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CONTENTS

October 2018

FEATURES 16

True Dedication

44

Working for Rural Missouri

Celebrating the Life and Legacy of C.W. Caldwell

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From the Fields to the Statehouse Senator Brian Munzlinger Serves as Impactful Agriculture Leader

Working For Rural Missouri

MEMBER NEWS 6 22 50

COLUMNS

Association Update Beef Checkoff News

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County News

True Dedication

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Straight Talk: Mike Deering Where’s the Faith

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CattleWomen’s Corner

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On the Edge of Common Sense: Baxter Black

Missouri CattleWomen Showcase Beef

Ear Tag Identification

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What’s Cookin’ at the Beef House Thank You to our Volunteers

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Intern Perspetive

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Junior Spotlight

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Cowboy Poetry

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Capitol Update

Growing & Learning

MJCA in the Bootheel

Cowboy Costume

Votes and Vetoes

The Missouri Beef Cattleman is an official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association.


MISSOURI

BEEF CATTLEMAN

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE MISSOURI CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Volume 48 - Issue 5 (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) Magazine Publishing Office 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, MO 65201 Phone: 573-499-9162 • Fax: 573-499-9167 Andy Atzenweiler: Editor/Production/Ad Sales P.O. Box 480977 • Kansas City, Missouri 64148 816-210-7713 • E-mail: mobeef@sbcglobal.net Coby Wilson: Ad Sales 573-499-9162 Ext 235

Missouri Cattlemen’s Association MCA Website: www.mocattle.com

DEPARTMENTS 7

New MCA Members

26

American Royal Livestock Show

30

Obituary: Leroy A. Strubberg

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NCBA News

78

Missouri State Fair Highlights

114

Advertisers Index Find us on Facebook:

Missouri Cattlemen’s Association

Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation www.mocattlemenfoundation.org

Missouri’s CattleWomen

http://mocattle.com/missouricattlewomen.aspx

2018 MCA Officers

Greg Buckman, President 573-696-3911 • 14601 N Rt U, Hallsville, MO 65255 Bobby Simpson, President-Elect 573-729-6583 • 3556 CR 6150, Salem, MO 65560 Marvin Dieckman, Vice President 660-596-4163 • 28998 Hwy JJ , Cole Camp, MO 65325 Matt Hardecke, Treasurer 573-846-6614 • 19102 Skymeadows Dr., Wildwood, MO 63069 David Dick, Secretary 660-826-0031 • 23529 Anderson School Rd., Sedalia, MO 65301

2018 MCA Regional Vice Presidents

Region 1: Adam Kuebler, 202 N. 6th St. Edina, MO 63537 309-706-4410 Region 2: Chuck Miller, 393 Spring Garden Road Olean, MO 65064 • 573-881-3589 Region 3: Charlie Besher, RR 5, Box 2402 Patton, MO 63662 • 573-866-2846 Region 4: Tony Washburn, 4912 457th Street King City, MO 64463 • 660-483-0038 Region 5: Bruce Mershon, 10015 Windsor Drive Lee’s Summit, MO 64086 • 816-525-1954 Region 6: Clay Doeden, 14555 S. Hwy A Stockton, MO 65785 • 417-808-0415 Region 7: Traves Merrick, 1956 Hwy 97 Miller, MO 65707 • 417-536-8080

OCTOBER 2018

Missouri Beef Cattleman, (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) is published monthly (12 times a year) and is the official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Missouri, 65201. PERIODICALS postage paid at Columbia, Missouri and additional mailing offices. Subscription price is included as a part of the minimum membership dues of $70.00 per year in Missouri Cattlemen’s Association. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Missouri Beef Cattleman, P.O. Box 480977, Kansas City, Missouri 64148

Mike Deering • Executive Vice President - Ext 230 Mike@mocattle.com Maria Washburn • Manager of Membership - Ext 231 Maria@mocattle.com Coby Wilson • Manager of Strategic Solutions - Ext 235 Coby@mocattle.com Candace Rosen • MBC Editor/Production Artist Candace@mocattle.com Lisa Stockhorst, Administrative Assistant – Ext 234 Lisa@mocattle.com

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Hanna Mueller, Jefferson City, MO Joe O’Bannon, Madison, MO Andre Oberle, Ste. Genevieve, MO Ben Oberle, Ste. Genevieve, MO Eva Oberle, Ste. Genevieve, MO Lexi Perriguey, Green Ridge, MO Katherine Petersen, Louisburg, MO Garland Pierce, Cross Creek Red Devons LLC, Branson West, MO Kade Plattner, Red Diamond Livestock, Springfield, MO Matt & Nancy Puchbauer, Peoples Bank, Jackson, MO Gracie Rogers, Princeton, MO Kali Rogers, Princeton, MO Paul Rogers, TLB Tax Services LLC, Palmyra, MO Sari Rogers, Princeton, MO Spratt Sadie, Ewing, MO Macey Sappington, Sappington Farm, Walnut Grove, MO Jenny Shepard, Warsaw, MO Brody Smith, Smith Farms, Revere, MO David & Doris Steinbecker, Perryville, MO Austin Stone, Hallsville, MO Jim & Rose Telle, Perryville, MO Loretta Thomas, Miller, MO Kate Thompson, Thompson Farm, Columbia, MO Kinsey Tiemann, LaGrange, MO Darren Toliver, El Dorado Springs, MO Don Van Black, Bolivar, MO Sydney Vehige, Vehige Enterprises, Wentzville, MO Kamryn Voris, Halfway, MO David & Lori Voss, Voss Angus, Washington, MO Tanner Wait, Moundville, MO Jim Watkins, Pleasant Hill, MO Sheldon Whetstone, Philadelphia, MO

See the MCA Membership Form on page 111.

Specializing in Land, Equipment and Livestock For Upcoming Sale Info: Contact: Mike Williams Higginsville, MO cell: 816-797-5450 mwauctions@ctcis.net

www.wheelerauctions.com

OCTOBER 2018

Austin Adam, Durham, MO Madison Agee, Halfway, MO Alliant Bank, Boonville, MO Braden Ast, Ast Angus, Nevada, MO Autumn Fuhrman, Bar JAF Partnership, Miami, OK Miles Bailey, Clinton, MO Daryl Berkbuegler, Ellisville, MO Alena Billups, Palmyra, MO Shawn Boultinghouse, El Dorado Springs, MO Grace Bridgman, Ewing, MO Tom Burford, Burford Farms, Whitewater, MO Andrea Callison, Holliday, MO Brent Campbell, Campbell Cattle Co. Inc., Caulfield, MO Creg Campbell, CSI / Central States Insurance Group LLC, St. Joseph, MO Kenny Chance, Windsor, MO Luke Coffelt, Coffelt Farms, Skidmore, MO Donald Dailey, Pacific, MO Kensie Darst, Breezin B Simmentals, Aurora, MO Jordan & Samantha Davis, Holts Summit, MO Steve Dickerson, Newtown, MO Lezlie Durst, Canton, MO Anita Ellis, University Extension Callaway County, Fulton, MO Leo Elsasser, Rocheport, MO Sherri Elsasser, Rocheport, MO Mike Epperson, Twin River Farm, Knob Noster, MO Branden Erwin, Palmyra, MO Shane Evans, Laclede, MO Megan Farley, San Luis Obispo, CA Taylor Floyd, El Dorado Springs, MO Mackenzie Gann, Long Lane, MO Madelynn Gastler, Martinsburg, MO Clint & Kacy Goldsmith, Windsor, MO Bruce Greer, Greer Farms, Marble Hill, MO Brett Griesbaum, Palmyra, MO Payton Hays, Philadelphia, MO James & Joann Hill, JH Hill Farm, Ellington, MO Elijah Hunziger, Cross Timbers, MO Gracie Imhoff, Boonville, MO Courtney Jenkins, J&N Farms, Bolivar, MO Dusty Jones, Stewartsville, MO Russell & Vicki King, Hunnydo Acres, Green Castle, MO Dane Lambert, DP Lambert Family Trust, Purdin, MO Ryan Lewis, Anderson, MO Chad Mallett, Columbia, MO Judson MayfieldMarble Hill, MO

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Straight

Talk

with Mike Deering Where’s the Faith? It’s difficult to keep the faith. In some cases, it’s nearly impossible. In today’s seemingly constant state of confusion accelerated almost daily by so-called leaders, mainstream media and more, it’s not at all difficult to lose faith. Aside from the biblical sense, faith is complete trust or confidence in someone or something. It can be as simple as having faith in someone you elected to represent you to something more personal. In the case of this association, we ask for you to have faith in the organization to advocate relentlessly on your behalf and to work aggressively towards advancing this industry today and for the next generation. We value your faith.

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But what about our consumers? We want our consumers to have faith in what we do every single day to care for our livestock, land and its resources. We want consumers to have absolute confidence when they choose beef they are buying a safe and nutritious product for their families. This industry has invested millions of dollars through checkoff investments in research, education and promotion. We’ve invested a lot of time to do everything within our power as individuals and as an industry to earn the consumers’ trust and to strengthen it with each passing day.

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That faith can disappear quickly. Trust is sacred. It doesn’t take much time to see that confidence disintegrate. That’s why protecting our industry’s nomenclature is so important. That’s why proactive legislation led by your association has caught the eye of legislators and industry groups from other states. Missouri became the first state to say enough is enough and others will follow. No more will we tolerate laboratory grown alternatives or plant-based products piggybacking on the reputation Missouri cattle producers work daily to earn.

Executive Vice President We aren’t willing to sit on the sidelines and watch consumer trust erode because of the lack of integrity in the marketing of food products. We are not against laboratory grown products or plant-based products. Again, tell consumers the truth. Market with integrity. If a consumer has a poor experience eating lab grown products when they thought it was actual beef because it wasn’t labeled any differently, it will cause that consumer to lose faith in our products. It is black and white issue to me. Meat is derived from harvested livestock or poultry. The legislation passed in Missouri says just that. We didn’t change the definition of meat. Our elected leaders simply passed legislation preventing companies from misrepresenting a product as meat that doesn’t meet the existing definition. Now some out-of-state companies are suing the state over the legislation, essentially arguing that it’s their constitutional right to mislead people. That’s beyond ludicrous. You can’t sell a Subaru as a Corvette. So why should you be able to misrepresent a food product as meat that doesn’t contain meat? In everything we do, we have to continue to make strides earning the trust and confidence of our consumers. As the general population continues to become more removed from the farm and more curious about where their food comes from, we must continue telling our story. We should not be comfortable watching that hardearned trust jeopardized by opportunistic marketers trying to sell an imitation product.


Area Producers Part of Leadership Program with King Ranch® Institute for Ranch Management KINGSVILLE, TEXAS (Aug. 28, 2018)—Local area producers and Missouri Cattlemen’s Association members, Jared Wareham and Jena McRell, were recently selected to participate in the Excellence in Ag Leadership Program offered by the King Ranch® Institute for Ranch Management (KRIRM) in partnership with the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA). Wareham and McRell, along with seven other ranching professionals and five KRIRM ranch management graduate students, began the program last week at the John B. Armstrong Lectureship on Systems Thinking in Kingsville, Texas. The Excellence in Ag Leadership Program, a distanceeducation program designed to further develop the next generation of leaders in the ranching industry, began in 2014 with its inaugural class. The 2018 class marks the third cohort of the leadership program. Participants from seven states were selected as highpotential leaders by KRIRM and NCBA. The training started at the systems thinking lectureship August 13-16 where participants learned how to use the concept of systems thinking to discuss questions and issues facing the agricultural industry and their ranching operations. Along with 34 additional lectureship attendees, the leadership participants were able to network with a diverse group of ranchers. Wareham, McRell, and fellow participants will attend two more KRIRM lectureships that focus on strategic planning and managing farm and ranch employees. A 360-degree leadership assessment and extraordinary leadership workshop will also be conducted at the 2019 NCBA convention in New Orleans, La. Individuals will collect leadership perception feedback from direct reports, peers, and managers; by the end of the workshop, participants will understand how they are perceived as leaders and will have a clear understanding of how they can become a more effective leader.

