Issuu on Google+

WILLIAM MITCHELL COLLEGE OF LAW Student Handbook 2010-2011


WILLIAM MITCHELL COLLEGE OF LAW Student Handbook 2010-2011

INTRODUCTION The Student Handbook is designed to help students understand the College’s policies and procedures. Suggestions for improving or updating the Handbook should be directed to the Office of the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life (Room 119; 651-290-8642). Policies and Procedures noted in the Student Handbook may be changed at any time during the academic year. Students will be notified of policy changes through The Docket. Students should routinely check The Docket to keep pace with important college information. Students are required to abide by all policies printed in the Student Handbook or announced in The Docket. Each student is provided a William Mitchell e-mail account. The account is the primary tool that William Mitchell uses to communicate with students. Students are responsible for the information sent to that account. Students who encounter any malfunction with that account should contact the Information Technology department for assistance at IT@wmitchell.edu. Complaints and grievances about any aspect of the college may be directed to the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life. The Dean will attempt to address any complaint or grievance, or will direct the student to the appropriate college official. All requests for accommodations due to disability or English as a second language should be directed to the Office of the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life.


TABLE OF CONTENTS A. ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 1. ACADEMIC CALENDAR: 2010-2011 2. REGISTRATION, WITHDRAWAL, AND RECORDS 2.1 Registration for First-Year Students 2.2 Registration for Upper-Class Students 2.3 Registration Credit Restrictions 2.4 Restriction on Number of Work Hours for Full-Time Students 2.5 Registration Requirement – Prerequisites and Co-Requisites 2.6 Course Cancellations 2.7 Auditing a Course 2.8 Adding a Course 2.9 Withdrawal and Drop from a Course 2.10 Withdrawal from the College 2.11 Leave of Absence 2.12 Change of Name or Address 2.13 Student Records 2.14 Updates and Amendments to Student Records 3. ACADEMIC STANDING 3.1 Good Academic Standing 3.2 Probation 3.3 Academic Dismissal 3.4 Rules for Appeal of Academic Dismissal 4. ACADEMIC RULES AND PROCEDURES 4.1 Attendance 4.2 Classroom Study Requirement 4.3 Perspectives on the Legal Profession (PLP) Requirement 4.4 First Class Assignments 4.5 Class Cancellations by Instructor 4.6 Class Make-Up Policy 4.7 Extending Course Work Completion Deadlines 4.8 Course Evaluations 4.9 Minimum and Maximum Time Frame for Course Work 4.10 Credits Earned at Other Law Schools 4.11 Other Courses of Study Not Permissible 5. EXAMS 5.1 Types of Exams and Use of Computers on Exams


5.2 Exam Numbers 5.3 Exam Conflict and Reschedule Policy 5.4 Deferring Completion of Exams 5.5 Extending Course Work Completion Deadlines 5.6 Exams Retained for One Year 6. GRADES, CLASS RANK, HONORS, AND AWARDS 6.1 Letter Grading System 6.2 Pass/Fail Grades 6.3 Notice of Grading Criteria 6.4 Grading Policy 6.5 Grade Changes 6.6 Grade Posting 6.7 Class Rank 6.8 Transcripts 6.9 Failed Courses 6.10 Honors and Awards 6.11 Required Average Grade 7. ADDITIONAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 7.1 Academic Support Programs 7.2 Semester or Year Long Independent Study Abroad Program 8. CURRICULUM AND GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 8.1 Required Courses (and Credits) 8.2 Perspectives on the Legal Profession Requirement 8.3 Skills Course Requirement 8.4 Statutory Course Requirement 8.5 Advanced Writing & Research 8.6 Academic Requirements for Graduation 8.7 Administrative Requirements for Graduation 8.8 Diplomas 9. ROSALIE WAHL LEGAL PRACTICE CENTER 9.1 Writing & Representation Courses 9.2 Legal Practicum 9.3 Clinics and Externships 9.4 Student Certification by the Minnesota Supreme Court 9.5 Other Elective Skills Courses 9.6 Legal Assistance to Minnesota Prisoners (LAMP) 9.7 Minnesota Justice Foundation (MJF)


10. BAR EXAM INFORMATION 10.1 Minnesota State Bar Examination Subjects and Comparable William Mitchell Subjects 10.2 Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam 10.3 Bar Exam Certification B. STUDENT AFFAIRS 11. STUDENT CONDUCT CODE 11.1 General Expectations and Community Standards 11.2 General Provisions 11.3 Student Organizations and Group Responsibility 11.4 Prohibited Conduct 11.5 Sanctions 11.6 Rules of Procedure 11.7 Initiation of Disciplinary Proceeding 12. PLAGIARISM 12.1 General Information 12.2 Frequently Asked Questions about Plagiarism 13. NON-DISCRIMINATION AND NON-HARASSMENT POLICY 13.1 Policy Statement 13.2 Definitions 13.3 Reporting Procedure 13.4 Investigation of Complaint 13.5 Disciplinary or Corrective Action 13.6 Questions 14. POLICY AGAINST SEXUAL HARASSMENT 14.1 Policy Statement 14.2 Definitions 14.3 Reporting Procedure 14.4 Investigation of Complaint 14.5 Disciplinary or Corrective Action 14.6 Questions 15. PROBLEMATIC CONSENSUAL ROMANTIC RELATIONSHIP POLICY 15.1 Introduction and Scope 15.2 Definitions 15.3 Policy Statement 15.4 Disciplinary or Corrective Action


15.5 Voluntary Disclosure

C. STUDENT FINANCE 16. TUITION AND FEES 16.1 Tuition Costs 16.2 Fees 16.3 Donations and Memberships 16.4 Time of Payment and Finance Charges 16.5 Full Payment Plan 16.6 Installment Payment Plan 16.7 Employer/Outside Agency Tuition Reimbursement 16.8 Student Refund Checks 16.9 Finance Department 16.10 Withdrawal from a Course – Add/Drop Effecting Tuition 16.11 Withdrawal from the College – Tuition Refunds 16.12 Return of Title IV Funds 16.13 Policy on Tuition for Students Returning from Active Duty in the Military 17. FINANCIAL AID 17.1 Financial Aid Office 17.2 Cost-of-Attendance 17.3 Federal Work Study (FWS) Program 17.4 Scholarships and Awards 17.5 Student Loans 17.6 Enrollment Verification 17.7 Deferment of Existing Student Loan Payments 17.8 Academic Eligibility for Financial Aid D. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY USE and EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 18. INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY 18.1 Policy Statement 18.2 Security 18.3 Usage 18.4 Acceptable Uses/Limitations 18.5 Prohibited Conduct 18.6 Violations 18.7 Questions 19. FACILITIES, POLICIES, AND PROCEDURES 19.1 Accidents and Injuries on Campus


19.2 Alcohol 19.3 Tobacco-Free Environment 19.4 Emergency Procedures for Fires 19.5 Emergency Procedures for Storms 19.6 Escort Service and Security 19.7 Identification Cards 19.8 Lockers 19.9 Lost & Found 19.10 Parking Policy 19.11 Poster and Distribution Policy 19.12 Room Reservations 19.13 Weapons Policy 19.14 Student Solicitation Policy 19.15 Food at Student Organization Sponsored Events E. COLLEGE OFFICES AND SERVICES 20. COLLEGE OFFICES & SERVICES 20.1 Administration 20.2 Bookstore 20.3 Career Development 20.4 Childcare Center 20.5 Copying, Faxing, Mail 20.6 Counseling Services 20.7 Services for Students with Disabilities 20.8 The Docket: News for Students 20.9 Institutional Advancement 20.10Media Services 20.11 Office of Multicultural Affairs 20.12 Student Services 20.13 Switchboard 20.14 Warren E. Burger Library F. GENERAL INFORMATION ITEMS 21. STATEMENT OF NON-DISCRIMINATION 22. DRUG and ALCOHOL FREE CAMPUS POLICY 22.1 Introduction 22.2 Resources 22.3 Policy Statement 22.4 Possible Health Risks of Drug Use/Abuse 22.5 Penalties 22.6 For Your Information 22.7 Attribution


A. ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 1. ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2010-2011 Monday, May 24, 2010 Saturday, May 29, 2010 Monday, May 31, 2010 Sunday, July 04, 2010 Monday, July 5, 2010 Monday, July 12, 2010

Summer 2010 Seven-Week Summer Session classes begin Memorial Day Weekend (College closed) Independence Day (College closed) Independence Day Holiday (College closed) Make-up Day for Memorial Day (Monday classes)

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Make-up Day for Independence Day Holiday (Monday classes)

Tuesday, July 13, 2010 Wednesday, July 14, 2010 - Thursday, July 15, 2010

Last day of Seven-Week Summer Session classes

Friday, July 16, 2010 Wednesday, July 21, 2010

Reading Days Summer Exams Fall 2010

Monday, August 16, 2010 Wednesday, August 18, 2010

Orientation for first-year students

Thursday, August 19, 2010

Fall Semester classes begin

Wednesday, August 25, 2010 Thursday, September 02, 2010 Monday, September 06, 2010 Thursday, October 21, 2010 - Friday, October 22, 2010 Wednesday, November 17, 2010

Add Deadline: Last day to Add a class via web registration Drop Deadline-last day to drop a course without a notation of “W” (withdraw) on transcript. See section 2.8 and 2.9 Add Deadline: Last day to add a class-requires faculty approval. See section 2.8 Labor Day (College closed) Fall Break - no classes Thursday or Friday (College open) Withdraw Deadline: Last Day to Withdraw from a class -see section 2.9.2

Thursday, November 25, 2010 - Saturday, November 27, 2010

Thanksgiving Break (no classes)

Monday, November 29, 2010

Make-up Day for Labor Day (Monday classes)


Tuesday, November 30, 2010

Make-up Day for Thanksgiving (Thursday classes)

Wednesday, December 01, 2010

Make-up Day for day after Thanksgiving (Friday classes)

Wednesday, December 01, 2010

Last day of Fall Semester classes

Thursday, December 02, 2010 - Friday, December 03, 2010

Reading/Class Makeup Days

Monday, December 06, 2010 - Wednesday, December 22, 2010

Fall Semester Exams

Friday, December 24, 2010 - Sunday, January 02, 2011

Winter Break (College closed) Spring 2011

Monday, January 03, 2011 - Saturday, January 08, 2011 Monday, January 10, 2011 Saturday, January 15, 2011 Saturday, January 15, 2011

J-Term Spring Semester classes begin Winter Commencement Add Deadline: Last day to Add a class via web registration Drop Deadline-last day to drop a course without a notation of “W” (withdraw) on transcript. See section 2.8 and 2.9

Monday, January 17, 2011

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (College closed)

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

Add Deadline: Last day to Add a class-requires faculty approval; see section 2.8

Monday, February 28, 2011 - Saturday, March 05, 2011

Spring Break – No classes

Monday, April 11, 2011

Withdraw Deadline: Last Day to Withdraw from a class -see section 2.9.2

Monday, April 25, 2011

Make-up Day for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (Monday classes) Last day of Spring Semester classes

Tuesday, April 26, 2011 Thursday, April 28, 2011 Friday, April 29, 2011 Friday, May 13, 2011 Sunday, May 15, 2011 Monday, May 23, 2011

Reading/Class Makeup Days Spring Semester Exams Spring Commencement Summer 2011 Seven-Week Summer Session classes begin


Friday, May 27, 2011 Saturday, May 28, 2011 Monday, May 30, 2011 Monday, July 4, 2011

Add Deadline: last day to add a class via web registration Drop Deadline- last day to drop a course without a notation of “W” (withdraw) on transcript. See section 2.8 and 2.9 Memorial Day Weekend (College closed) Independence Day Holiday (College closed)

Tuesday, July 5, 2011

Withdraw Deadline: Last day to withdraw from a class- see section 2.9.2

Monday, July 11, 2011

Make-up Day for Memorial Day (Monday classes) Make-up Day for Independence Day Holiday (Monday classes) Last day of Seven-Week Summer Session classes

Tuesday, July 12, 2011 Wednesday, July 13, 2011 - Friday, July 15, 2011

Reading/Class Makeup Days

Saturday, July 16, 2011 Thursday, July 21, 2011

Summer Exams


2. REGISTRATION, WITHDRAWAL & RECORDS 2.1 Registration for First-Year Students The college assigns first-year students to sections and registers them for their courses. 2.2 Registration for Upper-Class Students Upper-class students obtain registration materials on the web. Registration for fall and summer semesters is in April. Registration for spring semester and J-term is in November. Upper-class students may register through the first full week of classes through their Student Records Login. 2.3 Registration Credit Restrictions Fall and Spring Semesters: o Maximum: 15 credits. o Minimum: 8 credits except in final semester. The Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life may grant students a one-time exception to the 8-credit minimum for extraordinary circumstances. Summer: students may register for no more than 7-credits during the summer unless the Dean of Student Affairs & Student Life approves 8. Students matriculating prior to June 2007: Fall and Spring: students may take 16-credits but only during his or her final semester. Summer: Same as above. 2.4 Restriction on Number of Work Hours for Full-time Students A student enrolled in 12 or more credits in the fall or spring semester or 6 or more credits in the summer may not work more than 20 hours per week. Students are required to sign a statement verifying that they will not work more than 20 hours per week when they are enrolled at these levels. 2.5 Registration Requirement - Prerequisites and Co-Requisites Registration for some courses requires a student to complete one or more prerequisites or to take a course concurrently. A student must abide by these requirements unless the instructor waives the requirement. Before registering for any course, the student must obtain a waiver from the instructor and inform the Registrar, who will then assist in the registration process. Any student who elects to take a course without the required prerequisite and/or co-requisite course(s) does so at their own risk. Lack of prerequisite and/or co-requisite course(s) will not be considered as a factor in administering any William Mitchell College of Law policies. 2.6 Course Cancellations The college reserves the right to cancel a course on or before the first day of classes due to insufficient enrollment or other compelling circumstances. Students enrolled in the canceled course are notified of the cancellation by e-mail.


2.7 Auditing a Course A student who audits a course receives no credit or grade for the course. Students may not audit skills courses or clinics. Course requirements for auditors are set by the instructor. All financial and academic regulations that apply to a credit course also apply to an audited course. A student who audits pays the same tuition as one taking the course for credit except in the following instances: (1) if the audit credits plus the graded credits put the student in the full-time tuition bracket (12 credits or more), the student is charged $500 per-credit for those audit credits that exceed 11 credits; and (2) if the audit credits plus the graded credits put the student in the part-time bracket (8-11 credits), the student is charged $500 per credit for those audit credits that exceed 7 credits. Alumni may audit a course at no charge in 2010-2011. Those not affiliated with the college who hold a J.D. from another institution may audit a course with approval of the instructor and the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life, the cost is $500 per credit. See Tuition and Fees. 2.8 Adding a Course A student may add a course via the web during web registration. After web registration closes, a student may add an open course but must do so by the deadline published in the Academic Calendar (see Chapter 1). To add a course after web registration closes, a student must complete an add/drop form and obtain written approval (initialed form or e-mail approval) from the instructor. Instructors do not have the authority to admit students into a closed class. Instructors have the right to impose a more stringent limitation for adding a course than this section provides. If adding the course puts the student in a higher tuition bracket, the student pays the tuition for that bracket. Students may not register in any courses where the class meeting times overlap, regardless of the total time involved. 2.9 Withdrawal and Drop from a Course 2.9.1 Withdrawal from a Course for First-Year Students Any first-year student wishing to withdraw from a required course must speak with the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life. First-year students seeking to switch sections in a year-long course must obtain written approval (e-mail or an initialed add/withdrawal form) from both section instructors and the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life. Section switches are usually permitted only for changes in employment. In year-long courses, the final course grade is computed using the second semester instructor’s formula. 2.9.2 Upper-Class Drop and Withdrawal Deadline An upper-class student may drop a course via the web through the deadline published in the Academic Calendar (see Chapter 1) unless an instructor imposes a more stringent requirement. No record of the course appears on the student’s transcript. A student who wishes to withdraw from a course after the drop deadline must obtain the written approval (e-mail or an initialed add/drop form) from the faculty member. With approval, a student may withdraw from a course through the withdraw deadline published in the Academic Calendar (see Chapter 1). If a student withdraws after the drop deadline but before the withdraw deadline a record of the withdrawal (W – withdrawal in good standing) appears on the student’s transcript. If a student withdraws after the withdraw deadline a record of the withdrawal (WA – Administrative Withdrawal – withdrawal not in good standing) appears on the student’s transcript. For effect on tuition, please see Tuition and Fees.


2.10 Withdrawal from the College To withdraw from the college, a student must receive approval from the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life. It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that his/her withdrawal request has been approved. The last date for which tuition is charged is the date when the student initially contacts the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life. Students who withdraw from the college must petition the Admissions Committee for readmission if they wish to return. If, at the time of withdrawal, a student’s tuition payments exceed the amount of tuition liability, the Finance Department uses the overpaid amount to reduce any student aid awarded before returning any funds to the student. For refund schedule, please see Tuition and Fees. 2.11 Leave of Absence The Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life may grant a student a leave of absence due to personal circumstances for up to one year. A student must petition the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life in writing for a leave of absence. The time that a student is on leave will be calculated as part of the six years allowed to earn a J.D. Students on leave from the College are not considered enrolled for financial aid purposes, and their student loans may enter repayment during a leave of absence. Students concerned about the effect of a leave of absence on their student loans should contact the Financial Aid Office. 2.12 Change of Name or Address Students should notify both the Registrar’s Office and the Financial Aid Office of changes of name, address, or home or work telephone numbers. A copy of original documentation is necessary for name changes. Students may submit all other changes by logging into their student account and submitting the form located in “Demographics”. 2.13 Student Records Students attending William Mitchell have the right to review their educational records, which consist of official records and files maintained by college offices. Students’ rights with respect to these records are governed by the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Staff members in the Registrar’s Offices necessarily view confidential information pursuant to their work responsibilities. Student staff members sign a Confidentiality Agreement when they are hired, agreeing that they will not release, reveal, or discuss the information. Violation of the agreement subjects a student to dismissal from the position and discipline under the William Mitchell Student Conduct Code. 2.13.1 Student Record Policy: FERPA: Right to Review Records Students attending William Mitchell have the right to review their educational records, which consist of official records and files maintained by college offices. Personal files maintained by instructor or staff are excluded from coverage under this policy. Files maintained by the Security Department are confidential except for incident reports, which may be viewed by the student involved in the incident and noted in crime statistics that must be published annually. Personal files are records that are kept in the sole possession of the maker, are used only as a personal memory aid, and are not accessible or revealed to any other person except a temporary substitute for the maker of the record. Procedure for Requesting Review of Student Records:


1. A student’s request to review their records should be made to the administrator in charge of the office in which the records are on file, or to their designee. The college office may require the request to be in writing. 2. The request is granted within a reasonable time, not to exceed 45 days after the request is made. 3. The student inspects and reviews the records in the presence of the administrator in charge, or their designee. a. During the process of inspection and review, records can neither be changed nor deleted. b. The student shall be advised of their right to challenge any portion(s) of the school record and of the procedures to challenge the record. c. Upon written request, the student shall be provided with a copy of any portion(s) of their school record, with the exception of copies of transcripts and other official documents provided by other educational institutions to the college. 2.13.2 Hearing to Challenge Contents of Records In accordance with federal law, students shall have an opportunity for a hearing to challenge the contents of their school records to ensure that the records are not inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the privacy or other rights of students, and to provide an opportunity for the correction or deletion of any inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise inappropriate data contained therein. Procedure for Challenging Content of Student Records: 1. A student may request, in writing, an opportunity for a hearing to challenge the contents of their school record. a. A request should be made to the Dean or the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life. b. A request must: i. Identify in specific terms the portion(s) of the record challenged; ii. State the reason(s) for challenging the portion(s) of the record so identified; iii. State the remedy sought (i.e., the addition, alteration, or deletion of specific information under challenge). c. The written challenge shall be maintained as part of the record or file in question until the hearing has been concluded. 2. Hearing Procedures a. The hearing is conducted by the Dean or his or her designee. b. The hearing is granted within 15 working days after the request is received. c. Prior to the hearing, the hearing officer shall notify the student and the college official representing the record of the time, place, and date of the hearing and of the specific portion(s) of the student’s school record to be challenged in the hearing. d. The college official responsible for the student record under challenge, or their designee, shall represent that record in the hearing. e. The hearing shall be limited to a consideration of the specific portion(s) of the student’s school record being challenged. f. The student has the right to be assisted by an advisor of their choice. g. The burden of sustaining the challenge rests with the student. h. The student and the college official have the right to present evidence and witnesses directly related to the portion(s) of the student’s record being challenged. i. The hearing officer shall keep a taped record of the hearing.


j.

The hearing officer must provide the student with a written notification of the disposition of the challenge including the reason(s) for the disposition.

