Page 1


CONTENTS

May 2017

FEATURES 18

Hay Harmony

50

2018 Farm Bill

65

MCA All-Breeds Junior Show

Age-Old Border Wars Put to Rest When Tragedy Strikes the Midwest

NCBA President Testifies on Cattlemen’s Priorities for 2018 Farm Bill

Schedule and Entry Forms

MEMBER NEWS 6 32 44

MAY 2017

65

4

18 Hay Harmony

Association Update County News Beef Checkoff News

MCA All-Breeds Junior Show

COLUMNS 8

MCA President’s Perspective Working for the Membership

10

CattleWomen’s Corner

46

On the Edge of Common Sense: Baxter Black

Healthy Opportunities

Landscaping

48

Straight Talk: Mike Deering

70

Capitol Update

72

Field Notes: Wes Tiemann

Business Cards

Fair Memories Old and New

Resilient People

The Missouri Beef Cattleman is an official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association.


MISSOURI

BEEF CATTLEMAN

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE MISSOURI CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Volume 46 - Issue 12 (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) Magazine Publishing Office 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, MO 65201 Phone: 573-499-9162 • Fax: 573-499-9167 Andy Atzenweiler: Editor/Production/Ad Sales P.O. Box 480977 • Kansas City, Missouri 64148 816-210-7713 • E-mail: mobeef@sbcglobal.net Wes Tiemann: General Manager/Sales 816-244-4462

Missouri Cattlemen’s Association 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, MO 65201 Phone: 573-499-9162 • Fax: 573-499-9167

MCA Website: www.mocattle.com

DEPARTMENTS 7

New MCA Members

28

Brangus News

50

NCBA Testifies on Farm Bill

58

Obituary: Jerry Taylor

76

Sale Calendar

78

Advertiser’s Index

Find us on Facebook:

Missouri Cattlemen’s Association

Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation www.mocattlemenfoundation.org

Missouri’s CattleWomen

http://mocattle.com/missouricattlewomen.aspx

2017 MCA Officers

Butch Meier, President 573-270-4185 • 2013 Co. Rd. 330, Jackson, MO 63755 Greg Buckman, President-Elect 573-696-3911 • 14601 N Rt U, Hallsville, MO 65255 Bobby Simpson, Vice-President 573-729-6583 • 3556 CR 6150, Salem, MO 65560 Matt Hardecke, Treasurer 573-846-6614 • 19102 Skymeadows Dr., Wildwood, MO 63069 David Dick, Secretary 660-826-0031 • 23529 Anderson School Rd., Sedalia, MO 65301

2017 MCA Regional Vice Presidents

Region 1: Luke Miller, RR 2, Box 182 Hurdland, MO 63547 660-299-0798 Region 2: Charlie Besher, RR 5, Box 2402 Patton, MO 63662 • 573-866-2846 Region 3: Chuck Miller, 393 Spring Garden Road Olean, MO 65064 • 573-881-3589 Region 4: Tony Washburn, 4912 457th Street King City, MO 64463 • 660-483-0038 Region 5: Bruce Mershon, 10015 Windsor Drive Lee’s Summit, MO 64086 • 816-525-1954 Region 6: Clay Doeden, 14555 S. Hwy A Stockton, MO 65785 • 417-808-0415 Region 7: Dustin Schnake, P.O. Box 145 Stotts City, MO 65756 • 417-461-3139

MAY 2017

Missouri Beef Cattleman, (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) is published monthly (12 times a year) and is the official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Missouri, 65201. PERIODICALS postage paid at Columbia, Missouri and additional mailing offices. Subscription price is included as a part of the minimum membership dues of $70.00 per year in Missouri Cattlemen’s Association. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Missouri Beef Cattleman, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Missouri, 65201.

Mike Deering • Executive Vice President - Ext 230 mike@mocattle.com Maria Washburn • Manager of Membership - Ext 231 maria@mocattle.com Wes Tiemann • Manager of Strategic Solutions - Ext 235 wes@mocattle.com Candace Rosen • MBC Production Artist Candace@mocattle.com

5


6

MAY 2017


Barrett Pierce, Pierce Ranch, Springfield, MO Kent & Mark Pinkley, Elkland, MO Robb Pitts, Pitts Angus Farms, Hermitage, MO Body Quinley, Mount Vernon, MO Ryan Raucher, Heritage Livestock, Mt Vernon, MO Bob Schaefer, Macon, MO Ben & Kimberly Schaeffer, Hermann, MO Chris & Carol Schlotzhauer, Mountain Grove, MO Tim Settles, Onatah Forage, Norwood, MO Tyler Shaw, Walker, MO Kayla Shepard, Kansas City, MO Chris Slinkard, Diamond, MO Cheston Stacey, Humansville, MO Quentin Starke, Hermann, MO Johnnie Staton, Carrollton, MO Logan Summers, Greentop, MO Brian Thomas, Thomas Farm Systems, LLC, Liberty, MO Samuel Townsend, Goodman, MO Warren Townsend, Goodman, MO Jace Uchtman, Fordland, MO Gregory VandeDrink, DeSoto, Mo Sarah Vehige, Wentzville, MO Brice Walker, Chillicothe, MO Clayton Walker, Chillicothe, Mo Tony Ward, Valley Oaks Angus, Grain Valley, MO Michael Wehrman, Wehrman Insurance, Nixa, MO Josh Wiederholt, Maryville, MO John Wolken, Wolken Farms, California, MO David Wright, Bobcat of St. Louis, O’Fallon, MO Matt Wynn, Cedar Hill, Mo Clint & Casey Zent, Mount Vernon, MO

Marketing Cattle Weekly for Cattlemen

“Across Missouri”

“Sales each TUESDAY” “Sales each FRIDAY” O:660-882-7413 O:573-324-2295 www.movalleylivestock.com www.emcclivestock.com Justin Angell Mike VanMaanen Jon Angell 573-819-8000 573-881-0402 573-682-4656

MAY 2017

Adam & April Acklin, Graham, MO Cody Adwell, Ravenwood, MO Mark Akin, Sheldon, MO Steve Alexander, Alexander Land and Cattle, Linneus, MO Troy Anderson, Holts Summit, MO Mike & Karen Archer, Conception Jct, MO Julie Asher, Sweet Springs, MO Bryan Barnett, Bethany, MO Jim Bartley, Fulton, MO Donald & Mary Ellen Benne, Centertown, MO Rusty & Lisa Berry, Empty Wine Glass Red Angus, Rueter, MO Santara Best, El Dorado Springs, MO Harlan & Theresa Block, Old MO Farm, LLC, Carthage, MO Tommy Cooper, Mountain Grove, MO Andrew Craven, Norborn, MO Andy Devine, Columbia, MBCSept2014c.qxp_Layout 1 9/24/14 11:08MO AM Page 65 Corey Diehl, Elkland, MO Joe & Barbara Drake, Barnard, MO Randy Drake, Neosho, MO Edgeller adn, Harper Farm Equipment, Mountain Grove, MO Megan Ensign, Cameron, MO Stephen & Heather Farnan, Barnard, MO Ella Fischer, Oval F Ranch, St. Joseph, MO Todd Frankenfield, Adrain, MO Glen Goodnight, Deepwater, MO Ryan Haag, Columbia, MO David Hardwick, Brashear, MO Kent & Tammie Hartman, Hartman Farms, Goodman, MO Rick & Lia Heppermann, Foristell, MO Jacob Hoellering, Hoellering Farms, California, MO Gene Holloway, Neosho, MO William Hueman, Hueman Farms LLC, Slater, MO Nancy Krutzch, Clarksburg, MO Austin Lea, Cuba, MO Cameron Lee, Higginsville, MO Lewis Lyle, Barnard, MO Chad McCollough, Burlington Jct, MO Patrick Mullen, Cuba, MO Danny & Sara O’Dell, Chillicothe, MO Dillon O’Dell, Chillicothe, MO Orland Oesch, Silverleaf Farms, Mooresville, MO Jeff Pearish, Nevada, MO Andrew Perry, Perry Farms, Kirksville, MO Perry Phillips, Gile County Publishers Inc, Albany, MO Betty Pieper, O’Fallon, MO

7


8

MAY 2017


MAY 2017

9


10

MAY 2017


MAY 2017

11


MCA, NCBA Back Delay of GIPSA Rule - Groups Push for USDA to Pull the Rule Source: MCA Prime Cuts The Missouri Cattlemen’s Association, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) and multiple agricultural organizations expressed support for the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) April 11, 2017, announcement that the Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration is delaying the effective date of its interim final rule an additional six months to Oct. 19, 2017. “This is another step toward common sense and away from counterproductive government intrusion in the free market,” said NCBA President Craig Uden. “That said, while a delay is welcome, ultimately this rule should be killed and American cattle producers should be free to market our beef without the threat of governmentsanctioned frivolous lawsuits.”

MAY 2017

Two proposed rules and one interim final rule came out on December 20, 2016, one month before the end of the Obama Administration. The interim final rule regarding the scope of the Packers and Stockyards Act and the

12

proposed rule regarding undue preference and unjust treatment have a direct negative impact on the cattle industry. Current systems that allow producers to market their cattle as they see fit reward them for producing the higher-quality beef that consumers demand. Under the interim final rule, USDA or a producer no longer needs to prove true economic harm. Instead, one only needs to say that he or she was treated “unfairly” to file a damaging lawsuit that could discourage cattlemen from continuing to invest in improving the quality of beef being produced. “Trial lawyers are salivating at the prospect of this rule becoming the law of the land,” Uden said. “If this rule isn’t killed once and for all, cattle producers will lose nearly all incentive to invest in the production of higher-quality beef. That would mean less revenue for producers and lower quality for consumers. That’s a lose-lose proposition and exactly why the rule needs to not only be delayed - it needs to be killed outright.”


MAY 2017

13


MCA Cautiously Optimistic on China - US Beef to China Won’t Happen Immediately Source: MCA Prime Cuts News has been circulating that China is opening its doors to U.S. beef, but Missouri Cattlemen’s Association (MCA) Executive Vice President Mike Deering says it’s not that simple. “In September of last year, China announced they were lifting the restrictions on U.S. beef, but we are still unable to send our product because of several technical trade barriers. One example is the issue of traceability,” says Deering. “It will still be a while before we see U.S. beef in the Chinese market. We have good reason for optimism but this isn’t a done deal.” The recent news that has the U.S. beef industry excited about the possibility of entering the Chinese market was spurred by a weekend summit between President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping. During the summit, beef was a major topic of conversation and a priority for President Trump. Deering says this alone is a victory. “The U.S. cattle industry has been requesting that the President make beef a priority with China. On top of that, 39 U.S. Senators sent a letter calling for this issue to be front and center,” says Deering. “The fact that President Trump listened and made beef a priority issue in his first meeting with President Xi Jinping is a major victory for the cattle farmers and ranchers we represent.” Deering says MCA is “cautiously optimistic” that U.S. beef will eventually be sent to China. He states the value to the U.S. beef cattle industry could be “huge” considering China is one-fifth of the world’s population with a middle class greater than the entire U.S. population. “China is already a major importer of beef with most of it coming from Australia, New Zealand and Brazil. There is tremendous opportunity for cattle farmers and ranchers to grab a hold of some of that market share,” says Deering. “We could have a bright future with China, but there is more work to be done to get our foot in the door.”

MAY 2017

According to the Trump Administration, over the next 100 days the two countries will be engaging in dialogue to identify a path forward and address the barriers that have made trade impossible in the past.

14


MAY 2017

15


Agricultural Business Council Honors Three Agribusiness Leaders The Agricultural Business Council of Kansas City honored three of the region’s leading business figures on March 16 at a luncheon in the Chamber Board Room in Kansas City’s historic Union Station. Agricultural Business Council Chairman Cliff Becker noted the honorees are champions for agriculture in separate but very key areas in the region. The honorees were: Glen O. Klippenstein, Klippenstein Farms, Maysville, MO. Klippenstein rose to prominence as the partner/ operator of GlenKirk Farms which was one of the nation’s top purebred cattle operations. From 1966 to 1993, GlenKirk Farms sold more than 7,000 bulls and 7,500 females into all 50 states and 22 countries. His industry and civic service has included: twoterm chairman of the National Beef Promotion and Research Board; chairman, American Polled Hereford Association; director, National Cattlemen’s Association; member and vice chair of the Federal Agricultural Mortgage Corporation Board; CEO of the American Chianina Association; and as a member of both the Missouri State House of Representatives (2011-2013) and Missouri Senate (1993-94)

MAY 2017

Ken McCauley, K & M Farms, White Cloud, KS. McCauley, along with his wife, Mary, and son, Brad and his wife, farm corn and soybeans on 4600 acres of no-till cropland. McCauley is a past president of the National Corn Growers Association (2007). He is also a member and past chairman of the Kansas

16

Pictured above are: Cliff Becker, John Dillingham, Ken McCauley, Glen O. Klippenstein, Dr. Thomas L. Payne, and Bob Peterson.

