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MICHAEL ROLLINS

ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN


BLUE RIDGE CRAFTWORKS

Workshops and exhibition for traditional artisans in Floyd, VA

CYBERNARIUM

Computing center in historic downtown Bryan, TX

ZERO STUDIO

A park-side architecture studio in College Station, TX

COMPACT END TABLE

Furniture designed as airline carry-on luggage

ALL-FAITHS FOREST CHAPEL

Spiritual space in the Gila National Forest, NM

BULWARK

Architecturally-inspired kinetic fashion

DYNAMIC HOUSE

A fluctuating residence designed to be “dynamic” in Bryan, TX

THE GROVE

Temporary pavilion designed for on-campus exhibitions

TEXAS ARCHITECTURE CENTER

Center for public education and the exhibition of architecture and design in Houston, TX

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Resume and contact information

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BLUE RIDGE CRAFTWORKS FALL 2012 STUDIO PROJECT WORKSHOPS AND EXHIBITION FOR TRADITIONAL ARTISANS IN FLOYD, VA Many small towns nestled in the valleys of the Blue Ridge mountain range running from Pennsylvania to the Carolinas stagnate due to isolation. Floyd, located sixty minutes from Roanoke, Virginia, has begun to develop into an introverted community. Aside from the occasional tourist passing through the town on their way to the Blue Ridge Parkway or bluegrass enthusiast attending the “Friday Night Jamboree” to listen to local artists perform, the town is often quiet. Floyd is fortunate for its isolation; many of its traditional crafts and artistry remain unsullied by popular cultural movements or commercialization. This project is intended to celebrate Floyd’s practice of traditional Blue Ridge woodworking, metallurgy, luthiery, glassblowing, pottery, quilting, and weaving by not only exhibiting their craft but providing a space for the craftsmen to work and teach aspiring artisans. Seven studios, which are open 24-hours for registered craftsmen, have large storage walls that, when closed, still allow visitors to the center to see into the workshops while not disturbing the work being done; the doors may be opened to allow visitors to sit in on or even participate in the studios. The form reflects certain truths inherent in the local architecture in Floyd: The retail and exhibitions spaces are derived from the archetypal 25-foot storefront common to the town; vernacular materials such as limestone and steel allowed the building to retain the identity of Floyd while providing a contemporary space for its visitors; a standing seam metal roof accommodates on-site water collection to be used in the center. The courtyard in the center serves as both an exhibition space and a performance space, providing a performance space for the many musicians that currently must perform on benches outside of markets and public rest rooms.

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C

MECHANICAL

B

8

STORAGE

FURNITURE

D

INSTRUMENT

RETAIL

D

EXHIBITION

METALWORK

GLASS

C

06

A

CERAMIC

B

0’

5’

10’

A

15’

25’

50’


D 50’

50’

D

A

EXHIBITION

A

A

OPEN TO BELOW

A

25’

25’

OFFICE

C

C

B

0’

0’

PERFORMANCE

C

QUILTING

C

OFFICE RETAIL

RETAIL

D

10’

B

5’

B

5’

B

10’

15’

15’

WEAVING

D

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CYBERNARIUM FALL 2011 PARTNER STUDIO PROJECT COMPUTING CENTER IN HISTORIC DOWNTOWN BRYAN, TX As a response to the growing dependency of society on technology my partner and I were tasked with designing a computing center in downtown Bryan, TX with the aim of advocating technological literacy. The program consisted of a repair center, cafe, digital library, open-access computer lab, auditorium, learning facilities, and administrative offices. The primary purpose of the building is to educate the community on the growing technological advancements in software, hardware, and the Internet. Drawing upon the concept of networking, both digital and social, an open plan and large atrium connects spaces within the building and individuals to each other. The Open Access Lab can be divided into rooms when private classes are being held. Due to the site’s location in proximity to Bryan’s cultural district, spaces both indoor and out exist for the exhibition of movies and artwork; art is ingrained in the fabric of the community of Bryan. Structural loads were examined and a combination exposed-steel/ concrete one-way joist system with concrete columns was designed for the building; construction details were made for trusses, beamto-beam connections, and suspension rod joints. The skin of the building, a system of thin concrete shell forms, is a result of solar analysis, allowing direct entry only during the coldest of winter months. This was accomplished through a combination of false color studies and Ecotect daylight analysis.