3. Findings a. The record may stand. b. The record may be corrected. c. The record may be deleted. 2.13.3 Policy Regarding Access to Student Records Students attending William Mitchell have the right to know who has access to their records and the reason for that access. Accordingly, college offices with students’ education records must maintain a record listing the names of all parties, other than college officials with a legitimate educational interest, who requested or obtained access to and/or copies of student records. This record must be shown to students requesting such information. 2.13.4 Policy Regarding Release of Information Federal law prohibits, in most circumstances, disclosure of personally identifiable information from the student record except by written consent of the student. Federal law permits the disclosure of directory information about students without prior consent. “Directory information� includes name, address, email address, telephone number, participation in recognized activities, dates of attendance, degree and awards received, most recent previously attended school, year in law school, and part-time or full-time status. Under ordinary circumstances, lists of students are not provided to individuals and/or organizations. The college and Student Bar Association reserve the right to publish a student directory listing the names and addresses of students. 2.14 Updates and Amendments to Student Records Matriculating students have a continuing duty to disclose information regarding any charges they have received for violations of the law until graduation from William Mitchell, with the following exception: speeding tickets do not need to be disclosed by matriculating students unless more than three occur during your enrollment at WMCL. If more than three occur during your enrollment at WMCL, then all speeding tickets that occur (or occurred) during your enrollment at WMCL and not previously disclosed, must be disclosed. In all cases (even if just one offense), speeding tickets involving alcohol or drugs must be disclosed. In the case of both Updates and Amendment the burden is on the student to ensure that the update or amendment has been received and disposed of by the College. 2.14.1 Updates The William Mitchell College of Law Application for Admission states: The information requested in [the] questions [relating to criminal and educational conduct] is required to be disclosed to bar examiners when seeking admission to the bar. Matriculating students have a continuing duty to disclose this information until graduation from William Mitchell. Students who need to disclose incidents covered by the above must complete the following on-line form and include the details of the update (including relevant dates, disposition, etc.).


http://www.wmitchell.edu/services/registrar/studentupdate.html 2.14.2 Amendments An amendment is a disclosure that should have been made when initially applying for admission. A student who determines that an amendment to his or her application must be made must complete the following on-line form. Amendments must include the details of the incident(s) that were not initially disclosed, relevant dates, disposition, and the reason(s) for not disclosing the information at the time of application. http://www.wmitchell.edu/services/registrar/studentamendment.html


3. ACADEMIC STANDING This section of the Student Handbook complies with the standard that requires all ABA accredited law schools to have and adhere to clearly defined standards for good standing and graduation. 3.1 Good Academic Standing To be in good academic standing, a student must have a cumulative grade point average (G.P.A.) of 2.0 or better. Cumulative G.P.A. is determined at the end of a student’s first full academic year (two semesters and completion of 17 or more credits at William Mitchell College of Law), and at the end of each Fall and Spring semester thereafter. A student must be in good standing to continue (unless the student is eligible for probation) and must be in good standing to graduate. Students receiving financial aid should see Academic Eligibility for Financial Aid for additional requirements for continuing financial aid eligibility. 3.2 Probation A student whose cumulative G.P.A. is less than 2.0 will be placed on probation unless the student is dismissed under the rules listed in section 3.3 below. All students on academic probation should consult the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life about the advisability of a reduced credit load. Students must achieve a cumulative G.P.A. of 2.0 within two semesters following placement on probation or they are dismissed under the rules set forth at section 3.3. Students who are on probation at the end of their first year must take Legal Reasoning Workshop II: Powers Intensive during the following Fall semester. 3.3 Academic Dismissal 1. A J.D. student is dismissed with no right of appeal to the Academic Affairs Committee if the student has a cumulative G.P.A. below 1.66. 2. A J.D. student is dismissed with the right of an appeal to the Academic Affairs Committee when the student: a. has a cumulative G.P.A. below 1.8, but equal to or greater than 1.66; OR b. fails to bring cumulative G.P.A. to at least 2.0 within two semesters after being placed on probation; OR c. receives failing grades in five or more courses; OR d. has been on probation, achieves good standing, and then earns a cumulative G.P.A. below 2.0; OR e. has earned 86 credits and has a cumulative G.P.A. below 2.0; OR f. has failed to complete all J.D. requirements within 6 years of the first day of enrollment. 3. A previously dismissed student may seek re-admission when two or more years have elapsed since the dismissal and the nature of the interim work, studies, activities, or other experiences indicates a stronger potential for the study of law. 3.4 Rules for Appeal of Academic Dismissal 3.4.1 Generally 1. These rules govern the procedures used when a student appeals to the Academic Affairs Committee from the Dean’s (“Dean” means the Dean of the college or the Dean’s designee, in most cases, the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life) application of the academic rules of the college resulting in that student’s dismissal from the college.


2. Any notice, document, material, or decision which must be given to the student under these rules may be given to the student personally or sent by first-class mail to the student’s address as then on file with the college. 3.4.2 Authority of Academic Affairs Committee 1. The committee shall hear all appeals from the Dean’s application of the academic rules of the college referenced at 2 (a-f) under the heading Dismissal. 2. The committee may affirm, reverse, or modify the Dean’s application of the academic rules resulting in a student’s dismissal from the college. 3. The committee shall not take any action contrary to the Standards and Rules for Law Schools of the American Bar Association or the standards of the Association of American Law Schools. 4. There shall be no appeal from a decision of the committee, but a student may seek reconsideration under the conditions stated in section 3.4.6. 5. The Academic Affairs Committee has no jurisdiction to change a student’s grade. 3.4.3 Notice of Dismissal 1. The Dean shall give written notice of dismissal to the student and provide a copy of the notice to the Chairperson of the committee. 2. With the notice, the Dean shall provide the student with a copy of these rules. 3.4.4 Appeal 1. To Whom: A student who has been dismissed from the college as a result of the Dean’s application of the academic rules of the college, and has a cumulative grade point average of 1.66 or higher, may appeal to the Academic Affairs Committee. 2. Composition of Committee: For the purposes of an appeal, the committee shall consist of five faculty members of the Academic Affairs Committee and two student members of the Academic Affairs Committee. No Dean may sit as a member of the Academic Affairs Committee for an appeal, but the Dean of Students may be present during all committee meetings and deliberations on a student’s appeal. 3. Quorum; Votes Needed to Take Action: Where these rules provide for action by the committee, unless otherwise noted, an affirmative vote of two-thirds (rounded to the next highest whole number) of the members of the committee present and voting is required to take the action. Five persons including one student shall be a quorum. The Chairperson may vote. 4. Self-Recusal: Any member of the Academic Affairs Committee who chooses not to participate may be excused from sitting on a particular appeal. When necessary, the Chairperson shall appoint a replacement for a faculty member and the President of the Student Bar Association shall appoint a replacement for a student member. 5. Initiating the Appeal: a. The student shall submit a written statement addressing the factors stated in section 3.4.4(g) explaining why the committee should reverse or modify the dismissal. The student also may submit supporting documents. b. The student shall file the appeal materials with the Chairperson of the Academic Affairs Committee and provide a copy of the appeal materials to the Dean of Students. c. The Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life shall provide a written assessment of the merits of the student’s appeal. The assessment shall respond to the points raised in the appeal materials. The Dean shall provide the assessment to the Chairperson of the Academic Affairs Committee and, as stated in, section 3.4.4(h)(iii) shall make one copy available to the student.


6. Student’s Meeting with the Committee; the Committee’s Deliberations: a. After receiving a student’s timely appeal, the Chairperson shall schedule a meeting for the student with the committee. b. The meeting shall be conducted informally. At the beginning of the meeting, the student shall have the opportunity to make remarks. The student may invite to the meeting other people to provide information to the committee. Members of the committee may ask questions and make comments at any time. The Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life also may ask questions and make comments. The student shall not be present while the committee deliberates or votes on the appeal. Before leaving the meeting, the student shall have the opportunity to make brief closing remarks. c. The committee considers information from the following sources, among others: i. the student’s petition and supporting documentation (if any); ii. the student’s statements at the meeting; iii. the student’s academic file; iv. the assessment letter provided by the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life; v. knowledge that members of the committee possess concerning the student; vi. any comments from people who are aware of the student’s situation. d. The student may have access to their academic file in the Office of the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life prior to the day of the committee meeting but not on the meeting day itself. To arrange access to the file, the student must give the Office of the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life at least two working days notice and must arrange an appointment to take place during that office’s normal business hours. While reviewing the file, the student may obtain copies of any documents in the file subject to whatever procedures and fees the Office of the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life has in effect. 7. Factors Considered by the Committee; Burden of Proof; Committee Action Necessary to Reverse or Modify Dismissal: a. To reverse or modify the dismissal, a student must prove by clear and convincing evidence: i. the occurrence of an extraordinary event or set of circumstances that was the direct cause of their academic failure; and ii. that in the event the appeal is granted, it is probable that within no more than the ensuing two semesters the student’s cumulative G.P.A. will be 2.0 or higher and remain so until graduation. b. The dismissal stands unless the committee acts to reverse or modify the dismissal. 8. Time: a. The student must appeal within 13 days after the mailing of the notice of the dismissal or, if the notice is delivered personally to the student, 10 days from receipt. b. Failure to file an appeal within the prescribed time period will preclude any appeal and the dismissal shall stand. c. Within 10 days after the date upon which the student files the appeal, the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life shall provide their assessment to the Chairperson of the committee and shall make a copy available to the student for pick-up in the Office of the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life during normal business hours. The student is responsible for determining when the copy is available and for arranging to pick up the copy. d. Unless the student waives the right to meet with the committee, the committee shall meet with the student within 30 days after the student files the appeal but no sooner


than on the fourth working day after the assessment from the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life becomes available to the student. In any event, the committee shall decide the appeal within 35 days after the filing of the appeal. e. The Chairperson of the committee may extend any time period in these rules for good cause, except that committee action is required to extend the following by more than 30 days: i. the deadline for filing a student’s appeal; and ii. the deadline for requesting reconsideration under section 3.4.6. 9. Confidentiality: a. By filing an appeal, the student authorizes the Dean to provide the student’s College file to the committee. b. All documents submitted by or on behalf of the student to the committee shall become part of the student’s academic file and shall be subject to the same rules of confidentiality applicable to all student academic files. c. All proceedings of the committee which take place while the student is present shall be confidential as to third parties and shall not be disclosed to others unless: i. the student consents to disclosure; or ii. disclosure is necessary to defend the college or any member of the college community from charges of wrongful conduct. d. All deliberations and other proceedings of the committee which take place while the student is not present shall be confidential both as to third parties and as to the student and shall not be disclosed to others or to the student except: i. in strict accordance with section 3.4.5 below; and ii. where disclosure is necessary to defend the college or any member of the college community from charges of wrongful conduct. e. The Dean of Students and individual members of the committee may give the student advice as to how the student might improve their academic performance, so long as that advice does not disclose any information about the committee’s deliberations or other proceedings which occurred while the student was not present. 3.4.5 Notice of Committee’s Decision 1. Within 3 working days of deciding the student’s appeal, the committee shall give the student written notice of the committee’s decision and shall provide a copy of the notice to the Dean. 2. The notice shall state only the committee’s decision and shall not provide any supporting reasons or disclose the committee’s vote. 3.4.6 Request for Reconsideration 1. A student dissatisfied with the committee’s decision on their appeal may submit a written request, addressing the grounds stated in section 3.4.6(c), that the committee reconsiders its decision. 2. The request for reconsideration must be delivered to the Chairperson of the committee within 90 days of the date the committee gives notice of the committee’s decision to the student. 3. There are only two grounds for obtaining reconsideration: a. that the student has material information: i. which relates to the student’s situation as of the date of the meeting at which the committee decided the student’s appeal; ii. which is newly discovered or newly available since the meeting at which the committee made its decision; and


4. 5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

iii. which with reasonable diligence could not have been found and produced at that meeting. b. that the committee’s deliberations or decision were substantially influenced by extraneous prejudicial information improperly brought to the committee’s attention. The petition for reconsideration must state with particularity and on oath the information that the student asserts justifies reconsideration. Within 5 working days of receiving a request for reconsideration, the Chairperson delivers a copy of the request to each member of the committee. Within 10 working days of receiving the request, the Chairperson polls each member of the committee to see whether any member wishes to have a committee meeting to consider whether to grant the request for reconsideration. If at least 3 members of the committee wish to have a committee meeting to consider whether to grant the reconsideration request, the Chairperson schedules a meeting to take place within 20 working days of the day the Chairperson received the request for reconsideration. Otherwise, the Chairperson promptly informs the student in writing that, under this section 3.4.6(f), the request for reconsideration is denied. If the committee does meet to decide whether to reconsider the dismissal: a. the student is not present, unless the committee requests or requires the student to attend; b. the committee considers only whether the student has satisfied the Standard of section 3.4.6(c); c. the committee decides only whether to grant reconsideration; d. the committee does not reconsider the dismissal. If, after holding a meeting under section 3.4.6(g), the committee does not grant reconsideration, the chairperson promptly informs the student in writing that, after meeting, the committee did not grant a reconsideration. If the committee grants reconsideration, a. the student has an appeal de novo; b. the provisions of section 3.4.4 apply to the reconsideration process; except c. subject to section 3.4.4 (h)(v) on extensions of time, the following deadlines will apply: i. for the student to provide the Chairperson with any additional information the student wishes the committee to consider: 13 days after the mailing of the notice of the committee’s decision to reconsider, or if the notice is delivered personally to the student, 10 days from receipt; a student who does not intend to submit additional material must also inform the Chairperson within these time limits. ii. for the letter of assessment from the Dean of Students: 10 days from student’s filing of additional material or notice that no further materials will be submitted. iii. for the committee to meet to consider the de novo appeal: within 30 days after the committee provides notice to the student that the committee has granted reconsideration, but no sooner than on the fourth working day after the Dean of Students’ assessment becomes available to the student; iv. for the committee to decide the de novo appeal: within 35 days after the committee provides notice to the student that the committee granted reconsideration. If the committee declines to reconsider a dismissal or if, after reconsidering a dismissal the committee makes a decision that dissatisfies the student, no further appeal or reconsideration is allowed.


4. ACADEMIC RULES and PROCEDURES 4.1 Attendance Regular and punctual class attendance is required to satisfy American Bar Association residency and class hour requirements and is important for a student’s education. Students who attend class irregularly cannot satisfactorily carry out course work in the college. A student is subject to a grade of “F”, administrative withdrawal from a course, or dismissal from the college if attendance is so irregular (four or more absences) that the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life and instructor(s) deem it unwise for the student to continue in the course or in the college. Instructors may impose more restrictive attendance requirements for their courses. Students must wait for a late instructor until 15 minutes past the scheduled beginning of a class before determining that the class will not be conducted and, in that instance, an absence is not recorded. Students may check for weather-related closings by calling the William Mitchell information line at (651) 227-9171. The College reserves one or two days after the completion of classes each semester as reading or weather make-up days. If the college cancels classes because of bad weather, classes are rescheduled on these days. If you sign up for the College’s emergency notification system, E2 Campus, you will receive a text message if the College closes or classes are cancelled. 4.2 Classroom Study Requirement In order to comply with the American Bar Association requirements, William Mitchell students can take no more than 22 credit hours of non-classroom instruction. Non-classroom instruction includes clinics, externships, competitions and independent research projects – all courses where the credits are earned in a setting other than the classroom. 4.3 Perspectives on the Legal Profession (PLP) Requirement The legal system in the United States is a complex, sophisticated culture created to serve a diverse citizenry. It is the challenge and duty of each law school to prepare its students to function successfully in the U.S. legal system, and to serve society with dignity and integrity. The Perspectives on the Legal Profession Program (PLP) is designed for this purpose. In order to graduate, students must complete the various PLP components, listed below, which address the most important aspects of the U. S. legal system. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Careers in the Law Financial Literacy Judicial Proceeding Student Organization Perspectives Global Justice in a Diverse Society (GJDS) Stress Management and Healthy Lifestyle

Throughout the year, programs and lectures that satisfy each of these PLP component requirements are announced in the Docket. Students may obtain the certification form for PLP on the Mitchell website. This form should be completed and submitted by the conclusion of the third semester of law school. Students who do not complete the PLP Program requirements by the end of their third semester will not be permitted to register for the fifth semester of law school until all requirements are fulfilled. In


extenuating circumstances, a student may petition the Vice Dean for Academic Programs for permission to fulfill a PLP program requirement by writing a research paper, approximately 15 pages in length, on a topic related to the component that has not been completed. The topic must be pre-approved by the Vice Dean for Academic Programs. 4.4 First Class Assignments Many instructors assign course work for the first day of classes. First assignments submitted by instructors are posted on the Web site. 4.5 Class Cancellations by Instructor An instructor who must cancel a class shall notify the Switchboard Operator at the earliest possible time. The Vice Dean’s Office shall monitor class cancellations for each instructor. Notices of class cancellations are posted on the classroom doors, and on the video message screens on campus. 4.6 Class Make-Up Policy Instructors may schedule make-up classes in advance of a canceled class. Instructors announce the time and date to make up canceled classes as soon as possible after the cancellation. An instructor notifies the Switchboard Operator of the scheduled make-up class so that changes can be posted there. Instructors do not schedule makeup class(es) during the last two weeks of a semester unless it is impossible to make up the canceled class(es) at any other time. Instructors may arrange for videotapes or audiotapes of make-up classes which are placed on reserve in the library for a reasonable period of time following the make-up class. 4.7 Extending Course Work Completion Deadlines A student may not extend the due date of written work required in lieu of an examination without prior permission from the instructor and the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life. The instructor determines the due date for such written work required in lieu of an examination. A student must submit a “Request for Extension of Grade Due Date” form. The student is notified of the extension if approved by the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life. Work may not be deferred later than the ninth week from the start of the fall, spring, or summer session following the original due date. This extension deadline applies to independent research projects and independent clinics as well as to classes. If a student fails, without prior permission, to complete the required course work when scheduled or rescheduled by the instructor and the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life, the student is subject to failure in the course or administrative withdrawal (withdrawal not in good standing) for failure to fulfill the academic requirements of the course. 4.8 Course Evaluations Each semester, all students complete an evaluation for each course they take. The completed evaluation forms are reviewed by the Vice Dean, and the ratings on the forms are tabulated. The evaluations are returned to the instructor after grades for each course are submitted. The evaluations provide useful feedback to the instructor. The evaluations also are available to the Tenure Committee—it is the responsibility of this committee to assist beginning instructors to become better teachers and to evaluate the quality of instructor teaching. Committee members also visit classes to obtain more direct information. The evaluations are used in the same manner by the administration in making decisions on course assignments, salary, promotion, and tenure of tenure-track instructors, and retention of adjunct instructors.


4.9 Minimum and Maximum Time Frame for Course Work There is a minimum of two and one-half years and a limit of six years to complete all academic requirements for the J.D. degree. A student who does not complete course work within six years is subject to dismissal from the college. In cases of exigent circumstances, a student may request a one-year extension to the six-year limit to earn the J.D. degree. The request must be submitted, in advance of the six-year limit, in writing, and directed to the college President. The request must detail the circumstances necessitating the extension and a plan for completion of all degree requirements. If an extension is granted the total time frame cannot exceed 84 months from the initial enrollment of the student. 4.10 Credits Earned at Other Law Schools The Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life must approve credits earned at other law schools before the credit can be transferred to a student’s William Mitchell record. All regulations that apply to credits earned at William Mitchell also apply to transfer credits. No credit is given for course work taken prior to a student’s first matriculation in law school. Two types of credits earned at other law schools are regulated by this section: credits earned while visiting another law school and transfer credits earned prior to enrolling at William Mitchell. 1. Regulations applying to all forms of Credits Earned at Other Law Schools a. ABA Approval. Credits must be earned at an ABA-approved law school or an ABAapproved program sponsored by an ABA-approved law school. In some instances, course credit also is given for legal study in other countries in accordance with ABA guidelines. b. Minimum credits at the College. J.D. students must have a minimum of 24 credits in residence at William Mitchell in order to receive a J.D. degree from William Mitchell College of Law. c. Computation of credits. In most cases, the college accepts the number of credits as assigned by the school where the course was taken. Credits for courses taken at law schools on a quarter system are computed as follows: 1 quarter credit = 0.7 semester credit. 2. Regulations applying to Credits Earned while visiting another law school The Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life must grant permission for the visit away and preapprove proposed courses prior to the student enrolling at the law school the student wishes to visit. Students who wish to receive credit for courses taken while visiting another law school must complete a “Transfer of Credit” form. A student does not receive credit for a course that substantially duplicates work in a course previously taken at William Mitchell. If in doubt, check with the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life; the burden of checking is on the student. All grades earned by William Mitchell students who visit other law schools are noted on the transcript under a separate heading, but are not computed as part of the William Mitchell grade point average or class rank. All courses taken must be letter graded unless the course description states that the course is only offered on a pass/fail basis. Credit is granted only when a grade of at least C (not C-) or its equivalent is earned. In the event a student earns a failing


grade the grade is counted against the number of failing grades permitted at William Mitchell. All required classes must be taken at William Mitchell College of Law. Permission to visit another school is allowed for a maximum of one Fall or Spring semester. The college discourages visiting away in the final semester of law school. When a student visits another law school William Mitchell has no control over when that school posts its grades and releases transcripts. No credit is awarded until an official transcript is received from the law school the student visited. The College will not certify a student for purposes of bar admission until official transcripts are received and the Office of the Registrar has verified that all degree requirements have been met. 3. Regulations applying to Credits Earned at another law school and transferred to William Mitchell Transfer students must have received a grade of at least C (not C-) or its equivalent to receive credit for a course taken at the previous law school. All grades from another law school are noted on the transcript under a separate heading, but are not computed as part of the William Mitchell grade point average or class rank. A failing grade received at another law school is counted against the number of failing grades permitted at William Mitchell. 4.11 Other Courses of Study Not Permissible Other than dual-degree programs approved by William Mitchell College of Law, no other course of study, graduate or undergraduate, may be pursued by a student while enrolled at William Mitchell College of Law without prior consent of the Vice Dean for Academic Programs.