Corn Commission, former board chair of the Kansas Corn Growers Association, member of the National Association of Farm Broadcaster’s Board, and trustee of Iowa Township, Doniphan County, Kansas. Dr. Thomas L. Payne, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CAFNR), University of Missouri. Dr. Payne has just retired from his position as vice chancellor and dean of CAFNR, a position he held since 1999. An entomologist by training, he was head of the Entomology Department at Virginia Polytechnic Institute from 1987-1993, before moving on to the Ohio State University where he was associate vice president


from 1993-1998. His tenure at Mizzou was marked by growth in the college’s research programs, recruitment of world-class faculty members and an increase in private funds raised in support of the college. The honorees received the Council’s highest award, the Jay B. Dillingham Award for Agricultural Leadership and Excellence. “These individuals have had a positive and lasting effect on our community, said Council Chairman Becker. “They are strong examples of what being an advocate for agriculture can accomplish.”

See page 65

MAY 2017 17


18

MAY 2017


MAY 2017

19


20

MAY 2017


MAY 2017

21


Custom Cattle Feeders

MAY 2017

★ Backgrounding Available ★ 5490 Head Capacity - 2400 Head Under Confinement ★ Corn Grain Bank for Customers ★ No Interest on Feed Bill

22

HAMPTON FEEDLOT, INC.

23551 Hwy. 11 • Triplett, MO 65286 • 660-634-2216 • E-mail: hamptonfeedlot@ymail.com Hampton Alternative Energy Products, LLC • Hampton Feedlot owns the first anaerobic digester in the state of MO and uses “green” energy to power the feedlot. HAEP is producing a soil amendment by-product from the new digester.


MAY 2017

23


MAY 2017 24

ORYS 07 RED ANGUS Service age bulls, bred cows, cow/calf pairs, show prospect heifers available.

417-652-3425 417-839-7205 www.oryscircle7.com


MAY 2017

25


26

MAY 2017


MAY 2017

27


Telling the Brangus Story Source: IBBA by Yvonne “Bonnie” Ramirez “Go Brangus!” “Build with Brangus!” “Any Country is Brangus Country!” What do these slogans mean to you? Brangus cattle have a long and rich history, dating back to the early 1900s. There’s a great story to tell about Brangus cattle. Are you telling it? Brangus possess many favorable traits: heterosis, consistency, longevity, maternal excellence, environmental adaptability, disease and parasite resistance, reliability, and value. These traits are invaluable and offer significance to our breed’s unique characteristics. Why not choose Brangus? Build with Brangus; it’s the way to go, folks. The unparalleled combination of Brahman hardiness and Angus quality certainly sets Brangus apart from the rest. So Here’s the question: Are you spreading the great Brangus message? That’s the test and task at hand. And it all starts with us. We, as Brangus breeders and supporters, must tell our story, the great Brangus story, from pasture to packer to plate. Did you know that when we say, “any country is Brangus country,” we mean it? That mantra is supported by facts. Brangus are adaptable to any country, worldwide. Brangus cattle are known for their overall thriftiness. They have outstanding maternal strengths, they perform well in feedlots, they yield high carcass merit, and they exude balanced performance all the way around.

MAY 2017

Sharing this story will enable us to retain current breeders and membership and recruit new breeders and members. Retaining current membership and breeders may be the most difficult challenge, because we must ensure that they remain engaged, vested, excited and interested. The recruiting aspect is a bit simpler. All we have to do is educate by providing pertinent breed information, raise awareness about breed statistics, and all said and done, create a buzz of interest regarding Brangus cattle.

28

Currently, the International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA) is the nation’s eighth largest cattle association. How can we shift those numbers to an upward scale? Well, first and foremost, we begin by telling our story. Simply put, we can tell our story with photos and utilizing the ever so popular and growing social media channels. As the saying goes, “pictures are worth a thousand words.” Social media includes platforms like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. IBBA has a presence on all of these channels. Social media is fast, constant and ever-changing. It’s the

way the world communicates now, and it definitely is the way of the future as it continues to evolve. Social media is free, instant, easy, and you can communicate 24/7, year-round across the globe. Social media is a great way to share our Brangus story. So, my Brangus friends, today I challenge you to go forth and tell the Brangus story. Let’s market and promote Brangus cattle worldwide with our ultimate goal being to grow our breed and association. Let’s show the world what Brangus is all about and why they, too, should Build with Brangus! ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Yvonne Ramirez, better known as Bonnie, is a South Texas native who graduated from Sam Houston State University (SHSU) with a Bachelor of Science in agriculture with an emphasis in animal science, coupled with a minor in communications. Her spirited passion runs deep within the agricultural world. Ramirez’s roots stem from growing up in a small, rural community, being active in both 4-H and the National FFA Organization, and showing market swine and breeding heifers. During her collegiate career, Ramirez was enthusiastically involved in both SHSU’s junior and senior livestock judging teams. Some of her prior professional experience includes serving as the Texas Animal Health Commission’s director of communications, San Antonio Stock Show and Rodeo’s assistant livestock director and marketing coordinator and Ultimate Genetics - Sire Services customer relations. Ramirez was recognized by the Texas Farm Bureau in 2005 with an Excellence in Journalism award. Being an avid supporter of 4-H and FFA programs, and wholeheartedly believing in the future of agriculture, she has enjoyed judging several public speaking contests at both the Houston and San Antonio stock shows. Currently, she is on the San Antonio Stock Show and Rodeo Ranch Rodeo Finals Committee and a BEEF TIP on the Texas BEEF Team. In loving memory of her grandmother, Ramirez founded the annual Forget Me Not Benefit Alzheimer’s Team Roping fundraiser. In her spare time, Ramirez enjoys announcing at team roping events. Ramirez currently serves as assistant to the executive vice president for the International Brangus Breeders Association.


MAY 2017

29


IBBA Introducing Commercial Cattle Genomic Service Yielding Three Selection Indexes The International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA) will introduce a new DNA test for the profiling and selection of commercial replacement heifers. IBBA is rolling out the Igenity® Brangus profiler in partnership with Neogen GeneSeek Operations as part of a plan to diversify and grow its genomic services and enhance the tools available to producers. Commercial producers can already purchase Brangus seedstock that are backed up by Genomic-Enhanced Expected Progeny Differences (GE-EPDs), according to IBBA Executive Vice President Tommy Perkins, PhD., PAS. MBCSept2014c.qxp_Layout 1 9/24/14 9:59 AM Page 62 Soon they also can use similar technology

on their own ranch to select Brangus replacement heifers. “This service will help them move faster and more cost-effectively towards their production goals through earlier selection of heifers with the right combination of economically relevant traits associated with the Brangus breed,” he said. Producers also will be able to predict tenderness and confirm parentage in the heifers that they select to retain. “This will be incredibly important information that will impact their production system economics along with their ability to represent their steers in the feeder calf market. Igenity Brangus will profile traits currently provided as birth, growth and carcass trait EPDs by IBBA, plus the test will use Taurus and Indicus parentage markers for

sire identification along with tenderness markers. The traits will be provided as easy-to-use 1 to 10 scores. The scores actually predict traits that profiled heifers would pass on to their offspring, he said. For example, a Brangus heifer that scores well for moderate birthweight, easy calving, good yearling weight and good tenderness would be an ideal keeper, he noted. “Using genomics, you can look at those characteristics when heifers are young calves, before you put a lot of investment into them as replacements, and make some decisions about which are the best to keep and which will be sold as feeders,” Perkins said. Brangus-specific indexes will be used in the reports to help producers put selection pressure on multiple traits simultaneously, he added. Traits will include: • Maternal: Birth weight, calving ease direct, calving ease maternal, scrotal circumference • Performance: Weaning weight, yearling weight, milk • Carcass: IMF, REA, fat, tenderness • Parentage: Targus/Indicus markers Commercial producers will order the tests from IBBA and send their test samples to the association, where orders will be entered and forwarded on to GeneSeek. “Our goal is to give commercial producers information they can use to measure and select their future brood cows and Brangus steers. We also aim to further define

Buffalo Livestock Market 1 mile west on Hwy 32 • Buffalo, MO 65622 Barn: 417-345-8122

Sale Every Saturday 12:00 Noon

MAY 2017

• Selling 1200 to 1700 head Farm Fresh Cattle weekly • Special Stock Cow and Bull Sale 3rd Tuesday night of each month at 6:30 p.m. • Pre-Vac Feeder Calf Sales 2nd Saturday of every month in conjunction with Regular Sale (Pfizer Pre-Vac, BLM Pre-Vac, Bayer Program, Mo Quality Assurance. LMA-Vac and MFA Health Track)

30

Order Buying Service Available

Owners… Lyle Caselman Leon Caselman Howard Miller 417-345-7876 H 417-345-4514 H 417-345-8612 H 417-533-2944 cell 417-588-6185 cell

3390 Winbrook Dr., Memphis, TN 38116


our EPDs for fertility, performance and carcass merit for purebred Brangus breeders by accelerating the use of genomics and phenotypic data collection by commercial cattleman using the Igenity® Brangus profiler product,” he said. Brangus will partner with Neogen GeneSeek for genomic services to run the tests and is using the established Igenity brand name to quickly build a recognized commercial cattle profile. “Neogen GeneSeek has been an important partner in our DNA testing services, and we appreciate tapping into their broad experience across the commercial cattle market to design and field this new test,” Perkins said. “Their innovation cycle and the bioinformatic services that they provide to our staff make this new product a natural extension of our business relationship.” “We are very pleased to expand our partnership with the International Brangus Breeders,” said Dr. Stewart Bauck, vice president of agrigenomics for Neogen GeneSeek. “We look forward to working with them to provide fast, effective, affordable DNA testing solutions for their members and customers.”

MCA All-Breeds Junior Show June 9-11 • Sedalia

ISEMAN BRANGUS Registered Brangus Cattle For Sale At All Times! Kevin & Patricia Iseman Harrisonville, MO 816-430-5555

MAY 2017 31


COUNTY NEWS Dallas County Prairie Grove Mennonite School south of Buffalo once again opened their doors and graciously welcomed members of the Dallas County Cattlemen’s Association (DCCA) for our April 11 meeting. Although attendance was somewhat down due to the great weather, 85 members and guests still enjoyed a very good meal and excellent speakers. The sponsor for our meal that evening was Poynter Concrete Products of Phillipsburg. We really appreciate brothers Thomas and Donald Poynter for providing the hamburgers, hotdogs, and a lot of sides. Donald talked about all the different products they offer, which include waterers, feed bunks, storm shelters, and sileage bunks. He especially touted their concrete waterers which are freeze proof. Other features of the waterer include castin-place wings, which cut down on wind and allow the insulating dirt to be placed closer to the water area to help with the freeze prevention. Also speaking to the group that night was Mark Russell of MBIC. Mark updated us on how our check-off funds are being used, and all the different activities MBIC is involved in to promote beef and educate consumers. DCCA will once again be holding our annual Fourth Grade Field Day on May 4 in conjunction with “May is Beef Month.” We are especially grateful to MBIC for receiving a $500 grant to help us fund this day--a great example of our check-off dollars at work.

Callaway Livestock Center, Inc. On I-70, 4 miles east of Kingdom City, MO on outer road 573-642-7486 Every Monday: Slaughter Cattle Sale 10:00 a.m. Selling All Classes of Cattle 12:30 p.m.

