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NEWS

ST. PATRICK HOSPITAL LOOKS TO STOP THE BLEEDING WITH $5 MILLION RESTRUCTURING

A CALL TO ARMS FOR SEX, DRUGS AND FLY FISHING: ACCESSIBLE OPINION NEWSHOW BOOKS YOUNGER HUNTERS JIM HARRISON’S NEW NOVELLA ARE PLAN B PILLS?


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


NEWS

ST. PATRICK HOSPITAL LOOKS TO STOP THE BLEEDING WITH $5 MILLION RESTRUCTURING

A CALL TO ARMS FOR SEX, DRUGS AND FLY FISHING: ACCESSIBLE OPINION NEWS HOW BOOKS YOUNGER HUNTERS JIM HARRISON’S NEW NOVELLA ARE PLAN B PILLS?


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[2] Missoula Independent • December 12–December 19, 2013

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cover photo by Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation

News Voices/Letters Forest plans, the Front and racism.....................................................4 The Week in Review MADE Fair, house fire and the Tea Party...................................6 Briefs Bread, Russell Street and Santa............................................................................6 Etc. An end to a strange season ......................................................................................7 News St. Patrick Hospital announces job cuts, few details ............................................8 News In search of Plan B in and around Missoula .........................................................9 Opinion A call to arms for younger hunters ................................................................10 Feature How sage grouse have their beaks in everyone’s business.............................14

Arts & Entertainment Arts Ryan Bundy turns dark folk into a celebration of letting go ................................18 Noise Larry Hirshberg, Jerry Joseph and OverDoz .....................................................19 Books Harrison’s Brown Dog barks up the right tree..................................................20 Arts Kathleen Sheard builds a glass menagerie ...........................................................21 Film Blue needs less scissoring, more cutting .............................................................22 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films .....................................................23 Flash in the Pan In defense of garlic powder..............................................................24 Hangriest Hour All Souls Ale.......................................................................................26 8 Days a Week One bird, so many stones ...................................................................27 Mountain High Rodeo Run Sled Dog Races................................................................33 Agenda Feed the Zoo....................................................................................................34

Exclusives

Street Talk..............................................................................................................4 In Other News......................................................................................................12 Classifieds ..........................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ...........................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y.............................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle...............................................................................................C-7 Camp Sleepover ...............................................................................................C-11 This Modern World...........................................................................................C-12

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Randy Rickman PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL PROJECTS Christie Anderson ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Cathrine L. Walters CALENDAR EDITOR Kate Whittle STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen, Jimmy Tobias COPY EDITOR Kate Whittle ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Pumpernickel Stewart, Jonathan Marquis CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Allen MARKETING, PROMOTION & EVENTS COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, Jason McMackin, Brad Tyer, Nick Davis, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Matthew Frank, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Melissa Mylchreest, Rob Rusignola, Josh Quick, Brooks Johnson

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2013 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • December 12–December 19, 2013 [3]


[voices]

STREET TALK

by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked Monday, Dec. 10, near Broadway and Higgins. How did you keep warm during Missoula’s record cold spell? Follow-up: Survival in Montana can be tough (just read this week’s cover story). What endangered or threatened species do you worry about most? Jane Van D Grift: I stayed in my apartment with a fire going the whole time and studied for finals. Good track record: The black rhino in South Africa? I lived outside the park ( Yellowstone) and they lift bans all the time, like on the wolves. We do a good job of keeping track of numbers of species so I’m not that worried about it.

Steve Johnson: I didn’t. I was freezing. I tried to stay inside and stay warm and spend time with my granddaughter. Tipping the scales: Cutthroat trout. I think other trout are taking over their habitat. I worry about them sometimes but not all that much.

Steve Schwartz: I worked inside on cars at Zip Auto Service. Birds of a feather: The upland game, like pheasants. I’ve seen where you get cold temperatures and it doesn’t do them any good. They may have feathers but it’s still cold.

NaCole Beall: I went up to Snowbowl because I’m on the patrol. It was minus12 up there and I got frostbite on my cheek. I bundled up! Frosty paws: I worry about the domestic pets. Some stay outside in kennels all day long and I don’t think they stay warm. I think our wildlife have adapted to the climate here and are doing okay.

Lack of objectivity It is truly disappointing to watch the Flathead National Forest make a mockery out of the Whitefish Range Partnership collaborative and its Forest Plan revision public involvement process. In newspapers the past week, the Forest Service demonstrated its utter lack of objectivity and fairness when it comes to public input. The Flathead Forest Supervisor told the WRP, “This may be very close to, if not exactly what we end up doing,” praising them also for being “first out of the chute.” This even though he has not yet had his staff or the general public assess the environmental impacts and merits of the proposal. The supervisor’s right-hand man made things even worse when he said that those folks that weren’t invited to be a part of the WRP could later “take pot shots at it.” What better way to disenfranchise an American public only recently invited by the Flathead to participate in revising its Forest Plan through both a collaborative and a broader public review and comment process? Ethics, common sense and the law require that the Forest Service not play favorites. The forest supervisor and his staff should have thanked the WRP for its proposal and said it would be considered right alongside the many other proposals it will be receiving during the Forest Plan revision process. The Flathead National Forest belongs to all Americans, not just those who live locally or able to participate in a lengthy collaborative process. That is why the law requires that all proposals be submitted to the entire public for comment—and that those comments be regarded as something more than just “pot shots.” Keith J. Hammer Chair Swan View Coalition Kalispell

A round on me Good news: The Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee recently unanimously passed the Rocky Mountain

Front Heritage Act. I don’t always agree with Sen. Baucus, but I’m on board for this one. As the world gets more noisy and crowded, it is important to protect perfect places like the Rocky Mountain Front forever. There is no place like it left in the world. We are the caretakers of that place, and it’s our job to keep it whole. We also know that the more rare a thing is, the more valuable it becomes. With permanent protection, the Front can remain a geographic diamond

“When the Rocky Mountain Front Heritage Act becomes law, let’s all go up to the Buckhorn and have a party. I will buy a round.”

for all Americans to cherish and experience with their eyes and ears and legs and lungs. And it won’t hurt that those people will stay a night or two at the Stage Stop in Choteau, or get a burger at the Buckhorn in Augusta. We need to protect the Rocky Mountain Front for our hearts. Fortunately, our brains can come along without hesitation. I am sending this letter to Rep. Daines, whose help we will need after the Act passes the full Senate. Daines not only should support this legislation, he should introduce it in the House. Please call him to ask him to do that for all of

us. And when the Rocky Mountain Front Heritage Act becomes law, let’s all go up to the Buckhorn and have a party. I will buy a round, and I hope it breaks the bank. John Dendy Helena

For us, by us Montanans treasure the wild and quiet places in our state. While hunting, paddling, skiing or hiking in wild Montana it’s hard not to not be filled with gratitude for living in such a remarkable place. However, having abundant wild places in Montana for future generations requires vision and thoughtful planning. Terry Tempest Williams said it well, “The Eyes of the Future are looking back at us and they are praying for us to see beyond our own time.” Montanans have come together to see beyond our own time by having developed two bills. The Forest Jobs and Recreation Act and the Rocky Mountain Front Heritage Act were both built by Montanans for Montana. Ranchers, outfitters, students, business people, conservationists and timber advocates found common ground and crafted agreements that are the heart of both bills. Agreements reached by citizens talking about what matters most. Agreements that will help ensure long-term social and economic prosperity for Montana. On November 21 the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee passed the Rocky Mountain Front Heritage Act out of committee unanimously. That was an important step, but we need to keep our Montana bills moving. You can help ensure our Montana lifestyle continues for decades by encouraging our congressman and senators. Call Rep. Daines (202-225-3211), Sen. Tester (202224-2644) and Sen. Baucus (202-2242651). Thank them for progress made on the Rocky Mountain Front Heritage Act and the Forest Jobs and Recreation Act. Encourage them to get both bills passed, and continue seeing beyond our own time. A. Lee Boman Seeley Lake

[Comments from MissoulaNews.com] Backtalk from “Drunk on power,” Dec. 5

Shane O’Leary: I mostly stayed inside and read a lot. I’m in between college and the adult world and looking for jobs and internships. Delicate balance: I have general empathy for all species. Every species has an intrinsic value in the ecosystem and I think they are more fragile than we think.

Add to the list “Don’t forget to add this to the ‘Drunk on Power’ list … from a recent Indy no less: ‘Power grab: Bitterroot considers case for state ownership of public lands.’ Posted Dec. 5 at 8:52 a.m.

Stay in place “Drunk Indians is a common perception in the state, and having several of them walking around downtown Missoula

[4] Missoula Independent • December 12–December 19, 2013

in the summer while they’re drunk doesn’t help. These opinions are going to stay in place until the tribes of the state stop feeling sorry for themselves, stop blaming the white man, and start taking responsibility for their actions. Having your representatives drive drunk and then act arrogant certainly doesn’t help.” Posted Dec. 6 at 1:22 p.m.

Laugh till it hurts “Spot on, Dan. Thank you for the chuckles, while spotlighting ignorance.” Posted Dec. 6 at 5:12 p.m .

Right back at ya “I think the difference between you and an Indian ... is that if you get hammered and wander around downtown, nobody claims that all white people are drunks.” Posted Dec. 10 at 11:08 a.m.


missoulanews.com • December 12–December 19, 2013 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Cathrine L. Walters

Wednesday, December 4 The Missoula Area Secular Society, a community of “non-theists,” hosts its semimonthly Wednesday Discussion Group at the city’s Jack Reidy Conference Room to talk about “objective morality.” “I prefer the nights when we go out and drink beer together,” says Russ Thayer, one of the group’s organizers.

Thursday, December 5 James Tyrone Davis, 28, is sentenced to 12 years in prison for criminal possession of dangerous drugs for importing methamphetamine from Washington state into Montana. A May 2012 law enforcement search of his vehicle revealed 400 grams of meth.

Friday, December 6 The Tea Party Express, which bills itself as the “nation’s largest Tea Party political action committee,” endorses Republican Rep. Steve Daines for U.S. Senate. Missoula’s Champ Edmunds is also vying for the Republican nomination.

Saturday, December 7 The Missoula Police Department responds to a house fire on South Fifth Street. Despite fighting the blaze in sub-zero temperatures, crews put it out without any injuries to firefighters or residents. The cause of the fire remains under investigation.

Sunday, December 8 Hordes of holiday shoppers fill the Adams Center for the annual Missoula MADE Fair. The event has grown over the years from a room above what’s now Flathead Lake Brewing Company to local hotels to, now, a 6,000-seat basketball arena.

Monday, December 9 Missoula City Council approves changes to an ordinance that regulates “going out of business” sales in Missoula. Stores must now provide a list of inventory when applying for a permit and face a $500 fine if they sell unapproved items on clearance.

Tuesday, December 10 The Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee, which oversees grizzly bear recovery efforts in the United States, kicks off its twoday winter meeting at the Holiday Inn Downtown. The committee will decide whether or not to advise the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to delist the Yellowstone grizzly bear population.

A couple sleeps on the kitchen floor of the Poverello Center during last week’s extreme cold weather. The homeless shelter exceeded its 68-person capacity to meet demand, accommodating a near-record 113 people on Dec. 6.

Politics

ALEC opens up (a bit) The basement of the Grand Hyatt in Washington, D.C., has become a temporary shrine to the political right. Pamphlets, pens, stress balls and Frisbees from conservative groups including the Charles Koch Institute, the Heritage Foundation and Citizens Against Government Waste litter exhibit tables. Tea Party dignitaries such as Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and Indiana Gov. Mike Pence keynote long luncheons. The past three days have featured panels with titles like “The Disclosure Ruse: A Campaign to Restrict Corporate Speech.” Among the attendees at the American Legislative Exchange Council’s annual States and Nation Policy Summit are eight Republican delegates from the Montana Legislature. After a closing speech from Americans for Tax Reform president Grover Norquist on Dec. 6, three of the legislators—Sen. Roger Webb of Billings, Rep. Jonathan McNiven of Huntley and Rep. Doc Moore of Missoula—gather to chat about lessons they might take home. “You’re kind of flying with people that are at the same level from other states that have actually done

some of these things,” McNiven says. “If it pertains to your state, then you’re able to take that knowledge … bring it to Montana and craft it in the Montana way.” Much of the benefit the trio sees in ALEC’s summit comes from informational panels and casual conversations. But on Dec. 5, roughly 100 protestors lined the street outside to oppose a more secretive exchange: ALEC’s task force meetings, during which legislators and corporate members work together crafting model legislation. The Guardian recently released new ALEC documents containing an oath for ALEC state chairs to “put the interests of the organization first.” In response, protestors carried leaflets with an oath calling for legislators to serve constituents. “To be honest with you, it’s a pretty benign pledge,” said Diallo Brooks, a protestor with People for the American Way. Brooks, who was stopped by security guards inside the hotel, added that the individuals he approached shielded their conference badges. This reporter witnessed one ALEC attendee remove his badge entirely when walking through the hotel lobby. McNiven says he was unaware of the protest until hours later. He, Webb and Moore were also unaware that, while panels and luncheons were open to the

press, task force meetings were not. They insist there’s nothing for Montanans to fear. Webb defends ALEC’s transparency, which the organization itself says is improving. Webb adds during the two task force meetings he attended, corporate members rarely spoke up. “You didn’t miss anything,” he says, before inviting the Indy to attend future ALEC events as an official guest of the Montana delegation—in the interests of truly unrestricted access. Alex Sakariassen

Russell Street

Clock’s ticking on redesign Missoula’s non-motorized transportation advocates called upon like-minded locals to speak up about the upcoming Russell Street overhaul before a public comment period closes this month. In particular, they’re concerned that bike lanes and sidewalk infrastructure will take a backseat to vehicle amenities. “We’re pushing for additional strength in numbers,” says Missoula Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Board Chair Bob Wachtel. The Montana Department of Transportation, with

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[news] help from city and federal officials, is finalizing design plans for the first phase of the Russell Street overhaul. The project is expected to cost $40 million and, once completed, will transform Third Street from Russell to Reserve, along with 1.5 miles of Russell from Broadway to Mount. Just what that transformation will look like is under debate. Among the advocates’ primary concerns is MDT’s plan to create 12-foot-wide vehicle lanes on Russell. Ethel MacDonald, board president of the Bike Walk Alliance for Missoula, echoes Wachtel when saying that, because slimmer thoroughfares calm traffic and would make more room for cyclists, trimming vehicle lanes to 10 or 11 feet would go a long way toward making Russell Street safer. “Our big concerns are in the lane width,” MacDonald says. The advocates are similarly troubled by MDT’s proposal for the Broadway and Russell intersection. The new design would accommodate 24-26 bike and car lanes and, MacDonald says, would be “very dangerous.” In response, MDT’s Western Montana District Administrator Ed Toavs says the new Russell and Broadway intersection wouldn’t accommodate many more lanes than it does now, but it would move traffic more quickly. “It sounds quite impressive, and like a big octopus,” he says, “but really, it’s a handful of lanes beyond what’s out there.” Regarding lane width, Toavs says that while there could be some wiggle room, such as the potential to trim lanes to 11 feet, it would be tough to squeeze large vehicles like buses into anything smaller. “You end up with some problems that could be a little bit unsafe.” Toavs says that while he appreciates the advocates’ perspectives, it’s important to note that not everyone, such as those who drive large vehicles, shares them. But that’s the beauty of accepting public comment, he says. MDT will have the opportunity to dig into feedback on the first phase of the project, which runs from Broadway to Idaho Street, after the comment period closes Dec 21. The Missoula City Council will also hold a Dec. 16 public meeting to solicit input. Additional information on the plan can be found at mdt.mt.gov/pubinvolve/russell/. Jessica Mayrer

Christmas

Q&A with Santa, Mrs. Claus Fatherly concern led David Lybert to don a Santa suit. When his adult daughter hired a Santa impersonator six years ago at her Hip Strip store, Walking Stick Toys, Lybert noticed that the hired Claus was a little too enthusiastic about getting grown women to sit on his lap. So he bought a Santa suit, and took over. Lybert is now a man in demand, making appearances at Griz games, private residences, downtown busi-

nesses, the Watson Children’s Shelter, Big Sky Brewery and even Hooters. “I can be a bad Santa,” he says, showing off a photo of Santa guzzling “Griz Whiz” punch at a tailgate party. “Hooters can’t wait for us to come,” adds Janet, his wife. “They comp all our food and drinks.” Janet is Santa’s partner. Wearing the classic red-andwhite dress, she is a modern rendering of Mrs. Claus. She rocks a nose ring, her grandmother’s pearls and a wig of snow-white ringlets. As the Lyberts tell their story, they’re interrupted by a wide-eyed 7-year-old boy stunned to be in such close proximity to the Clauses. Once he finds the nerve to speak, he sits on Santa’s lap and asks for a train set.

“It’s not just the kids who love it,” says Janet. “The adults are more kids than the kids. Like, the biggest, burliest guy you’ll meet will come over and ask Santa for a hug.” Each year the Lyberts begin their tour of duty after Thanksgiving and impersonate the Clauses until Christmas day. By season’s end they begin making home visits, and that’s when the power of Santa becomes most apparent. Last year, the Lyberts visited a little girl who had a sharing problem. “We asked the girl if she had been good and she said ‘yes,’” says Janet. “We told her that we’d heard she had a problem sharing and she was like, ‘No, no, please.’” The little girl agreed to work on her problem, Janet says, and then she got a gift from Santa himself. Jimmy Tobias

Business

Bakery breaks down On Dec. 2, the oven at Worden’s Market’s offsite baking facility broke down. Owner Tim France says the three-year-old operation had conducted proactive maintenance to prevent such an incident, but this particular

BY THE NUMBERS Total ski area acreage under Snowbowl’s proposed expansion plan, which the Lolo National Forest approved last week. The figure is nearly double Snowbowl’s current size.

2,243

situation “was something we didn’t see coming.” “It was like one minute to the next, literally,” France says. “We woke up one morning and boom, she shut down. That was it.” Repairing the oven would have required parts that haven’t been manufactured for nine years. The price quote on a replacement was $42,000, France says, an expense that “wouldn’t pencil” with the bakery facing another two years of debt. Having exhausted its solutions, Worden’s made a tough decision: It shut down the bakery completely. “It was a hard decision,” France says. “A rough couple days. It’s still rough.” Eight employees were subsequently laid off, three of them full-time positions. In addition, 15 wholesale clients were left scrambling to find new sources for bread. Dan Brasington, head chef at Sean Kelly’s, was anticipating an order the day the oven broke down. Luckily, Brasington says, he had enough bread on hand to last two days. After that he turned to corporate suppliers to see what they could get him “on the fly.” “There’s not many bread people here in town, not many options,” Brasington says, adding that he’s still working to find a local alternative. Brasington sees it as a sad development, in light of both the lost jobs and the fact that he prefers to work with local businesses. He had a good relationship with the Worden’s bakery. “But I understand,” he says. “It was going to cost something like $50,000 to replace the oven … That’s tough for any small business.” Worden’s has been baking bread for nearly seven years. If business had picked up another 20 percent, France says, “we would have been doing great.” Worden’s will be able to meet its own in-store demand for baked goods for a few weeks using a convection oven and several conventional gas ranges. But it too will be searching for a more permanent solution. France says he’s now mulling ways to reinvent the space in his Higgins storefront, examining “what we do well” and perhaps focusing more on comfort food than fancy sandwiches. He adds that he’s hopeful Worden’s can salvage a few of the jobs lost in the bakery shutdown through that reinvention. Alex Sakariassen

ETC. A strange Montana football season came to an abrupt end Saturday afternoon in Washington-Grizzly Stadium. The conclusion, much like the season’s beginning, left many feeling bitter— and not just because of the weather. This year’s campaign started with a cloud of controversy (still) hanging over the university. Despite President Royce Engstrom’s pleas that it was time to move forward from the multiple investigations into how the administration handled cases of sexual assault and whether the athletic department offered players improper benefits— and, for that matter, from a deep division that emerged within the fan base—there was a reminder of those issues lining up under center every week in the form of star quarterback Jordan Johnson. The offensive star’s return to the field after being acquitted in a high-profile sexual assault case did little to quell critics and only served to rally die-hards. The team even adopted the tagline “United,” a not-so-subtle nod to any detractors, and plastered it on posters, signs and social media. Johnson handled the pressure with class and maturity, never appearing bothered by the extra scrutiny. He promptly threw for 250 yards and two touchdowns while leading the Griz to a 30-6 season-opening victory over Appalachian State in front of 26,293 fans, the largest crowd in WashGriz history. More than three months—and nine wins— later, the faithful showed up in considerably fewer numbers for the team’s home playoff game. An announced crowd of 17,345 attended the coldest Griz game ever only to watch a team from South Carolina coached by a former CEO jump out to a 21-point lead and hold on for a 42-35 upset. It was an unexpected outcome with equally unexpected twists (that botched review!), but perhaps fitting for a team carrying as much drama as an episode of “Friday Night Lights.” At the center of it all stood Johnson, a model of calm to his teammates and yet still a lightning rod to some. He finished the season with more than 3,300 passing yards and 32 touchdowns. Others may fill the highlights, but Johnson is the team’s unequivocal leader. On Sunday, the day after the Coastal Carolina loss, the Griz confirmed as much by naming Johnson the 2013 offensive MVP. One member of the athletic department tweeted the news, adding that Johnson and defensive winner Brock Coyle are “not just valuable players but very valuable citizens.” For better or worse, Griz Nation will get to experience that value for another year, as the quarterback returns for his senior season in 2014.

