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CONTENTS

January 2017

FEATURES 14

Keys to Heifer Nutrition

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Trash to Treasure

Guide Your Breeding Stock to Greater Sucess from Calf to Cow

Reporpused Materials Fill a Need on the Farm

MEMBER NEWS 6 22 50

Association Update Beef Checkoff News County News

66 Trash to Treasure

14 Keys to Heifer Nutrition COLUMNS 8

MCA President’s Perspective The Road Ahead

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CattleWomen’s Corner

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Straight Talk: Mike Deering

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On the Edge of Common Sense: Baxter Black

What We Do

Let’s Rewind 2016

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A Family Affair

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Capitol Update

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Field Notes: Wes Tiemann

The Unexpected

Farm Kids

The Missouri Beef Cattleman is an official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association.


MISSOURI

BEEF CATTLEMAN

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE MISSOURI CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Volume 46 - Issue 8 (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) Magazine Publishing Office 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, MO 65201 Phone: 573-499-9162 • Fax: 573-499-9167 Andy Atzenweiler: Editor/Production/Ad Sales P.O. Box 480977 • Kansas City, Missouri 64148 816-210-7713 • E-mail: mobeef@sbcglobal.net Wes Tiemann: General Manager/Sales 816-244-4462

Missouri Cattlemen’s Association 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, MO 65201 Phone: 573-499-9162 • Fax: 573-499-9167

MCA Website: www.mocattle.com

DEPARTMENTS 7

New MCA Members

Mike Deering • Executive Vice President - Ext 230 mike@mocattle.com Kevin Johansen • Manager of Membership - Ext 231 kevin@mocattle.com Wes Tiemann • Manager of Strategic Solutions - Ext 235 wes@mocattle.com Candace Rosen • Public Relations - Ext 234 Candace@mocattle.com

Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation www.mocattlemenfoundation.org

Missouri’s CattleWomen

http://mocattle.com/missouricattlewomen.aspx

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Hereford News

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Iowa Beef Expo

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Sale Reports

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Sale Calendar

David Dick, Secretary 660-826-0031 • 23529 Anderson School Rd., Sedalia, MO 65301

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Advertiser’s Index

2016 MCA Regional Vice Presidents

Find us on Facebook:

Missouri Cattlemen’s Association

Keith Stevens, President 417-326-4673 • 4740 S. 85th Rd., Bolivar, MO 65613 Butch Meier, President-Elect 573-270-4185 • 2013 Co. Rd. 330, Jackson, MO 63755 Greg Buckman, Vice-President 573-696-3911 • 14601 N Rt U, Hallsville, MO 65255 Matt Hardecke, Treasurer 573-846-6614 • 19102 Skymeadows Dr., Wildwood, MO 63069

Region 1: Luke Miller, RR 2, Box 182 Hurdland, MO 63547 660-299-0798 Region 2: Mike Henderson, 103 Harris School Rd. Wellsville, MO 63384 • 573-684-2773 Region 3: Bobby Simpson, 3556 CR 6150 Salem, MO 65560 • 573-729-6583 Region 4: Mark Garges, 315 Oak Cameron, MO 64429 • 816-248-6275 Region 5: Bruce Mershon, 10015 Windsor Dr. Lee’s Summit, MO 64086 • 816-525-1954 Region 6: Marvin Dieckman, 28998 Hwy JJ Cole Camp, MO 65325 • 660-596-4163 Region 7: Dustin Schnake, P.O. Box 145 Stotts City, MO 65756 • 417-461-3139

JANUARY 2017

Missouri Beef Cattleman, (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) is published monthly (12 times a year) and is the official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Missouri, 65201. PERIODICALS postage paid at Columbia, Missouri and additional mailing offices. Subscription price is included as a part of the minimum membership dues of $70.00 per year in Missouri Cattlemen’s Association. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Missouri Beef Cattleman, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Missouri, 65201.

2016 MCA Officers

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Jason Niedholdt, Keytesville, MO Colin Osborne, Truman State University, Rockford, IL Cynder Potter, SEMO Collegiate, Poplar Bluff, MO Katelyn Rader, SEMO Collegiate, Chester, IL Don & Karen Rains, Stockton, MO Noah Riley, Harrisonville, MO Trent Rodman, Truman State University, Novinger, MO Kate Royer, SEMO Collegiate, Jackson, MO Weston Shelby, Collins, MO Justin Steinman, Truman State University, Kirksville, MO Dennis Swartzentruber, DTK Farm, Sedalia, MO Sierra Teegarden, Carthage, MO Lyndal & Kimberly Turner, Broken T Angus, Pamona, MO Jenna Tuttle, Tuttle Farms, Bunceton, MO Richard & Barbara Tori Viets, Viets Farm, Buffalo, MO Ronald Virta, Pineville, MO Shelby Walker, SEMO Collegiate, Cape Girardeau, MO Marissa Wilson, SEMO Collegiate, St. Charles, MO

We want to welcome all of our new and reorganized affiliates of 2016

Dent Phelps County Cattlemen Morgan County Cattlemen Northeast Missouri Cattlemen Sullivan County Cattlemen Taney County Cattlemen University of Central Missouri Collegate Cattlemen Webster County Cattlemen

Callaway Livestock Center, Inc. On I-70, 4 miles east of Kingdom City, MO on outer road 573-642-7486 Every Monday: Slaughter Cattle Sale 10:00 a.m. Selling All Classes of Cattle 12:30 p.m.

1st Thursday Nite of Each Month: 6:00 p.m. Bred Cows and Breeding Bull Sale David Means

John P. Harrison

573-642-9753

573-386-5150

Jack Harrison

David Bell

573-386-2138

660-327-5633

JANUARY 2017

Roger Ash, FCS Financial, Lebanon, MO Shaun & Samantha Athey, Joplin, MO Vic Barker, Odessa, MO Steve Barmann, Conception Jct., MO Barnyard Trailers LLC, Warrensburg, MO Andrew Baumgarth Jr., A & W Angus, Catawissa, MO Morgan Britnell, Truman State University, Kirksville, Mo Kiel Brittain, KA Livestock, Hopkins, MO Vince Caldwell, DVM, Marshfield Vet Clinic, Marshfield, MO Arthur Campen, Canton, MO Makayla Cartwright, Sikeston, MO Kyle Chinn, Kyle Chinn Farms, Clarence, MO Garrett Cramer, Ludlow, MO W. John Cramer, Cramer Farms, Ludlow, MO Dallas County Cattlemen’s Association Stephanie Dearwester, Truman State University, Kirksville, MO Stuart Dill, Bar D Land & Cattle LLC, Phillipsburg, MO Colton Easter, Easter Farms, Green Ridge, MO Patrick & Cara Easter, Easter Farms, Green Ridge, MO Pam & Jerry Elder, Elderland Angus, Bloomfield, MO Kevin Farr, Marshfield, MO Allison Fix, Carthage, MO Lauren Gifford, Gifford Farms LLC, Licking, MO Rick Grantham, Jackson, MO Kody Graves, Graves Cattle Company, Eureka, MO Benjamin Greene, SEMO Collegiate, Naperville, IL Stacy Harder, Harder Farms, Edina, MO David & Kathy Haymes, Conway, MO Robbie Ketchum, Hallsville, MO Josh Kropf, Halfway, MO Webb Longworthy, Auxvasse, MO Danica Lowery, Lowery’s Red Angus, Eldorado Springs, MO Shannon Lowery, Lowery’s Red Angus, Eldorado Springs, MO Kevin Mailes, Seneca, MO Bailey Marks, SEMO Collegiate, Jackson, MO Braden Matthews, Fredericktown, MO Samantha Mennon, Truman State University, Geneseo, IL Dan Miles, Miles Farm, Centerview, MO Steve Miller, Buffalo, MO Whitney Mintert, West Alton, MO Emma Muzzey, Muzzey Farms, DeSoto, MO Erica Nabers, SEMO Collegiate, Cape Girardeau, MO

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Administration Releases Destructive GIPSA Rules WASHINGTON (Dec. 14, 2016) – Jeopardizing U.S. livestock producers, USDA released their final rulemaking on the 2010 Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Act. Tracy Brunner, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association president said these provisions are very similar to the 2010 proposed rules that industry groups have consistently voiced concern over. He also pointed out that Congress has repeatedly defunded the rules due to the staggering harm they would cause industry. “The GIPSA rules are especially troubling to the cattle industry,” said Brunner. “As we have consistently stated, if adopted, this rulemaking will drastically limit the way our producers can market cattle and open the floodgates to baseless litigation. In a time of down cattle markets, the last thing USDA needs to do is limit opportunity. The fact of the matter is, we don’t trust the government to meddle in the marketplace.” USDA has announced the new GIPSA regulations include an interim final rule on competitive injury and

two proposed rules to address undue preference and the poultry grower ranking system. While USDA has provided a 60-day comment period, the interim final rule will take effect 60 days from the date of publication. “USDA is going well beyond their statutory limitations, limiting marketing options for a product that America is demanding,” said Brunner. “If USDA was interested in real solutions rather than increased government regulations, they wouldn’t have rushed these rules out the door at the very close of the Administration’s term, bypassing any input from industry. Cattlemen and women don’t appreciate Secretary Vilsack throwing a grenade in the building as he abandons it.” NCBA will be working staunchly with the new Administration and new Congress to prevent these irresponsible regulations from harming our nation’s farmers and ranchers.

JANUARY 2017

We Market Cattle Across Missouri Weekly:

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…on Friday in Bowling Green. 573-324-2295 • www.emcclivestock.com

…on Tuesday in Boonville…

660-882-7413 • www.movalleylivestock.com

We routinely find true price discovery weekly across Missouri. We work for sellers and with buyers to keep our industry moving forward.


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Cowboys at the Capitol on Wednesdays Starting January 25 See page 6 for schedule

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Steer Profitability Competition Source: American Simmental Association There’s a difference between feeding a steer and being a cattle feeder. Sometimes there is even a difference between raising cows and being in the profit-focused beef business. And in a young person’s life, there comes a point when the animals cared so much about start becoming a part of their future and their family’s livelihood. Beef breed associations too often assume that their junior members want the easy way. That they don’t want to be pushed. The American Simmental Association (ASA) makes no such assumptions. Through a thorough strategic review of ASA junior programs it was clear that youth members wanted something more - the ability to learn more about the industry and meaningful ways to participate in that industry.

JANUARY 2017

While calves were being born back in the spring, the ASA and American Junior Simmental Association (AJSA) were bringing to life the Steer Profitability Competition (SPC). The SPC is a fed steer contest held at Chappell Feedlot in western Nebraska. AJSA members can enter steers of any breed composition into the contest to view the overall profitability of their calves

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all the way through harvest at Cargill Meat Solutions in Fort Morgan, CO.