5. EXAMS 5.1 Types of Exams and Use of Computers for Exams Professors have the discretion to administer in-class exams, take-home exams, papers or courtroom exercises. Exams may be closed or open book. No exam is open book unless the instructor of the course specifically designates the exams as such. Students complying with the College’s policies regarding advance registration and software installation may use computers to type their exam answers. 5.1.1 Advance registration and software installation requirements Advance registration is required for students wanting to use college-owned computers to type exams. While the college will make its best effort to ensure that resources are available, advance registration does not guarantee the student the use of college resources. Use of college computers is on a first request received, first request served basis. Students are required to submit a Typing Examination Request Form to Student Services (Room 119) by the appropriate deadline in effect for the semester (approximately two weeks prior to the first day of exams). Requests received after the deadline will be honored on an “as available” basis. If a computer is not available at a student’s scheduled exam time the request will be denied. Notification regarding the request will be sent to students via e-mail (to the assigned William Mitchell College of Law e-mail account). If the request is approved, the student will receive details for the exam day. Exams must be taken at the date and time originally scheduled. Exam times will not be rescheduled based solely on the request to type. The Typing Examination Request Form is only required if a student seeks to use a college-owned computer to type an in-class exam. Students using their own laptop do not need to turn in a request. However, students using their own computer for closed book exams are required to have the college’s exam software installed on their personal computer. 5.1.2 Use of Securexam for Taking Exams on a Personal Laptop Computer The college uses Securexam software for exam taking, which provides backup protection from losing work (in the event of computer malfunction) and prevents cheating. Not every instructor uses Securexam for every exam, but if a particular exam requires it, Securexam must be installed for you to take your exam on a computer. To use Securexam, the following conditions must be met: 1. Securexam software must be installed and tested on your computer prior to taking your first exam. You must become familiar with using it, including transferring your exam electronically. If you are scheduled to take an exam that requires Securexam, you will be notified by email one month prior to your first exam. This email will provide links for downloading the software and instructions on how to install and use it. 2. If your computer suddenly becomes unusable prior to the beginning of an exam, you may choose to take the exam on one of the workstations in the library’s computer lab (which will have Securexam already installed), or hand write the exam in a blue book. 3. If a computer suddenly becomes unusable during an exam already in progress, you must use a blue book to finish the exam from the point where the computer stopped working. Information Technology personnel will retrieve the work that was completed in Securexam prior to the crash.


4. Securexam is currently only Microsoft Windows and Macintosh OS compatible. More information about supported Windows and Mac versions will be provided in the email you will receive prior to exams. Information Technology Services professionals are available in Room 221 (or by phone at 651-290-6451) to assist with installing, using, and troubleshooting problems with Securexam. They will also be available during every scheduled Securexam, and will be notified of make-up exams by Student Services. 5.2 Exam Numbers Students are assigned examination numbers that are used as identification on exams throughout law school. Students may ask the Registrar to change their exam number at any time. Upon showing proper identification, students who forget their examination number can obtain it from the Registrar’s Office until one-half hour after the exam begins. If a student uses the wrong number on an exam, they should notify the Registrar in order to assure proper recording of grades. 5.3 Exam Conflict and Reschedule Policy Students take all exams, whether in-class or take-home, at the time and place announced either on the exam schedule or, in the case of take-home exams, by the instructor. No student may take any exam before the regularly scheduled time for that exam. In-class exams may be rescheduled by the Assistant Director of Student Affairs and Student Life for the following reasons: 1. A student is prevented from taking the in-class exam(s) because of their illness or an illness or death in the student’s immediate family; 2. A student has three in-class exams scheduled within a period of 3 calendar days, in which case a student may reschedule one exam; 3. A student has two in-class exams scheduled to begin within 23 hours of each other; Examples: a. 6 p.m. exam on a Monday followed by 5 p.m. exam the next day is a conflict. b. 6 p.m. exam on a Monday followed by 6 p.m. exam the next day is not a conflict. 4. A student has an in-class exam scheduled on a day and time that conflicts with his or her religious beliefs; 5. A student has a documented disability or speaks English as a second language, in which case the student may receive an extension of time on in-class exams and other accommodations, as needed, at the discretion and approval of the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life. Take-home exams may be rescheduled by the Assistant Director of Student Affairs and Student Life when directed to do so by the instructor giving the exam. The instructor has discretion to determine the details for rescheduled take-home exams unless the instructor has delegated that authority to the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life. The following deadlines must be adhered to when requesting that an exam be rescheduled: For Fall Semester 2010 Exams: Wednesday, November 19, 2010 at 5:00 p.m. For Spring Semester 2011 Exams: Friday, April 15, 2011 at 5:00 p.m. For Summer 2010 Exams: Friday, June 24, 2011 at 5:00 p.m.


Exam rescheduling is coordinated in Student Services, Room 119. Ordinarily, employment obligations are not a valid reason for rescheduling an exam, but the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life may consider them. Specific make-up dates for exam conflicts are scheduled at set times during the examination period. Students must take rescheduled examinations on the next available make-up date that does not cause a new conflict in the student’s exam schedule. No make-up exam or accommodation for extra time is given more than one week after the end of the regular exam period except when such a delay is necessitated by illness. The rules on Deferring Completion of Exams apply when a student fails to take an exam when it is scheduled. 5.4 Deferring Completion of Exams A student may not defer an in-class exam without prior permission from the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life. The Dean determines the deferred exam date. If a student fails, without prior permission, to take an in-class or take-home exam when scheduled or rescheduled by the instructor and/or the Dean, the student is subject to failure in the course or administrative withdrawal (withdrawal not in good standing) for failure to fulfill the academic requirements of the course. 5.5 Request for Extension of Grade Due Date A student may not extend the due date of written work required in lieu of an examination without prior permission from the instructor and the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life. The instructor determines the due date for such written work required in lieu of an examination. A student must submit a “Request for Extension of Grade Due Date” form. The student is notified of the extension if approved by the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life. Work may not be deferred later than the ninth week from the start of the fall, spring, or summer session following the original due date. This extension deadline applies to independent research projects and independent clinics as well as to classes. If a student fails, without prior permission, to complete the required course work when scheduled or rescheduled by the instructor and the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life, the student is subject to failure in the course or administrative withdrawal (withdrawal not in good standing) for failure to fulfill the academic requirements of the course. 5.6 Exams Retained for One Year Most exam booklets, take-home exams, and student papers are retained by the Registrar or the instructor for one year. Some exam booklets, take-home exams, and students’ papers are available for students to pick up in the Registrar’s Office. Otherwise, students should see the faculty support staff for the specific instructor.


6. GRADES, CLASS RANK, HONORS and AWARDS 6.1 Letter Grading System The college grades on a letter grading system as follows: A AB+ B BC+

4.00 3.67 3.33 3.00 2.67 2.33

C

2.00

C-

1.67

D+ D DF I

1.33 1.00 .67 0.00 0.00

Demonstrated excellence in the course Demonstrated above average competence for law students at William Mitchell College of Law Demonstrated average competence for law students at William Mitchell College of Law Demonstrated minimal level of competence to continue at or graduate from William Mitchell College of Law Demonstrated less than acceptable competence in the course; not a failing grade, but less than the minimum to stay in school.

Failed to demonstrate minimum competence to receive course credit Incomplete

Grades preceded by an “(R)” are not included in GPA or earned credits. 6.2 Pass/Fail Grades Courses are ordinarily graded on an A-F scale. With the permission of the Vice Dean for Academic Programs, an instructor may offer a course on a Pass/Fail basis. If an instructor is offering a course on a Pass/Fail basis, they must announce this orally or in writing to their students prior to or at the beginning of the semester. A student receiving a pass earns a grade of S (satisfactory) or a grade of P (pass), which is not computed in their cumulative G.P.A. A student receiving a fail earns a grade of “F”, which is computed in his or her cumulative G.P.A. There is no limit to the number of Pass/Fail credits a student may earn. Individual students may not elect to receive a Pass/Fail grade in a course that is letter graded. 6.3 Notice of Grading Criteria If all or part of a course grade is based on activities, standards, or tests other than a written examination at the end of the course, the instructor usually announces the basis for grading at the beginning of the course. 6.4 Grading Policy The Vice Dean for Faculty shall advise full-time faculty members and adjunct professors of the college’s grading policies, practices and typical grading curve. Prior to each grading period, the Vice Dean shall distribute to the instructors information about past grading practices, including the typical grade distribution, median, and mean. To promote grading consistency, the Vice Dean or the Registrar reviews all grades prior to posting and, if necessary, the Vice Dean discusses substantial grade disparities with the appropriate instructor.


6.5 Grade Changes Once grades are posted, no grade can be changed other than upon discovery of a mathematical or recording error. No administrator or instructor may undertake to review or re-evaluate an instructor’s exam for the purpose of changing the grade. This policy is subject to the rules adopted under the Policy Against Discrimination, the Policy Against Sexual Harassment, and the Problematic Consensual Romantic Relationships Policy. The Vice Dean for Academic Programs must approve all grade changes. Students who have questions about a grade should review the exam with the instructor who taught the course. No grades are changed once a student graduates from the college. 6.6 Grade Posting Students can review their grades on the Web using their student I.D. number and password. When new grades are being entered, students cannot access their grades. During regular grade posting periods, grades are available for review on the Web from Friday 5:30 p.m. to Monday 10 a.m. (See posting schedule on the Web for exact days/times.) For grade security purposes, grades are not given over the telephone. There are no exceptions to this policy. Grades of students owing money to the College are not posted or released until the amount owed is paid in full. A message in the student’s record on the Web indicates that a hold has been placed on the student’s record. The hold is released when all outstanding tuition and/or fees are paid. 6.7 Class Rank Class rankings are computed at the end of a student’s first academic year and every Fall and Spring Semester thereafter. Grades earned during Summer Sessions are factored in with the Fall Semester grades. J-term grades are factored in with the Spring Semester grades. The ranks are based on students’ cumulative grade point averages. Only those students who received all of their semester grades receive a class rank. Non-senior ranks are calculated one week after the last non-senior grades are processed. Senior ranks are calculated when all senior grades are processed. Students are ranked with other students who are proceeding through law school at approximately the same pace, except for the final ranking, in which students are ranked with their graduating class. Students who graduate in August are ranked with the subsequent January graduation class. A student’s class rank is not changed once ranks are computed. For grade security, students are not given their class ranks over the telephone. 6.8 Transcripts Students may obtain official transcripts by completing a transcript request form, or by sending or faxing a written request with the student’s signature to the Registrar’s Office. The cost of a transcript is $3. If a request is received by 3 p.m., it is available in the Registrar’s Office the following business day. Students may print their unofficial transcript from the college’s Web site. Under no circumstances can the college release photocopies of students’ transcripts from other academic institutions. Students must request those documents directly from the academic institutions they attended. 6.9 Failed Courses Students do not receive credit for courses in which they receive a failing grade (a grade of F). A student must repeat all required courses in which they earn an “F”. Students also must pass courses used to fulfill the statutory skills requirement. A student may choose to repeat any other failed courses. Both


the “F” and the repeat grade are computed as part of the student’s grade point average. A student may not repeat courses in which they did not receive a failing grade. Students who receive five or more failing grades are subject to dismissal from the College. 6.10 Honors and Awards 6.10.1 Honors The college issues the following academic distinctions upon the completion of all coursework and the awarding of the degree: Summa Cum Laude Magna Cum Laude Cum Laude

3.60 G.P.A. or higher 3.40 G.P.A. to 3.59 G.P.A. 3.20 G.P.A. to 3.39 G.P.A.

For purposes of the graduation ceremony only (both January and May), honors will be based on the students’ cumulative grade point average from the prior semester. 6.10.2 Dean’s List Students who earn a semester grade point average of 3.50 or better based on 8 or more graded credits are placed on the Dean’s List that semester. Students so honored receive a letter from the President and Dean of the College and a notation on their transcripts. 6.10.3 CALI Awards Faculty members may designate the Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI) Award of Excellence to students who receive the top grade in a course. Students so honored receive a letter from the Dean and a certificate from CALI. 6.11 Required Average Grade All sections of the following courses are required to have an average grade of 2.72, plus or minus the allowed deviation. Civil Procedure Constitutional Law-Liberties Constitutional Law-Powers Contracts Professional Responsibility Property I Property II Torts I Torts II


Allowable Deviation of the Average Grade Class size

Required Mean Grade

Maximum Allowed Deviation

80+ 70-79 60-69 50-59 < 50

2.72 2.72 2.72 2.72 2.72

+/- 0.13 +/- 0.14 +/- 0.15 +/- 0.15 +/- 0.16


7. ADDITIONAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 7.1 Academic Support Programs William Mitchell is committed to helping students achieve their full academic potential. In addition to the Writing & Representation (WRAP) tutors, there are a number of resources available to students who seek academic support. The courses listed below are managed by the College’s Academic Achievement Program (AAP). The mission of the AAP is to help all students master the analytical and communication skills necessary to succeed in law school and on the bar exam. For more information on the APP see: http://www.wmitchell.edu/current 7.1.1 Legal Reasoning Workshop I Legal Reasoning Workshop I is a one-credit course required for selected first-year students during the fall semester. The course focuses on learning strategies, case reading, case briefing, synthesis, outlining, and exam-taking skills. Because the curriculum uses torts doctrine, students are not required to prepare additional legal materials. There are frequent written assignments. Students also receive individualized feedback on every assignment. Instructors also meet with each student one-on-one to discuss the assignments and any concerns they may have. Students enrolled in Legal Reasoning Workshop I are not allowed to add courses in the Spring semester of the first year. 7.1.2 Legal Reasoning Workshop II - Constitutional Law Powers (Intensive) Legal Reasoning Workshop II is a one-credit course offered in the fall semester to second-year students. It provides in-depth focus on performance of legal analysis as well as strategies for preparing for and taking law school exams. Completion of the workshop is required for students ranked in the bottom 15% of the class after the first year but is open to all students if space is available. The course involves small group work and one-on-one meetings with the instructor. 7.2 Semester- or Year-Long Independent Study Abroad Program An independent study abroad program undertaken at a foreign law school provides an excellent opportunity for students to expand their knowledge of comparative and international legal issues. Credits for an independent study abroad program are governed by the rules of William Mitchell College of Law and the American Bar Association (ABA). William Mitchell works with students to assist in developing a viable plan and in applying for ABA approval. 7.2.1 Requirements 1. Students who have completed their first year or equivalent, if part-time, may submit applications for independent study abroad programs. Generally, students should complete all of their required courses at William Mitchell before seeking to study abroad, so students are generally in their third or fourth year before undertaking this independent study program. 2. Students may transfer up to 28 elective credits (two semesters) toward the William Mitchell J.D. through studying law at a foreign institution. Credits earned abroad may not be used to satisfy required courses at William Mitchell. Although you are permitted to complete 28 credits by independent study abroad, to ensure that you have a solid foundation in U.S. law, the most viable plans generally are for only one semester (11-14 credits). 3. Credit is given for grades earned of “C” or better, “Pass” or the equivalent. Grades that satisfy criteria set forth in the Student Handbook may be transferred to William Mitchell. See §4.10 on Credits Earned at Other Law Schools, Student Handbook.


4. The granting of residency credit shall comply with the requirements of ABA standard 304. See http://www.abanet.org/legaled/standards/Criteria%20for%20Approval%20of%20Student%20St udy%20at%20a%20Foreign%20Institution.pdf 5. Students must be fluent in the language of instruction at the foreign institution. 6. Students must receive pre-approval from the Vice Dean, Academic Programs at William Mitchell College of Law and the ABA before beginning any independent study abroad program. Courses taken or completed before approval is granted are not transferred to William Mitchell. 7. For your information the ABA Criteria for Approval of Individual Student Study Abroad for Academic Credit can be found at http://www.abanet.org/legaled/studyabroad/foreignstudyhome.html Information about the Independent Study Abroad Program is available in the Registrar’s Office. 7.2.2 Application Process Students need to apply no later than the beginning of the semester prior to the time they seek to attend the foreign program, approximately four months in advance – the earlier the better. Students must submit a proposal for their course of study to the Vice Dean, Academic Programs. Proposal guidelines and a preformatted proposal form are available online at: www.wmitchell.edu/current/policies/transcredit.pdf and www.wmitchell.edu/current/policies/IndependentResearchProposal.pdf or in the Registrar’s Office. For more information regarding independent study abroad opportunities, contact the Vice Dean for Academic Programs. Students pay the tuition and fees applicable to the foreign institution and do not pay tuition and fees at William Mitchell for the credits earned abroad. 7.2.3 Academic Advising The ABA Criteria for Approval of Individual Student Study Abroad for Academic Credit requires a full-time faculty member from William Mitchell and one professor from the foreign institution to supervise the student’s course of study. Students are strongly encouraged to fulfill all of William Mitchell’s required courses before studying abroad. This includes requirements for a long-paper, two skills course credits, and at least two statutory courses. 7.2.4 Financial Aid Financial aid availability for Study Abroad is based on a minimum of 2 credits in an approved course of study. The Study Abroad financial aid budget is based on estimated and actual costs which are determined by the host school and communicated directly to the William Mitchell financial aid office. William Mitchell scholarships are not portable to other schools. Early termination of your study abroad program may result in financial aid repayment. Summer Study Abroad financial aid applications are available on the William Mitchell financial aid website. Please contact the financial aid office for additional details and instructions.


Study Abroad scholarships may be available. The following web sites provide scholarship search services: The University of Minnesotaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Online Study Abroad Directory and FASTWEB, which lists over 180,000 scholarships and loans. 7.2.5 Passports and Other Information Passports are required for entry into or for extended stays in most foreign countries. For extended stays, (the duration varies from country to country), most foreign countries also require visas. For the most recent travel information regarding passports, visas, foreign consulates in the U.S., and travel warnings go to www.state.gov/travel/. Most countries require proof of your ability to cover living expenses while living in their country. Proof often may be satisfied by obtaining a certified letter from a bank or from the Financial Aid Office at William Mitchell or the host foreign school, indicating the amount of your financial aid package. 7.2.6 Other Important Consideration and Helpful Hints. Students are strongly advised to begin the application process as early as possible, as it requires approval from several parties; this task is lengthy and time-consuming. Students need to develop a reliable contact and gain permission from a full-time professor at the host foreign law school. It is wise to develop a specific contact, students can call at the foreign university, who is able to answer questions regarding the intended course of study. 7.2.7 ABA Approved Foreign Programs As another option, students may participate in law programs offered by any ABA-approved law school. There are many such programs, located around the world, which are run by ABA approved U.S. law schools. Some of these programs are offered in the summer and some are offered for one semester or longer. William Mitchell offers several such programs in collaboration with the Consortium for Innovative Legal Education (CILE). Current summer programs exist in England, Chile, Czech Republic, Ireland, the Netherlands, and Malta. Semester-long programs exist in Denmark and the Netherlands. See www.abanet.org/legaled/approvedlawschools/alpha.html for a complete list of ABA-approved schools.


