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THE GUY WHO SHOT A LLAMA INSTEAD OF AN ELK, AND OTHER STRANGE BUT TRUE MONTANA HUNTING TALES

BOOKS ARTS

OUT OF THIS WORLD: UM GRAD FINDS HER NICHE WRITING PARANORMAL ROMANCE NOVELS

THE RADICAL SIDE OF IMPRESSIONISM

NEWS

NEW CORONAVIRUS FINDS ITS WAY TO HAMILTON LAB

FILM

FOUND FOOTAGE FESTIVAL EMBRACES LOST ERA OF VHS


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


THE GUY WHO SHOT A LLAMA INSTEAD OF AN ELK, AND OTHER STRANGE BUT TRUE MONTANA HUNTING TALES

BOOKS ARTS

OUT OF THIS WORLD: UM GRAD FINDS HER NICHE WRITING PARANORMAL ROMANCE NOVELS

THE RADICAL SIDE OF IMPRESSIONISM

NEWS

NEW CORONAVIRUS FINDS ITS WAY TO HAMILTON LAB

FILM

FOUND FOOTAGE FESTIVAL EMBRACES LOST ERA OF VHS


The Montana Shop is the perfect place to shop for the holidays. Inspired by outdoor markets across Montana, The Montana Shop is home to local artisans, crafting clothing and accessories by hand. Our partners produce wonderfully fun products that are made with an attention to detail only possible by loving craftsmanship. Conveniently located on campus, a trip to The Montana Shop is always uplifting and inspiring. Find us online at TheMontanaShop.com or in The Bookstore at The University of Montana, located in The University Center. 406-243-1234

[2] Missoula Independent • November 29 – December 6, 2012


Cover illustration by Kou Moua

News Letters Return fire for “Loaded” .........................................................................................4 The Week in Review Legislator wants to teach intelligent design......................................6 Briefs Bikers battle back, date rape drugs and Cobell payments ........................................6 Etc. Rehberg checks out .......................................................................................................7 News Tester’s Sportsmen’s Act hits a snag ...........................................................................8 News New coronavirus arrives in Hamilton.........................................................................9 Opinion Washington state wipes out a wolf pack..............................................................10 Feature Strange but true hunting tales from across Montana...........................................14

Arts & Entertainment Arts Found Footage Festival embraces a long-lost era .......................................................18 Music O’Death, Cave Singers, Pearl Jam and Kendrick Lamar...........................................19 Art MMAC’s Impressionist show isn’t just a walk in the park............................................20 Books UM graduate Danica Winters makes her way in romance ......................................21 Film Ang Lee pulls off the impossible in Life of Pi ............................................................22 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films............................................................23 Flash in the Pan Good riddance, Hostess.........................................................................24 Happiest Hour Blackfoot Brewing IPA..............................................................................26 8 Days a Week Our aim is always true ..............................................................................27 Mountain High Boating safety ..........................................................................................37 Agenda Poverello Center benefit .......................................................................................38

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Exclusives Street Talk............................................................................................................................4 In Other News ...................................................................................................................12 Classifieds ........................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess........................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrology..........................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle............................................................................................................C-5 This Modern World .......................................................................................................C-12

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson ASSOCIATE EDITOR Matthew Frank PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Jason McMackin STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen COPY EDITOR Kate Whittle EDITORIAL INTERN Kelly Conde PHOTO INTERN Eric Oravsky ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Pumpernickel Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Sasha Perrin, Steven Kirst, Tawana De Hoyos SPECIAL PROJECTS COORDINATOR Alecia Goff SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Allen MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler MARKETING & EVENTS INTERN Whitney Skauge FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, Chris Dombrowski Andy Smetanka, Brad Tyer, Dave Loos, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Jamie Rogers, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Melissa Mylchreest

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2012 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • November 29 – December 6, 2012 [3]


[voices]

STREET TALK Asked Nov. 26 in front of the University Center.

by Eric Oravsky

Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton is studying a littleknown coronavirus that, so far, kills a third of the people it infects. What precautions do you take to avoid becoming sick? Follow-up: A colleague of mine just called in sick with a migraine. What’s your go-to story to use when you don’t want to go to work? David Freeman: Clean well. Wash your hands well. If you are making food, clean up after handling raw meat. Eating well and exercising well are really important for the immune system. Don’t do drugs because it suppresses your immune system. No guilt: I don’t skip work. I like to be honest. When I am sick I don’t go out in public. Being sick isn’t something you should be ashamed of, but it is your responsibility not to spread it.

Anna Martin: I wash my hands—a lot! When I start feeling sick I take zinc supplements and Emergen-C when I have been around others who are sick. I am sick right now though, and I don’t know why. Testing, testing: Usually I don’t skip. Well sometimes, if I have a big exam, but usually I just tell them that.

Ben Catton: I sleep a lot and eat a lot. A full night’s sleep is the best thing you can do. I don’t know if it really does anything, but at least you aren’t worrying about it. Role model: I don’t think I have ever done that. I would probably say I feel bad and be really general, like Ferris Bueller.

Jacob Anderson: Be physically active and eat healthy. So it's preventative, really. Other than that, just pray. Gut feeling: I don’t have a technique. I have acid reflux disease, so I usually will fall back on that when I am not feeling it.

Andrea Miller: Get plenty of rest. People are more productive if they are less stressed, and that keeps you healthy. The hugest contributor to getting sick is stress. It opens your immune system to all kinds of things. Honesty: I don’t ever call in sick when I’m not. But if I get what the Chinese call a wind, such as a stiff neck which usually precedes a sore throat, I take work off to try and nip it in the bud. I am rarely sick and haven’t been for over a year.

[4] Missoula Independent • November 29 – December 6, 2012

Off target After reading “Loaded” by Jamie Rogers (see Nov. 8), I learned more about the writer’s view about pulling the trigger in the Treasure State then I learned about actually pulling the trigger in the Treasure State. Although the writer tried to be objective, and to his credit he actually talked to some gun enthusiasts and experienced shooting firsthand prior to writing the piece, the information in the article was still presented from the writer’s own biases and did a huge disservice to the citizens of Montana, and elsewhere, who have a much deeper understanding of and respect for guns, shooting sports and the Second Amendment. I would like to offer that there is another perspective about the value of guns that was not touched upon in this article, a value in maintaining the freedom to bear arms (using guns for self-defense), a value in the shooting sports and a value in the tradition and the heritage of gun collecting. Not all of us will understand these values, but all of us should respect them nonetheless. I would also like to offer that while the NRA has become a political powerhouse for gun rights (out of necessity due to the general public’s regular diet of slanted and misinformation in the media about guns), it is also alive and well as a supporter and promoter of responsible and safe gun ownership and handling, featuring many competitive shooting events and gun safety education and training programs. The group also provides free information, education and gun locks to communities and schools. I am an NRA-certified shotgun instructor and range safety officer. I was the volunteer director of a gun club for ten years, ran a women’s shotgun clinic for nine years and coached a youth trapshooting team for seven years. I have met hundreds of people who have a deep respect and understanding of guns, people who are not trying to promote their love of guns on anyone but who find themselves and their passion for guns regularly in the sites of anti-gun enthusiasts who plaster the media with sensationalized stories and statistics. Although I am a member of the NRA, I do not agree with every political tactic or position they take and I have personally chosen not to carry a firearm for self-defense at the present moment. However, I credit the NRA in helping me make that educated decision. I understand the emotional attachment to guns that some persons experience as part of their family’s heritage and tradition. I also understand the emotional

attachment some people have to blaming guns for crimes rather than looking deeper at the causes. It is more comforting to believe that by controlling access to inanimate objects we can solve a problem that really requires going much deeper—delving into the ugly side of human nature. Working in the field of adolescent mental health I have met many disturbed youth. These young people are deeply hurt and sometimes very angry because they feel unloved and unlovable. When a young person is teased, made fun of, bullied or mistreated by peers and demeaned by the adults in their lives, they can become deeply wounded. Like scared animals they lash out at a world they see as cruel and rejecting. Some attempt to escape their pain through drugs and become addicted. Some people simply develop neurological disorders that cause

“As a ‘true blue Butte rat,’ I have eaten pasties consistently for over a half century.”

others to withdraw from them. Desperate people resort to desperate acts to exact revenge on perceived wrongs done to them or to get attention. The disturbed persons who pulled the trigger on the great tragedies at Columbine, Virginia Tech and more recently, at a movie theatre in Colorado, were lashing out at what they perceived as a cruel world. Or maybe they were going for the fame that comes from the media coverage of such events? Thanks to that non-stop media coverage of such tragedies and the focus of groups like the Brady Campaign, the real causes of these tragedies become obscured and buried time and again. There are also some people who make a good case for and blame the entertainment industry for promoting violence in our society. Either way, mental health problems, social cruelty and violent entertainment all play a significantly larger role in a per-

son’s decision to kill and maim other human beings than the inanimate objects that they choose to use to carry out their desperate acts. Wendy Mair Missoula

A pasty wager I could not disagree more with Carmen Ebert in regards to the pasties from Anaconda being better than any from Butte (see “Street Talk,” Nov. 15). This could be true, but as a “true blue Butte rat,” I have eaten pasties consistently for over a half century. There is no accounting for people’s tastes, but I’d like to propose a small bet with Carmen. Please go to Lisa’s Pasty Pantry in Missoula. Eat it there or take it home. If she can honestly say that a pasty from Anaconda is better, I will buy it. Lisa is originally from Butte and an expert in the art of making the “Letter from ’ome.” I strongly feel that Carmen will have to bring money to pay for the pasty herself. Ed L. Price Missoula

Dear Santa Obama For Christmas I would like you to control your spending of our/my tax dollars. Out of one side of your mouth you say that our government will run out of money by year’s end. Out of the other side of your mouth you tell Burma you will increase federal aid there. My God, can we take care of our country first?! Why do we even give out any foreign aid while people here are starving, without shelter, without jobs, without hope. This foreign aid will never be reciprocated. We are just being used. Three quarters of my wages go to taxes and health insurance. I think that is enough. Please, Santa Obama, can our children grow up not owing to China that which they should have themselves? Mr. President, you don’t have to play Santa to the whole world. Before increasing taxes you could widen the tax base by putting more people back to work. Reduce the freebies you give out. I know there are people who can’t work and are needy, but there are many just living off the U.S. government because it’s easy. Finding a job and keeping it has never been easy. Why make those of us who work pay the way for those who don’t even try because “Santa” will take care of them. Please, President Obama, stop this foreign aid and take care of our country first! Richard Brodowy Missoula


This holiday season SHOP LOCAL! Take part in the Downtown Holiday Shopping Stroll December 7-9.

With over 150 shops to choose from, Downtown Missoula has something for everyone.

Don’t forget about the FREE gift wrapping at the MSO Hub the first three weekends in December from 4-7 on Fri and 11-4 on Sat&Sun.

missoulanews.com • November 29 – December 6, 2012 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Eric Oravsky

Wednesday, November 21 Weber State University announces Timm Rosenbach as the football team’s new offensive coordinator. Rosenbach served as Montana’s offensive coordinator this past season, his first year on the job under coach Mick Delaney.

Thursday, November 22 Missoula’s Poverello Center, the state’s largest homeless shelter, serves 200 Thanksgiving meals to hungry locals. Pov staffers say they’re not yet sure why only about half as many people turned out for the free meal this year than in 2011.

Friday, November 23 Picketers gather outside the Mullan Road Walmart Supercenter on Black Friday, the busiest shopping day of the year. The protesters are part of a nationwide effort to pressure Walmart into providing better wages and benefits for its employees.

Saturday, November 24 The University of Montana men’s basketball team ekes out a one-point victory over the University of San Diego, 67-66. The win comes after Griz forward Kevin Henderson hits a three-point shot with 2.5 seconds left in the game.

Sunday, November 25 During Thanksgiving week, UM Office of Public Safety officers tally six reports of oncampus marijuana use. Four of those reports stem from UM dorms. Each time officers attempt to investigate the alleged drug use, no one answers the door.

Monday, November 26 Cynthia Renee Evers, 47, appears in court on felony charges of criminal endangerment resulting from a Friday night incident during which Evers allegedly drove her own vehicle into a car belonging to her romantic rival.

Tuesday, November 27 The Montana Legislature again makes national news as the Huffington Post reports that Rep. Clayton Fiscus, a Billings Republican, aims to introduce a bill requiring that intelligent design be taught in public schools.

The moon lights up the unusable lower section of Jerry Johnson Hot Springs on Sat., Nov. 24. Last season’s fires have collapsed trees and part of a hillside above the springs, allowing cold creek water to flow through the pools. A spokesperson with the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forest says cleanup is unlikely before next year.

Disability

Discrimination at MSO Dustin Hankinson’s muscular dystrophy forces him to use a ventilator and a wheelchair. Because of his mobility challenges, the 37-year-old Missoula man took pains planning where he would stay and what he would do during a scheduled visit to Washington, D.C., last year. He also took pains to ensure that he’d be cleared to fly. Prior to Hankinson’s Oct. 4, 2011 flight, he says that his caregiver phoned Delta Connection to ensure there would be no problems leaving from Missoula International Airport. Once at MSO, Hankinson cleared security and made his way to the gate. But as he prepared to board his flight, a Delta Airlines employee intervened. “They essentially yelled at me,� Hankinson says, “and told me I couldn’t get on the plane.� Compass Airlines, which flies as a Delta Connection carrier, admits in documents filed Nov. 15 in federal court that the employee wrongly believed that Hankinson’s ventilator was a portable oxygen concentrator, which is forbidden on commercial flights without a medical waiver. The erroneous identification prompted the agent

to prohibit Hankinson from getting on the plane. Hankinson, who’s the chair of the Missoula Democratic Party and a commissioner with the Montana Human Rights Bureau, which is charged to vet discrimination complaints, is well versed on the law. The day of the incident, he filed a complaint with the federal Department of Transportation alleging that Compass discriminated against him based on his disability. Hankinson also filed a complaint with the HRB. Because of Hankinson’s work with the watchdog agency, the case was transferred to the Idaho Commission of Human Rights, which investigated. According to court documents, the Idaho Commission found grounds to believe that Hankinson was discriminated against. The HRB in October advised Compass that it would hold a hearing to evaluate whether the airline broke the law. If the HRB finds Compass guilty, it could award Hankinson damages. On Nov. 15, Compass filed a lawsuit against the HRB in federal court. Compass argues the state has no authority over the airline and the court should limit further proceedings to the federal level. Compass explains in its lawsuit that it has taken action to ensure that it doesn’t make the same mistake again and that it fired the em-

ployee who told Hankinson he couldn’t get on the plane. Compass Airlines did not respond to an interview request for this story. Jessica Mayrer

Cobell

Too late for some Earlier this month, Dennis Gingold, lead attorney in the 16-year-long Cobell lawsuit, sent a letter to nearly 500,000 American Indians nationwide saying they could see their individual $1,000 settlement checks as early as Christmas. The final chapter in the Cobell v. Salazar saga is nearing a close. “When [Interior Secretary Ken] Salazar made a statement that the first payments would be going out before the end of the year, he made a statement to the other government officials saying, ‘I want this to be done, and don’t embarrass me,’� Gingold says. “That’s why I feel confident.� Gingold’s letter came in the wake of two appellate resolutions. On Oct. 29, the U.S. Supreme Court denied Kimberly Craven’s settlement petition; Craven had also

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[6] Missoula Independent • November 29 – December 6, 2012


[news] lobbied Congress to deny the $3.4 billion settlement. A few days later, three other individuals agreed to dismiss their own appeal. Gingold considers those appeals baseless and “unconscionable.” He’s not sure why four individuals fought so hard against the settlement. What he does know is, as the settlement labored for three years in Congress and the courts, roughly 12,000 class members died. Among them was the lead plaintiff herself, Blackfeet tribal member Elouise Cobell, who died in October 2011 after a months-long battle with cancer. The three-year delay has caused significant suffering in Indian Country, Gingold says. Gingold has received calls from class members “every single day”; he estimates he’s spoken to thousands. He says there are beneficiaries who, even as they wait for a settlement check, can’t afford a tank of gas or a square meal. About a month ago, he got a call from a beneficiary in Minnesota asking why the payments were so delayed. “Then he burst into tears on the telephone,” Gingold recalls. “He said, ‘Don’t you understand? I don’t even have enough money to heat my house.’” Alex Sakariassen

different ways to protect it. The Blackfoot landscape is one of those 2 percent.” Allen went on to highlight a series of loop trails in the Monture Creek area of the Blackfoot watershed accessed via the Lake Creek trailhead. If the current FJRA wilderness boundaries pass, the Lake Creek trail will be cut in half, blocking bikers from trails they’ve ridden and maintained for 20 years. Allen’s solution appears simple on paper: Expand the existing Otatsy Recreation Management Area to include those trails, and insert language into Tester's bill

Recreation

Bikers fight back In August 2009, the Montana Mountain Bike Alliance hosted its second annual backcountry festival in the tiny town of Lima, population 250, south of Dillon. Roughly 150 cyclists from across the region showed up to trek along singletrack in the Lima Peaks by day and party by night. The MMBA brought in a band. Bikers sponsored a spaghetti dinner, even rented local buses for shuttles. All told, the event raised nearly $1,000 for Lima’s assisted living center. Locals thanked the MMBA for the biggest economic boost in Lima in a decade. Bob Allen, MMBA’s co-president, told the Lima story to members of the Blackfoot Challenge during a recent meeting at the Lubrecht forestry center. It’s a prime example, he said, of the kind of contribution mountain bikers bring to small communities in Montana. It’s also a prime example of why the MMBA wants to see a portion of the Scapegoat Wilderness addition boundary in Sen. Jon Tester’s Forest Jobs and Recreation Act altered. Mountain bikers have lost access to hundreds of miles of trails across Montana and Idaho in recent years, partly due to a new Forest Service philosophy banning bicycles in certain areas that could theoretically be designated wilderness. Allen is drawing the line in the Scapegoat. “Cyclists support over 600,000 acres [of wilderness] in Tester’s bill,” Allen said. “The remaining 2 percent are places that we still want to talk about subtle adjustments,

allowing local Forest Service officials to explore replacement trail opportunities. The group had some success getting Sen. Max Baucus to include similar language in his Rocky Mountain Front Heritage Act. Allen feels bikers just didn’t have a strong voice in the FJRA discussion. “If this bill passes,” Allen said, “it prevents bikes from going any farther up that [Lake Creek] drainage. So as it stands now, we have a motorized snowmobile play area...up the drainage that bicyclists will not be able to access because of the boundary in this bill.” Allen added that he raised these concerns with Tester directly during a meeting in Washington, D.C., but the senator suggested that such a wilderness boundary adjustment should come from the broader community. Allen then shifted the discussion back around to Lima. In 2010, the town begged MMBA to host another festival. Allen had to decline. The 2009 Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest Plan had closed the Lima Peaks trails to mountain bikers. Alex Sakariassen

Drugged driving

Court sets precedent On Jan. 18, 2010, Leigh Paffhausen took a shot of Fireball Whisky while on shift as a bartender at the Elbow

BY THE NUMBERS

97

Sticks of dynamite detonated by the Missoula County Sheriff ’s Department Saturday morning at the Missoula landfill.

Room. Soon after, she began acting strangely. “She was fine,” says Paffhausen’s lawyer, William McCarthy. “And then she wasn’t.” McCarthy says Paffhausen took a celebratory whisky shot at about midnight with others. Paffhausen’s colleagues said later that she was out of character and that she simply disappeared after her shift. At roughly 2 a.m., when Missoula police pulled Paffhausen over for failing to yield to a stop sign, McCarthy admits, “There isn’t a question, she was impaired.” Exactly what caused her to be impaired remains under dispute. Paffhausen failed to submit to a Breathalyzer test and was charged in Missoula Municipal Court with drunken driving. McCarthy says that in the days after Paffhausen’s arrest, others also complained of becoming significantly impaired after drinking little alcohol at the Elbow Room that night. “They had a shot in common,” he says of the Fireball Whisky. The reports, along with Paffhausen’s uncharacteristic behavior, led McCarthy and Paffhuasen to believe that she had been drugged with GHB, known as the date rape drug. McCarthy says he handed over a list of people who could back Paffhousen’s claims to the Missoula Police Department, which, according to court documents, conducted an investigation. The problem for McCarthy—and for Paffhuasen—was that Montana law prohibited them from mounting what’s called an “involuntary intoxication” defense in response to DUI charges. The law barred him from calling anyone who could bolster Paffhausen’s claims. Police did not share their investigatory findings. On Nov. 20, the Montana Supreme Court, in a 4-3 decision, ordered that Paffhausen receive a new trial to air the evidence. Marking a significant new precedent, the court for the first time said that involuntary intoxication can be used as a DUI defense. While the majority said it was only fair that Paffhausen be allowed to mount a comprehensive and vigorous defense, Supreme Court Justice James Rice warned in the dissent that the court could now be making it even easier for drunken drivers to elude responsibility. “This may open the door to all manner of ‘I didn’t know’ defenses,” he wrote. Jessica Mayrer

ETC. We haven’t heard much from Rep. Denny Rehberg in the wake of his loss to Jon Tester in the U.S. Senate race. Usually the congressman would pop up on Twitter. Sometimes there’d be activity on his Facebook wall. Once a week, without fail, his official e-newsletter would show up in our inboxes with missives about presidential land grabs or announcements of upcoming listening sessions. Alas, Rehberg’s congressional Twitter account has been deleted. His congressional Facebook page has vanished. We haven’t received a newsletter since Nov. 6. Even the messages we’ve left for his communications director have gone unanswered. Are you there, Denny? It’s us, your constituents. Rehberg may have lost the Senate election, but his sixth and final term in the U.S. House doesn’t expire until Jan. 2. And Congress still has plenty to do in the 2012 lame duck session. There’s partisan wrangling over the much-ballyhooed “fiscal cliff”—roughly $500 billion in automatic spending cuts and tax hikes scheduled to take effect in early January. There’s a potential House vote on immigration legislation to, among other things, allow the families of green card holders to stay in the United States while waiting for their own green cards. There are farm provisions to consider, a cross-chamber stalemate over Violence Against Women Act reauthorizations to resolve and an omnibus appropriations bill that still hasn’t made it to the floor. The lame duck session is as full of vital leftovers as a post-Thanksgiving refrigerator. It’s not that Rehberg hasn’t been working. The House passed a bill Nov. 16 to normalize trade relations with Russia. Rehberg voted for it. One day before, the House passed the Mark Twain Commemorative Coin Act. Again, Rehberg voted in favor of the bill. What worries us is that, in the wake of a crushing election defeat, Rehberg’s fallen silent. He has just over a month left of representing Montana as the state’s lone congressman. We could postulate about what he’ll do next, but there’s plenty to worry about in the interim. The title of Rehberg’s last newsletter, sent on Nov. 6, was simple: “Hours left to vote.” Rehberg still has weeks to vote on behalf of Montanans. He should continue to keep us in the loop until he’s actually done.

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missoulanews.com • November 29 – December 6, 2012 [7]


[news] Through Jan. 5, 2013

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[8] Missoula Independent • November 29 – December 6, 2012

ingestion of spent ammunition and fishing tackle can kill birds. The magnitude of poisoning in some species such as waterfowl, eagles, California condors, swans and loons, is daunting.” “The federal government must be able to use all of the tools at its disposal to protect American families from consuming contaminated food,” Boxer wrote. “Therefore, we should not create unneeded exemptions that apply to lead and an unknown number of other contaminants.” She offered an amendment, supported by more than 200 organizations—including Montana’s Alliance for the Wild Rockies, Friends of the Wild Swan, Swan View Coalition, WildWest Institute and Women’s Voices for the Earth—that would strike the Toxic Substances Control Act exemption from Tester’s bill. After Monday’s vote, the Center for Biological Diversity’s Jeff Miller wrote in an email to supporters, “We now have the opportunity to further educate the Senate and the general public on why an exemption under the Toxic Substances Control Act for lead ammunition and fishing sinkers Photo by Chad Harder (as well as a polar bear A provision that would exempt lead ammunition from federal regulation could sink waiver under the Endanone of Sen. Jon Tester’s signature bills. gered Species Act) are horAll signs indicated that Tester would federal spending limits as part of last year’s rible policy moves.” The polar bear waiver refers not to take a significant step toward scoring his sec- deal to end the debt-ceiling crisis. Sessions ond big, bipartisan legislative accomplish- also said Tester’s bill violates the Constitu- new hunting opportunities, but would ment when the Senate voted this week on tion because all revenue-generating meas- allow hunters who killed polar bears in Canada while it was still legal and bring his Sportsmen’s Act of 2012, a grab-bag of ures must originate in the U.S. House. But the Sportsmen’s Act is also facing them into the United States. Humane Someasures intended to enhance hunting and fishing opportunities around the country. intensifying push-back from Democrats ciety International says that provision Earlier in the month, the Senate had voted concerned about a provision that would seeks to “indulge a small group of wealthy 92-5 to end debate on the bill. But on Nov. amend the Toxic Substances Control Act to trophy hunters who want to import polar 26, the Sportsmen’s Act was thwarted by exclude “shot, bullets and other projectiles, bear trophies from Canada in defiance of somewhat surprising bipartisan opposition. propellants, and primers.” They believe the current law.” The Sportmen’s Act now joins Tester’s “It’s definitely stalled,” says Robert change would preempt efforts by groups Saldin, a political science professor at the such as the Center for Biological Diversity three-year-old Forest Jobs and Recreation University of Montana. “There’s not an ob- to force the Environment Protection Agency Act as signature bipartisan proposals stuck to regulate lead ammo and fishing tackle. in legislative limbo. vious path forward in the Senate.” Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., was “I still think there’s reason to be opThe bill would boost access to land, protect animal and fish habitat, encourage among the Democrats who voted “no” on timistic for both of these pieces of legislafederal agencies to maintain shooting Monday, citing a long list of evidence that tion,” says Saldin. “There’s a broad ranges, allow bow hunters to cross federal suggests eating lead-contaminated meat can enough coalition, I think, on both of these land where bow hunting isn’t allowed, ex- be harmful to people—especially children measures.” How Tester can usher them through clude lead ammunition and fishing tackle and pregnant women—and animals. In from federal regulation, and allow hunters Boxer’s remarks submitted for the record, a divided Congess, and when, is anyone’s to bring home 41 polar bears shot in she quoted U.S. Geological Survey contam- guess. Canada before the bears were listed as a inants expert Barnett Rattner, who said in mfrank@missoulanews.com threatened species. As Tester said on the 2008: “Science is replete with evidence that Since U.S. Sen. Jon Tester’s election six years ago, arguably his greatest legislative achievement, however controversial, was the precedent-setting removal of gray wolves from the endangered species list. If it wasn’t evident already, the delisting, which Tester attached as a rider to an unrelated budget bill a year and a half ago, cemented the flat-topped organic farmer as a moderate red-state Democrat eager to broker bipartisan solutions. His reelection earlier in the month appeared to validate that approach.