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missoulanews.com • December 12–December 19, 2013 [7]


[news]

Stop the bleeding St. Patrick Hospital announces job cuts, but few details by Jimmy Tobias

Despite efforts by St. Patrick Hospital ing unfairly focuses press coverage on Com- was looking to move on and start a new chapter.” and its parent company, Providence Health munity Medical Center. While official information has been limThe former employee says that after of& Services, to quell rumors of impending layoffs, speculation regarding significant staff ited, some details of St. Pat’s changes have fering an early retirement option to qualifyreductions and the future of its Life Flight emerged. In the hospital’s press release, Fee ing staff, he believes the hospital started operations persist. The Independent spoke called Life Flight “an extraordinarily impor- cutting jobs. MNA says it maintains a good working with two former employees affected by the tant service to the Western Montana area.” cuts, as well as representatives from the He also said “the rapidly changing, compet- relationship with St. Pat’s and will continue Montana Nurses Association who are aware itive landscape of patient transport coupled to monitor changes at the hospital. “We haven’t seen this restructuring of the hospital’s intent to sell its emergency with the financial pressures the industry is facing has led many health systems to look plan, but the health care environment is air transportation. “It’s not just one particular group that’s at alternative models to ensure continuity calling for rapid change,” says Lori been affected,” says one employee who of safe, high quality, sustainable patient Chovanak, MNA’s executive director. “When you say people are afraid to go on the was recently laid off and requested transport.” anonymity for fear it may impact her future Robin Haux, labor director of the Mon- record, that puts red flags up all over for job prospects. “Everybody’s been affected tana Nurses Association, confirms that the me. It is very concerning and it is good for by this.” hospital is looking to sell its Life Flight service. us to know, because transparency is key to Officials from St. Patrick Hospital declined to comment for this story. So far, the hospital has only acknowledged the layoffs in a press release sent late Friday, Nov. 22, that announced it is “aggressively working to save nearly $5 million between now and the end of March, 2014” at St. Pat’s and other related locations. “We’re hearing that there are rumors about cuts and layoffs and want to speak directly to our community and employees with facts,” said Providence’s Western Montana Chief Executive Jeff Fee in the release. Fee went on to state that “restructuring” and “targeted reducphoto courtesy St. Patrick Hospital tions” have impacted hospital staff, but did not specify how many jobs St. Patrick Hospital announced a $5 million restructuring that sources say will inhave been or will be cut. “It’s a painful clude selling its Life Flight service to an outside company. transition, but one that cannot be avoided if we expect an improved health“MNA has not been notified of any po- making sure that there is a healthy work encare delivery system that is also more afford- tential or upcoming nursing layoffs, except vironment conducive to good patient care.” That same trepidation filters down to able,” he said. for Life Flight, but that is a department With approximately 1,773 employees, change,” she says. “They are looking to sell local government leaders. “I am very concerned when people get St. Patrick Hospital is the second-largest em- Life Flight itself, but we don’t know what ployer in the city of Missoula, behind the will happen and we don’t know who they laid off in Missoula, because there are not that many high-paying jobs in this town,” University of Montana. The nonprofit admit- are trying to sell it to.” ted more than 7,900 patients in 2011, with While MNA has not been notified of says Missoula City Councilman Jon Wilkins, approximately 95 percent coming from the nursing layoffs, others have confirmed who chairs the Public Safety and Health facility’s 17-county service area. The Mon- staffing cuts. One former employee who Committee. “I do think to a point it is [the tana Attorney General’s Office reports the worked at the hospital for more than 15 hospital’s] responsibility to provide inforhospital’s 2010 operating revenues at more years says St. Pat’s began offering early re- mation on this. If they are having financial than $230 million. tirement to “non-essential” staffers in the troubles or restructuring, then I think the St. Pat’s isn’t the only area hospital ad- summer. The employee, who requested public has a right to know, though I am a justing to a changing health care industry. anonymity because he signed a non-disclo- strong supporter of St. Pat’s, too.” Wilkins says until more information is The Missoulian reported in October that sure agreement, accepted a severance packCommunity Medical Center eliminated 20 age that included three months’ pay with made available he’s in the same boat as the positions and furloughed additional work- benefits and a lump sum based on years of general public. “Like everyone else, I am getting inforers in an effort to cut $3 million in costs. service. Community spokesman Geoff Peddicord “It was not a great place to be anymore mation from people I know at the hospital,” says CEO Steve Carlson is not giving inter- and a lot of people were angry,” he says. he says. views on the matter, partly because St. “The face of the hospital was changing. Patrick Hospital’s silence on its restructur- Then the severance package came up and I jtobias@missoulanews.com

[8] Missoula Independent • December 12–December 19, 2013


[news]

A test for Plan B How accessible is the morning-after pill in Missoula? by Jessica Mayrer

After a more than 10-year battle waged by reproductive rights advocates to increase access to emergency contraception, commonly referred to as “the morning-after pill,” a federal judge ruled that the drug can be sold without a prescription to anyone, regardless of age. A recent investigation by the Independent, however, found that despite the April ruling, multiple issues hinder the ability of young people to access the pill in and around Missoula. Prompted by a nationwide project called “Where is your Plan B?” launched this year by the Media Consortium on Reproductive Justice and the Association of Alternative News Media, the Independent visited seven area grocery stores and pharmacies last week and asked employees how to purphoto by Cathrine L. Walters chase emergency contraception. Challenges obtaining the drug were A federal judge ruled in April that emergency contraception must be made most apparent during a visit to Safeway on available to women of all ages, but the pills can still be tough to obtain in Missoula. West Broadway, where a pharmacy technician requested identification “to make sure at the Rosauers on Reserve Street. While the hind the pharmacy counter, like at you’re 18.” When we asked why, the em- store sells Plan B One-Step and, as is re- Rosauers. While Plan B can be effective for ployee explained that the rules are “still in quired, doesn’t ask for proof of age, it keeps up to 72 hours, ingesting it sooner increases the gray area right now.” A similar situation the pills behind the pharmacy counter, the odds it will work. Rosauers’ protocol occurred at Lolo Drug, where pharmacist meaning the drug can be obtained only dur- makes it tough for young women to access Ross Roadarmel said a customer would ing pharmacy hours. On weekdays, it’s the drug quickly. Similarly, Moran says have to be “at least 18 years of age” before open from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. It closes at 6 teenagers can feel shy about asking for birth obtaining a generic morning-after pill. control. p.m. on weekends. The confusion “Having them availstems from a series of able and not having to changes in the rules. In Is emergency contraception on the shelf ask for help from a 2009, the U.S. Food and pharmacist or a sales at area grocery stores and pharmacies? Drug Administration person in a store makes dropped the age reOn the shelf Behind the counter Asked for ID people much more quirement to purchase likely to actually puremergency contracepchase them,” she says, tion from 18 to 17. “which means they’re Further complicating much more likely to acthings was the FDA’s tually use them.” June decision to grant Advocates such as one company, Teva Moran add that the Pharmaceuticals, the FDA’s decision to grant exclusive right to sell an over-the-counter mothe drug without a prenopoly to TEVA’s Plan scription to individuals B puts low-income 17 and under. That dewomen at a disadvancision means the only tage. Plan B, which runs morning-after pill available to women NARAL Pro-Choice Montana Executive on average $50 per pill, costs roughly 25 perunder 17 without a doctor’s approval is Director Maggie Moran has concerns about cent more than generic morning-after pills. Teva Pharmaceuticals’ Plan B One-Step. some of the local practices and underlines Ultimately, she says any lingering chalThe problem is not all stores stock Plan the importance of making sure that emer- lenges make it clear that more work needs B One-Step. The Independent found that gency contraception remains available to to be done to ensure that all women have some pharmacies, including those at Safeway women, regardless of age. access to reproductive freedom. and Albertsons, only sell generic emergency “We’re eliminating a lot of unintended “We all have had experiences where, contraception, such as “Next Choice.” Despite pregnancies,” she says, “and then, of course, the next day, we think, ‘Oh man, I might the federal judge’s April ruling, girls 16 and the decision later that a woman would have have just put myself really at risk,’” she says. under who attempt to buy Next Choice with- to make about whether or not to terminate “And so, being able to get access to that out a prescription will be denied. that pregnancy.” medication right away is huge.” The Independent found further chalMoran sees a couple problems with lenges obtaining emergency contraception stores choosing to keep contraception bejmayrer@missoulanews.com

Beer Drinkers’ Profile

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missoulanews.com • December 12–December 19, 2013 [9]


[opinion]

Shots fired A call to arms for a new generation of hunters by Andrew Gulliford

Sometimes the National Rifle Association makes me laugh. The organization seems overly concerned with Americans’ rights to have 10-, 15- or even 30-shot magazines on pistols and rifles. Yet those of us who hunt know that if you can’t kill a deer or an elk in three shots, you’d better get a lot closer or spend more time on the rifle range. The sad fact is that probably at no time in American history have there been more guns and fewer hunters. The sportsmanlike pursuit of wild game has been one of the great American traditions on public land. Hunting rifles are usually limited to four shells—one in the barrel and three in the magazine. Hunting is about much more than killing. It’s about being outdoors with friends and family and the camaraderie around a campfire after a solid day of hiking with mud on your boots and twigs in your coat. As a boy with a Daisy air rifle filled with pebbles, I’d follow my father down the long rows of cornstalks waiting for pheasants to fly. I have fond memories of those fall afternoons in South Dakota with pheasants lined out on the station-wagon tailgate and the smell of coffee laced with brandy being poured from a thermos. I still have the .22 Winchester single-shot rifle I learned to hunt jackrabbits with on Colorado’s high plains. I grew up with the smell of Hoppes and nitro solvent, the stuff we used to clean rifles and shotguns, swabbing out the barrels after a day in the field. But that was decades ago. One of my adult sons has his Hunter’s Safety Card and the other one likes to target shoot, but neither one is interested in hunting. Across America, hunters are aging, and without younger hunters to carry on conservation traditions, wild game and habitat will suffer. There are over 300 million Americans, but only 12.5 million are hunters—a mere 5

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[10] Missoula Independent • December 12–December 19, 2013

percent of the adult population. Just as my hero, Theodore Roosevelt, was a bird and big-game hunter and an expert on North American large mammals, he was also a “wilderness warrior” who protected over 150 million acres of American public lands. The two causes go together: Because he hunted, he embraced the goals of conservation.

“The sad fact is that probably at no time in American history have there been more guns and fewer hunters.” We need younger hunters. It’s ironic that even with the recent craze for organic food, free-range chickens and a “paleo diet,” there are fewer folks willing to get up before dawn to get out in the woods and stalk game. Anyone who eats meat should learn to shoot, hunt and field-dress their game, whether it’s blue grouse found in high-altitude pines or mule deer bedded down in oak brush. As humans, we’ve hunted for millennia; anthropologists even posit that coordinated hunts spurred language development, culture and art. There has always been a spiritual bond between hunter and prey, and unlike the zany, pistol-owning NRA members who

seem obsessed with the size of their gun magazines, hunters know it’s rooted in humility. Native Americans have long believed that game only comes to hunters who are mentally and spiritually prepared. Practicing marksmanship beforehand, moving quietly through the woods, looking for animal spoor and sign—these are skills that hunters learn and refine. Young hunters learn that hunting is about being outdoors, moving through the landscape and learning about camouflage and ecosystems, learning to see and smell in the wild. Listening. In some seasons past, the largest thing I’ve cut up with my hunting knife is an orange. But killing game is not the sole reason to hunt. For true hunters, firearms are only a means to an end, not an end to themselves. I may walk for days on a hunt and never fire a shot. Aldo Leopold, one of our greatest conservationists and early ecologists, learned about the land through hunting. He also learned about himself. Leopold wrote, “At daybreak I am the sole owner of all the acres I can walk over. It is not only boundaries that disappear, but also the thought of being bounded.” This year, I hunted for cow elk during the third rifle season. I hunted for meat, not for antlers to hang on the wall, though I have those, too. And when I saw younger hunters in the forest, I gave them all the encouragement that I could. We need younger hunters and a little sanity in this gun-crazed nation.

Andrew Gulliford is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). He is a professor of history and environmental studies at Fort Lewis College in Colorado.


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missoulanews.com • December 12–December 19, 2013 [11]


[quirks]

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN – While leading police on a high-speed chase on the Massachusetts Turnpike, two men in a stolen minivan struck another vehicle from behind and then crashed into the median. The men fled on foot, but driver Vini Bunted Proeung, 18, was arrested when he tried to run through a state police barracks in Charlton. (Worcester’s Telegram & Gazette) Johnny Deleon, 20, was thwarted in his attempt to steal hubcaps from cars parked outside a restaurant in Harris County, Texas, where law officers were holding a retirement party. After an officer who spotted Deleon confronted him, about 30 deputies inside the restaurant rushed outside to assist. Noting that Deleon failed to notice the parking lot held “a multitude of marked and unmarked police vehicles,” Assistant Chief Tim Cannon commented, “Unfortunately for him, his zest for thievery overrode any form of common sense which placed him straight into the hands of law enforcement’s finest.” (Houston Chronicle)

WOE IS US – Biologists studying the speed of mammal extinction on islands created when the Thai government built a dam across the Khlong Saeng river 36 years ago reported in the journal Science that on most of the islands in the 60-square-mile reservoir, all the original native species have vanished. They’ve been replaced by Malaysian field rats. “Our results should be a warning,” Luke Gibson of the National University of Singapore said. “This is the trend that the world is going in.” (The New York Times)

DRINKING-CLASS HERO – After six adults and two children fled from a burning house in Columbus, Ga., Walter Serpit returned to rescue some valuables. “Being an alcoholic, I was trying to get my beer out,” Serpit said after escaping the flames with several cans of his favorite brew. (Columbus’s WTVM-TV)

FAILURE OF THE WEEK – After Yamkala Sapkota, 31, failed her driving test for the fourth time, despite having taken more than 90 lessons, she set herself on fire. The Nepalese immigrant admitted recklessly endangering the lives of others, but a Scottish court set her free after hearing that the cost of her driving lessons had placed a “significant” financial burden on her family. (Britain’s Daily Mail) INTRUDER ALERT – An animal control officer responding to a report of a bat inside a home in Arlington, Va., found that the intruder was actually a sweatband. (The Washington Post)

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After arguing with her boyfriend earlier in the day, Adele Bing, 52, said she heard “banging” and “kicking” at the door of her home in Winter Haven, Fla. Fearing the boyfriend had returned to carry out his threat to kill her, she armed herself with a .22-caliber pistol, opened the door and fired, shooting the visitor: her 25year-old daughter. Explaining the incident was a “fucked up accident,” she told police, “How could I look my grandkids in their face and say I killed their mother? Y’all can lock me away for good.” (Tampa Bay’s WTSP-TV)

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Chicago police who arrested Tiara M. Paul, 20, said they put her in a police cruiser, but while they waited for a female officer to arrive to conduct a search, Paul tried to hide a concealed handgun in the cruiser. She accidentally shot herself in the back. (Chicago Sun-Times)

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A 65-year-old man shot out a wall at South Dakota’s Bismarck Airport while trying to disarm his gun so he could check it. Police Sgt. Mark Buschena estimated the damage at between $1,000 and $2,000 but said no charges would be filed because the gunshot was accidental. (The Bismarck Tribune)

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SECOND-AMENDMENT FOLLIES – Concerned about the spread of plastic handguns made from 3D printers, officials with the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives produced several versions to test. While agents were testing one model, made from a kind of plastic called Visijet, it blew up in their faces. (The Huffington Post)

DRONE ON – Amazon.com founder Jeffrey P. Bezos, 49, unveiled a working prototype of a drone that he predicted would pave the way for using drones to deliver packages in as little as 30 minutes. The unmanned aerial vehicle uses a claw to scoop up packages at Amazon fulfillment centers and transport them to customers. Appearing on CBS’s “60 Minutes,” Bezos said the technology could be fully implemented within five years. (The Washington Post) SHADOW LAND – Residents of the Norwegian town of Rjukan, which sits in the shadow of surrounding mountains for six months of the year, saw the winter sun for the first time after three, computer-controlled, 183-square-foot mirrors were placed on one of the mountains, 1,500 feet above the town square. “Before, when it was a fine day, you would see that the sky was blue, and you knew that the sun was shining, but you couldn’t quite see it,” local tourist official Karin Roe said. “It was very frustrating.” (Associated Press) LITIGATION NATION – After police in Tulsa, Okla., charged Rodney Rotert with helping steal a 1967 Camaro worth nearly $100,000, he pleaded no contest and received a deferred sentence. Then he filed a lawsuit, claiming the car is his. Police said Rotert changed the car’s vehicle identification number, then lied to get a title for it, but Rotert argued that since his title matches the car’s VIN, it’s his. (Tulsa’ KOTV-TV) While fighting a house fire in St. Petersburg, Fla., fire Lt. Lawrence Wilson fell on the porch and injured himself. Citing pain and suffering, hospital bills, legal bills and emotional distress, Wilson sued homeowner Carl Gregory, who he claimed caused the injury by installing “slippery tile on the front stairs.” (Tampa Bay Times)


missoulanews.com • December 12–December 19, 2013 [13]


H

eading west on Highway 12, the mountains give way to the gold-gray plains of sagebrush and native grasses. It is a dry, monotonous landscape and it hides its treasures like the sea. Wyoming big sagebrush dominates the vista, splattered at random across the plains like coagulated paint. Its sparse foliage clings to gnarled limbs whipped day and night by hard winds. The first white naturalists who looked on this land saw in sagebrush a symbol of wilderness. They named the genus Artemisia after the Greek deity Artemis, who presides over hunters and all things wild. The bush’s bitter pungency and tenacious existence are synonymous with the American West. “Remember that the yield of a hard country is a love deeper than a fat and easy land inspires,” wrote journalist and historian Bernard DeVoto. “Throughout the arid West the Americans have found a secret treasure … a stern and desolate country, a high bare country, a country brimming with a beauty not to be found elsewhere.” Over the millennia the greater sage grouse evolved as the precise expression of this tough country. It is a sagebrush obligate, wholly dependent on the desiccated little bush. Maybe that’s why the species is so damn fragile. In March 2010, after years of legal wrangling and scientific research, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service declared that the greater sage grouse warranted federal protection under the Endangered Species Act. But the agency refrained from action. Other species were a priority for protection, it claimed, and the service placed the bird on a waiting list. Under direction

The greater sage grouse is an indicator of the health of the sagebrush grassland ecosystem. The bird needs sagebrush and forbs for both food and shelter.

from a federal court, it has until 2015 to decide if the West’s most iconic grouse will receive the legal protection of the federal government. The sage grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus, is the storied hermit diva of the upland game bird world. It entered written history on March 2, 1806, when Meriwether Lewis described the species in his journal as the “cock of the plains.” He observed that the bird needs wide-open spaces, and its habitat requirements are specific and nonnegotiable. “The scale at which the birds perceive their environment is huge compared with most other species,” says Dave Naugle, a wildlife biologist at the University of Montana who has studied the greater

sage grouse for 13 years. “During the nesting season they use dry sagebrush upland. When it is time to raise their chicks they move to wetter lowland sites, and in the winter 98 percent of their food is sagebrush so they need large tall stands of it.” They tolerate very little human disturbance, he adds. Barely a peep. The sage grouse once made its home in 13 Western states and three Canadian provinces. Naugle estimates that their numbers were in the millions. Legends contend that their seasonal migrations could blot out the sun and fill the sky with a feathered moving mass. Today the species is in precipitous decline across the West. Arizona, Nebraska, Saskatchewan and British Columbia no longer harbor the greater sage grouse. There are only marginal populations in

Nevada and California, which prompted the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to move forward with listing a subpopulation in those states. Sage grouse in the Dakotas are vulnerable to extirpation. Scientists estimate that the total population throughout the range is down to 200,000 birds. “Loss and degradation of sagebrush habitat has resulted in at least a four decade-long sage-grouse population decline and extirpation of the species from [at least] 46 percent of its native range,” Naugle wrote in a report prepared for the Bureau of Land Management. Contemporary land uses conspire against the grouse. “Scientists have identified at least 26 different land uses and related effects that negatively impact the sage grouse,” says Mark Salvo, a federal lands policy analyst

photo courtesy of NRCS

[14] Missoula Independent • December 12–December 19, 2013


with Defenders of Wildlife. “Sod busting was historically the most important threat to sage grouse in the eastern part of their range, and now it’s oil and gas development. In the western part of their range, it is mostly cheatgrass invasion and livestock grazing.” The decline of the species is due to years of habitat degradation—more than a century of ranching and row cropping, and decades of oil and gas drilling, subdivision development, invasive species encroachment, disease and depredation. The result makes it all but impossible for the grouse to survive on its native home range in the sagebrush steppe of the North American plains. Now, the Endangered Species Act, or ESA, looms large. Oil and gas companies, coal corporations, row crop farmers, cattle ranchers, real estate developers and an array of other powerful interests are desperate to avoid an ESA listing because it will be bad for the bottom line. But how else do you protect a bird that has its beak in everybody’s business?

The Lehfeldts, a ranching family in the small town of Lavina, population 187, run thousands of Rambouillet sheep on 12,000 acres of sagebrush plains. On a recent Friday, Ben Lehfeldt, stout, black-haired and boyish, sits at the family’s dining room table talking about sage grouse. Ben’s father, Bob, and mother, Marie, sit next to him. On the wall behind the table is a shrine to the Lehfeldt ancestors, black and white photos of the five preceding generations that called Lavina home. Ludwig Lehfeldt, Ben’s great-great-grandfather, built this house in the 1890s. Out the window, the Musselshell River flows east along the crooked valley. The Lehfeldt family ranch is part of a major effort to avert the need for ESA protections in sage grouse country. The effort is called the Sage Grouse Initiative, or SGI, and it began in Montana. Launched in 2010, SGI is a multiagency strategy to promote ranching as a way to protect and improve sage grouse

habitat. The initiative, spearheaded by the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service, or NRCS, works with ranchers to reduce overgrazing of the native grasses and forbs that are a crucial part of sage grouse habitat. The birds rely on these plants for cover and food. “The whole premise of SGI is that what’s good for ranching is good for sage grouse,” says Mark Szczypinski, a wildlife research technician with Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks who works with SGI. “So if the range is healthy and productive for a rancher, it will more than likely be that way for sage grouse too.” According to state estimates, 65 percent of sage grouse habitat in Montana is privately owned. Much of that land is used for ranching, and so rancher cooperation is crucial for the bird’s survival. The Lehfeldts signed up with SGI in 2010. With the agency’s financial assistance, they developed a grazing plan, fenced new pastures and built water tanks so they can rotate their sheep across the landscape more frequently. Additional rotation means less pressure on any one parcel of land. They started lining their fences with shiny reflective markers to keep the grouse from flying into fatal strands of barbed wire. Szczypinski flagging fences reduces sage grouse collisions by an estimated 83 percent. “We put 13 miles of flagging up, six miles of fencing and we added 13 water facilities,” says Bob Lehfeldt in a barely audible voice. “Another 2,400 acres are going into the SGI soon.” “We couldn’t have done that type of project in a five-year period without the help of NRCS,” adds Ben, who speaks with authority. “Maybe we could have done it over the next 30 years.” The Lehfeldts are clearly pleased with the program. “It will improve how we graze over the next 30 years and then maybe we can add more livestock later,” says Ben. “As for the sage grouse, hopefully it will be a win for them like it was a win for us.” Among other things, the SGI has dished out more than $234 million to flag

A coyote lies dead on the Lehfeldt ranch, emblematic of the tough terrain of the sagebrush grassland.

500 miles of fencing and secure conservation easements on 240,000 acres in prime sage grouse habitat across the West. The organization plans to spend an additional $24 million in 2014. Some are skeptical of SGI’s approach, however. They worry about the continued impact of grazing on grouse and want to see the cows and sheep go away. “So far what we are seeing is just the same old stuff—more fences, more water

development, more funding for ranchers to do things that hurt sage grouse,” says Katie Fite, biodiversity director of the Western Watersheds Project. “You ask, why in the world wouldn’t they use the money to buy up the land, rather than to build fences and develop water sources that keep the cows out there trampling habitat?” Fite’s concerns stem from history. Ranching has not always been friendly to the sagebrush steppe.

When conservationist Rachel Carson published Silent Spring in 1962, she included a lengthy diatribe about the plight of sagebrush country. In the middle of the 20th century, range managers across the West began a campaign of “range improvement.” In their eyes sagebrush was the mortal enemy of productive rangeland and successful ranching. Thus began the era of sagebrush eradication that continues to the present day, though much diminished. “One of the most tragic examples of our unthinking bludgeoning of the landscape is to be seen in the sagebrush lands of the West, where a vast campaign is on to destroy the sage and to substitute grasslands,” wrote Carson. “Several government agencies are active in it … the newest addition to the weapons is the use of chemical sprays. Now millions of acres of sagebrush lands are sprayed each year.” The pamphlet “Controlling Sagebrush on Rangeland”, published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 1960, offers a view of the past policy. It presented a laundry list of sagebrush eradication methods endorsed by the federal government. For the mechanically inclined, the pamphlet recommended using a one-way disc plow to ensure “good sagebrush kills.” For those who wanted a high-tech solution, it noted that “experimental spraying with 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T has produced good kills” of the pesky bush. The pamphlet boasted a smattering of before-and-after pictures to drive home the message. For the organizers of SGI, however, the past is mostly past. Very few agencies or private landowners still engage in sagebrush eradication, they say. And ranching, they argue, is benign compared to other contemporary land uses. “In eastern Montana the big threat is row crops,” says Joe Smith, a doctoral student at the University of Montana who works with the initiative. “SGI’s main strategy is to keep ranchers ranching rather than tilling up the land, because there is no comparison between ranching and row crops when it comes to the impact on sage grouse.”

photo courtesy of NRCS

Each spring male sage grouse gather on the lek, an ancestral breeding ground where they dance and fight for female attention.

missoulanews.com • December 12–December 19, 2013 [15]


Smith studies how “sod busting,” as it is known, impacts sage grouse in eastern Montana. His research shows that when landowners convert native sagebrush grassland to wheat or corn or another commodity crop, it reduces the population of sage grouse within a five-mile radius of the freshly tilled ground. It is habitat fragmentation par excellence. And row crop conversion consumes more land in Montana every year. A July 2013 study by the Environmental Working Group uses government data to estimate that farmers in Montana converted 323,539 acres of highly erodible lands—including large swaths of sagebrush steppe—into row crops in the last five years alone. The study, titled “Going Going Gone: Millions of Acres of Wetlands and Fragile Land Go Under the Plow,” reports that lavish federal crop insurance subsidies and record-high grain prices are largely to blame for the uptick in sod busting. Row cropping is lucrative and a constant temptation, even for the Lehfeldts. “When you’re ranching you have to leave yourself as many possibilities as you can,” says Ben Lehfeldt as he points over his shoulder. “The big chunk right out north of here would be conducive to farming. It’s always a possibility.” Already, the Lehfeldts have a few plots of corn and turnips and alfalfa in the bottomlands of their vast ranch. Tilled farmland has zero value as sage grouse habitat. Well-maintained sagebrush rangeland, on the other hand, can support plenty of birds. Naugle, who is also SGI’s science advisor, sums it up like this: “Cows not plows.” If that message doesn’t take, the birds will continue to diminish. “We used to have big groups of sage hens out there, oh yes,” says Bob Lehfeldt. “When I was a boy you would go hunting and there would be groups of 50 or 60 birds that would rise out of the brush, especially in the fall.” “It was a meal for us,” remarks Marie. “They are big birds.”

grouse. Szczypinski, for example, shows off a piece of dung he carries around with him. Sticking out of the matted excrement is a mangled radio antenna. It belonged to a collared grouse chick before it turned into a coyote chew toy. Such is a grouse’s fate. “Chick survival rates are somewhere around 20 percent,” says Szczypinski, his voice struggling against the roaring wind. “And that’s if the eggs hatch.” But don’t blame a particular predator or a single industry for the decline of the sage grouse. “It’s death by a thousand cuts,” says Paddock. Habitat fragmentation and grouse mortality happen every day in a thousand different ways.