Any breed composition? Why would a breed association take this position? Simple. ASA members and their customers have to compete in the market place with any and all breed types. They recognize and embrace the chance to compare cattle across breeds based on their profit potential for the commercial beef producer. AJSA members are no different. They already embrace the scientific realities of heterosis and crossbreeding. They know to get better you have to put yourself on the line. If you are successful, great! However, if you fall short then you know it’s time to get back to work and get better. Another reason for the open armed approach – young producers who haven’t found the right junior program can simply join the AJSA and then enter their calves into the SPC. It’s pretty simple – a straight forward program geared to helping young beef producers learn more about the feedyard potential, carcass merit, and overall profitability of the calves they raise or purchase. A unique component of the SPC is the mandatory monthly online meeting. Once a month, the participants join a nationally recognized expert online to discuss important topics of the day facing our industry. Antibiotic usage, VFD, feedlot nutrition, carcass parameters, shipping slides, DNA and genomics are just some of the topics that will be covered. Currently, the inaugural SPC class represents over 30 AJSA members, nearly 70 steers, and states from For Information on Simmentals Contact:

Jennifer Chandler 5664 Nutmeg Road Carthage, MO 64836 417-793-3646

Durham Simmental Farms Your Source for Quality Simmental in Central Missouri

38863 185th Road • Nelson, MO 65347

Ralph 660-837-3353

Garry 660-784-2242

Colorado to Kentucky and from North Dakota to Texas. The steers have been on feed since early November and will be harvested early in the summer of 2017. The winners will be recognized at the AJSA’s 2017 National Classic in Hattiesburg, MS. Ethan Miller of Olean, MO says that the SPC lets him see “how our cattle compete against others from across the country”. He is also very excited to follow the dollars through the process. His sister, Abby, notes that “it gives me a way to showcase my animals outside of the show ring.” A long list of sponsors stepped up to help these young agriculturists through this process. Allflex, Chappell Feedlot, GeneSeek, Zoetis, and insurers Ideal A&M, Lloyds, and Wichert are just some of the groups who have put their support behind the youth of the beef industry. To find out more about the AJSA and the Steer Profitability Competition or to consider entering steers next fall visit juniorsimmental.org.

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Cattle Co. Red Angus

Registered/Commercial Bulls Available

Forage Developed + Balanced Genetics + Stayability = Satisfaction

J.Micah Bristow www.circle5cattle.com 573-208-8125

For Your Simmental Needs Contact One of These Missouri Breeders… STEAKS ALIVE John & Jeanne Scorse Semen, embryos and foundation stock available at the ranch P.O. Box 3832 • Joplin, MO 64803 Phone: 417-437-0911 • Fax: 316-856-2338 E-mail: scorsej@steaksalive.com Web Page: http://www.steaksalive.com

LUCAS CATTLE CO. Forrest & Charolotte Lucas Owners

Cleo Fields 417-399-7124 Jeff Reed 417-399-1241 Brandon Atkins 417-399-7142

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Office: 417-998-6878 Fax: 417-998-6408 info@lucascattlecompany.com

Rt. 1, Box 1200 • Cross Timbers, MO 65634 www.lucascattlecompany.com

merrymoomoos@live.com

RLE SIMMENTAL

Oval F Ranch

Don Fischer • Matt Fischer 816-392-8771 • 816-383 0630 ovalfranch.com • Winston MO

Roger Eakins • 233 N. Bast, Jackson, MO 63755 Jim Ranes 679 SW 82nd Avenue Jamesport, MO 64648 (660) 663-5202

Ryan Ranes 679 SW 82nd Ave. Jamesport, MO 64648 (660) 663-5226

573-243-7282

Simmental that excel in Phenotype, Performance, Fertility & Carcass Traits

JANUARY 2017

Bulls for Sale!

Quality Simmentals for 40 years

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Straight

Talk

with Mike Deering Let’s Rewind 2016 I’m not sure how 2017 pushed out 2016 so quickly and without much of a fight, but it happened. The year flew by and now a new year greets us. As we plan for 2017, let’s set aside some time to look back at some of your success stories this past year. This was the first full year of the association having this magazine, the Missouri BEEF Cattleman, in house. We focused on improving the editorial content of the publication and also gave it a fresher look. This has resulted in increased readership and has attracted more entities to advertise with us. The revenue generated through the magazine, as well as other non-dues revenue sources allows the organization to be in good financial standing, which is important for the longevity of the association.

JANUARY 2017

We can’t ignore our legislative success this past year. It was nothing short of amazing – borderline unbelievable. Leading one veto override is very challenging and time consuming. It’s a major pain. Trust me. When all three of your legislative priorities were vetoed by Governor Jay Nixon, we didn’t crawl in the corner and cry. We worked hard to right the wrong. We successfully led three veto overrides, which doesn’t happen. In fact, I know of no other association that has done this. Our secret to success was our grassroots members showing up in droves at the Capitol to make their voice heard as part of our Cowboys at the Capitol program.

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Our emphasis on junior programs was kicked into high gear. The development of collegiate affiliates expanded in 2016, adding the University of Central Missouri to the mix. When it came to junior programs and the Missouri Junior Cattlemen’s Association (MJCA), we often talked the talk, but didn’t walk the walk. We were pretty good at talking about it, but we weren’t doing a good job of following the talk with actions. I feel confident in saying

Executive Vice President that changed in 2016 with a renewed focus on our young members, who are the lifeblood of this association and of this industry. From reenergizing MJCA to fixing the junior points program for youth exhibitors to growing the junior leadership conference to the highest attendance on record, we are committed to our young cattle producers. MCA formed a Youth Advisory Taskforce this year to ensure that these programs remain a priority and an integral part of the association. Finally, 2016 just like the previous 104 years of this association was powered by people. Under the leadership of the 2016 MCA President Keith Stevens, this association served its members to the very best of its ability. Personally, I appreciate Keith and his unwavering passion for all aspects of this association. He ensured every member was heard and their opinions respected. As Keith moves into the role as past president, I hope he knows that his leadership and commitment will not be taken for granted. Our association will be in good hands as Butch Meier takes over as president of this association. Butch and his leadership team will continue ensuring that this association is member driven and member run. As we begin another year together, I thank each and every one of you for your trust in me and for your membership in this association. We have a great staff in Columbia who take serving this association very seriously and I am blessed to work with these individuals.


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Your

BEEF CHECKOFF NEWS Beef for all Ages! Executive Director Mark Russell ever to educate the consumer about the safe and healthy product cattlemen produce.” Partnering to Showcase Beef – Harvest Market, a new concept grocery store in Champaign, IL, opened to the public in early October “to connect food producers and makers with its customers.” The idea is to “give the farmer a voice, and let them speak inside the store, continually building a relationship with farmers, producers and manufactures.”

Board Member Spotlight – Jarrod Simpson Simpson is a sixth generation cattlemen from Salem, Missouri. His family has owned and operated a commercial cow-calf operation in Dent County for over 60 years. Jarrod’s passion for the beef industry developed at a young age, and continues to grow as each day passes. He and his wife, Krystal, have three boys; Chase, 5; Trey, 3; and Rhett, 1. Insuring that future generations of cattlemen have the same opportunities that he has had, and that future generations can be profitable in the beef industry, are top priorities for Jarrod. Jarrod believes “With Americans getting further removed from agriculture, it’s more important than

JANUARY 2017

Specializing in Land, Equipment and Livestock

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For Upcoming Sale Info: Contact: Mike Williams Higginsville, MO cell: 816-797-5450 mwauctions@ctcis.net

www.wheelerauctions.com

The checkoff worked with Harvest Market to develop seven new beef bowls to feature in the prepared-foods department, which comprises a restaurant and deli. The bowls are available for customers to heat and serve, including Beef Fiesta, Country Style, BBQ, Beef and Broccoli, and Italian, among other flavors. During the launch, the featured items were so successful that it became difficult to keep up with demand! As a result, Harvest Market is expanding beef offerings at both the hot service counter and the cold deli counter. Understanding Effects of Aging on Tenderness – Tenderness is one of the top drivers of customer satisfaction with beef, influencing the likelihood that consumers will purchase beef and identifying how much they are willing to pay for it. Post-mortem aging – defined as the storing of fresh beef at refrigerated temperatures to allow the natural enzymatic and biochemical processes that result in improved tenderness – is a critical management practice that can improve consistency of beef tenderness. Starting with Beef as a First Food – The American Academy of Pediatrics, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the World Health Organization recommend introduction of complementary foods to infants at about 6 months of age, depending on the infant’s developmental readiness. At that age, the infant’s needs for several nutrients – including iron and


zinc – can no longer be met with breast milk alone. The checkoff’s “Beef as a First Food” explores infants’ nutritional requirements and explains how beef can provide them with the iron and zinc needed for optimal cognitive and physical development. Getting a Read on Consumer Perceptions – The checkoff has conducted a series of research efforts to increase understanding about the difficulty consumers have with preparing steaks and, thus, identify the shopping and culinary information that might increase their likelihood to order or prepare steak more often. This process started with a study about the barriers to achieving a great steak result, with observations of participants in the grocery store and in-home, then inviting the same consumers to a culinary workshop to get tips for preparing a great steak. Ideas that sparked interest were developed further and tested in a larger online consumer study.

the winter board meeting. We hope to see many of you there. January and February are great times to invite one of our staff or board members to local meetings and gatherings to share what the checkoff is doing. Call our office to get on the calendar. 573-817-0899. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year from Mark, Davin, Taylor and Rachel!

The best steak consumers, as measured either by favorable attitudes toward beef, or frequency of beef consumption, expressed that a range of information would motivate increased ordering or preparation of steak. The ideas that resonated with consumers most included quality (emulating a restaurant quality steak in-home), versatility (easy seasonings and rubs, and the use of steak as an ingredient) and techniques for mastering an outdoor grill.

