Page 1

UP FRONT

AS HISTORIC DROUGHT STARVES TEXAS CATTLE HAY IN MONTANA GOES THROUGH THE ROOF

CLOWN POSSE CAN BE ONE GRIZZLY FLASH ARTICHOKES RANGE SHOOTING NOISE INSANE HELL ON YOUR LOVE IGNITES A FURIOUS FLAP LOVES FAYGO SO MUCH!


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


UP FRONT

AS HISTORIC DROUGHT STARVES TEXAS CATTLE HAY IN MONTANA GOES THROUGH THE ROOF

CLOWN POSSE CAN BE ONE GRIZZLY FLASH ARTICHOKES RANGE SHOOTING NOISE INSANE HELL ON YOUR LOVE IGNITES A FURIOUS FLAP LOVES FAYGO SO MUCH!


Missoula Independent

Page 2 October 6–October 13, 2011


nside Cover Story

Cover photo by Chad Harder

I spent last summer and fall floating down the country’s largest Superfund site in a canoe. I was living in a borrowed cabin near Georgetown Lake, about 20 miles from the headwaters of the Clark Fork River. I wanted a closer look at a disaster before it was undone…Montana’s rivers, any fly-fisher will tell you, are everything a real river should be. Not the upper Clark Fork. Not yet, anyhow .......................14

News Letters Racists need to be monitored, and so do those coal trains ..........................4 The Week in Review Black bear tries a break-in, med pot makes ballot...................6 Briefs Lolo Hot Springs feels the heat, Clark Fork island will get a facelift ...............6 Etc. Hard time for Harris Himes ..................................................................................7 Up Front When Texas goes dry, Montana goes haywire .............................................8 Up Front Border lands bill as much a puzzle as a fix .................................................9 Ochenski The silent majority finally rises against greed! Yes!..................................10 Writers on the Range One little dead bear ignites a firestorm................................11 Agenda Montana Innocence Project presents a free public talk...............................12

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan Beware the love-stealing artichoke................................................19 Happiest Hour Jaker’s Bar and Grill ........................................................................20 8 Days a Week The worm has turned. Time for fleece underpants.........................22 Mountain High The 2nd Annual Tweed Ride and Bicycle Carnival ...........................33 Scope Robin Troy’s bowling novel began right here ................................................34 Soundcheck Insane Clown Posse brought the Faygo...............................................35 Arts Artists with Parkinson’s won’t be denied ...........................................................36 Film 50/50 tackles cancer with warmth and jokes ....................................................37 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films ...................................................38

Exclusives Street Talk....................................................................................................................4 In Other News...........................................................................................................13 Classifieds ................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y .................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle....................................................................................................C-7 This Modern World ...............................................................................................C-15

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Robert Meyerowitz PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson ASSOCIATE EDITOR Matthew Frank PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Molly Laich STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Skylar Browning COPY EDITOR David Loos ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Chris Melton, Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Rhonda Urbanski, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Jon Baker MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Dave Loos, Ednor Therriault, Ali Gadbow, Azita Osanloo, Cathrine L. Walters, Anne Medley, Jesse Froehling

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2011 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

Missoula Independent

Page 3 October 6–October 13, 2011


STREET TALK

by Steele Williams

Asked Sunday afternoon, Oct. 2, outside of the Mo Club in downtown Missoula. There are currently fewer beef cattle in the U.S. than at any time in the past half century. Where do you think they’ve gone? Follow-up: What’s your favorite meat?

Hannah Adams: I don’t know where they all went, hopefully to the land of happy cows. They probably never became in the first place, so how can they go anywhere without first becoming? On the hoof: My favorite meat is the kind that never becomes meat. I would hate to be bred, born and raised just to be eaten by humans.

Jeff Yoder: Do you remember the “Where’s the beef commercials?” It’s a good question, and I have no clue where the cows went. Actually, I take that back: my ex-girlfriend just moved to Europe, so I do know where one cow went. Cat/Griz Game: Nothing beats a big sausage late at night…everyone sleeps better after having one.

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Hate drop Earlier this month, Missoula and the University of Montana were defiled with racist messages that disturbed and offended many community members. The stickers and fliers containing the racist messages specifically targeted American Indians and African Americans. The press reported that the fliers sported the name of a well-known white supremacist organization, the Montana Creators. The Montana Creators are a subset of the Creativity Movement, an anti-Semitic and racist group that believes people of color are inferior “mud races.” As you’d suspect, Missoulians have been wondering who is responsible for the literature drop. We have a pretty good idea. One of my staffers was in Missoula the weekend of September 17 and happened to observe a few Billings “Creators” hanging out near a gas station. These activists routinely brag about conducting similar literature drops in Yellowstone County. While we can’t say for sure, it seems like more than a coinci-

“Charge the streaker as a sexual offender? That is dumb and a waste of time. How about blow up the picture of the streaker and post it all over town? Now that is what I call punishment.”

dence that “Creator ” literature was found in Missoula that weekend. The Billings “Creators” probably took their hate on the road in an attempt to make their presence in Missoula larger than it really is. We appreciate all the calls we’ve received from community members regarding the literature. It’s clear that our members in Missoula, along with the community at large, are committed to standing against the “Creator” agenda and keeping Missoula a welcoming place. Travis McAdam Montana Human Rights Network Helena

Fair punishment Charge the streaker as a sexual offender? That is dumb and a waste of time. How about blow up the picture of the streaker and post it all over town? Now that is what I call punishment. Love your cover. Alex Gallego Missoula

Comments from MissoulaNews.com Rick Sparks: I think Americans eat more meat than other countries and we ship it out more too. If you’re one of those people who wants to blame cow loss on wolves, well then, you can go fuck yourself. Average Joe: I prefer to eat beef, that’s really what I eat more than anything else, but I also like wild game just fine. I’m just your typical meat-and-potatoes type of guy. Ellen Wolferman: Oh my gosh, good question. They’re not going to Japan because they couldn’t get there. Maybe there’s just less need for beef, or we’re just eating more of it? I guess it’s just simple supply and demand. Multifaceted: Definitely not fish, and pork is way too dry, so I’m going to go with beef. There’s just so much you can get out of it, like steaks and hamburgers. There are tons of different ways to eat beef. Chris Allen: I don’t know, McDonald’s probably ate them all. I’m a pescatarian, which means the only meat I eat is fish. I don’t really think about beef, and I also think it’s a good thing there aren’t as many cows around these days. That’s my uninformed opinion, and it’s correct. Skin and bones: Meat is technically the flesh of an animal, so as far as fish meat, I would go with a “Salmon Surprise,” preferably served in a cafeteria by a girl wearing a hair net.

Missoula Independent

Page 4 October 6–October 13, 2011

Stop railing

Leaky logic

Loco-motives

Stop whinin’! Stop complainin’! Stop cryin’! Every major city in America faces far worse rail issues than Missoula’s Montana Rail Link (see “Breathe that train,” Sept. 29, 2011). Ever been to the industrial Midwest? Try Gary, Ind., where there are more crossing gates than overpasses. Try Columbus, Ohio, where a rail accident could shift the flow of the Scioto River. Try New Orleans, where 100-car freight trains carrying hazardous materials pass through the French Quarter and many other neighborhoods daily. The story is the same throughout America. From Portland, Maine to Portland, Ore., every city has to face what you’re experiencing. Funny, but the rails were here before we started building next to them. They also happen to still be there where many have decided to leave. This country was essentially built around the railroads, but years of policy allowing them to run wild have put us in the predicament we’re in. We have only ourselves to blame. Posted on September 29, 2011 at 9:11 a.m.

Neither the coal from Montana nor the oil from the Canadian tar sands transported through Montana is going to stay in the US. If other countries want this coal and oil so badly then they should be part of seeing that no harm comes to us in the transporting of these goods. If coal companies can afford to lose 500 tons of coal and coal dust per car for every 500 miles traveled at a 120 cars per train—mind boggling when you do the math—there’s got to be some money somewhere to cover the cars so that all that waste isn’t strewn across Montana and beyond. The same for the oil—if they can afford to lose billions of gallons in leaks, they can afford to prevent those leaks in the first place. How about we won’t sell this coal, we won’t pipe your oil, if you don’t find a way to transport it more cleanly? If we have this huge supply that is in demand, doesn’t that offer us some leverage in dealing with the buyers? Posted on October 1, 2011 at 9:51 p.m.

Other places are worse? That’s great logic. Coal is killing people. From the dust to the radon gas, the second largest cause of lung cancer and the single biggest supplier of airborne radon is mining, transporting and burning coal. Radon has a half-life of 3.5 days, then it becomes polonium 233, the most effective poison of all radioactive items, and 135 days later, it becomes lead, a leading cause of retardation in kids. In short, coal kills. We need to turn that around to kill coal. Posted on October 2, 2011 at 1:43 a.m.

Save backyards Framing opposition as NIMBYism is always what is done to dismiss those who are the most vocal about any development (see “Damned if you do,” Sept. 29, 2011). Without NIMBYS everybody’s backyards would eventually be destroyed. Posted on September 29, 2011 at 8:34 p.m.

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via e-mail: editor@missoulanews.com.

L


Free checking that gives you more - plus $100. Our free checking is our basic account with not-so-basic features. Write as many checks as you like each month, all with no monthly service charge and no minimum balance requirement. Plus, you’ll get $100 added to your account.* Just sign up and use any three of the following: Free Check Card, Free Direct Deposit, Free Online Bill Pay or Free Online Statements* and we will give you $100 - it is that simple!

Friday, Oct. 7th at 3 pm: Montana vs. Sacramento State Pre-Game Meal – UM Students: Enjoy free pizza before the game, courtesy of Grizzly Athletics!

Sunday, Oct. 9th at 11 am: Montana vs. Portland State Autograph Day – Get your 2011 soccer schedule poster autographed by the team after the game! sterlingsavingsbank.com Reserve St. (406) 541-6200

Downtown (406) 542-1500

Hamilton (406) 363-4400

Come check out this year’s soccer promotions and win prizes from Taco Del Sol and Stageline Pizza!

*Limit one (1) incentive per individual: $100 incentive for new personal Sterling Savings Bank Free Checking, $150 incentive for new personal Sterling Savings Bank Premium Checking. To be eligible for the cash incentive, you must enroll in three of the four following products within 90 days of account opening: Bill Pay, Online Statements, Check Card and/or Direct Deposit and meet specific usage requirements in conjunction with opening a new personal Free Checking or Premium Checking account. Usage requirements are as follows: you must meet 3 of the following 4 requirements: be enrolled in Free Bill Pay, enrolled in Online Statements, have a minimum of one (1) incoming Direct Deposit or ACH credit on your checking account within 90 days of account opening or use your Check Card a minimum of three (3) times within the first 90 days of account opening. Check Card transactions can be ATM, point-of-sale (POS) with PIN or signature based transactions. All account owners must be age 18 or older. Underage account owners with an adult cosigner are not eligible. New accounts will be reviewed three full calendar months after account opening and the incentive will be credited to your checking account within four calendar months of account opening upon meeting usage requirements. Incentive is subject to Internal Revenue Service and other tax reporting. Please consult your tax advisor. This offer does not apply to second or multiple checking accounts, existing accounts, or existing accounts that have been closed and reopened. All accounts require a minimum opening deposit of $100. The APY on Premium Checking is 0.15% APY on balances $50,000 and over; 0.10% APY on balances $10,000 - $49,999.99; and 0.05% APY on balances below $10,000.00. All APYs stated are as of September 1, 2011 and may change at any time. Fees may reduce earnings. Offer effective September 1, 2011 and is subject to change without notice.

Missoula Independent

Page 5 October 6–October 13, 2011


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, September 28

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

VIEWFINDER

Agenda

News Quirks by Steele Williams

In the early-morning hours, a black bear repeatedly attempts to enter Missoula International Airport. Its persistence prompts MSO staffers to shut off the airport’s automatic doors. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks officials eventually tranquilize the bear and relocate it to a less populated spot.

• Thursday, September 29 Rep. Denny Rehberg, chairman of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services and Education, introduces a funding bill for fiscal year 2012 that contains $153.4 billion in discretionary funding, 15.2 percent less than President Obama’s budget request.

• Friday, September 30 Missoula County Attorney Fred Van Valkenburg reminds locals that beginning Saturday, Missoula County law enforcement will again prioritize prosecution of misdemeanor marijuana crimes. The announcement comes as a new state law nullifies Missoula County’s Initiative 2, which proclaimed that misdemeanor marijuana possession should be local law enforcement’s lowest priority.

• Saturday, October 1 The University of Montana Grizzlies cream the Northern Colorado Bears 55-28, to the delight of nearly 26,000 fans at Washington Grizzly Stadium on UM’s homecoming. Nate Montana, son of football great Joe Montana, makes his first start for the Griz at quarterback and tosses a 39-yard touchdown pass.

• Sunday, October 2 Former Grizzlies Lex Hilliard, Dan Carpenter and Jimmy Wilson all have standout performances for the Miami Dolphins. Hilliard, a running back, scores a touchdown; Carpenter, a kicker, makes three field goals; and Jimmy Wilson, a cornerback, breaks up a pass. But the Dolphins lose to San Diego and drop to 0-4.

• Monday, October 3 The Montana Secretary of State’s office announces that “Patients for Reform—Not Repeal” successfully gathered enough signatures to put the state legislature’s medical marijuana crackdown up for a vote in Nov. 2012. However, medical marijuana advocates failed to gather enough signatures to suspend the law until then.

• Tuesday, October 4 Sen. Jeff Essmann, a Republican from Billings, announces his candidacy for governor, becoming the eighth GOP candidate to enter the race to succeed Gov. Brian Schweitzer. Essmann, 59, promises to “stand up to the Obama administration’s agenda, lower taxes on Montana business, and cut state spending.”

Griz fans crowded onto the UM Oval Friday, Sept. 30 for homecoming events including the “Yell Night Pep Rally,” the “Lighting of the M” ceremony and a fireworks show.

Economy Lolo Hot Springs feels the heat The recession has been relatively kind to Montana’s tourism industry, though Brent Olson might say otherwise. On Sept. 19, Olson, the owner of Lolo Hot Springs, a year-round resort on Highway 12 between Lolo and the Montana-Idaho border, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. “Our business has dropped off probably about a third of what it used to be,” says Olson, a Las Vegas-based real estate investor. “We just didn’t have the income to be able to make the loan payments.” The resort’s restaurant and bar have been hit the hardest, Olson says, because more and more visitors are bringing their own food. Still, he doesn’t think Imperial Oil’s gigantic test module, which has been parked in front of the nearby Lodge at Lolo Hot Springs for about six months, has helped any. The lodge has been compensated for the inconvenience; the resort hasn’t. Olson has owned Lolo Hot Springs since 2007. As he attempts to reorganize its debt, Handicapped Challenge, a Troy-based nonprofit that held an event for special needs families there last

September, is attempting to purchase the resort. Olson says the organization made an offer months ago but there haven’t been any further discussions because it’s short on cash, too. “At this point, all I can say is we need a lot of help,” says Handicapped Challenge founder Darrell Eby. Eby has big plans for Lolo Hot Springs. He wants to make it a destination resort for children with disabilities. He envisions a new dormitory, swimming pool, fishing pond, and suites for families. “It’s an escape from reality,” he says—one that he thinks will cost around $16 million. He’s looking for donors and investors and trying to form a Missoula-based advisory committee. But, he says, the effort is “kind of stuck here in first gear.” “Everybody’s in the same boat with the economic times like they are,” Olson adds. Matthew Frank

Film If you build it In a Hip Strip basement office on a recent afternoon, Seth Bloom, wearing a suit and tie, having

just returned from a meeting with investors, launches a PowerPoint presentation on his MacBook Pro that begins with a slide that says, “Please be seated.” Even before he shows the architectural mockups of the $70 million, 500,000-square-foot film and TV studio production complex Bloom envisions for Missoula, he oozes ambition. Bloom is short, intense and articulate. He’s an occasional actor (he produced, directed and starred in “Doubt” at the Crystal Theatre a few years ago) who began his career in Los Angeles. The entertainment industry is his passion, and he’s trying to bring it to Missoula. He’s making progress. A few days earlier, he pitched his vision, which he calls Pimlico Studios, to Gov. Brian Schweitzer, who’s championed Montana’s tax incentives to help bring filmmaking to the state. Bloom says Schweitzer’s “on board” with the concept—building infrastructure in Montana that’s as attractive to filmmakers as the scenery. “The governor recited it in such a way as if it were lifted right out of the business plan,” Bloom says. Bloom has a buy-sell agreement in place for about 10 acres in the Missoula County Development Park, near the airport. He says he

trick or tweet!

china woods from asia spookta furniture old house parts big clay pots shrines

cular treats

come t r i c k o r t r e a t i n g for discounts on products & services going now thru halloween!

You can see a lot by just looking. ~Yogi Berra ,4(05‹40::6<3(‹ >>>:69,33(:+(@:7(*64

Missoula Independent

Page 6 October 6–October 13, 2011


Inside

Letters

Briefs

hopes to break ground there next year. The all-inclusive complex would include studios, sound stages that double as entertainment venues, a hotel, restaurants, offices, retail space, and covered parking, all connected by climate-controlled access ways. It sounds over the top—but it’s not, Bloom says, when you consider the competition. He says it was his “genuine, painstaking task” to determine a size that would make a Missoula facility competitive with studios in other tertiary markets, such as Albuquerque. Now Bloom’s courting investors. One of his talking points is this: Over the last seven years, the state’s missed out on nearly $1 billion in revenue for lack of a production facility, according to his own research and consultation with the Montana Film Office. County Commissioner Jean Curtiss says she thinks Pimlico Studios could be a good fit for Missoula. “Montana’s always had the outdoor part of movies: We’ve got the scenery and the rivers and all of that stuff, so it’d be nice to be able to tie it all together,” she says. Does she think it’s possible? “Most dreams are possible if you have enough money.” Matthew Frank

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

“You try to design things so there are fewer places to hide; and ways that people can escape from danger, if it happens to be there.” While discussing acquisition of the property during a committee meeting last week, some council members asked if paying roughly $5,000 an acre to secure new recreational lands is prudent. The money comes from the city’s tax increment financing pot, which is used to help spruce up blighted areas. Behan says that the project is smart not only from a recreational perspective, but also as a longterm investment. “People said you shouldn’t be developing Caras Park when MRA did that,” he explains. “But the community loves it. The community uses it as Town

Recreation An island for Missoula It’s mostly transients and homeless folk who use the weedy five-acre parcel called the “West Broadway Island” in the Clark Fork River near the California Street Pedestrian Bridge. But after the Missoula City Council unanimously agreed to pay $25,000 to purchase the land from Ke-Do-Ma Investments, on Monday, Oct. 3, the property is now slated for a facelift. The city aims to transform the island west of downtown into a destination for frolicking, fishing and tuber take-out. “Our goal would be to start the improvements next spring,” says Missoula Redevelopment Agency Assistant Director Chris Behan. The city has had its eye on the property for more than a decade. Behan says its plans call for removing noxious weeds to encourage riparian plant growth and increase visibility. An old construction bridge at the end of Burton Street runs northsouth on the island’s west side. The city wants to erect a second bridge on the east side to create a loop and link the island directly to West Broadway. Those improvements will expand recreational opportunities and better ensure safety, Behan says.

Square. Plus, there’s been dozens of millions of dollars invested in buildings on Front Street and near the park, because they wanted to be near the park.” Behan says Missoula’s emphasis on reinvigorating the Riverfront Corridor—by building Caras, new trails and water features such as Brennan’s Wave and the planned Max Wave—helps make the community a great place to live. “It’s something you wouldn’t find in hardly any [other] place in the country.” Jessica Mayrer

Housing Rocky foundation Cary Gosselin told the Independent last January that at Home Savers of Montana, “we make the home right.”

Agenda

News Quirks

Gosselin buys foreclosed properties in Missoula, fixes them up, and sells them. But now his claim of making things right is being challenged in court filings by two buyers. April Speer and Mitzie Haney purchased their home on Skyview Drive from Home Savers in early summer 2010. According to a suit filed in Missoula County District Court this week, they’ve since noted a host of problems, including a lack of waterproofing in the home’s foundation. An inspector with the City of Missoula confirmed the lack of waterproofing in April. Speer and Haney are now leveling a number of accusations against Home Savers, including constructive fraud, negligence, breach of contract and violation of the Montana Consumer Protection Act. And their attorney, Ryan Shaffer, says they aren’t alone in arguing that Home Savers has “cut corners.” He says several other homebuyers intend to testify on electrical and plumbing failures that they claim resulted from shoddy workmanship. “These plumbing errors are things that, if you and I are working on our own homes…and we get it wrong, we suffer the consequences,” Shaffer says. “The problem here is that they do this substandard work knowing that it’s for the benefit of somebody else.” Gosselin says Home Savers has done nothing wrong. He’s familiar with some of the complaints, though he says this is the first he’s heard of the problem with the foundation. He says Home Savers didn’t do the wiring at the Skyview Drive residence, and that everything—including the foundation, which he adds was done by a licensed contractor—passed inspection not only by the city but also by the Federal Housing Administration. He says he was counting on the city, which permitted and cleared the project, to inspect the building properly. “If it wasn’t done properly,” he says, the city “should have red-tagged the contractor.” Gosselin says there’s a “buyer beware” element homebuyers should consider. Any major issues should have been picked up during the inspection process, he adds. But, he says, if there is a problem with the foundation at the Skyview Drive home, he’s more than willing to rectify the situation. “I’m a reasonable person,” Gosselin says. “If there’s some damage or something that needs to be fixed, I’d be glad to fix it.” Alex Sakariassen

Send Holiday Cards?

BY THE NUMBERS

250 lbs

Weight of the six-year-old grizzly that apparently killed hiker Brian Matayoshi in Yellowstone July 6. The sow, which was euthanized by park staff Oct. 2, had two cubs. She is also suspected in the fatal mauling of John Wallace in August.

etc. Big Sky Christian Center pastor and homophobe Harris Himes said being incarcerated last week on felony theft charges was an eye-opener. We bet! The thought of Himes in jail evokes all sorts of images. We envision something like a high-profile closet-case who lobbies state legislators to restrict gay rights and then discovers his smoldering love for his fellow man while surrounded by beefcake in the exercise yard at Montana State Prison in Deer Lodge. It could happen. Montana’s Commissioner of Securities filed six felony charges against Himes last week. That means his stint in the Ravalli County clink might foreshadow a longer stretch. Himes could face decades in prison resulting from allegations that he and another pastor, James “Jeb” Bryant, bilked a Bitterrooter, referred to in court documents as “G.S.,” out of $150,000. Charging documents paint a nefarious picture of Himes, who allegedly promised big returns if G.S. invested a recent inheritance in Duratherm Building Systems, a construction-goods company in which Bryant and Himes claimed to have partnership stakes. “G.S. told Pastor Himes he wished to invest his money in a conservative, risk-free investment that provided income to support ministry work and would allow him to serve the Lord full time,” documents state. After the commissioner’s office filed charges, Himes told KGVO Radio that he has not done anything wrong. “I will say this unequivocally: I am innocent of all charges, without sin or guilt.” Himes said the allegations are the work of social liberals who don’t like his politics and want to take him down. “There is some evidence that shows that this in fact is an opportunity for the gay rights activists to come after me,” he said. “(Securities Commissioner) Monica Lindeen is a lady I know from the legislature. She has always been very strongly on the other side…She is very pro-gay, very pro-abortion.” Lindeen spokesman Lucas Hamilton says Himes’ claims are “outlandish” and that charges were only filed after a thorough investigation. For our part, we can’t help but think that if Himes had spent more time keeping track of his own morals rather than policing everyone else’s, he might not be in this predicament. But rather than condemn Himes, we’d like to forgive him. Hell, we might even pray for him. Because we’ve got a sneaking suspicion that if he’s cleared of criminal wrongdoing this time, he’ll get himself in trouble again.

Heather Rothman

Why not shop local this year? Come see what Noteworthy*has to offer! We have stylish, affordable options and we can process your order quickly and efficiently!

Win a 50% OFF Merchandise Coupon Sign Up for our Weekly Drawing

Come see us today!

Leather Goods – Great Footwear Downtown – 543-1128 www.hideandsole.com

Missoula Independent

Page 7 October 6–October 13, 2011


Mon., & Wed. evenings 9pm - 2am bowling special. ONLY $1.00 per person per game (shoe rental not included) Karaoke on Wed, Thurs, and Sat evenings. THUNDER ALLEY BOWLING on Fridays at 9pm Live music by TOM CATS on Friday, 10/7.

Text to 72727 funcenter or funcenter 2 for specials & promotions!

MISSOULA'S FINEST

TEQUILA

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Making hay Amid drought, Texas ranchers look to Montana by Matthew Frank

Billings rancher Douglas Sidwell recently got a call asking if he could spare any hay. The buyer was a hay broker in Texas, which is stricken by an unrelenting drought. The broker was looking for as much hay as he could get his hands on to feed starving cattle. Sidwell had plenty, so he’s working out a deal to ship about 1,000 tons of hay to the San Antonio and Texas Panhandle areas. “To put that into perspective, it’s, give or take a ding-dong, about 2,000 round bales,” he says. As the worst single-year drought in Texas history ravages the state and its multibillion-dollar cattle industry—the nation’s

paying to have his round bales unrolled and then square-baled. “I don’t know how long it will continue,” Fraser says, “because we have a hard time understanding how producers in Texas can bring that hay all the way down there— I hear it’s bringing well over $200 a ton and in some cases up near $300—and make that work. They’re just trying to salvage their core herd and hold them together.” Adds Sidwell: “There’s an old adage that goes, ‘It’s cheaper to haul the cows to the feed than the feed to the cows.’ A lot of guys are doing it bass-ackwards this year, and it’s costing them.”

ents a potential problem: “If you are bringing these cattle into Montana, are all the health records up to date?” He says the biggest concern is bovine trichomoniasis, which can cause infertility and abortions. Officials in Nebraska, who are seeing similar import trends, have begun quarantining herds if ranchers haven’t followed import rules. If Texas ranchers don’t send cattle north, they’ll probably slaughter them— maybe as many as 500,000, according to Texas A&M University. “We’re going to be talking about a historically large reduction in beef-cow numbers,” David Anderson, an

largest—Montana’s feeling the repercussions. Desperate ranchers in Texas and surrounding scorched states find themselves snatching up Montana’s abundant hay—and hiking up the prices for everyone in the process. According to James Ward, of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, a ton of hay in Montana is selling for upwards of $175, on the verge of doubling last year’s average price. Many Montana ranchers are taking advantage of the new market, says Rob Fraser, a field representative with the Miles City Livestock Commission. He says haulers who come to Montana from Texas and Oklahoma with oil field equipment have recently been making the return trip loaded with square hay bales. Buyers are paying a premium for square bales because they fit easily on the back of semis. In fact, Fraser says, a rancher in Broadus is selling hay to a Texan who’s

Actually, they’re hauling feed to the cows and cows to the feed. Sidwell’s father, Richard, a real estate agent, has sold farm and ranch land for the last 35 years, and he says he’s seen an uptick in the number of ranchers from the south leasing ranchland in eastern Montana. “It’s noticeable, it really is,” says Richard, who’s gotten calls in recent days from Texas, Oklahoma and southern Kansas. “The ones that can do it are looking to buy real estate up here and spread their operation out so it gives them an opportunity to try to keep their cow herds together.” With southern-state ranchers hauling their cattle to greener pastures in the north, the number of cattle in Montana is rising beyond its usual count, which is between 1.6 and 1.8 million mother cows, the seventh most in the country, according to John Paterson, a beef cattle specialist with the extension service at Montana State University. The influx, Paterson says, pres-

economist at the university’s extension service, recently told Bloomberg. “If nothing else changes, that’s tighter supplies and less beef and higher prices.” And the size of the U.S. cattle herd was already at a 50-year low. High beef prices could be good for Montana ranchers—if they keep enough hay to feed their cattle through the winter. If not, it’ll be awfully expensive to buy more. “Everybody’s been caught up in the frenzy of shipping their hay to Texas,” says Douglas Sidwell. “There’ve been a few guys who I think are going to get in trouble because they’ve shipped too much hay, and it’s going to be interesting to see what happens there. If we get any winter at all we’re going to be in pretty poor shape.” Meanwhile, The drought in Texas shows no signs of abating. Texas State Climatologist John Nielsen-Gammon predicted last week that it could last until 2020.