“So far what we are seeing is just the same old stuff— more fences, more water development, more funding for ranchers to do things that hurt sage grouse.” —Katie Fite, Western Watersheds Project

When noon arrives the Lehfeldts serve lunch, though sage grouse is not on the menu. The birds are too scarce. The Lehfeldts don’t hunt them anymore. Instead, Bob and Marie, Ben and his wife, Jamie, and their young son, Luke, dig into homegrown lamb and homemade gravy, with a salad and a plate of croissants to boot. Then it’s time to go. In the driveway, as the ranch recedes in the rearview mirror, a sheep dog gnaws on a stack of raw venison ribs. Fifty feet to the right, a coyote lies dead in the grass. Tough country.

On a wind-whipped afternoon, Jenney Paddock, a NRCS range specialist, and Mark Szczypinski, the FWP research tech-

nician, drive out to the plains near Lavina in search of sage grouse. They turn down a dirt road and disappear on foot, armed with telemetry equipment that Szczypinski will use to track down radio-collared grouse in the area. Along with Paddock, Joe Smith and a handful of other scientists, Szczypinski studies the nesting habits and childrearing success of sage grouse hens. They’ve collared a number of local birds and monitor their movements regularly. Szczypinski stops on top of a tawny hill and scans the landscape for a signal. He and Paddock get a slow beep from the southwest. Off they go. The scientists cross the land, splotched here and there with cow dung and deer tracks, and drop into a grease

Ben Lehfeldt is a fifth-generation rancher in Lavina. His 12,000-acre ranch contains prime sage grouse habitat.

[16] Missoula Independent • December 12–December 19, 2013

brush bottom where the birds like to congregate in winter. Pepper weed, a scrumptious forb, lies under stiff clumps of brush. The telemetry equipment beep beeps as they approach the camouflaged creatures. The scientists see the flash of a white wing and pause. Szczypinski and Paddock inch forward quietly when 100 yards due west 20 birds burst into motion like cottonwood seed on the wind, disappearing into distant brush. Paddock and Szczypinski follow. Again they burst and disappear. And again. At each approach, the birds tease the pair with their movements, always out of reach. “They’re hermits,” says Szczypinski. The birds’ skittishness is understandable. A lot of things eat the greater sage

After the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service made its 2010 announcement, federal and state land management agencies began work on a flurry of plans to stem the hemorrhaging. In Montana, Gov. Brian Schweitzer and then Gov. Steve Bullock convened advisory councils to help develop a sage grouse conservation strategy. On Nov. 1, Bullock’s Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Conservation Advisory Council, which includes representatives from a wide range of interest groups, released a draft habitat conservation plan that lays out the state’s regulatory framework for protecting the bird. Around the same time, the Bureau of Land Management, which administers the majority of sage grouse habitat nationwide, released a slew of regional plans to manage the bird on federal land. Both the state and the BLM will focus their efforts on what they call “core areas.” “Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks worked with the BLM about five years ago to designate core areas,” says Catherine Wightman, FWP’s habitat and Farm Bill coordinator. “The intent was to identify those areas that are most important to the conservation of the species.” The agency met with local biologists to identify the

Jenney Paddock, a range specialist for the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service, works with ranchers to develop sustainable grazing plans.


With telemetry equipment in hand, Mark Szczypinski searches for collared sage grouse on a private ranch near Lavina.

areas with the highest population densities of sage grouse in the state. The governor’s advisory council drew lines around these strongholds to create a total of 12 different core areas. “These core areas have to be big and intact,” says Naugle. “They have to keep out the major stressors like energy development and sod busting.” Montana and the BLM put forth rules to regulate future energy development inside the core areas. The Montana plan, for instance, allows no surface occupancy within one mile of active sage grouse breeding grounds, also known as leks. Oil and gas companies cannot build more than one well pad per square mile in core areas. Power companies must locate their transmission lines, which provide perches for grouse-eating raptors, at least one mile from leks or bury the lines underground. Though the BLM plans vary in detail, their stipulations follow a similar approach. All of which has the energy industry peeved. In September, the House Committee on Natural Resources held a listening meeting in Billings to hear from locals about the impact a sage grouse ESA listing would have in their communities. David Galt, executive director of the Montana Petroleum Association, spoke out against the BLM draft strategies. “... New oil and gas leasing, exploration and development in Montana will be essentially terminated in areas within sage grouse habitat if the measures proposed by BLM in its [Resource Management Plan] revisions are adopted,” Galt told the committee. “[No surface occupancy] stipulations, which prevent the use of the surface area of the lease, would be imposed on 50 percent of the public lands in the Miles City Field Office, 70 percent in the HiLine Field Office and 60 percent in the Billings Field Office.”

At a recent press conference, the Montana Electric Cooperatives’ Association announced that it supports a state management plan for sage grouse, but would like to see the plan tweaked. “It is more restrictive than we hoped it would be … Our biggest worry about this plan is what it’s going to do to rates,” said Gary Wiens, assistant general manager of MECA. “What we are urging the governor to do is to stand firm, to resist pressure to make [the plan] more restrictive.” Some conservation groups, however, argue that the state and federal plans don’t go far enough. With 18 percent of the range-wide population, Montana has the second highest number of sage grouse after Wyoming. The stakes here are high. “While these plans would attempt to manage future land uses more carefully in sage grouse habitat, one of our major concerns is that much of the landscape has already been leased for mineral development,” says Salvo, the Defenders of Wildlife policy analyst. “None of these plans would prescribe new conservation measures for existing leases.” The Cedar Creek Anticline, a long, thin oil and gas field that jabs into Montana’s eastern flank like a knife, is of particular concern. The 780-square-mile anticline contains a crucial core area that links Montana’s sage grouse population to sage grouse in the Dakotas. Oil and gas wells, roads and truck traffic dominate the landscape. A 2010 study by Naugle, Rebecca Taylor and others identified 30 sage grouse leks and 265 male sage grouse in the Cedar Creek Anticline area. A look at the Montana Board of Oil and Gas webmapper application reveals that there are more than 1,000 approved, producing or completed wells that slice right through im-

portant habitat in Fallon County alone— and more wells are on their way. “The Cedar Creek Anticline was called out in the state draft plan as an area that will require ongoing special management due to current and future development,” says Catherine Wightman of FWP. Special management means oil and gas companies will be able to develop their own sage grouse management plans and submit them to the state for approval, rather than follow the state’s core area stipulations. The special management approach applies only to future development. The state offers no plans to manage previously developed well sites in the area. “The bottom line here is that we need to do as much as we can to restore those areas that should be core habitats but are

degraded by industrial development,” says Erik Molvar, a wildlife biologist with WildEarth Guardians. “The BLM, for instance, could shut down oil and gas well access on public lands during breeding and nesting seasons.” Other conservationists, including former Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt, advocate the expansion of the federal wildlife refuge system. The Powder River Basin, which extends from northeastern Wyoming into Montana, is another area of concern. It links sage grouse in Montana, Canada and the Dakotas to populations in the rest of the range. If extirpation proceeds there, the northern grouse could become dangerously isolated. The basin, however, is a major coal producing region, and also harbors oil and gas development and coal bed methane drilling. Cloud Peak Energy’s Spring Creek Mine sits right in the middle of two small special management core areas near the Wyoming border. The strip mine covers 9,115 acres, of which 4,059 are disturbed. It is the single large coal mine in the state, having produced 17 million tons of coal in 2012. Eight sage grouse leks are in close proximity to the mine. Such industrial activity, combined with West Nile virus outbreaks that are getting worse as wastewater ponds from drilling and mining create more mosquito habitat in the area, poses a fatal threat to Powder River Basin grouse. In 2012, the Taylor and Naugle team studied sage grouse persistence on the Wyoming side of the Powder River Basin, and found a troubling trend: “Effects of energy development and past [West Nile virus] outbreaks have depressed sagegrouse numbers in northeast Wyoming, placing the remaining small population at risk of extirpation,” they wrote in the report. Montana’s Powder River Basin grouse face the same dire problem. The BLM and Montana’s sage grouse advisory council will hold public meetings across Montana in the months ahead.

Depending on public response, they will adopt their draft proposals sometime next year. The million-dollar question, as FWP’s Wightman put it, is this: Will the plans work? If they don’t, an ESA listing is imminent.

With the wind gusting and the sage grouse long gone, Szczypinski and Paddock return to the truck. They drive to the edge of a nearby lek, an ancestral breeding ground at the center of the sage grouse life cycle. Part dance hall, part boudoir, the lek beckons generations of sage grouse to an annual mating ritual that begins in early spring. When researchers want to find sage hens, they look near the lek. When scientists want to estimate grouse populations, they count males on the lek. The two scientists walk out onto the lek as a herd of cows eyes them. It is a flat, dried-out mudflat pockmarked with prairie dog mounds; an anonymous slab of dirt. It doesn’t look like much, but this is where the male sage grouse dance and fight for supremacy each year while the ladies look on. The ornate mating ritual happens like this: A male appears on the mudflat lek. He wobbles two sagging yellow bags on his chest, each breast-like and hemmed in by the white feathery boa permanently wrapped around his neck. He beats his wings, lifts his legs like a royal horse, and dances between the springtime sagebrush while the yellow bags inflate and deflate and inflate again. He lets out a Jurassic-like pop, a hiss that harkens back to bison and yew bows, and further back to land bridges and great migrations. He wants to dance and fight and win. He wants to mate, and everyone— from oil developers to wildlife biologists, whether out of calculated self-interest or ecological idealism—wants the bird to succeed. jtobias@missoulanews.com

Sagebrush grassland is fragmented by barbed wire fencing in the foreground and sod busting in the background. Habitat fragmentation is a singular threat to the greater sage grouse.

missoulanews.com • December 12–December 19, 2013 [17]


[arts]

Get what you need Ryan Bundy’s Crow’s Share turns dark folk into a celebration of letting go by Erika Fredrickson

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

R

yan Bundy recently posted a Facebook message saying, “Why are you not here?” with a photo of a band playing to an empty room. It was a Thursday night and one of the first sub-zero cold snaps of the winter. Downtown was quiet except for a couple well-attended events, and one could conjecture that locals were mostly holing up at home. At the VFW, an Alaskan band called Historian was playing to no one but Bundy. “They are an awesome rock band from anchorage,” he wrote from his phone. “This is a fucking crime.” Bundy is the current artist-in-residence at the VFW, which means he plays every Thursday in December with a rotating line-up of bands that he hand-picks each week. He’s a friendly, bearded folk-influenced singer-songwriter who’s part of a DIY music scene that sometimes sees attendance at shows wax and wane in extremes. Historian was a casualty of that phenomenon, and Bundy—though fired up on Facebook—gets it. For the most part, music connoisseurs who go to the VFW pride themselves on supporting a fairly eclectic collection of underground music. And many of them are in bands, so they go to support each other. “People that go there love so many different kinds of music,” Bundy says. “The kids that love the punk bands will just stand up there and listen to me play folk songs too. I love that about the scene there.

(He laughs.) I played a bill there once where it was me and a black metal band, a honky-tonk band and a punk band, all in one night—and everybody loved it.” Bundy recently posted a new album online called Crow’s Share. It offers 12 songs that have a folk foundation—banjo and slide-guitar, accompanied by Bundy’s warm vocals. But it’s full of electronica warping and reverb, melancholic bridges and musical offroading that gives it a different composition than his previous two folk recordings. It feels so vastly different to Bundy that he calls it a “project.” “It felt like its own thing,” he says. “A concept. It’s not a Ryan Bundy album. This is more standalone. Some of my songs on the album start off and they could be just a folk song like what you’d hear on an old-school Iron and Wine album. And then it takes a turn and goes crazy. I like messing with people’s expectations.” Bundy is from Homer, Alaska, and came to Missoula for college in 2004. That’s about the time he started playing music, too. He was listening to songwriters like Townes Van Zandt and Jeffrey Foucault for inspiration. “My motivation getting into it was mostly songwriting—writing lyrics, so I was more of a writer than a musician. I’ve never been super into the [technical] part of music, though that’s changed now. I like to

[18] Missoula Independent • December 12–December 19, 2013

dabble in it now. I still watch guys solo on the guitar and I’m like, ‘I have no idea what you’re doing.’” In the last few years, Bundy has become a staple in the music scene, especially with his odd bedfellow buddies from punk and rock bands. His sound has evolved, he says, because of his exposure to different styles of music and because he’s become more interested in technical musicianship, just a little. Songwriting remains the focus of his work, though. The first track on Crow’s Share begins with the line, “I had a dream I was flying above the sea, wish you were here to tell me what it means,” and it doesn’t relent from that mood. Even if Bundy didn’t tell you himself, you’d know it was a heartbreak album from the first few notes. He admits it was heavy to record and required “taking breaks” to finish. But it’s literally about many other things. On the website, crowsshare.com, he offers a long, odd list of what the project covers: “love and loss, banjos, hope, electronica, left over morsels of childhood optimism, seagulls, it would be nice if you were here, gas stoves, colored plastic, shifters, bicycles, rolling rock, welsh books, clicking noises, dead flowers … white cats with different colored eyes, darkness, over exposed photos of hillsides in homer alaska … wound string, gray boots, crows, and crows.” Bundy grew up around crows. His mother’s maiden name was Crow and he was surrounded by

kitschy crow objects because of it. “I loved it, though,” he says, acknowledging he became fascinated with the bird. “Crow’s Share” is a term Bundy made up as an opposite to “lion’s share,” and he kept the idea in mind as he wrote the album. “‘Lion’s share’ means having the vast majority of something,” he says. “But ‘crow’s share’ refers to the concept of only taking what you need to survive.” For such a darkly colored album, this idea feels optimistic. Listening to each song, it’s easy to hear that unlike a lot of break-up albums, there is no bitterness or ill-will anywhere in it. “This is a melancholy project, but I think what I’m trying to say isn’t,” he says. “Crows live on leftover morsels but I think that they also flourish. And when it comes to letting go of someone it’s an interesting idea to think about how little you really need in order to move forward. You’re a lot more free.” Ryan Bundy releases Crow’s Share this week on CD, and you can listen to it at crowsshare.net. Bundy plays the VFW Thu., Dec. 12, at 10 PM with Pancakes and Whiskey Hooves. $4. He plays the VFW every Thursday through December with various bands. efredrickson@missoulanews.com


[music]

Power up Larry Hirshberg’s Devices ignores convention Robbie Fulks is a good example of an underrated musician, a brilliant songwriter who doesn’t usually color in the lines. What makes him great is the same thing that keeps him from showing up on mainstream country charts. Vocally, Missoula’s Larry Hirshberg actually sounds a bit like Fulks at times (or vice versa). But mostly what they share is that they won’t (or can’t) blend into the mainstream. Hirshberg has released several albums, some of which are experimental noise, others that are more singer-songwriter folk and even some rock music. His latest, Power Down Devices, is a no-frills, acoustic solo album. Part of what makes Hirshberg interesting is that he never seems to be trying to make the listener feel something. He takes a simple idea, sometimes a trivial one, and expands on it until something magical happens. In “Put the Kettle On” he lists all the reasons for putting a kettle on the stove including, “You’re alone at home and the house is old, put the kettle on.” But then as the song progresses it becomes stranger. Suddenly you’ve got lines like “Residue of a dream, it makes you cold, put the kettle on,” and “In the dark you think you need air. Light a fire underneath your stairs.” What are we talking about now? There’s never a menacing tone to Hirshberg’s songs, but stray ideas creep in that start to push them into wonderfully uncertain territory. There are a few tracks that don’t rise to the level of others. The repetitive riffs and chorus of “There It Is” feel uninspired, though it might actually make a

really good punk rock song. Hirshberg’s unapologetic tone has always made me think he could write a good three-chord, Partisans-style anthem. I don’t know if that would really work or not. What I do know is that Hirshberg is a poet, in that he knows how to build tension through words rather than worrying about the plot. In “Pony or a Hearse,” he imagines life in the womb, a robbery and birds “singing like dessert.” He sings, “Now it’s up to you to write your own verse. Are you going to ride a pony or a hearse?” You don’t know what he means exactly, but you might sort of understand. Those are the murky waters Hirshberg swims in. That idea of writing your own verse is a pervasive theme in Power Down Devices. Like the poet Elizabeth Bishop, Hirshberg uses his songwriting skills to talk about words. In “She’s Singing about Whiskey,” it’s not the whiskey he desires to sip but the chorus itself. In another song, he looks for a word he should use to rhyme with “awake.” It’s all so meta, but not in a pretentious way. You can enjoy this album absentmindedly if you need to—Hirshberg knows how to pluck pretty chords and be engaging. But if you really listen to what he’s doing, you’ll see the ways in which he’s breaking rules—deliberately or not. It might keep him from appealing to everyone, but it will always make him worth listening to. (Erika Fredrickson) Larry Hirshberg plays the Red Bird Wine Bar Mon., Dec. 16, at 7 PM. Free.

12/13-12/15 • 7 & 9PM

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Jerry Joseph, Jerry Joseph I’ve always wondered how artists choose when to put out the self-titled album. Plenty of bands do it for their first release. Then there is Jerry Joseph, who, three decades into a career with multiple bands, including the Jackmormons, and an extensive back catalog, just released Jerry Joseph. It’s composed of old songs newly arranged for him to accompany with acoustic guitar. It’s a satisfying collection, something like an old pro’s bag of tricks. Joseph knows exactly how to use his voice: sometimes penitent, as on “Eat My Soul,” sometimes bordering on braggadocio, as at the end of “Cochise,” when he closes a song about the search

for courage with, “On that day I will jump in the sea / and I’ll finally be all you want me to be.” He also expertly uses his guitar, varying tempo, rhythm and style so that the album never feels repetitive. “Eat My Soul” is a highlight that uses restrained vocals mixed in with shambling guitar. Joseph sings, “Come on baby / set my table / and eat my soul.” Listening to Jerry Joseph, with everything stripped away—no band, no other instruments, no title—is answering this plea. And it wouldn’t mean as much without three decades behind it. (Kevin Dupzyk) Jerry Joseph and the Jackmormons play the Top Hat Thu., Dec. 19 at 10 PM. $10/$8 advance.

OverDoz, Boom In 2011, A$AP Rocky rapped that “niggers ain’t ready for the flow switch / only Harlem nigger on this Bone shit.” Apparently, n-words were behind by exactly two years. That Bone shit—the triplet-based, offbeat-centered melodic cadence popularized by Bone Thugs-n-Harmony—is suddenly ubiquitous, and OverDoz are a pleasing example. Their new mixtape, Boom, is as light and tonal as it is stoney, with not a trace of aggression to be found. That last part is what makes it interesting. Those of us who remember that Bone shit in its original will

also remember that you couldn’t act hard listening to it. Fast rapping is just not scary. Maybe that’s why Boom came out so well: freed from the dominant conceit of contemporary hip-hop, OverDoz is allowed to explore other veins, like humor and wanting to do it. It’s not a perfect production—the beats are trebly, and the rapping is serviceable rather than daring—but it enters the hip-hop head’s library as a gust of fresh air. Let us not forget that rap is party music, and it’s hard to have a good time when you’re glaring and brandishing your watch. (Dan Brooks)

missoulanews.com • December 12–December 19, 2013 [19]


[books]

Modern odyssey Harrison’s Brown Dog barks up the right tree by David Knadler Sr.

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[20] Missoula Independent • December 12–December 19, 2013

Jim Harrison’s Brown Dog is a collection of five Bob abandons the project to take a $50,000 assignnovellas—four previously published, one not. To- ment elsewhere. A cynic might wonder what dirt-poor Brown Dog gether, they form a funny account of the kind of man a whole lot of American men might wish to be: self- would think of his creator, a big-shot writer with a nice sufficient, virile, immune to popular culture and a home in Montana and one in Michigan. But one of the appealing things about this character is that he is damned good fisherman. On the other hand, the eponymous character of not given to class envy or bitterness. Life’s obstacles all five novellas is also dirt-poor and consumes alco- are more puzzling than personal. He remarks on them hol the way most people consume water. Brown Dog without judgment or irony—just a sharp eye for detail. The central conflict of the book is the extent to never takes a part-time job without calculating its which Brown Dog’s freeequivalent worth in sixdom can survive as his varpacks. Lesser writers might ious relationships take make that kind of thing— root. But there are other playing poverty and threads, each compelling drunkenness for laughs— enough to keep you turnseem kind of false and paing the pages. First there is tronizing. But Harrison the well-preserved body of gives his character such an an Indian in full regalia, 70 incisive and deadpan outfeet below the surface of look, it’s easy to ignore a Lake Superior. Brown Dog misgiving or two. One rediscovers the body while viewer has compared the salvage diving and decides character to Huck Finn; to, well, salvage it. Complithe highest compliment I cations ensue. The identity can pay this book is to say of the Indian is a mystery that’s not too much of an that isn’t fully solved until exaggeration. Like Huck, much later. B.D. holds his tarnished Another recurring theme mirror up to America and is Brown Dog’s relationlets the reflection speak ship with his adopted for itself. children. Their violent, alWhile these five stocoholic mother was one of ries were written over two Brown Dog B.D.’s first flames, but she decades, together they Jim Harrison holds him in contempt. read like one full novel. hardcover, Grove Press Her son, Red, is a math Repackaging them like this 448 pages, $27 genius and her daughter, may be good financially for Berry, is a victim of fetalHarrison, but it also makes the book greater than the sum of its parts. As each alcohol syndrome who communicates mostly in novella gives way to the next, Brown Dog becomes eerily accurate bird calls. The identity of the father more than a rustic clown. He actually experiences is unclear. When the mother is sent to prison for attacking personal growth (gulp) despite his best efforts to a police officer, B.D. takes on their upbringing. The avoid it. By the end, it’s even poignant. In the beginning, Brown Dog is an itinerant sal- state of Michigan forbids the arrangement and orders vage diver who lives in deer hunting cabins in ex- that Berry be sent instead to a state facility in Lansing. change for repairs. His only burden is the guilt that When B.D. flees with the girl to Canada, it’s part of once, in a “pussy trance,” he revealed the location of an odyssey that also takes him to the urban wilderan Indian burial ground to his anthropologist girl- ness of Los Angeles and the high desert of eastern friend Shelley. Brown Dog is pretty sure he has some Montana. These travels, letting us view the larger Indian blood, but the exact amount has never been world through Brown Dog’s unjaded eyes, account made clear to him. By the last novella, “He Dog,” he for many of the book’s best passages. Finally, there is Brown Dog’s love for his social has, at 50, become a partially fledged family man with worker, Gretchen. She’s beautiful, intelligent and, as a wife and kids and a place of his own. While Harrison does invest Brown Dog’s B.D. discovers to his dismay, “a devout lesbian.” She poverty with a certain nobility, he does it with a cares about Brown Dog, but only as a committed libwink. He seems well aware that poverty can pay eral can care for a committed homeless person. Unpretty well to those who write about it. In “The daunted by the concept of sexual orientation, he goes Summer He Didn’t Die,” B.D. encounters a writer to great lengths to find some way to make it work. Whether or not you’re a fan of Harrison’s other named Bob, who covers wars and picturesque squalor for magazines like National Geographic. work, the character of Brown Dog is probably someBob offers B.D. $500 “if you’ll drive me around for body you’ll want to meet. If you already know B.D., you’ll find this collection works as a strong novel in two days to see the poor.” B.D. takes the job, but Bob can’t find anybody its own right. I recommend it highly. pathetic enough or Indian enough to match the story he’s already narrating into his recorder. Finally, arts@missoulanews.com


[art]

Animal collective

Are holidays & gatherings spoiled because of someone’s drinking? Al-Anon is for you!