8. CURRICULUM and GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 8.1 Required Courses • Required Courses: o Civil Procedure o Constitutional Law Liberties o Constitutional Law Powers o Contracts o Professional Responsibility o Property I o Property II o Torts I o Torts II o Writing & Representation: Advice and Persuasion o Writing & Representation: Advocacy • Additional Skills Course Requirement (minimum of 2 credits) (choices listed under Skills Course requirements; see section 8.3) • Statutory Course Requirement (minimum of 5 credits) • Electives Summary Required Courses Skills Courses Statutory Courses Elective Courses Total Needed to Graduate

39 2 – minimum (in addition to Advocacy) 5 – minimum 40 (fewer than 40 if Statutory/Skills credits exceed 7) 86

8.2 Perspectives on the Legal Profession Requirement Students must complete the requirements of the Perspectives on the Legal Profession program. This is a graduation requirement and successful completion of the program is indicated on a student’s transcript. See Academic Rules and Procedures for further details. 8.3 Skills Course Requirement Students are required to take a three-credit Advocacy course that focuses on client representation, negotiation, and advocacy skills. In addition to Advocacy, students must take at least one course from the following list of courses (minimum of 5 skills credits total). Advocacy is a prerequisite or co-requisite for some of the skills courses listed below. 8.3.1 Advanced classes in specific practice areas meld doctrine and skills • IP – Appellate Practice • IP – Intellectual Property Transactions • IP-Licensing • IP-Patent Litigation • IP-Patent Prosecution


• IP-Trademark Litigation • IP-Trademark Prosecution • Tax Research 8.3.2 One-credit workshops connected to elective doctrinal courses • Consumer Rights Workshop • Elder Law Workshop: Advising the Senior Client • Employment Law Workshop: Advising Clients and Drafting Employment Documents • Estates and Trusts Workshop • Legislation Workshop • Poverty Law Workshop: Administrative Appeals • Public International Legal Research Workshop I • Public International Legal Research Workshop II 8.3.3 Stand Alone courses focusing on specific lawyer skills or techniques • 44-Hour Family Mediation • Alternative Dispute Resolution • Alternative Dispute Resolution – Advanced • Advanced Advocacy • Argumentation and Persuasion • Beyond Listening: Skills Essential to Managing Conflict • Business Buy/Sell Transaction Simulation • Client Counseling • Elder Justice and Policy • Estate Planning • Drafting International Business Agreements • International Negotiations and Dispute Resolution • Internet Legal Research Skills • Introduction to Commercial Arbitration • Law Firm Management: The Business of the Practice of Law • Legal Practicum: Business Practice • Legal Practicum: General Practice Negotiation • Negotiating and Drafting Business Agreements • Persuasive Legal Writing • Policy Analysis • Pretrial Litigation • Situational Communication and Problem Solving 8.3.4 Clinics and externships involve assisting lawyers and representing clients in real cases • Administrative Law Externship • ADR Mediation Externship • Business Law Clinic • Civil Advocacy Clinic • Community Development Clinic • Court of Appeals Externship • Criminals Appeals Clinic • Criminal Justice Clinic • Family Law Externship


• Immigration Law Clinic • Intellectual Property Law Clinic • Law and Psychiatry Clinic • Legal Assistance to Minnesota Prisoners (LAMP) Clinic • Legal Planning for Tax Exempt Organizations and Low Income Clients (formally Tax Planning Clinic) • Misdemeanor Clinic • The Reentry Clinic 8.4 Statutory Course Requirement Students must take at least two statutory courses from the following list: Administrative Law Banking Law Bankruptcy Business – Agency, Partnerships, and Limited Liability Companies Business Entity Taxation Business - Corporations Business Organizations Copyright Law Corporate Tax Employment Law Survey Environmental Law Environmental Law – Contaminated Property

Estates & Trusts Family Law Immigration and Naturalization Income Tax International Business Transactions No-Fault Insurance Patent Law Payment Systems and Negotiable Instruments UCC-Sales UCC - Secured Transactions Securities Regulation Workers’ Compensation

8.5 Advanced Research & Writing (“Long Paper”) All students must complete a comprehensive research paper after their first year of law school. Students are advised to complete this requirement before their final semester. The paper should be written under the supervision of a full-time faculty member. Generally, supervision by an adjunct faculty member is appropriate if the paper is completed as part of a course taught by that adjunct faculty member and has been previously authorized by the Vice Dean for Academic Programs. An instructor must agree to supervise the paper before any drafts are written. There are two ways for a student to meet the Advanced Research & Writing requirement: (1) the student may write the paper as an independent research project (see additional information under Independent Research), in which case a student may receive 0-4 credits for the project; or (2) the student may write the paper as part of a course, competition, or Law Review, in which case a student receives the credits normally assigned to the course or activity. After the paper is completed, the student should fill out and have the supervising faculty member sign an Advanced Research & Writing Certification form. The signed form must be submitted to the Registrar in order for the requirement to be satisfied. Some courses that ordinarily meet the Advanced Research and Writing requirement are as follows:


(Students should verify with the instructor that such a paper may be written before registering for the course; also see the Course Descriptions at www.wmitchell.edu for a more thorough list of courses that may be eligible). American Legal History Argumentation & Persuasion Biomedical Ethics Comparative and International Patent Law Comparative Law: Japanese Comparative Law – Lawyers: Opponents of Democracy Construction Law Criminal Appeals Clinic Drug and Device Law Seminar Feminist Jurisprudence First Amendment Seminar

Independent Research (approved by supervising faculty) International Criminal & Humanitarian Law Law and Sexuality Seminar Legal Practicum: Business Practice Legal Practicum: General Practice Media Law Mental Health Law Seminar Products Liability Seminar Race and the Law Seminar Religion and the Constitution Toxic Torts

8.5.1 Permission Required With an instructor’s permission, students may complete a paper of at least 25 pages, exclusive of footnotes, involving substantial research to fulfill the College’s Advanced Research & Writing requirement. 1. If the paper is to be completed in conjunction with a course, students should contact the instructor regarding requirements for permission. 2. If the paper is to be completed in conjunction with independent research, the requirements and deadlines for independent research apply. See the Independent Research course description. The length of the paper is the prerogative of a student’s supervising instructor. 3. If the paper is to be written apart from a course or independent research, students must contact the supervising faculty member for the requirements before commencing work on the paper. 8.5.2 Drafts and Deadlines 1. Students submit a partial first draft covering one or two parts of the paper, a full first draft, a second draft, and, if necessary, a full or partial third draft. 2. Deadlines are set by agreement and must be honored. In the case of an independent research or a paper in partial fulfillment for a course, missed deadlines may be taken into account in grading, particularly if no extension is obtained until after the deadline has passed. All final drafts must be in by the final class day of the semester. Extensions must be requested in advance and must be approved by the instructor and the Dean of Students. A Request for Extension of Grade Due Date form can be obtained in the Registrar’s Office. 8.5.3 Format 1. The paper must be in the form of a law review note, with citations in footnotes rather than in text, parenthetical explanations of authorities in footnote where appropriate, and textual footnotes to develop points where treatment in the text would interfere with its flow.


2. Include a table of contents showing page numbers for all headings and subheadings, an introduction (headed “I. INTRODUCTION”) explaining how the paper will proceed, and a short conclusion. 3. Make liberal use of headings and subheadings to promote good organization, and make parts of the paper easier to find. 4. Try to use the active voice, possessives to minimize prepositions, short paragraphs, subparagraphed enumerations, and other devices to enhance readability. 8.5.4 Style 1. Use 8½” by 11” (letter size) paper. 2. Double space text except for indented quotes (50 words or more); single space footnotes. 3. Papers should have 1-inch margins and the typeface should be no larger than 12 points (10 characters per inch). 4. Comply fully with The Bluebook rules on form and citation, using the rules applicable to law review writing. 5. Center all headings and use the following priority and type: I. ALL CAPS UNDERLINED A. ALL CAPS 1. Underlined a. Not Underlined 1) Not Underlined a) Not Underlined 6. Use ordinary type for everything else (no ALL CAPS), except underline where The Bluebook calls for italics. 7. Footnotes may be placed either at the bottom of each page or as endnotes at the end of the paper. Nothing in these requirements is intended to preclude a supervising faculty member from imposing additional requirements to satisfy completion of the Advanced Research & Writing requirement. 8.6 Academic Requirements for Graduation 1. Students must complete a total of 86 credits with a cumulative average of at least 2.0 to graduate from the J.D. program. For students who transferred to the college, and for those visiting another institution, a minimum of 24 credits must be earned at the college. 2. Under no circumstances may a student earn more than 89 credits in the J.D. program. At registration, the student should designate any courses that exceed 89 total credits as “audits.” 3. The student should complete all curriculum requirements set forth in section 8.1 of the Student Handbook.


8.7 Administrative Requirements for Graduation 1. The college must have a student’s official undergraduate transcript on file. The transcript must be sent directly to the college from the registrar of the student’s undergraduate institution and must indicate that a bachelor’s degree was conferred at that institution. Transcripts reported by the Law School Data Assembly Service (LSDAS) are not official. 2. If a student received Title IV student loans (Federal Perkins/NDSL, or Federal Stafford, Federal Unsubsidized Stafford, and/or Federal SLS programs), they must attend an on-line financial aid exit interview. 3. If a student received a Federal Perkins/NDSL loan, they also must complete an on-line exit questionnaire. 4. All tuition, fees, and other charges owed to the college must be paid in full. 5. In accordance with the directive from the American Bar Association, the Career Development Office requires return of an on-line completed employment survey. 6. Bar Exam Questionnaire and Release. 7. Completion of the College’s on-line Graduation Information Form. Graduating students must meet all administrative and academic requirements prior to receiving a diploma and being certified to take the bar exam. 8.8 Diplomas Approximately 10 weeks prior to commencement students are asked to specify their names as they are to be printed on their diplomas. All tuition and fees due to the college must be paid and all graduation requirements must be met prior to receiving a diploma.


9. ROSALIE WAHL LEGAL PRACTICE CENTER The Rosalie Wahl Legal Practice Center (Rm. 254) is the location for many of the skills-based and experiential learning courses, including the required Writing & Representation courses (Advice & Persuasion and Advocacy), Legal Practicum, the clinics and externships, and other elective skills courses. The same area also houses the Legal Assistance to Minnesota Prisoners (LAMP) program, and the Minnesota Justice Foundation. Wahl Center administrative services are described below. 9.1 Writing & Representation Courses (Required courses for all William Mitchell students) 9.1.1 First Year: Writing & Representation: Advice & Persuasion Students may hand in or pick up completed WRAP assignments at the Wahl Center reception desk and speak to the WRAP Administrator. The WRAP tutor program operates out of the Wahl Center as well. 9.1.2 Second Year: Writing & Representation: Advocacy All questions concerning scheduling, course materials, and grading may be directed to the Advocacy Administrator. Students enrolled in Advocacy have individual files located in the lobby of the Wahl Center where their graded assignments may be reviewed throughout the semester. 9.2 Legal Practicum The Legal Practicum Administrator acts as a liaison and information source for course participants, plans the course schedule, governs scheduling matters, manages participantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; written work, and works with the Legal Practicum Director to compute and record interim and final grades. Although questions regarding the above subjects may be directed to the Legal Practicum Administrator, substantive questions should be addressed to the Legal Practicum Director. 9.3 Clinics and Externships Clinics and externships educate students in the practical arts of lawyering, develop studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; professional judgment, and provide legal representation to underrepresented individuals. The following clinics and externships are administered out of the Wahl Center: Administrative Law Externship; ADR Mediation Externship; Court of Appeals Externship; District Court Externship; Family Law Externship; Judicial Externship; Work of the Lawyer Externship; Business Law Clinic; Civil Advocacy Clinic; Community Development Clinic; Criminal Appeals Clinic; Criminal Justice Clinic; Immigration Law Clinic; Intellectual Property Clinic; Law & Psychiatry Clinic; Legal Assistance to Minnesota Prisoners Clinic; Reentry Clinic; Misdemeanor Clinic; Legal Planning Clinic for Tax-Exempt Organizations and Low Income Clients; and Independent Clinic. 9.4 Student Certification by the Minnesota Supreme Court The Student Practice Rules are located in Minnesota Rules of Court. Eligible students may be certified by the Supreme Court to perform activities of an attorney in representing and appearing on behalf of a client. The Administrative Coordinator for Clinics and Externships handles these requests. To be eligible, a student must be currently enrolled, have completed and received grades for at least 24 credits, and be in good academic standing (minimum 2.0 G.P.A.). There are two rules under which students may be certified:


Rule 1. General Student Practice Rule Applies to eligible law students who appear on behalf of any state, local, or other government agency, or any indigent person who is a party to a civil action or who is accused of a crime or a petty misdemeanor. The request for certification must be made by the government agency, organization, or person representing the indigent client. A written request with the student’s name and a statement that the student will be properly supervised should be sent to the Administrative Coordinator for Clinics and Externships. Students certified under Rule 1 will remain certified for one year. If certification will expire between the end of the semester and the student’s graduation from WMCL, the student must have their employer write the WMCL clinic administrator requesting recertification prior to the graduation ceremony to continue as a student attorney. It is the responsibility of the student to track the expiration date. Rule 2. Clinic Student Practice Rule Applies to eligible law students who are enrolled in a law school clinic course where representation of a client may occur. Students do not need to request certification. Names are submitted automatically through the clinic. 9.5 Other Elective Skills Courses Advanced Advocacy and Pretrial Litigation are elective courses administered by staff in the Wahl Center. (See J.D. Courses for descriptions.) All questions concerning scheduling, course materials, and grades should be directed to the appropriate skills course administrator. Files for students in Advanced Advocacy are kept in the lobby of the Wahl Center. 9.6 Legal Assistance to Minnesota Prisoners (LAMP) LAMP is a civil clinic that provides legal representation in civil matters for indigent inmates. Adjunct Professor in Residence, Bradford Colbert directs the LAMP clinic and represents criminal defendants in appeals for the State Public Defender’s Office. 9.7 Minnesota Justice Foundation (MJF) The Minnesota Justice Foundation (MJF) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization working to meet the legal needs of low-income people by connecting law students with public service agencies and pro bono attorneys. MJF is the administrative agency of the Law School Public Service Program (LSPSP), which asks each law student to perform at least fifty hours of legal pro bono work during his or her law school career. Volunteer opportunities include legal research, client interviewing, courtroom observation, courtroom representation, and fact investigation in a variety of subject areas, including juvenile, criminal, family, immigration, housing, environmental, and health law. In addition to volunteer opportunities, MJF coordinates a Summer Clerkship Program, providing paid clerkships at public interest law offices in Minnesota. The MJF office coordinates volunteer placements and administers the Summer Clerkship Program and is located in room 253 of the Wahl Center.


10. BAR EXAM INFORMATION 10.1 Minnesota State Bar Examination Subjects and Comparable William Mitchell Subjects Applicants for admission by examination to the Minnesota Bar are tested on some of the following subjects in the essay portion of the examination. Courses offered at the College that address these subjects of law are listed in the right-hand column. Current application materials, rules, and other related bar examination information for Minnesota can be found at www.ble.state.mn.us. Subject Tested Civil Procedure Constitutional Law Contracts Criminal Law Criminal Procedure Ethics and Professional Responsibility Evidence Family Law Federal Individual Income Taxation Partnerships Proprietorships & Corps. Real Property Torts Uniform Commercial Code Art. 1 & 2 Wills, Estates & Trusts

Comparable William Mitchell Course(s) Civil Procedure Constitutional Law Powers & Constitutional Law Liberties Contracts Criminal Law Criminal Procedure Professional Responsibility Evidence Family Law Taxation of Income Business Organizations Agency Partnerships and Limited Liability Companies; and Business Corporations Property I & Property II Torts I & Torts II UCC - Sales Estates & Trusts

10.2 Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam The Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam (MPRE) is required for admission to the bar in most states. Students should check with the board of law examiners in the state in which they plan to seek admission to the bar. Passing scores, which are established by each jurisdiction, are subject to change. Refer to the information booklet provided with the application to find out more on passing scores. The Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam is scheduled for March, August, and November of each year. Inquiries can be made to: National Conference of Bar Examiners MPRE Application Department 2255 N. Dubuque Rd. P.O. Box 4001 Iowa City, IA 52243-4001 (319) 337-1287 You can also apply online at http://www.ncbex.org/multistate-tests/mpre/ 10.3 Bar Exam Certification In order to sit for a bar exam, a student must complete all requirements necessary for graduation including payment in full of oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s student account and maintenance of a current balance on all Perkins loan accounts from the college. A student also must submit a bar certification from the college. Bar


certifications for Minnesota are submitted automatically by the college. All others are submitted by request. The following is a list of State Bar Examination administrators for states in the region: Minnesota Minnesota Board of Law Examiners 180 E. 5th Street Suite 950 Saint Paul, MN 55101 TEL: 651-297-1857 FAX: 651-297-1196 www.ble.state.mn.us Other states: see the National Conference of Bar Examiners website at http://www.ncbex.org/baradmissions/offices/


B. STUDENT AFFAIRS 11. STUDENT CONDUCT CODE 11.1 General Expectations and Community Standards As responsible members of the community, William Mitchell College of Law students are expected to maintain the highest ideals of academic and social conduct and are responsible for knowing the College’s published policies and standards. Students are also expected to respect the views and personal dignity of other members of the College community. In addition, students are expected to know the standards to which they will be held when they become lawyers. The Codes of Professional Responsibility published by each state’s bar association, describe these standards. Students should consult these codes for guidance. 11.2 General Provisions Individual and group responsibility: This Student Conduct Code is based on the assumption that individual and group responsibility is a part of the educational process. Disciplinary action can help encourage individual responsibility and self-discipline; protect the rights, freedoms, and safety of members of the College of Law community; and promote respect for the rights of others. Scope: 1. This Code applies to all students admitted to William Mitchell College of Law. The Code covers conduct that occurs from the time a candidate applies to the College, through the time a student graduates. 2. The Code applies to students enrolled in courses or programs sponsored or co-sponsored by the College of Law. 3. The Code also applies to student groups and organizations at the College of Law, regardless of whether they are formally recognized by the College of Law or receive funding, directly or indirectly, from the College of Law. 4. Investigations may be initiated or continued after a student has graduated, or after the student has completed the course or program, if the conduct at issue occurred while the individual was enrolled in the College of Law or in a program sponsored or co-sponsored by the College of Law. If a matter is pending when a student is scheduled to graduate, the student’s degree may be withheld until the matter is resolved. 5. The College of Law may take action for conduct that occurs on College premises, or at College sponsored (or co-sponsored) events, whether held on or off campus or in any other setting whether or not related to college activities. 11.3 Student Organizations and Group Responsibility Conduct: Student organizations are expected to adhere to all applicable institutional policies and standards. Failure to do so may result in action being initiated against the group; consequently, the Code applies to student organizations collectively. Student groups may be held responsible when any of the following conditions exist: 1. Members of the group act in concert to violate College of Law community standards.


2. A violation arises out of a group-sponsored, -financed, or –endorsed event. 3. A group leader has knowledge of the act or incident before or while it occurs and fails to take corrective action. 4. A pattern of individual violations is found to have existed without proper or appropriate group control, remedy, or sanction. 5. Members of the group cover up or fail to report improper conduct to the appropriate College of Law officials. Group Representative: One officer of the student group should be designated to represent the organization when a referral against that group is made under the Conduct Code. If the group does not designate an officer, the president or president-equivalent will be deemed the representative. 11.4 Prohibited Conduct 11.4.1 Violation of instructions Students must follow an instructor’s general and specific instructions concerning any assignment or examination. That is, in writing an examination or preparing an assignment a student may not use sources or collaborate with or enter into discussions with other people except as the instructor has authorized, nor may a student otherwise act contrary to the instructor’s instructions. In addition, students must follow instructions given by administrators. 11.4.2 Plagiarism Plagiarism, as described in Section 12, is a violation of the Student Conduct Code. In writing any paper or document other than a bluebook examination, a student may not borrow an idea or lift language from another source without giving full and accurate attribution by means of well-placed citations and, where there is a direct quote, accurate quotation marks. Not only direct quotes, but also paraphrased language, whether in text or footnotes, must be cited to the source the student used. A citation must appear every time a source is used; a citation that appears in one place does not serve as a citation to later use of the source. Sources include not only published material, but also electronic sources, unpublished manuscripts, briefs, and the like. This rule applies to papers and documents written for courses, independent study projects, the long paper requirement, student competitions, research projects for instructor, articles for The Opinion, or any other college-related activity. This rule is subject to specific instructions by a faculty member or supervisor of the particular activity in question. In articles written for The Opinion, and similar publications, accepted journalistic standards may dictate different requirements. 11.4.3 Classroom conduct Students must not disrupt a class by inappropriate noise or distracting activity. 11.4.4 Library rules Students must follow all library rules published on the library website or otherwise publicly promulgated. A violation of any library rule is a violation of this Student Conduct Code. For specific rules related to the Library, see www.wmitchell.edu/library.


11.4.5 Respect for person and property of others Students and student organizations must respect the person and property of others. A student and student organizations must not assault, must not harass, threaten, or otherwise attempt to intimidate, or intrude upon the rights of, any other person. A student and student organizations must not purposely damage, or knowingly take, the property of any other person. 11.4.6 Honesty and integrity A student and student organizations may not engage in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation. 11.4.7 Other college rules From time to time, the college may issue specific or general rules. When these rules are announced through the Docket or otherwise widely published, they become binding on all students. A student who violates any such rule also violates the Student Conduct Code.

