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NEWS BOOKS

BUILDING A BEER CASTLE IN SUPERIOR: MONTANA’S SMALLEST CRAFT BREWERY CARRIES BIG ASPIRATIONS

PETE FROMM RETURNS TO THE WILDERNESS

OPINION

SEND IN THE KLOWNS: MAKING SENSE OF A TEENAGE “PRANK”

BOOM FILL SECOND MUSIC DOOM, ANNUAL EROSION FESTIVAL


[2] Missoula Independent • October 13–October 20, 2016


News

Voices/Letters Medical marijuana and Missoula Public Library .....................................4 The Week in Review Hip Strip Block Party, Zinke protest and Tic Tacs........................6 Briefs Uncle Bill’s Sausages, paid parental leave and Saha awarded..............................6 Etc. Lola Zinke enters the campaign ...............................................................................7 News Bob Lake counters criticism in PSC reelection bid ...............................................8 News Montana’s smallest brewery has big aspirations ...................................................9 Opinion Missoula succumbs to the scourge of a teenage prank..................................10 Opinion Tough decisions loom for the West’s wild horses ..........................................11 Feature Shortchanged ...................................................................................................14

Arts & Entertainment

Arts Grazing the metal smorgasbord at Erosion Fest....................................................18 Music Death Angel’s near brush with mainstream metal .............................................19 Books Pete Fromm returns to the nonfiction wilderness.............................................20 Film Train falls even flatter than the book....................................................................21 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films.......................................................22 The Real Dirt Heirloom tomato pie .............................................................................23 Happiest Hour Devil’s Hump wins gold ......................................................................25 8 Days a Week But only four if you work construction ...............................................26 Agenda Spotlight on Peace Party...................................................................................34 Mountain High The Tweed Ride ..................................................................................35

Exclusives

Street Talk .......................................................................................................................4 News of the Weird ........................................................................................................12 Classifieds....................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ...................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y ....................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle .......................................................................................................C-8 This Modern World...................................................................................................C-12

PUBLISHER Matt Gibson EDITOR Skylar Browning PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston BOOKKEEPER Ruth Anderson DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL PROJECTS Christie Magill ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson CALENDAR EDITOR Charley Macorn STAFF REPORTERS Kate Whittle, Alex Sakariassen, Derek Brouwer COPY EDITOR Gaaby Patterson ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua GRAPHIC DESIGNER Charles Wybierala CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Steven Kirst, Robin Bernard, Jennifer Adams, Beau Wurster MARKETING & EVENTS COORDINATOR Ariel LaVenture CLASSIFIED SALES REPRESENTATIVE Jessica Fuerst FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Scott Renshaw, Nick Davis, Matthew Frank, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Rob Rusignola, Jaime Rogers, Chris La Tray, Sarah Aswell, Migizi Pensoneau, April Youpee-Roll

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2016 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • October 13–October 20, 2016 [3]


STREET TALK

[voices] by Skylar Browning

Asked Tuesday afternoon in the University of Montana’s PAR/TV building The nationwide clown scare reached Missoula last week with what turned out to be a misguided teenage prank. How do you feel about clowns? Follow-up: This prank crossed a line by threatening public safety. What’s a more appropriate prank you’ve pulled off—or seen pulled off?

Curen Feliciani: My grandpa was a clown. He was a rodeo clown and he also dressed up as a clown for other events. They’re not all bad. It’s unfortunate right now that they’re getting such a bad rap. They don’t deserve it. Extra credit: I convinced my friend he was getting expelled from [middle] school. I even got the principal to help me.

Keara Robert: I’m not afraid of real clowns. I do get angry when people take clowns, though, and make a more perverse version of them to try and scare people. Bloody good show: I put red Kool-Aid in the shower once. It was a long time ago. My brother was completely freaked out.

Jenna Lockman: In general, clowns are fine. I think I was only really scared by them for a six-month period after I read Stephen King’s It. Knock-knock: I like to scare my roommates by tapping on the windows at night. I don’t know if that’s more appropriate or not.

An amazing treasure I am a frequent visitor to the Missoula area, and, being a nature lover and a birder, I always enjoy a walk in Greenough Park. While doing some research on my family, I began to wonder if there was any connection between my Great Aunt Estelle Greenough Easton and Greenough Park. Was she part of that family, did she ever live in Missoula and was there ever a Greenough home on the park acreage? On a drizzly day last week, I popped into the Missoula Public Library to see if anyone would be willing to help me answer these questions. I headed for the reference desk. Jodi Christophe was on duty. Friendly and helpful, she offered to email me the information. Imagine my excitement when, the next day, Jodi wrote me back, telling me that Estelle Greenough was Thomas L. Greenough’s eldest daughter. Estelle and her siblings had grown up in the family home near Greenough Park, and Estelle was married to my grandfather’s brother, Stanly (correct spelling) A. Easton in that same house. Jodi sent me photocopies of old Missoulian issues describing how Thomas L. had given Greenough Park to the city of Missoula in 1901. She also found an article which showed the Greenough Mansion being moved during the construction of the freeway in the 1990s. My point is that there’s nothing like talking to a real human being—a good reference librarian such as Jodi Christophe. Your library is an amazing treasure. It is one of the most welcoming and complete that I’ve encountered anywhere. I understand there’s a bond issue to help construct a much-needed bigger library. Please support it. The Missoula Public Library is a community center, and an asset that will keep on giving into the years ahead. Joan Easton Lentz Santa Barbara, Calif.

I-182 must pass Salina Chatlain: I’m really scared of clowns. For me personally, it goes back to Poltergeist. I saw that movie way too young. It’s not the clown’s fault, by the way. As an art form, I think clowning is great. But when you add the rainbow hair and the noses and the shoes … unacceptable. Griz gone wild: My favorite prank ever has to be when my unstable friend streaked a Griz football game. Twice. I wasn’t there, but I saw the video. I’m pretty sure he’s been banned for life.

[4] Missoula Independent • October 13–October 20, 2016

My name is Quinn Fitzpatrick. I am a 28year-old recovered alcoholic whose life has been saved by medical cannabis, and I am writing to encourage my fellow Montanans to vote YES on I-182 this fall (see “In search of releaf,” Oct. 6). When I was 23 years old and at the

L

height of my alcoholism, a severe accident left me with a bruised heart, broken hand, two breaks in my pelvis and a severely lacerated liver. Had the woman who hit me with her car not called the ambulance, I would have died from internal bleeding. I spent four months in the hospital, three of which were spent in the SICU. I spent those four months on heavy opiate-based medications. I left the hospital with prescriptions for some of the most heavily abused opiatebased medications on the market. After taking only a small fraction of what I had been prescribed, I opted to use cannabis and yoga for rehabilitation instead. Although the doctors had optimistically estimated an 18month recovery time, I was walking in just

“A state ballot initiative should not be the process to approve medicine. The general public is not qualified to make medical decisions.” six months and back doing backflips within a year. I was able to stay out of the clutches of opiate addiction while cannabis, diet and exercise helped me recover and shaped me into the man I am today. I have now been sober for five years. I-182 must pass. Lives depend on this law, and Montana citizens want a responsible and accountable medical marijuana law. If you know someone with an addiction problem, a pain management situation or a lifethreatening condition like epilepsy, cancer or HIV/AIDS, please know that medical cannabis could someday be their saving grace. Cannabis isn’t for everyone or every condition, but patients suffering from debilitating illnesses should all have the right to access this natural medicine safely and legally. Quinn Fitzpatrick Belgrade

No on 1-182 Montanans were sold a bill of goods in 2004 that the process of getting medical marijuana was by going to their doctor and receiving a prescription. Montanans were deceived back then and the proponents of I-182 are trying to deceive Montanans this time as well. By 2008 Montanans saw the irresponsible, unregulated and unmonitored program explode in Montana. Traveling doctors “recommended” cannabis to their “clients,” despite the fact that they lack even the most rudimentary information about the composition, quality and dose. While pharmaceutical companies are responsible for any harm that befalls a patient from their products and tobacco companies are held accountable for damage done by cigarettes, marijuana providers and dispensaries hold no accountability for their product, of which very little is known. At a time that efforts are being made to stem the epidemic of prescription drug abuse, I-182 would allow distribution sites to proliferate without true regulation. A state ballot initiative should not be the process to approve medicine. The general public is not qualified to make medical decisions. The practice of medicine is evidence-based, and the legalization of a drug with the potential for abuse by the general population that has no qualification to determine composition, quality and dose is a bad way to practice medicine. It guarantees the failure of a program that may have potential success for patients who need medical marijuana under a doctor’s care and it ensures the accessibility of recreational marijuana to the rest of the population. Montanans need to vote “No” to I182. It wasn’t a good idea in 2004, and it is not a good idea in 2016. If you take the time to compare the two initiatives from 2004 and 2016, it is obvious that not only have the pro-marijuana proponents not made the medical marijuana safer for people with debilitating conditions, they have also opened up the system so that those who want to use it recreationally can have easier access to it. Steve Zabawa Billings

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via email: editor@missoulanews.com.


missoulanews.com • October 13–October 20, 2016 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Amy Donovan

Wednesday, Oct. 5 Proponents of the pro-medical marijuana ballot initiative roll out the “Champions for I-182” campaign, with a list of 116 noteworthy supporters from across the state, including former Montana Speaker of the House John Vincent.

Thursday, Oct. 6 Missoula International School hosts an open house showing the designs for its proposed 35,000-square-foot Third Street property, which was most recently occupied by The Hive community center. MIS estimates the new campus will cost between $10 million and $13 million.

Friday, Oct. 7 Missoula police identify the “prankster” behind the recent “Zootown Klown” threat on Facebook. Detectives determine that a 15year-old male is the culprit and poses no real threat to the community.

Saturday, Oct. 8 Attendees of the Hip Strip Block Party bundle up for an evening outdoor screening of The Princess Bride, hosted by the Roxy. The movie is projected in the Missoula Senior Center parking lot.

Shonen Knife performs at Monk’s Bar Oct. 11. The Japanese pop-punk band formed in 1981 and has toured through Missoula several times over the last few decades.

Sunday, Oct. 9 An Indy staffer attends a presidential debate watch party at a friend’s home, and brings Tic Tacs along as a reference to Donald Trump’s confessed habit of keeping mints on hand “just in case” he tries to kiss women.

Monday, Oct. 10 Missoula celebrates its inaugural Indigenous Peoples Day, which replaces Columbus Day, with representatives of local tribal groups. Other cities, including Seattle and Minneapolis, marked similar celebrations.

Tuesday, Oct. 11 Groups throughout the state host an organized protest outside U.S. Rep. Ryan Zinke’s offices to protest his continued support for Donald Trump in the wake of Trump’s sexually aggressive comments. More than 20 people gather at the Missoula location, with one woman sharing her personal experience of being sexual assaulted.

Parental leave

City tackles new policy In July, Missoula County unveiled its new paid parental leave policy. One of the first employees to take advantage of the plan was Parks and Trails Coordinator John Stegmaier, whose wife gave birth to their second child on Aug. 12. He says it was a blessing to be able to spend six weeks at home. “My wife was really encouraging me to do it because of the anticipated amount of help she’d need,” Stegmaier says. “You can’t sit back and relax. You have your infant in your arm while you’re pulling your toddler out of the oven or something.” The county originally calculated that its parental leave policy would cost only $10,000 annually, and so far it’s on par with that estimate, according to communications coordinator Katie Klietz.

[6] Missoula Independent • October 13–October 20, 2016

Now, the city of Missoula is looking to enact a similar paid parental leave policy—but unfortunately, it won’t be nearly as low-cost as the county’s option, says Councilwoman Emily Bentley. That’s because the city employs significantly more emergency services personnel, such as police and firefighters, whose jobs are considered too essential to go vacant for several weeks without being replaced by other staffers. When Bentley looked into the idea earlier this year, she found that rolling out an across-the-board parental leave policy could cost the city as much as $300,000. “That number seemed really high,” Bentley says. “So my proposal was to do this in increments, so we can hold one increment up if we need to.” On Oct. 5, Bentley and Councilwoman Heidi West asked a council committee to consider a multistep implementation of paid parental leave for all city employees. The first phase of parental leave: offering employees up to six weeks of paid

medical maternal leave, retroactive to July. Since firefighters and police are male-dominated professions, she doesn’t anticipate that maternal leave will cause a big disruption for the emergency services department. By summer 2017, Bentley thinks the city could look into a six-week “parental leave bank” offered to all city employees for pregnancy, birth and adoption. In coming years, she’d like to see paid parental leave expanded to 12 weeks. “It’s a once- or twice- or three-time-in-a-life opportunity, and people shouldn’t miss it,” Bentley says. “There are people I know who had to send four-week-old babies to daycare because they had to go back to work to put food on the table. That’s a disgrace.” Bentley hopes to bring a final version of the maternal leave plan before council within the next month for a vote. Kate Whittle


[news] UM

A different environmentalism It was about eight years ago, Robin Saha recalls, when he handed the microphone at the National Summit of Mining Communities to a trio of representatives from the town of Opportunity. He’d been investigating the effects of a nearby Superfund site since spring 2005, turning his students from the University of Montana’s environmental studies program loose to collect dust and water samples for testing. But rather than crow about his own findings at the summit in Butte, Saha defaulted to the core principle that’s driven his work in environmental justice. “Part of what I try to do in my work is not be the savior, but to more be a facilitator of the community building its own capacity to deal with the issues,” Saha says. Since his days as a graduate student at the University of Michigan, Saha has rooted his scientific career at the intersection of social work and environmentalism. His research into the disproportionate concentration of hazardous waste facilities in minority and impoverished communities was cited in mainstream media reports on the water crisis in Flint earlier this year. Saha’s efforts to engage community partners and involved students in fieldwork in places like Opportunity netted him this year’s Thomas Ehrlich Civically Engaged Faculty Award from Campus Compact, a national nonprofit network of more than 1,000 universities and colleges. This is the first time a Montana faculty member has received the award. Saha doesn’t talk much about the honor other than to say it was “validating.” He spends far more time in conversation discussing the communities he’s worked with throughout Montana. In addition to studying contaminant levels in Opportunity, Saha spent five years looking into health issues related to black mold in homes on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation. The project involved various tribal and federal agencies, Saha says, and centered largely on building awareness among residents, housing officials and local doctors at the Blackfeet Community Hospital. “They have children with asthma coming in, and adults too, with respiratory issues aggravated by exposure to black mold,” Saha continues. “It was sort of a public health crisis that was simmering below the surface.” Saha admits he wasn’t fully aware of the prevalence of such environmental injustices in Montana when he first came to UM. While originally from Cleveland, Saha worked for a summer in Yellowstone National Park and says he just knew the West was where he’d end up. In the

years since, he’s found the state to be a fitting place to pursue his own particular brand of environmentalism. And he’s left an impression on those he’s handed the microphone to—both figuratively and literally. “Robin was very instrumental in helping us out,” says Serge Myers, a member of the Opportunity Citizens Protection Association and one of the speakers in Butte. “Going to the summit and stuff, we got a chance to see people that were in the same boat as we were.” Alex Sakariassen

Sausages

Uncle Bill retires Missoula deli cases will soon be missing a familiar homegrown brand. Bill Stoianoff, the beret-wearing mascot and owner of Uncle Bill’s Sausages, is retiring after more than 30 years in the local food business. He’s run his eclectic storefront, The Joint Effort, even longer. He says the decision to close up shop was prompted in part because The Joint Effort’s lease expires in November, since its Brooks Street location has been bought by Southgate Mall with plans to demolish it. Oct. 29 will be his final farmers market appearance. “I thought about another store, but god, I’m damn near 70 years old, I should retire,” Stoianoff says. “So whether I like it or not, that’s what’s happening. I’m not telling anybody what I’m doing. I’m just gonna go live some life.” He’s not the only Brooks Street tenant to decide to close—his neighbor, Pet Nebula, is also calling it quits. Pet Nebula owner Jenny Lundberg DeNeut says she’s known about the lease expiring for a while. “We actually caught wind of it last summer,” she says. Lundberg DeNeut decided to take the opportunity to spend more time at home with her two young kids. The property manager, Jerry Ford with Lambros Real Estate, says Southgate Mall recently bought 1918 Brooks with plans to raze it. He says he wasn’t told what might be planned to go into the space. As for Uncle Bill’s Sausages, Stoianoff also alludes

BY THE NUMBERS

$24 million Financial gift to the University of Montana Foundation from Frontier Airlines executive Bill Franke. The donation, UM’s largest ever, will benefit the College of Forestry and Conservation and the Global Leadership Initiative. to some kind of conflict with the Mission Mountain Food Enterprise Center, where he’s rented kitchen space for years. “Well, that’s another whole story I don’t wanna get into,” Stoianoff says. The food processing center’s director, Jan Tusick, responds that they wish Stoianoff nothing but the best. “We’re going to miss Bill,” Tusick says. “He had a great product line.” Tusick does say that across the country, small businesses like Stoianoff ’s are facing increasing scrutiny from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Recently passed regulations require additional food safety precautions and an $800 training course, which can be daunting for small businesses trying to stay on top of the rules, she says. “[The USDA inspectors] are becoming more and more present, is the best way to say it, so we’re also seeing more stringent inspections happening every day,” Tusick says. The food processing center is liable if it’s tied to any illness outbreaks. “We’re almost like mini regulators in a sense, but we have to be,” she says. Stoianoff says he’ll always be proud of his gourmet sausages. The recipes are secret—“goddamn right, they are”—at least until he finds an interested buyer who offers the right price. He says he learned about cooking during his extensive world travels, and he still makes chorizo the way he was taught in Oaxaca, Mexico. “It’s been a damn fun run,” he says. Kate Whittle

ETC. Rep. Ryan Zinke’s wife, Lola, plays a starring, if silent, role in the congressman’s latest campaign ad. The 30-second spot features a close-up of the couple’s faces as Ryan pledges to protect his family and all Montanans. Lola looks up at her husband when he says, “and I’ll continue to keep you safe,” then turns back to the camera just in time for the congressman to ask for the viewer’s vote. Outside the scripted frame of a television ad, Lola has been more vocal during this election cycle—and not just to support her husband. The “San Diego lawyer,” as Univision referred to her in August, has been an enthusiastic supporter of Donald J. Trump’s candidacy, serving on his Hispanic Advisory Board, talking up the Republican presidential nominee on Twitter and donning Make America Great Again merch. While Rep. Zinke is the higher profile Trump surrogate (he once fantasized about his name on a Trump ticket), the congressman has acknowledged Lola as the true believer. He described his wife as an “early adopter to Trump … earlier than me, by far” in an interview with Breitbart, and Trump himself gave her a shoutout during his Billings rally. “Where the hell is he, my man!” Trump said of Ryan, the Billings Gazette reported. “He’s supported me from the very beginning, but it’s more his wife, right?” So after audio emerged Oct. 7 of Trump boasting, in the crudest terms, of sexually assaulting married women, Zinke was probably being honest when he issued a statement saying that “Lola and I have talked about it and we pray he has grown from his mistake.” Asked the same day if he was considering withdrawing support for Trump, Zinke told Montana Public Radio: “I think we’re taking it in, at the moment.” Lola didn’t have long to mull things over. She was a scheduled speaker on a “Women for Trump” bus tour this week through North Carolina that featured the wives of Republican congressmen. Trump seemed to have won her over by Sunday night’s debate, during which she tweeted that the candidate was “knocking it out of the park,” but by Tuesday morning the Zinke campaign was still mum on Lola’s participation. A few hours later, Lola released an op-ed through the campaign that made clear she would be aboard the Trump bus. “We all know Mr. Trump has said some regrettable things,” she wrote. “He’s since apologized. I got over it.”

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missoulanews.com • October 13–October 20, 2016 [7]


[news]

An open mind Bob Lake counters criticism in PSC reelection bid by Alex Sakariassen

Bob Lake jokes that his initial thought upon joining the Montana Public Service Commission in January 2013 was, “What did I get myself into?” In the months before his first term, Lake busied himself reading up on Missoula-based Green Taxi, which was seeking permission from the PSC to transport riders to nonemergency medical appointments and to operate outside of Missoula County. Having won his race against Democratic incumbent Gail Gutsche in November 2012, Lake knew the issue would be among the first on his docket once he got to Helena. “It’s required of a commissioner that if you are going to make a decision and vote on an order that’s about to come out, you must read all of the testimony,” Lake says. “The hearing documents, all of the prior documents—you have to certify that you have read it.” On a 5-0 vote, the new PSC in 2013 granted half of Green Taxi’s request, the half pertaining to medical appointments. Looking back now, the 1,150 pages Lake estimates he read in preparation for that case seem a paltry sum compared to the orders he’s tackled since. Discussion over NorthWestern Energy’s proposed acquisition of 11 hydroelectric dams in the state stretched on for nearly a year and, according to Lake, required the review of “something north of about 39,000 individual documents.” Lake and three other commissioners eventually voted to approve the $870 million purchase agreement in September 2014. “I think that was a very, very wise decision they made,” he says of NorthWestern’s pursuit of hydro, which is now the utility’s number one source of electricity in Montana. “Was $870 million too much? It’s probably a matter of opinion.” The cost of that purchase—and the roughly $4.50-per-month increase it generated for NorthWestern ratepayers—has been grounds for attack against Lake during his reelection campaign. So has his spearheading of an effort in spring 2013 to repeal a PSC mandate requiring privately owned state utilities to publicly disclose the salaries of their top three

[8] Missoula Independent • October 13–October 20, 2016

earners. When Lake supported an attempt by NorthWestern this March to recoup $8.2 million in costs incurred from a seven-month outage at Colstrip Unit 4 by raising rates, the Montana Environmental Policy Center accused him of voting “to increase customers’ rates instead of forcing NorthWestern to behave responsibly.”

photo Courtesy of Bob Lake for PSC

Public Service Commissioner Bob Lake has fended off criticism from renewable energy proponents throughout his first term and his reelection campaign, saying he operates without any political or ideological agenda.

The proposal was rejected on a 3-2 vote. “Montanans shouldn’t write a blank check to NorthWestern to operate an unreliable and expensive coal plant,” MEIC wrote on its blog in response to PSC’s March 29 vote. “Kudos to those three commissioners who are looking out for Montanans who buy electricity from a regulated monopoly.” Despite claims to the contrary by his 2016 challenger, Gutsche, and other critics, Lake insists he’s spent the past three and a half years doing the job and doing it well. In regards to NorthWestern’s $8.2 million ask, he says Montana law clearly

states the utility has the right to recoup costs if they’d acted prudently prior to the outage; the way he read the case, NorthWestern had. One of Lake’s primary stumping points is the need for members of the PSC to operate without any political or ideological agenda. He feels he’s lived up to that charge. “You have got to go into an issue with an absolute open mind,” Lake says. “You cannot have a complete and permanent outcome in your head because then you’re not doing your job right.” Like Gutsche, Lake came to the PSC straight from the Montana Legislature. The Republican spent eight years on the House Taxation Committee before moving to the state Senate in 2010. According to his online bio, Lake continues to serve on the Taxation and Economic Affairs Committee for the American Legislative Exchange Council, a conservative policy group that has been chastised for pushing state-level legislation undercutting environmental regulations and renewable energy. Among the donors to his 2016 reelection campaign is the Montana Oil & Gas PAC, which shares a Helena mailing address with the Montana Petroleum Association. Lake says he has not actively pursued any endorsements, and attributes the PAC contribution to existing relationships from his days as a lawmaker. A policy-making background isn’t the only thing Lake shares in common with his Democratic opponent. He also sees net metering as one of the biggest conversations facing legislators and the PSC over the next few years, and he agrees with Gutsche that a full rate case involving NorthWestern’s entire energy portfolio is in the offing. Where he disagrees, obviously, is in who can best approach such a comprehensive process with an “open mind.” “We’re not a policy agency,” Lake says. “We have absolutely nothing to do with policy. We can’t say, ‘We want to have more whatever energy.’ That’s not our job.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com


[news]

Building a beer castle

YOUR GARAGE AWAY FROM HOME.

