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CONTENTS

February 2018

FEATURES 19

50th Anniversary - Missouri Cattle Industry Convention & Trade Show Highlights and Award Winners

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Pioneer Award

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Cattleman of the Year

Man Focused on Youth Mentorship and Service Makes Lasting Impact

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Lifelong Advocate of the Missouri Cattle Industry Recognized

MEMBER NEWS 6 Association Update 48 Beef Checkoff News 52 County News Pioneer Award

Cattleman of the Year

COLUMNS 8

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MCA President’s Perspective The Year of MORE

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CattleWomen’s Corner

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Straight Talk: Mike Deering

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On the Edge of Common Sense: Baxter Black

New Challenges

Taking Ownership

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2017 The Year to Forget

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Cowboy Poetry

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Capitol Update

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Junior Spotlight

Cowboy Valentine

Politics and Personalities

Youth of the Industry

The Missouri Beef Cattleman is an official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association.


MISSOURI

BEEF CATTLEMAN

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE MISSOURI CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Volume 47 - Issue 9 (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) Magazine Publishing Office 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, MO 65201 Phone: 573-499-9162 • Fax: 573-499-9167 Andy Atzenweiler: Editor/Production/Ad Sales P.O. Box 480977 • Kansas City, Missouri 64148 816-210-7713 • E-mail: mobeef@sbcglobal.net Coby Wilson: Ad Sales 573-499-9162 Ext 235

Missouri Cattlemen’s Association 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, MO 65201 Phone: 573-499-9162 • Fax: 573-499-9167

MCA Website: www.mocattle.com

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Coby Wilson Joins MCA Staff

DEPARTMENTS 7

New MCA Members

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Coby Wilson Joins MCA Staff

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Obituary: Jim Ross

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Angus News

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Advertiser’s Index

Find us on Facebook:

Missouri Beef Cattleman, (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) is published monthly (12 times a year) and is the official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Missouri, 65201. PERIODICALS postage paid at Columbia, Missouri and additional mailing offices. Subscription price is included as a part of the minimum membership dues of $70.00 per year in Missouri Cattlemen’s Association. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Missouri Beef Cattleman, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Missouri, 65201.

Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation www.mocattlemenfoundation.org

Missouri’s CattleWomen

http://mocattle.com/missouricattlewomen.aspx

2018 MCA Officers

Greg Buckman, President 573-696-3911 • 14601 N Rt U, Hallsville, MO 65255 Bobby Simpson, President-Elect 573-729-6583 • 3556 CR 6150, Salem, MO 65560 Marvin Dieckman, Vice President 660-596-4163 • 28998 Hwy JJ , Cole Camp, MO 65325 Matt Hardecke, Treasurer 573-846-6614 • 19102 Skymeadows Dr., Wildwood, MO 63069 David Dick, Secretary 660-826-0031 • 23529 Anderson School Rd., Sedalia, MO 65301

2017 MCA Regional Vice Presidents

Region 1: Adam Kuebler, 202 N. 6th St. Edina, MO 63537 309-706-4410 Region 2: Chuck Miller, 393 Spring Garden Road Olean, MO 65064 • 573-881-3589 Region 3: Charlie Besher, RR 5, Box 2402 Patton, MO 63662 • 573-866-2846 Region 4: Tony Washburn, 4912 457th Street King City, MO 64463 • 660-483-0038 Region 5: Bruce Mershon, 10015 Windsor Drive Lee’s Summit, MO 64086 • 816-525-1954 Region 6: Clay Doeden, 14555 S. Hwy A Stockton, MO 65785 • 417-808-0415 Region 7: Traves Merrick, 1956 Hwy 97 Miller, MO 65707 • 417-536-8080

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Missouri Cattlemen’s Association

Mike Deering • Executive Vice President - Ext 230 Mike@mocattle.com Maria Washburn • Manager of Membership - Ext 231 Maria@mocattle.com Coby Wilson • Manager of Strategic Solutions - Ext 235 Coby@mocattle.com Candace Rosen • MBC Editor/Production Artist Candace@mocattle.com

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Adam Heitman, AJ Cattle LLC, Elsberry, MO Mikayla Clubb, Rush Hill, MO Brent McCauley, Columbia, MO Presley McDannald, TM Cattle Co, Rocheport, MO Cody Sipe, Columbia, MO Matt Thompson, Crossroads Cattle Company, Columbia, MO Chad Bigham, Bogard, MO Danielle Lichte, Pleasant Hill, MO Kade Collins, El Dorado Springs, MO E. Jay Barry, Canton, MO Evan Cameron, Luray, MO Miles Cameron, Luray, MO Cody Martin, Pleasant Valley, MO Cydney Mayfield, Pilot Grove, MO Stephanie Schuster- Day, BTC Bank, Booneville, MO Drew Boehs, Norwood, MO Jason Boehs, Denlow Valley Ranch, Norwood, MO James Dampier, Weaubleau, MO Chase Garretson, Garretson Cattle, Humansville, MO Brent Gideon, Preston, MO Lynn Gideon, Preston, MO

Jade Morris, Pittsburg, MO David Cope, Aurora, MO Lauren Smith, Lewistown, MO Jerry Browning, Eagle Rock Angus, Silex, MO David Henke, Stepping Stone Point Farms Inc., Moscow Mills, MO Brian Utterback, Winfield, MO Paul & Sandy Unterbrink, Unterbrink Farms, Madison, MO Tony Fuller, Anderson, MO Mickey & Jessica Vest, Skidmore, MO Mike Wansing, Westphalia, MO Reagan Sneed, Houstonia, MO Kaitlyn Held, Clarksville, MO Gaila Ingram, Ingram Farm, Bridgeton, MO Ryan Britt, Britt Farms Inc, Clifton Hill, MO Gerrit Brouwer, Osceola, MO Shawn McEwen, Leonard, MO Pat Lybyer, Lybyer Farms, Huggins, MO Kelly Dade, Schell City, MO McKayla, Hoselton, Nevada, MO James Hellebusch, Marthasville, MO Lucy Hellebusch, Marthasville, MO Scott Jacob, Hermann, MO Taylor Young, Russellville, MO

See the MCA Membership Form on page 88 to become a member of MCA or give it to someone you know that should be a member.

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Missouri Beef Industry Council – All Cattle Sales Subject to Checkoff Source: MBIC By law, all producers selling cattle or calves, either privately or through livestock markets or registered dealers, for any reason and regardless of age or sex, must pay $1-per-head to support beef/veal promotion, research and information through the Beef Promotion and Research Act. Here are some specifics: • Whoever makes payment to the seller is considered a “Collection Point” or person and must withhold $1-per-head, remitting those funds to the Qualified State Beef Council (QSBC) where they live. Collection points could include auction markets, feedyards, dealers/order buyers, other producers, auctioneers, clerking services, banks, packers and other entities. • The buyer is generally responsible for collecting $1 per head from the seller. By law though, both buyer and seller are equally liable to see that $1-per-head has been collected and paid. •Also under the Act and the Order, the State Beef Council is legally responsible for collecting monthly assessments as well as a two percent late charge on checkoff remittances if they are not received in our office postmarked by the 15th of the month following the month of sale. • No producer is exempt from the checkoff. Buyers who resell cattle no more than 10 days from the date of purchase may file a non-producer status form and avoid paying an additional dollar. They are, however, responsible for remitting collected funds and reporting any transaction to the QSBC. • Remember: A dollar or a document! All selling/purchase transactions must be reported. In each case, either $1-per-head or non-producer status form document must be collected by the buyer from the seller to show the dollar has been collected and paid within the past 10 days. • If it’s more convenient, the seller of cattle may collect and remit funds collected. For instance, purebred breeders selling to many different buyers may wish to remit the checkoff themselves; persons exporting cattle should also pay when the cattle change hands. Buyers should keep receipts showing the checkoff has been paid.

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• Persons in non-compliance with the Act and Order are subject to a civil penalty of up to $7,500 per transaction, plus unremitted checkoff dollars and interest. In Missouri, remittance is sent to the Missouri Department of Agriculture:

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Missouri Beef Council c/o Missouri Dept. of Agriculture P.O. Box 630 Jefferson City, MO 65102-9911


University of Missouri receives $300,000 USDA Grant to Develop NCARG Source: News Bureau University of Missouri - Written by Logan Jackson The Division of Animal Sciences at the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources (CAFNR) boasts many strengths, including its vast research and work with beef cattle reproduction and genetics. The faculty, who have responsibilities not only in research, but also in teaching, extension and economic development, are experts in taking their findings and sharing them with farmers, ranchers and the Missouri community as a whole. With the help of a $300,000 grant from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the division will be able to expand on those leadership opportunities. The grant, through USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), will be used to develop The National Center for Applied Reproduction and Genomics (NCARG) in Beef Cattle. The goal of NCARG will be to promote the economic impact of the technologies Mizzou animal sciences faculty have

developed and are using every day. The focus is on giving farmers and ranchers the answer to the question – “What is the return on investment if I invest in reproductive or genomic technologies?” “We’re not just trying to fill people’s heads with new knowledge – it’s more about lighting a fire,” said Jared Decker, an Extension beef geneticist at Mizzou. “We’re focused on helping farmers and ranchers understand the technology, but, more than that, to trust the technology and identify ways they can use it. We want to educate producers and help them take that next leap.” The multi-disciplinary grant is in partnership with the MU College of Veterinary Medicine. NCARG will have a big focus on continuing education for veterinarians, including educational and training opportunities for veterinary students, graduate students, farmers, ranchers and allied industry professionals. “This center again underscores the collaborative environment between schools and programs that exist (Continued on page 16)

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at Mizzou to advance training for veterinary and animal science students, and research that benefits Missouri stakeholders,” said College of Veterinary Medicine Interim Dean Carolyn Henry, DVM, MS, DACVIM (Oncology). The idea for a center of this type has been discussed amongst faculty in the Division of Animal Sciences for the past few years. David Patterson and Mike Smith, both professors of reproductive physiology, have taught numerous full-day sessions at American Veterinary Medical Association meetings. With all of the programs in place at MU, Patterson and Smith had many discussions on ways to share that research with not only

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Missouri, but on a national level. “Our reproductive and genomic research is so closely tied – and both are great strengths within our division,” Patterson said. “A center of this nature is the logical next step for our division. With beef cattle, there is so much technology that could help operations. We want to help transfer that technology to industry participants at all levels.” Patterson has led the reproductive extension work in the Division of Animal Sciences, with Decker leading the genetic extension efforts. There will be a big focus on the economic impact of using these technologies as well. Scott Brown, an assistant extension professor in the Division of Applied Social Sciences, will lend his expertise in agricultural and applied economics to the center. “The returns available to farmers from adopting these technologies will ultimately drive their use, and it is critical we show the increase in profitability that can result from integrating reproductive and genetic technologies in commercial herds,” Brown said. NCARG already has received numerous letters of support from veterinary medical professionals, U.S. beef breed associations, pharmaceutical houses, genomic testing companies, industry consultants, the artificial insemination industry, branded beef and feeder calf programs, and state agencies, organizations and companies. “I think it really reflects how people value research in reproduction and genetics at Mizzou,” Decker said. “I think they value the extension and educational expertise at Mizzou as well. The Division of Animal Sciences has worked extremely hard to build relationships with each of these organizations and groups, and it’s exciting to see them offer their full support.”