Senate floor on Monday, the bill is supported by about 50 organizations, ranging from The Nature Conservancy to the National Rifle Association, and it would reduce the deficit by $5 million over the next 10 years, according to the Congressional Budget Office. Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., said Monday he “strongly” favors most of the bill’s measures. Still, Sessions led the effort to block the proposal on the grounds that, because it raises revenue to pay for itself, it violates the Budget Control Act of 2011, which set


[news]

Down with disease New coronavirus goes under the microscope in Hamilton Feldmann and Munster, working with a committee of their peers, established research protocols using Syrian hamsters and rhesus macaques to determine the progression of the disease and its transmissibility. Their work will complement research being conducted in Europe. As a result of the global preparations for H5N1 and SARS, the Rocky Mountain Laboratories now finds itself well positioned globally to respond to emerging threats to human health. It’s an important step considering how quickly a virus can travel. For instance, the Hajj, the fifth pillar of wisdom in the Muslim faith and the world’s largest pilgrimage, in October 2012 drew approximately 3.4 million people from around the world to Mecca— only a month after the first two human cases of the new coronavirus became known in Saudi Arabia. This is the type of convergence of events that keeps public health officials up at night. It’s also an event for which the relatively new Laboratory of Virology was constructed. “I think this is the mission Photo courtesy of National Institute of Health of a lab like this,” said FeldScientists at Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton recently received a sample mann. “We work on dangerous of a new coronavirus, seen here through an electron microscope, that, as of last viruses, but this one may turn week, has infected six people, killing two of them. out to be a level two. We don’t know much about the patients or SARS, this new coronavirus also causes The worldwide scientific gear-up to fight and the potential of this virus to cause large respiratory distress severe enough to re- the pandemic that wasn’t soon proved to damage to public health. Should it turn out quire hospitalization. Other than that, little be a valuable exercise, however, because to be mild, you could maybe argue that it’s by 2003, the world was faced with SARS. a waste of time and money to work on it. But is known about it. The virus emerged in Saudi Arabia By then, thanks to the preparation for this is exactly what labs like the Hamilton and Qatar last June. How it arrived in H5N1, scientists and public health officials one are built for.” Hamilton earlier this month is a story of were well prepared, and the SARS outThough six cases and two deaths probscientific collaboration, and the result of break was relatively quickly identified and ably won’t register on public awareness, an aggressive global defense against an in- stopped, although not before sickening consider that at one time, there were only fluenza pandemic that never emerged— more than 8,000 people and killing more a half-dozen HIV cases in the world. It took not yet, anyway, according to Heinz than 900. only days to sequence the genome of the “SARS was a prime example of how a new virus and determine that it was a coroFeldmann and his colleague, Vincent Munster, the two RML scientists research- global response should happen,” says Feld- navirus. Compare that to the length of time mann. “It was a tremendous effort. And I it took scientists to figure out the origin of ing this new coronavirus. Feldmann serves as chief of RML’s Lab- think communications played a big role. HIV. “Years,” said Feldmann. oratory of Virology, known more colloqui- Everyone who wanted to be a part of it was Answers to the many questions swirling ally as the “biolevel four lab” where a part of it.” about this new coronavirus won’t be known Both Feldmann and Munster are from until the data are in, of course. But Feldscientists study deadly pathogens for which there currently are no treatments, such as Europe, where the emergence of the new mann notes that whatever the outcome, Ebola, Marburg and Lassa. Munster is chief coronavirus was treated with more con- Mother Nature always seems to bat last and of the Virus Ecology Unit, the most recent cern there than it has been in North Amer- viruses, like all living things, adapt or die. addition to the Hamilton biolevel four lab. ica. It was Munster and his personal “We’re always running after these In the late 1990s, Feldmann says the connection with Erasmus University in (viruses),” he says. “Nature will always be H5N1 influenza virus threatened global Rotterdam, Holland, that allowed Rocky ahead of us.” public health and the World Health Or- Mountain Labs to obtain a sample of the ganization prepared an enormous, coor- new coronavirus. With sample in hand, editor@missoulanews.com dinated effort to combat it. Scientists around the world, combining their considerable pools of knowledge and expertise, and preparing for an expected influenza pandemic, began communicating via methods not previously used in the notoriously competitive world of scientific research, working cooperatively, and in a virtual sense, with their far-flung peers. The viral threat posed by H5N1 has not emerged, though fear of it remains.

8th Anniversary

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by Carlotta Grandstaff

Scientists at Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton who study the world’s deadliest pathogens recently received their latest challenge: a sample of a new virus that emerged this year on the other side of the globe and has sickened six people, two of whom died. The virus, called a coronavirus for its crown-like appearance under the microscope, is relatively common. Like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus,

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missoulanews.com • November 29 – December 6, 2012 [9]


[opinion]

In for the kill Washington state wipes out a wolf pack by Laura Ackerman and Paul Lindholdt

Present this coupon with your cans, receive 10¢ bonus per pound. (expires 12/31/12)

Or drop your aluminum cans & newspapers in one of our bins to benefit the Missoula Food Bank.

[10] Missoula Independent • November 29 – December 6, 2012

A wildlife tragedy began in Washington state on Aug. 7, when the state Department of Fish and Wildlife announced that a wolf in the Wedge Pack had killed a calf on a ranch close to Canada. Afterward, the rancher said that wolves were continuing to kill or maim his cattle. Wildlife staffers examined his claim and acknowledged that 16 animals had been killed or injured. But this is the real tragedy: By Sept. 27, the entire Wedge Pack of eight wolves had been killed. The collared alpha male, shot from a helicopter, was the last to go. The pack was wiped out because the rancher dug in his heels. He refused to accept any reparation for his losses, insisting instead that the state’s management plan for wolves needed to be rescinded. Under that plan, ratified in 2011 after nine elaborate public hearings across the state, ranchers may receive payment for two grown beef cattle, in the case of a confirmed wolf kill, or one calf in the case of a probable kill. The plan also requires ranchers and the agency to attempt all possible non-lethal alternatives before they resort to killing wolves. State wildlife officials urge “livestock operators to enter into cooperative, costsharing agreements with the department that specify non-lethal measures.” State Sen. Kevin Ranker, a Democrat, says it’s “inexcusable” that the state didn’t “exhaust” nonlethal methods first. Before wolves can be taken off the endangered species list, the plan says, there must be 15 breeding pairs in existence statewide for three years. If the state hopes to reach this goal, it will certainly need to discontinue management by rifle barrel. State agents now say they are ready to try something called Chemical Bio-scent (a smelly repellent) as a non-lethal measure. They should also try a tool called Conditioned Taste Aversion, developed by biologist

Lowell Nicolaus, which applies worming medicine to cow carcasses to sicken feeding wolves. In classic Pavlovian conditioning, wolves soon learn that eating beef turns their stomachs. Nicolaus has adapted this technique successfully to change the behavior of wild crows and raccoons, and also used it on captive wolves. Yet the problem with the Wedge Pack is not so much wolves preying on cattle as it is the continued grazing of livestock on our federal estate. Especially during the summer,

“The collared alpha male, shot from a helicopter, was the last to go.” when the predation is highest, the rancher’s cows graze on public lands. That means American taxpayers pick up some of the tab for his herd. The rancher built his ranch, yes, but not without government help. Taxpayers subsidize tens of thousands of U.S. cattle each year, and these cattle degrade the same habitats that are required by wolves’ native prey. Science shows that cattle—an exotic species in the West—displace deer, elk, moose and other prey species. Grazing also undercuts sound wolf management efforts. Money to subsidize cattle grazing would be better spent on wolf recovery— restoring the range to the way it was before public-lands ranching became an institution. Ask most fans of outdoor recreation if they would rather watch wild species than cattle in wild areas, and you know what they will say.

Wolves and other large carnivores are keystone species in functioning ecosystems. A study conducted in 2012 by Oregon State University researchers concluded that the absence of carnivores—wolves especially— harms the land. Elk herds in Yellowstone, for instance, pruned willows and shrubs far back until gray wolves were reintroduced. An unnatural dearth of large carnivores allows herbivores to disrupt natural checks and balances. Another scientific line would be to design an interstate, even international, conservation and management plan. Such a plan would consider wolf populations all over the West. There is a lot at stake for taxpayers. The state’s wildlife agency had to pay employees several weeks of overtime to chase down the Wedge Pack. A helicopter was in the air for four days. Sen. Ranker has asked the department for the final cost, as well as for a study of the comparative costs of lethal and nonlethal methods. We can hardly wait to see that cost-benefit analysis. Whatever the price in blood, money and mismanaged compassion, this was the result: An entire wolf pack was killed for the sake of one ranch and its rancher. Wolves in the West are here to stay. They don’t comprehend state and national boundaries, but they understand their role in ecosystems. The Wolf Conservation and Management Plan, the law of the land in Washington for now, is all the wolves have to protect them. Let’s give the “conservation” part of the plan a fighting chance. The writers are contributors to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org ). Laura Ackerman is a Spokane farmer and environmental activist; Paul Lindholdt is a professor of English at Eastern Washington University in Spokane.


missoulanews.com • November 29 – December 6, 2012 [11]


[quirks]

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - A gunman demanded money at a Subway shop in Braidwood, Ill., only to be thwarted by a male employee who “threw a pot of soup at the suspect,” police Chief Rich Girot said. The suspect fled, empty-handed. (Chicago Sun-Times) Police said Herbert C. Ridge, 38, siphoned gas from a car in Mesa, Ariz., but caught fire while fleeing and crashed his pickup truck into a neighboring house. A security camera just installed by the siphoned car’s owner, Mitch Drum, 26, photographed Ridge leaping from the driver’s seat of the pickup and rolling on the ground with his shirt engulfed in flames. “He had this manufactured siphoning system that he made himself, with a pump hooked up to it, to a battery,” Drum said. “Something must have sparked.” (ABC News)

LITIGATION NATION - After avid golfers Robert and Katherine Brady bought a house next to a golf course in Ravalli County, Mont., they sued it and the county for not warning them that golf balls would land on their property. Some 1,300 balls a year landed in their yard, even after they built a 6-foot-tall cedar fence topped with a 14-foot-high net. The Hamilton Golf Club defended itself by pointing out no golfer would intentionally hit a ball into the Bradys’ yard and risk a two-stroke penalty, which would cause the golfer “strife and selfloathing.” District Judge James Haynes ruled against the Bradys, declaring they “failed to fulfill their independent duty to see what was plainly apparent” before buying the home. (Ravalli Republic) WAR ON OBESITY, ROUND TWO - Following bans on super-sized sugary soft drinks inspired by New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, PepsiCo Inc. unveiled a new version of Pepsi-Cola in Japan. Called Pepsi Special, it contains dextrin, an indigestible, potato-derived fiber that Pepsi says slows the absorption of fat in the body by binding with it and eliminating it as waste. “Why choose between a hamburger and a slice of pizza?” Japanese commercials announce. “If you choose Pepsi Special, you can have both!” (Yahoo Health)

THOSE ZANY SOUTH KOREANS - The South Korean city of Suwon opened the world’s first toilet theme park to honor its former mayor, who campaigned for better toilets for his country. Sim Jae-Duck, known as “Mr. Toilet,” had a passion for toilets, having been born in his grandmother’s bathroom. He designed and built himself a toilet-shaped house, which is now a museum in Restroom Cultural Park. Besides the theme park, Suwon holds an annual Golden Poop Art Festival. (London’s UK Metro) Several dozen South Korean activists stepped up aerial missions to launch condoms into North Korea after that country’s government threatened “merciless” military attack against such propaganda measures. In the latest assault, North Korean defectors joined Christian and right-wing organizations to launch 20 heliumfilled balloons in Yeoncheon County carrying 150,000 anti-Pyongyang leaflets and 5,000 condoms, as well as sanitary pads, underwear, flashlights, candy and toothpaste. (Agence France-Presse)

WHEN GUNS ARE OUTLAWED - Police reported a 28-year-old woman in Bellingham, Wash., hit her 31-year-old boyfriend on the top of his head with a glass bong. (The Bellingham Herald) When a gunman demanded cash from storeowner Saadat Khan, 49, in Stoneham, Mass., Khan told police he grabbed a cup of chili powder he keeps behind the counter to sprinkle on food and threw it in the robber’s face, then punched him and threw him out of the store. (Associated Press)

WHAT COULD GO WRONG? - California enacted a law requiring safety and performance standards be set for driverless motor vehicles by January 2015. Gov. Jerry Brown showed up in a self-driving Toyota Prius to sign the legislation at the Mountain View headquarters of Google Inc., which has been developing autonomous vehicle technology and already operates a dozen computer-controlled cars. The new law requires a licensed driver to sit behind the wheel to serve as a backup in case of emergency. “You can count on one hand the number of years before people can experience this,” Google co-founder Serey Brin said. (Associated Press)

SUSPICION CONFIRMED - Seatbelts on airplanes are pointless, according to Ryanair chief executive Michael O’Leary. “If there ever was a crash on an aircraft,” he announced, “God forbid, a seatbelt won’t save you.” O’Leary seeks approval to remove the last 10 rows of cabin seats on European flights so he can sell standing-room-only tickets there for less than $2. “We’re always looking for new ways of doing things,” O’Leary said. “It’s the authorities who won’t allow us to do them.” (Britain’s The Telegraph) SLIGHTEST PROVOCATION - Houston authorities accused Deby Mejia, 23, of beating her 10-year-old sister unconscious with an extension cord because she caught the child eating a bag of Cheetos that she bought from a neighbor while the older sister was gone. (Houston’s KTRK-TV)

AVOIRDUPOIS JUSTICE - Death row inmate Ronald Post, 53, asked a federal judge to stop his scheduled Jan. 16 execution in Ohio on the grounds that he’ll suffer severe pain because he’s so fat that he doesn’t have accessible veins in his arms, hands or legs for a lethal injection. Post, who weighs more than 400 pounds, said he’s tried losing weight, but back and knee problems have made exercise difficult, and severe depression keeps him from cutting down on his food intake. (Associated Press)

IT’S THE THOUGHT THAT COUNTS - San Francisco’s Health Commission voted to provide and pay for sex-change surgery for uninsured transgender residents. Public Health Director Barbara Garcia described the approval as “symbolic” since the city lacks the expertise, capacity and protocols to provide the procedure through its clinics and public hospital. (Associated Press) SUSHI FLAMBÉ - New York City fire marshals arrested sushi chef Fei Teng, 42, after gasoline he stored in soy sauce buckets at an East Side restaurant caught fire. Fire official Frank Dwyer said Teng asked a dishwasher to bring the containers from the basement to his car, but “more than half the gasoline” spilled onto the kitchen floor and ignited, burning Teng, a busboy and a waitress. (New York’s Daily News)

STICKY FINGERS - A Connecticut jury convicted Anthony Johnson, 49, of stealing up to $70,000 a week by crawling beneath seats in darkened movie theaters to remove credit cards from women’s pocketbooks. He used the stolen cards to collect cash advances from the state’s gambling casinos and to go on shopping sprees with his women accomplices, who would alert Johnson where potential victims kept their pocketbooks. The FBI said Johnson has been crawling on theater floors since at least 2007. (The Hartford Courant)

[12] Missoula Independent • November 29 – December 6, 2012


missoulanews.com • November 29 – December 6, 2012 [13]


T

he hunter walks quietly along the hillside, eyes wide, scanning, following tracks. Senses heighten. Over there, in the clearing, something moves. It’s a cow elk. The hunter freezes, heart pounding. He slowly raises his rifle, frames the elk in the scope, steadies his breathing, and... So goes another romanticized tale of thrilling primal triumph. They’re told by the tens of thousands of hunters who, every fall, shoulder rifles and amble out over Montana’s fields and river bottoms, along game trails through forests, and up steep snow-covered slopes. If you’ve heard one, you’ve heard them all. But what about the stories hunters dare not tell? Or the stories so memorable that Montana game wardens and wildlife biologists are the ones who retell them? Take that cow elk in the clearing. Well, in November 2008, a man from up-

state New York hunting somewhere in Montana’s Paradise Valley, north of Yellowstone National Park, pulled the trigger and killed it. But it wasn’t an elk. It was a llama. Some say this llama tale is a rumor— a “rural myth,” as one state wildlife biologist recently presumed. But it’s true. The hunter field-dressed that llama. It’s unclear what made him finally realize he hadn’t bagged an elk, but he later called a state game warden, who had to refer the situation to the Montana Department of Livestock. The DOL took photographs of the gutted llama sprawled in the back of a red pickup, and those photos went viral on the internet. The hunter wasn’t cited for breaking any laws, but the ridicule he suffered “was probably enough,” says Sam Sheppard, Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ warden captain in that region.

A lot of wild things happen during Montana’s annual hunting season, Sheppard says, “that could appear humorous if it wasn’t—from a wildlife perspective, and how wildlife’s treated—so tragic.” Years of monitoring the annual drama of humans chasing big animals have made Montana’s game wardens and wildlife biologists some of our best story tellers. Their tales, and the ones they hear, are indeed filled with hilarity and tragedy, with characters who are gutsy and gutless, and hunters who suddenly find themselves the hunted. “You name it, we’ve seen it,” Sheppard says.

THE DECOY Montana’s general deer and elk season ended Nov. 25. It was the first hunting season in 27 years that Jeff Darrah didn’t

work for FWP. The longtime warden captain retired this past summer, and now he’s at his home near Stevensville, still receiving calls from the field from former colleagues, wondering if he retired too soon. The 53-year-old aggressively pursued poachers, which earned him awards from those who appreciated his work, and death threats and one brick through the windshield from those who didn’t. Poachers didn’t appreciate this: Back in 1993, when Darrah was working in Butte, he and fellow game wardens began using deer and elk decoys to bust poachers. “Generally, when somebody poaches, there’s the animal and the bad guy, and the game warden’s [far away],” Darrah says while sipping coffee at his kitchen table. “What [the decoy] does is it puts the game warden, the hunter, the bad guy and the animal in the same location, and we

STRANGE BUT TRUE HUNTING TALES FROM ACROSS MONTANA by Matthew Frank • illustrations by Kou Moua

[14] Missoula Independent • November 29 – December 6, 2012


get to see if he passes the test or not. It’s no different than a highway patrolman sitting along the road with a radar gun waiting to see if somebody speeds.” The wardens began the poaching sting by placing a spike bull elk in an area where it was legal to shoot only browtined bulls. One warden ran a video camera, another hid in the brush, and a third observed from a vehicle in case he needed to give chase. The first day the elk decoy stood in the field, 13 hunters shot it. Most of them, Darrah says, fired from the road, which is illegal. Some fired from their vehicle, which is doubly illegal. “It was unbelievable,” Darrah says. “That was to us, in our world, a record. We had never heard of getting that many shooters in one day.” The wardens went back the next day and nabbed 10 more. “It just didn’t slow down,” Darrah says. Then, days later, the wardens moved to a forest road east of Butte that loops back to Interstate 90, which makes it a popular road-hunting route. This time, they waited until it was past legal shooting hours, and placed a mule deer buck decoy at a bend in the road, in the path of oncoming headlights. “I’ll always remember this—and it sounds like maybe we made it up—but we were 10 for 10,” Darrah says. Ten vehicles in a row approached the decoy, stopped, and a passenger took a shot. Darrah says they couldn’t write tickets fast enough, to the point where they had two or three vehicles of would-be poachers backed up waiting to be given citations. “And what’s even more unbelievable,” Darrah says, “was the makeup of those 10.” One of the hunters was a local preacher with a child in the passenger seat. Another was a retired highway patrolman from Oregon. Another was a well-respected member of a sportsmen’s group. Darrah remembers walking up to the vehicle with the sportsman inside. “He rolled down the window and I said, ‘You’ve gotta be kidding me.’” The next year, Darrah and his fellow wardens received a tip that poachers were heading to a place called Coyote Meadows, off the same forest road where they’d busted 10 poachers in a row. It was about 2 a.m. when the wardens placed a buck decoy at a 90-degree bend in the road, and then hid in nearby bushes. Minutes later, a truck carrying three men rumbled toward them. The truck stopped, and a passenger stepped out with his rifle and fired at the decoy. “There’s nothing like that when you’re sitting that close, just feet away, just listening to this,” Darrah says. “You’re in the still of the night, and when the gun goes off like that and you know it’s illegal...it’s not just a bang, it’s a ker-freaking-bang!” With the deer still standing, the driver stepped out of the truck with his rifle, mocked his buddy’s poor aim, and fired. Ker-bang!

That was enough. Darrah jumped out of the bushes and yelled, “Fish and Game!” The surprise apparently caused one of the poachers to wet his pants. When he stepped out of the warden’s truck after getting a ticket, he left behind a “big soiled stain on the seat cover,” Darrah says. “We scared the crap out of him, I guess.” During the first few years they hunted poachers near Butte, Darrah says he and his fellow wardens about doubled the number of poaching cases statewide, from around 70 to 150. “The decoy has been very, very valuable,” he says. “It’s not as effective today as it was then, because the word has gotten out—and that’s cool, because that’s what we wanted to happen. If it takes worrying about whether it’s a decoy or not, that instant that it takes gives an animal maybe the time it needs to get away from being poached.”

THE GOOSE 1-800-TIP-MONT is the state’s hotline for reporting wildlife crimes. In recent years, the hotline has received about 2,200 calls a year. But this year, FWP’s Brian Shinn, the TIP-MONT coordinator, expects the hotline to get about 2,600 calls by Jan. 1, which would be a record. “There’s a couple obvious reasons, and technology would be one of them,” Shinn says. “People are in the field now with cellphones, and they see [violations] immediately and they call them in immediately, instead of going home and stewing on it and forgetting about it.” The second reason, Shinn says, is education. “More and more people are educated on the fact that this number exists.” But it’s also true that there’s been an uptick in poaching cases this year. Shinn calls it a “pretty devastating year,” especially

the turkey just didn’t look right; something had happened to it. So Shinn dispatched a warden. “Long story short,” Shinn says, “the warden...goes down there, and it was a Butterball turkey from a store that had fallen out of somebody’s truck and was lying in the middle of the road, and the lady thought it was a poached turkey. “People don’t realize that [turkeys] don’t come wrapped in the wild, I guess,” Shinn adds. “That’s the kind of stuff we have to deal with on occasion.”

in northwest Montana. “This has been, as far as I can see, the worst year of people just shooting things and leaving them lay.” So perhaps Shinn and fellow FWP staffers who field so many grim TIP-MONT calls welcome the ones they can’t help but laugh about. This year or last—Shinn isn’t sure which, since he says all of the calls run together in his memory—a boy, who we’ll call Tommy, dialed TIP-MONT and Shinn answered. “I’d like to report a shooting from a vehicle,” the boy said, and he provided the shooter’s name and the vehicle’s license plate number. Then Shinn heard in the background, “Tommy, who are you calling?” “I’m turning you in, Uncle Bob,” the boy said. “You’re not allowed to shoot out the window.”

Not all of the stories are funny. On Nov. 10, FWP biologist Jay Kolbe, wearing a thick jacket and black Carhartt overalls, sits inside a trailer at the Bonner check station, on the banks of the Black-

Tommy had busted his own uncle. It’s an anecdote that makes Shinn believe that the hunting culture is changing. “Kids are telling the adults how to hunt now, and I think that’s kind of cool,” he says. Another FWP staffer shared the following TIP-MONT call on the condition of anonymity. Shinn can’t confirm or deny it. During this past hunting season, a woman driving down a highway spotted an injured goose on the side of the road. She pulled over and huddled around it to keep it warm, and called for an FWP warden to come and save it. A warden arrived a while later to discover that the goose wasn’t a goose at all. It was a goose decoy that evidently had fallen out of the the back of someone’s vehicle. Shinn can confirm a different call. Recently, an upset woman reported a turkey laying in the road. She told TIP-MONT that

foot River east of Missoula, sipping hot tea. It’s cold outside. A dusting of snow has fallen, the first accumulation of the hunting season. The snow should help hunters, but so far, at around 3 p.m., only about a half-dozen deer have come through. This check station, open on the six weekends of hunting season, has been in operation since the early 1950s. Kolbe has worked it for the past 16 years. It’s in a perfect spot, at a bottleneck between the expansive Blackfoot Valley and Missoula. Some 10,000 hunters drive through the check station every hunting season; state law requires them to stop if they’ve been hunting that day. Kolbe gathers data from 11 hunting districts, an area close to two million acres in size. The most important data he collects is the age of harvested animals. Equally important, though harder to quantify, he says, is the value in talking to those 10,000 hunters.

THE MOUNTAIN LION

missoulanews.com • November 29 – December 6, 2012 [15]


“Personally, for me, it’s the most important part of being here,” Kolbe says. “You never know what’s going to come through. It’s always interesting. You’re just getting all those stories, and all that input. It’s a pretty dynamic place.” He hears a lot about wolves, mountain lions and grizzly bears. The Blackfoot Valley’s wolf population began to surge in about 2007, Kolbe says, and during those first few years, every wolf sighting—even every wolf-track sighting—was a big deal to hunters. Those sightings are less remarkable now. “Even sightings of full packs by some folks doesn’t merit a waveover to tell you about it, like it would have five years ago,” he says. But grizzlies are a different story. Just this morning, Kolbe says, a grizzly sow with two cubs commandeered a whitetail buck before the woman who had shot it even had a chance to tag it. “The bear got what it wanted and she doesn’t need another tag and can hunt another day,” Kolbe says. “But it was a close call.” Just a week before there was a similar incident, which was described to Kolbe as a “Mexican standoff ” with a sow. “Forty yards away. Locking eyes. Somebody’s going to draw,” he says. “Eventually, things ended well. “That’s just real common stuff,” Kolbe continues, “and thankfully we haven’t had anyone hurt, that I’m aware of, by a grizzly in the Blackfoot since 2001, when that fella was killed on the [Blackfoot-Clearwater] game range.” For all Kolbe’s years in the field, and the stories he’s heard on cold weekends in this run-down trailer, he says hunters know specific areas in the Blackfoot better than he or any FWP staffer. “Like this guy,” he says. A white-haired man, sweating with his jacket off, steps into the trailer. His name is Steve Wallace. He just pulled up with a quartered bull elk in the back of his truck, the first elk to pass through the check station all day. His son shot it early in the morning. “This was a bit of a bitch,” Wallace groans. He and Kolbe chit-chat for a bit. Then Wallace says, “We saw lion tracks today. Every time I see lion tracks it reminds me of it.” “It” happened two years ago. Wallace and his son Court were hunting near Lincoln. Wallace carried a rifle, but he almost didn’t bother to bring it, since he had already filled his elk tag and didn’t have a deer tag. Some snow had fallen. They split up, and Wallace headed up a ridge, where he spotted large mountain lion tracks. But those tracks disappeared as the day wore on and the sun melted the snow. In the afternoon, while Wallace moved along a game trail below the crest of a ridge, he heard movement in the trees above him, followed by a very low, sustained growl—“Unlike any growl I had ever heard,” he says. A second later, Wallace saw a large lion, about 60 feet away, appear out of the trees, crouching, quickly gliding toward him. “As the cat approached I shouldered the gun and fired,” Wallace says. “There

was no time to aim, only react...The whole scope was just full of brown hair. “When I shot,” he continues, “the cat jumped into the air and went right by me on my left side and it was clawing at the ground wildly.” When it passed him, “I felt like I could almost reach out and touch it.” The cat tumbled 30 or 40 yards down the hill and stopped at the base of a tree. It wasn’t moving. Wallace pulled out his cellphone and called Court. “Court, I was just attacked by a mountain lion,” he remembers saying, “and I had to shoot it.” “Did you kill it?” “I think so.” Just as Wallace said that the lion limped away from the tree and into thick cover.

“No, the cat is not dead,” he said, and hung up the phone. But Wallace had lost sight of the animal. He moved uphill to where the lion had been and found a partially eaten whitetail doe. Then he crept toward the tree where it had stopped after being shot, and found a pool of blood the size of a paper plate. But there was no blood trail, and no more snow to reveal the lion’s tracks and whereabouts. He clutched his rifle, its safety off, and left. “Forty-two years in the woods and I never felt threatened—ever,” Wallace says. “I had many bear encounters and never felt threatened. This cat was going to eat me, or at least attack me. It was scary.” But he still always follows predator tracks. “I tell the kids, ‘It’s a good thing we’re seeing predator tracks everywhere we go,’” he says. “‘That’s a good sign. They’re in here hunting right along with us. And

if you don’t see any predator tracks, there probably isn’t any game there. So go somewhere else.’”

Back at Jeff Darrah’s kitchen table in Stevensville, he tells the inside story of one of the biggest poaching cases in Montana history, one of the hallmarks of his career. In the early 2000s, wardens who worked the Seeley Lake area suspected that a man named Dean Ruth and his family were poaching animals—a lot of them. Across the country, in northwestern Pennsylvania, where the Ruths also owned property, wardens suspected the same; the Pennsylvania Game Commission had been mailed a photograph of two men,

mounted on the wall. The wardens noted that every single rack had a kill date written on them in black marker. They found storage bins full of hundreds of photographs of dead animals and a bear skull in the freezer. In one of the rooms newspaper clippings were pinned to the wall. One was a news story from Pennsylvania about several decapitated deer being found. Another, Darrah says, was a personal ad that said something like, “If you can’t get ’em right, go get ’em at night. Use a light,” signed with the suspect’s initials. “It was kind of like ‘Criminal Minds’ or something,” Darrah says. “You got some guy who’s keeping trophies of his serial murders. It was the same thing, only it was wildlife.”

