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WIN

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Y L R E T R A U Q

TRADE HUB REFRESH: EASIER, FASTER, BETTER ECO-THINKING: DUNEDIN BUILDER’S UNIQUE FAMILY HOME BRANZ INSIGHTS: THE VALUE OF SUSTAINABILITY

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GET MORE DONE THE NEW AND IMPROVED TRADE HUB IS HERE. Faster, easier to navigate and packed with features to help you work smarter. Get instant access to your pricing, create estimates, place orders and more. It’s good. And it’s free.

See pages 22–23 for more information.

Visit mitre10.co.nz/trade or contact your Trade Account Manager for more information. Sign up is FREE.


You’d never take an unnecessary risk. So always choose the insulation that’s proven to be safe. International research confirms that any slight irritation to exposed skin caused by the glass wool fibres in Pink® Batts® insulation, or through their inhalation, is harmless and temporary. Plus Pink® Batts® is proud to be GREENGUARD Indoor Air Quality Certified® for low chemical emissions.


CONTENTS 8 WE’RE FROM HERE A flyover of Mitre 10 Trade news from around the country.

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9 EXPANDED OFFERING FOR HAMILTON TRADIES The opening of Mitre 10 MEGA Ruakara doubles the options.

9 WHAT OUR INDUSTRY NEEDS Highlights of the latest BRANZ survey.

11 NATIONAL CONFERENCE PREVIEW Plan ahead for this year’s NZCB National Conference and Expo.

12 UNDERFLOOR INSULATION: ALTERNATIVES TO FOIL A quick reminder on the foil insulation retrofit ban.

13 TURNING WASTE INTO HOMES An innovative approach to sustainable home construction.

13 FISHING COMP FOR MANAWATU TRADIES Mitre 10 MEGA Palmerston North has gone fishin’.

14 RIGID, RAPID AND RELIABLE All about Laminex New Zealand’s new Strandsarking roofing product.

16 SOUTHERN SUSTAINABILITY

22 EASIER, FASTER, BETTER

Builder Sacha Gray’s unique and personal home build.

19 WINTON GARDEN A COMMUNITY EFFORT A local project in Southland yields nourishing rewards.

20 A STRONG ECONOMY CAN ALSO BE ENVIRONMENTALLY SUSTAINABLE How strong economies and eco-tech promote sustainable construction.

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New features for the revamped Mitre 10 Trade Hub.

24 THE VALUE OF SUSTAINABILITY Make better decisions about sustainability and resilience features.

26 UNDERSTANDING THERMAL MASS Learn the fundamentals.

29 GUARANTEES: BUILDING PEACE OF MIND The small project guarantee from Builtin Insurance.

30 KEEPING YOUR TEAM SAFE: LADDERS Taking steps to protect your staff.

30 BEING A MENTOR AS WELL AS A BOSS Staff retention starts with you.

31 THE CONSTRUCTION AMENDMENT ACT 2015: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW Summing up the legislation.

33 “DO SWEAT THE SMALL STUFF” Solid advice from the Trades Coach.

34 MITRE 10 TRADE RACING Get under the hood of James “Huggi” Urquhart’s V8 Holden ute. 5

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Now there’s an MDF bracing system which is BRANZ Appraised to resist earthquake and wind loads on timber frame buildings. Environmentally friendly GoldenEdge Panelbrace Wall Bracing Systems are easy and quick to instal with excellent strength quality, surface smoothness and stability. Specify GoldenEdge Panelbrace Wall Bracing Systems with confidence.

For more information go to www.nelsonpine.co.nz Nelson Pine Industries Ltd, Nelson, New Zealand MS 20521 IT/2


THE QUARTER UPFRONT

Derek Heard General Manager Trade

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WELL IT’S BEEN a crazy start to 2017, though not unexpected with the current market conditions. Residential building for the last quarter was up over 14% on the previous year, and while some areas have softened slightly, the flow-on effects are still to be felt. With most of our customers under the pump, anything that we can do to make it easier to transact with us, the better. We’re very excited to have launched our refreshed Trade Hub, an online tool to help our customers get pricing, raise estimates, and place orders anywhere, at any time. Check out our article on pages 22-23 for details and customer comments. We’re also giving our customers a chance to win one of two iPad Pros as part of the launch. It’s always good to see what our customers are doing around the traps, and this issue features one of our good mates in Dunedin, who’s taken concepts of sustainable building personally. See Sacha Gray’s challenging build on page 16. If you’ve got some interesting builds on the go, let us know – we always like hearing what our trade customers are up to and it’s great to see the unique and different builds that are happening in our industry.

Y QUARTERL

TRADE HUB REFRESH: EASIER, FASTER, BETTER ECO-THINKING: DUNEDIN BUILDER’S UNIQUE FAMILY HOME BRANZ INSIGHTS: THE VALUE OF SUSTAINABILITY

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The house Dunedin builder Sacha Gray created for his own family is a very thoughtful build. Read more on page 16.

Mitre 10 Trade Quarterly is published four times a year in association with Mitre 10. Managing Editor Adele Thurlow Art Director Marc Backwell Contributors Andy Burrows BCITO BRANZ Builtin Infometrics ITAB MBIE Mitre 10 Trade Racing NZ Certified Builders Site Safe NZ Print and distribution PMP Limited Editorial enquiries Chocolate Fish Media adele@chocolatefishmedia.co.nz 027 454 2131

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While waiting for the next Trade Quarterly, get caught up on the latest Mitre 10 Trade and industry info by visiting the Mitre 10 Trade Blog – go to mitre10.co.nz/trade and click on the “News” tab to access the blog.

THIS PUBLICATION IS RECOGNISED BY THE BUILDING AND HOUSING GROUP AS CONTRIBUTING TOWARDS THE SKILLS MAINTENANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE LICENSED BUILDING PRACTITIONER SCHEME. If you are a licensed building practitioner, cut out and safely retain this panel with your skills maintenance literature for future reference and audit confirmation. Ref. Trade Quarterly Autumn 2017

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Advertising enquiries Annalise Bagrie 09 442 3047 annalise.bagrie@mitre10.co.nz Private Bag 102-925 North Shore City, Auckland 0745 mitre10.co.nz/trade Mitre 10 Trade Quarterly is subject to copyright in its entirety. The contents may not be reproduced in any form, either in whole or in part, without written permission of the publisher. All rights reserved in material accepted for publication unless initially specified otherwise. Opinions expressed in Mitre 10 Trade Quarterly are not necessarily those of Mitre 10 nor the publisher. No responsibility is accepted for the suggestions of the contributors or the conclusions that may be drawn from them. Although the publisher has made every effort to ensure accuracy, the reader remains responsible for the correct use and selection of any tools, materials, and systems followed, as well as the following of any laws or codes that may apply.

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FROM THE REGIONS

WE’RE FROM HERE

Check out what’s been happening in Mitre 10 Trade across the country.

Fishing comp for Manawatu tradies In February, Mitre 10 MEGA Palmerston North ran its first fishing competition for trade customers. Eighteen boats and around 80 mixed teams of builders, electricians, plumbers and plasterers took part with the entrants battling tough sea conditions to compete for a range of prizes totalling over $10,000. See the full story on PAGE 13.

New national Support Centre We officially relocated to our new national Support Centre on Auckland’s North Shore at the end of January, so we can provide even better support to the 82 stores nationwide, as well as more efficient service for our customers. The new 7000m2 purpose-built structure has incorporated the latest in building technology and is home to our 250-plus Support Centre team members.