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C

C

D

13

D

B

A

A

B

B

A

C

C

D

A

B


D

B

A

C

D

C

D

A

B

B

A

C

C

D

A

B

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LEVEL -1 PLAN

1/8”=1’

0

5

10

15

20

50’

LEVEL 0 PLAN

1/8”=1’

0

5

10

15

20

50’

SECTION A

1/8”=1’

0

5

10

15

20

50’

SECTION B

1/8”=1’

0

5

10

15

20

50’

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17 B

C

A

Carpet Flooring Mounting Layer Post-tensioned Concrete Foundation Slab 12“ Slab #5 Rebar at 12” OC 1“ Masonite Layer (around carton forms) 6”x 20“ Carton Form 1” Gravel Layer 30” Reinforced Concrete Grade Beam Carton Form (between piers) 24” Diameter Concrete Pier (8’ in depth)

D/E FOUNDATION DETAIL

Carpet Flooring Mounting Layer One-way Joist Post-tensioned Concrete Slab 4“ Slab 8”x 20“ Carton Form 6” x 12“ Joists 5/8” Drywall Finishing Drop-ceiling Panels and Track System

C FLOOR/CEILING DETAIL

1” Thick Pre-cast Concrete Facade Mounted on 1/2” Steel Rods Embedded into Concrete 9” Site-case Concrete Wall #5 Reinforcement Bars Double-pane Low-E Glass 1” Concrete Sill Finishing R-19 Batt Insulation Interior Wall Finishing (1”)

B WALL SECTION DETAIL

One-way Joist Post-tensioned Concrete Slab 4“ Slab 8”x 20“ Carton Form 6” x 12“ Joists R-30 Rigid Board Insulation (roof only) 5/8” Drywall Finishing Drop-ceiling Panels and Track System

Metal Flashing to Prevent Water Collecting Between Facade and Wall Vegetation Layer Growing Medium (4-6”) Water Retention Layer Sediment Filtration Layer Drainage Layer Root Barrier

A ROOF/CEILING DETAIL


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E

H

D

I

G

F

1-1/2“ Translucent Glass Flooring C-Channel Frame (6” x 12”) 2-1/2” Metal Rod from Ceiling Truss 4” x 6” C-Channel Welded Around Rod 1/4” Diameter 3” Bolt Connect C-Channels

I SUSPENSION DETAIL

1-1/2“ Translucent Glass Flooring C-Channel Frame (6” x 12”) 4” Metal Rod 4” From Slab Center 1” Steel Spacing Joint at Each Rod

H FLOOR-TO-SLAB DETAIL

C-Channel Beam Two 6” x 10” C-Channels 10” x 10” x 1” Gusset Plate 1/2” Steel Bolts (12 at each connection) Beam Mounts to Bottom Chord

G BEAM-TO-TRUSS DETAIL

C-Channel Beam Two 6”x10” C-Channels Mounted at 18” x 18“ x 1” Gusset Plate 1/2” Diameter Bolts Connect C-Channels to Plate Steel Plate Cast into Concrete Steel Angle Secured to Steel Plate 1/2” x 6” Bent Steel Rods 1/4” Fillet Weld at Base of Truss to Angle 1/2” Reinforcing Rods 18” OC

F TRUSS-TO-COLUMN DETAIL


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50 psf / offices, restrooms

100 psf / lobby, store, cafe, lounge, stairs

60 psf / conference, labs

125 psf / mechanical, electrical, roof garden

80 psf / auditorium seating, circulation

150 psf / open access lab


June 21: 12pm

June 21: 3pm

December 21: 3pm

Ext: 109,800 lux Int: 430.5 lux

Ext: 71,800 lux Int: 598.5 lux

Ext: 69,000 lux Int: 974.6 lux

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ZERO STUDIO FALL 2009 STUDIO PROJECT A PARK-SIDE ARCHITECTURE STUDIO IN COLLEGE STATION, TX Architecture, by definition, has the power to invade space. Parking lots, brownfields, green space, under-utilized architecture— the removal of one space for another is inherent in building construction. The spaces do not have to disappear altogether, though, and in the case of this project the park space is integrated, changed, but not destroyed. The primary challenge was creating a space for a 10,000 square foot design firm while integrating space that would otherwise disappear; the nearby neighborhood depends on this park as a safe place for children to go after school for sports and organization meetings. A hill backs up to the west side of the studio to both shelter the structure from the evening sun and act as an access point to the green roof. The permeable roof collects rainwater through drainage systems and serves as an extension of the neighboring park space, complete with seating and walking paths. Roof skylights allow pedestrians to look into the studio space and view the work that is being done. A similar catwalk exists on the second level of the studio space for clients to observe the design process without disturbing the designers. Entry to the space is possible either through the lobby and exhibition gallery or directly into each studio through a semi-outdoor space protected by layered trellises. Each project team also has the ability to remove the movable glass partitions that divide the work spaces from additional semi-outdoor patios to accommodate the need for larger working environments for large scale mock-ups of buildings and architectural details.