Montana’s smallest craft brewery has big aspirations by Derek Brouwer

The kettle inside Dunluce Brewing, in Superior, is no bigger than a sedan’s gas tank, but the steam rising from it keeps the entire brewery toasty on a cold day. The brewery is no castle, though. About the size of a New York City studio apartment, it makes Montana’s legion of microbreweries look downright palatial. “Not much to see here,” owner Adam Hauge says. Hauge doesn’t need to give a tour because everything’s in view from the open screen door. There’s no taproom or bottling equipment, just a half-barrel brewing system along one wall, a cooler chilling some 5-gallon kegs against another, a commercial sink across the room and four fermentation tanks on wheels. The place, a brewery in modeltrain scale, is so unassuming that any beer enthusiast who finds his way to this unmarked horse barn an hour northwest of Missoula is likely to step inside and think, “I could do this, too.” A similar attitude inspired Hauge and his wife, Lauren, to launch what’s likely the smallest commercial brewery in the state. The pair was vacationing in Ireland, visiting Dunluce Castle, when the idea coalesced. “As we finished touring the castle in Ireland, we kind of had our epiphany,” Hauge says. Hauge had been homebrewing at the time, and both he and his wife were interested in a career change that could bring Adam closer to his agricultural roots and Lauren to her family in Superior. So they resolved to turn Adam’s hobby into the family business. That was two years ago this month, yet Dunluce remains relatively hidden in Montana’s craft beer scene. Many brewers at the recent Montana Brewers Association convention in Missoula hadn’t heard of him, Hauge says, including those with Darby’s Bandit Brewing, which had fancied itself the state’s smallest brewery. Dunluce has flown below the radar in part because of its unique model. The beer is made in homebrew-sized batches and is available only on tap at a half-dozen bars in Mineral County, population 4,200. Hauge says his model was born out of necessity, as a way to begin brewing commercially without large upfront costs. So-called

nanobreweries constitute a distinct niche within the industry nationally, and some, such as Dogfish Head in Delaware, have grown to become craft beer leaders. But bootstrapping beer isn’t easy. “I think the economics are tough,” says MBA Executive Director Matt Leow. “You certainly get some economies of scale when you go bigger, even slightly bigger.” Starting small is Hauge’s way of buying time so he can develop Dunluce’s bigger idea: making beers from start to finish, or, as he calls it, from “farm to fermentation.” Hauge grew up on a wheat and barley

tomer front doors much like a milkman. At Four Aces bar down the road, Dunluce’s tap handle, with “Pilsner” written across it in chalk, looks almost out of place alongside the standard sports bar domestics. Seven men crowd the bar on a Monday afternoon, watching NASCAR and chatting about how the country has gone to hell. One man grips a fly swatter between sips. After pouring a pilsner, the bartender confesses she’s more of a Bud Light girl, at least when she’s not drinking shots. Yet owner Ronna LaPierre says having Dunluce on tap has been “really good for

Open 7 days.

Reduce. Reuse. Rebuild. 151 5 Wyom in g St | w w w.h om er es ou r ce.or g

photo by Derek Brouwer

Adam Hauge, owner of Dunluce Brewing, runs his Superior nanobrewery in a remodeled portion of a storage barn on a horse ranch. He distributes his beers to local bars and sells growlers at customers’ doorsteps.

farm, and over the last several years he and his father have experimented with barley strains that he hopes can eventually serve as the source for Dunluce beers. Lauren’s mother is helping propagate yeasts, and hops already grip the backside of the barn. “At some point, I would like this to be the family income,” Hauge says. At the moment, Hauge and his wife still live in Liberty Lake, Wash., two hours away. Adam brews on weekends and distributes 5-gallon kegs to bars staggered along I-90. He also takes orders for growlers, swapping them out at cus-

business.” Four Aces was the first bar to serve Hauge’s brews, rotating styles based on whatever Adam hauls in that day. “There are some people that really like it and come in for it,” she says. “I’m talking to him about making sure I have a backup keg.” LaPierre says she’s also not a fan of microbrews—the only other local tap belongs to Kettlehouse’s Cold Smoke. “But I do like the dill pickle one (Hauge) has,” she says. dbrouwer@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • October 13–October 20, 2016 [9]


[opinion]

Send in the klowns Missoula succumbs to the scourge of a teenage prank by Dan Brooks

To paraphrase an ancient curse, we live in interesting times. A vagina-grabbing billionaire runs for president against a former president’s wife. A global communications network allows us to quickly and efficiently insult strangers. Children wear watch-phones like Dick Tracy but have no interest in Dick Tracy himself. And the Missoula Police Department issued a press release regarding “the nationwide clown hysteria.” “In the absence of suspicious or unlawful behavior,” it read, “there is nothing illegal about someone walking down the street, riding in a vehicle or hanging out at a public park dressed as a clown. Some are even reputable, professional entertainers. Dressing in a costume is not a violation of any city ordinance or state statute.” Before you panic, know that the “Zootown Klown” has been apprehended. The Facebook account that threatened Missoula high school students with unspecified catastrophe was traced to a 15year-old boy. Like most members of his demographic, he “does not represent a threat to the public,” in the words of the police department. This announcement modified the department’s earlier press release, which urged residents to stock up on seltzer water, load as many people into their cars as possible and flee. Just kidding. Few people actually thought the Zootown Klown was a credible threat, least of all the police. So few terrorists spell “clown” with a K. Perhaps more tellingly, clown-related threats and hoaxes have been a social-media fad since August. Named and anonymous social media accounts report unsubstantiated stories of creepy clowns or threaten clown-related violence. That these threats almost always target schools should be a clue that the clown problem is more prank than epidemic. But we live in a golden age of pranks, thanks to the internet. Caller ID ended the prank call, but the prank news story, the prank social trend and the prank threat of mass violence against schoolchildren are thriving. This puts law enforcement in a difficult position. Heaven forbid they tell us

[10] Missoula Independent • October 13–October 20, 2016

all not to worry about killer clowns and then a balloon animal the size of a city block explodes, killing thousands. I admit that sounds farfetched. But the police must not get in the habit of telling citizens to ignore threats, no matter how incredible they seem. The downside of wrongly warning us is so much smaller than the

“This country’s fear has driven us to hysterics. You see it in our presidential contest between panic and the pathological insistence that everything is fine”

downside of wrongly telling us not to worry that they have incentive to treat every threat as real, even when it literally comes from some clown on Facebook. It may seem, therefore, that the blame for our nationwide stupidity should once again fall on children. But it’s not their fault for pranking this country into clown hysteria. It’s our fault for making that funny. As anyone who ever had a wart will tell you, kids are perceptive. They understand our deepest fears. Between the ages of 12 and 19, they mercilessly exploit

these fears—mostly to feel better about their own disgusting bodies and personalities, but also for laughs. These motivations should be familiar to any satirist. Kids are closely attuned to the world’s foibles, because they will have to live with them for longer than anybody else. And the world’s foible now is fear. We are so scared that we are afraid of clowns—not in our private hearts, maybe, but officially and socially. We are afraid to ignore even what we think is harmless, because we obsess over real horrors. Violent crime has reached its lowest rate in 50 years, but people actually do shoot up schools. Maniacs on Twitter and Facebook threaten to kill indiscriminately and then it really does happen. It just never really happens with clowns. But death and mayhem at the big, gloved hands of clowns seems like something that could happen in this day and age, and that puts it in the best traditions of satire. I don’t want to raise phony threats on Facebook to the level of Jonathan Swift. If you want to satirize America’s paranoid obsession with public safety, write a story about a clown that threatens a school. Don’t actually become that clown. But let us not pretend that our adolescents’ fixation on clown violence doesn’t mean anything. They know we are scared. They also know our fear has made us stupid— possibly because adolescents perceive everything as stupid, but also, probably, because they are right. This country’s fear has driven us to hysterics. You see it in our presidential contest between panic and the pathological insistence that everything is fine, and you see it in the last 15 years of desperate offers to trade liberty for security. This is the world the ZooTown Klown grew up in—the one we made for him. We should not be surprised to see him throw it back in our faces, even as we are startled. Dan Brooks writes about politics, culture and the increasingly urgent problem of younger people at combatblog.net.


[opinion]

Out of the barn Tough decisions loom for the West’s wild horses by Maddy Butcher

In September, the Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board, a group charged with making recommendations to the Bureau of Land Management about its Wild Horse and Burro Program, agreed that tens of thousands of equines in federal holding facilities might need to be euthanized. This recommendation—you might call it the nuclear option—undoubtedly hit horse lovers like a bomb. Social media mushroomed with immediate rancor. The BLM was inundated by negative feedback and quickly issued a statement saying it would not follow the board’s recommendation. It’s sad enough that the mustang crisis has devolved to this. It’s also sad that only a tiny fraction of the public has taken time to understand the situation, which has created a genuine cultural and environmental crisis in the American West. The board’s dramatic recommendation is reminiscent of the prospective Superfund designation of my nearby community of Silverton, Colo., site of last year’s disastrous Gold King Mine spill. Both attempt to address a long history of citizen and government irresponsibility. Each of them proposes a solution that’s as hard to swallow as it is necessary. Few of the many fractured parties find it palatable, but no one is offering better solutions. As horrifying as its recommendation may seem, the advisory group was only trying to rectify bad decisions regarding wild horses that date back generations. It’s a chronicle that’s echoed by the long history of corporate malfeasance in the mining world. Who, and what, has led us to this point? The simple answer is our forefathers, who thought it was okay to turn unwanted horses out into open country. Those domestic-turned-wild horses have done all too well on our public lands. The number of offspring of former Army horses, frontier horses and ranch horses doubles every five years. Feral horses may have irreversibly degraded millions of acres of rangeland, as the advisory board members discovered on a recent field trip to Antelope Valley, Nevada. They viewed miles of high desert land un-

touched by cattle yet devastated by the intense grazing of wild horses. If the horses weren’t so pretty, as well as being an icon of the Old West, we would call them “invasive,” and we would have sought more effective, less emotion-driven and politicized ways to manage them long ago. Do we have a romantic term for feral cats? Does the average taxpayer recognize how much damage both feral cats and feral horses do to the environment?

“They leverage romance, Old West ideals and widespread ignorance to fan the flames of public outrage. They like to use the word ‘mustang,’ but do they really know what that word means?” For decades, our government has rounded up the free-roaming horses and burros, removing them from the wild only to create more space and available resources for the equines left behind. The BLM’s strategy, in fact, has had exactly the opposite effect as intended. The wild populations have flourished because of it, not despite it. The National Academy of Sciences said as much in its 630-page publication, “Using Science to Improve the BLM Wild Horse and Burro Program: A Way Forward,” released in 2013.

Our government has also dragged its feet on pursuing humane population control options, like darting mares with a fertility control vaccine called PZP (porcine zona pellucida). Instead, it invested in risky, inhumane sterilization procedures, which produced horrible results and subjected the agency to several lawsuits. The agency also continued to hold counterproductive roundups that only galvanized more protesters and spurred more lawsuits. Certain activist groups say the feral horses and burros have more claim to the land than any other animals. They believe the equines deserve to live untouched and untethered lives, all other considerations be damned. They leverage romance, Old West ideals and widespread ignorance to fan the flames of public outrage. They like to use the word “mustang,” but do they really know what that word means? It comes from the Spanish word mestengo, and it means “stray.” We can also blame ourselves for failing to get educated about this environmental and fiscal crisis, for failing to support the wild horse trainers who gentle the animals for successful adoptions, for failing to adopt a mustang or burro and for letting extremists dictate the conversation and inform policy. Wild horses and burros are in a fight for their lives, whether it’s on land degraded by a rapid influx of invasive species like cheatgrass, whose spread some blame on horse overpopulation, or in holding pens. The prison-like conditions of these pens cost taxpayers about $50,000 for each animal over the course of its squandered lifetime. Do you find this current, catastrophic state distressing? Pause for a moment to mourn the damage done. Then get educated and help other concerned citizens work toward a solution. Just as with the mining mess, we will need to take drastic steps to get back to what’s right for wild horses and our degraded public lands. Maddy Butcher is a contributor to Writers on the Range, the opinion service of High Country News (hcn.org ). She writes in Mancos, Colo.

missoulanews.com • October 13–October 20, 2016 [11]


[offbeat]

FRONTIERS OF SCIENCE – Large kidney stones typically mean eye-watering pain and sudden urinary blockage until the stone “passes” (often requiring expensive sound-wave treatment to break up a large stone). Michigan State University urologist David Wartinger told The Atlantic in September that he had recently happened upon a pain-free—even exciting!—way to pass stones before they become problems: the centripetal force from a roller coaster ride. In a 200-trip experiment preparing for a validating “human” trial, he successfully passed stones in his hand-held, silicone model kidney (using his own urine) about two-thirds of the time when sitting in a rear seat at Disney World’s Big Thunder Mountain Railroad. PERSPECTIVE – With about 30 states having adopted some form of “stand your ground” defense to assault (or murder) charges, five membership organizations, charging up to $40 a month, have signed up a half-million gun owners concerned that law enforcement treat them fairly should they someday be forced to shoot—providing instructions and a “hot line” to coach members on what to tell police, plus liability insurance and help getting a lawyer. Critics say such organizations are also useful to those who might be prone to shooting people and want advice on how best to get away with it. The U.S. Concealed Carry organization’s wallet-sized card, to give to police, asks that the shooter under suspicion be given the same consideration as the officers might give to their own colleagues under suspicion. In a dozen YouTube videos recently released, Syria’s Tourism Ministry praised the country’s sandy, fun-filled beaches as ideal vacation spots and its many World Heritage Sites as renowned tourist exhibits—attempting to distract world travelers from the country’s daily bloodshed (and the wartime destruction of those priceless historical sites). Before civil war broke out in 2011, Syria was a fashionable, $8 billion-a-year destination (and the now-devastated city of Aleppo was known worldwide for its food). AWESOME! – Diego the giant tortoise, believed to be more than 100 years old, now lives in semiretirement on Santa Cruz Island in the Galapagos, but from 1976 to 2010, Diego brought an almost-extinct species back to life by fathering about 800 babies in the captive breeding program on Espanola, another of the Galapagos Islands. Biologists did not realize Diego’s prowess until 2010 when DNA tests identified him as the father of 40 percent of all tortoises on the island. Even on Santa Cruz Island, Diego keeps busy, with a “harem” of six females. (Another Galapagos tortoise species did die out in 2012 when the last male, the centenarian Lonesome George, maintained his celibacy until death.) COMPELLING EXPLANATIONS – The New York City Council, grilling police officials in September about their practice of freely seizing money from detainees under suspicion, asked for a thorough accounting of that money (suspecting that innocent victims rarely get it back unless aided by high-powered lawyers). Though (in “crime-fighting” hyperbole) NYPD routinely boasts of its half-million annual seizures, an NYPD official told the council it would be “impossible” to account for everything—that keeping track of it all would cause its computers to crash. THINGS YOU THOUGHT DIDN’T HAPPEN – Wanda Witter, 80, had been living on Washington, D.C., streets for 10 years, but insisting to anyone who would listen that the Social Security Administration owed her sums that recently reached $100,000, and that she had documents to prove it. However, given her circumstances, most regarded her as just another luckless person confused by homeless life. In June, though, after social worker Julie Turner took a closer look and found, improbably, that Witter was indeed owed $100,000 and even more improbably, that all of her paperwork was carefully organized among the unimpressive possessions she hauled around daily, SSA paid her $999 on the spot, and the remaining $99,999 arrived in August. FEEL-GOOD MARKETING – One branch of the James Harper funeral homes, in Bromley, England, announced its latest promotion via a sign in a front window (reported by the Bromley News Shopper in September): “Wow! Free Child’s Battery Powered Vehicle With Every Pre-Paid Funeral Arranged This Month.” A Harper spokesperson said the purpose was to encourage residents to think ahead about funerals. RECURRING THEMES – The most recent immigrant family living high on the hog in the United Kingdom is Arnold Mballe Sube and his wife, Jeanne, both 33, who drew the equivalent of about $130,000 in government benefits last year, but are still feuding with the Luton Borough Council near London over its inability to find (free) housing adequate for them and their eight children. They turned down four- and five-bedroom homes, were housed temporarily in a Hilton hotel, and said they would be satisfied only with a six-bedroom residence. Mr. Sube, from Cameroon, emigrated to France at age 18, then came to England in 2012 to study nursing at the University of Bedfordshire. Thanks this week to Neb Rodgers and Teri Darcy and to the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisors.

[12] Missoula Independent • October 13–October 20, 2016


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control 541-7387 MAYNARD•

Maynard is a 1 1/2-year-old male Pit Bull mix. Maynard has been through some unfortunate experiences, which makes him rather slow to warm up to new people. He was brought in by a Good Samaritan who watched him run from people who were throwing rocks at him. Maynard is quite the athlete and is not only able to jump 6 feet in the air, he can also climb chain link!

ELLIE•Ellie is a 4-year-old female Pit Bull. She loves the water. Her favorite game is chasing the spray of the garden hose. Ellie is a diva and wants to live the spoiled life. She doesn't think she should have to share it with any other pets or children. If you think you have what it takes to give Ellie the luxurious life she dreams of, come visit her!

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EMILY• Emily is a 4-year-old female Dilute Tortie. Emily is one of the most easy going cats at the shelter currently. She gets along with every one, and loves hanging out on her own just as much as she loves getting affection. KALLY• Kally is a 3-year-old female Calico. She came to the shelter ready to give birth to a litter of kittens. She has since reared and weaned her kittens. They have all been adopted out, and now it's Kally's turn to find a forever home. She is a very mild mannered girl that accepts affection but doesn't demand it. She'd make a great family cat.

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SHAKESPEARE• Shakespeare is an 8year-old male Orange Tabby. He was originally picked up by a Good Samaritan from a free ad on Craigslist. Shortly after that, a vet appointment revealed very severe dental needs, and he was surrendered to Animal Control. Since then, he has received the dental care he needed, leaving him completely toothless. This big boy doesn't seem to phased by his new toothless state.

MIA• Mia is a 2-year-old female German Shepherd mix. She has a very loving demeanor with a hint of nervous energy. Mia has exhibited separation anxiety and protective tendencies. At the shelter, we see a very sweet and loving girl who always wants to be by your side and earn your approval. She would do great in a home with lovingly firm boundaries that made her feel supported.

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana 549-3934 OAKLEY• Oakley is a handsome American Pit Bull Terrier mix. This young, active pup would love a family who can keep up with his exercise needs! From swimming, to hiking to car rides, Oakley is up for just about anything…except cats. Oakley’s adoption fee is discounted for Adopt-A-Shelter-Dog-Month. Come see him today!

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CHURCH MOUSE• Church Mouse came to the Humane Society of Western Montana as a stray and is now searching for the purrrfect home! With gorgeous long hair she’s a beauty. Church Mouse would love to take naps in the sun! Stop by and visit her at 5930 Highway 93 South in Missoula.

STEWART• Stewart is an active Aussie cross who would love to find a family who can take him on long walks! He is a great candidate for one of our basic manners classes where he can learn some new skills with his new family. Stop by and see Stewart! We’re now open Sundays noon-5 p.m.

OSWALD• This loveable, goofy senior cat came to the shelter as a stray. Oswald would love a quiet home where he can snuggle and enjoy his retirement years playing with toys and napping. He’s part of our Seniors for Seniors program and has a discounted adoption fee for senior families!

MAX• Max the loveable Blue Heeler/ American Pit Bull Terrier loves to play fetch! He has a wonderful personality and would love to snuggle up next to you. He is house and cratetrained and knows words like ‘sit.’ Learn more about max on our website at www.myhswm.org or better yet come visit him at the shelter!

LORETTA• Miss Loretta Lynn is looking for a forever home where she can show off her beautiful meowing voice! She enjoys cat naps, snuggles, treats and being around people. Make this beauty your new feline friend today! 5930 Highway 93 South in Missoula.

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missoulanews.com • October 13–October 20, 2016 [13]


I

n fall 2014, workers broke ground on one of the University of Montana’s biggest new academic offerings: the Harold and Priscilla Gilkey Building, a facility dedicated to “executive education offerings.” The three-story structure, which was funded with private donations, aimed to “partner with industry sectors, organizations and business leaders to develop their leadership capability and build organizational performance,” according to a UM press release. One of the first construction workers hired to lay the building’s foundation was Jennifer Moen, a tan, lanky 35-year-old. She’ll never forget that job—she was homeless at the time and living in her car with her two young kids. After a long shift pouring concrete at the Gilkey site, she’d pick up her kids from a babysitter, park in a Wal-Mart lot overnight and try to keep them warm.

“It was definitely one of those rough moments in my life I never wanna experience again,” Moen says. Since she was making more than $20 an hour, Moen didn’t question the desperately needed paychecks—until one day, when she met a union organizer who told her that, according to state law, she and everyone else hired by Northwest Concrete and Excavation deserved to get paid twice as much. “I didn’t really know what the rate was, honestly. I thought that it was fine,” Moen says. “I didn’t really pay attention.” Moen’s case is just one example of how disadvantaged workers can easily be misused in a construction industry that’s infrequently policed, according to Miles McCarvel, the ironworker and union organizer who approached Moen. “If you give a little, they’ll keep on asking for more,” McCarvel says. “That’s no different with our contractors or any-

body else. If somebody can make more money by screwing somebody, they often do.” By the Montana Labor Management Alliance’s estimate, construction workers have had to fight to recover nearly $5 million in unpaid wages in the past 10 years. McCarvel and other labor advocates say that’s probably just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to worker exploitation in the state.

W

hen the Gilkey project started, McCarvel walked up to the top floor of a nearby campus building and set up his telescope to keep watch through the window. He acknowledges that it might look a little bit nutty, but as a union organizer, it’s part of his job to keep an eye on major public construction projects for any possible wrongdoing and to encourage nonunion workers to join the Local 14.

While observing the Gilkey site, he questioned how Northwest Concrete’s workers were tying rebar—a process where sections of reinforced steel are tied with metal wire so they stay steady while the concrete foundation is poured in. “For one thing, there was a pile of rebar everywhere. It was a mess,” McCarvel says. State law sets the prevailing wages for the building industries each year. Ironworkers are at the very top, making about $50 an hour, including benefits. Carpenters make about $30 an hour, general laborers make $27 an hour, and so on. People working on public projects worth more than $25,000—such as the Gilkey Building—are supposed to earn prevailing wages. After several hours of observation, McCarvel decided he’d seen enough. He walked to the job site, introduced himself to Moen and asked what she was making.

