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T HE A R T PA R K AT H O ME

LOOK & LEARN ACTIVITIES This book belongs to:


T HE A R T PA R K AT H O ME

LOOK & LEARN ACTIVITIES Have you been to Michigan Legacy Art Park? If your answer is yes, we hope your exploration at the Art Park left you feeling inspired by Michigan’s artists, our state’s unique history and stories, and the beautiful natural spaces that surround us. If you have not explored the park yet, come anytime and see the artwork mentioned in this book. We can’t wait for you to discover all that the Art Park has to offer. Complete all of the activities, then fill out the Secret Reward Card at the end of this book. Mail your Secret Reward Card to us and receive a secret prize. The prizes are always as surprising as the Art Park itself. Onward to adventure!


MATCH-TIVITIES

How fast can you match? Your first challenge is to match the numbered activities with the different icons below.

1. Draw and COLOR Your Own Sculpture We provide the background and you create and color the artwork with this coloring book page. Design your own magnificent sculptural masterpiece from your imagination or draw your favorite Art Park sculpture from memory. 2. Stockade Labyrinth Maze Find a path through the Stockade Labyrinth with this fun and challenging maze. 3. Make a Fallen Comrade Paper Airplane Fold your own Fallen Comrade and give it flight!

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A

5. Build A Dream of Home Paper Sculpture Cut out and fold a model of Robert Holdeman’s iconic sculpture A Dream of Home. 6. Our Artists & Their Work Crossword Puzzle Fill in the answers to a crossword puzzle that tests your knowledge of Art Park artists and their work.

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3 4

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4. Make a Pine Cone Bird & Learn Nautical Knots Make a pine cone bird sculpture that captures your unique perspective on the natural world. For the last step, you will learn some useful knots to help you hang your bird as a decoration.

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7 8 9

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F

ANSWERS: 1B, 2E, 3D, 4C, 5F, 6A


DRAW AND COLOR YOUR OWN SCULPTURE


THE STOCKADE LABYRINTH MAZE NAVIGATE THE MAZE! Use your finger, a pencil, a pen or a marker to trace your path through a maze created in the spirit of David Barr’s immersive artwork, Stockade Labyrinth.

FINISH

START


MAKE A FALLEN COMRADE PAPER AIRPLANE Make your own version of Fallen Comrade as a paper airplane and let it fly! Find a safe, open flying space, and never throw the plane at another person. You will need: • A blank sheet of paper (8.5 x 11 inches) • A red crayon or colored pencil • Scissors (Have an adult assist you!) • Clear tape (optional)

2 Fold the top two corners into the center of the paper.

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Fold the entire plane in half vertically. We are almost done!

3 Fold the top point down so that it reaches the edge of your folds from Step 1.

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Use safety scissors to cut out the shape of the wings. Please be careful. Scissors are sharp!

Start by coloring the bottom 2 inches of your paper red on both sides. This will give Fallen Comrade its red tail, a reference to the airplanes flown by the famous and heroic pilots known as the “Tuskegee Airmen.*

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4 Fold the two top diagonal edges towards the middle to form a new point at the top.

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Flip your plane over to the other side and fold the wings down as shown above.

Fold the top portion downward to form what looks like an envelope.

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Fold the point of the “envelope” up so that it extends above the top edge and makes even triangles on the right and left.

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Pinch the body of the plane and place a 2-inch piece of clear tape across the top of the wings for stability and distance.

Great job! You are ready to fly! Adjust the back wings up or down to change the way your Fallen Comrade flies.

*Learn about the Tuskegee Airmen and their commander, the first African-American Air Force General, at tuskegeeairmen.org


CREATE A PINE CONE BIRD & LEARN NAUTICAL KNOTS TURN A PINE CONE INTO A MAJESTIC BIRD! Create a unique pine cone sculpture that will inspire all who see it. It’s super easy to make and the finished product will be more beautiful than words can describe. Hang it on a tree, use it as a holiday ornament or give it to someone special. They’ll love it.

Step 1: Gather your materials. Make sure you have what you need for birdmaking. Have an adult help you when cutting with scissors.

You will need: • A pine cone of average size • Colored paper or craft foam • A piece of string 15-20 inches long • 10-15 threads of dry grass or straw

Step 2: Fold your colored paper and cut two hearts. The first heart should be about as wide as the pine cone. The second heart should be twice as wide as the first heart. The small heart will be the bird’s head and the large heart will be the wings.