JANUARY 2017

State Office update Winter is a busy time for the staff in Columbia. Meetings and conventions on top of education events across the state keeps everyone busy. The Missouri Cattle Industry Convention is a key time for ranchers and farmers to gather and discuss their industry. The MBIC board will be involved in strategic planning for the organization in addition to

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AHA, NJHA Launch Fed Steer Shootout Program KANSAS CITY, Mo. - The American Hereford Association (AHA) and National Junior Hereford Association (NJHA) are teaming up with Gregory Feedlots, Inc. to launch the 2017 NJHA Fed Steer Shootout. The program is an opportunity for NJHA members to gain invaluable cattle-feeding industry education and experience. Participants will have the ability to estimate feedyard performance and carcass merit, and then compare the information to actual performance data. They will also measure and compare the profitability of their animals during the contest. “This is a fun and competitive program that will allow junior members to find out what their herd genetics are capable of doing,” said Shane Bedwell, AHA COO and director of breed improvement. “There are many great young breeders utilizing progressive genetics. This program will help recognize their efforts and provide learning opportunities to help them make selection decisions in the future.” To qualify for the steer-only program, cattle must be

purebred Hereford or Hereford-influenced steers. Hereford-influenced steers must meet Certified Hereford Beef (CHB®) live-animal specifications to qualify for the Shootout. In addition, cattle in the program must have a birthdate of Jan. 1, 2016, or later, have a weight of 600800 pounds, have been weaned 30 days or more prior to delivery and have had two rounds of vaccinations. Steers must be delivered to Gregory Feedlots, Inc., Tabor, Iowa, between Jan. 2-20, 2017. Alternate delivery points may be available based on area participation. All costs will be financed by the feedyard through the competition, with total expenses deducted from final payment at the conclusion of the contest. A final report will be returned to participants at the conclusion of the contest. Winners of the shootout will be announced at the 2017 AHA Annual Membership Meeting Honoree Reception hosted in Kansas City, Mo. Categories include feedyard performance, carcass performance and overall performance in the purebred, Hereford-influenced, pen of 3 and individual divisions. To learn more about the program, contact Trey Befort, AHA director of commercial programs, at 816-8423757 or tbefort@hereford.org. To view the entry form for the program, visit Hereford.org/node/440.

Custom Cattle Feeders

JANUARY 2017

★ Backgrounding Available ★ 5490 Head Capacity - 2400 Head Under Confinement ★ Corn Grain Bank for Customers ★ No Interest on Feed Bill

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HAMPTON FEEDLOT, INC.

23551 Hwy. 11 • Triplett, MO 65286 • 660-634-2216 • E-mail: hamptonfeedlot@ymail.com Hampton Alternative Energy Products, LLC • Hampton Feedlot owns the first anaerobic digester in the state of MO and uses “green” energy to power the feedlot. HAEP is producing a soil amendment by-product from the new digester.


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AHA’s Bedwell Selected as Top 10 Industry Leader KANSAS CITY, Mo. - Shane Bedwell, American Hereford Association director of breed improvement and chief operating officer, was recently honored by Cattle Business Weekly as one of the Top 10 Industry Leaders under 40 for 2016. The annual honor is awarded to 10 leaders involved in agriculture making a significant impact on the industry. Bedwell directs the breed improvement division at the AHA where he oversees the National Reference Sire Program (NRSP), the Whole Herd Total Performance Records (TPR™) program and the development of expected progeny differences (EPDs) for the breed. Bedwell leads AHA research projects and works with commercial and seedstock producers across the country to increase the value of Hereford genetics. “I’m honored to be selected as a Top 10 Industry Leader,” Bedwell said. “The Hereford breed is

continuing to progress and is gaining more market share within the commercial industry. I’m humbled to be a part of a breed that is rich in tradition yet continues to be forward thinking.” Bedwell also serves as a prominent livestock judge in the industry, where he has judged cattle in more than 30 states and at many national shows, including the National Western Stock Show and the American Royal. “We are thankful Shane is a part of our team here at the American Hereford Association,” said Jack Ward, AHA executive vice president. “He brings a wealth of commercial industry knowledge to our organization as well as the unique ability to communicate technology and science in beef-producer terms. He continues to make an impact on the industry as he documents and proves the Hereford advantage.”

49th Annual

Missouri Cattle Industry Convention & Trade Show — Char ting a Course —

JANUARY 2017

January 6-8, 2017 - Tan-Tar-A Resort

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Hereford Publications Inc. Now Accepting Summer Internship Applications KANSAS CITY, Mo. - Hereford Publications Inc. (HPI), a subsidiary of the American Hereford Association, is now accepting applications for the summer communications internship. The selected intern will assist with projects of the Creative Services department, production of the Herd Book and the August and September Hereford World issues. The internship will provide experience in feature writing, photography, editing, proofing, communicating with clients and managing projects. Applicants should be college juniors or seniors and must be working toward a degree in agricultural communications or agricultural journalism. Writing and editing skills are required along with knowledge of Microsoft Office programs, InDesign, Photoshop and AP (Associated Press) style.

The internship will span from approximately midMay to mid-August, with specific start and end dates depending on the applicant’s availability. Applications are due Feb. 15. Communications internship applicants can send a cover letter, résumé, three writing samples and references to Caryn Vaught, HPI production manager, cvaught@ hereford.org or P.O. Box 014059, Kansas City, MO, 64101. For more information, contact Vaught at 816842-3757.

Hereford Events at NWSS in Denver January 12 National Western Hereford Bull Sale, Denver January 12 National Western Junior Hereford Show, Denver January 12 Mile High Eve Frozen Hereford Genetics Sale, Denver January 13 Mile High Night National Hereford Sale, Denver January 13 National Western Hereford Carload/Pen Show, Denver January 14 National Western Hereford Female Show, Denver

JANUARY 2017

Polled Herefords

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Gary & Frances Duvall 1082 Hwy. 97 • Lockwood, MO 65682 (417) 232-4817 Herdsman Jason Swihart 417-737-1212 E-mail: duvallherefords@keinet.net


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Cattlemen’s Organization Conducts Aggressive Membership Campaign National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Emphasizes ‘Tough Times Require a Tough Team’

for U.S. beef cattle operations and help us keep those operations running today and well into the future.”

DENVER, COLO. (Dec. 2, 2016) – A hard-hitting, two-month membership campaign is being conducted by the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association to strengthen the U.S. cattle producer’s voice in Washington, D.C. on issues critical to both individual cattlemen and women and the nation’s cattle industry. The “Tough Times Require a Tough Team” campaign will run through Jan. 31, 2017, and features benefits to cattle producers that are both immediate and long term.

Brunner said burdensome regulations are just a part of the challenging landscape cattle producers are facing that needs to be addressed. Working with current and incoming legislators on future farm bills, the viability of U.S. beef in the global marketplace and laws that impact how producers conduct their businesses daily is also essential.

“Cattlemen and women have a great NCBA team fighting on their behalf in Washington, D.C. every day, but a bigger team means a bigger voice,” according to Tracy Brunner, a Kansas cattleman and NCBA president. “The cattle producer’s enhanced voice in our nation’s capital can improve the business environment

The Tough Times Require a Tough Team campaign will feature recruitment mailings to 70,000 potential members requesting their consideration, as well as advertising in publications and use of social media at the national and state levels. In addition to adding to the potential success of cattle operations, there are immediate benefits to becoming an NCBA member. New NCBA members will get entered into a drawing for a $300 Polar Cap cooler, and receive a free liter of Dectomax pour-on wormer, a $130 value. Current NCBA members who recruit a new member will also be entered into the drawing. Members also receive numerous other benefits, such as discounts on Roper, Stetson and Tin Haul boots and apparel, and regular discounts on other ag-related purchases.

JANUARY 2017

For more information on the NCBA’s Tough Times Require a Tough Team membership campaign, contact Sam Albrecht, NCBA senior director of membership, at 303-850-3378, or salbrecht@beef.org.

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Don’t Plan to Sell High-price Calves Anytime Soon, says MU Economist Source: Duane Dailey, University of Missouri Extension “Don’t look in the rearview mirror,” a University of Missouri Extension economist told cattle producers at the Kirksville Livestock Symposium. Scott Brown said record-setting high cattle prices are not likely to occur again soon. “The beef outlook approaches a new near-normal trend.”

There is greater economic growth and larger growing populations outside of the United States than within our borders. Those populations prefer our quality beef, he said.

On the commodity-price trend lines, Brown knocked out prices from the last four years. Without that volatility, his chart lines show a slow upward trend.

It wasn’t just the drought that added volatility. Record demand for ethanol and the worst recession in decades affected feed stock prices.

“Cattle prices are lower, but not catastrophic,” Brown said. What he called a “phenomenal time of very high prices” is over. You won’t see $3 calf prices again soon.

We’re not likely to see that combination of events again, Brown said. “From 2008 to 2012 gave amazing revenues for U.S. agriculture.”

The upsurge in prices resulted from convergence of outside events. First, record droughts brought sharp drops in cow numbers. That sent less beef to market.

In the long-term trend, current prices are not that bad, Brown said. It’s just that these prices looked a lot better on the way up than on the way down.

“High prices were more supply-driven than demanddriven,” Brown said. With record prices, producers responded by rebuilding beef herds. That shift continues to expand beef supplies.

When cattle prices are uncertain, Brown told producers to shift their focus. “You can’t control prices you sell for, but you can control costs of production.”

There will be more beef through 2018-19. Now prices must become demand-driven, Brown said. What he calls a “mountain of meat” must be moved by more consumers or lower prices.

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“I am doing my part, but you must eat a lot more beef,” Brown told the audience. “Or we must sell more in export.”

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Foreign trade can lift prices. Southeast Asia offers opportunity for more trade. “China could be particularly important,” Brown said. Trade must not be shut down.

He showed USDA numbers on differences between low-cost and high-cost farms. Low-cost producers tended to also get better revenues. That indicates better management on both sides of the equation. Management can easily make a $100 difference in return per acre. “That can make a difference between profit and loss.” Knowing the cost of producing a calf is needed when you lock in a price. “If you don’t know your costs, you


can lock in a loss.” Brown said. Brown didn’t ask for a show of hands when asking if anyone had locked in recent high calf prices. Often in the past when he asked, no hands went up. Brown did point out the downside risks on cattle prices. There’s still a need for risk management. One trend in beef pricing can aid risk management. Prices for lower-quality select-grade beef at the packers trend lower. Meanwhile, prices for USDA prime beef remains steady and higher. “Investing in better genetics can boost revenue,” Brown said. “That’s risk management.”

Other MU Extension state specialists gave tips on increasing value and cutting loss. Agronomist Craig Roberts told how to cut losses on cattle grazing toxic tall-fescue pastures. Replacing K-31 fescue with novel endophyte fescue improves gains and herd health. Jared Decker, MU Extension geneticist, told that DNA testing of replacement heifers boosts genetics. Recent sales of Show-Me-Select heifers showed that heifers with known genetics sold for big premiums. “Help is available from your regional extension specialists,” Brown said. “I am willing to help.” Livestock symposium information is at www. missourilivestock.com.