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NCARG is still in the beginning stages of development. The group is seeking a location to house NCARG and is continuing to search for partnerships.

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“We’re taking the model we’ve developed in Missouri over the past 20 years and making it a national center,” Decker said. “We’re hoping to spread the model of integrating research and extension in genetics, reproduction and economics – and putting that together. That’s worked really well in Missouri. Now, let’s spread it nationally.” Along with Patterson, Decker, Smith and Brown, Bill Lamberson, Scott Poock, Thomas Spencer and Jeremy Taylor were part of the development of the grant.


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Arkansas Cattlemen’s Association Welcomes New Executive V.P. Source: Arkansas Cattlemen’s Association The Arkansas Cattlemen’s Association is proud to announce the hire of Cody Burkham to fill the role of Executive Vice President. Burkham will help lead the association in state and federal legislative efforts, represent the membership on diverse regulatory issues within numerous agencies, and oversee administrative roles inside the ACA. The association is excited to see his determination, self-initiative and industry knowledge propel the goals of ACA members forward. Burkham is an Arkansas native that grew up on a commercial cow-calf farm near Hope. He said being raised in the industry taught him the true value of the producers that this association represents. “Growing up on my family’s cattle operation near Hope, Arkansas instilled in me a great appreciation and respect for Arkansas’s agriculture producers,” Burkham said. “These men and women devote their lives to protecting our natural resources while feeding and fueling the world all while battling mother nature, volatile markets, and government interference.”

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After graduating from Southern Arkansas University, Burkham became integrated in the political science

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field. His passion for agriculture, legislative policy and public service led him to Washington, DC where he gained hands-on experience working with Congressman Bruce Westerman (AR-04). He said his rural Arkansas upbringing, ag-focused education, experience as a professional policy advisor and commitment to serve his fellow Arkansans prepared him to hit the ground running to help the association grow and the member’s voices be heard. “My experiences and values align with the mission of the ACA to promote and advance the priorities for the Arkansas cattle industry by engaging state officials, enhancing producer knowledge and involvement and communicating with the public,” Burkham said. Burkham began his role as Executive Vice President on January 15, 2018. He said he is both excited and humbled to be selected for the position and looks forward to making connections with all the members statewide. “I am proud to return home to work beside the cattle producers of Arkansas to advance the goals of the industry and the ACA,” Burkham said.


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Is your risk management plan adequate for your Livestock and Pasture?

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The Pasture, Rangeland and Forage (PRF) Program protects livestock producers from losses to productivity caused by poor forage conditions due to lack of rainfall. The Livestock Risk Protection (LRP) Program protects against a decline in the CME Feeders Cattle Price Index. Farmers Bank of Northern Missouri can assist you in the Risk Management of your cattle operation with a loan and or insurance to assist you in running your operation.

Richard Hallock • Risk Management Agent • 660-425-2261 Office 660-947-2474 Office • 641-442-5222 Cellphone


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We Market Cattle Across Missouri Weekly:

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We routinely find true price discovery weekly across Missouri. We work for sellers and with buyers to keep our industry moving forward.

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…on Friday in Bowling Green.

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On the Edge of

Common Sense with Baxter Black 2017 – A Year To Forget “Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.” – President John F. Kennedy, 1962. The U.S. at that time has been remembered as a “royal” time. It was the age of Camelot. His wife a queen, he was the Golden Boy. Change was coming. The first Catholic President, pictures of him and Lincoln on the wall, Baby Boomers in a flowery cloud singing songs of “Peace on Earth.” Kennedy reduced income tax from 90% to 60%. The economy was responding. Congress had a common enemy… the Soviet Union.

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Martin Luther King was calling for integration without violence. Granted, it was soon to blow up in his face, but

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people respected the right to disagree. Even if we held different views we didn’t hate each other because we had another opinion. Fifty years plus have passed. The last time we were civil to each other and united in our Americanism, was 9/11. Since then we have become a country full of hate and ugliness. It’s so PERSONAL. Martin Luther King’s dream of diversity has become so twisted by the government that we are more segregated than ever. Our “leaders”; the politicians, media, and the entertainment puppets swamp us in an ocean of hatred and malice, of blame and blatant lies… like a band of backstabbers whose intent is to vilify and slander. Imagine having a job that required getting up every day and digging through the scum of the bucket you live in, looking for something that will hurt someone. It’s no wonder our country is warped.


We are in the process of starting a new year. Mind you, the slut mongers, muckrakers and mud slingers are dragging their scum buckets across the line, too. If you are so perverted by your own propaganda that you are incapable of listening to another idea, you’re blind in one eye. Words hurt. They hurt even deeper when they are said to deliberately hurt someone. But the poison goes two ways, because the vitriolic accuser blackens his own soul. Once again, this riot of hate is PERSONAL. No tv commentator, Washington DC or New York City manipulator or tainted politician will tell the truth or apologize for their lies. All you can do is feel sorry for them.

So what can ONE person do? Since it is PERSONAL, start there. 80 % of Americans are Christians. Many wear a cross around their neck. The 2nd ‘Greatest Commandment’ is, “You shall love thy neighbor as thyself.” If it means anything to you, give it a try. Give it a hand, offer help, call a loner, forgive an old grudge and make it a habit to thank God you live in America. In my later life I have become a practitioner of the verse, “Forgiveness and mercy to all who offend.” The more it sinks in, the better I sleep.

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American Angus Association Hires Corporate Sales Manager The American Angus Association® announces the addition of Kathy LaScala as Angus Productions Inc. (API) corporate sales manager. LaScala began her role January 3 and will be overseeing industry sales operations to ensure profit maximization and realization of sales targets. In her role, LaScala will be working with corporate accounts to position advertising, sponsorship and marketing opportunities across all API platforms. She also will attend major shows, events, meetings and publication meetings. “Kathy brings a wealth of experience to our team, and we are excited to be able to put her deep knowledge of developing corporate clients to use growing our corporate relationships,” said Rick Cozzitorto, API president. “She already has hit the ground running as we continue to enhance our offerings.”

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LaScala grew up on a dairy farm in western New York and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in animal science from Cornell University. For more than 11 years, she was on the Vance Publishing sales team with her main focus being Drovers and Bovine Veterinarian. While at Vance, LaScala was responsible for developing, maintaining and growing a portfolio of national accounts and represented the brands at industry tradeshows, conferences and industry events each year. Most recently, she was a member of the sales team at Lee Newspapers, Inc. In addition, LaScala also was responsible for selling more than 80 percent of the exhibitor space for the inaugural Angus Convention Trade Show, which resulted in securing an even larger venue for 2015 and several spaces being forward contracted by the close of the 2014 show. She also has received many awards and achieved many accomplishments in her career, including the 2017 Livestock Publications Council Ed Bible Distinguished Service Award; 2015 – 2016 Kansas Agriculture & Rural Leadership (KARL) Class XIII; judge – 2017 Kansas State FFA Extemporaneous Speaking Finals; 2014 National FFA judge, sales & marketing, career development event; 2012-2013 Livestock Publications Council president. For more information about Angus Productions Inc., visit angus.media.

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Saturday, March 24th, 2018 • 1:00p.m. At the Farm in Sedalia, MO

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Matt, Jennifer & Hannah Boatright David & Mariah Boatright 660-826-1880/660-287-1341 660-620-9052 mboatrig@gmail.com maplewoodredangus@gmail.com www.maplewoodacresfarm.com Bob & Susan Felten 660-834-3445/660-621-2083 refelten@iland.net Your Seedstock Opportunity for 2018!

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Your

BEEF CHECKOFF NEWS Give Your Heart Some Beef!

By Luella Fischer Gregory, guest author

Gearing up for Heart Health

February is American Heart Health Month and you can join the “Go Red” movement by highlighting beef as part of a heart healthy diet plan. In a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers from Penn State University found that people who participated in the Beef in an Optimal Lean Diet study, consuming lean beef daily as part of a heart-healthy diet, experienced a 10 percent decline in LDL “bad” cholesterol, and still met targets for saturated fat intake. As part of Heart Health Month, all 244 Hy-Vee locations, including Missouri locations, will highlight Heart-Check signs near in-store beef, and 100 Biometric Screenings will be “powered” by Beef. It’s what’s For Dinner.

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New Cut Trends for the New Year

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The annual, “What’s Hot” culinary forecast released by the National Restaurant Association named several cuts as top trends for 2018. The Beef, It’s What’s For Dinner website highlights recipes and new ways to enjoy these cuts: Shoulder Petite Tender: The Shoulder Tender is a lean cut that is shaped like the Tenderloin, but smaller. Like Tenderloin, it can be cut into medallions and is great for grilling, roasting, or broiling. Sirloin Bavette: The Sirloin Bavette, also known as the Sirloin Flap, is a thin boneless cut that’s great for fajita meat. It should be marinated and then grilled or broiled. Coulotte: This juicy savory roast is known by many other names, including the Top Sirloin Cap. It is best roasted in the oven or smoked slowly on the grill. It can also be cut into Coulotte Steaks. Petite Sirloin: The Petite Sirloin, also known as the Ball Tip, is a small roast. It’s a great cut for someone looking to maximize value and can be roasted, broiled, or braised. Tri-Tip Roast: The Tri-Tip

Roast is well known across much of the west, but is just gaining popularity on the East Coast. This lean cut is tender, full of flavor and can be grilled, roasted, braised, or broiled.

