__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1


CONTENTS July 2018

FEATURES 16

Develop the Best

52

Building for Efficiency

How Producers Get the Most From Their Heifers

Hoop Systems Provide Alternative Management Techniques

MEMBER NEWS 6 30 32

52

Association Update Beef Checkoff News County News

Building for Efficiency

COLUMNS 8

MCA President’s Perspective Get Excited about MCA

10

What’s Cookin’ at the Beef House

20

CattleWomen’s Corner

42

On the Edge of Common Sense: Baxter Black

MCA Steak Fry - Thank You

Great Opportunities

JULY 2018

A Close Call

4

58

Straight Talk: Mike Deering

62

Junior Spotlight

64

Cowboy Poetry

66

Capitol Update

The Monkey

Busy Times

The Ranch

Your Impact

The Missouri Beef Cattleman is an official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association.


MISSOURI

BEEF CATTLEMAN

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE MISSOURI CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Volume 48 - Issue 2 (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) Magazine Publishing Office 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, MO 65201 Phone: 573-499-9162 • Fax: 573-499-9167 Andy Atzenweiler: Editor/Production/Ad Sales P.O. Box 480977 • Kansas City, Missouri 64148 816-210-7713 • E-mail: mobeef@sbcglobal.net Coby Wilson: Ad Sales 573-499-9162 Ext 235

Missouri Cattlemen’s Association

16 Develop the Best DEPARTMENTS 7 14

New MCA Members Obituary: Wayne “Doc” Smith

22

Gelbvieh News

45

Kansas Feedlots

70

Advertisers Index

ON THE COVER:

A heifer and her first calf during spring calving at Francis Family Farms, Paris, Missouri. Photo by Coby Wilson

Find us on Facebook:

Missouri Cattlemen’s Association

Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation www.mocattlemenfoundation.org

Missouri’s CattleWomen

http://mocattle.com/missouricattlewomen.aspx

2018 MCA Officers

Greg Buckman, President 573-696-3911 • 14601 N Rt U, Hallsville, MO 65255 Bobby Simpson, President-Elect 573-729-6583 • 3556 CR 6150, Salem, MO 65560 Marvin Dieckman, Vice President 660-596-4163 • 28998 Hwy JJ , Cole Camp, MO 65325 Matt Hardecke, Treasurer 573-846-6614 • 19102 Skymeadows Dr., Wildwood, MO 63069 David Dick, Secretary 660-826-0031 • 23529 Anderson School Rd., Sedalia, MO 65301

2018 MCA Regional Vice Presidents

Region 1: Adam Kuebler, 202 N. 6th St. Edina, MO 63537 309-706-4410 Region 2: Chuck Miller, 393 Spring Garden Road Olean, MO 65064 • 573-881-3589 Region 3: Charlie Besher, RR 5, Box 2402 Patton, MO 63662 • 573-866-2846 Region 4: Tony Washburn, 4912 457th Street King City, MO 64463 • 660-483-0038 Region 5: Bruce Mershon, 10015 Windsor Drive Lee’s Summit, MO 64086 • 816-525-1954 Region 6: Clay Doeden, 14555 S. Hwy A Stockton, MO 65785 • 417-808-0415 Region 7: Traves Merrick, 1956 Hwy 97 Miller, MO 65707 • 417-536-8080

JULY 2018

Missouri Beef Cattleman, (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) is published monthly (12 times a year) and is the official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Missouri, 65201. PERIODICALS postage paid at Columbia, Missouri and additional mailing offices. Subscription price is included as a part of the minimum membership dues of $70.00 per year in Missouri Cattlemen’s Association. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Missouri Beef Cattleman, P.O. Box 480977, Kansas City, Missouri 64148

MCA Website: www.mocattle.com

Mike Deering • Executive Vice President - Ext 230 Mike@mocattle.com Maria Washburn • Manager of Membership - Ext 231 Maria@mocattle.com Coby Wilson • Manager of Strategic Solutions - Ext 235 Coby@mocattle.com Candace Rosen • MBC Editor/Production Artist Candace@mocattle.com Lisa Stockhorst, Administrative Assistant – Ext 234 Lisa@mocattle.com

5


6

JULY 2018


Misty Bock, Stockton, MO Bob Cooper, Salisbury, MO David & Angela Dittmer, Windsor, MO Amy Ford, Milo, MO Brandon Graupman, Mexico, MO Wyatt Graves, El Dorado Springs, MO Steven & Denise Haskins, Joplin, MO Waylan & Sarah Jones, Clinton, MO Danny Morrison, Dunnegan, MO Jacob Primm, Macon, MO Cindi Prothro, Stockton, MO Olivia Walrod, Bronaugh, MO Madison Whitaker, El Dorado Springs, MO See the MCA Membership Form on page 61.

JULY 2018 7


8

JULY 2018


What’s Cookin’ at the

Missouri Beef House By Pat & Patty Wood, MCA Beef House Managers MCA Steak Fry - Thank You

JULY 2018

Do you ever wonder who is behind the scenes of the Cattlemen’s Steak Fry in June, decorating the tables and preparing the meal? It’s MCA cattlemen and cattlewomen volunteers! Pat and Patty Wood plan the menu with input from the MCA staff, order food according to projected attendance, and prepare a checklist for all necessary items from tableware to drinks and everything in between. Our menu included: 10 oz KC strip steaks, baked potatos, salad, creamed corn, dinner rolls, brownies or cheesecake, ice cream, tea, lemonade, and water. Suetta Carter and Patty Wood decorated all the tables with collected items from Patty’s craft closet. With the increase in numbers anticipated this year, it was imperative that we have three large grills to cook our steaks, which were donated by Valley Oaks Steak Company from Lone Jack. I would like to extend big thanks to the Pettis County Cattlemen,

10

Benton County Cattlemen, and Mike Carter for letting us use their cookers. While most of the food is prepared at the Missouri Beef House, all food and serving items must be transferred to the Agriculture Building on the Missouri State Fairgrounds where our event is held due to large attendance numbers. I would also like to thank Mike Carter and Pat Wood for bringing their UTVs and trailers to transport many loads back and forth between the two locations. Thank you to all our volunteers who helped either prepare food, cook, serve, clean-up, etc. From Bates County-- Lonny & Marilyn Duckworth; Benton County-- Brad & Beth Crouch, Marvin & Carolyn Dieckman; Cape Girardeau County-- Butch & Eileen Meier; Cole County-- Ed & Judy Ehrhardt; Cooper County-- Paul Gibbs, Eric Kraus; Johnson County -- Dwayne & Carolyn Harms, Mike & Diane Huse; Lafayette County-- Kathy Harris; Pettis County-- Nick Asbury, Matt & Jennifer Boatright, Mike & Suetta Carter, Ben & Devann Catlett, John Chamberlain, Kevin & Barb Gregory, Jordann Gregory, Morgann Gregory, Alan Ream, Ali Schwartz, Anthony & Sherry Schwartz, Mary Ann Schwartz, Blake Voss, Amanda Werner, Ted Williams, Pat & Patty Wood; Polk County—Keith & Beverly Stevens. The success of the dinner served to 580+ people was possible because each of these volunteers work for a cause, not applause and live life to express not impress! Thought for the Month: “There is no ‘I’ in team, but we sure are glad ‘u’ are in volunteers!”


2018 Missouri Beef House County Volunteer Work Schedule (tentative) August 9-19 9 Thursday

10 Friday

11 Saturday

12 Sunday

10:00-2:30

10:00-2:30

10:00-2:30

10:00-2:30

Tri County 15 Hickory 10

Warren 10 Nodaway 10 Cole 15

Vernon 20

Knobnoster FFA 15

2:00-6:00 Texas 8 Cass Jackson 10 Morgan 10

2:00-6:00

2:00-6:00

Gentry 15 So. Central 6

Lafayette 20

2:00-6:00 Clinton 15 California FFA 15

5:30-9:30 Randolph 10 Mid-Mo. 10 Eugene FFA 10 Russellville FFA 7

5:30-9:30 MSU 10 MJCA 10 MCW 8 CCW/MCC 8

5:30-9:30

5:30-9:30

Benton 35 Andrew 5

Moniteau 15 Tipton FFA 15

13 Monday

14 Tuesday

15 Wednesday

16 Thursday

17 Friday

18 Saturday

19 Sunday

10:00-2:30

10:00-2:30

10:00-2:30

10:00-2:30

10:00-2:30

10:00-2:30

Ray 5 Eldon FFA 30

Lewis/Marion 8 Sullivan 10 Maries/Osage 5

Macon 12 Linn 10

Lafayette 15

Carroll 10 St. Charles 5 Douglas/Wright 8

10:00-2:30 Southwest Cattlemen 15 Cedar 5 Adair 5

2:00-6:00

2:00-6:00

2:00-6:00

2:00-6:00

2:00-6:00

2:00-6:00

2:00-6:00

Bates 25

Audrain 10 Newton/ McDonald 7

Callaway/ Montgomery 10 Appleton City FFA 13

Monroe 5 Ralls 5 St. Clair 15

Boone 15 Jasper 5

Polk 15 Franklin 8

Pettis 15

5:30-9:30

5:30-9:30

5:30-9:30

5:30-9:30

5:30-9:30

Henry 15

Johnson 15

Knox 5 Harrison 10

Cooper 15

Howard 15 Pike-Lincoln 10

5:30-9:30 MU Block & Bridle 10 Saline 18 Columbia FFA 15

Dallas 15

Thanks to All the Volunteers That Make the Beef House a Success! JULY 2018

Please arrive 30 minutes prior to your shift for volunteer orientation. The Beef House hours of operation are 11:00 am – 9:00 pm. If you need to change your shift, or you're a new county who would like a shift, please contact Maria Washburn at maria@mocattle.com or 573-499-9162 by July 15.

11


Annual Cattlemen’s Steak Fry Attracts Over 500 - Nearly $70,000 Raised The Missouri Cattlemen’s Association (MCA) hosted its 15th Annual Cattlemen’s Steak Fry June 9 in the Agriculture Building located on the Missouri State Fairgrounds in Sedalia, Missouri. MCA Policy and Legislative Affairs Committee Chair Jimmie Long said roughly 550 supporters of the association attended the event, which is intended to honor past MCA presidents and raise funds for the association’s Political Action Committee (PAC). He said the funds are used to ensure people who value Missouri agriculture are elected into office. “We had another fantastic event that truly did its part to recognize the leadership of our past presidents, while also raising funds to ensure we elect leaders in Jefferson

Governor Mike Parson, speaking to the crowd, was one of the highlights of the evening. This was the Governor’s first event since being sworn into office on June 1st.