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USMEF Report October Pork Exports Largest Since 2014; Beef Exports Remain Strong

U.S. pork and beef exports continued to build momentum in October, with both achieving doubledigit increases from a year ago, according to statistics released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF). October pork exports totaled 201,936 metric tons (mt), up 14 percent year-over-year and the largest monthly volume since March 2014. Export value was $521.1 million, up 16 percent. For January through October, export volume was 6 percent above last year’s pace at 1.86 million mt, while export value was up 3 percent to $4.79 billion. Exports accounted for 25.5 percent of total pork production in October and 21 percent for muscle cuts only. For January-October, exports accounted for 25 percent of total production – up a full percentage point from a year ago – and 21 percent for muscle cuts, up slightly. Export value per head slaughtered averaged $47 in October, up 8 percent year-over-year, while JanuaryOctober export value averaged $49, steady with the same period last year.

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October beef export volume was 105,938 mt, up 12 percent from a year ago, while export value climbed 10 percent to $559.5 million. For January through October, export volume was up 9 percent from a year ago at 954,868 mt, while value was down 3 percent to $5.1 billion. Beef muscle cut exports were especially strong in October at 75,903 mt – the largest volume in two years. Beef exports accounted for 14 percent of total production in October and 11 percent for muscle cuts

Buffalo Livestock Market 1 mile west on Hwy 32 • Buffalo, MO 65622 Barn: 417-345-8122

JANUARY 2017

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• Selling 1200 to 1700 head Farm Fresh Cattle weekly • Special Stock Cow and Bull Sale 3rd Tuesday night of each month at 6:30 p.m. • Pre-Vac Feeder Calf Sales 2nd Saturday of every month in conjunction with Regular Sale (Pfizer Pre-Vac, BLM Pre-Vac, Bayer Program, Mo Quality Assurance. LMA-Vac and MFA Health Track)

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only. January-October ratios were just over 13 percent and 10 percent, respectively – up slightly from the same period last year. Export value per head of fed slaughter averaged $269.35 in October, up 5 percent year-overyear. Through the first 10 months of 2016, export value averaged $254.71 per head, down 8 percent. “With pork production at a record level and beef production also on the rise, it is imperative that we work to expand global demand and accelerate the volume of product entering the international markets,” said Philip Seng, USMEF president and CEO. “With strong support from USDA, our U.S. industry partners and our international contacts, USMEF has intensified its marketing efforts in key destinations and capitalized on opportunities to regain market share – not only in mainstay markets such as Japan, Mexico and South Korea, but in a wide range of countries. This has laid the groundwork for a strong finish to this year and further growth in 2017.” Led by Mexico, pork exports strengthen in Western Hemisphere markets Pork exports to Mexico remained strong in October, increasing 9 percent from a year ago in volume (65,271 mt) and 6 percent in value ($115.2 million). For January through October, exports to Mexico pulled within 2 percent of last year’s record pace in volume (576,008 mt) and remained 1 percent higher in value ($1.05 billion). This strong performance has been especially supportive of prices for U.S. hams, the highest-volume export item to Mexico. Through October, in pesos, U.S. ham prices were 21 percent higher than a year ago while demand in Mexico remained strong. Ham prices strengthened further in November, and weekly export data showed even larger shipments to Mexico. To overcome the difficult exchange rate situation, USMEF has emphasized the quality and consistency of U.S hams with Mexico’s meat processors and worked with these companies on new product development. Pork exports to leading value market Japan were also strong in October, increasing 4 percent from a year ago in volume (30,987 mt) and 9 percent in value ($127.9 million). Through the first 10 months of the year, exports to Japan were 7 percent below last year’s pace in volume (320,491 mt) and 4 percent lower in value ($1.29 billion). Chilled pork exports to Japan remained on a record pace through October, totaling 180,793 mt, up 9 percent year-over-year. Pork muscle cut exports to China/Hong Kong continued to moderate in October, reflecting a rebound in China’s domestic pork production, but variety meat exports to the region remained strong. For January through October, total pork/pork variety meat exports to China/ Hong Kong were up 66 percent from a year ago in


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volume (450,257 mt) and 55 percent higher in value ($878.8 million). Other January-October highlights for U.S. pork exports include: After a slow first half of 2016, exports to Colombia continue to rebound. Though January-October exports were still down 13 percent year-over-year in volume (30,713 mt) and 20 percent in value ($70.6 million), October exports climbed 68 percent in volume (5,862 mt) and 77 percent in value ($14.6 million). October muscle cut exports to Colombia were the largest on record at 5,428 mt, up 58 percent from a year ago. Following a slowdown in September, pork exports to Central America rebounded strongly in October, especially in Honduras, Guatemala and Panama. January-October exports to Central America were up 18 percent from a year ago in volume (53,259 mt) and 12 percent in value ($126.9 million). Exports to the Dominican Republic were 9 percent above last year’s pace in volume (20,945 mt) and 4 percent higher in value ($45.8 million), including a 32 percent increase in October export value ($4.8 million). Although January-October exports to Korea remain well below last year’s large totals, demand has strengthened in recent months. Pork muscle cut exports to Korea reached 11,469 mt in October, the largest since March. Combined pork/pork variety meat exports were 12,121, up 11 percent from a year ago. October export value climbed 26 percent to $33.8 million. Beef exports set new monthly record in Taiwan; chilled exports continue to shine October beef exports were highlighted by a record performance in Taiwan, where volume was up 90 percent from a year ago to 5,177 mt. This pushed January-October exports to Taiwan to 35,241 mt (up 20 percent year-over-year) valued at $284.9 million, up 7 percent and on track for a new record.

JANUARY 2017

October exports were also outstanding to Japan, where volume soared 40 percent to 20,089 mt valued at $119.8 million (up 34 percent). January-October exports to

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Japan were up 21 percent in volume (213,636 mt) and 13 percent in value ($1.24 billion). Japan’s October imports of chilled U.S. beef exceeded chilled imports from Australia for the second consecutive month. In Korea, October exports were 16,897 mt (up 63 percent year-over-year) valued at $98.8 million (up 68 percent). January-October exports to Korea were 139,592 mt valued at $814.2 million, up 36 percent and 21 percent, respectively, from a year ago. Export value to Korea is on pace to exceed the 2014 record of $847.4 million, and with a strong finish could approach the $1 billion mark in 2016. Chilled beef exports to both Japan and Korea have excelled in 2016, with shipments to both markets up nearly 40 percent year-over-year. Through October, chilled exports were the largest on record to Korea and the largest to Japan since 2003. Other January-October highlights for U.S. beef exports include: Despite the persistent weakness of the peso, beef exports to Mexico were up 8 percent from a year ago to 195,799 mt, though export value to Mexico has trended lower this year ($812.1 million, down 11 percent). While January-October exports to Hong Kong were lower year-over-year (86,943 mt, down 6 percent, valued at $525.2 million, down 18 percent), October exports were easily the largest of the year in both volume (11,998 mt) and value ($72.8 million). Fueled by strong growth in Indonesia and Vietnam, exports to the ASEAN region increased 27 percent in volume (22,206 mt) and 3 percent in value ($119 million). Despite a decline to leading destination Egypt, beef liver exports increased 9 percent to 67,394. Larger volumes to Mexico and the addition of South Africa, a promising liver market that reopened earlier this year, offset lower shipments to Egypt, which takes about 75 percent of U.S. liver exports. Lamb exports trend lower, but muscle cuts improve October exports of U.S. lamb fell 31 percent from a year ago to 600 mt, but this was due to a steep decline in variety meat exports. Lamb muscle cut exports were 224 mt, up 19 percent. Lamb export value in October was $1.41 million, down 4 percent. January-October exports were down 6 percent from a year ago in both volume (7,120 mt) and value ($14.8 million), as gains in Bermuda, Hong Kong, the ASEAN region and the United Arab Emirates were offset by lower exports to leading market Mexico.


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2017 SW Missouri MU Extension Beef Cattle Conference The 2017 Southwest Missouri MU Extension Beef Cattle Conference will be held on January 26th at the Stockton United Methodist Church Family Life Center in Stockton, Mo. It will begin with registration at 4 p.m. and booth visitation. Participants will also have time to visit the booths during the hour supper break. The speakers and topics for the evening are as follows: • Hay Storage and Feeding Management by Bob Schultheis, Natural Resource Engineer Specialist, MU Extension Webster County • Beef Reproduction Update and the latest from the Show-Me-Select Replacement Heifer Program by Jordan Thomas, Senior Research Specialist and Ph.D. Candidate at MU • Keynote Presentation “What opportunities are there for cattle producers in 2017?” by Dr. Scott Brown, University of Missouri Assistant Research Professor of Agricultural and Applied Economics The supporter levels are as follows • Gold Level support is $100 and participant receive a booth and 3 conference tickets • Silver Level support is $75 and participant receives a booth and 2 conference tickets

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• Bronze Level support is $50 and participant receives a booth and 1 conference ticket

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Booths will be arranged on the outside of the large meeting room. Tables and extension cords will need to be brought for your booth. Booth visitation will be from 4:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. and then for an 1 hour during supper. In addition to the booth space you will be announced as a meeting supporter during the meeting and be in the brochure that is passed out to meeting participants. Space is limited and booths will be given out on a first response basis to sign up early. We usually have approximately 100 participants at the meeting. If you are interested in supporting the meeting or have questions on supporting the meeting you can contact the Cedar County MU Extension Center at 417 – 276 – 3313 or by email at cedarco@missouri.edu.


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Congress Provides Necessary Relief from EPA’s SPCC Regulations WASHINGTON (Dec. 10, 2016) – Statement by Scott Yager, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association environmental counsel on the Congressional passage of The Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act, which includes a provision to provide regulatory

Kingsville Livestock Auction Kingsville, Missouri Hwy. 58 • 45 Miles SE of Kansas City, MO

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relief for farms from the EPA’s Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure (SPCC) Rule for farms. “Cattle producers applaud Sen. Deb Fischer (R-Neb.) and Rep. Rick Crawford’s (R-Ark.) leadership championing this issue and getting the regulatory relief farmers and ranchers need from yet another unnecessary EPA overregulation. The SPCC regulations were originally designed for major oil refineries but were expanded to include agricultural producers by regulating on-farm oil storage. The provision included in the WIIN Act provides additional flexibility for storing oil containers on individual parcels of land and a complete exemption for animal feed additives, including tallow and grease. These commonsense exemptions will protect many cattle producers from the undue burden and cost of developing, and complying with, an SPCC plan. This relief is a well-deserved victory for agriculture at the end of the 115th Congress.”


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COUNTY NEWS

See What’s Happening in Your County

Vernon County The Vernon County Cattlemen met December 8 at the Vernon County Fairgrounds with approximately 45 people in attendance. President Jay Sloniker presided over a brief meeting. Then members enjoyed a traditional Christmas dinner, complete with ham, turkey, mashed potatoes and all the trimmings. Earlier in the day Treasurer Tommy Wait hand delivered monetary donations from the group to our county FFA Chapters. Our next meeting will be Thursday, January 19.

