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A2 – Missoulian, Monday, August 19, 2013

HISTORY

WORLD

EGYPTIAN UNREST Congress split on cutting off aid By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER Associated Press

MANU BRABO/Associated Press

A son of the late Ammar Badie prays during his father’s funeral in al-Hamed mosque in Cairo’s Katameya district on Sunday. Badie, the son of Muslim Brotherhood’s spiritual leader Mohammed Badie, was killed by Egyptian security forces Friday during clashes in Cairo's Ramses Square. Egypt’s military leader vowed Sunday that the army will not allow further violence after the deaths of hundreds in days of political unrest, while still calling for the political inclusion of Islamist supporters of the country’s ousted president.

36 killed in prison truck escape attempt By MAGGIE MICHAEL Associated Press

television reported that the deaths took place after security forces clashed CAIRO – Egyptian with militants near the police fired tear gas prison and detainees came Sunday in an attempt to under fire while trying to free a guard from rioting escape. The official MENA detainees, killing at least state news agency also said 36 as the country’s the trucks came under military leader vowed to attack from gunmen. tolerate no more violence State media also said all after days of clashes that those killed and the killed nearly 900 people. gunmen belonged to the The deaths of the Muslim Brotherhood, the prisoners, captured during organization that Morsi the fierce fighting in hails from. The officials recent days around Cairo’s who spoke to AP said some Ramses Square, came as of the detainees belonged Gen. Abdel-Fatah el-Sissi to the Brotherhood, while also called for the others didn’t. inclusion of Islamists in The differences in the the government. accounts could not be Meanwhile, security forces immediately reconciled detained Muslim Sunday night. Brotherhood members in raids aimed at stopping The violence adds to more planned rallies the ever-rising death toll supporting ousted in days of unrest. On President Mohammed Saturday alone, clashes Morsi – which the between Morsi supporters military-backed and police killed 79 government says fuels the people, according to a violent unrest. government tally released The suspects killed Sunday and carried by were part of a prison truck MENA. That raised the convoy of some 600 death toll for four days of detainees heading to Abu unrest across the country Zaabal prison in northern to nearly 900 people Egypt, security officials killed. Some 70 police told The Associated Press. officers were killed in Detainees in one of the clashes with protesters or trucks rioted and managed retaliatory attacks during to capture a police officer the same period, according inside, the officials said, to the Interior Ministry. Security forces fired The clashes began tear gas into the truck in Wednesday when security hopes of freeing the badly forces dismantled two beaten officer, the officials encampments in Cairo of said. The officials said Morsi supporters, who those killed died from demanded his suffocating on the gas. reinstatement. The The officials spoke on military overthrew Morsi condition of anonymity in a bloodless July 3 coup because they were not after millions took to the authorized to speak to street demanding him to journalists. step down. However, the officials’ Egypt’s militaryversion of event backed interim contradicted reports about government declared a the incident carried by state of emergency after state media. The official Wednesday’s clashes and imposed a curfew, turning website of Egyptian state

the capital into a ghost town after 7 p.m. every night. The government also began taking harsher measures to crippling the Brotherhood. Security forces arrested hundreds of Muslim Brotherhood members early Sunday morning in raids on their homes in different cities, aimed at disrupting planned rallies to support Morsi. The Cabinet also held an emergency meeting to discuss potentially banning the group, a longoutlawed organization that swept to power in the country’s first democratic elections a year ago. A possible ban – which authorities say would be implemented over the group’s use of violence – would be a repeat of the decades-long struggle between the state and the Brotherhood. It also would drain the group’s financial resources and allow for mass arrests of its members. That likely would diminish the chances of a negotiated solution to the crisis and push the group again underground. The Brotherhood has shown no signs of backing down though. Under the banner of an anti-coup alliance, the group held protests Sunday, though many appeared smaller in scale than others held in recent days. In the coastal city of Alexandria, protesters clashed with residents. In the southern city of Assiut, security forces fired tear gas to disperse hundreds rallying in front of a mosque. “They think they can end the movement,” said Muslim Brotherhood senior member Saad Emara. “The more killings, the more people join us.”

