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of Missouri

Published by the Missouri District of The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod

District Survey R esults: Myths and Facts

By Karen Siegel, Office and Human Resources Manager, Missouri District, LCMS

How do you find out what people across the district think about the Missouri District office and how it operates? You ask! This past summer, ordained and commissioned ministers and lay leaders were surveyed to gauge how the district is perceived, the joys and struggles facing congregations, and how the district can best respond. The district was assisted in the survey process by Gene Weeke, Ryan Curnutt, and John O’Hara of the LCMS Research Department. Congregations made a great effort to participate in the study. When combining the responses of pastors and lay leaders, 89 percent of district congregations (and mission starts) completed at least one survey. That is a response rate almost unheard of in the survey industry. The process started with interviews with district staff and focus groups held with pastors, lay leaders, school administrators and teachers from a cross-section of schools and churches in Missouri. The Synod research team was trying to learn about attitudes and perceptions people have about the district office and how it functions. After that, the team created questions to address issues brought up by the focus groups. Several of these perceptions actually turned out to be “myths” when the survey results were analyzed. Take a look at some of the “myths” as well as the actual survey findings:

Myth #1: The district is largely perceived as an unnecessary layer of bureaucracy. Survey Finding: The district is viewed as a positive partner that is more helpful than not. All respondent types indicated a desire to have a good relationship with the district president, district office, churches in their circuit, and others in the district. Eighty-one percent of the respondents viewed the district as a “positive partner.” How do respondents view currently view the District? 1

 When asked, 81% of

respondents (pastors and administrators) believe the District is a “positive partner” 

December 2012/ January 2013

VOICE

The

6% 10%

81%

3%

No one chose the option that district is “invasive or controlling” Distant

Obsolete

Wasteful

Controlling

Myth #2: The biggest issues our congregations face today are declining membership and giving. Survey Finding: Pastors and lay leaders both report that competing with people’s busy schedules is an even bigger problem for their ministries. The top five challenges, as reported by pastors and lay leaders: busy schedules, other churches, attendance, youth retention, and the economy. Survey-takers responded that theology, fellowship, adult classes, being welcoming, and children’s ministry were the top five survey items their congregations were doing fairly well with.

Top Ten Congregational Struggles 1

1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) 8) 9) 10)

Busy Schedules Other Churches Attendance Youth Retention The Economy Moral Issues Member Giving Aging Membership Inactive Members Religious Indifference

Myth #3: District congregations only need the district when they need help for problems they cannot solve on their own. Survey Finding: What congregations want most from the district are encouragement and a better relationship overall. Pastors indicated what they want most is a relationship with the district. They seek encouragement, an advocate, mentoring, and staying connected to the district. They also would like advice, to be connected to appropriate existing resources and assistance with resolving conflict in their congregations.

Partner

Myths: continued on page 3 Pastors and School Administrators (lay leaders were not asked this question)

The Missouri District Online

Regular Online Items: installations and ordinations, celebrations, anniversaries, obituaries, calendar and resources www.facebook.com/MissouriDistrictLCMS

In this issue: m o . l c m s . Page 4 - Guatemala Mission Trip Page 15 - A Lutheran Sundae Page 16 - Lutheran Malaria Initiative

org


mo.lcms.org

From t he president’s desk Where is Jesus?

For the Mirly family, all five kids plus mom and dad, Christmas was a high point of our year. The nearer Christmas day was, the more our attention turned to learning our part of the Bible’s account of Christ’s birth we would re-tell to our family, friends and fellow members at Zion, Pocahontas. Our one room school student body rehearsed singing our Christmas carols and songs almost every day for at least a month. The children’s Christmas service on Christmas Eve was like a magnet, drawing our undivided attention to prepare to tell President Ray Mirly the world the message first told by the angel to the shepherds, “I bring you good news of a great joy that will be for all the people. For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Savior, who is Christ the Lord” (Luke 2:10-11). I remember our family packed tightly into our small car, traveling to grandma’s house or to Uncle Dick and Aunt Gertie’s, singing songs we would sing at the Christmas Eve service or each one Set a specific time each day of us trying to speak our Bible verse while our siblings to review, ref lect, meditate were trying to do the same thing. There was a lot of talk and read the Gospel accounts about Jesus, shepherds, Magi, Bethlehem and far less of Christ’s birth. about what we thought Santa Claus would leave for us on Christmas morning. Certainly my mother, aunts and grandmother spent a lot of time doing special baking. Every woman baked her favorite Christmas cookies or stollen. We kids loved to taste test their offerings. Even our church contributed peanuts, oranges, apples and hard candy in small bags distributed to every child in attendance at the Christmas Eve service. As I reflect on the celebration of Christmas 55 or 60 years ago, the focus was much more upon Luke chapter 2 than Santa Claus, Christmas trees, gift exchanges and parties. The focus was upon God’s gift of His Son, wrapped in rags, bedded in a barn’s stall. What are your plans for Christmas this year? How will you keep your focus on the angel’s good news ... the angels’ choral anthem ... the shepherds telling everyone about what they saw and heard? How much of your time and the time of your family will be devoted to keeping “Christ in Christmas?” I ask these questions because there is a lot happening in December 2012. Decorating, baking, entertaining, traveling, visiting, shopping, wrapping, worshipping ... how many of these activities are on your December calendar? Perhaps you have additional commitments to add to the list. Most people agree December is one of the busiest months of the year. There is nothing wrong with decorating, baking, entertaining, traveling, visiting, shopping, wrapping and a host of other activities we associate with the Christmas season.

President’s Prayer List Please join me in prayer this month. Praise and thank God for the precious gift of our Savior, Christ the Lord. Praise and thank God you live in a country where you can celebrate the true Christmas. Pray that God will bless the faithful proclamation of the Christmas Gospel through the ministry of Missouri District congregations. Pray God to bless the pastors, music directors, choirs, instrumentalists and all others involved in preparing and presenting the many special worship services during the Advent and Christmas seasons. Pray that God will bless each of us to give a Christian witness to the nonchurched and de-churched. Pray God to grant safe travel to the many families traveling during the Christmas season. Praise and thank God for the beginning of new church plants in St. Charles County and Northeast Columbia. Pray God’s blessings upon the United States, President Obama, the congress, state and local officials newly elected to serve in their various offices. Pray the Holy Spirit to guide district congregations contemplating and/ or extending Divine calls. Pray God to bless all the men attending Missouri Synod seminaries. Pray God to bless all the men and women preparing for full-time church careers at Missouri Synod universities. Pray that the Holy Spirit will give faithful stewardship hearts to Missourians to more generously give of their time, talents, treasures and tissue. Pray God create a right spirit within each of us. Ask God to protect the men and women of the United States military.

However, my encouragement to you (and your family) is to set a specific time each day to review, reflect, meditate and read the Gospel accounts of Christ’s birth. Sing Christmas hymns and carols. Attend the many special worship services at your church. Focus upon Him who came as the Savior of the world born of Mary, wrapped in rags, cradled in a stable and worshipped by shepherds and kings. God grant you a blessed, joy-filled celebration of Jesus’ birth.

M erry Christmas from the staff at the district office.

For to us a child is born, to us a son is given; and the government shall be upon his shoulder, and his name shall be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace. Of the increase of his government and of peace there will be no end, on the throne of David and over his kingdom, to establish it and to uphold it with justice and with righteousness from this time forth and forevermore. The zeal of the LORD of hosts will do this. Page 2

Back row from left: Stu Brassie, Peter Krege, Dennis Gehrke, Ray Mirly, Dennis Klussman, Matthew Schultz and Gene Wyssmann. Front row: Donna Seipp, Sue Thompson, RuthAnn Grebe, Karen Siegel, Jennifer Krupp and Martha Schellin.

December 2012/January 2013


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Distr ict News Myths: continued from page 1

The results of the survey have already been shared with district staff and the disMyth #4: While some district members have strongly positive trict’s Board of Directors, who met at Heit’s Point for a strategic planning session. or negative views of the district, most are largely neutral. Goals for the triennium were developed using feedback from the survey. Survey Finding: While there is a large segment of neutral parties, According to the Synod research department, this is the first time a survey of the majority of respondents view the district as positive and effective. this type has been done in any of the Synod’s 35 districts. District President Rev. Respondents were asked about the district’s performance in the following ways: • How well is the district carrying out its mission? • How well does the district serve its members? • How well does the district president serve the district? • How well does the district communicate? The results were very positive, as shown on the graph below:

Dr. Ray Mirly thanks all who participated in the focus groups and took the survey. Please pray for God’s blessings upon the Board of Directors and district staff as they work together to implement the strategic plan to meet congregation needs identified in the survey. Watch for more information about the survey and the district’s efforts to respond to issues raised in future issues of The Voice of Missouri, in other district publications and emails, on the district website and at future events.

District Overall Performance

St. Matthew, Bonne Terre, Celebrates Adult Baptism/Confirmation

1 200 180 160

St. Matthew Lutheran Church, Bonne Terre, celebrates with the whole church that Don Williams was baptized in June and Ken Turly was confirmed in July.

140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Well District Mission

Good District Service

Ok

Weak DP Service

From left: Candy Williams, Don Williams, Rev. Charles Henrickson, Ken Turly and Michelle Turly.

Poor District Communications

2012 Eschatology – The End of Days

By Rev. Anthony Kobak, Hanover Lutheran Church, Cape Girardeau, Mo.

If you knew the world would end for sure on Dec. 21, 2012, how would you feel? Many of us can remember R.E.M.’s classic hit, which when listening to the words, supplies an answer the world does not understand: “It’s the end of the world as we know it … and I feel fine.” Lyrics from the 1987 rock band supply us with an interesting thought. The immediate end of the world is here and we feel fine. Why? Martin Luther spoke and lived as if the end of the world was imminent in the 16th century. He thought his generation was living in the last days: “I do not wish to force any one to believe as I do; neither will I permit anyone to deny me the right to believe that the last day is near at hand. These words and signs of Christ compel me to believe that such is the case. For the history of the centuries that have passed since the birth of Christ nowhere reveals conditions like those of the present. There has never been such building and planting in the world. There has never been such gluttonous and varied eating and drinking as now. Wearing apparel has reached its limit in costliness. Who has ever heard of such commerce as now encircles the earth? There have arisen all kinds of art and sculpture, embroidery and engraving, the like of which has not been seen during the whole Christian era.1” As we hear Luther’s words, you may feel like they have been written for our times today. In essence they have!