• Glue • Scissors • A marker (optional)

Step 3: If you have a marker, draw eyes and a beak on the smaller heart and some feathers on the larger heart. You can add additional decoration to your bird at this stage. Cut the larger heart in half as shown below to create separate wings.

The protruding bits on a pine cone are called “seed scales.”

Step 4: Place two drops of glue under each wing and wrap the string around the whole thing and tie it like your shoelaces. This will keep the wings in place while the glue dries. Rest your bird on the table, leaned against a book to remain upright. Use two more drops of glue to carefully attach the bird’s head to the larger end of the pine cone as shown above.

Step 5: Put a few drops of glue between seed scales on the narrow end of the pine cone as indicated by the red arrow above. Roll your bundle of grass between your thumb and finger, then gently place it into the glue between the seed scales so it resembles tail feathers.

Step 6: Now that the glue is dry, it’s time for some nautical knots. Proceed to page 2 to learn some skills that will help you complete your project.


CREATE A PINE CONE BIRD & LEARN NAUTICAL KNOTS LEARN TO TIE SOME RADICAL, NAUTICAL KNOTS Here are two knots that will help you finish your project. Knots have been used throughout human history for climbing, sailing, fishing, lifting heavy weights, rigging catapults and more. The end of a rope or string is sometimes called the “bitter end” and we have represented that in the diagrams below with a square end. The long trailing part of a rope or string is called the “standing” part of the rope and is represented in the diagrams below with a pointed end.

TWO HALF HITCHES The half hitch is the simplest knot of all. Make a loop in your string or rope then guide the bitter end behind and through the loop. Do it again to create two half hitches and lock the knot in place.

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This is a good knot for attaching your string to your pine cone bird. Tie a small half hitch and carefully loop it around a seed scale on your pine cone. Add another half hitch to lock it and you’re almost done.

B A

C D

THE BOWLINE KNOT The Bowline knot, pronounced “bowlin,” is a knot that can be tied to make a fixed, secure loop.

A Make a loop 3-4 inches from the bitter end.

Tie a Bowline at the trailing end of your string to make a loop and hang your bird from a branch or a hook.

around behind the standing part below.

B Bring the bitter end down through the loop and C Guide the bitter end back up through the loop and pull the knot tight.

You can also use one half hitch (step 1 above) to tie your bird to a branch temporarily.

D Great job! Your project is complete!


BUILD A DREAM OF HOME PAPER SCULPTURE You will need: • Scissors • Tape or glue

Create your own miniature replica of Robert Holdeman’s sculpture A Dream of Home. It celebrates the I-House style of architecture common in the Midwest. The “I” stands for Illinois, Indiana and Idaho but the style was also used for homes in Michigan, including the childhood home of the artist.

Always have an adult assist you when cutting with scissors.

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A LIL’ GLUE...

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With adult supervision, carefully cut out the three shapes on the blue lines. Fold on the dotted white lines. The diagrams and assembly instructions on the next page show how to put it all together with patience and a bit of glue or tape.

BE SAFE!

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ta

Goes a long way. A tiny amount of glue will fasten the tabs just right.

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Visit michlegacyartpark.org for more about artist and architect Robert Holdeman, including details about A Dream of Home. Then come and see it in-person!

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BUILD A DREAM OF HOME PAPER SCULPTURE

Assembly Instructions PHOTO BY MICHAEL POEHLMAN

Step 1: Fold section 1 into the shape shown here. This is the right half of your sculpture. Secure the wall tabs to the underside of the roof with tape or glue. The remaining tabs on the left will be used later.

Step 2: Insert front door panel 2 below the porch roof. Tuck the top tab inside and fold the bottom tab under. Secure both tabs inside with tape or glue.

Step 3: Fold section 3 into the shape shown here. This is the left half of your sculpture. Tuck and secure all tabs inside the with tape or glue. If you use glue, let both halves dry before proceeding to step 4.

Step 4: Use the remaining tabs on section 1 to attach it to section 3 . Secure tabs to the inside of the sculpture using tape or glue.

Congratulations!

You have successfully built a small-scale replica of the sculpture A Dream of Home by Robert Holdeman. You did a great job.