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WASHINGTON – Members of Congress are split over whether the U.S. should cut off military aid to Egypt, highlighting the difficult choices facing the Obama administration amid spiraling violence on the streets of an important Middle East ally. Democratic leaders have generally supported the president’s approach. But on Sunday Rep. Keith Ellison, D-Minn., said he would end aid to Egypt. Ellison is the first Muslim elected to Congress and is co-chairman of the Congressional Progressive Caucus. “I would cut off aid but engage in intense diplomacy in Egypt and in the region to try to say, look, we will restore aid when you stop the bloodshed in the street and set up a path towards democracy that you were on before,” Ellison said. “In my mind, there’s no way to say that this was not a coup. It is. We should say so. And then follow our own law, which says we cannot fund the coup leaders.” Among Republicans, there were growing calls to eliminate military aid to Egypt. But others were more hesitant. Rep. Pete King, RN.Y., said curtailing aid could reduce U.S. influence over Egypt’s interim government, which controls access to strategic resources, including the Suez Canal. “We certainly shouldn’t cut off all aid,” said King, who chairs the House panel on counterterrorism and intelligence. King said there are no good choices in Egypt. Ousted President Mohammed Morsi, a member of the Muslim Brotherhood, was democratically elected. But, King said, the group has not demonstrated a commitment to democracy. “The fact is there’s no good guys there,” King said. “But of the two, I think there is more opportunity to protect American interests if we work with the military and continue our relationship with the military.” The split among members of the same political party illustrates the uncertainty facing President Barack Obama as he tries to navigate volatile developments in Egypt, where

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crackdowns last week left more than 600 people dead and thousands more injured. Obama has denounced the violence, canceled joint military exercises scheduled for September and delayed the delivery of four F-16 fighter jets. But the White House has refused to declare Morsi’s removal a coup – a step that would require Obama to suspend $1.3 billion in annual military aid. The president insists that the U.S. stands with Egyptians seeking a democratic government. But he says America cannot determine Egypt’s future. Sen. John McCain of Arizona renewed his call Sunday to stop aid as the Egyptian military continues to crack down on protesters seeking Morsi’s return. “For us to sit by and watch this happen is a violation of everything that we stood for,” said the senior Republican on the Senate Armed Services Committee. “We’re not sticking with our values.” The military ousted Morsi July 3 after millions of Egyptians took to the streets to demand he step down, accusing him of giving the Brotherhood undue influence and failing to implement vital reforms or bolster the ailing economy. But Rep. Eliot Engel, D-N.Y., said he supports the president’s approach. “These are very, very difficult choices,” said Engel, the top Democrat on the House Foreign Affairs Committee. “I’m very unhappy, obviously, with the crackdown. But we essentially have two choices in Egypt. And that’s a military government, which hopefully will transition as quickly as possible to civilian government, or the Muslim Brotherhood. I don’t think the Muslim Brotherhood is a choice.” Sen. Jack Reed, DR.I., said Congress should give the president flexibility in dealing with Egypt. “I do believe we have to change our aid,” said Reed, a senior member of the Senate Armed Services Committee. “I think also we have to have included in the legislation a national security waiver, because we have to give the president not only the responsibility to deal with the government of Egypt but also flexibility.”

THIS DAY IN HISTORY Today is Monday, Aug. 19, the 231st day of 2013. There are 134 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On Aug. 19, 1848, the New York Herald reported the discovery of gold in California. On this date: In 1807, Robert Fulton’s North River Steamboat arrived in Albany, two days after leaving New York. In 1812, the USS Constitution defeated the British frigate HMS Guerriere off Nova Scotia during the War of 1812, earning the nickname “Old Ironsides.” In 1934, a plebiscite in Germany approved the vesting of sole executive power in Adolf Hitler. In 1936, the first of a series of show trials orchestrated by Soviet leader Josef Stalin began in Moscow as 16 defendants faced charges of conspiring against the government. All were convicted and executed. In 1942, during World War II, about 6,000 Canadian and British soldiers launched a disastrous raid against the Germans at Dieppe, France, suffering more than 50 percent casualties. In 1976, President Gerald R. Ford won the Republican presidential nomination at the party’s convention in Kansas City. In 1980, 301 people aboard a Saudi Arabian L-1011 died as the jetliner made a fiery emergency return to the Riyadh airport. In 1982, Soviet cosmonaut Svetlana Savitskaya became the second woman to be launched into space. In 1991, Soviet hardliners made the stunning announcement that President Mikhail S. Gorbachev had been removed from power, a coup attempt that collapsed two days later. One year ago: Missouri Congressman Todd Akin, the conservative Republican U.S. Senate candidate, said in a television interview that it was “really rare” for women to become pregnant when they were raped. Akin afterwards backed off his on-air comments, saying that he’d misspoken.

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