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COMPACT END TABLE FALL 2008 STUDIO PROJECT FURNITURE DESIGNED AS AIRLINE CARRY-ON The goal of this project was to design a piece of furniture that is modular, can be assembled and disassembled without tools, and is compact enough to be stored in carry-on airline luggage when in its disassembled state. The furniture could employ only wooden friction joints without the help of adhesives or store-bought nails and screws. This particular piece is formally modeled after the traditional “spiraling staircase�, rising from the base and providing increased shelving space as the platforms rise. During transport, the panels that make up the shelves of the table are stacked in the base; the top of the table serves to enclose the pieces during transit, forming a box that is locked in-place with Velcro straps and friction joints. The development of each individual piece provided insight into design/build processes and how the individual interacts with various furniture pieces.

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ALL-FAITHS FOREST CHAPEL SPRING 2012 STUDIO PROJECT SPIRITUAL SPACE IN THE GILA NATIONAL FOREST, NM Architecture has the power to move its occupants spiritually through an interplay of light and shadow, of form and void. Spirituality, though to some degree common in all of us, presents itself in different ways to different people. Architecture is challenged to bring those representations together in a single instance through the medium of space and light. This chapel and library located in the Gila National Forest in New Mexico serves as an all-faiths church independent of particular religious affiliation. Built of large timber members and glass, the design replaces traditional religious symbols with the universality of the interplay of light and shadow. The tall, slender columns recall the surrounding forest, blurring the barrier boundary between the built and the natural. The siting of the chapel on a raised portion of hillside is indicative of the occupants rising to a higher spiritual understanding— one may leave the concerns of the secular and revel in the spiritual. A physical separation of the secular portions of the complex (administration, facilities) reinforces this idea by providing a singularly sacred space for pilgrims and visitors. The road bisecting the site serves as the threshold for those passing into the spiritual space from both ground level and the raised pedestrian bridge. The interior volumes are inherently devoid of traditional religious precedent, such as the central procession or cross-shaped spaces of spiritual architecture of the past.

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TCUDORP LANOITACUDE KSEDOTUA NA YB DECUDORP

TCUDORP LANOITACUDE KSEDOTUA NA YB DECUDORP

35 PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


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BULWARK FALL 2009 STUDIO PROJECT ARCHITECTURALLY-INSPIRED KINETIC FASHION To explore the conversation between architecture, its surroundings, and its occupants, this project was designed has a combination of architectural sculpture, kinetic sculpture, and the natural movements of the human body. A radial shell was created out of Plexiglas and is modulated through the use of control arms that pivot around a central spine. A system of steel cables and levers swung each arm back and forth along an arc circling the human body. The movements engaged by the performer wearing the garment mimic the circular motion through a series of spins that undulate about the individual’s own vertical axis.

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DYNAMIC HOUSE SPRING 2009 STUDIO PROJECT A FLUCTUATING RESIDENCE DESIGNED TO BE “DYNAMIC” IN BRYAN, TX The coming generation of architects must be concerned not only with the large scale of skyscrapers and megalith architecture but with the economy-sized architecture of the home, of the personal space. As cities grow the space bestowed upon the individual becomes more and more valuable. This project required that the resident be able to eat, sleep, and work in a space less than 8,000 cubic feet. The residence has a greenspace that is accessible from the ground floor and may be used as an extension of the front lawn. The landscape echoes the form of the house in the curves of the burms, retaining walls, and organic steel trelliswork. The bedroom and bathroom “float” above the kitchen and living spaces, effectively dividing the public functions of the residence from the private while still offering a spatial connection through the voids around the catwalk. Color was added into the residence to illustrate how light and color can affect the mood that a space generates. Openings in the facade correspond to both the painted portions of the walls and, as the light changes over the course of the day, functions of the spaces.