Telling the story makes Darrah emotional. He misses the work, misses being out on the land. He says he always felt a strong sense of ownership over the districts he worked. “It was mine,” he says. “I didn’t own it on paper. But I felt like it was mine—it was my responsibility to protect that. And how dare you come into what I consider mine and do something illegal or poach or steal the wildlife from the rest of us who want to do it right.” Doing it right. That’s the point. That’s why Darrah tells one last story about a young boy who, years ago near Butte, shot his first elk. The boy thought he’d missed. But Darrah, watching from a distance through a spotting scope, saw the elk run off into the sage and fall down. Darrah

their faces concealed under hoods, posing with an apparently poached trophy whitetail buck. They were “taunting them, rubbing it in their face,” Darrah says. In November 2002, after gathering enough evidence for a search warrant, Darrah and Warden Captain Mike Moore knocked on the door of the Ruths’ double-wide trailer, and Dean Ruth’s wife Renita let them in. The walls, Darrah says, were completely covered in antlers, more than 100 of them. Deer. Elk. Moose. Antelope. They walked into the kitchen and noticed a familiar photograph on the refrigerator. It was of two men with a trophy buck, matching the photograph sent to the Pennsylvania Game Commission, only the two men’s hoods were off. Over in the corner, Darrah spotted two rifles with silencers. Then he saw the same whitetail buck from the photograph

In 2004, a federal judge sentenced Dean Ruth to four months in prison. Later that year, a state judge sentenced him to 20 years in prison, with 15 years suspended. Ruth was released from prison in 2005 and Darrah sat down with him for an exit interview. The warden found Ruth to be “very open and I think very truthful.” Darrah says Ruth told him he’d been poaching since he was a kid, even though his grandfather had been a game warden in Pennsylvania. It was his dad, Ruth told Darrah, who encouraged the disregard for the law. He told Darrah that his dad didn’t let him play sports, and instead he developed a prowess for poaching. Darrah remembers Ruth saying that the more he poached, the more impressed his dad was, “and he’d laugh and pat me on the back and say, ‘Way to go.’ So I was always looking for that affirmation from my dad that I was doing the right thing.’”

drove over to the boy, who’d begun walking away, to tell him that he hit that elk. The boy hopped in Darrah’s truck and they drove to where the elk lay. The boy walked over to it, and Darrah remembers him grinning “from ear to ear...giving me the thumbs up.” “You gotta pay attention when you shoot them,” Darrah said. “Sometimes they don’t just fall.” “What do I do now?” the boy asked. “You got a knife?” “Yeah.” “Have you ever gutted anything before?” “Not this big.” Darrah misses these moments, the opportunities to educate hunters, young and old, because if game wardens are successful, fewer wildlife tragedies happen. And perhaps another gutted llama won’t end up in the back of a pickup.

‘CRIMINAL MINDS’

[16] Missoula Independent • November 29 – December 6, 2012

mfrank@missoulanews.com


missoulanews.com • November 29 – December 6, 2012 [17]


[arts]

Time machine Found Footage Festival embraces the lost era of VHS by Nick Davis

I

s there a more lampoonable decade of U.S. culture than the 1980s? Big hair, neon spandex, pastel sportcoats, cocaine, drum machines, synthesizers, prime-time soap operas, preppies, yuppies, neutered muscle cars…the list of generational absurdities is longer than Boy George’s rap sheet. And in an unfortunate historical confluence, the ’80s also happened to be the first full decade featuring widely available consumergrade video recording and playback equipment. The result of this unholy convergence is untold millions of hours of ’80s culture stashed away on crappily produced VHS tapes all over the country. It would be nice to think that the technological advances of the last 20 years—DVD, Blu-Ray, streaming video—would forever bury the low-fi evidence of this most garish of eras. But cultural historians Nick Prueher and Joe Pickett have other ideas. They’ve combed thrift stores, garage sales and dumpsters across the United States, resurrecting chunks of mostly ’80s and early ’90s VHS video for use in their barnstorming Found Footage Festival Tour. Prueher and Pickett, veteran producers and writers for “Late Night With David Letterman” and The Onion, respectively, show various iterations of the clips on the big screen, and during the show offer commentary and context from the stage. The Indy recently caught up with Prueher on

the phone from his home base in New York. Indy: How did this begin for the two of you? Prueher: We both grew up Stoughton, Wis., and I trace the Found Footage origins to 1991, when I was in high school and working at a McDonald’s in Stoughton. I was bored in the break room and popped in a video I found, called “Inside Custodial Duties,” a training video for janitors. I couldn’t believe how awful it was. They tried to have this cute little plot to it, and the actors were nauseatingly enthusiastic about windows and garbage. I brought the video home to show Joe, and he loved it. We showed a bunch of our friends, they thought it was hilarious and it just kind of took off from there.

Prueher: It’s a gallery of odd behavior, and there’s certainly a voyeuristic element to it. There’s something uncomfortably funny about it. And maybe some catharsis there as well—like if you had to actually watch that McDonald’s video as an employee, and now you’re in public laughing at it with everyone else.

Indy: What do you think these clips say about U.S. culture? Prueher: The biggest question to us is, why did these people commit all this to tape? One thing we find in common in these videos is people with ton of ambition, but not a lot of talent or skill. There’s maybe something uniquely American about that—it’s so strange and wonderful.

Indy: Speaking of uncomfortable, in the trailer for the tour there’s a clip of a large man, clad only in a starspangled Speedo, dancing strangely in front of a semicircle of clearly bewildered elderly folks. What the hell is that about? Prueher: One of our favorites. We came across this tape from a California public-access TV station, and it’s so bizarre we just had to find the story. We hired a private detective to track this guy down, and when we found him he said, sure, we could come down and interview him, as long as we asked serious questions and would meet him at a specific beach in Santa Monica where he found his inspiration. He showed up in his swimsuit, and when we asked what the whole thing was about—was it performance art? A character sketch?—he got offended. We play that whole confusing interview at the show.

Indy: Why do you think people find this stuff so funny?

Indy: Do you ever get horribly depressed watching this stuff? It’s not exactly humanity at its best.

[18] Missoula Independent • November 29 – December 6, 2012

Prueher: You can get depressed at some of it. A lot of it is people trying to cash in on trends, creating problems that don’t really exist. But ultimately it’s so ridiculous that you have to laugh at it, you can’t take it too seriously. Our reaction is not to deride it from above but to celebrate it. We all have VHS skeletons in our closet. Indy: The advent of web and camera phones has resulted in a massive explosion of self-media, exponentially greater than in the VHS era. What will that mean for future curators of this culture? Prueher: Maybe we are just stubbornly old school, but we don’t find the same charm in internet videos or webcam clips as we do in physical media. But I bet in 10 or maybe even as little as five years from now those internet-age things will seem as antiquated as VHS tapes do now. And maybe then there will be two smartasses who’ll be rescuing hard drives of data and serving those up for audiences. And to those guys, I’d say, “We thought of it first.” The Found Footage Festival featuring Nick Prueher and Joe Pickett shows at the Wilma Theatre Sat., Dec. 1, at 8 PM. Doors open at 7 PM. $10. arts@missoulanews.com


[music]

Property Visits

Grim rippers O’Death doesn’t get you down For more than a decade, Brooklyn’s O’Death has been touring with its otherworldly brand of folk punk, aside from a hiatus around 2009 while drummer David Rogers-Berry fought off cancer and had an arm bone replaced with a prosthetic, in a turn of fate that’s creepily ironic for a band that’s made its name with such a gothic vibe. Getting cancer wasn’t ironic for Rogers-Berry, of course, and he’s said in interviews that his brush with death made him more contemplative of mortality and, in the practical side, encouraged him to use a more focused, considerate style of drumming. Since Rogers-Berry’s recovery and the band’s latest album—the understated, sad and beautiful Outside, released in 2011—O’Death has toured hard enough to mark occasional stops in Missoula, which is quite a feat given the distance between Montana and New York. Then again, maybe not, because O’Death’s contemporary bluegrass is very suited to a Montana audience. For a band with such somber-themed tunes,

Property valuation staff may be visiting your property during the upcoming tax year to conduct an on-site review for property tax purposes. You or your agent may want to be present. For an appointment or further information, contact the local Department of Revenue office.

O’Death generally knows how to get a crowd dancing around old-timey-like. It’s hard not to boogie a little to such fast, virtuosic playing. O’Death can be grim with its albums and imagery, but the band members seem intent on joyfully living life. (Kate Whittle) O’Death opens for World/Inferno Friendship Society at the Badlander Tue., Dec. 4, at 9 PM. $12, advance tickets available at Ear Candy.

Cave Singers: No Witch I read a joke somewhere on Twitter that the prominent indie rock acts these days, like Bon Iver, are so mellow they’re hardly rock at all. “We must get our young people back on trucker speed,” it said. It’s true that many of the big acts now—The National, The Shins, Blind Pilot—make music more suitable for winding down at bedtime than buttrocking. I agree, to a point. (Drugs are bad, kids.) But it’s nice to have tunes to play while at home chilling out with a book. The Cave Singers’ most recent album, No Witch, released in February 2011 on Jagjaguwar records, is a pretty, well-crafted, rich rock album that’s complex enough to play again and again. The Seattle group was formed in 2007 from the

ashes of the beloved Pretty Girls Make Graves. Its third release moves effortlessly between varied influences, from the bluesy guitars and Hammond organ on “Black Leaf ” to the bongo drums and eastern sitar-style melodies on “Outer Realms.” Lead singer Pete Quirk’s slightly raspy voice accompanies but doesn’t dominate the album. Songs sometimes build into more driving, toe-tapping anthems, like on “All Land Crabs and Divinity Ghosts” and “No Prosecution if We Bail,” making me hopeful they can have it both ways and make enjoyable bedtime music but also crank it up and party live. (Kate Whittle) The Cave Singers and Poor Moon play the Badlander Sat., Dec. 1, at 9 PM. $12, 21+, advance tickets at stonefly-productions.com.

Pearl Jam: Instant Classic Missoula Bootleg It wouldn’t have taken a lifelong Ten Club member to recognize that Pearl Jam’s Sept. 30 Missoula concert would be special. It marked the band’s only non-festival stateside appearance of the year, and Mudhoney was set to open. It sold out in less than 15 minutes. Seats on the secondary market sold for four figures. Then there was the backdrop of the nation’s most contentious U.S. Senate race, and the fact that this show acted as a fundraiser for incumbent Jon Tester. Forget local buzz—national media covered the thing as a major happening. It was a no-brainer, then, for Pearl Jam to present the show as the first of its “Instant Classic” bootleg se-

ries. A discounted download of all 31 tracks went on sale on Election Day with proceeds benefiting Missoula’s own Poverello Center, and remains on sale now for just $9.99. The bootleg, like reports of the show itself, lives up to the hype. Audience-only vocals on hits like “Better Man” and “Elderly Woman...”? Check. Long Eddie Vedder stories, including one about almost autographing a penis? Yep. A cover of MC5’s “Kick Out the Jams” with members of Mudhoney? You bet. In fact, that track may be the highlight of a highlight-filled night. As Vedder says before the song starts, “This is going to make a pretty good bootleg.” (Skylar Browning )

Kendrick Lamar: good kid, m.A.A.d city The best-reviewed albums are not generally the ones that become our favorites. Few year-end lists feature the best album to clean your apartment to, for example, or the album that you absolutely must take on the plane. To correct this injustice, I nominate Kendrick Lamar’s good kid, m.A.A.d city as best album for driving around Los Angeles on Sunday afternoon. That we are a thousand miles away from L.A. makes no difference; Kendrick will take you there. Yes, his rhymes are wordy, and his style harks back to Outkast and Bone Thugs—groups that fit into the

history of rap the way manatees fit into the evolution of the shark. It is also 90 minutes long, and much of that is skits. But tracks like “Money Trees” are irresistible head-bobbers, and the whole baroque mess coheres in a way that few contemporary hip-hop albums do. Kendrick is a smooth rapper with an ironically lush persona, as if R. Kelly had Snoop’s career, and the Compton he describes is real and fantastical by turns. It’s a fine place to spend an hour and a half, and he keeps it vivid in a way that transcends keeping it real. (Dan Brooks)

missoulanews.com • November 29 – December 6, 2012 [19]


[art]

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[20] Missoula Independent • November 29 – December 6, 2012

Yet, in the minds and hearts of the typical urban It’s hard for Americans living in the 21st century to appreciate the radical content of French impres- worker and artist, there was still an élan for the counsionist art. We typically associate this 19th century tryside and village. Monet and his friends ultimately fled the frenzy of movement with abstract daubs of color coalescing into demure images of dames strolling with parasols modern urban life for the Normandy coast and sought on windswept dunes, grain stacks and Gothic church refuge in villages like Sainte Addresse, Argenteuil, Troufacades in evening light, and water lilies floating in ville and, of course, Giverny. In his celebrated studio and gardens at Giverny, Monet found both the solitude Japanese-style gardens. Long before their luminous painterly style be- and subjects he sought for his paintings. Those imprescame the most beloved art movement of the western sionist scenes of leisurely life on the shore and in the world, the impressionists were marginalized artists garden, so vividly represented in the two exhibitions living and working at the edge of society, identifying at MMAC, were the escapist fantasies of people exwith the poor and the dispossessed. Social tension hausted by the pace of modern life. Ironically, those lies just below the sursame rural images were face of the paintings in extremely popular in the the exhibition Labor and cities. People loved seeLeisure: Impressionist ing their countryside in and Realist Masterpieces paintings. Wealthy urban from a Private Colleccollectors, who did not tion currently on view at exactly identify with the the Montana Museum of poor, still found it easy Art and Culture. to romanticize the life of The context for these the peasant. They loved paintings and the art the paintings of Jules works in the sister show Breton or prints by JeanImpressionism: MasterFrancois Millet. The pieces on Paper are two working poor, weavers, kinds of revolutions. The flax pickers and gleaners first were the political revof Michelangelesque olutions that swept proportions became the France in the 19th century, heroes of this art, no endless pendulum swings matter how destitute, between monarchists on desperate or tragic their the far right and democPhoto courtesy of Kaz Tsuruta actual lives were. rats on the left. The When the aristobloody battles between Jules Breton-Cribleuse de Colza cratic Eduard Degas royalists and republicans Peasant Woman Sifting Rapeseed painted child ballerinas for control of the government often left nothing more than dead bodies strewn or Henri Toulouse-Lautrec sketched sweating dancers on cobblestone barricades and the smell of gun pow- in the garish lights of Parisian dance halls, they were der hanging in the Parisian air. The impressionists were indeed “slumming” with people in the lowest echeborn into a society in political upheaval, long periods lons of society. Degas’ ballerinas now decorate many of brutal dictatorship punctuated by often violent out- an American adolescent’s bedroom. In their day, however, they were not far from prostitutes. These bursts of democratic fervor. An even greater social revolution was also taking women, whose hard lives were so faithfully recorded place as people left their farms for the city. Poor, by these artists, inhabited the demi-monde of the landless peasants looking for work came to Paris and beer hall, circus and hippodrome. In that decadent other large cities by the thousands. This was the age light, the classes mingled and violated all forms of soof the industrial revolution and the old cities became cial propriety. overcrowded, horrible places, not unlike Charles The two exhibitions at MMAC only hint at this Dickens’ London. Urbanization led to higher literacy world, but its modern pulse can certainly be felt. The rates, the clamor for democratic and economic tensions between urban and rural life, romanticism and rights, and a heightened awareness among European realism, and labor and leisure that characterized that industrial workers that looked like a proto-Occupy rapidly changing society are just below the surface. movement. Check out Dr. Gloria Groom’s lecture The Starting in the middle of the century, artists School of Nature in French Art: Realism to Imbegan documenting and commenting on those pro- pressionism at the Montana Theatre Mon., Dec. found changes. They painted the bustling city and 3, at 8 PM. The Labor and Leisure reception at new bourgeois patrons lined up to buy the works. the PARTV Center lobby is Thu., Dec. 6, from 4 For the early impressionists, the city was not just their to 6 PM. Free. métier; it was also their favorite subject. Claude Monet’s images of smoke-filled train stations or H. Rafael Chacón is a professor of art history crowded pedestrian bridges mirrored the utopian and criticism in the School of Art at The University vigor of the industrial age. of Montana.


[books]

Writing for love UM graduate makes her way in romance by Kate Whittle

Veronica slumped in her desk and looked at the clock. It was past midnight and she still had a feature article to copy edit. She dropped her red pen and massaged her fingers. She heard the unmistakable crack of a beer can opening across the room. Ugh. Johnny, the devil-may-care photo editor, never cared about office decorum. Here he was now, with that impish grin on his face. “You working late too, dollface?” he asked. Harder than you, she thought. You’re all image, no substance. You don’t have to care about proper semicolon usage or spelling out one through nine. Johnny picked up her pen and put it between his lips like a cigarette, flicking the cap with his tongue. As if reading her thoughts, he said, “I know you don’t think much of me, but baby, I can teach you the inverted pyramid like you’ve never seen before.” …Oh. Hey. Don’t mind me, I’m just taking a stab at my original romance genre, “AP-style copy editor erotica.” I’m following the advice of Missoula-area romance novelist Danica Winters, who says finding your niche is an important part of becoming a successful genre writer. Winters would know: she’s been writing paranormal romance for a few years, with published titles like Curse of the Wolf and The Nymph’s Labyrinth, and can boast about making Amazon’s bestseller lists. Haters can hate, but the romance novel industry—and it is an industry, with about $1.4 billion in sales in 2011—provides fun and escape for many readers, mostly women, while paying the bills for many authors, mostly women. Yes, romance novels are easy to make fun of, especially because our society loves to deride stuff that’s for chicks. So let’s dispense with the mockery, because romance authors face the same difficulty as everyone in a media-related job: The internet has maximized our ability to create and share information, while devaluing creative work and imploding our paychecks. Winters says a book she released in May has already been pirated online at least 20,000 times, mostly by foreign websites. Winters estimates she spends perhaps four hours writing for every five hours spent on marketing every day, which includes a promotions job for a publisher. To maintain a foothold on a loyal readership, Winters keeps a presence on several sites, including Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and her blog. Her efforts pay off, according to the Romance Writers Association: Liking a particular au-

thor is the biggest reason romance readers buy a book. The amount of exposure also has a drawback. Winters won’t reveal her real name for the Indy because of all the men who stalk her online and send her creepy emails. At least she’s good humored about it. “My husband just thinks it’s funny,” she says. Winters is sore, though, about some of the misperceptions of romance novelists. Her work might be erotic, but it’s not porn. “And I have never been on a stripper pole in my life,” she says. She’s also met with dismissal from the literary side of the Missoula writing scene. And let us not discuss 50 Shades of Grey. Despite the drawbacks, Winters loves romance writing. After graduating from the University of Montana in 2005 with a bachelor’s in anthropology, she wanted to find a line of work that would let her stay in the area and raise her kids, currently a preschooler and a kindergartner. A lifelong romance reader, Winters studied how-to books like Writing a Romance Novel for Dummies and kept sending in manuscripts until a publisher accepted in 2011. She heartily encourages anyone who wants to get into the business to give it a shot. She’s treasurer of Montana Romance Writers, which recently became a chapter of the national RWA. The organizations coach aspiring writers and connect them with agents and publishers. Winters also enjoys meeting with other local authors for a club where they drink wine and read rough drafts to each other (though Winters says she’s too embarrassed to read the “hoo-de-hoo” parts out loud). Romance welcomes a staggering breadth of sub genres, from African American lesbian vampire tales to steampunk gold mining dramas. Winters remembers attending one conference where a male homoerotic author sat next to a Christian-inspirational novelist. The one thing all romance has in common, of course, is that eventually two characters fall in love. “And that’s the way it will always be,” Winters says. In an uncertain world, where just about everybody is nervous about how they’ll continue to make a living, we can rest assured that at least love will conquer all. In stories, anyway. Danica Winters signs at Fact and Fiction Sat., Dec. 1 from 12 to 1:30 PM, along with Rionna Morgan, Casey Dawes and Pam Morris. Free.

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missoulanews.com • November 29 – December 6, 2012 [21]


[film]

Found at sea Ang Lee pulls off the impossible in Life of Pi by Molly Laich

What we have here is a commercial film with an Indian protagonist that takes very seriously the subject of spirituality, vegetarianism, the meaning of life and whether or not animals have souls. Thanksgiving weekend draws tons of families to theaters, and the marketing for Life of Pi doesn’t reveal much. The audience won’t learn until they’ve already bought their tickets and are trapped in a dark theater that the protagonist identifies as Catholic, Muslim and Hindu out of a voracious love of God. I wonder how many traditional Christians will leave the theater feeling confused and angry about what they’ve seen without knowing why. Pi Patel is a little boy growing up in India with his father, mother and older brother. They own a zoo, but

of the story takes place in Pi’s brain. How do you film a religious moment of surrender, for example? 2) The costars are mostly wild animals. I am happy to report that director Ang Lee made it work. The film does suffer a little from the CGI curse—lately, supposedly “live action” movies tend to look cartoonish and overly polished—but the result is bizarre and surreal, and overall, it works. There’s a hyper reality to the animals, confounded by the 3D, but we’re not watching a documentary. There’s a time and a place for gritty realism, and this film is not that. Lee is one of the weirder and more accomplished directors we have. This is the guy whose work includes Brokeback Mountain, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon

How not to use a knife.

times are tough, and when Pi is a young adult, his father decides to sell the zoo and move his family to Canada. Pi says goodbye to his girlfriend and sets out on an ocean voyage with a crew of belligerent white people and a few precious animals. But the ship sinks, and Pi is sent adrift on a lifeboat with a ragtag collection of nonhuman stowaways, the most formidable among them being a large Bengal tiger named Richard Parker. There’s not much more to the plot than that. Pi is out to sea for days, weeks, months. We know he makes it to Canada eventually, because the story is told to us in a flashback. What happens between the shipwreck and his eventual brush with land is less a series of events than it is an emotional and visual experience. Life of Pi is based on the 2001 novel by Yann Partel. I read the book years ago based on a friend’s recommendation, which is how most everyone comes to this book. I don’t know anyone who’s read it that wasn’t affected one way or another. It has long been referred to as an “unfilmable” novel, probably because 1) So much

[22] Missoula Independent • November 29 – December 6, 2012

and The Ice Storm. What these movies have in common is a tremendous depth and feeling, and interestingly enough, they’re all adaptations of novels or short stories. Life of Pi is an ambitious, sweet film, but more than that, it’s substantive and brave. Fans of the book will be heartened to learn that the film hasn’t shied away from the novel’s darker moments. I wondered how it was going to handle the book’s complicated and ambiguous ending. Without giving too much away, I’ll say that it does so with simplicity and grace; I’m still not sure what’s real and what isn’t. It’s worth noting that the movie opened fifth at the box office over the holiday weekend and made a dismal $22 million, stateside. For comparison, the new Twilight movie made twice that. I can’t say that I’m surprised by Life of Pi’s initial tally. But maybe, like the book, the movie will find the audience it deserves based on word of mouth. arts@missoulanews.com


[film]

OPENING THIS WEEK THE COLLECTION What if you escaped from the gnarliest serial killer of all-time only to be lured back into his booby trapped lair in order to save an innocent little girl? What if. Starring Josh Stewart, Emma Fitzpatrick and Christopher McDonald. Rated R. Village 6. KILLING THEM SOFTLY A trio of rubes rip off the area’s biggest, most disreputable gangsters during a card game. Somebody has to pay. With their life. Not with money. Starring Brad Pitt, Ray Liotta and Richard Jenkins. Rated R. Carmike 12 and Wilma.

NOW PLAYING FLIGHT A pilot saves an airliner from crashing, but something more sinister seems to be stinking up the joint. Say it ain’t so, Denzel! Directed by Robert Zemeckis. Starring Nadine Velazquez, Denzel Washington and Carter Cabassa. Rated R. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex and Entertainer. LIFE OF PI Disaster at sea. A boy befriends a Bengal tiger. Adventure abounds. Epic journey. Epic discoveries. Life, man, life! Directed by Ang Lee. Starring Suraj Sharma, Irrfan Khan and Adil Hussain. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Village 6 and Pharaohplex. LINCOLN Steven Spielberg directs Daniel Day-Lewis in this biopic about the United States’ greatest president as he struggles with the war, emancipation of the slaves, his cabinet and his family. Starring Daniel Day-Lewis, Sally Field and David Strathairn. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12. RED DAWN The 1984 version of this film was the first to be rated PG-13. This version is PG-13, too. The resemblance doesn’t end there. Yeah, so some high school kids in Washington state defend their homeland from North Korean paratroopers. What? Cuba was too busy? Starring Chris Hemsworth, Isabel Lucas and Josh Hutcherson. Carmike 12, Village 6 and Pharaohplex.

Nihilism never looked so good. Killing Them Softly opens Friday at the Carmike 12 and Wilma.

RISE OF THE GUARDIANS After the evil little twit Pitch tries to destroy the hopes and dreams of the world’s children, the Immortal Guardians get in cahoots to take him on. Nobody messes with the Easter Bunny, not now, not ever. Starring the voices of Hugh Jackman, Alec Baldwin and Isla Fisher. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex and Showboat. THE SESSIONS Based on the autobiographical writings of poet and journalist Mark O’Brien, this story follows the life of a 38-year-old man trying to lose his virginity with the help of his priest and a sex surrogate, all while confined to an iron lung. Starring John Hawkes, Helen Hunt and William H. Macy. Rated R. Wilma. SKYFALL Bond is back and this time MI6 is under attack. Looks like Great Britain’s best operative may have to take down one of his own in order to save the world. Starring Daniel Craig, Javier Bardem and Dame Judi Dench. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Village 6 and Pharaohplex. THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN - PART 2 In the conclusion of the series, dawn rebreaks again and the child born of human woman and vampire is under attack from the evil Voltouri. Starring Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson and Taylor Lautner. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex and Showboat. WRECK-IT RALPH Certain to appeal to folks of a certain age and their children, this animated film tells the story of a video game character seeking to be something more, all the while reeking havoc on the entire arcade where he dwells. Starring the voices of John C. Reilly, Jack McBrayer and Jane Lynch. Rated PG. Carmike 12.

Capsule reviews by Jason McMackin. Moviegoers be warned! For show times please visit missoulanews.com, contact the theaters telephonically or check theater websites in order to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 and Village 6 at 541-7469; Wilma at 728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603.

missoulanews.com • November 29 – December 6, 2012 [23]


[dish]

Great Food No Attitude.