Tommy Wait presents Bronaugh FFA chapter president Kasen Pitts with a donation.

Members brought non-perishable food items to donate to Community Outreach.

Tommy Wait paid an unexpected visit to Northeast Vernon County School with a donation also.

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JANUARY 2017

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Treasurer Tommy Wait and Vice President Jane Westerhold present a check to the Nevada FFA Chapter.

And, last but certainly not least, Tommy Wait also presented a donation to the Sheldon FFA Chapter.

Webster County The Webster County Cattlemen’s Association, an affiliate of MCA, will be holding their annual meeting on Thursday, January 19th at 6:30 p.m. at the Webster County Fairgrounds. The program for the evening will include the 2017 MCA President Butch Meier and MCA Executive Vice President Mike Deering. A complementary meal will be provided and there will also be door prizes available to those who attend. We will also be electing new 2017 officers at this meeting.

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We enjoyed MCA lobbyist, Shannon Cooper, who came to speak about the historic veto overrides that were achieved at our last meeting held on November 17. He explained how the money we spend on MCA memberships is beneficial to achieving these victories for Missouri farmers at the state legislative level. Also at the meeting, we added several new members, and largely due to the information received about what MCA membership really means for our farmers.

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Cedar County

tractors and a bailer, answered questions and held a drawing for John Deere caps, ornaments, calendars, etc.

The Cedar County Cattleman’s Association kicked off the Christmas season by hosting a toy drive in conjunction with their member meeting on December 1, 2016 at the Ray H. Zumwalt Expo Center in Stockton. Over 60 toys were donated and will be distributed to children in need at the El Dorado Springs and Stockton schools.

The next member meeting will be held on Thursday, February 2, 2017 at 7:00 p.m. at the Land O’ Lakes Youth Fairgrounds in El Dorado Springs. Please bring a dessert. The next board meeting will be on January 5, 2017 in El Dorado Springs. Submitted by Megan Richner

All members interested in serving on the 2017 scholarship committee should contact an officer or board member. The Veterinary Feed Directive was discussed during the meeting. This is effective January 1, 2017. Dr. Brent Lower, Tri-Lakes Animal Clinic, weighed in on the conversation, sharing his knowledge with members. Producers are encouraged to develop a relationship with veterinarians and feed companies.

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The sponsor for the evening was Legacy Farm and Lawn. Clayton Rains and Kim McGuire, sales representatives and Brandon Watkins, parts manager spoke to members about the diversity of John Deere equipment and how they can be tailored to fit the needs of any producers. They showcased two of their base

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The dinner sponsor for the evening was Legacy Farm and Lawn. (Left to right) Clayton Rains, Kim McGuire, and Brandon Watkins showcase one of their John Deere Tractors and spent the evening talking with producers.


Kim McGuire, sales representative at Legacy Farm and Lawn, talks with producers during the December meeting.

Clayton Rains, sales representative at Legacy Farm and Lawn speak to the Cedar County Cattleman during the December meeting about the diversity of John Deere equipment and how they can fit the needs of any producers.

Jeff Parrish and his son Cameron talk to Legacy Farm and Lawn representative, Kim McGuire during the December Cedar County Cattleman’s meeting. Young cattlemen, Jarrett Doeden and Ethan Richner help during the toy drive.

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Douglas/ Wright County Happy New Year to all our members. Thank you all for your continued support. I would like to take a moment out and re-cap 2016. Our president Kyle Smith will not be running for re-election; he will be pursing other options in our industry. We are thankful for all Kyle did for the past two years. Thank you for all your time and effort. In the past year, we have donated $1,000 in scholarships for seniors pursuing futures in the agriculture industry. Tri County Barn in Wright County received $250 for barn improvements as well. Wright County children’s home received $200 to buy Christmas presents for the children that currently reside in their home. It has been another productive year in giving back to our community. You have much to be proud of. We will be having a January meeting, so watch for the meeting notice in the mail. Elections will be held for a new president. If you have any suggestions or are interested, please contact me or any of our other directors. As always, we are looking for new sponsors and more information to start the new year.

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On behalf of Douglas/Wright Cattlemen we thank all our sponsors, members, and guests for another year of giving back to our industry. May our futures be bright. Should you have any questions or information you would like to share with us please don’t hesitate to call me - Karla Besson, Secretary/Treasurer, 417-259-1180.

Polk County Members of the Polk County Cattlemen met at the Citizen’s Memorial Hospital Community Room on Saturday, December 3, for a membership appreciation dinner and Christmas party. This served as our December monthly business meeting, but very little business was transacted, as this meeting was for the pleasure of everyone to just get together for an enjoyable evening of food, fun and entertainment. Linda Voris, among other ladies, did a fine job of singing Christmas songs, which also included a sing along with everyone participating. The 2016 year was a very busy year for us, and we feel a very profitable year too. We were involved in a lot of cookings and did a lot of different things to help our community. At this writing we still have the Christmas Parade on Saturday, December 10, and then we will work at the Share Your Christmas on December 13 and 14. We buy hamburger meat for Share Your Christmas, to give to the needy at this time of year, and some of our members work during the year to repair bicycles that have been donated by the public. These bikes are given to boys and girls that do not have bikes. Share Your Christmas is truly a good community work, and we Cattlemen are glad we can be a part of it. Our January meeting will be On January 12, at Smith’s Restaurant. Please plan to attend, and help us start off the new year with a bang.

www.wheelerlivestock.com Burleigh and Doris Wheeler • 417-840-6561 Byron Wheeler 417-777-0897 • Steve Wheeler 417-840-4149

JANUARY 2017

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P.O. Box 280, 3997 S. Clark • Mexico, MO 65265 Ben Eggers • E-mail: eggers@socket.net Barn: 573-581-1225 • Cell: 573-473-9202 Eddie Sydenstricker Office: 573-581-5900 EddieL@sydenstrickers.com Darla Eggers - Farm Secretary

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35004 E. McQuerry Rd • Oak Grove, MO 64075 www.valleyoaksangus.com The Ward Family David Ward– 816-229-8115 Tony Ward – 816-365-5930 tony@valleyoaksangus.com Kyle Lynn – 573-721-6382 – Herdsman kyle@valleyoaksangus.com

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Southwest Missouri Cattlemen’s Association The Southwest Missouri Cattlemen’s Association held their annual meeting in Mt. Vernon at the MARC on December 10. The attendance was down from past years due to Christmas parades and other places folks could be. The evening kicked off with the meal of deep fat fried fish, hush puppies and calf fries. Sides included potatoes, slaw and a variety of cobblers. Following the meal, a short business meeting was held that involved election of officers for 2017. Vince Blankenship reported for the nominating committee with the following elected by acclamation: president, Russell Marion, Pierce City and Jeff Kaal, Verona, vice president. Stephanie Fizette, Golden City remains as secretary – treasurer. New board members include Nolan Kleiboeker, Wentworth, Kenny Coose, Lockwood and Jimmie Moore, Sarcoxie.

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Russell Marion presented outgoing president, Keith Hankins a plaque as a show of appreciation for his two years of leadership. Jim McCann made a few remarks about the NCBA committee entitled U.S. Roundtable for Sustainable Beef that he serves on. Their vision is to be a global leader in environmentally sound, socially

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President Keith Hankins with Debbie Dunn and Kristi Marion from the Miller and Pierce City Schools who thanked the Cattlemen for support of their backpack programs. Kristi commented the cattlemen’s donation would support 5 children for one year.

responsible and economically viable beef. Jim said he welcomes any ideas anyone might have. Many, many items for the silent auction were bid on by the members earlier in the evening. Next came the live auction led by auctioneer and member, Jackie Moore of Mt. Vernon. He kept the auction lively and sold many


of the donated items under the list price due to the low number of bidders. The sale grossed around $15,000. Proceeds go to college scholarships and the school meal back-pack program. During the meal and auction a power point presentation ran with numerous pictures of the activities of the Lawrence County/Southwest Missouri Cattlemen’s Association dating from the late 70’s until 2016. The association has a rich history and much to be proud of.

Jeff Schoen and Jackie Moore visiting ahead of the auction. Could they be plotting how to attract more bids?

Jamie and Kevin Johansen, in the foreground, taking in the action during the auction. Kevin is MCA’s membership manager and Jamie is a native of Lawrence county.

Ben Fizette and Matthew Cope helping out in the kitchen.

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Proposed Tax Regulation Threaten Multigenerational Cattle Operations WASHINGTON (Dec. 1, 2016) – The Internal Revenue Service hosted a public hearing today on a Department of Treasury proposed rule that would eliminate or greatly reduce available valuation discounts for family-related entities. Kevin Kester, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association vice president, said the regulation would effectively discourage families from continuing to operate or grow their businesses and passing them on to future generations. Many cattle operations are family-owned small businesses, facing the same concerns as other smallbusinesses - making payroll, complying with numerous federal and state regulations, and paying bills, loans, and taxes. However, cattle producers face a number of unique challenges specific to agriculture.

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“Ranching is a debt-intensive business, making the U.S. livestock industry especially vulnerable to the estate tax,” said Kester. “Beef producers largely operate an asset-rich, cash-poor business model: a cattleman’s biggest asset is his land. In the event of the death of a principal family member, liquid assets are often sold in order to meet the costs associated with the estate tax. As a result, many families are unable to keep their estates intact.”

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For more than two decades, livestock producers have utilized legitimate valuation discounts as a means of maintaining family ownership. These discounts, which accurately reflect the actual market value of minority ownerships in closely-held businesses, reduce the tax burden at death allowing agricultural operations to maintain family ownership from one generation of producers to the next. “Should the discounts be eliminated, a significant number of farmers and ranchers will face an even greater tax burden during the difficult task of transferring minority interests to the next generation,” said Kester. “Having dealt with the death tax on multiple occasions, I can assure you that it’s not easy to settle the estate of a loved one while coping with the loss of that loved one. To add insult to injury, the proposed rule will upend succession plans, halt planned expansion and growth, and require a majority of livestock operations to liquidate assets in order to simply survive from one generation to the next.” The proposed regulations under Section 2704 will have a profoundly negative impact on the business climate for farmers and ranchers, ultimately dis-incentivizing a new generation of cattle producers from carrying on the family business. For that reason, NCBA calls for the IRS to formally withdraw the proposed rule.


