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MICHAEL ROLLINS

+ ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN


CYBERNARIUM

Computing center in historic downtown Bryan, TX

ZERO STUDIO

A seamless, integrated architecture studio in College Station, TX

MODULAR END TABLE

Compact furniture designed as airline carry-on baggage

THE CUBE

Analysis of forms in three-dimensional space

BULWARK

Architecturally-inspired kinetic fashion

DYNAMIC HOUSE

A fluctuating residence designed to be “dynamic” in Bryan, TX

THE GROVE

Temporary pavilion designed for on-campus exhibitions

TEXAS ARCHITECTURE CENTER

Center for the education and exhibition of architecture and design in Houston, TX

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Resume and contact information

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FALL 2011 PARTNER STUDIO PROJECT COMPUTING CENTER IN HISTORIC DOWNTOWN BRYAN, TX As a response to the growing dependency of society on technology my partner and I were tasked with designing a computing center in downtown Bryan, TX. The program consisted of a repair center, a cafe, a digital library, an open-access computer lab, learning facilities, and administrative offices. The primary purpose of the building is to educate the community on the growing technological advancements in software, hardware, and the Internet. The concept was based on networking, both social and physical; an open plan and large atrium connects spaces within the building and individuals to each other. The Open Access Lab can be divided into rooms when private classes are being held. Due to the site’s location in the historic and civic districts, spaces both indoor and out exist for the exhibition of movies and artwork; art is ingrained in the fabric of the community of Bryan. Additionally, structural loads were examined and a combination exposed-steel/concrete one-way joist system with concrete columns was designed for the building; construction documents were made for trusses, beam-to-beam connections, and suspension rod joints. The skin of the building, a system of thin concrete shell forms, responds to the angle of the sun, allowing direct entry only during the coldest of winter months. This was accomplished through a combination of False Color studies and Ecotect daylight analysis.

cybernarium

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LEVEL -1 PLAN

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SECTION A

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Carpet Flooring Mounting Layer Post-tensioned Concrete Foundation Slab 12“ Slab #5 Rebar at 12” OC 1“ Masonite Layer (around carton forms) 6”x 20“ Carton Form 1” Gravel Layer 30” Reinforced Concrete Grade Beam Carton Form (between piers) 24” Diameter Concrete Pier (8’ in depth)

D/E FOUNDATION DETAIL

Carpet Flooring Mounting Layer One-way Joist Post-tensioned Concrete Slab 4“ Slab 8”x 20“ Carton Form 6” x 12“ Joists 5/8” Drywall Finishing Drop-ceiling Panels and Track System

C FLOOR/CEILING DETAIL

1” Thick Pre-cast Concrete Facade Mounted on 1/2” Steel Rods Embedded into Concrete 9” Site-case Concrete Wall #5 Reinforcement Bars Double-pane Low-E Glass 1” Concrete Sill Finishing R-19 Batt Insulation Interior Wall Finishing (1”)

B WALL SECTION DETAIL

One-way Joist Post-tensioned Concrete Slab 4“ Slab 8”x 20“ Carton Form 6” x 12“ Joists R-30 Rigid Board Insulation (roof only) 5/8” Drywall Finishing Drop-ceiling Panels and Track System

Metal Flashing to Prevent Water Collecting Between Facade and Wall Vegetation Layer Growing Medium (4-6”) Water Retention Layer Sediment Filtration Layer Drainage Layer Root Barrier

A ROOF/CEILING DETAIL


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1-1/2“ Translucent Glass Flooring C-Channel Frame (6” x 12”) 2-1/2” Metal Rod from Ceiling Truss 4” x 6” C-Channel Welded Around Rod 1/4” Diameter 3” Bolt Connect C-Channels

I SUSPENSION DETAIL

1-1/2“ Translucent Glass Flooring C-Channel Frame (6” x 12”) 4” Metal Rod 4” From Slab Center 1” Steel Spacing Joint at Each Rod

H FLOOR-TO-SLAB DETAIL

C-Channel Beam Two 6” x 10” C-Channels 10” x 10” x 1” Gusset Plate 1/2” Steel Bolts (12 at each connection) Beam Mounts to Bottom Chord