Mon-Fri

7am - 4pm (Breakfast ‘til Noon)

Sat & Sun 8am - 4pm

531 S. Higgins

541-4622

(Breakfast all day)

Photo by Ari LeVaux

Good riddance, Hostess

SATURDAYS 4PM-9PM

MONDAYS & THURSDAYS ALL DAY

$1

SUSHI Not available for To-Go orders

2101 Brooks • 926-2578 • www.cafezydeco.com Tues - Sat 11am-8pm • Sun 9am-3pm • Mon 11am-3pm (Beignets available 9am-11am Sat and Sun 9am-3pm)

[24] Missoula Independent • November 29 – December 6, 2012

by Ari LeVaux As we all know, Hostess is in bankruptcy. A lot of people are really upset about the loss of certain iconic brands of crappy baked goods filled with fake whipped cream. Not me. The gas station chocolate muffin is all I need. I call them gas station muffins because I most often encounter them on the way to the bathroom after filling my tank. I eat them religiously, washed down with coffee, to help keep me awake during long drives, and they haven’t let me down yet. But gas stations aren’t the only place you’ll find gas station muffins. You can find them just about anywhere junk food is sold. Unlike the Hostess CupCake, the gas station chocolate muffin is not affiliated with any one company. In fact, it’s often the only thing for sale at the gas station that’s unique. While candy, drink, chip or other snack brands remain the same from place to place, it seems that each chocolate muffin maker is different, as if each town has its own chocolate-muffin bakery, or there is some extensive network of storebrand chocolate cupcake distributors that operates below my radar. Whatever the true structure of the chocolate muffin cosmos, at least it contains a shred of truth-in-advertising. My ongoing side-by-side trials suggest that gas station chocolate muffins billed as “double chocolate” do indeed contain more chocolate than muffins called “chocolate” or even “chocolate chocolate.” A recent survey of gas station muffins within a two-mile radius of my house turned up three different brands: Deli Fresh and Brownie Bakers both make “double chocolate” muffins, and Bon Appetit makes a “chocolate chocolate muffin,” which literally pales in comparison to the other two, looking more like “pumpkin pumpkin” and tasting like blueberry coffee cake with added chocolate. What we’re looking for, in addition to a deep ebony color, are the characteristics that one would expect to accompany that color—namely deep nothingbut-chocolate flavor with chocolate chunks. The ideal muffin’s density and concentration of chunks add up to a formidable snack commensurate with the largest cup of cheap coffee the gas station has to offer. Being a muffin, not a cupcake, the gas station chocolate muffin is devoid of frosting, but the better examples come with an artfully soggy cap, the consis-

FLASH IN THE PAN

tency of which mimics frosting. Beneath that gooey cap, the interior should be relatively solid and dry, yet somehow remain moist and supple. This is achieved with the help of a long list of unpronounceable ingredients. Sugar, being the most recognizable of these, might be the muffin’s healthiest ingredient, too. I like to accompany my gas station chocolate muffins with black coffee, even though I normally take cream and sugar. The muffin, masticated with sipped coffee into a homogeneous slurry, becomes the ideal combination of flavor and buzz that will last until your car’s gas tank is empty again. With these chocolate muffins so readily available, there’s no need to mourn the Hostess CupCake. The gas station variety may not have frosting or CoolWhip-like filling, but it’s bigger, beefier and better. And hopefully it has chocolate chips. You can mourn the demise of the Twinkie, if you must, in that no similar substitute is widely available. I’ve never understood what was appealing about Twinkies, so I won’t be missing them. But if ever there were a junk pastry whose loss is truly worth mourning, that would be the personal-size pecan pies that have quietly all but disappeared from our nation’s gas stations and convenience stores. Like gas station chocolate muffins, these pecan pies came in a variety of brands, though Bama was the dominant player in the market. Alas, in recent years supplies of personal pecan pies have mostly dried up. No more solid disk of corn syrup-cradled flaky crust that had shattered long before you opened it. The crushed pecans that give pecan pie its character have become so expensive that Bama has downsized its distribution of personal pecan pies to the company’s core geographic regions: Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas. If you’re gassing up outside of those states, you’re going to have to stick with chocolate muffins. And that’s probably for the best. While those pies disappeared in two or three bites, gas station chocolate muffins are built to satisfy the most intense bouts of munchies. Hostess will be missed for nostalgic reasons, not because it offered anything of true value. And now that it’s out of the way—and with the worthy personal pecan pie tragically following it toward oblivion—perhaps the humble, anonymous gas station chocolate muffin will finally get the attention and respect it deserves.


[dish] Alcan Bar and Grill 16780 Beckwith St. Frenchtown • 626-9930 Tantalize your taste buds with Angus beef burgers, chicken strips, shrimp, and biscuits and gravy from Alcan Bar & Grill. With more than 20 years of experience and 10 years in the business, we have been offering fresh meals and beverages at the area's most competitive prices. Our friendly professionals offer personalized service and make sure you leave our restaurant as one of our friends. We offer have a variety of specials for ladies night and sports events featuring drink specials and free food. Contact us today and enjoy our incredible menu selection. 9 am – 2 am Mon-Sun. Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway (across from courthouse) • 728-8900 Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 It's the little things we do together. Bernice's takes those moments to heart. This Christmas when you want "just the right size" gift or party package think Bernice's cookie plates, frosted Christmas trees (Yep! Those famous sugar cookies), packaged Bernice's Hot Cocoa, a Joyous Kringle, Mini Macaroons, Gingerbread Coffeecake, Loaves of Poundcake, and so much more! Have you checked out Bernice's wear-ables lately? Downright Smart. Coffee mugs? Oh, yeah. Bernice's wishes you a Merry Little Christmas. bernicesbakerymt.com Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Monday – Friday, 7:30 – 2. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 40 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Cafe Zydeco 2101 Brooks • 406-926-2578 Authentic cajun cuisine, with an upbeat zydeco atmosphere in the heart of Missoula. Accomodates indoor and outdoor seating. Breakfast served all day. Featuring Crawfish omlettes, beignets, and cafe au lait. Open Monday 11am-3pm, Tuesday-Saturday 11am-8pm, and Sunday 9am-3pm (Beignets available Saturday 11am-2pm, and All Day Sunday) Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 • ciaomambo.com The vibrant energy at Ciao Mambo is fantastically accompanied by steaming hot pizzas, delicious assortments of pastas and of course authentic Italian wine. We focus on making sure that whether it be date night, family night, or business dinners we accommodate whatever the need! And do not forget there are always leftovers! Open 5 to close every day, come make us your go to dinner destination! $-$$

$…Under $5

Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks • 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm Sun-Wed and 11am-10pm Thurs-Sat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc's is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you're heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc's is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items.

Educate your taste buds! www.thinkfft.com Mon-Thurs 7am - 8pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 *When school is not in session, we often close at 3pm Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. • 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and gluten-free options. Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! (Happy Hour 3-6 PM MonSat. 2 Empanadas for $7) Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. 11am-8pm Monday-Saturday. Downtown Missoula. $ $

Times Run 11/30 - 12/6

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. • 721-6033 Missoula's Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. M-TH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am4pm, Sat 8am-4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$

Killing Them Softly (R) Nightly at 7 & 9 Sat matinee at 1 & 3

The Sessions

Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St • 549-7723 www.grizzlyliquor.com Missoula's Tailgate Headquarters! We carry all of the spirits & accessories to make your tailgate party a success! Largest selection of spirits in Montana, including locally made whiskey, vodka, gin, rum and wine. We're located downtown with free customer parking. Grizzly Liquor was voted Missoula's #1 Liquor Store! Open M-F 9-6:30, Sat 9-6. $-$$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula's best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. 532-2056 No time to bake? Let Brooks and Browns do it for you! Cookie platters, mouthwatering truffles and freshly baked pies are just a phone call away. We’ve got your work parties and family get- togethers covered! It’s also not too early to reserve your Christmas rolls and pies! Call Brooks and Browns at 721-8500 today! Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula.

Beer & Wine AVAILABLE

Nighly at 7 and 9 Will NOT show Saturday Evening Saturday matinee at 1 and 3

131 S. Higgins Ave.

www.thewilma.com

406-728-2521

Downtown Missoula

d o w n t o w n

Sushi Bar & Japanese Bistro

BEST HAPPY HOURS IN TOWN ARE BACK Now, on Thursdays and Saturdays, join us from 7-9 PM for $2.50 Sake Bombs and Half Price Appetizers Join us for Monday $1 night and try our expanded Sushi menu!

403 North Higgins Ave • 406.549.7979 www.sushihanamissoula.com

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Iza 529 S. Higgins • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Contemporary Asian cuisine featuring local, vegan, gluten free and organic options as well as wild caught seafood, Idaho trout and buffalo. Join us for lunch and dinner. Happy Hour 3-6 weekdays with specials on food and drink. Extensive sake, wine and tea menu. Closed Sundays. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over

missoulanews.com • November 29 – December 6, 2012 [25]


[dish]

Blackfoot’s Single Malt IPA HAPPIEST HOUR About the beer: Helenabased Blackfoot River Brewing Company’s IPA is made with two different types of hops. This combination of Simcoe and Cascade hops makes for a delightfully bitter brew that, we think, tastes best when savored from atop a barstool in the back of Charlie B’s. Blackfoot Brewing Company coowner Brian Smith says that we’re not alone. “Charlie’s is probably our best IPA account in the state.”

tavern owner Charlie Baumgartner, as is his periodic custom, buys a round of drinks, including at least one Blackfoot IPA, for a crew of 30-somethings sitting in the back. What you’re eating: Red beans and rice from the Dinosaur Cafe. It’s perfect to soak up the IPA, which, at 6.8 percent alcohol by volume, carries a punch.

How to find it: Blackfoot’s Single Malt IPA is sold in roughly 25 Missoula-area bars Why we’re here: We love and restaurants, including the spending the holidays at CharPhoto courtesy of Rhino, Al’s & Vic’s, James Bar, lie’s. On Christmas and ThanksBlackfoot River Brewing Co. Silk Road and, during ski seagiving, the iconic watering hole fills with misfits of all ages—people who are in- son, Montana Snowbowl. You can drink a pint clined to eschew the traditional trappings of or a pitcher at Charlie’s at 428 N. Higgins Ave.— family celebrations and instead get a little drunk or as regulars like to say, at the corner of space and time. with friends and neighbors. —Jessica Mayrer Who we’re drinking with: On the Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana Wednesday evening before Thanksgiving, it’s old timers in blue jeans who sit in the front of the watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender bar talking amongst themselves. A younger o r b e v e r a g e f o r H a p p i e s t H o u r , e m a i l crowd files in as the night wears on. At one point editor@missoulanews.com.

11:30-3pm Happy Hour 3-6pm Dinner 5pm-close. Sat: Dinner 5pm-close $-$$ $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Jimmy John’s 420 N. Higgins • 542-1100 jimmyjohns.com Jimmy John’s - America’s Favorite Sandwich Delivery Guys! Unlike any other sub shop, Jimmy John’s is all about the freshest ingredients and fastest service. Freaky Fast, Freaky Good - that’s Jimmy John’s. Order online, call for delivery or visit us on Higgins. $-$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West • 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ The Mercantile Deli 119 S. Higgins Ave. • 721-6372 themercantiledeli.com Located next to the historic Wilma Theater, the Merc features a relaxed atmosphere, handcrafted Paninis, Sandwiches, and wholesome Soups and Salads. Try a Monte Cristo for breakfast, a Pork Love Panini for lunch, or have us cater your next company event. Open Monday – Saturday for breakfast and lunch. Downtown delivery available. $-$$ The Mustard Seed Asian Café Southgate Mall • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our nonsmoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, micro brews, fine wines & signature drinks. Gluten free menu, also. Takeout & delivery available. $$$$$ Pearl Cafe 231 East Front St. 541-0231 pearlcafe.us Serving country French specialties, Montana elk, Berkshire Pork, and delicious seafood dishes. Delectable salads and appetizers, as well as breads and desserts baked in-house. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Philly West 134 W. Broadway 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday - Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. Pita Pit 130 N. Higgins 541-PITA (7482) pitapitusa.com Fresh Thinking Healthy Eating. Enjoy a pita rolled just for you. Hot meat and cool fresh veggies topped with your favorite sauce. Try our Chicken Caesar, Gyro, Philly Steak, Breakfast Pita, or Vegetarian Falafel to name just a few. For your convenience we are open until 3am 7 nights a week. Call if you need us to deliver! Sapore 424 N. Higgins Ave. 542-6695 Voted best new restaurant in the Missoula Independent's Best of Missoula, 2011. Located on Higgins Ave., across the street from Wordens. Serving progressive American food consisting of fresh house-made pastas every day, pizza, local beef, and fresh fish delivered from Taste of Alaska. New specials: burger & beer Sundays, 5-7 $9 ~ pizza & beer Tuesdays, 5-7 $10 ~ draft beers, Tuesday -Thursday, 5-6:30 $3. Business hours: Tues.- Sat. 5-10:30 pm., Sat. 10-3 pm., Sun. 5-10 pm.

[26] Missoula Independent • November 29 – December 6, 2012

Sean Kelly’s A Public House 130 W. Pine St. 542-1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for lunch & dinner. Featuring brunch Saturday & Sunday from 11-2pm. Serving international & Irish pub fare. Full bar, beer, wine, martinis. $-$$ Silvertip Casino 680 SW Higgins 728-5643 The Silvertip Casino is Missoula’s premiere casino offering 20 Video gaming machines, best live poker in Missoula, full beverage liquor, 11 flat screen tv’s and great food at great prices. Breakfast Specials starting at $2.99 (7-11am) For a complete menu, go to www.silvertipcasino.com. Open 24/7. $-$$ Sis's Kitchen 531-5034 sisskitchen.com Wheat, Gluten & Allergen Free Foods. Frozen & Dry Mix Products. Sis's Kitchen plays a part in Best of Missoula "Best Pizza" Winner's for 2008-2012. Find our products at: The Good Food Store • Biga Pizza • Bridge Pizza • Pizza Cafe in Ronan (12"crust). $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI We have quick and delicious lunch specials 6 days a week starting at $7, and are open for dinner 7 nights a week. Try our comfort food items like Pork Katsu and Chicken Teriyaki. We also offer party platters to go and catering for all culinary styles. Lunch 11:30-3 Mon-Sat. Dinner 5-9:30 Every Night. Corner of Pine and Higgins. Very Family Friendly. 549-7979. $$-$$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins 327-8929 Stop in when you're in the neighborhood. We'll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula's best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 1110 Sun 12-9. Taco John’s 623 W Broadway 2600 S Reserve West-Mex® is about fresh taste and BOLD flavors. Taco John’s recipes make you smile and yell “OLÉ”. We combine hearty helpings of seasoned meats, crispy Potato Olés®, and flavorful cheeses with fresh-made Mexican specialties like burritos, tacos, and quesadillas. All topped off with bold sauces, spices and salsas. You’ll find West-Mex® cooking makes for an unbeatably satisfying meal. See you soon ... Amigo :) $-$$ Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 tacosano.net Once you find us you'll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. Tamarack Brewing Company 231 W. Front Street 406-830-3113 facebook.com/tamarackmissoula Tamarack Brewing Company opened its first Taphouse in Missoula in 2011. Overlooking Caras Park, Tamarack Missoula has two floors -- a sports pub downstairs, and casual dining upstairs. Patrons can find Tamarack’s handcrafted ales and great pub fare on both levels. Enjoy beer-inspired menu items like brew bread wraps, Hat Trick Hop IPA Fish and Chips, and Dock Days Hefeweizen Caesar Salads. Try one of our staple ales like Hat Trick Hop IPA or Yard Sale Amber Ale, or one of our rotating seasonal beers, like, Old 'Stache Whiskey Barrel Porter, Headwall Double IPA, Stoner Kriek and more. Don’t miss $8 growler fills on Wednesday and Sunday, Community Tap Night every Tuesday, Kids Eat Free Mondays, and more. See you at The ‘Rack! $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$


November 29-December 6, 2012

THURSDAYNOV.29 Step back man, it’s Rod Blackman, and he’s playing tunes for you all at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 5–8 PM. Free. The holidays are here and that means rad art stuff and handcrafted gnar-gnar is available at the University Center Holiday Art Fair on the UM Campus. 9 AM-6 PM. Free to gaze.

nightlife City Life Community Center Annual Auction takes place at the, uh City Life Community Center, 1515 Fairview Ave., and boasts goodies like autographed Griz basketballs, vacays and Harley-Davidson gear, plus hors d’oeuvres galore. Doors at 5:30 PM, auctioneering begins at 7:20 PM. Tickets are $100 per couple and include a $50 auction credit. Take a peek at the goods at citylifemt.com. Dress up that drab old apartment at the Holiday Wreath Workshop at the Fort Missoula Native Plant Garden Classroom. All materials needed to create a sweet wreath are available, plus there’s someone ready to help you out. $5. Registration required. Please call 327-0405. Erin and the Project trips out the patrons of Hamilton’s Bitter Root Brewery with “soul-ternative” music. 6–8:30 PM. Free. Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free. Get an earful of tuneful electric violin and bangin’ horns mixed up with a driving rhythm section when The Lionel Young Band does work at the Missoula Winery, 5646 Harrier Blvd. 6:30 PM. $12. The Invisible War is a film by Kirby Dick that uncovers the epidemic of rape in the U.S. military. It screens at the UC Theater. 7 PM. Free. (See Agenda.) This is Missoula, not L.A. Former Hollywood Undead front man Deuce performs rap-rock at the Palace, 147 W. Broadway Ave., on Sun., Dec. 2, at 9 PM. $15/$12 advance at Rockin Rudy’s.

The Dirty Corner Band plays rock and roll to dance and soak to at the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs. 7 PM. Free.

missoulanews.com • November 29 – December 6, 2012 [27]


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burning inside

Certain styles of music make listeners want to take a journey down a lost highway somewhere in America’s great wide open, with windows down and a passenger’s bare feet on the dash. The World/Inferno Friendship Society doesn’t do that for me exactly. Instead, the group creates a desire to hop in an old French Citroën with its smooth teardrop lines and cruise the cobblestones of Europe during the 1920s. A baguette should be riding shotgun alongside a wax paper bag filled with rank cheeses and WHAT: The World/Inferno Friendship Society, with O’Death and locals King Elephant and My Two Dads WHEN: Tue., Dec. 4, at 9 PM WHERE: Badlander, 208 Ryman St. HOW MUCH: $12. Tickets available at Ear Candy and Rockin Rudy’s.

fat purple grapes. Considering that the band is from Brooklyn, this may seem a curious reaction, but the signature style of the band is filled with notes that sound uncomfortable in contemporary pop music.

Zut Alors, Francophiles! It’s time for the Alliance Française de Missoula’s Soirée du Beaujolais, an evening of fine French wine, hors d’oeuvres and les bon moments. The Shack, 222 W. Main St. 7 PM. $15/$10 for members. Visit afmissoula.org. The UM School of Music and Composers Club present New Music Missoula, an evening of student compositions for diverse instruments and ensembles. Music Recital Hall. 7:30 PM. Free, with donations accepted to help fund our spring Composers’ Showcase.. Bluegrass bandits Special Consensus raise funds for the Lake

[28] Missoula Independent • November 29 – December 6, 2012

It’s not just the notes that forge a foreign sound, it’s the collection of instrumentation, too: baritone sax, tuba, clarinet, piano, accordian and bit of banjo complement the usual guitars and drums. Also, the diverse collection of musicians (sometimes numbering 30, but typically touring with seven to 10) come from varied worlds of loud music including Leftöver Crack, The Hold Steady, Star Fucking Hipsters and Nine Inch Nails. Undoubtedly, it’s the charismatic founder/ singer/leader of the group, Jack Terricloth, who makes the whole thing go. Terricloth’s performances are energetic and ethereal. It wouldn’t be a surprise to learn that he was born in 1899 and quit aging in 1929, only to live out eternity as a rock and roll singer. He wears dapper, well-cut suits. He engages the crowd as any punk vocalist might. His punk ethos shows itself even in the quieter tracks, where he sings about his past as well as author Phillip K. Dick, actor Peter Lorre and esoteric characters and historical topics. In 2012, the most punk rock thing to do might be to put on a suit and stop screaming, and instead whisper at the foundations until it all falls down. —Jason McMackin

County Youth Home when they acoustically melt off your face with them old-time tunes at the Ronan Performing Arts Center. 7:30 PM. $14/ 18 and under free. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 8–10 PM. During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, amazing musicians could play some great jams, just don’t tell your cousin Rapping Timmy about it. That guy’s version of “Santeria” is terrible. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up.

Show up the rest of the room with your version of “Ninja Survive” when you hit the Dark Horse for Combat Karaoke hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free. Don’t get twisted, sister, The Price plays that rock and roll for all them ladies and dudes at the Palace, with The Blox and Fine Lightning. 9 PM. $5. The Dead Hipster Dance Party is all kinds of sweaty, but ‘tis the droplets of the beautiful people. Get a taste in the place where love and funk is in the air (sometimes they are the same scent). Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight.


[calendar] Dancing? Work off the peanut brittle and Busch Light pounders at the Soul City Cowboys show at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St. 9:30 PM. Free. Russ Nasset done gone and cured ya of your tremors with a sweet shot of country hits up at the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., for a solo set this and every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free. It’s the final installment of the Magpies’ VFW residency. Tonight the long-legged and spaghetti-lovin’ trio is joined by Vera (Now with 100 percent more bass!) and Helena sexpots Tonight We Ride. 245 W. Main St. 10 PM. $2.

FRIDAYNOV.30 In The Littlest Angel, a mischievous child new to heaven brings a special gift to baby Jesus. Stevensville Playhouse. 319 Main St. 7:30 PM. $15/$10 advance for adults and $10/$8 for kids. Visit stevensvilleplayhouse.org. Get an eyeful of cheer and such at the Daly Mansion Holiday Tour. The place is spiffed up and the tours are by appointment only through Fri., Dec. 21 (excluding Fri., Dec. 14). Call 363-6004 ext. 4.

dence Series continues with author Victor LaValle reading some delicious words for fiction fans at the Dell Brown Room in Turner Hall. 7 PM. Free. Who gets to hold high the coveted Golden Grizzly trophy at the inaugural UM Entertainment Management Awards? Looks like you’ll have to buy a ticket and take a gander at some of the finalists down at Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St. 7:30 PM. VIP tickets are $50 and include a cocktail hour at 6 PM. Regular tickets for ages 18 and older are $15/$10 advance. To purchase tickets email the EMAs team at emas@business.umt.edu. Be a glam lamb and hear the words of Dr. Suess remanufactured into a musical made to make the audience enraptured. The Whitefish Theatre Co. performs Suessical at Whitefish Performing Arts Center, 1 Central Ave. 7:30 pm. $20/$18 seniors/$8 students. Visit whitefishtheatreco.org. Hear soaring vocals and the magic of harmonies at the UM Chamber Chorale concert. Music Recital Hall. 7:30 PM. $11. The Elbow Room, 1855 Stephens Ave., presents an Evening with Andre Floyd. Dude is playing acoustic versions of his jams for all you all. Time to get nice. 8–10 PM. Free.

The holidays are here and that means rad art stuff and handcrafted gnar-gnar is available at the University Center Holiday Art Fair on the UM Campus. 9 AM-6 PM. Free to gaze.

More events online: missoulanews.com

Victor LaValle, author of the spiff-ariffic short-story collection Slapboxing with Jesus gives a craft lecture called What the Hell is Going on? Structuring Your Story, in UM’s Stone Hall, Rm. 304. 12:10–1 PM. Free.

Bring a switch and give the cow a kiss, it’s time to kickstart the party with Ugly Pony at the Eagles in Missoula, 2420 South Ave. 8 PM. Free.

Practice being peaceful in a world of differences during the Intercultural Dialogue Group at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, where people from various backgrounds meet on the last Fri. of each month at 4:30 PM for an afternoon of conversation and peacemaking. Library of the Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call Betsy at 543-3955 or email peace@jrpc.org for more info.

Don’t be choosy hear some bluesy tunes by Three-Eared Dog while you get boozy and schmoozie with Kassie from accounting at Sean Kelly’s, 130 W. Pine St. 9 PM. Free.

nightlife Girls ages 9 to 18 learn to be powerful speakers during Express to Speak at The Girls Way, 1515 Wyoming St. Ste. 300, every Fri. from 5–6 PM. The first two visits are free. $5 for each subsequent class. Monthly memberships are available. Visit thegirlsway.org. El 3-Oh! sends you into a whirlwind of gypsy jazz at the Ten Spoon Winery and Vineyard, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive, where you can sip on wine and indulge in antipasto plates from Biga while they last. Or bring your own food. Wine tasting starts at 5 PM, music runs 6 to 9 PM. Free. Go to Ten Spoon’s FB page for more info. The President’s Writers-in-Resi-

It wouldn’t be Friday if Tom Catmull and the Clerics weren’t making dancers step up and lovers fall in. Union Club. 9 PM. Free.

Put down the candy cane rum, Pietro, and pick up your robot walkers for I’ll House You, a night of house music with DJs Kris Moon, Mike Stolin and Pandaura, at the Badlander. 9 PM. Free. No libel and no labels at HipHope for Women, a night of celebrating ladies and all they do, featuring MCs League, ‘Lil Sassy, Koti, Miz 1 Z, Traff the Wiz, plus DJs Aaron Traylor and Eroque. Palace. 9 PM. $3/$8 for ages 18-20. A portion of proceeds go to the YWCA. John “Poncho� Dobson hosts open mic at Fergie’s Pub every Fri. where you’re bound to mingle with a mix of resort celebs, odd locals and dizzy soakers. You never know who’ll show up and play. It could be you. Starts at 3 PM. 213 Main Street in Hot Springs. Sign up ahead at 406721-2416 or just show up.

JOIN US FOR

CRAZY8’S BOWLING NIGHT OUT!

Get shiny eyes and hot feet when dance outfit The Copper Mountain Band get ‘er done at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent Ave. 9:30 PM. Free.

EVERY THURSDAY AT 9PM. BOWL 3 GAMES OF 8 PIN NO TAP FOR $8.00. WIN PRIZES & BEER SPECIALS!

SATURDAYDEC.01

LIVE MUSIC BY THE "TOM CATS" ON DECEMBER 7TH AT 9PM

The KECI Weather Team signs their dope 2013 calendar at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. That means Brooke, Adam and Mark are in da house, y’all, from 10:30–1 PM.

THUNDER ALLEY BOWLING on Fridays at 9pm

The Missoula Folklore Society Contra Dance gets your tootsies toasty and your ears filled with the sounds of yesteryear at the Union Hall, 208 E. Front St., upstairs from the Union Club. Sleeping Child String Band plays and Mark Mathews has the call. Lessons at 7:30 PM, dance at 8 PM. $9/$6 members. Be a good little pagan and snatch up your Christmas tree cutting permit at one of the Lolo National Forest Ranger District offices. Permits are limited to three per family and cost $5 each. Permits can also be purchased at Bronc’s Grocery in Frenchtown and the Clinton Market. The Missoula Ranger District office, located at Fort Missoula, extends its hours for permit sales to 7:30 AM to 4:30 PM today and next Saturday. Make the ringing in of the new year a good time funfest and handle some of that blessed X-mas shopping at the First Night Missoula Book Fair where all the proceeds from the day’s sale help fund the citywide New Year’s Eve celebration of the arts. Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. 10–6 PM. The holidays are here and that means rad art stuff and handcrafted gnar-gnar is available at the University Center Holiday Art Fair on the UM Campus. 10–4 PM. Free to gaze. Living Art of Montana hosts an art workshop called Creative Tangents with Odette Grassi for those facing illness or loss. All materials provided. Living Art of Montana, 725 W. Alder St., Suite 17. 10:30–12:30 PM. Free. Check out this Falco-approved event and get rocked when The MET Live in HD presents: La Clemenza di Tito by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart at the Roxy Theater, 7187 S. Higgins Ave. 10:55 AM. $20/$18 seniors/$15 students. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s. Never fear, lovers of fresh, local vittles, the Heirloom Winter Market at the Missoula County Fairgrounds is rolling with music, kids’ activities, locally grown produce, meat, baked goods, jam, honey and so much more. 11–2 PM. Grab your sword of glory and go forth, young harlot, and get your books signed by romance novelists Danica Winters, Rionna Morgan, Casey Dawes and Pam Morris at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave., from noon–1:30 PM. (See Books.)

Give a season this season

SEASON SERIES SUBSCRIPTIONS NOVEMBER 30, DECEMBER 1-2, 5-9, 2012 THE MUSICAL

JANUARY 18-20, 23-27, 2013 MARCH 15-17, 20-24, 2013 APRIL 26-28, MAY 1-5, 8-12, 2013

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE IN ANY AMOUNT Box Office: 200 North Adams Street MCT Cen Center for the Performing Arts is ADA compliant. Cent ompliant. mpliant.