11.5 Sanctions A violation of the Student Conduct Code may result in expulsion from the college, suspension from the college, dismissal from one or more classes, fines, restitution, or any other appropriate penalty. Violations by student organizations may result in loss of funding and sponsorship from the college. The application of any penalty shall depend upon the seriousness of the offense and the presence or absence of mitigating factors. Execution of the penalty may be stayed pending successful completion of specified conditions of a probationary period. 11.6 Rules of Procedure 11.6.1 Service Service of notice or any other document may be completed either by personal service or by certified mail with a request for a return receipt. Notice by mail is effective on the date of mailing unless otherwise specified. Personal service upon the Dean may also be accomplished by delivery to any college employee in the Deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suite. 11.6.2 Definition References in this section 11 to â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;the Deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; mean the Dean, or any person designated by the Dean to perform the acts required under these rules. 11.7 Initiation of Disciplinary Proceeding Any person may initiate a disciplinary proceeding under these rules by a signed, written complaint. The complaint shall state the essential facts constituting a violation of the Code. The complaint shall be served upon the Dean in accordance with the rule on Service. 11.7.1 Investigation The Dean shall promptly investigate the allegations of the complaint. Within 7 days of the service of the initial complaint the Dean must either: (A) dismiss the complaint for failure to allege a prima facie violation of the Code and notify the complainant of the dismissal, or (B) serve on the student charged a copy of the complaint, a copy of these rules, a copy of the Student Conduct Code, and notice of the time and place for a conference with the Dean.


11.7.2 Disciplinary Action Within 14 days after serving the student charged with a copy of the complaint, the Dean must either: (A) dismiss the complaint and notify the student charged and the complainant of the dismissal or (B) make a written determination identifying, (1) any violation of the Code that has occurred, (2) the facts establishing the violation, and (3) any penalty authorized by the Code, and serve a copy of that written determination and notice of the right to appeal upon the student charged and the complainant. The notice shall contain the names of the members of the Code Committee. 11.7.3 Appeal A student may appeal from any disciplinary action, including any such action taken in any proceeding under the Discrimination Policy or the Sexual Harassment Policy. A student may perfect an appeal by serving written notice of appeal upon the Dean within 10 days after the student has been served with notice of the disciplinary action. The Dean shall promptly serve a copy of the notice of appeal upon the chairperson of the Code Committee. 11.7.4 Stay of Disciplinary Action The perfection of a notice of appeal shall stay disciplinary action unless the Chairperson of the Code Committee determines that the safety of persons or property would be jeopardized by a stay and so notifies the Dean and the student charged in writing. 11.7.5 Notice of Appeal Hearing If the student charged appeals, the Chairperson of the Code Committee shall, within 7 days of the service of the notice of appeal and at least 10 days prior to the date set for the hearing, serve notice of the time and place for the appeal hearing upon the Dean and the student charged. 11.7.6 Scope of Review The Code Committee shall examine the record for clear and convincing evidence of the violation. In doing so, the committee can in its discretion hear any new or additional evidence submitted by students, the Dean, or any other person. In addition, the committee on its own motion can invite persons to submit evidence. If the committee finds that the violation has not been established by clear and convincing evidence the committee shall dismiss the complaint. If the committee believes that a violation has been established by clear and convincing evidence, it will examine the sanction imposed to determine whether the disciplinary penalty is appropriate. If the committee finds that the disciplinary penalty imposed is not appropriate, the committee may assess any less or more severe penalty authorized by the Code. 11.7.7 Finality of Committeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Decision The decision of the Code Committee shall be final and not subject to reconsideration, except on the grounds of newly-discovered evidence. Request for reconsideration must be served upon the Chairperson of the Code Committee within 30 days from the date of its decision. The Chairperson shall determine whether to grant the request. If the request is granted the committee shall hold an additional hearing. It shall give notice of the hearing as prescribed by these rules for the initial hearing. The hearing shall proceed in accordance with the rules governing initial hearings. 11.7.8 Majority Vote Unless otherwise specified all actions of the Code Committee shall be by vote of a majority.


11.7.9 Appeal Hearing Procedures 1. Composition of Code Committee. The full committee shall hear the appeal. The committee hearing the appeal shall consist of 3 full-time faculty members who serve on the Code Committee and are appointed by the Dean and 2 students appointed by the President of the Student Bar Association. If any faculty member is unable or unwilling to serve the Chairperson of the Code Committee shall name a replacement. If any student member of the committee is unable or unwilling to serve the President of the Student Bar Association shall name a replacement. 2. Objections. At any time the student charged may object for good cause to the participation in the hearing of any members of the committee. If the Chairperson sustains an objection to a faculty member the Chairperson shall appoint a substitute instructor member. If the Chairperson sustains an objection to a student member the Chairperson shall ask the President of the Student Bar Association to appoint a substitute student member. 3. Open Hearing. The hearing shall be open to the public unless the student charged requests that it be closed. 4. Record. A verbatim record of the hearing shall be made stenographically or by electronic recording. A transcript or tape recording shall be furnished at cost to the student charged upon request to the Chairperson of the Code Committee within 5 days after the hearing. 5. Representation. The student charged and the Dean may represent themselves at the hearing or may be represented by persons of their choice. References hereafter to the Dean or student shall include the representative of each. 6. Evidence. Any oral or documentary evidence may be received by the committee, but the findings of the committee must be based on reliable evidence. The Chairperson of the committee may prohibit the introduction of irrelevant or unduly repetitious evidence, or unreliable information. 7. Order of Hearing: a. Opening Statements. The Dean and the student charged shall state the issues upon appeal and the contentions of each. b. Presentation of Evidence. The Dean shall proceed first with the presentation of evidence, followed by the student charged. c. Questioning. A witness may be questioned by the Dean, by the student charged, or by members of the committee. d. Rebuttal. Following the presentation of evidence by the student charged, the Dean may offer evidence in rebuttal. The student charged may then offer evidence in surrebuttal. e. Closing Statements. After all the evidence has been presented, closing statements may be made by the Dean and then by the student charged. f. Continuance. If either the Dean or the student charged asserts surprise by any evidence presented, the Chairperson may grant a reasonable continuance in order to enable the surprised party to obtain evidence to meet the surprise. g. Reopening. In the interest of justice, the Chairperson of the committee may permit either the student charged or the Dean to offer rebuttal evidence or to reopen that personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s case-in-chief.


11.7.10 Decision of Committee The committee shall make its decision within 10 days of the hearing. The decision shall be in writing and shall state the determinations of the committee. The Chairperson shall serve a copy of the decision upon the Dean, the student charged, and the complainant. Any disciplinary penalty approved by the committee shall go into effect upon service of the notice upon the student charged. 11.7.11 Amendments This Code may be amended only after an open meeting for all students to discuss the proposed amendments. 11.7.12 Construction Nothing herein shall be interpreted in a manner inconsistent with the ABA Standards for Approval of Law Schools or any other relevant accreditation standards, as amended from time to time.


12. PLAGIARISM 12.1 General Information 12.1.1 Definition Plagiarism is representing another person’s words or ideas as one’s own without proper attribution or credit. Another person’s words or ideas must be given adequate documentation whether used in direct quotation or in summary or paraphrase. 12.1.2 Prohibited Conduct The college’s Student Conduct Code prohibits the following conduct: 1. Using any sources that are forbidden by the instructor to complete an exam, written assignment, or other requirement for graduation; 2. Submitting the work of another as one’s own; 3. Engaging in any conduct that tends to give an unfair advantage to any students in any academic matter. A student with knowledge of any violations of this section should report the violation promptly. The prohibition against “submitting the work of another as one’s own” includes a prohibition against plagiarism. There has been an increase in the number of disciplinary cases brought against students for this breach of the student conduct code. This prompts a reminder that the Student Conduct Code applies to all work completed as a student, and an explanation of the severity with which this breach is dealt. Regardless of the source, including online sources, the rule for proper attribution is relatively simple: cite the source. The following is additional commentary contained in the WRAP Manual: When students derive an idea from a source he or she has read or from discussion with an authoritative person (such as a instructor), the student is obligated to so indicate in written work. If a student quotes the source or person, he or she must signify that the text is a quotation. Whether one uses a direct quotation or a paraphrase, an appropriate citation to the source must be provided. The consequences for breach of the Honor Code are severe. Students typically receive a grade of “F” in the course and may be expelled from the College, suspended for a period of time, dismissed from the class, or otherwise penalized by the College. Additionally, the disciplinary action is placed in the student’s file and reported to the board of bar examiners in every state where the student applies to take the bar examination. 12.2 Frequently Asked Questions Regarding Plagiarism 1. Have I committed plagiarism if I fail to provide attribution in only one or two sections of my paper? If you have neglected to provide citations in one or two instances, your instructor will most likely treat the lapse as a failure to cite authorities properly, which should rightly result in a


lower grade. If you consistently fail to cite your sources throughout your paper, your instructor rightly would find that lapse to constitute plagiarism in violation of the Student Conduct Code. 2. Have I committed plagiarism if I read and take ideas from source A, but cite only source B, which is cite in the footnotes of source A? Yes. You are obligated to cite source A, the source you use. You may and should also note that it cites source B. Ordinarily, it is better to read and evaluate source B and then cite it directly. 3. If I borrow ideas from a source, but then reorganize those ideas using my own words, must I cite the source I used? Yes. As stated in the WRAP Manual, when you use an idea (which may be quoted or paraphrased) from the work of another, you must cite the source you use. 4. Must I cite well-known facts? You are not obligated to cite well-known facts (e.g., the Bill of Rights was first adopted in 1791), but you must cite the sources from which you derived new ideas, information, or not so well-known facts. 5.

If I find information or ideas in several sources, must I cite all of them? If you find the same idea or information in several sources, you are permitted to select an illustrative source, which you should cite. You are permitted to note that there are other sources by using the designation â&#x20AC;&#x153;e.g.â&#x20AC;?. The central point in this question is that you must indicate the idea is not your own, but is derived from other sources. See Bluebook Rule 1.2.

6. If I am uncertain as to how I cite a source or whether I should cite a source, where can I go for assistance? When in doubt, consult the Bluebook, ask an instructor, and cite the source as best you can.


13. NON-DISCRIMINATION AND NON-HARASSMENT POLICY 13.1 Policy Statement William Mitchell College of Law (the "College") is committed to providing a working and learning environment that maximizes the potential of each student, faculty member and staff member. Discrimination or harassment of any sort interferes with that environment. Therefore, discrimination or harassment on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, sex, age, national origin, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, status with regard to public assistance, membership or activity in a local human or civil rights commission, or any other protected class status defined by applicable law ("discrimination or harassment") is prohibited and will not be tolerated. Retaliation against a person who reports or complains about discrimination or harassment, or who participates in or supports the investigation of a discrimination or harassment complaint, is also prohibited and will not be tolerated. Any member of the William Mitchell community found to have violated this policy is subject to disciplinary or corrective action. 13.2 Definitions Discrimination occurs when an individual is treated adversely or differently because of that person's race, color, creed, religion, sex, age, national origin, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, status with regard to public assistance, membership or activity in a local commission, or any other protected class status defined by applicable law. Harassment includes conduct that denigrates or shows hostility or aversion toward an individual because of his or her race, color, creed, religion, sex, age, national origin, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, status with regard to public assistance, membership or activity in a local commission, or any other protected class status defined by applicable law and that: 1. has the purpose or effect of creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working or educational environment; or 2. has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's work or educational performance; or 3. otherwise adversely affects an individual's employment or educational opportunities. Some examples of conduct that may constitute discrimination or harassment include the following: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

failure or refusal to hire, train, or promote because of an individual's protected class status; or limiting salary increases because of protected class status; or disciplining or terminating an individual because of protected class status; or treating an individual differently in any other respect because of protected class status; or epithets, slurs, threatening, or intimidating acts, including written or graphic material directed to an individual because of protected class status; or 6. written, verbal, or physical acts directed to an individual because of protected class status that purport to be jokes or pranks.

13.3 Reporting Procedure If a student, faculty member, or staff member believes that he or she has been discriminated against or harassed by another student, faculty member, staff member, or any other person whom the student, faculty member, or staff member encounters in the course of employment or education, or if a student,


faculty member, or staff member observes discrimination or harassment, the individual should immediately report the conduct as follows: 1. Students: To the Dean, Vice Dean, Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life, or any Associate or Assistant Dean. Anyone who receives a report or complaint of discrimination or harassment regarding a student should immediately report it to the Vice Dean. 2. Faculty and Staff: To the Dean, any member of management, or Human Resources. Anyone who receives a report or complaint of discrimination or harassment regarding a faculty or staff member should immediately report it to the Vice President of Human Resources. Complaints of discrimination or harassment involving the President and Dean should immediately be reported to an Officer of the Board of Trustees. If a complaint is made to anyone else, the complainant risks the possibility that it will not come to the attention of the appropriate management and, therefore, may not be acted upon. If the discrimination or harassment reoccurs, it should immediately be reported to any of the individuals listed above. The college does not tolerate any retaliation or intimidation directed towards anyone who makes a complaint or report of discrimination or harassment or who participates in the investigation of a complaint. The reporting procedure described above should also be used if an employee believes he or she has been subjected to prohibited retaliation or intimidation. 13.4 Investigation of Complaint Every complaint or report of discrimination or harassment made to any individual listed above will be promptly investigated. A complaint will be investigated by (a) the Dean or the Dean's designee; or (b) an individual who is not an employee of the college, who may be retained by the college for the purpose of investigating complaints of harassment, and who has experience and expertise in conducting investigations ("Consultant"); or (c) a combination of the above. If the investigation is commenced by the Dean or the Dean's designee, the investigation may be referred to the Consultant at any point in time. Reasons for referral could include, but are not limited to, the scope or complexity of the investigation or a perceived or actual conflict of interest. The timing and specific nature of the investigation of any complaint will be determined by the investigator. Although investigations will be conducted with sensitivity to confidential issues, investigative information will be communicated as appropriate to those with a need to know. Because the circumstances of every complaint are different, discretion and flexibility will be utilized in conducting an appropriate investigation of each complaint. If the investigation is commenced or completed by the Consultant, a written fact-finding report will be prepared upon completion of the investigation. This report may summarize information as appropriate. The Dean or the Deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s designee will review the report, may conduct additional fact-finding, and will determine whether it appears this policy has been violated. 13.5 Disciplinary or Corrective Action If it appears that a violation of this policy may have occurred, timely and appropriate disciplinary or corrective action will be taken as follows: 1. A faculty or staff member found to have committed a violation of this policy may be subject to a broad range of consequences, up to and including termination of employment. If necessary, a


matter will be referred to the appropriate disciplinary authority as required by college policy and by existing agreements with the faculty to determine what corrective action is appropriate. 2. A student found to have committed a violation of this policy may be subject to a broad range of consequences up to and including expulsion, suspension, or other appropriate action. However, if it appears that the safety or security of the college or of an individual member of the community may be jeopardized, the Dean or the Dean’s designee may take immediate action to prevent the occurrence or reoccurrence of discrimination or harassment. 13.6 Questions Please direct any questions to the appropriate office: for Staff – Any member of management or Human Resources; for faculty – President and Dean, Vice Dean, or Human Resources; for Students – President and Dean, Vice Dean, Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life, or any Associate or Assistant Dean.


14. POLICY AGAINST SEXUAL HARASSMENT 14.1 Policy Statement William Mitchell College of Law (the "College") is committed to provide a working and learning environment that maximizes the potential of each student, faculty member, and staff member. Sexual harassment of any sort interferes with that environment. Therefore, sexual harassment of any student, faculty member or staff member is prohibited and will not be tolerated. Retaliation against a person who reports or complains about sexual harassment, or who participates in or supports the investigation of a sexual harassment complaint, is also prohibited and will not be tolerated. Any member of the William Mitchell community found to have violated this policy is subject to disciplinary or corrective action. 14.2 Definitions Sexual Harassment - Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitutes sexual harassment when: 1. Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of employment or education, or 2. Submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as a basis for employment or educational decisions affecting the individual, or 3. Such conduct unreasonably interferes with an individual's work or educational performance, or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working or educational environment. Some examples of conduct that may constitute sexual harassment including but are not limited to the following: 1. Repeated and unwelcome suggestions regarding, or invitations to, social engagements or social events; or 2. Any indication, express or implied, that any aspect of employment conditions, academic progress or personal safety depends or may depend on the granting of sexual favors or on a willingness to accept or tolerate conduct or communication of a sexual nature; or 3. Unwelcome or coerced physical proximity or physical contact which is of a sexual nature or sexually motivated; or 4. The deliberate use of offensive or demeaning terms which have a sexual connotation; or 5. The deliberate creation of an intimidating, hostile or offensive atmosphere, through conduct or communication of a sexual nature; or 6. Inappropriate remarks of a sexual nature. 14.3 Reporting Procedure If a student, faculty member, or staff member believes that he or she has been sexually harassed by another student, faculty member, staff member, or any other person whom the student, faculty member, or staff member encounters in the course of employment or education, or if a student, faculty member, or staff member observes sexual harassment, the individual should immediately report the conduct as follows:


1. Students: To the Dean, Vice Dean, Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life or any Associate or Assistant Dean. Anyone who receives a report or complaint of sexual harassment regarding a student should immediately report it to the Vice Dean. 2. Faculty and Staff: To the Dean, any member of management, or Human Resources. Anyone who receives a report or complaint of sexual harassment regarding a faculty or staff member should immediately report it to the Vice President for Human Resources. Complaints of sexual harassment involving the President and Dean should immediately be reported to an Officer of the Board of Trustees. If a complaint is made to anyone else, the complainant risks the possibility that it will not come to the attention of the appropriate management and, therefore, may not be acted upon. If the sexual harassment reoccurs, it should immediately be reported to any of the individuals listed above. The college does not tolerate any retaliation or intimidation directed towards anyone who makes a complaint or report of sexual harassment or who participates in the investigation of a complaint. The reporting procedure described above should also be used if an employee believes he or she has been subjected to prohibited retaliation or intimidation. 14.4 Investigation of Complaint Every complaint or report of sexual harassment made to any individual listed above will be promptly investigated. A complaint will be investigated by (a) the Dean or the Dean's designee; or (b) an individual who is not an employee of the college, who may be retained by the college for the purpose of investigating complaints of harassment, and who has experience and expertise in conducting investigations ("Consultant"); or (c) a combination of the above. If the investigation is commenced by the Dean or the Dean's designee, the investigation may be referred to the Consultant at any point in time. Reasons for referral could include, but are not limited to, the scope or complexity of the investigation or a perceived or actual conflict of interest. The timing and specific nature of the investigation of any complaint will be determined by the investigator. Although investigations will be conducted with sensitivity to confidential issues, investigative information will be communicated as appropriate to those with a need to know. Because the circumstances of every complaint are different, discretion and flexibility will be utilized in conducting an appropriate investigation of each complaint. If the investigation is commenced or completed by the Consultant, a written fact-finding report will be prepared upon completion of the investigation. This report may summarize information as appropriate. The Dean or the Deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s designee will review the report, may conduct additional fact-finding, and will determine whether it appears that this policy has been violated. 14.5 Disciplinary or Corrective Action If it appears that a violation of this policy may have occurred, timely and appropriate disciplinary or corrective action will be taken as follows: 1. A faculty or staff member found to have committed a violation of this policy may be subject to a broad range of consequences, up to and including termination of employment. If necessary, a


matter will be referred to the appropriate disciplinary authority as required by College policy and by existing agreements with the faculty to determine what corrective action is appropriate. 2. A student found to have committed a violation of this policy may be subject to a broad range of consequences up to and including expulsion, suspension, or other appropriate action. However, if it appears that the safety or security of the college or of an individual member of the community may be jeopardized, the Dean or the Dean’s designee may take immediate action to prevent the occurrence or reoccurrence of sexual harassment. 14.6 Questions Please direct any questions to the appropriate office: for Staff – Any member of management or Human Resources; for faculty – President and Dean, Vice Dean, or Human Resources; for Students – President and Dean, Vice Dean, Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life, or any Associate or Assistant Dean.


