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PORTFOLIO


Contents MASTER O F L ANDSCAP E ARCH ITECTURE BACHELOR OF ARCHI TECTURE PR OFES SIONAL PROJECTS

O TH E R

AC ADEMIC P R OJECTS

Summer 2013

Spring 2013

Fall 2012

Applicant’s Name: Maria Juliana Lloreda Application Date: March 2014 for the Fall Semester 2014

Beaumont Glass Site Thesis Project Decker’s Creek Planting Plan 4th Semester Drawing Studio Silver Oaks Planting Plan 4th Semester Drawing Studio Thurmond Park Design 3rd Semester Studio Lower New Watershed 3rd Semester Studio

Spring 2012

Stormwater Park 2nd Sem. Construcion Studio

Fall 2011

Mellon Arena Redevelopment 1st Semester Studio

Spring 2009

Modular Single-Family Home 10th Semester Studio

Fall 2008

Rice Plant Redesign 9th Semester Studio

Spring 2008

Bank Building Design 8th Semester Studio

Spring 2007

Urban Redevelopment 7th Semester Studio

Spring 2007

Museum of Popular Art 6th Semester Studio

2014

Club O Deerfield Beach, FL

2013

University Place Apartments Morgantown, WV

2012

The Mansion Reconstruction Miami Beach, FL

2011-14

Photography Personal Hobby


PROFES SIONAL PROJE CTS

O T HE R BACHELOR OF ARCHIT ECTURE

MASTER O F L ANDSC APE ARCH ITECTURE

ACADEMIC P R OJECTS


Beaumont Glass Site

Location: Morgantown, WV Type of Project: Sustainable Urban Design Name of School: West Virginia University

Year: Summer 2013 Description: 4th Semester | Thesis Project Duration: 16 Months

This thesis project takes place in Morgantown, West Virginia, specifically at the former Beaumont Glass Factory site and its adjacencies. Through site inventory, analysis and research, a need for sustainable urban redevelopment has been identified in Morgantown’s downtown area. From the analysis, different expectations from the community have been integrated in the design approach, including from various stakeholders, and from young professionals and students. High density development, interpretive design, and brownfield reclamation strategies are frameworks that helped establish the design approach. High density development implements different land uses on site, allowing the users to dwell, work and entertain themselves in a local setting. Interpretive design is applied in the design, through the lenses of historical backgrounds, including the glass manufacturing and former railroad heritage. The former Beaumont location has been identified as a brownfield site by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (1992), and for this reason this project includes brownfield remediation approaches based on phytoremediation technologies, with soil and air treatments through native plant material to eliminate or transfer the contaminants. The program for design is divided into four categories, focused on the different aims of the project. The places for the community are aimed towards young professionals and families; other places are aimed to students due to the proximity with WVU’s downtown campus. A 3D model was created in ArchiCAD software, based on the analysis of the Sanborn maps and the historic images. The main purpose of the representation was to visualize how the Beaumont Glass complex would have looked in today’s context. As a result of the model, the overall Beaumont Glass complex can be perceived, and so the prototype is considered an influential and inspiring factor for the project design.

Aerial Image (Google Maps)

Beaumont Glass Site Reconstruction 3D Model, from Sanborn Maps

Existing Conditions

Existing Conditions

Program of Needs

Bubble Diagram

Existing Conditions


The masterplan drawing has been divided into zones for a clear appreciation. The drawings define spaces, circulations and natural features in the Glassworks Park. From this point on, the research done with contours and topography has allowed a more accurate approach to the design decisions displayed. Specifically within the Glassworks Park is a more defined circulation pattern. The Sanborn Maps evidence the building footprints and for this reason, the pedestrian circulation has been designed to fit the outside edge of each footprint, to direct the users to each concept area in the park. In addition, to demarcate the edge of the demolished buildings, ruinous seating walls made out of brick have been placed and spaced along the perimeters of each section.

BEaumont Glassworks Park Masterplan

Decorating Room / Lumber Garden Stock Room / Wash Room

Decorating Room

Lumber Garden (bioretention)

Stock Room

Wash Room

General View

With the Sanborn Maps as a basic design layer, each space within the park has been designed with the same name and a conceptual functional activity of the glass making process that took place inside the factory. For instance, where Beaumont Glass Company had their Decorating Room, a space with the same name but with the functionality of an outdoor sculpture garden has been designed; and where the lumber storage area used to be in the factory, now is the Lumber Gardens which have woody plant material and act as bioretention area. The Stock Room is where the raw materials were kept for the glass making process, including the silica or sand, and in the design this space has been adopted as a sand playground area for kids. Next to it is the Wash Room that has water features like fountains for people of all ages to enjoy. The Warehouse is a section where metal panels have been designed to contain interior and exterior historical photos of Beaumont Glass Company throughout history, along with information panels to educate the users on the glass making heritage of the site. Adjacent to the Warehouse is the Pattern Workshop where the hand painting for