OCTOBER 2018

Other components of the program will include individualized leadership coaching and attendance at the summer NCBA business meeting. This workshop will outline the next steps for the group to become involved in the cattle industry at the state and/or national level.

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Guiding the group on their leadership journey is KRIRM Associate Instructor Kim McCuistion, PhD. Senior Director of Governance and Leadership

Back row, from left to right: Clay Mathis, Jared Wareham, Craig Moss, Chance Clay, John Olsen, Jess Kane, and Rick Machen. Middle row, from left to right: Barb Wilkinson, Will Mayfield, Tyler Gardner, Chance Muehlstein, Zane Herrin, and Joe Glascock. Front row, from left to right: Jena McRell, Ashley Hughes, Amy Rorvig, Alethea Prewett, and Kim McCuistion.

Development Barb Wilkinson of NCBA also works closely with the group to help them develop their leadership skills, representing the commitment of both organizations to further develop these young leaders. McCuistion expressed her hope in the impact the leadership program will have on participant’s involvement in the industry. “We believe that the development of great leaders is an important leverage point in the ranching industry,” said McCuistion. “It is our commitment to help this group develop their skills to be effective leaders in their organizations and the industry.” For more information about the KRIRM leadership program and its participants, visit krirm.tamuk.edu/ leadership-program. About KRIRM Formed in 2003, KRIRM is a ranch management master’s program at Texas A&M University-Kingsville created in honor of the 150th Anniversary of the legendary King Ranch. As the only ranch management master’s program in the world, KRIRM teaches graduate students using a multi-disciplinary, systems approach to ranch management. KRIRM also provides rancher learning opportunities through high quality lectureships and symposia to stakeholders in the ranching industry. For more information about KRIRM, visit krirm.tamuk.edu.


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Barn Becomes a Classroom for Day at MU Thompson Farm Source: University of Missouri Extension SPICKARD, Mo. – The Thompson Farm calving barn became a classroom for the University of Missouri. The teachers were MU graduate students and their mentors. Their listeners were beef farmers on Sept. 17. In his field day greeting, Chris Daubert said this farm was a classroom as much as any building on the Columbia campus. Daubert, dean of the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, told how farm research helps beef farmers profit. It also prepares the next generation. The evening program taught as much on grass, beefcow rations and economics as it did on breeding heifers and cows. MU specialists adjusted the day’s programs to fit the need after a hot, dry summer. Drought crippled hay production. Eric Bailey, MU beef nutritionist, outlined a plan for feeding cows this coming winter. He says feed less hay. Also, cut waste in feeding big hay bales. Low-cost grains and byproduct feeds can replace expensive hay. Feeding hay that costs $85 per big bale makes no economic sense, Bailey said. Later, MU Extension beef economist Scott Brown said, “This drought is not like the drought of 2012.” Unlike then, grain crops will be plentiful, lowering feed costs. Rations using grains can replace high-price hay. In a nutshell economic outlook, Brown said beef producers will struggle through 2019. In 2020 and beyond, Missouri’s beef-cow herds can boost the economy. With returning rains, producers are maintaining herd size.

OCTOBER 2018

Brown added cautions. For now, huge supplies of meat loom over markets. Pork and poultry producers face serious financial challenges.

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Currently, consumer demand keeps beef prices strong. “Beef farmers listen to consumers and give what buyers want.” That’s both domestic and international. World trade remains vital to our farm economy, Brown said. Just ahead, beef producers won’t gain much from higher prices, he said. To survive they must look to cutting costs.

Gaining quality beef at lower cost came from beef herd research at Thompson Farm for more than 20 years. Major gains were made in cutting death losses at calving. Also, quality beef gains through better genetics. In the evening program, MU graduate students had first chances to share results of their studies at the MU research farm. Genetics add to the MU reproduction programs. Research at the DNA level speeds breed progress, scientists find. Students were joined by Jordan Thomas, a recent Ph.D. graduate now hired as an MU Extension specialist. It was his first appearance back at Thompson as a state specialist, up from student. His research shifts from breeding heifers to inseminating older cows. Artificial insemination protocols that work on heifers don’t work as well with cows 4 years and older. His report that older beef animals respond slower was understood by older beef farmers who made up much of the crowd. Already, Thomas’ studies of longer breeding protocols show promise on old cows. “We’re just beginning,” he said. Other research aims to improve split-time AI and use of sexed semen. In his wrap-up of the day, emcee Bill Lamberson, director of animal science on the MU campus, pitched an appeal for financial support for science and teaching at Thompson Farm. His call echoed an appeal earlier last week by UM President Mun Choi. The leaders seek added dollar support. State funding hasn’t kept pace with costs at the state’s land-grant university. Beef farmers already use research from MU Thompson farm to add value, Dean Daubert said. Results in breeding quality beef herd replacements will be seen at six Show-Me-Select heifer sales across the state this fall. Producers across the nation benefit from MU fixed-time AI breeding protocols. Field day visitors looked behind the scenes at new research on that.


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We Market Cattle Across Missouri Weekly:

573-324-2295 • www.emcclivestock.com

…on Tuesday in Boonville…

660-882-7413 • www.movalleylivestock.com

We routinely find true price discovery weekly across Missouri. We work for sellers and with buyers to keep our industry moving forward.

OCTOBER 2018

…on Friday in Bowling Green.

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Your

BEEF CHECKOFF NEWS Beef Continues to be on the Front Burner Wherever You Go With Mark Russell, Executive Director, MBIC

OCTOBER 2018

New publication assessing the healthy dietary pattern on phyiscal and mental health — It is important to consider whether dietary recommendations can have an impact on health outcomes beyond indexes of heart health. Previous observational research suggests that consumption of healthy eating patterns is associated with improved physical and mental health. In a randomized controlled trial, overweight/obese adults with good mental health, who followed a Mediterranean-style eating pattern, showed improvements in energy levels, including modest increased vitality and reduced fatigues as well as improved sleep quality; independent of red meat intake. The new publication from the Beef Checkoff co-funded study has been accepted and will be available in an upcoming issue of The Journal of Nutrition.

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A new educational display, intrigued fairgoers at the SEMO fair in September in Cape Girardeau.

Simplifying meal prep with freezer meal recipes — In cooperation with several state beef councils and their retail partners, the Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. Culinary Team has created a collection of freezer meal recipes intended to make meal prep easier for consumers. Recipe testers selected existing recipes and adjusted them to simplify and reduce prep time. These recipes are budget friendly, balanced and a great fit for people with busy lifestyles. Several state beef councils are sharing these freezer meal recipes with their retail partners and corresponding Registered Dietitians. As a part of the retail chain, retail Registered Dietitians are using these recipes in classes where consumers are encouraged to participate in some or all of the preparation process. This program highlights how beef can be a part of a healthy diet, especially for those with busy lifestyles.

All ages came to see the live animals inside the “tent” at SEMO!


Back to school beef breakfast — Dan Churchill, The Healthy Chef, recently created a blog post, social posts and a recipe video for a Colorful Beef and Quinoa Breakfast Bowl. This delicious meal is packed with nutrients that improve overall health and provide a boost of energy and brain power. Beef export values are reaching new heights in wide range of markets 4.76 billion in value for Jan.-July 2018 - 20% higher than last year’s record pace

Back in Missouri In October, stop by Farm Fest in Springfield and ask us about recent promotions with beef! Also, on the agenda for the month, includes school counselor tours in midMissouri, St. Louis Science Center Outdoor Science Festival, Bass Pro fitness runs, Nevada Schools launch for MO BEEF for MO KIDS, Dierberg’s Cooking classes, Missouri Forage Grassland Council Conference and more. Stop by our displays and find out how we are Driving Beef Demand!

$722 million in value for July 2018 - 16% higher than last July Top U.S. Beef Export Markets ( Jan.-July 2018) Japan – 191,237 metric tons (7% higher than 2017) • value up 12% to $1.2 billion • chilled beef up 4% to 87,034 mt, valued at $694.9 million (up 13%) Mexico – 137,560 mt (up 2%) • value up 9% to $596.5 million South Korea – 136,897 mt (up 38%) • value up 54% to $971.2 million • chilled beef up 33% in volume (29,923 mt) and 45% in value ($289.2 million) Hong Kong – 68,055 mt (up 4%) • value up 28% to $536.5 million Canada – 68,528 mt (up 1%) • value down 3% to $459.5 million Taiwan – 32,504 mt (up 34%) • value up 38% to $297.7 million • chilled beef up 46% in volume (13,040 mt) and 41% in value ($161.3 million) Measuring Beef Export Value Exports accounted for 14% of total U.S. beef production in July, 13.5% year-to-date. Up almost 1% from last July and up from 12.8% in first seven months of last year

OCTOBER 2018

Export value of $326.18 per head of fed slaughter in July, $318.31 year-to-date. This value is up 9% from July 2017 and up 16% year-todate.

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Improve Low-Quality Forages with Ammonia Treatment Source: University of Missouri Extension BELLFLOWER, Mo. – Livestock producers can stretch short supplies of hay this year by using a simple ammonia treatment on bales, says University of Missouri Extension agronomist Rusty Lee. Lee says ammoniation boosts the nutritive value of poor-quality hay and makes it more digestible for cows and horses. MU Extension state forage specialist Craig Roberts calls ammoniation a “secret weapon” in drought-stressed areas. With proper ammoniation, the nutritional value of hay, cornstalks and straw can improve significantly, even double, at a reasonable cost. Lee says it is important to ammoniate only poor-quality hay. Higher-quality grass hay can become toxic with

nitrates after ammonia treatment and cause “crazy cow” syndrome when fed. A maximum rate of 50 pounds of anhydrous ammonia per ton of straw should be observed to avoid nitrate issues. Producers should not worry if their tall fescue is endophyte-infected before ammonia treatment, Roberts says. MU research shows that ammoniated tall fescue is about five times less toxic than pasture, as the toxins break down during ammoniation. The process takes one week to a month, depending on temperature, says Lee. If the temperature is 85 degrees or higher, one week is recommended. Treat two to three weeks in milder temperatures and up to four weeks when temperatures fall. Lee says three weeks is a good average. Follow these steps: • Stack round bales in a pyramid so the covering will shed rainfall. Stack height is limited by width of plastic used to cover. • Cover with 6 mil thick black plastic, the kind used to cover silage pits. • Plastic sheeting should completely cover the stack with sufficient length to cover edges with soil or lime. Tamp soil down to create an airtight seal. • Fill the ammonia tank with only the amount required for the stack being treated. This will avoid the risk of overtreating. • Add ammonia slowly by cracking the valve on the tank. Let ammonia trickle into the middle of the hay bales overnight. Wear proper safety equipment when working around ammonia.

OCTOBER 2018

• Air out bales three days before feeding to allow the ammonia to clear. Do not uncover in windy weather. Air out before testing forage to check improvement.

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Cost to ammoniate is $20-$30 per ton, depending on cost of plastic sheeting and ammonia in your area, Lee says. For more information, contact Lee at 573-564-3733 or leerw@missouri.edu. You may also contact the agronomist at your county MU Extension center.


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2018 American Royal Livestock Show October 17th - October 28th Kansas City, Missouri

American Royal Welcomes Exhibitors to Kansas City with Inaugural Red Angus Show Source: RAAA As the Red Angus breed continues to grow, several new livestock expositions and state fairs have added a Red Angus show to accommodate Junior Red Angus Association of America members. RAAA is excited to announce the American Royal will host its inaugural Red Angus show for junior and open exhibitors in October 2018. The American Royal has been welcoming livestock exhibitors and enthusiasts to fill its historic halls for nearly 120 years. A Red Angus show at the American Royal is valuable to junior Red Angus members as an opportunity to showcase the breed and network with other exhibitors and beef industry stakeholders.