IN A FAST-PACED AND TRANSITORY CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY, IT’S ALL TOO EASY FOR MONTANA WORKERS TO LOSE OUT ON THE WAGES THEY DESERVE by Kate Whittle • photos by Amy Donovan

[14] Missoula Independent • October 13–October 20, 2016


Since Moen tied rebar, which is classified as ironwork, she ought to have been making ironworker wages. Instead, she was making about $24 an hour. When McCarvel asked to look at her pay stubs, he noticed strange discrepancies—one week, she’d be paid a salary, the next week, she’d be paid hourly. “No one’s ever told me what it was supposed to be, until Miles stopped and pulled me aside,” Moen says. McCarvel advised Moen to send in copies of her paycheck stubs to the state Department of Labor, and she tried to find the handful that she’d kept. In Montana, the onus is on the employee to initiate wage claims. It’s especially tough to call out wrongdoing, McCarvel says, when employees don’t want to risk losing their jobs. “The only way you can catch [contractors] is if you have an employee that isn’t job scared, that probably just got fired or

ployment ended because of “insubordination,” being frequently late to work and having a “negative” attitude. She thinks she was fired simply because she started to speak up about her pay. By May 2015, after Moen submitted a formal wage claim, the state says investigators felt obliged to undertake an audit of every Northwest employee’s payment. States vary widely in approaches to wage theft. Idaho, for instance, is a rightto-work state with fewer prevailing wage requirements. Others, like Utah and Washington, strenuously monitor employers. Between 2013 and 2015, the Utah Department of Labor recovered $1.7 million in pay owed to its residents. Washington keeps an online database where it’s easy to look up companies by name to see if they’ve been found guilty of shortchanging workers. Montana is, by contrast, much less transparent when it comes to wage theft.

“We don’t hit every project, we’re just trying to be out there and be within [some of] the projects throughout the whole state,” McDaniel says. She also says that in her entire career, she can’t recall a time when she’s been asked about prevailing wage laws by a reporter. In 2015, the Wage and Hour Unit reviewed 110 business payrolls and conducted 49 on-site visits. That represents a small fraction of the thousands of construction projects throughout the state. The city of Missoula alone issued 473 building permits in 2015. When prevailing wage specialists take note of a problem, such as incorrect or misclassified wages, McDaniel says they notify the contractors, architects and engineers associated with the project. If the employer provides evidence that the wage issue was resolved, the specialists consider the case closed.

McCarvel says since the state encourages parties to privately resolve disputes, it’s difficult to get an idea of how often workers really are being exploited. He suspects that shady contractors are perfectly fine with the state’s minimal level of oversight. “If they get away with it 10 times and they get caught once, and it costs ’em 10 percent of the profits they made the other times, then way to go,” McCarvel says. The Montana Labor Management Alliance offers a different picture of wage theft than the state’s Department of Labor. The MLMA keeps a tab on all wage theft incidents it hears about. The MLMA estimates that between 2005 and 2015, it helped workers recover $4.7 million in wages on projects ranging from elementary schools to hospitals. John Mooney is now semi-retired, but he used to investigate labor disputes for

State and federal laws require contractors on public construction projects to pay workers “prevailing wages,” which change each year. Projects contracted by public entities, such as the city of Missoula or the University of Montana, fall under these requirements.

something, that kept all their paycheck stubs and knows the law,” McCarvel says. “Which almost never happens.” In December 2014, a state wage compliance specialist visited the Gilkey project as part of a routine visit, where an investigator determined that two of Northwest’s employees were being paid incorrectly. In January, Northwest Concrete fired Moen. The termination letter, signed by Northwest owner Mark King, says her em-

No database of guilty employers exists online, nor does the Montana Department of Labor issue routine public reports about wage theft. The Wage and Hour Unit, tasked with enforcing prevailing wages, employs three compliance specialists to monitor the entire state construction industry. Wage and Hour Bureau Chief Pam McDaniel has served the Department of Labor for over 30 years. She acknowledges that the three investigators’ scope is limited.

McDaniel says she prefers to take a “proactive, rather than reactive” approach to wage law by having prevailing wage specialists educate employers and encourage parties to settle disputes without state involvement. She says most cases are resolved before they require the lengthy, formal process of an audit. The state audited nine businesses in 2015; only one audit—of Northwest Concrete’s work on the Gilkey project—resulted in a payout of more than $5,000.

MLMA. He says many MLMA recoveries might not show up in state records, because in his experience just pointing out the problem encourages contractors to resolve the issue quietly. “If you go to a contractor and say, ‘Take care of this,’ they’ll sometimes cough up the money right away and make everything right,” Mooney says. “But if you were to contact them they’d deny it, because there hasn’t been any official complaint. But that’s the way we do things. If

missoulanews.com • October 13–October 20, 2016 [15]


does, is just scratching the surface. Because they only have three people that do it, MLMA has only two people that do it, and there’s hundreds of these public work construction jobs every year.”

E

Justin McEwen has worked as a bricklayer and union organizer for 17 years. He says even when he’s brought evidence to the state showing an employer’s wrongdoing, it’s been difficult to prove his case.

“The biggest reason this stuff happens and why people get away with it is because the workforce isn’t educated. They don’t know anything about these laws, or how to deal with it.”

you want to get people the money they’re owed, that’s the route we take.” The MLMA lists recoveries ranging from a few hundred dollars to hundreds of thousands. In 2015, the MLMA claimed that a lath and plaster company owed workers $100,000 for an elementary school project in Billings. The outcome was unclear. “It’s a pretty big issue,” Mooney says. “What the MLMA does, and what the state

Ironworker and union organizer Miles McCarvel says wage theft is far more prevalent across the state than most people realize.

[16] Missoula Independent • October 13–October 20, 2016

ven when workers know what their rights are, it can be hard to prove an employer’s wrongdoing. Justin McEwen, a union organizer and bricklayer based out of Stevensville, is a broad-shouldered man with a direct gaze. In spring, his union leaders were incensed when they lost out on a major contract for an $18 million new Wal-Mart in Great Falls. McEwen didn’t understand how the subcontractor, J&L England Masonry from Idaho, could underbid his company by $380,000 without doing something improper. “That’s a huge margin,” McEwen says. “To move all of your equipment up from Idaho, when I have a contractor sitting right there in Great Falls, how do you beat somebody out of a bid by that much?” So McEwen went to work for J&L England as a “salt,” a common union practice when an organizer takes a nonunion job to investigate the working conditions. The company hired him, promising $22 an hour, plus overtime pay for anything above 40 hours a week. “I put 56 hours in [over] four days,” McEwen says. “We were working from 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 at night, with one break, a lunch break.” (State law doesn’t mandate breaks, but McEwen says union jobs require periodic paid break time.) Within a few days, McEwen thought he had everything he needed to show how the subcontractor was cutting corners. His pay stub—which he’s shown to the Independent—indicates he was receiving a mere $3 extra per hour, not time and a half, which is required by state law. The overtime was listed under per diem/travel pay. “Well, you don’t have to claim taxes on travel pay, so that’s where they put all my overtime,” McEwen explains. “So there was no overtime on that check. And that rips off the men for unemployment, because not all their wages are on their check, so they’re not getting all their wages counted for unemployment.” He sent in the documents to the Montana Department of Labor. The state’s standard procedure in cases of wage claims is to ask the employer to provide payroll data for evidence—however, it doesn’t ask for bank records. Shortly after McEwen’s claim, J&L England submitted payroll records showing the numbers as they should have originally appeared. McEwen says he and the other bricklayers on the project, who were mostly from Idaho, received backdated checks with extra overtime pay.


McEwen suspects J&L England just edited the payroll data in QuickBooks and mailed the sheet to the state. McEwen has all of his check stubs to prove it, but he says the state investigator was satisfied with the payroll printout. McEwen received a letter from the Department of Labor in June denying his wage claim. Nonetheless, he says England did follow correct procedure and started including time-and-a-half overtime on the rest of the project after the state got involved. “What came out is he did end up paying right,” McEwen says. “He did hurt his bottom dollar.” When asked about the incident in a recent phone interview, J&L England owner John England says McEwen’s claim resulted from a “misunderstanding.” England adds that McEwen “hired on just to stir things up, more or less,” shortly before cutting off the conversation and hanging up.

underpaid several workers by misclassifying wages or paying the wrong year’s prevailing wage rates. The company must pay out $42,000, which includes fines and fees. Some workers will be reimbursed for a single day’s wages; others for months’ worth of labor. The total amount doesn’t appear to include the wage claim Moen submitted before the state started its audit, though the state says an employee’s wage claim submitted in January did help prompt the investigation. Amy Smith, the wages compliance specialist who supervised the decision, says it shouldn’t matter how much money

ruling. Part of Northwest Concrete’s $42,000 fee includes a $25 per day fine for paying the wrong wage, which King calls “ridiculous.” He says he’s contemplating suing the state over the fines. “I just think that the state, whether we had done our due diligence or not, how can they consciously put that kind of debt onto a company?” King asks. He adds that he thinks the prevailing wage laws are weighted too heavily in the unions’ favor. Nonetheless, King says he’s working with his new bookkeeper to keep a close eye on the prevailing wage projects they’re contracted to work on this year.

started arriving. Moen says she’s received about $3,000 so far, which she’s put toward bills. She’s now renting a three-bedroom house in Frenchtown for her and her kids, ages 4 and 6. McCarvel, for his part, says he’d like the city of Missoula to take a stand by scrutinizing public work project bids more closely, possibly with a questionnaire that asks bidders if they’ve ever been charged by the state with wage theft. He’d also like to see more education for union and nonunion workers alike on their rights. “The biggest reason this stuff happens and why people get away with it is be-

T

he University of Montana held a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Gilkey Building in May, with remarks from President Royce Engstrom praising the center’s opportunity to “help business leaders build strong organizations and support economic vitality.” He posed for photos alongside business school Dean Larry Gianchetta, and Harold and Priscilla Gilkey, the primary donors of the project. The Gilkey Building, originally estimated to cost $9.3 million, came in at $8.8 million—about $500,000 under budget, according to UM officials. All UM projects are contracted by the facilities services department. Facilities services Director Kevin Krebsbach says he sometimes hears about issues with construction workers’ wages on campus projects. UM’s responsibility is to make sure prevailing wage rates are posted on a sheet in the job trailer. If a worker comes to him with a grievance, he refers them to the state. “If their paycheck comes up short they don’t come to me,” Krebsbach says. “If they do, I tell them to go back to the Department of Labor. Then I [issue a] notice [to] the contractor that there’s an issue with employees. I try not to get in the middle of that.” A few months before the Gilkey Building opened its doors, the state’s Wage and Hour Unit wrapped up its investigation of the subcontractor Northwest Concrete. (The company is also listed online as “Northwest Concrete & Construction,” though its letterhead and state documents refer to it as Northwest Concrete and Excavation.) Documents obtained by the Independent show in March 2016 an investigator determined that Northwest Concrete

According to state law, ironworkers should earn $50 an hour, including benefits, on public projects. State investigators say iron work is the most commonly misclassified type of labor.

a worker is owed, though $42,000 is certainly a significant chunk of change. “No matter whether it’s $5 or $50,000, it’s important that each wage earner gets what’s due to them,” Smith says. Mark King, head of Northwest Concrete, doesn’t deny that his company paid incorrect wages. He attributes the mistakes to a former bookkeeper and claims he hadn’t known about the state’s audit until it already began. “I didn’t realize all this was going down,” King says. “By the time I found out it was kind of too late. I found out this had been through the process.” State documents accuse Northwest of taking “multiple extensions” and submitting incomplete evidence, until a new bookkeeper was hired by the company in mid 2015 and helped provide additional payroll documents. While King doesn’t dispute any of the documented wage claims on the Gilkey project, he does take issue with the state’s

“We’re making damn sure that something like this doesn’t happen again,” King says. The state notes that the main contractor on the project, Quality Construction, was notified of the audit on Northwest. Quality Construction didn’t respond to multiple requests for comment on its prevailing wage practices or relationship with Northwest. Quality Construction’s website emphasizes its “commitment to cost control” and assures clients: “Our Quality Construction management team reviews financial statements monthly and job status reports weekly (or daily, as necessary) to control your project costs.” Moen moved on and found other work since Northwest Concrete fired her. She says it was a relief when she got a letter in March 2015, a year before the state finalized its ruling, notifying her she’d be receiving additional payment for her work on the Gilkey Building’s foundation— about $7,000 total. A year later, the checks

cause the workforce isn’t educated,” McCarvel says. “They don’t know anything about these laws, or how to deal with it. They’re job scared, they let the employer get away with it. It’s so prevalent that that’s what they’re used to.” McCarvel has tried to convince Moen to join the union, which would help her find work and ensure she’s paid appropriately. Moen hesitates, though, since apprentice ironworkers often get sent out of state when local union jobs are scarce. She’s unwilling to be far from her young kids. In the last few months, she’s been grateful to find other trustworthy contractors willing to give her a chance, though she’s frustrated that she’ll still have to watch out for herself. “Yeah, it’s crazy,” Moen says. “I think it should be investigated here in how the companies treat their employees. Their employees don’t go out there and bust a butt to make the money and not get paid.” kwhittle@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • October 13–October 20, 2016 [17]


[arts]

Doom and boom Grazing the metal smorgasbord at Missoula’s two-night Erosion Festival by Erika Fredrickson and Josh Vanek

D

oom and stoner metal still hold outsider status in the music world, even as they gain popularity among underground music scenes. This weekend’s Erosion Festival is a striking example of how diverse the genre has become, featuring a lineup of pioneers and newer hard rock doom acts coming out of Portland, Seattle and Missoula. The festival debuted in Great Falls last year with a modest eight-band lineup. Promoter Cory

Disenchanter

sion-looking piece of footage from 1986 of Saint Vitus playing the Palm Springs Community Center. It’s raw sounding and wonderfully filled with the feedback squall of Dave Chandler’s feral guitar. It crackles with the electric energy of four dudes destined to do exactly what they were doing at that moment in history. It is also singer Scott “Wino” Weinrich’s first show with the band, which is probably why the video has been viewed over a quarter-million times.

photo courtesy of Matt Amott

Lynch and silkscreener Wilson Raska are producing the festival’s second run in Missoula, this time with 18 bands. In advance of the two-night event, we give you the scoop on who to see and what to know about them.

Mos Generator I can contentedly nod along with the rest of them when it comes to psychedelic doom or the battle crescendos of Viking metal. But when bands mix in classic elements of 1980s hard rock, that’s what really makes my ears perk up. Mos Generator is one of the most dynamic bands you’ll hear at this festival. Crisp drums and squealing guitar solos evoke a little bit of early Judas Priest. Some people might find Mos Generator’s soloing over-the-top—especially in comparison to the thick, low-tuned soundscapes of the festival’s lineup—but I think it adds much-needed color. It reminds me of the way bands like the Supersuckers pulled the best instrumental tricks from MTV hair bands and made them cool for a grittier audience. (EF)

Saint Vitus YouTube has what looks like a grainy, transferredfrom-video, Southern-California-Public-Access-Televi-

Saint Vitus

In the video, the band has no trouble bringing a thoroughly raging set even though it’s a well-lit daytime show in a sleepy town. Saint Vitus is among the first of the post-Sabbath bands to play doom, along with Pentagram, Trouble and a few others. Wino was the band’s second singer but due to a preexisting commitment to a reunion with his other band, The Obsessed, Saint Vitus’ Missoula appearance will feature original singer Scott Reagers. We could do far worse, but I think unfortunately Wino’s the singer you want. Regardless, getting Vitus on this lineup is a pretty serious coup and fest organizers landed a massive fish in the world of all things stony, doomy and metal. (JV)

Acid King Acid King serve as a perfect example of how doom metal differs from region to region. The band formed in San Francisco in 1993 and it’s easy to pinpoint pieces of grunge, riot grrrrl and Pacific Northwest post-punk that has seeped into their DNA. (If you like 7 Year Bitch and the Melvins, you’ll like them.) Still, Acid King were always on the obscure side. Now, thanks to social media and some built-up street cred, they can fill a space with 500 people. (I mean, they’re still underground after all.) Frontwoman Lori S. sings with a distinctively hypnotic voice but it’s her guitar tone—a 1970s fuzz sound—

[18] Missoula Independent • October 13–October 20, 2016

that gets the most attention among fellow musicians and music nerds. (EF)

The Skull Like Saint Vitus, The Skull are also legitimately legendary in this scene, and not just for being old dudes. Formed by members of doom metal pioneers Trouble, they spent a solid decade writing and recording some of

singing. The band is building a strong following based on blazing, tight live shows. Parsing the difference between “doom” and “stoner” is a little bit of a waste of time, but the main difference is speed, with stoner bands being comfortable with some down-tuned slowness. Stone Elk come down more on the stoner side, to me, with big riffs providing the central scaffolding around which the songs are built. But they’re also comfortable using full stops

Acid King

the genre’s best recordings while laying the groundwork for bands that would follow for the next 25 years. Trouble contributed to some mild controversy in the metal world. They weren’t exactly quoting Stryper-style bible verses, but their lyrics were a far cry from the openly satanic content coming out of the black metal community, causing their then-label, Metal Blade, to dub them “white metal.” The band has refuted the tag as a bogus marketing tactic and doesn’t embrace the handle whatsoever. (JV)

Disenchanter Portland’s Disenchanter are, along with Witch Mountain, among the handful of Erosion Festival bands featuring a woman up front singing and, in Disenchanter’s case, also playing guitar. Sabine Stangenberg is a shredder whose winding solos add some color to a psychedelic melange that is pretty Sabbathy, but also features other good heavy ’70s reference points along the way. I predict that because of their relative youth in a pretty crusty scene, and because they showcase a little bit more rockand-roll nimbleness compared to some of their peers, Disenchanter will emerge as a sleeper favorite. (JV)

Stone Elk These local heroes feature Phil “P.D.” Lear delivering heavy riffs and desperately crazed wildman

and having rollicking rock and roll in their repertoire. Folks traveling to Missoula for the headliners will do well to sidle up to the stage when Stone Elk plug in. ( JV )

Shramana The moody intro to “Terrible Purpose,” off Shraman’s new album, Mythos: Logos, is a perfect example of what I like about this Missoula band. Shramana takes time to set up the song, fingerpicking a warm minor key melody that you could listen to during a relaxing massage. But as the drums begin to gallop and the guitar starts to shift into a high-gear frenzy, you know some kind of instrumental storm is coming. Speaking of storms (and regional influence), Shramana really pays tribute to wintry metal—the kind that perhaps originated in the 24-hour dark days of Scandinavia and migrated to Montana. Their subject matter is ingrained with social and environmental justice issues, so read the lyrics beforehand on their Bandcamp page and you’ll get that much more out of their performance. (EF) Erosion Festival runs Fri., Oct. 14, and Sat., Oct. 15, at Stage 112. Doors open at 5 PM, music starts at 6 PM nightly. $40 full-pass/$25 single day pass. efredrickson@missoulanews.com


[music]

Road mutants Death Angel’s near brush with mainstream metal by Andy Smetanka

Death Angel began as part of the Bay Area’s 1980s metal scene.

Death Angel’s first album, The Ultra-Violence, recorded when band members were still young (drummer Andy Galeon was 14), is a stone classic in a genre that would never get anywhere near mainstream success. Of the kindred thrash bands in the Bay Area metal scene circa 1987—Metallica, Megadeth, Exodus, Legacy (later Testament), Possessed, etc.—only one exemplar would truly graduate to household-word American megastardom, and then only by self-consciously removing thrash from its music. In 1987, a band started five years earlier by four cousins from a close-knit Filipino community in Daly City, Calif., seemed as likely or unlikely as any, and at least as game, to carry thrash to a wider audience. In a mostly white male genre, here was a bracing splash of melting-pot exoticism: a diminutive phalanx of thrashers with tag-team buzzsaw riffs, gang-shouted choruses, a 3-footed teenage drummer and windmills of fine black hair. Death Angel found an early champion/producer in Metallica guitarist Kirk Hammett, though when Hammett listed Frolic Through the Park, the band’s 1988 follow-up to The Ultra-Violence, among his recent faves in a Rolling Stone roundup, the writer got it wrong and the title appeared in print as Frogs Through the Park. Not bad press, and better than no press, but for Death Angel’s first brush with the mainstream they deserved better than to get the rock equivalent of Charlie Brown’s misspelled bowling trophy. (The Independent would have liked to know how this bit of anticlimax went down in the Death Angel camp, but the only member consenting to interviews on this tour did not join the band until 2001.) If not quite as frolicsome as its title would indicate, Frolic Through the Park certainly boasts more fun than the relentless Ultra-Violence. Though not a concept album, it begins with a short trip in an elevator, motor

noise and three beeps announcing the listener’s arrival at the titular étage of opening track “Welcome to the Third Floor.” When the doors open, in pour the Arcadian sounds of tweeting birds and laughing children— and then an ominous wheedling guitar lead to suggest the approach of a two-stone mosquito. By the time the doors slam shut at the end of the ferocious “Mind Rape,” there’s been drill-sergeant chanting, slow dirge, queasy metal-funk and a romp through “Cold Gin” by KISS. “Road Mutants” hints at good times—metal concerts, even—in a postapocalyptic landscape where suppurating zombies actually start their own speed-metal bands. When were Megadeth ever that fun? Metallica? Third album Act III was well-reviewed and moderately successful on its 1990 release, but a nighttime tour bus crash in Arizona left drummer Galeon critically injured and the band reeling on the eve of two ambitious tours and the recording of a live album. New label Geffen was unsympathetic; when Death Angel declined to find a long-term replacement for Galeon, whose recovery took a full year, the label dropped them and the band fell apart in 1991. There have been reunions and new incarnations since 2001, with guitarist Rob Cavestany the only remaining original member (vocalist Mark Osegueda “only” joined in 1984). Newer albums boast more production polish than the tinny roar of Frolic Through the Park, but perhaps less fun. Fittingly, Death Angel’s first Missoula appearance finds them reunited with Slayer and Anthrax, with whom they were slated to go on tour before that fateful night in Arizona. Death Angel, Anthrax and Slayer play the Wilma Thu., Oct. 13. Doors at 6:30 PM, show at 7:10. Sold out. arts@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • October 13–October 20, 2016 [19]


[books]

Homecoming Pete Fromm returns to the nonfiction wilderness by Chris La Tray

During Savor Missoula, participating establishments offer a prix fixe menu of $35, $20, $9.50, $7.50 or $5 per person. Restaurants will also feature their regular menus during the promotion. Food lovers: Dine out at as many participating restaurants as you like during Savor Missoula. Explore new dining opportunities or enjoy old favorites. There are no tickets or passes required for Savor diners!*

[20] Missoula Independent • October 13–October 20, 2016

Twenty-five years have passed since Pete Fromm ness to let him explore on his own helped him plot his spent, without any prior wilderness experience, life’s course. (Some childhood anecdotes would seemseven months alone in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilder- ingly draw attention from Child Protective Services in ness guarding salmon eggs. The book he wrote 13 today’s paranoid, safety-addicted world.) He covers the years later about that winter, Indian Creek Chroni- jobs he had as a lifeguard and ranger; the meeting and cles, became a classic of nonfiction nature writing. courtship of his wife, Rose; and, ultimately, musings Since then, the Montana-based author has written on fatherhood and its joys and struggles. Fromm wrestles with trying to reconcile the man four novels, four collections of short stories and won a record-setting five Pacific Northwest Booksellers Lit- he grew up wanting to be with the man he has become. When he considers abanerary Awards. In 2013 he had a doning the idea of a month in movie made based on his the Bob upon learning his sons novel, As Cool As I Am. His latwon’t be able to accompany est book, a return both to nonhim, his wife urges him to stay fiction and solo wilderness the course, telling him he can’t adventures, is a memoir called keep setting aside his own life The Names of the Stars: A Life for them. When Fromm counin the Wild. It may be his best ters that the boys are his life, work yet. Rose answers, “But this is part The main action in Stars reof you too. It’s who you are. volves around Fromm’s return You need to do this.” to the wilderness— this time the Later, in another passage I Bob Marshall—in the spring of found particularly meaningful, 2004 to babysit another batch of after he has settled into the fish eggs. Unlike his previous cabin that will be his home for experience, it’s only for a the month, he reflects on leavmonth, and Fromm is no longer ing home and family behind. a footloose young man. He’s Fromm writes, “But, too long pushing middle-age, is married in any one place, I began to and has two young sons. When The Names of the Stars: itch. The reason never stated, he is first offered the job, he A Life in the Wild never thought out, I just had to hopes to bring his sons out into Pete Fromm the wilds with him, despite the Hardcover, Thomas Dunne Books move. There was more out there, so much more, things I’d Bob having the highest concen272 pages, $25.99 never seen or heard or felt, tration of grizzly bears anywhere in the lower 48 states. Issues of liability and even dreamed of. How, with all that, could anyone Forest Service bureaucracy prevent Fromm from tak- sit still?” Yet, with family and responsibilities, is this right? ing them and he nearly decides not to go. I’m not the only person who can relate to this. Fromm covers plenty of ground in a relatively short book. He documents his 30-day adventure, The West is a hard place to make a living. Many of us which gets off to a rocky start when his primary guide scrabble and scrape to cling to nontraditional is viciously kicked in the head by a pack mule just as lifestyles that allow us to live and play in these beauthey are setting out. He describes his efforts to babysit tiful landscapes. Then life happens, and the internal the eggs—a project whose goal is to return wild questions arise as to where “truth to self ” ends and grayling to wilderness streams—and the daily 10-mile selfishness begins. Fromm is an excellent companion when it comes hike he must undertake to check the incubation sites. His primary nemeses are weather and terrain, though to approaching these existential hurdles. His writing he does encounter plenty of elk and deer, wolf tracks is clean and tight, and he delivers his thoughts in a and, ominously, bears. Black bears, mostly, but griz- fashion that makes a reader wish these conversations were happening at a table in a bar. Or, better yet, zlies as well. Woven as flashbacks throughout the primary nar- around a campfire, somewhere deep in the woods, rative is the story of Fromm’s life, how he came to em- with the sound of a stream nearby. Pete Fromm reads from The Name of the brace wilderness and all the points where fate seemed to intervene. He describes his years growing up in Wis- Stars at Shakespeare & Co. Tue., Oct. 18, at 7 PM. consin as the only member of his family who seemed drawn to the outdoors, and how his parents’ willingarts@missoulanews.com


[film]

Blackout Train falls even flatter than the book by Molly Laich

During Savor Missoula, participating establishments offer a prix fixe menu of $35, $20, $9.50, $7.50 or $5 per person. Restaurants will also feature their regular menus during the promotion. Food lovers: Dine out at as many participating restaurants as you like during Savor Missoula. Explore new dining opportunities or enjoy old favorites. There are no tickets or passes required for Savor diners!*

“Where did that Charmander go?”