Touchdown: Frito Lay teams up with BEEF

Your state and national checkoff continues to seek additional outlets for promoting and encouraging the purchase of beef. As part of a Super Bowl promo, Beef, It’s What’s For Dinner is teaming up with Frito Lay to give shoppers, using the Ibotta app, a dollar back when purchasing one pound of ground beef and FRITOS® Corn Chips. When redeeming the coupon, they will be able to view a Frito Pie recipe, perfect for game day. The campaign is expected to sell 200,000 pounds of fresh beef.

More Beef, Baby!

A recent Cornell University study shows that an expecting mother, whose diet is higher in choline, promotes overall baby’s cognitive development. The nutrient, choline, is one of beef’s top ten power nutrients that promote overall health and nutrition. The finding is important because choline is in high demand during pregnancy, yet most women consume less than the recommended 450 milligrams per day. Incorporating foods like beef that contain choline is a great way to boost brain development. The average person can get 50% their daily protein, plus ten essential nutrients in one 3-oz. serving of beef. Heart healthy, protein and nutrient-rich, a beef diet is beneficial for all ages and stages of life.

The Beef Message Reaches New Audiences

This winter, through Ag Education on the Move™ (partially supported by Missouri Beef checkoff), the beef message reached new audiences through professional development opportunities with career counselors. Missouri State Department of Education career staff


partnered with Ag Education on the Move™ to offer externships and career-ready meetings regionally. The intention of the meetings was to highlight today’s modern agriculture practices and career path opportunities for young people. As part of the effort, beef genetics and nutrition were a part of the dialogue and message. As a result, beef education and hands-on activities will also be highlighted at spring Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics educational events (STEM) at Washington State University (St. Louis); Central State University (Warrensburg), Northwest University (St. Joseph); and Kirksville Technical College.

Mary, a graduate of the University of Idaho, holds a BS in Animal Science - Livestock Production. We look forward to having Mary as part of the Missouri beef family. Winter Challenges - As we brave the cold and winter months, we are reminded how blessed we are to be a part a community that involves the most passionate, hardworking and selfless farm families. They continue to work hard during frigid temperatures to ensure quality beef is at your nearest meat case, favorite restaurant or retailer, and center of the plate. Beef continues to be king.

Beef in the Classroom

Over 5,000 students participated in Missouri’s Beef in the Classroom program in 2017. This program supported 23 junior and senior high school instructors facilitating lessons on beef selection, storage, preparation and nutrition. The program encourages the use of beef, while providing overview of production and process, from farm to table. To learn more about the program or to apply for support to use beef materials and lesson plans, visit mobeef.org, or call Taylor Tuttle at the office.

Welcoming a new face

We welcome Mary Scott, who will be leading consumer affair efforts and working to build relationships with those who play a significant role in beef’s journey from producer to consumer. Originally from southern Idaho, Mary grew up with ties to Idaho’s cattle industry.

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Prior to the Missouri Beef Industry Council, Mary worked for the Idaho Department of Agriculture, where she oversaw Egg Dealer and Aquaculture licensing programs, as well as Brucellosis and livestock traceability management, which included the operations of the state Brucellosis laboratory.

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Scholarships Available through FCS Financial Source: FCS Financial Since 2004, FCS Financial has provided more than half a million dollars to Missouri high school seniors seeking higher education. Up to 35 scholarships, each at $1,500, will be awarded to children or grandchildren of FCS Financial members. The scholarship deadline is March 1 and recipients will be notified in April. Applicants must be a graduating senior at a Missouri high school and a child or grandchild of an FCS Financial member. Additionally, the student must attain a grade point average of 2.5 or higher, an ACT score of at least 26 or rank in the top 20 percent of their senior class. The scholarship applicants are then judged by a non-partisan committee on leadership roles, work experience, community involvement and essays. Apply online at www.myfcsfinancial.com. Click on Scholarships at the top of the web page. Relatives of FCS Financial board members or employees are not eligible. FCS Financial serves 102 counties through 21 offices in Missouri. FCS Financial is a member of the Farm Credit System. The system is a nationwide network of cooperative lending institutions that provides credit and financial services to farmers, ranchers, rural residents and agribusinesses. With more than 100 years of agricultural lending experience, the Farm Credit System is the largest single provider of agricultural credit in the United States.

Cowboys at

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the Capitol

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on Wednesdays See Schedule on Page 80


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COUNTY NEWS

See What’s Happening in Your County

Southwest Missouri Cattlemen The first meeting of the association on January 2 was on a very cold night which likely explained the low turnout of 50 people. In spite of the cold, the meal catered by Maggie Mae’s of Miller warmed them up for the night. The meeting was held at the University of Missouri’s Southwest Research Center, Mt. Vernon. The hosts for the evening were Kent and Kathy Abele from the Green Springs Beef Development Center, Nevada. The Center was established in 1999 and now tests 800 to 1,000 bulls annually. In 2005 the Grow Safe Feed Systems were added which allows for individual animal feed intake measurement. From this data a residual feed intake value is developed. A brief business meeting was held that mainly involved upcoming events such as Soils and Crops Conference’s steak grilling, Monett Beef Conference, with a pot

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Kent Abele, makes a point during his presentation about the Green Springs Center.

luck chili supper and the upcoming state convention in Columbia. Traves Merrick, Miller will be a candidate for Region 7 vice president to replace Dustin Schnake, Stotts City at the state meeting. President Russell Marion also reported the association raised $17,600 at the annual meeting and foundation auction on December 2.

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Dallas County With January snows in Dallas County, came a lot of hay feeding. Members of the Dallas County Cattlemen’s Association heard about a unique way to feed hay at our January 9 meeting. Held at Prairie Grove School south of Buffalo, the 130 members and guests in attendance enjoyed a delicious roast beef dinner prepared by ladies of the community. The dinner was sponsored by O’Riley Livestock, Inc., of Lockwood, Missouri. We would like to thank company president Adam O’Riley and his family for sponsoring the meal.

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O’Riley presented a video and talked about his company’s hay grinding techniques. He will come to your farm and grind large or small bales with a 10-ton minimum. The ground hay can be added to a ration or fed separately. O’Riley also has a truck which can move up to 500 large bales from fields in one day. It was interesting to watch the video and see the truck at work loading and unloading the hay.

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Also talking that evening was Andy McCorkill, University of Missouri Extension livestock specialist and DCCA board member. Andy’s topic centered around proper hay storage and feeding. For producers who are lucky enough to have hay barns, storage loss will be minimal. However, round bales stored outside can suffer significant damage. Andy mentioned that many producers do not store hay properly. If large bales are stored with the rounded sides touching, much loss can occur. Other factors contributing to hay loss include bales that are smaller in diameter, bales stored under trees or on flat ground, and bales loosely wrapped. He recommended bales be stored three feet apart on crushed rock if possible with rows running north to south on a slope. He also touted using net wrap instead of plastic. If a big bale is just “set out,” up to 40 percent of the bale can be lost. Andy’s presentation showed different feeder designs and how they affect wastage. Many producers unwrap a large bale which has its advantages such as providing bedding for cattle but also adds to wastage. We appreciate Andy’s educational program and his knowledge of such an important topic to all cattle producers.


Buffalo FFA officers Madison Turner and Emily Whipple briefly addressed the group and asked for volunteers to help at an upcoming FFA contest which will be hosted by the chapter. Speaking on behalf of Jeff Knight, candidate for Missouri State Representative for the 129th district, was Amy Knight. She urged everyone to vote in the February 6 election. John Crawford announced that State Senator Sandy Crawford was recently appointed as a member of the Senate Agriculture Committee. She will certainly work hard for all of agriculture and beef cattle producers. A number of DCCA members very much enjoyed attending the recent 50th annual MCA Convention. We would like to thank Mike and his staff, the convention committee, and all MCA officers for such an outstanding convention and all their hard work. Congratulations to all the award winners, also! Our February 13 meeting will be held at Prairie Grove School. This is our annual pie auction for our scholarship program. Buffalo Livestock Market will host our March 13 meeting. We are very, very excited about our April 10th meeting which will be held at Prairie Grove School. Dr. Dan Thomson, host of the weekly “Doc Talk” show on RFD-TV, will be our guest speaker.

We certainly invite anyone and everyone to attend. What a great opportunity this will be to hear a thirdgeneration bovine veterinarian and host of a nationally aired veterinary television show talk to us! The evening will kick off at 7 p.m. with a delicious roast beef dinner prepared by the ladies of the community followed by Dr. Thomson’s presentation. So, mark your calendar now and watch for more details in upcoming issues of the Missouri Beef Cattleman magazine!

Callaway Livestock Center, Inc. On I-70, 4 miles east of Kingdom City, MO on outer road 573-642-7486 Every Monday: Slaughter Cattle Sale 10:00 a.m. Selling All Classes of Cattle 12:30 p.m.

1st Thursday Nite of Each Month: 6:00 p.m. Bred Cows and Breeding Bull Sale David Means

John P. Harrison

573-642-9753

573-386-5150

Jack Harrison

David Bell

573-386-2138

660-327-5633

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Lafayette County Lafayette County Cattlemen grilled 140 ribeye steaks December 5 for the Ray- Carroll annual meeting held at the American Legion Hall in Higginsville. Lafayette County was well represented at MCA convention in Columbia. Mark Nuelle, Bob and Alex Nuelle attended the Show-Me Select Replacement Heifer meeting held on Friday. Bob Nuelle serves as a board member for the West Central Region. Jennifer Wright attended MBIC meetings held and was elected president-elect of the Missouri Cattlewomen. August Bertz of Mayview, son of Harold and Melisa Bertz received the Hargadine Scholarship awarded by the Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation. Other Lafayette County members participating in meetings and the trade show included: W. A. Schlesselman, Kent and Marsha Corbin, John and Kathy Harris, Darrel and Sherie Neuner, Mike and Carolyn Boland, Marlene Edwards and Scott Wright.

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Plans are underway for the LCCA annual meeting to be held in Higginsville March 10. Annual reports and

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Lafayette County Cattlewomen enjoyed painting the American Barn at the MCW event with Paint the Town Columbia.

updates will be given, along with the election of officers for the upcoming year.