1st Thursday Nite of Each Month: MAY 2017

6:00 p.m. Bred Cows and Breeding Bull Sale

32

David Means

John P. Harrison

573-642-9753

573-386-5150

Jack Harrison

David Bell

573-386-2138

660-327-5633

See What’s Happening in Your County

University of Missouri Livestock Specialist Andy McCorkill shared his expertise with us and talked about intensive grazing. He discussed how intensive grazing can be a goal-driven approach to manage grassland resources as well as different watering systems and correct installation. DCCA members continue to volunteer working in the Ozark Beef House. Three members helped out at the Spring Round-Up on March 24. Members will work again on Memorial Day weekend for the annual Street Rod Nationals. Lynette Miller attended the MCA State Board Meeting on April 4. John Crawford, Stewart Dill, and Lynette attended Cowboys at the Capitol on April 5. Our next day in Jefferson City at the Capitol will be on May 3. We are looking forward to selecting our scholarship winners soon and attending the Buffalo FFA Banquet to present the Beef Proficiency Award later in April. Summer will find us firing up the grills to cook a lot of beef!

South Central This month over 45 of our members held our meeting at the University of Missouri Extension office in West Plains. We would like to thank Ed Trotter from Zoetis animal health for sponsoring the brisket meal catered by Saviors BBQ of West Plains. Our first speaker for the evening was John Cathy, orderbuyer of cattle at the Ozark Regional Stockyards in West Plains. John buys for nine different feed yards. He said 90 percent of cattle today sell on formula buying. Prices are based on supply and demand. It could take five to six years for prices to come back. John even said we may have to start killing heifers to control prices. Ed Trotter was our second speaker. Ed is a sales rep from Zoetis. He is well known in the area. Most of the producers at the meeting knew him, which shows me that they knew of the products that Ed sells. Zoetis is a large producer of medicine and vaccinations for pets and livestock. Ed’s talk for the evening was on improving production practices through animal health and reviewing producers’ spring herd health programs. Until next time!


Lafayette County John and Kathy Harris were chosen as the 2016 Lafayette County Cattle Persons of the Year by the organization. This award was presented to the Harris family by Chad and Hannah Copenhaver, the 2015 recipients, at the Lafayette County Cattlemen’s Winter Meeting held on Saturday, March 5, 2017. The Harris’s are very active in both the county and state Cattlemen’s association. John has served on the county board for many years including serving as president, and he is currently serving on the state board. Kathy can be seen not only helping at the county cookouts but also at

the Missouri Beef House during the Missouri State Fair. After serving as chairman of many cookouts, this couple saw a need for more space and got the ball rolling on our new cookout trailer. They spent countless hours painting and pulling the trailer to get cabinets, plumbing and electrical installed. When it comes to supporting the youth of Lafayette County, they are BIG supporters of our Scholarship Auction… especially when there is a pie being auctioned off. This is the seventeenth year that the association has presented this award, and the Lafayette County Cattlemen are proud to salute John and Kathy Harris.

Marlene Edwards was honored by the Lafayette County Cattlemen for her service as secretary for the organization for over 20 years.

John and Kathy Harris receiving the 2016 Lafayette County Cattle Persons of the Year award from Chad and Hannah Copenhaver, 2015 recipients.

Made in the USA

MAY 2017 33


Southwest Missouri Cattlemen The April 4 meeting of the association was held at the Main Street Baptist Church in Greenfield. During the evening, several thunderstorms passed over the church and dumped large amounts of April showers on the meeting. The meal was catered by Frickenschmidt’s of Lockwood and the sponsors were S & H Farm Supply, Coose Trailers and Pennington’s Seeds. Each firm gave a few remarks about the products they handle and the history of the business. Special guests for the evening were the officer team from the Everton FFA. Our association had given the chapter $2,500 to purchase five HP laptop computers. They gave a brief review of the chapter which had 23 members. Everton only has 40 high school students in total. They were so appreciative of the grant that they bought the computers within a week of receiving the money. Chapter advisor, Cheryl Ficken accompanied the members.

Brian Worthington and Keith Hankins with Penningtons provided the grand tour.

President Russell Marion thanked the grillers for their efforts since the last meeting. There were five or six different events held in Dade, Greene and Lawrence counties where beef burgers, ribeyes and steak sandwich samples were grilled. Mention was made about the Wild Fire Relief Fund and all of the hay, supplies and those persons who went to Kansas to help the victims of the devastating fires. The meeting at the church concluded, and the 65 attendees boarded two church buses and headed to the Pennington Seed Company down the street. Keith Hankins, manager, and Brian Worthington led us through the plant that features fescue seed, both field and lawn, bird seed mixes, wood pellets and pottery from all over the world.

Members learned that Pennington Seed Company has fescue seed, bird seed mixes, wood pellets and pottery from various locations at their facility.

All-in-all, it was a delightful, wet, stormy evening.

WINDSOR LIVESTOCK AUCTION MAY 2017

“FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1983”

34

Sales Every Wednesday @ Noon Jake Drenon 660-441-7716

Blake Drenon Rodney Drenon 660-351-4887 660-890-4898

Everton FFA and Chapter advisor, at left, Cheryl Ficken thanked the association for their generosity.

14th Annual Cattlemen’s Steak Fry June 10 • Sedalia

See page 63 for more information.


Missouri Angus Breeders The #1 State For Angus!

WD & Bonita Pipkin • Jim & Joann Pipkin Jim 417-827-0623 • Joann 417-827-2756 9770 W. State Hwy 266 • Springfield, MO 65802 www.clearwaterangus.com Cattle For Sale at Private Treaty!

GERLOFF FARMS AHIR Bulls Semen Available Females

Connealy Power Surge

3154 Hwy A Bland, MO 65014 573-437-3751/2507 Charlie Cell: 573-680-9117 Kim Cell: 573-291-1091 khuebler@fidnet.com www.gerloffcattle.com

Dedicated to the Livestock Industry Since 1906

Fall Bull Sale Oct. 16 2017 12 Noon

Performance Tested Bulls

Steve Miller and Family 21146 400th Street Graham, MO 64455 (660) 582-1334 E-mail: bigmilr@grm.net

Kenny & Janyce Hinkle Rt. 6, Box 69 • Nevada, MO 64772 Ph/Fax: 417-944-2219 • Cell: 417-448-4127 E-mail: hpca@centurytel.net

OGDEN HORSE CREEK RANCH

WEIKER

Angus Ranch 660-248-3640

KO Reg. Angus Bulls • A.I. Bred Heifers Bred Cows & Pairs • Quarter Horses

Trevon 417-366-0363

Fred Weiker • Julia Weiker Fred: 660-248-3765

Kenny 417-466-8176

1339 Hwy 124, • Fayette, MO 65248 “Where the Extraordinary are Availible”

For All Your Angus Needs! www.sydgen.com

22227 Saline 127 Hwy • Malta Bend, Mo 65359 Brian Marshall • (660) 641-4522 www.marshallandfennerfarms.com

Since 1942

Female Production Sale May 20th

21658 Quarry Lane • Barnett, MO 65011 Office: 573-302-7011 • Fax: 573-348-8325 E-mail: meadangus@yahoo.com Website: www.meadfarms.com Alan Mead, Owner 573-216-0210 Jeff Tallent, Manager 573-216-5514

35004 E. McQuerry Rd • Oak Grove, MO 64075 www.valleyoaksangus.com The Ward Family David Ward– 816-229-8115 Tony Ward – 816-365-5930 tony@valleyoaksangus.com Kyle Lynn – 573-721-6382 – Herdsman kyle@valleyoaksangus.com

36327 Monarch Trail • Guilford, MO 64457 • (660) 652-3670 MACIL LAUGHLIN FAMILY Our program is designed to control genetic improvement - not risk it. AHIR Records since 1969 In the Angus Business since 1959 Breeding Cattle with the Progressive Commercial Cattleman in Mind.

573-694-6152

E-mail: connell@missouriangus.org

missouriangus.org

Eddie Sydenstricker Office: 573-581-5900 EddieL@sydenstrickers.com Darla Eggers - Farm Secretary

Bub Raithel: 573-253-1664 Ryan Meyers Kyle Vukadin Roger Cranmer Joe Strauss Ken Roberts

CIRCLE A RANCH

41 Hwy K Iberia, MO 65486 1-800-CIRCLE-A

Dave Gust, Sr. • Dave Gust, Jr. Nick Hammett, Commercial Mktg. Mike Lembke • Kevin Lennon

Complete Dispersal of our Registered Angus Herd • June 3

334 Seth St. - Lincoln, MO 65338 www.RichardsonRanch.net adrrmd@mail.missouri.edu

Registered Angus Bulls & Females Available

Pete 660-281-0353

Ashlyn 660-281-1720

AHIR and ultrasound information available on all bulls. Herd sires are selected based on a combination of traits and not on any single trait.

John A Jones • 573-680-5151

21320 Hwy 179 • Jamestown, MO 65046 Lifetime Member of the American Angus Association Since 1957

MAY 2017

Greg Connell, Gen. Manager P.O. Box 109 • Eugene, Mo 65032

Ben Eggers • E-mail: eggers@socket.net Barn: 573-581-1225 • Cell: 573-473-9202

JJ Skyline Angus

For your ANGUS Cattle Needs Contact:

MISSOURI ANGUS ASSOCIATION

P.O. Box 280, 3997 S. Clark • Mexico, MO 65265

35


Polk County The Polk County Cattlemen met at Smith’s Restaurant on April 13, for a delicious roast beef dinner. Our attendence was down this month for various reasons. Some members were traveling for Easter, some were busy with school activities, etc. The meal was sponsored by MultiMin 90. The MultiMin Representative was Brad DeGroot DVM, PHD from Dillion, Montana. We appreciate him making the long trip to visit with us about their products, and for his sponsorship.

We are making plans for our scholarship banquet and auction on May 26. We are busy collecting items for the auction. So if you have any items you are willing to donate please let board member Richard know soon. We plan to have a great dinner, and two auctions. The auctions will include both a silent and a live auction, so plan to attend this event. The proceeds from this event will go into our scholarship fund. Another great cause for our community!!! Remember it is May 26. Hope to see you there!!

We are pleased to report that the Polk County Cattlemen have already sent one load of hay to Oklahoma to the victims of the wildfires that burned many acres of grass, and all the hay some farmers had available to feed their cattle. Some lost cattle, fences and homes. We have enough hay and funds to send two more loads of hay, and at this meeting a hat was passed to collect funds to help with more relief. Though our attendence was low we still collected $863 in cash to send to those in need. Way to go Polk County Cattlemen. Great way to show your generosity. President, Mark Stanek, reported about our trip to the State Capitol for Cowboys and Cowgirls at the Capitol Day on April 5. We felt the trip was very beneficial. We had a chance to visit with many of the Representatives and Senators about various agriculture issues. On April 8, several of our members worked at the Bolivar Lawn and Garden show. We sold lots of ribeye steak sandwiches, and hotdogs. Two weeks prior to that we worked at the Beef House, at the Ozark Empire Fairground, to help with the Urban Spring Fest. Our busy cooking season is now underway, and will probably continue into fall. We encourage all members to take their turn helping with these cookings. Do not leave it all up to just a few of us. We need everyone on board.

Brad DeGroot, DVM, PHD visiting with membeds

Diane Siebert, Lynn Siebert, Mark Stanek and Shirley Cook at the State Capitol.

CENTRAL MISSOURI SALES CO. 3503 S. Limit • Sedalia, MO

Your Reliable Market In Mid-Missouri Certified Special VACC Calf Sales the 1st and 3rd Mondays at 2:00 p.m.

MAY 2017

Sale Every Monday at 11:00 a.m.

36

660-826-8286

Jay Fowler Cary Brodersen E.H. Fowler 660-473-1562 660-473-6373 660-473-1048

Shirley Cook with Representative Sandy Crawford.


Bates County The Bates County Cattlemen’s annual meeting was held in Adrian, Missouri in December. Allison Jenkins, Butler, was honored with a college scholarship given by Bates County Jr. Cattlemen’s Association. Allison will be attending Missouri State University in Springfield in the fall, majoring in agriculture. She is an active member of the Cattlemen’s, FFA, and 4-H. McKenzi Self, Adrian, Missouri, was also honored with the “Gonna be Great” award. McKenzie is active in MJCA and 4-H. The award is given to a member who shows great potential in breeding, showing, and growing their beef herd. Her award was also given by the Bates County Jr. Cattlemen. The Bates County Cattlemen met March 14 at the MoKan Livestock Market. A large crowd filled the salebarn café to hear meal sponsors, Dr. Curtis Long and Dave Warfield, Briarwood Angus Farm, talk about their upcoming bull and female sale. Warfield commented on some of the top lots and mentioned one bull was the best he had ever raised at Briarwood. They invited everyone to the farm for lunch before the sale March 19th. Some members noticed that a couple of the “Beef,

Allison Jenkins (left) and McKenzi Self (right) received awards at the Bates County Cattlemen’s annual meeting.