Kathleen Sheard builds a glass menagerie by Jake Sorich

Kathleen Sheard is a Montana-based wildlife artist, but not in the way you might imagine. You won’t find grizzly bears or elk, no cows or horses in her designs. Her animals–sea turtles, lions, giraffes—are mostly inspired from far away places like Africa where she rarely spends her time. Furthermore, the exotic animals she illustrates—usually modeled from photographs—are actually rendered with small pieces of glass put through multiple firings. The tiny pieces of glass, called “frit,” can be as fine as microscopic specks of dust or as big as peas. If you think of it like a painting, the frit is her paint. A spoon and glue-gun combo is her brush. A sheet of glass is her canvas. The entire assemblage can be any shape and nearly any size, as long as it fits into one of her custom-made kilns. Instead of a glass mosaic look, however,

the wild creatures. In the late 1990s, Sheard went allin on her passion and traveled to Africa to study under renowned wildlife artists John Banovich and Kobus Moller. Being with them allowed her to get VIP access to the land and animals in South Africa, Zimbabwe and Namibia. Her obsession with zebras has led some of her private art students to call her “The Zebra Lady.” Sheard is a vocal animal advocate. She’s a member of Artists For Conservation, a nonprofit international organization dedicated to the celebration and preservation of the natural world. She became particularly interested in the environmental threat to sea turtles when, in 2009, Tropical Storm Claudette, Hurricane Gustav and other powerful storms drowned sea turtle nest eggs along the coasts. The turtles’

“Loxodonta africana” is one of artist Kathleen Sheard’s glass wall pieces.

the images end up looking like paintings, though one thing gives them away: All that compounded glass can lead to art pieces weighing 200 pounds or more. “I can only achieve the detail and the photo realism by learning new ways to work the glass every time I start a new art piece,” Sheard says. “My creative process is continually evolving, and to say I build my work upside down and backwards means I am solving a unique puzzle almost daily.” This is not an easy artistic path to take. There’s only one place in the world—Glass Alchemy, Ltd., in Portland, Ore.—that manufactures the frit. On top of access issues, there is the time needed for each art work. After all the labor of layering the frit, the firings can take between a day to a week, depending on its size. Some pieces require up to seven or eight firings, where Sheard adds extra frit in each layer to create a sense of depth. Unlike painting, glass doesn’t easily mix together no matter how tiny the pieces. Glass Alchemy creates nearly any color Sheard might need, but she also mixes her own frits. “If they get too chunky sized, they really don’t mix together,” she says. “They touch. [But] you can create another type of color by touching.” Some of Sheard’s most interesting creations are her reliquaries, which she calls “vessels of living animal spirits.” She started designing the ash containers in 2009 when a man requested she make a reliquary with a giraffe painted on it. He told her that before his wife died she loved Africa and had admired her giraffe pieces for several years. The models for Sheard’s glass animals come from photographs. But she also has first-hand knowledge of

plight was furthered during the Gulf of Mexico oil spill a year later. Since that time she’s set up a “turtle hospital” in her home with seven aquariums in her dining room. When not painting in her studio in Hamilton, she volunteers on a sea turtle patrol in Alligator Point, Fla., during which she walks the beaches for hours looking for evidence of turtle activity and documenting it. Listening to Sheard talk about sea turtles, one starts to understand her passion is deeply rooted. “My love of wildlife began when I was 3 or 4 years old and I had my first red-eared slider turtle in a round plastic container complete with a palm tree,” she says. “I was also fascinated by glass and its many moods even before there was a stained glass shop in Pueblo, Colo. I took the first stained glass class offered in Pueblo in 1977, where one of my first stained glass pieces was a small turtle panel. It took me 19 years in stained glass to recognize I was to incorporate my two passions together and be a wildlife artist with glass as my medium.” For almost 30 years since, she’s dreamed of making a life-sized cast glass sea turtle. She’s currently working on it now—her magnum opus. The physical representation has changed several times, but her vision for what the piece will represent to her has stayed the same. “It’s a new and larger process,” she says. “But this work demonstrates a passion that continues … to embrace change, which is a constant in life.” arts@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • December 12–December 19, 2013 [21]


[film] Times Run 12/13/13 - 12/19/13

Color clash

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater Great Expectations Nightly at 7 and 9 Sat matinee at 1 and 3:15

Blue needs less scissoring, more cutting

Enough Said Nightly at 7 Will NOT show Fri (12/13) Sat matinee at 1

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Blue is the Warmest Color

131 S. Higgins Ave.

Nightly at 9 Will NOT show Fri (12/13) Sat matinee at 3

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[22] Missoula Independent • December 12–December 19, 2013

Blue is the Warmest Color demonstrates a pervasive, relentless commitment to realism that works at times, but overall left me feeling drained and underwhelmed. Director Abdellatif Kechiche’s camera locks in on a French teenager named Adèle (Adèle Exarchopoulos) and follows her for several years. She seems like a normal-enough teenager, albeit prettier than most. A boy at school is into her, and it’s like when Juliet gets set up with Count Paris: She looks to like, if looking liking move, but it’s not moving for her. In fact, Adèle has a thing for the blue-haired girl she locks eyes with crossing the street one day. We see Adèle getting off to a fantasy of the blue-haired girl and then weeping. It’s hard to film confusion over sexual identity in any true or convincing way, so at this point I’m thinking: So far, so good. Adèle runs into the blue-haired girl a second time. Her name turns out to be Emma (Léa Seydoux) and a tender friendship begins. Emma is a confident art student who seems to zone in on Adèle like a target. After their first meeting, Emma stops by Adèle’s school to swoop her up. Her friends see the whole thing go down and are quick to put the pieces together, but then, you don’t need to be a detective. Emma and Adèle sit on a park bench and talk about art and literature, but they’re thinking about something else. The fact that Emma already has a girlfriend hangs in the air as a problem on the verge of being solved. There’s a particular style of filmmaking at work here. Instead of a concrete script, the actors improvise from a storyline. The director displays a commitment to framing the story with close-ups and medium close-ups, most of them aimed at Adèle. It’s a stylistic choice that works sometimes, but mostly feels claustrophobic, and it limits the story. At one point, Adèle tells Emma that she admires the films of Kubrick and Scorsese, and I caught myself thinking, “Oh, what I wouldn’t give to be at a screening of The Shining right now instead.” I longed for set pieces and wide expanses.

You might expect a coming-out scene, but it doesn’t happen that way. Adèle’s friends at school confront her about her sexuality and she denies everything. She convincingly introduces Emma to her parents at dinner as just a friend. Flash forward to what must be a couple of years later, and Emma and Adèle are living together. What happened in the interim between Adèle’s friends and family would be interesting to know, but these details are beyond the scope of the film. If it sounds like I’m giving the entire plot away, in fact, I’ve only described what’s happened up to the halfway point. An hour and a half into the film, I realized with a sinking feeling that we were only just now starting to climb the summit of the story arc. This is the Meet Joe Black of lesbian love stories. (Both films are too long, is the joke.) Much has been said about the film’s handful of sex scenes. One-time University of Montana visiting writer and queer authority Eileen Myles famously raged on Twitter that these scenes are insultingly tame and unrepresentative of what lesbian sex is actually like. I think she’s overreacting, but I too was pretty shocked to see a queer film directed by a straight man that had the audacity to include scissoring. As my anonymous lesbian informant confirmed for me, “I mean, we do it sometimes. But it’s not the main event.” Finally, for a film that’s so committed to realism, I found it grim, indeed, that in three hours no one manages to say anything funny. Once, a girl makes a joke about a worm in a pasta bowl being at a gang rape, but that’s stupid. She’s got no delivery. I didn’t like this film, but I have to concede that my complaints are largely a matter of taste. The movie is well-acted, and I admired the murkiness of Adèle’s sexuality and the subtleties of Emma’s manipulation. If you can take in the nuance and manage not to be bored, I salute you. You’re a more patient filmgoer than me. Blue is the Warmest Color continues at the Wilma. arts@missoulanews.com


[film]

OPENING THIS WEEK THE CRASH REEL Kevin Pearce fights to recover from a devastating injury and get back on the snowboard to defeat his half-pipe rival, Shaun White. Director Lucy Park uses 15 years of footage to tell the story. Not rated. Screening at the Roxy Dec. 1315 and Dec. 20-22 at 7 and 9 PM. GREAT EXPECTATIONS Orphan Pip comes into money in director Mike Newell’s take on the Dickens classic. Starring Toby Irvine, Jason Flemyng and Helena Bonham Carter. Rated PG-13. Wilma. THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG 100 percent more hot elf action is on tap in the second installment of the kids-book-turnedgiant-trilogy. Starring Martin Freeman, Ian McKellen and Richard Armitage. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex, Entertainer. THE PUNK SINGER Celebrate Bikini Kill, riot grrrl, angry women and sluts with this bio of Kathleen Hanna. Also features interviews with Carrie Brownstein, Kim Gordon and Joan Jett. Not rated. Screening at the Roxy Dec. 13–15 at 7:15 and 9:15 PM. (See Spotlight in 8 Days A Week.) “Say Yes To the Dress: Dickens Edition.” Great Expectations opens at the Wilma Fri., Dec. 13.

NOW PLAYING BLUE IS THE WARMEST COLOR (LA VIE D’ADÈLE) Two young French women fall in love and discover insights about life over a decade of a complex relationship. Starring Léa Seydoux, Adèle Exarchopoulos and Salim Kechiouche. Rated NC-17 (because depicting women’s sexuality is racy, y’all). Wilma. (See Film.) DELIVERY MAN A single dude discovers fatherhood in a big way when he finds out his sperm donations fathered 533 children. Starring Vince Vaughn, Chris Pratt and Cobie Smulders. Rated PG-13. (Fun film trivia: Chris Pratt gained 60 pounds for his role as an out-of-shape friend, because talented fat people are just so scarce these days.) Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex.

ENOUGH SAID A middle-aged woman seeking love realizes the fella she likes is a friend’s ex. You’re never too old for sloppy seconds! Starring Julia Louis-Dreyfus, James Gandolfini and Catherine Keener. Rated PG-13. Wilma. FROZEN A Nordic princess endeavors to find her sister and bring her back to their snowy kingdom. A whimsical talking snowman joins in the adventure, too. Starring the voices of Kristen Bell, Josh Gad and Idina Menzel. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex. THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY IN 3D Reclaim the treasure stolen by that old dragon Smaug, Bilbo Baggins, and you and your elven friends will be heroes for a millennia! Starring Martin Freeman, Ian McKellen and Richard Ar-

mitage. Rated PG-13. Screening at Carmike 12 on Dec. 12 and 13 at 8:30 PM

disappears. Starring Christian Bale, Woody Harrelson and Zoe Saldana. Rated R. Carmike 12.

HOMEFRONT Jason Statham is a former DEA agent who moves to a quiet town only to run into a meth dealer, in a story based on the novel by Chuck Logan and adapted for the screen by Sly Stallone himself. I can smell the testosterone already. Also starring James Franco and Winona Ryder. Rated R. Village 6.

THOR: THE DARK WORLD Everyone’s favorite Norse God, his hammer and his fierce mane of hair are back at it again. Starring Chris Hemsworth, Natalie Portman and Tom Hiddleston. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex, Showboat.

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE Katniss Everdeen and boring ol’ Peeta are back for the second installment of the dystopian teen fantasy. Starring Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson and Liam Hemsworth. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex, Showboat. OUT OF THE FURNACE Russell Baze is a beardy, rugged man seeking justice after his younger brother mysteriously

Capsule reviews by Kate Whittle. Planning your outing to the cinema? Visit missoulanews.com’s arts section to find up-to-date movie times for theaters in the area. You can also contact theaters to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 and Village 6 at 541-7469; Wilma at 728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603.

missoulanews.com • December 12–December 19, 2013 [23]


[dish]

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

In defense of garlic powder by Ari LeVaux

d o w n t o w n

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$2.50 Sake Bombs & Half-Priced Appetizers Thursdays & Saturdays • 7-9 PM 403 North Higgins Ave • 406.549.7979 www.sushihanamissoula.com [24] Missoula Independent • December 12–December 19, 2013

Many foodies look down on garlic powder—and its cousin, granulated garlic—as a stale, cheap substitute for the real thing. It’s a shortcut for lazy cooks, but not something the serious chef would consider. I get the principle behind the sentiment—fresh is better than preserved, as a rule of thumb. But taken as gospel in every case can approach sophomoric levels. “After half a year at culinary school, a culinary school, mind you, where garlic was minced from fresh, cinnamon was ground from sticks, and nutmeg was grated from whole—always—I have been carefully trained to look upon garlic powder with great disdain,” wrote cookbook author S.J. Sebellin-Ross in The Oregonian. “And it makes sense to me. Garlic powder and all it’s [sic] many cousins (garlic salt, garlic paste, prepeeled garlic cloves) may be great for the busy cook, but they are not nearly the taste treat pure garlic clove is for the eater.” But garlic is a gustatory chameleon, depending on how it’s used. When fresh garlic is added early and allowed to cook, its bite is replaced by sweetness and mild, permeating pungency. If added at the end of cooking, that same fresh garlic contributes piercing fireworks. I often find myself adding fresh garlic at both the beginning and end of meal prep, and sprinkling powder in the middle. Chef Rob Connoley, who is putting Silver City, N.M., on the culinary map with his inventive, foraged meals at Curious Kumquat, told me via Facebook chat: “All dried spices are different than their fresh counterparts. They’re typically stronger in flavor and a bit off compared to what we’re used to. So when I use them, sometimes it’s because I don’t have access to the fresh ingredient and I adjust the amount to flavor, but often it’s because I’m looking for a more aggressive flavor in my dish. On my stove right now is the classic Indian dish aloo gobi. I have fresh turmeric in my pantry but I prefer the most biting flavor of dried turmeric in this dish versus many soups that I make which I want the more mellow fresh version.” Alas, the case for garlic powder hasn’t been helped by some unkind words Julia Child had to say about it, or the misquoting of Anthony Bourdain, by members of the online garlic powder-hating community, as saying “Too lazy to peel fresh? You don’t deserve to eat garlic.” Sure, he said that in his book Kitchen Confidential. But a sentence earlier he noted: “Avoid at all costs that vile spew you see rotting in oil in screw-top jars.” I couldn’t agree more with Bourdain with regard to pre-chopped garlic in jars. Though billed as a convenient substitute for fresh garlic, pre-chopped garlic has lost its fresh bite, its clean, piercing flavor replaced by a foul sulfuriness. At best, it pales in comparison to the fresh version.

FLASH IN THE PAN

Curious about what Bourdain’s true feelings on garlic powder might be, I reached out to the esteemed muncher of warthog anus via Twitter, hoping for clarification. Alas, he didn’t get back to me. Some other food luminaries, however, did share with me their feelings on the subject. Francis Lam, a food writer and food reality show judge, tweeted back, smartly: “awful substitute, possibly decent as its own thing.” Food writer, editor and all-around icon Ruth Reichl was open-minded, though not a user. “I don’t really understand why you’d use an acrid industrial product when fresh garlic is so easily obtainable.” I responded that I grow my own garlic, and make my own garlic powder, to which she replied: “Homemade garlic powder! That’s an entirely different story. Sounds fantastic, actually. Just a dehydrator? I want to try it.” If you consider garlic powder as its own ingredient and not a substitute, the importance of fresh can be applied to it as well. Fresh garlic powder is a different animal than stale. If you’re not up for making your own from scratch, gourmet spice companies like Penzeys can express-deliver garlic powder that will be almost as fresh as homemade. I’ve also seen garlic powder for sale at farmers markets—crafty growers know that you can make powder out of the leaves at harvest time, too. To preserve its youth, large quantities of garlic powder should be stored in a cool, dry place, or even frozen. Unlike the dominating flavor of fresh garlic, powder is more the glue behind the glitter, adding a subtle fullness of flavor that may be more difficult to detect than with fresh, but nonetheless makes the meal taste better. I consider garlic powder like a (somewhat) less controversial version of MSG. Perhaps you can’t detect it specifically, but in a side-by-side comparison, the otherwise identical dish with added garlic powder will win. I have found little reason not to sprinkle it on everything, irrespective of how much fresh I use. If you add garlic powder, simply put, it will be better. And if you grow your own, converting it to powder is a great way to deal with the bulbs that are getting soft, or sprouting, as they do when it gets cold. Three good-sized heads will make about a third of a cup of garlic powder. Slice the cloves as thinly as possible and dehydrate them. If your dehydrator has a temperature control, set it at 125 degrees. When totally crispy, with no soft pieces in the mix, let the pieces cool to room temp. Pulverize them in a clean coffee grinder or spice grinder. Store in a salt shaker. Sprinkle on food midway through cooking, as MSG was tossed around Chinese restaurant kitchens in the 1970s. That is, on basically everything.


[dish] Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway • 728-8900 (across from courthouse) Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 It’s the little things we do together. Bernice’s takes these moments to heart. This Christmas when you want “just the right size” gift or party package, think Bernice’s cookie plates, frosted Christmas trees (Yep! Those famous sugar cookies), packaged Bernice’s Hot Cocoa, a Joyous Kringle, Mini Macaroons, Gingerbread Coffeecake, Loaves of Poundcake, and so much more! Have you checked out Bernice’s wear-ables lately? Downright smart. Coffee mugs? Oh, yeah. Bernice’s wishes you a Merry Little Christmas. xoxo bernice. bernicesbakerymt.com $-$$ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced beega) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Mon.–Fri., 7:30–4, Sat. 84. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. $ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins • 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$ Brooks & Browns Inside Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. • 532-2056 This week at Brooks and Browns: Thursday Trivia Night 7:30-10 pm. Friday 12/13: Captain Wilson Conspiracy 6-9 pm. Sunday Funday (Happy Hour all day). Martini MONDAY ($4 select martinis). Tuesday 12/17 John Floridis 6-9 pm. Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 41 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 • ciaomambo.com The vibrant energy at Ciao Mambo is fantastically accompanied by steaming hot pizzas, delicious assortments of pastas and of course authentic Italian wine. We focus on making sure that whether it be date night, family night, or business dinners we accommodate whatever the need! And do not forget there are always leftovers! Open 5 to close every day, come make us your go to dinner destination! $-$$ Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am11am on Weekdays and 7am-2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm Sun-Wed and 11am-10pm ThursSat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$ Dickey’s Barbecue Pit 143 W. Broadway Downtown Missoula • 203.1557 Taste why Dickey’s Barbecue is the world’s best barbecue since 1941! Try our 8 juicy hot pit smoked

$…Under $5

meats, like our southern pulled pork or our family recipe polish sausage. We even offer 11 home-style sides, like our creamy cole slaw and fried okra. Don’t forget we’re also your catering experts! Any event, any size – let Dickey’s do the cooking, and you can take the credit. Graduation parties, weddings, office functions, you name it! Dickey’s Barbecue is the perfect catering choice for groups of all sizes – from 10 to 10,000! Don’t forget-Kids Eat Free Sundays & everyone enjoys FREE ice cream every day! Dickey’s Barbecue. Seriously, Pit Smoked. Open 7 days a week. Offering a full liquor bar. $-$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$ El Cazador 101 S. Higgins Ave. • 728-3657 Missoula Independent readers’ choice for Best Mexican Restaurant. Come taste Alfredo's original recipes for authentic Mexican food where we cook with love. From seafood to carne asada, enjoy dinner or stop by for our daily lunch specials. We are a locally owned Mexican family restaurant, and we want to make your visit with us one to remember. Open daily for lunch and dinner. $-$$ The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. • 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and gluten-free options. NOW SERVING BREAKFAST Empanadas! Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. Mon-Sat 10am-5pm. Downtown Missoula. $ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. M-TH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am-4pm, Sat 8am-4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$

ldn’t be u o w s y a d Holi iss Beth’s M t u o h it complete w

Sweet Potato Casserole

To see Chef Beth’s recipe, visit twosisterscateringmontana.com

Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West • 541-FOOD The GFS Deli features made-to-order sandwiches, a rotating selection of six soups, an award-winning salad bar, an olive & antipasto bar and a self-serve hot bar offering a variety of housemade breakfast, lunch and dinner entrées. A seasonally changing selection of deli salads and rotisserie-roasted chickens are also available. Locally-roasted coffee/espresso drinks and an extensive smoothie menu complement bakery goodies from the GFS ovens and from Missoula’s favorite bakeries. Indoor and patio seating. Open every day, 7am – 10pm. $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St • 549-7723 www.grizzlyliquor.com Voted Missoula's Best Liquor Store! Largest selection of spirits in the Northwest, including all Montana micro-distilleries. Your headquarters for unique spirits and wines! Free customer parking. Open Monday-Saturday 97:30 www.grizzlyliquor.com. $-$$$ Heraldo's Mexican Food 116 Glacier Dr. • Lolo, MT 59847 406-203-4060 HeraldosMexicanRestaurant.com Lunch and Dinner. Open 7 Days • Eat-in or Carry-out • Handmade Tamales • Burritos • Chimichangas • Flautas • Fajitas • Combo plates and MORE. See our menu at www.heraldosmexicanrestaurant.com. Order Your Holiday Tamales Now! Also sold year-round. Call for details. $-$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We’re the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we’ll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over

DECEMBER

COFFEE SPECIAL

Yuletide Blend $10.95/lb.

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SUSHI Not available for To-Go orders

missoulanews.com • December 12–December 19, 2013 [25]


[dish]

All Souls Ale HAPPIEST HOUR What you’re drinking: All Souls Ale is a limited edition imperial saison, which means it’s a light, highly carbonated, slightly fruity and spicy beer. In the early 20th century saisons were brewed during the inactive months of winter and stored in farmhouses for drinking in the summer. No need to wait on this one (though we’re told it does age well). Just be mindful of too much chugging—it’s 11 percent alcohol by volume compared to the 7 percent or so of yesteryear’s saisons. Why you’re drinking it: This the fourth year Big Sky Brewing has partnered with All Souls Missoula, an alternative Christian church, to make the beer. The proceeds go to the local nonprofit Imagine Missoula, which organizes volunteers to help people with shoveling snow, weatherizing homes, moving and other small home projects. “It’s a way to really encourage community in Missoula,” says Nina Alviar, the program director for Imagine Missoula. “If there’s snow piling up on your neighbor’s walkway, have

you met them? Are they sick? Are they older? Are they living with disabilities? Is it a single parent?” What you’re getting: The 750ml bottles cost $14. A case of 12 bottles is $168 and a half case is $84. The label alone makes it totally gift-worthy and collectable, as it features a colorful stainedglass-style portrait of the Mother Mary holding a glass of beer. “What some people do is pop one open for the holidays, save one or two to age, and then they give the rest away,” Alviar says. Where to find it: Big Sky is rolling out All Souls at its taproom at 5417 Trumpeter Way on Fri., Dec. 13., starting at 11 a.m. You can reserve yours now by calling Alviar at 546-4697. Go to imaginemissoula.org for more info. —Erika Fredrickson Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

Iza 529 S. Higgins • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Contemporary Asian cuisine featuring local, vegan, gluten free and organic options as well as wild caught seafood, Idaho trout and buffalo. Join us for lunch and dinner. Happy Hour 3-6 weekdays with specials on food and drink. Extensive sake, wine and tea menu. Closed Sundays. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm, Dinner 5pm-close. Sat: Dinner 5pm-close. $-$$ Jimmy John’s 420 N. Higgins • 542-1100 jimmyjohns.com Jimmy John’s - America’s Favorite Sandwich Delivery Guys! Unlike any other sub shop, Jimmy John’s is all about the freshest ingredients and fastest service. Freaky Fast, Freaky Good - that’s Jimmy John’s. Order online, call for delivery or visit us on Higgins. $-$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West • 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. 543-7154 (on the hip strip) Did you know that the Missoula Senior Center serves delicious hearty lunches every week day for only $6? Anyone is welcome to join us for a delicious meal from 11:3012:30 Monday- Friday for delicious food, great conversation and take some time to find a treasured item or garment in our thrift shop. For a full menu and other activities, visit our website at www.missoulaseniorcenter.org. The Mustard Seed Asian Cafe Southgate Mall • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian fusion cuisine. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combine the best of Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences. Full menu available at the bar. Award winning desserts made fresh daily , local and regional micro brews, fine wines & signature cocktails. Vegetarian and Gluten free menu available. Takeout & delivery. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Pearl Cafe 231 East Front St. 541-0231 • pearlcafe.us Country French meets the Northwest. Idaho Trout with Dungeness Crab, Rabbit with Wild Mushroom Ragout, Snake River Farms Beef, Fresh Seafood Specials Daily. House Made Charcuterie, Sourdough Bread & Delectable Desserts. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Philly West 134 W. Broadway • 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday - Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. $-$$ Plonk 322 N Higgins • 926-1791 www.plonkwine.com Plonk is an excursion into the world of fine wine, food, cocktails, service and atmosphere. With an environment designed to engage the senses, the downtown establishment blends quality and creativity in an all-encompassing dining experience. Described as an urban hot spot dropped into the heart of the Missoula Valley and lifestyle, Plonk embodies metropolitan personalities driven by Montana passions. Romaines 3075 N. Reserve Suite N 406-214-2659 www.romainessalads.com We provide you with the convenience of delicious salads, sandwiches and soups. Our salads include over 30 wholesome ingredients. Our homemade soups change with the season as different ingredients become available. If hearty sandwiches are your favorite, then visit Romaines for one

$…Under $5

[26] Missoula Independent • December 12–December 19, 2013

of our braised meat sandwiches. We also have a Montana Hummus sandwich made from Montana grown garbanzo beans. At last, local, fresh, and healthy! $-$$ Roxiberry Gourmet Frozen Yogurt Southgate Mall Across from Noodle Express 317.1814 • roxiberry.com Bringing Missoula gourmet, frozen yogurt, using the finest ingredients (no frozen mixes), to satisfy your intense cravings with our intense flavors. Our home-made blends offer healthy, nutritional profiles. We also offer smoothies, fresh-made waffle cones, and select baked goods (gluten-free choices available). Join Club Roxi for special offers. See us in-store or visit our website for information. $-$$ Silvertip Casino 680 SW Higgins • 728-5643 The Silvertip Casino is Missoula’s premiere casino offering 20 Video gaming machines, best live poker in Missoula, full beverage liquor, 11 flat screen tv’s and great food at great prices. Breakfast Specials starting at $2.99 (7-11am) For a complete menu, go to www.silvertipcasino.com. Open 24/7. $-$$ Sis’s Kitchen 531-5034 • sisskitchen.com Wheat, Gluten & Allergen Free Foods. Frozen & Dry Mix Products. Sis’s Kitchen plays a part in Best of Missoula “Best Pizza” Winner’s for 2008-2012. Find our products at: The Good Food Store • Biga Pizza • Bridge Pizza • Pizza Cafe in Ronan (12”crust). $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI We have quick and delicious lunch specials 6 days a week starting at $7, and are open for dinner 7 nights a week. Try our comfort food items like Pork Katsu and Chicken Teriyaki. We also offer party platters to go and catering for all culinary styles. Lunch 11:30-3 Mon-Sat. Dinner 5-9:30 Every Night. Corner of Pine and Higgins. Very Family Friendly. 549-7979. $-$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins • 327-8929 Stop in when you’re in the neighborhood. We’ll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula’s best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 11-10 Sun 12-9. $-$$ Taco John’s 623 W Broadway 2600 S Reserve West-Mex® is about fresh taste and BOLD flavors. Taco John’s recipes make you smile and yell “OLÉ”. We combine hearty helpings of seasoned meats, crispy Potato Olés®, and flavorful cheeses with fresh-made Mexican specialties like burritos, tacos, and quesadillas. All topped off with bold sauces, spices and salsas. You’ll find West-Mex® cooking makes for an unbeatably satisfying meal. See you soon ... Amigo :) $-$$ Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you’ll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Walking Moustache 206 W. Main St. • 549-3800 www.walkingmoustache.com 12/14 Live Music with Ron Dunbar 7:30 pm. Our aim is to offer excellent food with five star service. Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner, Daily Specials + 2 am Special. Restaurant Hours: Tues 6 am – Sun 5 pm. Monday Lunch 11 am - 2:30 pm. Winebar Hours: Tues 11 am – Sat 11 pm. Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over


Bret Mosley puts his boots on and goes to work playin tunes at the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton, 6-8:30 PM. No cover.