Missouri Angus Breeders The #1 State For Angus! 16th Annual Production Sale March 19

The Pipkin Family

9770 W. State Hwy 266 • Springfield, MO 65802 j_pipkin@sbcglobal.net • clearwaterangus.com Jim (cell) 417-827-0623 • Joann (cell) 417-827-2756 WD & Bonita Bulls • Replacement Females for Sale

GERLOFF FARMS AHIR Bulls Semen Available Females

Connealy Power Surge

3154 Hwy A Bland, MO 65014 573-437-3751/2507 Charlie Cell: 573-680-9117 Kim Cell: 573-291-1091 khuebler@fidnet.com www.gerloffcattle.com

Dedicated to the Livestock Industry Since 1906

Performance Tested Bulls

Steve Miller and Family 21146 400th Street Graham, MO 64455 (660) 582-1334 E-mail: bigmilr@grm.net Bull Sale March 10 • Maryville

Kenny & Janyce Hinkle 14103 E. Summers Rd. • Nevada, MO 64773 Ph/Fax: 417-944-2219 • Cell: 417-448-4127 E-mail: hpca@centurytel.net

OGDEN HORSE CREEK RANCH

WEIKER

Angus Ranch 660-248-3640

KO Reg. Angus Bulls • A.I. Bred Heifers Bred Cows & Pairs • Quarter Horses

Trevon 417-366-0363

Fred Weiker • Julia Weiker Fred: 660-248-3765

Kenny 417-466-8176

1339 Hwy 124, • Fayette, MO 65248 “Where the Extraordinary are Availible”

For All Your Angus Needs! www.sydgen.com

22227 Saline 127 Hwy • Malta Bend, Mo 65359 Brian Marshall • (660) 641-4522 www.marshallandfennerfarms.com

Since 1942

Spring Sale March 3 2018

21658 Quarry Lane • Barnett, MO 65011 Office: 573-302-7011 • Fax: 573-348-8325 E-mail: meadangus@yahoo.com Website: www.meadfarms.com

Alan Mead, Owner 573-216-0210

35004 E. McQuerry Rd • Oak Grove, MO 64075 www.valleyoaksangus.com The Ward Family David Ward– 816-229-8115 Tony Ward – 816-365-5930 tony@valleyoaksangus.com Kyle Lynn – 573-721-6382 – Herdsman kyle@valleyoaksangus.com

36327 Monarch Trail • Guilford, MO 64457 • (660) 652-3670 MACIL LAUGHLIN FAMILY Our program is designed to control genetic improvement - not risk it. AHIR Records since 1969 In the Angus Business since 1959 Breeding Cattle with the Progressive Commercial Cattleman in Mind.

734-260-8635

E-mail: Julie@missouriangus.org

missouriangus.org

Eddie Sydenstricker Office: 573-581-5900 EddieL@sydenstrickers.com Darla Eggers - Farm Secretary

Bub Raithel: 573-253-1664 Kyle Vukadin Kyle Tate Joe Strauss Kenneth Roberts

Influence Sale April 10, 2018

CIRCLE A RANCH

41 Hwy K Iberia, MO 65486 1-800-CIRCLE-A

Dave Gust, Sr. • Dave Gust, Jr. Nick Hammett, Commercial Mktg. Mike Lembke • Kevin Lennon

Spring Production Sale March 17, 2018

334 Seth St. - Lincoln, MO 65338 www.RichardsonRanch.net adrrmd@mail.missouri.edu

Registered Angus Bulls & Females Available

Pete 660-281-0353

Ashlyn 660-281-1720

AHIR and ultrasound information available on all bulls. Herd sires are selected based on a combination of traits and not on any single trait.

John A Jones • 573-680-5151

21320 Hwy 179 • Jamestown, MO 65046 Lifetime Member of the American Angus Association Since 1957

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Julie Conover, Gen. Manager 105 S. Harris St. • Cameron, MO 64429

Ben Eggers • E-mail: eggers@socket.net Barn: 573-581-1225 • Cell: 573-473-9202

JJ Skyline Angus

For your ANGUS Cattle Needs Contact:

MISSOURI ANGUS ASSOCIATION

P.O. Box 280, 3997 S. Clark • Mexico, MO 65265

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Bates County The December meeting of the Bates County Cattlemen was held at the Butler Elks Lodge. AgriLix and Mallory Ag sponsored the meeting and talked about the benefits of their liquid feed supplement. Tom Mallory expressed his appreciation to all the customers and shared a “Merry Christmas” greeting by giving a wonderful vocal performance of the song “Hallelujah.” President Ivan Fischer commented on the positive feedback of the annual meeting in November. Preparations are already in place for the 2018 meeting to be held Saturday, November 10th at the Adrian Optimist Building. Everyone is invited. and we look forward to celebrating another wonderful year. As 2017 came to a close, the group didn’t miss any opportunity to serve the community. They decided to contribute once again to Coats for Kids, an area program that provides coats and jackets to young people in need. They also plan to donate the meat for the Ballard PTO Cattleman’s Dinner. This event is a great way to support the local community while receiving a little recognition. Under new business, Ivan mentioned Mike Deering’s article in the magazine discussing property taxes. Ivan

encouraged everyone to be aware of the proposed changes and attend the Cowboys at the Capitol sessions to oppose any increases. Looking to 2018, the group decided to plan some social activities, including a chili cookoff for the December meeting. The next meeting was January 9 at the Farmhouse Restaurant in Appleton City. The January meeting of the Bates County Cattleman was sponsored by Dow AgriScience. Brant Mettler gave an informative presentation on weed control and the best practices for pastures in the area. Under old business, Ivan Fischer reported that preparations are complete for the Ballard PTO dinner on January 20. The group has already started plans for cooking activities in 2018, with the first event happening February 7th. The West Central AgriService customer appreciation day is a big event in the area, with an estimated 200 people attending. Ivan brought an idea before the group on behalf of Gary Morrow, who suggested the cattlemen donate tables to the fair board for use during the county fair. The group hosts a steak dinner before the beef steer show and Gary mentioned the tables currently used needed replacing. The group voted to buy 21 tables for the fair building. To wrap the meeting up, Ivan announced that new Bates County Cattlemen caps were available to purchase and Austin Black gave a report on the state convention.

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The next meeting will be February 13 at the MoKan Livestock Market.

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Hwy 42 West • Vienna Missouri 65582 45 Miles South of Jefferson City Selling All classes of Cattle Wednesday • 10:00 a.m. Featuring ‘Star-Vac Program’ Cattle Weekly DVAuction Service for convenient online viewing & bidding For More Information Call… David Patton Office Ross Patton Bill Patton 573-308-6655 573-422-3305 573-308-6657 573-308-6658 Visit our website: www.scrsvienna.com or E-mail us: scrsvienna@gmail.com “Make South Central your Livestock Market”


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Polk County Polk County Cattlemen’s Association met on Thursday, January 11 for our first meeting of the year at the CMH Community room. We had about 25 folks that braved the terrible weather to attend despite the sleet and cold temperatures. Ash Grove Aggregates sponsored the chili dinner. Keith Stevens the newly elected president presided over the meeting. We had Polk County Sheriff Danny Morrison give an update on crime statistics and happenings around the county. We then spent the rest First place people’s choice award winners Polk County Cattlemen - at the Elks Chili Cook Off.

of our time in an open forum discussion of activities, meetings, and direction of the association for the coming year. On Saturday, January 13 Polk County Cattlemen’s entered the local Elk’s chili cook off that is held annually and walked away with first place people’s choice award. Main ingredient was beef of course! We donated the cash prize back to the Elk’s to help the veteran and children’s programs that they have in the community.

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Our next meeting will be held on Thursday, February 8 at Smith’s Restaurant in Bolivar at 7 p.m. with Boehringer Ingelheim as our sponsor.

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November Pork Exports Set New Value Record; Beef Exports Also Strong Source: USMEF U.S. pork exports recorded the highest-ever monthly value in November while U.S. beef export value took another step toward a likely full-year value record, according to export results released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF).

one percentage point). For January through November, these ratios increased about one percentage point from a year ago to 26.5 percent of total production and 22.2 percent for muscle cuts. November pork export value averaged $58.38 per head slaughtered, up 6 percent from a year ago and the highest in six months. Through the first 11 months of the year, per-head export value averaged $53.18, up 7 percent.

November pork exports totaled 223,962 metric tons (mt), down slightly from a year ago. But through the first 11 months of 2017, export volume remained on pace for a new record at 2.23 million mt – up 7 percent year-over-year. November export value was a recordhigh $615.6 million, up 5 percent year-over-year and just the fourth time monthly export value has topped $600 million. Through November, pork export value increased 10 percent to $5.9 billion.

Beef exports reached 111,915 mt in November, down 3 percent from the large volume of November 2016 but still the second-highest monthly total of the year. Export value was also the second-largest of 2017 at $666.4 million, up 8 percent year-over-year. JanuaryNovember export volume totaled 1.15 million mt, up 7 percent, while export value climbed to $6.6 billion – up 15 percent from a year ago and slightly above the record pace established in 2014.

Exports accounted for 27.7 percent of total pork production in November (down slightly from November 2016) and 24.1 percent for muscle cuts only (up about

Beef exports accounted for 13.1 percent of total production in November, the highest since July but down from 14.9 percent in November 2016. For muscle

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cuts only, the percentage exported was 10.9 percent – down from 11.7 percent a year ago. For January through November, beef exports accounted for 12.8 percent of total production (down from 13.5 percent in 2016) and 10.3 percent for muscle cuts (steady with 2016).

Although pork variety meat exports slowed in November, the 11-month total of 498,661 mt was still 6 percent higher year-over-year. Export value climbed 19 percent to $1.06 billion, setting a full-year record and exceeding $1 billion for the first time.

“For all livestock producers, variety meat exports make a November beef export value averaged $306.63 per head very important contribution to carcass value,” explained of fed slaughter, up 4 percent from a year ago and the USMEF President and CEO Dan Halstrom. “USMEF highest in nearly three years. January-November export has made it a priority to help our international value averaged $282.34 per head, up 9 percent. customers develop more uses for pork variety meat and Pork variety meat exports top $1 billion, breaking to broaden the global market for these products. At a previous full-year record time of record-large pork production, it is especially gratifying to see variety meat export value jump nearly 20 percent, which boosts the bottom line for everyone in the supply chain.” 21st Annual Performance-Tested

April Valley Farms

Angus Bull & Female Sale Sunday, March 18th, 2018 Complimentary Lunch Served at Noon • Sale 1:00 p.m.