BAR NOW SERVING OVER 40 PREMIUM TEQUILAS

Missoula Independent

Page 8 October 6–October 13, 2011

mfrank@missoulanews.com


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Broadening the line Even supporters of border security bill have questions by Alex Sakariassen

There’s a turf war going on near our nation’s borders. That’s the argument supporters of the National Security and Federal Lands Protection Act have made in defense of awarding border patrol agents unfettered access to millions of acres of federally held public lands, a proposal now under review in the U.S. House Natural Resources Committee. Agencies under the departments of Agriculture and the Interior have locked security personnel out of vast swaths of land, their story goes, putting U.S. citizens and border agents at risk. But the recent and sometimes outraged debate over House Resolution 1505 has shown a disconnect between Congress and the people calling for the bill. Rep. Rob Bishop, a Republican from Utah, introduced HR 1505. It would give

“We’ll just go around.”

the Department of Homeland Security “immediate access” to all federal lands within 100 miles of the nation’s land and maritime borders. The National Association of Former Border Patrol Officers supports Bishop’s proposal as written, says Vice Chairman Zack Taylor. However, he says, the bill goes well beyond anything his organization requested. “We were certain people wouldn’t have any trouble with Border Patrol,” Taylor explains. “But they do have a problem with people like” the Transportation Security Administration and Immigration and Customs Enforcement. “They don’t like the idea of a national police force— and that’s how they view where Homeland Security is going.” Taylor has worked for decades as an agent on the U.S.-Mexico border in Arizona. He lives within sight of the mountains near Nogales where Border Patrol agent Brian Terry was gunned down by smugglers last year. He repeatedly uses the story to emphasize the Border Patrol’s need for bet-

ter access to federal lands. But the choice to place such unfettered control in the hands of the Department of Homeland Security, instead of Border Patrol alone, gives Taylor pause. That isn’t what the agents, the former officers or the Arizona residents Bishop talked to during several border tours pushed for, Taylor says. Residents along the borders are “used to the guys in the green uniforms,” Taylor says. “They’ve been seeing them for 75 or 80 years.” Agents with other Homeland Security divisions “don’t know where they’re going,” he adds, “and don’t speak the local language.” Proponents of Bishop’s bill have offered a long list of arguments in favor of awarding greater control of all borders to Homeland Security. Many in the Southwest

Photo by Chad Harder

quoted an October 2010 report from the Government Accountability Office, stating that a memorandum of understanding between federal enforcement agencies “has simply not worked.” Rep. Denny Rehberg, a co-sponsor of the bill, pointed to recent criminal incidents in Montana, claiming that wilderness areas in the Northern Rockies have become “havens for criminal cartels.” “Remember the Arizona fugitives who hid out in Montana’s back country?” Rehberg has said. “Or the nearly $8 million of marijuana recently found growing in the Lolo National Forest? Criminal cartels don’t respect the Wilderness Act, therefore our Border Patrol is placed at a significant disadvantage.” The fugitives Rehberg mentioned were apprehended at a campground in Arizona after a three-week search. Details of the Lolo marijuana farm, which forest spokesman Brian Schulze said was an unusual case for his agency, have not been released. The reasoning behind HR 1505 has been overshadowed in recent weeks by complaints that the bill would allow

Homeland Security to disregard multiple environmental regulations. In September, Defenders of Wildlife listed HR 1505 among more than a dozen bills and provisions they say undermine the Endangered Species Act. And Interior Department spokeswoman Kim Thorsen testified in July that the bill would have a “significant impact” on her agency’s ability to protect natural and cultural resources. Even Sen. Jon Tester, who earlier this year voiced support for any “effective and affordable tool” to secure the country’s borders, took a swing at the proposal. HR 1505 “is nowhere even close to effective or affordable,” he says. “It gives one government agency supreme power to do whatever it wants without regard to rights or existing laws. It’s as bad as the Patriot Act and REAL ID. Proposals like this may sound good to folks in Washington, D.C., but it is not acceptable or affordable for Montana.” The complaints haven’t escaped Bishop. The House Natural Resources Committee, which he chairs, scheduled an Oct. 5 mark-up hearing on the bill. The exemptions from environmental review will likely remain untouched, he says, but he hopes to narrow his proposal’s focus over the next month to address concerns like Taylor’s, that the bill is too broad. “It should be the same thing, since [the Border Patrol] gets their funding and control from Homeland Security,” Bishop says. “However, when we change the bill and make the mark-up, that’s one of the changes we’re going to make, that this applies [only] to Border Patrol. In fact, it’s not going to apply to maritime situations, because Border Patrol doesn’t do that.” Meanwhile, the turf wars that prompted HR 1505 may not be playing out much in Montana. Robert Duff with the Havre Sector of the U.S. Border Patrol says his office has “very strong relationships with all the other partner agencies here, be it the other federal land management agencies, the tribal agencies, even the state and locals.” But Bishop says that giving the Border Patrol more unfettered access to lands near the Canadian border isn’t so much a response to existing problems as a preemptive move against future criminal activity. That’s a point Taylor hammers relentlessly. “Drug and alien smuggling is a business, a for-profit business,” he says. “They have to get the product into the United States before they can get paid…If we close the 17 corridors in Arizona that are on federal public land, are they going to quit smuggling this product, or are they going to find somewhere else to smuggle it?”

20

Best of Missoula

11

www.tanglesmt.com

275 W. Main St • 728-0343

asakariassen@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 9 October 6–October 13, 2011


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

99 to 1 Protests remind politicians where the votes are

ALL 2011 BIKES ON SALE! mountain • road • cyclocross • kids' comfort • commuter • cruisers 20% OFF up to $1,000 25% OFF up to $1,000-$2,200 30% OFF over $2,200

Components

Up to 40% OFF handlebars, grips, stems, seat posts, tires & wheels

Accessories

Take Off Table

Up to 40% OFF

Up to 50% OFF

apparel, shorts, bibs, jerseys, jackets, shoes, helmets & gloves

New components removed/swapped from new bikes

When the “Occupy Wall Street” demonstrations began several weeks ago, they were largely ignored or dismissed by the mainstream media. But that was then. Now, as the Wall Street demonstrations continue to grow, even the stodgy New York Times has to admit these protests are big news. With thousands of citizens occupying areas in front of financial institutions from big cities to small towns, the movement expands as Americans finally begin to show their dissatisfaction. It’s a hard reminder to politicians that the top 1 percent of the population may have a disproportionate share of the wealth, but the other 99 percent have the votes. Considering the kind of coverage American mainstream media have given to citizen uprisings in the Middle East during the so-called Arab Spring, trying to bury similar protests against greed, wealth and power in our own country was puzzling and disgraceful. It was as if to report on citizen discontent at home somehow admitted that we have some very serious and widespread problems in the U.S. Unfortunately, it’s nothing new to see the American media ignoring the reality of homelessness, millions of foreclosures, massive unemployment and the inability of our political institutions and “leaders” to deal with them effectively and equitably. The key word here is “equitable.” Nothing better illustrates the inequality of our government than how it dealt with the financial meltdown. While citizens were being tossed out of their homes and jobs, the federal government bent over backward to throw billions if not trillions at the speculative financial institutions, investment pirates and sleazeball corporations that caused the crisis. As President Obama’s economic advisers, all Wall Street toadies, filled the airwaves with proclamations that we simply had to save the “too big to fail” speculators, the little people were ignored. What crumbs got swept off the table in the way of mortgage relief were so encumbered by an incompetent bureaucracy and mazes of red tape that most of the funds never made it to those who needed them most.

SALE FOR BOTH STORES HELD AT 1110 South Ave. W. 406-543-3331 OCT 6th 6-10 PM Sale items can be viewed at both stores prior to sale: 1110 S. Ave. & 809 E. Front St. Open 10 to 6 Monday thru Saturday • bigskybike.com

Missoula Independent

Page 10 October 6–October 13, 2011

It wasn’t just Obama and his advisors who went along with this travesty. The Republicans supported it because George W. Bush started the massive corporate giveaways to benefit the funders of the Republican Party. The Democrats stood by nodding their heads because it was their president who said we needed to continue and expand the bailouts. They didn’t want to make him look bad by reminding him that the top 1 percent caused the problems

The divide-andconquer strategy that has been used by the ruling class in this country for two centuries is starting to fall apart. while the bottom 99 percent suffered the results. That Obama and many, many Democrats took and continue to take massive amounts of money from corporate donors made it just that much easier to turn their backs on the people while they carried the feast to the wealthy. It’s a perfect example of democracy gone awry when vox populi, “the voice of the people,” is muzzled to continue the “you scratch my back, I scratch yours” game of Congress and Washington, D.C. That the Republican majority of the Supreme Court then decreed that corporations were people who couldn’t be limited in the amount of money they could spend to buy influence and power added insult to injury and foretold a continuation and expansion of the corruption that plagues us. While our media were selectively and hypocritically cheering on the “popular rebellions” of the Middle East that could benefit U.S. corporate interests, the fire under the teapot of citizen suffering in this country burned. Now the pot is boiling furiously as Americans hit the streets.

The response has been predictable. In New York, 700 people were arrested as they attempted to cross the Brooklyn Bridge. A video of a white-shirted NYC police inspector spraying mace in the faces of non-violent women who were already contained behind a police fence went viral, further enraging the people. Like vicious guard dogs, the cops are protecting their masters: the pirates of Wall Street who are, we’re told, just trying to conduct their business and make a profit. But guess what? The crowds are increasingly reminding the cops that they, too, are in the 99 percent, not the 1 percent; that they, too, worry about paying their bills, getting their kids a decent education and keeping their jobs while hoping that a medical emergency won’t bankrupt them. Now the AFL-CIO has thrown its weight behind the movement. New York City transportation union members are refusing to be bullied into transporting their fellow citizens to jail for the crime of exercising their rights to free speech, free association and petitioning their government for redress of grievances. The divide-and-conquer strategy that has been used by the ruling class in this country for two centuries is starting to fall apart as the 99-percenters look one another in the eyes and realize they, not Wall Street or the mainstream media, are the voice of America. They have the power. There’s no way to know how this will end, but the frustration seems to have reached a tipping point. The change we were promised didn’t happen. The status quo is intolerable. The silence of our politicians only shows how befuddled they are. The choice, however, is theirs: Either serve the people who elected you or face the inevitable and growing consequences from which the 1 percent won’t save you. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


UM Continuing Education Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Conference Facility

Bruin confusion

A state-of-the-art conference facility starting at only $50/day.

Only one thing is certain: A grizzly got killed

Polycom system available for educational purposes.

by Daniel Person

As with most crime stories, the details of why Jeremy Hill killed a grizzly bear in northern Idaho were slow to emerge. The federal prosecutors who charged Hill with a misdemeanor in early August were stingy with information, beyond saying that he had killed the juvenile male on his property, thereby violating the Endangered Species Act. But some Idaho lawmakers framed the story in a way that was guaranteed to boil the blood of just about anyone raised in the land of the brave: The feds were trying Hill, a father of six, for protecting his family from vicious predators. What was worse, Hill had done the right thing by reporting what had happened to wildlife officials, only to have his report used against him. Smelling the scent of a good old-fashioned David-versus-the-Government story, Republican Gov. Butch Otter fired off a letter to the Obama administration demanding that charges be dropped. Meanwhile, an Idaho state senator warned ominously that the next bear that gets shot in the Panhandle probably won’t be reported, and Idaho’s federal delegation got to work to water down the Endangered Species Act. But as August, and then September, wore on, fuller details emerged, first in the form of a report by Boundary County prosecutor Jack Douglas, and then from federal prosecutors and Hill himself. According to these accounts, three bears, a mother and two cubs, came within 40 yards of the Hill family house. It was around 7 p.m. on Mother’s Day, and four of Hill’s kids were outside playing when his wife first saw the bears and yelled at the kids to get inside. The reports also noted that Hill never actually saw any bears near his children. Indeed, the juvenile male was climbing a fence surrounding a pigpen when Hill first shot it. The bear would eventually charge Hill, but only after it had been shot twice. Hill apparently knew that his wife and kids were safe inside when he fired the third and fatal shot.

Critics of the government argue that Hill acted to protect his children in a chaotic situation. Shooting the grizzly was a necessary act, they say. But the more detailed accounts also made the prosecutors’ position more understandable; after all, pigs aren’t children, while the bear was a member of a protected species.

The more detailed accounts made the prosecutors’ position more understandable; after all, pigs aren’t children, while the bear was a member of a protected species. In any case, Idaho’s politicians ignored the expanded version of the story and stuck to the cartoon version: “On Aug. 8, 2011, the U.S. Attorney for Idaho charged an Idaho man, Jeremy Hill, with a violation of the ESA for killing a grizzly bear on his property near Porthill, Idaho, in defense of himself and his family,” was how Republican Sen. Mike Crapo’s press shop summed up the story Sept. 14, weeks after it was revealed that the harm the grizzly bear posed to Hill’s kids was, at best, largely in Hill’s imagination. The purpose of the press release was to tout a new bill that would prevent a prosecution like this from ever happening again. No, it doesn’t specify that any grizzly climbing into a pigpen is fair game. Rather,

it “bolsters” the protections in the Endangered Species Act for people killing protected animals in self-defense. Critics responded that there was no need for the bill: The act already exempts people who are acting in self-defense. Some speculated the politicians were just trying to gain points with their constituents. That’s probably true, but whether it’s by design or not, the bill now before Congress will serve an even bigger purpose than simply amending the law. It will ensure that for months to come, Idahoans, and Westerners in general, are going to hear some version of the story of Jeremy Hill—most likely, the simplified, made-for-TV version. In politics, stories matter, and the story that Crapo and others like him want to tell has a lot of emotional power: When it’s a choice between a bear and your kids, their story goes, your government is going to protect the bear. Try defending endangered species on those terms. It could be argued that it was the federal government that brought this on with an overly zealous prosecution. By m i d - S e p t e m b e r, H i l l a n d t h e U . S . Attorney’s Office for Idaho had reached an agreement: no misdemeanor charge but a fine of $1,000. In announcing the agreement, U.S. Attorney Wendy Olson said her office wanted to give Hill credit for promptly reporting that he had shot and killed a bear. She also said that investigators couldn’t really pin down the exact location of Hill’s kids when he shot the bear. That seems like an important fact to have pinned down before bringing charges in a case like this. Then again, all the facts never played much of a part in the stories about a bear, some kids and some pigs in Porthill, Idaho, this summer. Daniel Person is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). He is a writer in Spokane.

Call Joe Gough at 406-243-6322 or email joseph.gough@umontana.edu You may also visit our website at umt.edu/ce

Pre-Season Pass SALE!

Sale ends October 31 Adult (18–61) Teen (13–17) Junior (7–12 ) Child (6 & under) Senior (62–69)

$229 $159 $149 $25* $159

Best Rates in the Region! Super Senior (70+) $129 College/Military $199 (with valid ID)

Mid Week Family

$159 $577

Order On-line

www.skilookout.com 208.744.1301

Missoula Independent

1-90 at the Idaho/Montana State Line

Page 11 October 6–October 13, 2011


MITCHELL MASSAGE THERAPY

TWO MEMBERSHIPS FOR THE PRICE OF ONE!

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

ERIC MITCHELL, LMT Massage Therapist/Owner

406-207-9480 MitchellMassage.abmp.com

From Tap to Tango, Zumba to Oula, the DDC is for Every Body

121 West Main Street, Missoula 406.541.7240 • www.ddcmontana.com

Your Complete Hobby Store for All your Aircraft Needs

Force 5000 Combo Pack $17999 The Force battling system gives you an out-of-the-box air-to-air battling experience. Complete with two helicopters, the force helis are ultra-lightweight, perfect for out-maneuvering opponents in tight quarters. The self-stabilizing characteristics and mil-spec gyro stabilization system keep you rock steady and in complete control, even if you’re a Force rookie.

THE

Ethical questions surrounding the death penalty can at times seem so academic that they’re ignored. It’s the stuff of middle school term papers, it’s a question without an answer, forget about it. The Montana Innocence Project begs to differ. The question is not going away. The debate is especially timely in the wake of Georgia’s recent execution of Troy Davis, given claims of his innocence. On, Tuesday, October 11th, the Montana Innocence Project presents a free public talk with Kirk Bloodsworth, the first death row prisoner freed by DNA evidence. Bloodsworth spent two years in prison based on the testimony of five mistaken eyewitnesses, until he finally convinced the courts to perform DNA testing that led to his acquittal. Bloodsworth has since become a staunch advocate

for reform of the criminal justice system. Innocence projects around the country, with the help of DNA e v i d e n c e , h a v e h e l p e d t o f r e e n e a r l y 30 0 Americans—including three Montanans. Don’t miss your chance to hear from someone so directly involved in what is still a lively and relevant debate. O n Tu e . , O c t . 1 1 , Montana Innocence Project presents a free public talk with advocate Kirk Bloodsworth, the first death row prisoner freed by DNA evidence, 7 PM at the UM Law School. A reception will run from 5:30–7 PM in the Law School’s Lower 2 Foyer. Join them for a $25 donation or $10 donation. Food and wine will be served. Please RSVP for the reception at 243-6698.

THURSDAY OCTOBER 6

a free critique group looking for new members. Experienced writers, both published and unpublished are invited to join them near the UM Campus, 2:30–5 PM. Contact Larry Godwin at 728-3573.

Talk transit with the Transportation Technical Advisory Committee, which meets the first Thu. of every month. Join them at 10 AM at the Missoula Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine.

TREASURE CHEST Crafts & Hobbies

Hang out with Tom Catmull and the Clerics and support Planned Parenthood of Montana all at once at their benefit dance, 6 PM, with food, auctions, dancing, door prizes and more, plus Stacey James, PPMT CEO as guest speaker. Tickets are $50/$20 students. 111 N. Higgins Ave.

1612 Benton • 549-7992

Montana CINE International Film Festival Opening Event

BEST OF FESTIVAL SCREENING "CULTURES OF RESISTANCE"

Fight the power/give peace a chance at the Fall 2011 Peace & Justice Film Series, which brings you a new rabble rousing film every Thu. This week see Pax Americana and the Weaponization of Space in the Gallagher Building, Rm. 123, starting at 7 PM. Donation based and open to the public.

FRIDAY OCTOBER 7

Monday, October 17th UC Ballroom, University Center

The Ravalli County Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence will host the 14th annual Report to the Community luncheon, 12–1:30 PM at St. Francis Community Center, 401 S. Fifth St. in Hamilton. The event kicks off White Ribbon week, which was also a really good movie from 2010.

7pm (doors open at 6:30pm) Co-Sponsored by International Programs, The University of Montana

Busses and poetry go together like two things that don’t ordinarily go together but make a synthesis anyway, as is the spirit of poetry, 4:30–5:30 PM outside the Mountain Line Transit Center. And then I think they’re going to keep reading on the busses themselves. Not sure. Free.

SATURDAY OCTOBER 8

Celebrate White Ribbon Week with SAFE by attending the Dancing for Dignity benefit at the Wild Mare Restaurant. Food, silent auction and music by Joan Zen, $15 adults / $10 kids 5–12, 283 Second St. Corvallis. Call 363-2793.

MONDAY OCTOBER 10 Monthly meeting of Bonner Milltown Community Council, with topics including discussion of traffic routing/control options at First St. and Hwy 200, Bonner School Library. 7 PM.

TUESDAY OCTOBER 11 The Northern Rockies Rising Tide has weekly meetings this and every Tue. at at Freecycles, 732 S. First St. W. at 6 PM, where participants fight climate change through grassroots resistance. YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts YWCA Support Groups for women every Tue. from 6:30–8 PM. An American Indian-led talking circle is also available, along with age-appropriate children’s groups. Free. Call 543-6691.

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 12 As part of White Ribbon Week there will be a community prayer and music service to shed light on the issue of domestic violence at the Hamilton Assembly of God Church, 601 West Main, Hamilton. Call Sonya at 363-2793.

Special Entertainment: Native American Singer/Songwriter/Performer Jack Gladstone

Dress in dapper tweed to support Missoula’s Spirt at Play early childhood program at the 2nd Annual Missoula Tweed Ride, which includes a bicycle carnival at 4 PM, followed by adult oriented music from 5–7 PM, starting at Free Cycles, 732 South 1st St. W. $8/$15 for two/$20 three or more. Visit MissoulaTweedRide.org. (See Mountain High in this issue.)

THURSDAY OCTOBER 13

Unity Dance & Drum, African Dance & Drum

Do it The Girls Way at their inaugural Light the Path benefit, with Bellatrix, featuring sumptuous food, song, dance and circus tricks, 6 PM at the Missoula Winery, 5646 W. Harrier. Check out thegirlsway.org.

Fight the power/give peace a chance at the Fall 2011 Peace & Justice Film Series, which brings you a new rabble-rousing film every Thu. This week see Mother: Caring for 7 Billion in the Gallagher Building, Rm. 123, starting at 7 PM. Donation based and open to the public.

FREE!

Students, Faculty and General Public Invited; Light Snacks More info: 728-9380

Missoula Independent

SUNDAY OCTOBER 9

The Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St. in Hamilton, presents a Fellowship Club meeting featuring a talk on Catherine Ponder’s book, The Healing Secrets of the Ages, 6–7:30 PM in the west meeting room of the library. Free. Call 363-1670.

Poets, writers and dreamers, listen up: The Menagerie is AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Page 12 October 6–October 13, 2011


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - Boston police reported that a man walked into a bank and handed a teller a note that read, “Give me all your money.” The teller refused, informing the would-be robber the window was closed. He moved over to the next teller, where a customer scolded him for cutting in front of the line. When the second teller and a customer in line told the man he’d have to take off his sweatshirt hood, the suspect refused and left empty handed. (The Boston Globe) Police concluded that Darin E. Moore, 49, smashed a window with his hand so he could break into a ground-floor apartment in Columbus, Ohio, but the broken glass severed an artery in his arm, and he bled to death. (The Columbus Dispatch) SECOND-AMENDMENT FOLLIES - Alfonsia O’Bryant, 85, was trying to remove an opossum that had gotten into a chicken pen in Augusta, Ga., when his friend fired a .32-caliber pistol at the animal. Richmond County sheriff’s officials said the bullet missed the possum but wounded O’Bryant in the face. (The Augusta Chronicle) Police in Louisville, Ky., reported that John Berthiaume, 53, seriously injured his right arm, buttock and leg when his homemade potato gun exploded. Tony Berthiaume said his brother apparently put too much black powder into the gun. (Louisville’s WLKY-TV) John Champion, 21, was hunting alone from his ATV in Levy County, Fla., when he shot himself in the foot with a crossbow. Florida Fish and Wildlife investigators said Champion, who is a paraplegic, was cocking his crossbow when he accidentally fired the bolt through his left foot, pinning it to the ATV’s floor. Unable to free himself, he tried to drive out but became stuck on some brush. Other hunters and family members eventually found him and took him to the hospital for treatment. (Tampa Bay’s WTSP-TV) KEEPING TO THE SCHEDULE - Terrified passengers aboard a bus in China’s Hunan province begged their driver to stop after the rear wheels fell off. Driver Shi Shao, 48, told police in Shaoyang he thought he’d just hit a pothole and continued on, even though the passengers saw the rear axle behind them in the road and could feel the floor of the vehicle becoming hot from scraping along the road. “The potholes around here are bad,” one passenger said, “but nothing could be that bad.” (China’s Global Times)

:

FATASTIC NEWS - Plastic surgeon Dr. Jeffrey Hartog announced the opening of a fat bank in Seminole County, Fla., where patients who’ve had fat removed during liposuction can store it for future cosmetic use, such as plumping up body parts affected by aging. The service spares the patient having to undergo liposuction, which requires anesthesia, a second or third time to obtain the fat. “Fat banking takes [liposuction] to a whole new level,” Hartog said. “We put the patient to sleep once. Do the lipo. Get the fat out once and have as much as we need for later injections.” He explained the fat is drained, cleaned, put in containers for freezing by a “patented process” and stored at his Liquid Gold center, located next to his cosmetic-surgery clinic. The cost to store 250 to 300 cubic centimeters of fat—enough to fill a coffee cup—is $900 for the first year and $200 a year after that. (Orlando Sentinel) Janet Hardt, 63, died after injecting heated beef fat into her face around her mouth and chin. She’d gone to the hospital complaining that her face felt like it was burning. Authorities in Cook County, Ill., said that, judging from infections in her mouth and lip and scarring from the injections, she apparently had performed the procedure several times, trying to reduce wrinkling. Although Hardt’s face reportedly looked “grotesque,” it had few wrinkles. Neither the injections nor the infections caused her death, however; an autopsy determined she died of peritonitis, a severe abdominal infection. (Chicago Sun-Times) FRIENDS INDEED - After Cumberland County, Pa., District Judge Thomas A. Placey ordered a continuance for Barry Horn Jr., who’s accused in a standoff with police, several court observers Googled Placey’s Facebook page and learned he’s a Facebook friend with the defendant. Placey said he knew Horn’s father, a former county sheriff’s deputy, but has never socialized with the defendant. He insisted the two aren’t real friends, only Facebook friends, adding that he accepts every friend request he gets. “Someone says you want to be my friend, I say yes,” Placey said. “You could be a Facebook friend of mine, I wouldn’t know it.” (Harrisburg’s The Patriot-News) Police in Greeley, Colo., accused Juan Gonzales Jr., 22, of breaking into a woman’s home and stealing her cellphone. After using the phone signal to trace the phone to Gonzales, investigators found that the suspect had sent the victim a friend request on Facebook. (Greeley’s The Tribune) A new Internet site called MyMicrobes offers to connect people based entirely on similarities in their gut bacteria. According to the science journal Nature, German biochemist Peer Bork, one of the site’s founders, got the idea for MyMicrobes after receiving nearly a hundred emails from people concerned about their gastrointestinal problems. “They were long emails,” he said. “There must be a lot of frustrated people out there.” The site lets people with similar digestive profiles share and gather information about their digestive health. Joining the site costs $2,100, which covers the cost of sequencing gut bacteria. (Mother Nature Network) WASTE MAKES TASTE - Authorities in China’s Zhejiang province detained 32 people accused of operating a criminal network selling “poisonous and harmful cooking oil” made from used grease dredged from drains behind restaurants. Noting the enterprise did business in 14 provinces, the ministry of public safety said police confiscated more than 100 tons of “gutter oil.” (Reuters) FOX IN THE HEN HOUSE - A $750 million-a-year Illinois program subsidizing childcare for 150,000 poor families hired convicted rapists, child molesters and other violent felons as babysitters. A prime example is Cornelius Osborne, who was convicted of raping two women and other assorted felonies, from robbery to failing to register as a sex offender, and repeatedly sent to prison before the state’s Child Care Assistance Program hired him to babysit two children. For more than two years, Osborne was paid nearly $5,000 before his latest conviction, for dealing drugs, returned him to prison. (Chicago Tribune)

Missoula Independent

Page 13 October 6–October 13, 2011


ill

No

n

lio

Re s

e

xo

i nR

ver

il

re

ev o

ir

m

dO

Ve r

L a k e Pen

St . R

egis River

Oxbow on the Clark Fork River

Photo by Chad Harder

The legacy of the poisoned Clark spent last summer and fall floating down the country’s largest Superfund site in a canoe. I was living in a borrowed cabin near Georgetown Lake, about 20 miles from the headwaters of the Clark Fork River. I wanted a closer look at a disaster before it was undone. Montana’s rivers, any fly-fisher will tell you, are everything a real river should be. Not the upper Clark Fork. Not yet, anyhow. My meanderings were marked by pink golf balls and green cattle bones. The golf balls washed into the river from Anaconda’s Old Works golf course—a pretty green bandage stuck on part of the town’s razed smelter complex—via Warm Springs Creek. Or they were shanked from the aspirationally named Anaconda Country Club, in the rural burb of Opportunity, into Mill Creek. You see them nestled in the brown sand of shallow bars

I

Missoula Independent

miles downstream, sunlit dimples winking under the water. The cattle bones are covered in bluegreen copper sulfate. I find them scattered by coyotes and lying in broad scabby swatches of riverbank called slickens, dead zones where flood-borne mine tailings from the old copper boomtown of Butte, upstream, have settled in deep drifts and choked the roots of the few silvery sun-bleached ghost willows still standing. Slicken soil is sulfurous gray and scummy, frosted with pimply eruptions of mineral salts—copper, arsenic, zinc, cadmium—that tinge the dead zone with rimes of green, blue and white. It’s not your typically scenic canoeing view. The salts leach out of the wet soil to coat the bones. I keep a cardboard box full of them in my garage, on a shelf where the dogs can’t reach them.