1

Source: Martin Luther, The Sermons of Martin Luther Volume 1 (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1996), 62. 

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We are called as Lutherans to live in a “here now, but not yet” eschatology. That is defined as living our lives embracing the thought of an impending consummation of history. Jesus’ second coming is right around the corner. The book of Revelation is being exposed right in front of our eyes. Now, modern popular culture, including books and movies, thrives on selling the idea of the end of the world as being about only doom and destruction. Yet God’s positive message for the baptized believer is revealed to us in the Book of Revelation. This prophetic word is not meant to scare us, but to comfort us in the grace of God. The grace is revealed in Jesus Christ, the Son of God who died for us so those who believe will have eternal life. This was accomplished by a sacrifice. Jesus is the Lamb of God (Revelation 5), who takes away the sins of the world. He is the perfect sacrifice atoning for our sinful lives. Through His death and resurrection the people of God are made holy and righteous through the blood of the Lamb. We are washed in His blood and made clean. Jesus won the victory for you and me, the baptized believers in Jesus Christ. Through His resurrection and second coming, Jesus has defeated death, hell and the devil (Rev. 12:5-12). This victory has been won for each of us. We are called to live our lives with joy waiting for His return as Christ-like servants of others. Christ concludes all arguments and worries with His own words in the Gospel of Luke: (Jesus) Being asked by the Pharisees  when the kingdom of God would come, answered them,  “The kingdom of God  is not coming with signs to be observed, nor will they say, ‘Look, here it is!’ or ‘There!’ for behold, the kingdom of God is in the midst of you” (Luke 17:20b-21).

December 2012/January 2013


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Distr ict News Why Missions?

By Rev. Robert O. Liebmann, St. Mark’s, Eureka

Why have we formed a team of people to spend time and money to plan and execute a mission trip to Guatemala? Why are we asking you to consider taking time from your busy life to go with us?

Helping with Kids Club.

Is a mission trip really worth it? At a time when we are already making hard choices about what we must buy and what we cannot afford, does it make sense to spend money and time to travel to a foreign country to share the Gospel when there are so many people who need help here? Good questions. When I was a child I mowed yards to make money. Being young, I had very few things to spend my money on. What I did buy was candy. There was a convenience store very close to our neighborhood and I was a candy connoisseur. I knew every type of candy, where it was and how much it cost. I knew the layout so well I could tell at a glance when a new candy bar came out.

When a new sweet morsel became available I had to try it. And when I liked it I wanted to share it with my brother. OK, not my candy bar. I got him his own. I badly wanted him to enjoy the chocolaty goodness I had just experienced. I loved what I had found, and I wanted to share it with someone I loved. It seemed so natural at the time to pass on the blessings that life brought my way. It still does. We are planning a mission trip because we want to share something we love. We have not discovered a new candy bar. We have experienced something that changed us. We think differently. We perceive differently. We value differently. We are different, and we want to share it. One of the most frustrating things about a mission trip is that it is impossible to fully communicate an experience. Remember back to the time your first child was born. Could you explain it in a way that a young person could understand? There is no way. We can speak of the sudden realization of awesome responsibility, but this will not communicate the depth of the experience. We can talk about the insecurity of knowing that we don’t know what to do next; how to feed this baby, how to change the diaper, how to know when the baby is sick … How could you put into words the love, pride and hope you feel so intensely for this child. There is no way to truly communicate such things. We can share stories, relate information, and show pictures, but it is not possible to fully share an experience with you without giving you the same experience. This is how it is with a mission trip. I cannot put into words my bewilderment when I saw the depth and impact of true poverty, and at the same time, saw true joy and trust in God in the same people. We speak of poverty in America. This truly robs meaning from the word. I cannot truly communicate to you the vastly different way I view my wealth, how I am grateful for every blessing and far more willing to share them. I have seen people with nothing share from what they did have willingly and with a generosity I found unbelievable. I have watched as these people, who really did not know where their next meal would come from, faithfully provide for another, trusting the God who provides for them. I cannot share the emotions I felt; the humility, the helplessness, the awe of what God was doing in people I thought I had come to bless. But they blessed me. This is a small slice of what we have found and experienced. It was uncomfortable and dangerous to our sense of well-being. It was powerful and life changing. I realize how much bigger God is than I ever thought before, how unlimited He is by culture or economic class. I have discovered something that changed me. And I want to share it with you.

Pouring the floor of the new home.

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December 2012/January 2013

Craig Selbert helping a child get ready for church.

Linda Mengel helping dig.

Thoughts from Participants: “Humbling and rewarding.” Tom Mengel “The children were very well behaved.” Linda Mengel “Poverty in resources, not poverty in relationships.” Craig Selbert “Humbling, rewarding, God inspired and awesome. These trips really do make you realize how blessed we really are and how God’s blessings are wonderfully different in other parts of the world … ” Wayne Ball “I went to Guatemala expecting to help make some positive changes in the lives of others and had no idea the profound blessing the mission trip would be in my own life.” Mark Koeller “The people are wonderful. Respect and love hold the families together.” Sue Templeton “It’s awesome to see how God is at work in Guatemala and to be a part of it!!” Sheri Haas


mo.lcms.org

Distr ict News Christmas Country Church Tour in Eighth Year

The eighth annual Christmas Country Church Tour, a very popular event, will be held in Perry, Cape Girardeau and Bollinger counties. Only country churches are featured. The event is from 3 to 9 p.m., Friday, Dec. 21, and from 11 a.m to 5 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 22. More than 20 churches will decorate, prepare refreshments and/or provide special music during the tour. Concordia Lutheran Church, Frohna, will sponsor “German Caroling” at 6 p.m. on Friday. The true spirit of Christmas will shine as you travel the roads connecting the country churches. Begin the tour on Highway 61 as far north as Longtown or south at Pocahontas. Each church will have maps and a list of churches on tour. For more information, call Janet Fiedler at (573) 833-6188, email janetfiedler45@ gmail.com or go to http://www.immanuelnewwells.org/events/events.html.

Celebrating 150 Years Makes for Quite a Party! Trinity Lutheran School (TLS), Orchard Farm, Mo., was very excited to celebrate its 150th anniversary. Who could have imagined back in 1862, all the lives touched by the establishment of a simple, one-room school. Many things have changed over the past 150 years. Indoor heat and plumbing rank high on the list! However, Trinity also has realized the blessings of a library, computer room, gymnasium, SMART boards, and even a kindergarten. One thing that has not changed is the tuition-free, Christian education that is still offered to all members. On Saturday, Sept. 15, Trinity held a celebration of “epic proportions.” What a day it was! A day that will go down in the history of the school. So much to celebrate … so much to be thankful for! Efforts were made to reach and invite every student (still living) who went to Trinity Lutheran School. Even though considered a small school (44 students), this was a huge job! To the best count, approximately 250 people, including former students, teachers and their families, enjoyed the festivities. There were games and a bounce-house for the kids, tours of the building, four tables of old pictures, a pot luck supper, opening of a time capsule placed in the cornerstone back in 1954, and a lot of laughter and memory-sharing. “Class pictures” were taken early in the afternoon and commemorative ornaments, magnets, memory books, and T-shirts were sold throughout the day! The program started with the Pledge of Allegiance and of course, Luther’s Morning Prayer. The celebration concluded with a worship service in the school gymnasium on Sunday morning. The Rev. Dr. Dale Meyer was the guest preacher. From the one-room school in the prairie, to our current building with its modern facilities, it’s easy to see how Trinity has grown! And yet, with only three classrooms to teach grades K-8, it’s no wonder the school prides itself in offering “Excellent Education in a Unique Setting.” Trinity prays for God’s continued blessings on the heritage and mission it so fondly refers to as “Trinity Lutheran School.”

The current Trinity Lutheran School kindergartners with some of the students from the oldest class represented at the event, the Class of 1937.

Everyone marveled at all the “stuff” that fit inside the time capsule.

Trinity Lutheran School then …

and Trinity Lutheran School now .

Joint R eformation Worship Service The Second Annual Wentzville Circuit Reformation Worship Service was held Sunday afternoon, Oct. 28. A choir was assembled from the churches that participated. The choir members were from St. John’s, Warrenton, and St. Paul’s, Jonesburg. They sang beautifully after only one hour of practice. The organist and director of the volunteer mass choir was Mrs. Toni Schwartz from St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, Jonesburg, Mo. A time of fellowship followed the worship service. The pastors who took part in the service are, from left: Rev. Gary Ellul, St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, Jonesburg, Mo.; Rev. Luke Wolters, Grace Lutheran Church, Wellsville, Mo.; and Rev. Jeremy Klaustermeier, St. John’s Lutheran Church, Warrenton, Mo.

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December 2012/January 2013

Organist and director of the volunteer mass choir, Mrs. Toni Schwartz.


mo.lcms.org

Com mun icat ions New Spanish Bible/Catechism

A new edition of the Spanish-language Bible (bound together with Luther’s Small Catechism) will be available in early 2013 from the Lutheran Heritage Foundation (LHF) in Macomb, Mich. The new Bible will be the Reina Valera Contemporánea (RVC) edition, a version well suited to Hispanic ministry in the United States. As with all LHF publications, the Spanish Bible with Small Catechism is available at no charge to those who need them. For those who are able, a suggested donation of $5-$10 per book covers printing and shipping costs and helps LHF continue its mission of translating and printing Lutheran materials. Interested parties are encouraged to pre-order their Bibles by emailing info@LHFmissions.org or calling LHF at (800) 554-0723.