glassware used to take place; this area has been implemented for kids and families to attend private or public arts and crafts activities, organized by the community. The Melting Room is where the restored brick furnace has been placed, along with smaller brick furnaces. The functionality of these structures is to provide a gathering space for the users, where they can sit around bonfires and understand the glass-making process, starting from the molten glass step. The brick furnaces have individual fireplaces with several curvy narrow watercourses emerging from underneath, representing the molten or fluid glass. The Mixing Room is an area that has raised picnic planters with an Osage Orange tree in the middle of each one to provide shade for the users. These two are articulator areas in the project because they are spaces where people of all different lifestyles and ages can gather. The Cullet Pile space has two water sculptures that resemble the concept of colorful glass waste mounds, represented through rising cubes at different elevations and various colors. Adjacent to this space are three sports courts; two for beach volleyball, and one for tennis, and close to this sports area is another space designated for outdoors recreation, as well as rail trails leading to the river through the dense vegetation where people can have a closer interaction with the Monongahela River. Throughout the site are several spaces that have been reserved for bioretention areas in order to address and treat stormwater runoff management. These green areas are planted with carefully selected native plant material in order to reduce runoff, and have phytoremediation specific plants to reduce the contaminant levels in the soils. Each space has been designed as integral to the entire park within the proposed spatial organization.


Beaumont Glass site is considered a brownfield due to its soil contamination. The contaminants found in the soil are arsenic, antimony, cadmium, lead, mercury, PCB, radioactive materials, selenium, and various hazardous and non-hazardous materials (Northern West Virginia Brownfields Assistance Center, 2008). The Beaumont site has the possibility to have mixed use developments including housing, retail, open spaces and riverfront activities. These uses bring forth interest from the city of Morgantown, the SunnysideUp Organization, West Virginia University and the community, for economic development. Brownfield Remediation Strategy There are many plants throughout the country that can be used for phytoremediation purposes, although the criterion for plant selection at Beaumont site was based on native plant selection, the accumulation quantities, and the accumulation types of each plant species. Utilizing native plants for phytoremediation brings advantages because they reestablish the biodiversity to areas that have been disturbed by human activity, they restore wetlands and habitats, creating natural environments, and they improve and preserve wildlife habitat. In addition, indigenous plants provide a more economical approach over other cleanup methods, and they require less management because no fertilizer, pesticides, and watering is required. Existing and Proposed Vegetation Through the site inventory and analysis, several predominant plant species have been identified throughout the extents. The recognized vegetation consists of Red Maple, Witherod, River Birch, Norway Spruce, American Holly, Tree of Heaven, Cattails, Black Walnut, Downy Serviceberry, and Honeysuckle. Only three of the existing plant species are known to be suitable for phytoremediation practices; the river birch, the cattails and the American holly. The plant palette was carefully selected out of hundreds of plant species that are suitable for phytoremediation. Several filters were established to reduce the number of plants for the 14.6 acre project site, and the number of selected plants was reduced to 22 plant species meeting all the criteria.

Warehouse / Pattern Workshop

Melting Room

Mixing Room / Cullet Piles

Warehouse

Melting Room

Mixing Room

Pattern Workshop

Decorating Room / Lumber Garden Section

Melting Room Section

General View


Decker’s Creek

Location: Morgantown, WV Type of Project: Planting Plan Name of School: West Virginia University

Year: Spring 2013 Description: 4th Semester | Planting Class Duration: 2 Weeks

Conceptual Design

Plant Massing Sections

Existing Conditions

Existing Conditions

Masterplan


Silver Oaks

Masterplan

Location: Morgantown, WV Type of Project: Planting Plan Name of School: West Virginia University

Sections

Year: Spring 2013 Description: 4th Semester | Planting Class Duration: 2 Weeks


Thurmond Park

Location: Thurmond , WV Type of Project: Park Design Name of School: West Virginia University

Year: Fall 2012 Description: 3rd Semester | Design Studio Duration: 4 Months

This project was an individual school project that includes research, inventory and analysis, resulting in a park design for the city of Thurmond, WV. Founded in the 1900s, Thurmond keeps an important history with the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway; it is said the railroad was essence of the town since it brought jobs, merchandise and passengers. For that reason, this design adopts important elements of a railway layout. The site has a cliff line along the back, as well as some vegetation. It is surrounded by mountainous landscape which can be appreciated from every angle, and the sun of rises in the East and sets in the West. The abandoned coaling tower structure is across from the railway line, and between this and the site, there are the railroad tracks, and next to it is the vehicular circulation and the pedestrian circulations. Currently, there is the Town Hall which is a 1-story building made out of concrete block masonry units, painted over with a tan yellowish color. It has a small staircase and the entrance on the front. Presently, the town hall is completely closed on the faรงade that faces the site. Adjacent to the town hall, there is a very modern-looking metal bench, which has decaying grass underneath. There exists a small plaza that displays an antique water pump and has another metal bench and a metal table as well. Three deteriorated stone slabs serve as stairs that lead to this plaza. Thurmond has an important history with the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway, it is said the railroad was essence of the town, since it brought jobs, merchandise and passengers. For that reason, this design adopts important elements of a railway layout. Thurmond Railway Park is divided into 4 main plazas, and the design includes connections between the plazas. Each design element of the park adopts several railroad layout elements. The plazas are Reversing Loop Plaza, Continuous Loop Plaza, CSX Bridge and Passing Loop Rest Area, and Traverser Plaza.