Page 14 October 6–October 13, 2011

Fork

Now that the Milltown Dam has been razed, Missoulians are turning their attention to plans for a new state park near the former reservoir. Meanwhile, the state of Montana and the Environmental Protection Agency will spend the next few years removing the slickens from “Reach A,” the 43-mile stretch of river from Warm Springs Pond to Garrison. Contractors will cut roads through mostly private ranchland to reach the river, divert its water into a ditch or pipe, then dig out the banks and bed to depths of five, 10 or 15 feet, and haul it away. They’ll regrade the banks with “donor soil” and route a new channel, using dirt wrapped in tubes made of coconut matting imported from Sri Lanka. Then the water will be steered back in. The green bones and the soils that stain them will be gone. Trout and golf balls will return.

by Brad Tyer

When I wasn’t paddling one Superfund site, I was walking another one, part of the same puzzle, about seven miles up Warm Springs Creek from the river, through a succession of former copper smelter sites studding the hills flanking Anaconda’s northern exposure. They’re gorgeous, especially in fall, when the slopes are painted with saffron outbursts of stunted aspen and streaked rusty red with relic brick. Across the valley to the south is the rise where the Anaconda Company’s last smelter, the Washoe, sat from 1919 to 1980. Its smokestack dusted the Deer Lodge Valley with tons of arsenic every day. There’s no hiking on that side, even though the site is technically


a state park. It was handed off to the state in 1986, when proud locals balked at plans to tear the 585and-a-half-foot-tall Washoe Stack down. Poisoned soils and the prospect of bricks falling from the sky create untenable liability. The public can stare at the eminence through a pole-mounted binocular a mile away, installed on a plaza modeling the stack’s massive footprint. When the EPA took me up the smelter hill on a media tour last year, we parked right under the stack. They made me wear a hardhat. Nobody explained how a hardhat was supposed to help if a brick fell 58 stories onto my head.

mind American landscapes, but the quote is usually misunderstood. Second acts aren’t synonymous with second chances. The second act—and Fitzgerald the screenwriter knew it—is the three-act play’s meaty, messy middle, where quests become complicated and outcomes tarred with doubt before resolution finally parts the clouds in Act III.

What Fitzgerald really meant, I bet, is that Americans have no patience for uncertainty and setback. Give us exciting incidents and cathartic climax. Hold the confusion. The Clark Fork—120 river miles from Butte to Missoula—is getting a do-over. It needs it. In the late 1800s, Butte boomed into the world’s largest copper camp just as Thomas Edison’s lightbulb was sparking the need for millions of miles of copper wire. Ten thousand miles of passageways were excavated underneath the city that

grew above them. Untold numbers of trees were chopped for mine timbers, and open-air ore-roasters and primitive smelters smothered the rest with airborne arsenic. Silver Bow Creek, feeding the Clark Fork, carried the brunt of it. Open-pit strip mining replaced underground hard-rock mining in the 1950s, and now Butte is famously home to the Berkeley Pit, a manmade sump for the 40 billion gallons of acid water that have poured out of all those miles of underground passages since the pumps that kept them dry were turned off in 1982. Looming over the pit are the Yankee Doodle Tailings, the biggest such dump anywhere in the world.

The English language loves a do-over: remediation, reclamation, restoration, redevelopment, redemption. F. Scott Fitzgerald is frequently quoted on the dearth of second acts in American life, never

r c

Ri ve t o o f k

r

Bl

a

Fl a t h e a d R i v e

Upper Clark Fork Watershed le

iver

i tt

C l a r k F o rk R

Bl a c k foot R i ve r

k

ee

k

o c k C ree

Flint Cree k

R

Bitterroot River

L

Wa r m S p r in g s C r

Warm Springs Ponds

S i l v e r B ow C r e e k Map by Jonathan Marquis

Missoula Independent

Page 15 October 6–October 13, 2011


Anaconda

Photo by Brad Tyer

In 1883, copper baron Marcus Daly founded the company town of Anaconda, 26 miles downstream on Warm Springs Creek, and built the world’s largest copper smelter there to treat the Butte ores. The smelter funneled its waste downhill into the wetlands where Mill Creek and Willow Creek seeped into the Clark Fork. The Anaconda Company was purchased by the Atlantic Richfield Company, ARCO, in 1977. Three years later Congress passed the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, aka Superfund. ARCO closed down Butte’s mines and the Anaconda smelter. The cost of business had gotten too high; besides, ARCO’s Chilean mines had become more profitable producers. British Petroleum absorbed ARCO in 2000. BP-ARCO foots the Clark Fork cleanup bill today. Arsenic was first found seeping into downstream wells in 1981, unleashing a rash of Superfund designations cascading upstream toward their source. The river has been a work in progress ever since. A quarter century in, much has been rebuilt. Most of the tributary Silver Bow Creek, spilling off the Continental Divide through Butte, has been dug up and replaced like a faulty sewer line. Missoula, the downstream terminus of the Superfund complex, is getting a do-over, too. The main restoration issue on the Clark Fork over the past few years has been the dismantling of Milltown Dam, just upstream of Missoula, and remediation of the 180-acre reservoir that had puddled behind it. Its bottom held a hundred years of mine waste washed downstream in floods and high water. The weight of the lake drove toxins into the aquifer, and from there into the wells. Three million tons of the poisoned sediments were dug up and loaded onto trains that ran seven days a week, from October 2007 to September 2009, upstream to Opportunity. Milltown’s arsenic plume is supposed to disperse within a decade or so. Above the plume, contractors have sculpted a new floodplain with Caterpillars and anchored rootballs along the bends and planted the banks in willow. The temporary channel that held the river while they worked is being filled in. Opportunity is not getting a do-over. For 70 years, Anaconda’s smelters sluiced their tailings into Opportunity’s wetlands. Now that the river is being cleaned up, contaminants from Silver Bow Creek and Milltown Reservoir have been shipped there. Starting this year, the slickens of the Clark Fork’s mainstem will be dumped there, too. Comprehensive cost estimates for the river’s restoration amount to $1.3 billion—a dollar for every man, woman and child in China. Opportunity is getting 0.1 percent of that, $1.3 million, for a park. Opportunity can’t get out of Act II.

Missoula Independent

On Dec. 16 last year, I was one of a couple hundred history-curious Missoulians who walked out onto a snow-covered bluff above the old Milltown Dam abutment to see something you almost never get to see: a river tangibly restored. Below us, the Clark Fork began to spill down its

rary bypass, the restoring confluence was just a trickle you could step across—not that anyone was allowed down there to do that. By the end of the day, it had washed out its mouth and was flowing full-bore in its new custom-made bed. Now it’s a river. Parks are planned, and the banks have been planted, but the confluence won’t be open to through-canoeists for another couple of years. Two days before this, I’d gone to Anaconda for a town hall meeting with the EPA. It was 20

Photo by Chad Harder

“Slickens”–areas poisoned by mining waste– near Galen.

reconstructed streambed, joining the alsoundammed Blackfoot River in free flow for the first time since the dam was built in 1908. We took pictures, though the visuals weren’t dramatic. A biblical wall of water crashing down the valley would have looked much cooler. At first, as earthmovers upstream breached the embankment that kept the river in its tempo-

Page 16 October 6–October 13, 2011

degrees and blowing snow that night, and I was one of about 30 people sitting on benches in the main courtroom of the county courthouse. EPA’s Charlie Coleman was there, along with a representative of the Clark Fork River Technical Assistance Committee. ARCO was not. The update concerned the Opportunity Ponds, a seven-square-mile hump of mine tailings and

smelter waste at its namesake community’s doorstep. The first speaker, consultant Gunnar Emilsson, referred repeatedly to “the Opportunity Ponds,” until a man in back raised his hand and asked if Emilsson was aware that the name of the site had been changed. Some Opportunity residents would just as soon disclaim naming rights to the poisoned perpetuity next door. They had successfully petitioned to change the site’s name to better reflect its management and function. It was one of Opportunity’s few victories. Emilsson didn’t know what the man was talking about. “What’s it called now?” “BP-ARCO Waste Repository.” “OK,” Emilsson said. “Well, the site’s official name is Opportunity Ponds, as reflected in the Record of Decision”—the EPA’s guiding document for site management—”but you can call it whatever you want.” Emilsson stumbled over the new name two or three times and then reverted to “Opportunity Ponds.” Everybody does, even the Missoula newspapers. I do, too. The landscape has already been stripped of integrity and life. I don’t want to see it lose what’s left of its poetry as well. BP-ARCO had been faced with two concurrently pressing problems. First, the company needed someplace to remove the Milltown sediment to. And upstream at Opportunity, it needed topsoil to spread across thousands of acres of dust-whipped tailings ponds. ARCO proposed that the Milltown sediments, dried out and perhaps tilled with lime or manure, might work to cap at least part of the ponds with vegetative, soil-holding growth, solving both problems. The bad news, formally admitted at the Anaconda town-hall meeting, is that it didn’t work. The Milltown waste was carefully shipped and prepped and spread and planted on a portion of Opportunity’s ponds, but nothing would grow on it. We saw slides of shriveled roots. Opportunity never wanted the Milltown waste in the first place. When the Milltown dam came down and the trains started rumbling the dredge toward Opportunity, resident Connie Daniels told reporters, “This is a good thing, but some are paying the costs. We’re sacrificing for everyone else.” Opportunity had been assured that the toxic sediments were nothing to worry about. It had repeatedly been reported that the Milltown sediments—a tiny fraction of the waste that had already transformed Opportunity’s ponds into low plateaus—were in any case less toxic than what was already there.


Opportunity

That also turned out to be false. Dennis Neuman, a Bozeman-based reclamation specialist and EPA adviser, informed the crowd that contrary to projections, tests showed that the new cap of Milltown dirt is up to five times more toxic than the toxic dirt it covers. And since the entire purpose of the project was to keep unsecured toxic dust from flying across the community’s windowsills, importing the Milltown sediments had only made the problem worse. A woman up front raised her hand and said, “Everybody here is feeling really betrayed. You guys have had information that we didn’t have.” Opportunity’s residents seemed to have a hard time grasping the full blatancy of what they had just been told. One man at the meeting insisted that the Milltown waste be “sent back to Missoula” since it hadn’t worked as advertised. Another asked, “Any more secret stuff we ought to know about?” The crowd laughed. Coleman, the EPA’s well-liked and much-abused spokesman for the Opportunity situation, said, “We are learning new stuff all the time.” It’s a fact worth noting, though I’d never heard it mentioned before that meeting, that the Milltown sediments were never studied for their suitability as topsoil in Opportunity. Why wouldn’t you study that? Because it didn’t matter. The Milltown sediments weren’t imported to Opportunity to cap the ponds. The Milltown sediments were imported because ARCO needed someplace to dump

Photo by Brad Tyer

them. If they somehow worked as soil, too, that’d be two birds killed with one stone and topped with cream gravy as far as ARCO was concerned. Otherwise, well, the waste had to go somewhere. Waste always does. EPA exercises approval and oversight of ARCO’s remediation responsibility. At that Dec. 14 meeting, EPA said ARCO had until spring to come up with a viable plan for providing 6 to 18 inches of functional, growable soil on top of Opportunity’s Milltown mess. Come May, EPA extended the deadline. ARCO’s dilemma, EPA had been persuaded, is the kind of thing that requires further study.

I met George Niland at the 24-hour Copper Bowl Cafe and Lanes in Anaconda. That’s about five miles up the road from Opportunity, past the mile-and-a-half-long flat-topped pyramid of the Anaconda Tailings Pond and the half-mile-long, 25-million-ton black slag heap and the decommissioned stack that loom over this stretch of Montana Scenic Route 1. There’s no commercial establishment in Opportunity where we could meet. Niland looked a little like an inland pirate, with his ragged Fu Manchu mustache and green Carhartt overshirt, a camo-patterned doo-rag clinging to his head. He looked at me over rec-

tangular-framed glasses and refrained from smoking and drank cup after cup of black coffee for two hours while we talked. I tried to match him cup for cup. When we parted company, I was shaking. He was born in Anaconda’s hospital and raised in Opportunity, in the house on two acres that his mother, 81 and healthy when he and I spoke, purchased in the early 1950s for $2,000. As a younger man, he worked on the railroad and as a guard at the Anaconda smelter. Now he’s on disability and repairs computers as a hobby. He’s got three children and six grandchildren scattered in Great Falls, Anaconda and Bozeman. A brother-in-law works for Jordan Contracting in Anaconda, driving trucks across the ponds. Niland says he’d leave Opportunity if it weren’t for his mother, but she’s not going anywhere. He attended school through sixth grade in the whitewashed Beaver Dam schoolhouse the Anaconda Company built for the community in 1914. The school was closed, on the heels of the smelter, in 1981. Niland wants to see it restored, maybe used as an interpretive center, but the county says it’s too full of asbestos to save. It’s going to be mothballed as the centerpiece of a small park—the $1.3 million bone Opportunity managed to beg from federal money pumped into the redevelopment kitty by Montana Sen. Max Baucus. Niland remembers that when he was growing up, the Clark Fork ran either tobacco-colored

Missoula Independent

or green from the mine tailings flushing out of the concentrator upstream at Butte. He called it Shit Creek. Neighbor kids played King of the Hill on the slag pile at the end of Stewart Street—the same slag used as de-icer on Opportunity’s winter streets. Two of his sisters died of cancer. Two of his mom’s dogs died of cancer. He says he could name 15 neighbors in Opportunity who have died of cancer. Seven years ago, Niland was diagnosed with a cancerous tumor on his spine. The doctors who removed it gave him a 70 percent chance of emerging a quadriplegic. He beat those odds. It’s pointless to try to quantify direct health effects. At least that’s what everyone seems to have concluded, since no comprehensive health survey has been done. A decade ago, when Niland and a few others were starting to make noise about Opportunity’s dilemma, activist Lois Gibbs—the woman who blew the whistle on New York state’s Love Canal and helped usher in the Superfund era—came to meet with the group. She told them not to bother trying to prove they were dying. There are too many environmental factors at play in an open valley over the course of a hundred years to ever sort them all out to a defense team’s satisfaction. It’s incredibly hard to prove you weren’t going to die anyway. The EPA’s standard for earthbound arsenic in Opportunity is 250 parts per million. According to Niland, EPA tests of his yard came back at 167

Page 17 October 6–October 13, 2011


Slickens are still common along the upper Clark Fork River.

ppm. Niland doesn’t trust the results. He says the EPA tests by taking multiple 3-inch surface samples, mixing them, and then testing the mix. If the EPA took four samples, and three tested at 50 ppm arsenic, and the fourth, from a hot spot, tested 500 ppm, he’d get a result much like the one EPA gave him. The EPA says the arsenic plume beneath Opportunity’s 5,000-acre tailings ponds—50-foot mounds of heavy metal dust sitting atop former wetlands at a creek-threaded headwater—just happens to be migrating away from the river, and from Opportunity’s wells. The EPA also said grass would grow on the Milltown sludge. Niland is into hot rods, hunting and racy humor, and he has a habit of asking inconvenient questions. Why was the downstream Superfund stretch cleaned up before the upstream work? Why concentrate all the waste in Opportunity, so close to the headwaters? Why, when the Beaver Dam school property in the center of the community was recently found to require soil replacement, are the Opportunity yards surrounding it considered safe? I ask him an inconvenient question of my own: So what should be done? Niland says that if he was in charge, he’d make ARCO buy Opportunity out, like it did in the 1980s with the smeltercentric community of Mill Creek, just across Scenic Highway 1. But Opportunity lacks ammunition. The Opportunity Citizens Protection Association, an organization Niland helped found to watchdog ARCO and the EPA, is idled now. People stopped showing up to OCPA’s annual “Opportunity Days” picnic, so OCPA stopped hosting it. The group has dwindled from seven

Missoula Independent

official members to four, and Niland has lost friends over his advocacy. They said he was dragging property values down. “We got tired,” Niland told me. “We don’t know what to do next.”

Opportunity isn’t much to look at, and it’s hard to see from the roads that bind it. Interstate 90 and state highways 1 and 48 enclose a triangle. The northern expanse is, from any distance,

Photo by Brad Tyer

filled with storage sheds for rent. There’s a little grocery dating from the ’40s at Stewart Street and South Hauser, catty-corner from the seldom-used white-clapboard community center. Some folks keep horses and others graze cattle. Most are at least semi-retired. It is by all appearances an unremarkable small Montana town. The remarkable thing about Opportunity, the thing I can’t get over—aside from the name, and there are hundreds of fading villages in the West saddled with equally cheap irony—is that even though what’s going on here is clearly not right, I can’t figure out what else should be done.

Photo by Brad Tyer

a featureless plain; the Google Earth view reveals a pale 5,000-acre crust of tailings. The triangle’s southeastern corner is Opportunity, a single thoroughfare and three cross-streets lined with modest homes built in the 19-teens and ’50s. Opportunity’s yards are green, and several are

Page 18 October 6–October 13, 2011

Environmental justice is the idea that no community, however economically disenfranchised or racially marginalized, should be subject to a disproportionate burden of the environmental costs of wealth and its wastes. In 1994, President Bill Clinton signed an executive order

that embedded environmental justice in federal decision-making. You might think that would mean that the EPA, perhaps the federal agency most directly involved in environmental hazard management, wouldn’t approve a plan that singled out one staggering community as a restoration project’s dumpsite of choice. You might figure that if specific communities aren’t to be unfairly burdened, then other communities will have to share the burden. By that measure, maybe the college town of Missoula, with its restored confluence and engineered whitewater play wave under downtown’s Higgins Avenue bridge, should carry some of the cleanup’s load. And in fact that was the EPA’s initial recommendation in 2003: to store the Milltown wastes at a site called Bandmann Flats, just downstream of the dam, in East Missoula. But public comment from Missoulians was almost unanimously opposed. In response, in 2004, EPA changed course to enact the Opportunity solution. Bandmann Flats is now a golf-course community called Canyon River. Joel Chavez, with the Montana Department of Environmental Quality, the state’s man in charge of rebuilding the Clark Fork, told an audience last March that it’s just good sense to “keep all the rats in one trap.” As unsatisfying an answer as this is, I’m not prepared to say he’s wrong. Waste has to go somewhere, and Opportunity is already buried. It’s hard to see what would be gained by sending it somewhere else and ruining that place, too. Would Opportunity be better off if two and a half million cubic yards of toxic sludge had been dumped closer to Missoula? Would Missoula be better off? But keeping all the rats in one trap is the very definition of disproportionate burden. Opportunity got dumped on because it’s disproportionately burdened. And here’s an ugly rub: Opportunity was born to die. In the early 1900s, farmers and ranchers in the encompassing Deer Lodge valley sued the Anaconda Mining Company for causing the shriveled crops and dead livestock in their fields, felled—the farmers believed—by arsenic poisoning. They were joined by the administration of Theodore Roosevelt, whose federal timber was dying in swaths downwind of the smelter stack. In 1904, with the Anaconda smelters producing 20 percent of the nation’s copper, the farmers filed suit. The Anaconda Company stalled its way past Roosevelt and bought out the farmers—they’d been mocked in company-owned newspapers as “smoke farmers”—to insulate itself from liability. In 1914, the company drained part of that land and carved it into 5- and 10-acre plots and sold them off to smelter workers. Opportunity was advertised as a “garden community” where citizens tired of the industrial bustle of Anaconda could retire in peace. Terms were good, and the company promised that if the man of the house died in the middle of his mortgage, the company would forgive the loan and give title to the widow. The Butte Miner praised Opportunity as “one of the most successful welfare systems ever


introduced by a big industrial company,” and declared that the area was “destined to become an important dairy and stock section.” By 1914, the Anaconda smelter had already been pouring its poison down Opportunity’s drain for four years. It’s unlikely any early Opportunarians thought they were buying into a Garden of Eden. It’s too easy to blame a mining company now three decades dead. It’s too easy to blame the faceless oil company that inherited the mess and wants to keep its costs down. The cell phone on which I made my appointment with George Niland runs on copper. Fifty pounds of copper power the truck in which I drive my canoe to the poison banks of the Clark Fork. I like electric lights, and I’m exceedingly fond of refrigeration and hot water. Just try and take it away from me. Just try and deny it to China and India, where copper-fueled industrialization is ramping up to surpass the scale that denatured the Clark Fork and required the sacrifice of Opportunity.

Earlier this year, I got the chance to teach writing to high school kids in rural Oregon for a couple of months. During show-and-tell one day, I told them the story of Opportunity and showed them some slides. I asked them to write a persuasive essay about what they would do with a landscape-sized mess they suddenly had to get rid of. A notable minority, exhibiting a flair for final solutions and enviable disregard for the price of rocket fuel, suggested shooting it into space. The impulse to just make it go away is ingrained, but the Opportunity Ponds aren’t going anywhere. It would cost too many billions of dollars to move the tailings, and even if the money were there, where would you put them? What would you sacrifice instead? This spring, I moved downstream to Bonner, across the Blackfoot from the now-defunct timber mill once powered by the now-removed dam, just downstream from where the reservoir used to be. I’ve spent my mornings walking up the Blackfoot, watching construction crews on the other side of the river dig out a PCB-laden pond on the mill property. By the time I got here, they’d already removed a low-head log-ponding dam and re-contoured the riverbank under an expansive slope of blond seed mat. I hadn’t been here long when the water started rising. Removing the dams lowered the water level, exposing thousands of long-drowned logs lodged in the Blackfoot’s bed. Then a heavy snowpack melted off the mountains and pushed the river past flood stage, flushing out the logs. The brown water raced downstream, roiled under the Interstate 90 bridge to pile into the Clark Fork, and legged west toward Missoula. The Clark Fork is named for William Clark, of Lewis and, but another William Clark—William Andrews Clark—put a more permanent stamp on it. In 1908, W. A. Clark built the dam in Milltown to power his Bonner mill. And in 1908, another

Photo by Chad Harder

heavy snowpack pelted with spring rain sent a 100-year flood raging down the Clark Fork, scouring the floodplain and taking out bridges in downtown Missoula. It was that flood, more than any high water that followed over the next century, that blew Butte’s slag piles and tailings heaps downstream, where they settled out on the reservoir floor behind the then-new dam. Those were the sediments that eventually seeped into the aquifer, poisoning wells and sparking the Superfund designation that finally led to the dam’s removal in 2008 and the restoration work that continues today. Those are the sediments that now top Opportunity’s ponds. Aside from an ornate Butte mansion now operating as a B&B, Clark’s physical legacy in Montana disappeared with the dam. His copper profits—he was raking in an estimated $12 million a year in his early-20th century heyday—left the state to build an opulent Manhattan palace and an art collection now housed in the Clark Wing of the Corcoran Gallery in Washington, D.C. Just a few months ago, less than a year after the Clark Fork flowed freely for the first time since he’d stoppered it, Clark’s youngest daughter died. Huguette Clark was 104 when she passed away in a New York hospital on May 24. She’d come into the world a year before her daddy’s dam was built, and she’d outlasted it by three. She hadn’t been photographed in 80 years, and spent the last two decades of her life behind a thick blanket of privacy, collecting fine French dolls and cared for by nurses in an anonymous hospital room while multimillion-dollar mansions in California, Connecti-cut and New York sat empty. She left a fortune, primed for a squabble, estimated at half a billion dollars. Huguette’s hermitude was breached last year when Bill Dedman, an investigative

reporter at MSNBC, published a series of articles exploring her family history and raising questions about the lawyers who represented her finances and shielded her from family and strangers alike. The article briefly resuscitated the story of William A. Clark, once toe-to-toe with John D. Rockefeller as the richest man in

ly presumed an act of arson intended to make way for the encroaching Berkeley Pit strip mine of Clark’s corporate successors, the Anaconda Company. A newspaper article quoted the kids’ teacher saying they wouldn’t let Huguette’s demise stop them. They’d send their letters to the lawyers.

Photo by Brad Tyer

America, but long since forgotten outside Montana. When Huguette involuntarily re-emerged, Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer wrote her a letter, asking her to steer some of her fortune back to Montana, the source of so much of it. He never got a reply. The day before Huguette died, it turned out, Butte schoolchildren had started their own letterwriting campaign. They want a slice of the family fortune to rebuild Columbia Gardens, a Butte amusement park built by William A. in 1899 that burned to the ground in 1973 in what was wide-

Missoula Independent

One wishes them luck without holding out much hope. As the citizens of Opportunity know better than most, you don’t get anything—not a restored river, not one red cent—for free. bradtyer@gmail.com This story originally appeared in High Country News. It was made possible with support from the Kenney Brothers Foundation. Former Independent editor Brad Tyer’s first book, Opportunity, Montana, will be published by Beacon Press in spring 2013.