I listened to an audio recording of Paula Hawkin’s wildly successful novel The Girl on the Train on a fourday car ride from Washington to Michigan. This was supposed to be “the next Gone Girl,” a brilliant novel by Gillian Flynn, deftly adapted for the screen by David Fincher. The stories share in common neglected wives, missing women and unreliable narrators. But where Gone Girl features fluid writing, complex characters and truly shocking twists, The Girl on the Train follows meagerly with half-fledged characters, dumb plot turns and silly melodrama. Still, I finished the damn book. I had to know what happened, even as I cursed the gimmicky structure that carried me through to its sensational conclusion somewhere on a lonely, boring road in Wisconsin. Directed by Tate Taylor (The Help), the film version of The Girl on the Train stars Emily Blunt as our main protagonist, Rachel. She’s still from London but the rest of the movie has relocated to New York. Rachel was once married to Tom ( Justin Theroux), but he’s since left her for Anna (Rebecca Ferguson). The new couple lives in Rachel’s old house with their newborn child, and Rachel watches them every day from the train on her phony commute to the city. In fact, she’s lost her job due to complications from alcoholism. She drinks clear liquor from a water bottle but the world knows what she’s up to and judges her. Beyond her unhealthy fixation on her old life with Tom, Rachel obsesses on a couple two doors down that she imagines have the perfect marriage. They are Megan (Haley Bennett) and Scott (Luke Evans). Not since Rear Window have people revealed so much of their lives in such brief windows. Rachel doesn’t know that Megan is Tom and Anna’s nanny, but all of that’s revealed when Megan goes missing and Rachel finds herself embroiled in the murder mystery for plot reasons too convoluted to elaborate on further.

I had high hopes for the film adaptation of this novel, for some reason. The novel switches between Rachel, Anna and Megan in a way I found tedious and often repetitive. I hoped the film might speed things up a bit, but the tedium remains, only with less psychological complexity and context to back it up. As it turns out, my earlier complaints about the lengthy interior passages are the book’s strength. So much of the novel’s plot is predicated on Rachel’s frequent and unlikely blackouts, as if alcohol offers a magic portal of convenient forgetfulness. For lack of a book to throw across the room, I dreamed of crashing my car into oncoming traffic as I listened to the audio version. For Christ’s sake, alcohol doesn’t work that way! The film improves on this at least by narrowing the Blackout Magic to one pivotal moment, shown to us in cheap, blurry fragments that feel more at home in a Lifetime Original Movie. It’s a shame, because there’s a lot of talent in the cast here. Allison Janney as the detective plays the role with grace and authority, but she’s got nothing substantive to work with, and the same is true for all the female characters. I believe in Blunt’s alcoholism (the chapped lips are a nice touch). Small roles by Lisa Kudrow and Laura Prepon belong in a better movie. The men in The Girl on the Train are crude afterthoughts who exist solely to gaslight and otherwise confuse the women. You may not see the plot twist coming, but that’s only because the characters are so thin that everyone’s a plausible suspect. You don’t need the book in your life and you really don’t need the movie. If it’s cinematic intrigue you’re after, skip this sludge and just see Gone Girl a second time. The Girl on the Train continues at the Carmike 12.

Saturday 11/12: The Indy Sip - Enjoy local spirits (*ticketed event @ the Loft) Thursday 11/17: Foodie Trivia @ the Holiday Inn - Downtown (Brooks & Browns) Friday 11/18: Foodie Flick @ The Roxy, The Hundred-Foot Journey Saturday 11/19: Foodie Flick @ The Roxy, Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory

arts@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • October 13–October 20, 2016 [21]


[film] PG. Stars Madina Nalwanga, David Oyelowo and Lupita Nyong’o. Playing at the Carmike 12.

OPENING THIS WEEK THE ACCOUNTANT What do criminal cartels, weapons dealers and terrorists have in common? They all have the same accountant. Rated R. Stars Ben Affleck, J.K. Simmons and Anna Kendrick. Playing at the Carmike 12 and Pharaoplex.

ROSEMARY’S BABY I must have missed the part in What to Expect When You’re Expecting about pacts with Satan. Rated R. Stars Mia Farrow, John Cassavetes and Charles Grodin. Playing Sat., Oct. 15 at the Roxy. 9 PM.

INDIGNATION Sexual repression seems like no big deal compared to falling in love with an unstable girl at college in the 1950s. Based on Philip Roth’s novel. Rated R. Stars Logan Lerman, Sarah Gadon and Tracy Letts. Playing at the Roxy.

STORKS Instead of delivering babies, these storks find themselves delivering packages for a giant online retailer. Rated PG. Stars the voices of Andy Samberg, Katie Crown and Jordan Peele. Playing at the Carmike 12 and Pharaoplex.

KEVIN HART: WHAT NOW? Goof-slinger Kevin Hart performs his comedy for an audience of 50,000. Rated R. Playing at the Carmike 12. MAX STEEL Look out! A teenager and an alien team up to face the scariest thing of all: a movie based on a toy line your kids love. Rated PG-13. Stars Ben Winchell, Billy Slaughter and Andy García. Playing at the Carmike 12.

NOW PLAYING THE BIRTH OF A NATION The story of Nat Turner’s famous Virginia slave rebellion comes to the silver screen. Rated R. Stars Nate Parker, Armie Hammer and Aja Naomi King. Playing at the Carmike 12. DEEPWATER HORIZON Just when you thought it was safe to go back into the water, the oil strikes back! Rated PG-13. Stars Mark Wahlberg, Kurt Russell and Kate Hudson. Playing at the Carmike 12 and the Pharaoplex. THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN Taking the train to work every day is usually pretty boring. Maybe Emily Blunt can jazz it up by getting embroiled in a murder investigation. Rated R. Also stars Rebecca Ferguson and Lisa Kudrow. Playing at the Carmike 12 and Pharaoplex. (See Film.)

SULLY Who would have thought crashing an airplane would be the best thing to happen to him? Rated PG-13. Stars Tom Hanks, Frank Marshall and Allyn Stewart. Playing at the Carmike 12 and Pharaoplex. “I can’t believe I’m only the second most well-known Daredevil.” The Accountant opens at the Carmike 12 and Pharaoplex.

THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN Beleaguered townsfolk enlist seven outlaws to defend them from a corrupt industrialist in this remake from the director of Training Day. Rated PG-13. Stars Denzel Washington, Chris Pratt and Ethan Hawke. Playing at the Carmike 12 and the Pharaoplex. MASTERMINDS He stole a cool million dollars, but still couldn’t afford a decent haircut. Rated PG-13. Stars Zach Galifianakis, Kristen Wiig and Owen Wilson. Playing at the Carmike 12 and Pharaoplex.

is in order. Rated PG. Stars Griffin Gluck, Andy Daly and Retta. Playing at the Carmike 12. MISS PEREGRINE’S HOME FOR PECULIAR CHILDREN Being the new kid at school is always tough, especially when all the other students are a little peculiar. Also some of them are literal monsters. Rated PG-13. Stars Eva Green, Chris O’Dowd and Samuel L. Jackson. Playing at the Carmike 12 and the Pharaoplex.

METROPOLIS Fritz Lang’s 1927 silent masterpiece about class warfare screens at the Roxy featuring a live score by Love is a Dog. Not Rated. Stars Brigitte Helm and Alfred Abel. Thu., Oct. 20 at 7 PM.

THE NEVERENDING STORY (1984) After evading some bullies, young Bastian gets lost in a good book. Really lost. Not Rated. Stars Barret Oliver, Noah Hathaway and Deep Roy. Playing Sat., Oct. 15 at 7:30 PM and Sun., Oct 16 at 2:30 PM at the Roxy.

MIDDLE SCHOOL: THE WORST YEARS OF MY LIFE When your principal is as bad as the one at Hills Village Middle School, maybe a little insurrection

QUEEN OF KATWE Sometimes all it takes is a good game of chess to get you out of the slums of Uganda. Rated

[22] Missoula Independent • October 13–October 20, 2016

TANNA Running away with the man you love is always a difficult decision. It’s even harder when you’re from rival tribes on the same island. Not Rated. Stars Mungau Dain and Maria Wawa. Playing at the Roxy. THE THING It really sucks when you’re stranded thousands of miles from civilization and something claiming to be someone they aren’t shows up. Rated R. Kurt Russell, Keith David and Wilford Brimley star in the greatest horror film ever made. The Roxy. Wed., Oct. 19 at 7 PM. Capsule reviews by Charley Macorn. Planning your outing to the cinema? Visit the arts section of missoulanews.com to find up-to-date movie times for theaters in the area. You can also contact theaters to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 at 5417469; The Roxy at 728-9380; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603.


[dish]

photo courtesy of Clare Vergobbi

Heirloom tomato pie by Clare Vergobbi There’s nothing quite like hand-feeding a chicken, pulling up a handful of carrots you seeded, weeded and hand-watered for two months, or watching the sun set over mountains while the farm is full of families picking up their vegetables for the week. These are the simple lessons good soil, clean water, hard work and fresh food can teach. I’ve spent the last two summers as an apprentice at River Road Neighborhood Farm, one of Garden City Harvest’s four farms, where I’ve been learning by doing. River Road grows food for over 80 households who are members of the farm, and helps stock the kitchen at the Poverello Center with food each week of the season. That brings me to tomato season. At long last, it arrived—albeit about a month later than usual and much lighter than the motherlode that blessed gardens and farms around Missoula last year. I spent most of the winter and spring eating the tomato soup, sauce, salsa and frozen fruits I preserved last fall, and most of this summer waiting for tomatoes to come back into season. I was so desperate for tomatoes I started making a list of everything I wanted to make out of them at the first hint of red on the vines. Unfortunately, it’s hard to outsmart the whims of nature, and August and September have been colder and rainier than anyone would have liked—less than ideal weather for tomatoes. Harvests of tomatoes, peppers and other hot weather crops have been exercises in frustration at River Road. But harvests finally topped out above 100 pounds and I have faith that we’ll all end up with enough tomatoes to have more than enough for preservation. The fleeting inconsistencies of this season reminded me that the best tomatoes are those enjoyed fresh off the vine, standing in the field with juice running down my fingers or starring as the primary flavor in a light dish. One of the dishes on my tomato wish list is tomato pie. The version I made was inspired by an onion pie that my coworker Samantha brought to work one day. Tomato pie is an amazing way to showcase the deep flavors and beautiful colors of heirloom tomatoes. I opted for a slightly healthier version (minus the sour cream and mayonnaise) than the original recipes I came across on a few southern cook-

THE REAL DIRT

ing websites—it’s a combination of Samantha’s onion pie recipe and a fantastic recipe for heirloom tomato pie I found on Dig This Chick, a local Missoula blog. Ingredients 1 cup breadcrumbs 3-4 sliced heirloom tomatoes 4 cups shredded cheese (I liked parmesan, white cheddar and gouda) 1 cup milk or plain yogurt 1 egg 1 small onion, thinly sliced 4 cloves of garlic, diced or sliced 1 teaspoon dried sage 1 tablespoon chopped chives ¼ cup diced fresh basil (or 1 tablespoon dried basil) Salt and pepper to taste Directions Preheat oven to 350 degrees. For the crust, take a cup or so of breadcrumbs and mix with 3 tablespoons of melted butter, then press mixture firmly around the pie pan. Caramelize onions and garlic. Mix milk/yogurt, egg, cheese, garlic, onions and herbs. Pour mixture into pie crust. Layer tomato slices to fill up remainder of pie pan, sprinkling with salt and pepper to taste as you go. Bake for about an hour, or until the cheesy stuff is nice and bubbly and the tomatoes are juicy and squishy, but not dehydrated or burned. When it comes out of the oven, it will still be pretty watery. Let it sit for an hour at room temperature so it can set up, but it’ll probably taste just as good if you can’t wait that long. Throw some extra fresh basil on top before eating to make it extra tasty. Clare Vergobbi is a student at the University of Montana and served as an apprentice this season at Garden City Harvest’s River Road Neighborhood Farm. She also contributes to The Real Dirt, Garden City Harvest’s blog. For more Dirt, visit gardencityharvest.org.

missoulanews.com • October 13–October 20, 2016 [23]


[dish]

Mon-Fri

Asahi 1901 Stephens Ave 829-8989 asahimissoula.com Exquisite Chinese and Japanese cuisine. Try our new Menu! Order online for pickup or express dine in. Pleasant prices. Fresh ingredients. Artistic presentation. Voted top 3 People’s Choice two years in a row. Open Tue-Sun: 11am-10pm. $-$$$

7am - 4pm

531 S. Higgins

541-4622

(Breakfast ‘til Noon)

Sat & Sun 8am - 4pm

(Breakfast all day)

Lunch Bento

served with rice, a california roll, shumai and one item of your choice.

Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a timehonored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$

Starts at $7.50 406-829-8989 1901 Stephens Ave Order online at asahimissoula.com. Delicious dining or carryout. Chinese & Japanese menus.

OCTOBER

COFFEE SPECIAL

Organic

Montana

BUTTERFLY

Liberal Blend $10.95/lb.

BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

ALL DAY

MONDAY & THURSDAY SATURDAY NIGHT

Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Gotta love Missoula in October and gotta love Bernice’s! Piping hot cups of carefully crafted coffee or espresso compliment the fall chill. For breakfast (or after your morning workout) think of Bernice’s as the perfect stop for tummy satisfaction. Handcrafted bran muffins, quiche, garlic hummus, jalapeno-cheddar croissants or pumpkin pound cake are just the tip of the iceberg. And don’t forget that Halloween and Day of the Dead are Bernice’s favorite. Come by and see what we have designed as you grab your sweet treats October 27 – November 2. xoxo bernice. bernicesbakerymt.com $-$$

232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

SUSHI SPECIALS Not available for To-Go orders

[24] Missoula Independent • October 13–October 20, 2016

Bridge Pizza 600 S Higgins Ave. • 542-0002 bridgepizza.com A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11am - 10:30pm. $-$$ Burns Street Bistro 1500 Burns St. 543-0719 burnsstbistro.com We cook the freshest local ingredients as a matter of pride. Our relationship with local farmers, ranchers and other businesses allows us to bring quality, scratch cooking and fresh-brewed Black Coffee Roasting Co. coffee and espresso to Missoula’s Historic Westside neighborhood. Handmade breads & pastries, soups, salads & sandwiches change with the seasons, but our commitment to delicious food does not. Mon-Fri 7am - 2pm. Sat/Sun Brunch 9am - 2pm. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 44 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart

of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West • 541-FOOD The GFS Deli features made-to-order sandwiches, Fire Deck pizza & calzones, rice & noodle wok bowls, an award-winning salad bar, an olive & antipasto bar and a self-serve hot bar offering a variety of housemade breakfast, lunch and dinner entrées. A seasonally-changing selection of deli salads and rotisserie-roasted chickens are also available. Locallyroasted coffee/espresso drinks and an extensive fresh juice and smoothie menu complement bakery goods from the GFS ovens and Missoula’s favorite bakeries. Indoor and patio seating. Open every day 7am-10pm $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St. 549-7723 • grizzlyliquor.com Voted Missoula’s Best Liquor Store! Largest selection of spirits in the Northwest, including all Montana micro-distilleries. Your headquarters for unique spirits and wines! Free customer parking. Open Monday-Saturday 9-7:30 $-$$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ India Grill & Curry House 400 E. Broadway 926-2021 facebook.com/indiagrillandcurryhouse Experience Missoula's only authentic Indian restaurant! Try our unique, daily vegetarian or meat combos prepared with house-made curries and spices imported directly from India. Served with rice, naan bread, salad and dessert all served on traditional Thali-style plates. Also try our housemade Chai, Mango Lassi or our special Lemon Juice. New menu items and combos daily! Special orders and catering available. Mon-Sat - Lunch 11am-3pm / Dinner 5pm-9pm. $-$$ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 ironhorsebrewpub.com We’re the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we’ll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$

$…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over


[dish] Iza 529 S. Higgins 830-3237 izarestaurant.com Local Asian cuisine feature SE Asian, Japanese, Korean and Indian dishes. Gluten Free and Vegetarian no problem. Full Beer, Wine, Sake and Tea menu. We have scratch made bubble teas. Come in for lunch, dinner, drinks or just a pot of awesome tea. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm, Happy Hour 36pm, Dinner M-Sat 3pm-close. $-$$ Liquid Planet 223 N. Higgins 541-4541 Whether it’s coffee or cocoa, water, beer or wine, or even a tea pot, French press or mobile mug, Liquid Planet offers the best beverage offerings this side of Neptune. Missoula’s largest espresso and beverage bar, along with fresh and delicious breakfast and lunch options from breakfast burritos and pastries to paninis and soups. Peruse our global selection of 1,000 wines, 400 beers and sodas, 150 teas, 30 locally roasted coffees, and a myriad of super cool beverage accessories and gifts. Find us on facebook at /BestofBeverage. Open daily 7:30am to 9pm. Liquid Planet Grille 540 Daly 540-4209 (corner of Arthur & Daly across from the U of M) MisSOULa’s BEST new restaurant of 2015, the Liquid Planet Grille, offers the same unique Liquid Planet espresso and beverage bar you’ve come to expect, with breakfast served all day long! Sit outside and try the stuffed french toast or our handmade granola or a delicious Montana Melt, accompanied with MisSOULa’s best fries and wings, with over 20 salts, seasonings and sauces! Open 7am-8pm daily. Find us on Facebook at /LiquidPlanetGrille. $-$$ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. (on the hip strip) 543-7154 themissoulaseniorcenter.org Did you know the Missoula Senior Center serves delicious hearty lunches every week day for only $4 for those on the Nutrition Program, $5 for U of M Students with a valid student ID and $6 for all others. Children under 10 eat free. Join us from 11:30 - 12:30 M-F for delicious food and great conversation. $ The Mustard Seed Asian Cafe Southgate Mall 542-7333 Contemporary Asian fusion cuisine. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combine the best of Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences. Full menu available at the bar. Award winning desserts made fresh daily , local and regional micro brews, fine wines & signature cocktails. Vegetarian and Gluten free menu available. Takeout & delivery. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary KoreanJapanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$

Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. 543-3188 orangestreetfoodfarm.com Experience The Farm today!!! Voted number one Supermarket & Retail Beer Selection. Fried chicken, fresh meat, great produce, vegan, gluten free, all natural, a HUGE beer and wine selection, and ROCKIN’ music. What deal will you find today? $-$$$

Devil’s Hump Red Ale wins gold

HAPPIEST HOUR

Pearl Cafe 231 E. Front St. 541-0231 pearlcafe.us Country French meets the Northwest. Idaho Trout with King Crab, Rabbit with Wild Mushroom Ragout, Garden City Beef Ribeye, Fresh Seafood Specials Daily. House Made Charcuterie, Sourdough Bread & Delectable Desserts. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Pita Pit 130 N Higgins 541-7482 pitapitusa.com Fresh Thinking Healthy Eating. Enjoy a pita rolled just for you. Hot meat and cool fresh veggies topped with your favorite sauce. Try our Chicken Caesar, Gyro, Philly Steak, Breakfast Pita, or Vegetarian Falafel to name just a few. For your convenience we are open until 3am 7 nights a week. Call if you need us to deliver! $-$$ Sushi Hana 403 N. Higgins 549-7979 SushiMissoula.com Montana’s Original Sushi Bar. We Offer the Best Sushi and Japanese Cuisine in Town. Casual atmosphere. Plenty of options for non-sushi eaters including daily special items you won’t find anywhere else. $1 Specials Mon & Wed. Lunch Mon–Sat; Dinner Daily. Sake, Beer, & Wine. Visit SushiMissoula.com for full menu. $$-$$$ Taco Sano Two Locations: 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West 1515 Fairview Ave inside City Life 541-7570 • tacosano.net Home of Missoula’s Best BREAKFAST BURRITO. 99 cent TOTS every Tuesday. Once you find us you’ll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9pm 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$

photo by Alex Sakariassen

The stakes: Competition was thick in Denver last week. Judges at the 30th annual Great American Beer Festival waded through 7,227 entries from more than 1,750 breweries to select a mere 286 award-worthy brews. In other words, hundreds of brewers across the nation had simultaneously crossed their fingers. When the buzz cleared, one Missoula brew came away with a gold medal. The winner: Devil’s Hump Red Ale, which claimed top prize in the Irish-style Red Ale category, is a whole lot lighter than the name might imply. The Missoula Brewing Company flagship weighs in at a drinkable 5 percent alcohol-by-volume. Taste-wise it tends to start out a bit on the sweet side, before the heavier malt body gives way to a crisper hops finish. And if that first sip triggers some deja vu, don’t be surprised. The backstory: Though the name is new, Devil’s Hump has actually been kicking around western Montana since 2008. MBC owner Bob Lukes introduced the recipe after acquiring the rights to the Highlander beer label, and it won

Best of Montana at the Garden City BrewFest in 2009. Formerly available only in bomber bottles and on select taps, the red-ale reimagining of one of Montana’s oldest brews finally enjoyed a wider release, including six-packs, shortly after MBC opened the doors of its taproom in 2015. Fellow winners: MBC wasn’t the only Montana brewery to snag an award at last week’s festival. Philipsburg Brewing won a bronze medal for its 5 Phantoms Pumpkin Spice Barleywine. Billings-based Uberbrew claimed two gold medals, a silver and a bronze, and was also singled out as Small Brewing Company of the Year. Find it: If you’re in the mood for a little Devil’s Hump, stop by Missoula Brewing Company at 200 International Dr., off Reserve Street. —Alex Sakariassen Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over

missoulanews.com • October 13–October 20, 2016 [25]


TUE | 8 PM | TOP HAT Alt-folk superstars HoneyHoney play the Top Hat Tue., Oct. 18. Doors at 7:30 PM, show at 8. $15.