City who value Missouri agriculture,” said Long, who was president of the association in 2011. “We were beyond honored to have Governor Mike Parson, who is a cattleman, at the event.”

The Past Presidents Pie Auction was a great success this year.

JULY 2018

Ben Eggers, MCA President in 1993, and Auctioneer Chas Wheeler, Wheeler Auction & Real Estate. Thank you to Chas for a job well done!!

12

3390 Winbrook Dr., Memphis, TN 38116

Hwy 42 West • Vienna Missouri 65582 45 Miles South of Jefferson City Selling All classes of Cattle Wednesday • 10:00 a.m. Featuring ‘Star-Vac Program’ Cattle Weekly DVAuction Service for convenient online viewing & bidding For More Information Call… David Patton Office Ross Patton Bill Patton 573-308-6655 573-422-3305 573-308-6657 573-308-6658 Visit our website: www.scrsvienna.com or E-mail us: scrsvienna@gmail.com “Make South Central your Livestock Market”


W.A. Schlesselman visiting with the Anstine brothers.

The event brought in roughly $65,000. All funds raised will go towards political campaigns of candidates who understand the importance of Missouri’s top economic driver in the state.

The event wouldn’t be possible without sponsors. This year’s top sponsors were Callaway Montgomery Cattlemen’s; Missouri Soybeans; Valley Oaks Angus; and VIT-A-ZINE.

“It is unfortunate that it takes money to make a difference, but that is a reality. We need to help candidates who are determined to advance Missouri agriculture,” said Long. “MCA is one of the most successful policy organizations representing the interests of Missouri farm and ranch families in the state. We get results. In order to be successful, you have to elect good leaders in Jefferson City.”

JULY 2018 13


Wayne “Doc” Smith Wayne Delarmie Smith, 90 years old, of Green Castle, Missouri, passed away Monday, May 28, 2018 at Kirksville Manor Care Center. He was born January 22, 1928 near Loeffler, Missouri. He was the son of Frank Delarmie Smith and Sylvia Juanita (Rickard) Smith. He grew up in the Loeffler community and graduated from Willow Branch Grade School then the Kirksville Senior High School in 1947. He received the FFA State Farmer Degree in 1947 and was FFA State Reporter. He received the FFA American Farmer Degree in 1948 and was in the High School Honor Society. He attended Kirksville State Teachers’ College (now Truman State) and graduated from the University of Missouri with a BS Degree in Agriculture in 1951, a Master’s Degree in 1952, and a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine in 1956. Wayne married Evelyn Ilene Young on Nov. 9, 1952 at the First Baptist Church in Columbia, Missouri with the Rev. Lee C. Shepherd officiating. He practiced Veterinary medicine in Winigan, Missouri from June 1956 to October 1979. He became Fieldman for the Missouri Angus Association on October 1, 1979 and graduated from Missouri Auction School in January 1980. He worked over 1500 cattle sales and retired from the Association on February 29, 2004. As a member of the First Baptist Church in Winigan he served as Sunday school teacher, Sunday school secretary, training union director, and Sunday school superintendent. He served as Chairman of the Sullivan County Health Department Board, Sullivan County Memorial Hospital Board and the Sullivan County Ambulance Board. He also served four terms as Judge of the Sullivan County Court (now called County Commissioner) Organization Chairman, first President of the Sullivan County Public Water District Organization Chairman and first President of the Sullivan County Cattleman’s Association, President of the Sullivan County Farm

CENTRAL MISSOURI SALES CO. 3503 S. Limit • Sedalia, MO

Your Reliable Market In Mid-Missouri Certified Special VACC Calf Sales the 1st and 3rd Mondays at 2:00 p.m.

JULY 2018

Sale Every Monday at 11:00 a.m.

14

660-826-8286

Jay Fowler Cary Brodersen E.H. Fowler 660-473-1562 660-473-6373 660-473-1048

Bureau, Chairman of the Sullivan County Extension Council, and served on the state advisory council, Chairman of the Sullivan County Republican Committee, served on the Agriculture Advisory Committee for Governor Kit Bond, Senator John Danforth and Representative Tom Coleman, appointed to the state ASCS Committee (now FSA) by the first George Bush and served four years, one as Chairman. He was President of the Winigan 4H and Community Park Board, a 32 Degree Free Mason, serving as District Grand Master, President of the Sullivan County Angus Association, President of the Chariton Valley Angus Association and Secretary of the Green Hills Angus Association. Who’s Who in Veterinary Science and Medicine, Who’s Who in Community Service, 1980 Junior Angus Association Man of the Year. 1995 First Inductee to the Missouri Angus Breeders Hall of Fame, 1997 inducted into the National Junior Angus Honorary Foundation, 1997 Missouri State Fair Cattle Show was dedicated to him. 2001 he was inducted into the American Angus Heritage Foundation. 2004 Block and Bridle at the University of Missouri Livestock Person of the Year. 2004 National Junior Angus Association show was dedicated to him. 2004 he was the second inductee into the Northeast Missouri Livestock Hall of Fame, and in 2004 Missouri Cattleman’s Association Pioneer Cattleman of the year. Doc has spent most of his life in the Loeffler and Winigan areas. He was preceded in death by his father, Frank, March 18, 1987, and his mother, Sylvia, October 4, 1989, his brother, Donald, February 27, 2011, his wife, Evelyn, July 27, 2012, his grandparents, aunts and uncles. He is survived by his nephews, the Larry Smith and wife Brenda of Green Castle and the Terry Smith and wife Tonyunna of Licking, Missouri, great nephews, Dee Jay, Jay Dee, Jackson and Josh Smith, great nieces Jesse Horton, other relatives and many friends. Memorial contributions are suggested to the Winigan Cemetery.


JULY 2018

15


16

JULY 2018


JULY 2018

17


JULY 2018

c n

l e

18

a C

d le


JULY 2018

19


20

JULY 2018


Cookie Cutters

JULY 2018

Order our catalog now for only $10 (refundable via credit voucher when your total orders for the 2018 calendar year reach $25.00). Over 700 shapes, designs, & sets covering all holidays & many subjects. Mail check or money order to: Cape County Cookie Cutter Company P.O. Box 424, Cape Girardeau, Missouri 63702

21


Reaching Beef Producers with the Story of Gelbvieh Since 1974 Source: HAGA The Heart of America Gelbvieh Association (HAGA) is a regional Gelbvieh association that has been serving its members and their customers in Missouri and surrounding states since its inception in 1974, just shortly after Gelbvieh genetics were brought to the U.S. from Germany. The Gelbvieh breed has been a part of the U.S. beef industry since its introduction in 1971 and is now the fifth largest U.S. beef breed determined by the number of registered animals in the breed’s national registry. Gelbvieh cattle are widely recognized for maternal traits such as fertility, quiet temperament, and longevity, which are all desirable traits to include in the cowherd. Coupling Gelbvieh’s maternal strengths with the breed’s aptitude for growth, muscling and superior feed efficiency, makes Gelbvieh-influenced cattle valuable in all aspects of the beef industry. Today, HAGA has a membership roster of 72 farms and ranches that actively promote the Gelbvieh and Balancer® breed throughout Missouri and the surrounding states of Kansas, Oklahoma, Illinois, and Arkansas. The organization sets up tradeshow booths at the Western Farm Show in Kansas City, Missouri, and Ozark Fall Farmfest in Springfield, Missouri, and sponsors breed shows at the Missouri State Fair. The association also produces and distributes 1,250 of its membership directories to Gelbvieh and Balancer

SOAP WEED GELBVIEH Dedicated to continuing the positive traits of disposition, calving ease, milk, and growth since 1978.

Polled, Purebred and Fullblood Red Bulls for Sale • Available Late Fall JULY 2018

Select Group of Red Females • Some Pairs

22

Barb, Butch & Heather LaShell 417-345-6396 or 417-872-6414

317 State Rd B Phillipsburg, MO 65722

Above: HAGA Trade Show Booth. Left: The HAGA 2017/2018 Breeders Directory.

breeders and commercial producers each year. But, the biggest event by far is the association’s annual female sale. The 22nd Annual HAGA Show-Me Plus Gelbvieh & Balancer® Sale will be held on Saturday, November 10, 2018, at the Springfield Livestock Marketing Center, Springfield, Missouri. This year’s sale will provide one of the largest gatherings of Gelbvieh and Balancer female genetics in the region with the addition of herd dispersals from notable members of HAGA, including a full herd dispersal from Triple K Gelbvieh, Basehor, Kansas, and a mature cow reduction offering from Justamere Ranch, Urbana, Missouri. “This year’s sale is slated to offer 250 head, which greatly surpasses the normal 100-head average. It will be an outstanding opportunity for seedstock and commercial producers alike to take home exceptional Gelbvieh and Balancer genetics,” said Bob Hart, HAGA secretary/treasurer. The sale will also feature registered Gelbvieh and Balancer females from several other HAGA members and approximately 60 head of Gelbvieh-influenced commercial females. For more information regarding the 22nd Annual HAGA Show-Me Plus Gelbvieh & Balancer® Sale or HAGA, please contact Bob Hart by phone at 816225-8530 or visit www.heartofamericagelbvieh.com. A membership directory can also be found on the HAGA website, or please contact Hart to sign up to receive the directory by mail.


JULY 2018

23


Gelbvieh Through the Supply Chain Source: by Angela Vesco, Megan Slater and Tom Strahm, AGA Staff

Gelbvieh cows breed back year after year and wean off a good size calf.

Gelbvieh and Balancer® cattle help feed the world. Not only are the cows profit drivers at the ranch, but they convert at the bunk and they grade on the rail. At the end of the day, the goal of the beef industry is to produce a product that consumers can enjoy during a nutritious dinner at the family table. It requires many different factors to get a product to the consumer. Gelbvieh and Balancer cattle are more in demand and are fulfilling their role in producing a good product for the consumer.

Another major factor that impacts a commercial producers bottom line is the efficiency of the cow. The Gelbvieh cow is known for her moderate mature size weaning off heavy calves. Gelbvieh ranks number 1 for smallest mature cow size and are the earliest to mature of the seven major beef breeds according to U.S. Meat Animal Research Center.