St. Joseph Stockyards • St. Joseph, MO Selling: 70 Fall & Spring Yearling Bulls 20 Cow/Calf Pairs • 25 Bred & Open Heifers

AVF EMBLAZON 1097 – He sells. Sire: LD Emblazon 999 Dam’s sire: SAV Bismarck 5682 CED +9, BW +1.5, WW +63, YW +110, Milk +19, MB I+.31, RE I+.50

Approaching Chinese New Year, beef exports to Hong Kong gained momentum in October and climbed again in November, with volume up 20 percent from a year ago to 16,106 mt (the largest since December 2014) and value soaring 43 percent to $119 million. Through November, exports to Hong Kong climbed 13 percent in volume (113,440 mt) and 26 percent in value ($765 million).

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AVF RESOURCE 3476 – He sells. Sire: SAV Resource 1441 Dam’s sire: SAV Angus Valley 1867 CED -1, BW +3.4, WW +65, YW +122, Milk +21, MB +.27, RE +.65

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Edmund J Theis, Jr. • Mark Theis Larry Theis • Jerry Theis 18432 Mt. Olivet Road Leavenworth, KS 66048 www.aprilvalleyfarms.com

Japan, Hong Kong drive beef export growth; new value records in Korea and Taiwan Japan continued to be the pacesetter for U.S. beef exports in November, with volume increasing 5 percent year-over-year to 24,819 mt and value up 6 percent to $159.2 million. This pushed Japan’s 11-month totals to 285,336 mt (up 20 percent) valued at $1.75 billion (up 27 percent and a new postBSE record). Chilled beef exports reached 137,707 mt through November, up 35 percent, valued at a record-high $1.02 billion, up 39 percent.

Jerry (913) 683-0775 Larry (913) 775-2130 Edmund (913) 682-4376 Fax (913) 682-8978 e-mail: avfarms@dishmail.net

For your free reference sale booklet, contact anyone in the office of the Sale Manager: Tom Burke, Kurt Schaff, Jeremy Haag, American Angus Hall of Fame, at the World Angus Headquarters, Box 660, Smithville, Mo. 640890660. Phone: (816) 532-0811 • Fax: (816) 532-0851 • E-mail: angushall@earthlink.net

November exports to China were 655 mt, the largest since the midJune market opening, valued at $5.7 million. Through November, exports reached 2,225 mt valued at $22.8 million.


“U.S. beef has only really scratched the surface in China, so exports are still relatively small but the value per pound is among the highest in the world,” Halstrom said. “This makes China an exciting addition to our strong portfolio of Asian markets, where beef exports continue to expand at an impressive rate. 2017 was a tremendous year for U.S. beef in Asia, and the coming year looks very promising as well.” Other January-November highlights for U.S. beef exports include: Driven by strong retail demand and reduced tariffs under KORUS, beef exports to South Korea have already set a new value record. Through November, exports increased 5 percent year-over-year in volume to 167,532 mt, valued at $1.1 billion – up 19 percent from a year ago and edging past the 2016 record of $1.06 billion. Chilled beef exports to Korea accelerated at an even faster rate, jumping 88 percent in volume to a record 41,086 mt – valued at $368.5 million, up 93 percent. A new value record was also established in Taiwan, where U.S. beef holds more than 70 percent of the chilled beef market. Through November, exports to Taiwan increased 3 percent from a year ago in volume

(40,402 mt) while value climbed 16 percent to $369.9 million – breaking the 2016 record of $362.8 million. November beef exports to Mexico dipped 8 percent in volume from a year ago to 20,161 mt, but value increased 2 percent to $80.8 million. Through November, exports to Mexico were steady with the first 11 months of 2016 in both volume (216,765 mt) and value ($894.1 million). Mexico is the second-largest volume market for U.S. beef (behind Japan) and ranks third in value (after Japan and Korea). Strong year-over-year growth in Indonesia, the Philippines and Vietnam pushed January-November exports to the ASEAN region to 38,039 mt (up 46 percent year-over-year), valued at $193.3 million (up 39 percent). Led by Chile, Peru and Colombia, beef exports to South America have already set new annual records. Through November, exports increased 27 percent from a year ago in volume (26,786 mt) and 23 percent in value ($106 million). Since shipments began in April, exports to Brazil have shown solid potential, reaching 1,998 mt valued at $7 million.

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James E. Ross, 1923-2017 James E. ( Jim) Ross, 94, of Columbia, died on Monday, Dec. 4, 2017 at the Harry S. Truman Veterans Hospital. In lieu of a funeral, his body will be gifted to the University of Missouri Medical Center for Human Research. A memorial service will be held at a future date. Jim was born on Jan. 28, 1923 in Perry, to Stella Utterback Ross and Clarence C. Ross. He graduated from Perry High School in 1941 and earned B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of MissouriColumbia. He served in the 71st Infantry Division, “Right of the Line Company”, of the Army in World War II in Europe as a First Sergeant. When he returned, he taught Veterans’ Agricultural classes in Mammoth Spring, Ark., where he met the love of his life and wife of 67 years, Tommie Benton Ross, who survives him. Following his teaching in Mammoth Spring, he became the Assistant County Agent of Miller County, Missouri and then became the County Agent of Texas County, Missouri. In 1958, he joined the faculty of the College of Agriculture at the University of Missouri in Columbia and retired in 1985 as a Professor Emeritus in Animal Science.

Throughout his career he was known statewide and nationally in his role as the State Beef Cow-calf Specialist in the University of Missouri Extension Service and was instrumental in moving the state of Missouri to the forefront of the beef cattle industry. He was an avid reader, excellent writer and public speaker who never forgot the punchline to any joke that he skillfully worked into his speeches. He served many years as the Secretary of the Missouri Livestock Association and was one of the founding members of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association. He served as an ex-officio director and advisor to that organization until his retirement. In 1986 he was named the Livestock Man of the Year and his portrait hangs in the Livestock Center. Additionally, he was the organizer of an annual state sheep shearing school. He was a member and Deacon of the First Christian Church and was a member of the Lick Creek Masonic Lodge, 302. Jim Ross was a highly skilled and avid fisherman who spent some of his happiest days on the water with his fishing and camping friends. He loved to garden and planted his last garden in the spring of this year. In addition to his beautiful, devoted and loving wife, he is also survived by his three beloved daughters, Linda Susan Ross Schroer (Colonel (retired) Ken Schroer), of Colorado Springs, Colorado, Dr. Patti Jane Ross Salinas (Dr. Manuel Salinas) of Springfield, Missouri, and Janet Eve Ross. He also was blessed with four grandchildren, Lt. Col. Michael Ross Schroer (Cora Beth Tuell Schroer), Meredith Anne Schroer Kipp, (Lt. Col. Timothy Kipp), David Ross Salinas and Thomas Ross Salinas; and eight great-grand- daughters, Makenzie, Madelyn and Ella Kipp, Natalie and Lauren Schroer, and Camryn, Suzanna and Miranda Salinas. He is also survived by numerous nieces and nephews, great-nieces and nephews and great-great-nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, his older sister, Zelma Menefee; and his older brothers, C. Verl, Samuel, and Pressley Ross.

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Memorials may be made in his name to the Lenoir Benevolent Society of Columbia.

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Campaign to Prevent Farms, Ranches From Being Regulated Like Toxic Superfund Sites Source: NCBA The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) today ( January 16) kicked off a media campaign aimed at spotlighting and correcting a recent court decision that will require livestock producers to comply with laws that are only meant to apply to highly toxic Superfund sites. The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) was enacted to provide for cleanup of the worst industrial chemical toxic waste dumps and spills, such as oil spills and chemical tank explosions. The Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) was enacted to ensure that parties who emit hazardous chemicals submit reports to their local emergency responders to allow for more effective planning for chemical emergencies. Both of these laws include reporting requirements connected to the events at hand. Neither of these laws was ever intended to govern agricultural operations, for whom emissions from livestock are a part of everyday life. To make this clear, in 2008, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finalized a rule to clarify that farms were exempt from CERCLA reporting and small farms, in particular, were exempt from EPCRA reporting, given that low-level livestock emissions are not the kind of “releases” that Congress intended to manage with these laws. Upon being sued in 2009, the Obama Administration’s EPA defended the exemption in court on the grounds that CERCLA and EPCRA do not explicitly exempt farms because Congress never believed that agriculture would be covered under these statutes, so a specific statutory exemption was not viewed to be necessary. Unfortunately, in April 2017, the D.C. Circuit Court vacated the EPA’s 2008 exemption, putting nearly 200,000 farms and ranches under the regulatory reporting authorities enshrined in CERCLA and

Call us to see some of the best calf raisers in the business. Grouping and Marketing customers’ calves since 1992!

“This is just another example of radical environmental groups using the courts to wildly distort the original Congressional intent behind legislation,” said NCBA President and Nebraska cattleman Craig Uden. “Unless this ridiculous situation is fixed, agricultural producers will soon have their operations treated like toxic Superfund sites, and government agencies like the U.S. Coast Guard will be inundated with unnecessary questions and reports.” NCBA’s issue campaign kicked off with a new online video featuring the group’s Chief Environmental Counsel, Scott Yager. In the video, Yager dons a yellow hazmat suit and explains the issue at an actual toxic Superfund site near Fredericksburg, Virginia. He then shows the contrast between the contaminated Superfund site and a cattle farm in nearby Louisa County, Virginia, that would likely have to comply with the new reporting requirements. “This is most certainly not a toxic Superfund site,” Yager explains from the Virginia cow pasture. “Unfortunately, a recent court decision may force cattle producers and other agricultural operations to report a bunch of information about their cow poop to the federal government under the Superfund laws that were only meant to deal with toxic waste. That is unless Congress acts soon.” NCBA is working with allies on Capitol Hill to introduce and quickly pass legislation that would correct the situation. The group is also working with other agricultural organizations to spotlight the issue and build support for a legislative fix. The groups will compile information and run a grassroots mobilization campaign through FreedomToFarm.com, a website hosted by the National Pork Producers Council (NPPC.)

Ron McBee 221 State Hwy H Fayette, MO 65248 (573) 228-2517 E-mail: mcbcattle@aol.com Website: McBeeCattleCompany.com

FEBRUARY 2018

Your One-Stop for Braunvieh Influence and Black Hybrid Commercial Females

EPCRA. The new reporting requirements could go into effect as soon as January 22.