G BEAM-TO-TRUSS DETAIL

C-Channel Beam Two 6”x10” C-Channels Mounted at 18” x 18“ x 1” Gusset Plate 1/2” Diameter Bolts Connect C-Channels to Plate Steel Plate Cast into Concrete Steel Angle Secured to Steel Plate 1/2” x 6” Bent Steel Rods 1/4” Fillet Weld at Base of Truss to Angle 1/2” Reinforcing Rods 18” OC

F TRUSS-TO-COLUMN DETAIL


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50 psf / offices, restrooms

100 psf / lobby, store, cafe, lounge, stairs

60 psf / conference, labs

125 psf / mechanical, electrical, roof garden

80 psf / auditorium seating, circulation

150 psf / open access lab


June 21: 12pm

June 21: 3pm

December 21: 3pm

Ext: 109,800 lux Int: 430.5 lux

Ext: 71,800 lux Int: 598.5 lux

Ext: 69,000 lux Int: 974.6 lux

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FALL 2009 STUDIO PROJECT A SEAMLESS, INTEGRATED ARCHITECTURE STUDIO IN COLLEGE STATION, TX The creation of a space for a complex program was the challenge for this particular project. A new design firm is opening a studio that is to be less than 10,000 square feet and follows all of the guidelines for commercial architecture in College Station, Texas. The primary goal of this development was to prevent a detrimental impact of this new construction on both the environment and the visual tranquility of the nearby park and neighborhood. A hill backs up to the west side of the studio to both shelter the structure from the evening sun and act as an access point to the green roof. The roof itself cools the building, collects rainwater through drainage systems, and serves as an extension of the neighboring park space, complete with seating and walking paths. Roof skylights allow pedestrians to look into the studio space and view the work that is being done. A similar catwalk exists on the second level of the studio space for clients to observe the design process without disturbing the designers. Entry to the space is possible either through the lobby and exhibition gallery or directly into the studio space through a semi-outdoor space protected by layered trellises. Each project team also has the ability to remove the movable glass partitions that divide the work spaces from additional semi-outdoor patios.

zero studio

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FALL 2008 STUDIO PROJECT COMPACT FURNITURE DESIGNED AS AIRLINE CARRY-ON The goal of this project was to design a piece of furniture that is modular, can be assembled and disassembled without tools, and is compact enough to be stored in carry-on airline luggage when in its disassembled state. The furniture could employ only wooden friction joints without the addition of adhesives or store-bought nails and screws. This particular piece is formally modeled after the traditional “spiraling staircase�, rising from the base and allowing increased shelving space as the platforms rise. During transport, the panels that make up the shelves of the table are stacked in the base; the top of the table serves to enclose the pieces during transit, forming a box that is locked in-place with Velcro straps and friction joints. The development of each individual piece provided insight into design/build processes and how the individual interacts with various furniture pieces.

modular end table

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SPRING 2009 STUDIO PROJECT ANALYSIS OF FORMS IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL SPACE Each student was designated a word that he or she would work around; the subject of this piece is “dynamism”. The process began with the development of a black and white composition using a grid system based around a one-inch square to compose diamonds, squares, and circles. Using rigid geometric forms, an illustration was derived from the composition to imply the feeling of thirddimensional volume in the two-dimensional plane that was the medium. From there, the student is to explode the illustration into the physical and build the form inside an enclosed space, creating the illusion of an “infinite” space within the finite confines of the cube.

the cube

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FALL 2009 STUDIO PROJECT ARCHITECTURALLY-INSPIRED KINETIC FASHION To exemplify the dance between architecture, its surroundings, and its occupants, this project was designed has a combination of architectural sculpture, kinetic sculpture, and the natural movements of the human body. A radial shell was created out of Plexiglas and is modulated through the use of control arms that pivot around a central spine. A system of steel cables and levers swung each arm back and forth along an arc that follows the contours of the human body. The movements engaged by the performer wearing the garment mimic the circular motion through a series of twirls that undulate about the individual’s own vertical axis.