On the Ranch The number one factor that impacts profitability on the ranch, is the fertility of the cow. Without a calf each year, that cow costs the rancher money. The Gelbvieh cow is a solution to that problem. Fertility is one of the most valued traits in the Gelbvieh cow. When commercial Gelbvieh and Balancer producers are talking about their cowherd and why they stay with those genetics, a large majority of producers cite exceptional cowherd fertility as a standout trait. Gelbvieh cows are also known for their stayability. Stayability refers to the reproductive longevity of a cow.

More and more producers are looking for replacement females that have Gelbvieh genetics because of the maternal advantages. Kurt Johnson, cow-calf producer from north central Nebraska ranks maternal ability, fertility, and longevity as extremely important traits. After Johnson sorts off his favorite heifers for replacements, he markets the remaining heifers as feeders at the local sale barn, but most of those heifers are bought as replacements by other commercial producers. The females in Johnson’s herd raise fast growing calves that, once weaned, are ready to go to the feedyard and convert feed to beef. In the Feedyard Improve the feeding performance of your cattle by utilizing Gelbvieh and Balancer genetics in a crossbreeding program. Crossbreeding with Gelbvieh and Balancer can increase the rate of gain, and improve feed conversion. Gelbvieh-influenced cattle excel at weaning weight, and at post-weaning growth as well. Gelbvieh and Balancer cattle perform very well in the feedyard. Producers who have retained ownership of their cattle through the finishing phase, often report average daily gains of 3.5 pounds/head/day, or even higher. Feedlot operators who have purchased Gelbvieh and Balancerinfluenced feeder cattle have also experienced similar performance.

JULY 2018

“The Gelbvieh and Balancer bulls have improved the consistency and uniformity of our calves. We like the growth, performance, and disposition of the Balancer calves, according to Adam Sindt, R&J Farms from Nebraska and 2017 AGA Commercial Producer of the Year.

24

Steers in the 2017 AGA Scale and Rail contest had an average daily gain of 4 pounds/head/day in the feedyard. (Continued on page 26)


JULY 2018

25


Feed efficiency is a major profit driver in beef cattle production and, especially in the cattle feeding/finishing sector. Gelbvieh-influenced cattle excel in the area of feed conversion. Decreasing the amount of feed needed to produce more pounds of saleable product increases your profit potential. “Gelbvieh-influenced cattle provide added carcass weight. At the end of the day we’re still paid on pounds. They also add ribeye, more gaining ability, and feed efficiency. All things that are highly valuable,” said Bill Tucker, Tucker Family Farms, Amherst, Virginia. On the Rail Not only do Gelbvieh and Balancer cattle perform well in the feedyard with increased efficiency and growth, Balancer cattle make the grade and deliver the value on the rail. Many feeders have reported Balancer-sired cattle that grade 90 percent Choice or better. In today’s marketplace where higher quality grades yield a premium, Gelbvieh and Balancer-influenced cattle meet those modern industry demands. In addition to quality grade, Gelbvieh and Balancerinfluenced cattle have been proven to excel in percent

retail product. According to the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center progress report #22, Gelbvieh rank #1 for percent retail product. In 2016, the American Gelbvieh Foundation launched its first annual Steer Challenge and Scale and Rail Sire-Identified Carcass Contest, which helps to provide information necessary to advance Gelbvieh and Balancer carcass merit. A total of 103 head participated in the 2017 contest and all head were harvested in July 2017. These cattle graded 85 percent Choice or better, with 91 percent of the cattle finishing Yield Grade 1, 2, or 3. These cattle also had an average dressing percentage of 64.42 percent. The AGA is committed to continually strengthening Gelbvieh and Balancer carcass value on the rail by providing producers with FPI™, which stands for feeder profit index. FPI aids producers in selecting sires whose progeny will perform in the feedyard and are sold on a grade and yield standpoint. Well ranking sires for FPI have higher marbling and carcass weight than their contemporaries. The average FPI over the last 20 years has increased within the Gelbvieh and Balancer breed by $19.14, proving Gelbvieh and Balancer cattle are meeting modern industry demands. On the Plate The 2016 Beef Quality Audit published by National Cattlemen’s Beef Association stated that “many companies were willing to pay a premium for guaranteed quality … Tenderness and flavor continue to be the two beef quality factors that drive customer satisfaction.”

JULY 2018

Gelbvieh and Balancer producers are committed to improving the carcass genetics of the breed with each calf crop to produce a tasty, satisfying eating experience for the consumer. Since 2010, the genetic trend for marbling has been steadily increasing.

26

Source: American Gelbvieh Association


DNA Panel Gelbvieh-Influenced Commercial Females Source: American Gelbvieh Association The American Gelbvieh Association (AGA) is proud to offer DNA products for commercial producers designed specifically for Gelbvieh-influenced cattle. The newly updated panel for Gelbvieh-influenced replacement females is called GGP-GV Heifer; its earlier model was previously marketed as Maternal Edge. The GGPGV Heifer provides data on more traits and produces two scores for each animal: one comparing an animal against its contemporaries and another that compares that animal against the Gelbvieh breed. The maternal and production-oriented traits offered are calving ease, stayability (currently ran on the BOLT model), mature cow weight, efficiency, and postweaning gain. The carcassoriented traits were selected particularly on their relevance in the Gelbvieh breed and their impact on the production of quality consumer products. Carcass traits include marbling and tenderness. The results provide a score between 1 and 10 for each trait; 10 is the most optimal performance for a certain trait and 1 is the least desirable outcome.

lab. Producers who calve with multi-sire pasture groups can gain valuable knowledge on the performance of their calf crop and determine which bulls are the most productive with the use of the parent verification tool. Tools like this are valuable to all producers, as the consumer demands more than just beef, but high quality beef. The GGP-GV Heifer panel can help make those decisions as early as possible to help design a herd that revolves around both maternal prowess and powerful carcass traits. Call the AGA office at 303-465-2333 for more information or visit www.gelbvieh.org.

This panel also includes the option for parent verification at no additional cost, provided the potential sire(s) have parentage markers on file at the GeneSeek

Missouri State Fair August 9-19 Sedalia, MO

JULY 2018

Beef House Schedule on Page 11 See You There!

27


Track Commercial Cowherd Data Like a Pro Source: by Angela Vesco, AGA Smart Select Service (SSS) is a data management program provided to commercial cattlemen and women by the American Gelbvieh Association. The program gives commercial producers the insight into their cowherd that they may have not of otherwise had. Users of Smart Select Service can track the data of their cowherd to assist them in making selection decisions with the goal of retaining the best females possible. At just $1 annual fee per head with no breed restrictions, it’s a cost-effective way to better understand and track the performance of individual animals and on a herd basis. The objective of Smart Select Service is to help commercial herds become more efficient and successful. Efficiency is becoming more important and crucial to the success of any cattle operation. Inefficiencies are identified by taking measurements and then utilizing the data, and Smart Select Service identifies that. Managing data can sound intimidating at times, but that is where the AGA comes in to help. The program does the data management, and the AGA staff is there to discuss the data and understand it. Value-added programs and genetic technology are management tools that tend to get overlooked by

Lincoln Gelbvieh “Breeding Gelbvieh for 35 Years” 24292 Hill Rd. • Linneus, MO 64653 660-895-5008 lincoln@grm.net

“Bulls For Sale”

Kingsville Livestock Auction Kingsville, Missouri Hwy. 58 • 45 Miles SE of Kansas City, MO

JULY 2018

No Special Cow Sale in July Due to Hot Weather Cattle Sale Every Tuesday 10:00 a.m.

28

For information call Rick or Jeremy Anstine

816-597-3331 or 816-732-6070

Visit our Website at: www.anstineauctions.com or E-mail us at: kingsville@earthlink.net

producers because of the added labor and cost. However, when markets are lower, and selection decisions are even more important, management tools can help separate the quality from the quantity and garner premiums. There is always more than meets the eye when it comes to evaluating livestock. Rancher Scott Hamilton of Hitchcock, South Dakota believes that it is crucial to understand the data that you collect. “A program like SSS is needed in the beef industry because it’s a program that makes it easier to understand your data and to let the AGA manage the data for you.” Hamilton plans on using SSS to take the next step in managing his cattle. “I need to track the cows that are producing the most efficient, high dollar calves for me. Ultimately, when times are tough, and the herd needs to be culled because of drought or other conditions, I need to have the data to back up the management decisions.” Since its inception, Smart Select Service has grown to over 3,000 head with 32 members. For more information on how you can participate in Smart Select Service please visit www.gelbvieh.org or call the office at 303.465.2333.


Buckley Joins American Gelbvieh Association Staff Source: American Gelbvieh Association Broomfield, CO - The American Gelbvieh Association is pleased to announce and welcome Taylor Buckley as the new data and member services coordinator. Buckley will assist AGA members and customers with DNA testing, as well as all aspects of the AGA Online Registry Service. She will also play a role in the AGA’s member education and communications team. “I am very excited to begin my career at the AGA; my combined passion for the beef industry and background in agricultural communications falls directly in line with the association’s purpose of serving its members and customers,” says Buckley. “I look forward to meeting the members and assisting the association in every aspect that I can.” Buckley grew up in the beef industry in Franktown, Colorado. Throughout her time in high school she was actively involved in 4-H and FFA at the local and

state region. Buckley graduated from West Texas A&M University (WTAMU) in May 2018 where she received her bachelor’s degree in agricultural communications as well as a minor in animal science. During her college career, she expanded her communication skills by working at the Beef Carcass Research Center at WTAMU as office manager. Buckley also completed internships at Friona Industries and Superior Livestock Auction, which helped develop her knowledge of the industry. “We are fortunate for the opportunity to add Taylor to the AGA staff. She brings a well-suited set of talents to assist our members and commercial customers and will grow to be an integral part of the AGA’s commitment to serving the modern beef industry,” says Megan Slater, AGA director of operations and public relations. Buckley started at the American Gelbvieh Association headquarters in Broomfield, Colorado, on June 4. She can be reached at the AGA office at 303-465-2333 or via email at taylorb@gelbvieh.org.