15. PROBLEMATIC CONSENSUAL ROMANTIC RELATIONSHIPS POLICY 15.1 Introduction and Scope Many members of the college community form important personal and professional relationships with other members; this is as it should be. Some of these relationships are consensual and romantic in nature. While many consensual romantic relationships are appropriate, others pose problems because they cross professional boundaries, thereby undermining the fair employment and educational environments that the college seeks to provide its faculty, staff, and students. This policy addresses consensual relationships. Nonconsensual, or unwelcome, conduct of a sexual nature is addressed in the college’s Sexual Harassment Policy. 15.2 Definitions A romantic relationship is problematic when: 1. It involves one participant who is in a position of power over the other participant, or 2. One participant has the ability to give employment-related or education related preference to the other participant. The following are examples of problematic romantic relationships: manager and subordinate reporting directly or indirectly to the manager; professor and student in the professor’s class; professor and research assistant; member of a student services office (e.g., Career Services, Financial Aid) and student. These relationships are problematic whether or not the power is exercised or preference is given, because the appearance of impropriety is itself a concern. 15.3 Policy Statement Community members are strongly encouraged not to engage in problematic consensual romantic relationships. If two members of the college community feel that a problematic consensual romantic relationship may be beginning, and they want to continue that relationship, they are to take prompt steps to render the relationship non-problematic, e.g. by arranging for dropping of a course (in the case of a student with a professor), agreeing to discontinue employment (in the case of a research assistant with a professor), or arranging for re-assignment (in the case of a manager with a subordinate). It is a violation of this policy for a faculty or staff member to engage in a problematic consensual romantic relationship. Students are strongly discouraged from engaging in a problematic romantic relationship. When a prohibited problematic romantic relationship arises that involves a faculty or staff member, the faculty or staff member shall promptly disclose it to the following: 1. Faculty: To the Vice Dean or the President and Dean; 2. Staff: To the employee’s manager, the employee’s senior manager, the Vice President of Human Resources, or the President and Dean. The college’s response will depend on the specific situation. In all situations, the response will include amelioration of the situation. For example, where feasible a subordinate’s or manager’s job responsibilities may be modified. As another example, a professor-student romantic relationship will cease until the student no longer is a student in the professor’s class.


15.4 Disciplinary or Corrective Action A faculty or staff member found to have committed a violation of this policy may be subject to a broad range of consequences, up to and including termination of employment. If necessary, a matter will be referred to the appropriate disciplinary authority as required by college policy and by existing agreements with the faculty to determine what corrective action is appropriate. 15.5 Voluntary Disclosure When a romantic relationship develops between two members of the college community that is not problematic as described above and at least one participant is a faculty or staff member, the faculty or staff member(s) is/are strongly encouraged to disclose the relationship to the following: 1. Faculty: To the Vice Dean or the President and Dean; 2. Staff: To the employeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s manager, the employeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s senior manager, the Vice President of Human Resources, or the President and Dean. This disclosure will reduce the likelihood that the relationship will become problematic, e.g., by inadvertent creation of a manager-subordinate relationship between the two participants.


C. STUDENT FINANCE 16. TUITION AND FEES 16.1 Tuition Costs For breakdown of tuition costs, please see the WMCL web site at: http://www.wmitchell.edu/current. Students are required to view their student account financial status online to determine if an outstanding balance exists on their account, requiring a payment to be made. To view your student account, login to the student record login page and click on the Finance Status tab. Monthly statements will not be distributed. 16.2 Fees Student Bar Association mandatory fee: $25 each semester (Fall & Spring only) Auditing fees for alumni: No charge for Fall 2010; Spring 2011 TBA at time of Handbook publication. Limitations apply. Contact registrar@wmitchell.edu with questions. Auditing fees for Students and non-Alumni holding a J.D.: see section 2.7 Printing Fee o Each student will be charged $10.00 for 250 pages (double-sided pages count as 2) at the beginning of each Fall Term. o Any additional pages must be purchased via cash or check at the Library Circulation Desk in $5.00 increments (125 pages). o All unused pages will remain on studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; accounts until one year after graduation. o Students will not be able to opt out of this program 16.3 Donations and Memberships Students are given the opportunity to make optional donations and payments. The suggested Minnesota Public Interest Research Group (MPIRG) donation per semester is $8.25. An annual student subscription for the William Mitchell Law Review is $25. An annual Minnesota State Bar Association (MSBA) membership is $30 to join the MSBA-Ramsey County District or $40 to join the MSBA-Hennepin County District. The annual student subscription to the ABA/Law Student Division is $20. Students also may donate to the Lew G. Wallace Emergency Student Loan Fund, Counseling Services, and the Loan Repayment Assistance Program. Students wishing to make donations or pay for subscriptions should visit the Accounting Office if they did not receive a Donations and Memberships/Subscriptions form in either their registration or admissions packet. Prices subject to change. 16.4 Time of Payment & Finance Charges At William Mitchell College of Law, the payment of tuition and any required and/or elected fees becomes the obligation of the student at the time of registration. William Mitchell College of Law bills students monthly. If the due date is a weekend or holiday, the due date shall be the next business day. If the amount due is not paid by the 15th day after the due date, a late fee may be assessed and the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s account will fall into past due status. Past due accounts will be subject to the following actions: Registration will be denied Transcript requests will not be processed Grades will be withheld Students will be Administratively Withdrawn from classes


Certification of Graduation sent to the State Board of Law Examiners will be withheld Past Due accounts assigned to a collection agency will be assessed interest and any other additional collections costs. If any part of a payment due is not paid on or before the fifteenth day following its due date, a late fee charge of .67% (annual percentage rate of 8%) of the overdue amount is assessed. The College reserves the right to grant or deny credit based on an individualâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past payment experience. Tuition payment by credit card is not accepted. 16.5 Full Payment Plan The Full Payment Plan requires that all tuition and any required and/or elected fees are paid before classes begin. If a student is receiving full financial aid the payment due date does not apply. A required fee is defined as any fee or charge that is not voluntary of the student. An elected fee is defined as any fee or charge that is voluntary of the student. See http://www.wmitchell.edu/services/tuition-aid/payment-plans.asp for deadlines. 16.6 Installment Payment Plan The Installment Payment allows students to spread the cost of tuition over three installments. Financial Aid received by the college will be credited in full to the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s account. See http://www.wmitchell.edu/services/tuition-aid/payment-plans.asp for deadlines. If the amount of financial aid exceeds tuition and other charges for the semester or session, students are not eligible for the installment plan. The Installment Payment Plan is only offered during the Fall and Spring semesters. 16.7 Employer/Outside Agency Tuition Reimbursement Students expecting to receive employer tuition reimbursement, or any other outside tuition reimbursement, should consult with the Accounting Office at the beginning of the semester when the reimbursement is to occur. Documentation from the employer, or outside agency, is required at this time. Once documentation is on file in the Accounting Office, tuition payments may be deferred, and subsequently, late fees waived. 16.8 Student Refund Checks Credit balances from fully paid student accounts will be distributed by check in accordance with any applicable Federal Regulations. Student refund checks may be picked up in the Finance Office or can be mailed by request. Refund checks not picked up within 21 days of the check date will be returned to the loan holder unless the student specifically requests that the check be sent directly to him/her and a current mailing address is provided. Students may return all or a portion of their refund check via the Finance Office up to 21 days after the date of the check. After that date, the student must return any excess funds directly to the loan holder. First refund checks in each semester will generally be available at the end of the semester add/drop deadline and every Friday afterwards. Specific dates are announced on the Docket.


16.9 Finance Department The Finance Department is open from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Services for students include the following: Receipt of billed tuition and fees Payroll check disbursement Student refund check disbursement Student account related inquiries 1098 tax form inquiries 16.10 Withdrawal from a Course – Add/Drop-Effecting Tuition Add/drop activities, once an academic term has begun, that result in a net reduction in tuition may incur a tuition liability based on the tuition refund schedule. Students who drop from full-time to part-time or from part-time to below 8 credits will have a refund calculation performed by the Finance Office where any tuition liability will be recognized and applied to the students’ accounts. Add/drop activities, once an academic term has begun, that result in a net increase in tuition will be billed accordingly in the next billing cycle. Credit balances from fully paid student accounts will be distributed by check in accordance with any applicable Federal Regulations. For additional questions regarding add/drop of classes, please see Registration, Withdrawals, and Records. For the Tuition Refund Schedule see www.wmitchell.edu/current/registration/refund.html. 16.11 Withdrawal from the College – Tuition Refunds For the process on how to Withdraw from the College see section 2.10. Students who fully withdraw from an academic term, once the term has started, will have a tuition liability calculation completed by the Finance Office. The calculation will be based on the day of the official withdrawal and subject to the percentages listed on the WMCL website under “Tuition Refund Schedule” for the specific academic term. After the 60% point in a term, no refunds for tuition are given. Students who receive federal financial aid will have a calculation done for Return of Title IV Funds as well. Any remaining balance on a student account after these calculations are performed is due immediately. William Mitchell College of Law will process withdrawal calculations within 10 days after the withdrawal form is received in the Finance Office. If, at the time of withdrawal, a student’s tuition payments exceed the amount of tuition liability, the Finance Office uses the overpaid amount to reduce any student aid awarded before returning any funds to the student. Aid is refunded to student financial aid programs in the following order, as mandated by federal and state regulation: 1. Unsubsidized Federal Direct Loan 2. Subsidized Federal Direct Loan 3. Graduate Plus Direct Loans 4. Federal Perkins Loan 5. Other Title IV (Federal) Financial Aid Programs 6. Other Federal Sources


7. 8. 9. 10.

Institutional Aid Private Aid (private loans, outside scholarships, etc.) SELF Loans (or other state aid) Student

16.12 Return of Title IV Funds Return of Title IV Funds is a federally mandated policy that applies only to students who receive federal financial aid and who withdraw from the college, drop out, are dismissed, or take a Leave of Absence during an academic term. The college will evaluate the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s account with respect to the federal Return of Title IV Funds regulation to determine how much aid, if any, must be returned to Title IV loan programs. The Title IV funds considered in the policy are the Federal Subsidized/Unsubsidized loan, Federal Grad Plus loan, and the Federal Perkins Loan. The policy does not apply to the Federal WorkStudy Program. 16.13 Policy on Tuition for Students Returning from Active Duty in the Military Tuition for students who enter active duty in the military will be charged as follows: In times of war: Tuition will be charged at the level that would have been charged during the period the student was serving in the military if the student is called into or voluntarily enters active duty. For example: If a student was serving in the Military during a time of war in: 2010-11

returns in

Tuition would be at

2012-13

2010-11 level for 2012-13 2011-12 level for 2013-14 etc.

In non-war times: This section applies in non-war times when the student is called into service involuntarily. The section does not apply when a student voluntarily enters active duty during non-war times. There is a three year look back limit. For example, if a student returns after a five year absence, the tuition would be at the level from three years prior to the date of return. This section applies to entering students who have made an admission deposit with the College as well as to all currently enrolled students.


17. FINANCIAL AID 17.1 Financial Aid Office The Financial Aid Office administers student loan programs, the federal work-study program, and institutional scholarships. Application materials and information are available from the Financial Aid Office and on the William Mitchell web site www.wmitchell.edu/services/finaid. Financial aid information is communicated by mail, e-mail, on the William Mitchell web site, and in the Docket. Financial aid is available as federal work-study program eligibility, federal student loans, and scholarships. Financial aid pays for tuition, fees, books, supplies, and budgeted living expenses for periods during which an admitted student is enrolled for at least 2 credits. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) determines annual eligibility for financial aid. FAFSA applications are available at www.fafsa.ed.gov. The William Mitchell federal school code is G02391. A priority FAFSA application deadline of March 15th is observed each year to facilitate awarding of limited funds, ie. work-study, Perkins loan, and scholarship funds. Students may continue to submit FAFSA applications after that date for consideration of any remaining limited funds and federal student loan programs. Academic eligibility for federal financial aid is reviewed annually (see: www.wmitchell.edu/services/finaid/academiceligibility.html). Students who do not meet satisfactory academic standards at the start of fall semester are not eligible to receive financial aid. Notification of non-eligibility can occur at any point in the financial aid cycle, and if disbursement has occurred, funds will be withdrawn and the student billed directly. Disbursement of financial aid items is through student accounts managed by the Finance Office. 17.2 Cost-of-Attendance (also known as the student’s “budget”) 17.2.1 Establishing the Cost-of-Attendance Each year, the financial aid office establishes a modest and adequate cost-of-attendance budget which includes tuition, fees, books, supplies and living expenses. Budget details can be viewed at http://www.wmitchell.edu/services/finaid/cost+of+attendance.asp . The FAFSA process results in an expected family contribution (EFC) number, which is compared to the student’s cost-of-attendance. The difference between the two numbers is the student’s eligibility for “need” based financial aid items. Need based financial aid items will be offered when available. Students will be offered financial aid items equal to the total cost-of attendance for the student’s program. The total amount of all need and non-need financial aid items from both on and off campus sources cannot exceed the student’s cost-ofattendance. A separate, summer cost-of-attendance is established for summer registration. 17.2.2 Adjustments to the cost-of-attendance Adjustments to the cost-of-attendance are made on a case by case basis when special circumstances are documented and submitted for consideration by the Financial Aid Office. In general, cost-of-attendance adjustments can be made for reasonable child care expenses, uninsured, non-elective medical expenses, student insurance premiums, and a one-time computer purchase. Request forms for adjustments are available at http://www.wmitchell.edu/services/finaid/forms.html and must be accompanied by detailed documentation specific to the 2010-2011 school year. Adjustments to the cost-of-attendance cannot be made for consumer debt, lifestyle choices, moving expenses or other expenses which are not specific to the academic program.


17.3 Federal Work-Study (FWS) Program Federal Work-Study program eligibility is need based. Funds are limited. Work study eligibility is awarded on a priority basis based on the March 15th FAFSA application deadline. Holding a work-study job allows students to earn, rather than borrow, some of their financial aid eligibility. Work-study funds are paid in the form of a paycheck from the work-study job. To apply for work-study jobs, review oncampus and off-campus job listings in the Career Development area of the William Mitchell Web site, Simplicity, or visit the Career Development Office, Room 103. Job listings are most plentiful at the start of each semester. Work-study may be used at anytime throughout the year, from May 15, 2010 through May 13, 2011. Please contact the Financial Aid Office for further information. 17.4 Scholarships and Awards The total value of all scholarships and fellowships received, whether from on or off campus sources cannot exceed the student’s total tuition charges. 17.4.1 Merit-Based Scholarships The college awards merit-based scholarships to entering students, some of which are renewable if the recipient meets specific criteria. Scholarships open for application for the 2010-2011 academic year will be announced in the Docket. Newly available scholarships continue to be announced on the Docket, and remain listed in the financial aid section of the Docket until the application period has closed. Scholarships are credited to student’s account at the beginning of each semester. A student entering the college without a merit-based scholarship who then achieves a 10% co-hort ranking at the close of spring semester is eligible for an Academic scholarship, to be awarded the following fall. If scholarship retention criteria are not met, forfeiture of the scholarship will be effective with the term immediately following spring semester after grades/rankings are made available. Withdrawal from the college before the end of the semester for which a scholarship was awarded will cause forfeit of the full amount of the scholarship. 17.4.2 Fellowships Fellowships are paid to SBA officers and to Law Review editorial staff. Fellowships are included in financial aid totals. The total amount of all fellowships and scholarships received cannot exceed a student’s total tuition bill. 17.4.3 Outside Scholarships Throughout the academic year, the college receives information about scholarships from outside organizations. Scholarship announcements are published on the Docket.

17.5 Student Loans William Mitchell participates in the Department of Education Direct Loan Program. Eligibility for Perkins, Subsidized/Unsubsidized, and Grad PLUS federal loan programs require submission of the “Free Application for Federal Student Aid” (FAFSA) at www.fafsa.ed.gov. The William Mitchell federal school code is G02391. The type of loans a student is eligible to apply for is determined by the results of the processed FAFSA. International students who do not qualify for federal loans should contact the William Mitchell Financial Aid Office for assistance and information. It is the student’s responsibility to complete the appropriate loan applications and promissory notes. Complete loan program details including borrower rights and responsibilities are available from lenders. Early application is encouraged to assure that funds are available no later than the first day of classes. Unpaid student accounts may be assessed


late fees, and an academic hold may be placed if funds are not received in a timely matter. See §16.4 Time of Payment & Finance Charges. 17.5.1 Federal Perkins Loan Need based Subject to funds availability $6,000 annual program limit/$40,000 aggregate limit 5% fixed interest rate accrues no interest until repayment William Mitchell College of Law is the lender 9 month principal repayment grace period after graduation, student leaves school, or is less than halftime 17.5.2 Federal Direct Subsidized/Unsubsidized Loans Need based $138,500 aggregate maximum 6.8% fixed interest rate 6-month principal repayment grace period after, graduation, student leaves school or is less than half time No credit check is required Subsidized loans (need based) accrue no interest until repayment: $8,500 annual maximum Unsubsidized loans accrue interest from initial disbursement: $12,000 annual maximum Depending on subsidized loan eligibility, annual combined Stafford loan limit is up to $ $20,500 All first time borrowers must complete a Loan Program Entrance Counseling session Borrowers who graduate or leave the college must complete a Loan Program Exit session before their graduation will be certified or transcript will be released. 17.5.3 Federal Grad PLUS loan Non-need based No aggregate maximum: limit is the cost-of-attendance minus all other aid received 7.9% fixed interest rate No grace period Credit check is required Interest accrues from initial disbursement

17.5.4 Private Educational Loans It may be necessary to apply for and receive a private loan for educational purposes if you are an International Student. In all other instances, a federal loan is recommended. Before applying for any loan, other than a federal loan, please visit the Financial Aid Office to discuss. 17.5.5 Lew G. Wallace Memorial Emergency Loan Fund (ESL’s) Emergency Student Loans (ESL’s) are short-term no interest loans used for extraordinary financial circumstances that may arise during a student’s enrollment at the college. Extraordinary circumstances are those that create a financial hardship that cannot be alleviated by alternative funding options. The Financial Aid Director must approve all ESL requests. The following conditions apply:


A student may receive no more than a total of four loans with a combined total of $4,000 during his or her course of study at the college. No more than one ESL per semester with a maximum limit of $1,000 will be approved. There will be a 24-hour waiting period once the request is received in the Finance Department. Loans will only be approved if there is a verifiable source for repayment that meets the following time restrictions: o The maximum repayment period is 90 days if a student is receiving financial aid and a distribution for the current term is forthcoming. o The maximum repayment period is 90 days from receipt of loan if a student is not receiving financial aid. The unpaid balance of ESL’s after the due date will be placed on the student’s account and will accrue interest and penalties until the balance is paid in full. Late payments will affect a student’s ability to use the ESL fund in the future. Students with past due ESL balances will not be permitted to register, to receive grades, transcripts, or bar certifications. 17.6 Enrollment Verification The College verifies a student’s enrollment to outside interested parties for a variety of reasons. These include deferment of educational loans, insurance, and certification of enrollment status for third-party funding (e.g. VA benefits, employer reimbursement). For these verifications the College uses the following definitions: For Fall and Spring Semesters Full-time enrollment: 8 or more credits Half-time enrollment: 4 – 7 credits Less than half-time enrollment: 1 – 3 credits For Summer Session: Full-time enrollment: 4 – 7 credits Half-time enrollment: 2 – 3 credits Less than half-time enrollment: 1 credit The above credit levels apply to enrollment verification only and are not the definition for tuition billing levels. The levels for tuition billing can be found at http://www.wmitchell.edu/services/tuitionaid/tuition-financial-aid.asp. For deferment eligibility you must be at least a half-time student as defined by the above credit criteria. 17.7 Deferment of Existing Student loan Payments WMCL works in conjunction with the National Student Clearinghouse to report student’s enrollment status 3-4 times each semester. The purpose of this report is to inform lender(s) of a student’s current enrollment level so the lender(s) can determine eligibility for deferring loans. The information is transmitted electronically to the Clearinghouse. The Clearinghouse then forwards the enrollment status directly to the holder(s) of the student’s existing loans. The first electronic transmission is submitted approximately two weeks after classes begin in the fall term and continues monthly throughout the entire academic year. The servicer(s) of the loan(s) will process the deferment status retroactively to the first date of class.