Petone’s V8 simulator visit In January, Mitre 10 MEGA Petone set up eight simulator V8 Supercars so locals could challenge each other on the “race track”. Competitors could choose from a range of tracks including Bathurst and Hampton Downs, and race in anything from an F1 from the 1950s to the latest McLaren or Ferrari.

Weber BBQ winners Greymouth builder Phil Wilkins and his wife Michelle were the lucky winners of a new Weber barbeque in our Trade Quarterly summer Facebook giveaway. Pictured below are Phil and Michelle with Bryan Williamson, the assistant trade manager for Mitre 10 MEGA Greymouth.

Mitre 10 Trade Racing win Richard “Danger” Moore of the Mitre 10 Trade Racing team delivered two wins at the NZ Grand Prix in Manfield, winning the round for the team and boosting him into second place in the Drivers’ Championship standings.

Winton community gardens Mitre 10 Winton, along with Caldwell Builders and other local businesses, banded together and built a community garden late last year. The five large raised garden beds are full of fresh produce for locals to use and are maintained by Mitre 10 Winton. See the full story on PAGE 19.

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NEW DEVELOPMENT

EXPANDED OFFERING FOR HAMILTON TRADIES

Getting the job done is now twice as easy. THANKS TO THE new Mitre 10 MEGA Ruakura store, Hamilton tradies can now pick up their orders from two convenient locations. Mitre 10 MEGA Ruakura expands Mitre 10’s trade offer in the city, allowing tradies to use their one account across both stores. The new Ruakura store features a 1000m2 trade yard with bulk bins and drivethru capabilities, as well as doubling the trade offering of Mitre 10 MEGA Te Rapa. Qualified builder Bryan King has also come on board as GM Trade and Commercial for both Hamilton Mitre 10 MEGA stores, to provide strategic leadership for their offering. He will ensure these stores deliver even greater service for tradies across the region. “I’ll use my extensive building knowledge to support our trade departments in creating the best possible experience for our trade and commercial customers,” says Bryan. “We have a great team across both stores and will be looking at new ways

to continually raise the level of service and value we give to our customers.” Terry Wilson, Owner-Operator of both Mitre 10 MEGA Hamilton stores, says an important part of Bryan’s role will be to maximise technology use for trade

WHAT OUR INDUSTRY NEEDS

Builders highlighted their desire for up-to-date information on product specification, building codes and standards, design details, good practice information, and fixing/fitting details. The report also showed builders prefer

The latest BRANZ survey highlights builders’ concerns. REGULATION CONCERNS AND building compliance were the top two issues for builders in the latest Industry Needs Survey from BRANZ and MBIE. Builders also ranked training, product knowledge, accountability and liability on par with previous years when it came to topics they are most concerned about. This is the second time BRANZ and MBIE have partnered to survey the building and construction industry to better understand their information needs and the sources of information the industry uses. BRANZ has conducted the survey every

customers through services like the Mitre 10 Trade Hub. “It’s a level of service that others aren’t able to provide, and is a real asset for our trade customers.” See pages 22-23 for more details on the Trade Hub.

two years, accumulating 20 years of valuable data, with results published starting from 2008 on the BRANZ website.

sourcing this information from product specification websites, BRANZ and Standards NZ. BRANZ was also rated highly for selecting research projects that create new knowledge and for communicating its research. BRANZ publications were rated the second most valuable source of information, with seminars being builders’ preferred method for continuing professional development (CPD). For the detailed report, visit branz.nz

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ARD O RB E T AS ® PL GIB

S M E T SYS

7 THINGS TO CONSIDER showe WHEN BUILDING OR RENOVATING Unenclosed A BATHROOM. These recommendations are not a substitute for the full information contained in the GIB Aqualine® Wet Area Systems literature. Please refer to this literature before proceeding with any project. 1

Always use GIB Aqualine® on walls and ceilings to help protect against moisture and steam damage.

2

Use waterproof membranes in the right areas – such as to the edge of showers, baths and vanities to be tiled. e.g. Enclosed shower over bath

Bath

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S A E AR

mm

150

3

To provide stability use a GIB® Rondo® NZ18 metal angle attached to the internal corner of timber framed shower walls. Vertical corner GIB® Rondo® NZ18 32 x 32 x 0.55mm galvanised steel angle to a minimum height of 1800mm

For best practice, and to avoid time-consuming and costly call-backs, incorporate a wet area system that maintains integrity when inadvertently exposed to water and steam.

4

Fix GIB Aqualine® horizontally where possible to reduce joints and improve the finish.

5

Use 13mm GIB Aqualine® on ceilings to protect against moisture and steam.

The GIB Aqualine® Wet Area Systems literature contains all the information you’ll need to correctly install GIB® Wet Area Systems.

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When tiling*, fasteners are required at 100mm centres to the perimeter of the sheet and to all intermediate studs.

100mm centres

GIB Aqualine®

Bracing systems must not be located behind showers or baths because of durability requirements, renovation likelihood and other practical issues relating to fixing bracing elements.

To request your free copy contact the GIB® Helpline on 0800 100 442 or download at gib.co.nz/aqualine

GIB® is a registered trademark. *10mm GIB Aqualine® is for tile weights up to 20kg/m2 and 13mm GIB Aqualine® up to 32kg/m2. Most wall tiles weigh under 20kg/m2.

WWB_BPS_001_April 2016

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NZ CERTIFIED BUILDERS

GREAT APPRENTICE RACE 2017

M10 9644 Great Apprentice Logo v3.indd 1

NATIONAL CONFERENCE PREVIEW

Find out what’s planned for this year’s New Zealand Certified Builders 2017 Annual National Conference and Expo. BE SURE TO keep 26 and 27 May available for the New Zealand Certified Builders 2017 Annual National Conference and Expo. The Mitre 10 Trade Team will be there again, so come by our stand to say hello. This year we will be showcasing the Mitre 10 Trade Hub, which can really speed up your job pricing and makes it easier for you to order product on the go. Once more, we’ll also be supporting the crowd-pleasing Great Apprentice Race, which is sure to be entertaining.

The conference is a great chance for hearing the latest industry news and catching up with the trade while enjoying Auckland’s waterfront views at Wynyard Quarter. Conference attendees also have the chance to spend Friday night revisiting New Zealand’s maritime past at the Maritime Museum before getting suited up for Saturday night’s awards dinner at the ANZ Viaduct Event Centre.

4/04/16 4:57 pm

The Mitre10-sponsored Great Apprentice Race is back in 2017 and is a must-see for conference attendees. The high-energy event starts with the country’s finest apprentices completing a three-hour construction challenge, with the brief unveiled just before they commence. After designing and constructing their racing machines, the apprentices will have to use their newly-built contraptions to complete an indoor race circuit and finish building tasks along the way. As the competition heats up and things inevitably start to fall apart, it’s sure to provide guaranteed entertainment for all attendees.