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Same Roots, Different Field Alabama Athlete-turned-chef Promotes Beef in Coastal Town Source: CAB - What a Chef Wants - Laura Conaway Sitting on the back deck, seven feet from salt water, Chris Sherrill’s right where he never thought he’d be. With a drawl and handshake that reveal his roots, the Alabama chef had no plans for the title. “My dream was to play college football,” Sherrill says matter-of-factly, “so I worked toward that.” A different title – one with trophies and flashy rings – drove his daydreams. An injury at 18 sidelined them all. “The top of my body went one way and the lower half the other,” he tells. That was it. The moment that set his life on the course he now craves.

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At Salt, his new concept at the San Roc Cay Marina in Orange Beach, Alabama, Sherrill brings skill and natural talent to a different game. He’s studied his opponents and, with a recipe book of plays, equips his

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team for touchdown after touchdown. “What we are doing is a little cutting-edge for Alabama,” Sherrill says. Salt features an “ultra fresh” menu that dispels traditions of fried shrimp and imports. Whole fish on ice, dirt dangling from produce, “we can tell you almost to the dot where your meal was sourced.” Suave to social media, “I may do a Facebook Live video from a farm where we are harvesting okra one day or show footage from the Certified Angus Beef® (CAB®) brand Chef Tour the next.” That break from the kitchen, a chance to learn from the people who produce his food and share with those who consume it keeps Sherrill growing and Salt, relevant. “There are great restaurants in our town, and that competition breeds excellence,” he says. “We work together but we’re all on our toes to outdo each other, too.” One way he does that is through his beef. (Continued on page 70)


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“We grow the best seafood in the world and we tout that,” Sherrill says of the renowned catch common to the Gulf. “We believe that CAB goes out and finds the best beef in the world.” A visit to the company’s headquarters left the chef intrigued by the process of dry age. “I was just blown away by the smells, the pungentness, the beauty of it. I was hooked.” He wanted it to be a signature of Salt. Not one to waste or spend in excess, he took a CocaCola beverage cooler and a store-bought humidifier and let the coastal humidity do its thing. “It holds at 39 degrees and 80-85% humidity,” he says of his accidental artistry. “We’re hitting a home run.” To an out-of-towner’s eye, it may seem odd, boastful beef in a coastal town, but Sherrill assures it accounts for 50% of Salt’s sales.

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“If you have a first-class seafood program, you have to have a first-class steak program,” he says. When you achieve “dual awesomeness,” it shows, and people start to talk about it.

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That’s the best marketing you can’t buy, the chef says. The cuisine backs it up and keeps tourists and regulars coming back for more. “A well-marbled ribeye’s the best steak in the world if you ask me,” Sherrill says. If it were his last meal, he’d go for a 64-oz. sirloin. “Just a big ole’ slab of sirloin,” along with truffle mashed potatoes and sautéed mushrooms and onions, “and I’m gonna get shot for this but a jar of A.1. Sauce because I love it,” he says with a grin. Just talking about food reveals Sherrill’s passion. It’s hard to imagine there was ever another in its place. Sleeves pulled up, mind running wild, the chef gig fits him fine. In fact, it allows him to work with his wife, Jenny, who runs the front of house. Together, they support their family of six. “It’s been a good and long career,” Sherrill says. Barely 41, he’s got plenty up his sleeve. To cattlemen who supply his customers with the beef they crave, he says, “Don’t give up. There are people who believe in the product and stand by it.” Feet from the salt water, he’s doing the same.


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Excellence Can Cut Costs Source: CAB - Black Ink® - Miranda Reiman Working as a waitress throughout high school, I hated the sight of an empty table. It meant one less chance to make a tip. In fact, if it were a slow day at Perkins, and there were too many tables without customers, they’d just start letting servers go home early. When saving for a car that will get you to college, you don’t want your section to be the one they close. Until a few months ago, I had never thought about that from a restaurant-wide, economics standpoint. Then I heard the owner of one of the largest steakhouses in Texas talk about the cost of an empty table. Just a single, two-person table, sitting empty every night could reduce his sales by almost $100,000 annually. The strategy to keep that from happening hinges on everything from customer service to food quality to

what’s on the menu, but it’s all based on the idea of getting repeat customers. Decisions on cutting costs are never taken lightly, because on the other end of that choice is a consequence. “I will refuse to make a decision on a contract, sitting in my office, looking at a spreadsheet,” the restaurateur said. “I make that decision, instead, walking down to the dining room and looking at my customers and talking to them, because if the customer doesn’t benefit from my decision, I will not benefit from my decision.” He acknowledged food cost is a big deal, a large portion of the budget. That’s why it’s so alluring to try to find ways to cut corners. Substitute the cost of food for genetics or health products and that statement begins to sound like something you can relate to as well. Imagine he’s not a steakhouse owner, but rather a cattle feeder or a rancher. Doesn’t this account ring true in all segments of the beef community? “Here is the sin in my business, right here: temptation to buy cheaper. We spend a lot of time in our business trying to buy smarter. I don’t want to buy cheaper,” he said. Instead, he serves the best beef he can, because “mediocracy is everywhere.” Selling excellence brings people in the door. It keeps the tables full. It’s still a matter of cutting costs, really. Opportunity cost, that is.

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On the live cattle side, we have our own version of the empty table. Nobody wants a shallow crowd or disinterested bidders at the auction barn when your calves walk in, or a lack of response to calls about possible private-treaty sales. After a buyer procures your cattle once, you want to keep them coming back for more, just like the regulars at that steakhouse.

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That begs the question: Are there any places in your operation that could use a little more cost cutting, by way of adding excellence?


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Behind the Static, 560-lb. Weaning Weights Source: CAB - On Target - Justin Sexten, Ph.D. It looks like weaning weights have gone pretty much nowhere for 15 years. That’s according to a summary of North Dakota State University’s Cow Herd Appraisal of Performance Software (CHAPS) that presents genetic progress as functionally static since 2003. I couldn’t miss that summary, well-publicized and pointed out by just about every contact and source I know. Static being a relative term—there were fluctuations in the data—weaning weight hovered around 560 pounds (lb.), weaning age was 193 days and average daily gain was 2.5 lb. Seeing the flat trends, author Kris Ringwall suggests genetic progress in the commercial cow-calf sector is “mature.” The topic came up during a “Bull-Pen Session” at the Range Beef Cow Symposium in Cheyenne, Wyoming, in December, where the discussion suggested the beef industry has gone astray, utilizing growth genetics while failing to increase weaning weight but driving cow size up. Well, some of that rings true. A rise in cow mature weight is evidenced by the increasing yearling weight EPD (expected progeny difference) in all major breeds. But combine that with a steady increase in fed-cattle carcass weights for more than 15 years and the idea that weaning weight remains static seems to defy logic. CHAPS is not alone in documenting the static trend. David Lalman at Oklahoma State University summarized several data sets across the country with similar results at Cattlemen’s College last year.

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How do weights at one sector level off while growing steadily at another? Genotype and environment combine to produce a phenotype. Across the beef industry, genotypic growth potential has certainly grown, as all segments demanded. Virtually no one aims to go backward, in genetics or any other production technologies.

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But how many cow-calf producers aspire to participate in any other segment? To the extent that number remains static, weaning weights appear static. Genetic progress aside, two aspects of this “static” equation remain constant in most operations that govern this progress.

The environment for those genetics limit their expression at the commercial cow-calf level, lush environments less so than herds restricted by that governor. Keep in mind environment is no physical location; differences in your pasture or range management offer differing nutrients; abundant and restricted supplies can exist across a fence. Lalman has shown data where each extra pound of weaning weight requires 27 lb. more dry matter for the cow to make sufficient milk to increase weight gain. That causes some to suggest we should reduce growth potential in all cattle to accommodate the ranch environment, the least-common nutrient denominator. However, challenges arise when we realize the required efficiencies for greater gain in the nutrient-rich environments further down the supply chain. That’s where the second aspect of the equation is often ignored. The CHAPS summary notes that these static and historical weights are matched with a historically static marketing program. It’s a program where least and greatest growth potential are typically sold to the next user rather than retained to capitalize on genetic investment. Imagine the growth you could capture at the ranch level if the same 27 lb. of dry matter the cow needs to increase weaning weight were fed to calves after weaning. Even at a poor 9-to-1 feed conversion, you could triple the calf gain compared to feeding it through the cow. Backgrounding calves at the ranch rather than selling your genetic potential at weaning offers not only improvements in nutrient-use efficiency but marketing options of retained ownership or selling weaned, preconditioned calves. Backgrounding enterprises may not fit every ranching operation, but cattle selected for limited growth don’t fit in any post-weaning feeding operation. And when you don’t retain ownership, you MUST sell to one of those. As heifers are kept back and sires are purchased this year, look for those that continue to match the ranch environment while offering the next owner upside potential. The tools available to make such decisions have never been more available. And if you want to understand how important upside potential beyond the ranch can be, try setting up an new enterprise where you are the next owner.


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NCBA, Cattle Genetics Experts Team Up For 2018 Genetic Webinar Series Source: NCBA Cattle genetics will be the focus of a new set of webinars to help cattlemen and women better use the tool in their operations. The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association is teaming up with six genetics specialists from across the country to offer the NCBA Cattlemen’s Genetics Webinar Series, which kicked off Jan. 18, 2018. Titled “Fake News: EPDs Don’t Work,” the January webinar will be followed by sessions in February, March and April that explore other aspects of genetic utilization that will give cattle producers a knowledge boost on cattle selection and breeding. Providing expertise to producers through the webinar series is the eBEEF team, a group of six genetic specialists from five academic institutions that have invested time and resources in the advancement of the cattle industry through genetics. Members of the team are: Darrh Bullock, Ph.D., University of Kentucky; Jared Decker, Ph.D., University of Missouri; Alison Van Eenennaam, Ph.D., University of California-Davis; Matt Spangler, Ph.D., University of Nebraska; and Megan Rolf, Ph.D., and Bob Weaber, Ph.D., Kansas State University. The Cattlemen’s Genetics Webinar Series is being coordinated by the NCBA producer education team. The January session on EPDs featured Van Eenennaam and Spangler, with other members of the eBEEF team conducting future webinars. According to Josh White, NCBA executive director of producer education, the genetics webinar series is an

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extension of NCBA educational webinars started several years ago. “Our model has been to do six or seven timely and seasonal webinars a year, geared to times that producers are looking at specific production practices,” White said. “We noticed that some of our largest viewership has been when we focused on genetics in the spring. We are excited to be partnering with the eBEEF team to expand the offering in 2018.” Darrh Bullock said the eBEEF team was created to expand the understanding of genetics beyond their own states. “Genetics specialists are a limited resource,” he said. “Even though we provide education in our own states, we feel an obligation to provide more education on a national basis, recognizing that many states don’t have genetics specialists.” Bullock said one of the creations of the eBEEF team is a website on eBeef.org where cattlemen can find out much of what they need to know about the genetics of beef cattle, featuring videos, factsheets, frequently-askedquestions and other resources. The new opportunity to work with NCBA on the webinar, he said, is an extension of the team’s outreach. “We have worked informally with NCBA for years, through Cattlemen’s College and individual webinars on genetics,” he said. “This new program is an opportunity to provide cattlemen with more information in advance of the upcoming breeding season, getting them up-todate genetics information. There really is no better way to get the word out about this topic than through NCBA and the educational programs they coordinate. They reach many cattlemen.” Bullock said the upcoming webinar series is geared for any producer who would benefit from genetics knowledge, from the experienced seedstock breeder to someone who might be new to the cattle industry and needs to better understand genetics. Cattle producers are invited to join the webinars live, or access recordings of them following the sessions. For more information on the NCBA Cattlemen’s Genetics Webinar Series go to the producer education tab of the NCBA.org website. Recordings of previous webinars are also available on the site.