OCTOBER 2018

State Directories Now Available

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Chessie Mitchell, RAAA show coordinator, stated “The Red Angus Association of America is excited to add another Red Angus show to the list of exhibition opportunities available throughout the nation each year. We have had tremendous growth in registrations and memberships this past year. The growth that the breed is experiencing is a testament to the value and demand of Red Angus genetics in the marketplace. We look forward to the upcoming American Royal show as yet another avenue to highlight our breed’s strengths.” The American Royal Red Angus junior and open shows will be Saturday, Oct. 20, 2018, beginning at 5 p.m. For additional details, please refer to the American Royal Livestock Premium Book or contact Chessie Mitchell at chessie@redangus.org or (940) 226-4762.

Come to Kansas City for these 2018 American Royal Charolais Events… Kansas City, MO Shows and Sales! October 26th • 10:30 a.m. - Charolais Breeders Classic, Hale Arena • 2:00 p.m - Charolais Sale October 27th • 8:00 a.m. -Charolais Junior Heifer Show followed by the 50th National Charolais Show, East Side Hale Arena Missouri Charolais Breeders Association Vice-President President Jeannine Doughty Tad Owings 660-998-2557 816-616-8838 Check us out on the web @

Treasurer Secretary Annette Bonacker Judy Shaffer 636-285-1656 417-825-4067 www.missouricharolais.com


American Royal Livestock Show Changes for 2018 Source: American Royal 2018 Premium Book Breeding Cattle • The Salers will host a Junior Show • There will be a Red Angus Junior Show and Open Show Breeding Gilts • There will be a Hereford/Tamworth division • All swine must have a Federal 840 tag or an official identification eartag (ex. NUES tag) Market Animals • Eligibility changes for market animal exhibitors • All market animals must submit DNA by August 10th • Exhibitors must declare animals that they will be showing at time of entry form submission • Exhibitors may show three of each species Market Steers • An exhibitor may show three market steers

Market Hogs • There will be a Hereford/Tamworth division • All swine must have a Federal 840 tag or an official identification eartag (ex. NUES tag) Market Lambs and Goats • Two show arenas will be used in Upper Exhibition Hall • Market lambs and goats will show on Saturday, October 20th (check arrival schedule for changes) Exhibitor Social • The Exhibitor Social will take place on Friday, October 19th All livestock are subject to an ethics check and veterinary inspection upon arrival.

2018 American Royal Livestock Show Tentative Schedule

Sunday, October 14 6:00 a.m. Intercollegiate Meat Judging ContestsNebraska Beef – Omaha, NE 7:30 p.m. Intercollegiate Meat Judging Contest Award Dinner – Omaha, NE (Continued on page 28)

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Tuesday, October 16 7:00 a.m. National 4-H Meat Judging Contest – Manhattan, KS Wednesday, October 17 7:00 a.m. Market Steers, American Aberdeen, Braunvieh, Gelbvieh, Miniature Herefords, Red Angus, Salers Move-In 8:00 a.m. National 4-H Meat Judging Contest Awards Breakfast – American Royal Complex 12:00 p.m. Market Hog and Breeding Gilt Move-In Thursday, October 18 8:00 a.m. Market Steer Check-In 9:00 a.m. Calf Scramble Show- West Side Hale Arena 11:00 a.m. Market Steer Weight Cards Due 11:00 a.m. Breeding Gilt Check-In followed by Market Hog Check-In- Governors 1:00 p.m. Stierwalt Beef Clinic Sponsored by Weaver Leather and Livestock - Hale Arena 3:00 p.m. Sullivan Supply Fitting Clinic- Hale Arena 4:00 p.m. Sullivan Supply Cattle Fitting Contest- Hale Arena 4:00 p.m. Market Hog and Crossbred Gilt Weight Cards Due 5:00 p.m. Market Goat Move-In- Upper Ex 5:00 p.m. Market Lamb Move-In- Upper Ex 5:00 p.m. Sullivan Supply Hog Clinic- Governors

OCTOBER 2018

Friday, October 19 10:00 a.m. Breeding Gilt Show (Pedigreed followed by Crossbred) - Governors 1:00 p.m. Market Beef/Junior Heifer ShowmanshipWest Side Hale Arena 1:00 p.m. Market Lamb/Goat Check-In- Upper Ex 3:00 p.m. Market Lamb/Goat Weight Cards Due 3:30 p.m. Stierwalt Lamb & Goat Clinic Sponsored by Weaver Leather and Livestock- Upper Ex 5:30 p.m. Exhibitor Social Sponsored by John Deere and Heritage Tractor- Hale Arena 6:30 p.m. Sullivan Supply Lamb & Goat Clinic- Upper Ex 7:00 p.m. Sullivan Supply Lamb & Goat Fitting Contest- Upper Ex

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Saturday, October 20 8:00 a.m. Lamb Showmanship- Upper Ex Market Lamb Show- 30 minutes after completion of Market Lamb Showmanship- Upper Ex 9:00 a.m. Market Goat Showmanship- Upper Ex Market Goat Show- 30 minutes after completion of Goat Showmanship- Upper Ex 8:00 a.m. Swine Showmanship- Governors 8:00 a.m. Gelbvieh Junior/Open Show- East Side Hale Arena 8:00 a.m. Braunvieh Junior/Open Show- West Side Hale Arena

1:00 p.m. Crossbred Market Hog Show- Governors 1:00 p.m. Market Steer Show- West Side Hale Arena 1:00 p.m. Salers Junior/Open Show- East Side Hale Arena 5:00 p.m. Red Angus Junior/Open Show- East Side Hale Arena 7:00 p.m. Royal Gilt Sale- Wagstaff Sale Center Sunday, October 21 7:30 a.m. Pedigreed Market Hog Show- Governors 8:00 a.m. Miniature Hereford Junior Show/Open ShowWest Side Hale Arena 9:00 a.m. American Aberdeen Junior Show/Open Show- East Side Hale Arena 4:00 p.m. All cattle released- must vacate by midnight 6:00 p.m. Junior Premium Livestock Auction- Wagstaff Sale Center Tuesday, October 23 6:00 p.m. Angus, AOB Junior Heifers, Charolais, Hereford, Limousin, Maine-Anjou, Shorthorn, & Simmental Move-In Wednesday, October 24 7:00 a.m. Angus, AOB Junior Heifers, Charolais, Hereford, Limousin, Maine-Anjou, Shorthorn, & Simmental Move-In 1:00 p.m. Livestock Judging Contest Officials MeetingAR Board Room 6:00 p.m. 4-H/FFA Livestock Judging Coaches Meeting Thursday, October 25 7:00 a.m. 4-H/FFA Livestock Judging Contest- Hale Arena 12:00 p.m. LimousinJunior/OpenShow-EastSide HaleArena 12:00 p.m. Shorthorn Junior/Open Show- West Side Hale Arena 3:30 p.m. 4-H/FFA Livestock Judging Contest Awards Banquet- Wagstaff Sale Center 7:00 p.m. ICLS/JCLS Coaches Meeting Friday, October 26 7:00 a.m. Intercollegiate/Junior College Livestock Judging Contest- Hale Arena 10:30 a.m. Charolais Breeders Classic- East Side Hale Arena 12:00 p.m. Maine-AnjouJunior/OpenShow-West Side Hale Arena 12:00 p.m. AOB/Commercial Junior Heifer Show- East Side Hale Arena 2:00 p.m. 40th National Charolais Sale- Wagstaff Sale Center 2:30 p.m. Junior Heifer Showmanship- East Side Hale Arena


Saturday, October 27 8:00 a.m. Intercollegiate/Junior College Livestock Judging Contest Awards Breakfast 8:00 a.m. Angus Junior Heifer Show followed by Angus ROV Show- West Side Hale Arena 8:00 a.m. Charolais Junior Heifer Show followed by 50th National Charolais Show- East Side Hale Arena 2:00 p.m. Hereford Sale- Wagstaff Sale Center 5:00 p.m. Hereford Junior Heifer Show- West Side Hale Arena 5:00 p.m. Simmental PTP Bull Show- East Side Hale Arena Sunday, October 28 8:00 a.m. National Hereford Show- West Side Hale Arena 8:00 a.m. Simmental Junior Heifer Show followed by PTP Female Show- East Side Hale Arena 12:00 p.m. Supreme Champion Jr Heifer Show- Hale Arena The American Royal Management reserves the right to cancel events or change scheduling when necessary due to unforeseen circumstance.

8:00 a.m. Market Lamb Show- South Arena Upper Ex Lamb Showmanship- 30 minutes after completion of Market Lamb Show- Upper Ex 8:00 a.m. Swine Showmanship- Governors 1:00 p.m. Crossbred Market Hog Show – Governors 1:00 p.m. Market Steer Show – West Side Hale Arena Sunday, October 21st 7:30 a.m. Pedigreed Market Hog Show – Governors 6:00 p.m. Junior Premium Livestock Auction – Wagstaff Sale Center American Royal Livestock Show General Information/Rules and Regulations apply to the Junior Market Division.

Quality Livestock Equipment Since 1961 Panels, Headgates, Calf Tables, Calving Pens, Manual Chutes, Hydraulic Chutes, Tip Chutes, Tubs & Alley Systems

Junior Market Schedule Wednesday, October 17th 7:00 a.m. Market Steer Move-In Begins 12:00 p.m. Market Hog and Breeding Gild Move-In Begins Thursday, October 18th 8:00 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. Market Steer Check-In – Lower Ex 11:00 a.m. Breeding Gilt Check-In followed by Market Hog Check-In – Governors 5:00 p.m. Lamb and Goat Move-In Begins Friday, October 19th 12:00 p.m. Calf Scramble Show- West Side Hale Arena 1:00 p.m. Market Beef/Junior Heifer Showmanship – West Side Hale Arena 1:00 p.m. Market Lamb Check-In – Upper Ex 3:00 p.m. Stierwalt Beef Clinic – Hale Arena 5:00 p.m. Stierwalt Lamb & Goat Clinic- Lamb/Goat Arena 6:00 p.m. Exhibitor Social – Hale Arena

OCTOBER 2018

Saturday, October 20th 8:00 a.m. Goat Showmanship- North Arena Upper Ex Market Goat Show- 30 minutes after completion of Goat Showmanship- Upper Ex

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Leroy A. Strubberg Leroy A. Strubberg was born May 29, 1936 in Washington, Missouri; the son of the late Edwin J. Strubberg and his wife Rose nee` Gildehaus. He passed away Sunday, September 2, 2018 surrounded by his family. Leroy attended Immaculate Conception Grade School in Union, Missouri and graduated from St. Francis Borgia High School in 1954. He then went on to attend St. Louis University. He graduated with a B.S. in Accounting in 1960. Leroy was united in marriage to Ruth Ann Dierking November 10, 1957 at Immaculate Conception Church in Union, Missouri. The couple made their home in Union and moved to New Haven, Missouri in 1974. Leroy owned and operated two accounting offices for 43 years, one in Union, Missouri and a second in New Haven, Missouri.

OCTOBER 2018

Leroy was an accomplished Accountant and was recognized nationwide for his achievements. In 1990 he was awarded the Accountant of the Year by the National Society of Public Accountants, he also served as their State Director from 1972-1976. He also served on the IRS Commissioners Advisory and was Chairman for the National Society of Public Accountants Federal Taxation Committee. He was awarded Missouri Society of Accountants Outstanding Achievement Award in 1985. He was chosen to be on the St. Louis IRS District Director and Liaison Committee for four years and served as the Kansas City IRS Service Center Liaison. Leroy served as President of the Missouri Society of Accountants in 1974 and President of the National Society of Accountants in 1996.