OUR ARTISTS & THEIR WORK CROSSWORD PUZZLE 1

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Across 1. Holdeman, an architect, and an artist, this founding member of Michigan Legacy Art Park helped build develop and design Crystal Mountain Resort, and his piece A Dream of Home brings visitors back to their roots and the comfort of a home place. 4. Richardson, this artist brought Michigan’s iron ore mining history to life with his piece Ontonagon. 6. Rau, this artist will have a piece added to Michigan Legacy Art Park’s collection in the Fall of 2020 that reflects indigenous fishing techniques. 7. Osip, this artist’s work reflects the natural patterns and shapes that surround us, and Unravel reminds visitors to the Art Park to explore and appreciate the natural art in our world. 9. Teicher, this artist fought for female artist representation in museums and her piece Bonnet stands as a testament to the often unrecognized heroes: pioneer women. 10. McGillis, this artist incorporates Michigan’s State Tree into many of his pieces, and Five Needles reflects these bunches of pine needles.

11. Allen, this artist created Frog and he has pieces at The Detroit Zoo, The Brookfield Zoo, and The Field Museum of Natural History. 12. Ayres, this artist used elements that were naturally available to create the Boat Series that can be viewed at the Art Park. Down 2. Ferriby, this artist’s works Michigan and Superior were constructed from welded steel and show visitors a different view of the Great Lakes that define the state of Michigan. 3. Sauvé, this artist challenges the viewer to recognize the positive and negative impact humans have on nature, and Man In His Element provides a medium to express this concept. 5. Barr, Art Park founder and creator of Fairy Ring, Stockade Labyrinth, Solar Month, and many more works of art on display at Michigan Legacy Art Park. 6. Greenwood, this artist memorialized the Tuskegee Airmen and Michigan’s role in manufacturing the P-51 fighter plane by creating Fallen Comrade. 8. Innis, this artist created Robins!, Logging Camp, and more artwork on display at Michigan Legacy Art Park. Answers at michlegacyartpark.org/fieldguides


CONTRIBUTORS Look & Learn Activities is a project of the nonprofit Michigan Legacy Art Park and is supported by The Legion Foundation, Rotary Charities of Traverse City, Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, and the National Endowment for the Arts. Created in 2016

Special Thanks

Stories & Legends Written by Patricia Innis, Edited by Diana Bolander Exploring the Natural World Written by Jaye Lynn Trapp Along the 45th Parallel Written by Janine Winkler Elements of Art Written by Kristine Harvey

Josey Ballenger Ramona DeGeorgio Venegas Kathryn Den Houter Troy DeShano Renee Hintz MR Products Tim Murtaugh Patty Pelizzari Kit Robey Carol Stark

Contributors to This Book Andrew Tyra, Writer, Creative Director Joseph Beyer, Editor and Creative Contributor Madeline Saucedo, Writer and Creative Contributor Chris Loud, Writer and Creative Contributor Crystal Mountain Resort & Spa The park’s home has been generously provided by our partners at Crystal Mountain Resort & Spa since our opening in a unique public and private partnership serving our community.

A huge thank you to all of our volunteers at the Art Park who give their time and talents to bring learning to life for visiting students on field trips and special tours. Educational benchmarks were developed with guidelines from the Michigan Department of Education and National Core Arts Standards — ­ for a detailed list of citations, please visit our website.

michlegacyartpark.org/education


FIELD GUIDE JOURNAL After your day at the Art Park, describe your experience in just...

Create an Artist Profile of yourself!

One Word:

I’m inspired by:

One Sentence (or Tweet): I feel good when:

I feel bad when: My favorite thing I learned about was: I care deeply about:

Things I Saw (Trees, Birds, Animals, Insects):

My biggest fear is:

I dream most about:

My biggest hero is:

My favorite things to make art with are:

SECRET REWARD CARD

Cut along the dotted line and mail us this card. Then, you’ll receive your prize in the mail. Congratulations!

Michigan Legacy Art Park 12500 Crystal Mountain Dr Thompsonville, MI 49683

Your Name: Your Mailing Address:

LOOK & LEARN

Your Favorite Art Park Activity:

Certified by: (Sign Your Name Here)


ACTIVITIES INCLUDE: DRAW & COLOR YOUR OWN SCULPTURE

CREATE A PINE CONE BIRD & LEARN NAUTICAL KNOTS

THE STOCKADE LABYRINTH MAZE

MAKE A FALLEN COMRADE PAPER AIRPLANE

BUILD A DREAM OF HOME PAPER SCULPTURE

OUR ARTISTS & THEIR WORKS CROSSWORD PUZZLE

MY FIELD GUIDE JOURNAL

SECRET REWARD CARD

Profile for mlap-fieldguide

Look & Learn: Activities  

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