Existing Conditions

Existing Conditions

Site Inventory and Analysis

Existing Conditions

Existing Conditions

Railroad Elements


The railway elements in the park design are: 01 A reversing loop is a railroad arrangement that allows a train to return down the line from which it came from. 02 A continuous loop or a “tail chaser” which can be a circle shape, an oval or even an 8 shape, and this layout allows trains to run indefinitely. 03 A switchback intersection is an arrangement used for trains to climb or descend steep hills, as well as zigzagging in up-hill direction. 04 Passing loops are composition of two rail switches, and like the names states it, it allows two trains to pass each other. 05 CSX Bridges have always been important elements of railways due to the ability of connecting train paths over odies of water and mountainous landscapes, such as the Thurmond landscape. 06 Turntables are arrangement for locomotives or small trains to reverse, while providing multiway switch functions for storage sidings. 07 Traverser or Transfer Tables are used for storage sidings and also to increase car moving possibilities in a switching layout. Reversing Loop Plaza/Switchback Intersection: This is an area that can be used by visitors as well as for outdoors Town Hall meetings. This space features raised planters, a pergola covered in climbing vines to protect from the sun and also tables for users to sit and chat,

while enjoying the views of the mountainous landscape that surrounds Thurmond. The tables will also be made of aluminum with a faux wood finish in green wood. The switchback intersections throughout the park come to a merging point, and are designed to allow the users to decide which path to take. The existing Town Hall will remain although it will have a façade improvement, with brick and stone to match the existing National Register Historic Buildings. The existing storage building will be removed, leaving the working water pump exposed as education purposes, and a new storage building will be built behind the Town Hall, to supplement the need for storing. The addition of the storage room will also be matched with brick and stone façades. Continuous Loop Plaza: This is place where people can sit down under the specimen tree, and enjoy some shade, as well as enjoying the view of the landscape that surrounds Thurmond. The Continuous Loop Plaza features a beautiful specimen tree which is a Gingko biloba, which will have a showy yellow fall color. This plaza also features a catch garden that adopts the shape of a turntable. This catch garden is strategically located close to the poorly drained soils in the site, in order to catch water that could potentially flood areas of the park. The garden features wet-tolerant plants. Reversing Loop Plaza / Switchback Intersection: This is an area that can be used by visitors as well as for

outdoors Town Hall meetings. This space features raised planters, a pergola covered in climbing vines to protect from the sun and also tables for users to sit and chat, while enjoying the views of the mountainous landscape that surrounds Thurmond. The tables will also be made of aluminum with a faux wood finish in green wood. The switchback intersections throughout the park come to a merging point, and are designed to allow the users to decide which path to take. The existing Town Hall will remain although it will have a façade improvement, with brick and stone to match the existing National Register Historic Buildings. The existing storage building will be removed, leaving the working water pump exposed as education purposes, and a new storage building will be built behind the Town Hall, to supplement the need for storing. The addition of the storage room will also be matched with brick and stone façades. Continuous Loop Plaza: This is place where people can sit down under the specimen tree, and enjoy some shade, as well as enjoying the view of the landscape that surrounds Thurmond. The Continuous Loop Plaza features a beautiful specimen tree which is a Gingko biloba, which will have a showy yellow fall color. This plaza also features a catch garden that adopts the shape of a turntable. This catch garden is strategically located close to the poorly drained soils in the site, in order to catch water that could potentially flood areas of the park. The garden features wet-tolerant plants.


Reversing Loop Plaza

Reversing Loop Plaza View

CSX Bridge and Switchback Intersection

CSX Bridge and Switchback Intersection View

Continuous Loop Plaza

Continuous Loop Plaza View

Traverser Plaza

Traverser Plaza View

CSX Bridge: The CSX Bridge is a design that has been integrated into the park as a cultural heritage focal point that shows the structure of a CSX Bridge at a smaller pedestrian scale. Next to the bridge is the Passing Loop Rest Area which is a transition area where pedestrians can sit and get some rest, or just sit and enjoy the park. Traverser Plaza: The path coming from the east of Thurmond directs and invites pedestrians into the park and the people are then welcome to Traverser Plaza, which is the first stop of Thurmond Railway Park. In this plaza, people will stop to see some of the signage that

explains Thurmond’s railroad and coal history, as well as the exhibition coal cars. Summary History was key factor in the design concept of the Thurmond Railway Par. As mentioned before, the town of Thurmond has a very distinct history that goes back to the CSX railroad that served purpose for coal and timber transportation. The design elements that were used in the pedestrian park were the same ones that are used in real life, on a railway layout. These elements are not only implemented as design in the park but they

are also complemented with some materials that are native to the landscape, such as river stone, as well as materials that capture the essence of a railway, such as steel and concrete. In addition, the existing buildings have a distinct brick and stone façade language that has been captured in the redesign of the town hall. Thurmond Railway Park is a unique and memorable concept that captures the essence of the town and of its railway history and heritage.