For more info go to nzcb.nz

TOOLBOX SEMINARS: BUILDING A GAME PLAN Each year NZCB runs a Toolbox Seminar series to keep the trade industry in the know. These seminars provide useful information to keep you up-to-date with industry changes, increase productivity and improve how your business grows. This year’s three-part seminar series, Building

a Game Plan – Three Simple Steps to Succeed, is kicking off with “Round One: PreContract Requirements of The Building Process”. It’s important to start your builds strong, and this seminar gives you the right tools to make sure you’re gaining your customer’s confidence from day one. It’ll touch on the LBP

scheme, break down building contracts and consumer protection measures, take a look at how builders are getting caught out, and give you the capability to ensure you get paid. There are heaps of practical building examples and scenarios to put the seminar content into context, 11

and you’ll get one LBP point towards your Skills Maintenance Record. Seminars are usually an hour long, run throughout the country, and are open to anyone in the building industry. For dates and locations, contact your local NZCB representative or go to nzcb.nz M I T R E 10

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WARM UP WISELY

UNDERFLOOR INSULATION: ALTERNATIVES TO FOIL

A quick reminder on the foil insulation retrofit ban and some alternative underfloor insulation options for both existing and new homes. DUE TO THE ban on retrofitting foil insulation, it’s no longer permitted to repair or retrofit foil insulation on residential buildings with an existing electrical installation. The two main issues with foil insulation are the risk of electrocution and actual insulation factor: ■■ Foil insulation is a great conductor of electricity and the method of attaching it to an existing home involves a risk of accidentally piercing a live electrical

cable with fasteners and potentially enlivening the foil along with the area around it. ■■ The other issue with foil insulation is that it has questionable effectiveness. As the foil ages, becomes damaged, and/or gets dusty, the positive effects of the underfloor insulation are significantly reduced. The existing ban works in conjunction with new requirements under the Residential Tenancy Act to insulate

all rental properties by 1 July 2019. In recommending direct replacement options that comply with minimum R-values for building code compliance without creating additional safety risks, Mitre 10 Category Manager for Building Supplies Shayne Elstob says the best options are bulk insulation products made from polystyrene, glasswool or polyester. His product recommendations for each are below.

EXPOL Underfloor R1.4 and EXPOL Black R1.8 for timber floor insulation

Pink Batts® SnugFloor® insulation

GreenStuf® Underfloor insulation

Shayne says, “The SnugFloor® range comes in both R1.6 and R2.6 – narrow and wide. Durable and easy to install, the product design means that even when joists are uneven or out of kilter, the installation process is quick and painless. This product is also made from over 80% recycled glass.”

Shayne says, “GreenStuf® Underfloor comes in both R1.5 and R1.8 and in three widths (450mm, 500mm and 600mm). The width options aid ease of installation and typically these products can be friction-fitted without further support from straps. This durable insulation is also manufactured using a minimum of 45% recycled PET Plastics.”

Shayne says, “Durable and easy to install, both EXPOL Underfloor R1.4 and EXPOL Black R1.8 can be used on new and existing timber floors and both fit snugly between timber floor joists to stop drafts and damp from entering. The EXPOL manufacturing process also eliminates polystyrene waste by converting it all into reusable material.”

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BRIGHT IDEAS TURNING WASTE INTO HOMES IN AN INNOVATIVE approach to sustainable home construction, Conceptos Plasticos has created interlocking blocks from plastic waste to use in constructing affordable housing for families in Latin America. The Conceptos Plasticos team visits poor areas and encourages locals to collect waste plastic and rubber that is cleaned, ground down into a rough powder, and then mixed, melted and moulded into shapes to be used for building. The blocks join together without any adhesive, and a two-bedroom house with a kitchen, bathroom, dining room and living room can be built in just five days by only four people. The houses are portable, earthquake-resistant and fireproof, require little maintenance, and only start to degrade after around 500 years.

FISHING COMP FOR MANAWATU TRADIES IN FEBRUARY, MITRE 10 MEGA Palmerston North ran its inaugural fishing competition for trade customers. Eighteen boats and around 80 mixed teams of builders, electricians, plumbers, and plasterers took part, with the entrants battling tough sea conditions to compete for a range of prize categories totalling over $10,000. The main category, Heaviest Snapper, was won by Gary Brown from Noel’s Building – who took home the trophy 13

and a $2000 Broil King BBQ after landing a snapper weighing in at 7.6kg. Mitre 10 MEGA Palmerston North Trade Administrator, Sian Smith-Teddy, says that the feedback received from the event was overwhelmingly positive and the store cannot wait to do it again next year. “A big thank you to all of our amazing sponsors who made the day such a success,” says Sian. “It’s always good to have friendly banter with our customers and there’s no better way to finish a day’s fishing than with a BBQ dinner and beers!” M I T R E 10

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YOUR ROOF

OUR SHOUT! 20 TO BE

WON!

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FREE


TOP IT OFF as close as practical along all free edges, with a maximum 120mm panel cantilever over the blocking if an overhang is required. Strandsarking panels should be installed such that there is a minimum 25mm air gap between the underside of the panel and any roof insulation material. This gap must be maintained in all situations for the life of the Strandsarking. Cover the installed Strandsarking with an appropriate roofing underlayment as soon as practical in order to minimise the Strandsarking being exposed to the weather unnecessarily.

PRODUCT ADVANTAGES

RIGID, RAPID AND RELIABLE

All you need to know about the new Strandsarking roofing product from Laminex New Zealand.

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TRADE ESSENTIALS STRANDSARKING is a 16.3mm (nominal) thick, high-density reconstituted wood panel specifically formulated for use as a roof sarking material under roofing. Strandsarking is suitable in roofing applications for all roofs down to a pitch of two degrees. Strandsarking H3.1 Square Edge is the premium roofing substrate. Improved resin composition provides increased weathering performance with the added benefit of meeting New Zealand building requirements.

INSTALLATION TIPS Check that roof trusses or framing provide a level surface for fastening the Strandsarking onto. Trusses or rafters should be shimmed as necessary in order to provide a level surface. If the top chords of trusses or rafters are warped or bowed, install blocking to straighten. Lay the Strandsarking panels with the long edge perpendicular to the trusses/ rafters in a staggered pattern. The ends of each sheet will be supported by the truss/rafter or solid blocking. Strandsarking panels can be tightly

■■ ■■

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butted and fastened hard up to each other. However, membrane suppliers have held different views on the requirement for timber substrates. The fixing instruction in this guide should be used as a starting point, but designers must detail joints that allow for expansion in accordance with practices recommended by the chosen membrane supplier. Allow a 5mm clearance between the Strandsarking panel and other elements protruding through the roof, such as vent pipes etc. Greater clearances than this may be required around flues and chimneys. Where blocking is required, Strandsarking panels must be blocked 15

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Provides less wastage: Strandsarking has no face grain so it could be laid in any direction, with a maximum span of 900mm. With every strand of the board exposed to the preservative treatment, cut edges do not require further treatment on site (H3.1 treated). Has a textured surface to provide a more slip-resistant surface than is available with smooth-sanded panel products. Has been manufactured using sustainable plantation-grown radiata pine (a highly durable, formaldehydefree resin wax) to improve moistureresistance, and non-solvent-based organic preservative chemicals. No delamination or checking. More rigid substrate, which minimises the propensity for the board to sag between the trusses, giving a flatter and more pristine roofline. A 3600mm x 800mm panel size makes the board easier to pass up between the trusses. The extra length spans an extra truss, reducing the double fixing at sheet ends. Can be used in wind zones up to and including Extra High as specified in NZS 3604.

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SOUTHERN SUSTAINABILITY Dunedin builder Sacha Gray talks eco-building and shows us his unique personal home build.