Who Are We? The Missouri District consists of 299 congregations. The Vision: Congregations of the Missouri District—LCMS partnering as one church, united in doctrine, ready, equipped and acting to fulfill the Great Commission in their unique setting with their unique people. The Mission: The Missouri District—LCMS is to serve and encourage congregations to fulfill the Great Commission and promote unity of the true faith.

are any oF theSe thoughtS a concern For you?  Avoiding arguments in my family at my death.  Spreading out the inheritance for my children. Kirk Mueller

The Voice of Missouri A bimonthly publication produced under the guidelines of the Board of Directors of: The Missouri District—LCMS 660 Mason Ridge Center Drive, Suite 100 St. Louis, MO 63141-8557 E ditor : Jennifer K rupp Editor’s email: movoice@mo.lcms.org President’s email: ray.mirly@mo.lcms.org District website: http://mo.lcms.org

 General and health care power of attorney.  Reducing taxes on the transfer of my IRA or 401K to my family.  Forgetting to leave a gift for ministry. Consider a review of your Lifetime Plan for Giving.

Submission deadline: First day of month preceding publication. Upcoming deadline and theme:

Address changes: Send them to or call them into your church office or use the form on this page. Advertising policy: It is the policy of The Voice of Missouri to accept advertising only from entities of, or affiliated with, the LCMS. Advertising must pertain to ministry-specific services.

Jan. 3

Feb./March

Lutheran Malaria Initiative

Photos will not be returned. Make copies before submitting. Identify all photo subjects (left to right, front to back); what they are doing; name and date of event depicted; why subject is there; include suggested caption. Please do not write on the back of a photo—write on a label and then affix it to back of photo. Get permission from the people in your picture(s) before submitting. Submission of pictures implies approval.

Missouri District Staff President Rev. Dr. Ray Mirly 314-590-6200 Ray.Mirly@mo.lcms.org

Assistant to the President – Family Life and Youth Ministry/Congregational Health Rev. Gene Wyssmann 417-766-2183 gawyssmann@hotmail.com

Assistant to the President – Missions/Congregational Services Rev. Dr. Stuart W. Brassie 314-590-6205 Stuart.Brassie@mo.lcms.org

Financial Specialist Ruth Ann Grebe 314-590-6213 RuthAnn.Grebe@mo.lcms.org

Assistant to the President – School Ministry Dennis Gehrke 314-590-6209 Dennis.Gehrke@mo.lcms.org Vice President – Lutheran Church Extension Fund Dennis A. Klussman 314-590-6207 Dennis.Klussman@lcef.org

Publications Specialist/Voice Editor Jennifer Krupp 314-590-6219 Jennifer.Krupp@mo.lcms.org movoice@mo.lcms.org Education Specialist Martha Schellin 314-590-6215 Martha.Schellin@mo.lcms.org Pastoral Support Specialist Donna Seipp 314-590-6206 Donna.Seipp@mo.lcms.org

Assistant to the President – Financial Planning and Control Peter Krege 314-590-6200 Peter.Krege@mo.lcms.org

Office and Human Resources Manager Karen Siegel 314-590-6210 Karen.Siegel@mo.lcms.org

St. Louis Social Service Outreach and Volunteer Coordinator Rev. Matthew Schultz 314-590-6211 Matthew.Schultz@mo.lcms.org

 Guardians for my children.  Transferring my business or farm to my family.

Scripture: All Scripture in The Voice of Missouri is from the English Standard Version (ESV) unless otherwise noted. Submissions: When submitting an article to The Voice, emails sent to movoice@mo.lcms.org are strongly preferred. Please furnish sharply focused original photographs. JPEGs, GIFs or TIFFs may be emailed at 300 dpi at 5x3.5” size.

Events Specialist Sue Thompson 314-590-6217 Sue.Thompson@mo.lcms.org

New Subscription/Change of Address Form The Voice of Missouri is provided free of charge to all Missouri District–LCMS congregation member households. Check with your church office to have your address added or changed. If you are not a Missouri District congregation member and wish to receive a copy, forward the completed form below to:

The Missouri District–LCMS, Attn.: VOICE Subscriptions, 660 Mason Ridge Center Drive, Suite 100, St. Louis, MO 63141-8557 or send the same information by email to movoice@mo.lcms.org Please use this form for a change of address as well as a new subscription.  Please send a new subscription.  Please remove my name from your subscription list. Subscribe to receive  Please change my address to the one listed below.  The Voice electronically at mo.lcms.org (I have also provided my old address.)

For more information, contact:

Name

LMCS Foundation Gift Planning Counselor Kirk Mueller

Church Name and City

11645 Benham Road, St. Louis, MO 63136-6112

Current Address

(314) 704-4389 Email: Kirk.Mueller@lcms.org

City

State

ZIP

Old Address City Telephone (

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December 2012/January 2013

)

State

email

ZIP


mo.lcms.org

Distr ict News LWR Gifts A dvent Giving Trees Help Those in Need ‘Unwrap a Better Life’

Lutheran World Relief (LWR) introduces a new way for churches, schools, and families to give this season. Parents, grandparents, and especially children want to help make the world a better place. LWR Gifts, the alternative giving project from Lutheran World Relief, is making it easier for U.S. Lutherans to get involved in the global fight against poverty with its new Advent Giving Tree project. The LWR Gifts Advent Giving Tree is a creative way for congregations, schools, Lutheran organizations and families to celebrate this year. Learn more online at lwrgifts.org/advent. The program works like a Christmas “angel” or gift tree. Visit the website to download the free die cut ornament kit and decorate a tree at church or school. Donors select from ornaments representing various LWR gifts and visit lwrgifts. org to purchase their gift. After making their purchases, they can decorate the ornament and bring it back to hang on the tree. There are options for every budget and interest. Even for congregations that typically use a giving tree to ease the needs of those living in their communities, adding LWR gifts ornaments provides a simple way to bring a global option to giving this Christmas. Additional downloadable resources can help congregations and educators encourage young children and families to get involved in other ways as well. The free online resource kit includes: • • •

Downloadable sheets with stencils and instructions for creating die cut ornaments. A four-part children’s message series (useful for Sunday worship or as part of congregational Sunday school during Advent). Four bulletin-styled inserts that can be sent home with students or used on Sunday mornings.

Thanks

to all of you who used your camp in 2012. We pray that your stay was a blessing to you and your faith was strengthened in our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ.

Summer camp

Outdoor Education

Singles

With programmed events, adult and youth retreats, family reunions, and more, it has been a very busy year. The Lord continues to bless His ministry at Heit's Point. Here are opportunities early next year: Check out our website for more information. 11-13 Jan.

Elders workshop led by President Mirly.

24-26 Feb.

Marriage retreat led by Pastor Dubisar.

Thanks again! Heit's Point Lutheran Ministries - "Strengthening the connection with the Vine" www.heitspoint.com

The LWR Gifts Giving Tree provides a meaningful way to directly help another person unwrap a better life. Gift-givers are encouraged to share pictures of their giving tree experience at the LWR Facebook page, facebook.com/LuthWorldRelief.

“Strengthening the Connection with the Vine” www.heitspoint.com info@heitspoint.com 877-668-2362 or 660-668-2363 28345 Heits Point Ave., Lincoln, MO 65338

The Missouri District Lutheran Laymen’s League Harms Elected District President

R eflect on Christmas Memories

Jim Harms, Columbia, Mo., was elected 27th president of the Missouri District Lutheran Laymen’s League at the district’s 70th convention held in Columbia. Other officers elected: Harvey Loenneke, vice president; Alan Turley, secretary; and Mark Nolte, treasurer. The new officers were installed by Rev. Dr. Ray Mirly at the closing worship service. Beth Berner, brand advocate specialist, brought greetings and represented International at the convention. She encouraged local groups to be sure they were affiliated with International. Groups affiliated in the past need to be sure they are still affiliated under the new International organization. She also emphasized the need for more local congregation ambassadors. They are the only contact most congregational members have with the work of LHM. There is a need to recruit new ambassadors as many past ambassadors have failed to respond. If LHM is to continue to bring Christ to the Nations, and the Nations to the Church, we then must bring more people into the support of the outreach.

What’s your favorite part of Christmas? Is it the lit Christmas tree and the ornaments and all the decorations? Is it family coming over, and all the songs and stories that arrive with them? What about the smell of baked chocolate chip cookies? Maybe it was the carefully laid out Christmas village, with miniature houses, sidewalks, ponds, metal figurines, and fake snow. Is it the presents? This year Christmas Memories captures the essence of Lutheran Hour Ministries’ Advent devotions for 2012. Written by LHM’s theological editor and writer Wayne Palmer, these meditations draw from the biblical account of Luke (chapters one and two) and, in particular, Mary’s observations. “Just as we all have cherished memories of Christmases past, Mary shares her treasured memories of the first Christmas, relating the events to Luke to include in his Gospel,” according to Palmer. “As a pastor, one of my favorite things was to ask our elderly members to share their childhood memories of Christmas. Searching their memory always brought a twinkle to their eyes, and it was delightful to listen to their laughter, as they pulled out the treasures that had sat in the attic of their memory, gathering dust,” Palmer added. Tournament of Roses Parade Hearing these stories from his congregation’s older members figured notably in Palmer’s approach for this year’s Advent devotions. “I want to bring alive the events The theme for the 2013 Pasadena Tournament of Roses Parade is “Oh, the Places of that first Christmas through the recollections of a very special woman of faith You’ll Go.” This year’s LHM float theme is “Jesus … The Way to Heaven.” 2013 rd marks the 63 year of LHM’s participation in the parade. It remains the only reli- who ‘treasured up all these things, pondering them in her heart’” (Luke 2:19b), he said. gious float in the parade. Available to read online or to hear as a podcast, Christmas Memories can also Most networks will carry the parade, but will have commercial interruptions. The be received as an email subscription throughout the Advent season. It is available Home and Garden channel will air the parade without interruption. online for download and personalization for your local congregation. The audio verFor more information on the float go to www.petalpushers.org. sion begins Dec. 2. Go to www.lhm.org for subscription and downloads. The float is financed through private donations and no LHM funds are used. Questions or comments? Contact: jack1422@mchsi.com

Website

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for the

M issour i D istr ict LLL:

www.lutheransonline.com/missouridistrictlll

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Fa m i ly Li fe a nd Yout h

N a t i o n a l Yo u t h G Next summer we will enjoy “Live Loved” – the 2013 LCMS National Youth Gathering in San Antonio. We are offering leadership training for all who will serve as adult leaders. There will be five meetings held throughout the state. Please plan to attend! Sunday, Jan. 27 2-4 p.m. District office – St. Louis Sunday, Jan. 27 6-8 p.m. Timothy – Blue Springs Sunday, Feb. 10 2-4 p.m. Trinity – Jefferson City Sunday, Feb. 10 6-8 p.m. Redeemer – Springfield Saturday, Feb. 23 10 a.m. – noon St. Paul – Jackson These meetings will give you the opportunity to ask questions, learn more about the city of San Antonio, get an overview of the gathering schedule and find out how you can best be prepared to experience the gathering with your group.