JULY 2018 29


Your

BEEF CHECKOFF NEWS Summer is Here and so are Beef Activities! With Mark Russell, Executive Director Driving beef demand in the summer is exciting and packed with events and activities. In June alone, MBIC has participated in the World Meat Congress, Hospital Hill Fitness Expo in Kansas City, MCA All-Breeds Junior Show, Beef Jerky promotions in St. Louis, Bike Across Missouri (BAM) along Old Route 66. The rest of the summer will see beef promotions and live cattle displays at the St. Louis Science Center in July and September. Another first for MBIC will include participating in promoting nutrition information at participating McDonalds in St. Louis in July. The Missouri State Fair will be highlighting a new virtual “Pasture to Plate” tour at the Beef Showcase hosted by the Missouri Cattlewomen. Be sure and stop by when you are at the fair. American Heart Association nutrition/cooking classes will kick off this summer and HyVee stores are gearing up for an intense beef promotion in September this fall.

Illinois and Missouri Beef Councils are also teaming up for digital marketing campaigns with Pandora during the summer. The Mediterranean Diet is one of the most popular dietary patterns and was recently named as the “Best Diet Overall,” “Best Diet for Healthy Eating” and “The Easiest Diet to Follow” by U.S. News and World Report. The diet is commonly characterized by a relatively high consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts/ seeds and olive oil. According to new research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, following a Mediterranean-style eating pattern that incorporates lean, unprocessed red meat can support heart health. The study, “A Mediterranean-style eating pattern with lean unprocessed red meat has cardiometabolic benefits for adults who are overweight/obese in a randomized crossover controlled feeding trial,” showed that eating a Mediterranean-style eating pattern with up to 18 ounces of cooked, lean, unprocessed beef and pork per week, along with poultry and/or fish, can positively impact cardiometabolic disease risk factor profiles as effectively as (and in some cases, better than) lean, unprocessed poultry meat.

JULY 2018

About the study Conducted by a research team, led by Wayne Campbell, PhD, at Purdue University with a research grant from The Beef Checkoff and the National Pork Board, the study demonstrated that a Mediterranean-style eating pattern including typical U.S. intakes of red meat was just as effective as a red meat-restricted Mediterraneanstyle eating pattern in supporting heart health.

30

Courtney Dehn, Dearborn and Paisley Nelson, Platte City garnered the champion award in the burger cookoff, during the MCA All-Breeds Junior Show, sponsored by the Missouri beef checkoff.

Forty-one overweight or obese adults enrolled in a 16-week randomized, controlled crossover study, where study participants were assigned to consume a


429,286 metric tons (946 million pounds) in volume for Jan.-April 2018 - 10% higher than last year 111,213 metric tons (245 million pounds) in volume for April 2018 - 11% higher than last April. Exports accounted for 14.1% of total U.S. beef production in April, 13.4% year-to-date Export value of $328.46 per head of fed slaughter in April, $318.91 yearto-date - Up 16% from April 2017 and 17% year-to-date. Sam Tummons, Rocheport and Ethan Vanderwert, Columbia received the reserve champion award in the burger competition at the MCA All-Breeds Junior Show in June.

Mediterranean-style eating pattern with varying amounts of lean, unprocessed red meat to determine the impact of lean, unprocessed red meat intake on heart disease risk factor profiles. What were the results? The research team demonstrated that participants, who ate a healthy Mediterranean-style eating pattern with 18 oz of cooked, lean, unprocessed red meat per week, had decreases in total and LDL cholesterol, and blood pressure - indicating that the inclusion of lean red meat can positively impact cardiovascular disease risk factor profiles. This new research adds to the growing body of scientific evidence demonstrating that a healthy diet that includes lean, unprocessed red meat alongside poultry and/or fish can offer the same cardiovascular health-promoting properties as a red meat-restricted one, and that lean beef can be enjoyed as part of a healthy Mediterranean dietary pattern to support a healthy heart.

JULY 2018

U.S. Beef Exports Update through April 2018 $2.59 billion in value for JanuaryApril 2018 - 20% higher than last year’s record pace $676.7 million in value for April 2018 - 23% higher than last April and the fourthhighest on record.

31


COUNTY NEWS

See What’s Happening in Your County

Cedar County The Cedar County Cattlemen’s Association hosted “meet the scholarship recipients” night in conjunction with their June membership meeting on Thursday, June 7, 2018, at the Land O’Lakes Youth Fairgrounds in El Dorado Springs. The meal consisting of brisket, green beans, baked beans, and cheesy potatoes was provided by the board. Desserts were provided by the members. After dinner, business was conducted and the floor was turned over to the special guests for the evening, the 2018 scholarship recipients. Each student shared highlights from their high school career, their involvement in agriculture and their future plans. Recipients from Stockton were Cindi Prothro, Bo Walker and Tyler Mann and from El Dorado Springs, Amy Ford, Wyatt Graves, and Madison Whitaker. Cheston Stacy, one of the 2017 scholarship recipients, was put on the spot to share his experiences as a Crowder College Aggie and his future plans.

Cheston Stacy talks about his most recent trip to Costa Rica where he learned about their agriculture practices.

Jordan Richner, Tom Bryant and Jeff Stacy (left to right) are greetin’ and grillin’ at the Humansville Livestock Auction customer appreciation day.

Scholarship Recipients (left to right): Cheston Stacy, Cindi Prothro, Bo Walker, Tyler Mann, Madison Whitaker and Wyatt Graves. Not pictured: Amy Ford.

WINDSOR LIVESTOCK AUCTION JULY 2018

“FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1983”

32

Sales Every Wednesday @ Noon Jake Drenon 660-441-7716

Blake Drenon Rodney Drenon 660-351-4887 660-890-4898

On June 5, Tom Bryant, Jordan Richner, and Jeff Stacy grilled for the Humansville Livestock Market (United Producers Inc.) customer appreciation day. They served over 100 people throughout the lunch hour. Jeff Stacy was selected to represent the Cedar Co. Cattlemen’s Association on the Cedar Co. Extension Council. The addition of this position was due to a recent change to the council’s bylaws. Cedar County is slated for five volunteers to work the Missouri State Fair Beef House on Saturday, August 18, from 10 a.m.- 2:30 p.m. If you are interested in working, please contact a board member. The next membership meeting is Thursday, August 2, 2018, at 7 p.m. in Stockton.


Saline County The Saline County Cattlemen scholarship committee has announced this current year’s recipients of their annual scholarship awards. The cattlemen have made a tradition of supporting Saline County, Missouri youth for over 25 years with these awards.

Rachael Bagnell, daughter of Tonya and Bob Bagnell, will be attending the University of Missouri. She currently attends Slater High School.

$1,000 Scholarship Recipients:

Jonathan Sprigg, son of Rhonda and John Sprigg, will be attending the University of Missouri. He currently attends Marshall High School.

Katelin Looney, daughter of Laurie and Jeremy Eckhoff, will be attending Northwestern College in Iowa. She currently attends Sweet Springs High School.

Additionally, the Saline County Cattlemen are giving scholarship awards in the amount of $250 to the following recipients:

Taylor Petzoldt, daughter of Judy and Mark Petzoldt, will be attending the University of Missouri. She currently attends Marshall High School.

Olivia Hager, daughter of Cheryl and Scott Hager, will be attending Eckerd College. She currently attends Sweet Springs High School.

Evan Weaver, son of Stacy and John Weaver, will be attending Williams Baptist University. He currently attends Marshall High School.

Logan Reid, son of Darla and Bill Reid, will be attending State Fair Community College. He currently attends Sweet Springs High School.

Hannah Viets, daughter of Brenda and Mike Viets, will be attending Northwest Missouri State University. She currently attends Sweet Springs High School.

Bailey Welch, daughter of Sarah and Jason Welch, will be attending State Fair Community College. She currently attends Sweet Springs High School.

JULY 2018 33


Newton-McDonald County The Newton McDonald County Cattlemen met on May 15 at Crowder College. The evening kicked off with a wonderful taco bar prepared by the Crowder Aggie students and sponsored by the evening presenters, FCS Financial. As well, the ice cream team provided a variety of fabulous homemade flavors. Before the meal, Connie Rogers led the blessing. Following dinner, President Ruhl passed around a card and information regarding the passing of long-time member and friend, Ronnie Gunlock. Members signed the card and a donation to the building fund at Ronnie’s church is being forwarded. Ronnie will be missed by all and the membership sends its good wishes to Doratha. President Ruhl then introduced the evening’s program, presented by Tom Vehige, vice president of Commercial Livestock, along with Beth Luebbring with Farm Loans and from the Joplin office, Hailey Rook, who coordinates traditional loans and crop insurance for FCS Financial. Tom outlined the importance of keeping a strong and careful record of income and expenses, along with all tax information in order to be able to make the most of financing opportunities. He urged members to form a strong relationship with their banker and to develop an accurate business plan based on all of this information. He encouraged interested members to email him to get a good format for the balance sheet. Tom is a long-time Gelbvieh producer who has shown seedstock cattle widely across the nation and understands the business very well.

JULY 2018

Beth and Hailey outlined their respective areas of responsibility and the challenges their customers generally face, encouraging members to contact them with any needs or questions. The email address to touch base with Vehige is tom.vehige@myfcsfinancial. com. This meeting’s information served as a good introduction to the next regular meeting’s topic which will feature a statewide expert from the University of Missouri Extension office in Bolivar, Wes Tucker, on understanding the true cost of farm and ranch production.

34

Following submission and approval of the financial statement (forwarded from Gary Emmert who was ill), showing $1,168.60 on hand and approval of minutes presented by secretary, Warren Townsend, reports were provided. First, was Jorge Zapata, the new director of the agriculture division at Crowder. Jorge thanked members who volunteered to help with Aggie Days for helping make this annual event, bringing thousands to the campus, an amazing success and a really smooth day, operationally. He went on to thank members for their support of the 5th Annual Cattlemen’s Calf Sale

at the Joplin Regional Stockyards, which raised over $15,000. He presented a student signed/framed poster of the event to Dr. Dale Kunkel of Kunkel Farms for the outstanding registered Red Angus heifer donated for the event. Dr. Kunkel stated beautifully how lucky we all are to be part of a great industry and to give back from what God has richly blessed us to have and do. He thanked all members for their support of this worthwhile effort which has to-date raised over $60,000 over the past five years, with all proceeds going to support Crowder Aggie travel for contests and extensive national and international fieldtrips. Dr. Ronnie Rogers concluded the discussion, thanking everyone for their continued support. Nick Neese joined President Ruhl to remark on the value the felt they and the Association got from their recent participation in Cowboys at the Capitol. Estella Osborne concluded reports, bringing the membership up-to-date on the directory update currently underway and on progress with the website. Max rounded out the reports noting the association purchase of advertisements in both the Newton and McDonald County fair books. He outlined tentative plans for a possible October 6 fieldtrip to Harry Brown’s farm near Neosho. Ruhl concluded noting planned attendance at the Cattlemen’s Steak Fry, set for June 9 in Sedalia and reminded all that the September meeting (following summer break) will feature the 2nd Annual Chili Cookoff. With no further business, the meeting was adjourned.