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While Leroy was very accomplished in his career and professional life he was even more dedicated to his local community and was most proud of his volunteer work close to home. He was a member of the Union Volunteer Fire Department for 62 years and served on all committees and ranks. He was captain for 6 years as well. Leroy was also a member of the Union Rotary for 61 years and had perfect attendance for 48 years. He was a past member of the Union Jaycees and the Franklin County Fair Board. He was one of the organizers for the Franklin County Cattleman’s Association and was a member for 48 years as well as a member of the National Cattleman’s Association for 35 years. Leroy was a founding member of the Union Ambulance District and instrumental in establishing the Emergency Numbering System for Franklin County. He served on the United Way Board, the Financial Committee for Emmaus Home and the East Central College Accounting Advisory Board. In addition, he served on the Union Chamber of Commerce, the

Industrial Development Corporation, Union R-XI Foundation and was one of the founders of the First State Community Bank. Leroy was awarded the Union Jaycees Outstanding Young Man in 1972, Fireman of the Year in 1972, Future Farmers of America Civic Award in 1976, Union Volunteer Fire Department Life Saving Award in 1985 and 1986, Missouri Life Saving Award in 1983 and 1987, the Distinguished Service Award in 1993, and the Long Haul Award in 2006. Leroy was a member of the Immaculate Conception Church and was a 3rd Degree Member of the Knights of Columbus. He was preceded in death by three brothers, Melvin, Eldo and Ewald Strubberg. He is survived by his wife Ruth Ann Strubberg nee` Dierking of New Haven, Missouri; two daughters, Kathy Langenberg and husband David of Washington, Missouri and Julie Gaugh and husband Chet of Union, Missouri; two sons, Jim Strubberg and wife Sharon and Tom Strubberg and wife Kim both of New Haven, Missouri; nine grandchildren and Six GreatGrandchildren; two sisters-in-law, Carol Henderson and Janette Strubberg both of Union, Missouri; nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. Funeral mass was held Thursday September 6, 2018 at 10 a.m. at Immaculate Conception Church in Union, Missouri with Rev. Joe Post officiating. Burial followed in the church cemetery.

Leroy Strubberg (seated) was the 2017 MCA Pioneer Award honoree. Leroy and his family are pictured with Darla Eggers at the 2017 MCA Convention. The Pioneer Award is the highest recognition offered by MCA. Strubberg was actively involved with the association since 1972. He was integral to the creation of the Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation and moving the headquarters to Columbia.


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Callaway Livestock Center, Inc. On I-70, 4 miles east of Kingdom City, MO on outer road 573-642-7486 Every Monday: Slaughter Cattle Sale 10:00 a.m. Selling All Classes of Cattle 12:30 p.m.

1st Thursday Nite of Each Month: David Means

John P. Harrison

573-642-9753

573-386-5150

Jack Harrison

David Bell

573-386-2138

660-327-5633

OCTOBER 2018

6:00 p.m. Bred Cows and Breeding Bull Sale

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COUNTY NEWS Dallas County Members of the Dallas County Cattlemen’s Association met September 11 at the O’Bannon Community Center in Buffalo and heard from three University of Missouri Extension Specialists about “Surviving the Drought of 2018.” With much-needed rain in recent weeks, pastures are looking better. However, with hay in short supply and many parched pastures still recovering, the 84 producers in attendance really appreciated the suggestions and expertise of the speakers. First to address the group was University of Missouri Agriculture Business Specialist Wesley Tucker. He told the group that we do have options for winter feeding. With a lot of the corn states predicting 200+ bushels per acre, he said that feeding grain as a supplement will be cheaper than hay. He urged producers to calculate the cost of a pound of protein and the cost of a pound of energy, and do what works best for you. Tucker mentioned that in normal years it would cost about $1.50 per cow per day, but he estimates that this winter he believes it will cost about $2.50 per head per day.

OCTOBER 2018

Next to talk to the group was agronomist Terry Halleran. He told the group that “good farming practices pay off in a drought year.” He cautioned everyone to not panic and buy hay sight unseen. Also,

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See What’s Happening in Your County

buy by the ton, not by the bale. He said to be careful where you feed if you don’t know what’s in the hay. He told cattlemen to probe purchased hay and soil test now to strengthen pastures as the number one thing robbed from the ground is phosphorus--not lime. Livestock specialist Andy McCorkill gave tips on weaning of fall calves early at 150 days if forage is short. He believes cows can get by on 10 pounds of hay a day if producers supplement with by-products such as grain or alfalfa hay. He recommended preg checking and culling anything open, old, ornery, or other (such as bad feet, udders, etc.) Earlier that evening the group enjoyed delicious sloppy joe sandwiches and hot dogs furnished by Billy Bolch of Stoutland, where he and his wife raise Scottish Highland cattle. Billy is also a dealer for Lewis Cattle Oilers. He displayed one of his oilers and gave a brief presentation about his products. He uses red diesel mixed with permethrin, and a 45 degree wick pumps the mixture out of a 8 1/2 gallon tank. He estimates it costs $4.00 per cow per month for fly control. We appreciate the Bolchs donating the meat, and we thank Ruby Hostetler and Gloria Miller for preparing it. Also speaking at our meeting was John Crawford, representing Sen. Sandy Crawford and Rep. Jeff


Knight. He are very fortunate to have two DCCA members in the legislature who are very pro agriculture. DCCA is also very proud to have sponsored two local youth to attend the recent Show-Me Beef Leadership Conference. Buffalo FFA students Devyn Rackley and Mackenzie Gann gave an excellent presentation about their trip which they really enjoyed and found quite educational. Sixteen DCCA members volunteered recently to work in the Missouri Beef House at the Missouri State Fair. We also cooked for two days at the annual Southwest Missouri Celtic Festival held in Buffalo at the end of August. We will be firing up the grill for the Fair Grove Old Settlers Heritage Reunion at the end of September, and we will also be working in the OEF Beef

Buffalo FFA students Devyn Rackley and Mackenzie Gann.

House during FarmFest. Our next meeting will be held October 9 at the O’Bannon Community Center. We hope everyone continues to receive rain and hope fall calving is going well.

FALL SELECTION DAY SALE McBee Cattle Company October 27, 2018 • 10:00 to 2:00 at the Ranch, Fayette, Missouri Join Us For Lunch! • 50 Braunvieh and Braunvieh/Angus bred heifers. Synchronized for tight calving window to low BW and high CED bulls for maximum hybrid vigor. • 30 Braunvieh and Braunvieh Angus Hybrid 18 month old bulls, developed for a long and productive life, evaluated on performance and efficiency and carcass trait measured.

The McBee Customer’s Bonus Any bull purchase qualifies the buyer for participation in the McBee Calf Roundup. Grouping and Marketing Customers’ Calves since 1992.

Ron & Teri McBee 221 State Rt. H Fayette, MO 65248 (573) 228-2517

E-mail: mcbcattle@aol.com website: McBeeCattleCompany.com

OCTOBER 2018

Largest Selection in the Midwest!

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St. Clair County The St. Clair County Cattlemen’s Association has had a busy month of September. On Labor Day weekend, St. Clair County Cattlemen’s Association set up and sold 200 steak sandwiches, and 250 hamburger/ cheeseburgers at the Osceola Rodeo Days in Osceola, Missouri. The cattlemen also put a float through the parade with the theme being “Making a Difference One Beef at a Time.” They received first place on their float. St. Clair County Cattlemen’s Association also sold 50/50 tickets at the Lucas Oil Pro-Pulling Nationals event on Friday, September 14 to support their local scholarship fund. It was a great evening and the cattlemen raised $1,912 with Austin Rife of Wheatland winning $956. Thanks to all who came out and helped make both events a success!! Lucas Oil Pro-Pulling Nationals event on Friday, September 14.

Osceola Rodeo Days in Osceola, Missouri. Lucas Oil Pro-Pulling Nationals event on Friday, September 14.

Lucas Oil Pro-Pulling Nationals event on Friday, September 14.

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Osceola Rodeo Days in Osceola, Missouri.

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Osceola Rodeo Days in Osceola, Missouri.

Lucas Oil Pro-Pulling Nationals event on Friday, September 14.


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Henry County It has been another busy month. Twenty-seven members took time out from their busy schedules to work at the Missouri Beef House at the Missouri State Fair. This is always a favorite activity of the members. We had a very informative dinner/meeting sponsored by Heritage Tractor. They discussed their new equipment. After their presentation, we had our regular meeting and committee reports. Our next grilling event at the Calhoun Colt Show was discussed. A father/son team (Micah and Stanley Charles) listen to the speaker.

A very enthusiastic crowd prepares for beginning their shift at the Missouri Beef House.

Another family unit (Mike, Josiah and Chelsea Town) getting ready to join the food line at Dietz’s Buffet.

OCTOBER 2018

Members Pay and Kent Carney are asking questions after the presentation from our speaker/sponsor from Heritage Tractor.

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Douglas / Wright County The Douglas / Wright County Cattlemen’s Association met on Tuesday, September 11, 2018 at 6 p.m. in Mountain Grove, Missouri at Club 60 Steakhouse. The group enjoyed a steak dinner sponsored by Bayer Pharmaceutical.

to treat cattle for parasites often results in great financial losses amongst a herd. Dr. Hawkins and local Bayer representative, Stacey Roth were gracious to answer many questions and offer advice during and after the meeting.

President Karla Besson opened the meeting and brought us up-to-speed with current news in E-ID tagging studies taking place in Kansas. Upcoming events include meetings in October and our year-end meeting in December, where an auction will be held to sell the steer calf born from the Red Angus heifer that was donated by Gourley Red Angus in 2017. She then asked the blessing before the meal.

The Douglas / Wright County group will hold their October meeting on Tuesday, October 16, 2018 at 6 p.m. at Club 60 Steakhouse in Mountain Grove, Missouri. The sponsor for the meeting will be GeneTrust.

After dinner, time was given to our sponsor who gave a brief presentation. Dr. Larry Hawkins of Bayer Pharmaceutical discussed parasite management and proper implementation to control parasites in our cattle herds. He stressed the following points: 1) Start early with parasite treatment once noticed, 2) Inspect the herd often, 3) Do not allow parasite populations to multiply, 4) Know and implement the proper application technique to eradicate the problem, and 5) Stay on top of treatment. Improper treatment or failure

Custom Cattle Feeding • 12,000 Head Capacity Family owned & operated since 1917

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OCTOBER 2018 55


Bates County Catching up after a busy summer of fairs, food and fun, the Bates County Cattlemen held their August meeting on August 14, hosting a potluck for attending members. Susie Serna spoke on behalf of the Butler Community Café and shared about their efforts to provide free meals every Tuesday at different churches in the area. She offered the cattleman’s the opportunity to help cook and serve, which the group agreed to do on November 6. Following Susie, MBIC Director Mark Russell shared about the Mo Beef for Mo Kids program. The program connects cattle producers with local schools to help provide beef through donated slaughter cows for school lunches. The group was very interested in the program and decided to move forward in coordinating efforts between local producers and the Butler school district. President Ivan Fischer reported on the Bash Night and steak dinner at the Bates County Fair and discussed other upcoming cooking events. He also shared the cattlemen’s had purchased two steers at the junior livestock sale for nearly $2,000. The group will once again be cooking meat for the Osage Valley Electric Cooperative annual meeting in Clinton on August 30. This is a three-day event for the group with meat preparation starting two days prior. It’s a huge event, with hundreds of co-op members in attendance and a great opportunity to serve high quality roast beef sandwiches. The September meeting was held at the famous Poplar Heights Living History farm just outside Butler. This is a special meeting for the group with a delicious three-

course catered meal sponsored by Heiman’s Inc and Purina. Bates County Farm Bureau President Sharon Arnold shared details on the upcoming candidate hearing hosted by Farm Bureau and the Cattlemen’s. This will be an opportunity to hear from each state and local candidate as they share their bio and short campaign speech. The hearing will take place Tuesday, September 18 and is designed to be an informative session with questions allowed following the event. Following the meeting opening, the group discussed a cooking event sponsored by Thrivent Financial. At an earlier meeting, Thrivent sponsored our meal and gave away a $250 gift card to be used for fundraising efforts for a non-profit group. Cattleman’s member Donnie Brown won the card on behalf of the cattleman’s group and presented the idea of hosting another cooking event at the Family Center parking lot. The group did this in May to promote beef month and took donations for the meal, which were then dispersed to area non-profits. The replay will happen on October 6 and the group will serve burgers, chips and water to anyone who comes by. Other upcoming cooking events are the Amsterdam Jubilee on September 21 and the community café on November 6. The group is gearing up for our annual meeting on November 10 and would like to invite everyone out for a delicious prime rib dinner and music presented by Tom Mallory.