It’s What’s for Dinner” signs placed throughout the county were in need of replacing. President Lonny Duckworth said he would investigate the cost of new signs. Duckworth reported that some county residents experienced wind damage from recent storms. He hoped the group would be able to help with clean up, but noted that most of the work was already complete. The main discussion of the night was the wildfires in Kansas and Oklahoma. Duckworth shared information that was posted online regarding relief efforts in place and asked the group how they wanted to help. Members voted to set aside money to help families in Kansas and a hat was passed around to collect individual donations. A committee was formed to oversee distribution of the funds and arrangements were made to send checks to three families that lost their homes in the fire.

MAY 2017 37


MBCSept2014c.qxp_Layout 1 4/22/15 3:48 PM Page 62

Henry County Green grass, little calves leaping and frisking, chirping birds, AND MUSHROOMS! Missouri is at its best! We do keep in our minds, and prayers, the less-fortunate farmers and ranchers in other states that lost so much in the fires. Our county organization sent money to help with fuel costs as people shipped hay to those in need. Our first activity in April was helping one of our members, Bob Harriman, with his bull sale at the Windsor Livestock Auction. From the sounds of the bidding, it was quite successful.

Bob Harriman visits with prosective bull buyers.

Our monthly dinner/meeting was last Thursday. Roth Farms sponsored the event. The speaker was Shane Bedwell, Chief Operating Officer and Director of Breed Improvement of the American Hereford Association. Nearly 70 members enjoyed the delicious prime rib dinner.

New member Byron McCoy visits with members Robert and Gail Perryman.

Serving at the Harriman Bull Sale are Kent Carney, Bob Trolinger, Pam Carney, Jan and Gene Reid, Wanda and Roy Batschelett, and Lola and Russ Christopher.

Member John Dameron and daughter Aren listen to the speaker. Bob Harriman is on the far right.

10' Feed Bunk

MAY 2017

Featuring our THREE TON PORTABLE FEED BIN

38

• Ground Opening Lid • Sight Glass • Pin Hitch • Spout just right for a five gallon bucket

Dealer Inquiries Welcome www.greenswelding.com

Made from all 14 gauge steel 22" high and 8" deep

Green’s Welding and Sales 1464 S.E. County Road 15305 Appleton City, MO 64724

(660) 476-5598 Fax: (660) 476-2801


Jerry Burford helps new member Bob Close with his membership application. Sponsors Roth Farms include Eddie, Ed, Carol and Levi Roth. Speaker for the evening was Shane Bedwell.

Specializing in Land, Equipment and Livestock For Upcoming Sale Info:

Visitors for the dinner were Susie Drake and her father Tim Bernt, DVM.

Contact: Mike Williams Higginsville, MO cell: 816-797-5450 mwauctions@ctcis.net

www.wheelerauctions.com

MAY 2017 39


Vernon County The Vernon County Cattlemen held their annual banquet March 18 at the Three Cedars Event Center. There was a great turnout of approximately 200 people. Numerous items were donated by area businesses and individuals for the silent auction. A huge thank you goes to all the area businesses and individuals that support this event year after year!

Thank you to Cole Abele for conducting the live auction.

Thank you to Kent and Kathy Abele for use of the facilities and for preparing the great dinner. A good time was had by all!

Cass/Jackson County The March meeting of the Cass/Jackson County Cattlemen’s Association was held at the Harrisonville Community Center with 47 members and guests present. The meeting and presentation was sponsored by Heritage Tractor of Adrian, Missouri. J.D. St.Clair represented Heritage Tractor with a short introduction as the intended presenters were both down with the flu. He brought some John Deere items to be given away in a drawing as well. Members Lee Ann Stark, Michelle Thurman, and Mark Gray, won John Deere hats. Linda Hedgpeth and Barb Flint won John Deere toys.

MAY 2017

A homemade coconut cream pie was auctioned with proceeds to be donated to some of the recent wildfire victims in Kansas, Texas, Oklahoma and Colorado.

40

Custom Cattle Feeding • 12,000 Head Capacity Family owned & operated since 1917

Steve Sellers 620-257-2611

Kevin Dwyer 620-680-0404

Detective Brett Wilson (Brett.Wilson@jocogov.org) of the Johnson County Kansas Law enforcement then gave a presentation on TRACE, a program on theft reports of agricultural and construction equipment, which sends out e-mails to its members on reports of theft of cattle, ATV’S, trailers, and other equipment. These notices are also found on Facebook and other electronic sources. This means more eyes on the watch for stolen items. Currently there are over 1,750 members covering 128 counties in both Kansas and Missouri. Membership is free for the service. Chapter President Randy Steckly spoke on the disaster relief for Kansas ranchers that suffered huge loses due to the devastating fire. Donations of hay and money are needed in the areas affected. The membership decided to “pass the hat,” and, with donation from the chapter as well, raised $1,200 to send to the Kansas Livestock Foundation. The phone number (1-800-993-1113) was provided to enable the donation of hay.


Newton and McDonald County The March 21st meeting of the Newton and McDonald County Cattlemen’s Chapter boasted over 100 members, guests and guest speakers for their first meeting experience at Crowder College’s Jim Tatum Center located south of Jane. The group was given a tour of the facility and later enjoyed succulent prime rib smothered in au jus sauce, coupled with twice baked potatoes, green beans, rolls, cookies and several varieties of homemade ice cream. Once again, the meal was prepared by Crowder Agriculture Department Chair, Jay Wilkins and wife Tresa. The meal was courtesy of sponsors, Hunke Spray Service, Dow Chemical, and Harps Market. The programming for the evening featured a wide spectrum of topics, kicked off by Brant Mettler with Dow Chemical who presented a detailed educational program geared towards weeds confronting farmers and ranchers in Missouri. The presentation included weed descriptions and photographs, along with proper application mixture rates and seasonal timing to best combat the ‘misery’ weeds. In keeping with the weed theme, MoDOT McDonald County Supervisor, John Allison, updated the group on the Knapweed Control

project instituted a couple years ago with the support of local MU Extension services. Executive Vice-President of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association, Mike Deering, updated the group on the organization’s successful advocacy endeavors which ultimately led to the override of three major veto efforts by the previous governor. All three were significant to farmers and ranchers statewide, such as; liability law changes to negligence liability, privacy bill changes to prevent government entities from sharing private data of government program participants and removing taxation of Disaster Relief funds awarded to stricken farmers. He stated it would not have happened had it not been for grass roots efforts of members at the local level. Finally, Deering addressed the grass fire tragedy in Oklahoma, Kansas and other states to our west. He noted that donations of hay, supplies and cash are coming in and at least 15 Cattlemen groups at the county level have raised significant funds for those affected. Ronnie Rogers, also announced that the Joplin Regional Stockyards raised over $28,000 for assistance

MAY 2017 41


to those victims. MFA, MFA Oil, Missouri Corn and Missouri Soy also contributed. The business portion of the meeting highlighted upcoming events of interest to the local membership. One agenda item was to secure volunteers from membership to assist with the March 23rd Crowder Aggie Days contests held at the Crowder campus. Each year over 2,000 high school students in the region come to test their ag skills. The college gives away $12,000 in scholarships each year to top scorers. April 5th was set for the fourth annual Cattlemen’s Calf Sale and Fundraiser for Crowder Aggie students. The event held at (and co-sponsored by) Joplin Regional Stockyards ultimately netted over $13,000 through repeated sale of the Red Angus heifer donated by Dr. and Mrs. Clarence Martin, association members. A special presentation was made during this event honoring Dr. Harold “Doc” Haskins for Lifetime Achievement. The plaque cited “Doc’s” lifelong contributions to veterinary medicine and to the ranchers of Southwest Missouri.

planning stages with the Executive Committee looking at potential dates of April 12 or May 5 for coordination with other Region 7 members to participate in the Cowboys at the Capitol lobbying efforts. State Representatives, Bill Lant and Bill Reiboldt discussed the veto override successes and indicated that the new governor appears to be more willing to take an objective look at legislation sent his way, which was refreshing. Both representatives noted that each now has additional responsibilities as chairs of new committees at the state. Reiboldt stated that a HSUS lawsuit against the Soybean Growers check-off could set a bad precedent and trickle down to the state level. He also stated that the Animal Confiscation bill supported by the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association is coming up soon for legislators to consider. The proposed legislation will require reimbursement of expenses occurring during the process, in cases where the farmer/rancher is exonerated of the charges. The conclusion of the meeting offered a show of support for neighboring cattlemen affected by recent wild fires that devastated Kansas and Oklahoma. A literal hat was passed among Newton and McDonald Cattlemen members, collecting $898 cash to be sent to the Missouri

A special presentation was made during this event honoring Dr. Harold “Doc” Haskins for Lifetime Achievement.

MAY 2017

Next was a reminder of the Spring Ranch Visit/Fieldtrip slated for April 8th at Diamante Ranch just west of Diamond, Mo. Fieldtrip participants/visitors will be treated to onsite transportation to view the ranch Red Angus herd and to a Ribeye Steak Barbecue, with homemade ice cream. Diamante ranch is owned by Glenn and Randy Brown. Another upcoming event announced was the upcoming Grazing School set for June 6-8 at Crowder College. The Crowder Aggie students will prepare a meal with cost for the two-day event at $110 per person or $160 per couple. Group President, Max Ruhl noted that another activity is in the

42

5

Cattle Co. Red Angus

Registered/Commercial Bulls Available

Forage Developed + Balanced Genetics + Stayability = Satisfaction

J.Micah Bristow www.circle5cattle.com 573-208-8125

Above is the flyer, with sponsors, for the Crowder College Calf Auction which was held at Joplin Regional Stockyards in April.


MAY 2017

43


Your

BEEF CHECKOFF NEWS Checkoff seeing increases in foreign and domestic demand Executive Director Mark Russell

MAY 2017

Board Member spotlight: Bill Patton represents the Missouri Livestock Marketing Association on the Missouri Beef Industry Council Board, and has served in this position since 2015. Bill, originally from Argonia, Kansas, moved to Missouri in 1994 when his father became co-owner of South Central Regional Stockyards in Vienna. Bill and his wife planted their own roots in Missouri when they bought their first farm in 2002, and in 2014, he and his brother became co-owners of South Central Regional Stockyards with their father. Bill says, “I want to ensure that we take care of the competitive agricultural market and take care of the producer with how the cattle are presented at market.” In addition to his role of serving on the MBIC Board, Bill has also helped with the beef exhibits at Saint Louis Science Center’s GROW. He is featured on the interactive Pasture to Plate Game representing the livestock market sector for the beef industry. The Pasture to Plate Game is located on the map of Missouri in the GROW Pavilion.

44

National efforts getting top results Over the past few months, the checkoff on a national level has had several successes including: • Consumers’ 2.9 million views of our beautiful recipe videos in January and February

• An additional half a million video recipe views surrounding St. Patrick’s Day in March • Our strong relationships with many innovative bloggers and chefs, which has more than 850,000 monthly page views • Giving consumers a behind-the-scenes look at the Beef Checkoff’s Culinary Center through cuttingedge Facebook live tours • Beef promotions as part of our ongoing and extensive foreign marketing programs in Israel, Taipei, Tokyo and the Baltic regions since the beginning of the year • A new campaign to educate consumers on the realities of beef production, and include them in our food community, which will roll out soon to consumers • Constantly safeguarding your reputation by monitoring and providing factual responses to inaccuracies in media and online about beef • Launch of the completely free, online version of Beef Quality Assurance certification Total protein market in foodservice The total foodservice protein market represented 25.744 billion pounds in 2016. Foodservice protein volume is up 335 million pounds over the past year and 855 million pounds since 2012. The volume decline of the foodservice Beef category which started in 2013, began to reverse itself in 2016. • Beef increased by 79 million pounds (1% in 2016). • Chicken and Pork both have gained significantly over the past 4 years (433 and 478 million pounds respectively). Chicken volume has been driven by the wing trend and pork has been driven by breakfast growth (bacon and breakfast sausage). Additionally, both have also benefitted from high Beef prices over the past few years. Overall Beef is up 1% in volume but down 13% in value. Deflation in the Beef market overall drives down market value of all Beef products.