FRI | 7 PM | WILMA Chase Rice heads to the Wilma Fri., Oct. 14 after a day stalking elk. Doors at 6 PM, show at 7. $35 –$45.

[26] Missoula Independent • October 13–October 20, 2016

MON | 9 PM | MISSOULA WINERY The Heartless Bastards’ Erika Wennerstrom plays Missoula Winery Mon., Oct. 17. Doors at 8 PM, show at 9. $15.


FRI | 10 PM | PALACE New York's LVL UP bring their blast from the past to the Palace Fri., Oct. 14. Doors at 9 PM, show at 10. $10/$8 in advance.

SAT | 6 PM | STAGE 112 Chron Goblin play the Erosion Festival Sat., Oct.15. Thrash your way to stage112.com for tickets and full lineup. Doors at 5 PM, show at 6. $40/$25 single day pass.

missoulanews.com • October 13–October 20, 2016 [27]


Friday 10-1 4

10-1 3

Thursday Missoula, land of fresh produce, provides yet another weekly market for all your organic needs. The Grizzly Green Market runs from 10 AM to 2 PM every Thursday in the mall outside the Mansfield Library on campus.

nightlife Frame of Mind and Bayern Brewery are combining two things Missoula loves best: Monte Dolack and beer. Head to Frame of Mind for a beer tasting and art viewing. 5:30 PM–8:30 PM. Free. Djebe Community Drum and Dance at Barn Movement Studio, 2926 S. Third St. every Thursday from 6–7 PM. $5 donation. John Schiever is at Bitter Root Brewing. 6 PM–8:30 PM. Free. Any word on if their guitars, drum kits and oboes got caught in the rain? Good thing they had their Basses Covered. Boom. Perfect joke. Catch the show at Draught Works. 6 PM–8 PM. Free. Questions about the Federal Reserve? I know I do. Like, what is it? Spend an evening with Neel Kashkari where the Federal Reserve Bank president speaks about his initiative to end “Too Big to Fail.” 7 PM. RSVP at hs.umt.edu/hs/rsvp. Slayer is joined by Anthrax and Death Angel to strike the unholy hammer of thrash metal at the Wilma. Doors at 6:30 PM, show at 7:10. $49.50–$65 at ticketfly.com. Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM. Dead Hipster Dance Party is so cool even I don’t know about it. The Badlander, 208 Ryman St., with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight. 21-plus. I’m not saying Scott Pemberton sold his soul to be the avatar of guitar music on Earth. I am definitely not saying that. I’m just saying no human can play guitar like this. See for yourselves at the Top Hat. Doors at 9:30 PM, show at 10. Free. The Newlyweds describe themselves as the Sex Pistols for your grandmother. Clearly they’ve never met Grandma Puke Macorn. Joined by Rotgut Whines and Alabama Deathwalk, the show kicks of 9 PM at the Palace. Free.

Like a tumbleweed made of guitar strings, Mike Murray and the band roll into the Top Hat. 10 PM. Free. You’ll be in stitches at Yarns at the Library, the fiber-arts craft group that meets at the Missoula Public Library in the board room from noon–2 PM Fridays. No registration required, just show up! The Women in Black stand in mourning of international violence every Friday on the Higgins bridge from 12:15–12:45 PM. Visit jrpc.org/ calendar to learn more. Pow! ZACC Comics is a six-week program where students create single and multi panel cartoons. At least I think that’s what happening in this timeline. Superboy Prime punched a wall and now I don’t know what’s going on. 3:30–5:30 PM. $95/$85 for members. I don’t know about you, but wrapping up my workweek by watching some poor cricket getting devoured by a large Chilean tarantula is somehow very satisfying. Tarantula feeding at the Missoula Butterfly House and Insectarium at 4 PM. $4 admission.

nightlife Do you like your metal like you like your scarred Latverian dictators? Come to Stage 112 for Erosion, a two-day doom metal festival. Thrash

[28] Missoula Independent • October 13–October 20, 2016

your way to stage112.com for tickets and full lineup. $40/ $25 single day pass.

Bowl XXIII, heads to the Wilma. Doors at 6 PM, show at 7. $35 – $45.

The Dana Gallery opens a new exhibit featuring work by a dozen of their favorite artists. 5:30 PM–8 PM.

Enjoy free cinema at Missoula Public Library’s World Wide Cinema night, the second Friday of every month. The series showcases indie and foreign films. Doors open at 6:45, show at 7 PM. Check missoula publiclibrary.org for info. Free.

This year dozens of Montana artists celebrate the Day of the Dead with work based on the heroes, dreamers and fighters in their lives. See the result at the grand opening from 5:30 PM–8:30 PM at the ZACC. Free. Missoula Brewing Co. welcomes the live music of Lochwood. 6 PM–8 PM. Free. Larry Hirshberg plays Ten Spoon Vineyard. 6 PM. The Top Hat presents Family-Friendly Friday, a time where parents and their kids can socialize, listen to music, eat great food and have fun. This week Child Bloom provides the musical entertainment. Free. Bring an instrument or just kick back and enjoy the tunes at the Irish Music Session every Friday at the Union Club from 6–9 PM. No cover. Chase Rice, the only country singer to share his name with the Cincinnati Bengal’s defensive strategy at Super

Camille Bloom plays Missoula Cellars. Doors at 6:30 PM, show at 7. $15/$10 in advance. Author and University of Montana alumna Megan Kruse reads from her new book in the Dell Brown Room of Turner Hall. 7 PM. Free. Enjoy fine wine and beer tasting with food samples from Missoula’s top restaurants and caterers at the 11th Annual Montana Wine and Beer Festival. The Adams Center. 7 PM–10 PM. $50. Grab your gas mask and get ready to pee your pants in fear. The Missoula Haunted House is back for its fourth year of sending shivers down your spine. Missoula County Fairgrounds. Kids’ hours from 4 PM–6 PM. Adults 7 PM–11 PM. $10.

I am not even going to attempt to pronounce this word. Arts & Above presents αἰών: of faith, a new work about faith, the internal voice and personal logic at the Downtown Dance Collective. 7:30 PM–9 PM. $15

Pianissimo bring nine pianos, over 25 pianists and more keys than a locksmith convention to the UM Music Recital Hall. 7:30 PM. $25 at griztix.com The 406 Band play the Eagles. 8 PM. Free. New York’s LVL UP are known for reworking ‘90s indie rock gems for the modern age. Joined by Cardinal Kin, Mido Skip and Shahs at the Palace, it’s a real blast from the past. Doors at 9 PM, show at 10. $10/$8 in advance. Just in time for the spookiest time of year, Jack Shiver plays the Sunrise Saloon. 9:30 PM. Free. Russ Nasset and the Revelators have some secrets to unveil; they’re all about the music, and one of them is a werewolf. The Union Club. 9:30 PM. Free. Like a tumbleweed made of guitar strings, Mike Murray and the band roll into the Top Hat. 10 PM. Free.


10-1 5

Saturday Missoula’s Clark Fork Market features vendors offering local produce and meats as well as locally made products, hot coffee and prepared foods. Music starts at 10:30 under the Higgins Bridge. 8 AM–1 PM. Missoula’s Hellgate Roller Girls are on hand at Orange Street Food Farm to bag groceries, raise money for their league and chew bubble gum. And it looks like they’re all outta bubble gum. 10 AM–2 PM. This certainly explains the luck I had with Dr. Horsington J. Dog. Meadowsweet Herbs hosts animal therapist Judith Poelarends for a lecture on how animals can help us heal. 2 PM–3:30 PM. The Sacramento State Hornets buzz into Washington Grizzly Stadium, looking to sting our football team. The Grizzlies, used to dealing with stings while foraging for delicious honey, are ready for anything. 2:30 PM. Get your jack-o’-lantern on lockdown while supporting the Poverello Center with Pumpkins for the Pov in the old Safeway parking lot next to St. Pats. Enjoy music, costume contest and more. 4 PM–6 PM.

nightlife When there’s no more room in Hamilton, the dead will walk the

OCT

Earth. Ravalli County Muesum’s daylong celebration of the zombie apocalypse runs from 2:30 PM to 8:30 PM. Still haven’t done anything about all those double consonants, huh? Jeff Carroll plays Missoula Brewing. 6 PM–8 PM. Free. In celebration of her CD release, Joan Zen is kicking off some jams at Bitter Root Brewing. Come down and give out some high-fives. 6 PM– 8:30 PM. Grab your gas mask and get ready to pee your pants in fear. The Missoula Haunted House is back for its fourth year of sending shivers down your spine. Missoula County Fairgrounds. Kids’ hours from 4 PM–6 PM. Adults 7 PM–11 PM. $10. Time to dust off my Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm costume. Dress as your favorite literary character or author and come down to the Crystal Theater for music, readings and good times at this fundraiser for the Open Country Reading Series. 7 PM. $15. I am not even going to attempt to pronounce this word. Arts & Above presents αἰών: of faith, a new work about faith, the internal voice and personal logic at the Downtown Dance Collective. 7:30 PM–9 PM. $15

The 406 Band play the Eagles. 8 PM. Free. The Symes Hotel in Hot Springs hosts Basses Covered. 8 PM–10 PM. Free. Local post-punkers MASS FM and groove-heavy Iron Eyes set the Palace on fire. With music, obviously. 9 PM. Free. DJ Kris Moon completely disrespects the adverb with the Absolutely Dance Party at the Badlander, which gets rolling at 9 PM, with fancy drink specials to boot. No cover. Looking for some local tunes and good times? Monk’s welcomes the Codependents, Farch, Zak James, Cove Court Music and Big Diction. 9 PM. $5 for 18-plus, $3 for 21plus. Catch the song, soul and passion from the otherside of the divide as Bozeman band Hawthorne Roots plays the Top Hat Lounge. Doors at 9:30 PM, show at 10. Free. Just in time for the spookiest time of year, Jack Shiver plays the Sunrise Saloon. 9:30 PM. Free. The Union Club hosts the music of Cash for Junkers. 9:30 PM. Free.

14

CHASE RICE

16

OCT

INDIGO GIRLS

OCT

THE LIL’ SMOKIES

21 OCT

22 OCT

30 OCT

31

THE LAST REVEL

N0V

BLEED GOLD TOUR

N0V

SHOVELS & ROPE

13

N0V

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PINKY & THE FLOYD N0V 3 DIFFERENT ONES

29

BEN FOLDS

DEC

& A PIANO

05

DEAN WEEN GROUP DEC 30MEAT PUPPETS

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FEB

02 17

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THE FELICE BROTHERS

OCT

HONEYHONEY

18 OCT

ROTGUT WHINES

CHERUB

06

INDIANOLA

PORTUGAL. THE MAN BOONE HOWARD

CHRIS ROBINSON BROTHERHOOD JIM JAMES MOE.

NYE RUN - 2 NIGHTS!

IRATION PROTOJE

NOV

PAPER BIRD & THE

FEB

JOHN BROWN’S BODY

16 BALLROOM THIEVES 15

AN EVENING WITH

28 KELLER WILLIAMS TICKETS & MORE INFO AT THE TOP HAT TOPHATLOUNGE.COM • THEWILMA.COM

ating ThirtyCelebryyears Th 1987-1988

2016-2017

Catch the song, soul and passion of Hawthorne Roots at the Top Hat Sat., Oct. 15. Doors at 9:30 PM, show at 10. Free.

missoulanews.com • October 13–October 20, 2016 [29]


10-1 6

Sunday The Missoula marathon running class is designed for beginning to advanced runners. Meet every Sunday morning at 8 AM, Run Wild Missoula in the basement of the Runner’s Edge, 304 N. Higgins. $100. Dress in your finest tweed and take your bicycle out for a lovely afternoon ride. The seventh annual Missoula Tweed Ride starts at Free Cycles at 1 PM. $15/$12 in advance. People Who Stutter is a casual group of folks who get together the third Sunday of each month to just hang out and exchange stories and info. With Tricia Opstad, MS, CCC-SLP and Trevor Monsos. Liquid Planet Grille, 1025 Arthur St., 1:30–3:30 PM. Free. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like storytelling, finger plays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM on Sat. and 2 PM on Sun. at the Missoula Public Library. Free.

nightlife Celebrate 30 years of being the change you want to see in the world at the Anniversary Peace Party, celebrating three decades of the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center’s activism. 3 PM–7 PM. $40. I am not even going to attempt to pronounce this word. Arts & Above pres-

Catch the power of two when the Indigo Girls play the Wilma Sun., Oct. 16. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $35–$50 at thewilma.com. ents αἰών: of faith, a new work about faith, the internal voice and personal logic at the Downtown Dance Collective. 7:30 PM–9 PM. $15 Bitter Root Brewing turns 18. To celebrate they’re pulling out all the stops with a customer appreciation party featuring Radio Static. 11:30 PM–8 PM.

Planned Parenthood turns 100! Celebrate with a reception and live story-telling to celebrate the centennial at the Crystal Theater. 5:30 PM– 8 PM. Free. The Second Wind Reading series welcomes Lisbet Portman and Anita Huslin to the Badlander. 6 PM. Free.

Spotlight Many people would be surprised to learn Lugosi in the titular role. It went on to take the the first appearance of Bram Stoker's undead world, the cinema and pop culture by storm. count wasn't in the classic 1897 novel of the From there, Dracula was adapted hundreds same name, but rather on the stage. A full week before the book’s release, Stoker premiered a hastily written and rehearsed adaptation of his own WHAT: Dracula book for the London stage. Due to the copyright laws of the time, Stoker's WHO: UM’s School of Theatre & Dance plan was to secure the stage copy- WHEN: October 19-23 and 26-30. right in the United Kingdom himself before his novel came out to cut off WHERE: Montana Theatre any enterprising theaters from jumping his claim. With a run time of HOW MUCH: $10-$20 nearly five hours, the production MORE INFO: umt.edu/umarts/ opened to indifferent audiences and theatredance hostile critics before closing forever after just one show. Despite staging the play to protect his rights for future theater endeavors in the first place, Stoker was so frustrated with the whole ordeal of times for the stage, including William Mche never allowed Dracula on the stage again Nulty's version, which the University of Montana’s School of Theatre & Dance program in his lifetime. Thirty years later, Stoker's estate green-lit opens this week. a stage play featuring Hungarian actor Bela —Charley Macorn

[30] Missoula Independent • October 13–October 20, 2016

Open mic at Lolo Hot Springs’ Bear Cave Bar and Grill offers cool prizes like cabin stays, bar tabs and hot springs passes, plus drink specials, starting at 7 PM. Call 406-273-2297 to sign up. No cover.

the power of two at the Wilma The-

Folk-rockers the Indigo Girls got out their map and found Missoula. Catch

lander. Play games, have drinks, for-

ater. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $35–$50 at thewilma.com Every Sunday is a fun day at the Badget tomorrow is Monday. 9 PM.

biting classic

photo by Cathrine L. Walters


10-1 7

Monday Spend Monday morning exploring the fall foliage around Missoula before relaxing with a hot beverage with Coffee Walks. This week explore Marshall Mountain. Meet at Currents Aquatics Center. 9 AM-12 PM. $5. Sip a fancy cocktail for a cause at Moscow Monday at the Montgomery Distillery, 129 W. Front St. A dollar from every drink sold is donated to Blackfoot Challenge. Bring the family! 12 PM–8 PM. Relax and realign with Yoga for Wellness at the Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent Ave., Mondays from noon–1 PM. $45 for six classes, or $10 drop-in. Call 721-0033 or visit redwillow learning.org. WordPlay! offers opportunity for community creativity. Word games, poetry, free writing and expansion all happen in Ste. 4 of the Warehouse Mall at The Base. Open to all ages and abilities every Mon. at 4 PM. The Shuffles Dance Studio hosts tap classes for all ages and levels, Mondays through Thursdays from 4-7 PM. 500 N. Higgins Ave. Call 210-

8792 or drop in to observe a class. $60 for four classes.

nightlife Tired of their life in the dark, folk rockers The Felice head for the bright lights of the Top Hat Lounge. Doors at 8 PM, show at 9. $18/$16 advance. Prepare a couple songs and bring your talent to Open Mic Night at Imagine Nation Brewing. Sign up when you get there. Every Monday from 6–8 PM. Bingo at the VFW: the easiest way to make rent since keno. 245 W. Main. 6:30 PM. $12 buy-in. Find out how the Garden City grows at the weekly Missoula City Council meeting, where you can no doubt expect ranting public commenters, PowerPoint presentations and subtle wit from Mayor Engen. Missoula council chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Meetings are the first four Mondays of every month at 7 PM, except for holidays. Get mindful at Be Here Now, a mindfulness meditation group that meets Mondays from 7:30–8:45

PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Free, but donations appreciated. Visit openway.org. In an event that was hard to write about without sounding like I’m insulting her, Erika Wennerstrom of the Heartless Bastards plays Missoula Winery. Doors at 8 PM, show at 9. $15. Voncommon Vondays is back at the Roxy. Check out a double feature of films representing pivotal moments in feminist history. 8 PM. $8.(See Spotlight.) Aaron “B-Rocks” Broxterman hosts karaoke night at the Dark Horse Bar. 9 PM. Free. Conan Neutron & the Secret Friends are joined by Magpies at Stage 112. I hope they’re better than Solomon Kane Electron. Doors at 8 PM, show at 9. $5. 18-plus. Live in SIN at the Service Industry Night at Plonk, with DJ Amory spinning and a special menu. 322 N. Higgins Ave. 10 PM to close. Just ask a server for the SIN menu. No cover.

Spotlight femme flix In 1974, filmmaker Johanna ered to be the first feminist film ever Demetrakas documented an incredi- made, this silent classic still rings true ble and bold untertaking by artists today. Despite being made decades Judy Chicago and Miriam Shapiro. Chicago and Shapiro rented a Holly- apart, both films work together as an wood mansion, and opened it up to their artists friends, asking them to explore the nature of womanhood by altering rooms in the large estate. The kitchen became home to aprons with female body parts sewn on to them, asking if a woman's body is synonymous with housework. One bathroom was painted with hundreds of tubes of lipstick while another was painted white to contrast against the WHAT: VonCommon Vondays overflowing trashcan full of Feminist Film used tampons in the center of the room. The final film, WHO: VonCommon Art Collective Womanhouse, remains a WHEN: Mon., Oct. 17 at 8 PM classic of women's film. Fifty years earlier, an- WHERE: The Roxy Theater other filmmaker, the French actress Germaine Dulac, HOW MUCH: $8 directed her own film about MORE INFO: theroxytheater.org the female experience. In La souriante Madame Bedut, and intelligent young woman, exploration of womanhood, feminism trapped in a loveless marriage, at- and art. tempts to alter her husband's harmless —Charley Macorn prank to have deadly results. Consid-

missoulanews.com • October 13–October 20, 2016 [31]


10-1 8

Tuesday Join in time for the end of the world, Missoula Public Library hosts a timely brown bag discussion about the Electoral College. 12 PM–1 PM.

nightlife Justin Boening reads from his debut book of poems at Shakespeare & Co. 5 PM. Play a round of disc golf in a local park. Missoula Parks and Rec and Garden City Flyers set up a course in a local park each Tuesday. This week’s folf adventure meets at Ben Hughes Park. 5 PM. Free. Join the Montana Dirt Girls every Tuesday for an all-women hike or bike. Find locations at facebook.com/MontanaDirtGirls. 6 PM. Dust off that banjolin and join in the Top Hat’s picking circle, 6–8 PM every Tuesday. All ages. Learn the basics of canning your own salsa at Moonlight Kitchens. 1951 Kensington 6 PM. $20/$10 for MUD members. Blackfeet Tribal members discuss the Badger-Two Medicine area of the Rocky Mountain Front and the efforts of the Blackfeet to protect the area from oil and gas development. A screening of the documentary Our Last Refuge follows. 6:30 PM–8 PM. Free. Local author Pete Fromm reads from his new memoir The Name of the Stars: A Life in the Wilds at Shakespeare & Co. 7 PM. (See Books.)

The Lacs stop by the Palace for a musical recreation of great moments in redneck history Tue., Oct. 18. Doors at 9 PM, show at 10. $20/$18 advance. 18-plus. Canadian Japanese-drum band Fubuki Daiko bring their percussion to Seeley Swan High School. 7 PM. $14.

Sugar - BUM BUM BUM BUM BUMBUM - ah HoneyHoney play the Top Hat. Joined by Rotgut Whines, doors at 7:30 PM, show at 8. $15.

Learn the two-step and more at Country Dance Lessons at the Hamilton Senior Center, Tuesdays from 7–9 PM. $5. Bring a partner. Call 3811392 for more info.

Flail your legs, but keep your hands at your side. Scott Doherty of Riverdance and Lord of the Dance is back with Rockin’ Road to Dublin at the Dennison Theatre. 7:30 PM. $36-$46.

Show off your big brain at Quizzoula trivia night, every Tuesday at the VFW, 245 W. Main St. Current events, picture round and more. 8:30 PM. Free. Our trivia question for this week: What is the only insect that produces food eaten by humans? Answer in tomorrow’s Nightlife.

Georgia boys The Lacs stop by the Palace for a musical recreation of great moments in redneck history. Doors at 9 PM, show at 10. $20/$18 advance. 18-plus.

Comedy Showcase/Open Mic at the Roxy Theater. 7:30 PM. Free with concession purchase.

Wed. at the Sunrise Saloon. 9 PM. Free.

Mike Avery hosts the Music Showcase. At the Badlander, 9 PM–1 AM. To sign up, email michael. avery @live.com.