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OCTOBER 2018

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See Us at the Ozark Fall Farmfest October 5-7 • Springfield


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Southwest Missouri Cattlemen The Southwest Missouri Cattlemen’s meeting for September was held September 4 at the University of Missouri Southwest Research Center, Mt. Vernon. Sixty-five attended and enjoyed the meal prepared by Prime Cut of Monett. Stacy Roth represented the company along with Dr. Marc Campbell, Stillwater. They did a tag-team presentation on several Bayer products for external parasite control. The Ash Grove FFA officer team opened the program after the meal with a “thank you” to the cattlemen who help with the ribeye steak grilling at the chapter’s banquet last May. Attendance numbered 275. The chapter president, Makenna Johnson gave her speech regarding the importance of agriculture in the heartland and received a well-deserved round of applause.

President, Russell Marion reviewed the summers’ grilling activity and those events coming up later this fall. They’ve had a busy time and even made some money along the way. Jim McCann reported he was recruiting retired cows again for the MO Beef for MO Kids at the Mt. Vernon schools.

Lafayette County LCCA toured Valley Oaks Steak Company and feedlot July 31. Members learned about their processing operation and got to see some of their cattle on feed in the finishing building. Lafayette County Cattlemen enjoyed cooking at Customer Appreciation Day for Equity Bank in Higginsville September 14.

Makenna Johnson gives her prepared speech about youth and agriculture in the future.

OCTOBER 2018

Marlene Edwards, Harvey Geary, Kent and Marsha Corbin, and Kathy Harris served Equity Bank customers hamburgers, beef dogs and specialty brats.

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Ash Grove FFA Officers express their appreciation to the cattlemen. LCCA toured Valley Oaks Steak Company at Lone Jack.


SEMO Cattlemen We couldn’t have asked for better weather at the SEMO Cattlemen’s Association annual picnic. It was hosted at the East Perry Fairgrounds, Altenburg, on August 23, 2018, where 135 ribeyes were served. We heard from Rock Ridge Farms of Dexter on their meat market and processing facility and their marketing strategy of

Mike Deering giving an update on MCA legislative priorities surrounding fake meat, property rights, and liability protection from trespassers at the SEMO Cattlemen’s Association Annual Picnic.

supplying local meat to local consumers. Reis Meat Processing, Pocahontas, discussed their plans for expansion and Mike Deering gave an update on MCA legislative priorities surrounding fake meat, property rights, and liability protection from trespassers.

Hwy 42 West • Vienna Missouri 65582 45 Miles South of Jefferson City Selling All classes of Cattle Wednesday • 10:00 a.m. Featuring ‘Star-Vac Program’ Cattle Weekly DVAuction Service for convenient online viewing & bidding For More Information Call… David Patton Office Ross Patton Bill Patton 573-308-6655 573-422-3305 573-308-6657 573-308-6658 Visit our website: www.scrsvienna.com or E-mail us: scrsvienna@gmail.com “Make South Central your Livestock Market”

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U.S. Pork and Beef Export Volumes Strong in July; Pork Value Squeezed by Higher Duties Source: USMEF July exports of U.S. pork and beef were higher than a year ago, according to data released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF). Export value results were mixed, with beef exports posting another near-record month while pork export value declined, reflecting the impact of retaliatory duties imposed by Mexico and China. Pork exports totaled 176,413 metric tons (mt) in July, up 1.5 percent from a year ago, valued at $465.3 million – down 5 percent year-over-year and the lowest monthly value since February 2016. For the first seven months of the year, pork exports remained 2 percent ahead of last year’s record volume pace at 1.45 million mt, while value was up 3 percent to $3.83 billion.

OCTOBER 2018

“It is encouraging to see pork export volume continue to grow, even in the face of considerable headwinds in some of our most critical markets,” said USMEF President and CEO Dan Halstrom. “But as anticipated,

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the 20 percent duty in Mexico and 62 percent duty in China weigh heavily on the price these exports can command and on the returns generated for producers and for everyone in the U.S. supply chain. Buyers outside of Mexico and China have stepped up to purchase our product, which is fantastic. But they are capitalizing on a buying opportunity made possible by the higher costs of doing business in Mexico and China.” July exports accounted for 24.7 percent of total pork production and 21.7 percent for muscle cuts only, down from 25.9 percent and 21.3 percent, respectively, last year. For January through July, the percentage of total pork production exported fell from 27.5 to 27 percent, but for muscle cuts the percentage increased from 22.8 to 23.3 percent. July pork export value averaged $48.49 per head slaughtered, down 11 percent from a year ago. Through July, per-head export value was up slightly to $54.27. (Continued on page 62)


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Bull and Female Sale Oct. 27th

Dave Gust, Sr. Dave Gust, Jr. Nick Hammett, Commercial Mktg. Mike Lembke • Kevin Lennon

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Fall Bull & Heifer Sale • Oct. 20

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OCTOBER 2018

Julie Conover, Gen. Manager 634 S.W. 1201 Rd • Holden, MO 64040

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MISSOURI ANGUS ASSOCIATION

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Led by another spectacular performance in South Korea and strong growth in Japan, Taiwan and Latin America, July beef exports climbed 12 percent in volume to 116,575 mt, valued at $722 million – up 16 percent from a year ago and just slightly below the May 2018 record of $722.1 million. For January through July, beef exports established a record pace in both volume (779,450 mt, up 10 percent year-over-year) and value ($4.76 billion, up 20 percent). July exports accounted for 14 percent of total beef production and 11.8 percent for muscle cuts only (the highest since December 2016) – each up nearly a full percentage point from a year ago. For January through July, exports accounted for 13.5 percent of total beef production and 11.1 percent for muscle cuts – up from 12.8 percent and 10.1 percent, respectively, last year. Beef export value averaged $326.18 per head of fed slaughter in July, up 9 percent from a year ago. Through July, per-head export value was up 16 percent to $318.31.

OCTOBER 2018

“The worldwide momentum for U.S. beef has rarely been as strong as it is today,” Halstrom said. “To a large degree our mainstay Asian markets are driving this growth, but emerging markets in Asia and in the Western Hemisphere are also displaying a tremendous

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appetite for U.S. beef and contributing significantly to the surge in export value. From high-end restaurants to convenience stores, U.S. beef is gaining new fans across the globe on a daily basis.” Pork exports show resilience, but July value suffers due to trade headwinds The duty rate on most U.S. pork entering Mexico increased from zero to 10 percent in early June and from 10 to 20 percent in early July. This took a toll on July exports to Mexico, especially in terms of value. July volume was 56,484 mt, down just 4 percent from a year ago. But pork moved south at lower prices, with value falling 25 percent to $92 million. In China, the duty rate on U.S. pork and pork variety meat increased from 12 to 37 percent on April 1, and to 62 percent on July 6. July exports to the China/ Hong Kong region totaled 22,199 mt, down 31 percent from a year ago, while value dropped 19 percent to $55.9 million. Pork variety meat volume to China was hit especially hard in July, dropping 49 percent from a year ago to 7,446 mt. For January through July, pork and pork variety exports to China/Hong Kong dropped 22 percent year-over-year in volume (238,207 mt) and 10 percent in value ($563 million) – due in part to the higher duty rates, but also due to an upward trend in China’s domestic pork production.


The July export picture was much brighter in other major markets – including Japan, the leading value destination for U.S. pork. Exports to Japan totaled 31,248 mt in July, up 10 percent from a year ago, while value climbed 6 percent to $127.2 million. For January through July, exports to Japan were 1 percent ahead of last year’s pace in volume (230,315 mt) and 2 percent higher in value ($948.6 million). This included a 2 percent decline in chilled pork exports to 120,288 mt, though chilled pork value increased 1 percent to $580.4 million. Other January-July highlights for U.S. pork include: Korea is the growth pacesetter for U.S. pork in 2018, with exports up 44 percent from a year ago in volume (148,233 mt) and 50 percent in value $424.3 million. The U.S. has supplied 40 percent of Korea’s imported chilled/frozen pork this year, up from 36 percent in 2017. U.S. pork dominates Korea’s imports of picnics and butts while Europe supplies most of the bellies. But Korea is also importing more of a wider range of U.S. pork cuts, including loins, hams and ribs. Fueled by strong results in Colombia and Peru, pork exports to South America increased 30 percent in volume (73,003 mt) and 26 percent in value ($180.3 million). Although year-to-date pork exports to Chile

were down 7 percent, exports gained momentum in July and were the second-largest on record at 4,103 mt. U.S. pork also recently gained access to Argentina, which could further boost exports later in the year. Double-digit growth in all seven Central American nations pushed pork exports to the region 19 percent above last year’s pace in volume (46,020 mt) and 18 percent higher in value ($108.9 million). Honduras and Guatemala are the leading destinations, but U.S. pork continues to gain momentum throughout Central America. The Dominican Republic has also been a top growth market this year, with exports up 22 percent in volume to 25,985 mt and value up 19 percent to $56.7 million. This included a 79 percent increase in July volume (3,718 mt), with July value up 42 percent to $7.2 million. In Oceania, a critically important market for U.S. hams used for further processing, exports climbed 7 percent in volume (49,649 mt) and 9 percent in value ($145.7 million), with exports trending higher to both Australia and New Zealand. With strong growth to the Philippines and shipments to Vietnam more than tripling from a year ago, exports to (Continued on page 64)

Reynolds Herefords

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20 Horned & Polled Bulls • 15 Spring & Fall Cows • 20 Show Heifer Prospects 5 Hereford Show Steers • 3 BWF Show Steer • 25 Black & BWF Commercial Females

OCTOBER 2018

This On Target grandson will One of twenty open heifers selling. add pounds to your calf crop. She is sired by Ironman. www.reynoldsherefords.com • reynoldscattle@cvalley.net • Matt: 660-676-3788

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the ASEAN region climbed 23 percent higher in volume (32,888 mt) and 25 percent higher in value ($85.9 million). Beef export value reaching new heights in wide range of markets U.S. beef exports to Japan hit a post-BSE volume high in July, reaching 31,883 mt (up 15 percent from a year ago) valued at $196.3 million (up 12 percent). For January through July, exports were up 7 percent in volume (191,237 mt) and 12 percent in value ($1.21 billion). This included a 4 percent increase in chilled beef exports to 87,034 mt valued at $694.9 million (up 13 percent). U.S. beef has captured 50 percent of Japan’s chilled import market this year, down slightly from a year ago.

Despite recent trade tensions and uncertainty, beef exports to Mexico have been very solid in 2018, with volume up 2 percent from a year ago to 137,560 mt and value up 9 percent to $596.5 million. For muscle cuts only, exports increased 10 percent in volume to 80,450 mt and 11 percent in value to $465.7 million.

Other January-July highlights for U.S. beef include: Although export volume to China/Hong Kong slowed in July, the January-July total was still up 10 percent from

Complete export results for U.S. beef, pork and lamb are available from USMEF’s statistics web page. Monthly charts for U.S. pork and beef exports are also available online.

Kingsville, Missouri Hwy. 58 • 45 Miles SE of Kansas City, MO

OCTOBER 2018

U.S. beef is enormously popular in Taiwan, where the United States captures nearly 75 percent of the chilled beef market. July export volume was record-large at 5,640 mt, up 46 percent from a year ago, while value climbed 32 percent to $48 million. Through July, exports to Taiwan increased 34 percent from a year ago in volume (32,504 mt) and 38 percent in value ($297.7 million). Chilled beef exports totaled 13,040 mt (up 32 percent), valued at $161.3 million (up 41 percent).