Lower New Watershed

Location: New River Gorge, WV Type of Project: Conceptual Design Name of School: West Virginia University

Year: Fall 2012 Description: 3rd Semester | Design Studio Duration: 4 Months

The Lower New Watershed is a national treasure area, and holds the New River Gorge, which is perhaps the oldest River in North America. As a project, the watershed is an area that has many opportunities. The conceptual design proposes two types of plans to enhance the cultural heritage, the economic development, the preservation of the environment, and the communities. Even though, the Gorge National River attracts around one million people per year for outdoor recreation purposes, there are still a lot of people that do not know about the existence of the New River Gorge National Park. The government and several organizations are trying to promote the National Park Service’s mission to preserve and protect the park for future generations, by conserving the historical resources of West Virginia, including the coal mines and the Civil War trails. The Lower New Watershed is an area that offers a great potential for wildlife, vegetation, economy and recreation. It is one of the national treasures and comprises an extensive cultural heritage that tells about American social history. Residents and visitors of the watershed are conscious that all these historic values and the natural resources must be protected for the present and the future of the area.

Slope Percentage Map

Coal Mining Map

Soil Suitability Map

Wildlife Map

The Lower New watershed area has a lot of potential for development and preservation of heritage. For that reason, this conceptual plan proposes various enhancements to the area including cultural, economic, environmental and social improvements. The proposed cultural enhancements mean to preserve history through education with a projected driving tour that incudes specific stopping points that are meant to inform the visitors about the history of the area and its historic architecture. The economic improvements are meant for a diverse economic development in the area, by promoting sustainable development while the social enhancements aim to create new housing opportunities and creating sense of place throughout the area. In the conceptual plan, the included environmental enhancements are destined to conserve and encourage open space and clean water through green infrastructure, managing stormwater as well as runoff water.


Proposed Conceptual Masterplan - Cultural

Landscape Conditions

Proposed Conceptual Masterplan

Landscape Conditions

Landscape Conditions

Landscape Conditions


Stormwater Park

Location: Parkersburg, WV Type of Project: Stormwater Park Design Name of School: West Virginia University

Year: Spring 2012 Description: 2nd Semester | Construction Studio Duration: 4 Months

Functional Design One of the main objectives is to create places for people to gather and enhance the sense of community in the City of Parkersburg. There will be several Green Spaces where people can enjoy being outdoors. In addition, there are spaces proposed for Cultural Uses, Restaurants, and Commercial Spaces. Each street has a complete street treatment, with pedestrian walkways, seating spaces, biking lanes, on-street parking, green infrastructure and vehicular lanes. With the new proposal, this part of the city revitalizes Parkersburg, and generates a new identity of culture, lifestyle, and healthy environment. The design invites people from Market Street and Ann Street, as well as visitors from Camden Clark Medical Center, towards the proposed green paths and Water Facilities. Program and Circulation The project proposes 1) a Storm Water Park and a Library Media Center along 6th Street, 2) a Green Parking lot on Juliana Street and 7th Street, and a 3) Community Garden between Juliana Street along with a Green Alley on 6th Street.

Commercial Park View

Commercial Park Masterplan

In addition, an Outdoor Cafe is the focal center of all three projects, and a Node for people of all ages to gather around and encounter. The project preserves some of the History of Parkersburg, which is why there are vintage locomotives and box cars on the abandoned railway bridge, over 6th Street, and reuse them, on the inside, as the Library Media Center and other amenities. Each box car is proposed for a different function; some will be for a) library purposes, other for b) computer labs, and c) dining, amongst other proposed uses. One of the main objectives of the projects is to create a Landmark in the City of Parkersburg and enhance the identity of the residents and visitors.

Commercial Park View

Green Parking Lot Masterplan

Green Parking Lot View


Water Management The green infrastructure reduces the volume and pollutants of storm water runoff before it goes into the sewer system and nearby waterways. The way it functions is by capturing Storm Water and diverting it to where it can be detained, infiltrated into the ground, evaporated, absorbed by plants, and/or reused. The project also offers constructed wetlands, rain gardens, bio-retention, bioswales, and green roofs. These facilities will be not only for storm water management but also for educational purposes, as well as enjoyable urban scape.