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THE GROVE SPRING 2010 STUDIO PROJECT TEMPORARY PAVILION DESIGNED FOR ON-CAMPUS EXHIBITIONS Architecture can be transient as well as permanent. It can be the subject of movement and yet feel stationary. It can be a triumph of engineering or recall natural aesthetics familiar to days past, can display and be displayed. The Grove is a 4,000 square-foot pavilion located on the hill between the Langford Complex and the Oceanography and Meteorology Building on the Texas A&M campus. The pavilion is to be erected in a way that least disturbs the site and disassembled at a later date. All of the pieces may be loaded on a single flatbed truck in their disassembled state and as few as two workers, with the assistance of scaffolding, can assemble the pavilion on-site. Using 2”x4”x8’ timber, polycarbonate, and steel cable the structure recalls a small grove of trees; a combination of translucent, opaque, and green-tinted polycarbonate panels create a canopy of filtered light. Students and faculty who wish to exhibit work within the pavilion either create stand-alone works or may suspend works between the timber supports. The space serves, sited as it was initially, as an extension of the “Grassy Knoll” space. When not in use as an exhibition space the pavilion acts as its design suggests: as a shaded space to escape the summer heat.

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TEXAS ARCHITECTURE CENTER SPRING 2011 PARTNER STUDIO PROJECT CENTER FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION AND THE EXHIBITION OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN IN HOUSTON, TX This proposal was one of an educational nature: design a building that may encourage the public interest in architecture through exhibition and education. Sited in the Museum District of downtown Houston, Texas, the lot’s location along the edge of a main thoroughfare created opportunities for the display of work from the street. The research library accommodates large sculptural pieces with a three-level high atrium space at the corner where the space meets the street. The library, exhibition hall, and auditorium are open to the public and occupy the first two levels. The third level consists of administrative offices. A pedestrian path leads the occupants beneath the primary gallery space and into the outdoor cafe and to the primary entrances to the auditorium and the research library. The cantilever above the cafe, delicately held by a single branching column, serves to shade the sunken outdoor space. By developing spaces through which the occupants can interact with the building the architecture is “experienced” and does not simply act as a stationary object.

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MICHAEL ROLLINS rollins.michaelj@gmail.com michaeljrollins.com 1.512.695.5793

GOALS

Work with a design firm that will lead to the development of sustainable and client-responsive housing, commercial, and educational facilities in growing urban and suburban contexts

EDUCATION

Texas A&M University Fall 2008–Spring 2012 Bachelor of Environmental Design [Architecture] Art and Architecture History Minor Graduated with Honors in College of Architecture, Magna Cum Laude ItalArt Design Institute Fall 2010 Historical Preservation + Cultural Studies Semester Abroad in Castiglion Fiorentino, Arezzo, Italy Virginia Tech Fall 2012–Present Master of Architecture, 2-Year Program College of Architecture + Design [Current GPA: 4.0]

EXPERIENCE

Contractor Assistant SilverLinings Construction Summer 2011 Assisted in the development and construction of two house additions and a Bluebonnet Trails clinic in Creedmore, Lockhart, and Gonzales, Texas respectively; began documentation for the construction of a dental clinic in Luling, Texas Graphic Design + Web Development, The Agency Texas A&M Department of Architecture Fall 2011–Spring 2012 Designed advertising material for lectures and events in the College of Architecture and assisted development of the Department’s unofficial online newsletter


EXPERIENCE

Architectural Intern Jacobs Engineering Summer 2012 Assisted registered architects in the design and documentation of facilities for TAM International, Yum! Brands, Inc; completed preliminary designs for the Max Road sports pavilion in Pearland, TX Teaching Assistant Virginia Tech College of Architecture + Design Fall 2012–Present Assisted Professor Hans Christian Rott in proceedings of his Architecture and Western Thought course; produced presentation models and reports for a school being developed in Haiti

CAPABILITIES

AutoCAD, Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, SketchUp, Autodesk Revit model making, hand drafting, 35mm + digital photography, graphic design, familiar with LEED Certification Process

ACHIEVEMENTS

INVOLVEMENT

Arthur W Licht Memorial Scholarship Spring 2010 Honoring High Academic Achievement August A Neuner Scholarship Spring 2011 Honoring High Academic Achievement Texas Aggie Grant Fall 2008–Spring 2012 Honoring High Academic Achievement Tau Sigma Delta Architecture Honors Society Phi Kappa Phi National Honors Society AIAS TAMU Axiom Editor-in-Chief AIAS TAMU Promotions Officer USGBC TAMU Membership TAMU Honors Program VSAIA Competition References and additional work available upon request



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