Beef export growth to Korea continued at a remarkable pace in July, with volume up 51 percent from a year ago to 23,614 mt and value soaring 66 percent to $169.2 million. This shattered the previous monthly value record of $154.8 million, set in June 2018. For January through July, exports to Korea jumped 38 percent to 136,897 mt, valued at $971.2 million (up 54 percent). This included a 33 percent increase in chilled beef exports to 29,923 mt, valued at $289.2 million (up 45 percent). U.S. beef has accounted for 58 percent of Korea’s chilled beef imports this year and 53 percent of the chilled/frozen total (up from 54 percent and 47 percent, respectively, during the same period last year). Australia is expected to trigger its beef safeguard in the coming weeks, resulting in a temporary tariff rate increase agreed to in the Korea-Australia Free Trade Agreement. This could further strengthen momentum for U.S. chilled beef to Korea through the end of this year.

Kingsville Livestock Auction

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a year ago to 72,193 mt, while value climbed 37 percent to $572.9 million. Efforts to build a presence for U.S. beef in China have been hampered by retaliatory duties, which increased the tariff rate from 12 to 37 percent in early July. January-July exports to China were 4,138 mt valued at $36.4 million.

Special Cow Sale Saturday, October 27 • 11:00 a.m. Cattle Sale Every Tuesday 10:00 a.m.

Strong growth in the Philippines helped push beef exports to the ASEAN region 9 percent higher in volume (25,520 mt) and 24 percent higher in value ($141.6 million). Exports to Singapore and Indonesia have also increased this year, though volumes to Indonesia slowed the past two months. In Central America, larger volumes to Costa Rica, Guatemala, and Panama pushed exports 29 percent higher in volume (8,320 mt) and 28 percent higher in value ($45.4 million). Despite a modest decline in volume, export value also increased to Honduras.

If you have questions, please contact Joe Schuele at jschuele@usmef.org or call 303-226-7309.

Jim and Scott Cape… 57 Years Trusted Service to Missouri Cattlemen “Your Source for Quality Trailers”

For information call Rick or Jeremy Anstine

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www.jimsmotors.com 1-800-897-9840


Calling Future Cattle Producers: Making the 2019 Cattle Industry Convention Pay Off Internships give opportunities for students to interact, gain experience Source: NCBA DENVER (Sept. 10, 2018) -- A fun, rewarding and engaging opportunity awaits college students wanting to attend the 2019 Cattle Industry Convention and NCBA Trade Show in New Orleans, La., Jan. 30 to Feb. 1, 2019. A team of 18 interns – who are vital to the success of the largest annual meeting in the U.S. beef cattle industry – will gain first-hand experience and be able to interact with leaders of every segment of the cattle and beef industry. They will also be provided with a oneyear NCBA student membership. Eighteen interns will be selected for this opportunity, which is non-paid but provides lodging and meals. They will be assigned to help many different staff members with meetings and events, and should be prepared to handle a wide range of responsibilities, from setting up sessions and distributing handouts, managing the indoor arena, staffing committee meetings to posting on social

media. NCBA will strive to provide students time to maximize industry networking. Students must be able to work Jan. 27 – Feb. 1, 2019 in New Orleans. They must be at least a junior-level college student at an accredited university at the time of application. Preferably they will have a background in, or working knowledge of, the cattle and/or beef industry, and must have a minimum 3.0 GPA. Students should be well-versed in all areas of social media. Interested students must complete a Student Internship Application, and send college transcripts, two letters of recommendation and a resume. Deadline for applying is Oct. 10, 2018. For more information, contact Grace Webb at gwebb@ beef.org.

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NCBA Encouraged by USDA Involvement in Lab-Grown Fake Meat Public Meeting Source: NCBA WASHINGTON (September 10, 2018) – Today Danielle Beck, Director of Government Affairs for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, released the following statement in response to the announcement of a joint public meeting between the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on the use of animal cell culture technology: “Consumers depend on a regulatory system that ensures their food is safe and accurately labeled. That is why it is encouraging to finally see USDA involvement on the issue of regulating lab-grown fake meat. USDA’s stringent food safety inspection processes and robust labeling protections make the agency the best choice for leading oversight of these new products. NCBA looks forward to participating in the public meeting and will continue to advocate for USDA’s primary oversight role.”

NCBA Reaffirms Unwavering Support for Beef Checkoff Source: NCBA DENVER (Aug. 10, 2018) — The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) is fully committed to the Beef Checkoff Program and the state beef councils who carry out necessary demand-building programs on behalf of the industry. For more than 50 years, state beef councils have been the cornerstone of beef promotion, enjoying widespread support from the vast majority of the beef producers who invest in the Beef Checkoff. This week’s attack by R-CALF and its activist partners on 13 additional state beef councils is nothing more than an attempt to broaden the damage they have caused in Montana. There they have already weakened the producerdirected programs that support beef demand and divided neighbors in a manner that undermines the best interests of the entire beef community.

OCTOBER 2018

Although NCBA is not a party to the litigation, the association’s support for the Beef Checkoff is unwavering. We will stand with the state beef councils and help defend them against the attacks being orchestrated by R-CALF and its activist allies, who are aligned with the Humane Society of the United States and other anti-agriculture organizations.

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5

Cattle Co. Red Angus

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OCTOBER 2018

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On the Edge of

Common Sense with Baxter Black Ear Tag Identification Good ranch managers often use numbered ear tags to monitor their herd more closely. Clem thought Reg ought to give up and start all over again. They had moved the pairs that were mothered up to the east pasture down the road. Accidentally, calf number R31 had gone with that bunch. His mama had been left behind. In his I.D. number the R stood for red. His mama’s number was also R31 but her tag was yellow. In the record book she was listed as YR31. Her calf was listed as BYR31. There was also a cow in the herd with a red tag numbered 31 (R31 in the book). Mama YR31 was bawlin’ and missin’ her calf. Reg asked Clem to haul her to the pasture and find her calf. On the way he asked him to pick up a dry cow they’d left in a trap.

OCTOBER 2018

When Clem reached the pasture he had two cows loaded in the 16-foot stock trailer. They were separated

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by the inside gate. Sure enough a calf came runnin’ toward the trailer. He was black brockle just like the cow. She went to bellerin’. Unfortunately she was in the front. Clem couldn’t coax her out the side escape hatch. So, somehow he smashed the dry cow between the inside gate and the side of the trailer with a piece of cotton rope. And using one foot and one hand managed to lift the wooden door panel out of the tail gate. Mama YR31 squeezed by and leaped out. She raced to the herd and never even looked at the calf! Clem closed the trailer up, leaving the dry cow in the


rear section. Reg drove up. After finding out that Clem never actually saw the calf suck the cow, he thought they ought to check her to be sure. Out across the pasture they drove to find the cows. Reg was drivin’ and lookin’ for a place to cross the creek. “Reg,” said Clem. “We don’t wanna cross here. I see cattails.”

pasture. As they were closing the gate they saw a calf with a blue tag that read R31 suckin’ a cow with a red tag 31. And next to her was a cow R31 with a yellow tag nursin’ a big Charlois-cross calf. They never did get the calf’s number but as Reg said, “That’s alright. We’ll catch’er in the fall!”

They stuck it when the front bumper hit the opposite bank! Clem escaped out the window and they walked the mile back to his pickup and trailer. Reg got the handy man jack and set it under the tongue.

Performance Tested Bull Sale

“Reg,” we’re not gonna need the jack. We’ve got a thousand pound cow in the back section.

Monday, October 29, 2018 • 7:00 P.M.

Reg jacked it up anyway. When Clem slid the sleeve back on the hitch it came off the ball like a monkey touchin’ a hot plate. The nose of the trailer shot four feet in the air, rolled forward and creased the pickup’s tailgate… permanently. It still won’t open. By the time they’d pulled Reg’s truck outta the creek, the cows had circled the pasture, gone out the gate Reg had left open and were headed down the road. It took ‘em an hour to get the cows gathered back in the east

92nd Southwest Missouri Performance Tested Bull Sale Springfield Livestock Marketing Center LLC, Springfield, MO

Selling 44 Bulls

No. Breed

Avg. 205 Wt.

Avg. 365 Wt.

Avg. 365 Frame

41 Angus 3 P. Hereford

748 1,263 6.7 732 1,224 5.9

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OCTOBER 2018

Mexico (573) 581-5900 Macon (660) 385-2177 Rocheport (573) 446-3030 Kirksville (660) 665-1500 Chillicothe (660) 646-5493 Palmyra (573) 769-2112

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Balansa Clover Increases ADG of Cattle and Forage Biomass in Recent Study Source: ABC Limited Preliminary results from a 2018 trial by Mississippi State University found cattle grazing wheat planted with balansa clover had a 0.82 pounds per day weight gain advantage and cost savings of $5.39 per acre (see charts), compared to annual ryegrass systems planted with balansa clover. The trial, conducted by Rocky Lemus, MSU Associate Extension and Research Professor, measured the average daily gain (ADG) of Brangus cross stocker calves at a stocking rate of two head per acre on cool-season grasses for two grazing periods of March 10 to April 9 and April 30 to May 17. Forage biomass was also measured in the oat, annual ryegrass and wheat pastures which were broadcasted with FIXatioN balansa clover at a rate of 10 pounds per acre.

OCTOBER 2018

During the first grazing period, cattle performed best on oats, with an ADG of 2.92 pounds per day, followed by wheat with an ADG of 2.86 pounds per day and annual ryegrass with an ADG of 2.79 pounds per day. However,

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during the second grazing period, cattle on wheat gained 3.88 pounds per day, compared to oats at 3.15 pounds per day and ryegrass at 2.31 pounds per day. Pasture biomass was collected at the beginning of each grazing period, measured in pounds of dry matter (DM) per acre. Wheat produced the most forage with 1,459 pounds DM per acre in period one and 1,850 pounds DM per acre in period two. Oats followed with 1,278 pounds DM per acre in period one and 1,771pounds DM per acre in period two. While the annual ryegrass mixture did see an increase from 1,218 pounds DM per acre in period one to 1,408 pounds DM per acre in period two, it produced almost 700 pounds DM per acre less than wheat. According to Lemus, the biomass increase seen across all the cool-season grass systems was due to the later maturity of the balansa clover. “Balansa clover maintains a very upright growth which makes it very competitive with annual ryegrass or small grains,” explains Lemus. “Cool-season grasses like


annual ryegrass or small grains like wheat, oats or rye, tend to mature much faster in the late spring, making them high in fiber, but low in protein. However, balansa clover is very high in digestibility and crude protein, which can maintain animal gains for an extended period of time compared to just having a grass monoculture system.

Lemus. “Not only does the Nitrogen fixation of balansa cut fertilizer costs, but its late maturity and high protein content allow for improved livestock performance.” Cost analysis charts:

Cost Advantage As the cost of fertilizer and annual ryegrass continues to increase, producers can cash in significant savings by enhancing their grazing systems with the high protein and Nitrogen fixing properties of balansa clover. Traditional grazing management of annual ryegrass would require 100 units of Nitrogen per acre, for a total production cost of $53.90 per acre. When planted with FIXatioN balansa clover, the price declines $1.80 per acre. However, the biggest cost advantage is for producers who graze cattle on wheat planted with FIXatioN balansa clover for a cost savings of $7.19 per acre against traditional annual ryegrass systems, and $5.39 per acre against annual ryegrass and balansa mixtures. “For producers looking to save money on inputs and maximize outputs, cool-season grasses planted with balansa clover will work to their advantage,” says

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In Drought, Byproduct Feeds Help Cow Herds on Short Pastures, Hay Source: University of Missouri Extension In the 2018 drought forages for cow herds are short. Without rain, pastures didn’t grow and stored hay for winter feeding fell short. But feed options are at hand that were not available before. This drought has more feed grains available at possibly lower prices, says Scott Brown, University of Missouri beef economist. Missourians hard hit by forage shortages have byproduct feeds available. The leftovers from making ethanol or biodiesel provide feed to fill the forage gap. MBCSept2014c.qxp_Layout 1 9/24/14 9:59 Page 62 “This drought is unlike theAM2012 drought,”

Brown says “This one varies across the state. Even across small areas, some beef farmers are hit harder than others.” MU Extension beef nutritionist Eric Bailey says herd owners should supplement the forage. Hay is not only in short supply, much of it is poor quality. “Poor hay needs energy supplement,” Bailey says. “Corn and soyhulls have been the cheapest commodity feeds in Missouri this summer,” he adds. “Don’t get complicated in making daily rations,” Bailey tells farmers. “Focus on getting energy calories into cows. Five pounds of corn plus 5 pounds of soyhulls supplements even straw or baled cornstalks.”