Jorge Zapata presenting Dr. Dale Kunkel the framed poster from the calf sale.


Missouri Angus Breeders The #1 State For Angus!

Performance Tested Bulls

The Pipkin Family

9770 W. State Hwy 266 • Springfield, MO 65802 j_pipkin@sbcglobal.net • clearwaterangus.com Jim (cell) 417-827-0623 • Joann (cell) 417-827-2756 WD & Bonita Bulls • Replacement Females for Sale

Steve Miller and Family 21146 400th Street Graham, MO 64455 (660) 582-1334 E-mail: bigmilr@grm.net

Kenny & Janyce Hinkle 14103 E. Summers Rd. • Nevada, MO 64773 Ph/Fax: 417-944-2219 • Cell: 417-448-4127 E-mail: hpca@centurytel.net

WEIKER

GERLOFF FARMS Connealy Power Surge

Angus Ranch

AHIR Bulls Semen Available Females

660-248-3640

Fred Weiker • Julia Weiker

3154 Hwy A Bland, MO 65014 573-437-3751/2507 Charlie Cell: 573-680-9117 Kim Cell: 573-291-1091 khuebler@fidnet.com www.gerloffcattle.com

Fred: 660-248-3765

Dedicated to the Livestock Industry Since 1906

1339 Hwy 124, • Fayette, MO 65248 “Where the Extraordinary are Availible” 65th Anniversary Sale • November 10th

For All Your Angus Needs!

22227 Saline 127 Hwy • Malta Bend, Mo 65359 Brian Marshall • (660) 641-4522 www.marshallandfennerfarms.com

Since 1942

21658 Quarry Lane • Barnett, MO 65011 Office: 573-302-7011 • Fax: 573-348-8325 E-mail: meadangus@yahoo.com Website: www.meadfarms.com

Alan Mead, Owner 573-216-0210

35004 E. McQuerry Rd • Oak Grove, MO 64075 www.valleyoaksangus.com The Ward Family David Ward– 816-229-8115 Tony Ward – 816-365-5930 tony@valleyoaksangus.com Kyle Lynn – 573-721-6382 – Herdsman kyle@valleyoaksangus.com

36327 Monarch Trail • Guilford, MO 64457 • (660) 652-3670 MACIL LAUGHLIN FAMILY Our program is designed to control genetic improvement - not risk it. AHIR Records since 1969 In the Angus Business since 1959 Breeding Cattle with the Progressive Commercial Cattleman in Mind.

734-260-8635

E-mail: Julie@missouriangus.org

missouriangus.org

Dave Gust, Sr. Dave Gust, Jr. Nick Hammett, Commercial Mktg. Mike Lembke Kevin Lennon

334 Seth St. - Lincoln, MO 65338 www.RichardsonRanch.net adrrmd@mail.missouri.edu

Registered Angus Bulls & Females Available

Pete 660-281-0353

Ashlyn 660-281-1720

AHIR and ultrasound information available on all bulls. Herd sires are selected based on a combination of traits and not on any single trait.

John A Jones • 573-680-5151

21320 Hwy 179 • Jamestown, MO 65046 Lifetime Member of the American Angus Association Since 1957

JULY 2018

Julie Conover, Gen. Manager 634 S.W. 1201 Rd • Holden, MO 64040

CIRCLE A RANCH

41 Hwy K Iberia, MO 65486 1-800-CIRCLE-A

JJ Skyline Angus

For your ANGUS Cattle Needs Contact:

MISSOURI ANGUS ASSOCIATION

35


Southeast Missouri Cattlemen’s Association The SEMO Cattlemen’s Association hosted its 23rd annual Farm Day event at Flickerwood Arena, courtesy of the Boardman Family. Around 820 third grade students from sixteen schools across three counties, as well as over 200 teachers, parents, and volunteers came together to put on this one-day educational event. Students learned about where their food and fiber for daily living comes from and how it is produced on local farms. Students visited ten stations: beef, corn, dairy, soybean, pork, bees, poultry, forestry, soil and water, and agriculture tourism. Stations discussing animal agriculture included live animals for the students to view and the opportunity to pet some species. The stations were an interactive presentation for students, teachers, and parents to learn about the different aspects of agriculture and how they fit together to provide food and other products that are used in our everyday life. The increasing age of the average farmer is an indicator that younger generations are becoming more and more removed from agriculture, making this event even more important. Thanks to all who help put on an amazing event!

JULY 2018

Students recited the Pledge of Allegiance before activities began. The Jackson FFA department displayed the flag.

36

Students visited 10 stations to learn about agriculture.

Lydia Hunt, MJCA member, taught students about cattle digestion and diets.

A Jersey from Kirchdoerfer’s Dairy and Holstein from Shoen’s Dairy were on display for students to pet and brush.


Lafayette County The Lafayette County Cattlemen’s Association has selected their 2018 Scholarship Recipients. The Association Scholarships in the amount of $1,250 were awarded to the following: Valerie Barnett, daughter of James and Karla Barnett, Wellington, Missouri; is the recipient of the Bob Sanders Memorial Scholarship in the amount of $1,250. Valerie is a 2018 graduate of Wellington-Napoleon RIV. Valerie plans to attend Northwest Missouri State University and major in elementary education.

August Bertz, son of Harold and Melisa Bertz, Mayview, Missouri is a 2018 graduate of Lafayette County C-1 in Higginsville. August plans to attend Frank Phillips College in Borger, Texas on a Livestock Judging Scholarship. He plans to major in animal science.

Austin Freund, son of Paul and Joyce Freund, Concordia, Missouri is a 2018 graduate of St. Paul Lutheran High School in Concordia. Austin plans to attend State Fair Community College and major in agribusiness.

Katelyn Geary, daughter of Roger and Kristen Geary, Odessa, Missouri, is a 2018 graduate of Odessa High School. Katelyn plans to attend Truman State University.

JULY 2018 37


Polk County The June meeting of the Polk County Cattlemen was held at the Rocking R Auction Building south of Bolivar and was sponsored by owners of the building, Allen and Lucas Roberts. The owners plan to make the Rocking R Building more than an auction building. Allen Roberts purchased the building with a vision in mind that this may be an event center for many public events as well as private parties. He is now remodeling the building and expects the capacity will be approximately 250 when he is finished. This type of building is needed in our area. Our speaker of the evening was Terry Halleran, who is an employee of the MU Extension office. He spoke about soil health and grazing. I think all present were convinced he knows a lot about soil health. One member told me he was so impressed that he went home and told his wife, “We received a full college semester of soil knowledge in an hour’s time.” He certainly was informative. He said loam soil is the best soil for growing farm crops. He said loam has the right amount of sand, silt and clay for air and water to move through it, which is most advantageous for good growth. He shared the example that if the soil is so hard and compacted it is very difficult to drive a fence post into it, how can we expect plant roots to make enrodes through it? We were pleased to have our new supply trailer available for all members to view. We thank McCurry Trailer Company for helping us acquire this trailer. They were very instrumental in us being able to afford it. Our old supply trailer had been inadequate for our needs for a long time. The convenience of the bigger trailer should reduce our efforts at our cookings.

Our association is gearing up to cook at the Polk County Youth Livestock Show June 16, the Celebration of Freedom July 4, the Ozark Empire Fair during the last week of July, and then the State Fair in August, and we may have other events that are not scheduled yet. Our July meeting will be at Smith’s Restaurant. It will be sponsored by Oak Star Bank. We plan to have a blood drive at this meeting. The mobile blood drive vehicle will be on scene by 3:30 p.m. and will be receiving donors until 7 p.m. Remember, the summer months are when more accidents happen, therefore causing a greater need for a larger supply of blood. Please, do come and give blood to possibly save a life. Just think how much importance we would place on the availability of blood if we, or a family member, were in dire need of blood.

A picture of members listening to Terry Halleran.

WHEELER & SONS LIVESTOCK AUCTION

417-646-8102 Hwy. 13 & TT, Osceola, MO 64776

Board member, Len Sievers, eats with a small grandchild-, who will hopefully be a future cattlemen’s member.

Special Stock Cow Sale Saturday • July 28 • 6:00 p.m. Live Broadcast via Cattle USA

JULY 2018

Cattle Sale Every Thursday - 1:00 p.m. (No Sale July 5th) Happy 4th of July!!

38

www.wheelerlivestock.com Burleigh and Doris Wheeler • 417-840-6561 Byron Wheeler 417-777-0897 • Steve Wheeler 417-840-4149

Members Monty and Mary Wheeler visiting with member Howard Hardecke while waiting in the food line.


MBCSept2014c.qxp_Layout 1 4/22/15 3:48 PM Page 62

Boone County Beef Month marked the annual Farm Tour for third and fourth graders at Buckman Farms in Hallsville, Missouri. Greg Buckman and the Boone County Cattlemen began the event nine years ago to educate school children about beef production. More than 250 attended the May 7, 2018, event. Participants learned from experts about animal health, nutrition, veterinary care, and equipment before they enjoyed a grilled hamburger. Supporters of the 2018 event included: Buckman Farms, Apex Financial, Boone County Cattlemen, MFA Incorporated, University of Missouri School of Veterinary Medicine, Missouri Beef Industry Council, and Stanton Brothers Farm. Since its inception, there have been more than 2,000 children, teachers, and chaperons attend the Farm Tour.

10' Feed Bunk Featuring our THREE TON PORTABLE FEED BIN

Dealer Inquiries Welcome www.greenswelding.com

Made from all 14 gauge steel 22" high and 8" deep

Green’s Welding and Sales 1464 S.E. County Road 15305 Appleton City, MO 64724

(660) 476-5598 Fax: (660) 476-2801

JULY 2018

• Ground Opening Lid • Sight Glass • Pin Hitch • Spout just right for a five gallon bucket

39


Henry County This was another busy month. We had our monthly dinner/meeting at the Rotary Club. Our sponsor and speaker was Galen Dody of Dody Legacy Group. He gave a very informative program on ways to preserve family farms. To celebrate “Beef Month,� we grilled steaks and all the trimmings and took them to the local media: Clinton Daily Democrat and KDKD radio station. We enjoyed the activity as much as the employees did. This was to thank the paper and radio station for all the coverage they give our various activities.