This activity is conducted electronically and without paper deferment forms. If a deferment form is received, you can submit it to the Registrarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office for processing. However, if your lender/servicer works with the Clearinghouse, the paper form is not necessary. A listing of participating guarantors, lenders and servicers that utilize the Clearinghouse to perform enrollment verification electronically can be found at: http://www.studentclearinghouse.org/gls/lenders_servicers.htm. 17.8 Academic Eligibility for Financial Aid Federal financial aid eligibility requires students to make satisfactory academic progress toward their degree. Academic progress is measured qualitatively, quantitatively, and incrementally as follows: 17.8.1 Qualitative Standards A studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cumulative G.P.A. must be at least 2.0, or if below 2.0, the student must meet the Academic Affairs Committeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s requirements for Academic Probation. 17.8.2 Quantitative Standards A student must complete his or her J.D. degree within 6 years of matriculation, or is subject to dismissal from the college as stated in the Academic Rules and Procedures. 17.8.3 Incremental Standards To ensure that students progress toward completion of their J.D. within the maximum time frame of 6 years, students must complete a minimum number of credits by the end of spring semester of each year: Year One: 14 credits Year Four: 56 credits Year Two: 28 credits Year Five: 71 credits Year Three: 42 credits Year Six: 86 credits


D. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY USE and EDUCATIONAL FACILTIES 18. INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY 18.1 Policy Statement William Mitchell College of Law encourages use and application of technology to enhance studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; legal education by providing the ability to conduct legal research and to efficiently communicate with faculty and other members of the college and the legal community. The technology tools include, but are not limited to, computers, telephones, on-line library databases, e-mail, and Intranet/Internet. Access to various technology tools available at the college is a privilege extended to current students and requires that individual users act responsibly. Users must respect the rights of others, respect the integrity of systems and related physical resources, and observe all relevant laws, regulations, and college policies. The college reserves the right to access all information in its technology tools for business purposes. Business purposes may include day-to-day management of the systems, monitoring user performance or productivity where applicable, investigating possible violations of this or other college policies, such as sexual harassment, the unauthorized disclosure of confidential information, misuse of college resources or property, or a violation of law. There is no privacy nor expectation of privacy associated with a userâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s college account. The college reserves the right to extend, limit, restrict, or deny privileges or access to its technology tools. 18.2 Security Users are expected to keep passwords confidential and user passwords may be overridden by the college as necessary for business or administrative reasons. The student to whom the account is assigned is the only person authorized to use the account. Please report any unauthorized use of your account to the Information Technology Vice President. 18.3 Usage Accounts will be terminated twelve (12) months after the end of the last semester, in which the student was enrolled. User access may be suspended or terminated by the college at any time with or without notice. 18.4 Acceptable Uses/Limitations Examples include but are not limited to: The collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s technology tools are to be used primarily for college business purposes. Use of any college system for the benefit of any student or third party is expressly prohibited. Students are permitted to use technology tools in a prudent manner for personal use as long as it does not interfere with the use of technology by other members of the college community. Users do not own accounts on college computers, but are granted the privilege of use. The college may revoke this privilege if college policies are not followed. Users may not share their accounts with others and must keep account passwords confidential. The college cannot guarantee that messages or files created, stored, received or sent through college technology systems (including computers, telephones, hard drives, disks, etc.) are private or secure. The college may monitor and record usage to enforce its policies and may use information gained in this way in disciplinary actions against the user. Users must adhere strictly to software licensing agreements and copyright laws.


Only software that has been authorized by the college may be loaded or used on any college computer. The Information Technology Services Department is responsible for loading or removing any software. 18.5 Prohibited Conduct Examples include, but are not limited to: Sending, storing, or accessing harassing, pornographic, obscene, offensive, or otherwise inappropriate information or material. Deliberate attempts to access files or information that the user is not authorized to access. Downloading music or videos due to the impact on system performance. Unauthorized attempts to view and/or use another person’s accounts, computer files, programs, or data. Use of college resources for any commercial activity or for-profit services. Any attempts to disable or compromise the security of information contained on college’s computers. Copying software protected by copyright. Initiating or propagating electronic chain letters. Inappropriate mass mailings to newsgroups, mailing lists, or individuals. Unauthorized broadcasting: of unsolicited mail or information. Failure to limit personal use of the computer. Attempts to disrupt, subvert, or circumvent the college’s access to any data, communications, systems, files, or passwords. Posting a message on an Internet bulletin board, World Wide Web document, or any publicly available Internet site which in any manner refers to the college and its programs and services, or which might be interpreted as stating a college position or policy, without express advance approval of the President and Dean, unless the message clearly indicates that it reflects only the views of the author and not the college. 18.6 Violations Any suspected violation of this policy should be directed to the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life. Violations may result in disciplinary action. 18.7 Questions Users of the college’s technology tools are encouraged to ask questions and understand the topics covered in this policy. Questions should be directed to the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life.


19. FACILITIES POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 19.1 Accidents and Injuries on Campus All accidents and injuries on campus should be reported to the on-duty security officer as soon as possible. The on-duty security officer may be reached by phone at (651) 290-6330, by radio at (651) 2248763, or by pager at (612) 527-3533. There are first aid kits available at the Summit Avenue security desk; the Copy Center; and in Student Services. 19.2 Alcohol The use of alcoholic beverages on campus is prohibited. Exceptions may be approved for college- or student group-sponsored activities such as receptions and other special events. When an exception is approved, such beverages are limited to wine and beer, and non-alcoholic beverages also must be available. All requests for exceptions must be approved in writing by the Dean of Student Affairs. 19.3 Tobacco-Free Environment Smoking is not permitted inside the facilities. Smoking is only permitted outside in the posted designated location on the north side (Portland) of the 1953 building.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

6.

7. 8. 9.

19.4 Emergency Procedures for Fires Pull the nearest fire alarm box. This will sound alarms in the building and cause all smoke barrier doors to close automatically. Evacuate people from the fire area. Shut the door to confine the fire. Call Security, extension 330 or (651) 224-8763, when you are in a safe place, to advise them on the type and status of the fire. Security will call 911. If possible, assist in locating the fire extinguisher for a small fire and return with Security to the area of the fire. IF THE FIRE IS OUT OF CONTROL, IMMEDIATELY EXIT THE BUILDING. DO NOT USE THE ELEVATORS. If there is anyone in the area that needs assistance evacuating the building, notify Security immediately. If the fire is outside your room and the door or exit is hot, stay in the room, stay low, open a window for fresh air, and if you are able, call Security, extension 330 or (651) 224-8763 to report your location. If there is no phone available, call out for help. The fire department will advise Security if and when the building can be safely re-entered. You may not re-enter the building until the fire department gives the all clear. Report details of the fire to Security immediately. If the college closes as a result of a fire the Dean or Deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s designee will notify the college community.

19.5 Emergency Procedures for Storms The severe-weather sirens are tested on the first Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. At any other time the sirens blow, proceed as follows: Immediately proceed to the library building. In the library building, take the stairs to the lower level. Stay clear of the outside perimeter windows. The lower level library easily holds all occupants of the building. Remain in the lower level of the library until the all-clear status is announced by Security personnel. Staff should proceed to the main stairwell of the basement level of the 1931 building or the library and remain there until the all-clear status is announced by Security personnel.


19.6 Escort Service and Security The college Security staff is on duty when the library building is open. Normal hours of operation are: Monday through Thursday from 7 a.m. to midnight; Friday from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Saturday from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday from 8 a.m. to midnight. Students may contact the on-duty security officer through a telephone interconnect system that functions through a two-way radio system. The security number is (651) 224-8763; (651) 290-6330 (direct); (612) 527-3533 (pager). Because the system operates through a radio repeater system, there may be a delay in the conversation with a security officer. With the exception of the delay, the interconnect operates as if the call is being made to another telephone. Also, a security officer may be contacted at the Summit Avenue main security desk. All persons are requested to cooperate with a security officer who asks for identification. All crimes occurring on campus must be reported to the on-duty security officer, who will contact the St. Paul Police Department. The Security Department maintains an escort service when the library building is open. A security officer will provide an escort within a 6-block radius of the campus. Students may request an escort by contacting a security officer at the Summit Avenue main security desk. Security escorts are available until 30 minutes before Library/Building closing time. 19.7 Identification Cards New students must obtain a photo identification card during orientation. Students need a college I.D. to register and to borrow library materials. During the first week of orientation the Media Specialist photographs the students for the I.D. card. After that time, students should contact the Facilities Manager at (651) 290-6457 for replacement or a new card. There is a $10 replacement charge for the card. 19.8 Lockers Lockers are available for students to rent through the Switchboard desk for $40 per year. Call (651) 2906350 for more information. 19.9 Lost & Found The collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Security staff is responsible for securing lost items. To turn in or claim an item contact Security at the Summit Avenue security desk, (651) 224-8763; or extension 330. Lost items may be claimed from the person staffing the Summit Avenue security desk by providing a complete description of the item. A claimant must sign for valuable items. Any items not claimed within one week may be discarded. 19.10 Parking Policy There are various restrictions on parking on the streets near the college. These restrictions are designed to make some parking available for the residents of the neighborhood. It is important that all William Mitchell students respect these restrictions because it is a way for the college to be courteous to those people with whom we share the neighborhood. Also, it is against the law to violate these restrictions. Possession of a William Mitchell parking permit does not guarantee the permit holder a parking space; it merely guarantees your right to seek, and park in, an available spot in accordance with the following policies.


William Mitchell provides parking on its property, and the college has an agreement to use spaces located across Victoria Avenue in the Summit Avenue Assembly of God Church lot and the House of Hope Church lot located on the corner of Summit and Grotto. The following location names are designated by initials hereafter: Summit Avenue Assembly of God - AOG William Mitchell College of Law, Summit/Victoria - WMCL/V House of Hope Church, Summit/Grotto - S/G William Mitchell College of Law, Portland- WMCL/P Parking in the WMCL/P lot is restricted to instructor and staff during the day, Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. After 5 p.m., students with a valid Summit/AOG parking permit are permitted to park in this lot. The WMCL lots are open to faculty, staff, and students with valid permits except from 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. During this time, vehicles may be ticketed and towed at the vehicle ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expense unless the owner has received prior authorization from security. The northwest corner of the WMCL/V lot is the designated parking area for motorcycle and bicycle parking. The AOG lot is open for faculty, staff, and students with valid permits except on Wednesdays after 5 p.m. and on days when the lot is posted for church parking due to special events (weddings, funerals, etc.). Vehicles with college permits parked in the AOG lot on Wednesdays after 5 p.m., or when it is posted for church parking only, may be ticketed and towed at the vehicle ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expense. The S/G lot is available for first-year students; however, faculty, staff, or students with valid William Mitchell parking permits may park in this lot. All vehicles parked in the WMCL, AOG, or the S/G parking lots between 7 a.m. and midnight, Monday through Friday, must prominently display a valid William Mitchell permit on the back of the rearview mirror or by displaying a valid temporary permit. Any vehicle parked overnight must be registered with the on-duty security officer at the front main desk. The fee for parking is $50 per year (from August 1 through July 31). The permits for the S/G lot are free for first year students and are valid for the S/G lot only. Parking in the other William Mitchell lots with this permit will result in tagging, towing, or both. The Facilities Department maintains a complete list of the permits issued. Permits may only be sold by the college and not offered for resale or exchange between, among, or by individuals. Anyone engaging in such activities will have their permits revoked and may be subject to disciplinary action. You may obtain additional parking permits by providing a copy of the vehicle registration form, license plate number, and picture identification. Under no circumstances is more than one vehicle for each permit holder to be in any of the three lots at the same time. Limited reserved parking is identified in both William Mitchell lots. Handicap spaces are designated in each lot. In the WMCL/P lot, the following space has been designated: Dean. In the WMCL/V lot the following spaces have been designated: one space reserved for the security vehicle; one space reserved


for library staff after 3 p.m.; three designated visitor parking; one faculty and one student PILF auction space; Doug Heidenreich; five Reserved for Adjunct Parking and five Reserved after 4 p.m. for Adjunct Parking. The AOG lot has spaces marked for church visitors. Please do not park in any of the reserved spaces. If you do, you are subject to ticketing and towing. A vehicle occupying a handicapped space must clearly display a handicapped license plate or a window permit issued by the State of Minnesota. Vehicles not displaying the appropriate handicapped plate or permit or displaying the appropriate signage but not being driven by or used for transporting the person to whom the permit is issued are ticketed by the St. Paul Police Department. Fines can exceed $200 and permit privileges can be revoked for inappropriate use of designated handicapped parking. Minnesota state law requires enforcement of handicapped parking spots on a 24 hours per day, 7 day a week basis, including holidays. The college issues parking permits to all regular part-time and full-time faculty and staff. They are valid for each employeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s term of employment at the college. Based on availability, visitors of the college are issued visitor or guest permits at the security desk. These permits must be prominently displayed on the vehicle dashboard while the vehicle is in the lot. Visitors not displaying their guest permits will be subject to towing. Adjunct faculty are given temporary parking permits which are issued each semester. These permits must be displayed prominently by hanging on rear view mirrors. During final exam periods, open parking is permitted. The college occasionally reserves spaces in the WMCL/V lots and WMCL/P lots for Board of Trustee meetings, judges, and special event speakers. These spaces are clearly marked and any vehicles inappropriately parked in these spaces are subject to ticketing and towing. These regulations are subject to change; however, every effort will be made to provide timely notification. Any policy changes, additions, or special instructions will be announced in the Docket and on the Video Messaging System. 19.10.1 Vehicles May Be Towed for the Following Reasons: 1. Parking at any yellow curb or other area designated as a no-parking zone. 2. Unauthorized parking in any reserved spot. 3. Parking in any William Mitchell lot or the AOG lot when the vehicle does not prominently display a valid college parking permit. If your vehicle is towed, contact Budget Towing, 846 Earl Street, St. Paul (651)771-8817. Budget Towing only accepts cash to retrieve a vehicle and towing/admission costs are a minimum of $250. 19.10.2 Tickets Issued for All Violations are as Follows: First offense: warning; second offense: $15; third offense: $30; fourth offense: $50 and the vehicle is subject to booting/towing, and the permit is revoked for the remainder of the fiscal year. 19.10.3 Parking Lot Security Tips: 1. Lock all doors and close all windows. 2. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t leave valuable items in plain sight. 3. Park in well-lit areas. 4. Report crimes or suspicious individuals to security at (651)224-8763 or ext. 330. 5. Report ice or maintenance problems to security at (651)224-8763 or ext. 330.


6. Drive slowly through campus parking lots at a speed of less than 5 miles per hour. 7. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t walk alone at night. Call security at (651)224-8763 or ext. 330 for an escort. 8. Emergency call boxes are available at several of the outside perimeter entrance doors. 19.11 Poster and Distribution Policy The Poster and Distribution Policy is designed to limit the amount of non-student-sponsored literature on campus and to maintain an orderly appearance while reducing maintenance costs (painting, wallpapering, etc.) of campus buildings. Suggestions from students, faculty, and staff on the placement of additional bulletin boards for general use are welcome. 1. Students may post notices concerning college- or student-organization-sponsored events on designated bulletin boards and on the stairwell landing walls. Those groups responsible for posting notices must also remove all postings after the event. 2. Notices or posters will not be allowed on painted, glass, or wallpapered surfaces or on windows or doors. 3. All notices or posters must clearly identify the author or sponsoring organization. No anonymous materials may be posted or distributed. 4. All posters or notices that are either posted or set out for distribution by organizations not recognized by the college must be approved by the Office of Student Affairs, Facilities Manager or the Director of facilities prior to posting. Under no circumstances should this material be posted on campus for more than two weeks. 5. Under special circumstances, the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life may temporarily suspend these rules. The Student Bar Association is responsible for removing unauthorized posters from Hachey Commons. The Maintenance staff is responsible for removing all unauthorized posters from other parts of the building. Organizations and departments of the college are responsible for maintaining their designated bulletin boards. 19.12 Room Reservations The principal purpose of room use at William Mitchell College of Law is support of academic programs. The college has rooms available on a first-come, first-served basis during times not scheduled by the Registrar for academic programs. Students may reserve rooms by contacting the collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Switchboard Operator at (651) 227-9171. Group study rooms are also available in the Library. Contact the Circulation Desk to reserve a room. 19.13 Weapons Policy 19.13.1 Policy Statement It is our objective to provide an environment free of hazardous or potentially dangerous situations. With that goal in mind, the college maintains a strict policy prohibiting guns and all other weapons, to the extent permitted by law. This policy applies equally to everyone, whether or not they possess permits to carry guns. The college reserves the right to search and inspect the premises and persons of anyone while in college premises or while engaged in college business off premises, to determine compliance with this policy.


19.13.2 Procedure The college does not allow anyone to carry and/or possess guns or other weapons at any time while in college premises, except that guns (but not other weapons) are permitted in parking areas. For everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s safety the college expects that guns stored in vehicles in the collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parking areas will be kept out of sight, unloaded, and locked in the vehicle. Faculty, staff, and students are also prohibited from carrying and/or possessing guns or other weapons even off college premises when they are acting in the course and scope of their employment or education except as expressly permitted by law. The weapons prohibition applies, but is not limited to times a faculty, staff, or student is: 1. Driving college vehicles for any purpose; 2. Driving privately-owned vehicles used in the course of conducting college business; and 3. Participating in any college-sponsored activity, whether business-related or not. 19.13.3 Definitions For purposes of this policy faculty includes full-time faculty, adjunct professors, visiting professors, or any others serving the college in a teaching capacity. 19.13.4 Disciplinary or Corrective Action If a violation of this policy occurs, timely and appropriate disciplinary or corrective action may be taken as follows: A faculty or staff member found to have committed a violation of this policy may be subject to a broad range of consequences, up to and including termination of employment. If necessary, a matter will be referred to the appropriate disciplinary authority as required by college policy and by existing agreements with the faculty to determine what corrective action is appropriate. A student found to have committed a violation of this policy may be subject to a broad range of consequences up to and including expulsion, suspension, or other appropriate action. The college also prohibits persons other than faculty, staff, and students from carrying and/or possessing guns or other weapons at any time while in college premises. These persons include but are not limited to relatives, independent contractors, visitors, vendors, and all others, excluding on-duty law enforcement officers. 19.13.5 Reporting Faculty, staff, and students are required to report promptly to Security any information relating to any person(s) carrying and/or possessing guns or other weapons in college premises in violation of the policy, or reasonably suspected of doing so. 19.13.6 Questions Any questions about the weapon prohibition policy should be directed to Human Resources or to the Chief Administrative Officer. 19.14 Student Solicitation Policy Any person or organization that wishes to sell to, distribute to, or solicit a response from students is defined under this policy as a solicitor and must confine these activities to Hachey Commons (that does not include the official campus food service provider). Solicitors can only be students, student


organizations, or organizations not related to the college whose product or information has a benefit directly related to the academic program of the college. Solicitors must limit activities to tables in the link between Hachey Commons and the 1953 Building. All solicitors must receive prior permission from the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life. When more than two solicitors wish to use Hachey Commons at the same time, permission will be given in the following priority: student organizations, students, then other organizations. In rare cases, solicitors may approach students in class, but only with prior approval of the professor teaching the class. All questions about this policy should be directed to the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life. 19.15 Food at Student Organization Sponsored Events Student organizations who intend to serve food at an on-campus event are required to contact the Food Service vendor operating in Hachey Commons. The Food Service vendor (or a catering company working in connection with the Food Service vendor) has a right of first refusal for all on-campus events at which food is served. In the event the Food Service vendor operating in Hachey Commons allows another vendor to provide food at an event, any leftover food is not to be brought to Hachey Commons or adjacent to Hachey Commons at the conclusion of the event.


E. COLLEGE OFFICES AND SERVICES 20. COLLEGE OFFICES & SERVICES 20.1 Administration The President and Dean is the chief academic and administrative officer of the college and has overall responsibility for providing the vision and leadership to improve and maintain the college's stature. The President and Dean is accountable for the outcome of the academic program and strategic plan and the sound financial operations of the college. The Dean plays a leadership role in the college's development efforts and represents the college before its internal and external constituencies, the legal community and the larger community. The President’s Cabinet includes the following positions: Vice Dean, Faculty, Vice Dean, Academic Programs, Associate Dean for Information Resources, VP-Finance, VP-Human Resources, VP-Institutional Advancement, Associate Dean of Multicultural Affairs and the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life. The Vice Dean, Faculty oversees the faculty’s work in teaching, scholarship, and service. The Vice Dean, Academic Programs reviews student requests for permissions related to academic requirements, is responsible for encouraging and supporting curriculum innovation, and is the Dean’s designate on most matters of student discipline. The Vice Dean, Faculty oversees Multi-cultural Affairs. The Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life directs the Student Services offices, including the Office of the Registrar, Office of Financial Aid, Counseling Services, and Career Development. The Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life also serves as ombudsman and advisor to students. The administration meets regularly with student leadership and welcomes comments and suggestions from students at any time.

20.2 Bookstore Room LL45, (651) 290-6334 The William Mitchell Bookstore sells textbooks, study aids, and school supplies, as well as imprinted clothing and gifts for adults and children. The bookstore conducts book buy-backs year round. Used books are purchased for cash, not on a consignment basis. Academic Year hours:

Summer hours:

Monday-Thursday Friday Saturday Monday-Thursday Friday Saturday

10 a.m. - 8 p.m. 10 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. As posted 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. 10 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. As posted

Hours subject to change. 20.3 Office of Career & Professional Development The law degree allows many different career options, including public, private, and nonprofit employers, from large to small law firms, and jobs that involve the practice of law as well as non-legal jobs for which a law degree provides additional skills and expertise. Therefore, the goal of the Career & Professional Development Office is to help each student and alumni find employment that is both challenging and rewarding.