Buffalo Livestock Market 1 mile west on Hwy 32 • Buffalo, MO 65622 Barn: 417-345-8122

OCTOBER 2018

Sale Every Saturday 12:00 Noon

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• Selling 1200 to 1700 head Farm Fresh Cattle weekly • Special Stock Cow and Bull Sale 3rd Tuesday night of each month at 6:30 p.m. • Pre-Vac Feeder Calf Sales 2nd Saturday of every month in conjunction with Regular Sale (Pfizer Pre-Vac, BLM Pre-Vac, Bayer Program, Mo Quality Assurance. LMA-Vac and MFA Health Track)

Order Buying Service Available

Owners… Lyle Caselman Leon Caselman Howard Miller 417-345-7876 H 417-345-4514 H 417-345-8612 H 417-533-2944 cell 417-588-6185 cell

High-price hay makes lower-cost byproducts appealing, the MU specialists tell farmers. Producers must shift their way of thinking about wintering their herds, Brown says. This takes changing feeding routines. It may require adding on-farm feed storage. Help in finding lower-cost feeds is available on the MU Extension Agricultural Electronic Bulletin Board (AgEBB.missouri.edu). The MU feed source service is updated weekly on AgEBB. To find the nearest, least expensive or most available feed, a farmer need not make many phone calls shopping for feed. Calling is done every week by AgEBB specialists. Bailey has been kept busy teaching producers how to extend available pastures and types of forage. For some it means weaning calves early and culling unproductive cows. Some producers have made silage or balage from varied crops. Now, bulk supplied feeds may be available at biofuel plants or other places. The AgEBB alternative feed page goes beyond state lines for sources in neighboring states. Iowa and Illinois crop farmers had more favorable growing seasons than Missourians. In the 2012 drought, the impact was across the Corn Belt. With grain shortages, crop prices shot up. This time, Missouri has greater yield loss than other states in the region. “Drastic price increases are not as likely this year,” Brown says. “Shopping for byproduct feeds may offer less expensive rations for maintaining cow herds.” Both Brown and Bailey spoke Sept. 17 at the MU Thompson Farm west of Spickard. Nutrition was added to talks on heifer breeding and genetics. Brown’s price outlooks gain value as profit margins shrink from feed prices. Farmers can find help on cattle rations from regional livestock specialists through local MU Extension centers. On the web, search for AgEBB By-Product Feed Price List or go to dairy.missouri.edu/byprod.


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Missouri State Fair Highlights Missouri State Fair Queen Miss Samantha Nelson from Higbee was named the 2018 Missouri State Fair Queen in a ceremony held on opening day Thursday, August 9. Miss Nelson received the highest score of 48 contestants vying for the title in the two-day competition held in the Mathewson Exhibition Center. Miss Nelson will reign over the State Fair events and be an ambassador for the State Fair and Missouri agriculture throughout the coming year. Miss Nelson is 18 years-old and studies Nursing at Moberly Area Community College. As Queen, she will receive a $2,000 scholarship to continue her education. She entered as Miss Howard County and is the daughter of Neil and Angie Nelson.

up honor went to Miss Henry County Kayla Taylor, who will receive a $350 scholarship, and the fourth runner-up honor went to Miss Boone County Ashley Voeller, who will receive a $250 scholarship. Recognition plaques went to contestants ranking highest in each of the four competitive categories: Davis received top ranking in Interview; Missouri Beef Queen Miss Kenadee Barnitz received top ranking in Evening Gown; Nelson received top ranking in Speech; and Voeller received top ranking in Talent.

“As Missouri State Fair Queen, I am most excited to experience new things that I have not been exposed to during the 18 years I have attended the Fair with my family,” Nelson said. Participants in the queen pageant were judged in multiple areas including interview, speech, talent and evening gown. Miss Scotland County Sadie Davis was named first runner-up and will receive a $1,000 scholarship. Second runner-up went to Miss Cooper County Sarah Oerly, who will receive a $500 scholarship. The third runner-

OCTOBER 2018

WINDSOR LIVESTOCK AUCTION 78

“FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1983”

Sales Every Wednesday @ Noon Jake Drenon 660-441-7716

Blake Drenon Rodney Drenon 660-351-4887 660-890-4898

Miss Samantha Nelson of Higbee was crowned the 2018 Missouri State Fair Queen in a ceremony held Thursday, Aug. 9, during the annual State Fair in Sedalia. Miss Nelson is the 18-year-old daughter of Neil and Angie Nelson and is a sophomore at Moberly Area Community College.


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Missouri Agriculture Raises more than $145,000 for Childhood Hunger Source: Missouri State Fair Food insecurity affects one in five Missouri children. According to Feeding Missouri, this number increases to one in three kids in rural parts of the state. Missouri agriculture made it a mission this summer to combat these statistics through the Missouri Farmers Care (MFC) Drive to Feed Kids campaign. This volunteer, non-profit project’s mission is to raise funds for backpack programs and in-school food pantries to help children across the state in the most food-insecure households be prepared to succeed. This collaborative partnership raised resources to feed nearly 1.8 million hungry children across the state. “This event raises awareness of food insecurity faced by Missouri school kids, especially kids in rural areas,” said Dr. Alan Wessler, D.V.M., Missouri Farmers Care Chairman. “It also speaks to the heart of Missouri’s agricultural community, showcasing the tremendous work of farmers and ranchers who leverage science, technology, their expertise and natural resources to provide food for the world.” On Tuesday, Aug. 14, MFC partnered with the Missouri FFA Association for the second annual Missouri FFA Food Insecurity Service Day held at the Missouri State Fair. More than 650 FFA members and agricultural leaders spent the day packing 100,800 meals to feed families of up to six people. The meals were distributed to Missouri’s regional food banks across the state.

OCTOBER 2018

“FFA Food Insecurity Day served as a chance for Missouri FFA members to experience service in action,” said Paxton Dahmer, Missouri FFA Association President. “It was wonderful to see so many members excited about helping those in need. They left energized and ready to take their own service to the next level, truly living out the fourth line of our FFA Motto – “Living to Serve.””

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Governor Mike Parson and First Lady, Teresa Parson, along with Missouri’s elected officials and agricultural leaders joined the cause on Thursday, Aug. 16, at the Missouri State Fair. Together they packed nearly 2,000 backpack meals which will provide weekend meals for students in Pettis, Benton and Cooper counties for the first month of school.

The Drive to Feed Kids campaign culminated Aug. 18 with a check presentation of $145,165 to Feeding Missouri, the association of Missouri’s six regional food banks, for childhood food insecurity programs. “It is unacceptable that so many children in rural Missouri and throughout the heartland of our country do not know when or if they’ll have supper tonight,” said Cyndi Young, Director of Brownfield Ag News. “Brownfield partners with Missouri Farmers Care in Drive to Feed Kids because it is the right thing to do.” Fairgoers participated in the Missouri Farmers Care Food Drive Day at the Missouri State Fair by bringing non-perishable food donations. There was also a Can Creation Contest where teams used canned food items donated by Woods Supermarket. Through these activities, a total of 18,932 pounds of non-perishable food was donated to local pantries. In addition, Missouri FFA donated pounds of fresh produce from FFA student projects on display at the fair. “The collective effort of Missouri’s agriculture community is significant. As people become more aware of the hunger problem in Missouri, they’re stepping up to do something about it and our farmers are leading the way,” said Scott Baker, State Director, Feeding Missouri. “The impact from this partnership will be felt by many of our neighbors in need throughout this new school year.” Sponsorship of Missouri Farmers Care’s Drive to Feed Kids was provided by: Brownfield Ag News, Monsanto, MFA, Inc., American Family Insurance, Missouri Farm Bureau, FCS Financial, Missouri Corn Merchandising Council, Missouri Soybean Association, Missouri Soybean Merchandising Council, Missouri Department of Agriculture, Missouri State Fair, National FFA Association, Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health, Nutra Blend, CoBank, John Deere Financial, Forrest and Charlotte Lucas – founders of Protect the Harvest, MFA Oil, Sydenstricker Implement Company, Missouri Pork Association, Country Vet Pet Foods, Missouri FFA Leadership Fund, Central Missouri AgriServices, Corteva Agriscience, Missouri’s Electric Cooperatives, Lewmar Foundation, Wood & Huston Bank and the contributions of many Missouri farmers, ranchers and agribusinesses.


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Missouri Beef House Thank You to our Volunteers

Adair County Audrain County

Appleton City FFA

OCTOBER 2018

Bates County

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Linn County


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OCTOBER 2018

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Missouri Beef House Thank You to our Volunteers

Boone County

Callaway County

OCTOBER 2018

Carroll County

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See Us at the Ozark Fall Farmfest October 5-7 • Springfield

Cass/Jackson County


OCTOBER 2018

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Missouri Beef House Thank You to our Volunteers

College of the Ozarks/ Taney County

Clinton County

2018 Performance Tested Bull Sale 83rd Southeast Missouri Performance Tested Bull Sale Friday, October 19, 2018 • 7:00 P.M. Farmington Auction Company 1 mile north on Hwy 67

Cedar County

24 Performance Tested Bulls No. Breed

OCTOBER 2018

18 Angus 2 Charolais 4 Sim/Angus

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Avg. 205 Wt.

Avg. 365 Wt.

737 702 768

1,263 1,284 1,277

Sale book at www.semobeef.com. Sale day phone: 573-756-5769 Darrell Aufdenberg, Sale Manager 573-270-6755

Cole County


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Missouri Beef House Thank You to our Volunteers

OCTOBER 2018

Columbia FFA

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Dallas County


OCTOBER 2018

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Missouri Beef House Thank You to our Volunteers

Douglas/Wright County

Eugene FFA

Blue Mound Angus El Dorado Springs, MO

Registered Angus Bulls & Females Our program consists of a small herd of cows using 100% A.I. Sires and no clean up bulls.

SW Missouri Performance Tested Bull Sale

Oct. 29, 2018 • 7:00 PM Springfield Livestock Marketing Center

Franklin County

6 Bulls Consigned

Registration Numbers: 19159081, 19159094, 19159183, 19159199, 19159200, and 19159201

OCTOBER 2018

These bulls are sired by SydGen Enhance, SydGen Exceed 3223, SydGen Blacksmith4010, and SydGen Process 2412.

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The Dam of BMA Exceed 735, 1 of the bulls consigned is a full sister in blood to the record selling bull in 2014 for $8,000.00.

Fred & Sheldon Swartzentruber 417-327-3752 417-327-5885

Gentry County


OCTOBER 2018

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Missouri Beef House Thank You to our Volunteers

OCTOBER 2018

Henry County

92

Hickory County


Howard County

Johnson County

OCTOBER 2018 93


Missouri Beef House Thank You to our Volunteers

Lafayette County 1 Benton County

Lafayette County 2

OCTOBER 2018

Monroe County

94

Lewis/Marion County Macon County


OCTOBER 2018

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Missouri Beef House Thank You to our Volunteers

MJCA Moniteau County

OCTOBER 2018

MJCA

96

Moniteau FFA


Morgan County

MSU

MU Block & Bridle

Newton/McDonald County

Norborn FFA

Polk County

OCTOBER 2018

Pike/Lincoln County

Pettis County

97


What’s Cookin’ at the

Missouri Beef House By Pat & Patty Wood, MCA Beef House Managers Thank You to our Volunteers Thank you, thank you to all of you who volunteered at the Missouri Beef House during the 2018 Missouri State Fair August 9-19 in Sedalia. The compassion you show to the people we serve is an inspiration for us all. MCA volunteers are the backbone of our organization. MCA volunteers are the true heroes who are constantly ready and willing to contribute their personal time, talents, and body energy just to help make our Missouri Beef House a success. MCA volunteers make a day run smoother. MCA volunteers showed up this year as requested and made a difference! In fact, 698 individuals from 51 county cattlemen affiliates, 10 FFA chapters, 2 Mizzou groups, 1 MSU group, 1 MCJA group, and MCW volunteered for a four hour shift sometime during the 11-day fair. Our incredible volunteers served a total of 16,002 customers at the Missouri Beef House and 4,174 customers at the Missouri Beef

OCTOBER 2018

Served @ Mo State Fair 2018

98

House Express for a total combined average of 1,834 customers per day. With some sunny days and some rainy days, our covered patio breezeway was considered the prime spot to eat beef. Missouri Cattlemen’s Association continues to showcase beef during the Missouri State Fair since 1982. Thought for the month: “How much beef could a beef cook cook, if a beef cook could cook beef?” Say that three times fast!