December 12–December 19, 2013

Père Noël invites you to the Alliance Francaise de Missoula’s Christmas party, where you’ll enjoy potluck desserts, raffle prizes and of course, wine. Missoula Winery and Event Center, 5646 W. Harrier St. 6:30 PM. Free, kids welcome. Celebrate the Montana Native Plant Society by noshing on native plants at the annual Christmas Potluck. Dell Brown Room in Turner Hall, 6:30 PM. Bring a tasty dish, a plate and some utensils. Chicago’s Chance the Rapper hits the Wilma stage, along with DJ Rashad and Spinn. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $25/$22 in advance at jadepresents.com/chance-the-rapper-missoula. The Stumptown Players get heavy with Spirit Control, a drama about an air traffic controller guiding a passenger through an emergency landing. Performances at the KM Theatre, 40 Second St. E. in Kalispell, from Dec. 5–Dec. 7 and Dec. 12–Dec. 14 at 8 PM. $18. Tickets available at stumptownplayers.org. Howl at the moon and kick up your boots when Wild Coyote Band plays the Sunrise Saloon. Country two-step beginner/intermediate class is from 7-8:30 PM, live music and dancing from 9 PM to close. $5 for dance class/no cover after 9. If you ain’t gettin’ drunk, get the bleep out the club when Dead Hipster presents Crunskmas VI at Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St. Light show and all sortsa festivities are planned. 9 PM. $3. DJs Cryptochrome, Chaddabox, Dubsfeld and Broken Stihletto provide tasty trax while you heat up the scene at the Palace. 9 PM. No cover.

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

“I’ve been accepted to Hogwarts!” The Missoula Community Theatre presents Willy Wonka at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts Dec. 13-15 and Dec. 18-22. All evening shows are at 7:30 PM, except Sundays, which are at 6:30. Saturday and Sunday matinees are at 2 PM. $15-$21. Tickets at mctinc.org, by calling 728-7529 or the 200 N. Adams St. box office.

THURSDAYDEC12 Pour some sugar on me and let’s watch Ryan Bundy, Pancakes and Whiskey Hooves tear it up at the VFW, 245 W. Main St. 10 PM. $2/$4 for ages 18-20. Today kicks off the annual Montana Organic Association conference, which focuses on GMOs this year, and includes a screening of GMO OMG and live music from The Pheromones. Hosted by Flathead Valley

Community College in Kalispell. Visit montanaorganicassociation.org to learn more. Take the time to make that automatic thingamajig a reality with MakerSpace’s Open Time/Project Development at the Missoula Public Library. Thu., Dec. 12 and Mon., Dec. 16 from Noon-3 PM. Wed., Dec. 18 from 4-8 PM. To learn more check out missoulapubliclibrary.org/ makerspace.

nightlife Classical music aficionado Nathan Eyre plays tunes on guitar, mandolin and piano at the

Top Hat, starting at 6 PM. Free. Manage the holiday frazzles with Herbal Medicine for Nervous System Health and Stress Support, a workshop with clinical herbalist Britta Bloedorn. She’s chat about western herbal medicines and holistic approaches to stamina and dealing with stressful situations. 210 N Higgins Suite 318. 6 PM. $30. Call 8300949 or visit brittabloedorn.com to learn more. Singer-songwriter Kristi Neumann buoys spirits at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 6-8 PM. No cover.

Minneapolis’ world-beat-funk-bluegrassthingy Gypsy Lumberjacks do the work while you do the partying at the Top Hat. The Dodgy Mountain Men just might sneak in to play, too. 10 PM. No cover.

FRIDAYDEC13 Hark, children, that melodious blast of brass is coming our way once again. The Sentinel High School Band’s TubaChristmas returns with another delightful evening of traditional carols arranged for mass tuba and euphonium. Plus, there’s a tuba decorating contest! Performances at the Southgate Mall Center Clock Court from 7-8:30 PM.

nightlife The High Desert Journal launches its 18th issue, and celebrates with a publication party

missoulanews.com • December 12–December 19, 2013 [27]


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Sign me up for that group hug. Cigarette Girls Burlesque, along with the Cold Hard Cash Show, present a holiday extravaganza at the Wilma Fri., Dec. 13. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $20/$16 in advance at Rockin Rudy's and 1111presents.com. 18-plus.

and reading from literary radsters like Robert Stubblefield, Mary Jane Nealon and Melissa Mylchreest. Fact and Fiction, 220 N. Higgins. 5-7 PM. The Missoula Calligraphers Guild hosts a Second Friday exhibit, featuring an “eclectic mix” of works that expand on this age-old art form with painting, collage and digital touches. ZACC. 5:30-8:30 PM. Spruce up a blank T-shirt, tote or accessory with the Silk-Screening Night at the ZACC, where friendly artfolk will help you choose and print an in-house design. 5:30 PM. Free, donations appreciated. Set a spell while Americana outfit Pickled Okra dazzles the kiddos at Family Friendly Friday at the Top Hat. 6-8 PM. Free. Captain Wilson Conspiracy provides the jazz, you provide the intrigue at Brooks and Browns, inside the Holiday Inn on Pattee St. 6-9 PM. No cover. Enjoy zee cinema at Missoula Public Library’s World Wide Cinema night, the second Friday of every month. The series showcases indie and foreign films. Doors open at 6:45, show at 7 PM. Check missoula publibrary.org for info. Free. Get toasty when Soul City Cowboys play rock and country at the Symes Hot Springs Hotel, 209 N Wall St. in Hot Springs. 7 PM. No cover. The Cold Hard Cash Show and Cigarette Girls Burlesque join forces for a holiday extravaganza that’ll heat up the Wilma nice and toasty-like. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $20/$16 in advance at Rockin Rudy’s and 1111presents.com. 18-plus. Missoula Art Museum presents a chamber music concert with Lydia Brown and Robin Scott, with works by Debussy, Janáček, Dvorak and other composers your calendar editor can’t pronounce. 335 N. Pattee St. 7 PM. $100/$50 for MAM members. Visit

[28] Missoula Independent • December 12–December 19, 2013

missoulaartmuseum.org or call Tracy at 406-728-0447, ext. 225, to purchase tickets. Dream sweet, my sugarplums, it’s time for the 29th annual Garden City Ballet rendition of The Nutcracker. Guest artists Katherine Lawrence and Tom Mattingly from Ballet West, in Utah, lead a ginormous cast of 150 local performers. Showing Dec. 13-14 at 7:30 PM and Dec. 15 at 6 PM, plus 2 PM matinees all three days. $25/$20 for matinees. Tickets at griztix.com, by calling 1-888-MONTANA or from any GrizTix outlet. Puccini’s classic “Gloria” is the featured piece at Missoula Community Chorus and Chamber Chorale’s annual holiday concert. Mozart’s “Regina Coeli” and some old-school carols are part of the festivities, too. St. Anthony Church, 217 Tremont Ave. 7:30 PM. $10, tickets at Rockin Rudy’s and missoulachorus.com. Please sir, may I have another cog? The Whitefish Theatre Company presents a steampunked-out performance of the classic musical Oliver. O’Shaughnessy Center, 1 Central Ave. in Whitefish. Showing Dec. 67, 13-14 and 20-21 at 7:30 PM., plus Sunday matinees on Dec. 8, 15 and 22 at 4 PM. $20/$18 for seniors/$8 for students. Get your Golden Ticket and head on down to the Missoula Community Theatre production of Roald Dahl’s Willy Wonka. Performances at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts Dec. 13-15 and Dec. 18-22. All evening shows are at 7:30 PM, besides Sundays, which are at 6:30. Saturday and Sunday matinees are at 2 PM. $15-$21. Tickets available at mctinc.org, by calling 7287529 or at the box office on 200 N. Adams St. The Stumptown Players get heavy with Spirit Control, a drama about an air traffic controller guiding

a passenger through an emergency landing. Performances at the KM Theatre, 40 Second St. E. in Kalispell, from Dec. 5–Dec. 7 and Dec. 12–Dec. 14 at 8 PM. $18. Tickets available at stumptownplayers.org. Shakespeare’s comedy The Two Gentlemen of Verona comes to the stage for Frenchtown High School, in a public performance to raise funds for continued Shakespeare in the Schools at Frenchtown. High school auditorium. 8 PM, after the Christmas Dessert Extravangaza (ooh!). $10. Tickets available at the door or by calling 406-626-2730. Get lucky this Friday the 13th with the Winter Moon Square Dance. No experience necessary, and Bev Young calls out the steps. Stage 112, inside the Elk’s at 112 Pattee St. 8 PM. $3, 21-plus. We’re all outta mistletoe, so you’ll just have to mack on each other by the neon of the Rainier Light sign when Muzikata plays the Union Club. 9 PM. No cover. A glitch in time’ll save nine when Bay Area DJ Bass Science plays the Palace, along with Enzymes, Kris Moon and Tygerlily. 9 PM. $10, plus $5 surcharge for ages 18-21. Slam a PB&J and enjoy life on Mars when local rock outfits Voodoo Horshoes and Marvin play the Badlander. 9 PM. No cover. It’s raining men, hallelujah, at Gentleman’s Night with Richie Reinholdt, Josh Farmer, Travis Yost and Jacob Straw. Sean Kelly’s. 9 PM. No cover. Singer-songwriter dude Luke Dowler celebrates his latest album release with a show at Crush Wine Bar, 124 Central Ave. in Whitefish. 9 PM. Free. Have yourself a jelly baby and head on down to Jamulation at the Dark Horse. 1805 Regent. Gets rolling around 9 PM or so. No cover.


[calendar] Work on that case of cabin fever when Band in Motion plays the Eagles, 2420 South Ave. W. 8 PM. No cover. John “Poncho” Dobson hosts open mic at Fergie’s Pub every Fri., where you’re bound to mingle with a mix of resort celebs, odd locals and dizzy soakers. You never know who’ll show up and play. It could be you. Starts at 3 PM. 213 Main Street in Hot Springs. Sign up ahead at 406721-2416 or just show up. Lolo Hot Springs Resort hosts the weekly TomBourine Show, plus you can get your soak on and rent a cabin. 9:30 PM. No cover. Get yer dance on while The O’Connells play the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave. 9:30 PM to close. No cover.

SATURDAYDEC14 You’ll get a kick out of the Rocky Mountain Ballet Theatre’s Christmas Ballet Cabaret, with a Sugarplum Salsa, Winter Wonderland Kickline and Parade of the Toy Soldiers, along with other holiday delights. Top Hat. 2 PM. $18/$22 for VIP seating. Tickets at the Top Hat and tophatlounge.com. It’s time to tally the swans-aswimming and partridges in pear trees once again. Five Valleys Audubon invites all birders to join in the Christmas Bird Count throughout the day, either at home or by joining a group in the field. Last year Missoulians counted a record 87 species. To join in, contact Larry Weeks at 5495632 or email bwsgenea@centric.net. You can’t be in more than one place at a time, but that wily ole Saint Nick sure can, so come hang out and multi-task at the Chief Charlo Elementary Holiday Craft Fair. Sixty-five local

vendors offer all sorts of treasures while Santa chats with kiddos. Plus, there’s chili, pizza, hot cocoa and apple cider. 5600 Longview Dr. 9 AM–4 PM, with Santa’s appearance from 9:30 AM–3:30 PM. Put a reindeer on it at the Lowell School Hip Holiday Market, which promises that is is “not your ordinary craft sale!” Local artists and crafters from all over the region offer neato stuff and baked goods, plus there’s prize drawings. 1200 Sherwood. 10 AM-5 PM. $1 donation requested. Stay true to your root vegetables with the Heirloom Winter Farmers Market, which offers produce, honey, crafts and more, in the Floriculture Building on the Western Montana Fairgrounds. 10 AM-2 PM on Saturdays. Take off that balaclava and nosh on baklava at the Holiday Greek Pastry Sale at the Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church, 301 S. Sixth St. W. 10 AM-4 PM. You can also make advance orders for baklava, kourabiethes, melomakarona, koulourakia and spanakopita by calling Kristina at 544-4349, Mary at 552-2222 or Penny at 360-1046. Author Rod Overholt reads from his children’s book, I’m Lost: Which is the Right Path?, a bible-based story about a grizzly bear cub trying to find his way back home. Garden of Readn’, 2621 Brooks St. 10 AM-6 PM. A slew of authors are decking the halls for an International Choral Festival Salute, including Donna Love, Gary Glynn, Seabring Davis, Sneed B. Collard III, Margo Mowbray, Alice Finnegan and Alan Leftfidge. Fact and Fiction, 220 N. Higgins. Readings throughout the day, starting around 11 AM. See Verdi’s comic classic Falstaff like you’ve never seen it before when The Met: Live in HD shows at the Roxy Theater. 11 AM. Encore presentation on Tue., Dec. 17 at 7:30 PM.

$20/$18 for seniors/$15 for students and children. Ho! Ho! Ho! Missoula Public Library gets into the swing of things with family storytime, cookie decorating and holiday crafting. Plus, a certain friendly sleigh-driving visitor might appear. 11 AM-1 PM. Free. If there’s room in your heart and your house for a new buddy, AniMeals is sponsoring a pet adopt-athon. Friendly critters who need good homes will be ready for you to meet, and experts will be available to give advice. Kendall Subaru, 1600 Stephens. Noon-3 PM. Hot drinks and snacks available for the first 100 visitors. I dunno if turtledoves and French hens will be around, but there’ll be cute critters for sure at the Holiday Party with Animal Wonders. This kidfriendly party includes a live animal program, crafts, games and pictures with Santa. Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St. 1-5 PM. $5. Photos with Santa and animals run about $15-$25. The Clay Studio hosts a Holiday Open House where the whole fambly can find cheery ceramics, holiday decoratino station, music, raffle items and get your hands dirty with throwing demos. 1106 A Hawthorne St. 37 PM.

nightlife Dream sweet, my sugarplums, it’s time for the 29th annual Garden City Ballet rendition of The Nutcracker. Guest artists Katherine Lawrence and Tom Mattingly from Ballet West, in Utah, lead a ginormous cast of 150 local performers. Showing Dec. 13-14 at 7:30 PM and Dec. 15 at 6 PM, plus 2 PM matinees all three days. $25/$20 for matinees. Tickets at griztix.com, by calling 1-888-MONTANA or from any GrizTix outlet. Kick back and enjoy a rarefied evening when Blue Moon plays

“Wanna try my secret sauce?” Inspirational rocker Luke Dowler celebrates his latest album release with a show at Crush Wine Bar, 124 Central Ave. in Whitefish. Fri., Dec. 13 at 9 PM. Free.

missoulanews.com • December 12–December 19, 2013 [29]


[calendar] Draught Works, 915 Toole Ave., from 6-8 PM. No cover.

Dark Horse. 1805 Regent. Gets rolling around 9 PM or so. No cover.

Aran Buzzas busts out with a little gee-tar at the Blacksmith Brewery in Stevensville. 6-8 PM. No cover.

Work on that case of cabin fever when Band in Motion plays the Eagles, 2420 South Ave. W. 8 PM. No cover.

Rise to the top when the Bottom Feeders play the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6-8:30 PM. No cover. Get your Golden Ticket and head on down to the Missoula Community Theatre production of Roald Dahl’s Willy Wonka. Performances at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts Dec. 13-15 and Dec. 18-22. All evening shows are at 7:30 PM, besides Sundays, which are at 6:30. Saturday and Sunday matinees are at 2 PM. $15-$21. Tickets available at mctinc.org, by calling 728-7529 or at the box office on 200 N. Adams St. Play your cards right and you might get lucky when Black Jack plays tunes for dancin’ at the Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins Ave. 7:30-10 PM. $6/$10 for couples/$3 for students.

FREE

$20 GIFT CARD WHEN YOU PURCHASE $100 IN GIFT CARDS

(WHITE ELEPHANT RECOMMENDED)

The Stumptown Players get heavy with Spirit Control, a drama about an air traffic controller guiding a passenger through an emergency landing. Performances at the KM Theatre, 40 Second St. E. in Kalispell, from Dec. 5–Dec. 7 and Dec. 12– Dec. 14 at 8 PM. $18. Tickets available at stumptownplayers.org. Band together for a cause with the Missoula Food Bank benefit. The Hasslers, Off in the Woods and Muzikata will be playing tunes, and there’s $2 Bayern drafts, raffles and all kindsa prizes from local shops and restaurants. Sean Kelly’s. 8 PM. (See Agenda.) The Jack Saloon and Grill (formerly the venerated Lumberjack) presents live music on Saturdays. 7000 Graves Creek Road. 9 PM. Have yourself a jelly baby and head on down to Jamulation at the

Cash For Junkers insists you gotta get down on Saturday, Saturday, Saturday at the Union Club. 9 PM. No cover. Don we now our gayest apparel for the ISCSM Holiday Show, which features fabulous local drag queens and kings and dancing. Palace. Doors at 9 PM, show at 10:15. $5, 18-plus. Proceeds go toward NCBI. Get yer dance on while The O’Connells play the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave. 9:30 PM to close. No cover. Enough with the restraint and the white wine spritzers and the heaven’ly choirs already. Bob Wire and Chip Witson present a Xmas Xtravagonzo that guarantees a holiday-buttkicking rock dance party, with Baby and Bukowsi and the Off White Christmas Band. Top Hat. 10 PM. $10 suggested donation; some proceeds go to the Southside Lions Club to support vision testing and glasses for kids.

SUNDAYDEC15 Cut loose and get down when The Hasslers play Draught Works, 915 Toole Ave., from 5-7 PM. No cover. Dance the cabin fever blues away when the Golden Age Club hosts dances on the first, third and fifth Sunday afternoons through February, an alcohol-free event with potluck snacks during breaks. 727 Fifth St. in Hamilton. 1-4 PM. $3.

nightlife

Please sir, may I have another cog? The Whitefish Theatre Company presents a steampunked-out performance of the classic musical Oliver. O’Shaughnessy Center, 1 Central Ave. in Whitefish. Showing Dec. 67, 13-14 and 20-21 at 7:30 PM., plus Sunday matinees on Dec. 8, 15 and 22 at 4 PM. $20/$18 for seniors/$8 for students. Dream sweet, my sugarplums, it’s time for the 29th annual Garden City Ballet rendition of The Nutcracker. Guest artists Katherine Lawrence and Tom Mattingly from Ballet West, in Utah, lead a ginormous cast of 150 local performers. Showing Dec. 13-14 at 7:30 PM and Dec. 15 at 6 PM, plus 2 PM matinees all three days. $25/$20 for matinees. Tickets at griztix.com, by calling 1-888-MONTANA or from any GrizTix outlet.

nightlife The weekend ain’t quite over yet, so head on downtown for country swing with the Western Union Swing Band. Top Hat. Dance lesson at 6 PM, dancing from 7-9. No cover. Get your Golden Ticket and head on down to the Missoula Community Theatre production of Roald Dahl’s Willy Wonka. Performances at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts Dec. 13-15 and Dec. 18-22. All evening shows are at 7:30 PM, besides Sundays, which are at 6:30. Saturday and Sunday matinees are at 2 PM. $15-$21. Tickets available at mctinc.org, by calling 728-7529 or at the box office on 200 N. Adams St. The hallelujah chorus shall reigneth over us when the Glacier Symphony and Choral presents Handel’s Messiah. Performances at the Whitefish Performing Arts Center on Dec. 14 at 7:30 PM and at the Flathead HIgh Performance Hall in Kalispell on Dec. 15 at 3 PM. $15-$32 for adults/$10 for ages 18 and under. Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Starts at 8 PM with Front Street Jazz. Free.

MUSTARDSEEDWEB.COM DINE IN | TAKE OUT | DELIVERY 542.SEED

MONDAYDEC16 It’s a long way to the top if you wanna rock and roll, as you’ll see in the 2008 rockumentary Anvil: The Story of Anvil, about the influential but unsuccessful Canadian heavy metal band. Screening at the Top Hat. 7:30 PM. Free.

nightlife Show how big your gray matter can get at Super Trivia Freakout. Win a bar tab, shots and other mystery prizes during the five rounds of trivia at the Badlander. 8:30 PM. Free.

Tie one on. Bob Wire and Chip Witson present an Xmas Xtravagonzo at the Top Hat, with Baby and Bukowsi and the Off White Christmas Band. Sat., Dec. 14 at 10 PM. $10 suggested donation; some proceeds go to the Southside Lions Club to support vision testing and glasses for kids.

[30] Missoula Independent • December 12–December 19, 2013

Munch down on some roast beast today with the Community Food & Agriculture Coalition’s holiday feast and annual member celebration. Tasty small plates will be available for purchase, plus a raffle with prizes from a whole raft of local food producers. Montgomery Distillery. 5


[calendar]

rebel girl “BECAUSE we are angry at a society that tells us Girl = Dumb, Girl = Bad, Girl = Weak. BECAUSE we are unwilling to let our real and valid anger be diffused and/or turned against us via the internalization of sexism as witnessed in girl/girl jealousism and self defeating girltype behaviors.”

Hanna recounts her role in the birth of the movement and in Bikini Kill and Le Tigre, plus her personal struggles with falling in love with a Beastie Boy (Adam Horowitz) and getting diagnosed with Lyme disease.

I’m excited about so many things about The Punk Singer, but That’s part of the 1991 Riot if I had to pick one to explain coGrrrl Manifesto, published in Bikini herently, it’s that it’s heartening to Kill Zine 2. It’s an answer to a lot of see the women of riot grrrl staying questions: Why are you angry? rebellious as they age. Punk rock is Why do you need feminism? Why a hard subculture to grow old in, do you need punk rock? Why riot and doubly so if you’re a woman, grrrl? with all the expectations that you’re supposed to settle down. It’s unRiot grrrl, if you need a primer, seemly to be a girl who’s exuberant was the punk feminist movement and pissed-off and opinionated, let that sprung up in the Pacific Northalone if you’re an adult woman west and spread elsewhere in the with responsibilities. I’ve always asearly ’90s, with bands like L7 and sumed that liking punk rock has an Bratmobile claiming the aggresexpiration date, that I’ll have to give siveness and anger of punk for photo courtesy Sophie Howarth it up the way I got too old for pony themselves. The beacon for riot rides at the fair. Seeing women like grrrl, Kathleen Hanna, is the subject of a documentary released this year by Opening Hanna and Joan Jett and Kim Gordon continuing to Band Films. The Punk Singer: A Film About Kathleen rock out assures me that I can love this as long as I want to. WHAT: The Punk Singer: A Film About Kathleen Hanna WHEN: Dec. 13–15 at 7:15 and 9:15 PM WHERE: The Roxy Theater HOW MUCH: $6-$7

PM. Free, membership not required to join in the fun. Hey, David Lynch lovers, The Roxy Theater shows episodes of “Twin Peaks,” a few at a time, every Monday at 7 PM. Homemade pie and Black Coffee Roasting Co. decaf and regular available. $5. Larry Hirshberg does his groove thang at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave., from 7-10 PM. No cover. Let the love light shine when Dolce Canto presents Luminescence, a choir concert featuring new works and old favorites. Dec. 11 at St. Anthony Parish, 217 Tremont, and on Dec. 16 at the Stevensville United Methodist Church. 7:30 PM. $18/$15 for students. Tickets for the Missoula concert available at Fact and Fiction, Rockin’ Rudy’s or DolceCanto.info. How many clarinetists does it take to change a lightbulb? Just one, but they’ll go through a whole box of them before they find just the right one! That joke is sure to get a chortle after the Sentinel High School Bands holiday concert, which includes original compositions, jazz standards and lots of holiday cheer. Sentinel High Margaret Johnson Theater. 7:30 PM. Food bank donation requested for admission.