Peer Ministry Training Looking for a great youth ministry leadership opportunity? Peer Ministry Training (PMT) is an opportunity to come together with high school youth and youth counselors who want to learn additional/intentional skills in counseling/discipleship to serve in their youth ministry – in their congregation, their school, their community and their family. The Missouri District Family Life and Youth Board invites you and/or your youth to Peer Ministry Training Feb. 15-17, 2013, at the Pallottine Renewal Center, St. Louis, Mo., or at Heit’s Point in Lincoln, Mo. This year’s Peer Ministry Training consists of Peer Ministry Training 1 (offered at both locations). The entry level course is designed to teach participants: Quality training in caring skills Commitment to growth in faith and values Christian service to other people Welcoming others Listening with care How to ask questions Help bring the hope of Christ into the lives of their peers Peer Ministry Training 2 (only at the Pallottine Center): This is the follow-up course to Peer Ministry Training. Participants must have been through PMT 1. The focus of PMT 2 is: Learning how to validate others How to deal with sensitive issues Discovering our spiritual gifts Learning to share our faith and personal faith stories Our training teams will be led by Rev. Gene Wyssmann, assistant to the district president for Family Life and Youth Ministry, and Rev. Mark Martin and Christina Stackle, members of the Missouri District Board for Family Life and Youth. The members of the teaching teams are certified instructors in Peer Ministry.

Your cost for the entire weekend is $75 per person. The actual cost for the training is more than $200 per person which includes staff, materials, housing and meals. However, the Missouri District Board for Family Life and Youth Ministry is providing funds to pay the balance per person for youth and counselors. Medical forms should be brought to the training and NOT sent to the district office with your registration. Please duplicate forms as needed. Call us at (314) 590-6217 or email Sue.Thompson@ mo.lcms.org for more information. Information is also on our website at http://mo.lcms.org. Registration suggestion: A team of two or three youth and an adult leader is ideal. Individuals who come alone may find themselves missing the support needed to grow together and support one another at home. Bring your Bible and supplies to take notes, plus recreational and personal needs. You can bring items for evening activities, like table games, cards, etc. Sleeping arrangements at Heit’s Point are “camp style” on bunk beds. You need to bring sleeping bags and towels since these are not provided. At the Pallottine Center, rooms Tentative Schedule for PMT are motel style. Males and females will sleep in Friday separate quarters. On Saturday afternoon, there 6:30 p.m. Registration and Check-in will be free time to go swimming in the indoor 7:00 PMT Session 1 pool. 8:30 Break Peer Ministry Training is an outstanding expe- 9:00 PMT Session 2 Fellowship, get to know you time rience with great training/leadership teams and 10:30 11:30 Lights out! great youth and counselors coming together to learn, grow and serve. Share this opportunity Saturday with everyone in your youth ministry.

8:00 a.m. Breakfast and Devotion 9:00 PMT Session 3 10:30 Break 10:45 PMT Session 4 12:15 p.m. Lunch 12:45 Free time eer inistry raining egistration orm or scheduled outdoor activity 3:00 PMT Session 5 Yes, I want to attend Peer Ministry Training!  5:00 Dinner Free time or scheduled activity Name: 5:30 6:30 PMT Session 6 8:30 Free time or scheduled activity Address: 10:30 Evening worship 11:30 Lights out!

P

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(PMT) R

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City, State, ZIP: Phone: (

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Email address:

Male Female T-shirt size: Small-2XL (Youth Only) Grade: Age: I am registering for: Peer Ministry Training 1 Peer Ministry Training 2 at Heit’s Point or Pallottine Center Congregation Name and City: Mail registration form and $75 fee (please make checks payable to the Missouri District) to: Missouri District LCMS – Peer Ministry Training, 660 Mason Ridge Center Drive, Suite 100, St. Louis, MO 63141-8557 Questions? Please email: Sue.Thompson@mo.lcms.org. Registration and $75 fee (payable to the Missouri District) is due by Feb. 1, 2013.

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December 2012/January 2013

Sunday 8:00 a.m. Breakfast and Devotion 9:00 PMT Session 7 10:30 Break 10:45 PMT Session 8 12:15 p.m. Lunch 1:00 PMT Session 9 2:30 Free time or scheduled activity 3:30 PMT Session 10 5:00 Clean up, pack up, load cars 5:30 Dinner 6:00 Commissioning and Sending 7:00 Depart for home


mo.lcms.org

Fa m i ly Li fe a nd Yout h

G at h e r i ng Updat e These meetings will give you the opportunity to ask questions, learn more about the city of San Antonio, get an overview of the gathering schedule and find out how you can best be prepared MISSOURI DISTRICT SAN ANTONIO 2013 to experience the gathering with your group. You will also have the opportunity to network with other adult leaders in your area and learn from those who have attended previous national gatherings. We would also like to try to network groups Front of T-shirt together who may be interested in sharing transportation. Once again, our district will make available a T-shirt designed exclusively for the Missouri District! The prices will be $14-$16, and can be personalized with your church name and city for just an additional $2 per shirt. Also, news about our district event will be shared. We are gathering the results of a survey sent out recently on where this event will be held and are finalizing plans, costs, dates and times. Information will be available on our website and emailed to all churches by the end of the year.

WEBSTER GARDENS SAINT PAUL SHEPHERD OF THE LAKES FAMILY OF CHRIST BLESSED SAVIOR SAINT JACOBI CHRIST IN THE CITY OUR REDEEMER EMMAUS ALIVE IN CHRIST SAINT MATTHEW IGLESIA LUTERANA EL BUEN PASTOR CALVARY HANOVER SALEM CHRIST CONCORDIA MOUNT HULDA H O L Y T R I N I T Y O U R S A V I O R  J E S U S H O P E TRANSFIGURATION SOUTH CAMPUS  CHRIST THE KING EPIPHANY GRACE SAINT MARKS AMIGOS DE CRISTO PRINCE OF PEACE GETHSEMANE NEW HOPE ABIDING SAVIOR CEDAR HILL

T RIC IST NEW RI D U BEGINNINGS SO SAINT ANDREW MIS SAINT TRINITY CHAI V

013 IO 2 N O ANT SAN

SHALOM TRINITY KING OF KINGS TIMOTHY SAINT LUKE FIRST SHEPHERD OF THE HILLS ZION MOUNT HOPE BETHLEHEM GRACE LUTHERAN CHAPEL SAINT PETER SAINT STEPHEN MOUNT CALVARY JEFFERSON HILLS V I L L A G E R E F O R M A T I O N FA I T H S H E P H E R D O F T H E VA L L E Y G R E A T COMMISSION PILGRIM SHAPED BY THE CROSS EISLEBEN SAINT JAMES MOUNT OLIVE ASCENSION AMAZING GRACE CHILD OF GOD SAINT JOHN BARNES & NOBLE IMMANUEL HOLY SACRAMENTS HOPE CHAPEL BETHESDA POINTE OF HOPE HOLY CROSS BEAUTIFUL SAVIOR RESURRECTION  CAMPUS BETHANY PEACE LORD OF LIFE LIGHT OF CHRIST CHINESE LUTHERAN MISSION RIVER OF LIFE MESSIAH EBENEZER GLENDALE C H R I S T MEMORIAL THE BRIDGE

Back of T-shirt

Family Life Ministry Nearly 20 years ago, many parents were proud of the fact that their children were involved in so many activities that they hadn’t eaten as a family in a “month of Sundays.” Today, we see a changing concern among parents and a felt need to be more influential in shaping their families in the areas of time and resource management. There are more and more “family friendly churches” offering training, support and resources to families in their congregations dealing with a variety of issues. We witness them communicating: • How can we help you build strong marriages? • How can we give you training and resources for parenting skills with nuclear or step families? • How can we support you in passing on the faith to your children? • How can we help you have a more balanced family life? • How can we walk with you in sharing godly sexuality with your children? • How can we help you understand and supply you with resources for your aging parents? • How can we supply you with tools to help your children be servant leaders in today’s world? One of our Family Life alumna, who is employed in a congregation serving as a Director of Family Ministry (DFLM), was working with the Sunday school teachers and directors to help them set goals. During the conversation, they told the DFLM worker that the job of the Sunday school was to teach the faith. She said to them, “Well, do you think this is only the job of the Sunday school? What is the parents’ role in teaching the faith?” They looked at her and couldn’t answer that question because they didn’t yet understand the partnership between the church and the home. The Family Life program at Concordia University, Ann Arbor: • Trains DFLM to work in the church, teaching and supporting homes in their journey of marriage, re-marriage, children’s ministry, youth ministry, ministry to the elderly, and to offer training for parents to obtain the tools they need to be “the teachers in their homes.” • Produces students who become Child Life Specialists (CLS) in hospitals, working with sick children and their families. • Prepares students to work in social services settings. Students and graduates work in adoption agencies, homes for the elderly, and a variety of social services agencies. • Is certified by the National Council of Family Relations. • Poises men and women to continue their studies for postgraduate degrees. Being a liberal arts university, the family life major provides a wonderful groundwork and springboard into many areas – masters of divinity, masters of social work, graduate studies in the field of medicine, law or criminal justice.