“THE SOUTH’S A special place,” says Sacha Gray. “Living and working in such a beautiful location is pretty humbling. There’s real warmth to the people here; I’ll often end up saying hi to four or five people I know just on the way to work.” Born and raised in the Catlins and now living near Dunedin, the Otago-based builder couldn’t think of a better place for his family home – a 535m2 six bedroom house he designed and built for himself, his wife Emily, and their three daughters. “We wanted something that made people feel welcome and relaxed – not a ‘grand place’, but comfortable. Recycled materials and sustainable features played a big part in the design, and we also incorporated a lot of timber features so it would have a natural look and feel.” Much of the materials for the build came from unconventional sources: Jarrah hardwood beams from a centuryold Southland bridge; trusses made out of extra-large railway sleepers; wooden stairs that were previously part of a grandstand; and Oregon-Canadian beams sourced from a commercial demolition. “A large chunk of the timber was macrocarpa that was milled off my parents’ farm, but we just found and stored the rest of the materials as we went. Using recycled materials helped to keep costs down, and we kept designing throughout the build until it was all incorporated,” says Sacha. M I T R E 10

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CUSTOMER FEATURE

Left: The custom bathtub made from a solid granite slab is one of Sacha’s favourite features. Far left: The house features many reclaimed and recycled materials. Bottom left: The Just Build It Ltd team.

“One of my favourite features is a custom to do what they believe is eco-friendly, bathtub made out of a solid granite slab but the materials and finished result – it adds a unique touch to the bathroom. actually end up being just the opposite. The only issue was getting it into place ““Glass is a big issue,” says Sacha. “Big without breaking my back!” ‘glass box’ houses can create the illusion Sustainable thinking plays an increasing of warmth but glass is the weak point for role in the client keeping heat in – builds that Sacha particularly down “BUILDERS CAN HELP TO and his team work south. You receive TRANSLATE THE PLANNING on, and is a key part PROCESS, AND I THINK daylight heat but of his approach to you can’t keep it in HAVING THEM INVOLVED house design. at night, especially IN THE EARLY DESIGN “I like efficiency STAGES RESULTS IN A BETTER with high windows and minimal waste that are hard to QUALITY OF BUILD – WELL– it’s the way I was PRICED AND BUILT TO PLAN.” cover with curtains.” brought up and the “It’s easy to nature of a tight budget. And that mindset build big, expensive houses, but one that has carried over onto the construction site.” is also comfortable and economical takes He says that for a lot of clients, their more thinking.” perception of “eco-building” can be It’s a common perception says Sacha for confused; they often invest a huge amount people not to see their builder as having 17

the knowledge to advise on the design of an eco-friendly and cost effective house – yet having that early input is crucial to achieving a good outcome. “It’s unfair to expect every client to know if they have the right plans for the outcome they want,” says Sacha. “Builders can help to translate the planning process, and I think having them involved in the early design stages results in a better quality of build – well-priced and built to plan. “But you need to build trust before being asked to sit down at the design phase, and that trust only comes with relationship and reputation.” Being owner and construction manager of Just Build It Ltd for the last 14 years, Sacha knows the value of having a team that is trusted by clients to deliver great results and give advice that saves time and money. M I T R E 10

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CUSTOMER FEATURE “My team make it special. We love to build, so it’s not just about making money. “It’s about doing the job right, doing small things like giving good advice, cleaning up at night, and spending an extra five minutes helping a client with a one-off task. Creating a great outcome, a happy client, and a big thank you is immensely satisfying.” Having strong support from suppliers makes a difference too, and Sacha has had that from his local Mitre 10 Trade team for past 17 years. “Mitre 10 MEGA Dunedin is very supportive. Chris [Bremner] and Mark [Harper] treat my whole team well. They’re a very down-to-earth bunch, always happy to say hi, and who genuinely care about my business.” “They’ve got my back and will sort out what I need – you can’t put a dollar value on that.” After more than 25 years in the trade, Sacha says that the passion is still there. He still gets a kick out of making plans come to life, the unexpected problem-

solving that happens onsite, and the satisfaction of a good result. “Being a builder is an incredibly unique privilege. House builds are often the biggest decision of people’s lives, and being invited to help make that decision a reality is unlike anything you get in other jobs.

“Whether I’m building a home for my family or someone else’s, it’s knowing what comes after the build is finished – when people live inside what you’ve helped to create – that you really appreciate the positive impact builders can have.”

Right: Sacha (centre) with Mitre 10 MEGA Dunedin Trade Manager Chris Bremner (left) and Trade rep Mark Harper (right). Below: After more than 25 years in the trade, Sacha still has passion for his work – a passion his team at Just Build It Ltd share too.

SACHA’S MITRE 10 TEAM OVER THE COURSE of 17 years, Chris Bremner has gotten to know Sacha Gray pretty well. “He’s a good guy to know,” says Chris. “A pure gentleman and a really good builder.” As Sacha’s first Mitre 10 Trade rep, Chris has helped to supply many high-end builds for Sacha’s company over the years and he says that Sacha’s personal home build might be one of his best efforts. “It’s a very unique house, with a lot of Sacha’s personality incorporated. It makes use of a lot of space but is still very warm and welcoming. Helping him to source the materials for the build was, at times, an interesting challenge that we enjoyed meeting.” Since Chris was promoted to Trade Manager at Mitre 10 MEGA Dunedin, it has been Trade rep Mark Harper who looks after Sacha’s company,

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among other local tradies, making sure his builds always have what they need when they need it. “Maintaining strong relationships is key to delivering good service,” says Mark. “It’s important to get out to each customer’s job site to see and hear firsthand how things are going and what we can do as their trade supplier to make things as easy as possible.” A new dispatch yard opened late last year and has helped the Mitre 10 MEGA Dunedin trade team to expand its offering and increased service efficiency for local tradies. “Many of our customers started with us over 20 years ago,” says Chris. “Like Sacha, they’ve grown with us and we’ve grown with them, and thanks to word of mouth, we’ve added more customers each year.”


COMMUNITY FOCUS

WINTON GARDEN A COMMUNITY EFFORT

A small project flourishing in Southland yields nourishing rewards.

IN LATE 2016, the Winton community decided to help those less privileged by building a community garden full of fresh produce for locals in need to use. Craig Flynn, Mitre 10 Winton’s Store Manager, was keen to get involved and banded together with other local businesses to get it done. “Mitre 10’s core values are all about giving back to the community,” says Craig. “So we

want to do what we can to help Winton.” Caldwell Builders lent a helping hand too, dedicating three men over two days to build five raised planter beds measuring 6000mm x 1500mm x 600mm. Trevor Caldwell of Caldwell Builders is born and bred in Winton and agrees with Craig that the initiative was about giving back to the town. “This is a great project that will bring the community together by

helping those less privileged and teaching kids about gardening,” says Trevor. Prior to Christmas, hampers were filled with fresh produce from the gardens and given to those in need to use and enjoy during the holiday season. Two of the raised beds have also been donated to Winton Primary and St Thomas Aquinas schools to educate students on caring for and harvesting produce.

WANT TO WIN AN IPAD PRO?  Place an order for pickup or delivery through the Mitre 10 Trade Hub and be in to win one of two Apple iPad Pros worth $1369 each!