FOR TICKET INFORMATION:: FO F  ŔXXXNDUJODPSH   P PSH

missoulanews.com • November 29 – December 6, 2012 [29]


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close encounter Friends, we’ve had enough of your fear, your apathy and your lackadaisical attitude towards the arts. We live in a town chock full of talented folks who deserve an audience and the nationally acclaimed UM Dance Program features some of those folks in its Dance Up Close concert. For those unsure about whether they are ready to take in a dance concert, this is the perfect time to stick your toe in the proverbial water as this concert features two separate programs made up of various dance styles. The programs alternate nightly, so if you find yourself gaga over one, you can take in the other program the following evening. Also, for you parents, the Saturday matinee is more kid-friendly than the evening performances. Styles of dance include contemporary ballet, lyrical dance, modern and searching right now.” (Full disclosure: Bradley Browning is the wife of the Indy’s editor.)

WHAT: Dance Up Close WHO: UM School of Theatre & Dance WHEN: Wed., Dec. 4 through Sat., Dec. 8, at 7:30 PM and Sat., Dec. 8, at 2 PM WHERE: Masquer Theatre, UM PARTV Center HOW MUCH: $9/$6 children

improvisation, among others. According to Associate Professor of Dance Nicole Bradley Browning, the intimate concert is a “taste test of various choreographers different perspectives about dance,” and one that “showcases what each [choreographer] is re-

The guild that sews together, stays together, so join Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., at Craft Vigilantes, its monthly Modern Quilt Guild for beginners and pros alike. 12–5 PM. $20 (first few signups are free). Peace be with you at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center Holiday Open House, 519 S. Higgins Ave., which boasts refreshments, the Dragonfly Singers and a reading by author Charlotte Kasl who wrote If the Buddha Had Kids: Raising Children to Create a More Peaceful World. at 3 PM. The whole deal takes place from 1–5 PM.

[30] Missoula Independent • November 29 – December 6, 2012

In some of the pieces the dancers perform within arm’s reach of the audience, giving viewers an opportunity to appreciate intricate movements that are sometimes lost in a larger theater. In other pieces, dancers perform a “chance dance,” in which the dancers know the order of events in the piece, but not who will perform the parts until minutes before going live. The works are meant to transport the audience and illustrate how dance can recreate an idyllic world or bombastic one. The close proximity of dancer to audience can only increase the visceral intensity of this most physical of arts.

Put down the ham radio mic and get tripped out when you learn of mysterious happenings in Joan Bird’s book Montana UFOs and Extraterrestrials: Extraordinary Stories of Documented Sightings and Encounters, which she signs at Fact & Fiction, 200 N. Higgins Ave. 1:30–3 PM.

nightlife The holiday season officially kicks off downtown with the arrival Santa Claus, a full day of family friendly activities, the lighting of the downtown Christmas tree and Uncle Johnny passing out from too much eggnog. Okay, maybe that last one

—Jason McMackin

just happens at our house. The rest of it — and a ton more — happens at the Parade of Lights throughout downtown Missoula, starting at 9 AM and culminating in a parade and tree lighting. Visit missouladowntown.com for a full schedule. Free. No screaming here, only The Trees performing tuneage for you and Uncle Toots down at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 6–8 PM. Free. Mudslide Charley drops a blues bomb on the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. And boom goes the dynamite. 6–8:30 PM. Free.


[calendar] Go way to the back, deep into the stacks for some edufying by author and professor of anthropology at the University of Montana Douglas MacDonald when he discusses and signs his book Montana Before History at Seeley Lake’s Grizzly Claw Trading Co. 7 PM. Free. Get an eyeful of some awkward moments, big hair and inappropriate weight-lifting when comedians Joe Pickett and Nick Prueher host the Found Footage Film Festival, an evening of re-discovered VHS magic at the Wilma Theatre. 7 PM. $10. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s and brownpapertickets.com. (See Arts.) A bunch of rag-tag musicians with who knows what kind of instruments get together from 7 to 9:30 PM on the first Sat. of every month for the Bitterroot Valley GoodTime Jamboree at the Grange Hall, 1436 South First St. in Hamilton. Call Clem at 961-4949. Do the Christmas thing right and check out the Montana A Cappella Society presentation of Christmas in Killarney, a grab bag of musical gifts including ancient carols and modern jamz. Mary Stuart Rogers Performing Arts Center, 425 Fourth St., in Victor. 7:30 PM. $5 plus a non-perishable food item. Fresh off a recent contract renewal, music director Darko Butorac is sure to bring his best baton work to the Missoula Symphony Orchestra & Chorale’s presentation of Holiday Pops, a concert of classic holiday tunes at the Dennison Theatre. And let us not forget chorale director Dean Peterson. Not to mention Santa, who is in the house, too. 7:30 PM. $10$40. Visit missoulasymphony.org. In The Littlest Angel, a mischievous child new to heaven brings a special gift to baby Jesus. Stevensville Playhouse. 319 Main St. 7:30 PM. $15/$10 advance for adults and $10/$8 for kids. Visit stevensvilleplayhouse.org. Be a glam lamb and hear the words of Dr. Suess remanufactured into a musical made to make the audience enraptured. The Whitefish Theatre Co. performs Suessical at Whitefish Performing Arts Center, 1 Central Ave. 7:30 pm. $20/$18 seniors/$8 students. Visit whitefishtheatreco.org. Bring a switch and give the cow a kiss it’s time to kickstart the party with Ugly Pony at the Eagles in Missoula, 2420 South Ave. 8 PM. Free. Fall in love with your mistress all over again to the original tunes of John Patrick Williams at the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs. 8–10 PM. Pass the hat. Comedian Leif Skyving totes a suitcase of the funny to Hamilton’s Roxy Club Theater. What do you need to know about Skyving? He has shared the stage with Weird Al Yankovic. Boom. $20. Visit roxyclubtheater.com. Bring your socks, coats, mittens, gloves and other cold-weather

leftovers to the Bluegrass, Country and Burlesque Benefit for the Poverello Center at Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St. Entertainments provided by Cash for Junkers, The Lil’ Smokies and the Cigareete Girls Burlesque. 9 PM. $5. (See Agenda.) John Floridis play music at Sean Kelly’s, 130 W. Pine St., at 9 PM. Free. Folkin’ and indie rockin’ is on tap when Emerald City pretty pops The Cave Singers do work along with fellow Jet City denizens Poor Moon at the Palace. 9 PM. $12. (See Music.) Hunting season is over, now go find yourself a good looking dance partner at the Lumberjack Saloon and spin to win with Russ Nasset and the Revelators. Head up Graves Creek Rd. about 12 miles west of Lolo on Hwy. 12. 9 PM. Free. Dance to that Zeppo MT soul music or hang out by the loo and wait for love to come walking out the door. Union Club. 9 PM. Free. Absolutely with DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo is the de facto dopest DJ duo in town. Get hip to their jamz, hippies. Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2 for 1 Absolut drinks until 11 PM. Free. Get shiny eyes and hot feet when dance outfit The Copper Mountain Band get ‘er done at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent Ave. 9:30 PM. Free.

SUNDAYDEC.02

floor of 127 N. Higgins Ave. 1 PM. Call Lindsey at 544-1271.

nightlife Fresh off a recent contract renewal, music director Darko Butorac is sure to bring his best baton work to the Missoula Symphony Orchestra & Chorale’s presentation of Holiday Pops, a concert of classic holiday tunes at the Dennison Theatre. And let us not forget chorale director Dean Peterson. Not to mention Santa, who is in the house, too. 7:30 PM. $10$40. Visit missoulasymphony.org. Be a glam lamb and hear the words of Dr. Suess remanufactured into a musical made to make the audience enraptured. The Whitefish Theatre Co. performs Suessical at Whitefish Performing Arts Center, 1 Central Ave. 7:30 pm. $20/$18 seniors/$8 students. Visit whitefishtheatreco.org.

MITCHELL MASSAGETHERAPY ERIC MITCHELL, LMT

Massage Therapist/Owner

2601 S. 3rd St. W. • 406-207-9480 MitchellMassage.abmp.com

Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with Josh Farmer, The Vanguard Combo and Front Street Jazz. Free. Get a flavorful nibble of West Coast hip-hop at Feruqi’s, 318 N. Higgins Ave., when Zyme aka Enzyme Dynamite of The World Famous Bayliens is joined by DJ True Justice and Eugene, Ore.’s The 4 Trees, with locals Abuv Limitz, J Beatz, Linkletter and M-AD. 9 PM. $5.

Larry Hirshberg was once a famous clogger out East, but this early evening he plays music for you to sip beers by at the Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 4–6 PM. Free. This is the kind of mass I can really get behind. The Missoula Area Secular Society presents its Sunday M.A.S.S. Brunch, where atheists, secular humanists, agnostics and other freethinkers meet the first Sun. of every month for brunch from 10 AM– noon at the meeting room of Sean Kelly’s Stone of Accord, 4951 N. Reserve St. Free to attend, but the food costs you. Visit secularmissoula.org. Dance your way to a free mind and an open body at Turning the Wheel Missoula’s Ecstatic Dance. Headwaters Dance Studio, 1042 Monroe St. 11-12:30 PM. $10/$75 for eight classes. Visit turningthewheel.org. Support the Montana World Affairs Council and have author Steven Levine sign his book Mao: Arc of an Empire after you buy it for dad. Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Noon to 1:30 PM. The topic of this month’s Polytana meeting is integrating new partners into established relationships. Bring a dish for which you are thankful. The meeting takes place in the Atrium located on the second

Music that stays with you.

Holiday Pops! Join the Orchestra and Chorale for a sleighful of music sure to get you into the holiday spirit. This year’s spectacular holiday show is the perfect event for all ages to share. Even Santa will be there!

SAT., DECEMBER 1, 7:30 P.M. SUN., DECEMBER 2, 3:00 P.M. The University Theatre Tickets: $10 to $40 Online at missoulasymphony.org Call 721-3194 or visit 320 E. Main St. Sponsored by

There will be no pre-concert talk with Darko before these concerts.

missoulanews.com • November 29 – December 6, 2012 [31]


[calendar]

2012 Jeannette Rankin Civil Liberties Awards Saturday, Dec. 1 • 6 pm • Free Missoula Winery and Event Center 5646 W. Harrier Drive

Join the ACLU of Montana as we honor Planned Parenthood of Montana and Flathead High School Senior Barrie Sue Sugarman for their contributions to protecting civil liberties in Montana.

RSVP at www.aclumontana.org

Turn it up. The Missoula Symphony Orchestra & Chorale perform a Holiday Pops concert on Sat., Dec. 1, at 7:30 PM and Sun., Dec. 2, at 3 PM, at the Dennison Theatre. $10–$40. Visit missoulasymphony.org.

Beer Drinkers’ Profile

THROWBACK TO THE WAYBACK

Don’t kiss the strutters when rap rocker Deuce brings his signature masks and mad skillz to the Palace for an evening of music from L.A. 9 PM. $15/$13 at Rockin Rudy’s.

MONDAYDEC.03 Ditch the TV for an evening of big sounds and sweeping vocal performances at the UM Choir Concert in the Dennison Theatre. 7:30 PM. $11.

Back In Black Whether it's no sale, wholesale, or retail, we've been fueling holiday fun for over twenty years.

First Friday, holiday shopping, festive food and drink–all good reasons to drop by the Iron Horse. Something New Is Always Happening At The Horse

501 N. Higgins • 728-8866

REI is accepting new gear donations for its Holiday Giving Tree. The donations benefit InnerRoads Wilderness Program, a program of Youth Homes. The program provides wilderness therapy to at-risk teens ages 14-17 and their families. Teens spend 30 days in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness area building selfconfidence and outdoor skills. Drop-off at the store, 3275 N. Reserve St. Bring the whole unified family to the Gestalt Film Fest, an evening of short films by UM media arts students at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 6-8 PM. Free. For all those affected by epilepsy, come to the Epilepsy Support Group at Summit Independent Living Center, 700 SW Higgins Ave. 2–3:30 PM. Free. Call 721-0707.

[32] Missoula Independent • November 29 – December 6, 2012

The Rough Cut Science Seminar Series shows off the brainiacs of Montana’s scientific community, with presentations on current research each week at 4 PM in the University Center Theater. Visit montanaioe.org/ rough-cut-series for the schedule.

Børk, børk, børk it’s time for Missoula Area Dubstep (MAD) Monday, with a bevy of radness and cartons of kicking it as well as DJs Milkcrate Mechanic, Lizard King, Enzymes and Earthlink. Badlander. 9 PM. Free, with $5 pitchers of PBR on tap.

nightlife

Open Mic with Joey Running Crane at the VFW, 245 W. Main, seems like a fine idea, especially with 2-for-1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. 10 PM. Free. Call him up and get yourself a slot at 2290488.

Occupy Missoula General Assembly meets at the Union Hall above the Union Club at 6 PM. Visit occupymissoula.org. The UM Climate Action Now Meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM Flat, 633 5th St. E. 6:30 PM. Bingo at the VFW: the easiest way to make rent since keno. 245 W. Main. 6:45 PM. $12 buy-in. Grab a glass and fill up on straight up jazz with David Horgan and Beth Lo at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. 7–10 PM. Free. Don’t lie, you don’t know much about French art except that it’s a thing, so make your brain more better at the President’s Lecture Series spiel The School of Nature in French Art: Realism to Impressionism, by Dr. Gloria Groom, who is the Mary and David Winton Green curator of 19thcentury European painting and sculpture at The Art Institute of Chicago. Montana Theatre inside the UM PARTV Center. 8 PM. Free.

You know it gotta be a real party when DJ Super Steve rocks the karaoke with the hottest Kamikaze tuneage this side of the hemisphere at the Dark Horse. Are you brave enough to let the computer pick your songs? 9 PM. Free.

TUESDAYDEC.04 The Montana Musicians and Artists Coalition hosts the Musician Showcase at Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St., an evening of tuneful live tuneage made by locals for locals. 8–11 PM. Free. 18 plus. Fa-la-la-la! The Five Valley Chorus of Sweet Adelines invites women of all ages to practice Christmas music with them every Tue. evening from 7 to 8:30 PM at the


[calendar] First Baptist Church, 308 W. Pine. Polish your pipes to sing with the group at retirement homes in the Missoula area and for the Parade of Lights on Dec. 1, plus the annual Christmas Concert at the Southgate Mall Clock Tower, on Dec. 14 at 7 PM. There’s no pressure to join the chorus for good, it’s about the magic of new friends and harmonizing. Free. Fun with Yoga at the Families First Children’s Museum might work for you and the kids. It might make you cry, too. 11 AM. 225 W. Front. $4.25. Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room for Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters, at 5205 Grant Creek Dr., and work on your elk-camp locution with the best. All are invited. Noon–1 PM. Free. Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication, a non-violent communication weekly practice group, at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. 519 S. Higgins. Noon–1 PM. Free. Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. Third St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1–3 PM. For information, call 543-3955.

nightlife It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Boys Bluegrass from 5:30 to 8 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. Nice dude and perfect road trip foil Patrick Marsolek hosts a Holiday Stress Relief course which uses self-hypnosis and other techniques to aid in keeping sanity in your back pocket during this most fretful time of the year. Two Tuesday sessions. Warehouse Mall, 725 W. Alder St. #17. 6:00 to 7:30 pm. $20. Visit innerworkingsresources.com/StressRelief. Join the Missoula Community Theatre for an adaptive performance of Miracle on 34th Street: The Musical. The performance of the classic holiday piece accommodates people on the autism spectrum with lower light and sound levels. The lobby is staffed by autism experts and volunteers. Radness. 200 N. Adams St. 6:30 PM. $10. Call 728-1911.

Dance Up Close. Program I features ten original dance works that include a bevy of styles and themes. Masquer Theatre, UM PARTV Center. 7:30 PM. $9. (See Spotlight.)

Attend the 1,000 New Gardens Meeting and allow the Garden City to live up to its moniker by helping plant the seeds of self-foodulation. UM FLAT, 633 S. Fifth Street E. 5:30-6:30 PM.

Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free pub trivia, which takes place every Tuesday at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with: What are the combined ages of the four main members of the Rolling Stones? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.)

Body Talk! Body Talk! Join local certified BodyTalk practitioners for an introduction to this alternative holistic therapy at the Missoula Public Library where you get a sample session starting at 6 PM. Free.

Break it down like a mudslide and put your dentures in your pocket, Grandpa Jean, cuz genre-hoppers The World/Inferno Friendship Society bring a cacophony of whatevs they like to the Badlander, with alt-country outfit O’Death and locals King Elephant and My Two Dads. $12. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s and Ear Candy. (See Spotlight and Music.)

WEDNESDAYDEC.05 What was life like in a French mental institution circa 1925? Awful is my guess, but you can learn more for yourself during Viscosity Theatre’s Crime dans une Maison de Fous (Crime in A Madhouse) at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. Absinthe bar at 7 PM, show 8 PM. $15/$12 advance at viscositytheatre.org.

nightlife Head to the Northside Kettlehouse tap-room, 313 N. First St. W., and support New Directions Wellness Center which provides fitness and wellness programs for people with physical limitations, disabilities, and chronic illnesses. 50 cents of each pint benefits the group. 5–9 PM.

Hey, winter is here and TV ain’t exactly pumping out the good stuff these days, so get off your bum for a few and take Cathy Clark’s West Coast Swing Class at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent Ave. 7 PM. $5. The UM Symphony Orchestra plucks, toots, taps and blows, yet it all sounds gorgeous. Hear how at the Dennison Theatre. 7:30 PM. $11. (Pub trivia answer: 273 years.) The UM School of Theatre & Dance presents its acclaimed dance concert Dance Up Close. Program II features ten original dance works that include a bevy of styles and themes. Masquer Theatre, UM PARTV Center. 7:30 PM. $9. (See Spotlight.) Kraptastic Karaoke welcomes Black Eyed Peas fanatics to belt out their fave jamz at the Badlander, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $5 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free.

THURSDAYDEC.06 Slide on a blazer (don’t forget to roll up the sleeves) and drop some “in Soviet Russia” jokes at Missoula’s Homegrown Stand-Up Comedy at the Union Club. Sign up by 9:30 PM to perform or just sit back and take in the funny. Free. Teach them loudmouth whippersnappers that old dogs love new tricks and head to the iCloud Work-

The good eggs at Partners In Home Care Hospice (PIHC), announce the 25th Anniversary of the Tree of Life Ceremony and lighting of the Hospice Tree in Rose Memorial Park. After the lighting folks are invited to follow the path of luminaria for a reception. The park is located at the corner of Brooks and Stephens avenues. 6:30 PM. The fact is the clarinet is way better than you think it is. Hear it in all its glory at the UM Symphonic Wind Ensemble in the Dennison Theatre. 7:30 PM. $11. The University of Montana School of Theatre & Dance presents its acclaimed dance concert

missoulanews.com • November 29 – December 6, 2012 [33]


HERE’S HOW IT WORKS: Buy any new kid’s bike with a 12-inch thru 24-inch wheel size. Continue trading in and trading up until your child is on their first full-size bike. Big Sky Bikes Trade In, Trade Up Program is retroactive on all kids’ bikes purchased from Big Sky Bikes in 2010, 2011 and 2012.

Spalalalala GIVE THE GIFT OF RELAXATION Gift Certificates from Cedar Creek Salon & Day Spa

216 W. Main St., Suite 210 • 406-543-0200 www.cedarcreekspa.com • Gift certificates & packages also available online.

Explore dynamic exhibitions at MAM during the holidays with your family and Friends. *Buy a gift membership and receive a free MAM tote bag. missoulaartmuseum.org

Tue-Fri 10am-5pm // Sat-Sun 12-5 PM

Admission is always free.

Shop local; keep your holiday dollars in the Missoula! [34] Missoula Independent • November 29 – December 6, 2012


[calendar] shop at the Bitterroot Public Library taught by Stephen Goheen, a Top Down Computer Consultant. 3–4:30 PM. Free. Grab a look at some artful beauties (and some artwork, too, nyuknyuk) during the reception for two exhibitions—Labor and Leisure: Impressionist and Realist Masterpieces from a Private Collection and Impressionism: Masterpieces on Paper. UM PARTV Center Lobby from 4–6 PM. Free. It’s an arty party when the UM Emerging Ceramic Artists and the Student Sculpture Association of the UM School of Art host the 27th annual Holiday Sale and Juried Show. Tunes by Good Clean Dirt and gorgeous shapes abound. 4–7 PM, with an awards presentation at 5 PM. UM Art Annex. Free.

nightlife Hop down from your pommel horse, Playboy Buddy Rose, and check out the musical stylings of Muzikata at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 5–8 PM. Free. Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free.

Where did I put my cigarette? Shahs begins its month-long Thursday night residency at the VFW, 245 W. Main St., on Thu., Dec. 6, at 10 PM, with J. Sherri and Monster with 21 Faces. $2.

GardenCity

Property Management

422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

missoulanews.com • November 29 – December 6, 2012 [35]


[calendar]

I’m gonna get a sucker. Author Victor LaValle reads at the Dell Brown Room in Turner Hall on Fri., Nov. 30, at 7 PM. He also gives a craft lecture in Stone Hall, Rm. 304, from 12:10 to 1 PM. Both events are free.

Acoustic quartet Alma Desnuda takes off its shirt and bears its soul at the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6–8:30 PM. Free. Learn math from a duck at the Ravalli County Museum’s screening of Walt Disney’s 1959 movie Donald in Mathmagic Land. Duck takes us to Greece to meet Pythagros as well as other math geniuses. 205 Bedford St. 6:30 PM. Free. The Dirty Corner Band plays rock and roll to dance and soak to at the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs. 7 PM. Free. What was life like in a French mental institution circa 1925? Awful is my guess, but you can learn more for yourself during Viscosity Theatre’s Crime dans une Maison de Fous (Crime in A Madhouse) at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. Absinthe bar at 7 PM, show 8 PM. $15/$12 advance at viscositytheatre.org. The University of Montana School of Theatre & Dance presents its acclaimed dance concert Dance Up Close. Program I features ten original dance works that include a bevy of styles and themes. Masquer Theatre, UM PARTV Center. 7:30 PM. $9. (See Spotlight.) Children of the Earth Tribe Song and Chant Circle at the Jeannette

[36] Missoula Independent • November 29 – December 6, 2012

Rankin Peace Center is for all those ready to sing in honor of our connection to one another and the earth. 519 S. Higgins (Enter through back alley door.). 7:30 PM. Free will offering. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 8–10 PM. During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, amazing musicians could play some great jams, just don’t tell your cousin Rapping Timmy about it. That guy’s version of “Santeria” is terrible. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up. The Dead Hipster Dance Party is all kinds of sweaty, but ‘tis the droplets of the beautiful people. Get a taste in the place where love and funk is in the air (sometimes they are the same scent). Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight. Show up the rest of the room with your version of “Ninja Survive” when you hit the Dark Horse for Combat Karaoke hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free. The beats are, in fact, technotronic at 20,000 Beats Under the

Sea, so bring your scuba suit for a night of techno and house tunes with DJs Atom, Tak45, and Nic Jaymes. Palace. 9 PM. Free. Don’t beat that mule and keep you hands off the Ugly Ponye band makes tunes for the lovemaking set at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent Ave. 9:30 PM. Free. Shahs has style, Shahs has grace and Shahs begins its month-long VFW residency tonight, with J. Sherri and Monster with 21 Faces. 245 W. Main St. 10 PM. $2. Most of the hunting for critters is over, but the hunting for gifts begins in earnest. Shop local, stay rad and don’t spend too much green. Remember it’s the thought that counts, even if the thought is merely a bootshaped beer cozy from Zoo City Apparel (jus’ sayin’). Send your event info to me by 5 PM on Fri., Nov. 30 to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to The Calemandar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”


[outdoors]

MAIN FACILITY BROADWAY BUILDING 500 W BROADWAY • MISSOULA M - F 8 - 5:30

MOUNTAIN HIGH

I

certainly hate to natter about the need for more rules, licenses and/or government interference in all of our lives, but don’t you think it’s kind of weird that in some states no license is required to operate watercraft? Of course Montana is one of those states. Unless you are 13 to 14 years of age, then one must pass the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Park’s Boating Safety Class and earn a motorboat operator certificate. Once the kid passes the course, she can operate a boat or personal watercraft without an adult onboard. Admittedly, my inner-13-year-old is stoked about this. But the class is for adults as well, and it also covers safety requirements and

dos and don’ts aboard non-motorized craft. Obviously, though, you’re a big smart fisher man or woman who spends all kinds of time floating the river and you know it all already. Here’s a fact for you: There were 11 boating fatalities in the state last year. —Jason McMackin

COMMUNITY MED CTR CAMPUS PHY CTR 3 2835 FT MISSOULA RD • MISSOULA M - F 8 - 5:30 LOLO FAMILY PRACTICE • 406.273.0045 11350 HIGHWAY 93 S • LOLO M - F 9 - 5 • WALK-INS 8 - 9 AM

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NOW CARE DOWNTOWN • WEEKDAYS 8-5:30 500 W BROADWAY • 406.329.7500 NOW CARE SOUTHGATE MALL 2901 BROOKS • 406.721.0918 M-F 9 - 7:30 • SAT 9 - 5:30 • SUN 11 - 4:30

The Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Boating Safety Class takes place at the FWP office, 3201 Spurgin Rd., on Thu., Dec. 6, at 6:30 PM. Free. To register call 542-5500 or visit the FWP office.

406.721.5600 • 800.525.5688 • WESTERNMONTANACLINIC.COM

Photo by Eric Oravsky

THURSDAY NOVEMBER 29 Big time water enthusiast and one of Outside magazine’s “top ten ‘game changers’ in adventure since 1900,” Doug Ammons presents Riverscapes: The Geology and Human Culture of Rivers. Through photos and personal experience, Ammons explains how rivers shape our culture. Ravalli County Museum, 205 Bedford St. 6–8 PM. Free.

FRIDAY NOVEMBER 30 Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s weekly meeting to talk about past glories and upcoming activities at Bigfork’s Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free.

SATURDAY DECEMBER 1 Be a good little pagan and snatch up your Christmas tree cutting permit at one of the Lolo National Forest Ranger District offices. Permits are limited to three per family and cost $5 each. Permits can also be purchased at Bronc’s Grocery in Frenchtown and the Clinton Market. The Missoula Ranger District office, located at Fort Missoula, extends its hours for permit sales to 7:30 AM to 4:30 PM today and next Saturday. Just don’t run on a full stomach during Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which occurs every Sat. at 8 AM at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. After the run/walk, you’ll grab breakfast with other participants. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org.

SUNDAY DECEMBER 2 Get a peek at a farmer’s grip of beaks during Five Valleys Audubon’s trip to view win-

tering raptors in the Mission Valley. The valley boasts one of the largest concentrations of hawks, harriers, owls, eagles and falcons in the West. Meet at the Adams Center parking lot at 8 AM or the Cenex on the south side of Ronan at 9 AM. Call Jim for more info at 5498052.

MONDAY DECEMBER 3 REI is accepting new gear donations for its Holiday Giving Tree. The donations benefit InnerRoads Wilderness Program, a program of Youth Homes. The program provides wilderness therapy to at-risk teens ages 14-17 and their families. Teens spend 30 days in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness area building self-confidence and outdoor skills. Drop-off at the store, 3275 N. Reserve St.

WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 5 Before you head out to the backcountry brush up on your snowpack knowledge at the UM Outdoor Program’s Avalanche Awareness Lecture. UM North Underground Lecture Hall. 7–8 PM. Free.