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Farm Bill Action Possible in Early 2018 if Congress Keeps Much of Present Law Source: Duane Dailey, Writer, University of Missouri Extension

“How much can this Congress agree upon?” Brown asked the audience.

COLUMBIA, Mo. – There’s an open window for passing a farm bill in early 2018, says Scott Brown, University of Missouri policy analyst. But potential passage gets tough by late spring.

Action on major legislation often slowed or stalled.

Getting action depends on Congress quickly agreeing to pass a farm bill much like what exists. Mostly, farmers are pleased with current legislation, Brown told the MU Crop Management Conference. But every commodity group has ideas for tweaks to their parts of the farm bill. Insurance to cover disaster losses has gained favor with farmers. However, dairy farmers don’t care for their margin protection plan added to the last farm bill.

Legislative votes from farm districts are limited. “Nutrition matters for many more legislators,” Brown says. Previous congressional votes to cut nutrition from the farm bill failed. “There may be moves to change who qualifies for food stamps,” Brown says. Congress has been moving away from ad hoc disaster assistance toward insurance programs, Brown says. Some attempt to reduce subsidies to insurance programs.

In writing a farm bill, spending will be important. With concern about federal deficit, cutting costs will drive most decisions.

Overall, insurance spending is a “drop in the bucket” compared to many federal expenditures. Agricultural aid was eased with higher crop prices after the last farm bill was passed. Support comes from the market.

Farm groups must watch what’s in the appropriations bill that keeps being pushed back. Budget will decide what happens in many areas. “What happens in dairy support may be affected more by budget than by farm bill,” Brown says.

Jim and Scott Cape…

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The Congressional Budget Office reports 77 percent of farm bill spending goes for nutrition aid.

If House or Senate ag committees open talks for dairy changes, other groups will want changes as well. “Proposed changes likely will cost more, not less,” Brown says.

If debate opens over spending priorities, that slows passage to a standstill.

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At the start of each farm bill debate there are attempts to remove food stamps from the farm bill. From the standpoint of votes, the removal isn’t likely, Brown says.

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“Not so fast,” Brown says. “Few farm bills are written in exactly five years.” Legislators stick with what they have. That could happen with the present farm bill. “Overall, there’s support for what we have,” Brown says. Passage of the last farm bill dragged on for four years. “From 2011 to 2014 the ag committees were exhausted updating their legislation annually before one finally passed,” Brown says. “It took a lot of baling wire to tie together provisions that gathered votes needed to pass a bill.”

The House and Senate ag committee have held many hearings, Brown says. That increases the chance of something happening quickly, but if delayed until after spring other issues take priority. A mid-term election year ahead slows all action. However, legislators will look for bills they can agree on so they can show what they have done. The window for a farm bill remains open.

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Study Points to Four Key Factors Shaping America’s Ag Industry A study released by Osborn Barr reveals many challenges and opportunities on the horizon for the agriculture industry as the next generation prepares to take over the farm.

“The reason I do not choose farming as a career is because I need a more steady option and also want a career that does not have such big risk and startup costs,” said one Gen Z Study Respondent.

The generational shift study titled “Farmers of Tomorrow: Generation Z’s Future in Agriculture” is the first comprehensive study to better understand how the next generation views farming and ranching.

2. Gen Z Views Government Involvement More Positively Research indicates a shift with Gen Z viewing government involvement more positively than the older age group.

The initial qualitative research results indicate the gap in attitudes, perceptions and intentions between “Gen Z” (18-to 22-years-olds with an immediate family member farming) and “BoomXY” (Baby Boomer, Generation X and millennial farmers age 28 to 74). O+B’s Ag Advisory Council – which was created in June 2017 to examine and interpret some of agriculture’s most important issues facing rural America – provided strategic guidance on the study development. Richard Fordyce, Ag Advisory Council Chairman, said this study is vital to our future and he’s eager to lead more groundbreaking research. “A number of trends emerged, and their potential for impacting the industry are real,” said Fordyce. “It’s important to consider how the next generation will shape the ag industry moving forward.” The study results identified four major factors shaping the future of agriculture: 1. Farm Succession Expectations Differ Of the sample surveyed, succession expectations differ between older farmers/ranchers and their children, many of whom plan to work in agribusiness.

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• 71 percent of BoomXY farming parents believe at least one of their children may desire to take over their farming business someday COMPARED to 54 percent of the farm-raised 18-to 22-yearolds who indicate a desire to take over the family farming/ranching business some day

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• For those 18- to 22-year-olds who don’t currently plan to take over the family farming/ranching business, obtaining a degree in an ag-related field is viewed as a means of remaining involved in agriculture with the steady paycheck that farming often doesn’t offer

• Gen Z had an overwhelmingly positive outlook when it came to government entities (USDA, EPA, FDA), far outpacing BoomXY in regard to the FDA, in particular •64 percent of the farm-raised 18-to 22-year-olds view restricted immigration policy FAVORABLY compared to just 35 percent who oppose greater immigration restrictions “Based on this data, I believe Gen Z has more trust in government, they know the issues and they are committed to ag,” said Fordyce. “They are more engaged with law makers, active in policy and want to make a difference.” 3. Ag Tech Tops the List for Gen Z According to the study, Gen Z is more in favor of agricultural technology. • 85 percent of the farm-raised 18-to 22-year-olds view existing herbicide technologies positively COMPARED TO 43 percent of farmers 28 and older • 85 percent of the farm-raised 18-to 22-year-olds view existing insecticide technologies positively COMPARED TO 59 percent of farmers 28 and older • The older age group had a more balanced opinion of organic farming, while Gen Z skewed negatively and also in favor of existing bio ag technologies • GMOs and more advanced genetic engineering is largely perceived positively by both ag groups but even more so from Gen Z “Gen Z seems to not be afraid of technology and even expect new advancements more than any other generation,” said Fordyce. “It’s a very encouraging


signal for this industry, and I’m confident in our leaders of tomorrow. 4. Gen Z Prefers Peers Over Brand Names Research shows Gen Z is less brand loyal, and more peer driven when making decisions and are more receptive to marketing messages. • 78 percent of the farm-raised 18-to 22-year-olds consider brand names important when it comes to purchasing farm products COMPARED TO 90 percent of BoomXY farmers/ranchers • For ag information, Gen Z was far more receptive to information provided by their peers via social media, other farmers, network/cable TV and ag/ rural radio, while the older age group favored ag print pubs, network radio and manufacturer websites

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• Gen Z was much more inclined to pay attention to marketing messages, while BoomXY was not, unless it came from their dealer/retailer “We know what we need on our farm and ultimately if it gets the job done the brand shouldn’t matter,” said one Gen Z survey respondent. This baseline data will be expanded within the next year to provide a more in depth understanding of the compelling aspects of the next generation and tomorrow’s American family farm. Future key topics of exploration include ag tech adoption, food innovation and the broader issues of rural America. Visit RuralSpirit.com to learn more about future research and survey results. FEBRUARY 2018 83


Feedout Ink Is Red: Steers Lose Average of $134 Per Head Source: Eldon Cole, Livestock Specialist The 97 steers that finished the Missouri Steer Feedout on November 14 and December 19 ended up with an average per head loss of $134.76. There were fourteen different owners from across the state in the feedout this year. “The cause for the red ink was partly due to a relative high average set in price on June 6,” said Eldon Cole, livestock specialist with University of Missouri Extension. The average price then for the 696 pound steers was $158.77 per hundred or $1076 per head. The MBCSept2014c.qxp_Layout 1 9/24/14 Page 62 average carcass price 9:59 was AM $185.95 per hundred which considered premiums and discounts. The cost of gain was $75.51 which was higher than anticipated due to deaths of five head. “One or two of the steers were nearing their harvest date when they died. Causes of death were varied from bloat, pneumonia, abscessed lung, lever abscesses and maybe hardware,” said Cole. The group of five that lost the least money at $29.05 per head was owned by Meadlowlyn Farm, Cassville. They were Angus-sired by Cedar Ridge. They gained 3.62 lbs. per day during the period with four grading low Choice and four were Yield Grades one or two. Close behind with the least loss was the group of five purebred Angus from Carrier’s Muddy Creek Angus,

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Lockwood. Their per head loss was $32.91. All five made Choice with one going Certified Angus Beef which boosted his carcass value by $8 per hundred. Jeff Kaal, Verona entered five head out of a Polled Hereford sire. They came in their a loss of $46.47. Following closely was Russell Marion’s, Wentworth group at $46.57 for two Angus bulls. Individually, the highest profit steer came from Steve Jones, Mt. Vernon with a profit of $230.37. His profit was helped by his top average daily gain of 5.14 lbs. per day and his CAB carcass bonus. He and his five herd mates had an average daily gain of 4.30 lbs. which was 0.83 pound above the average of the 97 steers. Their sires were out of GAR Prophet and GAR Sure Fire. Other standout individuals included an Angus from Norman Garton, Nevada who rated number one for retail value per days of age. Jones also had the top steer for retail value per days on feed. As always the feedout program results in surprises as some cattle perform better than expected while others disappoint according to Cole. Still, cow-calf producers can benefit from feedouts or retaining ownership to slaughter as they try to learn their herd’s strengths and weaknesses. “Owners who discover they have cattle that consistently stay healthy, gain above average and produce carcasses that are above average in quality and yield grade should use that as a marketing tool for feeder calves and breeding stock,” said Cole. The next Missouri Steer Feedout will be for steers calved after July 1, 2017. They will be sent to southwest Iowa and a Tri-County Steer Carcass Futurity feedlot. For more information, contact any of the MU Extension livestock specialists in southwest Missouri: Eldon Cole in Lawrence County, (417) 466-3102; Andy McCorkill in Dallas County at (417) 345-7551; Dr. Randy Wiedmeier, in Ozark County at (417) 679-3525; or Dr. Patrick Davis in Cedar County at (417) 276-3313.