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Docility: Performance or Convenience Trait? Source: Justin Sexton, Ph.D., CAB Director, Supply Development As calving season approaches, many ranchers look forward to the newborns that represent hours of studying sire summaries and bull catalogs. For all the optimism, however, there’s one source of lingering dread: the cow or cows that you know should have been culled due to attitude. You hoped she’d be open at pregnancy check, after that one-last-tour across the pasture she led when you thought the herd was corralled. And you know that tagging tool makes a poor defense mechanism when you try to work her calf. You tell yourself she is fine after she calves and “mothering ability” is important. We know docility is moderately heritable, calculated at an average coefficient of 0.37, so the trait can be moved in a positive or negative direction through selection. Historically, removing the outliers has been the approach to improving docility in most herds. Recent research published in the Journal of Animal Science by Kelsey Bruno and co-workers at the University of Kentucky looks at measuring systems and the effect of docility on calves during the receiving period. It offers a different approach to the impact of docility with that focus on receiving, and penning cattle by their various docility rankings. Previous research has shown less docile cattle tend to eat less, a problem compounded with the stress from weaning and shipping to feedyards that can lead to nutrient deficiencies. Penning cattle by docility score, the researchers hypothesized, could allow for diets modified to accommodate lower feed intake. Docility was determined in two ways at initial processing. The first quantified the variation in weight indicated by the chute scales for each animal. For 10 seconds after the head was caught, the variation in scale weights was calculated; increased variation indicated

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greater movement in the chute, and these animal were considered less docile. When this docility scoring system was compared to the traditional chute score developed by Temple Grandin, where handlers observe the animal and assign a subjective score (1=calm, 2=restless, 3=squirming/shaking, 4=continuous shaking, 5=rearing, twisting, violent struggling), there was only slight correlation. That, along with unexpected performance results suggest this new measurement system needs further study. The second scoring system used in this and many other studies was exit velocity, where faster exit is related to less docile cattle. The downside to this measure in actual practice is that it’s taken as the animal leaves the chute, thus requiring a later sort for culling. In the Kentucky study, cattle were penned in four groups: calm in the chute and slow to exit, calm in chute and fast to exit, excited in the chute and slow to exit, and exited in the chute and fast to exit. If you’ve spent much time as monitor at the receiving pen, you can imagine the joy of checking those “less docile” groups. This experiment offered the chance to see if the less docile cattle exhibit performance differences because of their interaction with tame cattle, or because they are inherently less docile themselves. There were no interactions between the two scoring systems so the team was able to look at exit velocity independently. The fast-exiting cattle gained 0.18 lb./ day less during the 58-day receiving period than the slow (docile) counterparts. Feed intake was 1.1 lb./day more for slow-exiting cattle, an expected result that was the basic rationale for feeding different diets based on docility classification. However, the increased nutrient-density diet for lessdocile cattle in this experiment had no effect on the group’s performance regardless of the scoring method. That suggests the higher dietary protein levels used were either not high enough to overcome lower feed intake, or docile cattle are more efficient at nutrient use. While this work didn’t report carcass merit, we know in Tri-County Steer Carcass Futurity data, calves that were calm or simply swished their tail while in the chute consistently returned more dollars to the feeding enterprise through improved quality grade while maintaining better health. How we identify docile cattle will continue to evolve, depending on where you are in the supply chain, but there are clear benefits to maintaining focus on improved docility from ranch through harvest.


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Iowa Beef Expo Highlights From 2016

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Is your risk management plan adequate for your Livestock and Pasture?

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The Pasture, Rangeland and Forage (PRF) Program protects livestock producers from losses to productivity caused by poor forage conditions due to lack of rainfall. The Livestock Risk Protection (LRP) Program protects against a decline in the CME Feeders Cattle Price Index. Farmers Bank of Northern Missouri can assist you in the Risk Management of your cattle operation with a loan and or insurance to assist you in running your operation.

Richard Hallock • Risk Management Agent • 660-425-2261 Office 660-947-2474 Office • 641-442-5222 Cellphone


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Register Now for Calving Workshop in Springfield Jan. 16 SPRINGFIELD, Mo. - Get registered now for a University of Missouri Extension “Calving Workshop” planned for 6 p.m. on Jan. 16 at the Springfield Livestock Marketing Center, 6821 W Independence Drive, Springfield.

CENTRAL MISSOURI SALES CO. 3503 S. Limit • Sedalia, MO

Your Reliable Market In Mid-Missouri Certified Special VACC Calf Sales the 1st and 3rd Mondays at 2:00 p.m.

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Jay Fowler Cary Brodersen E.H. Fowler 660-473-1562 660-473-6373 660-473-1048

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There is a $10 per person registration fee but a meal will be provided to attendees thanks to a sponsorship from Alan McMurtrey and Macs Vet Supply. Scott Poock, state MU Extension vet, will discuss topics related to assisting the cow and calf during calving time, what to do when the vet can’t get there, cow health before and after birth and young calf health concerns. Wesley Tucker, ag business specialist with MU Extension, will discuss the economics associated with spring and fall calving. Andy McCorkill, a livestock specialist with MU Extension, will discuss the nutritional needs of the cow before and after calving along with breed-back concerns. Registration is needed for the workshop is needed by Jan. 14. The preferred method is to register and pay online at http://extension.missouri.edu/greene. Registrations can also be made by mailing a check to Greene County Extension, 2400 S. Scenic Ave., Springfield, Mo. 65807.


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Making The Most Of It Source: Black Ink - by Miranda Reiman “Suppose we could only make 1 million cars. If the auto industry was limited for some reason, what would they do? Would they make small, cheap vehicles or big, premium, expensive cars?” An industry observer asked that question at a cattle feeders meeting this summer. It seemed the answer was obvious: the automakers would have to get the most money they could for every single vehicle. “They’d be making Escalades, King Ranch pickups and Corvettes. They’d make the biggest, highest-margin premium vehicles they could,” Pete Anderson, Midwest PMS research director, confirmed. Do you see a parallel with the cattle business? “We aren’t going back to 40 million cows,” he said, “so we’ve got to maximize revenue from the ones we have. We’ve got to make the equivalent of Escalades and let somebody else sell Honda Civics.”

The 2017 Escalades have a starting MSRP (manufacturer’s suggested retail price) value of $73,395, while a Chevy Suburban has one of $49,915 by comparison. I know there are many features to consider, but at their core, they are fairly similar: with bench seats both hold eight passengers, both have all the same standard safety features and the conveniences you’d expect of a brandnew vehicle today. I’m certain it costs incrementally more to make an Escalade—just as I’m certain it doesn’t cost $23,000 more. I’d bet the take-home margin is larger on the premium vehicle. The Escalade’s advertisements use verbiage like, “Ambition on a grand scale,” “Beauty, meet brawn,” and “Smart as it is powerful.” Even as the happy owner of a plain old Ford SUV, I can appreciate the way everything about the Escalade brand says luxury. If I were making cars, I’d rather make an Escalade than a Civic, too. So what is the Escalade of the beef business? What will consumers continue to buy more of at a higher price? History and research show us the higher the quality of the beef—in terms of marbling and consistency—the more consumers will pay. Even when all protein prices were especially high a year and two years ago, they still didn’t mind paying even more when they were assured by experience that it was worth it. People still turned to beef. Well, more specifically, they turned to high-quality beef. Anderson had a plea for the crowd: “The cattle industry must produce big, high-grade cattle to maximize revenue per unit.”

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Maybe more than just a few of you already know that.

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After all, from 2014 to 2016 so far, Prime production is currently up 37.6%, while Select shows a decline of 21.7%. Yet premiums for Prime remain strong while discounts for Select have worsened, even with tight supplies. In a country with only 24 or 26 million head of fed cattle a year, not 40, aiming high seems like the smart solution for making more of less.


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Red Angus DNA Scores Align with Carcass Results Denton, Texas — Cattlemen and women frequently ask if DNA scores are truly predictive of phenotypic results. A recent study completed by the Red Angus Association gathered DNA data on a set of Red Angus calves and followed the cattle through harvest, collecting phenotypic data. The results illustrated the Igenity® DNA scores accurately predicted carcass weight, marbling score and overall carcass value. The cattle were raised and owned by Bob and Elaine Yackley of Onida, South Dakota, and fed at a custom

feed yard. A total of 91 head of 2015-born steers comprised the group that was DNA tested with Igenity Silver and followed through harvest to obtain carcass data on each individual animal. The top 25 head with the highest DNA scores for Average Daily Gain (ADG) and marbling were compared to the bottom 25 head, which exhibited the lowest combined DNA scores for the same two traits. Summarized results for the two groups are shown in the table. This comparative analysis reveals that the top-DNAscoring steers produced heavier carcass weights as a result of faster rates of gain (21-pound advantage). They also had higher average marbling scores and higher quality grades, with notably more upper-two-thirds Choice grade carcasses. Even in a softened fed-cattle market, the difference in value between the two groups was $50.60 per head favoring the high-DNA-scoring steers. Weight and marbling make a big difference when selling cattle on a grid. “These cattle had the right combinations of genetics and management in addition to being fed to the correct endpoint,” explained Gary Fike, RAAA director of commercial marketing. “The

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Tucker Janssen

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Southern Region

Manager

806-679-1700 tjanssen@immucell.com 7706 Georgetown Dr. Amarillo, TX 79119

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fact that out of the 50 head in this comparison, there was only one Yield Grade 4 in the low-DNA group and none among the top-DNA steers, is a testament to that.” Fike, who organized and conducted the field study, further noted that these results demonstrate how DNA can be successfully used in commercial operations. “This is real-world data,” he said. “By using DNA testing and eliminating low-scoring animals for the traits of interest, producers can be confident they are building superior genetic value into their herds. That is why we recommend testing all replacement heifer candidates and culling low-scoring females before breeding.” The Red Angus Association of America serves the beef industry by enhancing and promoting the competitive advantages of Red Angus and Red Angus-influenced cattle. RAAA provides commercial producers with the most objectively described cattle in the industry by seeking and implementing new innovative technologies based on sound scientific principles that measure traits of economic importance. For more information, visit redangus. org.