Stormwater Park View

Storm Water Park The storm water park is a place that celebrates vital elements for people, such as water, sunshine, wind, and wildlife. The program includes rain gardens, constructed wetlands, green roofs, outdoor seating areas and a library media center. In addition, reflective pools with fountains were proposed along with pedestrian walkways, and complete street treatments. The beautiful rain gardens which face the community garden and the outdoor cafĂŠ invite people to the library media center and water terraces. Along rain gardens and constructed wetlands, a sense of place was proposed, so people can enjoy the sound of water splashing and flowing. Likewise, the reflection of the sunshine on the water surface, and the wind over the gardens create an enjoyable experience for the users. All storm water runoff was filtered and cleaned through the rain gardens and constructed wetlands, and eventually collected into the lowest reflective pool in the last water terrace. It is designed to be a place for children and people of all ages to explore and play with clean water and fountains. Native wetland species were inserted into all the storm water management facilities to provide habitats for native species and create opportunities for people to enjoy outdoors and nature.

Stormwater Park Masterplan

Stormwater Park View

Overall Park Masterplan

General Park View


Mellon Arena

Location: Pittsburgh, PA Type of Project: Urban Redevelopment Name of School: West Virginia University

This project coincided when the demolition of the Mellon Arena started, in Pittsburgh. The building, founded in 1961 had been a place for concerts and sporting events and treasured by the community. In hopes of bringing out the best of the demolition, this project attempted to create an innovative design in the Mellon Arena space, while connecting downtown Pittsburgh to the adjacent neighborhoods, and by further solving current local issues. The Civic Arena was constructed in 1961 and had been a great place for concerts and sports events. It was an architectural piece loved by the citizens of Pittsburgh. Some people felt the construction of the building had been a segregation between the downtown area and the neigborhood area. But regardless of the feelings of the community, the demolition of the landmark began. The elimination of the Civic Arena shouldn’t be seen as negative, but instead as a creative opportunity for the city of Pittsburgh. In addition to solving current local issues, we have proposed a redesign of the site as a place that creates a connection of the site with the downtown area to the neigborhood. Ecological Design: We will enhance local ecosystem by introducing native species into our green roofs, constructed wetlands, vertical gardens, bioswales and all green spaces we are proposing. This Ecological Design will allow the landscape to tie back to nature and connect people to nature. Economical Design: We will recycle and re-use Stormwater and Wastewater. This will prevent flooding and reduce the pollution to the rivers. The Green Roofs and Vertical Garden-Belts that wrap around each building will save cost for electricity and will prevent “heat island� phenomenon in Pittsburgh. Community Design: We have proposed facilities for community enhancement such as a Community Center, along with Community gardens, and a daycare center for children and elder. These facilities will promote activities and communication inside the community and neighborhood.

Masterplan

Year: Fall 2011 Description: 1st Semester | Design Studio Duration: 4 Months


Concept Design: A proposed ecological design allows the landscape to tie back to nature and connect people to nature. There are proposed facilities for community enhancement such as a community center, along with community gardens, and a day-care center for children and elder. These facilities will promote activities and communication inside the community and neighborhood.

Water Systems

Green Roofs: A 1,000 square foot green roof can produce more than 600 gallons of runoff for every 1” of rain that falls on it. Results indicate that the green roofs are capable of removing 60% of the annual rainfall volume from a roof. The green roofs and Vertical garden-belts that wrap around each building, attempting to save cost for electricity and will prevent “heat island” phenomenon in Pittsburgh. Living Machines: Living machines are treating wastewater an generating clean water for reuse in hundreds of installations around the globe. The system uses living plants and beneficial microorganisms to turn wastewater into clean water Constructed Wetlands: Constructed wetlands simulate natural wastewater treatment systems, using flow beds to support water loving plants. The roots of those plants help provide an aerobic environment to aggressively break down the contaminants. The proposed wetlands will restore habitat for native species. They will also discharge wastewater and stormwater runoff. Bioswales: A bioswales is an urban landform used to convey surface water in order to enhance infiltration and reduce stormwater runoff. Bioswales may serve to reduce sediment load and other water pollutants from reaching natural water courses. An enhancement of local ecosystem was proposed by introducing native species into green roofs, constructed wetlands, vertical gardens, bioswales and all planned green spaces.

Water Systems

Wetlands

Vertical Gardens: Living walls help with air filtration, reduce wind speeds and traffic noise, and prevent the heat island effect. These façades are vertical gardens that improve the air quality by reducing dust and increasing biodiversity, as well as increasing infiltration and rainwater storage. The living roofs and vertical garden-belts that wrap around each building, attempting to save cost for electricity and will prevent “heat island” phenomenon in Pittsburgh. Grass Paver Mix: This grass-paver mix allows water to easily percolate, avoiding high pressure on water draining systems. Water pollution will be controlled as well.; Water Management: Stormwater and wastewater were proposed to be recycled and reused in order to prevent flooding and reduce the pollution to the rivers.