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Missouri District churches are leading the way in the LCMS in their willingness to follow Luther’s lead. He states in the Book of Concord “they (the parents), in the first place, were commanded by God to provide for the proper training of their children,” Luther continues to write: “The Christian homes should again become home-churches, home-schools … performing the office of the ministry there just as the pastors did in the churches.” He was referring to what scripture says in Prov. 22:6 and 2 Tim. 3:15 regarding teaching and training your children in the truths of the Scripture. Have you heard your pastor repeating the phrase that “the home is the center for faith formation, and the church is there to partner with them?” Some of us used to bristle at those words because we were so used to dropping off our children at church and assumed we had done our “job” by getting them there. After all – wasn’t that the church’s responsibility? The Family Life Program at Concordia University Ann Arbor (CUAA), along with the newly formed Concordia Center for the Family (CCF), teaches, supports Christian research for the home, offers funding, uplifts students, parents and congregations in the process of helping families thrive and to pass on the faith, and to grow godly leaders for today’s world. The Family Life Department welcomes Dr. Steve Christopher, who recently joined the Family Life staff at CUAA as Director of the Family Life academic program. He will work hand-in-hand with Professor Ben Freudenburg, who is the director of the Concordia Center for the Family. The Family Life team also includes Professor Karna Doyle and Project Manager Jennifer Freudenburg. The curriculum is interdisciplinary and draws from CUAA staff in a number of areas. Can you imagine what it is like for the congregations that have called pastors who have majored in Family Life? Seminary students have made comments that the basis of the work in a congregation is working with homes and that they have been overwhelmingly blessed by having the skills that the family life program offers. The staff of the family life program solicits your prayers and thanks you for your continued support!

December 2012/January 2013

From left: Steve Christopher, Karna Doyle, Jennifer Freudenburg and Ben Freudenburg.


mo.lcms.org

Educat iona l Ser v ices St. Mark’s Lutheran School, Eureka, Hosts Winter Warm Up

Proceeds Benefit Otis Woodard Ministries, matching donation from Thrivent Financial for Lutherans.

Students at St. Mark’s Lutheran School, located in Eureka, are warming up the community this winter. During the second quarter, students will collect winter coats, hats, gloves, scarves, blankets and heaters to donate to Otis Woodard Ministries. Thrivent Financial for Lutherans in Jefferson County will provide matching donations, up to $400. Otis Woodard, also known as “Outreach Otis,” has been serving the St. Louis metro area for four decades. Woodard manages the North St. Louis Outreach Ministries and established a “Peace Park” in the College Hill neighborhood in North St. Louis County. Items donated by St. Mark’s students will be dispersed to North St. Louis County residents in need. Woodard is also seeking toys to be distributed to boys, ages infant to 12, who live in a local shelter. “We encourage our students to serve our community by hosting various philanthropic opportunities each quarter,” said St. Mark’s Principal Sue Templeton. “St. Mark’s Otis Woodard is also known as “Outreach Otis.” has been working with Otis Woodard Ministries for several years and we value the work he is doing in North St. Louis County.” St. Mark’s continues to promote its theme, “Equip, Serve and Achieve,” through numerous volunteer and philanthropic events. The Winter Warm Up is the second philanthropic mission the school has adopted this year. For more information about St. Mark’s, visit www.stlmlm.org or call (636) 938-4432.

Lutheran High North, St. Louis Crusaders in National Merit Program

Two Lutheran North students have been recognized in the 2012 National Merit Scholarship Program. Stefan Cotton was named an Outstanding Participant in the National Achievement Scholarship Program, having scored in the top 3 percent of 160,000 Black Americans taking the PSAT. Alex Schutte placed among the top 5 percent of more than 1.5 million junior students taking the PSAT and was designated a Commended Student in the National Merit Scholarship Program. Stefan and Alex have been classmates and friends since elementary school, when they both attended Salem Lutheran School in Black Jack. Stefan Cotton, left, and Alex Schutte achieve National Merit status.

Crusaders Put Their Faith in Action

All Lutheran North students and faculty participated in the first semester Faith in Action Day on Oct. 11. More than 330 Crusaders spread out in the metropolitan St. Louis area to pack boxes of food, sort clothing, paint, rake, clean, etc. God provided a beautiful day and everyone enjoyed serving Him by serving others.

LESA Students Celebrate Fall’s Bounty Students at LESA-member Lutheran schools in the St. Louis metro area made the most of fall’s blessings by sharing their talents with fellow students and the community. At St. Mark’s, Eureka, preschoolers teamed up with seventh-and Lutheran North Crusaders putting their faith eighth-graders for a day of pumpinto action. kin-carving and story-telling. The iPads in Hand activity was part of St. Mark’s “Lead Lutheran High School North has sucto Learn” project, which helps older cessfully begun the “iPad era.” Thanks to a grant from the Lutheran Foundation of students develop leadership, communication and relational skills St. Louis, every student has an Apple iPad to use at school and at home. Students have by mentoring younger students. adapted very quickly to the newness of having iPads in hand and are enjoying backStudents at St. Paul’s, Des Peres, used their leadership skills to help out at Ronald McDonald packs without heavy textbooks and noteHouse’s Mercy Hospital Campus in Creve books. The faculty is embracing the new Coeur. Members of St. Paul’s National technology and learning how best to use Junior Honor Society cooked and served it. The digital world offers endless possimore than 75 meals for families staying at bilities for educational enhancement. the home. They also created Build-A-Bear stuffed animals to help comfort the children who are undergoing medical treatment. Josh Baumann, center, instructs students Casey Thompson, left, and Kyle Zorich,right. Students at Our Savior, Fenton, learned how to protect their families and communities during National Fire Prevention Month. The students visited with first responders from the Fenton Fire Protection District, and Hannah DeCuir. Back row: Rebecca Endres, Emily Anderson, Jennifer toured a fire truck and learned Salem, A ffton, Winners Wittmayer, Abbey Tate and Jessica Johns. how to crawl out of a house durS alem Lutheran School , A ffton, brought ing a fire. Congratulations to the girls A1 team, which took home two volleyball winners this fall! first place in the Green Park students celeCongratuA1 St. Louis City brated their faith during a spelations to the Tournament. cial “Grandparents Day at Green Park.” The event included a girls A2 team, Back row from left: Coach Heritage Chapel that celebrated which took first Carrie Hartwig, Zoe Harthe Reformation and the people place in the A2 ris, Abigail Howard, Sarah who helped shape the Lutheran Rivers, Hannah Fox and St. Louis City Erin Moellenhoff. Front faith. Green Park students also Tournament. said “thanks floor the memories” row: Christina Droege, to their school’s 1980’s era gym Front row from left: Emily Miller and Dakota Abbie Sanford, Claire Desnoyer. Not pictured: floor. Thanks to a private donaRenth, Kailey Court- Kathy Truong. tion, the school will install a new wright, Kaitlyn Pena multi-purpose floor later this fall.

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Leadersh ip Tra in ing

Sharing the True Light at Christmas

Christmas is the one time of the year when — even in the most commercial and secular of places — images, words and songs about Christ are not only acceptable, they are welcomed. The weeks leading up to the Church’s celebration of our Lord’s birth are full of opportunities to try to engage a secularized culture with the truth of Christmas. While children’s programs and choral services are common among many LCMS congregations, there are many other ways in which congregations can step out into their communities through acts of mercy, service and witness. Consider new ideas or take things that you have always done and invite the community to be involved. Collections of clothing and food, presentations of gifts for families in need and events with children can all provide ways to proclaim Christ’s birth and invite others to come and celebrate Christmas with your congregation. Here are just a few ideas that other congregations have undertaken: Saint Nicholas Day Socks and Shoes The story of Saint Nicholas (celebrated on Dec. 6) provides an opportunity to collect socks and shoes for children. Rather than distributing gold like Bishop Nicholas, the church can bring warm socks and shoes to needy families. If possible, consider purchasing the book Saint Nicholas, available now in paperback from Concordia Publishing House. Light the City Park with the True Light Christmas lights seem to be everywhere in December. If your community has a public park, consider approaching them with the idea that the congregation (and potentially other businesses) could sponsor light displays. The design of the church’s light display should point to Christ. Sometimes church choirs will come and sing at night or members will pass out invitations to worship. Christmas in a Box Contact public schools, libraries, day care centers or home child care providers and develop a list of children for whom you can provide “Christmas in a Box.” You might include a nativity scene craft (to be put together at home), a book about the nativity, a car or doll, Christmas cookies, and an invitation and schedule for worship services. What to include and how to distribute the boxes may vary from one community to the next. Happy Birthday Jesus Party Birthday parties always include games, presents and cake. Try inviting children to come and celebrate Jesus’ birthday. Christmas tree ornaments make great crafts. Concordia Publishing House occasionally has special offers on inexpensive paperback Christmas books that you could distribute to the children in attendance. New Spin on Children’s Programs Consider having the children’s Christmas program at a local nursing home, senior center or community center in addition to at the church. Christmas Vacation Bible School Plan a one-day VBS during the break between Christmas and New Year’s. Many parents are looking for activities for their children during this break from school. Take all the elements of VBS, but just shorten it to one day. What other ideas have you heard from congregations? How might any of these ideas be adapted for use by your congregation to serve others and proclaim the Gospel? Put your thinking hats on! God’s blessings on your plans to celebrate Christmas and tell others about the hope that is within us. LCMS Rural and Small Town Mission supports and encourages rural and small town congregations in engaging their communities and growing together in Christ through Word and Sacrament. If you have a good idea for outreach or a story you’d like to share so we can share it with others, please contact Amy Gerdts at amy.gerdts@lcms.org. Learn more about us at www.lcms.org/rstm or by calling Amy at 888-463-5127.