10-1 9

Wednesday You know, some people think writing humorous blurbs in a community calendar is a kind of art. Just sayin’. Artists Megan Moore and Jim Woods highlight the monthly Art Associates of Missoula meeting at Radius Gallery. 10 AM.

This open mic is truly open. Jazz, classic rock, poetry, spoken word, dance, shadow puppets—share your creative spark at The Starving Artist Café and Art Gallery, 3020 S. Reserve St. Every Wed., 6–8 PM. Free.

nightlife

Don’t give me none of that formal H20. Casual Water plays Great Burn. 6 PM. Free.

At the Phish Happy Hour you can enjoy Phish music, video and more at the Top Hat every Wednesday at 4:30 PM. But I know you’ll show up at 4:20. Free. All ages.

Wednesday Night Brewery Jam invites all musicians to bring an instrument and join in. Hosted by Geoffrey Taylor at Imagine Nation Brewing Co., 6–8 PM. Free.

Raise a pint to combat muscular dystrophy at Kettlehouse. A portion of every pint sold between 5 PM and 8 PM goes to support the Muscular Dystrophy Association of Montana.

Win big bucks off your bar tab and/or free pitchers by answering trivia questions at Brains on Broadway Trivia Night at the Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W.

[32] Missoula Independent • October 13–October 20, 2016

Broadway Ave. 7 PM. Trivia answer: The honey bee. I can neither confirm nor deny the existence of Captain Wilson Conspiracy. Just kidding. You can see them play the Top Hat. 7 PM. Free. Charley Henley, a man who spells his first name in the correct fashion, reads and signs copies of The Deep Code at Fact & Fiction. 7 PM. Free. I’m so afraid of vampires I refuse to buy a welcome mat to avoid any undead loopholes. The Montana Theatre hosts Dracula. The play, that is. Not the person. $20. umt.edu/ umarts/ for more full schedule and info. Montana’s favorite humorist Dan Brooks headlines the HomeGrown

Get up onstage at VFW’s open mic, with a different host each week. Halfprice whiskey might help loosen up those nerves. 8 PM. Free. Show your Press Box buddies you know more than sports and compete in Trivial Beersuit starting at 8:30 every Wednesday. $50 bar tab for the winning team. Make the move from singing in the shower to a live audience at the Eagles Lodge karaoke night. $50 to the best singer. 8:30–10:30 PM. No cover. Get your yodel polished up for rockin’ country karaoke night, every

Kraptastic Karaoke indulges your need to croon, belt and warble at the Badlander, 9 PM, no cover. You catch more space flies with Moon Honey than moon vinegar. Catch Moon Honey yourself at Stage 112. Joined by Cardinal Kin, the doors open at 9 PM, show at 10. $5. 18-plus. Sure are a lot of honeyrelated events this week, huh? Ironically this SLC-based band had to go pretty far north to get here. Westward plays the Real Lounge. With support from Two Foot Titan, the doors open at 9 PM, show at 10. $5. 18-plus.


10-2 0

Thursday Release some stress during t’ai chi classes every Thursday at 10 AM at the Open Way Center, 702 Brooks. $10 drop-in class. Visit openway.org. The miniNaturalist Pre-K program at the Montana Natural History Center engages youngsters in the exploration of the natural world through fun hands-on activities, games and play. 10 AM–11 AM. Head to montananaturalist.org for registration and more info. Missoula, land of fresh produce, provides yet another weekly market for all your organic needs. The Grizzly Green Market runs from 10 AM to 2 PM every Thursday in the mall outside the Mansfield Library on campus. Spend your lunch hour learning about how homeWord promotes and creates local, sustainable communities in Missoula. 11:45 AM–1:15 PM. homeword.org for more info. The impact of sexism in the 2016 presidential campaign is discussed by a bipartisan panel at the YWCA. 4 PM. RSVP on Facebook. Yoga newbies can get hip to a gentle, mindful practice with Easy Yoga for Beginners at the Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent Ave. Meets Thursdays from 4–5:15 PM. $45 for six weeks or $10 drop-in.

nightlife The ZACC holds a workshop on how to create the Mexican folk craft of Papel Picado banners. 6 PM–8 PM. Free.

New South Fork is much better than my old west spoon. Mainly because they play bluegrass while my spoon doesn’t actually exist. Bitter Root Brewing. 6 PM–8:30 PM. Free. New South Fork is much better than my old west spoon. Mainly because they play bluegrass while my spoon doesn’t actually exist. Bitter Root Brewing. 6 PM–8:30 PM. Free. Beverly Lowry reads from her new book Who Killed These Girls? Cold Case: The Yogurt Shop Murders. All I know is I couldn’t have done it. I was too busy watching the penguins at the North Pole. Shakespeare & Co. 7 PM.

Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. Get cash toward your bar tab for first place, plus specials on beer. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30– 10 PM. Julie Bug and Northern Exposure play the Sunrise Saloon. I wonder if Barry Corbin will be there? 8:30 PM. Free.

Dead Hipster Dance Party is so cool even I don’t know about it. The Badlander, 208 Ryman St., with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight. 21plus. Feeling left out? The Alienated play Stage 112. 9 PM. $5 18-20/ 21plus free. Start spreading the news! There’s Karaoke today! You don’t need to be a veteran of the Great White Way to

sing your heart out at the Broadway Bar. 9:30 PM. Free.

We want to know about your event! Send to calendar@missoula news.com at least two weeks in advance of the event. Don’t forget to include the date, time, venue and cost. Send mail to Cal-eesi, Mother of Calendars c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801.

missoulanews.com • October 13–October 20, 2016 [33]


Agenda FRIDAY OCTOBER 14

TUESDAY OCTOBER 18

The Women in Black stand in mourning of international violence every Friday on the Higgins bridge from 12:15–12:45 PM. Visit jrpc.org/calendar to learn more.

Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters help you improve your public speaking skills with weekly meetings at ALPS in the Florence Building, noon–1 PM. Free and open to the public. Visit shootinthebull.info for details.

SATURDAY OCTOBER 15

Join in time for the end of the world, Missoula Public Library hosts a timely brown bag discussion about the Electoral College. 12 PM–1 PM.

This certainly explains the luck I had with Dr. Horsington J. Dog. Meadowsweet Herbs hosts animal therapist Judith Poelarends for a lecture on how animals can help us heal. 2 PM–3:30 PM. Get your jack-o’-lantern on lockdown while supporting the Poverello Center with Pumpkins for the Pov in the old Safeway parking lot next to St. Pats. Enjoy music, costume contest and more. 4 PM–6 PM.

On Dec. 8, 1941, Congress met to vote on a declaration of war against Japan following the attack on Pearl Harbor the day before. The vote was almost unanimous, with the sole exception of a single Missoulian. Jeannette Rankin, the first woman to hold federal office in the United States cast the single opposing vote. “As a woman I can't go to war,” she said. “And I refuse to send anyone else.” She was mobbed as she left the chambers after the vote, where a police escort had to get her to safety. Of the hundreds of angry phone calls and telegrams she received following her negative vote, the worst was from her own brother. “Montana is 100 percent against you.” And at that time, Montana may have been.

But in the years and decades since she drew her line in the sand, Rankin’s commitment to freedom and pacifism has spread. The Jeannette Rankin Peace Center works to honor and promote Rankin's goals by empowering people to build a socially just, nonviolent and sustainable global community. This Sunday, the center celebrates 30 years, with dinner, beer, wine and music from the Montana Women's Chorus. —Charley Macorn Jeannette Rankin Peace Center hosts the Spotlight on Peace Party at the Missoula County Fairgrounds Sun., Oct 16, at 3 PM. Visit jrpc.org/spotlight-onpeace to register. $40/$30 advance

[34] Missoula Independent • October 13–October 20, 2016

The International Wave of Light is a worldwide lighting of candles in memory of pregnancy and infant loss. A memorial will be held in the Gallagher Board Room at Community Medical Center from 6:45 PM to 8 PM.

MONDAY OCTOBER 17 Find out how the Garden City grows at the weekly Missoula City Council meeting, where you can no doubt expect ranting public commenters, PowerPoint presentations and subtle wit from Mayor Engen. Missoula council chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Meetings are the first four Mondays of every month at 7 PM, except for holidays.

Blackfeet Tribal members discuss the Badger-Two Medicine area of the Rocky Mountain Front and the efforts of the Blackfeet to protect the area from oil and gas development. A screening of the documentary Our Last Refuge follows. 6:30 PM–8 PM. Free.

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 19 If you or your loved ones are looking for an Alzheimer’s support group, join Summit Independent, 700 Higgins Ave., every second Wednesday of the month for their meetings from noon–2 PM. Nonviolent Communication Practice Group facilitated by Patrick Marsolek every Wednesday at Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. 12–1 PM. Email info@patrickmarsolek.com or 406-443-3439 for more information. Raise a pint to combat muscular dystrophy at Kettlehouse. A portion of every pint sold between 5 PM and 8 PM goes to support the Muscular Dystrophy Association of Montana.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.


MOUNTAIN HIGH

J

ust like how the name of Nimrod, the great biblical hunter, became synonymous with foolishness and idiocy due to a joke made by Bugs Bunny in one cartoon, so too did our view of tweed change because of popular media. The image of a professor, decked out in tweed, making his way obliviously through crowds of undergrads while balancing a stack of books is an easy one to conjure. But we really associate tweed with smarts because of the films of Sherlock Holmes. Much like his iconic deerstalker cap, Holmes, played by Basil Rathbone in a series of 14 feature films between 1939 and 1946, wore tweed because of its warmth, durability and cost. It was really the Carhartt of its time. But because we see Holmes as a more intelligent person, those same clothes he wore to keep warm while chasing glowing dogs across the moors became interchangeable with in-

telligence, creating a new market of tweed jackets, pants and shirts for the discerning academic. But tweed can still be used for its original purpose, especially when you plan on biking on a brisk autumn day. The 7th Annual Missoula Tweed Ride takes you on a 5-mile loop with stops for tea both downtown and in Greenough Park before cycling back (ha!) to Free Cycles for “best of” contests, food, drink and music in what will be the tweediest party you can imagine. —Charley Macorn The Tweed Ride begins at Freecycles Sun., Oct. 16, at 1 PM and returns to Freecycles at 3:30 PM. Ride over to missoulatweedride.org for more info and registration. $15/$12 advance.

photo by Joe Weston

FRIDAY OCTOBER 14 Join other pedalers for a weekly ride to Free Cycles Missoula and back to UM. Meet at the Grizzly statue. 12:30–2 PM. Free. Contact Sandra Broadus at 406-243-4599 for info. I don’t know about you, but wrapping up my workweek by watching some poor cricket getting devoured by a large Chilean tarantula is somehow very satisfying. Tarantula feeding at the Missoula Butterfly House and Insectarium, every Friday at 4 PM. $4 admission.

SATURDAY OCTOBER 15 You’ll be bright-eyed and bushy-tailed after Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which start at 8 AM every Saturday at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org.

SUNDAY OCTOBER 16 The Missoula marathon running class is designed for beginning to advanced runners. Meet at 8 AM, Run Wild Missoula in the basement of the Runner’s Edge, 304 N. Higgins. $100.

MONDAY OCTOBER 17 Spend Monday morning exploring the fall foliage around Missoula before relaxing with a hot beverage with Coffee Walks. This week explore Marshall Mountain. Meet at Currents Aquatics Center. 9 AM-12 PM. $5.

TUESDAY OCTOBER 18 Play a round of disc golf in a local park. Missoula Parks and Rec and Garden City Flyers set up a

course in a local park each Tuesday. This week’s folf adventure meets at Ben Hughes Park. 5 PM. Free. Join the Montana Dirt Girls every Tuesday for an all-women hike or bike. Find locations at facebook.com/MontanaDirtGirls. 6 PM. Blackfeet Tribal members discuss the Badger-Two Medicine area of the Rocky Mountain Front and the efforts of the Blackfeet to protect the area from oil and gas development. A screening of the documentary Our Last Refuge follows. 6:30 PM–8 PM. Free.

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 19 Head to Missoula Winery for lawn game madness every Wednesday through the summer. Croquet, bocce and petanque (that’s French for bocce) from 4–7 PM. The Missoula marathon running class is designed for beginning to advanced runners. Every Wednesday at 6 PM, Run Wild Missoula in the basement of the Runner’s Edge, 304 N. Higgins. $100. Hellgate Hunters and Anglers bring the butcher from Cloven Hoof to show their stuff at Burns Street Bistro. 6 PM–8 PM. $15.

THURSDAY OCTOBER 20 The miniNaturalist Pre-K program at the Montana Natural History Center engages youngsters in the exploration of the natural world through fun hands-on activities, games and play. 10 AM–11 AM. Head to montananaturalist.org for registration and more info.

missoulanews.com • October 13–October 20, 2016 [35]


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

October 13–October 20, 2016

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“Age is not a particulaly interesting subject. Anyone can get old. All you have to do is live long enough.”– Groucho Marx


EMPLOYMENT

ADVICE GODDESS

GENERAL

By Amy Alkon THINKING OUTSIDE THE BOOBS I’m a man who likes to girl-watch. I do this from behind very dark glasses, yet I still elicit scowls from women. Recently, I was at a help desk, and I availed myself of the view down the receptionist’s top. She quickly covered up with a scarf. I’m puzzled, because there’s no way she could’ve seen my eyes. What’s going on here? –Sunglasses We all appreciate a nice view, but your eyes might be lingering a bit long in the wrong places if you hear stuff like “Sir ... are you ready for my areolas to take your order?” Hiding your boob recon behind pitch-dark shades doesn’t help matters— but not because we have some magical ability to know when someone is staring at us. Sure, people will swear that they can tell—even if the starer is behind them or is behind dark glasses. However, unless they grew up someplace else— like on Planet 34—they have no organ that would detect this. (Here on Earth, “eyes in the back of your head” is just a figure of speech—save for any rare genetic accidents.) Why might we think we know when we’re being watched—even by someone we can’t see? Well, we may—subconsciously—be picking up on subtle reactions of people around us who can see the watcher. Neuroscientist Joseph LeDoux explains that our amygdala—part of our brain’s threat detection circuitry— reacts beneath conscious awareness, messaging our body to get ready to run or rumble (that “fight or flight” thing). Among our body’s responses, our little hairs stand on end. That’s a creepy feeling—leading us to whirl around to see what gives—and whoa! ... there’s some dude angling to cavity-search us with his eyeballs. We have a term for that “hairs standing on end” feeling, and it’s “being creeped out”—which is what women are experiencing when they can’t see what your eyes are up to behind those dark glasses. Evolutionary social psychologist Frank McAndrew published the first study on the nature of “creepiness.” He explains that the feeling that something is “creepy” is a self-protective response to “ambiguity”—our being unsure of whether we’re facing a threat. We err on the side of assuming that we are—and in rushes the palace guard to barricade the cleavage with a scarf. This woman you stared at was at the “help” desk, and no, that isn’t short for

“Help yourself to a nice long look down my boobage.” Close-range staring at a captive audience like that is particularly creepy—as in, it’s rude. Again, the sunglasses don’t change that; they make it worse. If you’re going to girl-watch, do it in wide-open spaces, like on the street or in a mall, so you don’t make women feel like sitting ducks in pushup bras. You might also take off those spy glasses and engage with one of these ladies. If you get something going with a woman, gazing admiringly at her will seem like a form of flattery—as opposed to a sign that your mom reset the Net Nanny to block all those “filthy” webcam sites.

THE SON ALSO PLAGIARIZES I met this woman who’d dated my ex. In talking, we realized that he used the same romantic lines on both of us. Granted, these made me feel good at the time, but I feel angry and stupid for falling for them. How do you know when a guy is sincere? –Scammed Understandably, you want a man’s lovey-dovey talk to come from the heart, not from a Word doc he saved on his hard drive. However, a guy whose heartfelt remarks turn out to be a renewable resource isn’t necessarily some sneaky recycler. Consider how personality plays into this. Personality is a pattern over time of thoughts, feelings, and desires that shape how you behave. Research by social psychologist Nathan W. Hudson suggests that you may be able to change aspects of your personality through behavioral change—like by repeatedly acting more conscientiously. Still, Hudson—along with about 10 truckloads of other social psychologists—sees a good deal of evidence that personality is “relatively stable.” In other words, even a sweet, sincere guy is likely to use some of the same romantic wordery with any woman he’s dating. What tells you whether he’s a good guy or he just talks a good game is time—reserving judgment on what you have together until enough time passes for you to hold up the sweet things he says to what he actually does. Wanting to see any discrepancies is really the best way to protect yourself from serial romancers—or worse. (“I bet you say that to all the girls you put in your freezer!”)

AdviceAmy@aol.com. www.advicegoddess.com

[C2] Missoula Independent • October 13–October 20, 2016

Administrative Assistant Under the supervision of the Manager, SPH Medical Staff Services, this position is responsible for assisting with all office functions including filing, answering phones, as well as providing clerical and other assistance to the Provider Concierge. Job duties must be performed in a manner consistent with St. Patrick Hospital s Mission as demonstrated by the core values of Respect, Compassion, Justice, Excellence, and Stewardship. Education: High School diploma or GED required. Experience: Minimum of three years office experience, including strong computer ability in Microsoft Word and Excel. Experience with printer, fax, scanning. Special qualifications: Excellent organizational skills, personal relations and communication skills including listening, verbal and written. Ability to work under pressure and prioritize tasks. Excellent analytical skills and adaptability. Degree of Supervision Required: Involves general guidance and direction by the Manager, SPH Medical Staff Services. Employee will be expected to perform most job duties independently and in accordance with established departmental and hospital policies and procedures. Clerical: Demonstrates telephone etiquette by answering the phone by the third ring, identifying self and department, giving accurate and careful answers, ensuring the accuracy of messages, transferring calls accurately, always saying please and thank you, terminating calls pleasantly and allowing the caller to hang up first. Demonstrates the ability to maintain an organized filing system by filing documents in a timely manner, retrieving documents, and purging files as needed. Communication: Demonstrates the ability to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences, adjusting personal style to meet the needs of individuals. Maintains an ongoing dialogue with peers, hospital leadership and medical staff to insure that they have access to the information needed to effectively handle their responsibilities. Values / Service Excellence: Effectively conveys to peers and employees, the importance and significance of living the core values and mission in our daily work. Payor Credentialing Functions Assist in obtaining, verifying, completing and submitting MT Medicaid revalidations Assist

in BC/BS reverification process, including verifying provider status, demographic information, and updates as appropriate Research provider payor issues as directed by Provider Concierge Follow up with payers regarding status of revalidations and reverifications Assist as needed with initial provider enrollment process Procedural Functions Create/update tracking spreadsheet for new payer credentialing applications Create tracking spreadsheet for revalidations (Medicaid) and reverifications (BC/BS). Investigate possibility of using reporting available from various payors Create roster of employed/contracted providers for whom Provider Concierge is responsible. Create listing of all payers for which Provider Concierge is responsible for enrolling providers. Full job listing online at lcstaffing.com Job ID# 28568 AID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home! No Experience Required. Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity. Start Immediately! Auto transport company seeking professional Class A CDL drivers. Experience preferred. Excellent wages, benefits, and bonuses. Hire on bonus of $1,500. On the road for 14-17 days then home 4 days. Call Gary 406-2591528 or apply online www.jandstransport.com/drivers. Caregiver for Elderly Woman Experienced in home caregiver needed for elderly woman. Live in preferred. Room and board provided. lisa.roulund@assuredperformance.net Driver Delivery driving position for a local automotive glass company. Will be delivering to Polson, Kalispell and Whitefish. Additional duties will include warehouse work including but not limited to picking orders and loading truck for deliveries. Position is 30 + hours a week. Variable shifts- early morning shift and swing shift Monday-Friday. Must have current valid driver’s license with a clean driving record. Must be able to lift 50# on a regular basis. This is a temporary position that has the potential to become long term.$10/hour Full job listing online at lcstaffing.com Job ID# 28576 Election Aide Missoula County is seeking a short term, part-time, ELECTIONS AIDE. Performs a variety of duties related to conducting elections, checking

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petitions and registering voters. Requires high school diploma or GED. Requires two years of clerical office experience including personal computer use, data entry, and face-to-face customer service. Requires a valid Montana driver’s license. Provides information to the public. Assists with processing voter registration cards; absentee ballots; late registration; and enters data on computer system. Assists with preparations for general, primary, school, and special elections. Checks petitions by verifying signatures using computer files and statutory required procedures. Maintains files of election materials and assists in their proper destruction. Operates data entry equipment, personal computer, copy machine, fax machine, calculator and other office equipment. Full job description at Missoula Job Service. employmissoula.com Job #10236357 HOME RESOURCE IS HIRING! Home ReSource seeks a Reuse Specialist to help reduce waste and build a vibrant and sustainable local economy at our retail store. To apply visit: homeresource.org. Laborer Reputable, local industrial cleaning company looking for a temp laborer.Industrial cleaning service involves portable pressure washing, sand blasting, and lots of vacuuming work. Must have a valid DL, clean driving record and be able to drive a standard transmission. On the job training is provided, and qualified candidate must be able to lift up to 75# and not afraid of heights. $12/hour. Monday through Friday, 8am5pm and some Saturdays may be required. Full job listing online at lcstaffing.com Job ID# 28397 z LAUNDRY/HOUSEKEEPING WORKERS NEEDED! NELSON PERSONNEL is looking to fill positions for housekeeping/laundry at $8.35/hour, Full-time. Call Us at 543-6033 NEED A JOB? Let NELSON PERSONNEL help in your job search! Fill out an application and schedule an interview. Call Us at 543-6033 Nelson Personnel is in search for a professional, friendly individual to fill FULL-TIME a RECEPTIONIST/ADMIN ASST. position. $10-12/hr. Call Us at 543-6033 NELSON PERSONNEL is looking to fill PRODUCTION SUPPORT, JANITORIAL, & WAREHOUSE

positions for a manufacturing company. $11/hr – Full-Time. Call Us at 543-6033 PT Line Cook Local Missoula Brewery and Bistro is seeking PART-TIME LINE COOK. Must be dependable and hard-working. Be available at least 20 hours per week. Both day and evening availability preferred. Full job description at Missoula Job Service. employmissoula.com Job #10233055 Rug Doctor, the nation’s leader in Do-It-Yourself carpet care, is looking for Independent Contractors that are responsible, selfstarters to deliver products and provide service to existing accounts in the following areas: Missoula MT as well as the surrounding areas. ï 1 day per week (of your choosing) making $11,613 annually servicing 29 accounts. ï Our Independent Contractors are responsible for providing quality services and merchandising to Rug Doctor Accounts in the area. ï Restocking products, pricing, facing, rotating, and invoicing of products and machines during each service call ï Inspecting and testing equipment and displays by performing preventative maintenance as needed, including, but not limited to overall functionality of machines, clean/polish racks, floor space around and under racks. Provide customer service, including service calls and Walmart kiosk maintenance, 3rd party merchandising projects, periodic inventory counts, out of cycle service calls and store service requests ï A reliable truck or van to transport products and machines to assigned vendors ï To be able to cover fuel and maintenance cost on your truck or van ï A secure location to stock minimal supply or products and machines ï A current active Driverís License ï Full coverage vehicle insurance ï Commercial general liability insurance ï Acceptable DMV Report with No DUIs ï A smart phone, Android preferred ï Rug doctor will pay independent contractors (IC) for their service per store basis. Stores further away from home will be paid at higher rate as fuel cost is included in the service fee. IC will be given exact service fees per store prior to start date. Standard fee rates will be paid for service calls, kiosk maintenance and 3rd party merchandising projects. Pay period is bi-weekly, with 1099 provided for tax purposes. IC will be provided a list of stores to service the week prior to when they will need service. IC can service stores based on his/her schedule. Some stores