Riot grrrl might be the topic of documentaries, but its spirit is far from dead. This isn’t news to anyone who’s listening to The Gateway District or Kitten Forever or War on Women. In a time when singer Lauren Denitzio, of the Worriers and Measure SA, still gets asked if she’s “with the band” or not, we still need riot grrrl’s spirit, and we still need Kathleen Hanna and people like her. —Kate Whittle

TUESDAYDEC17 Local rabble-rousers The Whiskey Hooves along with Monk and the Mothers tie one on for an evening of bluegrass and alt-country at the Badlander. 9 PM. Free, plus $3 Montgomery drink special. Watch your little ones master tree pose in no time during yoga at the Children’s Museum of Missoula. 11 AM. 225 W. Front. $4.25. See Verdi’s comic classic Falstaff like you’ve never seen it before when The Met: Live in HD shows at the Roxy Theater. 11 AM. Encore presentation on Tue., Dec. 17 at 7:30 PM. $20/$18 for seniors/$15 for students and children.

happen around what ancient pagan holiday? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.) Pete Seeger can rest easy when The Acousticals play their traditional Americana tunes at the Top Hat. 8 PM. Free. 21-plus after 9 pm. Singer-songwriter fella Eric Barrera plays tunes at the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave., starting at 9 PM. No cover.

WEDNESDAYDEC18 The Muslim Journeys Book Discussion focuses on Dreams of Trespass, Fatima Mernissi’s memoir about growing up in a Moroccan harem in the 1940s. Missoula Public Library. 6 PM.

nightlife

nightlife

It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Boys Bluegrass from 5:30 to 8 PM. Free. Call 327-0900.

Jolly good cheer is on tap for the Community Pint Night to benefit the ZACC. Artist-type folk will host a free drawing class while the kids can visit with Santa. Ugly sweaters encouraged. Northside Kettlehouse, 313 N. First St. W. 5-8 PM.

Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free pub trivia, which takes place every Tuesday at 8 PM. Here’s a question to tickle your brainwaves: Christmas is celebrated in December partly to

Mark your calendars for the bluegrass-inspired picking circle at Tangled Tones, now every week on Wednesday. Bring anything from your

missoulanews.com • December 12–December 19, 2013 [31]


[calendar] violin to your accordion, as long as it’s got “strings or buttons that you don’t plug in.” All skill levels welcome, listeners too. 2005 South Ave. W. 6 PM. Free. Get your Golden Ticket and head on down to the Missoula Community Theatre production of Roald Dahl’s Willy Wonka. Performances at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts Dec. 1315 and Dec. 18-22. All evening shows are at 7:30 PM, besides Sundays, which are at 6:30. Saturday and Sunday matinees are at 2 PM. $15-$21. Tickets available at mctinc.org, by calling 728-7529 or at the box office on 200 N. Adams St. Breakdance like Li’l Bub intended at Random Music For Random Kitties, an edition of Milkcrate Wednesday featuring DJs Hauli, Wolf Trap, Chadderpiller and the Milkcrate Mechanic. Palace. 9 PM. No cover, plus $6 PBR pitchers and free pool. (Trivia answer: Solstice.) Bluesy party outfit Andy Frasco and the UN keeps the peace at the Top Hat. 10 PM. $8.

THURSDAYDEC19 Films by pioneering Russian puppeteer and stop-motion animator Ladislas Starevich, including The Cameraman’s Revenge and The Ant and the Grasshopper, get the live-score treatment from Next Door Prison Hotel at the Roxy Theater. 8 PM. $10.

nightlife You’ll swear every song is dedicated to you when the one and only Tom Catmull plays Draught Works, 915 Toole Ave., from 5-8 PM. Get your nosh on while Tyler Decker plays mellow tunes at the Top Hat Dinner Show. 6 PM. Free. Might we suggest pairing a dirty martini with Captain Wilson Conspiracy’s jazzy tunes when they play Montgomery Distillery. 6-8 PM. No cover.

If you could use a refreshing artsy palate cleanser, here’s an unusual function to wet your whistle. The Moonrisers Variety Show includes three short plays by Christopher Magee, a short scene from Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead and music from Brody Klemer and The Chalfonts. ZACC. 7 PM. Free, but donations appreciated. Get your Golden Ticket and head on down to the Missoula Community Theatre production of Roald Dahl’s Willy Wonka. Performances at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts Dec. 1315 and Dec. 18-22. All evening shows are at 7:30 PM, besides Sundays, which are at 6:30. Saturday and Sunday matinees are at 2 PM. $15-$21. Tickets available at mctinc.org, by calling 728-7529 or at the box office on 200 N. Adams St. Ask our former calendar editor to dance, why dontcha, and cut a rug when Julie Bug and Northern Exposure play the Sunrise Saloon. Country two-step beginner/intermediate dance

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[32] Missoula Independent • December 12–December 19, 2013

lesson from 7-8:30 PM, live band starting at 9. $5 for dance class/no cover after 9. Like a bad boyfriend, Jerry Joseph just can’t stay away for long, so he and his Jackmormons play rock ‘n’ roll at the Top Hat, starting at 10 PM. $10/$8 in advance. Tickets at Rockin Rudy’s, the Top Hat and tophatlounge.com/events. Nothing’s going to ruin my holiday. This is going to be the best Christmas ever. Submit events to Calapatra by 5 PM on Friday to calendar@missoulanews.com to ensure publication in print and online. Don’t forget to include the date, time and cost. If you must (my email is organized, but my desk is a disaster) snail mail to Calapatra c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit events online. Just find the “submit an event” link under the Spotlight on the right corner at missoulanews.com.


[outdoors]

MOUNTAIN HIGH

N

ot so very long ago, dog sleds served as important transportation in Idaho and Montana. In the early 20th century, heavy snowfall made railroads impassable, and so it was up to mushers to carry mail and supplies. Mushing was a successful wintertime business, and made for a great sport. The 1917 American Dog Derby traveled 55 miles along the Yellowstone Branch of the Union Pacific railroad from West Yellowstone to Ashton; the winner, Tud Kent, led his team through a blizzard over the two-day competition. We might not need mail by mushing anymore, but the sport carries on, and not just at the Iditarod. West Yellowstone still hosts sled dog races, including the upcoming Rodeo Run. It draws dozens of mushers from throughout the northwest with adult and junior divisions and teams from four to 12 dogs. Getting my

dog to behave on a walk is enough trouble for me, let alone training twelve of them to move in unison. The Rodeo Run events kick off Thu., Dec. 12 with a dog trailer decoration contest, Parade of Lights and Meet the Mushers session in downtown West Yellowstone from 5–7:30 PM. Teams compete starting at 9 AM on Friday and Saturday, following snowmobile trails as far as 32 miles. Mushing might not be typical transportation these days, but it’s still a testament to the combined power of human and dog. —Kate Whittle The Rodeo Run Sled Dog Races run Thu., Dec. 12–Sat., Dec. 14 in West Yellowstone, off Highway 287. Free to watch. Check out wysleddograces.com to learn more.

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

THURSDAY DECEMBER 12

SUNDAY DECEMBER 15

Backcountry aficionado Brian Story talks about skiing in the Missions and the Bitterroots as part of the December Rocky Mountaineers meeting. Trail Head, 221 E. Front St. 7 PM. Learn more at rockymountaineers.com.

The weather might be frightful, but it’ll be cozy and delightful during the Winter Candlelight Tours throughout this month at Lewis and Clark Caverns. Tours run between 9:30 a.m. and 2:45 p.m. and last about two hours. $15 for adults/$8 for ages 611. Kids under five not recommended. Call 2873541 or visit stateparks.mt.gov to learn more.

FRIDAY DECEMBER 13 Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s weekly meeting to talk about past glories and upcoming activities at Bigfork’s Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free. Make sure your first time is special by attending First Timer Friday at the Freestone Climbing Center, 935 Toole Ave. in Missoula, at 7 PM. Free if it’s your first visit.

SATURDAY DECEMBER 14 You’ll be bright eyed and bushy tailed after Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which start at 8 AM every Saturday at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. Grab breakfast with other participants afterward. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org. The West Central Montana Avalanche Foundation hosts an Avalanche Transceiver Clinic, in which you’ll learn to use the handy devices. UM Outdoor Program office in the Rec Center on campus. $15, includes instruction and transceivers. Call 243-5172 to register, or visit life.umt.edu/CREC/Outdoor/TripClassDetails to learn more. Them waters might be chilly, but you can b.s. about trout anyway when the Rock Creek Fisherman’s Mercantile hosts a weekly Fly Tyer’s Roundtable. Y’all can drink coffee, learn new patterns and use tools and materials for free. Rock Creek Fisherman’s Mercantile, 73 Rock Creek Road in Clinton. 10 AM. Call 825-6440 or email rcmerc@blackfoot.net for more details.

Perhaps this will be the year you take the plunge and join the Libby Polar Bear Club, which meets at the Farm-to-Market Bridge over Libby Creek at 2 PM on Sundays through April. If the ice can be broken, the club does the dive. Check out libbymt.com/outdoors/polarbearclub.htm.

WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 18 Demonstrate the power of your glutes this season with the Ski/Winter Sports Conditioning class at Summit Athletics, designed to get your butt in gear for everything from ice skating to snow shoeing. 1920 Montana St. Wednesday nights through March. 5 PM. $5 drop-in/$20 per month.

THURSDAY DECEMBER 19 The miniNaturalists Pre-K Program is aces for outdoorsy learning for ye childrens. The Montana Natural History Center. 10–11 AM. $3/$1 for members. Visit montananaturalist.org. You can’t achieve those marathon dreams unless you get started now, so check out the Boston/Spring Marathon Training Class informational session, which meets in the basement classroom at Runner’s Edge, 304 N. Higgins Ave. 5:30 PM. The 16-week course is intended for advanced runners, and the first run will be Jan. 5. $75/$50 for RWM members. Register at runwildmissoula.org. calendar@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • December 12–December 19, 2013 [33]


[community]

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It’s a bit a trope to point out that, during the holiday season when many of us eat like it’s a hobby, many others don’t know where their next square meal will come from. But it’s true, and increasingly so. Chances are you’ve needed help or someone you know has, since one in seven Missoulians uses the Missoula Food Bank every year. The food bank has reported continually growing need. Services from 2009 to 2012 increased by nearly 20 percent,

Feed the Zoo: A Benefit for the Missoula Food Bank is Sat., Dec. 14 at Sean Kelly’s. 9 PM. Bands include Off In the Woods, Muzikata and The Hasslers. Free. 21-plus.

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THURSDAY DECEMBER 12 The UM Climate Action Now Meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM FLAT, 633 Fifth St. E. Now meeting at 6 PM.

SUNDAY DECEMBER 15

FRIDAY DECEMBER 13

MONDAY DECEMBER 16

Perhaps you’ll get along better with peeps from other cultures after UM communication professor Phyllis Ngai presents “Intercultural Communication and Social Justice,” a Brown Bag Lecture at the YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway. Noon-1 PM.

Avoid debtor’s prison or just the modern-day versions of it when the Montana Consumer Law Center’s Jessie Lundberg presents a free Debt Education Class. Topics include negotiating debt settlements, dealing with collector harassments, wage garnishment and credit reports. Solstice Building, 1535 Liberty Lane. Space is limited, so register is advance by calling 7213000, ext. 1161, or email katy@lundberglawyer.com.

If you’re having trouble paying for daycare for the little ones, Missoula’s Child Care Resources offers scholarships. New guidelines mean a family of three can earn up to $2,386 per month to qualify. Call 406728-6446 or visit childcareresource.org to learn more. Women hoping to improve their lot with further education have until tomorrow to apply for the Missoula Soroptimist’s Women’s Opportunity Award. Email simissoula@gmail.com for application and guidelines. Visit soroptimistofmissoula.com to learn about deadlines for other upcoming cash grants. Big Sky Mind and the Tibetan Language Institute host A Day of Buddhist Practice: Cultivating Love and Compassion, a one-day retreat. 102 McLeod Ave. 9:30 AM-5 PM. Everyone’s invited to stay during the break for a potluck lunch between 12:30 and 2 PM. Suggested donation $25-$30/free for students. Call 961-5131 or email info@tibetanlanguage.org to register, or just show up at 9 AM on the day of.

Enter to win great prize giveaways at every booth and one lucky bride will win Photograph courtesy of Hixson Family Photography

Learn about maintaining healthy relationships at Co-Dependents Anonymous, which meets at 11:30 AM on Saturdays at the Fourth D Alano Club, 1500 W. Broadway. Contact Koryn for more information at 493-4431.

You don’t have to be a time lord or a doctor to check out the Missoula Time Bank, in which members exchange skills and services instead of money. Orientations are at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center on the second and fourth Thursdays of the month. Enter through the alley door. 7 PM. RSVP required prior to the orientation by emailing info@missoulatimebank.org, and visit missoulatimebank.org.

SATURDAY DECEMBER 14

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reflecting nationwide trends reported by the national food bank network Feeding America. America, the land of plenty, where corporations are reporting record profits and the economy is supposed to be on the rebound, but that rebound hasn’t trickled down to the lower classes. It’s depressing to think about the systems of inequality that make the rich richer and poor poorer in our society. But we can either sit around feeling disenfranchised, or get up and do what we can on a local level. The Feed the Zoo benefit for the Missoula Food Bank includes reggae, pop and Americana music from Off in the Woods, Muzikata and The Hasslers. Artists Candice Rhea and Nathaniel Luke Smith will offer live performance art. A raffle includes gift cards for everything from lift tickets to concert passes to restaurants. Plus, there’s $2 Bayern drafts, so you can get your holiday spirit on while still supporting less fortunate folks. I’ll raise a toast to that. —Kate Whittle

Loretta Vizzutti and Odette Grassi present Ornamentation, a healing workshop for folks facing illness and loss. Living Art of Montana, 725 W. Alder St. Unit 17. 10:30 AM-12:30 PM. Free.

Seeking all concerned citizens who want to develop a new worldview, a new Tribal Wisdom and Deep Ecology Discussion Group will chat about environmental ethics and living in relationship to the earth. Meets Sundays at 4 PM at a home in Missoula. Call Louisa at 214-2410 for location and details.

TUESDAY DECEMBER 17 An Affordable Care Act expert will be on hand to help folks figure out the confounded thing at Missoula Public Library. 6 PM. Appointments are on a drop-in basis. Call 721-2665 or visit missoulapubliclibrary.org to learn more.

WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 18 Cancer patients and survivors are invited to Your Body, An Instrument of Beauty, a therapeutic sound and song workshop with Dawn Payne. Living Art, 725 W. Alder St. Unit 17. Noon-1:30 PM. No charge, but please RSVP to 549-5329. Just let the stress fly away with the Mini Reiki and Body Code sessions for relaxation and holistic healing of mind and body. Upstairs in Building 28 at Fort Missoula. 5:45-8 PM. Donations requested. Call 2071370 to learn more.

THURSDAY DECEMBER 19

The UM Climate Action Now Meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM FLAT, 633 Fifth St. E. Now meeting at 6 PM.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

[34] Missoula Independent • December 12–December 19, 2013


missoulanews.com • December 12–December 19, 2013 [35]


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

December 12 - December 19, 2013

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small birthmark on it, she has a white undercoat, and is brown/black on her top. Her tail is dark and fluffy, and she is not spayed. She was last seen around Splash Montana, Playfield Park, and Pattee Creek Road. If you have seen her or know of her whereabouts please contact Kiki at 701 361 9506 or Kayla at 507 381 8646.

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Table of Contents Advice Goddess . . . . . .C2 Free Will Astrology . . .C4 Public Notices . . . . . . . .C5 Crossword . . . . . . . . . .C7 Camp Sleepover . . . .C11 This Modern World . .C12

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ADVICE GODDESS

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

By Amy Alkon

ANNOUNCEMENTS

TOOK THE WIND OUT OF HER ZALES Around Valentine’s Day, my beloved boyfriend of a year kept hinting about a big surprise. He’d been talking about moving in with me, and I was expecting a proposal and a ring. I got a fondue pot. I have two children and, apparently, the idea that a man should put a ring on a woman’s finger before moving in with her and her kids. He said he’d propose when he was ready. Then, by accident (I think), he left his Amazon.com page open on my computer, showing the tackiest, cheapest ring in the world and a pocketknife for himself (which cost more than the ring). I told him to move in and forget the ring. I bought myself a ring, but that didn’t work. I felt unvalued and ashamed. We fought often, and he ended up moving out. He wants me back, but I don't want to live with him without the stupid ring. We're both too needy to live apart. Can we salvage this? —Heartbroken Mama The man you love did give you a shiny object that you could show off to the girls at the office, even if the admiring remarks you were hoping for weren’t “Look at that thing! It’s twice the size of Miranda’s Crock-Pot!” and “Ooh, is that stainless steel?” Diamond engagement rings can seem like a completely stupid thing to want. They're absurdly expensive and hard to tell from lab-created rings available at a fraction of the cost. And what good are they, really? As evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miller jokes in The Mating Mind: “Why should a man give a woman a useless diamond engagement ring, when he could buy her a nice big potato, which she could at least eat?” Well, the answer is that men can walk away after sex and women may walk away with a bunch of little mouths to drag around and feed, so women evolved to seek reliable signs that a man has access to resources and a willingness to provide them. Any hump ’em and dump ’em smooth talker can make promises. The most reliable signs of commitment are those economists call “costly signals,” meaning that they require substantial effort or financial investment and are therefore difficult to fake. Basically, only a guy who’s madly in love with you would be willing to prove it with an object as wildly expensive and useless as a diamond. That's why buying yourself a ring didn't work and why you felt “unvalued and ashamed” when your

boyfriend got down on one knee, but only so he could plug in a moderately-priced kitchen appliance and propose, “How ’bout we put stale bread cubes on sticks and dunk ’em in melted cheese?” Being too needy to live alone is reason to get a dog or paste a face on your robot vacuum cleaner, not rush into a lifelong commitment. The way to figure this out is by spending time together without living together until he’s ready to commit or you’re ready to throw in the towel. But pick a date to take stock of whether progress is being made so you aren't hanging on endlessly. As they say in the fondue world, there comes a time when a guy needs to either dip or get off the pot.

PARADISE LUST I want to break up with my girlfriend, but we are supposed to go to Costa Rica and have already paid for the house we’re renting for the month with her friends. Is it ridiculous to wait till after Costa Rica to break up? —I Sound Like A Jerk When you put off canceling a relationship to avoid canceling your vacation, even posing for photos can get complicated. You might find yourself trying to put a native person or pre-Columbian artifact between the two of you to avoid blurting out, “Hey, can you stand a little farther away from me? It'll make it way easier to crop you out.” Unfortunately, you can’t do much to cushion the blow when she invariably squeezes out of you that you stuck around long after you stopped loving her, which will make her feel stupid and humiliated, in addition to the usual fun feelings that come with being dumped. Barring some immediate need for your emotional support (like your partner’s grandma’s impending funeral or bail hearing), the kindest thing you can do is break up as soon as you know it’s over— even if it bummers up your travel plans and means you’ll eat some costs. Letting your girlfriend go without you to Costa Rica might allow her to look back fondly on both the relationship and the vacation—in a way she couldn’t if she were flipping through her trip photos saying, “And this is the guy who wanted nothing to do with me kissing me under a jungle waterfall.”

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com www.advicegoddess.com

[C2] Missoula Independent • December 12 – December 19, 2013

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EMPLOYMENT GENERAL STORE MANAGER-GLASGOW, MT. Border Plains Equipment, LLC, a certified Case IH dealer, is looking for a motivated and driven individual to join our team as a store manager. The selected candidate will provide leadership in all aspects of the dealership. This candidate will work with develop and execute profit plan to produce targeted volume and margins, lead and ensure a location of staff highly aligned with company values, effectively directs and coaches staff to achieve results and ensures customer satisfaction. Applicants must be/and possess: Excellent organizational, communication & problem solving skills. Thrive & multitask in a fast paced environment. Superior customer service skills. The ability to anticipate issues and respond proactively with solutions. Computer skills with the ability to learn new programs. We offer competitive wages, 401k retirement plan, health insurance, dental insurance, vision insurance, short-term & long-term disability insurance, life insurance, paid vacation, eight paid holidays and job training. To be considered for this position: Please submit resume to: david.anfinson @borderplains.com

BARTENDING

$300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training available. 1-800-965-6520 ext. 278 CREW SUPERVISOR FLOAT FT position providing supervisory support to a variety of work crew. Supervisory experience preferred. M - F: Days and some varied shifts. Supervisory

and Customer Service experience preferred. $9.91 - $10.16/hr. Closes Tuesday, December 17, 2013, 5 PM. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job#9984483

Service: employmissoula.com. Job#2985889

Flatbed Drivers needed from the Missoula area. Home weekly to Bi-weekly • Top pay • Full benefits • New equipment • 2 years experience required • Clean driving record • Must be present to apply. 406-493-7876 Call 9am-5pm M-F only.

BEHAVIOR CARE COORDINATOR Must have a welldocumented work history and a minimum of 4 years in working with adolescents with autism, those with special needs, or those with developmental disabilities. Or BA/BS Degree in Human Services. Sat & Sun, 9am-2pm and MonWed, Noon to 10 pm, for approximately 40 hours per week. $10.40/hour. Benefits are offered. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job#2985890

GET PAID TO LEARN a new career as a drop shipper. Receive instant pay raise from your current employment while training. 1800-808-6157, www.HomeEmployers.com Montana School of Massage is currently hiring a Massage Clinic Receptionist. Please refer to the website MontanaMassage.com under job postings. Now Hiring Call Today! 273-2266 Passenger Service Agent Responsible for providing customer service, ticketing and those activities related to boarding and deplaning passengers at the ticket counter, passenger gate or baggage areas. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job#9984496 TREATMENT SERVICE TECHNICIAN Work with adolescents in a group home. HS Diploma or GED required, valid MT driver’s license. Prior employment experience preferred. TueFri, 3-11 p.m., about 32 hours per week. $10.25/hour + benefits.Full job description at Missoula Job

PROFESSIONAL

CASE MANAGER TEMPORARY Non-profit in

Missoula that serves children is seeking a Temporary Case Manager. Requires Bachelor’s degree in Social Work, Early Childhood Education or related field, and experience planning & working with

infants & toddlers. Extensive recordkeeping & paperwork required. $15.72/hr + full benefits. Usually Mon-Fri 8am-5pm, 40 hrs/wk with some evening visits and family activities. Staff must be flexible with schedule to meet families’ needs. CLOSES: 12/18/2013 at 5pm. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job#2985882 CASINO ASSISTANT MANAGER Local Casino looking for ASSISTANT MANAGER. High School Diploma or GED and work experience with computers and ten-key. Position includes working nights, weekends and holidays. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job#2985881 CLINICAL DOCUMENT COORDINATOR / #2984087 $40,560.00 $46,800.00 Yearly. Associate degree in Nursing or Medical Coding. Minimum 5 years experience adult inpatient medical surgical or

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EMPLOYMENT critical care nursing; or minimum 5 years inpatient coding. Full time; M-F; day shift. Full benefit package provided. /lat. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 E N V I R O N M E N TA L HEALTH SPECIALIST I Requires a bachelor’s level degree in the physical, biological, or environmental sciences. Requires one year of experience working as a sanitarian, or in a biological or physical sciences field that is related to environmental health. Applicants must meet minimum standards for sanitarians in training In accordance with Montana ARM 24.216.502 which require a minimum of 30 semester or 45 quarter credit hours in physical and biological sciences including at least one successfully completed course in chemistry, biology, and microbiology (microbiology can be taken after hire). Requires lifting, 10 pounds frequently; moving 50-100 pounds occasionally. Requires a valid MT driver’s license. *DUTIES: Performs technical and professional work in environmental health disciplines such as air and water quality, and general sanitation. Employees hired as Environmental Health Specialist I, must become a Sanitarian in Training within one month of hire and a Registered Sanitarian with the Montana Board of Sanitarians within one year of hire. Inspects restaurants, day cares, schools, youth homes, trailer courts, motels, jails, and other establishments or public facilities to ensure compliance with state and local regulations. Issues septic permits and conducts inspections. Inspects public water supply systems. *HOURS/DAYS: Full time, permanent position. *WAGE: $18.46 to start; $19.65 with Sanitarian Certification CLOSES: Monday, Jan 06, 2014. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job#2985883 TEMPORARY OFFICE ASSISTANT This position requires effective communication skills, familiarity with digital filing, strong analytical skills, and knowledge of professional office practices, including office equipment. This per-

son will convert a paper filing system to an electronic system. This position will need to work independently to organize the files, with IT support. Part-time, M-F, 93 p.m. for six weeks. $10 to $12 per hour. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job#2985879

SKILLED LABOR CUSTODIAL / MAINTENANCE MANAGER Lolo employer is seeking to hire a part-time CUSTODIAL/MAINTENANCE MANAGER. $12/hr or more DOE. Medical Insurance after 60 day probationary period. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job#2985880 OPERATIONS ASSISTANT FT position responsible for assisting with maintenance requirements of Corporation buildings, vehicles, and equipment. M - F: 8 AM - 5 PM varied. $10.50 $11.40/hr. Closes Tuesday, December 17, 2013, 5 PM. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job#9984485 Part-Time opening “approximately 1200 hours/year” for Custodial/Maintenance Manger for Woodman School. Minimum $12/hr plus medical insurance after 60 days successful employment. Paid hourly or salary depending on individual ability or qualifications. Call 406-273-6770 for application and job description.