Engaging Rural Communities Make plans to join LCMS Rural and Small Town Mission for an Engaging Rural Communities Event at Saint Paul Lutheran High School in Biltz Hall, Concordia, Mo., presented with the Missouri District from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 19. Missouri District LCEF Vice President Dennis Klussman, along with Rev. Dr. Lee Hagan, RSTM, will assist each congregation with some practical approaches on engaging its community with the Gospel. Each congregation will receive personalized demographics for its community. Engaging Rural Communities (ERC) events are geared for single and multi-point parishes in rural and small town settings. Ideally, a pastor and three or four lay leaders will examine their communities and consider ways they can serve those unique needs.

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Send Me Saturday 2012 On Saturday, Oct. 27, Send Me St. Louis invited the community to love God and serve others by coming together with their families, friends, churches and charities. 150 volunteers chose to act on that invitation. Because of their gifts of time and talent: • A new family can move into a safe apartment and begin rebuilding lives free of domestic violence. • People experiencing homelessness have a clean, welcoming space to eat hot meals and gain access to vital services. • 1,600 blind people will have Braille Scripture calendars to encourage them and help them maintain their independence. • Senior residents have safe surroundings and peace of mind in their own homes. • Residents at two assisted living facilities had care, company, and fall-themed fun with their friends and families. • New Americans have a warm, welcoming space to learn and grow with their children and friends. • A new center for urban ministry and service is one step closer to reality. Thank you for your service, and thanks be to God for pulling together the right people for each project. It’s clear that you poured your hearts into your work on Saturday, because we had glowing reports from all our project sites flowing into Send Me St. Louis. Here are some samples: “Those were the best volunteers we’ve ever had!” Laura Moore, Volunteer Coordinator at Lydia’s House “We wouldn’t be where we are today without Send Me Saturday volunteers … They’ve helped us keep this place running, and they keep coming back!” Al Buckman, Christian Friends of New Americans “I wasn’t sure we’d get through the first project. But those Send Me Saturday volunteers had both of our projects wrapped up by lunch. It was amazing!” Rev. Dave Andrus, Lutheran Blind Mission “There were two children in the neighborhood watching us work. By the end of the day, both had joined in to help us – and we went over to work on the neighbor’s yard too!” Ann Vazquez, volunteer, Mount Calvary Lutheran Church We know it can be easy to forget the amazing things happening around us, or take for granted the work God is doing in and through our churches, agencies, and communities. Please join us in celebrating the great work God is doing around us, and thank the people in your church/organization who help make that work possible!

Send Me St. Louis 2013 Workshops Send Me St. Louis is finalizing its offerings for spring 2013! Take a sneak peek at our topics and workshops listed below. If you’d like to learn more about any upcoming workshop, please visit our website at www.sendmestlouis.org. To sign up for our mailing list, contact Hannah Shanks at Hannah@SendMeStLouis.org or call (314) 678-0015, ext. 103, or follow us on facebook.com/SendMeSTL. • Speed Networking – Disaster Relief • Christian Volunteer Managers’ Network • From Checks to Change: Creating Church Events with Meaning • Hiding in Plain Sight: Uncovering Assets to Further Your Ministry • For All Ages: Leading Across the Generational Divide • Equipping Everyday Servants Participants will identify personal and congregation assets in place and make plans for using their resources to engage their respective communities. One important theme of the event will be on building and strengthening partnerships. Many rural congregations today are concerned about shrinking membership and fewer children and families in worship. There is no “one size fits all” solution; however, congregation leaders will be encouraged as they see new opportunities for engaging their communities and are filled with hope for the future. The cost per participant is $25. If desired, overnight reservations may be made at Biltz Hall by calling (660) 463-2238, ext. 313. For more information regarding the event, contact RSTM Project Coordinator Amy Gerdts. Register for the event by Friday, Jan. 4 by calling RSTM at (888) 463-5127 or emailing amy.gerdts@lcms.org.

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Concord ia Sem ina r y, St. Lou is

Three Admissions Events Set for January

Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, will hold three visitation events in January for people interested in the pastoral or deaconess ministry.

Shepherds of God’s Flock: January 10

Green and Gold Days: January 11

Taste of the Sem: January 19-21

Designed for men in college or older, the retreat will focus on the spiritual and personal aspects of the decision-making process. Concordia Seminary invites you to explore these questions as you talk with current seminary students about their decisions to prepare for being shepherds of God’s flock; worship with the Seminary community in chapel; and talk with participants from around the country who are contemplating pastoral ministry. Wives, fiancées, and girlfriends are encouraged to attend. Participants are encouraged to stay through Friday, Jan. 11, to attend “Green and Gold Days,” allowing for time to attend seminary classes.

Designed for men and women college age and older thinking about becoming pastors or deaconesses, Green and Gold Days provide a quick opportunity for participants to come and see all the seminary offers. They will interact with current students, attend classes, worship in chapel, and speak with members of the faculty. We will end the day with dinner and conversation.

Taste of the Sem is an opportunity for high school men to spend a weekend at the seminary to study theology, pray, worship, meet, and talk with seminary students and professors. The event is designed to provide a sense of seminary life if you think God might be directing you toward the pastoral ministry. You will spend time with one seminary student at his field education congregation on Sunday morning and attend classes with him on Monday morning. In the evenings, you may play in tournaments in volleyball, basketball, foosball, and ping-pong.

All visitation events are free to attend. For registration information, please call (800) 822-9545 or email admissions@csl.edu.

21st Annual Schola Cantorum Set for February

Concordia Seminary will offer its 21st Annual Schola Cantorum: An Adult Choir Member Workshop, on Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013. The workshop will be held in the Chapel of St. Timothy and St. Titus on the seminary campus. Registration begins at 8 a.m., followed by the Welcome and Morning Prayer at 8:15 a.m. Program begins at 9 a.m. and ends at 3 p.m. Dr. Ralph Schultz will serve as this year’s clinician. Schultz graduated from Concordia University, River Forest, Ill., the Cleveland Institute of Music; and Union Theological Seminary, New York. Schultz led

the Concordia Choir at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center and on tours through the United States and Europe for 35 years. He has published numerous compositions and Leading the Choir, a video/book for the inexperienced choir director. After 15 years as chairman of the music department, Schultz became president of Concordia College, New York. Upon retirement, he was named Professor of Music Emeritus and President Emeritus. Presently, Schultz conducts the Jubilate Singers and Orchestra in the Capital Region of New York. A Choral Reading Session will be held Friday, Feb. 1, 2013, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. In the session, Schultz will

guide participants through an evening of choral and instrumental song in which he will preview new and current titles of music. The session is open to all, but is especially designed for choir directors. There is no charge to attend but registration is required. The cost for the Schola Cantorum is $65 per individual or $120 per congregation ($75 or $135 after Jan. 15, 2013). For the congregation fee, a choir can send as many members as it desires. Lunch and the choral music are not included in the fee. For more information or registration forms, call (314) 505-7486 or email ce@csl.edu.

Bach at the Sem Presents Two Concerts in Spring 2013 Bach at the Sem, presented by Concordia Seminary and the American Kantorei, will conclude its 20th season with concerts at 3 p.m. on March 24 and April 28. “The seminary, host for the series, is very excited about bringing this season’s offerings to the St. Louis community,” Concordia Seminary’s Dean of the Chapel Kent Burreson commented. “The American Kantorei and top professional instrumentalists will be led by accomplished guest conductors who specialize in

Baroque music. We know that each conductor’s professionalism and conducting style will enrich the concerts and match the high standards Bach at the Sem audiences expect.” Dr. Jeffrey Wilson, chairman of the music department and director of choral activities at Greenville College in Illinois, will make his second appearance at Bach at the Sem as guest conductor for the March 24 concert. Dr. Scott Hyslop, guest conductor for the

April 28 concert, serves as the director of parish music at St. Lorenz Lutheran Church in Frankenmuth, Mich., one of the largest and oldest congregations in The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod. More detailed information on each concert and guest conductor, as well as on the American Kantorei and its personnel, may be found on the Bach at the Sem website at http://bach.csl.edu.

Missourians Enjoyed LutherHostel

Helen Benson of Independence, Mo., Phyllis Bischof of Willow Springs, Mo., Lance and Melinda LeFevre of Lee’s Summit, Mo., Darla Wolters of Independence, Mo., Leota and Walt Schoedel of St. Louis, Mo., and Carolyn Zimmerman of Owensville, Mo., attended LutherHostel at Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, on Oct. 6-9. LutherHostel is an event designed to provide growth in biblical knowledge and understanding, fun, and fellowship, and a chance to gain helpful insights for daily living. It is offered for adults age 55 and older. The theme for the event was “One King—Two Kingdoms: Living as a Christian American.” The main presenter was Dr. Joel Upcoming Seminary Biermann, professor at Concordia Seminary.

Guild meetings: Dec. 7 Feb. 1

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Front row, from left: Phyllis Bischof, Pat Stelzer, Carolyn Zimmerman, Leota Schoedel; back row: Darla Wolters, Helen Benson, Melinda LeFevre, Lance LeFevre, and Walt Schoedel.

December 2012/January 2013


mo.lcms.org

Lutheran Women’s Missionary League    

President’s Penning Leaving a Legacy I attended an LWML fall rally recently where to my great delight, my cousin was to be the presenter of Karen Drury the program. He was literally born in the mission field. My aunt and uncle served as missionaries in Central and South America over 50 years ago, where my cousin, Mark, and his nine siblings were born. During his presentation, Mark shared with the ladies the history of his family on his mother and father’s sides that has close ties with the early Lutherans arriving in the states and the “missionary” blood that has been passed down to him through them. Mark went on to share about his own personal experience of serving in the mission fields of Guatemala, Venezuela, and Panama. Throughout his stories he wove a common thread of the impact that the LWML has had through the years in the mission field in these areas. And how, even today, he could take us to visit places that were aided by the mites of faithful women of the LWML. What a beautiful legacy. The Lutheran Women’s Missionary League is celebrating its 70th birthday. During this time, more than $100 million has been donated though the collection of mites to fund mission grants reaching out all over the world! It is not possible for us to know how many millions of lives have been touched through these ministries and the number of people who have come to know of God’s saving love through Jesus because of them. What a beautiful legacy! One of my favorite hymns is “Hark, the Voice of Jesus Calling.” I am particularly drawn to the verse: “If you cannot be a watchman, standing high on Zion’s wall, Pointing out the path to heaven, Offering life and peace to all, With your prayers and with your bounties you can do what God commands; You can be like faithful Aaron, Holding up the prophet’s hands.” Be a part of the legacy!

www.MissouriLWML.org www.lwml.org

Page 13

Winners?