bulwark

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SPRING 2009 STUDIO PROJECT A FLUCTUATING RESIDENCE DESIGNED TO BE “DYNAMIC” IN BRYAN, TX The Dynamic House project required that the resident be able to eat, sleep, and work in a space less than 8,000 cubic feet. The residence has a green-space that is accessible from the ground floor and may be used as an extension of the front lawn. The landscape echoes the form of the house in the curves of the burms, retaining walls, and organic steel trelliswork. The bedroom and bathroom “float” above the kitchen and living spaces, effectively dividing the public functions of the residence from the private while still offering a spatial connection through the voids around the catwalk. Further developing compositional instinct, color was added into the residence to illustrate how light and color can affect the mood that a space generates.

dynamic house

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SPRING 2010 STUDIO PROJECT TEMPORARY PAVILION DESIGNED FOR ON-CAMPUS EXHIBITIONS “The Grove” is a 4,000 square-foot pavilion located on the hill between the Langford Complex and the Oceanography and Meteorology Building on the A&M campus. The pavilion is to be erected in a way that least disturbs the site and disassembled at a later date. Using 2”x4”x8’ timber, polycarbonate, and steel cable, the pavilion expresses the architect’s personal view of the world. The structure resembles that of a small grove of trees, with a combination of translucent, opaque, and green-tinted polycarbonate panels suspended with steel cable to represent the canopy of the trees. Students and faculty who wish to exhibit work within the pavilion either create stand-alone works or may suspend works between the timber supports. The space serves as an extension of the “Grassy Knoll” space; it is a shaded area to relax outdoors without having to suffer the summer sun.

the grove

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SPRING 2011 PARTNER STUDIO PROJECT CENTER FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION AND THE EXHIBITION OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN IN HOUSTON, TX The Texas Architecture Center proposal was one of an educational nature: design a building that may encourage the public interest in architecture through exhibition and education. Sited in the Museum District of downtown Houston, Texas, the lot’s location along the edge of a main thoroughfare created opportunities for the display of work from the street. An additional pedestrian path leads the occupants beneath the primary gallery space and into the outdoor cafe and to the primary entrances to the auditorium and the research center. The cantilever above the cafe, delicately supported by a single branching column, serves to shade the sunken outdoor space. By developing spaces through which the occupants can interact with the building the architecture is “experienced” and does not simply act as a stationary object.

texas arch center

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MICHAEL ROLLINS

rollins.michaelj@gmail.com michaeljrollins.com 512.695.5793

EDUCATION

Texas A&M University Fall 2008–Spring 2012 Bachelor of Environmental Design [Architecture] Art and Architecture History Minor College of Architecture, Magna Cum Laude [GPA 3.835] ItalArt Design Institute Fall 2010 Historical Preservation + Cultural Studies Semester Abroad in Castiglion Fiorentino, Arezzo, Italy

ACHIEVEMENTS

“Best Design” Spring 2010 TAMU Upper-Level Admission Portfolio Competition Arthur W Licht Memorial Scholarship Spring 2010 Honoring High Academic Achievement August A Neuner Scholarship Spring 2011 Honoring High Academic Achievement Texas Aggie Grant Fall 2008–Spring 2012 Honoring High Academic Achievement

INVOLVEMENT

Tau Sigma Delta Architecture Honors Society Phi Kappa Phi National Honors Society AIAS TAMU Axiom Editor-in-Chief AIAS TAMU Promotions Officer USGBC TAMU Membership TAMU Honors Program References and additional work available upon request


EXPERIENCE

Design + Marketing Assistant Loupot’s Bookstore Spring–Winter 2009 Created advertisements for newspapers, mailers, and designed products for Loupot’s and A&M organizations Contractor Assistant SilverLinings Construction Summer 2011 Assisted in the development and construction of two house additions and a Bluebonnet Trails clinic in Creedmore, Lockhart, and Gonzales, Texas respectively; began documentation for the construction of a dental clinic in Luling, Texas Graphic Design + Web Development, The Agency Texas A&M Department of Architecture Fall 2011–Spring 2012 Designed advertising material for lectures and events in the College of Architecture and assisted development of the Department’s unofficial online newsletter

CAPABILITIES

AutoCAD, Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, SketchUp, model making, hand drafting, 35mm + digital photography, graphic design, Rhinoceros, Autodesk Revit, Microsoft Office Suite, LEED Certification Process

References and additional work available upon request


Architecture Portfolio  

Architecture portfolio for Michael Rollins. Draft of 4.4.12

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