Helping the grillers were Joyce Trolinger and Wanda Batschelett, seated. In back are Jacey Jones, Bailey Jones, and Janet Akers. Not shown are Marylin Lesmeister and Brooklyn Trolinger.

We are pleased to welcome new members this month: Dave and Angie Dittmer and Waylon and Sarah Jones. We did our annual cookout the Friday before Memorial Day. This is one of our main fundraisers for our scholarship fund.

Sponsor Galen Dody and wife Julie.

Randy Howell visits with sponsor Galen Dody and our candidate for state representative, Roger Reedy.

New members David and Angie Dittmer.

JULY 2018

Memorial Day grillers: Anthony Lesmeister, Taylor Bush, Roy Batschelett, Ron Hoffman, Tony Trolinger and Bob Trolinger.

40

New member Sarah Jones and daughter Jacey.


Johnson County On June 5, the Johnson County Cattlemen had the honor of grilling for those who serve in the law enforcement community during Law Enforcement Appreciation Day. Approximately 65 law enforcement personnel from the area enjoyed ribeye steak sandwiches, baked beans, potato salad, and dessert. Valley Oaks Steak Company supplied the meat, with Millers BBQ suppling the beans and potato salad. Dessert was homemade by the women of the Cattlemen’s Association. In attendance, also showing their support and appreciation were State Senator Denny Hoskins, District 21, Representative Dan Houx, District 54, Representative Dean Dohrman, District 51, and Representative Glen Kolkmeyer, District 53. MBCSept2014c.qxp_Layout 1 Law enforcement personnel put their lives on the line daily so we can live in safety. With that being said, let me encourage each of you, if the opportunity arises, to tell our men and women in law enforcement thank you for all they do.

9/24/14 9:59 AM Page 62

Editorial Note:

Please send County News items via email to: mobeef@sbcglobal.net Deadline for the August issue is July 15th.

Buffalo Livestock Market 1 mile west on Hwy 32 • Buffalo, MO 65622 Barn: 417-345-8122

Sale Every Saturday 12:00 Noon • Selling 1200 to 1700 head Farm Fresh Cattle weekly • Special Stock Cow and Bull Sale 3rd Tuesday night of each month at 6:30 p.m. • Pre-Vac Feeder Calf Sales 2nd Saturday of every month in conjunction with Regular Sale (Pfizer Pre-Vac, BLM Pre-Vac, Bayer Program, Mo Quality Assurance. LMA-Vac and MFA Health Track) JULY 2018

Order Buying Service Available

Owners… Lyle Caselman Leon Caselman Howard Miller 417-345-7876 H 417-345-4514 H 417-345-8612 H 417-533-2944 cell 417-588-6185 cell

41


On the Edge of

Common Sense with Baxter Black A Close Call Talk about takin’ a beating. I stood on the porch at Dale’s horse farm and soaked up the view. It was deep springtime in west Tennessee. The grass was so green it hurt your eyes. The dogwoods were in bloom and two sleek and shiny horses grazed in the picture. It looked like a cover off the Quarter Horse Journal. “Nice fence,” I said, commenting on the pole fence circling his pasture.

“Thanks,” said Dale, “But we had a heckuva scare buildin’ it. See that post...” I noted a stout post at the end of the driveway. The harrowing tale unfolded. Dale had decided to build this fence and finally got around to it in December. He enlisted the aid of two friends, Chuck and Phil. They all dressed warmly since it was twenty degrees the day they started. At the particular post in question, the boys were havin’ trouble diggin’ the hole. It was close to the paved road and the ground was hard.

Custom Cattle Feeding • 12,000 Head Capacity Family owned & operated since 1917

Steve Sellers 620-257-2611

Kevin Dwyer 620-680-0404

Your One-Stop for Braunvieh Influence and Black Hybrid Commercial Females

JULY 2018

Call us to see some of the best calf raisers in the business.

42

Grouping and Marketing customers’ calves since 1992!

Dale backed his tractor up to the future hole and poised the posthole auger over the designated spot like an ovipositing wasp. The auger spun on the surface of the frozen ground. Chuck, who’s big as a skinned mule, pulled down on the gearbox. No luck, Chuck. So

Ron McBee 221 State Hwy H Fayette, MO 65248 (573) 228-2517 E-mail: mcbcattle@aol.com Website: McBeeCattleCompany.com

McBee Cattle Company Fall Braunvieh Sale • October 27 • Fayette, Missouri


Phil stepped between the auger and the tractor and leaned his weight on the horizontal arm supporting the auger. Now, Phil had come prepared to work in the cold. He had on his hat with Elmer Fudd earflaps, mudboots, socks, undies, long johns, jeans, undershirt, wool shirt and Carharts. Carharts, for you tropical cowboys, are insulated coveralls made out of canvas and tough as a nylon tutu. Phil gave Dale the go-ahead. Dale engaged the PTO. The auger clanked and started to turn. Suddenly Phil seemed to explode in front of Dale’s eyes! Dale engaged the clutch immediately and everything stopped. Phil stood before them naked. I said naked. Not quite. He had on his hat and his boots and his belt, still through the beltloops. The jeans had been ripped off his body from the pockets down, leaving only a small piece containing the fly. It flapped like Geronimo’s loincloth. As explanation, Phil’s pantleg had brushed up against the extended arm of the PTO. In a split second, as fast as Superman could skin a grapefruit, the PTO had torn all the clothes off Phil’s body. In less than three minutes his body turned blue. Nothing was broken but he was as bruised as the top avocado at the supermarket. Chuck commented later that he looked like he’s been run through a hay conditioner. I figger he was the blazing example of that expression, “...he looked like he’d been drug through a knothole.”

Callaway Livestock Center, Inc. On I-70, 4 miles east of Kingdom City, MO on outer road 573-642-7486 Every Monday: Slaughter Cattle Sale 10:00 a.m. Selling All Classes of Cattle 12:30 p.m.

1st Thursday Nite of Each Month: 6:00 p.m. Bred Cows and Breeding Bull Sale John P. Harrison

573-386-5150

Jack Harrison

David Bell

573-386-2138

660-327-5633

JULY 2018

David Means

573-642-9753

43


The Growing Requirements Source: CAB On Target, Justin Sexten, Ph.D. Beef cattle genetic power keeps moving up. Just look at the trend for pre- and post-weaning growth potential across breeds. Look at the continued improvement in quality grade across the industry. Some say that growth increase has come at the detriment of the cow herd, increasing feed and forage requirements beyond what the ranch can maintain. But steer carcass weights peaked at 930 lb. in fall 2015, not maintaining their historic 5-lb. annual increase as predicted. While carcass weights vary seasonally, they have declined annually since 2015 and trend lower in 2018. No, this isn’t just a review of carcass weights, but the trend change serves as an example of the role management can play in the ability to achieve genetic potential. Carcass weights are on their third year of decline, but genetic potential for carcass weight has continued to increase; the difference is management. Cattle feeders can quickly change carcass weight by choosing to market cattle at lighter weights. Meanwhile, improvements in genetic potential for marbling let them do that while increasing or at least holding quality grade steady. New research highlights the role management plays in allowing genetic potential to be expressed. Emma Neidermayer and co-workers from Iowa State University evaluated the influence implants and trace mineral recommendations have on finishing performance. While their work focused on the finishing phase, the data pose interesting questions for the entire industry in view of gains in genetic potential.

Marketing Cattle Weekly for Cattlemen

JULY 2018

“Across Missouri”

44

“Sales each TUESDAY” “Sales each FRIDAY” O:660-882-7413 O:573-324-2295 www.movalleylivestock.com www.emcclivestock.com Justin Angell Mike VanMaanen Jon Angell 573-819-8000 573-881-0402 573-682-4656

For those who doubt what growth-promoting implants can do to reduce resources needed to produce beef, Neidermayer’s data showed a 10.5% increase in carcass weight while improving feed efficiency 23%, with no detrimental effect on quality grade. While these results exceed previous reports, the authors suggest that may be attributed to improved genetic potential further enhanced by technologies. Better genetics and technology led the Iowa State group to evaluate trace mineral level during the finishing period as well. Historically, mineral recommendations were set to prevent animals from displaying deficiency symptoms without regard for improved performance. This study went beyond that, looking at trace mineral levels where calves were not supplemented, or only at required levels, or at consultant-recommended levels (1.5 to 3 times the minimum requirement, depending on the mineral). Carcass weights were improved 3% with no change in feed efficiency or carcass quality grade by adding trace minerals at levels recommended by industry consultants compared to those fed at merely the required level or unsupplemented. These data suggest trace mineral supplementation may need to be modified to suit the “growing demand” for nutrients by calves with greater genetic potential. As you visit with your nutritionist this summer, discuss your cow herd’s genetics. When purchasing mineral supplements or developing a creep feed, consider the increased growth potential you have built your herd around and ensure you’re providing adequate nutrients to capture genetic potential. Deciding whether to creep feed calves is a ranch-level example related to the carcass weight discussion and the Iowa State experiments. Creep feeding is a management tool that can add nutrition to let a calf express its full pre-weaning genetic potential. Milk and abundant forage may be all that’s needed to meet the calf’s minimum requirements, but genetic growth potential may be left unmet due to inadequate nutrition. That growth potential may not be lost, just transferred to the next owner—and similar to the carcass weight decline, the lighter weight calves may be just as profitable. Since genetic potential, nutrient resources and market value differ across operations, you should consider management strategies that optimize all three, rather than seeking to maximize only one.


JULY 2018

45


Strong April for U.S. Red Meat Exports, Including New Volume Record for Pork Source: USMEF April exports of U.S. pork, beef and lamb were sharply higher than a year ago in both volume and value, according to data released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF). Pork exports set a new volume record, fueled by tremendous demand in Mexico, while beef exports posted the bestever results for the month of April. April pork export volume was 230,049 metric tons (mt), up 13 percent from a year ago and topping the previous high set in November 2016. April export value was $584.1 million, also up 13 percent. For January through April, pork export volume was 4 percent ahead of last year’s record pace at 866,346 mt, while value increased 9 percent to $2.29 billion. (For pork muscle cuts, excluding variety meat, April was also a record volume month at 184,487 mt, up 18 percent from a year ago. Muscle cut export value was $480.6 million, up 14 percent.)