Project Elements

Public Plaza


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Modular Home This is a project that was developed in the St. Nicholas neighborhood, in Cali, Colombia. It was a team project, with an emphasis project for each person. My emphasis project was to design a modular single family house that could be geographically positioned anywhere within the neighborhood. The concept of this modular home provides different options to families with different needs. The design is based on a modular grid which allows a progressive development of the home’s structure. The house has been designed with two stories; the first story is where the social area is (garage, study room, kitchen, living, dining, and laundry rooms), and the second story is where the private area is (bedrooms and family room). For this project, different options for each story are shown, based on the same spatial and structural grid. The zoning design of the house is very simple; the access leads to a circulation hallway that articulates different spaces, and provides the user with options to either enter any area on the first story or go directly to the staircase which leads to the second floor. The stories can be combined as desired by the user depending on their needs. The first floor is composed of flexible spaces that may vary between a study room, an extra bedroom, a parking garage, a small commercial space facing the street, the living room, dining room, laundry room, and one bathroom. The only spaces that are non-flexible in these designs are the two gardens (one at the rear, and one in the center) in front of the stairs, and the staircase itself.

Location: Cali, Colombia (South America) Type of Project: Single Family Home Design Name of School: St. Bonaventure University

Small Commercial

Ldry Kitchen

Garage

Dining

WC

Ldry Kitchen

Dining

Garden

Garage

Garden

Living

Garden Study Room

First Floor (Option A)

Living

Garden

First Floor (Option B)

WC

Bedroom

Walk Bedroom WC In

Bedroom

WC

WC

Bedroom

Void to Garden Void

Void to Garden

Void to Living

Bedroom

Longitudinal Section

Void to Garden

Bedroom

Second Floor (Option B)

Staircase

Bedroom

Garden Garage (Flexible)

Void to Garden Bedroom

Second Floor Modular Options (Option Home A)

The second floor also has modular flexible options, which allow the design to have up to three bedrooms, one family room and two bathrooms (or four bedrooms and two bathrooms). The non-flexible spaces in these designs are the two voids overlooking the gardens. The two gardens are strategically positioned within the grid to allow a constant natural ventilation horizontally and vertically, which is why air conditioning system will not be required. Since the region is located on the equator, there is tropical climate all year round, ranging between 60°F and 70°F. The roof has a void where the two gardens are located.

WC

Year: Spring 2009 Description: 10th Semester | Design Studio Duration: 4 Months

Living

Garden


Garden Dining

Study Rm. (Flexible)

Ldry

Kitchen

WC Garden Bedroom

Bedroom

Study Rm. (Flexible)

Garage (Flexible)

Living Garage (Flexible)

Garden

Transversal Section

First Story - Study Room / Garage

Garden

Void to Garden

Dining Void

Bedroom WC

WC

Walk In

Bedroom

Roof

Concrete

Void to Garden

Void to Living (Felxible)

Second Story - 3 Bedrooms / 2 Bathrooms

Central Garden

Roof Void to Garden

Void to Garden

Bedroom

Faรงade

Front Elevation

Void to Garden

Roof Plan

Study Room and Staircase

Garage and Central Garden

2nd Floor Circulation

Void from 2nd Floor


Winds Study Area Location

Commercial

et

re

th

10

St

Industrial (Rice Mill)

4th

Ave

nue

Institutional

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Existing Conditions - Overall

Land Use Map PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

The mill is located on 10th Street, which is a main road of the town, and leads pedestrians to the main city plaza. Across the streets of the facilities are commercial and residential land uses, as well as a few open spaces. For these two reasons, the proposal includes street treatments with wide pedestrian walkways and open spaces. The two-story proposed office building is located at the entrance of the facilities, while the production facilities and silos will be arranged throughout the 4-acre project area. The production facilities are hangars that contain the machinery. The massive silos, which contain the rice in its different processes, are left outdoors strategically located near the facilities.

Town of Jamundí

Residential

ce rra Te

The program of needs for the 4-acre study area includes an expansion and beautification to the offices and production areas. The overall conceptual design will have a revitalized scheme, although the proposal includes a restructuring of the facilities to make the rice process more efficient and organized, according to each stage of the procedure.

Winds

h 5t

In 1950, a group of rice farmers established a rice mill in the small town of Jamundí. Since then, the company and farmers have had continuous production of this valuable food. The company was founded when the region still had much undeveloped land, although now the City has reached certain boundaries. For this reason, the stakeholders aspire to make this sector of Jamundí a more attractive and enjoyable place for the community. This project contributes to bring a sense of place to the town of Jamundí, since this rice plant has been a landmark for over 60 years.