Cowboys at the Capitol on Wednesdays Starting January 25

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On the Edge of

Common Sense with Baxter Black A Family Affair If you live in a rural community, you can probably name many examples of a multi-generational family that operates a ranch or farm. Their lives are built around the animals or crops they raise. Last August I spent a couple days gathering and branding calves for a local rancher. It was obvious that Dad was in charge and every member of this tight-knit family knew his job. You expected things would move smoothly along, in part due to the up-to-date facilities and reasonably calm livestock. He said a prayer for the gather, then sent us out to bring in the 100 or so cows. When we got the pairs to the corral we sorted the 250-pound calves off into a separate pen. “We” is defined as the four hired help plus the Dad, the Son and the Daughter, all family members over 6’2” feet tall…and tough! I was assigned to fill the holes, sort of a

quality control position. Ropers rotated. We had at least three muggers on the crew that seemed to take pleasure doing the flanking. I got tired just watching them! By noon it was 96 degrees and the dust was thick as diesel fumes. Dad had a Nord Fork calf holder he wanted to try. It reduces labor by holding the front quarters while the roper holds the hind legs. The muggers ignored him. Every time he attempted to hook up his Nord Fork the muggers stepped in front and dove at the calf! We were down to the bigger calves. Roper drug a big’un by the hind legs into the sweat-soaked, dirty crew. I

WINDSOR LIVESTOCK AUCTION JANUARY 2017

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reached down to hold the rope tight so Roper could take up slack. The rest of the story is still blurry in my memory; visions of Gettysburg, Moby Dick, Star Trek, the Ziegfeld Follies and Jurassic Park clash, wherein Captain Ahab gets his harpoon line tangled around Dr. Spock’s ankle who is fishing for Jaws. Shrek is water skiing, Cat Woman is juggling the vaccine gun, a branding iron, an ear tagger, open pocket knife and a can of fly spray. This whole extravaganza is accompanied by Beethoven playing “Ship My Body Back to Texas if I Die Out on the Trail!” The calf got one hind foot loose. Daughter dived on top of the calf. From my view looking up, Dad’s silhouette is trying to get his Nord Fork on the front end but gets sucked into the vortex and crashes forward onto the growing pile. This is when Son jumps on top of Sister; alias Daughter. Mind you, Brother, alias Son, weighs as much as the calf which makes Sister a 500 lb sandwich! This is a moment when I stood up and took an imaginary photograph. I titled it “Killer Whales attacking a Writhing Porpoise.”

PAUSE. The calf rose to his feet; castrated, vaccinated, tagged and branded. He stared at the creatures around him. Although he had never seen a coal miner he figured that’s what they would look like comin’ home from work. All they needed was a light helmet and lunch bucket.

Hwy 42 West • Vienna Missouri 65582 45 Miles South of Jefferson City Selling All classes of Cattle Wednesday • 10:00 a.m. Featuring ‘Star-Vac Program’ Cattle Weekly DVAuction Service for convenient online viewing & bidding For More Information Call… David Patton Office Ross Patton Bill Patton 573-308-6655 573-422-3305 573-308-6657 573-308-6658 Visit our website: www.scrsvienna.com or E-mail us: scrsvienna@gmail.com “Make South Central your Livestock Market”

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Capitol Update with Nancy Giddens & Shannon Cooper The Unexpected A blow-out on your trailer full of cows, your prize bull struck by lightening, or a prolapsed heifer at midnight all teach the same valuable lesson – expect the unexpected. This saying holds true whether you’re in the state capitol or on the farm. Due to life’s complexities, generally we retreat to places where safety and stability reign. For most of us, our home provides that comfort…unless you’re Cooper the evening after the election. Still reeling from the dramatic results that were unexpected by nearly everyone, it is safe to say that Cooper was not on his game.

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Awakened in the dead of night by his fearless companion, Hank, a scantily dressed Cooper navigated his darkened home to let out Hank for what he expected to be a mundane bathroom break. Unbeknownst to him, he was about to get ambushed by three raccoons huddled on his doorstep. Hank jumped in the middle of them, leaving one to dart directly into Coop’s house. The raccoon jolted inside and, according to Cooper, “hissed and pissed” on everything. His dining room table, chairs, china cabinet, and more – nothing was protected from the raccoon’s rage.

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Nancy Giddens & Shannon Cooper After some time, the raccoon found comfort in Cooper’s “funeral plant,” which is the plant he nurtured for years since his grandmother’s death. With the raccoon hanging tightly to the plant, Cooper reoriented himself to the chaos that had ensued and crafted a plan with his son to evict the intruder. Equipped with brooms and boxers, the two pushed the plant on its wheeled base with broomsticks to the stillopened door. Once in the entryway, Cooper aggressively ejected the raccoon from the top of the plant. Slamming the door closed, Cooper felt the degree to which one never can fully expect the unexpected. The same holds true as we begin to sift through bills prefiled for the 2017 legislative session. As some of the topics have been regurgitated over decades, some legislators are trotting out new ideas. While we can’t predict what will occur or be filed, we are fully prepared to expect the unexpected and vigilantly defend the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association.


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FIELD NOTES with Wes Tiemann Farm Kids I received a phone call at work, and it’s my three and a half-year-old, Mesa. She immediately said, “It’s been a bad day around here Dad, Suzy got ran over.” So, my wife confirms that was the case, and I get home early to deal with the situation. I got a hole dug, but can’t put poor Suzy in until Mesa tells her goodbye. So, she puffs her chest up and walks right on over and takes a good look and says, “Better get her in there, Dad, it’s getting dark.” I try my best to gently put the dirt on as not to upset her. Mesa said, “She sure was a good doggie, but get her covered up.” It was tough for me not to cry because I guess I thought that she would.

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While not easy, it’s little things like these that country kids can process and handle so much better than others. I am sure her kindergarten teacher and others parents will wish she hadn’t taught the class the birds and bees of the animal kingdom or the difference between pork and beef so early. However it’s these innocent things in kids’ backgrounds that keep them from having to require a “safe room” on their college campus someday. So those of you with kids or grandkids on the farm take time to enjoy the little comments you hear that no one else in the city limits will get the pleasure of. I will leave you with a few I get to hear.

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SAVE THE DATE COUNTY LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE MARCH 13-14, 2017

MCA Manager of Strategic Solutions “Dad we need to go to the elevator (MFA), we are out of suckers.” “That sure is a good looking bull, Dad (as we flip through sale books).” “It’s ok, we can get a new one at the sale barn.” “You might as well just shoot that coyote.” See you at the sale,


SALE REPORTS Show Me Select Replacement Female Sale, Farmington, MO 10-28-16 117 Bred Heifers............................................Avg. $1,518 McBee Cattle Co. Fayette, MO 10-29-16 8 Braunvieh Purebred Bulls...........................Avg. $3,313 11 McBeef Builder Hybrid Bulls....................Avg. $3,368 2 Braunvieh Pairs...........................................Avg. $2,763 3 Braunvieh Bred Heifers................................Avg. $2200 7 McBeef Builder Hybrid Pairs.......................Avg. $2275 19 McBeef Builder Hybrid Bred Heifers.......Avg. $2,282 GENETRUST @ Chimney Rock Cattle Company Concord, AR 11-4-5-16 Registered Brangus Female Averages 54 Open Heifers.............................................Avg. $5,193 17 Bred Heifers..............................................Avg. $6,559 14 3n1s...........................................................Avg. $6,343 3 Donors......................................................Avg. $21,333 5 Bred Cows...................................................Avg. $3,600 2 Pregnant Recips..........................................Avg. $3,325 Total 95 Registered Females..........................Avg. $6,004 Registered Brangus & Ultrablack Bulls 52 Coming 2’s................................................Avg. $5,596 86 Yearlings....................................................Avg. $3,965 Total 138 Brangus & Ultrablack Bulls...........Avg. $4,580 Commercial Brangus Females 54 Fall Pairs....................................................Avg. $2,219 120 Bred Heifers............................................Avg. $1,871 28 Bred Cows.................................................Avg. $1,632 100 Open Heifers...........................................Avg. $1,241 15 Spring Heifer Calves....................................Avg. $658 317 Commercial Brangus Females................Avg. $1,653

Sydenstricker Genetics, Mexico, MO 11-19-16 90 Yearling Angus Bulls.................................Avg. $5,672 63 Angus Bull Calves.....................................Avg. $3,217 97 Open Angus Heifers..................................Avg. $4,915 44 Bred Angus Heifers...................................Avg. $4,181 34 Bred Angus Cows......................................Avg. $3,698 60 Angus Fall Pairs.........................................Avg. $5,600 8 Embryos......................................................Avg. $1,350 120 Sydgen Influence Bred Heifers................Avg. $1,645 Dalebanks Angus Bull Sale, Eureka, KS 11-19-16 130 Angus Bulls..............................................Avg. $4,521 Butch’s Angus, Jackson, MO 11-26-16 34 Angus Bulls................................................Avg. $2,880 37 Angus Fall Pairs.........................................Avg. $2,358 Show Me Select Replacement Female Sale, Kingsville, MO 11-26-16 148 Bred Heifers............................................Avg. $1,910 Show Me Select Replacement Female Sale, Fruitland, MO 12-3-16 96 Bred Heifers..............................................Avg. $1,962 Wright Charolais, Kearney, MO 12-2-16 9 Open Heifers...............................................Avg. $8,083 4 Pairs.............................................................Avg. $6,000 14 Bred Heifers..............................................Avg. $4,132 14 Bred Cows.................................................Avg. $3,921

Show Me Select Replacement Female Sale, Kirksville, MO 11-18-16 149 Bred Heifers............................................Avg. $1,731

Show Me Select Replacement Female Sale, Palmyra, MO 12-10-16 240 Bred Heifers............................................Avg. $2,054

Show Me Polled Hereford Classic Sale Windsor, MO 11-19-16 9.5 bulls..........................................................Avg. $3,384 48 females.......................................................Avg. $3,492 57.5 lots..........................................................Avg. $3,472

ORYS 07 RED ANGUS Service age bulls, bred cows, cow/calf pairs, show prospect heifers available.