JULY 2018

Exports accounted for nearly 30 percent of total pork production in April, up from 28.4 percent a year ago, while the percentage of muscle cuts exported also increased significantly (25.8 percent, up from

46

23.5 percent). Through April, the percentage of total production exported was fairly steady with last year at 27.4 percent, while muscle cuts jumped from 22.8 percent to 23.5 percent. April pork export value averaged $58.45 per head slaughtered, up 6 percent from a year ago, while the January-April average increased 5 percent to $55.69. Beef export volume was 111,213 mt in April, up 11 percent year-over-year. Export value was $676.7 million, up 23 percent and the fourth-highest on record. Through the first four months of 2018, exports were up 10 percent in volume to 429,286 mt. Export value was $2.59 billion, 20 percent above last year’s record pace. Exports accounted for 14.1 percent of total beef production in April, up from 13.6 percent a year ago. For muscle cuts only, the percentage exported was 11.3 percent, up from 10.6 percent. For January through April, exports accounted for 13.4 percent of total production and 10.8 percent for muscle cuts, each up about half a percentage point from last year. Beef export value averaged $328.46 per head of fed (Continued on page 48)


JULY 2018

47


slaughter in April, up 16 percent from a year ago. Through April, per-head export value averaged $318.91, up 17 percent. Even with growth in red meat production, both pork and beef exports have accounted for a larger share and contributed more dollars per head, indicating strong international demand. Huge month for pork to Mexico; Exports to Korea continued to surge Mexico was again the pacesetter for pork exports in April, with volume reaching 79,019 mt – up 34 percent from a year ago and the second-largest on record. Export value to Mexico was $134.1 million, up 28 percent. Through the first four months of 2018, exports to Mexico were 7 percent above last year’s record volume pace at 282,675 mt, with value up 6 percent to $505.4 million. Maintaining this pace will be challenging, however, with Mexico announcing retaliatory tariffs on imports of most U.S. pork products effective June 5. The tariff rate on chilled and frozen pork muscle cuts is 10 percent until July 5, when it is set to increase to 20 percent.

JULY 2018

“The outstanding April performance for pork exports to Mexico really underscores the importance of this

48

market to the U.S. industry and how it has been such a reliable trading partner for hams, picnics and other pork cuts,” said USMEF President and CEO Dan Halstrom. “USMEF will continue to emphasize the quality and consistency of U.S. pork to red meat customers in Mexico and make every effort to help U.S. suppliers retain their business. But make no mistake about it, the U.S. industry is going to have to fend off competitors who suddenly have a significant tariff rate advantage and see a clear opening into the Mexican market.” Pork exports to South Korea continued to build momentum in April, with volume (25,370 mt, up 74 percent) and value ($74.1 million, up 81 percent) increasing significantly from a year ago. Through April, exports to Korea are on a record pace, climbing 44 percent in volume to 94,888 mt, valued at $276.1 million (up 55 percent). Strong growth in consumer demand and duty-free access under the Korea-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (KORUS) have fueled a rapidly expanding presence for U.S. pork in Korea. While pork exports to the China/Hong Kong region were below year-ago levels in April, shipments remained relatively strong despite the additional 25 percent tariff on U.S. pork that took effect April 2. It is likely, however, that the trade impact will show up more dramatically in May export data and in coming months. The tariff


increase essentially tripled China’s standard rate on frozen pork imports, taking it from 12 percent to 37 percent (the increase does not apply to Hong Kong, which still charges zero duty). April exports to China/ Hong Kong were 41,567 mt, down 14 percent from a year ago, but slipped only slightly in value to $95.9 million. For January through April, exports to China/ Hong Kong were 15 percent below last year’s pace in volume (153,248 mt) but steady in value at $356.6 million. “It is encouraging to see that pork volumes to China/ Hong Kong held up fairly well in April, but the tariff disadvantage is still having a negative impact on the U.S. industry and has pressured prices for key export items,” Halstrom noted. “It’s another situation in which our competitors are capitalizing on the extra cost associated with importing U.S. pork.” Asian markets and Mexico highlight strong April for beef exports Japan maintained its position as the leading volume and value market for U.S. beef, with April exports totaling 25,650 mt (up 9 percent from a year ago) valued at $166.6 million (up 16 percent). Through April, exports to Japan were steady with last year’s volume at 98,090 mt while value increased 10 percent to $626.1 million. This included a 4 percent increase in chilled beef to 47,322 mt, valued at $375 million (up 17 percent). Frozen shipments have regained momentum now that the 50 percent safeguard duty rate has expired. But with a 38.5 percent rate in place for both chilled and frozen beef, the U.S. remains at a large disadvantage compared to its top competitor, Australia. U.S. beef continues to build tremendous momentum in South Korea, where April exports were up 62 percent from a year ago in volume (19,185 mt) and 72 percent in value ($134.8 million). For January through April, exports to Korea climbed 31 percent to 71,094 mt, valued at $501 million (up 45 percent). Chilled exports totaled 15,480 mt (up 29 percent) valued at $148 million (up 40 percent). In contrast to Japan, U.S. beef has a slight tariff advantage versus Australia, as KORUS was implemented earlier than the Korea-Australia Free Trade Agreement.

(Continued on page 50)

JULY 2018

“The enthusiasm for U.S. beef in these markets may be at the highest level I’ve ever seen,” Halstrom said. “In nearly every segment of the retail and restaurant sectors, U.S. beef is attracting new customers with a wider range of cuts and menu items. It’s an exciting trend that’s not just limited to Japan and Korea, with U.S. beef’s popularity also strengthening in other Asian markets and in the Western Hemisphere.”

49


For January through April, other highlights for U.S. beef include: In Mexico, exports were 5 percent ahead of last year’s pace in volume (78,435 mt) and 16 percent higher in value ($342.4 million). Demand was especially strong in April, as exports totaled 21,396 mt (up 22 percent and the largest since August), while value increased 33 percent to $92.1 million. Exports to China/Hong Kong increased 23 percent in volume (46,043 mt) and surged 51 percent in value to $352.4 million. China still accounts for a small portion of these exports, as shipments to China were 2,299 mt valued at $21.3 million. China reopened to U.S. beef in June of last year. While U.S. beef is not yet subject to retaliatory duties in China, it remains on the proposed retaliation list with a possible additional tariff of 25 percent. Taiwan continues to display a growing appetite for U.S. beef, especially for chilled cuts. Exports to Taiwan were 30 percent above last year’s pace in volume (17,500 mt) and 42 percent higher in value ($168.7 million). Chilled exports were up 43 percent in volume (7,605 mt) and value ($96 million), as U.S. beef captured 74 percent of Taiwan’s chilled beef market. Steady growth in the Philippines and a tripling of exports to Indonesia pushed exports to the ASEAN region 35 percent above last year’s pace in volume (14,865 mt) and 37 percent higher in value ($82 million). Exports to South America were up 14 percent in volume (8,971 mt) and 28 percent in value ($43.5 million), with the main destinations being Chile, Peru and Colombia. Leading market Chile was up 20 percent in volume (4,137 mt) and 14 percent in value ($22.5 million), though shipments slowed in March and April following a strong start to the year. Complete April export results for U.S. beef, pork and lamb are available from USMEF’s statistics web page. Monthly charts for U.S. pork and beef exports are also available online. If you have questions, please contact Joe Schuele at jschuele@usmef.org or call 303-226-7309.

Brookover Cattle Co. of Scott City, LLC Ranger Feeders Location 620-397-5600 Shelby G. Jones, Mgr. fax: 620-397-2451 email: shelby@st-tel.net 144 S. Ogallalah Rd. • Dighton, KS 67839


United States Cattle on Feed Up 5 Percent Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 11.6 million head on May 1, 2018. The inventory was 5 percent above May 1, 2017. This is the second highest May 1 inventory since the series began in 1996. Placements in feedlots during April totaled 1.70 million head, 8 percent below 2017. Net placements were 1.63 million head. During April, placements of cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds were 320,000 head, 600-699 pounds were 230,000 head, 700-799 pounds were 415,000 head, 800-899 pounds were 445,000 head, 900-999 pounds were 205,000 head, and 1,000 pounds and greater were 80,000 head. Marketings of fed cattle during April totaled 1.80 million head, 6 percent above 2017. Other disappearance totaled 63,000 head during April, 5 percent below 2017.

JULY 2018 51


52

JULY 2018


JULY 2018

53


54

JULY 2018


JULY 2018

55


56

JULY 2018


JULY 2018

57


Straight

Talk

with Mike Deering The Monkey When we first started this journey together over five years ago, we initiated a strategic planning taskforce to set goals, priorities and chart the course for the organization. The message was clear: Get the monkey off our backs. The monkey in this case was liability. In a sue-happy culture, we sought to reduce liability and minimize legal risks for cattlemen. Year after year, we have delivered. Little by little, we have successfully led efforts to take the monkey off your back. In 2014, we joined with every single major agricultural organization in the state to successfully push the Farming Rights Amendment (Right to Farm) through the General Assembly and then before Missouri voters. Once voters approved the constitutional amendment, we had to once again defend it before the Missouri Supreme Court. The amendment guarantees your right to farm and ranch in this state and enshrines that right in the Missouri Constitution. In 2015, we alone led legislation expanding the existing equine liability waiver to include livestock. The revised law adds protection for farm and ranch families, livestock shows, livestock markets and more. This law deters lawsuits and also gives property owners, who post the signs in accordance with the law, a strong legal standing should they find themselves in a legal battle. It’s another tool in the toolbox.