BE IN TO WIN! Entries close: 7pm, Sunday 30 April 2017  Draw date: Monday 1 May 2017 Terms and Conditions: mitre10.co.nz/trade/draws-terms One entry per account holder

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A STRONG ECONOMY CAN ALSO BE ENVIRONMENTALLY SUSTAINABLE

Strong economic conditions combined with developments in eco-technology could boost sustainable construction in 2017-19. THERE WAS AN increased push for greater environmental sustainability during the economy’s boom times last decade – until the global financial crisis hit in 2008, that is. Now the New Zealand economy is back in a strong position, and we expect to see an increasing amount of investment in environmentally sustainable buildings over the next few years. The reality is that specifying and constructing new buildings to a higher environmental standard usually means a bigger upfront cost for developers, and thus a greater income stream is needed M I T R E 10

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from the investment to justify the initial outlay. That greater income stream could come from being able to charge higher rents or, in the case of an owner-occupier, reducing their ongoing operating costs through reduced energy or water bills, for example. Given the inherent uncertainty that surrounds future income streams compared to known upfront costs, investors will generally place less weight on the possible future income. Favouring more near-term and tangible results creates a higher hurdle for “green” investment to take place. Current economic conditions are conducive to sustainability making a comeback. Improved business 20

profitability provides more room financially for firms to pursue broader social and environmental objectives. And low interest rates mean it’s effectively cheaper for firms to take on risks, making projects with an uncertain future return more likely to progress. It’s unsurprising to see building developments such as 20 Customhouse Quay in Wellington, Mercury’s new headquarters in Newmarket, and the Park Hyatt Hotel in Auckland going ahead with a strong emphasis on their environmental features. The overall rate of non-residential building has grown about 40% since mid-2012 and is currently about 11% above its previous record high in 2005-06. With the sheer amount of non-residential


BY THE NUMBERS construction currently taking place and the renewed focus on sustainability, the overall stock of non-residential buildings looks set to become considerably more environmentally friendly over the next few years. Sustainability is not just limited to nonresidential construction. In the residential space, improving energy efficiency has been an important aspect of government regulation, such as the higher insulation standards for new homes that came into force from 2008. These requirements have been followed up by similar ceiling and underfloor insulation standards for rental properties from 2019.

TECHNOLOGICAL PROGRESS AND HIGHER INCOMES ULTIMATELY GIVE PEOPLE GREATER CHOICE ABOUT THE WAY THEY LIVE AND DO BUSINESS, INCLUDING AN INCREASED ABILITY TO MITIGATE THE ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF THEIR ACTIONS OR LIVE IN A MORE SUSTAINABLE FASHION. The payoffs from these higher standards range from the easily quantifiable (lower electricity bills) to the more difficult to measure (better health outcomes for the occupants). Technological advances are also instrumental in achieving more environmentally sustainable outcomes. The proliferation of heat pumps has been a factor contributing to a 1.8%

MORE CAREFUL WITH OUR ENERGY USAGE Annual electricity generation in NZ, GWh 45,000

40,000

35,000

reduction in New Zealand’s electricity consumption since December 2010 which, as the graph below shows, is a stark contrast from the 2.2%pa growth in electricity usage over the previous 36 years. The recent lack of growth in electricity usage is even more astounding given population growth is at a 40-year high. Dramatic drops in the price of solar panels have also made microgeneration a much more viable option than in the past. With battery technology likely to get significantly cheaper in the near future, homes that are almost self-sufficient in terms of their energy needs could easily become the norm within the next decade. Smart homes can also mean more environmentally friendly houses, with features such as sensor lights reducing energy usage, or automatic blinds letting or keeping in heat as appropriate. The cost of this sort of technology is likely to keep coming down over time, resulting in a greater take-up in new homes as well as more retrofits into existing buildings – both residential and non-residential. To conclude, strong economic growth can often be associated with negative environmental outcomes – the side effects of intensive dairy farming on water quality, or the seeming lack of regard for environmental issues alongside China’s rapid economic development over the last couple of decades. But technological progress and higher incomes ultimately give people greater choice about the way they live and do business, including an increased ability to mitigate the environmental effects of their actions or live in a more sustainable fashion. Given the strong economic outlook for the next few years, along with rapidly improving eco-technology, there is likely to be a strong push for more environmentally sustainable construction during 2017-19. Infometrics help you make sense of economic problems. They provide industry, regional, and general economic analysis and forecasts that assist organisations in making planning, policy, and strategic decisions. To find out more, visit infometrics.co.nz.

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EASIER, FASTER, BETTER

The revamped Trade Hub has received some new features to make it even easier for Mitre 10 Trade account holders to use. EVERY MINUTE COUNTS when you’re on the job, and time behind the desk means less time onsite. The Mitre 10 Trade Hub lets you take your business on the go and access your Mitre 10 account wherever you are. From your mobile, computer, or tablet you can access your individual pricing, create an estimate for a job, place an order, or check your account. From foundations to fence line, you can price up and order all of your project requirements through the Mitre 10 Trade Hub.

MITRE 10 TRADE HUB FEATURES CUSTOMISED PRICING OPTIONS ■■

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24/7 ACCOUNT ACCESS ■■

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Instant access to your own account pricing on thousands of products. Create and save your own customised list of favourite items. Request pricing on special items. Create estimates for your clients and calculate your profit. Check on your orders, account history, balances, and invoices. Re-print your invoices or download your transactions to CSV. Manage staff access for the Trade Hub and set PINs for in-store purchasing.

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ORDER PRODUCT WHEREVER YOU ARE ■■

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Order from thousands of products available at your store to be delivered or collected. Track your order history from any of your staff members.

INDUSTRY NEWS ■■

Keep up-to-date on latest industry news and our monthly trade offers.

The Mitre 10 Trade Hub is available free to all Mitre 10 account holders. No monthly or annual fees.

Contact a Mitre 10 Trade Account Manager to find out how the Mitre 10 Trade Hub can save you time and money.


TRADE HUB NEWS FROM THE JOB SITE Find out how the new Trade Hub is working for Kiwi builders. View live pricing

Mike Carol Mike C Builders Ltd “I got on to the Trade Hub straight away when it first came out. It’s been a big time saver and I’ve found the latest version even easier to use. My regular order items and custom pricing are all saved under my account, making it straightforward to send off invoices – even when onsite. “I have the option to include my pricing margins for open-book customers and also to include my business logo on any quotes or invoices I send from the Trade Hub to a customer. “As someone who didn’t grow up with computers and who prefers to be on the tools, I’d have to say they’ve made the Trade Hub really easy for just about anyone to use.”

Create an estimate for your client

Anthony Elwin Elwin Contracting “I’ve been using the Trade Hub since November and it’s been a big help in freeing up more time to be onsite and on the tools. Because ordering and quoting can be done fast and easily online, I’ve cut down my admin time and get it all done at night. “The whole Trade Hub site was pretty straightforward and easy to understand, and having access to it wherever I am just adds to the great overall service I get from Doug, Neil, and Monique at Mitre 10 MEGA Westgate.” Order confirmation

Trevor Daniell ChCh HomeBuilders

THE MITRE 10 TRADE HUB WE’VE MADE IT BETTER

“It gives you the ability to check on costing while on the job site, which has been really useful. It’s also good that I can set up orders after hours, giving me more time onsite running my business. “Most features on the Trade Hub are easy to use and you just need to spend a bit of time to get to know the program. Karl Mead, my Mitre 10 Trade Rep, was really good at sorting any questions I had while learning the ropes.”