This past summer, for 14 days, we watched the Olympics and saw men and women of many nationalities compete in many athletic events for the gold, silver, and bronze medals. They had worked, trained and some even left their families for years to compete. We saw the victories, the happiness, and jubilation of the winners. However, we also saw how heart-breaking it was for the losers, as if all their hard work and dedication was for naught. In God’s plan of salvation for all believers, there are no losers. He has done all the work and suffered pain on the cross for us and will give us the award of eternal life. As John in Rev. 2:10b says, “Be faithful unto death, and I will give you the crown of life.” We then should, with Paul in Acts 20:24 (NIV1984), say, “However, I consider my life worth nothing to me, if I only may finish the race and complete the task the Lord Jesus has given me, the task of testifying to the Gospel of God’s grace.” So knowing this, let us spread the Gospel so that all Carolyn Scott people – young and old of all nations may receive the Vice President winning award with us – eternal life with Jesus in heaven. of Christian Life

Counselor’s Corner LWML and eschatology, how do they relate?

Rev. Gary Griffin Eschatology is about the end times where Scripture reminds us there will be wars and rumors of wars, earthquakes, famines, etc., and then the end will come when Jesus returns in all His glory. How shall Christians think about all of this, especially at the very end? Luke 21:28 reminds us of our victory, “Straighten up and raise your heads, because your redemption is drawing near.” What does this have to do with the Lutheran Women’s Missionary League? The optimal word is missionary! “But whoever does not believe will be condemned” (Mark 16:16b). Do you see the connection between missionary and “end times?” The LWML is somewhat stuck in a bind with trying to be missionaries and funding mission work. It’s the reality of the world in which we live. If you want to distribute Bibles, Christian literature, or develop a center to help people in need, it takes money. And the LWML does do wonderful things, funding $360,000 worth of Missouri District projects just this biennium. Through these mission projects, the Word of God is being sent out, people are hearing and believing, and by God’s grace are being saved. To make sure these mission projects come to fruition, local LWML societies send in dues, hold harvest dinner festivals, and sell crafts to help fund not only their local LWML projects but also LWML district projects. Now here is the dilemma. So much time and energy is concentrated on raising funds to help someone else do mission work, that mission work in their own church is a low priority. Honestly evaluate mission work in your LWML. Yes, you serve funeral dinners, make and hand out baby blankets or quilts, etc., but does your LWML group have an intentional, planned mission initiative to reach the unchurched in your community and the inactive in your church by hosting Friendship Sundays, holding community Easter Egg Hunts and giving out Christian Easter literature, etc.? My challenge to all LWMLs is to be more missionary at your church. For the days are short, the end is one day, one week, one month closer. When relationships aren’t formed where the Gospel can be shared, people won’t hear and receive the Word by the power of the Holy Spirit and be saved. That is what the Lutheran Women’s Missionary League is about. The face of LWML is women sharing and telling the Good News too! God help us all as churches, as pastors, as teachers, as LWML members, and as individual Lutheran Christians to be stewards of the Gospel of sharing the Word.

35th Biennial LWML Convention

Date: June 27-30, 2013 Location: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Theme: “Quenched! by the Water” Scripture Verse: [Jesus said:] “… but whoever drinks of the water that I will give him will never be thirsty again. The water that I will give him will become in him a spring of water welling up to eternal life” (John 4:14). Visit www.lwml.org/conventions for more information. December 2012/January 2013

Discover the eQuarterly

Join us as we turn an electronic corner in the history of the Quarterly! For those who enjoy the portability of an e-reader, you can now purchase a digital subscription to the eQuarterly. If you don’t already use an e-reader, this is a great time to introduce yourself to this format. You can take your eQuarterly with you everywhere you take your phone, tablet or laptop. It will be delivered almost instantly to your e-reader. No more waiting for the Quarterly to be delivered. You can store all your back issues of the eQuarterly on your device – no disorganized stacks of magazines on the floor in your closet. How do you get the eQuarterly? Simple. Go to www.lwml.org/eQuarterly. Consider giving an LWML gift certificate this Christmas for a full year of the eQuarterly. The price for the one-year subscription is only $6.50!


mo.lcms.org

A nnouncements Calling Congregations

For Sole Pastors: Bolivar, Zion – called Rev. Kent Schaaf of Charlotte, NC Bourbon, Concordia Branson, Faith – called Rev. Joel Krueger of Mexico, MO (accepted) Dexter, Faith – applying for a seminary candidate Glendale, Glendale – called Rev. Timothy Lawson of Omaha (declined) Lemay, Gethsemane – called Rev. Derek Paetow of Muscle Shoals, AL (accepted) St. Peters, Child of God – called Rev. Chris Mizel of St. Peters, MO (accepted) Spanish Lake, St. Peters – Johnny Greer assigned as SMP pastor Valley Park, Zion For Senior Pastor: Affton, Salem – called Rev. Wayne Huebner of Chilton, WI (accepted) Jackson, St. Paul

For Associate or Assistant Pastor: Crystal City, Immanuel Kirkwood, Concordia Served by Intentional Interim Pastor or Interim Pastor: Fenton, Our Savior (Rev. Dr. Richard Foss) Glencoe, St. Paul (Rev. Robert Lange) Macon, Zion (Rev. Roger Mackie) Pocahontas/Shawneetown – Zion/Trinity (Rev. Virgil Kelm) St. Louis, Epiphany (Rev. Marty Haeger) St. Peters, Child of God (Rev. Al Schade) Slater, Peace/St. Paul (Rev. Douglas Dubisar) Pastors Considering Calls: Krueger, Joel (St. John, Mexico) to Trinity, New York Mills, MN (declined)

Vacant on Hold – But Being Served: Ashland, Family of Christ Bethany, Hope Bismarck, St. John Center, Trinity Cuba, St. Paul – called Rev. Joe Ed Pederson (currently on candidate status) (accepted) Diggins, Zion Elk Prairie (Rolla), Peace Isabella, Faith Knob Noster, Faith Memphis, St. Paul Milan, Peace Oak Grove, Shepherd of the Valley Pilot Knob, Immanuel Princeton, Immanuel St. James, St. John St. Louis, Holy Sacrament St. Louis, St. Matthew St. Louis, St. Paul Sarcoxie, Trinity Shelbyville, Mount Hope Sweet Springs, Christ

Personnel Changes — Ordained Transferred to our District: Golter, Randall (RM) installed Ex. Dir. Office of International Mission, St. Louis, MO 10/25/12 by M. Harrison Huebner, Wayne (SW) installed Salem, Affton, MO 11/11/12 by R. LaBore Johnson, Daniel (IE) installed Field Specialist, Eurasia-Baltic and Siberia, Office of International Mission, St. Louis, MO 10/15/12 by B. Saunders Miller, William (MDS) installed associate pastor, Messiah, St. Louis, MO 10/14/12 by M. Hoehner Wenholz, Dennis (NOW) installed Hospice Chaplain for Lutheran Senior Services, St. Louis, MO 10/17/12 by V. Gundermann Retired: Liebnau, David (St. Trinity, St. Louis) 10/31/12

Ordinations/Installations: Roedemeier, Dennis (CS’12) ordained and installed as SMP/Associate Pastor, Salem, Salem, MO to serve at Steelville, MO 10/7/12 by D. Kettner Changes within District: Grimenstein, Edward (Mgr. Disaster Response) installed as Dir. of Personnel, Office of International Mission, St. Louis, MO 11/8/12 by R. Golter Pederson, Joe Ed (candidate status) installed St. Paul, Cuba, MO 11/11/12 by A. Wollenburg Candidate/Non-Candidate Status: Bijjiga, Jaya (candidate) to noncandidate status 9/30/12 Deceased: Parsch, Daniel (emeritus) 10/28/12

Personnel Changes — Commissioned Ministers of R eligion Graduates Installed Self, Mary Beth (Colloquy S ’12) to St. Paul’s - Concordia 10/11/12 by R. Hagan Torblaa, Travis (SP ’98) to New Beginnings, Pacific 10/28/12 by J. Sullivan Transferred from Other Districts Stelmachowicz, Cary (SW) to Lutheran High School of Kansas City, Kansas City 10/28/12 by M. Schulz Reinstated Brand, Alison (reinstated by COP 9/12) to candidate Horvath, Gail (reinstated by COP 9/12) to candidate Tiemann, Louise (reinstated by COP 9/12) to emeritus Candidate Status Adrian, Amy (Salem, Florissant) 2/1/12 Brevard, Jennifer (St. John, St. Louis) 5/26/12 Dart, Cheryl (Good Shepherd, Columbia) 6/1/12 Elfe, Jenna (St. John, Ellisville) 6/1/12 Hansen, Catherine (Child of God, St. Peters) 6/30/12 Johnson, Kara (Martin Luther Academy, Kansas City) 7/1/12 Moore, Cassandra (Faith, Oakville) 6/1/12

Page 14

Non-Candidate Status Dorgan, Jill (Child of God, St. Peters) 7/21/12 Eaton, Cynthia (Martin Luther, Joplin) 6/2/12 Eckhoff, Debra (Lutheran School Association, Cole Camp) 8/27/11 Newell, Kristen (Christ Community, Kirkwood) 2/1/12 Schroeder, Julie (St. John, Ellisville) 8/1/12 Changes Within District Fackler, Lisa (non-candidate) to Grace Chapel, Bellefontaine Neighbors 8/19/12 by N. Ruback Fittje, Kristen (Immanuel, St. Charles) to Immanuel, Lockwood 8/12/12 by G. Griffin Retired Holst, Larry (Messiah, Independence) 5/23/12 Kaestner, Dorothy (LCMS Foundation, St. Louis) 7/1/12 Tirmenstein, Stephen (Lutheran High School North, St. Louis) 6/1/11 Walling, JoAn (Zion, Rockville) 8/1/12 Deceased Telschow, Earl (emeritus) 1/31/12 Transferred to Other Districts Brandt, Robert (emeritus) to IN 10/22/12 Brandt, Shirley (emeritus) to IN 10/22/12 Tracy, Marjorie (emeritus) to TX 10/20/12