Page 19 October 6–October 13, 2011


dish

the

The telltale fartychoke FLASHINTHEPAN

Missoula's Original Bright Idea For Breakfast & Lunch www.thinkfft.com Sun-Thurs 7am - 3pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 3pm Sun 8am - 3pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

Many relationship-type activities are conducted in private, with good reason. The world doesn’t need to see you chasing each other around the kitchen with frying pans, or the details of how you make up. But during a particularly volatile phase of my wooing of Shorty, our privacy was invaded by three Jerusalem artichoke plants. They proceeded to broadcast our secrets to the whole neighborhood. To anybody who’s grown Jerusalem artichokes, aka sunchokes, it will come as no surprise that they intruded on our relationship: it’s one of the most invasive crops you could ever plant. You only have to plant sunchokes once, and if you change your mind it takes considerable effort to remove them. That’s a good thing if you’re a sunchoke fan, but even their most fervent supporters recommend growing them in a separate, dedicated area, so they don’t take over your whole garden. The plant is a close relative of the sunflower, and it looks the part, though its flowers are smaller. Underground, sunchoke roots are crowded with tubers that taste something like a cross between a potato and a water chestnut, with a hint of sunflower aroma. The tubers can be habit-forming, especially if prepared correctly. But be warned, they’re often called Jerusalem “fartychokes.” And rightly so. Many people have a hard time digesting the carbohydrate inulin present in sunchokes, and this can cause intestinal bloating and flatulence. Some people are unaffected. Beano and similar products are said to help. To be safe, if you’ve never tried sunchokes, it’s best to introduce them to your diet slowly. And as with garlic and beans, it’s best if you and your sweetheart are on the same page. But flatulence, or intolerance thereof, played no part in my dating drama with Shorty. The drama started when a friend gave me a Jerusalem artichoke from his garden in Minnesota. I cut it into three pieces and planted them in my shallot patch. A few months later they were growing vigorously. Meanwhile, I had, like a moron, broken up with Shorty. Lucky for me I came to my senses and decided to give her another shot. She came over one day to help me weed the garden.

by ARI LeVAUX

Alas, bitter shadows descended upon our hearts toward summer’s end, and Shorty dumped me. I couldn’t help but notice the symmetry between the two hurting sunchokes and our two failed attempts at love. And it felt like the whole neighborhood could see it too. Without Shorty around I had plenty of time on my hands to ponder questions like, “Why are they called Jerusalem artichokes?” They aren’t artichokes, and they aren’t from Jerusalem. It turns out that explorer Samuel de Champlain first noticed them in a Native American garden on Cape Cod in 1605. Champlain took a liking to them, thought they tasted like artichokes, and sent some home to his native France, whence they eventually found their way to Italy. The Italian word for sunflower is girasole, which means “follows the sun.” Girasole sounds a lot like “Jerusalem.” One thing led to another, and the name stuck. Even after that extensive linguistic exploration, I still had time to kill, so I made sunchoke soup. To make four servings, scrub one pound of Jerusalem artichokes under cold water, Photo courtesy of Kok Robin slice them into 1/4-inch rounds, and toss Sunflowers grow like weeds in my garden. I have them in the juice of one lemon. Melt four tablea hard time pulling them because they’re so nice to spoons butter in a pan, add one chopped leek, one have around, but they create a lot of shade, repro- chopped shallot, one carrot sliced into 1/2-inch duce bountifully, and can quickly become a problem. rounds, and the sliced chokes and lemon juice. Cover Shorty thought she was doing a good thing by and cook over mellow heat for 20 minutes. Add three removing what she thought were sunflowers. But cups chicken or vegetable stock, 1 teaspoon salt, and knowing that didn’t take away the sting of losing two 1/4 teaspoon crushed black pepper. Cover and simmer until everything is soft. Puree everything to a of my three babies. Shorty felt bad for screwing up. I felt bad that smooth consistency, ideally with a submersible she felt bad. We both wanted to somehow undo what blender. Adjust the consistency with water, stir in 1/2 had been done. We replanted the sunchokes, tied cup (or more) heavy cream or mayo, and serve. I brought Shorty a bowl of sunchoke soup, and them to stakes, and every day for weeks I watered them. Soon, these two once-uprooted plants grew it brought a smile to her face, which brought a smile into a metaphor for our two tenuous attempts at to my face. I can’t say if it was the soup, but we decidlove, past and present. As the summer progressed, ed to give it one more try. But what about the two withered plants, you we kept our eyes on the plants, as if their ability to hang on and prosper would shed light on our future. ask, and their ominous forecast? I point silently to True to form, the uprooted chokes would not the third Jerusalem artichoke, the one Shorty didn’t croak. But neither did they thrive. Tiny leaves sprout- yank, the third strike we didn’t need. It grew almost ed from the naked stalks, where once robust leaves 10 feet tall. And like the tubers it left in my garden, to this day our love just won’t go away. had cast broad shadows. “You could weed the shallot patch,” I suggested, as I tackled the strawberries. It did not occur to me to ask her to spare the Jerusalem artichokes. I thought that was obvious. A few minutes later I wandered over to see how she was doing. She had already pulled two of my sunchokes and her hands were wrapped around the third. “No!” I pleaded. “Not the Jerusalem artichokes!” “I thought they were sunflowers,” she gasped.

LISTINGS

Missoula Independent

$…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over

sugar cookies. Chocolate Bats & Cats. And, Bernice’s staff carries on tradition by dressing up Halloween Day & walking in the Day of the Dead Parade! Come taste a bit of community in every bite! See you at Bernice’s in October. bernicesbakerymt.com.

Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway (across from courthouse) • 728-8900 Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$

Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$

Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 Fall is sneaking up on us all! And so is Halloween! Did you know Bernice’s sells Halloween sweet treats from October 21st thru November 2nd? Awesome frosted sugar cookies. Infamous Pumpkin Bread. Goblin cupcakes. Pumpkin frosting on pumpkin

Big Sky Drive In 1016 W. Broadway 549-5431 Big Sky Drive In opened June 2nd 1962. We feature soft serve ice cream, shakes, malts, spins, burger, hot dogs, pork chop sandwiches and breaded mushrooms all made to order. Enjoy our 23 shake and malt flavors or the orange twist

Page 20 October 6–October 13, 2011

ice cream. Drive thru or stay and enjoy your food in our outdoor seating area. Lunch and dinner, seven days a week. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Monday – Friday, 7:30 – 2. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. Blue Canyon Kitchen 3720 N. Reserve 541-BLUE (adjacent to the Hilton Garden Inn) www.bluecanyonrestaurant.com We offer creatively-prepared American cooking served in the comfortable elegance of their lodge restaurant featuring unique dining rooms. Kick back in the Tavern; relish the cowboy chic and culinary creations in the great room; visit with the chefs and dine in the kitchen or enjoy the fresh air on the Outdoor Patio. Parties and special events can be enjoyed in the Bison Room. Winter Hours: 4pm - 9 pm Seven Days a Week. $$-$$$


the The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins • 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to late. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 39 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks • 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am-2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm SunWed and 11am-10pm Thurs-Sat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$$ Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 Cold Stone Creamery offers the Ultimate Ice Cream Experience. Ice Cream, Ice Cream Cakes, Shakes, and Smoothies the Way You Want It. Come in for our weekday specials. Get Gift Cards any time. Remember, it's a great day for ice cream at Cold Stone Creamery. $-$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery service within a 3 mile radius. Family Dental Group Southgate Mall • 541-2886 What is 21st Century Dentistry? It is all about communication. Dentists now have digital x-rays and intra-

October

COFFEE SPECIAL

oral cameras that provide patients with virtually the same information the dentist has. Patients today are much more informed because they can see what their dentist sees. Once your dentist explains what you are looking at, your options make much more sense. Farm to Family 241-6689 Farm to Family MT is a local food delivery business in Missoula. Through convenient online ordering we bring you fresh, local and regional groceries right to your door. We offer community supported agriculture shares, local produce, Bernice's and Le Petite breads, Black coffee, Lifeline cheese, grass-fed beef and more. Deliveries occur on Wednesdays. Find out more: farmtofamilymt.com. Flathead Lake Brewing Company of Missoula 424 N. Higgins • 542-3847 www.flbcofmissoula.com Known for their “Bar Burgers” a masterpiece of deliciousness; Flathead Lake Brewing Co. of Missoula is unfiltered sophistication atop the skyline of Missoula Montana. Downtown or Uptown, any way you look at it, Flathead Lake Brewing Co. of Missoula is your best destination for great food, wine and spirits. Come on in and join us. We can't wait to see you. Cheers!!! $-$$ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and an espresso bar till close. WE DELIVER On Campus & to the area between Beckwith, Higgins & 5th Street. Open Mon.-Thur. 7am-8pm, Fri. & Sat. 7am-4pm and Sun. 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$

dish

HAPPIESTHOUR Jakers Bar and Grill Atmosphere: At first glance, Jakers comes off as more restaurant than bar. Booths outnumber stools. The menus have multiple pages. Heck, they have a hostess at the front door. But once you’re in the bar area, the place feels as cozy as any favored dive around town. Martini glasses hang from racks above the counter. There are flatscreen TVs for sports. You can get your Bayern Oktoberfest in a pint…or a stein. Whom you’re drinking with: Pretty much any collection of locals, from the early-20s set to folks fast approaching retirement. Later in the football season, when the Griz are playing plenty of away games, the maroon-and-white masses descend. Veteran waitress Kari Rainer—she’s been here almost four and a half years—says, “We get the crowd that knows we’ve got sports playing.” What you’re drinking: Don’t expect an atomic Bloody Mary or Caesar here. Rainer says their versions are less spicy than most, but still insanely popular. They also make a killer mojito. “I have a friend who moved to town and she was struggling to find a mojito she liked,” Rainer says. “I took her here and she said it was the best yet.” And don’t worry about finding your way home when you’ve had a few. Rainer says the place has called a few cabs in its day, so they’ve got your back.

Photo by Alex Sakariassen

Double your fun: If you can’t make the Jakers happy hour between 4 and 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, don’t sweat it. You get a second chance with their late night happy hour, 9 to 11 p.m. Monday through Wednesday and 9 p.m. to midnight Thursday through Saturday. Beers, house wines and well drinks are two for one, and they’ve got some mean food deals, too. Rainer says she sees lots of guys stopping in late at night for beers and an $8 wood fired pizza. Where to find it: Head southwest on Brooks Street toward the South Hills and follow the curve. Jaker’s is on your right at 3515 Brooks. —Alex Sakariassen Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, e-mail editor@missoulanews.com.

BUTTERFLY HERBS

COFFEES, TEAS AND THE UNUSUAL 232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

Guatemala Antigua Italian Roast

$10.95/lb. Missoula’s Best Coffee

BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

d o w n t o w n

Sushi Bar & Japanese Bistro

We have your Happiest Hours! Now, on Thursdays and Saturdays, join us from 7-9 PM for $2.50 Sake Bombs and Half Price Appetizers Join us for Monday $1 night and try our expanded Sushi menu!

403 North Higgins Ave • 406.549.7979

www.sushihanamissoula.com Missoula Independent

Page 21 October 6–October 13, 2011


Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. • 532-2056 Enjoy Happy Hour every afternoon from 4 to 7 pm on the Patio at Brooks and Browns. Microbrews or margaritas are $3.00 or enjoy a Micro pitcher with friends for $9.00. Our full menu runs the range from homemade Chips and Salsa up to a 16 oz. Ribeye steak with Bistro fries. You can bring your family, too. It’s a perfect spot to play Bocce or Croquet. Pastimes are family times, so enjoy time with yours in Bess Reed Park while we cook dinner for you. Brooks and Browns is the most peaceful patio in town. 200 S. Pattee Street, just off the Atrium at The Holiday Inn Downtown Missoula. Hunter Bay Coffee and Sandwich Bar First Interstate Center • 101 East Front St hunterbay.com • 800.805.2263 Missoula’s local roaster since 1991 - now open downtown in the First Interstate Center! Stop by for hand-crafted gourmet coffees and espressos plus madefrom-scratch, healthy sandwiches and soups. Enjoy the sunshine from our patio! Free Wi-Fi and Free Parking in the upper deck lot. Open Monday through Saturday. Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$

SATURDAYS $1 SUSHI 4pm-9pm Mondays & Thursdays - $1 SUSHI

Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$

(all day)

Tuesdays - LADIES' NIGHT Not available for To-Go orders

Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West • 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ The Mustard Seed Asian Café Southgate Mall • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our all-new bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our non-smoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, microbrews, fine wines & signature drinks. Takeout & delivery available. $$-$$$

Ask About Our Outside Catering Options!

Oil & Vinegar Southgate Mall • 549-7800 Mon.-Sat. 10:00 AM-9:00 PM Sun. 11:00 AM-6:00 PM. With a visit to Oil & Vinegar, you will discover an international selection of over 40 estate-produced oils & vinegars suspended in glass amphora-shaped containers on a dramatic backlit wall. Guests can sample the varieties and select from various shapes & sizes of bottles to have filled with an “on-tap” product of choice. Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. • 543-3188 Don’t feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paradise Falls 3621 Brooks St. • 728-3228 paradisefallsmissoula.com We’re the place for all things Griz! Tailgate with us and catch a ride to and from every home football game! Join us every Tuesday for the Coaches Show, broadcast live at 6pm. Chat with the coaches and have a pound and a pitcher for $12! $-$$

Beef & Wild Game Features At the Blue Canyon Kitchen and Tavern we are proud to feature a variety of exceptional and creative Beef and Wild Game Entrees in addition to our excellent American cuisine comfort food – made from scratch! The Home of Creative American Cooking RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED

( 2538 )

3720 NORTH RESERVE STREET MISSOULA, MONTANA 59808

www.BlueCanyonRestaurant.com

Just next door to the Hilton Garden Inn®

406.541.BLUE

Missoula Independent

Page 22 October 6–October 13, 2011

Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $8.50. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $7.75. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$. Pearl Café 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French specialties, bison, elk, trout, fresh fish daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Three course bistro menu with wine $30, Tues. Wed. Thurs. nights, November through March. Extensive wine list, 18 wines by the glass, local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the warm and inviting dining areas. Go to our website Pearlcafe.us to check out nightly specials and bistro menus, make reservations or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$

$…Under $5

Philly West 134 W. Broadway • 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday - Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. Pita Pit 130 North Higgins Avenue 541-PITA (7482) • pitapitusa.com Fresh Thinking Healthy Eating. Enjoy a pita rolled just for you. Hot meat and cool fresh veggies topped with your favorite sauce. Try our Chicken Caesar, Gyro, Philly Steak, Breakfast Pita, or Vegetarian Falafel to name just a few. For your convenience we are open until 3am 7 nights a week. Call if you need us to deliver! SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway • 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Sean Kelly’s Empire Grill 130 W. Pine St. • 542-1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for lunch & dinner. Featuring brunch Saturday & Sunday from 11-2pm. Serving international & Irish pub fare. Full bar, beer, wine, martinis. $-$$ Second Street Sushi 322 S. 2nd, Hamilton • 363-0600 JOIN US at Second Street Sushi, Sunday October 2nd for "A Taste of Europe", a 7-Course European Wine Pairing Event. (5 European wines will be featured.) 7 PM. $75 per person. Please call ahead for reservations. The Shack Restaurant & Catering 222 W. Main • 549-9903 Voted Best Breakfast in Missoula again and again, a Missoula favorite since 1949. Extended summer hours all day from the time the rooster crows til the cows come home. Tues.-Sun. 7am - 9pm, Mon. 7am-3pm. Fine wine & beer selection, weekly specials. Sidewalk dining in good weather. See our complete breakfast, lunch and dinner menu online at www.theshackcafe.com. NOT JUST SUSHI Sushi Hana Downtown offering a new idea for your dining experience. Meat, poultry, vegetables and grain are a large part of Japanese cuisine. We also love our fried comfort food too. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. Corner of Pine & Higgins. 549-7979. $$–$$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins • 327-8929 Stop in when you’re in the neighborhood. We'll do our best to treat you right. Home of the Famous Fish Taco. Crowned Missoulas best lunch for under $6. Mon-Sat. 11-10 Sun. 12-9. Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you'll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Drive 549-8703 • www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins • 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 14 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Sun Wed 8-3pm, Thurs - Sat 8-8pm $-$$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming • 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$ YoWaffle Yogurt 216 W. Main St. • 543-6072 (Between Thai Spicy and The Shack) www.yowaffle.com YoWaffle is a self-serve frozen yogurt and Belgian waffle eatery that offers 10 continuously changing flavors of yogurt, over 60 toppings, as well as gluten free cones and waffles, coffee and a selection of cold beverages. Build it your “weigh” at 42 cents per oz. for most items. Open 7 days a week. SunThurs 11 AM to 11 PM, Fri 11 AM to Midnight, Sat. 10 AM to Midnight. Free WiFi. Loyalty punch cards and gift cards available. UMONEY accepted. Like us on facebook.

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over


8

days a week

Arts & Entertainment listings October 6–October 13, 2011

THURSDAY October

06

The MiniNaturalists Pre-K program lets young people explore the world through hands-on activities, games and play in a natural setting, this and every Thu. through Sept. 29. Cost is $3/$1 for MNHC members. Learn more at MontanaNaturalist.org. Reading is fundamental at Montana Festival of the Book, which brings together the region’s finest writers to celebrate reading and writing. Events will take place Oct. 6–8 at various locations in Missoula. Check out humanitiesmontana.org. Talk transit with the Transportation Technical Advisory Committee, which meets the first Thu. of every month. Join them at 10 AM at the Missoula Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine. Learn about Southwest Asia while eating a sandwich you brought in a bag at the Brown Bag series, Noon to 1 PM in Stone Hall, Room 303 on the UM Campus, with Abdujabbor Shirinov’s talk, “Tajikistan in 20 Years: Challenges and Achievements.” Free.

Photo courtesy of Dillon Jenkins

Cigarettes and cash go so well together. Smoke up with Cold Hard Cash along with the Cigarette Girls Burlesque show, Sat., Oct. 8, at the Top Hat, starting 10 PM. $5.

nightlife Good eggs and Montana Writing Collaborative’s resident writers Caroline Patterson and David Allan Cates will give readings at Fact and Fiction as part of the Montana Festival of the Book. Plus, wine and cheese. 5 PM. Free.

Hang out with Tom Catmull and the Clerics and support Planned Parenthood of Montana all at once at their benefit dance, 6 PM, with food, auctions, dancing, door prizes and more, plus Stacey James, PPMT CEO as guest speaker. Tickets are $50/$20 students. 111 N. Higgins Ave.

All MAM members and donors are invited to a swanky, members only preview of Ansel Adams: A Legacy for MAM Supporters from 5–7 PM at 335 N. Pattee St. Look for your invitation in the mail. Registration required! missoulaartmuseum.org.

Chicago’s most vibrant musician could very well be Keith Scott, playing 6–8:30 PM at Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton. Free.

The Kelly’s have it when Kelly Apgar and Mary Kelley show their work during Artists on Site Night at the Gallerie at Piney Creek, 5–8 PM, 100 Central in Whitefish. Free.

Celebrate Dia da los Muertos, or “Day of the Dead” at Stumptown Art Studio during Thursday gallery nights, 6–9 PM at 145 Central Ave. in Whitefish. Free. Visit stumptownartstudio.org.

Take in some Native American Ledger Art during the Whitefish Gallery Night’s final First Thursday event of the season, 6–9 PM at the Walking Man Frame Shop & Gallery, 305 Baker Ave. in Whitefish. Free. Fight the power/give peace a chance at the Fall 2011 Peace & Justice Film Series, which brings you a new rabble rousing film every Thu. This week see Pax Americana and the Weaponization of Space in the Gallagher Building, Rm. 123, starting at 7 PM. Donation based and open to the public. end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Oct. 7, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Molly Llama c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

Nationwide Wireless Your locally owned and operated one-stop cellular store No Contract, No Credit Check Cell Phones

$2995 $4495

a month for 1200 min talk ’n’ text with 50 MB data a month for unlimited talk ’n’ text with 20 MB data

20% off accessories and chargers $5 off regular price activation 2704 Brooks Suite 1, behind the Dollar Tree on Kensington

Office 830-3394 • Mobile 552-5860 Missoula Independent

Page 23 October 6–October 13, 2011


The 6th Annual REEL ROCK FIlm Tour promises audiences a mind-blowing selection of climbing flicks, 7 PM at the Urey Lecture Hall on the UM Campus. Tickets are $10/$8 advance. Visit reelrocktour.com.

mences 9 PM at the Dark Horse, 1805 Regent St. Free.

Market and Café, 1221 Helen Ave. Free.

LoL at the Missoula Homegrown Stand Up Comedy Open Mic, 10 PM at Union Club. Get there by 9:30 PM if you want to sign up to perform. Free.

Leisure suit plus beer goggles not r e q u i r e d : Tr i v i a l B e e r s u i t , Missoula’s trivia night for the layperson begins with sign ups at 7:30 PM and trivia shortly thereafter at the Lucky Strike Bar & C a s i n o , 15 15 D e a r b o r n A v e . Includes prizes like a $50 bar tab, and trivia categories that change weekly. Free. E-mail Katie at kcgt27@gmail.com.

He’ll cure your tremors with a sweet shot of country: Russ Nasset hits up the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., for a solo set this and every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free.

The iconography of the West is always fun to dispute as is Ansel Adams’ legacy, so come hear what learned Adams scholars Dr. Kelly Dennis and Audrey Goodman have to say about it at the MAM, 335 N. Pattee St. 3:45–5 PM. Free.

A mesmerizing drama about compassion, exploitation, and redemption awaits you when UM presents The Elephant Man by Bernard Pomerance, Oct. 4–8 and Nov. 15 at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors & students. Visit umtheatredance.org. Good evening! Whitefish Theatre Co. presents the slapstick, Hitchcock spy spoof The 39 Steps, Oct. 6–8 and 14–15 at 7:30 PM, plus 4 PM shows on Oct. 9 and 16th. Tickets are $8 on Oct. 6 and otherwise $18 adults/$14 seniors/$8 students, all at the O’Shaughnessy Center, 1 Central Ave. in Whitefish. Call the boxoffice at 862-5371 or visit whitefishtheatreco.org.

Beer Drinker’s Profile Clayton

Strange, But So Familiar

Our armed men and women are multi-talented and eager to present, United States Air Force Concert and Singing Sergeants, 7:30 PM at the University Theatre on UM’s Campus. Free. Sure, Tamarack Brewing has been open since April, but whatever, they’re having their big Grand Opening party now, from 8 PM to question mark, with food, live music, a photo booth, door prizes and other things I’m sure. Let warm bread comfort your end of summer blues when Bernice’s Bakery hosts Blues and Bread, 8–10 PM, 190 S. Third St. W. with proceeds going to the Missoula Food Bank, featuring Mudslide Charley.

What brings you to the Iron Horse today? A two-day motorcycle road trip from Regina, SK. I looked into Missoula and the Iron Horse online. Google may have misled me on the mileage. But here I am. How do you like it so far? I love the history of mountain railroad towns. They're are all different but also similar. About the sandwich, I've been a chef for 15 years, and my sandwich was amazing! Beer Of Choice? Moose Drool, but I might try them all.

Enjoy NFL Sunday Ticket And Griz Games On TV With Us! Something New Is Always Happening At The Horse

501 N. Higgins • 728-8866

Missoula Independent

Par ty without future consequences at The Badlander during their Thursday night dance party, Prehab, with sets of hip hop and electronic music from local DJs Kris Moon, Vyces and Hotpantz, plus $1 wells and $1 Pabst from 9 PM to midnight, begining at 9 PM. $2. Only Reno, Nev. could produce outlaw country such as Hellbound Glory, with local artist Aran Buzzas, 9 PM at the Palace. $8. Where is Soul City, you ask? Don’t ask questions! Soul City Cowboys are playing 9 PM at Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St. Free. “Genie In a Bottle” fans need not apply. Rocking Karaoke com-

Page 24 October 6–October 13, 2011

Things have changed and so can you! Check out Dead Hipster Dance Party at Sean Kelly’s. Party starts at 10 PM, and oh lordy, there are $1 well drinks until midnight. $3. Check out deadhipster.com. They tried to make me go to Rehab, the southern rock, hip-hop and country group, 10 PM at the Top Hat, and I said, I don’t know, maybe. $18/$15 advance.

FRIDAY

07

October

Reading is fundamental at Montana Festival of the Book, which brings together the region’s finest writers to celebrate reading and writing. Events will take place Oct. 6–8 at various locations in Missoula. Check out humanitiesmontana.org. The MAM’s newest addition to its permanent collection, Self Taught and Art Brut, will be on display until March of 2012 and will feature the rejection of academic styles, folk art, you know, Outsider Art made by Steve Muhs, as well as local faves Elizabeth Dillbeck and Lew Foster. Free. Runners, walkers and strollers are all welcome at the 5k Run Through History through historic downtown Kalispell, beginning at 10 AM on 2nd St. E. next to the Museum at Central school. Visit downtownkalispell.com. The Ravalli County Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence will host the 14th annual Report to the Community luncheon, 12–1:30 PM at St. Francis Community Center, 401 S. Fifth St. in Hamilton. The event kicks off White Ribbon week, which was also a really good movie from 2010. Brown bag it at the YWCA of Missoula for a discussion called “Social Development and Aging: Sabbatical Insights in Bangladesh, Malaysia, Vietnam and Cambodia,” 12–1 PM, 1130 W. Broadway. Free. Call Michelle at 543-6691. Sadness meets whimsy in Emily Hall’s paintings, Expressions of Solitude, 3–5 PM at Buttercup

Buses and poetry go together like two things that don’t ordinarily go together but make a synthesis anyway, as is the spirit of poetry, 4:30–5:30 PM outside the Mountain Line Transit Center. And then I think they’re going to keep reading on the buses themselves. Not sure. Free. But really, what isn’t earth inspired? Head to the Montana Natural History Center for Earth Inspired Images from the Northern Rockies as part of First Friday, 4:30–6:30 PM, 120 Hickory St. MontanaNaturalist.org. Free.

nightlife Things aren’t always as they seem down at the MAM and Willem Volkersz’s sculpture, “Childhood (Lost),” is one of those things. I suspect the work made up of children’s playthings has little to do with happiness or the blessedness of innocence. 5–8 PM. Showing until Dec. 18th. Free. Fill that hole in your heart with magic when Estha McNevin and Raven Digitalis offer two days of classes in Spell Casting 101, Oct. 7–8, with Spell Casting 101 on Fri. at 7 PM, Part 2 on Sat. at 7 PM, and a class on history and application of the Thoth Tarot on Sat. at 3 PM. They’ll also be available for Tarot readings throughout the day, all at Between the Worlds, 205 Main St. in Hamilton. btwmt.com. Montana Museum of Arts & Culture invites you to look at art from 4–6 PM, as part of First Friday, in conjunction with the exhibition, War Torn: The Art of Ben Steele – Paintings and Drawings from the Bataan Death March. Visit umt.edu/montanamuseum. Free. Sandpiper Art Gallery in Polson presents Fins, Furs & Feathers, a selection of wide-ranging works celebrating the theme of fish, fishing, wildlife and birds, 306 Main St. 5–7 PM. Free. Join photographer Peter Tucker when he displays a series of stopaction moments captured around Missoula in Freeze Frame! (I added the !) 5–7:30 PM at Computer Central, 136 E. Broadway. Free. ccmissoula.com. The MAM hosts Ansel Adams: A Legacy, which features 130 Adams’ works looking all majestic and stuff, 335 N. Pattee. 5-8 PM. Free. Mary Byers of Hamilton re-thinks Barbie’s wardrobe in Forever


Barbie at the The Artists’ Shop, 5–8 PM, 304 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Listen up weasel slappers, Hawk and Animal invite you to the The Brink Gallery for Mary Ann Bonjorni’s exhibition, Road Warrior, 5–8 PM, 111 W. Front. Free. Monte Dolack Gallery will be exhibiting images from Rock Creek and other pretty Montana places, 139 W. Front. Free.

Words That Heal: A Poetry & Journaling Retreat with Joyce Hocker Poetry has long played a role in the process of human expression and healing. These words have the ability to touch our hearts and transform us!

Start your silent auction bid at the Dana Gallery’s First Friday exhibit featuring art by artists with Parkinson’s like Hadley Ferguson and Catherine Armsden from 5 to 8 PM. Free.