EMPLOYMENT may request specific dates and times for services. ï Please contact eric.white@rugdoctor.com for more information. Rug Doctor is an Equal Opportunity employer. The Equal Employment Opportunity Policy of Rug Doctor is to provide a fair and equal employment opportunity for all associates and job applicants regardless of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, age, marital status or disability. Rug Doctor hires and promotes individuals solely on the basis of their qualifications for the job to be filled. Rug Doctor believes that associates should be provided with a working environment which enables each associate to be productive and to work to the best of his or her ability. We do not condone or tolerate an atmosphere of intimidation or harassment based on race, color, religion, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, age, marital status or disability. We expect and require the cooperation of all associates in maintaining a discrimination and harassment-free atmosphere. Servers Local retirement center is seeking part-time SERVERS to assist with meals. Must enjoy working with people. Servers may be scheduled for 2-3 hour shifts for the supper hour MonFri, and 2-3 hour shifts up to 3 times a day on Saturdays and Sundays. Full job description at Missoula Job Service. employmissoula.com Job #10229526 WORK OUTSIDE! NELSON PERSONNEL is looking to fill a Maintenance position for a property management company. $10/hr. Full-time. Call Us at 543-6033

PROFESSIONAL Accounting Administrative Assistant Short term (2 weeks) or possibly long term Accounting/Administrative Assistant needed ASAP! Montana manufacturer in need of an Accounting/Administrative Assistant ASAP! This could be a short-term (2 week) or possibly a long-term position. We specialize in designing and producing commercial aquatics equipment. The Accounting & Admin Assistant will split his/her time between assisting both the Accounting Manager and the General Manager in a wide array of activities. PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITY: Assist the Accounting department with day-to-day tasks to help ensure that the department is able to meet their goals and the needs of their internal and external customers. OTHER RESPONSIBILITIES: General Responsibilities: • Directly responsible for answering the phone, processing the mail, and resolving vendor and customer issues in a timely manner. • Set up regular maintenance appointments for office equipment and building maintenance and cleaning. • Assist in planning and executing company functions. • Manage all airline travel booked through American Express program. • Assist the General Manager in special projects as assigned. • Attend scheduled meetings and

training as directed by management. • Assist with or accept other duties as may be considered necessary in the circumstances or as directed by management. Accounting & HRRelated Responsibilities: • Timely process of vendor invoices, including but not limited to maintaining vendor files, GL account coding, vendor correspondence, verifying PO receipt of goods, verifying freight shipments, and payment of all vendor invoices. • Develop A/P cash forecasts on a weekly basis. • Manage expense report process, including timely and accurate reconciliation of the American Express vendor account to statements. • Track freight costs to ensure that profitability is maintained. • Open customer orders on daily basis and work with Staff Accountant as needed to address customer orders that are on credit hold. • Process credit card payments, review orders submitted by sales department, and assist in resolve customer payment issues as needed. • Match purchase and sales order backup to invoices to ensure billing accuracy. • Manage the mailing of customer invoices and statements. • Assist Accounting Manager in Human Resource-related tasks as needed. • Maintaining electronic and hard copy filing systems for the Accounting and department. Support Accounting Department in month-end and year-end close activities. Full job listing online at lcstaffing.com Job ID# 28567 HR/AR/Staff Supervisor One of Missoula’s top Dealerships is seeking an exceptional HR/AR/Staff Supervisor to join our growing team. This position will be required to wear multiple hats in a hands-on capacity. The HR Assistant duties will consist of walking new employees through our on-boarding process, entering data in system, updating benefit choices, workers compensation reporting , and communication of current policies and procedures. AR responsibilities: prepare AR statements, report accurate data to Assistant Controller and to appropriate management and act as back-up for entering cash receipts (towing, cash counter activity, funding, etc.) You will, also, be primary on submitting and recording coop advertising and internal staff. Reconcile other entity bank activity and possible other misc. items as need arises or is assigned. Dealer Trade responsibility includes preparation of dealer trade checks and input dealer trade information. As the Office Staff Supervisor you will work as a team leader in the office, com-

municating office and company needs, posting schedules, training and offering support to office staff as needed. Must maintain professionalism with management and staff in communication and while providing superb customer service. Hours would be 7:30-4:30 M-F with an occasional Saturday. $16.00/hr. Full job listing online at lcstaffing.com Job ID# 28328 Programmer Logistic Systems, Inc. is seeking a full-time programmer to be primarily responsible for maintaining & developing code. Logisys prefers programmers with 1+ years experience in the following programs: C/C++/C Sharp, Java, Visual Basic, SQL Server databases, Windows Server Professional and Windows Operating Systems. Full job description at Missoula Job Service. employmissoula.com Job #10234410 Secretary/Administrative Assistant Needed to be a Customer Care Rep in our company a in well-organized and timely manner. Experience not required. $860 per week for a start, send your CV/Resume to aliciaje92@yahoo.com or call:(406) 234-2197 Structural Design Engineer Morrison-Maierle, Inc. has exciting opportunities for entry to mid-level Structural Engineers. Master’s degree in CivilStructural Engineering. 0 to 6 years experience. Engineer Intern certification. If years of experience have been fulfilled, Professional Engineering (PE) license is preferred. Experience with Revit/BIM and specialized structural analysis software preferred. Strong work ethic. High level of personal responsibility and accountability. Interpersonal skills to interface effectively with employees and managers. Strong organizational skills and attention to detail. Must have a valid driver license and insurable driving record. Full job description at Missoula Job Service. employmissoula.com Job #10236571

SKILLED LABOR Construction Materials Technician Exciting long-term career opportunity for a Construction Materials Technician to join a leading provider in consulting, engineering, and technical services throughout Montana and worldwide. This is a diverse company, including individuals

with expertise in science, research, engineering, construction, and information technology. More than 14,000 employees and 350 offices worldwide! Opportunity to work with team of 5 geotechnical engineers and 4 laboratory/field technicians. Responsibilities: Complete primarily lab work on construction and geotechnical projects that involve testing of construction materials (concrete, asphalt, soil). Work in conjunction with others to produce quality testing results and reports based on ASTM or AASHTO standards. Assist Lab Manager to communicate with and distribute reports to clients. Perform work in various professional settings and be able to communicate results to others in a professional manner, both verbal and written. Qualifications: PREVIOUS CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING EXPERIENCE IS REQUIRED FOR THIS POSITION. Must have mathematical aptitude. Must be able to read, write and communicate in English. Must have strong writing and organizational skills to be able to complete field reports. Computer skills in Microsoft office suite are required, especially Excel. Materials testing certifications also desired, including; ACI, nuclear densometer certificate, and others. Degree Requirements: None; however, coursework in, or a degree in Construction Management or Civil Engineering Technology is preferred. Excellent benefits offered after completing 500 hours through LC Staffing employment agency by the Client. M-F, 8:005:00, $14.00/hr minimum, or higher dependent on experience. Full job listing online at lcstaffing.com Job ID# 28164 Welder/Metal Fabricator Now recruiting for a Welder/Metal Fabricator position. The job of Welder/Metal Fabricator is for the purpose of fabricating and welding parts/ assemblies in the manufacturing and production of commercial stainless steel swimming pool equipment while meeting demand and completing work orders in a timely, efficient manner; and ensuring safety and resolving immediate safety concerns. All welds are performed to company standards and finished products or projects are to conform to drawing and quality specifications. Qualified candidate must be able to walk and stand throughout an eight to ten hour day, and must be able to consistently lift 50 to 70lbs from a floor or table position to waist high using proper lifting technique. Employee will perform

welds on various products using MIG and TIG welding processes in all positions. All parts and assemblies are type 304L and type 316L stainless steel. Qualified employee will be able to use and operate safely various shop equipment, power tools, and hand tools (e.g. chop saws, drill presses, iron worker, punch machines, cope grinders, disc grinders, belt sanders, hand drills, and tool box tools). This is a full time, long term position. Wage $12.50-$15/hour DOE and weld test. Full job listing online at lcstaffing.com Job ID# 28519

HEALTH CAREERS Dentist Missoula County is seeking a DENTIST with a degree of D.D.S. or D.M.D. from an accredited dental school and current license to practice dentistry in the State of Montana from the Montana Board of Dentistry with no history of licensure suspension or disciplinary action. Must be eligible for malpractice/liability coverage. Will provide comprehensive and emergency dental care for Partnership Health Center patients; assure quality dental services; represent Partnership Health Center to the Missoula Dental community. Provides basic and emergency dental care for Missoula County Detention Facility inmates as required. Provides dental services including dental screenings, preventative education, diagnosis, and basic restorative dentistry, oral surgery, endodontics, prosthodontics, and emergency care. Full job description at Missoula Job Service. employmissoula.com Job #10235607 Dermatology LPN/CMA Please join our progressive and enterprising health care organization in our commitment to providing the best patient care in Western Montana! Candidates must have excellent clinical and computer skills (Epic experience preferred) and be able to demonstrate their initiative and ability to work in a team environment with patients, providers and co-workers. Be a part of an organization that makes a difference in our health care community. Seeking LPN/CMA’ s with experience in Dermatology, Family Practice, Midwifery and a Sleep Clinic setting with a current MT LPN license or certified/registered MA required. New graduates will be considered. Wage range from $13.50-$20.25/DOE. Full job listing online at lcstaffing.com Job ID# 27049

SALES Inside Sales Representative Seeking a full-time Inside Sales Representative to grow our existing customer base including national key strategic accounts and pursue new customers in the commercial aquatic market. You must be goal and customer oriented in order to achieve or exceed the monthly and annual sales target and the Company’s overall strategic goals. Essential Duties and Responsibilities: • The ability to read and interpret commercial construction drawings and specifications is a plus. • Commercial construction drafting / sales experience and dealing with clients is a plus. • Maintain existing customers and target large national accounts by providing accurate product information, superior service and technical expertise. • Understand and determine customer requirements and expectations in order to propose specific products and solutions. • Generate new and repeat sales in order to achieve the sales growth target and increase the company’s presence in the market place. • Set up and maintain customer files regularly. Must be proficient in MS Office Suite and have some familiarity with an ERP System. BS or equivalent experience required with a minimum of 3-5 years of proven sales track and meeting sales objectives. Detail oriented and the ability to multi-task in a fast paced work environment essential. The position will be required to lift 25-50 lbs on occasion. $25,000.00 + commission/DOE. Full job listing online at lcstaffing.com Job ID# 28350 Inside Sales Representative Seeking a full-time Inside Sales Representative to grow our existing customer base including national key strategic ac-

counts and pursue new customers in the commercial aquatic market. You must be goal and customer oriented in order to achieve or exceed the monthly and annual sales target and the Company’s overall strategic goals. Essential Duties and Responsibilities: The ability to read and interpret commercial construction drawings and specifications is a plus. Commercial construction drafting / sales experience and dealing with clients is a plus. Maintain existing customers and target large national accounts by providing accurate product information, superior service and technical expertise. Understand and determine customer requirements and expectations in order to propose specific products and solutions. Generate new and repeat sales in order to achieve the sales growth target and increase the company’s presence in the market place. Educate customers on the features and the benefits of the entire product line in order to increase sales, improve company’s market share and deliver the total customer satisfaction. Up sell and cross sell in order to increase sales, average order size and profitability. Prepare daily customer quotes, orders and new projects submittal packages in a timely manner. Adhere to the established customers pricing structure to ensure profitability. Manage customer orders and shipment dates to ensure ontime delivery. Set up and maintain customer files regularly. Must be proficient in MS Office Suite and have some familiarity with an ERP System. BS or equivalent experience required with a minimum of 3-5 years of proven sales track and meeting sales objectives. Detail oriented and the ability to multitask in a fast paced work environment essential. The position will be required to lift 2550 lbs on occasion. $25,000.00 + commission/DOE. Full job listing online at lcstaffing.com Job ID# 28350

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): A study published in the peer-reviewed Communications Research suggests that only 28 percent of us realize when someone is flirting with us. I hope that figure won’t apply to you Aries in the coming weeks. According to my analysis of the astrological situation, you will be on the receiving end of more invitations, inquiries and allurements than usual. The percentage of these that might be worth responding to will also be higher than normal. Not all of them will be obvious, however. So be extra vigilant. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The ancient Greek sage Socrates was a founder of Western philosophy and a seminal champion of critical thinking. And yet he relied on his dreams for crucial information. He was initiated into the esoteric mysteries of love by the prophetess Diotima, and had an intimate relationship with a daimonion, a divine spirit. I propose that we make Socrates your patron saint for the next three weeks. Without abandoning your reliance on logic, make a playful effort to draw helpful clues from non-rational sources, too. (P.S.: Socrates drew oracular revelations from sneezes. Please consider that outlandish possibility yourself. Be alert, too, for the secret meanings of coughs, burps, grunts, mumbles and yawns.) GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The Helper Experiment, Part One: Close your eyes and imagine that you are in the company of a kind, attentive helper—a person, animal, ancestral spirit or angel that you either know well or haven’t met yet. Spend at least five minutes visualizing a scene in which this ally aids you in fulfilling a particular goal. The Helper Experiment, Part Two: Repeat this exercise every day for the next seven days. Each time, visualize your helper making your life better in some specific way. Now here’s my prediction: Carrying out The Helper Experiment will attract actual support into your real life.

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CANCER (June 21-July 22): New rules: 1. It’s unimaginable and impossible for you to be obsessed with anything or anyone that’s no good for you. 2. It’s unimaginable and impossible for you to sabotage your stability by indulging in unwarranted fear. 3. It’s imaginable and possible for you to remember the most crucial thing you have forgotten. 4. It’s imaginable and possible for you to replace debilitating self-pity with invigorating self-love and healthy self-care. 5. It’s imaginable and possible for you to discover a new mother lode of emotional strength.

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): It’s swing-swirl-spiral time, Leo. It’s ripple-sway-flutter time and flowgush-gyrate time and jive-jiggle-juggle time. So I trust you will not indulge in fruitless yearnings for unswerving progress and rock-solid evidence. If your path is not twisty and tricky, it’s probably the wrong path. If your heart isn’t teased and tickled into shedding its dependable formulas, it might be an overly hard heart. Be an improvisational curiosity-seeker. Be a principled player of unpredictable games.

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Some English-speaking astronomers use the humorous slang term “meteor-wrong.” It refers to a rock that is at first thought to have fallen from the heavens as a meteorite (“meteor-right”), but that is ultimately proved to be of terrestrial origin. I suspect there may currently be the metaphorical equivalent of a meteor-wrong in your life. The source of some new arrival or fresh influence is not what it had initially seemed. But that doesn’t have to be a problem. On the contrary. Once you have identified the true nature of the new arrival or fresh influence, it’s likely to be useful and interesting.

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Most of us can’t tickle ourselves. Since we have conscious control of our fingers, we know we can stop any time. Without the element of uncertainty, our squirm reflex doesn’t kick in. But I’m wondering if you might get a temporary exemption from this rule in the coming weeks. I say this because the astrological omens suggest you will have an extraordinary capacity to surprise yourself. Novel impulses will be rising up in you on a regular basis. Unpredictability and spontaneity will be your specialties. Have fun doing what you don’t usually do!

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): During the final ten weeks of 2016, your physical and mental health will flourish in direct proportion to how much outworn and unnecessary stuff you flush out of your life between now and October 25. Here are some suggested tasks: 1. Perform a homemade ritual that will enable you to magically shed at least half of your guilt, remorse and regret. 2. Put on a festive party hat, gather up all the clutter and junk from your home, and drop it off at a thrift store or the dump. 3. Take a vow that you will do everything in your power to kick your attachment to an influence that’s no damn good for you. 4. Scream nonsense curses at the night sky for as long as it takes to purge your sadness and anger about pain that no longer matters.

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): A Buddhist monk named Matthieu Ricard had his brain scanned while he meditated. The experiment revealed that the positive emotions whirling around in his gray matter were super-abundant. Various publications thereafter dubbed him “the happiest person in the world.” Since he’s neither egotistical nor fond of the media’s simplistic sound bites, he’s not happy about that title. I hope you won’t have a similar reaction when I predict that you Sagittarians will be the happiest tribe of the zodiac during the next two weeks. For best results, I suggest you cultivate Ricard’s definitions of happiness: “altruism and compassion, inner freedom (so that you are not the slave of your own thoughts), senses of serenity and fulfillment, resilience, as well as a clear and stable mind that does not distort reality too much.” CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Now is a perfect moment to launch or refine a project that will generate truth, beauty and justice. Amazingly enough, now is also an excellent time to lunch or refine a long-term master plan that will make you healthy, wealthy and wise. Is this a coincidence? Not at all. The astrological omens suggest that your drive to be of noble service dovetails well with your drive for personal success. For the foreseeable future, unselfish goals are well-aligned with selfish goals.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Has your world become at least 20 percent larger since September 1? Has your generosity grown to near-heroic proportions? Have your eyes beheld healing sights that were previously invisible to you? Have you lost at least two of your excuses for tolerating scrawny expectations? Are you awash in the desire to grant forgiveness and amnesty? If you can’t answer yes to at least two of those questions, Aquarius, it means you’re not fully in harmony with your best possible destiny. So get to work! Attune yourself to the cosmic tendencies! And if you are indeed reaping the benefits I mentioned, congratulations—and prepare for even further expansions and liberations.

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Some astrologers dwell on your tribe’s phobias. They assume that you Pisceans are perversely drawn to fear; that you are addicted to the strong feelings it generates. In an effort to correct this distorted view, and in accordance with current astrological omens, I hereby declare the coming weeks to be a Golden Age for Your Trust in Life. It will be prime time to exult in everything that evokes your joy and excitement. I suggest you make a list of these glories, and keep adding new items to the list every day. Here’s another way to celebrate the Golden Age: Discover and explore previously unknown sources of joy and excitement.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES.

[C4] Missoula Independent • October 13–October 20, 2016

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Durable Goods Montana

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PUBLIC NOTICES MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-16-165 Dept. No. 4 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF EVA M. BAIR, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All person having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Laura E. Bair, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 4110 Weeping Willow Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803, or filed with the Clerk of the above-named Court. Dated this 15th day of August, 2016. /s/ Laura E. Bair, Personal Representative By: /s/ Nancy P. Gibson, Attorney for Personal

Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No.: 1 Cause No.: DP-16-161 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF: EUGENE J. MATELICH, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Lewis B. Matelich, has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Lewis B. Matelich, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o, Timothy D. Geiszler, GEISZLER STEELE, PC, 619 Southwest Higgins, Suite K, Missoula, Montana 59803 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 22 day of August, 2016. GEIS-

MNAXLP ZLER STEELE, PC. By: /s/ Timothy D. Geiszler, Attorneys for the Personal Representative. I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the state of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 22 day of August, 2016. /s/ Lewis B. Matelich, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No.: 1 Cause No.: DP-16-188 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: WILLIAM ANDREW NAGY, JR., a/k/a William A. Nagy, Jr. Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be

forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to PAT NAGY SWARTZ, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at c/o Bjornson Jones Mungas, PLLC, 2809 Great Northern Loop, Suite 100, Missoula, MT 59808, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 4th day of October, 2016. /s/ Pat Nagy Swartz, Personal Representative Bjornson Jones Mungas, PLLC By: /s/ Craig Mungas, Attorneys for Pat Nagy Swartz, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-16-167 Dept. No. 2 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: DOROTHY MARION RAHDERS, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons

having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Christy Lee Bergstrom, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of Douglas D. Harris, Attorney at Law, PO Box 7937, Missoula, Montana 59807-7937 or filed with the Clerk of the above-named Court. DATED this 26th day of September, 2016. /s/ Douglas Harris for Christy Lee Bergstrom, PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No.: DP-16-177 Dept. No. 4 NOTICE OF CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF OSWALD F. BLOCK, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Donna F. Tyler has been appointed personal

representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Donna F. Tyler, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of Reep Bell Laird Simpson & Jasper, P.C., P.O. Box 16960, Missoula, Montana 59808, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 20th day of September, 2016. REEP BELL LAIRD SIMPSON & JASPER, P.C.. /s/ Lance P. Jasper, Attorney for Personal Representative STATE OF MONTANA) :ss County of Missoula) I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. Signed this 20th day of September, 2016. /s/ Donna F. Tyler

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/19/04, recorded as Instrument No. 200424029 BK-738 Pg-684, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Milton A. McAdams was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and First American Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 24 in Block 7 of Wapikiya Addition No. 1, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof, except that part described as follows: Beginning at the most Easterly corner of said Lot 24; thence Northwesterly along the lot line common to said Lots 24 and 25, a distance of

missoulanews.com • October 13–October 20, 2016 [C5]


PUBLIC NOTICES 63.20 feet; thence Southwesterly at right angles, a distance of 5 feet; thence Southeasterly at right angles, a distance of 63.20 feet; more or less, to the South lot line of the said Lot 24; thence Northeasterly along the South lot line of said Lot 24, a distance of 5 feet, more or less, to the point of beginning, On file and of record in the office of the County Clerk and Recorder of Missoula, County, Montana. Recording Reference: Book 369 of Micro Records at Page 674. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because Current Beneficiary has declared that the Grantor is in breach of the terms and conditions of the obligation secured by the deed of trust. The nature of the breach is Grantor’s failure to pay, when due, non-payment of taxes and/or insurances under the terms of the Deed of Trust together with all subsequent payments, costs, advances, attorneys’ and trustee’s fees and costs accruing until the date of sale, full satisfaction, or reinstatement of the obligation. As of August 13, 2016, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $194,517.69. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $187,955.30, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 27, 2016 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. McAdams, Milton A. (TS# 7023.116795) 1002.288281-File No.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/26/12, recorded as Instrument No. 201222001 Book 903 Page 478, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which Jane Duboise was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 44A of Carline Addition No. 3, Block 45, Lots 42A and 44A, a plated subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat thereof. More Accurately Described As Follows: Lot 44A of Carline Addition No.3, Block 45,Lots 42A & 44A, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/16 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of August 29, 2016, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $173,589.55. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $166,605.96, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, On the Front Steps, City of Missoula on January 5, 2017 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these

MNAXLP sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. Duboise, Jane (TS# 7023.116333) 1002.288498-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/02/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200824451 B: 828 P: 837, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which Earl Jay Lowry a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and First American Title Insurance Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Insurance Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 5 of Lloyd Addition, a Platted Subdivision of Missoula County, according to the official recorded Plat thereof on file recorded in Book 6 of Plats at Page 19 1/2, Missoula County, Montana. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 11/22/15 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of August 25, 2016, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $94,435.12. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $82,347.83, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security

interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on January 5, 2017 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no

CLARK FORK STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 24, 103, 142, 152, 266 Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, Toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting 10/17/2016 by appt only by calling 541-7919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to at 10/20/2016 at 4:00 P.M. Buyer’s bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale, All Sales final.