Tenderness studies show consistency On a national level, studies are conducted through the checkoff as to tenderness in beef cuts. As in the 20102011 survey, most steaks in the 2015-2016 survey were considered tender. Similar to previous surveys, the 20152016 results indicate the need for more industry focus on increasing overall liking for cuts from the round. As 40% of Bottom Rounds are aged less than 14 days, increased attention to optimal aging practices could prove beneficial. An expansion of consumer education efforts on the different cooking methods for cuts from different primals could result in more consumers enjoying a satisfying beef eating experience more often, particularly in the case of cuts from the round.

Despite the challenges of the last 10 years, the quality of beef being produced in the United States has remained steady and often improved. With tenderness goals being achieved, the industry is dedicating more focus to additional factors impacting beef quality, such as flavor development. Check out our new website at www.mobeef.org and follow us on facebook. Call the office for any beef promotion needs. 573-817-0899

Compared to all of the surveys since 1999, post fabrication aging times increased for most steak types. This may be due in part to requirements of different branding programs or changes in managerial practices at the retail and processor levels. As a consequence of the current trend to produce larger beef animals yielding larger carcasses, chilling times have naturally lengthened, creating longer aging times.

MAY 2017

A significant shift from previous survey results was the decrease in the percentage of retail steaks labeled with packer/processor or store brands or claims. Also, unlike previous survey findings, higher USDA quality grades for food service steaks did not necessarily predict tenderness improvements, particularly as seen in the values of Select and Choice cuts. In general, tenderness levels for both retail and foodservice cuts have held steady since the 2005-2006. The results of the survey confirmed the industry’s notable progress since the early 1990s in efforts to respond to consumer demands for consistently tender, leaner, and more flavorful beef.

45


On the Edge of

Common Sense with Baxter Black Landscaping Genie noticed the bottle of Jack Daniels on the kitchen table when she got home late that night. Like most lettuce farmers, if whiskey was kept in the house, it was not usually kept on the kitchen table. She marched in the bedroom to find her husband Don sprawled out on the bed with one pant leg off and one sock on. He looked like a body that had been dragged off the bottom of a lake. He began shakily, “I was watchin’ TV in my shorts when I heard a ruckus on the lawn… and mooing.” Don went to the window and peeked out to discover his front yard covered with cows! They were obviously from neighbor Willie’s farm across the road. It was a surreal picture under the yard light; black and tan and red clouds on a sky of green grass. Don ran out on the porch waving and shouting at the curious beasts. Although the cows paid him little mind, Willie’s bull developed an immediate urge to mash him to a pulp! Don did a wheelie on the cement walk and

Kingsville Livestock Auction Kingsville, Missouri Hwy. 58 • 45 Miles SE of Kansas City, MO

MAY 2017

Special Cow Sale Saturday, May 20th • 11:00 a.m. Cattle Sale Every Tuesday 10:00 a.m.

46

For information call Rick or Jeremy Anstine

816-597-3331 or 816-732-6070

Visit our Website at: www.anstineauctions.com or E-mail us at: kingsville@earthlink.net


ran back into the house! The bull mounted the porch steps and charged the door! After ramming it several times he clattered through the lawn furniture and mowed down a good sized decorative evergreen! Don waited a few minutes, put on his jeans and nervously eased out intending to shoosh the cows off the lawn which was now covered with deep tracks and cow pattys. It was just as he stepped on the leaking sprinkler head with his socks on, that the bull charged from behind the arborvitae! He raced to the front door, clearing the jam and slamming it in the bulls’ face! He could see the paint cracking as the bull pounded on the other side! The bull then crashed off the porch and rammed the passenger side of his daughter’s red Monte Carlo! Then he clammered back on the porch to resume his lusty bawling and door demolition! Don was hyperventilating as he tried to dial the sheriff. “He’s not here but I can call him on the radio,” offered the receptionist, “What’s the complaint?” “Ma’am, yer not gonna believe this but a cow’s tryin’ to break into my house!”

The sheriff had come and gone and the sirens had all died away by the time Genie got home. The front lawn looked like Katrina! As she listened to her pitiful exhausted husband unfold his bizarre tale, she was torn between the need to comfort and hold him, and the uncontrollable desire to snort and fall over backwards in gales of hysterical laughter! She simply wiped her eyes and went to the kitchen and poured herself a shot. www.baxterblack.com

Hwy 42 West • Vienna Missouri 65582 45 Miles South of Jefferson City Selling All classes of Cattle Wednesday • 10:00 a.m. Featuring ‘Star-Vac Program’ Cattle Weekly DVAuction Service for convenient online viewing & bidding For More Information Call… David Patton Office Ross Patton Bill Patton 573-308-6655 573-422-3305 573-308-6657 573-308-6658 Visit our website: www.scrsvienna.com or E-mail us: scrsvienna@gmail.com “Make South Central your Livestock Market”

MAY 2017 47


Straight

Talk

with Mike Deering Business Cards We all pass them out. We all get them. When we get them, we stuff them in our wallets, throw them in a desk drawer, snap a picture of them and then throw them away or maybe even put them in a rolodex (if you don’t know what that is, you are likely under 30). Personally, I throw them on my dresser at home and then when the pile gets unbearable, I go through them all and enter them into my phone. Even worse, I usually forget to bring my own cards with me or I accidentally hand out someone else’s card because it somehow got in the wrong pile. They are a pain. The logic behind a business card is to make connections. At some point, I think the business card will be as uncommon as the rolodex. Technology will replace that card. We will probably even come to miss the silly things.

MAY 2017

Making connections is important, but a business card is just a little piece of paper that is destined to become lost or trash. What will never be lost or misplaced is what we stand for and how we communicate that to the people that we want to buy what we’re selling or join the cause that we’re backing. I am proud of what the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association stands for but I am not entirely sure that we are effectively communicating that back to the producers who aren’t members of this association.

48

Are we reaching nonmembers to share the story of MCA? Are we telling them that this association is the only organization solely representing the interests of cattle producers in this state? Are we showing them that their membership dues are nothing compared to the tangible and nontangible benefits? Do they know that their property taxes not increasing this year is a result of this association? Do they know the money they will save in times of dire need by not having to pay taxes on disaster assistance is because of this organization? Getting the word out isn’t easy. The answer could be a

Executive Vice President huge advertising budget. The solution could be incentives to new members. The solution could be a whole host of things; some not even thought of yet. However, I believe the answer to the problem is so simple. It’s the people behind the business cards. You are a member because you believe. You know where your dollars are going and the return on that investment. Today, I ask that you serve as a walking, talking business card for this organization. Please talk to the people you meet at industry events, visit with your neighbors or write a letter to the editor. Think of how many times you are afforded the opportunity to visit with fellow producers that you know for a fact are not members of this association. Instead of handing them a card, extend your hand in friendship and explain why this association matters and why you belong. We have nearly 5,000 members and if each one recruits just three people – brand new or renewed – this association could grow to a level that has never been seen before. I want that and I believe you do as well. I have been your executive vice president for four years now and I truly believed we could grow to 10,000 producer members within five years. Don’t get me wrong, we have grown sustainably because of your efforts, but we are nowhere close to where we should be. I also realize that goal was extremely optimistic, but I have always believed in aiming high (just ask that deer that got away last year). I am asking for your help and for your advice. Let’s grow this organization together. You are the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association. This is your organization. I am just your hired hand and damn proud to be in this role.


MAY 2017

49


NCBA President Testifies on Cattlemen’s Priorities for 2018 Farm Bill

$150M for FMD Vaccine Bank, Regulatory Relief, Trade Top Group’s Agenda Source: NCBA

food processors and related industries.”

WASHINGTON (March 21, 2017) – In testimony on Capitol Hill today, Craig Uden, a fourth-generation cattle producer from Nebraska and the president of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, called on Congress to authorize $150 million a year over five years for a “stronger and more adequate foot-andmouth disease (FMB) vaccine bank” as part of the 2018 Farm Bill. Uden testified before the House Agriculture Committee’s Subcommittee on Livestock and Foreign Agriculture.

Uden also testified that the vast majority of cattlemen oppose the federal government’s involvement in determining how their cattle are marketed – whether through vehicles like Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration’s (GIPSA’s) interim final rule on competitive injury or through mandatory Country of Origin Labeling (mCOOL.)

“Foot-and-mouth disease is highly contagious and has the potential to spread widely and rapidly, debilitating our herds,” Uden warned subcommittee members in his oral testimony. “Analysts estimate that an FMD outbreak in the United States could potentially cost our nation’s livestock producers billions of dollars in the first 12 months alone. An FMD outbreak has the potential to cause enormous economic losses to not only livestock producers, but also to auction markets, slaughterhouses,

CENTRAL STATES BEEFMASTER SALE

Saturday, May 13, 2017 • 11:00 a.m. Sycamore Springs Arena, Locust Grove, OK 5 1/2 miles south of Locust Grove on Hwy. 82

Offering

120 Lots of Cattle:

42 Open Heifers • 24 Pairs 26 Bred Heifers • 28 Bulls Some Black, Several Polled

MAY 2017

Grading of Cattle Friday, May 12 2:30 p.m. Featuring Top Young Genetics

50

CSBBA Membership Meeting & Dinner Friday, May 12 6:30 p.m.

For Catalog Call: Tom Hood 918-456-1199 or Online: www.csbba.org For pictures go to the Hood Cattle Services Facebook page Sale day Phones: Tom Hood 918-316-6710 • Wes Hood 479-228-8264

“Our analysis of the (GIPSA) rule leads us to believe that if this rule is implemented, the packers will offer one price for all cattle, regardless of quality,” Uden testified. “We believe this rule would eliminate value-based marketing programs and negatively impact producers, making it more difficult to provide the types of beef products that consumers are clamoring for.” Uden continued on the issue of mandatory, governmentdictated, country-of-origin labeling: “Repeal of the previous mandatory program was necessary since, after six and a half years of implementation, it provided no market benefit to beef producers or consumers. On top of that, it also violated trade agreements with two of our largest and vital trading partners.” Uden concluded his Farm Bill testimony by stressing the importance of international trade to the American beef industry. “Trade is vital to the beef industry, and protecting trade promotion programs such as the Foreign Market Development and Market Access Programs within the 2018 Farm Bill are important,” Uden said. “Ninety-six percent of the world’s consumers reside outside U.S. borders. We recognize that the growth and profitability of the U.S. cattle and beef industry is closely tied to our ability to market our products to those consumers.”

Jim and Scott Cape… 57 Years Trusted Service to Missouri Cattlemen “Your Source for Quality Trailers”

www.jimsmotors.com 1-800-897-9840


MAY 2017

51


Prepare for Disease Outbreaks in Livestock Operations with Written Plan Source: Linda Geist, University of Missouri Extension COLUMBIA, Mo. – A written plan to respond to disease outbreaks for your livestock operation is like insurance. You hope you never need it. You may never need it. But if there is an outbreak, the economic survival of your livestock operation might depend on having that plan. Planning and prevention are the best insurance against an outbreak, says University of Missouri Extension economist Ray Massey. Disease in a livestock operation spreads quickly. Animal and economic losses can be catastrophic. The Iowa Farm Bureau Federation estimated losses in that state from a 2015 avian flu outbreak at $1.2 billion, including 8,400 lost jobs. Some economists estimated the loss at triple that. “These are big dollars,” Massey says. When viruses such as avian flu or PEDV strike, livestock operations lose productivity for about six months, Massey says. “This means that the livestock operator

MAY 2017

Land Rights Seminar

52

Join us and 23 top level speakers who share your concerns for property rights, rural and urban. Two fast-paced days, only $75 including three meals and a tour of University of Nebraska-Lincoln Eastern Nebraska Research and Extension Center. Register now at RangeRights.com.

might be without income. Animals have died or been quarantined.” Worse yet, operators may incur extra expenses for veterinary bills, installation of new biosecurity systems, composting dead animals and carcass removal. If you need a line of credit during this period, a written disease-outbreak plan helps present your case to the bank for a loan extension or new loan. “Have a plan for the worst-case scenario,” Massey says. “The plan tells your banker that you want to stay in business. The bank is more likely to see you as a wise businessman who has shown foresight.” The best plan of action against disease outbreaks continues to be everyday prevention and preparedness, Massey says. However, when disease strikes, be ready with a written plan. Massey recently spoke at a series of biosecurity workshops on how to prevent and respond to disease outbreaks. MU Extension and partners sponsored the workshops. For more information, contact your local MU Extension center or search online at extension.missouri.edu.