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JANUARY 2017

Show Me Select Replacement Female Sale, Joplin, MO 11-18-16 364 Bred Heifers............................................Avg. $1,651

Earl Marshall Angus Sale, Anita, IA 12-4-16 1 Angus Bull...................................................Avg. $6,000 4 Open Heifers...............................................Avg. $1,612 33 Bred Heifers..............................................Avg. $2,942 25 Bred Cows.................................................Avg. $1,728 3 Embryos.........................................................Avg. $800

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Sale Calendar

JANUARY 2017

January 7 MCA Seedstock Auction, Tan-Tar-A January 18 Deer Creek Cattle Co Sale, Bowling Green, MO January 28 Jauer Dependable Genetics, Hinton, IA January 28 Nichols Farm Private Treaty Bull Sale, Bridgewater, IA January 28 Carswell-Nichols Herefords, Alton, KS February 4 Loonan Stock Farm Production Sale, Corning, Iowa February 7 Hoover Angus Farm, Creston, IA February 8 River Creek Farms, Manhattan, KS February 11 Crooked Creek Angus, Clarinda, IA February 11 Rudow Family Cattle Bull Sale, Pana, IL February 11 J&N Black Hereford, Leavenworth, KS February 12-19 Iowa Beef Expo, Des Moines, IA February 13 Iowa Beef Expo Simmental Sale, Des Moines, IA February 13 Iowa Beef Expo Charolais Sale, Des Moines, IA February 16 Iowa Beef Expo Angus Sale, Des Moines, IA February 17 Cow Camp Ranch Bull Sale, Lost Springs, KS February 18 Byergo Family Angus, Savannah, MO February 18 Riley Brothers Angus, Darlington, WI February 18 Badger Creek Bull Sale, Emporia, KS February 23 IL. Performance Tested Bull Sale, Springfield, IL February 24 Jamison Herefords Bull Sale, Quinter, KS February 25 Peterson Angus Bull Sale, Alcester, SD February 25 Stratford Angus, Pratt, KS February 25 Spur Ranch, Vinita, OK February 25 Seedstock Plus Sale, Kingsville, MO

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February 26 February 28 March 1 March 3 March 3 March 4 March 4 March 4 March 4 March 4 March 4 March 8 March 9 March 11 March 11 March 11 March 11 March 11 March 16 March 17 March 17 March 17 March 18 March 18 March 18 March 18 March 18 March 18 March 18 March 19 March 20 March 21 March 24 March 25 March 25 March 25 March 25 March 25 March 25 March 25 March 25

Missouri Angus Breeders Futurity Sale, Columbia, MO Mill Creek Ranch, Alma, KS Ferguson Angus, Phillipsburg, KS Express Ranches Spring Bull Sale, Yukon, OK The KSU Legacy Sale, Manhattan, KS Mead Farms, Versailles, MO Peterson Farms Charolias Sale, Mnt. Grove, MO Satterfield Charolias and Angus, Evening Shade, AR Linhart Limousin, Leon, IA Pine View Angus, Colesburg, IA Seedstock Plus Arkansas Bull Sale, Hope, AR Stucky Ranch, Kingman, KS BJ Angus, Manhattan, KS Heart of the Ozarks Angus, West Plains, MO Wright Charolias, Kearney, MO JAC’s Ranch, Bentonville, AR Galaxy Beef, Maryville, MO Mill Brae Ranch, Maple Hill, KS Benoit Angus Ranch, Esbon, KS Marshall & Fenner/Murphy Cattle Co, Marshall Junction, MO THM Land and Cattle, Vienna, MO Sunflower Genetics, Maple Hill, KS Brinkley Angus Ranch, Green City, MO Circle A Angus, Iberia, MO Musgrave Angus, Griggsville, IL Mississippi Valley Angus Assoc. Palmyra, MO Falling Timber Farm, Marthasville, MO Pinegar Limousin, Springfield, MO Flying H Bull Sale, Butler, MO Briarwood Angus Farms, Butler, MO Hinkles Prime Cut Angus, Nevada, MO KW Cattle Co. Ft. Scott, KS SE MO PT Bull Sale, Farmington, MO Valley Oaks Annual Private Treaty Sale, Oak Grove, MO Missouri Charolais Breeders Association Spring Sale, Kirksville, MO Worthington Angus, Dadeville, MO NE MO Performance Tested Bull Sale, Palmyra, MO Maplewood Acres, Sedalia, MO Seedstock Plus, Carthage, MO PBG Bull Sale, Montrose, MO Magness Land and Cattle, Miami, OK


March 26 March 27 March 27 March 28 March 30 March 31 March 31 April 1 April 1 April 1 April 1 April 1 April 3 April 5 April 8 April 11 April 15 April 22 April 22 April 23 April 29 April 30

C/S Cattle, Pomona, MO Oleen Bros. Dwight, KS SW MO PT Bull Sale, Springfield, MO Genetrust Brangus, Suhn Cattle Co. Eureka, KS Sweiger Bros Bull Sale, Maysville, MO Sandhill Farms, Haviland, KS Meyer Cattle Co. Curryville, MO Gardiner Angus Ranch, Ashland, KS Shoal Creek Simmental, Excelsior Springs, MO Panther Creek Angus, Bowen, IL Four States Angus Sale, Springfield, MO Show Me Classic Bull Sale, Windsor, MO Brockmere Farms, New Cambria, MO Chair Rock Ranch, Greely, KS The Renaissance XXV Sale, Strafford, MO Sydenstricker Genetics Influence Sale, New Cambia, MO Simon Cattle Co. Farley, IA Express Ranches Grass Time Sale, Yukon, OK Windy Hill Charolias Farms and Guests Sale, Cedar Hill, MO C&C Performance Breeders, Tina, MO Pinegar Limousin, Springfield, MO Jim D Bellis Family Female Sale, Aurora, MO

MBC Classified The MBC Classified column appears monthly. Classified advertising is only 50¢ a word. Send your check with your ad to Missouri Beef Cattleman, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Mo 65201. Deadline 10th of month before an issue.

“REESE” DISC MOWERS, CADDY V-RAKES, “REESE” TUBE-LINE BALE WRAPPER, AITCHISON DRILLS, SELF-UNLOADING HAY TRAILERS, HEAVY DUTY BALE AND MINERAL FEEDERS, FEED BUNKS, BALE SPIKES, CONTINUOUS FENCING, COMPLETE CORRAL SYSTEMS, INSTALLATION AVAILABLE: Tigerco Distributing Co. 660-645-2212, 800-432-4020 or www.tigercoinc.com. SUPERIOR LIVESTOCK AUCTION Video Sale Via Satellite. Your area representative is Bob Walker, 417-777-0949. BULLS: CALVING EASE LINE BRED BLACK SIMMENTALS. Outstanding EPD’s, Fast Growth. These are good looking, sound footed, fall and yearling bulls. We deliver. Mike Williams, Higginsville, MO 816-797-5450. STEEL OIL FIELD PIPE AND SUCKER RODS. Call 573-5782687 or 573-422-3735. COVERED MINERAL BUNKS: CCA treated wood bunks work well with salt or other mineral mix. Built is six sizes 6’ - 16’, at Sentinel Industries. Ashland, MO. Phone: 573-657-2164. PUREBRED CHAROLAIS BULLS: Good Selection, Serviceable Age, Reasonable Price. Carl Speight. Dadeville, MO. 417-995-3120 or 417-298-7307.

Cowboys at the Capitol on Wednesdays Starting January 25

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Advertiser Index

90

AMEC....................................................................................31 American Angus Association.................................................61 American Gelbvieh Association........................................35-38 American Hereford Associaiton.............................................25 American Simmental Association..........................................43 Anipro....................................................................................68 Badger Creek Sale..................................................................45 Benoit Angus Ranch..............................................................72 Buffalo Livestock Market.......................................................42 Callaway Livestock Center Inc.................................................7 Carswell-Nichols....................................................................29 Central Missouri Sales Co.....................................................72 Circle 5 Cattle Co..................................................................19 Circle A Angus Ranch...........................................................55 Classified................................................................................89 Clearwater Farm....................................................................55 Crooked Creek Angus............................................................46 Crystalyx................................................................................53 Deer Creek Cattle Co Sale.....................................................41 Double R Cattle Co...............................................................19 Dow AgroSciences R&P........................................................33 Durham Simmental Farms....................................................19 DuVall Herefords...................................................................28 Eastern Missouri Commission Company..............................12 Farmers Bank of North Missouri...........................................70 FCS........................................................................................92 Ferguson Angus......................................................................75 Galaxy Beef LLC...................................................................55 Gerloff Farms.........................................................................55 Gibson Mineral Feeders.........................................................84 Green’s Welding & Sales........................................................50 Gregory Polled Hereford.......................................................26 Hampton Feedlot...................................................................24 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus...............................................13, 55 Hoover Angus Farm...............................................................73 Immucell - First Defense........................................................76 Iowa Beef Expo......................................................................63 Iowa Beef Expo Angus Sale...................................................65 Iowa Beef Expo Simmental Sale............................................62 J&N Black Hereford Sale.......................................................56 Jamison Hereford Sale...........................................................27 Jauer Dependable Genetics...................................................11 Jim’s Motors...........................................................................60 JJ Skyline Angus.....................................................................55 Joplin Regional Stockyards....................................................77 Kingsville Livestock Auction..................................................48 Laughlin Angus......................................................................55 Loonan Stock Farm................................................................59 Lucas Cattle Co.....................................................................19 Marshall & Fenner Farms......................................................55 MCA Brand Wall Page..........................................................85 MCA Member Benefits..........................................................81

MCA Membership Form.......................................................82 MCA PAC Fundraiser with Allen West.................................34 McBee Cattle Co...................................................................54 McPherson Concrete Products..............................................89 Mead Cattle Co.....................................................................52 Mead Farms...........................................................................55 Merial Long Range..................................................................9 Merry Meadows Simmental..................................................19 MFA Fair Share......................................................................83 Missouri Angus Association...................................................55 Missouri Angus Breeders.......................................................55 Missouri Beef Industry Council.............................................23 Missouri Limousin Breeders Association...............................71 Missouri Simmental Association............................................19 Missouri Simmental Breeders................................................19 Missouri Valley Commission Company.................................12 MultiMIN USA.....................................................................17 Naught-Naught Agency.........................................................26 NCBA Membership Drive.....................................................40 Nichols Farms Sale.................................................................91 Norbrook ...............................................................................21 Ogden Horsecreek Ranch......................................................55 Ory’s Circle 7 Red Angus......................................................87 Oval F Ranch.........................................................................19 Owners Statement..................................................................80 Pinegar Limousin...................................................................49 Powerlift ................................................................................79 Pro-Serve...............................................................................78 R&T Land & Farm................................................................48 Reed Farms............................................................................28 River Creek Farms.................................................................39 RLE Simmental.....................................................................19 Rudow....................................................................................47 Salt Fork Feed & Supply.........................................................18 Seedstock Plus Sales...............................................................53 Sellers Feedlot........................................................................44 Shoal Creek Land & Cattle....................................................19 South Central Regional Stockyards.......................................79 Steaks Alive............................................................................19 Superior Steel Sales................................................................57 Sydenstricker Genetics...........................................................55 Triple C, Inc...........................................................................74 Valley Oaks Angus...........................................................32, 55 Weiker Angus Ranch..............................................................55 Wheeler & Sons Livestock Market.........................................54 Wheeler Auctions & Real Estate............................................22 Mike Williams........................................................................22 Windsor Livestock Auction....................................................78 Wright Charolais Sale..............................................................3 Y-Tex........................................................................................2 Zeitlow Distributing...............................................................30


Missouri Beef Cattleman January 2017  

Missouri Beef Cattleman January 2017

Missouri Beef Cattleman January 2017  

Missouri Beef Cattleman January 2017

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