Faster estimate creation Flexible proposal templates for your clients ■■ Improved product search functions with category filters ■■ Purchase over 30,000 SKUs online* ■■ Improved compatibility with mobile devices. ■■ ■■

*Subject to store availability

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THE VALUE OF SUSTAINABILITY

An assessment of the costs and benefits of sustainability and resilience features aids decision-making in the building industry.

LAST YEAR BRANZ released a report – SR346: The value of sustainability – Costs and benefits of sustainability and resilience features in houses – that sought to give builders, designers and specifiers the information they need to make better-informed decisions around investing in sustainability features. Previous research showed that builders wanted information on whether insulation levels above the minimums required by the New Zealand Building Code were cost-effective for various households. That analysis and more are provided in this report, which also includes data on the costs, benefits and payback periods for sustainability features such as: ■■ Water conservation measures and rainwater tanks ■■ Solar water heating ■■ Heat pump water heating ■■ Photovoltaic generation ■■ Lifetime design and material life-cycle cost.

KEY FINDINGS ■■

The minimum insulation R-values mandated by the NZBC (in schedule method of NZS 4218:2004 Energy efficiency – Small building envelope, as modified by H1/AS1) are near their financial optimum for most households for the assumed heating regime (see next page). In cooler climates such as Wellington and the lower South Island, slightly more ceiling insulation and under-slab insulation is costeffective for the average occupancy. If households are heating to higher than assumed levels in winter then

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■■

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more insulation, including additional roof insulation, becomes cost-effective. Domestic rainwater tanks can supplement supply in reticulated areas, providing a significant share of water demand. In areas with metering, payback time is typically nine to 15 years, which makes them marginally cost-effective at the upper payback years. Solar water-heating and photovoltaic 24

■■

generation are becoming more cost-competitive as the equipment cost declines. However, unless the household circumstances are exceptional (i.e. high hot water or electricity use during the day), the solar appliances will have quite long payback periods, typically 10 years minimum. For heat pump hot-water systems, the payback period is quite long, typically over 16 years.


BRANZ INSIGHTS FIGURE 1

IS IT COST-EFFECTIVE TO HAVE MORE THAN THE MINIMUM REQUIRED INSULATION?

Medium-sized new house with above minimum-required insulation – benefit:cost ratios for various enhancements

The answer depends on a number of factors, including: House type and location, energy and insulation prices, level and duration of indoor heating, period of analysis, and discount rates. Results from BRANZ’s computer modelling of house insulation above minimum required levels are shown in the charts at right. The benefit-to-cost ratios, represented by each orange column, help to identify the payback for individual types of insulation. If the ratio is under 1.0 then the enhancement is not cost-effective. Benefit: The reduced energy cost due to the additional level of insulation when compared to the minimum required levels (discounted over 25 years). Cost: the additional cost of insulating above minimum required levels.

0.6

AUCKLAND 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1

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Assumptions and notes The modelling used a medium-sized home (148m² excluding the unheated double garage) in three areas: Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch. A medium level of heating is assumed, with two hours in the morning and six hours in the evening, heating to 20°C. Energy costs include the heat pump cost spread over kWh consumption. Heat pump appliances are assumed as the base case, since they are the most common form of heating in new housing. The charts show insulation R-values rather than the wall or roof component R-value.

WELLINGTON

1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2

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SUMMARY

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The graphs in Figure 1 indicate the minimum insulation R-values mandated by the NZBC are set at appropriate levels with few enhancements proving cost-effective in any of the three regions. However it should be noted that under a different heating regime (e.g. high heating where the house is heated constantly at 20 degrees) then many more insulation enhancement options can become cost-effective. For full details see the study report.

CHRISTCHURCH

1.2 1 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2

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Reference: Page, I. (2016). The value of sustainability – Costs and benefits of sustainability and resilience features in houses. Study Report 346. For the full report go to branz.nz

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UNDERSTANDING THERMAL MASS

Learn the fundamentals of thermal mass design and usage in construction.

HIGH MASS MATERIALS such as concrete, brick, stone, and compressed earth can absorb considerable heat energy during the day and release it at night. When used in buildings, these materials are called thermal mass. Thermal mass can decrease indoor temperature swings, increase occupant comfort, and reduce heating and cooling bills with minimal ongoing maintenance costs.

THERMAL MASS DESIGN Thermal mass should ideally be: ■■ Dark in colour with a non-reflective (matte) surface. ■■ Near large windows so it is exposed to substantial direct sunlight. ■■ Of a volume that is appropriate for the size of the conditioned spaces it influences. ■■ Of a high density. ■■ Contained within the building’s thermal envelope (fully insulated from the external climate). ■■ Able to be shaded/exposed when needed. The glazing that lets sun onto the thermal mass should be: ■■ Thermally broken aluminium frames with low-emissivity (low-E) insulated glazing units (IGUs) as a minimum in all climates zones. See the New Zealand Window Energy Efficiency Rating System (WEERS) for guidance on window selection. ■■ Timber or uPVC frames with low-E IGUs. Some thought should be given to the future of the solar aspect; take note of whether future landscaping, neighbouring foliage, fences, or buildings could shade M I T R E 10

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the direct sunlight. The two most effective ways of including thermal mass in homes are: ■■ Direct solar gain onto the thermal mass material (typically using a concrete floor). ■■ Indirect solar gain (typically using a Trombe wall). Ideally, at least a third of the mass should receive prolonged direct sunlight on a sunny day in winter. In many houses with good passive design, large northfacing windows extend from the floor to the ceiling to ensure that sunlight can shine on the thermal mass elements for long periods. Flexible shading of the thermal mass elements provides occupants some control to deal with non-seasonal weather such as a cold spell in the middle of summer. 26

Please note, the design solutions provided below assume that the thermal mass is used for heating rather than for cooling, which is typical for New Zealand.

CONCRETE FLOORING Using a concrete slab so that it receives direct solar radiation is the most costeffective way of unlocking thermal mass in typical new home builds. Slabs should be uncovered or finished with (relatively conductive) materials such as stone or ceramic tiles or slate in the northern aspects of the home, but can be covered elsewhere. To maximise the thermal performance of exposed concrete slabs, insulation is required under the slab to minimise heat losses to the ground and around the perimeter (to minimise losses to the


TECHNICAL GUIDE 140mm wide wall plate

external air). These are the main solutions available for insulated slabs: ■■ Insulation applied to the outside face of the foundation (Figure 1 at right). ■■ Fully insulated systems. There are a few proprietary products on the market that insulate both the underside and the perimeter of concrete slabs. Some of them have the ability to eliminate all thermal breaks by having a continuous polystyrene enclosure of the slab, covering all but the top surface. Insulation under areas of larger loading – such as the footings under perimeter and internal load-bearing walls – are made of high-density polystyrene to ensure adequate structural strength and good load transference. (Note that this will require specific engineering design.)