Friday, October 21, 7-9pm Saturday, October 22, 9am-5pm Sunday, October 23, 1-4pm

Murphy-Jubb Fine Art will show new watercolors by Kendahl Jan Jubb, with guitarist/vocalist Stan Anglen, 210 N. Higgins #300. 5–8 pm. Free. Sadness looks good in Emily Hall’s paintings, Expressions of Solitude, 3–5 PM at Buttercup Market and Café, 1221 Helen Ave. Free. Come early if you wanna see how Lavender Lori makes her legendarily likeable lavender oils (hint: steam distillation) at the Ceretana Studios, 801 Sherwood, 5–8 PM. Free. I love a parade as does the MAM, so much so it has decided to host a collection of parade-themed works created by local artists entitled, The Parade Route, through February 13th 2012. 335 N. Pattee St. 5–8 PM. Free. Betty’s Divine hosts Americana by L. Alexander Wolfe, a foray into the artist’s influences from the 80’s to today, 521 S. Higgins Ave. 5–8 PM. Free. Sometimes happy accidents are pretty darn sad, as in the case of Alva Gene Dexhimer, a Missourian who spent his adult life with major learning disabilities suffered after a tractor accident. He taught himself to draw, though, and his beautifully morose works are displayed at the MAM through Dec. 18th in the exhibition Missouri Maverick, 5–8 PM. 335 N. Pattee St. Free. Laura Blaker is breaking bones and on and on at her art exhibit Sticks & Stones, 5–8 PM at A & E Architects, 222 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Jeremiah Goldson will be showing his black and white illustrations of pretty and dangerous-looking ladies at Modwest, 110 Caras Dr. 5–8 PM. Free. Ray Chapman’s art shows you internal feelings with external gestures, 5–8 PM at the Missoula AIDS Council, 500 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 100. Free. Stop by Butterfly Herbs as part of First Friday and look at IMUR Recent Works, 5–8 PM, 232 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Look at Masks and Marbling: A Retroactive by Martha Elizabeth,

Retreat cost: $150 For more information or to register, please contact Kathy Mangan at 406-721-0033 or rwlcmt@gmail.com. For a complete listing of our classes, please visit www.redwillowlearning.org. Sliding scale fee available. Red Willow Learning Center, 825 West Kent Street, Missoula

Look how beautiful! Mary Byers of Hamilton re-thinks Barbie’s wardrobe in Forever Barbie at the The Artists’ Shop as part of First Friday, Oct. 7 from 5–8 PM, 304 N. Higgins Ave. Free.

5–8 PM at Noteworthy Paper and Press, 101 S. Higgins. Free.

Hawthorne. Show runs through Oct. 28. Free.

There’s a Farmers and Crafters Market in Stevensville for every time and season. Get your goods every Saturday morning from 9 AM–1 PM, First Fridays 5–9 PM, and Wednesday evenings, 4–7 PM.

Experience the work of artistic geniuses Claire Willis and Amanda Armstrong when they present Through a Glass Darkly: Behold the Observer, 5:30–9 PM at Western Montana Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 202. Free.

We are north of the Burrito Line, but fortunately Montana Art and Framing has Barbara Morrison’s mixed media extravaganza, Memento Mori, which uses Mexico’s Day of the Dead imagery. Also Christofer Autio presents, Life in Oaxaca, black and white photographs from Mexico and his video, Weavers of Oaxaca, 709 Ronan Street. 5–9 PM. Free. Vote on which straw man freaks you out the most at the 6th Annual Scarecrow Festival, 5–9 PM at River’s Mist Gallery of Fine Art, 317 Main St. in Stevensville. Dudes will remain on display through Oct. 15. Free. Here’s some eccentric art brought to you by eccentric people at the 4th Annual Missoula NOW Group Exhibition, with artists including, but not limited to Adelaide Every, Acton Douglas, Jonathan Marquis and Abe Coley, plus music from Bryan Ramirez, Shahs and still more, 5–9 PM at the Burns Street Studio, 1500 Buns St. Free. Take in some sweet, sweet jazz at Sweet Jazz for First Friday, 5:30–8 PM at Sotto Voice, 121 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Explore the relationship between material, object and environment at the gallery Function, Figuration, and Architectural Forms, with Martha Grover, Carla Potter and Eliza Au, 5:30 to 9 PM at the Clay Studio of Missoula, 1106A

Doubtless derived from the age-old “never pet a” wisdom, REI is bringing you the Burning Dog Festival, where sports fans will pray for snow and presumably do other things, 6 PM at Big Sky Brewery, 5417 Trumpeter Way. $10. I checked the hamper, the chaps aren’t there. But if you wanna keep searchin’ for ‘em head to L.A. Design and join Chick Lookin’ for Chaps, 337 E. Broadway. 6–8 PM. Free. Turns out there is in fact a Pastel Society of the Northern Rockies and they are having a group show at the Frame & Shop and Gallery from 6–8 PM as part of First Friday, 325 Main St. in Hamilton. Show runs through November. 363–6684. El 3-Oh! serves up gypsy jazz at the Ten Spoon Vineyard, 4175 Rattlesnake Dr., 6–8 PM. Free. Hang out with the work of guest artist Rich Adams at River’s Mist Gallery of Fine Art, 6–9 PM, 317 Main St. in Stevensville. Call 7770520. Free. Show runs through Nov. 1. Watch tough chicks in make-up smash out breast cancer at the Rack N’ Roll Hellgate Rollergirls breast cancer awareness double-header bout, 7 PM at Adams Center on UM’s campus, $10/$15 VIP trackside/10 and under free.

Missoula Independent

Page 25 October 6–October 13, 2011


Oooh, the Holy Ghost and others may make an appearance for Ghost Tours at the Conrad Mansion, where staff will tell stories while walking through dark halls with electric candles, 7–9:15 PM. Not for small children or the faint of heart. $8. 330 Woodland Ave. conradmansion.com. A mesmerizing drama about compassion, exploitation, and redemption awaits you when UM presents The Elephant Man by Bernard Pomerance, Oct. 4–8 and Nov. 15 at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors & students. Visit umtheatredance.org. Things will be getting quite cheeky down at The Roxy when double entendres, chicanery and folly rule the

screen during the National Theatre Live broadcast of One Man, Two Guvnors. What does that mean? An Italian play will be performed by British people performing in front of a British crowd and watched by you, an American, on a movie screen here in Missoula. Whoa, dude/chap. Adults $16, Seniors $14, Students, $11. Call 322-2589. Good evening! Whitefish Theatre Co. presents the slapstick, Hitchcock spy spoof The 39 Steps, Oct. 6–8 and 14–15 at 7:30 PM, plus 4 PM shows on Oct. 9 and 16th. Tickets are $8 on Oct. 6 and otherwise $18 adults/$14 seniors/$8 students, all at the O’Shaughnessy Center, 1 Central Ave. in Whitefish. Call the boxoffice at 8625371 or visit whitefishtheatreco.org.

I spy with my little eye that the play Something’s Afoot! will be performed at the Stevensville Playhouse for the first 3 weekends in October, Fri. and Sat. at 8 PM and Sun. at 2 PM. Call 777-2722. 319 Main St. in Stevensville. Leave your red wheelbarrow at the door for the Montana Festival of the Book Poetry Slam at the Top Hat, 8 PM. Free. You just can’t get ahold of western music greats Wylie & the Wild West. They’re performing at 8 PM at the University Theatre on the U M Campus, $18/$16 advance at all GrizTix locations, by calling 888-MONTANA or online at griztix.com.

One night in the zoo will shake Keith Scott’s blues, maybe, when he performs live music starting at 8 PM at the Flathead Lake Brewing Co., 424 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Get what all the buzz is about (sorry) at The Bee Play or Venn Diagrams, written by Kate Morris and directed by D. Marie Long, Sept. 30–Oct. 1 and Oct. 7–8 at 8 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $10/$8 students. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Fishbowl, fishbowl, but just one straw when the BassFace Krew presents Fishbowl Friday: The Disco Bloodbath Pre-Party, which featuresets of electronic music by locals Ebola Syndrome, 35th Octave and Tiger Lily, at 9PM. Free, with a $5 fishbowl drink special. Don’t worry about ketchup shooting out of ear holes when Aural fixation presents Dark Dreams: Hardcore Heresies, a collaborative dance party coinciding with The Disco Bloodbath Pre-Party that features heavy as hell dance music styles in the vein of hardstyle, UK hardcore, gabber, power noise and drum ’n bass. from local Djs BioWulf, asyn9, Gabber-tron and HauLi, at 9 PM. Free 21+/$5 ages 18–20. Get your fix of raucous, live and local music this and every Friday night at the Union Club, this week with Chele Bandulu, starting at 9:30 PM and always free. You’re in the hands of professionals when Party Trained plays 9:30 PM at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St. What’s he building in there? Bad Neighbor plays classic rock at the Dark Horse, 1805 Regent St. at 9:30 PM. I’ll tell you one thing. He’s not building a playhouse for the children... He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once

Missoula Independent

Page 26 October 6–October 13, 2011

they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. Leave the plow at home, Jesse, and let the Josh Farmer Band and plowmate Dj Logisticalone plant some jazz/pop/piano in your dirty old ears down at the Top Hat, 10:30 PM. $2.

SATURDAY

08

October

Reading is fundamental at Montana Festival of the Book, which brings together the region’s finest writers to celebrate reading and writing. Events will take place Oct. 6–8 at various locations in Missoula. Check out humanitiesmontana.org. Keep it local every Sat. from 8 AM–1 PM as you head down to the Clark Fork River Market (clarkforkrivermarket.com), which takes place beneath the Higgins Ave. bridge, and to the Missoula Farmers’ Market (missoulafarmersmarket.com), which opens at 8:30 at the north end of Higgins Avenue. If you’re after non-edibles, check out East Pine Street’s Missoula Saturday Market (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), which runs 9 AM–1 PM. Free to spectate, and often to sample. Help out the Elk population with a service outing sponsored by the Sawmill Gulch Restoration Project, which will meet at the main Rattlesnake Trailhead at 8:30 AM to remove barbed wire, clip and bag seed stalks and so much more I’m sure. Free. Call Bert at 542–7645. Pee yourself to a better self might be another name for Improvisation of the Spirit, a ladies-only improv workshop designed to build confidence and expand creative potential during


a weekend of shenanigans and jocularity at Chico Hot Springs. Lunch and a workbook are included for $255, lodging is not. katiegoodman.com I am told that “touch” is the primary verb for this weekend workshop, Intimate Porcelain: Fingertips to Form led by Carla Potter, 10 AM–5 PM, 1106A Hawthorne. $90/$80 for members. See also a bonus lecture on Oct. 9 at 11 AM, free. Visit over 14 art stuidos, galleries and museums in the Seeley Swan and Blackfoot Valleys as part of Tour Of the Arts 2011, Oct. 8–9 from 10 AM to 5 PM. Read all about it at alpineartisans.org or call 677–0717. Come find your own Great Pumpkin at the inaugural Pick Your Own Pumpkin Sale at the Milltown Garden Patch, proceeds will assist in preparing for the 2012 growing season, Columbia St. 10–5 PM.

Learn the fine art of making simple yet festive folded books at the Saturday Family Art Workshop at MAM (Missoula Art Museum) as part of the Festival of the Book, 11 AM–12:30 PM. All ages. $5. Register at missoulaartmuseum.org. The UM dancers want to give you a “rich and often interactive experience” at their show UM Dancers on Location: A Site Specific Dance Concert, Sat. and Sun., Oct. 8–9 at noon, in the Mansfield Library courtyard on the UM Campus. Free. See a talk led by one of my favorite local writers about one of my favorite girly historical figures in The Lost Journals of Sacajawea with Debra Magpie Earling and Peter Koch, 3 PM at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free. Dress in dapper tweed to support Missoula’s Spirit at Play early childhood program at the 2nd Annual Missoula Tweed Ride, which includes a bicycle carnival at 4 PM, followed by adult oriented music

5–7 PM, starting at Free Cycles, 732 South 1st St. W. $8/$15 for two/$20 three or more. Visit MissoulaTweedRide.org. (See Mountain High in this issue.)

nightlife Fill that hole in your heart with magic when Estha McNevin and Raven Digitalis offer two days of classes in Spell Casting 101, Oct. 7–8, with Spell Casting 101 on Fri. at 7 PM, Part 2 on Sat. at 7 PM, and a class on history and application of the Thoth Tarot on Sat. at 3 PM. They’ll also be available for Tarot readings throughout the day, all at Between the Worlds, 205 Main St. in Hamilton. btwmt.com. Do it The Girls Way at their inaugural Light the Path benefit, with Bellatrix, featuring sumptuous food, song, dance and circus tricks, 6 PM at the Missoula Winery, 5646 W. Harrier. Check out thegirlsway.org. Take in the tunes and the fall colors with 907 Britt and Richie Reinholdt at the Ten Spoon Vineyard, 4175 Rattlesnake Dr., 6–8 PM. Free.

SPOTLIGHT big buzz Venn Diagrams or The Bee Play would make a seriously great “Twilight Zone” episode—if the “Twilight Zone” were as smartly written as “Mad Men.” On the surface, it’s a story about a witty but insecure 30-something woman named Imogen who is looking for the perfect point of intersection between love, sex and satisfaction. She’s certain that raising bees will somehow fulfill her empty life. Even though she’s with Ben, a man who loves her, she has the distinct feeling that somewhere along the way she Photo by Steele Williams didn’t make the bold choices she Michael LaPointe and Martha Neslen star in Venn Diagram or should have. The Bee Play. Almost immediately the story takes a sci-fi turn when Imogen realizes she has the abil- humor and horrifying obsession. And it’s all done in a way ity to stop time by saying “stop” and start it by saying “go.” with which we can empathize. In the small, cool space of Not only that, but she can travel through time and change the DDC there’s no need for big theatrics, and director D. the course of her actions—including hooking up with her Marie Long has created a production where everyone crush, Thomas, played with enormous charm by Michael keeps it natural no matter how high emotions get. LaPointe. As you might guess from other time-travel stoLastly, but of most importance here, is local playries, all kinds of complications ensue. But they’re not the wright Kate Morris, who took several seemingly diskind you might think. The perils of other time-travel stories parate ideas and put them together in beautiful, funny are most often couched in physical logistics. Venn and mysterious ways. The dialogue is full of smart sideDiagrams, however, explores the psychological perils of bars on hipsters, crosswords and modern anxieties. At being able to redo your life again and again. Even if you one point when Ben kisses Imogen he says she tastes have power over space and time, do you know a mistake like “honey.” At the same time Imogen guesses what when you see it? The acting is amazing in each instance, he’s going to say and blurts out “mistakes.” This is the but Martha Neslen is especially noteworthy playing strange and heartrenching tone of the entire play. Imogen with a mix of sincerity and self-centeredness, I don’t want to give too much away, and the suspense of the storyline is important. But in the periphery you learn the science of queen bees. The low buzzing WHAT: Venn Diagrams or The Bee Play you hear throughout the play becomes a symbol for the WHERE: The Downtown Dance Collective low buzzing questions that eat away at the back of your mind: What paths could you have taken, however WHEN: Fri., Oct. 7, and Sat., Oct. 8, immoral, to make yourself happy? And when should you at 8 PM nightly just be happy with what you’ve got?

HOW MUCH: $10/$8 students

—Erika Fredrickson

Missoula Independent

Page 27 October 6–October 13, 2011


Missoula Independent

Page 28 October 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 13, 2011


Ohio rockers The Workers are putting in the time so you don’t have to, 6–8:30 PM at Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton. Free. An all night dance party for the ages awaits you at SHINE cubed to the power of 3 NRG is going down at Marshall Mountain with costumed characters, DJs, camping, multiple stages and “multiple dimensions of shining positive love vibrations.” Aw! Party goes 7 PM to 10 AM the next day, 5250 Marshall Canyon Rd. $10. A mesmerizing drama about compassion, exploitation, and redemption awaits you when UM presents The Elephant Man by Bernard Pomerance, Oct. 4–8 and Nov. 15 at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors & students. Visit umtheatredance.org. Good evening! Whitefish Theatre Co. presents the slapstick, Hitchcock spy spoof The 39 Steps, Oct. 6–8 and 14–15 at 7:30 PM, plus 4 PM shows on Oct. 9 and 16th. Tickets are $8 on Oct. 6 and otherwise $18 adults/$14 seniors/$8 students, all at the O’Shaughnessy Center, 1 Central Ave. in Whitefish. Call the boxoffice at 862-5371 or visit whitefishtheatreco.org. I spy with my little eye that the play Something’s Afoot! will be performed at the Stevensville Playhouse for the first 3 weekends in October, Fri. and Sat. at 8 PM and Sun. at 2 PM. Call 777-2722. 319 Main St. in Stevensville. Kris Moon and special guest Monty Carlo guarantees to keep you dancing to an assortment of hip hop, electronic and other bassheavy beats ‘til the bar closes during Absolutely at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. Swig drinks while listening to oldschool rock hits, ‘80s tunes or modern indie rock songs when Dead Hipster presents Takeover!, which features “drinkin’ music” DJ’d by the Dead Hipster DJs starting at 9 PM at the Central Bar & Grill, 143 W. Broadway St. Includes drink specials and photos with Abi Halland. Free.

Such bellicose band names! Big Sexy and the Mean Fingers, Toronto Rage and Hell and High Water are playing the Dark Horse, 1805 Regent St., starting 9 PM. Cover unknown. Fill your Saturday nights with live and local music, this week with Cash for Junkers, 9:30 PM at Union Club. Free. No execution jokes, you guys, seriously. Country Line is playing 9:30 PM at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St. The Saturday Night Shuffle concert series continues at 9:30 PM with a Rock Night at Sean Kelly’s, 130 W. Pine. $3 donation at the door. DJ Dubwise supplies dance tracks all night long so you can take advantage of Sexy Saturday and rub up against the gender of your choice at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. Mah gawd, Gorilla, it’s the ghost of Big John Cash and he’s performing with Cold Hard Cash at the Top Hat with Cigarette Girls Burlesque Show, 10 PM. $5.

SUNDAY

09

October

Locavores unite at the Target Range Community Farmers’ Market, which features a plethora of local foods and assorted goods and runs from 10 AM–1 PM every Sun. until Oct. 9 at the parking lot of Target Range School, 4095 South Ave. W. Free. Call Peggie at 728-5302. Look on the bright side and celebrate the closing of the Montana Arts Refuge at the Last Best Jazz Brunch Potluck Extravaganza, 11 AM–1 P M at the Basin

Community Hall in Basin. Bring a dish and hang out. Donations are welcome. Yet another opportunity to peruse and purchase local crafts and produce hits Missoula during the Carousel Sunday Market and Festival, which runs from 11 AM–3 PM this and every Sun. until Oct. 16 at the New Park parking lot, between A Carousel of Missoula and the Caras Park Pavilion. This week’s music is by Fiddlin’ Farmer John. Visit carrousel.com/carousel-sundaymarket-and-fes. The UM dancers want to give you a “rich and often interactive experience” at their show UM Dancers on Location: A Site Specific Dance Concert, Sat. and Sun., Oct. 8–9 at noon, in the Mansfield Library courtyard on the UM Campus. Free. Go with the jam when The Rocky Mountain Grange Hall, 1436 S. First St. south of Hamilton, hosts a weekly acoustic jam session for guitarists, mandolin players and others, from 2–4 PM. Free. Call Clem at 961-4949. We can do it! This and every Sun. through October, come to Ladies’ Night at Freecycles from 2–6 PM to learn to build and fix bikes plus hang out with other chicks, 732 S. First St. W. Poets, writers and dreamers, listen up: The Menagerie is a free critique group looking for new members. Experienced writers, both published and unpublished are invited to join them near the UM Campus, 2:30–5 PM. Contact Larry Godwin at 728-3573.

nightlife I spy with my little eye that the play Something’s Afoot! will be performed at the Stevensville Playhouse for the first 3 weekends in October, Fri. and Sat. at 8 PM and Sun. at 2 PM. Call 777-2722. 319 Main St. in Stevensville.

There are strange disturbances in the sanitorium since Count Dracula moved in next door . . .

Get out of Missoula for a second at the Lumberjack Saloon for a free night of music and dancing, this week with Blue Collar. Show starts at 9 PM, and there are cabins for rent and a shuttle bus available. Call 273-6264. Dig into a lyrical lunchbox when Keep Pushin Entertainment presents “The All or Nothing Album Release Tour,” a CD release show for Spokane hip hoppers Unique, which also features sets by Skeptical, Tonsofun, Supa Saa, b$, Gotcha Back Records, UTC, Semi Auto, and Kilo & Savage, with DJ Doc the Lion on the beats, starting at 9 PM. $5.

John L. Balderston By Hamilton Deane & Stoker ’s novel m Bra Based upon uel French, Inc. arrangement with Sam Produced by special

October 21–30 MCT CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

728-7529

www.mctinc.org

Sponsored in part by: Galusha, Higgins & Galusha • Payne Financial Group, Inc. MCT accommodates accessibility upon request. Some accommodations require advance notice.

Missoula Independent

Page 29 October 6–October 13, 2011


The School of

Journalism

at The University of Montana

“Election 2012: The View from 12 Americas” Visiting journalist Dante Chinni, author of "Our Patchwork Nation" and contributor to The Wall Street Journal and PBS NewsHour, will join political science professor Chris Muste and journalism professor Lee Banville for a panel discussion on the state of the electorate and the country leading up to the next election season.

Monday, October 10 • 7 p.m. Skaggs Building 117 • Open to the public

Good evening! Whitefish Theatre Co. presents the slapstick, Hitchcock spy spoof The 39 Steps, Oct. 6–8 and 14–15 at 7:30 PM, plus 4 PM shows on Oct. 9 and 16th. Tickets are $8 on Oct. 6 and otherwise $18 adults/$14 seniors/$8 students, all at the O’Shaughnessy Center, 1 Central Ave. in Whitefish. Call the boxoffice at 862-5371 or visit whitefishtheatreco.org.

Get some much needed spiritual guidance at Between the Worlds, 205 W. Main St. in Hamilton at their Spiritual Discussion Group, this Monday with Star Jamison. Call 363-2939 with questions.

Reading out loud is fundamental when the UM MFA students pair up with esteemed writers in the community for the Second Wind Reading Series, 5 PM at the Top Hat. This week features Jeff Whitney and Gary Thompson. Free.

I should make an allusion to the game Angry Birds here but I don’t know anything about it, so nevermind. Check out “How wind energy in Montana affects birds & other wildlife” as presented by the Five Valleys Audobon, 7:30 PM in room L14 of the Gallagher Business Bldg on the UM Campus.

Celebrate White Ribbon Week with SAFE by attending the Dancing for Dignity benefit at the Wild Mare Restaurant. Food, silent auction and music by Joan Zen, $15 adults / $10 kids 5–12, 283 Second St. Corvallis. Call 363-2793. Put some swing in your second Sunday when the Ed Norton Big Band plays the Missoula Winery from 6–8 PM, 5646 W. Harrier. $5. missoulawinery.com. One of the world’s greats brass ensembles, Foothills Brass Quintet are coming at you, 6:30 PM at Seeley Swan High School, 679 Locust Lane. $14/$12 seniors/kids are free. alpineartisans.org. or call 677-0717. See the moving picture about a photographer, Ansel Adams: A Documentary Film, 7–8:30 PM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins. $3 donation, please? Call 549–1142.

Have a drink and take a load off in the company of your fellow laborers during the Badlander’s Service Industry Night, which runs this and every Mon. and includes drink specials for service industry workers starting at 9 PM. Free. Also, if you have an iPod, bring it in and they’ll play it. Free. All you get is a miracle during another installment of Milkcrate Mondays with the Milkcrate Mechanic and Friends, which features TBA local Djs playing various styles of electronic music, at 9 PM, with free pool and $6 pitchers of PBR. Free.

TUESDAY

Hey dummy, get learned up on old-timey country and americana with Friend of the 7 Smart Fellers and Paul Lee Kupfer down at the Top Hat, 8 PM. Free.

nightlife

Jazz luminaries Squid Pro Quo plan to take you on a musical journey every other Sunday at the Badlander, starting at 9 PM and always free.

MONDAY October nightlife

10

Learn about the 12 different types of counties in this country and how they can win the coveted homecoming vote in a panel discussion presented by Christopher Muste, “Election 2012: The View from 12 Americas,” 7 PM in Skaggs Building Rm. 117 on the UM campus. Free. Monthly meeting of the Bonner Milltown Community Council, with topics including discussion of traffic routing/control options at First St. and Hwy 200, Bonner School Library. 7 PM.

Page 30 October 6–October 13, 2011

So you think you can fill in the blank? Prove it at Sean Kelly’s Open Mic Night this and every Monday at 8:30 PM. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM on Monday to sign up.

Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike. This week features the Trevor Riddle Experience, D.R. Trio and $4 martinis as always, beginning around 8 PM. Free.

You’re all gonna be hanged by the neck until dead when The Goddamn Gallows offers up a devilishly good mix of rock, Americana and psychobilly, at 9 PM. Port Orchard Wash.’s James Hunnicutt opens with a set of rock and roots music, along with hill country blues by locals Black Mountain Moan. $5.

Missoula Independent

Horns rule the night as part of the Faculty and Guest Artist Series, 7:30 PM at UM’s Music Recital Hall, which features Ian MacLean. Free. Visit umt.edu/music.

October

11

Let someone else do the dishes this and every week for the Tuesday Night “Early” Dinner at the Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St., 5:30 to 7 PM for $9 ($14.95 on the last Tues. of the month for prime rib). Membership not required. Call 54905423 by noon on Mon. to make reservations. Cancer, Courage and Creativity is an 8week workshop for men and women experiencing the effects of cancer, 5:30–7:30 PM this and every Thu. at the Living Art Studio, 725 W. Alder #17. Free. Call 549-5329. There’s a new sheriff in town, but he has no judicial authority, he just loves to rock. The Tuesday Night Open Mic/Jam Night is now at the Lucky strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave, hosted by Louie Bond, Teri Llovet and the UFOkies. Sign up is at 6 PM and music goes 7–10 PM. The Northern Rockies Rising Tide has weekly meetings this and every Tue. at at Freecycles, 732 S. First St. W. at 6:00 PM, where participants fight climate change through grassroots resistance. Throw your jazz hands in the air and join Chris Duparri and Ruthie Dada every Tuesday evening for a Jazz Martini Night, with $2 martinis at Brooks and Browns, 200 S. Pattee. Free. YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts YWCA Support Groups for women every Tue. from 6:30–8 PM. An American Indianled talking circle is also available, along with age-appropriate children’s groups. Free. Call 543-6691.


Sadness looks good on you. Check out Emily Hall’s paintings, Expressions of Solitude on Fri. Oct. 7, 3–5 PM at Buttercup Market and Café, 1221 Helen Ave. Free.

The film Sin By Silence is an emotionally packed documentary that examines the stories of women incarcerated for killing an abusive partner as part of White Ribbon Week, and you can catch a screening, 7 PM at the Bitterroot Pubilc LIbrary, 306 State St. in Hamilton. Visit SinBySilence.com.

PM at Flathead Lake Brewing Co., 424 N. Higgins Ave. Free.

Learn all about the horrible injustice of capital punishment and its unfair application when the Montana Innocence Project presents a free public talk by Kirk Bloodsworth, the first death row prisoner freed by DNA evidence, 7–8:30 PM at the UM School of Law, Room 101. Free. Call 243-6698.

Pushing the boundaries and checking definitions at the door is what the Badlander’s Live and Local Night is all about when it presents Great Falls-based singer/songwriter Joe Ryan, along with an opening set of comedy by Great Falls’ Krystine Wendt, with doors at 9 PM. Free.

I already used up my “Country Strong” joke earlier this month, so, you know, just go see Miranda Lambert play country, 7:30 PM at the Adams Center on the UM Campus. Tickets are $32.25–47.25 and are available online at griztix.com or by calling 888-MONTANA.

The name says it all. Rocking Country Karaoke, 9 PM at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St. Free.