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Sale Calendar February 3 Loonan Stock Farm Sale, Corning, IA February 6 Hoover Angus Production Sale, Creston, IA February 10 J&N Black Hereford Sale, Leavenworth, KS February 10 Crooked Creek Angus Sale, Clarinda, IA February 11-18 Iowa Beef Expo, Des Moines, IA February 16 Cow Camp Ranch Bull Sale, Lost Springs, KS February 17 Byergo Family Angus, Savannah, MO February 17 Genetic Blend Bull Sale, Carthage, MO February 23 Jamison Hereford Bull Sale, Quinter, KS February 24 Seedstock Plus North Missouri Sale, Kingsville, MO February 24 Stratford Angus, Pratt, KS February 24 Cowman’s Kind Bull and Female Sale at Post Rock Cattle Co., Barnard, KS February 25 Missouri Angus Breeders Futurity Sale, Columbia, MO March 2 Express Ranches Spring Bull Sale, Yukon, OK March 3 Seedstock Plus Arkansas Bull Sale, Hope, AR March 3 Mead Farms Spring Sale, Versailles, MO March 3 Peterson Farms Charolias Sale, Mnt. Grove, MO March 7 Ferguson Angus Sale, Agra, KS March 8 BJ Angus, Manhattan, KS March 10 Seedstock Plus Red Reward Bull & Female Sale, Humansville, MO March 10 Valley Oaks Spring Sale, Kingsville, MO March 10 Wright Charolais Bull Sale, Kearney, MO March 10 Flickerwood Angus Production Sale, Jackson, MO March 10 Genetic Power Gelbvieh and Balancer Bull Sale, Springfield, MO

Cowboys at the Capitol FEBRUARY 2018

on Wednesdays

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See Schedule on Page 80

March 10 March 10 March 10 March 10 March 11 March 11 March 13 March 14 March 15 March 15 March 16 March 16 March 16 March 16 March 17 March 17 March 17 March 17 March 17 March 17 March 17 March 18 March 18 March 19 March 20 March 23 March 24 March 24 March 24 March 24 March 24 March 24 March 25 March 26 March 26 March 26 March 27

Heart of the Ozarks Angus, West Plains, MO JAC’s Ranch, Bentonville, AR Galaxy Beef, Maryville, MO Redstock Red Angus Sale, Chillicothe, MO Sampson Annual Bull Sale, Kirksville, MO Gleonda-Garton Legacy of Performance Sale, Springfield, MO Cooper Hereford Ranch Production Sale, Willow Creek, MT Stucky Ranch, Kingman, KS Benoit Angus Ranch Sale, Esbon, KS Henke Farms, Salisbury, MO Marshall & Fenner/Murphy Cattle Co, Marshall Junction, MO THM Land and Cattle, Vienna, MO Sunflower Genetics, Maple Hill, KS MBS Charolais Bull Sale, Bowling Green, MO Circle A Spring Production Sale, Iberia, MO Pinegar Annual Herdbuilder XXIV Sale, Springfield, MO Brinkley Angus Ranch, Green City, MO Musgrave Angus, Griggsville, IL Mississippi Valley Angus Assoc. Palmyra, MO Falling Timber Farm, Marthasville, MO Flying H Bull Sale, Butler, MO Briarwood Angus Annual Production Sale, Butler, MO April Valley Sale, St. Joseph, MO Hinkles Prime Cut Angus, Nevada, MO KW Cattle Co. Ft. Scott, KS SE MO PT Bull Sale, Farmington, MO Seedstock Plus South Missouri Bull Sale, Joplin Regional Stockyards, Carthage, MO Worthington Angus, Dadeville, MO NE MO Performance Tested Bull Sale, Palmyra, MO Maplewood Acres, Sedalia, MO PBG Bull Sale, Montrose, MO Magness Land and Cattle, Miami, OK C/S Cattle, Pomona, MO Oleen Bros. Dwight, KS SW MO PT Bull Sale, Springfield, MO Green Springs Bull Test Sale, Nevada, MO Genetrust Brangus, Suhn Cattle Co. Eureka, KS


April 2 Brockmere Farms, New Cambria, MO April 5 Hunter Angus Sale, Fair Grove, MO April 6 Meyer Cattle Co Sale, Bowling Green, MO April 7 Shoal Creek Simmental, Excelsior Springs, MO April 7 Angus in the Green Hills, Green City, MO April 7 Show Me Classic Bull Sale, Windsor, MO April 7 Four States Angus Assn. Sale, Springfield, MO April 7 Gardiner Angus Sale, Ashland, KS April 10 Sydenstricker Genetic Influence Sale, New Cambria, MO April 13 Spur Ranch Sale, Vinita, OK April 14 The Renaissance XXVI Sale, Strafford, MO April 14 Frank/Hazelrigg Sale, Fulton, MO April 14 Howard County Angus Sale, Fayette, MO April 14 Ozark and Heart of America Beefmaster Sale, Springfield, MO April 21 McBee Spring Selection Day Sale, Fayette, MO April 21 East Central Missouri Angus Association Sale, Cuba, MO April 21 Express Ranches Grass Time Sale, Yukon, OK April 28 Windy Hill Charolias Farms and Guests Sale, Cedar Hill, MO April 22 C&C Performance Breeders Sale, Tina, MO April 27 Gerloff Enhanced Female Sale, Cuba, MO April 28 HHCA Highland Auction, Labanon, MO April 28 Pinegar Limousin, Springfield, MO April 29 Jim D Bellis Family Female Sale, Aurora, MO

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Advertiser Index

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AMEC...........................................................................77 American Angus Association.........................................73 April Valley Sale............................................................62 Benoit Angus Ranch......................................................75 BJ Angus Sale................................................................47 Buffalo Livestock Market...............................................84 Byergo Angus Sale......................................................... 51 Callaway Livestock Center Inc......................................55 Cargill............................................................................29 Central Missouri Sales Co.............................................76 Circle 5 Cattle Co..........................................................45 Circle A Angus Ranch...................................................57 Circle A Angus Ranch Sale...........................................27 Classified........................................................................97 Clearwater Farm............................................................57 Cooper Hereford Ranch................................................81 Cow Camp Sale.............................................................71 Cowboys at the Capitol..................................................80 Crossroads Cattle Co.....................................................68 Eastern Missouri Commission Company......................39 ET Herefords.................................................................52 Express Ranch Sale.......................................................99 Falling Timber Farm Sale.............................................58 Farmers Bank of North Missouri...................................36 FCS..............................................................................100 Flickerwood Angus LLC...............................................85 Galaxy Beef LLC...........................................................57 Galaxy Beef LLC Sale...................................................53 Genetic Blend Sale.........................................................70 Genetic Power Sale........................................................13 Gerloff Farms.................................................................57 Gleonda-Garton Sale.....................................................61 Grassworks Weed Wiper................................................50 Green’s Welding & Sales................................................52 Heart of the Ozarks Angus Sale....................................63 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus.............................................57 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus Sale.....................................37 J&N Black Hereford Sale...............................................35 Jac’s Ranch.....................................................................59 Jim’s Motors...................................................................78 JJ Skyline Angus............................................................57 Joplin Regional Stockyards............................................83 Kingsville Livestock Auction.........................................78 KW Cattle Co................................................................55 Laughlin Angus.............................................................57 Maplewood Acres Sale...................................................46 Marshall & Fenner Farms..............................................57 MCA App......................................................................87 MCA Benefits.................................................................95 MCA Brand Wall Page..................................................91

MCA County Leadership Conference...........................86 MCA Lifetime Membership..........................................89 MCA Membership Form...............................................88 MCA Policy Priorities....................................................66 MCA Show-Me Select Sale Credit................................93 McBee Cattle Co...........................................................65 McPherson Concrete Products......................................97 Mead Cattle Co.............................................................54 Mead Farms...................................................................57 Mead Farms Sale.............................................................3 Missouri Angus Association...........................................57 Missouri Angus Breeders...............................................57 Missouri Angus Futurity Sale........................................33 Missouri Beef Industry Council.....................................49 Missouri Valley Commission Company........................39 MultiMIN USA.............................................................25 Naught-Naught Agency...................................................7 Norbrook Norfenicol................................................. 14-15 Ogden Horsecreek Ranch.............................................57 Orrick Farm Service......................................................44 Ozark and Heart of America Beefmaster Sale..............60 Peterson Farms Bull Sale...............................................67 Pinegar Limousin...........................................................21 Post Rock Cattle Co. Sale..............................................79 REDStock......................................................................41 Richardson Ranch.........................................................57 Sampson Cattle Co........................................................72 Seedstock Plus................................................................43 Sellers Feedlot................................................................46 South Central Regional Stockyards..............................58 Square B Ranch/Quality Beef.......................................56 Stockade Stock-Lix........................................................40 Stucky Ranch Sale.........................................................69 Superior Steel Sales........................................................56 Sydenstricker Genetics...................................................57 Sydenstricker Implements - John Deere........................18 Triple C, Inc...................................................................64 Valley Oaks Angus.........................................................57 Valley Oaks Angus Sale.................................................45 Valley Oaks Angus (ride along insert)...................... Insert Weiker Angus Ranch.....................................................57 Westway Feed...................................................................9 Wheeler & Sons Livestock Market.................................90 Wheeler Auctions & Real Estate....................................94 Mike Williams...............................................................94 Windsor Livestock Auction............................................80 Wright Charolais........................................................... 17 Y-Tex................................................................................2 Zeitlow Distributing.......................................................16


Profile for Missouri Beef Cattleman

February 2018 Missouri Beef Cattleman  

February 2018 Missouri Beef Cattleman  

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