FIGURE 1: insulation applied to outside face of foundation

concrete floor slab DPM under slab insulation

insulation to exterior face of footing

ground

DPM

protective layer over insulation

sand blinding and hardfill

TROMBE WALLS One of the most effective construction elements that can provide substantive thermal benefit is the Trombe wall (Figure 2 below), a heavyweight, north-facing, glazed, uninsulated external wall. Solar energy transmitted through the glazing heats the dark, concrete external face of

the Trombe wall. This heat slowly conducts through the wall, to be reradiated out many hours later into the internal space, reducing the amount of conventional space heating needed. Trombe walls are suited to homes in all New Zealand climate zones. During

FIGURE 2: Schematic cross-section of typical Trombe wall showing key components

insulation

approximately 200mm thick concrete wall

overhang sized for summertime shading

radiated heat into room single or double glazing unit exposed (uncovered) finish reinforced concrete slab

approximately 50mm air gap dark painted or coloured surface

summer, Trombe walls need to be shaded carefully so as not to overheat the interior. Ideally, there should be flexible shading to ensure unseasonable weather can be responded to easily and quickly. Trombe wall planning, design, and specification are provided in the BRANZ Sustainability Fact Sheet – Trombe Wall Design. The fact sheet includes sample construction details, user experiences, a minimum design checklist, and questions for the designer to discuss with the homeowner. An alternative to the Trombe wall is a north-facing thermal wall. To be effective, this type of wall needs to be at least 100mm thick (200mm is preferable to maximise storage and ensure the heat is reradiated to the adjacent space over a longer period), and located close to large north-oriented glazing and part of the space being heated. The optimum area of the wall will depend on its length and the size of the space it services, as well as the other passive-related features of the house. This is where thermal simulation is needed to determine suitable dimensions.

stop flashing

insulation under slab and footing

DPM

protective surface to insulation 30-60mm XPS insulation

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This guide was taken from BRANZ Bulletin (Issue 571) – Thermal Mass (available for purchase at BRANZ.co.nz). The full bulletin includes more detail on thermal mass benefits and options, as well as projected heating cost savings and design strategy. M I T R E 10

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Southern Pine Products (SPP) is New Zealand’s leading distributor and manufacturer of high-quality finished timber products. At the forefront of technological innovation, SPP is proud to introduce ECOTRIM pre-finished mouldings. Produced from finger-jointed New Zealand Radiata Pine ECOTRIM offers a superior finish using dual coats of gesso which are sanded between coats and finished with a final coat of acrylic primer. ECOTRIM a superior range of quality pre-finished mouldings that come ready to install with a quality surface prepared for finishing.

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SMALL PROJECT GUARANTEE what those things might be. Taking out a guarantee makes good sense and gives additional peace of mind for all parties involved.

A 10-YEAR GUARANTEE FOR SMALL RESIDENTIAL PROJECTS In response to additional demand from homeowners, Builtin Insurance now also offers a 10-year guarantee for residential building projects under $30,000. This gives homeowners the same peace of mind for their small works under $30,000, guaranteeing that the workmanship and materials supplied by their builder will be free of defects for 10 years. Additionally, a Small Project Guarantee covers their deposit and guarantees completion of the work if their builder is unable to finish it.

GUARANTEES: BUILDING PEACE OF MIND

Builtin Insurance discusses the importance of independent guarantees for both clients and builders.

IN LIGHT OF continued coverage of building company failures, growing numbers of people are asking their builder to provide an independently insured guarantee of building work. Mandatory disclosure rules already require residential builders to say whether they can offer this, and a number of leading banks require them when lending for construction projects – and this is set to increase.

HOW TO OFFER A GUARANTEE WITHOUT SUGGESTING YOU DON’T HAVE CONFIDENCE IN YOUR WORK Although, at its core, a guarantee is a hedge against non-completion or sub-par workmanship, the motivations for offering a guarantee are often quite the opposite.

WHY SHOULD BUILDERS OFFER AN INDEPENDENT GUARANTEE FOR SMALL PROJECTS? In the current construction climate, homeowners are increasingly looking for an independently backed guarantee from their builder. Being able to offer one means you’ll be more competitive compared to builders who cannot. The guarantee includes liability protection for the builder, protecting them from defects claims by the homeowner (after the first year) and, unlike current building guarantees where the builder is responsible for

IT’S USUALLY THE HIGHEST-QUALITY PRODUCTS THAT HAVE THE LONGEST, STRONGEST WARRANTIES. THE SAME APPLIES TO BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION WORK. If any of your clients have doubts, simply ask them to think about the other items they buy; it’s usually the highest-quality products that have the longest, strongest warranties. The same applies to building and construction work. Providing an independently backed warranty that covers a substantial period of time post-completion means your clients should have even more confidence in your work. Also, despite taking all the right steps, things can go wrong from time to time and neither you nor your client can predict 29

filling out the paperwork and paying the premium, it’s the homeowner who applies and pays for this guarantee (online). To find out more about the Small Project Guarantee, visit builtin.co.nz/small-project-guarantee Builtin Insurance is a specialist in insurance and guarantees for builders and trade professionals. For more information and quotes visit builtin.co.nz or contact Ben Rickard at ben@builtin.co.nz or phone 0800 BUILTIN. M I T R E 10

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KEEPING IT RIGHT ONSITE

KEEPING YOUR TEAM SAFE: LADDERS AS AN OWNER or construction manager, you must take action to protect your workers from harm that could come from a fall while working at heights, as far as is reasonably practicable. While ladders shouldn’t be the first option on the job site (work platforms, scaffolding, and towers are all better options), if you or your workers need to use a ladder – for lower-risk and short-duration tasks – here are some useful tips from the team at Site Safe.

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Do as much prep work on the ground as possible. Use an industrial-quality ladder on stable ground. Make sure the ladder legs are fully open and secure the top and bottom

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to prevent it slipping sideways or falling backwards. Use the 4 to 1 rule: If the ladder is 4m high it should be 1m from the wall. Ensure the stays and clips are secured on stepladders, place the steps towards your work, and avoid side-on loading (like drilling side-on through bricks).

WHILE ON THE LADDER ■■ ■■

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Keep three points of contact. Make sure your belly button remains between the rails of the ladder. Face the ladder when moving up or down. Keep both your feet at the same level. Stop at the third step from the top of a straight ladder or ensure you have at least 1m extending past the point at which you are stepping off from.

AVOID ■■ ■■ ■■

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Overloading or overreaching. Working near openings or voids. Placing the ladder against a fragile surface such as guttering. Having more than one person on the ladder at one time.

Site Safe is a not-for-profit, membershipbased organisation that promotes, inspires, and supports a culture of health and safety in NZ construction. For more tips on how to use ladders, check out Site Safe’s practical advice at sitesafe.org.nz, or consider booking Site Safe’s new Passport renewal course, Passport Plus – Height, which is available for online booking.

BEING A MENTOR AS WELL AS A BOSS

well from day one. Get it into their heads that they are training to be professionals who are expected to contribute right away to the value of the business.

MILLENNIALS WILL MAKE up most of the industry by 2025, so it’s vital that every owner-operator has the tools to get the best out of the next generation of tradies.

Having a “go to” person whose role is to help trainees and younger employees with their learning and keep them on track creates a good environment where young workers are accountable, feel valued, and understand what they are achieving.

BE A MENTOR Being a good mentor means giving your employees a chance to excel while pushing them to be their best. Discuss with each apprentice how they prefer to learn and how they want to develop their career. This way you’ll both clearly understand how instructions will be given and received.

RUN GROUP WORKSHOPS Group sessions are a great way to get discussions going about different aspects of learning and employee development. To encourage attendance, schedule the workshops after hours and shout a feed. And look at running joint workshops with M I T R E 10

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HAVE A “GO TO” PERSON

BENEFITS OF STAFF MENTORING

other businesses to give your workers the chance to network while also benefiting from a wider range of experiences.