“OMG, have you ever seen them live, though?” quoth my friend Josh, (paraphrased) regarding Battles, 7:30 PM at the Wilma. Tickets are available at Rockin Rudy’s, by calling 877.4.FLY.TIX and online at TicketFly.com. If you love cranky old people, you’ll love this McManus Comedies production, Poor Again...Dagnabbit! 7:30 PM at the Ronan Performing Arts Center, 200 Round Butte Rd. in Ronan. Tickets are $14/$12 in advance and available by calling 800-823-4386. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? What’s a gazetteer? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.) What’s eating Nick Gilbert? That’s a dumb joke. I’m sorry. See him play live, starting 8

All royalty gets irie during Royal Reggae Night, which features free pool plus reggae, dancehall and hip hop remixes spun by an array of DJs starting at 9 PM at the Palace. This week features DJs Supa J, General Smiley and Green. Free.

Technophobes take comfort at the E-Reader Workshop, 10–11:30 AM at the Bitterroot Public Library. Tracy Cook will present instruction on Sony E-Reader Touch, iRiver Nook Color, iPad and the Kindle. Brings yours along. Call 363-1670. 306 State St. Free.

WEDNESDAY October

12

Dust off somebody else’s old skis and other things at the Used Outdoor Gear Sale, where you can buy or sell outdoor equipment from 12–5 PM in the University Center Atrium. Bring stuff to sell 7 AM–11 AM. It’s a fundraiser for the UM Outdoor Program, yo.

nightlife Open the door, get on the floor, everybody head to the first floor atrium of the Clapp Building on the UM campus for National

Missoula Independent

Page 31 October 6–October 13, 2011


Fossil Day. Lectures, tours, food and beverage, kids activities and of course boom boom acka lacko boom boom, hosted by the UM Paleontology Center. 6 PM. Free.

Party without future consequences at the Badlander during their Thursday night dance party, Prehab, with sets of hip hop and electronic music from local DJs Kris Moon, Vyces and Hotpantz, plus $1 wells and $1 Pabst from 9 PM to midnight, begining at 9 PM. $2.

Create a portrait as unique as yourself at a free class, Mixed Media S e l f - Po r t r a i t u r e w i t h A n n a Lemnitzer, 6–8 PM for ages 13–18 at Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Visit missoulaartmuseum.org. Pub Trivia Answer: A gazetteer is a geographical dictionary or directory, an important reference for information about places and place names.

Dude, I don’t even know where I am right now. Here be the Blackout America Tour, featuring Rattlehead and Kaustik, 9 PM at the Dark Horse. 1805 Regent St. Cost? No spooky doughnuts but plenty of Voodoo Horseshoes down at Union Club, 9:30 PM. Free.

As part of White Ribbon Week there will be a community prayer and music service to shed light on the issue of domestic violence at the Hamilton Assembly of God Church, 601 West Main, Hamilton. Call Sonya at 363-2793. Cheers to learning how to speak eloquently in public and stuff! The Speechcraft program offered by Bitterroot Toastmasters Club offers 6-weeks of instruction every Wed., 6:30–8 PM, Oct. 5–Nov. 9 at Perkins Restaurant, 1285 N. First St. in Hamilton. $60 includes a workbook. Pizza and trivia go together like two things that don’t necessarily but could at Front Street Trivia Night. Note the move to Wednesday night, (because football) 7 PM at the Mackenzie River Pizza, 137 W. Front St. Free. Talk mountains at the Rocky Mountaineers Meeting with club member Alden Wright, who will present on living in New Zealand, 7 PM at the Trail Head, 221 E. Front St. rockymountaineers.com. Free. Better recognize, Ansel Adams’ contribution to the increased recognition of photography as a legit art form. Steven B. Jackson will lecture on the subject at the MAM, 7 PM. Free.

Nate Hegyi, lead singer/songwriter of Wartime Blues, keeps the folk and Americana flowing freely when he plays with a rotating cast of friends this and every other Thu. at the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., at 10 PM. Free. We can fly! See indie folksters Buster Blue along with Missoula favorites, The Boxcutters, Wed., Oct. 12 starting 10 PM at the Top Hat. $5.

the courage to sing the epically long, house favorite tune, “Total Eclipse of the Heart” and other fine staples during Kraptastic Karaoke at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. Just don’t speak in acronyms during WTF Wednesdays and Ladies’ Night at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, where drink specials mix with music by The Tallest DJ in America every Wed. starting at 9 PM at the bar. Free. Put on your trance pants and get groggy when the Palace hosts Progressive, a night of progressive house music and trance spun by local DJs starting at 9 PM, this week with DJs Dre, Jboogie and Coma. Free with 25 cent pint beers which go up 25 cents every half hour.

Your search for that high, lonesome sound ends now, because the Old Post hosts a Pickin’ Circle this and every Wed. at 9 PM. Free.

The music is coming from inside the machine when the Palace hosts Harvest Kitties, a night of various styles of electronic music with Metatron, Illegitimate Children, DubBudda and Soundsiva, 9 PM. Free.

Be sure you’ve downed enough pitchers of PBR in order to have

Moo-moo buckaroos, it’s indie-folkster Buster Blue and Missoula’s

rocking tunesters The Box Cutters at the Top Hat, 10 PM. $5.

THURSDAY

13

October nightlife

The Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St. in Hamilton, presents a Fellowship Club meeting featuring a talk on Catherine Ponder’s book, The Healing Secrets of the Ages, 6–7:30 PM in the west meeting room of the library. Free. Call 363-1670. A guitar and his man, John Floridas takes the stage, 6–8:30 PM at Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton. Free. The local Institute of Noetic Sciences (IONS) are meeting for a talk called, Nature Connection, Personal Wellbeing and Culture Repair, 7 PM at the Bohemian Grange, 125 Blanchard Lk. Rd. in Whitefish. Call 862–7711.

Fight the power/give peace a chance at the Fall 2011 Peace & Justice Film Series, which brings you a new rabble rousing film every Thu. This week see Mother: Caring for 7 Billion in the Gallagher Building, Rm. 123, starting at 7 PM. Donation based and open to the public. Hard to believe this is real, but it is. Three separate expeditions of the Orange River in Africa are channeled in this presentation by international adventure guide, Mandela van Eeden, 7–9 PM at McGill Hall, Rm. 210 on the UM Campus. Free. Leisure suit plus beer goggles not r e q u i r e d : Tr i v i a l B e e r s u i t , Missoula’s trivia night for the layperson begins with sign ups at 7:30 PM and trivia shortly thereafter at the Lucky Strike Bar & Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Includes prizes like a $50 bar tab, and trivia categories that change weekly. Free. E-mail Katie at kcgt27@gmail.com. Rhymesayers recording artists Grieves and Budo will be microphone checkin’ at the Top Hat, 8 PM. $14/$12 adv.

Things have changed and so can you! Check out Dead Hipster Dance Party at Sean Kelly’s. Party starts at 10 PM, and oh lordy, there are $1 well drinks until midnight. $3. Check out deadhipster.com. Bittersweet news, everyone! I, Molly Laich, aka Molly Llama, calendar girl, am leaving Missoula. I’m going to New Hampshire for the winter to write a novel and dream and stuff, and only God knows when I’ll be back. Jason McMackin, or Calamander (cutest name ever, right?) will be taking over. Please be patient and understanding with him as he makes this tough transition into the thankless world of keeping everyone informed and happy. Help him out by sending Jason your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Oct. 7 to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternatively, snail mail your events to Calamander c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax 543-4367. Find us also on twitter.com/#!/8DaysMissoula. Finally, you can submit things online in the arts section of our website. Scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says, “submit an event.”

Step up to the plate for conservation. You can support Five Valleys Land Trust through the UM Charitable Giving Campaign, the Combined Federal Campaign or through the Missoula County Public Schools Employee Giving Campaign. When you donate to Five Valleys or purchase a license plate you are helping to assure that our treasured open spaces and clean rivers are here for future generations to enjoy.

For more information, check out our website at

Missoula Independent

Page 32 October 6–October 13, 2011

fvlt.org


MOUNTAIN HIGH L eave the struggle buggy at home, guys and dolls, grab your bicycle and let your gams do the work at the 2nd Annual Tweed Ride and Bicycle Carnival. Lovers of the old-timey and cycling alike are bound to have a copasetic time when they don their glad rags for a three o’clock lolly around Missoula that is sure to be the cat’s meow. Riders can take two routes, a family-friendly two-miler and a four-mile adult ride. The ramble departs from Free Cycles and returns around five o’clock for food, a snort of giggle water, a fashion show, prizes for costumes and a hotsy-totsy evening of revelry (featuring music by The Steel Toe Flos, also Baby and Bukowski). Don’t forget the Bicycle Carnival taking place outside Free Cycles at 4 p.m., which features the painful-sounding, “Pin-the-seat-on-the-bike” and other games for the young and young-at-heart. The carnival is sure to be the bee’s knees. What’s the big

idea, you ask? The Tweed Ride is a fundraiser for Spirit at Play, an early childhood development program, as well as for Free Cycles’ youth education program. So you sheiks and shebas grab your knickerbockers, your newsy cap, perhaps a smart tweed skirt and a vest that shouts, “Darn tootin’ I’m not a wet blanket,” and show the palookas on the corner what being on the up and up is all about. The 2nd Annual Tweed Ride and Bicycle Carnival would love to see you dapper chaps and dandy lasses out for a worthy cause at 3 p.m. on Sat., Oct. 8. No worries if you don’t have a bike, Free Cycles, located at 732 S. 1st W., can loan you a snappy steed for your toot around town. Tickets are $8 per individual, $15 for two, or $20 per family and are available at Spirit at Play and Free Cycles. Get on the trolley Jack and check out missoulatweedride.org.

BARGAINS GALORE! Find stuff for that new apartment @

Times Run 10/7- 10/12

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater The Debt (R) Nightly at 9:00 7 & 9 on Sun (10/9), Mon (10/10), & Wed (10/12) Fri & Sat matinee at 3 Sarah's Key

Nightly at 7 The Whistleblower (R)

Sat. Oct. 8, 9-1:30 UM Parking Structure. 243-5874 for details. Or visit our website www.life.umt.edu/umadv

Nightly at 7 & 9 9 ONLY Sat 10/1, Sun 10/2, Tue 10/4 & Thur 10/6

www.thewilma.com

Beer & Wine AVAILABLE 131 S. Higgins Ave. Downtown Missoula 406-728-2521

Photo by Chad Harder

THURSDAY OCTOBER 6

SUNDAY OCTOBER 9

The MiniNaturalists Pre-K program lets young people explore the world through hands-on activities, games and play in a natural setting, this and every Thu. through Sept. 29. Cost is $3/$1 for MNHC members. Learn more at MontanaNaturalist.org.

We can do it! This and every Sun. through October, come to Ladies’ Night at Freecycles from 2–6 PM to learn to build and fix bikes plus hang out with other chicks, 732 S. First St. W.

FRIDAY OCTOBER 7 Runners, walkers and strollers are all welcome at the 5k Run Through History through historic downtown Kalispell, beginning at 10 AM on 2nd St. E. next to the Museum at Central school. Visit downtownkalispell.com. But really, what isn’t earth inspired? Head to the Montana Natural History Center for Earth Inspired Images from the Northern Rockies as part of First Friday, 4:30–6:30 PM, 120 Hickory St. MontanaNaturalist.org. Free. Doubtless derived from the age-old “never pet a” wisdom, REI is bringing you the Burning Dog Festival, where sports fans will pray for snow and presumably do other things, 6 PM at Big Sky Brewery, 5417 Trumpeter Way. $10.

SATURDAY OCTOBER 8 Help out the elk population with a service outing sponsored by the Sawmill Gulch Restoration Project, which will meet at the main Rattlesnake Trailhead at 8:30 AM to remove barbed wire, clip and bag seed stalks and so much more I’m sure. Free. Call Bert at 542–7645. Come find your own Great Pumpkin at the inaugural Pick Your Own Pumpkin Sale at the Milltown Garden Patch, proceeds will assist in preparing for the 2012 growing season, Columbia St. 10–5 PM. Dress in dapper tweed to support Missoula’s Spirit at Play early childhood program at the 2nd Annual Missoula Tweed Ride, which includes a bicycle carnival at 4 PM, followed by adult oriented music 5–7 PM, starting at Free Cycles, 732 South 1st St. W. $8/$15 for two/$20 three or more. Visit MissoulaTweedRide.org.

MONDAY OCTOBER 10 I should make an allusion to the game Angry Birds here but I don’t know anything about it, so nevermind. Check out “How wind energy in Montana affects birds & other wildlife” as presented by the Five Valleys Audubon, 7:30 PM in room L14 of the Gallagher Business Bldg on the UM Campus.

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 12 Dust off somebody else’s old skis and other things at the Used Outdoor Gear Sale, where you can buy or sell outdoor equipment from 12–5 PM in the University Center Atrium. Bring stuff to sell 7 AM–11 AM. It’s a fundraiser for the UM Outdoor Program, yo. Open the door, get on the floor, everybody head to the first floor atrium of the Clapp Building on the UM campus for National Fossil Day. Lectures, tours, food and beverage, kids activities and of course boom boom acka lacko boom boom, hosted by the UM Paleontology Center. 6 PM. Free. Talk mountains at the Rocky Mountaineers Meeting with club member Alden Wright, who will present on living in New Zealand, 7 PM at the Trail Head, 221 E. Front St. rockymountaineers.com. Free.

THURSDAY OCTOBER 13 The local Institute of Noetic Sciences (IONS) are meeting for a talk called, Nature Connection, Personal Wellbeing and Culture Repair, 7 PM at the Bohemian Grange, 125 Blanchard Lk. Rd. in Whitefish. Call 862–7711. calendar@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 33 October 6–October 13, 2011


scope

Memory lanes

Missoula Independent

Robin Troy’s “old-timer” bowling buddies inspire a new novel by Skylar Browning

Robin Troy was supposed to go find Jesus. Instead, “I found that they drink and date and dance more her first novel, Floating, published in 1998. “At the same she found Santa on a barstool—and the beginnings of than I do, and they stay up later than I do,” says Troy, now time, everyone in life is dealing with something. I think a novel. 37. “Talking to them was like talking to someone else my through their friendships they really did save and shape Recalling the story nearly eight years later, Troy can’t age at the time. They bucked any stereotype about what and brighten each other’s lives.” Troy first started to write Liberty Lanes in 2005, two help but laugh at the absurdity and dumb luck that came aging is.” Troy’s experiences with the old-timers directly years after she wrote the original story about Laughlin. In from a fluffy Christmas season assignment. She was working as a staff writer for the Independent and her editor inspired her new novel, Liberty Lanes. It’s the story of a 2006, she accepted a teaching position at Southern thought it would make great copy if someone would inter- group of friends, mostly in their 70s, who meet three times Connecticut State University, and returned to Missoula view a Jesus from one of the local holiday pageants. Troy a week to bowl a few frames and, afterward, and perhaps the following summer to finish her first draft of the novel. The writing went relatively quickly, and the rest of the staff spent weeks but pitching the idea to publishers looking for a willing JC, but came up took time. empty. With the season slipping “I had a lot of people tell me they away and the paper’s storyboard couldn’t sell old people,” says Troy, still empty, Troy suggested a fallback who still teaches at SCSU. “They liked plan: she could track down a Santa the writing, but not the subject matter.” Claus she’d met a year earlier at the That knee-jerk ageism makes VFW Club. This wasn’t the standard Troy’s book all the more important. mall Santa, Troy explained, but While Liberty Lanes doesn’t sugarsomeone who flew by helicopter to coat serious aging issues like demensurrounding towns outside of tia, it does reinforce Troy’s realization Missoula—with an elf, no less—and that the only real difference between handed out chocolates and her peers and the rambunctious oldChapStick to elementary school stutimers is perspective. That theme dents. He’d been doing it 29 years, plays out throughout the book, most meaning Troy, if she found him notably in how Hailey’s love life sputagain, could interview him on the ters in comparison to Nelson’s unexeve of his 30th anniversary. pected rekindling of a long lost affair. Her editor gave her 15 minutes The sweet old bastard even uses the to find the flying Santa. word “lover” to describe his new 72“I went down to the VFW and year-old squeeze. he was on the same stool I left him “Hailey is a character whose trouat a year earlier, drinking a beer,” ble is she isn’t sure she has the capacisays Troy. “He even remembered ty to love, or even the understanding me.” of what real love looks like,” says Troy. Troy and Norm Laughlin, who “In part it’s because she’s young, but was a half-century older than the also because she doesn’t have an reporter, hit it off. The first interview example to follow from her own familed to a second, and Laughlin sugly…She’s able to follow Nelson. It’s gested Troy meet him at his weekly something where she’s able to relate to senior bowling game to ask any last him and talk with him on the same questions. level.” “I walked into that bowling Troy continues to stay in touch alley and it was a blast of the most with many of the old-timers. She dediunexpected, undeniable, positive cated the book to Evaun Church, who energy. It just stopped you in your hosted a party—“what they like to call a tracks,” says Troy, describing hunbig ol’ wing dingy”—for Troy before dreds of bowlers in their 70s, 80s she moved to Connecticut, and with and 90s. “What those people reprewhom she’s in the closest contact. It’s sented was this absolute insistence also dedicated to Laughlin, who died a on having a good time. That energy few years ago. was completely infectious. Aside She’s hoping to see Church and from having to ask Norm questions, Photo by Chad Harder the other surviving members during I wanted to be in that room. I wantYears ago Robin Troy’s search for a Santa Claus story led her to bowling with a her visit at this week’s Festival of the ed to learn more.” group of “old-timers,” which inspired her new novel Liberty Lanes. Book. It’s the first time Troy’s been Troy was quickly introduced to a segment of the Missoula community that most 20- more importantly, chitchat over drinks. A young female back in Missoula in two years, and there’s a lot of catching somethings never bother to consider. Long after her reporter, Hailey, meets the group’s ringleader, Nelson, up to do. But no matter how much has changed, one thing holiday story hit newsstands (title: “One helicopter, 30 while working on a story and uncovers a wonderful web of hasn’t: Troy plans to meet the group during its weekly years, 48,000 sticks of lip balm and 37,500 chocolates: love triangles, catfights, kept secrets and rivalries drenched bowling game. Behind the scenes with Missoula’s only flying Santa”), in enough alcohol to make a college student jealous. Think Robin Troy reads from Liberty Lanes for the she, Laughlin and a core crew that Troy affectionately “Gossip Girl” based on the “Golden Girls” demographic, Montana Festival of the Book at the Holiday Inn refers to as “the old-timers” continued to regularly all set against the sobering reality of growing old. Yellowstone Glacier Room Friday, Oct. 7, at 2:30 “I wanted to capture their spirit in a totally fictional- PM. Free. meet for drinks, parties and, of course, bowling. The embedded reporter slowly became another member of ized account,” says Troy, who earned her masters from the University of Montana’s creative writing program and had the group. sbrowning@missoulanews.com

Page 34 October 6–October 13, 2011


Scope Soundcheck Arts Film Movie Shorts

Juggalo world Mythbusting at the Insane Clown Posse show by Molly Laich

There are three types of people in this world: followers of Insane Clown Posse (known affectionately as Juggalos and Juggalettes), people who hate ICP, and people like my mother, who’ve never heard of them. I had the good fortune of covering the ICP show last Saturday, Oct. 1 at the Wilma. Here are some of the myths and legends surrounding the infamous band and their often-misunderstood fans—some true, some false.

rainbows represent UV rays reflected off the sun and the clouds or something, but come on. They were just trying a little tenderness. A group of street kids were gathered outside the building with a sign reading, “Donate $1 for Magnet Research.” I gave them a dollar and asked them, “Are you Juggalos or just opportunists?” “We’re opportunists!” they gleefully told me, and offered me a handful of Skittles.

ICP is a Christian band.

Juggalos love Faygo and drugs.

It didn’t occur to me to ask any of the Juggalos if they believed in God, but they sure didn’t sound like Christians. Lyrical refrains like, “Dead bodies dead bodies all over the street,” “Fuck the world!” and “Suck my

Oh my god, they love Faygo so much! For me, this was the big event. Faygo, if you’re unaware, is a cheap, off-brand soda bottled in Michigan and relished by outcasts, because a two-liter still only costs something like 50 cents. (My favorite growing up in Detroit was Moon Mist and Rock n Rye, or lemonlime and red.) Four bins stocked with hundreds of two-liters sat menacingly on stage. I had to conclude that either the band gets real thirsty performing, or they had in mind a darker purpose. The Juggalette to my right confirmed, “We’re about to be drenched in the shit.” The stuff came out of shaken up bottles, squirt guns, and big buckets. Days later, the money in my wallet is still sticky, and all of it the exact same flavor: Diet Root Beer. As for the drugs, I can’t speak for all of them, but if you were out on the streets at Photo courtesy of Lauren Wright all on Saturday night and heard sirens, dick!” (To which the crowd, both men and women, chances are they were sent to resuscitate a partied-out enthusiastically yelled back,“Suck my dick!”) seemed to Juggalo—but, you know, I’ve seen worse. conflict with the teachings of Christ. If Shaggy 2 Dope Juggalos are prone to insane bouts of rage and Violent J are Christians in their private life, they’ve and violence at the slightest provocation. kept it out of the act. Red, white and blue was the preThis idea is born out of the infamous Tila dominant color scheme, with demented clowns resem- Tequila incident at the Meeting of the Juggalos in bling Uncle Sam traipsing about onstage, but I don’t 2010, when angry fans threw rocks and human feces know if the patriotism is supposed to be ironic. at the TV harlot until she bled. Nothing like that Fashion among the Juggalos has remained largely unchanged since the mid 1990s.

So true. When kids from your high school got dreadlocked hatchet-men tattooed on themselves in 1994, I bet you never dreamed they’d still be relevant nearly 20 years later, but here we are. Juggalettes will show their tits for a dollar.

I didn’t see a single titty all night. However, I spent much of the first three acts wandering in and out of the building feeling lost, nauseated and questioning my life choices, and so there’s a lot I missed. A polite ninja outside told me the pole dancers I walked out on during the first act got naked on stage, but these women had to have been paid more than a dollar. I observed most of the Juggalettes to be formidable, strong and tomboyish. I’d have to conclude that Montana Juggalettes are not exhibitionists. If they are, that’s cool, too. Shaggy 2 Dope and Violent J don’t know how magnets work and think rainbows are miracles.

Probably not, but I challenge most anyone to tell me exactly how magnets work without consulting Google first. Yeah, you know it has something to do with the poles and positive and negative forces, and

Fussy nesters appreciate our 100% natural handmade futons. H A N D M A D E

F U TO N S

125 S. Higgins 721-2090 Mon – Sat 10:30 – 5:30 smallwondersfutons.com

Homeword October Classes

“Get Ready for Home Ownership”

20% OFF

October 11, 13, 18 and 20 • 6-9pm Lambros Real Estate ERA, 3011 American Way $20/person or $35/household

Evergreens • Perennials Roses • Herbs Fruit & Shade Trees

“Financial Fitness” October 18-20 • 6-9pm Homeword, 127 N Higgins, Ste 303

Straw Bales

$10/person Register and pay online at www.homeword.org

Asters • Bulbs • Garlic • Mums • Flowering Cabbage & Kale

Childcare vouchers available for Busy Hands Fun Center

For questions or more information, call 532-HOME or email info@homeword.org!

happened at the Wilma on Saturday night. Their mosh pit was an expression of controlled love masked as violence, just like at any other rowdy show. The thought bubbles dancing above our heads seemed to say, “Can we love each other yet? Can we love each other yet? When do we get to knock each other down and then enthusiastically pick each other up and then cuddle again?” They’re not a gang, and they’re not racist. “We’re all a family here,” one Juggalo emphatically told me. “Write that down in your notebook.” ICP put on a great stage show

I love enthusiastic crowds and I love love and the event had both of those things in spades. Don’t get me wrong; the music is beyond awful. Twenty years of rapping and they’ve yet to graduate from a seventhgrade rhyme scheme. I’d rather listen to a garbage disposal. But the music isn’t really the point. It’s about cheap soda and confetti and chicken feathers and clown makeup melting off of faces onto the faded black concert T-shirts they’ve been waiting their whole lives to wear out with the family. Woop woop! mlaich@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 35 October 6–October 13, 2011


Scope Soundcheck Arts Film Movie Shorts

No stopping Parkinson’s artists find the good life in creative challenges by Erika Fredrickson

Right now Hadley Ferguson is on medication, so you won’t notice the tremor in her right hand. You might not realize that her handwriting has gotten smaller over the last few years. You couldn’t possibly know—partly because she emits so much energy—that sometimes she only sleeps a few hours a night. You’d also be surprised to know that the renowned local artist, whose paintings are represented at the Dana Gallery and cover downtown brick walls and the insides of coffee shops and bars, has, since she was diagnosed with Parkinson’s at the young age of 33, gotten more adventurous with her paintings. “They’re brighter and there’s a lot more variation between one piece and another,” says Ferguson, now 35. “I’m branching out, just enjoying the painting process versus creating a product that somebody’s going to like. I don’t care about that anymore. I’m taking more risks and I like my paintings better.” Case in point: She’s right-handed, but she just finished a painting using her left hand. The image shows a family of three standing at wooden gates in an autumnal landscape. It’s an impressionistic, glimmering take on the season (and a tribute to her family),

less precise than her right-handed paintings but vibrant and skillful nonetheless. If painting with her right is going to become an issue, she says, why not try the left? That sort of optimism is the most obvious thing about Ferguson when you talk with her. And it’s not sugar-coated optimism. “When I’m tired I notice the tremor and that means probably down the road it will be more pronounced,” she says. “I’m trying for the first time to do a painting with my left hand as an exercise where if something doesn’t work one way there’s always another way to do it. You don’t stop just because something’s difficult.” Ferguson is spearheading a Parkinson’s awareness weekend October 20–22, through her non-profit group Summit for Parkinson’s, which she started with Brandi Roman, a 30-year-old Montana Parkinson’s patient. It’s co-sponsored by the Brian Grant Foundation, the project of the former Portland Trail Blazers player who was diagnosed with Parkinson’s in 2009. The big weekend includes a documentary screening, parties with music, panels, silent and live auctions, and other events, with

proceeds going to fund Parkinson’s resources and education. To kick things off early, the Dana Gallery has donated its space this First Friday to showcase art by people with Parkinson’s. Ferguson’s left-handed painting will be on display with other silent auction items, including fused glasswork, photographs and knitted bags—all of which require a detailing that’s often challenging for people with Parkinson’s. The artists, who all have early-onset Parkinson’s, are between 30 and their mid-50s. Most of them know each other through Facebook. One artist for the show, Catherine Armsden, 56, started writing 10 years ago during a fit of physical symptoms—insomnia and fatigue, mostly, plus the depression that often accompanies them. She isn’t sure those symptoms were related to Parkinson’s, but eventually she started getting more concrete symptoms and was finally diagnosed in late 2009, about a year before Ferguson. She’d been an architect for a firm she still owns with her husband in San Francisco, and she was building dream homes for people. But the symptoms made her tired and her curiosity in

“Left-Handed Painting” by Hadley Ferguson will be on display for the Summit for Parkinson’s First Friday silent auction at the Dana Gallery.