THURSDAY DECEMBER 6 Fact: The Red Cross gets slow on blood right before the holidays, so do something about it and enjoy a free cookie, too. The blood mobile is at St. Patrick Hospital, 500 W. Broadway Ave., from 8 AM–2 PM. Call 329-5838. calendar@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • November 29 – December 6, 2012 [37]


[community]

<RX'HVHUYHLW Photo by Steele Williams

Â?Â&#x2122;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x2014;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2014;Â?Â?Â&#x203A;Â&#x2022;Â?Â&#x2039;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2122;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â?Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x201E;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x203A;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2014;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;ǤÂ&#x160;Â&#x2021; Â&#x201E;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201E;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â&#x2122;Â&#x192;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2022;Â&#x203A;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x161;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2018;ÇŻÂ&#x2022;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x192;Â&#x203A;Â&#x192;ÇĄÂ&#x2122;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â?Â&#x2039;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2C6; Â&#x2014;Â?Â&#x2022;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2039;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â&#x201E;Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2026;Â&#x160;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2026;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2021;Â&#x161;Â&#x2019;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Í&#x2013;ÇĄÍ&#x201D;Í&#x201D;Í&#x201D;Â&#x203A;Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2014;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2014;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2030;Â&#x160;Â&#x2013; Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2014;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2014;Â&#x161;Â&#x2014;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2022;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2018;Â&#x192;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Ǥ Â&#x2018;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2026;Â?Â&#x203A;Â&#x2014;Â?Â?Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2014;Â&#x201E;Â?Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x201E;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2018;Â? Â&#x2021;Â&#x201E;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2014;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x203A;Í&#x2022;ÇŚÍ&#x2022;Í&#x201D;ÇĄÍ&#x2013;Í&#x201D;Í&#x2022;Í&#x2014;Ǥ Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â?Â&#x192;Â&#x201E;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2013;Â&#x192;Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x192;Â&#x2039;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x160;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Í&#x201A;Í&#x2013;Í&#x201D;Í&#x201D;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2122;Â&#x160;Â&#x2039;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201E;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;ÇĄ Â&#x192;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2122;ǤÂ?Â&#x2013;Â?Â&#x2122;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x201E;Â&#x192;Â?Â?ǤÂ&#x2026;Â&#x2018;Â?Č&#x20AC;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2014;Â?Â?Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;ÇŚÂ&#x2026;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2014;Â&#x201E;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2026;Â&#x192;Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D; Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2039;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Â&#x2013;Í&#x2122;Í&#x2DC;Í&#x2013;ÇŚÍ&#x161;Í&#x2013;Í&#x2013;Í&#x2013;Ǥ

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the time of year when all of us of some means are getting hit up to donate, to help out, and to donate and help out. Before we all get weary of the asking, the ringing bells and the sad TV commercials, we should take a look around our own neighborhoods. There are people living outdoors right now in these first cold days and nights. These people could probably use what pro wrestler the Jake â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Snakeâ&#x20AC;? Roberts called â&#x20AC;&#x153;essentials:â&#x20AC;? toothpaste, hats, gloves, soap, winter socks, etc. These essentials, as well as non-perishable food items, are what the Poverello Center is requesting from those who attend the upcoming Bluegrass, Country and Burlesque benefit at Monkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar. With performances by Cigarette Girls Burlesque, Cash for Junkers and The Lilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Smokies, the evening is sure to get downright rural. But before we party like weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in Uncle Jedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shop, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

look at what the Pov does: In 2011, the emergency shelter provided 25,231 nights of stay. Twenty-five percent of those using the facilities were veterans and 20 percent were women. Also, the organization served 127,103 meals in 2011. With donated food and volunteer time, each meal costs approximately 17 cents (not accounting for paid staff and utilities). So if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever wondered whether your little bit helps, now you know. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jason McMackin The Bluegrass, Country and Burlesque benefit show for the Poverello Center takes place Sat., Dec. 1, at 9 PM, at Monkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar, 225 Ryman St. The show features the Cigarette Girls Burlesque, Cash for Junkers and The Lilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Smokies. $7/$5 with a donation to the center.

[AGENDA LISTINGS] THURSDAY NOVEMBER 29

MONDAY DECEMBER 3

City Life Community Center Annual Auction takes place at the, uh, City Life Community Center, 1515 Fairview Ave., and boasts goodies like autographed Griz basketballs, vacays and Harley-Davidson gear, plus hors dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;oeuvres galore. Doors at 5:30 PM, auctioneering begins at 7:20 PM. Tickets are $100 per couple and include a $50 auction credit. Take a peek at the goods at citylifemt.com.

REI is accepting new gear donations for its Holiday Giving Tree. The donations benefit InnerRoads Wilderness Program, a program of Youth Homes. The program provides wilderness therapy to at-risk teens ages 14-17 and their families. Teens spend 30 days in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness area building self-confidence and outdoor skills. Drop-off at the store, 3275 N. Reserve St.

Bluegrass bandits Special Consensus raise funds for the Lake County Youth Home when they acoustically melt off your face with them old time tunes at the Ronan Performing Arts Center. 7:30 PM. $14/ 18 and under free.

Occupy Missoula General Assembly meets at the Union Hall above the Union Club at 6 PM. Visit occupymissoula.org.

FRIDAY NOVEMBER 30 Practice being peaceful in a world of differences during the Intercultural Dialogue Group at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, where people from various backgrounds meet on the last Fri. of each month at 4:30 PM for an afternoon of conversation and peacemaking. Library of the Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call Betsy at 543-3955 or email peace@jrpc.org for more info.

SATURDAY DECEMBER 1 Make the ringing in of the new year a good time funfest and handle some of that blessed Xmas shopping at the First Night Missoula Book Fair where all the proceeds from the dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sale help fund the citywide NYE celebration of the arts. Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6 PM.

SUNDAY DECEMBER 2 This is the kind of mass I can really get behind. The Missoula Area Secular Society presents its Sunday M.A.S.S. Brunch, where atheists, secular humanists, agnostics and other freethinkers meet the first Sun. of every month for brunch from 10 AMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;noon at the meeting room of Sean Kellyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Stone of Accord, 4951 N. Reserve St. Free to attend, but the food costs you. Visit secularmissoula.org.

The UM Climate Action Now Meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM Flat, 633 5th St. E. 6:30 PM.

TUESDAY DECEMBER 4 Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication, a non-violent communication weekly practice group, at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. 519 S. Higgins. Noonâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;1 PM. Free. The good eggs at Partners In Home Care Hospice (PIHC), announce the 25th Anniversary of the Tree of Life Ceremony and lighting of the Hospice Tree in Rose Memorial Park. After the lighting folks are invited to follow the path of luminaria for a reception. The park is located at the corner of Brooks and Stephens avenues. 6:30 PM.

WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 5 Head to the Northside Kettlehouse tap room, 313 N. First St. W., and support New Directions Wellness Center which provides fitness and wellness programs for people with physical limitations, disabilities, and chronic illnesses. 50 cents of each pint benefits the group. 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 PM.z Attend the 1,000 New Gardens Meeting and allow the Garden City to live up to its moniker by helping folks plant the seeds of self-foodulation. UM FLAT, 633 S. Fifth Street E. 5:30-6:30 PM.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

[38] Missoula Independent â&#x20AC;˘ November 29 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; December 6, 2012


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control 541-7387 HOPS• Hops has such an interesting face! Whether he's happy or sad or simply thoughtful, you can see it clearly in his facial expression. Right now he's mainly stressed from living in a noisy kennel surrounded by other dogs, instead of having a real home and being surrounded by a loving family. He just wants to be a good pet.

A Dog in Need of a Good Home Showcasing shelter dogs difficult to Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MTSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

TAVIA•Tavia is that dense grey color that reminds us of fine pewter, and that's not the only fine thing about her. She's a sweet, petite lady who's lively enough to keep you interested in her antics, but sedate enough to enjoy lap-sitting and other kinds of gentle attention. She'd be a great companion.

2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

place -- either because the dog's presentation misleads or because the dog is indeed a challenge.

BIG ON BIG Lab X Montgomery is big -- big like a pro basketball player. Montgomery's run is swift and powerful too, so one steps aside to avert a knock, but he's also obliging, obedient, and listens well. He can be guided to the shelter yard off-leash, and at the end of his alloted time he trots to the door, awaits entry, and then immediately finds and enters his kennel. Because he likes people, dogs, and especially puppies, he causes no ruckus. Inside his kennel, however, Montgomery turns his back to the aisle; he sees no people. His not seeing spares him mind pain, for everyone passes him by, not seeing his gracious acceptance of the shelter big dog situation. Only a select few can walk the big dogs. The combination of strength and pent-up energy creates canine combustion. Walking a big shelter dog can be like walking a bull just released from a rodeo chute. The select few walkers are those are themselves big and strong -- Big helping Big. It's been said that the best cure for the blues is to focus on the troubles of others, and big people walking big shelter dogs is a perfect example of this. And it works both ways; when helping a big dog like Montgomery, you often receive more than you give.

KIM•Kim is just a youngster, but we can already tell that she's going to be a gorgeous adult cat. Her coat is mainly grey tiger, but it features tan and gold marking too. She's quite shy, but she'd really blossom in a quiet, adult household where she would get lots of one-onone attention from her people.

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana 549-3934 GRACIE•Easygoing Gracie is looking for a loving retirement home. This 9-year-old Catahoula mix is very well-mannered. She is already housetrained and doesn’t jump up when she meets people. Senior pets have no adoption fee in November to celebrate Adopt-a-Senior-Pet month, so take her home today!

BAILEY•6-year-old Bailey L-O-V-E-S people. When she meets someone new her whole body wags. Bailey loves to play with toys, explore new trails, and play in the river. Bailey is great with kids and well-mannered indoors. She’s a perfect canine companion for Western Montana. For more information visit www.myHSWM.org. ONYX• Lounging in her cage, Onyx patiently awaits her forever home. This gentle 12-year-old loves to be brushed and sit on your lap. Onyx has a playful side despite her senior status. She enjoys chasing the laser pointer and feather toys alike. Onyx is on a special diet to support her kidneys. She hopes that someone will see past that and give her the retirement home she deserves.

SAMPSON•This 12-year-old cat loves to strut his stuff! Sampson is confident and outgoing. Boy, does he love his snacks! Sampson eats a special diet to support proper urinary tract health but he still thinks he should get straight tuna! Sampson would be a great addition to your home. Do you have room for him? To celebrate Adopt-a-Senior-Pet month Sampson’s adoption is FREE in November. Flowers for every bride. In Trouble or in Love? The Flower Bed has affordable flowers for all your needs.

The Flower Bed

2405 McDonald Ave. 721-9233

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

ARLO•Outgoing and handsome, Arlo is very purrrsonable. He’s a laid-back guy who takes things in stride. Arlo gets along great with other cats, dogs, and kids. He enjoys snuggling in a comfy spot and letting you pet his super soft fur. Arlo also loves snacks and is smart enough that you could teach him to do tricks! Since he’s a senior, he has no adoption fee for the duration of November.

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WAFFLES•10-year-old Waffles was surrenMON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

dered with Arlo above. He’d love to go to a home with other cats. Waffles is the strong and silent type. He enjoys a scratch behind the ears but isn’t demanding of your attention. If you are busy, he is content to amuse himself. The Humane Society is open from 1-6 pm on Tues – Fri and from noon – 5 on Saturdays.

missoulanews.com • November 29 – December 6, 2012 [39]


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

November 29 - December 6, 2012

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD NEED CLEANING? Students Bachelors - Builders - Move-in Move-out. Call Tasha @ RC Services 888-441-3323 ext 101. Locally Owed & Operated. Licensed & Insured. Visit our website www.rcservices.info. HOLIDAY SPECIAL: Buy 2 Hours, Get 1 Hour FREE! (Limit 1 free hour per customer). $90 value for $60.

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ANNOUNCEMENTS

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14th ANNUAL YE JOLLY OLDE CRAFT & ART FAIR. Hosted by Girl Scout Troop 3832 Saturday, December 1, 2012. 9:00a.m.3:00p.m. Target Range School. Bring a nonperishable food item Grout Rite Your tile & grout specialists. Free Estimates. Over 31 yrs exp. 406-273-9938. www.groutrite.com

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Piano Lessons

Table of contents

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PET OF THE WEEK Lizzy is here to convince you why Pit bulls are the best! This 1 year old pit mix is friendly, energetic, intelligent, and playful. She LOVES to romp with other dogs and to snuggle. Lizzy is super responsive and loves to learn new tricks. She is hoping her new family will enroll her in the Humane Society’s Basic Manners class once she is adopted. Did you know that black dogs (and cats) typically take a lot longer to get adopted? Who could resist a face like hers!?! Visit www.myHSWM.org to view all adoptable animals and to learn more about our training classes.


ADVICE GODDESS

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

By Amy Alkon

HOLIDAY CLEANING SPECIAL Buy 2 Hours, Get 1 Hour FREE! (Limit 1 free hr per customer)

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THE WAY OF THE NAILGUN My boyfriend of four years is a wonderful man who makes me incredibly happy. He was there for me throughout my breast cancer, making me feel sexy, beautiful, and loved. I’m 43, divorced five years. He’s 41, never married, and his longest relationship was with a train wreck of an alcoholic on house arrest (I know, red flag). Six months ago, he moved in with his dad (45 minutes away) after his dad asked him to help renovate a house he bought to flip. We text daily and sometimes talk on the phone for 10 minutes, but I only see him every two weeks for a weekend. I’m lonely every day. I miss the day-to-day of coming home to the person who loves you, cooking together, working through life together. Realizing the renovation will take more than another two years, I asked him whether he’d ever consider moving in with me. He said he’s already unpacked and it would be a pain to move again. Couples marry and have babies in the time we’ve been dating! He says they’ll all be divorced in five years and we’ll still be together, which could be true. I just don’t know how to get past wanting more. —Empty House

Sure, absence makes the heart grow fonder—until it makes the heart yank out its calculator and notice that it’s spent 85 percent of its year sitting next to a dent in the couch. You’re experiencing an unbreakup—a breakup where you don’t quite break up. Your boyfriend has managed to get out of your relationship, but without the wrenching breakup conversation or the bummer of no longer having you in his life. And although it’s been six months since he had himself downgraded from boyfriend to biweekly houseguest, you’re still referring to him as a “wonderful man” who makes you “incredibly happy.” In fact, you can’t help but bubble over with the language of joy: “I’m lonely every day” and “I don’t know how to get past wanting more.” Wanting the man you love to be around to cook dinner with you isn’t exactly a freakish sexual fetish. Still, he isn’t a bad person if he doesn’t want that—just a bad person for you. But, consider that his relocation to Home Sweet Home Depot might stem from some emotional itchiness on his part. Maybe it’s overwhelming when a woman just needs him because she loves him and not because she can’t get to the liquor store herself while wearing her state-

supplied ankle jewelry or because she’s too weak to hitchhike to chemo. Whatever your boyfriend’s problem, it’s making your happiness come a distant second to his dad’s need to reface the cabinets. This isn’t entirely his fault. It might be worth it to him to work through his commitment heebie-jeebies or whatever, but you can’t just hint at what’s bothering you (asking whether he’d “ever consider moving in”). You need to tell him flat-out that you’re miserable without somebody there day to day. This tells him he’d better come through, or he’ll lose you. (Spell that out if it needs spelling.) As for your priorities, you emailed me some wise words from your oncologist: “You deserve to be happy. You only get one life, and you worked really hard to keep yours.” This suggests that the right guy for you will be there for you because you’re there and alive and you want to be with him; you won’t need to dress up as a leaky faucet to get his attention.

MAO TSETONGUE I’m a woman dating a woman who never really cooked until she met me. I’m not a professional chef—just seriously into cooking. At first, she loved learning from me. Now, when she has me over for dinner, she gets upset when I make suggestions. I just hate to see her plan a great meal, sometimes with expensive ingredients, and have it not turn out. —Dicey Situation She was probably planning on serving capellini, not Mussolini. Sure, it’s got to be hard to watch her violate a tomato, but maybe the “right way” to dice one is the way that doesn’t break you two up. To avoid meddling, don’t think of her cooking for you as cooking; think of it as an edible gift. (If it were your birthday, surely you wouldn’t tail her to the mall, lecture her on what to buy, and then berate her on how she’s wrapping it all wrong.) Compliment her efforts, and when you cook, you can enlist her help and show her a thing or two. Ultimately, knowing your way around the kitchen sometimes entails knowing when to stay out of it and keeping your mouth clamped shut until it’s time for Mr. Fork to fly a big load of oddly rubbery mashed potatoes into the hangar.ashed potatoes into the hangar.

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MUSIC MUSIC LESSONS In-house lessons on guitar, ukelele and piano. Sign up now! MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of

the Fairgrounds entrance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 5490013. www.montanamusic.com Outlaw Music Got Gear? We Do! Missoula’s Pro Guitar Shop specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, Tuesday-Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am-6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533. Outlawmusicguitarshop.com Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 7 2 1 - 0 1 9 0 BennettsMusicStudio.com

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PETS & ANIMALS Basset Rescue of Montana www.bassetrescueofmontana.org 406-207-0765 CATS: #2162 Grey Torbi, British Shorthair, SF, 7yrs; #2305 Torti, DSH, SF, 4yrs; #2312 Grey/white, DMH, SF, 10yrs; #2334 Blk/wht, DMH, NM, 15yrs; #2391 Wht/Orange, DSH, SF, 9mo; #2445 Grey/white, DSH, NM, 3yrs; #2455 Black, ASH/Bombay X, SF, 6yrs; #2499 Black, DSH, SF, 1.5yrs;#2508-2509 Black, KITTENS 9wks; #2510 Black, DMH, SF, 9wks;#2520 Grey Torti, DMH, SF, 2yrs; #2521 Orange, DSH, NM, 8wks; #2523 Orange/Buff, DSH, NM, 9wks; #2534 Grey Tabby, DSH, NM, 7rs; #2535 White/Blk Calico, DSH, SF, 6yr; #2561 Black, DSH, NM, 7 1/2yrs; #2569 Black, Siamese/DSH, NM, 10yrs; #2573 Blk/white, DSH, SF, 2.5yrs; #2587 Black, DSH, SF 9 mo; #2599 Grey Torti, DMH, F, 2yrs; #2602 Brn Torti, DSH, F, 8wks; #2615 Grey/Blk, Maine Coon X, F, 9wks; #2663 Blk, DSH, NM, 12wks; #2666 Blk/tan Tabby, ASH, SF, 9wks; #2668 Orange/wht, DSH, NM, 3yrs; $2670 Dilute Torti, Persian, SF, 9yrs; #2676 Blk, DSH, NM, 1yr; #2683 Blk/white, ASH, SF 9wks; #2695 Grey/brown, Russian Blue, NM, 3yrs; #2697 Buff, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #2698 Black, ASH, NM, 1yr; #2706 Buff, ASH, SF, 2yrs; #2708

Flame Point, Siamese X, NM, 12wks; #2722 Grey, Russian Blue, SF, 10yrs; #2723 Grey, Russian Blue, SF, 5yrs; #2724 Buff, ASH, SF, 10yrs; #2726 Tan/Blk Tips, Maine Coon X, NM, 3yrs; #2727 Blk/white, Maine Coon X, SF, 8mo; #2728 Creme/Blk, Siamese, NM, 6yrs For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840. DOGS: #2169 White/grey, Border/Heeler X, SF, 3 1/2yrs; #2285 Red/Tan, Boxer X, SF, 6yr; #2396 Yellow, Chow/Lab x, SF, 1yr; #2467 Brown, German Shep X, NM, 2yrs; #2564 Brindle, Catahoula, NM, 2yrs; #2575 Brn/white, Husky X, NM, 1yr; #2595 Blk/white, Heeler X, SF, 1yr; #2702 White/brindle, Boxer, NM, 1yr; #2705 Tan, Pit X, NM, 5yrs; #2712 Yellow, Lab/Retriever, NM, 4yrs; #2716 Blk/rust, Dobie/Hound X, NM, 2yrs; #2717 Fawn/white, Pit/Terrier, SF, 3yrs; #2736 Blk/white, Boxer/Lab/BC, SF, 1yr; #2737 Blk/white, F, Boxer/Lab/BC, 2wks; #2738 Brown/white, Boxer/Lab/BC, M, 2wks; #2740 Heeler X, F, 1yr; #2741-2746 BOXER/Lab/BC PUPPIES; For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 3635 3 1 1 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

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[C2] Missoula Independent • November 29 – December 6, 2012


EMPLOYMENT

MARKETPLACE

GENERAL Actors Needed Male and female actors needed to appear in a DVD that teaches healthcare interviewing skills. Acting experience and knowledge of diabetes is desired. The work is 2 to 4 hrs in length. Pay $48/hr. Must be available for filming on Dec. 15 and 16. Call 406-459-0244 for more information. AMERICAN GREETINGS is hiring Part-time Merchandisers across Montana. For a full listing of available positions and detailed job information, please visit us at HTTP://AMGREETINGS-CAREERS.COM BARTENDING $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training available. 1-800-965-6520 ext. 278 Market Research Participant Need market research participants to evaluate local establishments. Apply FREE: Shop.BestMark.com or call 800969-8477 Mechanical Design Drafter 1 yr min SolidWorks experience required. Competitive pay and excellent benefits. Email resume to hr@am-eagle.com. Now Hiring! Start tomorrow. Days only. 273-2266

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): “They are trying to make me into a fixed star,” complained religious leader Martin Luther a few centuries ago. “I am an irregular planet.” I invite you to use that declaration as your own in the coming weeks. You have every right to avoid being pinned down, pigeonholed, and forced to be consistent. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you need abundant freedom to mutate your identity. You deserve a poetic license that allows you to play a variety of different roles and explore the pleasures of unpredictable self-expression. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “The Star-Spangled Banner” is America’s national anthem. It features the lyrics of a patriotic poem written by Francis Scott Key. But the melody itself is entirely lifted from a bawdy old song that celebrates Bacchus, the ancient god of wine and ecstatic dancing. I love it when things are repurposed as dramatically as that. Do you? The coming weeks will be prime time to repurpose stuff with creative abandon. Make the past useful for the future, Taurus. Turn good old ideas into fantastic new ones. Don’t just recycle; transform. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I’m guessing that in the coming weeks you will be receiving a multitude of inquiries, invitations, and temptations—probably more than you feel capable of responding to, and certainly more than you should respond to. A few of these opportunities might be appealing and lead to interesting adventures. But some will be useless, diversionary, or trivial. Will you be able to tell the difference? That’s your big challenge. If you’d like help dodging unwanted solicitations, give out this phone number as your own: 212.479.7990. It’s a free service provide by “The Rejection Line” at Rejectionline.com. People calling that number will be politely told you aren’t available.

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): For millennia, the plant known as the yellow avalanche lily has thrived on mountain slopes and meadows throughout western North America. It blooms early in the spring, just in time for broad-tailed hummingbirds that migrate from Central America to sip the flower’s nectar. But now there’s a problem with that ancient arrangement. Due to global warming, the lily now blossoms 17 days earlier than it used to. But the hummingbirds haven’t made an adjustment in their schedule, so they’re barely showing up in time to get their full allotment of nectar. I suspect this is a metaphor for a shift you may be facing in your own life rhythm. Fortunately, you’ve been forewarned, and you can adjust better than the hummingbirds.

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b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In our calendar, there is no special holiday devoted to honoring the joy and power of rebellion. This oversight confounds me. All my experience tells me that the urge to revolt is a fundamental human need. Every one of us has a sacred duty to regularly rise up and overthrow a stale status quo that is oppressing us—whether that’s an organized group effort we’re part of or our own deadening routine. I’m telling you this, Leo, because it’s an excellent time to celebrate your own Rebellion Jubilee. Your vitality will soar as you shed numbing habits and decaying traditions.

Buy a package of 4 hours of massage, get one hour free.

c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Recently you’ve had resemblances to an eight-year-old kid wearing the pajamas you loved when you were five. Your bare arms are jutting out beyond where the sleeves end, and there’s a similar thing going on with your legs. The fabric is ripped here and there because it can’t accommodate how much you’ve grown. You’re feeling discomfort in places where the overly tight fit is squeezing your flesh. All of this is somewhat cute but mostly alarming. I wish you would wean yourself of the past and update your approach.

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A lot of leopard frogs live on Staten Island, one of New York City’s five boroughs. Most of them make a sound that resembles a long snore or a rapid chuckle. But over the years, biologists have also detected a third type of frogly expression: a clipped, repetitive croak. Just this year, they finally figured out that this belonged to an entirely distinct species of leopard frog that they had never before identified. It’s still so new it doesn’t have a name yet. I expect a metaphorically similar development in your life, Libra. You will become aware of a secret that has been hiding in plain sight. You will “find” something that actually revealed itself to you some time ago.

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Tom Tolbert is a sports talk show host on San Francisco radio station KNBR. I am amazingly neutral about him. Nothing he says fascinates me or mirrors my own thoughts. On the other hand, he never makes me mad and he’s not boring. I neither like him nor dislike him. I simply see him for who he is, without any regard for what he can do for me. He has become a symbol of the possibility that I’m able to look at a human being with complete impartiality, having no wish for him to be different from what he is. In the coming week, I suggest you try to achieve this enlightened state of mind on a regular basis. It’s prime time, astrologically speaking, to ripen your mastery of the art of objectivity.

f

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): If you say “rabbit rabbit rabbit” as soon as you wake up on the first day of the month, you will have good luck for the next 30 to 31 days. At least that’s how reality works according to a British superstition. But judging from your astrological omens, I don’t think you will have to resort to magic tricks like that to stimulate your good fortune. In the next four weeks, I suspect you will be the beneficiary of a flood of cosmic mojo, as well as a surge of divine woowoo, a shower of astral juju, and an upwelling of universal googoo gaga. If it would give you even more confidence to invoke your favorite superstitions, though, go right ahead. Even scientists say that kind of thing works: tinyurl.com/SuperstitiousBoost.

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): According to Greek myth, Perseus cut off the head of Medusa. She was the creature whose hair was composed of snakes and whose gaze could turn a person into stone. The immortal winged horse Pegasus was instantaneously born from Medusa’s blood. He ultimately became an ally to the nine Muses, and Zeus relied on him to carry thunder and lightning. I predict that while you’re sleeping, Capricorn, you will have a dream that contains elements of this myth. Here’s a preliminary interpretation of that dream: You are undergoing a transition that could in a sense give you the power of flight and a more abundant access to a muse.

h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It’s time for you to be leader of the pack, Aquarius; to take your gang to the next level; to make sure the group mind isn’t suppressing innovation and enforcing peer pressure but is rather inspiring every member of the tribe to be as creative as they dare to be. And if it’s not realistic for you to wield that much power, then do whatever you can to synergize the alliances that hold your posse together. Build team morale. Gossip constructively. Conspire to animate an influx of fresh magic.