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-5454546

HEALTH CAREERS CAREGIVERS HIRING ASAP! Busy home health care company is looking for experienced, presentable, full and part time caregivers in the Missoula area. 6 months of caregiving experience required. Driver’s license and reliable transportation. Must be able to lift up to 50 lbs and work evenings, overnights, weekends, and holidays. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 2985885 HAB TECH I FT position providing services to adults with disabilities in a residential/community setting. Supervisory experience preferred. TU - FR: 2:30 PM - 9

FOSTER CARE PROVIDER Opportunity Resources, Inc. is seeking a Foster Care Provider for a 19 year old female with developmental disabilities who is looking for a home. A $1500 monthly stipend w/room and board will be paid; respite money is available through the individual cost plan. Please contact Sheila: 329-1765 or Kerry: 329-1736.

PM, & SAT: 10 AM - 10 PM. $9.60 - $10/hr. Closes Tuesday, December 17, 2013, 5 PM. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job#9984489 Resident Care Director RN / LPN / LVN Prior Resident Care Director or Nurse Management experience a plus! Licensed Registered Nurse (RN) or Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) or Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN) in good standing with State Licensing Authority. Associates degree preferred. Valid driver license. Computer proficiency. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job#9651962 ST. Patrick Hospital Clinical Laboratory Scientist

(CLS) Generalist/Histologist. Examine & analyze body fluids, tissues, & cells to identify bacteria, parasites, & other microorganisms; and evaluate test results, etc. Reqs: BS degree or foreign degree equiv.; 1 yr. exper. as Medical Lab Technologist or related working in Histology, Histopathology or related field; & Montana State licensure as Clinical Laboratory Scientist. F-T, Missoula, MT. Submit resumes at:http://www.providenceiscalling.jobs/ (Job number 19782).

OPPORTUNITIES Marketing on motion Marketing on Motion for Public display (Ads in Motion). Interested Car owner should apply and earn

$500/wk. Send a mail of interest to fredwilliams8791@gmail.com or sms (747) 333-6401 for more information. Mr Fred Williams

OPERATIONS ASSISTANT FT position responsible for assisting with maintenance requirements of Corporation buildings, vehicles, and equipment. M – F: 8AM – 5PM Varied. $10.50 -$11.40/HR. Closes: Tuesday, December 17, 2013, 5PM.

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FT position providing supervisory support to a variety of work crew. Supervisory experience preferred. M – F: Days and some varied shifts. Supervisory and Customer Service experience preferred. $9.91-$10.16/hr. Closes Tuesday, December 17, 2013, 5PM.

HAB TECH I 2) FT (1) PT position providing services to adults with disabilities in a res/comm setting. Supervisory experience preferred. $9.60-$10/hr. Closes Tuesday, December 17, 2013, 5PM. (1) TU – FR: 2:30PM – 9PM & SAT: 10AM – 10PM. (2) M & TU: 2PM – Midnight, W: 2PM – 9PM, & SUN: 7AM – 8PM. (3) PT – FR: 9:30AM – 5:30PM, SAT & SUN: 10AM – 6PM. Valid MT driver license No history of abuse, neglect or exploitation

Applications available at: OPPORTUNITY RESOURCES, INC., 2821 S. Russell, Missoula, MT 59801 or online at: www.orimt.org. Extensive background checks will be completed. NO RESUMES. EOE

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Escape with MassageSwedish, Deep Tissue and Reiki. Open days, evenings and weekends. Insurance accepted. Janit Bishop, LMT • 207-7358 • 127 N Higgins

Hummingbird Usui Reiki Attunements at Garden Mother Herbs 345 West Front St. Missoula, 1st level $75, 2nd level $75, Master Level $150. ph 406-529-3834

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Julie Linville, CHom Certified Classical Homeopath

406-274-2009

845 W. Kent · 406-546-5485

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A natural healing art based on the principle that there are reflex points on the feet, hands & ears that are actually "reflections" of the body systems & organs. Using gentle acupressure, your reflexologist is able to stimulate the body's own natural ability to achieve better overall balance and energy. It's a perfect complement to traditional health care routines... and you get to keep your clothes on!!

Please call or email for appt. 406-830-7276 mountainreflexology@gmail.com 127 N. Higgins, Ste. 308

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • December 12 – December 19, 2013

[C3]


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT

By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected President of the United States four times, more often than any other president. We can conclude that he was one of the most popular American leaders ever. And yet he never won a majority of the votes cast by the citizens of his home county in New York. I foresee the possibility of a comparable development in your life. You may be more successful working on the big picture than you are in your immediate situation. It could be easier for you to maneuver when you're not dealing with familiar, up-close matters. What's outside your circle might be more attracted to your influence than what's nearer to home.

BLACK BEAR NATUROPATHIC

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In 2009, actress Sandra Bullock starred in three films, two of which earned her major recognition. For her performance in All About Steve, she was given a Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Actress. Her work in The Blind Side, on the other hand, won her an Oscar for Best Actress. I'm thinking that you may experience a similar paradox in the coming days, Taurus. Some of your efforts might be denigrated, while others are praised. It may even be the case that you're criticized and applauded for the same damn thing. How to respond? Learn from Bullock's example. She gave gracious acceptance speeches at the award ceremonies for both the Golden Raspberry and the Oscar.

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GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Almost 2,000 years ago, a Roman doctor named Scribonius Largus developed recipes for three different kinds of toothpaste. One contained the ashes of burned-up deer antler, aromatic resin from an evergreen shrub known as mastic, and a rare mineral called sal ammoniac. His second toothpaste was a mix of barley flour, vinegar, honey, and rock salt. Then there was the third: sun-dried radish blended with finely ground glass. Let's get a bit rowdy here and propose that these three toothpastes have metaphorical resemblances to the life choices in front of you right now. I'm going to suggest you go with the second option. At the very least, avoid the third.

We’ve Moved To Better Serve You!

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Are you feeling a bit pinched, parched, and prickly? Given the limitations you've had to wrestle with lately, I wouldn't be surprised if you were. Even though you have passed some of the sneaky tests and solved some of the itchy riddles you've been compelled to deal with, they have no doubt contributed to the pinched, parched prickliness. Now what can be done to help you recover your verve? I'm thinking that all you will have to do is respond smartly to the succulent temptations that life will bring your way in the coming weeks.

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Have you ever situated yourself between two big bonfires on a beach and basked in the primal power? Was there a special moment in your past when you found yourself sitting between two charismatic people you loved and admired, soaking up the lifegiving radiance they exuded? Did you ever read a book that filled you with exaltation as you listened to music that thrilled your soul? These are the kinds of experiences I hope you seek out in the coming week. I'd love to see you get nourished stereophonically by rich sources of excitement.

c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Mythically speaking, this would be a propitious time for you to make an offering to the sea goddess. In dreams or meditations or fantasies, I suggest you dive down into the depths, find the supreme feminine power in her natural habitat, and give her a special gift. Show her how smart you are in the way you express love, or tell her exactly how you will honor her wisdom in the future. If she is receptive, you may even ask her for a favor. Maybe she'll be willing to assist you in accessing the deep feelings that haven't been fully available to you. Or perhaps she will teach you how to make conscious the secrets you have been keeping from yourself.

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don't linger in a doorway, Libra. Don't camp out in a threshold or get stuck in the middle of anything. I understand your caution, considering the fact that life is presenting you with such paradoxical clues. But if you remain ambivalent too much longer, you may obstruct the influx of more definitive information. The best way to generate the clarity and attract the help you need will be to make a decisive move—either in or out, either forward or backward, either up or down.

e

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): "It's a rare person who wants to hear what he doesn't want to hear," said TV talk show host Dick Cavett. I will love it if you make yourself one of those rare types in the coming week, Scorpio. Can you bring yourself to be receptive to truths that might be disruptive? Are you willing to send out an invitation to the world, asking to be shown revelations that contradict your fixed theories and foregone conclusions? If you do this hard work, I promise that you will be granted a brainstorm and a breakthrough. You might also be given a new reason to brag.

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f

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): There are pregnant truths I could reveal to you right now that I've decided not to disclose. I don't think you're prepared to hear them yet. If I told you what they are, you wouldn't be receptive or able to register their full meaning; you might even misinterpret them. It is possible, however, that you could evolve rather quickly in the next two weeks. So let's see if I can nudge you in the direction of getting the experiences necessary to become ready. Meditate on what parts of you are immature or underdeveloped—aspects that may one day be skilled and gracious, but are not yet. I bet that once you identify what needs ripening, you will expedite the ripening. And then you will become ready to welcome the pregnant truths.

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): "Finifugal" is a rarely used English adjective that I need to invoke in order to provide you with the proper horoscope. It refers to someone who avoids or dislikes endings—like a child who doesn't want a bedtime story to conclude, or an adult who's in denial about how it's finally time to wrap up long-unfinished business. You can't afford to be finifugal in the coming days, Capricorn. This is the tail end of your cycle. It won't be healthy for you to shun climaxes and denouements. Neither will it be wise to merely tolerate them. Somehow, you've got to find a way to love and embrace them. (P.S. That's the best strategy for ensuring the slow-motion eruption of vibrant beginnings after your birthday.)

h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): According to 20th-century British author John Cowper Powys, "A bookshop is a dynamite-shed, a drugstore of poisons, a bar of intoxicants, a den of opiates, an island of sirens." He didn't mean that literally, of course. He was referring to the fact that the words contained in books can inflame and enthrall the imagination. I think you will be wise to seek out that level of arousal in the coming weeks, Aquarius. Your thoughts need to be aired out and rearranged. Your feelings are crying out for strenuous exercise, including some pure, primal catharses. Do whatever it takes to make sure that happens.

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): "I am not fearless," says Mexican journalist and women's right advocate Lydia Cacho, "but I'm not overtaken by fear. Fear is quite an interesting animal. It's like a pet. If you mistreat it, it will bite, but if you understand it and accept it in your house, it might protect you." This is an excellent time to work on transforming your fright reflexes, Pisces. You have just the right kind of power over them: strong and crafty and dynamic, but not grandiose or cocky or delusional. You're ready to make your fears serve you, not drain you. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

[C4] Missoula Independent • December 12 – December 19, 2013

MontanaNaturalMedicine.com

Christmas villages, Christmas decor, new toys and games, and sports memorabilia. Hidden Treasures 1810 North Ave. 406-317-1001. 10-5 Monday thru Saturday.

AUCTIONS Real Estate AUCTION Dec. 18, 3 Caledonia Rd., Livingston. Preemptive Offer Deadline 12/13. 3- bd home, 3.9-AC 60-GPM Well, RV Hook-up. 1-406-8614490. www.BigSkyBid.com Big Sky Bid R.E. Auctions!

CLOTHING JEANS! Like new. Size 8. Lee $5.00 each. LL Bean lined $10.00 each. 728-6157/msg

MUSIC Banjo lessons

not just for

guys anymore. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com GUITAR LESSONS. Mike Johnson. $15 per 1/2 hour. 10 minute free consultation. All ages welcome. E-mail Mike mikej9350@gmail.com. Will come to you. Outlaw Music Got Gear? We Do! Missoula’s Pro Guitar Shop specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, Tuesday-Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533. Outlawmusicguitarshop.com Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

PETS & ANIMALS Basset Rescue of Montana www.bassetrescueofmontana.or g 406-207-0765 Best GoldenDoodle Puppies A new puppy for the Holidays! Beautiful F1 goldendoodles avail 12/11. Males and females, Will deliver to you, no extra charge. Dam: AKC apricot/red standard poodle. Sire: AKC red golden retriever,

thick wavy coat. Lovingly raised at home, great socialization-lots of handling. Nearly paper trained. Goldendoodles display “hybrid vigor”, are low-to-nonshedding/allergenic, smart, loyal and great with kids. $1000 Msla/Bittrt areas. [$500 deposit to reserve your puppy].Visit terralunafarms website, reply by email: terralunafarms@gmail.com, or call Paula at 406-531-2978. CATS: #2455 Black, ASH/Bombay X, SF, 6yrs; #3240 Calico, DSH, SF, 8yrs; #3248 Black, DMH, NM, 2yrs; #3340 Blk/tan, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #3468 Black, DSH, SF, 2yrs; #3505 White/grey, ASH, SF, 8yrs; #3620 Grey Tabby, ASH, SF, 6wks; #3670 Blk/white, ASH, SF, 9yrs; #3683 Grey/white, DSH, NM, 1yr; #3698 Black, Bombay X, SF, 7yrs; #3719 Grey Tabby, ASH, SF, 3 mo; #3729 Blk/Gold Torti, DMH, SF, 7yrs; #3740 Dilute Calico, DSH, SF, 3mo; #3741 Dulite Calico, DSH, SF, 3mo; #3748 Buff, OSH X, NM, 4 mo; #3759 Black, DLM, NM, 5yrs; #3776 Blk/white, DSH, NM, 5mo; #3869 Black/Tan Tabby, ASH, NM, 5yrs; #3885 Grey Tabby, DSH, NM, 8 mo; #3889 Black, DSH, SF, 6yrs; #3909 Black, DSH, NM, 3yrs; #3935 Orange/Grey Torbi, SF, 3yrs; #3942 Grey/Blue, Russian Blue, SF, 5yrs; #3953 Orange Tabby, ASH, NM, 6mo; #3958 Black, ASH, NM, 10yrs; #3959 Black, DLH, NM, 12 yrs; #3983

Gray, American Bobtail, SF, 4yrs; #4001 Orange/white, ASH, NM, 4yrs; #4013 White/grey, DSH, NM, 4yrs; #4017 Blk/Brn, Maine Coon X, SF, 5yrs; #4025Buff, Persian X, NM, 6yrs; #4043 Blk, Persian X, NM, 8yrs; #4047 Orange, Maine Coon, NM, 6yrs; #4049 White/grey, ASH, SF, 9 mo. For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840. DOGS: #2564 Brindle, Catahoula, NM, 2yrs LONGEST RESIDENT; #3681 Tan/Blk, Shep X, NM, 4yrs; #3822 White/Tri, Aussie X, NM, 1.5yrs; #3838 Tri, ShepX, NM, 7yrs; #3919 White/Brown, Blue Heeler, SF, 2yrs; #3936 Tri, Aussie X, SF, 8yrs; #3947 Grey, Pit Bull X, SF, 2yrs; #3965 Black/tan, Heeler/Rott, NM, 3 yrs; #3966 Red Tick, Hound, NM, 8 mo; #3975 Blk/Brn, Shep/Lab, SF, 3yrs; #3998 White/Blk, Pit, NM, 4yrs; #4002 White/Brown, Pit X, NM, 1yr; #4040 Tan/white, Shep/Pit, SF, 9 weeks; #4045 Blk/tan, Aussie/Husky, SF, 4yrs; #4046 Tri, Aussie/BC, SF, 4yrs. For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.


MARKETPLACE OUTDOOR GEAR The Sports Exchange - Great Gear. Great Prices. Buy • Sell • Trade • Consignment. 111 S. 3rd W., Missoula, on the Hip Strip. 406-721-6056

Thift Stores 1136 W. Broadway 930 Kensington

Accepting Winter Consignments 111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

AUTOMOBILE CASH FOR CARS: Any Car or Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

Outlaw Music

Missoula's Stringed Instrument Pro Shop! Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

541-7533

724 Burlington Ave. outlawmusicguitarshop.com Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

QUAALUDE 1 oz. Vodka 1 oz. Coffee Liqueur 1 oz. Hazelnut Liqueur Splash of milk Build in an old-fashioned glass

PUBLIC NOTICES Cassie R. Dellwo MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM 38 Second Ave E Dickinson, ND 58601 Ph: (701) 2271841 Fax (701) 227-4739 Attorney for the Plaintiff CDellwo@mackoff.com MT Bar #11880 IN THE JUSTICE COURT OF MISSOULA COUNTY, STATE OF MONTANA SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION Cause No. CV2013-44222 Lakeview Loan Servicing, LLC Plaintiff, -vs- Carol L Sprano; Anna Azure; and any person in possession, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT ANNA AZURE: You are hereby summoned to answer the Complaint in this action, which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your Answer and serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff’s attorney within ten (10) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or Answer, Judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action relates to an eviction and subsequent possession upon the following described real property in the County of Missoula, State of Montana: LOT 2 OF ORCHARD GARDEN SUBDIVISION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH A 15 FOOT WIDE PRIVATE SEWER AND PRIVATE UTILITY SERVICE EASEMENT AS SHOWN ON LOT 1 OF THE PLAT OF ORCHARD GARDEN, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court, this 15th day of November 2013. (SEAL OF THE COURT) /s/ Karen A. Orzech, Judge of the Justice Court Dated this 13th day of November, 2013. MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM Attorneys for Plaintiff 38 Second Ave E Dickinson, ND 58601 Tel: (701) 227-1841 MT BAR ID#11880 By: /s/ Cassie R. Dellwo, Attorney Attorney for the Plaintiff MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP-13-232 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF FELICIA GARLAND SULLIVAN, Deceased. Terry J. Sullivan has been appointed Personal Representative. Creditors of the Estate shall present their claims within 4 months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or be forever barred. Terry J. Sullivan, 4908 Rattlesnake Drive, Missoula, MT 59802 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY PROBATE NO. DP-13-231 DEPT. NO. 3 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF LEE ANDREW TORGRIMSON aka LEE A. TORGRIMSON, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Cara A. Torgrimson, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Morales Law Office, P.C. at 422 West Spruce S., PO Box 9311, Missoula, MT 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 19th day of November. 2013. /s/ Cara A. Torgrimson, Personal Representative c/o Morales Law Office, P.C. 422 W. Spruce St., PO Box 9311, Missoula, MT 59807-9311 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA

COUNTY Cause No. DP-13-233 Dept. No. 4 Judge Karen S. Townsend. NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of FREDERICK MAISEL, IV, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above estate. All persons having claims against the Decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to William Andrew Maisel, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of his attorneys, Crowley Fleck PLLP, 305 South 4th Street East, Suite 100, PO Box 7099, Missoula, MT 59807-7099, or filed with the Clerk of the Court. DATED this 21st day of November, 2013. /s/ William Andrew Maisel, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DV-13-1268 Dept. No.: 1 Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Lauren Kelso, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Lauren Michelle Kelso to Lauren Michelle Kelso Hanna. The hearing will be on January 8th 2014 at 1:30 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: 11/27/13 /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Laura M. Driscoll, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 2 Cause Probate No. DP-11-139 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ALEXANDER A. GEORGE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Penelope M. George, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested at GEORGE LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 210 North Higgins Avenue, Suite 234, Missoula, Montana 59802 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED: November 22, 2013 /s/ Penelope M. George, Personal Representative Personal Representative’s Attorney: GEORGE LAW FIRM, PLLC, 210 N. Higgins Ave., Suite 234, Missoula, Montana 59802 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Ed McLean Probate Case No. DP-13-236 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of Del W. Cumley, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the Personal Representative, Shirley J. Edwards, return receipt requested at 4206 Expressway #14, Missoula, MT 59808 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 2nd day of December, 2013. /s/ Shirley J. Edwards, Personal Representative 4206 Expressway #14, Missoula, MT 59808 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Robert L. Deschamps III Cause No. DP-13-235 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF RICHARD M.

LEONARD, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Jeffery Leonard has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be mailed to Jeffery Leonard, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Timothy D. Geiszler, GEISZLER & FROINES, PC, 619 Southwest Higgins, Suite K, Missoula, Montana 59803 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 22nd day of October, 2013. GEISZLER & FROINES, PC /s/ Timothy D. Geiszler, Attorneys for the Personal Representative. I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the state of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 22nd day of October, 2013 /s/ Jeffery Leonard, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate No. DP12-46 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF THEODORE D. ANTWEILER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to DEAN C. ANTWEILER, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested,in care of Thiel Law Office, PLLC, 315 West Pine, PO Box 8125, Missoula, Montana 59807 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 20th day of November, 2013. THIEL LAW OFFICE PLLC Attorney for Personal Representative /s/ Matthew B. Thiel MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP13-228 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DAN WACHSMUTH, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representatives of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Vickie Blake, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane PC, PO Box 4747, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. Dated this 31st day of October, 2013. /s/ Vickie Blake, Personal Representative. I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. /s/ Vickie Blake WORDEN THANE PC Attorneys for Personal Representative /s/ Matthew J. Cuffe NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/24/93, recorded as Instrument No. Book 398 Page 2032 and modified on 1/31/06 under AF# 200602265, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which James W. Royan, A Married Man As His Sole and Separate Property was Grantor, Montana Mortgage Company was Beneficiary and Insured Titles, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 11 and the North 10 feet of

Lot 12 in Block 1 of Mosby’s Leisure Highlands Addition No. 5, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Recording reference in Book 225 at Page 475 Micro Records By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. Book 577 Page 0274, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to The Chase Manhattan Bank F/K/A Chemical Bank. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 07/01/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of October 16, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $57,775.47. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $55,203.26, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on February 20, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.104324) 1002.258811-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/09/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200800671 and Modified on 3/18/2013 under auditor’s file no. 201305291, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which Billy C Balentine, A Single Person was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Golf Savings Bank, Its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as

follows: Lot 37 in Block 4 of El Mar Estates Phase I, a platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201217903, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor by merger to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of October 15, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $244,619.65. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $236,190.73, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on February 19, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.103577) 1002.253989-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/26/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200702634, Bk. 791, Pg. 655, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Mark W. Knight and Laura A. Knight, husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Home123 Corporation was Beneficiary and First American Title Insurance Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 55-B of Snider Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200807848,

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • December 12 – December 19, 2013

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PUBLIC NOTICES Bk. 816, Pg. 1024, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to HSBC Bank USA, National Association as Trustee for Deutsche Alt-A Securities Mortgage Loan Trust, Series 2007-AR3. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of October 17, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $994,172.33. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $599,322.54, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on February 24, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7777.26264) 1002.97599-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/19/98, recorded as Instrument No. 199831230 Vol 563 Pg 243, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Pamela J. Walzer, a single person was Grantor, Norwest Mortgage, Inc. was Beneficiary and Insured Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lots 7 and 8 in Block 58 of School Addition in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes

and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 06/01/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of October 15, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $64,003.89. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $57,462.58, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on February 24, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.107762) 1002.259179-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on January 17, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 47 of HELLGATE MEADOWS, PHASES 1 AND 2, a platted subdivision of Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat of record in Book 25 of Plats at Page 56 Leigh E. Bitney, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on August 8, 2006 and recorded on August 10, 2006 on Book 780 and Page 1020 as Document No. 200620128. The beneficial interest is currently held by U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, as successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association, as Trustee, successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for Residential Asset Mortgage Products, Inc., Mortgage Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-RS1. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of

$1,321.06, beginning April 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of September 27, 2013 is $171,100.00 principal, interest at the rate of 7.5% now totaling $32,995.49, late charges in the amount of $1,550.63, escrow advances of $8,583.71, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,042.75, plus accruing interest at the rate of $35.16 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: September 11, 2013 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham) On this 11th day of September, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 Suntrust Vs. Bitney 41531.702 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on January 21, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Mis-

[C6] Missoula Independent • December 12 – December 19, 2013

soula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 584 OF PLEASANT VIEW HOMES NO. 5, PHASE II, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Laura S. Jeszenka and Bryan M. Jeszenka, as Grantor(s), to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated May 5, 2011 and recorded May 6, 2011 in Book 877 Page 322 under Document No 201107507. The beneficial interest is currently held by Guild Mortgage Company a California Corporation. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Trustee. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the

monthly payments due in the amount of $1,105.43, beginning May 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of September 1, 2013 is $200,232.73 principal, interest at the rate of 5.0% now totaling $4,160.17, late charges in the amount of $405.75, and other fees and expenses advanced of $510.52, plus accruing interest at the rate of $27.43 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts

are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis,

without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bank-


PUBLIC NOTICES ruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: September 19, 2013 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham) On this 19th day of September, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 Guild Vs. Jeszenka 41291.895 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on January 21, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 15 OF ORCHARD PARK PHASE I, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Charles A. Hill, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, LLC., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 18, 2003 and recorded on July 23, 2003 in Book 712, Page 838 under Document No 200326742. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. successor in interest to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $887.96, beginning March 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of September 8, 2013 is $92,149.85 principal, interest at the rate of 5.25% now totaling $2,914.90, late charges in the amount of $221.06, escrow advances of $394.99, and other fees and expenses advanced of $934.95, plus accruing interest at the rate of $13.25 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation se-

cured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: September 11, 2013 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham) On this 11th day of September, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 Citimorgage Vs. Hill 42011.626 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on January 21, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: IN MISSOULA COUNTY, STATE OF MONTANA, TO WIT: LOT 20 IN BLOCK 2 OF REMICK’S SWAN RIVER TRACTS NO. 2, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. ASSESSOR’S PARCEL NO: 1886100 Jimmie D. Carter and Rosenda P. Carter, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated October 21, 2009 and recorded October 27, 2009 in Book 849, on Page 1002, under Document number 200925754. The beneficial interest is currently held by EverBank. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,889.27, beginning April 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 6, 2013 is $344,010.75 principal, interest at the rate of 4.8750% now totaling $26,782.99, late charges in the amount of $377.84, escrow advances of $4,945.74, and other fees and expenses advanced of $800.46, plus accruing interest at the rate of $45.95 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: September 18, 2013 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham) On this 18th day of September, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 Everhome Vs. Carter 41471.317 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on January 27, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Tax ID Number: 3626500 Land situated in the County of Missoula in the State of MT Lot 12, of MONTANA VISTA PHASE 2, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official recorded plat thereof. Bryce J. Finn and Jennifer K. Finn, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Source, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 21, 2006 and recorded July 17, 2006 Book 778, Page 1481 as Document No. 200617421. The beneficial interest is currently held by ALLY BANK. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $542.54, beginning November 1, 2012, and each month subsequent,

which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of September 6, 2013 is $192,904.73 principal, interest at the rate of 3.375% now totaling $6,057.13, escrow advances of $3,019.41, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,475.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $17.84 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, whereis basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards.