Missoula Independent

Page 36 October 6–October 13, 2011

architecture was beginning to shift—she was more intrigued with people’s idea of home than how their actual home would be designed. “I became more fascinated by the whole psychology of the work, what people were asking for, than the actual design of the house,” she says. Armsden found that however depleted or depressed she felt, she was able to sit down and write. It gave her permission, she says, to sink her teeth into creative writing, which eventually evolved into the beginnings of a novel. By the time she was fully diagnosed, she was several years into the book. Dream House, which is set to be published in 2012, is loosely based on her own life. It tells the story of an architect who designs houses for people but who’s also searching for her own place in the world. She’s from Maine but she’s living on the West Coast, feeling alienated by her clients who are wealthy and have fantasies of big houses. The protagonist ends up back where she grew up in Maine to come to terms with what a dream house really means to her. For the Dana Gallery exhibit and auction, Armsden didn’t have a conventional way to show her work (“I don’t think anyone will bid on a novel,” she says), so she came up with a more visual way to display her writing. She selected two old photographs shot by her father, both of which heavily influenced the novel. They’re black and white photos with a nostalgic, mysterious quality. One is the view from her childhood bedroom of a cove in Maine and the other is of her with her two sisters when they were little. Then she combined handwritten passages from the book with those two photographs. One begins: “The shore held the cove with the roundness of a ballerina’s arms, opening to the harbor then releasing the water to flow around the islands and beyond.” The other is a conversation between the three sisters as they divide up family heirlooms after the parents have died. “I think people are curious about the way other people live and about their photographs,” she says. There’s no stopping Armsden. She’s already halfway through another book. This is probably the most surprising thing when you talk to any of these artists with Parkinson’s. Post-diagnosis, everything changes, but in ways people often can’t imagine. For a lot of Parkinson’s patients, art opens up their minds and keeps their brains in shape. And, in the process, some people learn that they actually have a gift for art. “I think that what the Parkinson’s has done is made me much more determined to be a serious writer and get this book published,” says Armsden. “I’m working hard with a real focus and at the same time getting the most out of my relationships—just really trying to get as much out of life as I possibly can. It’s a pretty sweet thing.” The First Friday silent auction showcases art by artists with Parkinson’s at the Dana Gallery Friday, Oct. 7, from 5 to 8 PM. Free. The silent auction runs through Sat., Oct. 22. efredrickson@missoulanews.com


Scope Soundcheck Arts Film Movie Shorts

Good fight 50/50 goes beyond the Big C by Dave Loos

There are a number of inherent risks associated him. It’s awkward but endearing. And while Kyle’s with making a film about cancer, especially one billing incessant attempts to help Adam use his cancer as a itself as a comedy. But introducing the malady before way to meet girls and get laid may get old, all signs we even get to know the character may the ballsiest point to a friend who sometimes just tries too hard to help his buddy. move in a film that makes a lot of penis jokes. Kyle’s outsized personality runs counter to Adam’s In 50/50, there are all of about two scenes with 27year-old Adam (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) before the Big C laid-back everyman persona, and Gordon-Levitt is very makes its appearance. By the time we have quickly good as the shell-shocked but resilient victim. His understated demeanor established that the young doubles as a defense Seattle professional works mechanism, allowing him for a radio station and has a to play it cool whether he girlfriend who is slowly means it or not. The supmoving in with him, we are porting characters who sitting in a hospital office as play off Adam are what a doctor clumsily informs separate 50/50 from other our protagonist that his films that have tried and recent backaches are the failed at tackling similarly result of an aggressive and heavy topics. Katherine rare form of spinal cancer. (Anna Kendrick), a young It’s not as if we didn’t doctoral student who expect this news, but for it to counsels the sick, doesn’t come before the audience try to hide her inexperihas finished more than a ence in helping Adam, handful of popcorn is bold who seems to enjoy their and sets an immediate tone. discussions and the subtle Everything we will subseflirting that evolves during quently learn about Adam each session. And there comes in the context of a are scenes in 50/50—most nasty disease requiring notably those involving immediate chemotherapy two other cancer victims and potentially life-threatenwhom Adam gets to know ing surgery. As he learns during chemotherapy sesfrom the always trusty sions—that are so WebMD, his chances of sur- The Patrick Stewart School of Style. thoughtful and heartvival are about 50 percent. These early scenes can’t help but feel uneven—we meet wrenching they feel as though they’ve been ripped just about every major player in the first 10 minutes—but straight from a documentary. Apatow can only dream there is important groundwork to be laid during these of fusing laughs with tears the way director Jonathan initial erratic moments. And there is a reward for your Levine has managed to do here. 50/50 is great in part because our sympathies are patience in the form of a film that ends up deftly meldnot always solely directed at Adam, but rather the faming drama and comedy with surprising earnestness. It’s during the frenetic opening scenes that we also ily and friends who surround him, some of whom he meet Adam’s longtime best friend Kyle (Seth Rogen), has taken for granted. Adam’s mother Diane (Anjelica who takes the cancer news harder than Adam’s girl- Huston) must simultaneously deal with a cancer-strickfriend Rachel (Bryce Dallas Howard). “I want to throw en son and a husband with Alzheimer’s disease. up,” Kyle tells his friend, before quickly pointing out Huston is just fantastic as the well-meaning, stressedthat he has better odds than any casino game. Those of out, overly concerned mother, and the scene in which you expecting the same Rogen character we’ve already she tells a surprised Adam about the family cancer supseen a handful of times in Judd Apatow films won’t be port group she attends is among the film’s best. Later, disappointed. The only thing Kyle likes talking about at in a wonderfully touching hospital waiting-room length more than weed is oral sex—so yeah, he’s basi- moment, Diane blurts out to Katherine, “I only smothcally playing the same immature 20-something guy ered him because I loved him so much!” For all its strengths, 50/50 is still very much a mainfrom Knocked Up, only here there’s no kid involved. But this is Rogen’s best movie to date in large part stream film about a profoundly depressing topic, and I because he’s playing a role he actually lived. 50/50 is don’t pretend for a minute that there aren’t levels of loosely based on the life of Rogen’s real-life friend Will despair far beyond what Gordon-Levitt and Rogen Reiser, who battled spinal cancer in his early 20s and touch on here. And to their credit, the filmmakers don’t ended up writing the screenplay for this film. It’s easy try to make it something it isn’t or couldn’t be. You’ll to label performances as authentic, but Rogen lends a laugh about situations that rarely warrant such an emosense of urgency and loyalty to Kyle’s character that tion, and feel okay about it. 50/50 continues at the Carmike 10. goes beyond the normal stoner routine we’ve become accustomed to. When Kyle catches Rachel cheating on Adam, he reacts as if someone has been unfaithful to arts@missoulanews.com

Bringing our family to yours. Always accepting new clients with Medicare. There’s more to our care than you might think!

610 N. California 721.1646

www.bluemountainclinic.org Join Us For

VOLUNTEER TRAINING When: Thursdays 10/13, 10/20, 10/27, 11/3, & 11/10. Time: 6 pm – 9 pm Where: Hospice of Missoula 800 Kensington, suite 204 It is one of the beautiful compensations of this life that no one can sincerely try to help another without helping himself. ~Ralph Waldo Emerson To sign up for this class please contact:

Hospice of Missoula

406-543-4408

www.hospiceofmissoula.com/contactus

Our members specialize in the management of single family homes, condominiums and apartment complexes. We welcome your inquiries and our members look forward to serving your residential rental and management needs. Our members are:

• Licensed professionals • Educated regularly on current laws, regulations and fair housing • Have a duty to provide you with the best possible service • We promote a high standard of professionalism and are bound by a code of ethics for property managers

Missoula Independent

Page 37 October 6–October 13, 2011


Scope Soundcheck Arts Film Movie Shorts OPENING THIS WEEK THE IDES OF MARCH Beware the ides of winter in October! George Clooney directs and stars in a political thriller about campaign nuttiness, along with Philip Seymour Hoffman, Ryan Gosling and a million other academy hopefuls. Carmike 10: 1, 4, 7 and 9:30. Mon–Thu: No 1 PM show. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri–Sun: 12:05, 2:30, 5, 7:25 and 9:45, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. Mon–Thu: 1:20, 4, 7 and 9:30. REAL STEEL Finally! It’s the live-action Rock ‘Em Sock ‘Em film that nobody’s been waiting for! Hugh Jackman hangs out in the near future as a father who wins

No 1:15 show. Stadium 14: Fri.–Sun: 12:05, 2:35, 4:55, 7:20 and 9:40, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. Mon.–Thu: 1:30, 4:10, 7:20 and 9:40.

aliens are invading the Old West. It’s always something! Will Harrison Ford and Daniel Craig triumph? John Favreau directs. Stadium 14: 4 and 9:25.

ABDUCTION Taylor Lautner (you may know him from “Team Jacob” fame) stars as a dreamboat/physically gifted young adult who discovers he was kidnapped as a child. Now he must uncover a web of lies! Lily Collins and Alfred Molina are also there. Village 6: Fri: 4:30, 7 and 9:25. Sat: 1, 4:30, 7 and 9:25. Sun: 1, 4:30 and 7. Mon.–Thu: 4:30 and 7. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 PM show on Sun. Showboat in Polson: 4:15, 7:15, 9:15. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:05, 4:05, 7:05 and 9:40, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight.

THE DEBT Helen Mirren, Tom WIlkinson and Jessica Chastain star in this intense international thriller involving Nazis, secret agents, betrayal and subterfuge. Directed by John Madden. Wilma Theatre: Nightly at 9, with 7 PM shows on Sun, Mon, and Wed. and Fri. and Sat. matinees at 3. DOLPHIN TALE This inspirational saga of a boy who builds a dolphin a prosthetic tail and teaches everyone around him to love again is family-friendly and heartwarming. Pardon me, I’m not made of wood. Morgan Freeman and Ashley Judd star. Wait, it’s in 3D. I take it all back. Carmike 10: 6:45 and 9:15. in 2D: 1 and 4. Mon.–Thu: No 1 PM show. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: in 2D: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show. Entertainer in Ronan: 4, 7, 9:15. Mountain in Whitefish: 1:45, 4:15, 7 and 9:30. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun: 12:45, 3:45, 7 and 9:35, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. Mon.–Thu: 1:10, 4:05, 7 and 9:35. DREAM HOUSE Dream House, viewers will come to learn, is a somewhat facetious title, the meaning of which is layered and many, in this horror film starring Daniel Craig, Rachel Weisz and Naomi Watts, plus a couple of creepy little girls for good measure. Village 6: Fri: 4:10, 7:20 and 9:50. Sat: 1:30, 4:10 and 7:20. Sun: 1:30, 4:10 and 7:20. Mon.–Thu: 4:10 and 7:20. Stadium 14: 1:10, 4:10, 7:10 and 9:45, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. DRIVE Here is a film about a stunt driver, played by Ryan Gosling, that seems to take itself deathly seriously, what with the Godfatheresque music and the constant suggestion of faces being flattened by hammers. Albert Brooks and Ron Perlman also star. Carmike 10: Fri.–Tue: 7 and 9:15. Tue.–Thu.: 4, 7 and 9:40. Village 6: Fri: 4:20, 7:30 and 9:55. Sat: 1:20, 4:20, 7:30 and 9:55. Sun: 1:20, 4:20 and 7:30. Mon.–Thu: 4:20 and 7:30. Mountain in Whitefish: 1:45, 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30. Stadium 14: Fri–Sun: 6:50 and 9:25, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. ESMERALDA Esmeralda is playing for one morning only at the Carmike 10 on Sun. Oct. 9 at 9 AM.

Good looks. Real Steel opens Friday at the Carmike 10.

his son’s love by leading an underdog robot to the championship. Carmike 10: 1:20, 4:20, 7:20 and 10. Mon–Thu: No 1:20 show. Village 6: Fri: 4:15, 7:15, 9:55. Sat: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 9:55. Sun: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15. Mon–Thu: 4:15 and 7:15. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 and now 9 PM show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun: 12, 1. 3, 4, 6, 7, 9 and 9:50, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. Mon.–Thu: 1, 1:45, 4, 4:30, 7, 8:30 and 9:40. Mountain Cinema 4 in Whitefish: 1:15, 4, 6:45, 9:15.

NOW PLAYING 50/50 50/50 refers to the odds Joseph Gordon-Levitt has of beating the cancer he’s been diagnosed with at 27, but his buddy Seth Rogen and his therapist Anna Kendrick are going to help him through it. I love Levitt so much! I hope he makes it. Carmike 10: 1:15, 4:10, 7 and 9:30. Mon.–Thu:

Missoula Independent

CONTAGION It’s been awhile since the movies have reminded us of our human frailty via an unstoppable, spreading contagion. Notable actors Matt Damon and Kate Winslet star in this one, and Steven Soderbergh directs, so I think it has a fighting chance of not sucking. Carmike 10: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10. Mon.–Thu: no 1:30 show. COURAGEOUS Four police officers face a tragedy that changes everything. They spend the rest of the story dealing with whatever that tragedy is, but mostly, the movie seems to be about fatherhood. Alex Kendrick directs, writes and stars. Carmike 10: 1, 4, 7 and 10. Mon–Thu: no 1 PM show. Stadium 14: Fri.–Sun: 12:20, 3:30, 6:35 and 9:25, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. Mon.–Thu: 1, 3:50, 6:45 and 9:35. COWBOYS & ALIENS Plastic hasn’t even been invented yet and already

Page 38 October 6–October 13, 2011

FAUST Faust is a bleak opera about a man who trades his soul for knowledge, and it will be playing one time only: Tue., Oct. 11, 7 PM at the Carmike 10. THE HELP It’s 1962 in Mississippi and Emma Stone has forged an unlikely friendship with Viola Davis and Octavia Spencer, social conventions be damned! Tate Taylor writes and directs. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun.: 12:10, 3:15, 6:15 and 9:15, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. Mon.–Thu.: 1:15, 4:10 and 7:45. KILLER ELITE Trained assassins jump through windows, leap from building to building, screech tires and duck and roll with firebombs exploding all around them on a mission to save someone from something and also kill people. Robert De Niro, Jason Statham and Clive Owen star. Carmike 10: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 and 10. Mon.–Thu: no 1:30 show.

Village 6: Fri: 4, 7 and 9:35. Sat: 1, 4, 7 and 9:35. Sun: 1, 4 and 7. Mon.–Thu: 4 and 7. Mountain in Whitefish: 1:45, 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:15 and 6:45, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. THE LION KING 3D You’ve already seen this movie (it’s Hamlet with lions) but now you can see it in 3D. I just watched the trailer, but on a 2D computer, so I can’t speak to the differences. You will probably want to grab at hot embers during the hyena scenes. Carmike 10: Fri.–Sun: 1, 4, 7, 9:15. Mon.–Thu: no 1 PM show. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri-Sun: 12, 2:25, 4:50, 7:15 and 9:30, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. Mon–Thu: 1:20, 4, 7:15 and 9:30. MONEYBALL Brad Pitt and Jonah Hill have a computer logarithm and a vision to turn the Oakland A’s into a winning team. Nobody believes in them and everything goes wrong, but then the music changes and maybe they will win after all? Aaron Sorkin (The Social Network) has a writing credit! Carmike 10: 1:10, 4:10, 7:10 and 10. Mon.–Thu: no 1:10 show. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:45 and 9:10, with Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Mountain in Whitefish: 1:30, 4, 6:45 and 9:15. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri–Sun: 12:15, 3:15, 6:20 and 9:20, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. Mon–Thu: 1, 3:50, 6:40 and 9:35. SARAH’S KEY A Parisian journalist, played by Kristin Scott Thomas, becomes entwined with a young girl from 1942 in this French-language film where people clutch books and stare off in in the distance, remembering. Wilma Theatre: Nightly at 7, with Fri. and Sat. matinees at 1. WARRIOR Tom Hardy and his former pro boxing, grizzled father, played by Nick Nolte, sweat it out and discover emotional truths when Hardy trains to be an MMA fighter. This film will undoubtedly do for cage-fighting enthusiasts today what Wall Street did for ‘80s guys way back when. Village 6: Fri: 4, 7 and 10. Sat: 1, 4, 7 and 10. Sun: 1, 4 and 7. Mon.–Thu: 4 and 7. WHAT’S YOUR NUMBER? Anna Faris comes to the kind of conclusion only someone starring in a romantic comedy ever possibly would: that she should draw from the pool of 20 men she’s slept with to find a husband. Chris Evans has second billing, so I’m going to go ahead and guess he’s the one she picks. Carmike 10: 1:20, 4:20, 7:20 and 9:45. Mon.–Thu: No 1:20 show. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 PM show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:05, 4:05, 6:55 and 9:35, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. THE WHISTLEBLOWER The U.N. thinks they can get away with any ol’ post-war Bosnia era sex scandal they please, that is until a Nebraskan cop played by Rachel Weisz comes around. Monica Belluci and Vanessa Redgrave also star. Wilma Theatre: 9 PM shows on Sun., Mon., and Wed. only. Capsule reviews by Molly Laich. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., Oct. 7. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-F I LM; S t a d i u m 14 i n K a l i s p e l l – 752 - 78 0 0 . Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.


Missoula Independent

Page 39 October 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 13, 2011


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

October 6 - October 13, 2011

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Birth Mama Doula Training Oct 7-9. contact 546.6452 or chardoula@msn.com Check out Red Willow’s Facebook page and become a fan today! Have sexual health questions? The Montana Access Project

(MAP) Receive answers to your sexual health questions via text from sexual health experts. Text 666746 Type ASKMAP (space) enter your question. Free & Confidential. askmap.info Red Willow Learning Center now available to rent. 1000’ space for classes or meetings.

Video conferencing, AV, beverage service. 825 West Kent. Call Kathy 880-2639.

LOST & FOUND

Fixed male. 406-531-1456 Lost camera Camera in waterproof case lost on Bitterroot river, between florence and lolo. $100 reward! 406880-6285

www.missoulanews.com

LOST b/w tuxedo CAT Lost near Orange St Food Farm.

Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio

Did you know? Posting a classified ad online is FREE! 

BEAT THE COLD WITH OUR HOT PLATE ITEMS!

I BUY

Hondas, Subarus, Toyotas Japanese/German Cars & Trucks

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE

FREE

Estimates

Hot Stone, Deep Tissue & Swedish

Snow Plowing /Removal

Rosemary Polichio

406-880-0688

bladesofglorylawncarellc.com

Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not.

Table of contents Advice Goddess . . . Free Will Astrology Public Notices . . . . Crossword . . . . . . . Home Page . . . . . . Sustainafieds . . . . . This Modern World

. . . . . . .

. .C2 . .C4 . .C6 . .C7 . .C8 . .C9 .C11

FAST CASH 24 HOURS

327-0300

P L A C E YOU R AD: Deadline: Monday at Noon

239-0474

Walk it. 317 S. Orange

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION ADVICE Call

721-7744 Today!

Bulmanlaw.com Montana’s Health & Safety Lawyers

416 E. Pine Street Missoula MT



Talk it.



Send it. Post it.

543-6609 x121 or x115

classified@missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

PET OF THE WEEK Apollo Huge and handsome, Apollo is a very large Leonberger male. He gets along well with most dogs and has a playful disposition. He loves to spend time with people whether its exploring the great outdoors or curled up by your feet. October is Adopt-aDog month. Help us empty the kennels by bringing home a canine companion this month. FREE microchips for all dogs and other specials all month long! Call the Humane Society at (406) 5493934 or visit us online at www.myhswm.org.


ADVICE GODDESS

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

By Amy Alkon

ANNOUNCEMENTS

THAT WITCH DOES NOT KILL US... I am 19 and have been dating a wonderful 24-yearold guy for about a month. Some of his family members wish he were still with the fiancée he broke up with six months ago and aren’t too happy about him seeing me. His 19-year-old half sister actually contacted me on Facebook, told me to “watch my back,” and made some mean assumptions about me. Next, his mother Facebooked me and said that she’s also sorry her son’s with me and that I should watch what I say to her daughter. (I just told her daughter that it wasn’t cool to judge me, because she doesn’t know me.) I told my boyfriend, who immediately called them, told them I’m in his life, and said a lot of nice things about me. I’d really love for his family to like me, but they don’t even want to meet me. How do I get them to? If they don’t like me after that, fine. —Unpopular The wonderful thing about social networking is how easy it’s become for people to get in touch with one other. As you’ve discovered, this is also the really awful thing about it. That’s why my boyfriend, who’s not exactly a people person, claims he’s starting a nihilistic social network called “Quitter.” (Posts are zero characters, and you’re asked not to join.) Speaking of anti-social networking, that’s an interesting family your boyfriend’s got there. In many families, there’s some Voice of Maturity who steps in when a squabble gets out of hand. In your boyfriend’s family, they apparently leave that to the parrot: “Hello! Hello? CRAAAACKER!” Now, maybe his 19-yearold half sister was plastered when she Facebooked you or typically seems one Ding Dong short of a valu-pak, but probably the last thing you’d expect from somebody’s mother is for her to come in and bat cleanup in the psycho family division. As hard as it is to feel misrepresented, misunderstood, and unheard, you’re unlikely to change that by clamoring for a part in his family’s trashy reality show, “Don’t You Be Goin’ Near My Son!” Beyond that, prematurely going through the steps of an already-serious relationship, such as meeting somebody’s family, can lead you to decide somebody’s right for you instead of looking to see whether he actually is. Consider why you feel compelled to try to win these two nasties over. Perhaps, like many women, you have a mental photo album of your life upon meeting the man for you, perhaps with some sunkissed

snapshots of a Sunday family barbecue. Well, you may be in this guy’s future, and there may be family barbecues, but there’s a good chance his mom and half sister will be picturing you on the spit. If you two start getting serious, make sure you can both handle whatever relationship or lack of one you have with the Wicked Witch of the Wherever and her buzzard daughter. Contact with them now is sure to be very uncomfortable. But, who knows...you and his half sister may end up sitting there on your wedding day, laughing at how she came after you on Facebook— which should give his mother just enough time to dump the laxatives into your drink. The music starts: “Here comes the bride...” and wow...there goes the bride...and at quite a clip!

Epilepsy Support Group Do you or someone you love have seizures? Group Meetings will be held every 3rd Tuesday of the month from 7-8PM at Community Medical Center, Conference Room K. Meetings are open to those with epilepsy including friends and family of those with epilepsy.Please feel

G o t a p r o b l e m ? Wr i te A m y Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

INSTRUCTION ALLIED HEALTH CAREER TRAINING - Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available.

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-5326546 Ext. 97 http://www.continentalacademy.com

Children & Walk-ins Welcome Haircuts-$8.50 • Beard Trims-$4 8:30am - 5:30pm • Tuesday-Saturday 1114 Cedar St, Missoula, MT • 728-3957

Fletch Law, PLLC Steve M. Fletcher Attorney at Law

Social Security Disability Over 20 years experience. Call immediately for a FREE consultation.

My last boyfriend lied and cheated so much that I am wary of all guys now. My best friend keeps telling me that not all guys are like him and that I just have to put myself back out there. —Betrayed

541-7307 www.fletchlaw.net

SALE at

Equus & Paws

$10 OFF large dry dog food (25lb. & larger) $5 OFF cat food (5lb. & larger) $1 OFF cat/dog treats 99¢ 13 oz. dog cans Equus & Paws Grooming, canine & equine massage

2825 Stockyard Rd, Suite E4 (406) 552-2157• www.equusandpaws.com

Sign up for fall NOT ARTISTIC? Come have some fun painting. Instruction & art supplies furnished. Complimentary wine or tea. 327-8757

Art Hang up • 839 S. Higgins

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2 October 6 – October 13, 2011

Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-4819409 www.CenturaOnline.com ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com

Ken's Barber Shop

CAN’T TWIN ’EM ALL

You didn’t end up with a cheater because he fell down your chimney, pulled a gun on you, and said, “Ho-ho-ho, let’s date!” You chose the guy and then neglected to un-choose the guy when there were indications of more than a few ho-ho-hos in his life. But, like many people exiting a bad relationship, the last thing you seem interested in is taking responsibility for sticking with a partner who treated you like a gymnast in the Humiliation Olympics. In other words, the answer isn’t just putting yourself back out there, but putting yourself out there with what was missing the last time around: a little discernment. As I wrote recently, boyfriends who are liars and cheaters go for girlfriends who put up with lying and cheating. And if you’re like a lot of women who’ve been romantically duped, you’ll say you want a man who’s ethical if you’re asked, but you don’t make that an actual requirement in men you date. Now would be an excellent time to start. It beats being wary of all men because your last man cheated on you, which is kind of like being wary of people in pants because the last person who mugged you was wearing pants (as opposed to a stylish summer shift).

free to contact Amanda with any questions or concerns at 406-2146546 or via email Esthiamanda@yahoo.com

ADOPTION PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-4136293


EMPLOYMENT “I found a brighter world, I found Unity” 546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

GENERAL

RETAIL SALES #2980596. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

Send resume jobs@modwest.com

! BECOME A BARTENDER ! $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training courses available. 1-800-965-6520 ext. 278

SMALL BUSINESS MANAGER #2980598. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

Lively Times is looking for a part-time production person in the Mission Valley. Newspaper experience and/or computer design skills necessary. Send resumé to kristi@livelytimes.com. No phone calls please.

FRONT DESK CLERK #2980604. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

At YOUR Home All Ages, All Levels

Billings/Missoula, 4546

1-800-545-

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION Piano Lessons! Learn Music! Learn how to play any song, fast! Theory, technique, repertoire. Call Jim at 721-8947

Job hunting is stressful. You deserve a break. Get started at www.MissoulaEvents.net

CHILDREN’S CASE MANAGER #2980593. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

MEDICAL BILLING CLERK #9956445. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

Executive Director sought by Working Dogs for Conservation, a small, MT-based, but globally active, nonprofit. For full announcement contact WDCEDSearch@ workingdogsforconservation.org.

CONCRETE FINISHER #2980602. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 LOGGING TRUCK DRIVER #2980600. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

HEALTH CAREERS

Linux Systems Administrator Modwest is looking for Linux Systems Admin w/3+ yrs experience in production environment. Visit our website, modwest.com/jobs for job details.

TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services,

Medical Transcriptionist Work from home as a Medical Transcriptionist. Career Step offers top-of-the-line training for an exciting new career in the growing healthcare field. Enroll today and take the course that will change

MOTEL HOUSEKEEPING #2980591. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

Piano Lessons

PROFESSIONAL

to:

POSTAL SUPPORT WORKER #2980597. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

SKILLED LABOR

PRESCHOOL TEACHER #2980605 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

your life. Free laptop incentive for September enrollment. Call 1-800411-7073 to inquire and mention referral code 10228 for $50 off, or visit http://referral.careerstep. com/ref10228 for more info. Career Step also offers training for careers as a Medical Administrative Assistant, Pharmacy Technician, and Medical Coder.

SALES SALES HELP WANTED. Clark Fork Valley Press, Plains seeks a salesperson. $10/hour to start. FT with benefits. Experience preferred, but will train right person. Please email Dan at ddrewry@hagadone.com

OPPORTUNITIES ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS Needed immediately for upcom-

ing roles $150-$300/day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1800-560-8672 A-109. For casting times/locations $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-4057619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com MOVIE EXTRAS to stand in background of major film productions. Earn up to $200/day. Experience not required. All looks needed. Call 877-8246285 Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

Bruce- 546-5541

MDSC, a non-profit serving adult clients with severe disabilities is welcoming 12 new clients from an institutional setting to our community-based arrangement. www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Part-time and full-time openings for all shifts available for:

• Direct Support Professionals • Residential Assistant Manager • LPN or RN For information/application, go to www.mdscmt.org or obtain app at 1005 Marshall Street, Missoula, MT 59801. EOE.

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist Susan Clarion RNC CA MATS 552-7919

Aurora Family Therapeutic Massage Virginia Bazo, LMT

Swedish, Deep Tissue & Reiki 370-4175 Located in Shear Perfection at UC Center

Classes at Meadowsweet Herbs: Environmental Effects on Preconception and Pregnancy, Thursday, 10/6, 7:-9 pm. Cost: $20. Childhood Vaccinations: A Naturopathic Perspective, Tuesday,10/11, 7-9 pm. Cost: $20. Making your own

Mineral Make Up, Wednesday, 10/12, 6:30-9 pm. Cost: $25, Materials fee: $10. Natural Perfumery, Wednesday, 10/19, 6-9 pm. Cost: $25, Materials fee: $10. Advanced Soap Making, Saturday, 10/22, 11 am-4 pm. Cost: $50, Materials fee: $35.