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): If you’re a food company that wants to sell chicken in the shape of a chicken wing, it must have actual chicken wing meat in it. Otherwise, the law says you’ve got to call your product “wyngz.” I’ve always thought that there’s a lot of information the media presents as “news” that is really as fake as wyngz. That’s why I advocate calling the bogus stuff “newzak” (rhymes with “muzak”). Your assignment in the coming weeks, Pisces, is to make sure you’re not putting out any wyngz- or newzak-like stuff in your own chosen field. The fates will help you rather dramatically if you put a high premium on authenticity. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

[C4] Missoula Independent • November 29 – December 6, 2012

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PUBLIC NOTICES CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on December 3, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider a resolution amending the FY 2012 budget to appropriate expenditures that were not identified in the original budget to recognize grants, proceeds from bond sales and capital lease financings, the recording of budgets for debt service payments for new bond issues and certain other revenues received during the fiscal year. A copy of the resolution is on file in the City Clerk office. For further information, contact Brentt Ramharter, Finance Director at 5526108. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/Martha L. Rehbein, CMC, City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA Request for Proposals – Forestry Thinning on Mount Jumbo The City of Missoula, Parks & Recreation Department is requesting proposal statements for a forest thinning project on Mt. Jumbo. Proposals are requested from interested professional foresters. Mt. Jumbo is a public conservation area located within the Missoula City limits and managed primarily for native habitat. The contractor shall perform work necessary to reduce susceptibility of forest to pine beetle attack, decrease wildfire danger and restore historic (pre-fire suppression) forest conditions on the property. The density of trees per acre is quite variable across the site depending on slope, age of stand and available moisture. This project will entail selectively thinning small diameter conifers across 101 acres on the eastern slopes of Mt. Jumbo. Contractors interested in submitting proposals are required to attend a pre-bid tour of the project area on Friday, November 30, 2012, at 12:30 p.m. The tour will begin at the Marshal Canyon Trailhead located on Marshall Canyon Rd. approximately 1.25 mi. north of the intersection w/ highway 200. Contact the city Conservation Lands Manager with questions. Proposals are due Monday, December 10th, 2012, at 4:30 PM at the Missoula Parks Operation Office. Late proposals will not be accepted. Detailed requests for qualifications must be obtained from Morgan Valliant, City Conservation Lands Manager or on-line at http://www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids.. Please see below: Morgan Valliant, Conservation Lands Manager Missoula Parks and Recreation Operations Division mvalliant@ci.missoula.mt.us 100 Hickory St. Missoula, MT 59801 (406) 552-6263 (406) 327-9367 (fax) CITY OF MISSOULA Request for Proposals – Mobile Data Computer (MDC) The City of Missoula Police Department is seeking proposals for Mobile Data Computers (MDC) for use by the City of Missoula Police Department. Vendors are required to submit “Intent to Respond” forms by December 14th, 2012, at 5:00 p.m. MST. Proposals are due December 21st, 2012, at 2:00 p.m. MST. Late proposals will not be accepted. A copy of the request for proposals which includes

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more information about the project is available on-line at http://www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids or by contacting the Missoula Police Department at 406-552-6320. MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD Title III Fuel Mitigation Requests Notice is hereby given that a proposal for allocation of Missoula County funds for the purpose of fuels mitigation projects was put before the Board of County Commissioners on November 21, 2012. The funds originate from the federal government as part of the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act of 2000, and are being spent under Title III of that Act. The following allocations are proposed: To mitigate the effects of wildfire by supporting Firewise Communities Programs, including cost sharing on fuels mitigation projects: $25,000 to Missoula Rural Fire District; $25,000 to Frenchtown Rural Fire District; $30,00 to Seeley Lake Rural Fire Department and Clearwater Resource Council; $19,000 to Swan Ecosystem; $20,000 to Missoula City Fire Department. Agencies receiving these allocations must have the funds spent by September 30, 2013, or those funds will revert to Missoula County for re-allocation by the Board of County Commissioners. The Board of County Commissioners will act on these proposals at their regularly scheduled Weekly Public Meeting on Wednesday, January 23, 2013 at 1:30 p.m. in Room B14 of the Missoula County Administrative Building. Any person wishing to be heard on the matter may submit written or other materials to the Commissioners and/or speak at the hearing. Comments may also be submitted anytime prior to the hearing by phone, mail, fax or personal delivery to the Commissioners at their offices in the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, Fax (406) 721-4043 email bcc@co.missoula.mt.us. Additional information on the proposals may be obtained from Chris Lounsbury at the Office of Emergency Management, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802; or by calling (406) 258-4469. DATED THIS 21st DAY OF November, 2012. Chair, Board of County Commissioners MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON ISSUING BONDS RELATED TO PARTNERSHIP HEALTH CENTER AND ICE RINK IMPROVEMENTS MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County Commissioners of Missoula County, Montana (the “County”), will meet on Wednesday, December 19, 2012, at 1:30 p.m., M.T., in the public meeting room, Admin B14, of the County Administration Building, located at 199 West Pine, in Missoula, Montana, for the purpose of conducting a public hearing on a proposal that the County issue its limited tax general obligation bonds (the “Bonds”) in the approximate amount of up to $1,300,000 for the purpose of improving and remodeling the Creamery Building (the “2012 Project”), which houses certain operations of Partnership Health Center Incorporation, a Montana nonprofit corporation and a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization (“PHC”), refunding certain of the County’s outstanding bonds as de-

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s scribed below, and paying certain costs associated with the sale and issuance of the Bonds. The 2012 Project is located at the Creamery Building, the address of which is 401 West Railroad in Missoula, Montana. The Bonds will also refund the County’s outstanding Limited Obligation Notes (Partnership Health Care Project), Series 1998 (the “Series 1998 Notes”) and certain outstanding maturities of the County’s Limited General Obligation Bonds, Series 2004 (the “Series 2004 Bonds”). The Series 1998 Notes were issued to pay a portion of the costs of building PHC’s health care facility (the “PHC Building”) at 323 W. Alder in Missoula, Montana, and the Series 2004 Bonds were issued to pay a portion of the costs of improving and constructing an open-air artificial ice facility at Missoula County Fairgrounds (the “Ice Rink Project”), the address of which is 1101 South Avenue West in Missoula, Montana. The PHC Building is leased by the County to PHC and the Ice Rink Project is leased by the County to Missoula Area Youth Hockey Association, a Montana nonprofit corporation and a Section 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization (“MAYHA”). The Series 1998 Notes and the Series 2004 Bonds will be refunded for interest rate savings, thereby reducing the amount of money the County has to pay on such obligations. The portion of the Bonds to finance or reimburse the costs of the 2012 Project is expected to be in the amount of approximately $400,000, and the refunding portion of the Bonds is expected to not exceed $850,000. PHC and MAYHA, either through their leases or operations, are expected to pay the principal of and interest on the Bonds. All persons interested may appear and be heard at the time and place set forth above, or may file written comments with the County Clerk and Recorder prior to the date of the hearing set forth above. Comments addressed or delivered to the Missoula County Commissioners at 199 West Pine in Missoula, Montana 59802 (FAX (406) 721-4043) and received prior to the hearing will be considered. Further information may be obtained from Andrew Czorny, County Chief Financial Officer, (406) 258 4919, or the County Commissioners Office at 199 W. Pine, Missoula, MT, (406) 258-4877. DATED: NOVEMBER 21, 2012. BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS /s/ Vickie M. Zeier, County Clerk and Recorder/Treasurer MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DV-12-1247 Dept. No.: 1 Ed McLean Notice of Hearing on Name Change of Minor Child In the Matter of the Name Change of Emily Mae Solomon: Genevieve McGrath, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court to change a child’s name from Emily Mae Solomon to Emily Mae McGrath. The hearing will be on 12/12/2012 at 1:30 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: 10/31/2012 /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Maria Cassidy, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-12-1261 Dept. No. 3 John W. Larson Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Mathew Crum. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Mathew James Crum to Mathew James Jackson. The hearing will be on 12/20/2012 at 9:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. DATED: November 21, 2012. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Nicole Borchers, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 3 Cause No. DP-12-186 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF LUCILE M. ROGMANS, Decedent. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has

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been appointed as Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Angela Herring at St. Peter Law Offices, P.C., 2820 Radio Way, PO Box 17255, Missoula, MT 59808 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 25th day of October, 2012. /s/ Angela Herring, Personal Representative. DATED this the 25th day of October, 2012. ST. PETER LAW OFFICES, P.C. /s/ Don C. St. Peter STATE OF MONTANA ) : ss. County of Missoula ) I, Angela Herring, declare under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is true and correct. /a/ Angela Herring, Personal Representative. SUBSCRIBED AND SWORN TO before me this 25th day of October, 2012. /s/ Don C. St. Peter, (SEAL) Notary Public for the State of Montana, Residing at Missoula, Montana My commission expires: May 22, 2014 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 4 Karen S. Townsend Cause No. DP-12-201 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HELENE JOYCE LaCASSE, Decedent. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed as Co-Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Allen J. LaCasse and Rosemary L. Howard at St. Peter Law Offices, P.C., 2820 Radio Way, PO Box 17255, Missoula, MT 59808 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 20th day of November, 2012. /s/ Allen J. LaCasse, Personal Representative /s/ Rosemary L. Howard, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-10-127 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ROY EDWARD RAYMOND aka Roy E. Raymond, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of this Estate. All persons having claims against the deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to ELIZABETH RAYMOND, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Garlington, Lohn & Robinson, PLLP, PO Box 7909, Missoula, Montana 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 13th day of August, 2010. /s/ Elizabeth Raymond, Personal Representative. 11.15/11.22/11.29, 2012 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-12-202 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT L. FRALEY, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Ardella M. Fraley, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane PC, PO Box 4747, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 20th day of November, 2012. /s/ Ardella M. Fraley, Personal Representative WORDEN THANE, P.C. Attorneys for Personal Representative /s/ Patrick Dougherty

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP-12-194. Honorable Judge Deschamps, Presiding. NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF NORMAN FRANCIS WADE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said Deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Michael T. Henry, the Personal Representative, Return Receipt Requested, c/o Skjelset & Geer, PLLP, PO Box 4102, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 16th day of November, 2012. /s/ Michael T. Henry, Personal Representative. SKJELSET & GEER, P.L.L.P. /s/ Suzanne Geer, Attorney for the Estate MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP-12-200 Honorable John W. Larson, Presiding. NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF CATHERINE G. OLSON a/k/a KAY OLSON, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said Deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Judith Stenberg and Karla Nichwander, the Co-Personal Representatives, Return Receipt Requested, c/o Skjelset & Geer, PLLP, PO Box 4102, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 20th day of November, 2012. /s/ Judith Stenberg, Co-Personal Representative /s/ Karla Nichwander, Co-Personal Representative SKJELSET & GEER, P.L.L.P. /s/ Douglas G. Skjelset, Attorney for the Estate MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DR-12-486 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF ROBERT D. HUGHES, Petitioner, vs BRENDA OLWEN HUGHES, Respondent. THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED RESPONDENT: BRENDA OLWEN HUGHES: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Amended Petition for Dissolution in this action which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your response and serve a copy thereof upon the Petitioner’s attorney within twenty-one (21) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Amended Petition for Dissolution. Petitioner’s preliminary declaration and disclosure prepared pursuant to Mont. Code. Ann. § 40-4-252 is available for Respondent to review by contacting Petitioner’s counsel. this action is brought for the purpose of dissolving the parties’ marriage and to direct the delivery of property. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court this 7th day of November, 2012. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk (SEAL) By: Casie Kragh, Deputy Clerk WORDEN THANE P.C. PO BOX 4747, Missoula, Montana 59806 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate No. DP-12-189 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF BARI LYNN CARDIFF, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons hav-

ACROSS

1 Looney Tunes voice Mel 6 Proof-ending abbr. 9 Petraeus who stepped down as CIA head 14 Mushrooms have a weird effect on him 15 "Burn Notice" network 16 Month before febrero 17 Advice like "Don't fly so low you crash into the Death Star"? 19 Gainesville collegian 20 Drift into dreamland 21 Stars with a belt 22 Cub Scout leaders, in the U.K. 26 Like restaurants that serve sushi, pad thai, and 58-down 29 Do a medical scan on a British royal? 31 ___ Dinh Diem 32 ___ Deportes (Spanish-language channel) 33 Moves, in real estate jargon 34 Amethyst, for one 35 Elected official straight from a Fox singing competition? 39 Not the sharpest knife in the drawer 42 In ___ (mad) 43 A shot 47 ___ Mae Brown (Whoopi Goldberg's "Ghost" role) 48 Resort town for video game enthusiasts? 51 Honorary flag position 53 Wine agent 54 Tinseltown, in headlines 55 Old-school laundry detergent 56 Word after wake or Ouija 57 Oinker who designed a commercial space shuttle? 63 Highway sign 64 Start of most John Grisham book titles 65 Olympic skater Slutskaya 66 "___ to recall..." 67 Animal pattern on Gateway computer boxes 68 Young accounting partner? Last week’s solution

DOWN

1 Bike race with hills 2 Rule 3 The Diamondbacks, on scoreboards 4 See 10-down 5 Courvoisier or Remy Martin 6 Pound, in British slang 7 Unproven ability 8 "___ Kapital" 9 Junior high in a 1980s teen show 10 With 4-down, "Delta of Venus" author 11 Putting the kibosh on 12 Historic period for blacksmiths 13 Palme ___ (Cannes Film Festival prize) 18 "___.0" (Comedy Central webclip show) 21 ___ the other 22 Body spray brand with hot ads 23 ___-One (rapper who guested on R.E.M.'s "Radio Song") 24 "The Raven" monogram 25 Bobcat cousin 26 False reason 27 Sanctions 28 ___ de guerre 30 Ursus ___ (brown bear) 36 Office machine 37 Equally awful 38 Alternative to ja 39 "I blew it," to Homer 40 Big potatoes 41 Scary programs 44 Shaker founder Lee 45 F/X animation 46 QVC rival 49 Spittoon noise 50 Award for a bomb 52 Fake a signature 55 "Celebrity Rehab with Dr. ___" 56 Fat measure 57 "The Mayor of Simpleton" band 58 Saigon soup 59 Slip up 60 Wrestling victory 61 Border org. 62 Gangster's sidearm

©2012 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • November 29 – December 6, 2012 [C5]


PUBLIC NOTICES ing claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to SHAWN E. ROSSCUP, attorney for the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at PO Box 9410, Missoula, Montana 59807-9410 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED: November 1, 2012. /s/ JESSICA L. MURRAY, Personal Representative. I declare under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED: November 1, 2012. /s/ JESSICA L. MURRAY. WELLS & McKITTRICK, P.C. /s/ Shawn E. Rosscup, Attorney for Personal Representative NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/24/09, recorded as Instrument No. 200910705, Bk 838, Pg 1342, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Jeffrey McCaffree and Megan McCaffree was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for American Bank was Beneficiary and Madison Settlement Services was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Madison Settlement Services as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 419 of Pleasant View Homes No. 4, Phase 2, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201210741, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the

obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of September 27, 2012, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $252,702.07. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $245,000.83, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on February 6, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-

Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.102808) 1002.230120-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/13/03, recorded as Instrument No. 200330476, Bk 715, Pg 225, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which David M. Huerta and Georgie A. Huerta, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc. was Beneficiary and Stewart Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 33, of Pleasant View Homes, Phase III, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of September 20, 2012, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $128,314.64. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $106,563.74, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on Feb-

[C6] Missoula Independent • November 29 – December 6, 2012

ruary 1, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.91146) 1002.180637-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/27/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200730982, Bk. 809, Pg. 883, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which James Leonard Sampson, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 15 of Hurt First Addition, a platted subdivison in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana,

according to the official recorded Plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 06/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of October 5, 2012, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $162,592.29. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $156,932.38, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on February 13, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no

default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.102943) 1002.230681-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/04/10, recorded as Instrument No. 201010942, Bk. 861, Pg. 31, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Sean W. Hayward, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 6 except the West 13 feet of the South 79 feet and all Lots 7 and 8, Block 11, Butte Addition in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat of record in Book 2 of Plats at Page 57. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of October 1, 2012, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $189,931.36. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $182,684.62, plus accrued interest, accrued

late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on February 11, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.102345) 1002.230247-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on December 26, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula,


PUBLIC NOTICES MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE SW1/4 OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 14 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS TRACT 12C2 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 3692 Cody Iddings, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on December 15, 2006 and recorded on December 19, 2006 in Bk- 789, Pg- 313 as Document No. 200632432. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. successor in interest to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $$2,099.85, beginning March 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of September 3, 2012 is $253,468.17 principal, interest at the rate of 6.0% now totaling $8,954.71, late charges in the amount of $572.81, escrow advances of $2,780.15, and other fees and expenses advanced of $879.74, plus accruing interest at the rate of $41.67 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: August 17, 2012 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 17th day of August, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Amy Gough Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 5/26/2015 Citimortgage V Iddings 42011.767 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on December 26, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: LOT 9 IN BLOCK 2 EAST

MISSOULA ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF, AND DESCRIBED AS LOT 9 OFCERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5373 Rebecca E Titus, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to David R Chisholm, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated August 9, 2005 and recorded August 16, 2005 in Book 758 and Page 359 as Document No. 200521182. The beneficial interest is currently held by U.S. Bank National Association. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $708.60, beginning November 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of September 14, 2012 is $112,989.05 principal, interest at the rate of 5.5000% now totaling $5,917.90, late charges in the amount of $212.58, escrow advances of $876.96 and other fees and expenses advanced of $135.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $17.03 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: August 24, 2012 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho )) ss. County of Bingham ) On this 24th day of August, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 US Bank v Titus 41810.644 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on January 4, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: LOT 5 IN BLOCK 9 OF HILLVIEW HEIGHTS NO. 6, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY,

MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF JENNIFER D HRITSCO-MURRAY & Steve R Murray who took title as Steven R Murray, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Insurance Company of Montana, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on November 19, 2007 and recorded on November 26, 2007 on Book 809 and Page -511 as Document No. 200730610. The beneficial interest is currently held by Green Tree Servicing LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,265.67, beginning November 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of September 15, 2012 is $147,509.31 principal, interest at the rate of 6.5% now totaling $9,156.89, late charges in the amount of $244.60, escrow advances of $2,543.24, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,150.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $26.27 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: August 29, 2012 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 29th day of August, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shauna Romrell Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 06/04/2016 Green Tree V Hritscomurray 41525.433 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on January 7, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 5 OF EMMA DICKINSON HOMESITES, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL

RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Terri Lee Rider, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, Inc, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on April 10, 2009 and recorded on April 15, 2009 on Book 837 and Page 526 as Document No. 200908490. The beneficial interest is currently held by EverBank. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,192.17, beginning January 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of September 16, 2012 is $225,083.69 principal, interest at the rate of 4.5% now totaling $8,440.60, escrow advances of $2,572.87, and other fees and expenses advanced of $386.94, plus accruing interest at the rate of $27.75 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: August 29, 2012 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 29th day of August, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Everhome V Rider 41470.276 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on January 7, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NE1/4 OF SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 22 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS TRACT 2 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 4065 Keith A. Patterson and Tina M. Patterson, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Co, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as

Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on October 24, 2008 and recorded on October 24, 2008 on Book 828 and Page 658 as Document No. 200824272. The beneficial interest is currently held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A.. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,249.45, beginning August 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of September 16, 2012 is $189,875.45 principal, interest at the rate of 6.50000% now totaling $14,939.87, late charges in the amount of $199.92, escrow advances of $2,158.46, suspense balance of $-1,075.26 and other fees and expenses advanced of $147.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $33.81 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: August 30, 2012 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 30th day of August, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Chase V Patterson 41954.032 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee Sale Number: 12-02602-3 Loan Number: 0308227149 APN: 5842204 TO BE SOLD for cash at Trustee’s Sale on March 25, 2013 at the hour of 11:00 AM, recognized local time, on the front steps to the County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula the following described real property in Missoula County, Montana, to-wit: TRACT 2B1B OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 2305, LOCATED IN THE SOUTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 21 WEST, P.M.M, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. APN#5842204 More commonly known as: 15975 NAVAHO TRAIL, FRENCHTOWN, MT JAMES D MERRITT, A MARRIED PERSON, as the original grantor(s), conveyed said real property to TITLE SERVICES INC, as the original trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Wells Fargo Bank, NA,

as the original beneficiary, by a Trust Indenture dated as of September 15, 2010, and recorded on September 15, 2010 in Film No. 865 at Page 1394 under Document No. 201017901, in the Official Records of the Office of the Record of Missoula County, Montana (“Deed of Trust”). The current beneficiary is: Wells Fargo Bank, NA (the “Beneficiary”). FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY was named as Successor Trustee (the “Trustee”) by virtue of a Substitution of Trustee dated October 2, 2012 and recorded in the records of Missoula County, Montana. There has been a default in the performance of said Deed of Trust: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears as of September 21, 2012: Balance due on monthly payments from May 1, 2012 and which payments total: $1,458.18: Late charges: $233.32: Late Charge Forecasted: $0.00 Bad Check: $0.00 Net Other Fees: $0.00 Advances: $0.00 There is presently due on the obligation the principal sum of $216,088.09 plus accrued interest thereon at the rate of 4.50000% per annum from April 1, 2012, plus late charges. Interest and late charges continue to accrue. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds include the trustee’s or attorney’s fees and costs and expenses of sale. The beneficiary has elected to sell the property to satisfy the obligation and has directed the trustee to commence such sale proceedings. The beneficiary declares that the grantor is in default as described above and has directed the Trustee to commence proceedings to sell the property described above at public sale in accordance with the terms and provisions of this notice. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the aforesaid property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default theretofore existing. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714.730.2727 DATED: October 29, 2012 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITTLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee, By: Stephanie Alonzo, Authorized Signature A4326065 11/15/2012, 11/22/2012, 11/29/2012 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 02/15/2013 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which DONALD R. FOREMAN AND MARKAY FOREMAN as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 06/27/2007 and recorded 07/03/2007, in document No. 200717008 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 800 at Page Number 1213 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 31 OF STILLWATER ADDITION AT MALONEY RANCH PHASE I, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. SEE TITLE A.P.N: 2092-241-02-31-0000 MORE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED AS: LOT 31 OF STILLWATER ADDITION AT MALONEY RANCH PHASE I, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 3687 RODEO ROAD, MISSOULA, MT 59803. The beneficial

interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 05/01/2012, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $206,036.93 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.375% per annum from 05/01/2012 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 10/05/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0068610 FEI NO. 1006.164734 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING THE MISSOULA CITY COUNCIL will conduct a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. on Monday, December 10, 2012 in the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine, Missoula, MT, on the following items: 1. A request by Kathy Gibson, represented by Alan McCormick with Garlington, Lohn & Robinson, to appeal an administrative decision made by the Office of Planning and Grants regarding a 40% Conditional Use application for a property located at 2432 S. 5th Street in the City Special District #2 (SD#2) zoning district. If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling the Office of Planning and Grants at 258-3869. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. For a complete legal description or additional information regarding this appeal you may contact Hilary Schoendorf at the same number or by e-mail at hschoendorf@co.missoula.mt.us.

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • November 29 – December 6, 2012 [C7]


PUBLIC NOTICES 03/08/2013 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which JARED HEGGEN AND JENNIFER HEGGEN, AS JOINT TENANTS as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to TITLE SERVICES INC as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 08/16/2006 and recorded 08/22/2006, in document No. 200621349 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 781 at Page Number 763 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 45 OF MALONEY RANCH, PHASE VIII, AS A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 6573 LOWER MILLER CREEK ROAD, Missoula, MT 59803. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWMBS, INC., CHL MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST 2007-J2 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-J2. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 02/01/2012, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT

IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $1,662,837.92 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.875% per annum from 02/01/2012 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 10/29/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-9840407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 120045686 FEI NO. 1006.160835 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 03/08/2013 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which SUSAN C. MATTHEWS, AN UNMARRIED PERSON as Grantor(s), conveyed

said real property to TITLE SERVICES, INC. as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 06/01/2005 and recorded 06/07/2005, in document No. 200513653 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 753 at Page Number 1597 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 22 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS TRACT A-1 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 4050. Property Address: 21413 NINE MILE ROAD, HUSON, MT 59846. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF HARBORVIEW MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-08, MORTGAGE LOAN PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-08. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 05/01/2012, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $351,127.94 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 3.125% per annum from 05/01/2012 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the

[C8] Missoula Independent • November 29 – December 6, 2012

property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 10/25/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0081258 FEI NO. 1006.170613 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 02/26/2013 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which LARRY L SCHMELEBECK AND ANNA SCHMELEBECK, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 12/02/2004 and recorded 12/08/2004, in document No. 200434087 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 744 at Page Number 906 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE E1/2 OF SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 13 NORTH, RANGE 16 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DE-

SCRIBED AS TRACT 3D OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 6147. Property Address: 23727 MESSINA DRIVE, Bonner, MT 59823. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-J2, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-J2. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 11/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $135,298.22 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.875% per annum from 11/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 10/17/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0097242 FEI NO. 1006.143443

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE. To be sold for cash at Trustee’s sale on March 22, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., on the front (south) steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, all of Trustee’s right, title and interest to the following-described property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Unit 231 of the T.A. Price Condominium, Residential Condominiums located on Lot 12A of Montana Addition—Block 32—Lots 11A and 12A, an Amended Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, as showed and defined in the Final Declaration of Condominium Under the Unit Ownership Act Pertaining to the T.A. Price Condominium recorded in Book 855 of Micro Records at Page 314 and CONDO000215. Together With each Unit’s undivided interest in the General Common Elements and Limited Common Elements as set forth and described in the Final Declaration of Condominium Under the Unit Ownership Act Pertaining to the T.A. Price Condominium recorded in Book 855 of Micro Records at Page 314. MEI-432, LLC, as the original GRANTOR, conveyed the real property to Stewart Title of Missoula, as TRUSTEE, to secure an obligation owed to Missoula Federal Credit Union, as Beneficiary, by Trust Indenture recorded September 29, 2006, in Book 784 of Micro Records at Page 337, in the records of the Missoula County, Montana, Clerk and Recorder. A Modification of Deed of Trust thereafter was recorded which revised the Grantor in the prior Montana Trust Indenture to 6 on 6, LLC, which document was recorded on September 30, 2009, in Book 848 of Micro Records at Page 478. A Substitution of Trustee designating Kevin S. Jones as Successor Trustee was recorded November 8, 2012, in Book 903, Page 617, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The default of the obligation, the performance of which is secured by the aforementioned Trust Indenture, and for which default of this foreclosure is made, is for failure to pay the monthly payments as and when due. Pursuant to the provisions of the Trust Indenture, the Beneficiary has exercised, and hereby exercises, its option to declare the full amount secured by such Trust Indenture immediately due and payable. There presently is due on said obligation the principal sum of $558,973.31, plus interest at a rate of 7% totaling $9,648.03, plus late charges of $617.25, plus back-due Missoula County real property taxes of $10,843.16, for a total amount due of $580,081.75, as of August 30, 2012, plus the costs of foreclosure,

attorney’s fees, trustee’s fees, escrow closing fees, and other accruing costs. The Beneficiary has elected, and does hereby elect, to sell the above-described property to satisfy the obligation referenced above. The Beneficiary declares that the Grantor is in default as described above and demands that the Trustee sell the property described above in accordance with terms and provisions of this Notice. DATED 9th day of November, 2012. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Trustee. STATE OF MONTANA)) ss. County of Missoula). On this 9th day of November, 2012 before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Kevin S. Jones, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. (SEAL) /s/ Christy Shipp, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at: Missoula, Montana. My Commission Expires: 05/07/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE. To be sold for cash at Trustee’s sale on March 22, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., on the front (south) steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, all of Trustee’s right, title and interest to the following-described property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Unit 233 of the T.A. Price Condominium, Residential Condominiums located on Lot 12A of Montana Addition—Block 32—Lots 11A and 12A, an Amended Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, as showed and defined in the Final Declaration of Condominium Under the Unit Ownership Act Pertaining to the T.A. Price Condominium recorded in Book 855 of Micro Records at Page 314 and CONDO000215. Together With each Unit’s undivided interest in the General Common Elements and Limited Common Elements as set forth and described in the Final Declaration of Condominium Under the Unit Ownership Act Pertaining to the T.A. Price Condominium recorded in Book 855 of Micro Records at Page 314. MEI-432, LLC, as the original GRANTOR, conveyed the real property to Stewart Title of Missoula, as TRUSTEE, to secure an obligation owed to Missoula Federal Credit Union, as Beneficiary, by Trust Indenture recorded September 29, 2006, in Book 784 of Micro Records at Page 337, in the records of the Missoula County, Montana, Clerk and Recorder. A Modification of Deed of Trust