14th Annual Cattlemen’s Steak Fry June 10 • Sedalia

See page 63 for more information.


MAY 2017

53


Weather-stressed Grass Sets Seed Instead of Leaf for Grazing Cattle Source: Duane Dailey, University of Missouri Extension In spring, lush green grass grows in pastures—except when odd weather hits. Herd owners should watch grass this spring to see if it meets livestock grazing needs. After a long spell of weather stress, pastures, especially of tall fescue, may set seed heads instead of leaves. Missouri pastures had two extreme-weather seasons, winter and spring. Winter gave record-setting drought. Spring held early warmth followed by cold and finally rain. Heavy precipitation fell in some areas. Bad weather upsets plant growth, says Craig Roberts, forage specialist with University of Missouri Extension. Winter had only 7 inches of rainfall. The state broke records on dryness in February. Recent rains ended the drought. However, temperatures varied, said Pat Guinan, MU Extension climatologist.

Both specialists spoke on the first MU teleconference of the growing season. They heard reports from MU Extension regional specialists and they answered questions. Roberts warned that forages under stress may set seed heads early this year. Unstable weather can trigger a survival response. The plants create seeds to ensure continuation of the population. “If recent rains and temperatures continue in April, spring forage growth could be great,” Roberts says. “If not, pastures may look lush, but be stems and seeds instead of leaves.” Grass seed stems do not provide nourishment for grazing herds. This is true in all grass species, but tall fescue carries a potential threat. Most Missouri pastures are in tall fescue, and most of that is toxic Kentucky 31. The toxic alkaloids concentrate in stems and seeds. The toxin comes from an almost invisible fungus growing between fescue plant cells. The alkaloids protect fescue plants by repelling insects, fungi, diseases and even grazing livestock. Cows eating the toxin stop grazing. That protects grass but harms cattle. Alkaloids create heat stress in cattle. They stop eating to stand in shade or cool water. In winter, the vasoconstrictors cut blood flow to body extremities—the

MAY 2017

Rakes and Tedders

54

Mexico, Curryville, Herman, Moscow Mills, Rocheport, Tipton, Macon, Chillicothe, Kirksville, Palmyra, Dutzow


feet, ears and tail. That can cause frostbite or the more serious “fescue foot.” Cattle losing frozen hooves must often be put down. Many other side effects occur. The toxin cuts weight gains, conception rates, and milk production. Nationally, the toxic impact hits $1 billion in lost production. Forage specialists urge replacing toxic fescue with a new variety of fescue that carries nontoxic endophyte. Plant breeders have inserted a natural, nontoxic novel endophyte to protect the plant. Fescue needs an endophyte to survive, but not the toxin. Producers try to control the loss through management. Roberts says management-intensive grazing allows cattle to tip seed stems before they set seed. The toxic fungus concentrates in the seed to propagate the grass and the fungus into the next generation. This year may require clipping seed heads with a mowing machine, as the seed stems develop early. Usually, tall fescue becomes most toxic around June 1, when seed matures.

To clip, set the mower blade high enough to cut the seeds but not clip the grass. Another preventive is to move cattle from cool-season grass onto paddocks of warm-season grasses. Information on grazing schools is available from regional MU Extension specialists.

WHEELER & SONS LIVESTOCK AUCTION

417-646-8102 Hwy. 13 & TT, Osceola, MO 64776

Special Stock Cow Sale Saturday • May 27th • 6:00 p.m. Cattle Sale Every Thursday - 1:00 p.m.

www.wheelerlivestock.com Burleigh and Doris Wheeler • 417-840-6561 Byron Wheeler 417-777-0897 • Steve Wheeler 417-840-4149

Is your risk management plan adequate for your Livestock and Pasture?

Richard Hallock • Risk Management Agent • 660-425-2261 Office 660-947-2474 Office • 641-442-5222 Cellphone

MAY 2017

The Pasture, Rangeland and Forage (PRF) Program protects livestock producers from losses to productivity caused by poor forage conditions due to lack of rainfall. The Livestock Risk Protection (LRP) Program protects against a decline in the CME Feeders Cattle Price Index. Farmers Bank of Northern Missouri can assist you in the Risk Management of your cattle operation with a loan and or insurance to assist you in running your operation.

55


The Lobster Tail of Meats Source: Steve Suther, Industry Information, Certified Angus Beef LLC. By Laura Conaway The growing beef supply won’t automatically find more room in the meat case, but it can earn its way with differentiated quality. “We can’t be as efficient in production as pork and poultry so therefore we’re not going to be as cheap,” said Sam Hands, managing partner of Triangle H, Garden City, Kan. “We know that.” Addressing producers at Cattlemen’s College last February in Nashville, Tenn., he said, “If we were gearing up for a party and wanted fish, we’d be thinking about lobster tail, because that’s the ultimate goal. At the meat counter, we are the lobster tail, so we have to make sure we’re the best.” That’s within reach for beef, thanks to genetics that lifted cattle above load-lot anonymity, back when “there was no discrimination, no difference between good and bad.”

Grid marketing created incentives so that now 75% of cattle grade Choice or better, ratcheting the entry level for premiums to even higher levels. “Pounds pay the bills, but what sets your cattle apart?” Hands asked. “Quality makes the difference in most grid scenarios.” He knows from experience with the integrated Triangle H farm, feedyard and commercial Angus herd. “Genetically, the cattle can do it,” he said. “We see it in our own feedlot and with our customers’ cattle. At harvest, we want to be sure to realize all the potential market that is there.” At the same time, Hands encourages steady progress in every herd supplying calves for feeding, so that they are worth a premium at every step. “We want our customers to continue to make genetic improvements,” he said. “We know the tools are there to help them get there.”

MISSOURI BEEF INDUSTRY COUNCIL DIRECTOR ELECTION LEGAL NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Director of Agriculture will be conducting an election to fill three positions on the Missouri Beef Industry Council Board of Directors. One regional council member is to be elected in each of Regions 2, 3 and 4. Terms of office are three years. Any cattle producer within the specified regions of the State of Missouri who is producing cattle for market and the legal owner of one or more head of cattle becomes eligible to vote in the election by registering at his/her respective Farm Service Agency (FSA), or electronically at http://mda.mo.gov/councils/ prior to July 20, 2017. Cattle producers who have voted in any of the previous three (3) elections are not required to register unless their address has changed.

MAY 2017

The Missouri Department of Agriculture will mail ballots to registered producers August 18, 2017. Ballots must be postmarked no later than August 31, 2017 to be valid.

56

Any qualified producer may be nominated and have his/her name placed on the ballot provided the independent nomination is accompanied by petition of not fewer than 100 producers in the nominee’s region and written permission of the candidate. Petitions must be delivered to the Director of Agriculture on or before July 20, 2017. Petition forms are available from the Missouri Department of Agriculture by calling 573-751-5633.


Tools such as genomic testing and predictive databases have advanced to support those choices. That’s good for everyone involved – even those scanning the meat counter.

“It’s something that can’t necessarily be determined with the naked eye,” she said. “It’s how the animal was treated, its environmental impact, how their food was grown and how it got here.”

“These cattle have to work on the ranch back home,” Hands said. “But we have to make sure that our consumer, when they sit down at home, go out to a restaurant or relax with a picnic, that they have the best eating experience they can imagine.”

For those who would differentiate their cattle, Saunders suggested anticipating and getting ahead of the next trend’s curve.

LeAnne Saunders, president of Where Food Comes From Inc., a leader in certification and verification services, also on that “value-added” panel, noted 84% of consumers say they will pay 5% more for brands. Hitting the mark for any brand that pays cattle producers must start long before harvest. “In a segmented supply chain, we have to know what they [consumers] want in order to deliver,” she said, because “they can buy something else.” What they want goes well beyond price, packaging and color of product, Saunders said, all the way to “credence attributes” as they read those labels.

“The opportunity is greater than the expense going in,” she said of programs such as non-hormone treated cattle (NHTC) and age-and-source-verification, which her company offers. “Through years of collecting the premium data on feeder cattle, we know there are opportunities in these markets and consumers are paying for these specific attributes,” Saunders said. Producer participation starts with keeping records and choosing a program. “Not all programs fit everybody,” she said. “The great opportunity we have in the beef industry today is that the consumer wants choices. They want transparency and they want information. There isn’t one size fits all.” Hands and Saunders agreed that starting with highquality beef provides the most opportunity.

MCA All-Breeds Junior Show June 9-11 • Sedalia

MAY 2017 57


John Gerald “Jerry” Taylor John Gerald “Jerry” Taylor, Buffalo, Mo., entered into eternal life on March 27, 2017. Jerry was born on February 29, 1924, to John and Ada Forrester Taylor, one of seven siblings and the last survivor. Jerry married Mary Virginia Likes in 1948 in Macomb, “robbing the cradle as many said.” They have three daughters who they loved dearly: Pam and Gary Naylor, Buffalo, Mo.; Lana and Dr. Bruce Packard, Magnolia, Texas; and Melody and Mark Herman, Holland, Mich. They also have three grandchildren that Jerry adored: Brett and Brittney Naylor, Centralia, Mo., Sarah Packard, Magnolia, Texas, and Marie Packard, Des Moines, Iowa. He has several nieces and nephews that survive. Jerry also leaves behind countless friends who loved him and were part of his family, including Kate Carmean, Virginia Watson, Garry Hager and Gary Crosby. Jerry and Mary lived in the Bushnell-Prairie City, Illinois area until 1986. Jerry was a crop farmer and raised Purebred Shorthorn Cattle. Cattle was his love and he won many championships across the country showing his prized Shorthorn cattle. He also was a well-known and well-respected cattle judge, traveling the United States judging all breeds of cattle from the Cow Palace in San Francisco to the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo, to many state fairs and county fairs. In 1986, Jerry and Mary relocated to Buffalo, Mo., to be closer to daughter Pam and her family, especially to watch Brett grow up. Jerry continued his cattle judging and was often found helping local cattlemen (Dr. Bob Coscia Limousins, Springfield, Mo., and Gregg Alsup, Fair Grove, Mo., both great family friends). His walls in his home office are adorned with plaques and awards he has received throughout the years. To name a few, they include: University of Missouri Long-Term Commitment and Support of the MU Extension Program (2013), 2013 Pioneer Award of the Ozark Empire Fair Foundation, Charter Officer and

MAY 2017

Your One-Stop for Braunvieh Influence and Black Hybrid Commercial Females

58

Call us to see some of the best calf raisers in the business. Grouping and Marketing customers’ calves since 1992!

Director of the Land of Lincoln Purebred Livestock Breeders Association, 2002 Long-Standing Service and Dedication to Missouri State Fair, National Livestock and Meat Board Director (1970-1973), Land of Lincoln Livestock Award 1987, Schuyler County Fair Honorary Director (1977), Illinois State Fair Board of Directors (1970–1986), and McDonough District Hospital (Macomb, Ill.) Board of Directors (1970- 1982). Jerry was an inspiration and a humble, selfless man. As great friend Monte Lowderman of Lowderman Auctioneering, Macomb, Ill., reminisced, “Jerry was a family man, who spent his whole life (68 years) with his true love and together they raised three beautiful daughters. He was a friend to many; he was a livestock expert and enthusiast; and he was always a true and constant professional in his words and actions. Jerry knew how to have a good time and make sure everyone around him was also having a good time. A special man that has left this world a better place and who left a positive impression and influence on all he met.” Anyone who met Jerry became a friend. He never met a stranger. He especially loved helping kids with livestock projects. Jerry always had a smile on his face and the most positive attitude. He never had a bad day. Jerry loved flowers because they were bright and cheery. But in lieu of flowers, donations can be made to The American Shorthorn Association Foundation, c/o Bill Rasor, 1800 Lovers Leap, VanAlstyne, TX 75495.