SERVICES HOME IMPROVEMENT Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator. Testimonials Available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642

MASONRY JL Masonry Brick, Block, Stone, Concrete. (406)3173266 or (406)546-9649

[C6] Missoula Independent • October 13–October 20, 2016

default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. Lowry, Earl Jay (TS# 7023.117021) 1002.288509-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/07/09, recorded as Instrument No. 200925539 Book 849 Page 787, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Tana L. Mullendore, an unmarried woman was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and First American Title Ins Co of Montana was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Ins Co of Montana as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 7 of Mountain Shadows West -

EAGLE SELF STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units 10, 31, 53, 62, 63, 146, 238, 266, 298, 355, 356, 400, 410, 441, 442, 688 & 689. Units can contain furniture, clothes, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, & other misc. household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday October 24, 2016. All auction units will only be shown each day at 3 P.M. written sealed bids may be submitted to storage office at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59804 prior to Thursday October 27, 2016 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

Phase 2, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Subject to easements, covenants, conditions and restrictions of record or apparent By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. , beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to . Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantors failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due in full. As of August 26, 2016, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $668,503.96. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $639,132.13, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges,

accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on January 3, 2017 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is,

COPPERSTONE STOR-ALL

BITTERROOT MINI STORAGE 6415 Mormon Creek Rd., Lolo, MT 59847

COPPERSTONE STOR-ALL will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent on Friday October 28th, 2016 at 11:00 a.m. Units can contain furniture, clothes, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc. household goods. A silent auction will be held Friday October 28th at 11:00 a.m. at 8700 Roller Coaster Rd, Missoula, MT 59808. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

Will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 4, 12, 15, 16, 27, 33, 37, 41, 43, 114 & 115.. Units may contain misc. household goods, furniture, toys, clothes, tools and other misc. items. We will hold a live auction from 2:00-3:30 p.m. on October 27th, 2016. Payment will be due immediately at acknowledgment of winning bid. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Unit must be emptied by buyer at least 10 business days from day of sale. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final. Please contact Grizzly Property Management at (406) 542-2060 or rentals@grizzlypm.com with any questions.


PUBLIC NOTICES where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. Mullendore, Tana L. (TS# 7023.116670) 1002.288501-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on December 1, 2016, at 11:00 AM at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT 6H OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 1863, A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE SOUTH ONEHALF OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 21 WEST, PRINCIPLE MERIDIAN, MONTANA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA Verlene Dolly Stewart, as Grantor, conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Mountain West Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust on December 18, 2007, and recorded on December 24, 2007 as Book 810, Page 1112 under Document No. 200732784. The beneficial interest is currently held by Nationstar Mortgage LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Trustee. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments beginning August 1, 2015, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of July 22, 2016 is $291,000.57 principal, interest at the rate of 6.00000% totaling $18,464.55, late charges in the amount of $491.65, escrow advances of $4,676.44, and other fees and expenses advanced of $4,121.22, plus accruing interest, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be

charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: July 12, 2016 /s/ Rae Albert Assistant Secretary,

MNAXLP First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho)) ss. County of Bingham) On this 12 day of July, 2016, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Rae Albert, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shannon Gavin Notary Public Bingham County, ID Commission expires: 01-19-2018 Nationstar Mortgage LLC vs STEWART 100682 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on December 1, 2016, at 11:00 AM at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 6 OF LOLO HEIGHTS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF KENNETH L KERN, as Grantor, conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana, a Montana Corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as designated nominee for Universal American Mortgage Company, LLC, beneficiary of the security instrument, its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust on March 13, 2015, and recorded on March 13, 2015 as Book 941, Page 766 under Document No. 201504283.The beneficial interest is currently held by PennyMac Loan Services, LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, a Montana Corporation,

TEXTING AND DRIVING MAKES GOOD PEOPLE LOOK BAD. STOPTEXTSSTOPWRECKS.ORG

missoulanews.com • October 13–October 20, 2016 [C7]


JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s “It Is U!”–so let’s swap it out.

by Matt Jones

ACROSS

1 Three-year-old, e.g. 4 Indiana-Illinois border river 10 Coll. application figures 14 Abbr. in a military address 15 Grand Canal bridge 16 "___ Kleine Nachtmusik" (Mozart piece) 17 Author Grafton, when researching "T is for Tent"? 19 Look after 20 Daily Planet reporter Jimmy 21 Seemingly endless span 22 Lauder of cosmetics 23 "Buffy" spinoff 25 Buffy's job 26 He plays Iron Man 28 Foot-pound? 30 Actress Acker of 23-Across 31 Go back to the start of an ode? 36 "Yoshi's Island" platform 38 Not a people person 39 You, in the Bible 40 Put the outsider on the payroll on the Planet of the Apes? 43 "Kill Bill" actress Thurman 44 "Slow and steady" storyteller 45 Explosive compounds, for short 47 Dough 50 Ditch the diversions 51 Cut off from the mainland 52 Hexa-, halved 54 Eventually be 57 Half of CDVIII 58 1980s fashion line that people went bats#!@ crazy over? 60 Event that may play happy hardcore 61 Jockey who won two Triple Crowns 62 Abbr. on a golf tee sign 63 "Moral ___" (Adult Swim show) 64 1970s space station 65 Tavern overstayer

Last week’s solution

DOWN 1 ___ Tuesdays 2 Down Under gemstone 3 Rush song based on a literary kid 4 Laundry-squeezing device 5 "You Will Be My ___ True Love" (song from "Cold Mountain") 6 Einstein Bros. purchase 7 "And another thing ..." 8 "Star Trek" phaser setting 9 "Green Acres" theme song prop 10 Takes home the kitty, perhaps? 11 Devoutness 12 "Bonne ___!" (French "Happy New Year") 13 Meal with Elijah's cup 18 Early Quaker settler 22 High-voiced Muppet 24 Fine facial hair 25 Jessye Norman, e.g. 26 Marathon's counterpart 27 Atlanta Hawks' former arena 28 Daybreak 29 Abound (with) 32 Pacific salmon 33 Home of an NBC comedy block from 1983 to 2015 34 San ___, Italy 35 Positive votes 37 0, in some measures 41 Six feet under, so to speak 42 "Way to go!" 46 It may be changed or carried 47 Brewery head? 48 One of four for Katharine Hepburn 49 Garnish that soaks up the gin 50 "And that's ___!" 52 Bosporus dweller 53 Like blue humor 55 "Augh! Erase that step!" computer command 56 Subtle attention-getter 58 Krypton, e.g. 59 "How We Do (Party)" singer Rita

PUBLIC NOTICES is the Trustee. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments beginning January 1, 2016, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of May 7, 2016 is $203,922.72 principal, interest at the rate of 3.50000% totaling $3,080.49, late charges in the amount of $185.52, , suspense balance of $36.00 and other fees and expenses advanced of $15.50, plus accruing interest, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: July 13, 2016 /s/ Rae Albert Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, A Montana Corporation Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho)) ss.

[C8] Missoula Independent • October 13–October 20, 2016

County of Bingham) On this 13 day of July, 2016, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Rae Albert know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, a Montana Corporation, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shauna Romrell Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 06/04/2022 PennyMac vs KERN 101450-1 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on December 12, 2016, at 11:00 AM at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE SW1/4 OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 22 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS TRACT 20 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 351 Eileen D. Hatten and Marc S. Hatten, as Grantors, conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., a Montana Corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Guild Mortgage Company, a California Corporation, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on July 10, 2014 and recorded on July 16, 2014 as Book 931 Page 83 under Document No. 201409960. The beneficial interest is currently held by Guild Mortgage Company, A California Corporation. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments beginning March 1, 2016, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of July 1, 2016 is $257,491.10 principal, interest at the rate of 4.00000% totaling $4,277.97, late charges in the amount of $562.11, escrow advances of $0.00, suspense balance of $0.00 and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,459.01, plus accruing interest, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public

MNAXLP sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: August 4, 2016 /s/ Rae Albert Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., a Montana Corporation Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho)) ss. County of Bingham) On this 4 day of August, 2016 before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Rae Albert, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., a Montana Corporation, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Amy Gough Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 6-9-2021 GUILD vs Hatten 101807-1 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on December 5, 2016, at 11:00 AM at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 28 IN BLOCK 3 OF LINDA VISTA TENTH SUPPLEMENT PHASE I, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Shayne D Spence and Tina A Spence, as Grantors, conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., a Montana Corporation,

as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. (“MERS”) solely as nominee for Guild Mortgage Company, A California Corporation, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on November 14, 2013 and recorded on November 15, 2013 as Book 922 Page 171 under Document No. 201322205. The beneficial interest is currently held by Guild Mortgage Company, A California Corporation. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments beginning March 1, 2016, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of July 1, 2016 is $238,120.61 principal, interest at the rate of 4.25000% totaling $4,203.43, late charges in the amount of $515.51, and other fees and expenses advanced of $679.45, plus accruing interest, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the

deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: July 26, 2016 /s/Rae Albert Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., a Montana Corporation Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho)) ss. County of Bingham) On this 26 day of July, 2016 before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Rae Albert, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., a Montana Corporation, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shannon Gavin Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 01/19/2018 GUILD vs Spence 101787-1 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on February 1, 2017, at 11:00 AM at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Parcel A Of The Amended Plat Of Tract 1 And 2 Of CALRTON Tracts, Block 2, A Platted Subdivision In Missoula County, Montana, According To The Official Recorded Plat Thereof. Together With An Easement For Access Over 20 Foot Strip Along An Existing Road Parallel to the North Portion Of The Westerly Boundary Of The Above Described Parcel A. It is more accurately described as follows: Parcel A Of The Amended Plat Of Tract 1 And 2 Of CARLTON Tracts, Block 2, A Platted Subdivision In Missoula County, Montana, According To The Official Recorded Plat Thereof. Together With An Easement For Access Over 20 Foot Strip Along An Existing Road Parallel to the North Portion Of The Westerly Boundary Of The Above Described Parcel A. RUBY FINCH, as Grantor, conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson at Mackoff, Kellogg, Kirby & Kloster, as


PUBLIC NOTICES Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to PHH Mortgage Services, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust on June 7, 2005, and recorded on June 8, 2005 as Book 754, Page 40 under Document No. 200513735. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments beginning May 1, 2016, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of July 29, 2016 is $96,422.18 principal, interest totaling $1,850.77 late charges in the amount of $104.80, escrow advances of $265.30, and other fees and expenses advanced of $81.00, plus accruing interest, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the

trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION O B TAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: September 19, 2016 /s/ Kaitlin Ann Gotch Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho)) ss. County of Bingham) On this 19 day of September, 2016, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Kaitlin Ann Gotch know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Rae Albert Notary Public Bingham County, ID Commission expires: 09/06/2022 PHH vs FINCH 101879-1 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on January 10, 2017, at 11:00 AM at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THE NORTH ONEHALF OF LOT 1 AND THE NORTH ONE-HALF OF LOT 2 IN BLOCK 14 OF BUTTE ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. RECORDING REFERENCE: BOOK 705 OF MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 789 JOE LONG, as Grantor, conveyed said real property to Title Services, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. (MERS), as nominee for American Brokers Conduit, its successors and/or assigns, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust on October 11, 2006, and recorded on October 16, 2006 as Book 785, Page 371 under Document No. 200626757. The beneficial interest is currently held by LSF9 Master Participation Trust. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to

MNAXLP make the monthly payments beginning June 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of May 12, 2016 is $153,441.43 principal, interest at the rate of 2.00000% totaling $15,994.57, late charges in the amount of $1,472.40, escrow advances of $9,274.15, and other fees and expenses advanced of $9,940.59, plus accruing interest, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation

up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: August 25, 2016 /s/ Rae Albert Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho)) ss. County of Bingham) On this 25 day of August, 2016, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Rae Albert know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Diana Reese Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 07/29/2022 Caliber vs LONG 101487-1 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on January 5, 2017, at 11:00 AM at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 7 OF RIVERWOOD MEADOWS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MON-

TANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Jeff Bretherton and Julie Bretherton, as Grantors, conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. (MERS), as nominee for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., its successors and/or assigns as Beneficiary by Deed of Trust dated on October 26, 2006, and recorded on December 14, 2006 as Book 788 Page 1263 Document No. 200631994. The beneficial interest is currently held by THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWMBS, INC., CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH TRUST 2006-19, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-19. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments beginning November 1, 2015, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of August 16, 2016 is $498,489.30 principal, interest at the rate of 6.62500% totaling $28,877.99, and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,884.18,

plus accruing interest, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s

sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: August 26, 2016 /s/ Rae Albert Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho)) ss. County of Bingham) On this 26 day of August, 2016 before me, a notary public in and for said /County and State, personally appeared Rae Albert, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shannon Gavin Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 01/19/2018 Shellpoint vs Bretherton 101834-1

TRAPPERS TRA

If you ou win or lose on I-177 YOU STILL LOSE! You o have no CŽŶƐƟƚƵƟŽŶĂůZŝŐŚƚin Montana to trap. K E ^d / d h d / K E  > D  E  D  E dƚŽƉƌŽƚĞĐƚLJŽƵƌ ƚƌĂƉƉŝŶŐƌŝŐŚƚƐ  E  K E z> ' / ^ > d / s  Z  &  Z  E  h DĂŶĚĚŽŶ͛ƚůĞƚĂŶLJŽŶĞƚĞůůLJŽƵŝƚĐĂŶ͛ƚ͊ tĞ͛ǀĞŚĂĚƚĞŶLJĞ LJĞĂƌƐƚŽĚŽƚŚŝƐ͘

-- Mike Dey, President, TOM O

missoulanews.com • October 13–October 20, 2016 [C9]


RENTALS APARTMENTS 1315 E. Broadway #7. 2 bed/1.5 bath, close to U., coinops, carport, pet? $850 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1547 S. Higgins #4. 1 bed/1 bath, close to UM, coin-ops, offstreet parking $725. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 2 bed, 1 bath, $650, N. Russell, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, storage, HEAT paid NO PETS, NO SMOKING. Gatewest 728-7333 2 bed, 1 bath, $750, near Good Food Store, quiet cul-de-sac, DW, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, HEAT paid NO PETS, NO SMOKING. Gatewest 728-7333 2 bed, 1 bath, $750, Ronald & Connell, DW, AC, 62 & older community, coin-op laundry, onstreet parking, storage, basic cable, HEAT paid NO PETS, NO SMOKING. Gatewest 728-7333 2329 Fairview #1. 2 bed/1 bath, close to Reserve Street, shared yard, off-street parking $725. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 Garden City Property Management. Voted Best Property Management Company in Missoula for the past 9 years. 406-5496106 www.gcpm-mt.com

REAL ESTATE 1 bed, 1 bath, $595, Southside 4-Plex, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, storage. W/S/G paid. NO PETS, NO SMOKING. Gatewest 728-7333

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ROOMMATES

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1269 S. 1st St. West “A”. 2 bed/1 bath, W/D, DW, central location, all utilities included. $1100. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

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1424 Toole Ave. “B” 2 bed/1 bath, upstairs unit, fenced yard, close to shopping $625. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

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1535 Liberty Lane. Centrally located professional office space in energy-efficient building on the river. Rochelle Glasgow, Ink Realty Group. 728-8270 glasgow@montana.com

mate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com!

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205 ½ W. Kent. Studio/1 bath, shared W/D, all utilities paid $600. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 211 S. 4th St. East #1. 3 bed/1 bath, near U, shared yard $1050. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

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Lolo RV Park. Spaces available to rent. W/S/G/Electric included. $495/month. 406-273-6034

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DUPLEXES

Property Management 422 Madison • 549-6106

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-8777353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

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[C10] Missoula Independent • October 13–October 20, 2016

4 Bdr, 3 Bath, Riverfront home. $430,000. BHHSMT Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

10955 Cedar Ridge. Loft bedroom, 1 bath on 20+ acres with deck, studio & sauna. $275,000. Shannon Hilliard, Ink Realty Group. 239-8350 shannonhilliard5@gmail.com

5 Bdr, 2.5 Bath Lower Rattlesnake home. $525,000. BHHSMT Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

235 McLeod. 5 bed, 2.5 bath University District home with study, fireplace & large fenced backyard. $499,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653 pat@properties2000.com

5 Bdr, 2.5 Bath University District home. $625,000. BHHS Montana Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

ceilings, open floor plan & large windows provide an open & bright interior. Amazing deck, fenced yard & underground sprinkler system. New roof & deck in 2015. Great school district, close to shopping, parks & downtown.

"Let us tend your den"

524 S. 5th Street E. “A”. 3 bed/2 bath, two blocks to U.,

3 Bdr, 2 Bath, River Road home. $320,000. BHHSMT Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

601 High Park Way, Missoula This move-in ready home has 3 bedrooms, $312,000 • MLS # 21607248 2.5 baths & updated kitchen. Vaulted

Grizzly Property Management

MOBILE HOMES

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

1001 Medicine Man Cluster. Stunning custom-built 3 bed, 3.5 bath with 3 car garage. $1,150,000. Shannon Hilliard, Ink Realty Group. 239-8350 shannonhilliard5@gmail.com

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing Since 1971

210 South 3rd. Lease space available by the Hip Strip near Bernice’s Bakery. Shannon Hilliard, Ink Realty Group. 239-8350 shannonhilliard5 @gmail.com

HOMES FOR SALE

Leeza Cameron Finalist

Finalist

Main Street Realty (406) 493-4834 leeza@mainstreetmissoula.com


REAL ESTATE Centrally Located 1815 Hollis. This home is in great shape and the minute you walk in, it’s love at first sight! 2 bed 1 bath. $236,500 KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Fidelity Management Services, Inc. • 7000 Uncle Robert Lane #7, Missoula • 406-251-4707. Visit our website at fidelityproperty.com. Serving Missoula area residential properties since 1981. More than 35 years of Sales & Marketing experience. JAY

GETZ • @ HOME Montana Properties • (406) 214-4016 • Jay.Getz@Outlook.com • www.HOMEMTP.com Sweet Bungalow 120 Strand Ave. This little bungalow is about as sweet as they come! 1 bed 1 bath $230,000 KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Trail Street 2144 Trail Street- PRICE REDUCED! This 3 bed 2 bath well-loved home is ready to move into! $265,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

We s t s i d e / N o r t h s i d e 1635 Sherwood. It’s a little bit ‘’quirky’’, it’s a little bit ‘’funky’’, it’s a little bit ‘’homey’’- conveniently located on Missoula’s popular Westside/Northside. $140,000 Andrea370-2238 porticorealestate.com

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES Pinnacle Townhomes. Modern 3 bed, 2.5 bath with private fenced yard & double garage on Charlo

#214 at The Uptown Flats • Offered at $174,900 2 bedroom, 1 bath, 852 sf CONDO. Located at 801 N. Orange St. within walking distance of Downtown Missoula, St. Pat’s Hospital, Farmer’s Markets, Clark Fork River, Ball Park, etc.

Street. $289,900. Shannon Hilliard, Ink Realty Group 2398350 shannonhilliard5 @gmail.com

Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546.5816. annierealtor@gmail.com

The Uptown Flats #105. Ground floor condo offers extra large south-facing patio. 1 bed, 1 bath. $161,900 Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546.5816 annierealtor@gmail.com

The Uptown Flats #303. 1 bed, 1 bath with all the amenities. $159,710. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816 annierealtor@gmail.com

The Uptown Flats #214 . 852 sf CONDO 2 bed, 1 bath plus bonus room with all the amenities. $174,900. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546.5816. annierealtor@gmail.com The Uptown Flats #301. Large 1 bed, 1 bath plus bonus room with all the amenities. $210,000.

18.6 acre building lot in Sleeman Creek, Lolo. $129,900. BHHSMT Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

LAND FOR SALE

4.6 acre building lot in the woods with views and privacy. Lolo, Mormon Creek Rd. $99,000. BHHS Montana Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

14.9 acre building lot in Frenchtown. Borders public lands. $180,900. BHHSMT Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

NHN Old Freight Road, St. Ignatius. Approximately 11 acre building lot with Mission Mountain views. $86,900. Shannon Hilliard, Ink Realty Group 239-8350. shannonhilliard5@gmail.com

Rochelle Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

728-8270

1201 South 6th Street, Missoula Modern Condo Unit #204

$259,900 • MLS # 20157047

2 Bedroom 3 Bathroom Unit, 1,496 sq ft. The Factory Condos Complex is possibly the ''Greenest'' Building in Missoula. High Efficiency Lighting and Energy Efficient Gas Boiler with H2O Baseboard Heat. Unit consists of 2 levels with 10 Foot Ceilings on Main Floor and 9 Foot Ceilings on the upper floor. Bamboo Floors throughout the Main Floor Highlight the Open Kitchen which has Butcher-Block Counter Tops. Fresh Interior, Brand New Appliances with Natural Gas Range. Living Area has a New Gas Fireplace Master Bath with Tiled Floors and Counter Tops.

Tylor Trenary Main Street Realty (406) 544-3310 tylor@mainstreetmissoula.com

Take the pledge at ItsOnUs.org

missoulanews.com • October 13–October 20, 2016 [C11]


REAL ESTATE

NHN Weber Butte Trail. 60 acre ranch in Corvallis with sweeping Bitterroot views. $800,000. Shannon Hilliard, Ink Realty Group 239-8350. shannonhilliard5@gmail.com NW Montana Real Estate. Multiple large acre parcels. Timbered. Water. Bordered by National Forest. Company owned.Tungstenholdings.com. (406)2933714 South Frontage East, Alberton. 37 acres with multiple building sites. $49,000. Pat McCormick,

Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com

COMMERCIAL 3106 West Broadway. 20,000 sq.ft. lot with 6568 sq.ft. building with office, retail & warehouse space. $795,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties 2000.com Business For Sale Established bulk spices, herbs, teas and gifts. All products, furnishings and equipment must be moved. Turn-key. 406-8223333

Martin’s Clean All. Successful power washing business includes truck & equipment. $80,000. Pat McCormick, Properties. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com

OUT OF TOWN 122 Ranch Creek Road. 3294 sq.ft. home on 37+ acres in Rock Creek. Bordered by Lolo National Forest on 3 sides. $1,400,000. Shannon Hilliard, Ink Realty Group. 239-8350 shannonhilliard5@gmail.com 3.52Ac $259/month Boulder, MT- 2.12Ac $391/month Ab-

saraokee, MT21.3 Ac $203/month Red Lodge, MTMore properties online Justin Joyner, Steel Horse RE www.ownerfinancemt.com 406539-1420 3 Bdr, 2 Bath, East Missoula

home. $200,000. BHHSMT Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Huson home o 5.5 acres. $447,500. BHHSMT Properties. For more info call Mindy

4 Bdr, 2 Bath, Clinton home on 1.5 acres. $312,500. BzzHHSMT Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

Hot Springs 215 Spring Street, Hot Springs. A charming building reminiscent of an Old West store front with attached greenhouse are useful additions to this beautiful land. $145,000 KD 240-5227 porticoreal estate.com

2138 S 6TH ST W UNIT B

Under Contract

$188,500 Spacious and wonderful 3 bedroom, 2-1/2 bath condo! Amenities include a master suite with a 3/4 master bath, a fenced back yard, central air, a covered front porch, and a detached double garage.

235 McLeod • $499,000 U District 4+ bed, 2.5 bath with arched doorways, study, fireplace & spacious fenced backyard.

[C12] Missoula Independent • October 13–October 20, 2016

Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

Pat McCormick Real Estate Broker Real Estate With Real Experience

pat@properties2000.com 406-240-SOLD (7653)

Properties2000.com

Call Matt at 360-9023 for more information

Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture

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