PUBLIC NOTICES thereafter was recorded which revised the Grantor in the prior Montana Trust Indenture to 6 on 6, LLC, which document was recorded on September 30, 2009, in Book 848 of Micro Records at Page 478. A Substitution of Trustee designating Kevin S. Jones as Successor Trustee was recorded November 8, 2012, in Book 903, Page 617, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The default of the obligation, the performance of which is secured by the aforementioned Trust Indenture, and for which default of this foreclosure is made, is for failure to pay the monthly payments as and when due. Pursuant to the provisions of the Trust Indenture, the Beneficiary has exercised, and hereby exercises, its option to declare the full amount secured by such Trust Indenture immediately due and payable. There presently is due on said obligation the principal sum of $558,973.31, plus interest at a rate of 7% totaling $9,648.03, plus late charges of $617.25, plus back-due Missoula County real property taxes of $10,843.16, for a total amount due of $580,081.75, as of August 30, 2012, plus the costs of foreclosure, attorney’s fees, trustee’s fees, escrow closing fees, and other accruing costs. The Beneficiary has elected, and does hereby elect, to sell the above-described property to satisfy the obligation referenced above. The Beneficiary declares that the Grantor is in default as described above and demands that the Trustee sell the property described above in accordance with terms and provisions of this Notice. DATED 9th day of November, 2012. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Trustee. STATE OF MONTANA)) ss. County of Missoula). On this 9th day of November, 2012 before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Kevin S. Jones, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. (SEAL) /s/ Christy Shipp, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at: Missoula, Montana. My Commission Expires: 05/07/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE. To be sold for cash at Trustee’s sale on March 22, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., on the front (south) steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, all of Trustee’s right, title and interest to the following-described property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Unit 235 of the T.A. Price Condominium, Residential Condominiums located on Lot 12A of Montana Addition—Block 32—Lots 11A and 12A, an Amended Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, as showed and defined in the Final Declaration of Condominium Under the Unit Ownership Act Pertaining to the T.A. Price Condominium recorded in Book 855 of Micro Records at Page 314 and CONDO000215. Together With each Unit’s undivided interest in the General Common Elements and Limited Common Elements as set forth and described in the Final Declaration of Condominium Under the Unit Ownership Act Pertaining to the T.A. Price Condominium recorded in Book 855 of Micro Records at Page 314. MEI-432, LLC, as the original GRANTOR, conveyed the real property to Stewart Title of Missoula, as TRUSTEE, to secure an obligation owed to Missoula Federal Credit Union, as Beneficiary, by Trust Indenture recorded September 29, 2006, in Book 784 of Micro Records at Page 337, in the records of the Missoula County, Montana, Clerk and Recorder. A Modification of Deed of Trust thereafter was recorded which revised the Grantor in the prior Montana Trust Indenture to 6 on 6, LLC, which document was recorded on September 30, 2009, in Book 848 of Micro Records at Page 478. A Substitution of Trustee designating Kevin S. Jones as Successor Trustee was recorded November 8, 2012, in Book 903, Page 617, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The default of the obligation, the performance of which is secured by the aforementioned Trust Indenture, and for which default of this foreclosure is made, is for failure to pay the monthly payments as and when due. Pursuant to the provisions of the Trust Indenture, the Beneficiary has exercised, and hereby exercises, its option to declare the full amount secured by such Trust Indenture immediately due and payable. There presently is due on said obligation the principal sum of $558,973.31, plus interest at a rate of 7% totaling $9,648.03, plus late charges of $617.25, plus back-due Missoula County real property taxes of $10,843.16, for a total amount due of $580,081.75, as of August 30, 2012, plus the costs of foreclosure, attorney’s fees, trustee’s fees, escrow closing fees, and other accruing costs. The Beneficiary has elected, and does hereby elect, to sell the above-described property to satisfy the obligation referenced above. The Beneficiary declares that the Grantor is in default as described above and de-

mands that the Trustee sell the property described above in accordance with terms and provisions of this Notice. DATED 9th day of November, 2012. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Trustee. STATE OF MONTANA)) ss. County of Missoula). On this 9th day of November, 2012 before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Kevin S. Jones, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. (SEAL) /s/ Christy Shipp, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at: Missoula, Montana. My Commission Expires: 05/07/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE. To be sold for cash at Trustee’s sale on March 22, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., on the front (south) steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, all of Trustee’s right, title and interest to the following-described property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Unit 237 of the T.A. Price Condominium, Residential Condominiums located on Lot 12A of Montana Addition—Block 32—Lots 11A and 12A, an Amended Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, as showed and defined in the Final Declaration of Condominium Under the Unit Ownership Act Pertaining to the T.A. Price Condominium recorded in Book 855 of Micro Records at Page 314 and CONDO000215. Together With each Unit’s undivided interest in the General Common Elements and Limited Common Elements as set forth and described in the Final Declaration of Condominium Under the Unit Ownership Act Pertaining to the T.A. Price Condominium recorded in Book 855 of Micro Records at Page 314. MEI-432, LLC, as the original GRANTOR, conveyed the real property to Stewart Title of Missoula, as TRUSTEE, to secure an obligation owed to Missoula Federal Credit Union, as Beneficiary, by Trust Indenture recorded September 29, 2006, in Book 784 of Micro Records at Page 337, in the records of the Missoula County, Montana, Clerk and Recorder. A Modification of Deed of Trust thereafter was recorded which revised the Grantor in the prior Montana Trust Indenture to 6 on 6, LLC, which document was recorded on September 30, 2009, in Book 848 of Micro Records at Page 478. A Substitution of Trustee designating Kevin S. Jones as Successor Trustee was recorded November 8, 2012, in Book 903, Page 617, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The default of the obligation, the performance of which is secured by the aforementioned Trust Indenture, and for which default of this foreclosure is made, is for failure to pay the monthly payments as and when due. Pursuant to the provisions of the Trust Indenture, the Beneficiary has exercised, and hereby exercises, its option to declare the full amount secured by such Trust Indenture immediately due and payable. There presently is due on said obligation the principal sum of $558,973.31, plus interest at a rate of 7% totaling $9,648.03, plus late charges of $617.25, plus back-due Missoula County real property taxes of $10,843.16, for a total amount due of $580,081.75, as of August 30, 2012, plus the costs of foreclosure, attorney’s fees, trustee’s fees, escrow closing fees, and other accruing costs. The Beneficiary has elected, and does hereby elect, to sell the above-described property to satisfy the obligation referenced above. The Beneficiary declares that the Grantor is in default as described above and demands that the Trustee sell the property described above in accordance with terms and provisions of this Notice. DATED 9th day of November, 2012. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Trustee. STATE OF MONTANA)) ss. County of Missoula). On this 9th day of November, 2012 before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Kevin S. Jones, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. (SEAL) /s/ Christy Shipp, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at: Missoula, Montana. My Commission Expires: 05/07/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE. To be sold for cash at Trustee’s sale on March 22, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., on the front (south) steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, all of Trustee’s right, title and interest to the following-described property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Unit 239 of the T.A. Price Condominium, Residential Condominiums located on Lot 12A of Montana Addition—Block 32—Lots 11A and 12A, an Amended Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, as showed and defined in the Final Declaration of Condominium Under the Unit Ownership Act Pertaining to

SUSTAINAFIEDS the T.A. Price Condominium recorded in Book 855 of Micro Records at Page 314 and CONDO000215. Together With each Unit’s undivided interest in the General Common Elements and Limited Common Elements as set forth and described in the Final Declaration of Condominium Under the Unit Ownership Act Pertaining to the T.A. Price Condominium recorded in Book 855 of Micro Records at Page 314. MEI-432, LLC, as the original GRANTOR, conveyed the real property to Stewart Title of Missoula, as TRUSTEE, to secure an obligation owed to Missoula Federal Credit Union, as Beneficiary, by Trust Indenture recorded September 29, 2006, in Book 784 of Micro Records at Page 337, in the records of the Missoula County, Montana, Clerk and Recorder. A Modification of Deed of Trust thereafter was recorded which revised the Grantor in the prior Montana Trust Indenture to 6 on 6, LLC, which document was recorded on September 30, 2009, in Book 848 of Micro Records at Page 478. A Substitution of Trustee designating Kevin S. Jones as Successor Trustee was recorded November 8, 2012, in Book 903, Page 617, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The default of the obligation, the performance of which is secured by the aforementioned Trust Indenture, and for which default of this foreclosure is made, is for failure to pay the monthly payments as and when due. Pursuant to the provisions of the Trust Indenture, the Beneficiary has exercised, and hereby exercises, its option to declare the full amount secured by such Trust Indenture immediately due and payable. There presently is due on said obligation the principal sum of $558,973.31, plus interest at a rate of 7% totaling $9,648.03, plus late charges of $617.25, plus back-due Missoula County real property taxes of $10,843.16, for a total amount due of $580,081.75, as of August 30, 2012, plus the costs of foreclosure, attorney’s fees, trustee’s fees, escrow closing fees, and other accruing costs. The Beneficiary has elected, and does hereby elect, to sell the above-described property to satisfy the obligation referenced above. The Beneficiary declares that the Grantor is in default as described above and demands that the Trustee sell the property described above in accordance with terms and provisions of this Notice. DATED 9th day of November, 2012. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Trustee. STATE OF MONTANA)) ss. County of Missoula). On this 9th day of November, 2012 before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Kevin S. Jones, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. (SEAL) /s/ Christy Shipp, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at: Missoula, Montana. My Commission Expires: 05/07/2013

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K237DZ, Missoula, Montana PUBLIC NOTICE On November 9, 2012, Sheila Callahan & Friends, Inc. filed an application for the renewal of license of K237DZ serving Missoula, Montana. K237DZ operates on Channel 237 at a power of 99 watts and rebroadcasts the signal of Station KIBG, 100.7 MHz, Bigfork, Montana. The transmitter site for K237DZ is located at 46° 48' 30" N. Latitude, 113° 58' 38" W. Longitude. You are invited to advise the Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC 20554, of any facts relating to K237DZ’s application for renewal or whether the station has operated in the public interest. K296FM, Missoula, Montana PUBLIC NOTICE On November 13, 2012, Sheila Callahan & Friends, Inc. filed an application for the renewal of license of K296FM serving Missoula, Montana. K296FM operates on Channel 296 at a power of 20 watts and rebroadcasts the signal of Station KDXT, 97.9 MHz, Lolo, Montana. The transmitter site for K296FM is located at 46° 48' 30" N. Latitude, 113° 58' 38" W. Longitude. You are invited to advise the Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC 20554, of any facts relating to K296FM’s application for renewal or whether the station has operated in the public interest.

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RENTAL APARTMENTS 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom $550 across from Public Library, coin-op laundry, offstreet parking, W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom $550 between Russell and Reserve, W/D hookups, offstreet parking, W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom $575, northside location, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 1024 Stephens #2. 2bed/1bath ground level apartment, shared yard, coin-ops, cat? $675. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 112 TURNER CT.: STUDIO, FULL KITCHEN & BATH, SECOND FLR, STORAGE, BIG CLOSET, PARKING, NEAR PARK & BASEBALL FIELDS, $440. $100 Costco Gift Card. Garden City Property Management 549-6106 120 Harlem: 1 bedroom, den-area, top floor, laundry, private deck, free cable, heat paid. $750, 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property Management 549-6106 1237 KENSINGTON: STUDIO, NEWER!, PRIVATE PATIO, FULL KITCHEN & BATH, DISHWASHER, STORAGE, CENTRAL LOCATION, FREE CABLE, COIN-OP LAUNDRY, NO PETS/SMOK-

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are ING HT PAID, $595. 1 YEAR COSTCO available on an equal opportunity basis. MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property To report discrimination in housing call Management 549-6106 HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

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1301 Montana: Newer studios, Pergo floors, full kitchen with DW, laundry, patio, heat & cable paid $660 & $625. 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property Management 549-6106 1509 10th: 1 Bedroom, dining, laundry, large, central, parking, heat & cable paid $675. 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property Management 5496106 1801 Howell #3. 2 bed/1 bath, W/D hookups, storage, shared yard, pet okay. RENT INCENTIVE $725. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1826 S. 4TH ST. W.: 2 BEDROOM, 2ND FLOOR, CARPORT & STORAGE, ONSITE LAUNDRY FACILITIES, BIG CLOSETS, BY GOOD FOOD STORE, PRIVATE DECK, NO SMOKING OR DOGS, CAT ALLOWED!, HEAT PAID, $775. 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property Management 549-6106 2 bedroom, 1 bath $795 W/S/G paid, newly renovated, Southside location, DW, W/D hookups, carport. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom $595, southside, DW, carport, off-street parking, storage, W/S/G paid, cat upon approval, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom $615 coin-op laundry, off street parking, storage, H/W/S/G paid, No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom $695 quiet culde-sac, DW, coin-op laundry, off street parking, H/W/S/G paid, No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 WEEKS FREE With 6 Month Lease (Limited Time to Qualified Applicants) New Complex, 1 & 2 bedroom units, $650$825 DW, A/C, deck, storage, coin-op laundry, limited off-street parking, W/S/G paid, 2 bedroom units have W/D hookups or 2nd bath. No pets. No smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

2212 1/4 North: Studio on alley, yard, full kitchen, shower, dog welcome $480. 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property Management 549-6106 2339 Mary #1. 1 bed/1 bath, coin-ops, shared yard, HEAT PAID. $575. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 322 BENTON #B: STUDIO, ON-SITE WASHING MACHINE, JUST OFF OF HIGGINS AVENUE, CENTRAL, * NO COOKING *, NEW CARPET, ALL PAID, $375. 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property Management 5466106

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DUPLEXES 407 S. 5th St. E. “B” 2bed/1bath, W/D hookups, close to University, all utilities paid. RENT INCENTIVE. $800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

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431 Daly: 1 bedroom, second floor, 1 1/2 blocks to UM, storage, laundry, heat paid, $595. 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property Management 549-6106

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HOUSES

731 W. Sussex #4. 2bed/1bath HEAT PAID, carport, coin-ops. $700. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 805 Ryman: 1 bedroom, NEW CARPET, lower with egress, near downtown, LF, heat paid, cat, $490. 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property Management 549-6106 808 1/2 Sussex: 2 bedroom, by College of Tech, hookups, newer carpet, lower with egress, $610. 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property Management 549-6106 825 SW Higgins Ave. B3. 2 bed/1 bath HEAT PAID, patio, single garage, gas fireplace. $800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 Luxurious Uptown Flat Apt. Near downtown&UM. 1Br/1Ba. $825/mo + $150/mo utility fee: covers all but electricity. Alex (323)825-1875

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GARDEN DISTRICT 2 BEDROOM RENT: $703 W/S/G PAID

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Grizzly Property Management, Inc. No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing 30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

www.gatewestrentals.com

[C10] Missoula Independent • November 29 – December 6, 2012

"Let us tend your den"

GOLD DUST APARTMENTS 2 BEDROOM RENT: $691 INCLUDES ALL UTILITIES

Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

HOMES FOR SALE 1004 Charlo. Energy efficient 2 story 1876 sqft home with 3 bed + bonus, 2 bath, high finishes and stainless appliances. $249,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com 1010 Vine Street. Lower Rattlesnake 2 bed, 1 bath very well-maintained home with single garage. $171,500. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com 108 North Davis. 3 bed, 1.5 bath with 2 car garage near Milwaukee Bike Path. Lots of upgrades and a great front porch. $180,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com 1136 & 1136 1/2 Howell. 3 UNITS. 3 bed house & two 2 bed apartments on corner lot. $380,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com 11689 Stollen Rock Court. 5 bed, 3 bath, 2 car garage on 3.15 acres. $329,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net 1265 #B Dakota. To-be-built 3 bed, 2 bath with double garage near McCormick Park. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com

Rent Incentive

2026 9th Street 1 Bed Apt. Hkups $525/month

RENTALS OUT OF TOWN

COMMERCIAL

Property Management

4905 Lower Miller Creek 2 Bed, 1.5 Bath Garage $865/month

Room for rent Cozy bmnt room near U & dntn. Ut/C/I paid. w/d. $450/mo. 406-396-7718

11270 Napton Way 1C. 3bed/1bath, shared yard, coin-ops, central location in Lolo.$800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

549-7711 Check our website!

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ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

9850 Anderson Road. 4bed/1bath house in Bonner. Spacious yard, basement, W/D hookups. $1050. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown www.alpharealestate.com

ROOMMATES

Finalist

Finalist

Some restrictions apply. For more information contact MHA Management at

549-4113

1480 Cresthaven. 3 bed, 2.5 bath on over one private acre. Open floor plan, dream master bathroom and double garage. $350,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 1520 South 6th West. 2 bed, 1.5 bath with wood floors, fenced yard & basement. $185,000. KD Dickinson, Portico Real Estate 327-8787. kdrae52@msn.com 1623 Wild Turkey Lane, Stevensville. Over 200 acre private ranch with creek surrounded by conservation easement land. $949,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula. 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoulaproperties.c om 1830 Schilliing. 3 bed, 1.5 two story with front & back porches, fenced back yard, UG sprinklers, AC & garage. $179,900. KD Dickinson, Portico Real Estate 3278787. kdrae52@msn.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath Pleasant View home. $205,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath Windsor Park home. $195,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 322 David Court. 3 bed, 1 bath on 1/4 fenced acre near river trail. 3 car garage & many great upgrades. $210,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula. 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoulaproperties.com 4 Bdr, 1 Bath South Hills home. $182, 500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4227 South 7th West. Beautiful sample home to be built. 4 bed, 2.5 bath with covered porch and 2 car garage. Lot available separately for $125,000. MLS #20121798, $325,000. Jake Booher, Prudential Montana 544-6114. jbooher@montana.com 4412 23rd Avenue. 4 bed, 1 bath with 2 car garage on 9600 sq.ft. lot. Lots of room! $185,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net 4600 Monticello. 3 bed, 2 bath with 2 car garage in Canyon Creek. Private backyard & patio. $176,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com


REAL ESTATE 5 Bdr, 4 Bath, Wye area area home on 2.5 acres. $389,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 521 Daly. 3 bed, 2 bath in U District. Single garage, basement, studio, enclosed front porch. $369,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 8804749. montpref@bigsky.net 5501 Prospect. 4 bed, 4 bath adjacent to common area in Grant Creek. Sun room, hot tub and many upgrades. $385,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 6544 McArthur. 3 bed, 2.5 bath with gas fireplace and 2 car garage. $240,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net 833 Defoe. 1 bed, 1 bath Northside bungalow with large front yard. $125,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net 955 Clements. 3 bed, 2.5 bath in Target Range with gas fireplace, wood floors, deck and large heated shop. $463,500. Jake Booher, Prudential Montana 5446114. jbooher@montana.com Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free comparative market analysis. 360-8234 Huge Lot Bungalow Style Home Middle of Missoula, close to Good Food Store, 1/2 acre + lot, enormous shop, great home. 203 Curtis, 2405227 porticorealestate.com I can help you sell your home! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com Looking for a place to call home? Call me! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com Looking for homebuyer education? Call me! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES 1641 Stoddard To-be-built 6-plex on Northside. $650,500 Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties 1847 West Central. 3 bed, 1.5 bath townhome with 2 car garage. No HOA fees. MLS #20121385. $158,500. Jake Booher, Prudential Missoula 544-6114. jbooher@montana.com 2025 Mullan Road. Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos. Large secure units with affordable HOA dues. Starting at $144,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net 3100 Washburn #31. 2 bed, 1 bath fully remodeled with all appliances & gas fireplace. $100 HOA dues. $119,000. Jake Booher, Prudential Montana 544-6114. jbooher@montana.com 4433A Bordeaux Blvd. Newer 3 bed, 2 bath with 2 car garage. Fenced backyard with dog kennel & pergola. Very nice! $179,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com

Affordable Townhomes Didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think you could afford to buy your own place? This sweet new, green-built development may be your ticket. STARTING AT $79,000. 1400 Burns, 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Beautiful Downtown Triplex Two 2 bedroom units and one 1 bedroom; great rental history; great building on Historic Register with tons of character and in great shape! $359,500. 518 Alder porticorealestate.com 240-5227 Open & Light & Green & Clean Efficiency abounds in this 3 bed, 2.5 bath stand alone super-insulated condo with heated floors and so much more. 1530 S 12th W. Near Good Food Store and bike trails. $250,000. 240-5227. porticorealestate.com The Uptown Flats have two one bed one bath units starting at $149,900. Great downtown living! Call Anne 546-5816 for showing. www.movemontana.com Uptown Flats. From $149,900. Upscale gated community near downtown. All SS appliances, car port, storage and access to community room and exercise room plus more. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com

5104 Village View Way #3. Beautiful 2 bed, 2 bath South HIlls condo with garage & patio. $164,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com

MANUFACTURED HOMES

53 Brookside. 2 bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage on corner lot with Mount Jumbo views. $289,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net

14x70 MOBILE HOME FOR SALE! $6500.00 o.b.o at 12 Laurie Lane (El Mar Village) 1971 Century 14x70 single-wide. In good condition with built-in dishwasher, stove, garbage disposal, 2 refridgerator/freezers, washer and dryer, raised living room...a MUST SEE!! Please call if interested, we are asking for serious inquiries only. (406)549-2515 or georganayahvah@gmail.com.

723 North 5th West. 2 bed, 1.5 bath with maple floors, open kitchen, fenced backyard & lots of light. $179,500. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com 8 Catrina Lane. 2 bed, 1 bath single level townhome with large fenced yard, patio & garage. $132,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

1825 Burlington. Two central Missoula lots with 3 bed, 2 bath mobile. Great investment or first time buy. $89,900. Pat

McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com

LAND FOR SALE 20 ACRES FREE. Buy 40-Get 60 acres. $0-Down, $168/month. Money back gaurentee. NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful views. Roads/surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.SunsetRanches.com 207 Catlin. 1.54 acre development parcel in central Missula. $375,000. Jake Booher, Prudential Montana 544-6114. jbooher@montana.com 3.2 Acres in the Wye area. Gorgeous mountain and valley views. $65,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

all utilities stubbed to the site and ready to build on: $160,000. portico realestate.com KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com 240-5227

COMMERCIAL 110 Main Street, Stevensville. Restaurant in heart of Stevensville next to Blacksmith Brewery. $149,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net 4 Klakken, Noxon. Motel with 9 units, laundromat & 2 rentals on 1/2 acre. $259,000. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

tana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net

19488 Highway 200 East/ Bonner. 5 bed, 3 bath, basement & 3 car garage on 3 mountain view acres. $399,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 2406503. riceteam@bigsky.net

2351 Highway 83 West, Seeley Lake. 2 bed, 2 bath with basement & 2 car garage on 2.4 lakefront acres. $583,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula. 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoulaproperties.com

2 Bdr, 3 Bath Lolo home. $217,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 2110 Petty Creek, Alberton. Gorgeous 3 bed, 2.5 with 2 car garage on over 10 acres. $409,000. Betsy Milyard, Mon-

3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Stevensville area home on 6+ acres. $339,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

East Missoula Building Lot with great trees and a sweet â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;hood. $55,000. 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

4,500 Sq Ft Lot on the Northside. Zoned for single or multifamily. All utilities available. $59,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

Gorgeous Victorian home zoned for commercial use in a great location $395,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

5980 Gregâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way. Commercial building lot in Missoula development park allows for 12,000 sq.ft. building. $212,500. Jake Booher, Prudential Montana 5446114. jbooher@montana.com

OUT OF TOWN

Bear Gulch, Garnet Ghost Town. 40 acres bordering BLM land. Great recreational property. $55,000. Jake Booher, Prudential Montana, 544-6114. jbooher@montana.com

Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com

170 South 1st Street, Clinton. 2 bedroom, 1 bath with basement & garage on private 2.2 fenced acres. Close to the river and Forest Service land. $165,000.

Bruin Lane Lots. Near Council Groves & The Ranch Golf Course. From $85,000. Jake Booher, Prudential Montana. 5446114. jbooher@montana.com NHN Twin Creek Road/Bonner. 3.69 acres with creek. Mobiles on permanent foundations allowed. $165,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 2406503. riceteam@bigsky.net Rattlesnake Acreage Rattlesnake 1/4 acre lot at the base of Mt. Jumbo with

RICE TEAM

Rochelle Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

Missoula Properties 728-8270

Please call me with any questions Astrid Oliver Senior Loan Originator Guild Mortgage Company 1001 S. Higgins Ave 2A Missoula, MT 59801

Phone: 406-258-7522 Cell: 406-550-3587 NMLS # 395211, Guild License #3274, Branch 206 NMLS # 398152

Robin Rice â&#x20AC;˘ 240-6503 8668 Snapdragon â&#x20AC;˘ $204,900 â&#x20AC;˘ Brand new 3 bed, 2 bath on 1/4 acre with great views â&#x20AC;˘ No money down!

5905 Ocean View $300,000 This home on 1.63 pine studded and park like acres is a must see if you are looking for a large home with nature, privacy and tranquility.

11689 Stolen Rock Court, Frenchtown $329,000 â&#x20AC;˘ 5 bed, 3 bath on over 3 acres â&#x20AC;˘ Great valley & mountain views

&YMPHMRKELSYWI# -´PPWLS[]SY XLI[E]LSQI 7GSXX,ERWIR:4'SRWXVYGXMSR0SER7TIGMEPMWX 21079-

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missoulanews.com â&#x20AC;˘ November 29 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; December 6, 2012 [C11]


REAL ESTATE

4 Bdr, 3 Bath Stevensville area home on 13 acres. $575,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 418 Church, Stevensville. 1930’s 4 bed, 1.5 bath with wood floors, original cabinetry, and great front porch. Fireplace, patio, single garage. $174,500. KD Dickinson, Portico Real Estate 327-8787. kdrae522msn.com 45822 Meadowlark, Polson. 5 bed, 3 bath Lindal Cedar home on over 3 acres on 250 feet of Flathead Lake frontage. $1,600,000. Jake Booher, Prudential

Montana 544-6114. jbooher@montana.com 57005 West Road, Moiese. Certified Organic Farm with artesian well on 80 acres near Flathead River. $525,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com Big Arm On Flathead Lake. 45765 Meadow Lake Lane. 6 bed, 4 bath with 3 car garage on lakefront acreage. Two additional homes included. MLS #20120312. $1,200,000. Jake Booher, Prudential Montana 544-6114. jbooher@montana.co

HUGE PRICE REDUCTION! 15305 Spring Hill Road, Frenchtown. Beautiful cedar 4 bed, 2.5 bath with 3 car garage & deck on acreage bordering Forest Service. $500,000. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. PRICE REDUCED! 101 Boardwalk, Stevensville. 3 bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage. Zoned commercial with separate office. $310,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net PRICE REDUCED! 102 Boardwalk, Stevensville. 3 bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage.

Zoned commercial with 48’x30’ shop. $293,500. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net

THE UPTOWN FLATS

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL

1 and 2 bedroom condos available

QUICK CASH FOR REAL ESTATE NOTES and Land Installment Contracts. We also lend on Real Estate with strong equity. 406-721-1444 www.CreativeFinance.com

Units starting at

$149,900 Call Anne for more details

Homes: 1520 S. 6th W. . . . . . . .Sweet & Charming . . . . . . . .$185,000 518 Alder . . . . . . . . . .Gorgeous Downtown Triplex . . .$359,500 203 N Curtis . . . . . . . . .Older Farm House . . . . . . . .$225,000 418 Church . . . . . . . . .Stevensville Charmer . . . . . . .$174,500 4600 Monticello Place . . .Canyon Creek . . . . . . . . . . .$176,000 506 Central . . . . . . . . .Sweet Stevi Home . . . . . . . .$200,000 1830 Schilling . . . . . . . .Newer, Light and Airy . . . . . .$179,900 Homes w/land: 20135 Wambli . . . . . . . .Gorgeous Custom Home . . . . .$599,000 2348 River Road . . . . . .Home & Land to Build . . . . .$535,000 Land: Westside Building Lot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$35,900 Rattlesnake Lot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$160,000 E Missoula Building Lot With Trees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$55,000 Sawmill . . . . . . . . . . . .Cascade County . . . . . . . . . .$30,000 Commercial: 2309 Grant . . . . . . . . .Awesome Quonset . . . . . . . .$155,000 1535 Liberty Lane . . . . .New Lease Space . . . . . . . . .$11-$15 Townhomes/Condos: 1400 Burns . . . . . . . . .Cheaper Than Rent . . . . .From $79,000 1530 S 12th West . . . . .Green Construction . . . . . . . .$250,000 Uptown Flats . . . . . . . . .Upscale Downtown .Starting at $149,900

BUILT IN 2009 1004 Charlo $249,900 MLS #20126560 • Energy efficient, open floor plan • 3 large bedrooms on same level • Bonus room and 2 bath • Cherry floors, Avinite & Butcher Block counters, stainless steel appliances • Fenced yard, large deck in back and a wired shop

Pat McCormick Real Estate Broker Real Estate With Real Experience

pat@properties2000.com 406-240-SOLD (7653)

Properties2000.com

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

546-5816 Anne Jablonski annierealtor@gmail.com movemontana.com

PORTICO REAL ESTATE theuptownflatsmissoula.com


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