Ron McBee 221 State Hwy H Fayette, MO 65248 (573) 228-2517 E-mail: mcbcattle@aol.com Website: McBeeCattleCompany.com


May CattleFax Webinar to Address Expectations for Cow-Calf Producers Have the lows been established for the cattle industry? With the magnitude of the breaks and rallies that we have experienced across the entire cattle industry thus far that question is on everyone’s mind. An upcoming free CattleFax webinar will address that question as well as provide an outlook for the cow-calf and entire beef industry for 2017.

CattleFax analysts will discuss a variety of topics in the one-hour session, including: • Cattle and feedstuff market projections for the next 12 to 18 months • Calf market outlook through summer and fall of 2017 • Analysis of a recent Cow-Calf Survey conducted by CattleFax.

The CattleFax Trends+ Cow-Calf Webinar will be May 24, 2017, at 5:30 p.m. MT. To participate in the webinar and access program details, producers and industry leaders simply need to register online at https:// www.cattlefax.com/#!/about

The Trends+ webinar series informs cattle producers about current market conditions and provides providing decision-friendly advice regarding management decisions. The analysis and strategies shared through the webinar series has reached more than 4,000 producers, and sponsorship from Elanco Animal Health is making the seminar free for all attendees.

One of the most aggressive U.S. beef cowherd expansions in the last four decades has increased beef supplies and caused cow-calf profitability to be reduced back toward long term levels. As profits have narrowed well-informed producers can maintain healthy margins by adjusting production, marketing and risk management plans with increasing supplies in mind.

MAY 2017 59


MAY 2017

2017 Missouri Beef House County Volunteer Work Schedule (tentative) August 10-20

60

10 Thursday

11 Friday

12 Saturday

13 Sunday

10:00-2:30

10:00-2:30

10:00-2:30

10:00-2:30

Tri County 15

Warren 10 Nodaway 10 Cole 10

Vernon 20

Knobnoster FFA 15

2:00-6:00 Texas 8 Cass Jackson 10 Morgan 10

2:00-6:00 Gentry 15 So. Central 6

2:00-6:00

2:00-6:00 Clinton 15 California FFA 15

5:30-9:30 Randolph 10 Mid-Mo. 10 Eugene FFA 10 Russellville FFA 7

5:30-9:30 MSU 10 MJCA 10 MCW 8 MCCW 8

5:30-9:30 Benton 35 Andrew 5

5:30-9:30 Moniteau 15 Tipton FFA 15

Lafayette 20

14 Monday

15 Tuesday

16 Wednesday

17 Thursday

18 Friday

19 Saturday

20 Sunday

10:00-2:30 Ray 5 Eldon FFA 30

10:00-2:30 Lewis/Marion 8 Sullivan 10 Maries/Osage 5

10:00-2:30 Macon 12 Linn 10

10:00-2:30

10:00-2:30 Carroll 10 St. Charles 5 Douglas/Wright 8 Windsor 11

10:00-2:30 Southwest Cattlemen 15 Cedar 5

10:00-2:30

2:00-6:00

2:00-6:00 Audrain 10

2:00-6:00 Polk 15 Franklin 8

2:00-6:00

Bates 25

2:00-6:00 Boone 15 Jasper 5

5:30-9:30

5:30-9:30

Henry 15

Johnson 15

Lafayette 15

2:00-6:00 Callaway/ Montgomery 10 Appleton City FFA 13

2:00-6:00 Monroe 5 Ralls 5 St. Clair 15

5:30-9:30 Adair 5 Knox 10

5:30-9:30 Cooper 15

5:30-9:30 Howard 15 Pike-Lincoln 10

5:30-9:30 MU Block & Bridle 10 Saline 18

Dallas 15

Pettis 15

Thanks to All the Volunteers That Make the Beef House a Success!

Please arrive 30 minutes prior to your shift for volunteer orientation. The Beef House hours of operation are 11:00 am – 9:00 pm. If you need to change your shift, or you're a new county who would like a shift, please contact Maria Washburn at maria@mocattle.com or 573-499-9162 by July 15.


MAY 2017

61


Strong Pace Continued for U.S. Meat Exports in February February results for U.S. pork and beef exports were well above year-ago levels, with pork exports posting the strongest February volume on record, according to statistics released by USDA and compiled by USMEF. Pork exports reached 197,025 metric tons (mt) in February, up 15 percent year-over-year, with value up 17 percent to $486.7 million. For the first two months of 2017, exports totaled 399,692 mt, up 18 percent, with value increasing 22 percent to $995.3 million. February exports accounted for 27.6 percent of total pork production and 22.9 percent for muscle cuts only, up from 23.8 percent and 20 percent, respectively, last year. January-February ratios were also significantly higher at 26.8 percent and 22.2 percent, compared to 23 percent and 19.3 percent in the first two months of 2016. Export value per hog slaughtered averaged $51.94 in February, up 18 percent year-over-year, while the January-February average was up 20 percent to $51.05. Beef exports totaled 90,417 mt in February, up 9 percent year-over-year, with value up 16 percent to $508.5 million. Through February, beef exports were up 13 percent in volume (186,905 mt) and 17 percent in value ($1.02 billion). February exports accounted for 12.6 percent of total beef production and 10.1 percent for muscle cuts only, which was steady with last year. January-February ratios were also fairly steady at 12.4 percent and 9.8 percent, respectively. Export value per head of fed slaughter averaged $276.96 in February, up 13 percent from a year ago, while the January-February average was up 10 percent to $266.34 per head.

MAY 2017

“With trade deficits being a hot topic of conversation, especially with countries such as Mexico, China and Japan, it’s important to highlight the sectors in which U.S. products are competitive throughout the world and exports are thriving,” said USMEF President and CEO Philip Seng. “The red meat sector is certainly in that category, as exports have helped fuel growth in the U.S. industry and, in turn, larger U.S. production has opened further export opportunities and generated positive returns for the entire supply chain.”

62

Chilled beef to Japan, Korea and Taiwan continues to drive export growth Japan continued to solidify its position as the leading volume and value market for U.S. beef, with February exports climbing 48 percent from a year ago in volume (23,789 mt) and 55 percent in value ($134.3 million).

Through February, exports to Japan were up 41 percent in volume (46,276 mt) and 44 percent in value ($259.6 million). This included a 60 percent increase in chilled beef volume to 19,404 mt. Japanese import data showed that U.S. beef overtook Australian beef in the first two months of the year, with U.S. market share climbing to 45.6 percent while Australia’s dropped to 44 percent. Strong momentum continued for U.S. beef in Korea, where February exports increased 11 percent to 13,093 mt valued at $86 million (up 26 percent). This pushed the two-month totals up 23 percent in volume (28,287 mt) and 31 percent in value ($177.6 million). Chilled exports through February were up 95 percent to 5,384 mt. In Taiwan, February exports jumped 33 percent from a year ago to 2,886 mt, while value increased 26 percent to $25.3 million. Through February, exports were up 28 percent in volume (6,477 mt) and 25 percent in value ($55.1 million). U.S. beef holds 70 percent of the chilled beef market in Taiwan, the highest of any Asian market. Through February, chilled exports to Taiwan increased 12 percent to 2,479 mt. Other highlights for U.S. beef included: Exports within North America are off to a solid start in 2017, with January-February exports to Mexico increasing 14 percent from a year ago in volume (36,235 mt) and 3 percent in value ($147.4 million). Exports to Canada are showing signs of a rebound, with volume up 11 percent to 19,446 mt and value up 18 percent to $123.5 million. Beef exports to two key South American markets increased significantly in value through February, with exports to Chile up 22 percent year-over-year to $8.9 million and exports to Peru up 68 percent to $4.3 million. The increase in Chile was achieved despite a 16 percent decline in volume (1,417 mt) while volume to Peru was up 16 percent to 1,130 mt. A rebound in the Philippines and continued growth in Vietnam pushed January-February beef exports to the ASEAN region up 33 percent in volume (4,774 mt) and 19 percent in value ($27.3 million). Exports to Indonesia, which set a value record of $39.4 million last year, are off to a slow start in 2017 with value through February down 48 percent to $3.5 million. Strong growth to most Asian markets helped offset a slowdown to Hong Kong, where January-February volume was down 21 percent to 16,131 mt, valued at $104.7 million (down 12 percent).


MAY 2017

63


64

MAY 2017


MAY 2017

65


66

MAY 2017


MAY 2017

67


68

MAY 2017


For Information on Simmentals Contact:

Jennifer Chandler 5664 Nutmeg Road Carthage, MO 64836 417-793-3646

Durham Simmental Farms Your Source for Quality Simmental in Central Missouri

38863 185th Road • Nelson, MO 65347

Ralph 660-837-3353

Garry 660-784-2242

For Your Simmental Needs Contact One of These Missouri Breeders… STEAKS ALIVE John & Jeanne Scorse Semen, embryos and foundation stock available at the ranch P.O. Box 3832 • Joplin, MO 64803 Phone: 417-437-0911 • Fax: 316-856-2338 E-mail: scorsej@steaksalive.com Web Page: http://www.steaksalive.com

LUCAS CATTLE CO. Forrest & Charolotte Lucas Owners

Cleo Fields 417-399-7124 Jeff Reed 417-399-1241 Brandon Atkins 417-399-7142

L

Office: 417-998-6878 Fax: 417-998-6408 info@lucascattlecompany.com

Rt. 1, Box 1200 • Cross Timbers, MO 65634 www.lucascattlecompany.com

merrymoomoos@live.com

Bulls for Sale!

RLE SIMMENTAL

Oval F Ranch

Don Fischer • Matt Fischer 816-392-8771 • 816-383 0630 ovalfranch.com • Winston MO

Roger Eakins • 233 N. Bast, Jackson, MO 63755 Jim Ranes 679 SW 82nd Avenue Jamesport, MO 64648 (660) 663-5202

Ryan Ranes 679 SW 82nd Ave. Jamesport, MO 64648 (660) 663-5226

573-243-7282

Simmental that excel in Phenotype, Performance, Fertility & Carcass Traits

MAY 2017

Quality Simmentals for 40 years

69


70

MAY 2017


MAY 2017

71


72

MAY 2017


SALE REPORTS Marshall & Fenner/Murphy Cattle Co 3-17-17, Marshall Jct, MO 19 SimAngus Bulls.........................................Avg. $3,115 53 Angus Bulls................................................Avg. $3,230 71 Angus Females...........................................Avg. $3,023 16 Embryos.......................................................Avg. $506 12 Commercial Open Heifers........................Avg. $1,025 7 Commercial Bred Heifers...........................Avg. $2,192 THM Land and Cattle 3-17-17, Bay, MO (Vienna, MO) 35 Angus Bulls................................................Avg. $3,882 MBS Charolais Bull Sale 3-17-17, Bowling Green, MO 19 Bulls...........................................................Avg. $3,061 Sunflower Genetics 3-17-17, Maple Hill, KS 97 SimAngus Bulls..........................................Avg. $4100 Binkley Angus Ranch 3-18-17, Green City, MO 30 Older Bulls................................................Avg. $6,350 66 Yearling Bulls............................................Avg. $5,875 49 Commercial Pairs......................................Avg. $2,493 Circle A Angus 3-18-17, Iberia, MO 145 Angus Bulls..............................................Avg. $3,959 200 Commercial Bred Heifers.......................Avg. $2,241 Falling Timber Farms 3-18-17, Marthasville, MO 62 Hereford Bulls and Females......................Avg. $3,556 Pinegar Limousin 3-18-17, Springfield, MO 12 Fall Bred Females......................................Avg. $6,600 24 Spring Bred Females.................................Avg. $4,938 9 Open Heifers...............................................Avg. $6,544 30 Bulls...........................................................Avg. $6,289 Briarwood Angus Farms 3-19-17, Butler, MO 38 Angus Bulls................................................Avg. $3,742 32 Angus Females...........................................Avg. $2,359 April Valley Farms 3-19-17, St Joseph, MO 62 Angus Bulls................................................Avg. $3,875 50 Angus Females...........................................Avg. $3,059 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus 3-20-18, Nevada, MO 108 Angus Bulls..............................................Avg. $5,956 99 Angus Females...........................................Avg. $5,593 KW Cattle Co 3-21-17, Ft. Scott, KS 133 Angus Bulls..............................................Avg. $3,917 31 Angus Females...........................................Avg. $2,006 58 Commercial Open Heifers........................Avg. $1,306