The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: September 19, 2013 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham) On this 19th day of September, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 Gmac Vs. Finn 42061.026

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"'Round Here"–a token of my gratitude.

by Matt Jones

ACROSS

1 Martial artist in "Lethal Weapon 4" 6 River that empties into the Caspian 10 Take quickly 14 Sweeping 15 Heat up in a hurry 16 Prefix that means "transcending" 17 Do a radio remembrance of a late Pantera founder? 19 Critters that may be "live" 20 Alternatives to Cokes 21 Portrayer of Ricky on "I Love Lucy" 22 "___ Lang Syne" 24 Metal coating that's all the rage? 29 Another, in Argentina 30 Open a barrel 31 Electric fan setting 32 Altar area 35 Nicolas whom "Dog the Bounty Hunter" once posted bail for 36 Bilbao bear 37 Cater a party for Drew Brees? 42 Overly permissive 43 The Runnin' Rebels of the NCAA 44 Some, in Seville 45 Lob's trajectory 46 "___ recall..." 47 Right in the atlas 50 Punch out the clown from "It"? 55 A restaurant may hold it for you 56 Inkling 57 "Do Ya" rock group 59 "Burlesque" actress 61 Ubiquitous arcade game message, or a hint to this puzzle's theme 64 Means

Last week’s solution

65 Drama king? 66 Water park slide 67 Some stocking stuffers 68 ___ of thousands 69 Logical flaws

DOWN

1 Hook-shaped ski lift 2 "Love Story" novelist Segal 3 Trunk 4 Youngster 5 Statement of denial 6 World Heritage Site org. 7 His fame involved a lot of twists 8 Wanted poster letters 9 21, often 10 "New car" or "burning tire" 11 TV ad come-on 12 The Falcons, on scoreboards 13 Pump contents 18 Former Israeli PM Golda 23 Word with crust or hand 25 Open-___ shoes 26 Coup d'___ 27 1900 Puccini premiere 28 Furry movie creatures 32 Insurance co. with a "spokesduck" 33 Oyster's offering 34 "American Pie," e.g. 35 Honda SUV 38 Visibly nervous 39 Pristine, to Brits 40 "That's ___!" 41 "___ digress..." 47 "___ Game" (2013 film) 48 Yesterday, in Cuba 49 1980s timepiece 51 "Who ___?" 52 Jewish month that sounds like a car 53 Asian economic hub 54 Best of the best 58 Binary digits 59 Where Alabama may be viewed, for short 60 Follower of boo, yoo or woo 62 Wedding column word 63 Stand-up comic Margaret

©2013 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • December 12 – December 19, 2013 [C7]


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control 541-7387 SCOOTER• Scooter is a small dog with a big heart. He loves people, is great with other small dogs, and would be wonderful in a home where his people had plenty of time to pay attention to him. He has lots of love to share.

HOLLY•This tiny lady is full of energy without being hyper, and she also loves to play with other small dogs. When we open her kennel gate she immediately prances down the aisle of the kennel to say hello to all the other dogs.

Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MTSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

LILY•Lily is a lovely dog with a slim build, sleek coat, and very endearing face. She walks well on a leash and is a 2330 South Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59801 Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) favorite of our dog walkers. She'd love to have a home again and people of her own 3708 North Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59808 Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri) to take care of her. Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 9:00am-12:00pm (Sat)

PROSPERO•Prospero is a big, handsome cat with attractive markings, a sweet face, and killer blue eyes. He's also been declawed, so this quiet guy needs an indoor-only home to keep him safe and secure.

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

PEPPER•For someone who would like

Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

a pet, but doesn't want a dog or cat, Pepper might just be perfect. He's a tidy, well-behaved rabbit who loves attention. He's low-maintenance and has lots of affection to share.

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

www.dolack.com

LIONEL•Lionel had probably been living on his own for a while, and he seemed quite relieved to be rescued and brought to the shelter. He's a quiet, mellow cat with a sweet manner and a tiny meow.

Original Paintings, Prints and Posters 139 W. Front St., Missoula (406) 549-3248

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana 549-3934 MAGGIE• Maggie is the perfect dog! She loves hikes, loves car rides, and best of all, she loves other dogs, big and small. This 6-year-old pit bull mix has fantastic manners, is housetrained, and has outgrown all of those annoying puppy habits. Won't you give this lovely lady a home for the holidays?

Serving the community’s framing needs since 1993 using environmentally sustainable practices.

139 West Front St. inside the Monte Dolack Gallery, Downtown Missoula, MT

(406) 549-3248 • dolack.com

SID• Sid is a handsome black boy with chubby cheeks that just beg to be scratched and smooshed. Sid was originally found in rough shape, but has since regained his strength and shine. He's shy, but once he trusts you he loves to be petted and snuggled. Sid would prefer a quiet home, where he can snooze in a sunny spot!

ATLAS•Atlas is a 3-year-old terrier/pit bull mix who would love the chance to find his perfect home. He would prefer a family without small children - all that noise and commotion can make a guy nervous! Atlas is a big, strong fellow, but he has beautiful, intelligent eyes, and looks at you as if to say, "Are you my new person?"

WILDER• Wilder loves to play! This

YELLOW•Yellow is a five-year-old lab

SERENA•Serena was tired, hungry and afraid when she came to the shelter way back in April. After spending lots of time learning to trust staff and volunteers, she has warmed up to humans. Now, all this 4-year-old girl wants is a warm bed, some tasty food, a safe place to call home, and a human of her own!

mix who loves to play with other dogs, especially little ones! This hefty fellow loves treats (maybe a little too much!) and fetching, and he walks well on a leash. He would make a great addition to a family that needs a new companion who is both laid back and playful. Maybe yours?

beautiful 2-year-old Maine Coon mix would love a home where he can be an involved part of the family - he's outgoing, energetic, and inquisitive, and loves men, women, kids, and even other cats! He's currently in a HOPE foster home, and can't wait for a home of his own!

MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

[C8] Missoula Independent • December 12 – December 19, 2013

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

Missoula’s Locally Owned Neighborhood Pet Supply Store

www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275 East Broadway • South Russell • North Reserve


RENTALS APARTMENTS 1 bedroom, 1 bath $675, newer, garage, DW, microwave, W/D in unit, W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 7287333 1 bedroom, 1 bath $685, newer, DW, W/D hookups, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 7287333 112 Turner Ct.: Studio, New carpet & linoleum, Storage, Main floor, Big closet, $475. Garden City Property Management 5496106 1237 Kensington: Studio, Dishwasher, Laundry, Full kitchen & bath, Heat paid, $625 Garden City Property Management 5496106 1502 #4 Ernest 1 bed/1 bath, W/D hookups, recent remodeling, central location. $600. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1801 Howell #2. 2 bed/1 bath, Northside, deck, shared yard, W/D hookups, storage. $725. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1848 S. 4th St. W.: 1 Bedroom, On-site laundry facilities, Near

Papa Murphy’s, Heat paid, $625. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!! 1885 Mount Ave. #2. 1 bed/1 bath, shared yard, storage, central location. $550. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 1939 3rd:1 Bedroom, Stacking washer & dryer, Microwave, Central, $595. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106 2 bedroom Equinox unit. Equinox Building boasts exceptional energy efficiency, underground parking, and a community room overlooking the Clark Fork. This 2-bedroom, first floor apartment has tall ceilings, a private deck, storage unit and contemporary finishes. $620 plus electric & natural gas for forced air climate control. Please contact Colin Woodrow, 549-4113 x 122, cwoodrow@missoulahousing.or. 2 bedroom, 1 bath $595, W/D hookups, DW, storage, carport, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bath $615, coinop laundry, storage, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bath $695, quiet cul-de-sac, DW, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

2 bedroom, 1 bath, $825. New complex, W/D hookups, open concept, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

735 W. Sussex #3. 2 bed/1 bath, central location, HEAT PAID, coin-ops on site. $700. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 Fireweed Court 2 BR. $604 a month. Townhouse style apartment. Please contact Colin Woodrow, 549-4113 x 122, cwoodrow@missoulahousing.org Garden District. 1BR. $576/$550 deposit. Quiet location in central Missoula near the Good Food Store. W/D included. Available mid-December. Contact Kelly Abbey at 406-549-4113, ext. 127 or kabbey@missoulahousing.org. Gold Dust Apartments. Quiet location near downtown! Art studio and large community room! Mountain Line EZ pass included. 2 bedroom, accessible 504 unit, $691, all utilities paid. ONE MONTH FREE RENT! Contact: Matty Reed at 406-549-4113, ext. 130 or mreed@missoulahousing.org. Orchard Gardens: 1 BR. $589 all utilities paid. Mountain Line EZ pass for every family member.

Palace 1 BR apartment. $556 per month. Heat paid. EZ pass with lease-up. One month rent free. Contact Matty Reed at 5494113, x. 130 or mreed@missoulahousing.org

Property Management, 1511 South Russell. 721-8990. For immediate showing, contact current resident, Doug. 210-364-4317

817 Monroe. 1 bed/1 bath, Rattlesnake area, W/D hookups, carport $650. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

MOBILE HOMES

HOUSES

Russell Square Apartments. 2 bed, $650 month/ $650 deposit. Quiet community, second floor unit. Washer and dryer hookups. New flooring. Available now. Contact Kelly Abbey at 406-549-4113 x127 or kabbey@missoulahousing.org

Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent. W/S/G/Electric included. $425/month 406-273-6034

STUDIO APARTMENT WITH ONE BATH. $535 plus utilities. No pets, no smoking. 204 East Pine #15. Contact Professional

1708 Scott St. “A”. 1 bed/1 bath, shared yard, all utilities included, pet? $625. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

DUPLEXES

120 South Ave East. RENT INCENTIVE. 3 bed/2 bath, close to University, fenced back yard. $1200. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 3+ bedroom, 2 bath house $1,350. 2 WEEKS FREE RENT to Qualified Applicants. U Area, Garage, W/D hookups, fenced backyard, lawn care provided, S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

426 Alder St. 3 bed/1.75 bath, downtown near St. Pat’s Hospital, W/D, fenced back yard, some hardwood floors, single car garage. $1350. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 603 Cherry St. 2 bed/1 bath, Rattlesnake Creek, W/D hookups, carport. $950 Grizzly Property Management 5422060

ROOMMATES ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

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422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

448 Washington. 1 bed/1 bath, downtown, HEAT PAID, coin-ops on site. $700. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

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Contact Connie Toney: 406-5437500 or ctoney@missoulahousing.org.

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115 Johnson 2 Bed House $815/month

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2141 Carol Ann Court 2 Bed Duplex $850/month

Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

Finalist

Finalist

1409 2nd St. W. 1 Bed Apt. $465/month

MHA Management manages 10 properties throughout Missoula. All properties are part of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program. The Missoula Housing Authority complies with the Fair Housing Act and offers Reasonable Accommodations to persons with Disabilities.

1235 34th St. • Missoula (406) 549-4113 missoulahousing.org

100 South Curtis 2 Bed Duplex $695/month

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing 30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

www.gatewestrentals.com

119 Johnson 1 Bed Apt. $495/month Uncle Robert Lane 2 Bed Apt. $660/month Visit our website at fidelityproperty.com

SERVICES CHILDCARE Diaper Service averages 18 cents per change, so why are you throwing your money away? Local cloth diaper sales & service. Missoula peeps order online and get your goods delivered during diaper route Wednesdays. 406.728.1408 or natureboymontana.com

HANDYMAN Squires For Hire Carpentry, Remodel, Drywall, Custom

Tile, Appliance Repair. Free Estimates. Licensed Contract #163074. Bret Squries, Handyman 406-544-4671

HOME IMPROVEMENT Natural Housebuilders, Inc. Building the energy-efficient SOLAR ACTIVE HOME • Custom crafted buildings • Additions/Remodels. 369-0940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net

Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator. Testimonials Available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642

Massage. Zoo City Massage located at 1526 S. Reserve St., Missoula. Call (406) 370-3131 to schedule an appointment. zoocitymassage.com.

SBS Solar offers design and installation services for Solar Systems: residential, commercial, on- and off-grid. We also specialize in Energy Audits for home or business. www.SBSlink.com

WINDOWS

MASSAGE

Abbott’s Glass Vinyl Windows • Wood Windows • Small Commercial Jobs • “The Meticulous Glass Professionals” Since 1992 728-6499

$35/hour Deep Tissue

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • December 12 – December 19, 2013 [C9]


REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 11689 Stolen Rock Court. 5 bed, 3 bath, 2 car garage on 3.15 acres. $315,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net 1308 Jackson. 3 bed, 1 bath in Lower Rattlesnake. One block from Greeenough Park & Rattlesnake Creek. $289,900. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 531-2605 vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 1807 Missoula Avenue. Lovely Bavarian-style 3 bed, 2 bath in Lower Rattlesnake. Mount Jumbo views & 2 car garage. $309,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com 1944 S. 8th W. 2 bed, 1 bath on two lots. Wood floors, garden & front deck. $158,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com 1965 Raymond. 4 bed, 2 bath Rattlesnake home with 2 kitchens & 3 garages. $339,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 2550 Pattee Canyon. 3 bed, 2.5 bath on 8 acres. Gourmet kitchen, deck, patio, 2 car garage. $480,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 2607 View Drive. 3 bed, 2 bath ranch-style home in Target Range. Hardwood floors, fireplace & 2 car garage. $239,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate. 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 29203 Old Hwy 10 West. 4 bed, 2.5 bath on 3.39 acres on the Clark Fork River. $539,900. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 3 Bdr, 1 Bath, Central Missoula home. $214,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

3010 West Central. 3 bed, 1 bath on 5 acres in Target Range. Borders DNRC land. $499,900. Properties 2000. Pat McCormick 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com 3024 Elms Park Drive. 2 bed, 2 bath with 2 bonus rooms, gas fireplace, deck & single garage. $254,900. Vickie Honzel, Lambros Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambroera.com 4475 Quaking Aspen. 4 bed, 2.5 bath Prairie-style home on almost one Rattlesnake acre. Built by professional woodworker with lots of natural light and beautiful details. $599,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate, 532-9229 tory@montana.com 511 Spanish Peaks. 4 bed, 3 bath Mansion Heights home with 3 car garage. $769,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate. 532-9229 tory@montana.com 524 Spanish Peaks Drive. 4 bed, 3 bath Mansion Heights home with 3 car garage near park & common area. $549,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 5329229 tory@montana.com 5454 Canyon River Drive. 6 bed, 4 bath with 3 car garage on Canyon River Golf Course. $550,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 606 North Avenue West. 3 bed, 2 bath with finished basement & 2 car garage. $255,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com 716 South 6th West. 3 bed, 2 bath with wood floors, fireplace, basement, large fenced yard & single garage. $259,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com

FIND YOUR WAY HOME! David Loewenwarter, Prudential Montana Real Estate, 406.241.3321 Lewis and Clark Area Home! 839 W Central. $220,000 MLS# 20136229. 2 bedroom, 2 bath. Double detached garage and many other sweet features. KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Lot 42 Jeff Drive. To be built 2 bed, 2 bath Hoyt home in Linda Vista with 3 car garage. $369,500. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES 1 Bdr, 1 Bath, University District condo. $210,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 1815 A Montana Street. 3 bed, 2.5 bath end unit with open floor plan. Single garage. $138,000. Rita Gray, Lambros ERA Real Estate 532-9283. ritagray@lambrosera.com 1845 B West Central. 3 bed, 1.5 bath on quiet cul-de-sac. Large, open kitchen, patio & garage. No HOA dues! $150,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270 glasgow@montana.com 2025 Mullan Road. Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos. Large secure units with affordable HOA dues. Starting at $149,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 8804749. montpref@bigsky.net

756 Angler’s Bend. 3 bed, 2 bath with 3 car gargage on East Missoula golf course. $465,332. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate. 532-9229 tory@montana.com

2272 South 10th West. 3 bed, 1 bath bungalow with wood floors, basement, 2 car garage & fenced yard. $197,500. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com

925 Cleveland. 1 bed, 1.5 bath Slant Street home with fenced backyard, gas fireplace & single garage. $189,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com

505 California. 3 bed, 2.5 bath stand-alone near Riverfront Trail. No HOA fees. $289,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 531-2605. vickiehonzel@ lambrosera.com

[C10] Missoula Independent • December 12 – December 19, 2013

Burns Street Commons 1400 Burns St. #15. $159,9000. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. Coveted 3 bedroom home in the Burns St. Commons, next to the Burns St. Bistro and the Missoula Community Co-op. KD: 2405227 porticorealestate.com Condo With Views 1545 Cooley, Apt C. 2 bed, 1 bath Westside condo close to downtown, Burns Street Bistro & Missoula Community Co-op. $128,500 MLS# 20134747 KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com Northside Condo 1545 Cooley St #C. MLS# 20134747. 2 bedroom 1 bath Condo. Views of the North Hills. $128,500. KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Uptown Flats #103. 1 bed, 1 bath with W/D, patio and handicap accessible features. $120,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com Uptown Flats #210. 1 bed, 1 bath modern condo on Missoula’s Northside. $149,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com Uptown Flats #306. 1 bed, 1 bath top floor unit with lots of light. W/D, carport, storage & access to exercise room. $162,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com Uptown Flats. Upscale gated community near downtown. All SS appliances, carport, storage and access to community room

and exercise room plus more. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com Why Rent? Own Your Own 1400 Burns. Designed with energy efficiency, comfort and affordability in mind. Next to Burns Street Bistro and Missoula Community Co-op. Starting at $79,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

MANUFACTURED HOMES 2424 McIntosh Loop. Bright & airy 2 bed, 2 bath in 55+ community. Ramp, patio and single garage. $129,000. Vickie Honzel, Lammbros ERA Real Estate. 531-2605 vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

LAND FOR SALE 160 acres in Grant Creek bordered on two sides by Forest Service land. $750,000. Pruden-

11689 Stolen Rock, Frenchtown • $319,000 5 bed, 3 bath on over 3 acres Great valley & mountain views

Mullan Heights Riverside Condos Large secure units with affordable HOA dues Starting at $144,900


REAL ESTATE tial Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 53 acres overlooking Missoula in the South Hills. Utilities and septic approved. $927,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

910 Bandmann Trail. Over 1 acre on Canyon River Golf Course with 252 Clark Fork River frontage. $275,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

5402 Canyon River Road. Canyon River Golf Course Lot. 15,901 sq.ft. $150,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

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missoulanews.com • December 12 – December 19, 2013 [C11]


REAL ESTATE East Missoula Lot At 559 Speedway (Next Door) $55,000. 4,800 square feet. Mature trees, sewer available. KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Florence Acres 944 Pathfinder. 330 gorgeous acres with 1 bed cabin and double garage. This little slice of perfection can be yours! Build your dream home here. $650,000 MLS# 20134863, 20134864 KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Frenchtown area, 14.9 Acres, existing well, adjacent to Forest Service land. $225,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com NHN Frontage Road, Alberton. 2 building sites with Clark Fork River views. $65,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653 pat@properties2000.com NHN Old Freight Road, St. Ignatius. 40+ acre parcel with Mission Mountain views. $199,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

NHN Old Freight Road. Approximately 11 acres with Mission Mountain Views. $86,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com NHN Ryans Lane Tract B. 103+/- treed acres with year-round creek near Evaro Hill. $517,250. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@ yahoo.com Noxon Reservoir Avista frontage lots near Trout Creek, MT. Red Carpet Realty 728-7262 www.redcarpet-realty.com

COMMERCIAL Great place to run your business and either live on-site or rent out for a supplemental income stream. $265,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com HISTORIC STENSRUD BUILDING. Renovated 1890’s building with 95% original hardware. Residential or commercial zoning. Lovely opportunity. $799,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-9270. glasgow@montana.com

OUT OF TOWN 109 Church Street, Stevensville. Historic 2 bed, 1 bath 2 story home with 2 bonus rooms, parlor

& library. $139,000. Rita Gray, Lambros Real Estate 532-9283. ritagray@lambrosera.com 11901 Lewis & Clark Drive, Lolo. Cute 2 bed, 2 bath farmhouse on nearly 1 acre. $207,000. Rita Gray, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 532-9283 ritagray@lambrosera.com 1333 Juniper, Alberton. 5 bed, 3 bath on nearly 20 acres bordered by National Forest. $725,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 210 Red Fox Road, Lolo. 4 bed, 2.5 bath on 2.59 acres along Bitterroot River. $480,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula, 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 3 Bdr, 1 Bath Alberton home. $130,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

Rochelle Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

Missoula Properties 728-8270

$158,000 REMODELED

1944 S. 8th W.

• 2 bed, 1 bath • 2 lots on Zoned RM1-45 • Newer roof & windows Pat McCormick Real Estate Broker • Front deck, Real Estate With Real Experience fenced yard with pat@properties2000.com 406-240-SOLD (7653) garden shed Properties2000.com

[C12] Missoula Independent • December 12 – December 19, 2013

3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Historic Stevensville home. $239,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Stevensville area home on 6+ acres. $325,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3416 Lupine, Stevensville. 3 bed, 2 bath log-sided home with wraparound deck & Bitterroot views. $259,900. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 5 Bdr, 3 Bath, Florence area home on 3.2 acres. $575,500. Prudential Montana. For more

info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com 575 Killdeer, Stevensville. 5 bed, 3 bath on 7.5 fenced acres. Great mountain views. $339,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL EQUITY LOANS ON NONOWNER OCCUPIED MONTANA REAL ESTATE. We also buy Notes & Mortgages. Call Creative Finance & Investments @ 406-721-1444 or visit www.creative-finance.com

We are experts in the home lending process. Call Astrid Oliver, Loan Officer at Guild Mortgage Company. 1001 S Higgins Suite A2, Missoula. Office: 406-258-7522 or Cell: 406-550-3587

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com



Missoula Independent