PROMOTE PROFESSIONALISM Steer away from using apprentices and young employees as ‘just labourers’ and instead train every member of your team 30

Mentoring your staff leads you to develop a loyal and highly skilled team that will help your business grow. The process of mentoring also encourages you to regularly evaluate your business practice and keep on top of the latest industry developments.


INDUSTRY UPDATES

THE CONSTRUCTION AMENDMENT ACT 2015:

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW THE CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS Amendment Act 2015 requires from 31 March 2017 that retention money withheld under commercial construction contracts must now be held on trust. Note: This will not apply to contracts signed before 31 March. The trust requirement is designed to provide greater certainty of payment for contractors and sub-contractors owed retention money for work done, and aims to ensure that money held in retentions is responsibly managed.

MBIE SAYS THAT THE NEW LEGISLATION PROVIDES: ■■

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A fair, balanced and appropriate payment regime. Fast and cost-effective dispute resolution. Cost-effective and timely enforcement of rights and obligations. Better certainty of payment of retention

money withheld under commercial construction contracts.

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HOW WILL IT WORK? Where payers withhold retention money under a commercial construction contract, the retention money must be held on trust. The payer (e.g. building company) becomes a trustee and the payee (e.g. contractor) becomes the beneficiary. The obligations of the payer holding retention money on trust end when: ■■ The retention money is paid. ■■ The payee to whom the money is payable agrees to give up their claim. ■■ The money ceases to be payable under the contract.

WHAT CAN’T YOU DO? ■■

Payment of retention money cannot be conditional on anything other than the performance of the payee’s obligations 31

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under the contract. Retention money cannot be used for any purpose other than to remedy a payee’s breach of their obligations under the contract, such as fixing defective work. You cannot include in a contract any terms designed to delay payment of retention money. Any such terms in a contract will be void. Similarly, you cannot include any conditional payment provisions for retention money in a construction contract (known as pay-when-paid provisions). Conditional payment provisions have been banned since the Act came into force in 2003. The amendments make it clear that this ban also applies to provisions for payment of retention money.

For more information go to mbie.govt.nz M I T R E 10

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NEW TO THE DRYMIX CONCRETE RANGE HI-STRENGTH QUICK TO SET CONCRETE

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TRADES COACH

“DO SWEAT THE SMALL STUFF” Your business is judged on more than build quality.

CRITICAL NON-ESSENTIALS AS THE OLD adage goes, “Perception is reality.” In the absence of facts or prior knowledge, what a person perceives about your business becomes reality in their mind – even if it’s wrong.

YOUR CLIENTS’ POINT OF VIEW ■■

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Factors that can influence your clients’ perceptions of build quality and overall service include: ■■ How your team members look ■■ How they act ■■ The tidiness of the job site ■■ How often you talk to a client.

In a highly technical industry like construction, it’s too easy to become focussed on your core business function and become detached from thinking about your clients’ mindset and perceptions. But it is your clients’ mindset and perceptions that are vital in achieving high levels of satisfaction and securing referrals. Most clients have a limited understanding of the technical aspects of what your business actually does, but what they do understand is how your business and, more specifically, your staff, present themselves. They will often judge presentation in ways totally unrelated to the core function of your business.

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These non-technical factors are aspects of a business that have little or no bearing on the core service delivery process, but are just as important because clients understand them. Neglect the critical non-essentials and you risk your business suffering, even if you are the best at what you do. It’s a good idea to take a moment and review how your business looks from the outside, as it could need an update in areas such as: ■■ Company culture ■■ Staff presentation ■■ Your team’s client interaction skills. Think about what the critical non-essentials are for your business – consider the entire process from first enquiry through quoting, the actual build, and follow-up service. And don’t be afraid to seek advice if you need it.

This article was brought to you by Andy Burrows, The Trades Coach. Get in touch at andy@tradescoach.co.nz or visit www.tradescoachacademy.co.nz

IT IS YOUR CLIENTS’ MINDSET AND PERCEPTIONS THAT ARE VITAL IN ACHIEVING HIGH LEVELS OF SATISFACTION AND SECURING REFERRALS.

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UNDER THE HOOD

MITRE 10 TRADE RACING

We take you into the pits of the NZ V8 Ute Racing Series for a close-up look at the Mitre 10 Trade Racing ute. WE ASKED KERRY Holland, Mitre 10 Trade Racing’s Chief Engineer, to shed some light on what’s under the hood (and body kit) of James “Huggi” Urquhart’s V8 Holden ute. “In terms of body kit, our ute is stockAFTER-MARKET EXHAUST “We don’t use a standard Holden performance part as they’re pricey to replace when damaged – which happens a lot when racing.”

SUSPENSION “The ute is lowered to handle better on the track.”

standard and not much different from a tradie’s Holden ute, except that it’s not road legal. Body kit alterations can be costly to repair when damaged, and the point of this class of racing is to keep costs as low as possible.”

TRAY “Utes race more like a sedan than a race car because they’re heavy at the back. The tray’s useful for storage when transporting gear but you just have to remember to unpack before you race!”

TYRES “We run semi-slick Yokohama tyres – a roadracing tyre with some tread that allows us to race one tyre in all conditions.”

LEXAN “The driver’s window is a polycarbonate material called lexan that won’t shower the driver in glass if smashed.”

ENGINE ”The engine is a Holden L98 6L V8 with 350hp and a top speed of 225km/h in NZ and 238km/h on the Bathurst track. We have engine mods to allow it to run more oil and added double-row timing gear.”

HOT LAPS WITH HUGGI How did you get into V8 racing? “The moment I heard that the Australian V8 ute-racing series was coming to New Zealand, I jumped on it. That was in 2008 and Mitre 10 came on board in 2012.” What was your previous racing experience? “I used to do a lot of water racing with ski boats, yachts and thundercats, even taking out a couple of North Island titles.” Why did you switch to road racing? “I enjoyed the laps I did around Pukekohe in my road car, so then when ute racing came to New Zealand, I bought one of the original 16 utes and really got into it. We don’t race that original ute anymore, as we wrote it off a few years ago and had to upgrade – that’s what happens when you hit a wall at 170km/h in the wet!” So road racing is more difficult than racing on water? “Both types of racing have their challenges, but road racing is far more difficult. There’s a lot more to concentrate on and you get a lot closer to your competitors.”

To keep up to date with races and other events throughout the year, follow www.facebook.com/Mitre10TradeRacing M I T R E 10

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Appraisal No. 611 [ 2011 ]

Appraisal No. 611 [ 2011 ]

Appraisal No. 611 [ 2011 ]

Using HomeRAB Pre-Cladding has a big advantage over building paper. You can close in your site before the cladding goes on, letting you start work on the inside sooner. That means you’ll get the job done quicker, saving you time and money. While HomeRAB Pre-Cladding stops the weather getting in, its Rigid Air Barrier also allows moisture vapour to escape. Plus the 4.5mm board provides structural bracing and can be used in, up to and including, very high wind zones. So choose HomeRAB Pre-Cladding from James Hardie and you won’t be left flapping in the breeze. Visit www.jameshardie.co.nz to download the installation manual.

PRE-CLADDING JAH0001ITMFP


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Mitre 10 Trade Quarterly - Autumn 17  

Mitre 10 Trade Quarterly - Autumn 17  

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