Celebrate the Holidays in a Unique Way

Where do you find the celebration of Chanukah in the Bible? It’s in the New Testament! The only place in the Bible where Chanukah is celebrated is in John 10 when Jesus announced Himself to be the Messiah of Israel. Join Congregation Chai v’Shalom, St. Louis, for its annual Chanukah Party and Potluck Dinner and learn the whole story, hear Chanukah songs, play dreidel games, enjoy entertainment, light the menorah, and of course, eat some latkes (potato pancakes)! You bring a dish, we’ll make the latkes! The event is at 6 p.m., Friday, Dec. 14, at King of Kings Lutheran Church, 13765 Olive Blvd. in Chesterfield, Mo. What do the books of Esther and Exodus have in common? They both begin with the letter “E” and are great ways to evangelize! One of the many ways Congregation Chai v’Shalom participates in the Entertainment at the Chanukah party is provided Great Commission is through the celebration of the by the guests. It’s a talent feast days that these books chronicle. Both festivals show you’ll not soon forget. are wonderful ways to learn about our own roots in the Old Testament, but more importantly, great proclamations of the promise of the Messiah and the promise fulfilled in Y’shua (the Jewish way to say Jesus!). Esther is a wonderful melodrama celebrated through the Festival of Purim. Congregation Chai v’Shalom, with Burning Bush Ministries and King of Kings Lutheran Church, will celebrate with a Purim party at 6 p.m. on Rev. Kevin Parviz reads the whole megilla, the Friday, Feb. 22, at King of story of Esther, as children act it out. Kings, 13765 Olive Blvd. in Chesterfield, Mo. The traditions of Purim include reading the book of Esther, or the whole megillah, dressing up as your favorite character from Esther and acting out the story as it is read in a melodramatic way, with cheers, boos and the stamping of feet. Other traditions of Purim are to share baskets of food with one another and to offer food to the poor. So, our Purim party is a pot-luck supper and we will take an offering to be sent to a food bank the congregation supports. Exodus is the story of the deliverance of the Jewish people from Egyptian slavery, and Passover is the annual remembrance of these historic events. It was at Passover that Jesus instituted the Lord’s Supper. What better way to begin Holy Week than with a Passover Seder? The Seder is a full meal in the midst of the story of the Exodus, just as Jesus might have celebrated. Chai v’Shalom’s Seder has been likened by some to “dinner theatre” with song and dance, but Jesus is still at the center. The Passover Seder is at 3 p.m. on Palm Sunday, March 24, 2013 at St. Paul Lutheran Church, 12345 ManRev. Parviz helps a child read “the chester, Des Peres, MO 63131. For tickets, call four questions.” Children play a (314) 645-4456 or email revkevye@aol.com. big role in the Passover Seder.

We R emember:

1 Rev. Daniel Paul Parsch, age 67, of Nixa, Mo., passed away Sunday, Oct. 28. He was a Missouri Synod pastor for 36 years. 1 Earl T. Telschow, age 81, of Freistatt, Mo., passed away Jan. 31, 2012. He taught at Lutheran schools for more than 25 years, as well as being a choir and band director.

December 2012/January 2013


mo.lcms.org

A nnouncements Make it A Lutheran Sundae

One late Sunday afternoon, the small Bible study group at the Fountain soda shop in Steelville, Mo., closed their study by asking the Lord to bless their seedling start up and bless them in the coming week. As the few folks started their way out onto the vacant streets of Steelville, the thermometer was still hovering around 100° and still no rain. Before the grayhaired pastor left, he asked the owner, Eric, if perhaps next week he might offer the study class a small ice cream sundae as a simple way of saying thank you. Of course, the pastor reminded him that it would have to be kept reasonable. Eric thought about it, then a plan came together and A Lutheran Sundae was born.

The simple idea took wings under the great story work of Rev. David Kettner of Salem, Mo., and his wife, Tana. A Lutheran Sundae is about the celebration of our Lutheran past and the joy of our future. The sundae tells the Lutheran story in a mission way. When people order this sundae, they can’t resist asking about what everything means. They want to know about the flavors, colors and the cross. What a chance to proclaim God’s message! The following is the description of A Lutheran Sundae:

What is A Lutheran Sundae?

The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod believes and teaches that a person is saved by grace alone through faith alone as revealed by Scripture alone. The Rocky Road represents grace alone. The rocky road of our lives reminds us that we need God’s grace because of our sinful condition. Yet, God, in His pure love for sinners, gave His Son, Jesus Christ, to save the world. Strawberry represents faith alone. The red color of the ice cream reminds us that we trust in Jesus with our heart. We trust only in Him because He has done everything necessary for our salvation. Vanilla represents Scripture alone. The white color of the ice cream reminds us that the Bible is God’s pure Word. It has no errors. Thus, it’s absolutely reliable. Its chief purpose is to bring us to faith in Jesus and to strengthen our faith in Jesus. The whipped cream reminds us that through faith in Jesus we are pure and innocent. The chocolate cross reminds us of the sacrificial suffering and death of Jesus. The nuts remind us of the good works that Christians are equipped, enabled and called to do in this life. The cherry reminds us that the best is yet to come.

Joplin Group Makes Mats for the Homeless By Rev. Gary Asmus, retired pastor

A little over a year ago, an article appeared in The Lutheran Witness and Lutheran Woman’s Quarterly about a project taken on by members of Immanuel Lutheran, Palatine, Ill., making sleeping mats to bring comfort to the homeless. The Seasoned Saints group of Immanuel Lutheran, Joplin, Mo., looked at the video of the project (www.lutheranchurchcharities.org), and decided to take it on. Two women of the group, Marlys Horn and Roberta Faulk, knew how to crochet. In several months, the group had nine bag mats finished, which were taken to a Joplin homeless shelter, Watered Gardens. The shelter was happy to receive them. The Seasoned Saints group now has 10 participants learning from Marlys Horn how to crochet and make more sleeping mats. Others furnish plastic bags, which are cut into round strips about two inches wide and looped together. It’s estimated that each 3-by-6 foot mat contains 500-800 plastic bags. The mats are said to be waterproof, have a plastic, crocheted carrying strap, and help homeless get a good night’s sleep even on wet grass when the temperature allows.

The next time you have a youth gathering, confirmation class or Ladies Aid, grab some ice cream, whipped cream, cherries and spoons and enjoy. Members of Seasoned Saints, Immanuel, Joplin, Mo. Front row from left: Lorraine Asmus, Roberta Faulk, Mary Eddy and Jane Felland. Holding mat: Marlys Horn and Rev. Gary Asmus.

Handbells & Chocolates Concert and Chocolate Reception Featuring the Gateway Ringers with the Christ Memorial Ringers

Don’t miss the concert of handbells featuring the Gateway Ringers and the Christ Memorial Ringers at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013. Plan to rid the weary winter blahs with the joyful sound of handbells and an elegant chocolate reception after the performance at Christ Memorial Lutheran Church, 5252 S. Lindbergh Blvd. ($5 suggested donation). For group reservations, contact Suzanne Barton at (314) 603-2472.

Page 15

Gulf Shores, Ala. Bed & Breakfast Quiet Nature Retreat on 23 Acres Private Eight Acre Fishing Lake Near Hermann, Mo.

condo for rent

(573) 252-4136

Three bedroom, two bath, fully equipped kitchen, washer/dryer, indoor–outdoor pools, hot tub, tennis court, exercise, sauna; golf, fishing, children’s attractions nearby.

Members - Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church

Members of The Lutheran Church of Webster Gardens

woodmere@ktis.net Woodmerecabin.members.ktis.net

December 2012/January 2013

beachfront

Call (314) 843-6063


mo.lcms.org

District News Lutheran Malaria Initiative

Dear friends of LMI, By God’s grace, we are making much progress toward the Lutheran Malaria Initiative’s (LMI) goal of ending malaria deaths in Africa by 2015. Thank you for all that you are doing! In 2010 a child died from malaria every 45 seconds. Worldwide efforts, including those of LMI, have helped reduce the child mortality rate from malaria to one death every 60 seconds. But yet, there is still much work to do. To help keep the church informed about the campaign, we are launching a monthly newsletter called “LMI Update.” In November’s premiere issue, you can read more about a recent trip to Tanzania by the LMI Fellowship of college students, an innovative VBS program in Michigan and the LMI mascot, Martie the Mosquito, and how you can use the costume to enhance your LMI activities. Here is the link to the premiere issue: http://www.lcms. org/publications/lmi-update. You also can find the newsletter at www.lcms.org/lmi. Please share the links with others, post the newsletter to your website, and print and display it at your church or school. Encourage others to learn more about LMI! reprinted from LMI Update - November 2012

Jonathan Ernst for Lutheran World Relief

lwr.org/chocolate 888.294.9660

Malaria Kids Corner Malaria makes kids in Africa very sick. So sick they can’t go to school, and sometimes they don’t get better. Working together, it doesn’t have to be that way! Even kids can help. The first step in fighting malaria is learning about it. Find the words below. Then talk to your family about how you can help fight malaria.

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Jonathan Ernst for Lutheran World Relief

Immanuel, Lockwood, Supports Lutheran Malaria Initiative

Immanuel Lutheran School, Lockwood, Mo., designated its chapel offerings for the Lutheran Malaria Initiative (LMI) during August and September. Chapel offerings totaled $426.10. Information about Lutheran Malaria Initiative was shared with the students and parents through the weekly school newsletter and on a bulletin board with a bed net hanging from the ceiling.

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December 2012/Janaury 2013

The Voice of Missouri

December 2012 January 2013 Voice of Missouri  

The Voice of Missouri is provided free of charge and offers news from the district office and from district congregations. We pray that the...

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