JULY 2018

In tort law, strict liability is the imposition of liability on a party without a finding of fault. For beef cattle farmers and ranchers, this means if livestock escape their confines and cause property damage of any kind the livestock owner

58

5

Cattle Co. Red Angus

Registered/Commercial Bulls Available

Forage Developed + Balanced Genetics + Stayability = Satisfaction

J.Micah Bristow www.circle5cattle.com 573-208-8125

Executive Vice President is strictly liable. Essentially, the cattleman is guilty with no opportunity to prove otherwise. That’s no longer the case. In 2016, we led the charge changing the law from strict liability to negligent liability, where negligence must be proven rather than automatically placing guilt on the livestock owner. Most recently, we supported the Business Premises Safety Act, which is awaiting Governor Parson’s signature. Again, this legislation is all about reducing liability. It modifies provisions regarding the liability of property owners when criminal conduct occurs on the property. If someone trespasses on your farm and manages to get themselves hurt, you should not be held responsible for someone who is unlawfully on your property. It is absolutely insane to believe that some clown, regardless of their state of mind, who is committing a crime on your property could hold you responsible if they were injured. This legislation fixes that. The staff at MCA say what we think, but do what you say. You have been abundantly clear in your request that your association work to reduce the risk of frivolous lawsuits and liability. Your farm is important to you and you want to keep it. You don’t want to live in fear knowing that you are just one lawsuit away from losing your family farm or ranch. Year after year, little by little – we are working hard to push meaningful measures forward to reduce liability risks and send that little liability monkey into the Missouri River and off your back.


JULY 2018

59


60

JULY 2018


JULY 2018

61


62

JULY 2018


JULY 2018

63


64

JULY 2018


JULY 2018

65


Specializing in Land, Equipment and Livestock JULY 2018

For Upcoming Sale Info:

66

Contact: Mike Williams Higginsville, MO cell: 816-797-5450 mwauctions@ctcis.net

www.wheelerauctions.com


SALE REPORTS Seedstock Plus - North Missouri Bull Sale 2.24.18 - Kingsville, MO 128 Balancer Bulls.........................................Avg. $3,947 17 Gelbvieh Bulls...........................................Avg. $4,504 Seedstock Plus - Arkansas Bull Sale 3.3.18 – Hope, AR 19 Angus Bulls................................................Avg. $2,758 39 Balancer Bulls...........................................Avg. $3,198 13 Gelbvieh Bulls...........................................Avg. $3,146 Seedstock Plus RED REWARD Bull & Female Sale 3.10.18 – Humansville, MO 46 Balancer Bulls...........................................Avg. $4,105 11 Gelbvieh Bulls...........................................Avg. $5,114 18 Registered Open Heifers...........................Avg. $1,630 69 Commercial Open Heifers........................Avg. $1,286 Seedstock Plus - South Missouri Bull Sale 3.24.18 – Carthage, MO 109 Balancer Bulls.........................................Avg. $3,379 26 Gelbvieh Bulls...........................................Avg. $3,902 Mead Farms – Female Production Sale 5.12.18 – Versailles, MO 10 Older Bulls................................................Avg. $2,930 11 Yearling Bulls............................................Avg. $4,859 71 Bred Heifers..............................................Avg. $1,822 61 Bred Cows.................................................Avg. $2,066

25 Spring Pairs...............................................Avg. $3,232 2 Comm. Bred Cows......................................Avg. $1,600 2 Commercial Pairs........................................Avg. $2,550 SW MO Show-Me-Select Rep. Heifer Sale 5.18.18 – Carthage, MO 13 Tier II A.I Bred Heifers............................Avg. $1,800 12 Tier II N.S. Bred Heifers..........................Avg. $1,763 76 Tier I A.I. Bred Heifers.............................Avg. $1,876 90 Tier I N.S. Bred Heifers............................Avg. $1,639 NE MO Show-Me-Select Rep. Heifer Sale 6.2.18 – Palmyra, MO 10 Tier II A.I. Bred Heifers...........................Avg. $1,680 5 Tier II N.S. Bred Heifers............................Avg. $1,625 62 Tier I A.I. Bred Heifers.............................Avg. $1,612 57 Tier I N.S. Bred Heifers............................Avg. $1,565

Jim and Scott Cape… 57 Years Trusted Service to Missouri Cattlemen “Your Source for Quality Trailers”

www.jimsmotors.com 1-800-897-9840

JULY 2018 67


SALE CALENDAR July 28 Oct 20 Oct 26

JULY 2018

68

Grace Farms Fall Calving Charolais Dispersal Sale, Joplin Regional Stockyards, Carthage, MO Square B Ranch Open House, Warsaw, MO Spur Ranch Sale, Vinita, OK

Quality Livestock Equipment Since 1961 Panels, Headgates, Calf Tables, Calving Pens, Manual Chutes, Hydraulic Chutes, Tip Chutes, Tubs & Alley Systems

Oct 27 Oct 27 Oct 28 Nov 2-3 Nov 10 Nov 10 Nov 17 Nov 17

McBee Cattle Company Fall Sale, Fayette, MO Cattlemen’s Preferred Sale Registered Bulls, Females Plus Commercial Replacement Females in Ratcliff, AR Lacy’s Red Angus Sale, Drexel, MO GeneTrust Sale at Chimney Rock Cattle Co, Concord, AR Weiker 65th Anniversary Sale, Fayette, MO 22nd Annual Show-Me Plus Gelbvieh and Balancer® Sale, Springfield, MO Sydenstricker Sale, Mexico, MO GeneTrust Sale at Cavender Ranches, Jacksonville, TX


MBC Classified The MBC Classified column appears monthly. Classified advertising is only 50¢ a word. Send your check with your ad to Missouri Beef Cattleman, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Mo 65201. Deadline 10th of month before an issue.

“REESE” DISC MOWERS, CADDY V-RAKES, “REESE” TUBE-LINE BALE WRAPPER, AITCHISON DRILLS, SELF-UNLOADING HAY TRAILERS, HEAVY DUTY BALE AND MINERAL FEEDERS, FEED BUNKS, BALE SPIKES, CONTINUOUS FENCING, COMPLETE CORRAL SYSTEMS, INSTALLATION AVAILABLE: Tigerco Distributing Co. 660645-2212, 800-432-4020 or www.tigercoinc.com. SUPERIOR LIVESTOCK AUCTION Video Sale Via Satellite. Your area representative is Bob Walker, 417-777-0949. BLACK SIMMENTAL BULLS SINCE 1993: Calving Ease, Attractive, Athletic, Sound Footed and Docile. We Deliver. Mike Williams, Higginsville, 816-797-5450 STEEL OIL FIELD PIPE AND SUCKER RODS. Call 573-578-2687 or 573-422-3735. COVERED MINERAL BUNKS: CCA treated wood bunks work well with salt or other mineral mix. Built is six sizes 6’ - 16’, at Sentinel Industries. Ashland, MO. Phone: 573-657-2164. PUREBRED CHAROLAIS BULLS: Good Selection, Serviceable Age, Reasonable Price. Carl Speight. Dadeville, MO. 417-995-3120 or 417-298-7307. RED ANGUS BRED HEIFERS Consistent Uniform Load Lots Top Commercial Replacements Quality! In Volume! Proven Development Program. Contact Verl Brorsen, Perry, OK 580-336-4148 View heifers via www.bluestemcattle.com

JULY 2018 69


Advertiser Index

JULY 2018

ADM Animal Nutrition.......................................... 3 AMEC................................................................... 57 American Gelbvieh Association............................ 25 Brookover Cattle Co. / Ranger Feeders................ 50 Buffalo Livestock Market...................................... 41 Callaway Livestock Center Inc............................. 43 Cape County Cookie Cutter Company................ 21 Cargill................................................................... 15 Central Confinement Service, Ltd........................ 55 Central Missouri Sales Co.................................... 14 Circle 5 Cattle Co................................................. 58 Circle A Angus Ranch.......................................... 35 Civil War Bull Ad................................................. 28 Classified............................................................... 69 Clearwater Farm................................................... 35 Eastern Missouri Commission Company............. 44 Ertel Cattle Company........................................... 24 FCS Financial......................................................... 9 Finney County Feedyard...................................... 51 Galaxy Beef LLC.................................................. 35 Gallagher.............................................................. 69 Gerloff Farms........................................................ 35 Grace Farms Fall Calving Charolais Dispersal.... 18 Grassworks Weed Wiper....................................... 43 Green’s Welding & Sales....................................... 39 Hart Farm Gelbvieh............................................. 26 Heart of America Gelbvieh Association................ 23 Hilltop Gelbvieh.................................................... 29 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus.................................... 35 HRC Feed Yards................................................... 45 Innovative Livestock Specialists............................ 72 Irsik & Doll Feedyards............................................ 2 Jim’s Motors.......................................................... 67 JJ Skyline Angus................................................... 35 Joplin Regional Stockyards..................................... 7 Kingsville Livestock Auction................................ 28 Kinsley Feeders LLC............................................ 47

70

Laughlin Angus..................................................... 35 Lincoln Gelbvieh................................................... 28 Marshall & Fenner Farms..................................... 35 MCA Benefits........................................................ 68 MCA Brand Wall Page......................................... 65 MCA Golf Tournament...................................59-60 MCA Jr. Beef Tour................................................ 63 MCA Lifetime Membership................................. 50 MCA Membership Form...................................... 66 MCA Show-Me Select Sale Credit....................... 50 McBee Cattle Co................................................... 42 MCF Scholarship.................................................. 19 McPherson Concrete Products.............................. 69 Mead Cattle Co..................................................... 33 Mead Farms.......................................................... 35 Missouri Angus Association.................................. 35 Missouri Angus Breeders...................................... 35 Missouri Beef House Schedule.............................. 11 Missouri Beef Industry Council............................ 31 Missouri Valley Commission Company............... 44 Naught-Naught Agency......................................... 67 Pro-Serve.............................................................. 12 Richardson Ranch................................................ 35 Rogers Valley Farm Gelbvieh............................... 27 Rush-Co................................................................ 56 Seedstock Plus....................................................... 71 Sellers Feedlot....................................................... 42 Soap Weed Gelbvieh............................................. 22 South Central Regional Stockyards...................... 12 Square B Ranch/Quality Beef.............................. 35 Sublette Feeders..................................................... 49 Superior Steel Sales............................................... 37 Sydenstricker Genetics.......................................... 35 Sydenstricker Implements..................................... 13 Tiffany Cattle Company....................................... 46 Triple C, Inc.......................................................... 51 Valley Oaks Angus................................................ 35 Weiker Angus Ranch............................................ 35 Wheeler & Sons Livestock Market........................ 38 Wheeler Auctions & Real Estate........................... 66 Mike Williams....................................................... 66 Windsor Livestock Auction................................... 32 Zeitlow Distributing.............................................. 68 Zimms Feedlot...................................................... 48


Profile for Missouri Beef Cattleman

July 2018 Missouri Beef Cattleman  

July 2018 Missouri Beef Cattleman  

Advertisement