The Career & Professional Development staff does not match students and graduates with employers. Rather, the Career & Professional Development Office provides services to help students and graduates manage their own career exploration and employment search. This assistance includes: Programming that provides an insight into career options, employment search skills training (such as interviewing, networking, resume preparation, managing the search process and online job searching) and opportunities to meet a wide variety of employers, alumni, and other practicing attorneys. Programming that addresses the needs of both full and part-time students during each year of law school. Job postings for available part-time and full-time jobs, which are updated daily and are received from a wide variety of employers. Several employers interview on-campus. One-on-one career counseling sessions. In particular, the Career & Professional Development Office works with the Office of Institutional Advancement and Alumni Relations to build relationships with William Mitchell alumni in Minnesota and throughout the nation who may be able to provide networking and other career management assistance. More detailed information is available from the Career & Professional Development Office and on its Web page. 20.4 Childcare Center St. Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Childhood Center, headquartered across from the college on Summit Avenue, provides fully licensed childcare services at its main facility (900 Summit) Monday through Friday. Infants, toddlers, preschoolers, and latchkey children are served at St. Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main facility. Childcare services are open to all members of the William Mitchell community. For more information, call St. Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Childhood Center at (651) 224-4749. 20.5 Copying, Faxing, Mail Central Services provides these services: photocopying, fax services, courier services, outgoing mail, and mailboxes for full-time and adjunct instructors, staff, and student organizations. Fax and photocopying services are provided for a fee. Central Services staff can explain the fees at the time of service. 20.6 Counseling Services The demands of law school can place stress on individuals, relationships, and work and academic performance. William Mitchell College of Law provides counseling for no initial cost and a $25 copayment thereafter. This is short term counseling with a maximum of 10 sessions. Counseling Services can also provide assessments and referrals when appropriate. Discussions are confidential and can be reflective of personal concerns as well as those of an academic nature. The therapists are experienced and licensed professionals, not otherwise connected with William Mitchell College of Law. Counseling Services also provides regular PLP requirements in the Stress Management category such as Stress Management, Time Management, Enhancing Test Performance, and Mental Health/Chemical Dependency issues. Please call (651) 290-8656 for information on scheduling an appointment.


20.7 Services for Students with Disabilities Students who require classroom or testing accommodation due to a disability should contact the Office of the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life, room 119 for assistance. 20.8 The Docket: News for Students The Docket is a campus newsletter posted on the William Mitchell Web site (www.wmitchell.edu/docket). It contains announcements about classes, College policies and procedures, student events, student job opportunities, financial aid, and more. Students are responsible for information on The Docket and should check it routinely. The Docket accepts submissions only from staff, faculty and recognized student groups. Those wishing to publish notices in The Docket must submit them via the Internet at The Docket site. The College reserves the right to edit submissions. Those who submit information are held accountable for the accuracy of such information published in The Docket. 20.9 Institutional Advancement The office of institutional advancement consists of the offices of alumni relations, development and marketing. Alumni Relations The Alumni Relations team exists to foster productive, informed and engaging relationships between alumni and friends and the law school and its faculty, staff, programs and students. It collaborates with Admissions, Career Development, Multicultural Affairs and other departments and faculty to offer social, learning, networking and volunteer opportunities for alumni such that they/you will continue to be informed, involved and committed to supporting William Mitchell College of Law. The Annual Fund, overseen by Alumni Relations, gives alumni the opportunity to give back to Mitchell, raising unrestricted funding that enhances the quality of education offered and bridges the gap between the tuition students pay and the actual cost of their law school education. The fund has seen steady growth and increasing participation from alumni. Mitchell currently is a leader among independent and other law schools in alumni participation in giving back. The Alumni Board of Directors works with Alumni Relations to engage alumni in activities, such as an annual golf tournament, Women in Law Tea, continuing learning education programs, (CLE’s), mentoring, online social networking, as well as regional and local alumni gatherings. The Alumni Board of Directors also offers the Student Award of Merit – an award presented to two graduates each year who have demonstrated exemplary work and study – as well as the Warren E. Burger Award and Judge Ronald Hachey Award given annually to alumni who have served the community and the college in exemplary ways.

Development The Development team works to raise needed funding for scholarships, faculty, academic programs and other needs. It works with the President and Dean, trustees, faculty, staff, students and alumni to communicate the college’s mission, goals, activities, and needs to a broad constituency that includes alumni, friends, law firms, corporations, and foundations. The Development team oversees the “If Not for Mitchell” Scholarship Drive launched in 2008 to raise endowed scholarships for current and future students, and works in partnership with various department to ensure good stewardship of the generous support given to the college.


Marketing The Marketing team publishes the highly regarded William On Law magazine (two issues per year) for alumni and friends of the law school and a monthly online e-newsletter The team maintains the college Web site and creates publications and other marketing materials for student recruitment, alumni relations, career development, fund raising, faculty, and many other college departments and functions. It works with local and national media to publicize and promote news about events and accomplishments of faculty, students, and the college as a whole.. . 20.10 Media Services The Media Services (AV) Department is able to secure audio and video copies of all classes. Contact your instructor for permission and ask your instructor to contact the Media Services Department to make arrangements. Please do not ask the college to make arrangements beyond these circumstances: religious holidays, accidents or illnesses that lead to hospitalization. Because of the limited resources and time constraints, the college strongly recommends that students try to make arrangements (audio recording or computer notes) with fellow students. 20.11 Office of Multicultural Affairs At William Mitchell, diversity is vital to our success. We recognize, express, and value differences in order to build a vibrant learning community and an inclusive profession where all individuals feel welcome and respected. William Mitchell College of Law is committed to diversity among students, faculty, and staff. We understand the need for all in the legal system to appreciate the cultural context of different constituencies and work toward eliminating the barriers in the educational and legal systems. That is why we look at multiculturalism and diversity as something that is encouraged and welcomed in our campus and the community. This office is responsible for developing opportunities and encouraging students, faculty, and staff to explore cultural differences and viewpoints. Throughout the year, the office sponsors programs designed to broaden the perspectives of the entire campus community and enhance the legal education environment. For more information see www.wmitchell.edu/services/multicultural. 20.12 Student Services The Office of the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life provides leadership for the following student services offices: Office of Financial Aid, Office of the Registrar, Counseling Services, and Career Development. Specific responsibilities of the Office of the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life include developing and implementing policies and procedures that enhance student life; advancing a student-centered culture; ensuring a climate supportive of students coming from diverse backgrounds; and monitoring and analyzing student academic success. The Dean provides academic counseling to students, and serves as the primary liaison to student organizations. The Dean is also responsible for counseling students; evaluating student service programs; and keeping and analyzing statistics related to student academic success. Student Services seeks to provide students with convenient service and information pertaining to all college matters. Unless otherwise noted, the following forms are available in Room 119: Address and name changes Admissions applications and catalogs (Admissions Office) Directory information waivers Due-date extensions for course work Add/drop forms


Employment reports (Career Development Office) Employment surveys (Career Development Office) Exam conflict and rescheduling forms Financial aid applications and brochures (Financial Aid Office) Good standing letter request form (on-line) Independent research proposals Job applications (Career Development office) Advanced Research and Writing certification forms LSAT/LSDAS applications (Admissions office) On-campus interviewing registration (Career Development Office) Scholarship applications (Financial Aid Office) Transfer of credit forms (for attendance at other schools) Transcript request forms Tuition reimbursement forms 20.13 Switchboard The switchboard is located at the Summit Avenue entrance. Switchboard personnel provide the following services from 8 a.m. until closing: Parking permits Access to security 2-way radio Video message system submissions Room reservations Class changes and cancellations 20.14 Warren E. Burger Library Students must follow all library rules as published on the library website or otherwise publicly promulgated. A violation of any library rule is a violation of the Student Conduct Code. For all policies and information pertaining to the Warren E. Burger Library see www.wmitchell.edu/library


F. GENERAL INFORMATION ITEMS 21. STATEMENT OF NON-DISCRIMINATION As required by state and federal law, William Mitchell College of Law does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, sex, national origin, marital status, sexual orientation, status with regard to public assistance, age or disability in admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, its educational programs and activities. “Educational programs and activities” includes but is not limited to admission, financial aid, classroom instruction, and disciplinary matters. The Dean of Students is responsible for coordinating the college’s compliance with its Statement of nondiscrimination for students. The Dean of Students is also responsible for coordinating the college’s compliance with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1972, and all applicable laws and regulation prohibiting discrimination in educational programs. Students who feel they have been discriminated against or harassed in violation of the college’s nondiscrimination policy should make a complaint to the Dean of Students. Complaints will be investigated in a prompt, thorough, and impartial manner. Once the investigation is complete, the college will take timely and appropriate corrective action, based on the results of the investigation. Students who feel they have been discriminated against or harassed may also file a complaint under the college’s Non-Discrimination or Sexual Harassment policies.


22. DRUG AND ALCOHOL FREE CAMPUS POLICY 22.1 Introduction William Mitchell College of Law recognizes drug and alcohol abuse among the major health hazards in our society. It further recognizes the debilitating consequences such abuse can inflict upon students, employees, the legal community, and the community at large. It is William Mitchell's desire to maintain a safe, healthy, and productive work place and learning environment for its students, faculty, and staff. The abuse of drugs and alcohol represents a serious threat to an individual's mental, emotional and physical health. Health risks from chemical abuse include drowsiness, disorientation, hallucinations, depression, convulsions, coma and death. Similarly, there are significant health risks associated with the abuse of alcohol. William Mitchell provides assistance and guidance to individuals who need help. Contact the Vice President for Human Resources, the Dean of Student Affairs and Student Life, or Counseling Services (651) 293-0979 to identify appropriate resources. 22.2 Resources Below is a list of low cost drug or alcohol counseling, treatment, rehabilitation or re-entry programs that are available in the area: Lawyers Concerned for Lawyers Court International Building 2550 University Avenue West Saint Paul, MN 55114 651.646.5590 First Call for Help 404 South 8th Street Minneapolis, MN 651.224.1133 Hazelden P.O. Box 11 15245 Pleasant Valley Road Center City, MN 55012-0011 651.213.4000 800.257.7810 Regions Hospital Alcohol and Drug Abuse Programs 445 Etna Street, Suite 55 Saint Paul, MN 55106 651.254.4804 Alcoholics Anonymous Suite 407 Spruce Tree Centre 1600 West University Avenue


Saint Paul, MN 55104-3898 651.227.5502 22.3 Policy Statement Federal law requires that, as a condition of receiving funds or any other form of financial assistance under any Federal program, including student financial aid, an institution of higher education must adopt and implement a program to prevent the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees. In addition, federal contractors and federal grant recipients are required to establish and maintain drug-free awareness programs in the workplace. This policy shall be enforced consistent with the rights and responsibilities set forth in the Student Conduct Code (see section 11 of the Student Handbook) and applicable standards and procedures for faculty and staff. 1. No student, faculty, or staff member of William Mitchell College of Law may unlawfully manufacture, dispense, possess, use, or distribute alcohol or illicit drugs on college property or as part of any of its activities. In addition, faculty and staff members are prohibited from reporting for work or from working under the influence of controlled substances. As a condition of employment, employees are required to notify the College of any criminal drug statute conviction for a violation occurring in the workplace no later than 5 days after the conviction. 2. Disciplinary sanctions shall be imposed on students, faculty, and staff who violate A, above. The application of any disciplinary sanction shall be dependent upon the seriousness of the offense and the presence or absence of mitigating factors. 3. Sanctions for students include, but are not limited to: a. Expulsion from the College. b. Suspension from the College. c. Record of violation entered into student's file, which may, in turn, be reported to the applicable State Board of Law Examiners. d. Drug or alcohol dependency treatment and counseling as a condition of remaining in or returning to the College. e. Referral to the State or Federal Government for prosecution. 4. Sanctions for faculty and staff members include, but are not limited to: a. Termination of employment with the College. b. Suspension from employment. c. Record of violation entered into faculty or staff member's file, which may, in turn, be reported to the applicable Board of Professional Responsibility. d. Drug or alcohol dependency treatment and counseling as a condition of continued employment. e. Referral to the State or Federal government for prosecution. 22.4 Possible Health Risks of Drug Use/Abuse 22.4.1 Marijuana Possible Signs of Use/Abuse: Increased heart and pulse rate; bloodshot eyes; increased appetite; dryness in the mouth and throat; hallucinations, paranoia or panic; impaired memory; and altered sense of time; and decreased concentration, reaction time, and coordination.


Possible Health Risks of Use/Abuse: Damage to heart, lungs, brain and nerve cells; lung cancer; memory disorders; interference with psychological maturation; temporary loss of fertility in both women and men; psychological dependence; and bronchitis, infections, colds, and other viruses. For pregnant women: premature birth or low birth weights. 22.4.2 Cocaine/crack Possible Signs of Use/Abuse: Euphoria; dilated pupils; narrowing of blood vessels; increased blood pressure, heart rate, breathing rate, and body temperature; decreased appetite; insomnia; runny nose; violent, erratic, or paranoid behavior; sweating; anxiety; and tremors. Possible Health Risks of Use/Abuse: Malnutrition, respiratory problems; addiction; stroke; liver problems; seizures; heart and respiratory failure; psychosis; coma; convulsions; and sexual dysfunction. For users who share or use non-sterile needles to inject cocaine: tetanus, hepatitis, or HIV/AIDS. 22.4.3 Steroids Possible Signs of Use/Abuse: Sudden increase in muscle and weight; increase in aggression and combativeness; violence; hallucinations; depression; jaundice; purple or red spots on body, inside mouth, or nose; swelling of feet or lower legs (edema); tremors; and bad breath. For women: breast reduction, enlarged clitoris, facial hair, baldness, and deepened voice. For men: enlarged nipples and breasts, testicle reduction, enlarged prostate, and baldness. Possible Health Risks of Use/Abuse: High blood pressure; liver and kidney damage; heart disease; increased risk of injury to ligaments and tendons; bowel and urinary problems; gallstones and kidney stones; and liver cancer. For men: impotence, sterility and prostate cancer. For women: menstrual problems and sterility. For users who share or use non-sterile needles to inject steroids; hepatitis, tetanus, tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS. 22.4.4 Hallucinogens Possible Signs of Use/Abuse: Dilated pupils; increased body temperature, heart rate, and blood pressure; sweating; loss of appetite; sleeplessness; dry mouth; tremors; hallucinations; disorientation; confusion, paranoia, violence; euphoria; anxiety; panic, and distorted perception of time, space and reality. Possible Health Risks of Use/Abuse: Liver damage, convulsions; addiction with sever withdrawal symptoms; coma; death due to overdose. 22.4.5 Narcotics Possible Signs of Use/Abuse: Euphoria, restlessness and lack of motivation; drowsiness; lethargy, decreased pulse rate; constricted pupils; flushing (skin appears to be reddish); constipation; nausea and vomiting; needle marks on extremities; skin abscesses at injection; shallow breathing; watery eyes; and itching. Possible Health Risks of Use/Abuse: Pulmonary edema; respiratory arrest; convulsions; addiction; coma; death due to overdose. For users who share or use unsterile needles to inject narcotics: tetanus, hepatitis, tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS.


22.4.6 Stimulants Possible Signs of Use/Abuse: Increased alertness; excessive activity; agitation; euphoria; excitability; increased pulse rate; blood pressure and body temperature; insomnia, loss of appetite; sweating; dry mouth and lips; bad breath; disorientation; apathy; hallucinations; irritability; and nervousness. Possible Health Risks of Use/Abuse: Headaches; depression; malnutrition; hypertension; psychosis; cardiac arrest; damage to the brain and lungs; convulsions; coma; death. 22.5 Penalties 22.5.1 Schedule of Drugs (I-V) I. Heroin, LSD, mescaline and peyote, amphetamine variants, marijuana, other hallucinogens. II. Opium, morphine, codeine, methadone, cocaine, barbiturates. III. Anabolic steroids, opium, codeine, methadone, cocaine, barbiturates. IV. Barbiturates, benzodiazepines, chloral hydrates, other narcotics, stimulants, and depressants. V. Opium, codeine, other narcotics and depressants. 22.5.2 Examples of Federal Drug Law Penalties Fines and sentences may be higher than stated below. Always subject to change. Schedule I Drugs (Penalty for possession) First Offense: 10 years to life, 10 year mandatory minimum; if death or serious injury, 20 year minimum; up to $4 million fine individual, $10 million other than individual. Second Offense: 20 years to life, 20 year mandatory minimum; if death or serious injury, not less than life; up to $8 million fine individual, $20 million other than individual. Schedule II Drugs (Penalty for possession) First Offense: 5 to 40 years, 5 year mandatory minimum; if death or serious injury, 20 year minimum; up to $2 million fine individual, $5 million other than individual. Second Offense: 10 years to life, 10 year mandatory minimum; if death or serious injury, not less than life; up to $4 million fine individual, $10 million other than individual. Schedule I or Schedule II Controlled Drugs (Penalty for possession of drugs other than Heroin, LSD, and Fentanyl Analogue) First Offense: 0 to 20 years, if death or serious injury, 20 year minimum, not more than life; up to $1 million fine individual, $5 million other than individual. Second Offense: 0 to 30 years, if death or serious injury, not less than life; up to $2 million fine individual, $10 million other than individual. Schedule III Drugs (Penalty for possession) First Offense: 0 to 5 years, up to $250,000 fine individual, $1 million other than individual. Second Offense: 0 to 10 years; up to $500,000 fine individual, $2 million other than individual. Schedule IV Drugs (Penalty for possession) First Offense: 0 to 3 years, up to $250,000 fine individual, $1 million other than individual. Second Offense: 0 to 6 years, up to $500,000 fine individual, $2 million other than individual.


Schedule V Drugs (Penalty for possession) First Offense: 0 to 1 year, up to $100,000 fine individual, $250,000 other than individual. Second Offense: 0 to 2 years, up to $200,000 fine individual, $500,000 other than individual. 22.5.3 Minnesota Alcohol Violations Fines and sentences may be higher than stated below. Always subject to change. Driving while intoxicated: $1,000 fine, 90 days in jail, revocation of driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license for 30 days, reinstatement fee of $20, retake driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license exam â&#x20AC;&#x201C; written and behind-the-wheel. Possession by persons under 21: $100 fine. Use of false identification for alcohol purchase: $100 fine. Furnishing alcohol to persons under 21: $3,000 fine and/or 1 year in jail Party Ordinance: $300 fine and/or 90 days in jail. 22.5.4 Examples of Minnesota Drug Laws and Penalties Fines and sentences may be higher than stated below. Always subject to change. First Degree Sale: 10+ grams of cocaine, 50+ grams of other narcotic drug, 200+ doses hallucinogen, 50 kilos marijuana, or 25+ kilos marijuana in a school zone, park zone, or public housing zone. Possession: 25+ grams cocaine, 500+ grams of other narcotic drug, 500+ doses hallucinogen, 110+ kilos marijuana. Penalty: 0 to 40 years, 4 year mandatory minimum if prior drug felony; up to $1,000,000 fine. 0 to 40 years, 2nd offense. Second Degree Sale: 3+ grams cocaine, 10+ grams of other narcotic drug, 50+ doses hallucinogen, 25+ kilos marijuana, or sale of a Schedule I or II narcotic drug of 5+ doses hallucinogen or methamphetamine either to a person under 18 or in a school zone, park zone, or public housing zone. Possession: 6+ grams cocaine, 50+ grams of other narcotic drug, 100+ doses hallucinogen, 50+ kilos marijuana. Penalty: 0 to 40 years, 3 year mandatory minimum if prior drug felony; up to $500,000 fine. Third Degree


Sale: Narcotic drug, 10+ doses hallucinogen, 5+ kilos marijuana, or sale of any Schedule I, II, or III drug (except a Schedule I or II narcotic drug or marijuana) to a person under 18 or employment of person under 18 to sell the same. Possession: 3+ grams cocaine, 10+ grams of other narcotic drug, 10+ kilos marijuana, and any amount of a Schedule I or II narcotic drug or LSD or methamphetamine or 5+ kilos marijuana in a school zone, park zone, or public housing zone. Penalty: 0 to 30 years, 2 year mandatory minimum if prior drug felony; up to $250,000 fine. 0 to 30 year years, 2nd or subsequent offense. Fourth Degree Sale: Any Schedule I, II or II drug (except marijuana), or sale of marijuana in a school zone, park zone, or public housing zone or any Schedule IV or V drug to a person under 18 or conspiracy for the same. Possession: 10 doses hallucinogen, any amount of a Schedule I, II or III drug (except marijuana) with the intent to sell it. Penalty: 0 to 30 years, 1 year mandatory minimum if prior drug felony; up to $100,000 fine. Fifth Degree Sale: Marijuana, or any Schedule IV drug. Possession: All Schedule I, II, III, IV drugs except 42.5 grams or less of marijuana. Any prescription drugs obtained through false pretenses or forgery. Penalty: 0 to 5 years, 6 month mandatory minimum if prior drug felony; up to $10,000 fine. 22.6 For Your Information This policy has been developed in compliance with the National Drug Control Strategy. This measure, issued in September 1989, proposed that Congress pass legislation requiring schools, colleges and universities to implement and enforce firm drug prevention and education programs as a condition of eligibility to receive federal financial assistance. On December 12, 1989, the President signed the DrugFree School and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 which require that institutions of higher education implement a program to prevent the unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by its students and employees on school premises or as part of any of its activities. 22.7 Attribution This policy was developed with the assistance of documents created by Minnesota State Colleges and Universities with permission from Associate Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Mike Lopez.


2010–11 William Mitchell Student Handbook