Magness Land and Cattle 3-25-17, Miami, OK 24 2 Year Old Limousin Bulls........................Avg. $4,276 64 Yearling Limousin Bulls............................Avg. $3,507 Hightower Cattle Co. 3-26-17, LaCygne, KS 21 Gelbvieh & Balancer Bulls........................Avg. $3,215 6 Open Heifers...............................................Avg. $3,000 CS Cattle 3-26-17, Pomona, MO 40 Angus Bulls................................................Avg. $2,690 28 Angus Females...........................................Avg. $3,160 Oleen Brothers 3-27-17, Dwight, KS 65 Hereford Bulls...........................................Avg. $4,089 60 Angus Bulls................................................Avg. $4,497 95 Commercial Pairs......................................Avg. $2,729 88 Fall Bred Heifers.......................................Avg. $2,448 25 Colts.............................................................Avg. $760 9 Riders..........................................................Avg. $3,956 Genetrust Brangus, Suhn Cattle Co. 3-28-17, Eureka, KS 143 Brangus Bulls..........................................Avg. $5,524 Sandhill Farms 3-31-17, Haviland, KS 115 Hereford Bulls.........................................Avg. $5,000 13 Spring Pairs...............................................Avg. $8,150 45 Commercial open heifers..........................Avg. $1,470 Gardiner Angus Ranch 4-1-17, Ashland, KS 375 Angus Bulls..............................................Avg. $7,100 315 Angus Females.........................................Avg. $5,324 113 Commercial Bred Heifers.......................Avg. $2,609 Brockmere Farms 4-3-17, New Cambia, MO 53 Angus Bulls................................................Avg. $4,044 10 Angus Females...........................................Avg. $2,265 10 Comm. Open Heifers................................Avg. $1,300 Chair Rock Ranch 4-5-17, Greely, KS 139 Angus Females.........................................Avg. $2,860 Meyer Cattle Co 4-7-17, Bowling Green, MO 35 Angus Bulls................................................Avg. $3,802 New Day Genetics 4-8-17, Osceola, MO 52 SimAngus Bulls.........................................Avg. $4,530 34 SimAngus Heifers......................................Avg. $1,868 The Renaissance XXV Sale 4-8-17, Strafford, MO 51 Lots............................................................Avg. $2,783 Sydenstricker Genetics Influence Sale 4-11-17, New Cambria, MO 70 Angus Bulls................................................Avg. $4,049 6 Open Angus Heifers....................................Avg. $1,450 7 Bred Heifers................................................Avg. $2,642

MAY 2017

Worthington Angus 3-25-17, Dadeville, MO 34 Angus Bulls................................................Avg. $5,022 37 Angus Females...........................................Avg. $3,158

23 Commercial Bred Heifers.........................Avg. $1,895 8 Commercial Open Heifers..........................Avg. $1,193

73


74

MAY 2017


MAY 2017

75


Sale Calendar May 6

Timberland Cattle 7th Annual Angus & Sim-Angus Female Cattle Sale, Vernon, AL

May 8

Gardiner Angus Ranch 2nd Annual Meating Demand Bull Sale, Ashland, KS

May 13

Central States Beefmaster Sale, Locust Grove, OK

May 19

Show-Me-Select Replacement Heifer Sale, JRS Carthage, MO

May 20

Mead Farms Female Sale, Versailles, MO

June 3

Circle A Complete Dispersal of Registered Angus Herd, Iberia, MO

June 10

Passion for Prime Wagyu Sale, Springfield, MO

Expanding Cows or Herds Source: Justin Sexten, Ph.D., Director, Supply Development, CAB

MAY 2017

As the cow herd expands, market prices contract from their record highs and focus more attention on adding value. How to do that commonly comes down to adding what the market values in health and weaning practices from effective vaccinations to bunk breaking. This month, let’s consider ways to capitalize on the one trait common to all producers and market-price calculations: weight.

76

For years—and especially renewed in the recent cost/ price squeeze—discussion has centered around reducing cow size and increasing cow numbers as a way to increase returns per acre. That’s usually seen as more important than return per cow, but it makes some sense to look at both: how you measure profitability should vary by the most limiting resource. In land-limited operations, you can add value per acre through grazing management without changing the cow herd. Where land use is not yet optimized, more cows can increase pounds produced per acre.

Carrying capacity or stocking rate is a function of body weight and time. Simple as that, whether the cows are big, little or just right, their weight applied to a given land unit for a given time is stocking rate. If maximizing output per acres is your goal, you should incorporate a feedyard into the system. That’s how to apply a really dense stocking rate to a smaller land mass to produce maximum pounds of beef. That’s outlandish for many cow-calf producers, but it leads us to consider adding value by increasing the time you take to capture the benefits of your genetic investment and management. You spend time deciding which bulls or genetics to buy, vaccines to give or dewormer to use, and that’s only justified and reimbursed when you own the cattle though the time those decisions affect the calves. Steer weights have been increasing steadily for decades, closely linked to sires yearling growth trends. All of this has increased cow size, but selling calves as they are weaned may not capture enough dollars from the


added growth potential to offset keeping cost on the bigger cows. That’s not a hint to go back to smaller cows and calves at odds with the market trend. Your cows will likely stay big, so why not add profit through their calves?

MBC Classified

Owning cattle longer lets you capture value added through practices from conception to harvest. While cash flow, forage supply and labor resources may limit or rule out some options, the opportunities are there. Value addition tends to focus on the short term; have you considered the long term? Imagine yourself a feedyard operator or an order buyer. When your calves come up for sale, can you say this is a group you would buy, or would you hold back because something needs to change? Get back to the real world and change it. That may begin in the breeding season, health or other management. On the other hand, perhaps you realize you’re ready to stay linked to those cattle, capturing the value you worked so hard to add.

“REESE” DISC MOWERS, CADDY V-RAKES, “REESE” TUBE-LINE BALE WRAPPER, AITCHISON DRILLS, SELF-UNLOADING HAY TRAILERS, HEAVY DUTY BALE AND MINERAL FEEDERS, FEED BUNKS, BALE SPIKES, CONTINUOUS FENCING, COMPLETE CORRAL SYSTEMS, INSTALLATION AVAILABLE: Tigerco Distributing Co. 660-645-2212, 800-432-4020 or www.tigercoinc.com.

Regardless of how or if you adjust stocking rates—more little cows or focused management on larger ones—the challenge of flexibility remains. Again, one answer is to take a longer view. Rather than selling cull cows immediately after they lose a calf or they’re called open, consider adding condition and pounds by incorporating them into the grazing system or backgrounding yard. In the spring, a ranch sometimes cannot stock heavily enough to keep up with forage growth so consider exposing all possible replacement heifers. After an early-season pregnancy diagnosis, keep only those bred artificially or otherwise earliest calvers and sell the rest as heavy yearlings into the historically improving yearling market as the grass begins to dry up.

SUPERIOR LIVESTOCK AUCTION Video Sale Via Satellite. Your area representative is Bob Walker, 417-777-0949. BULLS: CALVING EASE LINE BRED BLACK SIMMENTALS. Outstanding EPD’s, Fast Growth. These are good looking, sound footed, fall and yearling bulls. We deliver. Mike Williams, Higginsville, MO 816-797-5450. STEEL OIL FIELD PIPE AND SUCKER RODS. Call 573-5782687 or 573-422-3735. COVERED MINERAL BUNKS: CCA treated wood bunks work well with salt or other mineral mix. Built is six sizes 6’ - 16’, at Sentinel Industries. Ashland, MO. Phone: 573-657-2164. PUREBRED CHAROLAIS BULLS: Good Selection, Serviceable Age, Reasonable Price. Carl Speight. Dadeville, MO. 417-995-3120 or 417-298-7307.

MAY 2017

Late-weaning fall calves is another way to improve spring forage use while increasing pounds sold overall. Some argue that challenges the fall herd in rebreeding, but the cows better be settled before going this route. Just allow time for their third-trimester flush as you wean and sell those heavier calves into that hot yearling market this fall.

The MBC Classified column appears monthly. Classified advertising is only 50¢ a word. Send your check with your ad to Missouri Beef Cattleman, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Mo 65201. Deadline 10th of month before an issue.

77


MAY 2017

Advertiser Index

78

AgPower John Deere.................................................... 21 Agri-Labs Vet Gun........................................................17 AMEC......................................................................... 25 Arrowquip.................................................................... 51 Buffalo Livestock Market............................................. 30 Callaway Livestock Center Inc.................................... 32 Cattlemens Sessions..................................................... 59 Central Life Sciences - Altosid..................................... 27 Central Missouri Sales Co........................................... 36 Central States Beefmaster Sale.................................... 50 Circle 5 Cattle Co........................................................ 42 Circle A Angus Ranch Sale......................................... 13 Circle A Angus Ranch................................................. 35 Classified...................................................................... 77 Clearwater Farm.......................................................... 35 Double R Cattle Co..................................................... 69 Drovers Cowboy College............................................. 71 Durham Simmental Farms.......................................... 69 Eastern Missouri Commission Company...................... 7 Farmers Bank of North Missouri................................. 55 FCS of Missouri........................................................... 80 Galaxy Beef LLC......................................................... 35 GeneTrust Brangus...................................................... 31 Gerloff Farms............................................................... 35 Green’s Welding & Sales.............................................. 38 Hampton Feedlot......................................................... 22 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus........................................... 35 Innovative Livestock Services........................................ 3 International Brangus Breeders Association............... 29 Irsik and Doll............................................................... 79 Iseman Brangus........................................................... 31 Jim’s Motors................................................................. 50 JJ Skyline Angus.......................................................... 35 Joe Machens Ford........................................................ 43 Joplin Regional Stockyards.......................................... 57 Kingsville Livestock Auction....................................... 46 Land Rights Seminar................................................... 52 Laughlin Angus........................................................... 35 Lucas Cattle Co........................................................... 69 Marshall & Fenner Farms............................................ 35 MBIC Legal Notice..................................................... 56 MCA All Breed Junior Show..................................65-69 MCA Brand Wall Page................................................ 75 MCA Member Benefits................................................ 61 MCA Membership Form............................................. 74 MCA Saturday Shoot - Thank you!............................ 26 MCA Steak Fry Pac Auction..................................63-64

McBee Cattle Co......................................................... 58 McPherson Concrete Products.................................... 77 Mead Cattle Co........................................................... 39 Mead Farms................................................................. 35 Mead Farms May Sale................................................... 9 Merry Meadows Simmental........................................ 69 Missouri Angus Association......................................... 35 Missouri Angus Breeders............................................. 35 Missouri Beef House Schedule.................................... 60 Missouri Beef Industry Council................................... 45 Missouri Limousin Breeders Association.................... 49 Missouri Simmental Association................................. 69 Missouri Valley Commission Company........................ 7 MJCA Point Show....................................................... 68 MLS Tubs.................................................................... 37 MultiMin USA............................................................. 47 Naught-Naught Agency............................................... 16 Norbrook - Enroflox................................................ 14-15 Ogden Horsecreek Ranch........................................... 35 Ory’s Cirlce 7 Red Angus............................................ 24 Oval F Ranch.............................................................. 69 P.H. White.................................................................... 33 Passion for Prime - Wagyu Sale................................... 53 Pro-Serve..................................................................... 30 Ashlyn Richardson...................................................... 35 RLE Simmental........................................................... 69 Sellers Feedlot.............................................................. 40 Shoal Creek Land & Cattle......................................... 69 Show Me Select Sale.................................................... 24 South Central Regional Stockyards............................ 47 Superior Steel Sales...................................................... 41 Sydenstricker Genetics................................................. 35 Sydenstricker Implement............................................. 12 Sydenstricker Implement - Khun................................. 54 Triple C, Inc................................................................. 46 Valley Oaks Angus....................................................... 35 Weiker Angus Ranch................................................... 35 Wes Ad......................................................................... 54 Westway Feed............................................................... 23 Wheeler & Sons Livestock Market............................... 55 Wheeler Auctions & Real Estate.................................. 39 Wilbers Fish Branch.................................................... 52 Mike Williams............................................................. 39 Windsor Livestock Auction.......................................... 34 Y-Tex.............................................................................. 2 Zeitlow Distributing..................................................... 59


MAY 2017

79


May 2017 Missouri Beef Cattleman  

May 2017 Missouri Beef Cattleman

May 2017 Missouri Beef Cattleman  

May 2017 Missouri Beef Cattleman

Advertisement