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CENTRAL MISSOURI SALES CO. 3503 S. Limit • Sedalia, MO

OCTOBER 2018

Your Reliable Market In Mid-Missouri Certified Special VACC Calf Sales the 1st and 3rd Mondays at 2:00 p.m.

108

Sale Every Monday at 11:00 a.m.

660-826-8286

Jay Fowler Cary Brodersen E.H. Fowler 660-473-1562 660-473-6373 660-473-1048


OCTOBER 2018

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OCTOBER 2018

SALE CALENDAR

112

Oct 6 Oct 6 Oct 6 Oct 7 Oct 12 Oct 12 Oct 13 Oct 13 Oct 13 Oct 13 Oct 14 Oct 15 Oct 19 Oct 20 Oct 20 Oct 20 Oct 20 Oct 20 Oct 20 Oct 21 Oct 21 Oct 24 Oct 26 Oct 27 Oct 27

Genetically Yours Sale Springfield, MO Route 66 SimGenetics Road to Success Sale, Springfield, MO Jac’s Ranch Production Sale, Bentonville, AR Gast Charolais & Bradley Cattle Bull & Female Sale, Springfield, MO Smith Valley Angus Sale, Salem, MO J Bar M Gelbvieh Complete Female Dispersal, Stella, MO Byergo Family Angus Sale, Savannah, MO J&N Black Hereford Sale, Leavenworth, KS Ozark and Heart of America Beefmaster Sale, Locust Grove, OK Missouri Charolais Breeders Association Fall Bull Sale, Springfield, MO Byergo Beef Genetics Private Treaty Bull Sale, Nevada, MO Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus Fall Sale, Nevada, MO Southeast MO Performance Tested Bull Sale, Farmington, MO Seedstock Plus Fall Bull Sale, JRS, Carthage, MO Square B Ranch Open House, Warsaw, MO Circle A Bull & Heifer Sale, Iberia, MO Heart of the Ozarks Association Sale, West Plains, MO Reynolds Farm Beef Cattle Fall Production Sale, Martin, TN Rhodes Red Angus Sale, Florence, KS Frank/Hazelrigg Family Values Sale, Fulton, MO Reynolds Herefords 17th Annual Production Sale, Huntsville, MO New Day Genetics Sale, Harrison, Arkansas Spur Ranch Sale, Vinita, OK McBee Cattle Company Fall Sale, Fayette, MO Cattlemen’s Preferred Sale Bulls and Females, Ratcliff, AR

Oct 27 Oct 27 Oct 27 Oct 28 Oct 28 Oct 29 Nov 1 Nov 2-3 Nov 3 Nov 3 Nov 3 Nov 3 Nov 3 Nov 3 Nov 3 Nov 4 Nov 8-10 Nov 10 Nov 10 Nov 10 Nov 17 Nov 17 Nov 17 Nov 17 Nov 17 Nov 19 Nov 24 Nov 30

Gerloff Farms Sale, Bland, MO Mead Angus Farms Bull Sale Versailles, MO East Central Missouri Angus Association Sale, Cuba, MO Lacy’s Red Angus Sale, Drexel, MO Baker Angus Farms Sale, Butler, MO Southwest MO Performance Tested Bull Sale, Springfield, MO Moser Ranch Sale,Wheaton, KS GeneTrust Sale at Chimney Rock Cattle Co, Concord, AR Seedstock Plus Red Reward Sale, Humansville, MO Pitts Angus Farms Sale, Hermitage, MO Ridder Farms Family Values Charolais Sale, Hermann, MO Missouri Simmental Association Fall Harvest Sale, Springfield, MO Red Tie Event, Tina, MO B/F Cattle Co and Cleland Cattle Co. Bull Sale, Butler, MO New Day Genetics Sale, Passaic, MO Ogden Angus Ranch Production Sale, Lockwood, KS American Black Hereford Association National Show & Sale, Sedalia, MO Weiker 65th Anniversary Sale, Fayette, MO 22nd Annual Show-Me Plus Gelbvieh and Balancer® Sale, Springfield, MO Moriando Farms and MM Cattle Co. Sale, Mt. Vernon, MO Sydenstricker Sale, Mexico, MO GeneTrust Sale at Cavender Ranches, Jacksonville, TX Show-Me Polled Hereford Classic Sale, Windsor, MO Seedstock Plus Influence Commercial Female Sale, Kingsville, MO Dalebanks Angus Sale, Eureka, KS Green Springs Late Spring Bull Test Sale, Springfield, MO Butch’s Angus Sale, Jackson, MO Jamison Fall Female Sale, Quinter, KS


MBC Classified The MBC Classified column appears monthly. Classified advertising is only 50¢ a word. Send your check with your ad to Missouri Beef Cattleman, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Mo 65201. Deadline 10th of month before an issue.

“REESE” DISC MOWERS, CADDY V-RAKES, “REESE” TUBE-LINE BALE WRAPPER, AITCHISON DRILLS, SELF-UNLOADING HAY TRAILERS, HEAVY DUTY BALE AND MINERAL FEEDERS, FEED BUNKS, BALE SPIKES, CONTINUOUS FENCING, COMPLETE CORRAL SYSTEMS, INSTALLATION AVAILABLE: Tigerco Distributing Co. 660645-2212, 800-432-4020 or www.tigercoinc.com. SUPERIOR LIVESTOCK AUCTION Video Sale Via Satellite. Your area representative is Bob Walker, 417-777-0949. BLACK SIMMENTAL BULLS SINCE 1993: Calving Ease, Attractive, Athletic, Sound Footed and Docile. We Deliver. Mike Williams, Higginsville, 816-797-5450 STEEL OIL FIELD PIPE AND SUCKER RODS. Call 573-578-2687 or 573-422-3735. COVERED MINERAL BUNKS: CCA treated wood bunks work well with salt or other mineral mix. Built is six sizes 6’ - 16’, at Sentinel Industries. Ashland, MO. Phone: 573-657-2164. PUREBRED CHAROLAIS BULLS: Good Selection, Serviceable Age, Reasonable Price. Carl Speight. Dadeville, MO. 417-995-3120 or 417-298-7307. RED ANGUS BRED HEIFERS Consistent Uniform Load Lots Top Commercial Replacements Quality! In Volume! Proven Development Program. Contact Verl Brorsen, Perry, OK 580-336-4148 View heifers via www.bluestemcattle.com FOR SALE – 100 Head Co-graze goats with cattle.. Bucket/Dog Trained. Kiko Genetics. Goats eat what cattle won’t. Highland Ranch. 314-276-6126. Perryville, MO.

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OCTOBER 2018

Advertiser Index

114

3C Cattle Company..........................................................68 A-1 Cattle Feeders.............................................................54 ADM Animal Nutrition...................................................81 Ag Risk Solutions..............................................................73 AMEC............................................................................107 American Angus Association...........................................75 American Black Hereford Association.............................92 American Simmental Association....................................43 Angell-Thomas Sale .........................................................82 B/F Cattle Co. Bull Sale.................................................105 Jack Baker Angus..............................................................47 Bayer Clean-Up II............................................................25 Blue Mound Angus...........................................................90 Buffalo Livestock Market..................................................74 Callaway Livestock Center Inc.........................................49 Cargill / NutreBeef Safe-Guard Dewormer Mineral.......67 Cattle Visions....................................................................38 Central Missouri Sales Co..............................................108 Circle 5 Cattle Co.............................................................66 Circle A Angus Ranch................................................ 37, 61 Classified......................................................................... 113 Clearwater Farm...............................................................61 Crystalyx/CrystalBlox......................................................55 Dalebanks Sale.................................................................72 Durham Simmental Farms...............................................83 Eastern Missouri Commission Company........................19 Feed Train LLC................................................................50 Frank/Hazelrigg.............................................................103 Galaxy Beef LLC..............................................................61 Gallagher........................................................................ 113 GeneTrust.........................................................................57 Gerloff Farms....................................................................61 Gleonda Farms Angus - Traves Merrick..........................61 Green’s Welding & Sales...................................................56 Heart of the Ozarks Angus Sale.......................................65 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus................................................61 Irsik & Doll .................................................................... 116 J&N Black Hereford Sale..................................................27 Jim’s Motors......................................................................64 JJ Skyline Angus...............................................................61 Joplin Regional Stockyards..............................................39 King City Motors..............................................................24 Kingsville Livestock Auction............................................64 Lacy’s Red Angus Sale.....................................................77 Langford Herefords & Hybrids...................................... 115 Lucas Cattle Co................................................................83 Marshall & Fenner Farms................................................61 MCA Beef Queen Contest................................................32 MCA Brand Wall Page...................................................109 MCA Convention ...................................................... 33-35 MCA Convention Trade Show Form...............................36 MCA Gun Raffle............................................................106

MCA Member Benefits.................................................76

MCA Membership Form................................................ 111 MCA Presidents Council............................................ 40-41

MCA Trap Shoot Fundraiser............................... 99-100

McBee Cattle Co..............................................................51 McPherson Concrete Products....................................... 113 Mead Cattle Co................................................................62 Mead Farms................................................................ 15, 61 Merry Meadows Simmental.............................................83 MFA Fair Share................................................................70 Missouri Angus Association.............................................61 Missouri Angus Breeders..................................................61 Missouri Beef Industry Council.......................................23 Missouri Charolais Breeders Association.........................26 Missouri Simmental Association......................................83 Missouri Simmental Breeders..........................................83 Missouri Valley Commission Company...........................19 Moriando & MM Cattle Co. Sale...................................87 Moser Ranch Sale.............................................................88 MultiMIN USA................................................................11 Naught-Naught Agency....................................................96 NCBA Convention.......................................................... 101 New Day Genetics Sale....................................................93 Ogden Angus Ranch Sale ...............................................95 Oval F Ranch...................................................................83 Priefert Squeeze Chute...................................................106 Red Tie Event...................................................................91 ReproLogix.......................................................................42 Reynolds Farms Beef Cattle Sale.....................................66 Reynolds Hereford Sale....................................................63 Rhodes Red Angus Sale...................................................85 Richardson Ranch............................................................61 Ridder Farms Sale............................................................79 RLE Simmental................................................................83 SE Missouri Performance Tested Bull Sale......................86 Seedstock Plus...................................................................53 Sellers Feedlot...................................................................55 Shoal Creek Land & Cattle..............................................83 South Central Regional Stockyards.................................59 Spur Ranch Sale...............................................................71 Square B Ranch/Quality Beef..........................................61 State Auto.........................................................................89 Superior Steel Sales..........................................................60 SW Missouri Performance Tested Bull Sale....................69 Sydenstricker Genetics..................................................3, 61 Sydenstricker Implements - JayLor..................................69 Trans-Ova........................................................................31 Triple C, Inc.....................................................................84 Valley Oaks Angus...........................................................61 Wax Company....................................................................2 Weiker Angus Ranch..................................................59, 61 Westway Feed.....................................................................9 Wheeler Auctions & Real Estate........................................7 Wheeler Livestock Market................................................54 Mike Williams....................................................................7 Windsor Livestock Auction...............................................78 Zeitlow Distributing.........................................................29


Profile for Missouri Beef Cattleman

October 2018 Missouri Beef Cattleman  

October 2018 Missouri Beef Cattleman  

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