Year: Fall 2008 Description: 9th Semester | Design Studio Duration: 4 Months

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Rice Mill Redesign

Location: Jamundí, Colombia (South America) Type of Project: Rice Mill Redesign Name of School: St. Bonaventure University

Existing Conditions - Entrance

Perspective Sketch (10th Street)

Existing Conditions - Inside Plant

Existing Conditions - Offices

Proposed Masterplan

Existing Conditions - Storage


Proposed Redesign

Sections

Proposed Redesign

Overview of Proposal

Proposed Redesign


Business Center

Location: Cali, Colombia (South America) Type of Project: Business Center Design Name of School: St. Bonaventure University

Year: Spring 2007 Description: 8th Semester | Design Studio Duration: 4 Months

The study area is located on 4th Street, downtown of the city of Cali, in a neighborhood called St. Peter. Throughout time, the land use in downtown Cali has been transforming from a residential use to a more disorganized commercial use. The predominant building typology consists of rectangular buildings with short facades, and lateral and rear voids. The schematic design consists of a U-shaped building with the void facing the west building neighbor. The proposed 6-story building has mixed use with retail on the ground floor, a bank on the first floor, and business offices from the second floor to the sixth floor. There are two vertical voids that are gardens on the first floor, and offer views from the above stories. This is a response to the urban typology of courtyard buildings. This project attempts to partially redevelop the entire block due to the designed connections on the first floor with the adjacent building neighbors. The floor plans of the existing neighbors have been studied to provide a similar pattern in circulation for the proposed retail in the project. The ground floor invites pedestrians to a reception hall that provides connections to the retail area within the proposed building and the neighboring buildings. The bank has been specifically designed on the first floor for security, but yet accessible enough for the users in a busy setting like the downtown of the City is. The offices in the building are set to be modified in size depending on the needs of the occupant. The volumes in the main façade’s design reflect the functionality of each floor. For example, the ground floor has glass fronts to allow the users to visually understand the setting, and to invite the pedestrians inside. The bank on the first floor is somewhat closed in the façade for security reasons, and the top stories have considerable amounts of glass to allow views from the offices. The proposed design depicts a modern-era façade as a response to the diversity of buildings that were built between the 1950s and 1960s, with designs inspired by the modern movement. The structure consists of concrete columns and metal beams, with a light prefab slab. The structure is composed of three independent skeletons joined by joints, for a better behavior during a seism.

Plan Sketch

Structural Sketch (1st Floor)

Perspective Sketch

Section Sketch

Masterplan - Ground Floor

Study Site

Study Site

Study Site

Existing Conditions

Model

Model


Faรงade

Outdoors Rear Plaza

First Floor

Faรงade

Front Elevation

Longitudinal Section

Outdoors Rear Plaza


Urban Redevelopment

Location: Cali, Colombia (South America) Type of Project: Urban Redevelopment Name of School: St. Bonaventure University

Year: Fall 2006 Description: 7th Semester | Urban Studio Duration: 4 Months

This 37-acre project analyses the apparent urban problems existent in the Imbanaco neighborhood. This neighborhood is located in the city of Cali, and has been growing throughout time to be a place where professionals in the medical field have been establishing their private practices, clinics and hospitals.

Schematic Diagram by Sector

Proposed Masterplan

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Apartments Apartments

Offices Offices RetailRetail Parking Basements Parking Basements

Mixed Use Building Layout

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Schematic Design

Diversity in residential use is proposed. The analysis showed that there is a need for temporary residence for the families of the patients. Since the healthcare field is predominant in this neighborhood, people need temporary places to stay. A redesign of existing single family and multifamily homes is also proposed. In order to fulfill the different lifestyles of the users, mixed use buildings and townhomes are proposed. The building typology is strategically organized in a way that creates internal courtyards between them, to contain the pedestrians in a friendly environment, away from the risks of the streets. Because the mixed use buildings offer a nonresidential first floor, pedestrian flow is attracted to the project. The soccer stadium is near the neighborhood, no more than one mile from its center, which is why the typology of proposed mixed use buildings allow for open spaces for people to enjoy after of before each game. Green open spaces are proposed, as well as texture treatments for sidewalks and pavement. The mixed use buildings typically offer two parking garages in the basement, retail on the ground floor, offices on the 1st floor, and apartments from the 2nd floor to the 7th floor.

Existing Conditions PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

The proposal includes the relocation of small commerce within new retail buildings, parking options such as street parking and building garages, in order to fulfill the demand in the sector. Rights of way are proposed to be enhanced and complete streets are planned. In addition, street bollards will be implemented to allow pedestrians to safely walk on the sidewalks without motorists invading them. The project provides circulations that connect buildings within the neighborhood with teach other.

Existing Conditions

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

One of the biggest problems in the neighborhood is the lack of amenities and open spaces for the pedestrians. Because of its character in land use, the sidewalks have been invaded by peddlers, cars parking, and visually unaesthetic signage. In addition, there is lack of crosswalks, to the point that pedestrians have to risk their lives crossing the streets where there are none. Another big problem is the deteriorated houses and a very low residential density.

Existing Conditions


Typ. Floor Plans - Retail (1st, 2nd Floors)

Typ. Floor Plans - Apartments (5th, 8th Floors)

Front Elevation

Typ. Floor Plans - Offices (3rd, 4th Floors)

Lateral Elevation

Proposed Model

Townhomes

Proposed Model

Mixed Use Buildings

Mixed Use Buildings


Pop Art Museum The 2-acre study area is located near the University center in the town of Pance. This town has been growing with much residential land use due to the educational activity in the area. The studio problem was to propose a building design that would complement the growing institutional field, and it was decided that a popular art museum was the best choice for this site. The design for the museum building has been proposed to have 5 stories, and try to depict the building as a sculpture itself, erect within the hills of the town. The history of the town, hundreds of years ago, speaks of native tribes that resided in this part of the country. For that reason, some tribe names have been adopted for the proposed outdoor terraces on the ground floor. Because the Country is located on the equator, there is tropical climate all year round. This means that sun protection is a challenge in this area. This has been an indicator to propose native plant material to provide shade, as well as a few built elements, such as trellises. Because the study area is located on one of the town’s hills, winds flow easily to the site, making it cooler. The site is divided by a small creek with a riparian buffer. The zones are divided in 2/3 for the museum and 1/3 for a protected natural green zone, which is very steep in slope, but is used in the proposal to take advantage of the views to the City. The other 2/3 of the site is relatively flat, which is where the museum is projected. The terraces that have been proposed are four, and have been named after native extinct Indian tribes; Yariquii, Pemea, Abibe and Nori. In addition, the protected natural area is called Cerrapa Forest. Yariquii is located on the corner of the site, receiving pedestrians walking from the Universities. This plaza has been proposed to have many lights to make it look attractive for people, especially at night. Terrace Pemea is a transition space which consists of fountains and water elements, in order for people to enjoy during a hot day. This area is a place for people of all ages to have fun with the water. Abibe terrace is the one that leads pedestrians to the museum building. Is has spaces for outdoor performances and has a series of trellises to protect the users from the sun. Connected through a ramp is terrace Nori, which is depressed, and has trellises as well as natural plant material to protect from the heat. This plaza has been destined for street art including graffiti walls. Within the building, there are several uses for museum purposes. The basement is proposed for parking, and also for an auditorium. All stories, from the ground floor to the 4th floor have bathrooms and flexible exposition rooms in order to accommodate museum needs. The ground floor has the reception and an extra locker room. Each story has voids to allow vistas from the above story to the lower story.

Location: Cali, Colombia (South America) Type of Project: Pop Art Museum Design Name of School: St. Bonaventure University

Project Zones

Positive / Negative Diagram

Sun Study

Winds

Lateral Elevation

Lateral Elevation

Proposed Model

Year: Spring 2005 Description: 6th Semester | Design Studio Duration: 4 Months

Rear Elevation


Parking Plan - Basement

Ground Floor Plan

Typ. Gallery Floor Plan - 2nd, 3rd Floors

Longitudinal Section

70° - 12pm 65° - 11am & 1pm 55° - 10am & 2pm

70° - 12pm 65° - 11am & 1pm

Front Elevation

Detailed Interior Sun Study


East View

PROFES SIONAL PROJE CTS

O T HE R BACHELOR OF ARCHIT ECTURE

MASTER O F L ANDSC APE ARCH ITECTURE

ACADEMIC P R OJECTS


Club O Renderings

Location: Deerfiled Beach, FL Firm: Estate Design and Development Year: 2014

Involvement: 3D modeling and photorealistic renderings of a 5-story building along the beach in South Florida.


University Place Apts.

Location: Morgantown, WV Firm: West Virginia University Year: 2013

Involvement: 3D modeling and photorealistic renderings of a typical four bedroom apartment, along with furnished floor plans.


The Mansion Reconstruction

Location: Miami Beach, FL Firm: 3DCADCO Year: 2012

Involvement: 3D modeling, photorealistic renderings, and floor plan drawings of a historic building.


PROFES SIONAL PROJE CTS

O T HE R BACHELOR OF ARCHIT ECTURE

MASTER O F L ANDSC APE ARCH ITECTURE

ACADEMIC P R OJECTS


Photography

Year: 2011 - 2014 Description: As a hobby

Kaymoor Mine, WV.

New River Gorge Bridge, WV.

Belle, my pet.

New River Gorge Landscape, WV.


Grist Mill at the Babcock State Park, WV.

Maria José, my pet.

Maria José, my pet.

Grist Mill at the Babcock State Park, WV.


Golden Triangle, Pittsburgh, PA.

Falling Water, Mill Run, PA.

Ruins at Beaumont Glass Factory, Morgantown, WV.


Thank you for your consideration! For more projects, please visit: mjlloreda.wix.com/portfolio

Portfolio 2014  

Master of Landscape Architecture + Bachelor of Architecture

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