Homeopathy for the Cold & Flu Season. Thursday, 12/1, 7-9 pm. Cost: FREE. Please register early as class space is limited. Meadowsweet Herbs, 180 S. 3rd St. W., Missoula, MT 59801 728-0543 www.meadowsweet-herbs.com

Kaimu Mystical Poet looking for Muse.

Hypnosis & Imager y

808-443-1786

MSW, CHT, GIS

* Smoking * Weight * Negative self-talk * Str e s s * D e p r e s s i o n * E m p o w e r y o u r s e l f

728-5693 • Mar y Place

Copper King Sauna & Massage located in Bitterroot/Hamilton. Outside visits/Missoula 7 days “Relax, Renew, and Rewind” LMT by appointment 406.274.5084.

Headaches?

Try Acupuncture 728-2325

Acupuncture & Herbal Care

Since 1992

PSYCHIC READINGS

$30

Honest, Accurate and Meaningful Guidance

Ruthi (310) 738-0098

Professional Instruction

Spanish & Flamenco Beginners-Intermediate

Who Else Wants A FREE Chiropractic Office Visit To Help With Your Neck Or Back Pain?

Downtown Dance Collective, Missoula

Elenita Brown Dance

777-5956

Call 728-1250

Did you know? Posting a classified ad is FREE!

Still not sure? Go to our new website:

www.missoulanews.com montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3 October 6 – October 13, 2011


BODY, MIND & SPIRIT

By Rob Brezsny

Energy Balancing and acupuncture meridians. 493-6824 or 399-4363

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Do unto others as they wish,” advised French artist Marcel Duchamp, “but with imagination.” I recommend that approach to you, Aries. You’re in a phase of your astrological cycle when you can create good fortune for yourself by tuning into the needs and cravings of others, and then satisfying those needs and cravings in your own inimitable and unpredictable ways. Don’t just give the people you care about the mirror image of what they ask for; give them a funhouse mirror image that reflects your playful tinkering.

Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie Clarion 406-552-7919

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): An old Egyptian saying declares that “the difference between a truth and a lie weighs no more than a feather.” I suspect that your upcoming experiences will vividly demonstrate the accuracy of that statement. There will be a very fine line between delusional nonsense and helpful wisdom…between colorful but misleading BS and articulate, provocative analysis…between interesting but irrelevant fantasies and cogent, evidence-based prognostications. Which side will you be on, Leo? To increase your chances of getting it right, be a stickler for telling yourself the heart-strong truth.



VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): What’s the most practical method of acquiring wealth? One out of every five Americans believes that it’s by playing the lottery. While it is true, Virgo, that you now have a slightly elevated chance of guessing the winning numbers in games of chance—the odds are only 90 million to one instead of 100 million to one—I don’t recommend that you spend any time seeking greater financial security in this particular way. A much better use of your current cosmic advantage would be to revitalize and reorganize your approach to making, spending, saving, and investing money.



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The Jet Propulsion Laboratory landed two robotic vehicles on Mars in 2004. They were expected to explore the planet and send back information for 90 days. But the rover named Spirit kept working for over six years, and its companion, Opportunity, is still operational. The astrological omens suggest that any carefully prepared project you launch in the coming weeks could achieve that kind of staying power, Libra. So take maximum advantage of the vast potential you have available. Don’t scrimp on the love and intelligence you put into your labor of love.



SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “I don’t want to play the part of the mythical phoenix again,” my Scorpio friend Kelly has been moaning as she prepares for her latest trial by fire. “I’ve burned myself to the ground and risen reborn out of the ashes two times this year already. Why can’t someone else take a turn for a change?” While I empathized, I thought it was my duty to tell her what I consider to be the truth: More than any other sign of the zodiac, you Scorpios have supreme skills in the art of metaphorical self-immolation and regeneration. You’re better able to endure the ordeal, too. Besides, part of you actually enjoys the heroic drama and the baby-fresh feelings that come over you as you reanimate yourself from the soot and cinders. Ready for another go?

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): When she was seven years old, my daughter Zoe created a cartoon panel with colored pens. It showed an orange-haired girl bending down to tend to three orange flowers. High overhead was an orange five-pointed star. The girl was saying, “I think it would be fun being a star,” while the star mused, “I think it would be great to be a girl.” I urge you to create your own version of this cartoon, Sagittarius. Put a picture of yourself where the girl was in Zoe’s rendering. Getting your imagination to work in this way will put you in the right frame of mind to notice and take advantage of the opportunities that life will bring you. Here’s your mantra, an ancient formula the mystics espouse: “As above, so below.”



CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Years ago, I discovered I was eligible to join MENSA, an organization for people with high IQs. Since I’d never gotten any awards, plaques, or badges, I thought I’d indulge in this little sin of pride. Not too long after I signed up, however, I felt like an idiot for doing it. Whenever I told someone I belonged to MENSA, I felt sheepish about seeming to imply that I was extra smart. Eventually I resigned from the so-called genius club. But then I descended into deeper egomania—I started bragging about how I had quit MENSA because I didn’t want to come off like an egotist. How egotistical was that? Please avoid this type of unseemly behavior in the coming week, Capricorn. Be authentically humble, not fake like me. It’ll be important for your success.



AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Right now you have license to make pretty much everything bigger and funnier and wickeder. Good fortune is likely to flow your way as you seek out experiences that are extra interesting and colorful and thought provoking. This is no time for you to be shy about asking for what you want or timid about stirring up adventure. Be louder and prouder than usual. Be bolder and brighter, nosier and cozier, weirder and more whimsical. The world needs your very best idiosyncrasies and eccentricities!



PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): There is a slight chance the following scenario will soon come to pass: A psychic will reveal that you have a mutant liver that can actually thrive on alcohol, and you will then get drunk on absinthe every day for two weeks, and by the end of this grace period, you will have been freed of 55 percent of the lingering guilt you’ve carried around for years, plus you will care 40 percent less about what people think of you. Extra bonus: You’ll feel like a wise rookie who’s ready to learn all about intimacy as if you were just diving into it for the first time. But get this, Pisces: There’s an even greater chance that these same developments will unfold very naturally—without the psychic, without the prediction about a mutant liver, and without the nonstop drunkenness.

Wholistic Therapy.

Choices Massage Neuromuscular

D

IS

E

274-5084 H M AS

S

MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS 1st Interstate Pawn. 3110 South Reserve, is now open! Buying gold and silver. Buying, selling, and pawning items large and small. We pay more and sell for less. 406-721(PAWN)7296. FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation non-denominational 1-800-475-0876

AUCTIONS OFFERED AT AUCTION 10/29/11 affordable modern Helena Valley Hobby Ranch, 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, large garage, workshop/barn, storage buildings, irrigated hay/pasture. www.montanalandauctions.com Russell Pederson 406-939-2501 OFFERED AT AUCTION 10/30/11, 2:00pm: Two +/50’x130’ lots, one w/house, 613 Eisenhower Street SW, Ronan, Montana. www.montanalandauctions.com Russell Pederson 406-939-2501

COMPUTERS Even Macs are computers! Need help with yours? CLARKE CONSULTING @ 5496214

Steel Buildings Reduced Factory Inventory 30x36 – Reg $12,300

Now $9,970 36x58 – Reg $20,300

Now $16,930 48x96 – Reg $42,400

Now $36,200 81x130 – Reg $104,800

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

SAUNA AG

Past life regression. Find out what your soul has experienced in other lifetimes. It helps you understand your strengths, talents, fears and relationships. 406-961-4449. Serving Western Montana.

ER KI PP

G



Moondance Healing Therapies. Massage & BodyTalk. Rosie Smith CBP/LMT 240-9103 www.redwillowcenter.org

E



CANCER (June 21-July 22): The experiences you’re flirting with seem to be revivals of longforgotten themes. You’re trying to recover and reinvigorate stuff that was abandoned or neglected way back when. You’re dipping into the past to salvage defunct resources, hoping to find new applications for them. To illustrate the spirit of what you’re doing, I’ve resurrected some obsolete words I found in an 18th-centry dictionary. Try sprinkling them into your conversations; make them come alive again. “Euneirophrenia” means “peace of mind after a sweet dream.” The definition of “neanimorphic” is “looking younger than one’s true age.” “Gloze” is when you speak soothing or flattering words in order to persuade. “Illapse” means the gradual or gentle entrance of one thing into another.

MASSAGE BY JANIT, CMT Swedish-Deep TissueReiki-Vibrational Energy WorkChakra Clearing $1/per minute 207-7358

SW

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Is there something you’ve always wanted to create but have not gotten around to creating? Now would be an excellent time to finally get that project off the ground. Is there any role you have fantasized about taking on but have never actually sought out? Now would be a perfect moment to initiate an attempt. Is there any big mysterious deal you’ve thought about connecting with but never have? Any profound question you’ve longed to pose but didn’t? Any heartexpanding message you’ve wanted to deliver but couldn’t bring yourself to? You know what to do.

With over 500 events per month, you’re sure to find something for Body, Mind and Spirit at www.MissoulaEvents.net

N

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Winner of the American Book Award in 1963, William Stafford wrote thousands of poems. The raw materials for his often-beautiful creations were the fragments and debris of his daily rhythm. “I have woven a parachute out of everything broken,” he said in describing his life’s work. You are now in a phase when you could achieve a comparable feat, Taurus. You have the power to turn dross into sweetness, refuse into treasure, loss into gain.

Massage $45/hour. Anna 2413405

CO

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

Now $89,940 Source# 01S, 406-545-4580

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4 October 6 – October 13, 2011

RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway 5438287

FURNITURE Small Wonders queen size futon. Double wool with 2 covers. Asking $600; $1200 new. 240-4499 Used Furniture & Appliances Affordable, Quality, and For a Good Cause! Donation Warehouse, 1804 North Ave West www.donationwarehouse.net

MUSIC ADULTS....PIANO CLASS FORMING Learn to play the piano in a fun, informal way with the latest in technology to enhance your learning. 12 weeks $89.00 includes materials. Missoula’s #1 Music Store. MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds entrance. 1105 W

Gear up for Fall Great Prices 111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

ADULTS ...

PIANO CLASS FORMING. Learn to play the piano in a fun, informal way with the latest in technology to enhance your learning. 12 weeks $89.00 includes materials.

MORGENROTH MUSIC 1105 W Sussex, Missoula 549-0013 www.montanamusic.com

Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 549-0013. www.montanamusic.com Outlaw Music Specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, TuesdayFriday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am-6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533. Outlawmusicguitarshop.com Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 7 2 1 - 0 1 9 0 BennettsMusicStudio.com

EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

549-6214

Outlaw Music

541-7533

Missoula's Stringed Instrument Pro Shop!

Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

724 Burlington Ave. outlawmusicguitarshop.com

WWW.GREGBOYD.COM One of the world’s premier music stores. (406) 327-9925.

PETS & ANIMALS DOGS: #1219 Black, McNabb Blue Heeler X, NM, 2yrs; #1694 Black, Lab/Pit, NM, 2yrs; #1715 Black/creme, St Bernard/Rott X, SF, 2yrs; #1727

Back-toschool savings!

1136 W. Broadway 930 Kensington 1221 Helen Ave


AUTO

MARKETPLACE Brown/white, St Bernard X, SF, 3yrs; #1733 Tan/Blk, GSD X, NM, 6yrs; #1747 Black, Lab, SF, 2.5 yrs; #1748 Black, Lab, SF, 2.5yrs; #1785 Yellow, Lab, SF, 11yrs; #1798 Black/silver, Husky X, NM, 5.5 yrs; #1834 Brown, Poodle, NM, 9yrs; #1835 Black, Poodle, NM, 9yrs; #1855 Black, Lab X, SF, 1yr; #1858 Yellow, Lab, NM, 1yr; #1872 Black/tan, Lab/Husky X, NM, 1.5yrs; #1879 Blue Merle, Heeler X, SF, 4.5 yrs; #1883 Liver, GSP, SF, 9yrs; #1884 Brown/white, Pit, SF, 1 1/2yrs; #1888 Black, Boxer X, NM, 8mo; #1912 Black, Lab, SF, 10yrs; #1923 Brn/white, Corgi/Beagle X, SF, 2yrs; #1946 Blk/grey, Heeler/BC X, SF, 1.5 yrs; #1954 Black, Heeler X, SF, 2.5yrs; #1964 Blk/wht, Heeler X, SF, 4yrs; #1972

Red/blk, SF, Heeler/Clow X, 10 mo; #2020 Blk/white, Malamute X, NM, 2yrs.For photo listings see our web page at w w w. m o n t a n a p e t s . o r g Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hami lton or www.petango.com, use 59840. DR. ANGUS DISPERSAL. October 8, 2011, 12:30pm. Dickinson Livestock Exchange West, Dickinson, ND selling 328 head: bred cows, bred heifers, open heifers, bull calves, herd sires. Contact (517)546-6374 for more information CATS: #0588 Grey Tabby, Am Short Hair, SF; #0624 Black, Am Short Hair, NM, 4 yr; #1230 White/Grey, Tabby, ALH, SF, 9yrs; #1255

Tuxedo, DLH, SF, 2 yrs; #1330 Black/white, ASH, SF; #1333 Black, Maine Coon X, NM, 7yrs; #1364 Tan/Black, DSH, SF, 1 yr; #1413 Grey/white Tux, ASH, SF, 3yr; #1551 Dilute Torti, DMH, SF; #1552 Dilute Calico, ASH, SF; #1553 Black, Bombay X, SF; #1587 Tan/black, ASH, NM; #1596 White/grey, ASH, NM, 4yrs; #1604 Orange/white, M, DSH, 1 1/2yrs; #1621 Dilute Torti, SF, BSH, 8 yrs; #1623 Orange Tabby, DSH, SF, 2yr; #1627 Grey/white, DLH, NM, 2yr; #1628 Black/white, DLH, NM, 1yr; #1635 Black/white Tux, ASH, NM, 6yrs; # 1642 Black/tan Tabby, SLH, SF, 2.5mo; # 1643 Blk/tan Tabby, ASH, NM, 2.5mo; #1650 Black, ALH, NM, 2 mo; #1653 Tan/white/grey, DLH, NM,

15yrs; #1667 Grey, DSH, SF, 1yr; #1676 Orange Tabby, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #1678 Tan TAbby, DMH, SF, 1yr; #1718 DMH, NM, 4.5yrs; #1745 Black/white, DMH, SF, 4yrs; #1758 Orange/white, DSH, NM; #1786 Blk Tabby, Maine Coon , SF, 1 1/2yrs; #18071812 Siamese X, KITTENS 8 months; #1818 Black/white, Siamese X, SF, 2yrs; #1819 Dilute Calico, Siamese X, SF, 2yrs; #1833 Black, DSH, SF, 5yrs; #1840 Orange/white, DMH, NM, 9 weeks; #1846 Silver Tabby, DSH, NM, 10yrs; #1849 Grey, DSH, NM, 10 mo; #1857 DMH, SF, 4yrs; #1886 Black, DSH, NM, 6mo; #1913 Blk/white, DSH, SF, 14yrs; #1921 Grey/white, DSH, SF, 2yrs; #1942 Orange Tabby, ASH, NM, 3yrs; #1948 Grey, DSH, SF, 10ys; #1949 Black, DMH,

SF, 1yr; #1950-1953 Black, KITTENS, DMH, 1 mo; #1973 Grey, DSH, NM, 8mo; #1975 Black, Bombay X, NM, 5yrs; #1977 Buff, DSH, NM, 10yrs; #1976 White Cali, Siamese X, SF, 2yrs; #1978 Grey/tan, DLH, SF, 2yrs; #1979 White/Tan/Brown, Snowshoe X, SF, 3mo; #1980 Tan/brown/white, NM, Snowshoe X, 3mo. For photo listings see our web page at w w w. m o n t a n a p e t s . o r g Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hami lton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

GARAGE SALES After you scour the sales, plan your savvy weekend at MissoulaEvents.net

CRUISEGENERAL CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 18 8 8 - 4 2 0 - 3 8 0 8 www.cash4car.com 2004 JEEP LIBERTY Silver,Trail Rated,72k miles,4WD,CD Player,VERY CLEAN, black cloth interior,RUNS FLAWLESSLY,college student looking to downsize, call 406-590-5439

SPORT UTILITY 00’ Subaru Forester $5,800 Runs Great Lucas 406-552-2474

ADULT SWEET & DISCRETE Escort Referral Service

829-6394

NOW HIRING www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

SERVICES CHILDCARE Iddy Biddies Preschool Iddy Biddies has preschool openings for children 2-6 years of age. Encouraging a love for nature, adventure, and the arts. We are located at 2901 Eaton St (Between the mall and Shop-Ko) Stop by or call for an apointment 406-7285055

COMPUTERS/IN TERNET SERVICES Affordable Websites Need a website? 15yrs exp. prof. & classy Currently attending college so my prices are 1/2 of other web building companies. 406-2125708

GARDEN/ LANDSCAPING Environmental Enhancements Irrigation Get current system upgrades including: wireless solar controllers, smart self adjusting

controllers, and drip irrigation retrofits. EEI is a Full ServiceLawn Sprinkler Company with extensive industry experience. Call today for summer specials! 406-880-3064 • www.eeirrigation.com

HANDYMAN Squires for Hire. Carpentry, Drywall, Painting, Plumbing, General Handyman. I actually show up on time! Bret 544-4671

You’ll find plenty of classes and seminars to finish that project at MissoulaEvents.net

UMPHREY

PHOTOGRAPHY & GALLERY Weddings Portraits • Birthdays

Drive a little, save a lot!

1522 S. Reserve

Blue Mountain Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x20 $65 Bitterroot Mini Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x10 $45 • 10x15 $55 10x20 $65 • 10x30 $85 • 542-2060

493-0874 www.umphreyphoto.com

Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

"Let us tend your den"

HOME IMPROVEMENT Natural Housebuilders, Inc., *ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes* Additions/Remodels* HIGHER-COMFORT crafted building* Solar Heating* 369-0940 or 642-6863* www.naturalhousebuilder.net

406.241.2432

Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator, testimonials available. Hoythomes.com or 7285642

Black’s Deck Finishing & Residential Painting Licensed & Insured Interior & Exterior Painting

880-6211

Commercial or Residential ImprovingYourOutlook.com

Locally Owned & Operated

Free Estimates

(406) 531-7872 blacksdfrpainting.com

GPM HEATING COOLING & PLUMBING

Furnace check & clean $75 Serving Missoula, Ravalli, and Mineral counties. 406-241-2598

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5 October 6 – October 13, 2011


PUBLIC NOTICES CITY OF MISSOULA NVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, 59802-4297 until 3:00 p.m., Tuesday, October 18th, 2011 and will be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room, City Hall at that time. As soon thereafter as is possible, a contract will be made for the following: Installation of 75 feet of 36 Inch diameter Cure in Place Sewer Pipe Liner Bidders shall bid by City bid proposal forms, addressed to the City Clerk’s Office, City of Missoula, enclosed in separate, sealed envelopes marked plainly on the outside, “Bid for Installation of 75 feet of 36 Inch Diameter Cure in Place Sewer Pipe Liner, Closing 3:00 p.m.,Tuesday, October 18th, 2011”. Pursuant to Section 18-1-102 Montana Code Annotated, the City is required to provide purchasing preferences to resident Montana vendors and \ or for products made in Montana equal to the preference provided in the state of

The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following items on Tuesday, October 18, 2011, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. 1. Rezoning Request — Mahlum Meadows A request from Tom Mahlum to zone property along Mahlum Lane from being Unzoned to C-RR1 (Residential). The property is located on the south side of Waldo Road and west of Highway 93 in the Wye vicinity. See Map D. 2. Rezoning Request — Baker Apartments A request from Gregg Baker, represented by William Nerison of WRN Architects, to rezone property located on the east side of Peacock Street between Highway 200 E and Minnesota Street (in East Missoula) from C-C2

(General Commercial) to C-R3 (Residential). See Map F. The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing on item #1 at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, October 26, 2011, and on item #2 at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, November 9, 2011. Both hearings will be held in Room 201 of the Missoula County Courthouse at 200 West Broadway. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request and exact legal description is available for public inspection at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants, City Hall, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana. Telephone 258-4657. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 258-4657. The Office of Planning and Grants will provide auxiliary aids and services.

the competitor. Each and every bid must be accompanied by cash, a certified check, bid bond, cashier’s check, bank money order or bank draft payable to the City Treasurer, Missoula, Montana, and drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana or by any banking corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Montana for an amount which shall not be less than ten percent (10%) of the bid, as a good faith deposit. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal forms. No bid will be considered which includes Federal excise tax, since the City is exempt there from and will furnish to the successful bidder certificates of exemption. The City reserves the right to determine the significance of all exceptions to bid specifications. Products or services that do not meet bid specifications must be clearly marked as an exception to the specifications. Vendors requesting inclusion or pre-approved alternatives to any of these bid specifications must receive written authorization from the Wastewater Collections Supervisor a minimum of five (5) working days prior to the bid closing. The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids and if all bids are rejected, to readvertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. The City reserves the right to waive any technicality in the bidding which is not of substantial nature. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to bid opening at 3:00 p.m., Tuesday, October 18th, 2011. Bidders may obtain further information and specifications from Pat Brook, Collections Supervisor at the

PUBLIC NOTICE The Missoula City Council will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Monday, October 24, 2011, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana: Bee Hive Homes (2406 River Road) Building Expansion A request from Jim Decker, representing Bee Hive Homes, for a Conditional Use approval for property located at 2406 River Road (see Map C), zoned RT10

(two unit/townhouse). The applicant requests a conditional use in order to expand a personal care facility building, currently housing 11 residents, to add 5 additional bedrooms or 5 residents. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request and case file are available for public inspection at the Office of Planning and Grants, 435 Ryman Street. Call 258-4657 for further assistance. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 258-4657. The Office of Planning and Grants will provide auxiliary aids and services.

City Wastewater Division at (406) 552-6600. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the City’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on November 7, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider an ordinance amending Title 6 Missoula Municipal Code entitled "Animals" repealing Chapters 6.02, 6.04, 6.09, 6.12, 6.16, 6.20 and 6.22, enacting Chapter 6.07 entitled "Animal Ordinance" and renaming Chapter 6.08 entitled "Dogs and Pet Shops" to "Pet Shops, Pet Sales and Boarding Kennels" to generally amend, recodify and update the City's regulations pertaining to animals, increase license fees and increase fines pertaining to violations. For further information, contact Ed Franceschina, Animal Control, at 5417387. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein CMC, City Clerk MISSOULA COUNTY MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-10-1647 Judge: John W. Larson NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT G. MULLENDORE, STEWART TITLE OF MISSOULA COUNTY AS TRUSTEE, JOHN DOES 1-10, JANE DOES 1-10, and XYZ COMPANIES 1-10, Defendants. TO BE SOLD at Sheriff’s Sale on the 10th day of November, 2011, at 1:30 o’clock p.m., at the front door of the County Court House, in the City of Missoula, County of Missoula, State of Montana, to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and personal property located in Missoula County, Montana, and more particularly described as follows: Lots 1 and 2 on Block “K” of Pattee Canyon Addition No. 2 to Far Views Homesites in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official map or plat thereof on file and of record in the office of the Clerk and Recorder for Missoula, County, Montana. The Real property or its address is commonly known as 125 Takima Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803. Any person willfully taking down or defacing a posted notice, if done before the sale or satisfaction of the Judgment (if the Judgment be satisfied before the sale), forfeits $500.00 (Section 25-13-702, MCA). DATED this 6th day of October, 2011. /s/ CARL C. IBSEN, Sheriff Of Missoula County By: /s/ Patrick A. Turner, Deputy MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF CLOSE OF REGISTRATION Notice is hereby given that registration for the Municipal General Election to be held November 8, 2011, will close at 5:00 P.M., on October 11, 2011.. All qualified registered electors of the City of Missoula are entitled to vote at said election. Ballots will be automatically mailed to Active Electors only. If you are a registered voter who resides within the City of Missoula and do not receive a ballot, contact the county election office to update your information as necessary and receive a ballot. Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the Election Administrator in the Courthouse Annex, 2nd floor. If moving has made a change of precinct, it is necessary to have your registration transferred to your new address. NOTE: If you miss this regular registration deadline, you may still register for the election by showing up at the Missoula County Fairgrounds building 15 starting October 12 through November 8, 2011 until close of polls at 8:00 p.m. Dated this 20th day of September, 2011 /s/ Vickie Zeier Election Administrator Missoula

County By /s/ Debbe Merseal, Chief Deputy, Clerk & Recorder/Elections MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT Dept. No. 3 Probate No. DP11-166 Dept. No. 2 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ERIKA CAMP, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Thomas H. Camp, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Milodragovich, Dale, Steinbrenner & Nygren, P.C., 620 High Park Way, PO Box 4947, Missoula, Montana 59806-4947, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 7th day of September, 2011. /s/ Thomas H. Camp, Personal Representative

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DN-11-36 Department No. 1 Judge Edward P. McLean SUMMONS AND CITATION IN THE MATTER OF DECLARING G.J.M., JR., A YOUTH IN NEED OF CARE. TO: ALIDA RAE GARFIELD Re: G.M. Jr., born July 18, 2011. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Child and Family Services Division (CFS), 2677 Palmer, Suite 300, Missoula, Montana 59808, has filed a Petition for Emergency Protective Services, Adjudication as a Youth in Need of Care and Temporary Legal Custody. CFS has petitioned for temporary legal custody of G.M., Jr. for six months, or for said youth to be otherwise cared for: Now, Therefore YOU ARE HEREBY CITED AND DIRECTED to appear on Wednesday, the 2nd day of November, 2011 at 9:00 a.m. at the Courtroom of the above entitled Court at the Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, then and there to show cause, if any you may have, why the above-named child should not be adjudicated a youth in need of care; why CFS should not be awarded temporary legal custody of G.M., Jr. for six months; why the Petition should not be granted or why said youth should not be otherwise cared for. Alida Rae Garfield is represented by Court-appointed attorney Kelli Sather, 610 N. Woody, Missoula, Montana, 59802 (406) 523-5140. Your failure to appear at the hearing constitutes a denial of your interest in custody of the youth, which denial will result, without further notice of this proceeding or any subsequent proceeding, in judgment by default being entered for the relief requested in the Petition. A copy of the Petition hereinbefore referred to is filed with the Clerk of the District Court for Missoula County, telephone: (406) 258-4780. WITNESS the Honorable Edward P. McLean, Judge of the above-entitled Court and the Seal of this Court, this 28th day of September, 2011. /s/ Edward P. McLean, District Judge MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-11-161 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF RICHARD T. GILLIGAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Edward Greskiewicz, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at Beal Law Firm, PLLC, PO Box 8898, MIssoula, MT 59808, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 24th day of September, 2011. /s/ Edward Greskiewicz, 8 Rainbow Court, Clinton, MT 59825 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-11-162 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF BENNIE JOHN VO0RHIES, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Nicole J. Chaffin, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested,in care of Thiel Law Office, PLLC, 315 West Pine, PO Box 8125, Missoula, Montana 59807 or filed with the Clerk of the aboveentitled Court. DATED this 6th day of September, 2011. THIEL LAW OFFICE, /s/ Matthew B. Thiel Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP-11-158 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF MARGO A. KIDDER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Raine J. Kidder has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons hav-

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C6 October 6 – October 13, 2011

ing claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Raine J. Kidder, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Timothy D. Geiszler, GEISZLER & FROINES, PC, 619 Southwest Higgins, Suite K, Missoula, Montana 59803 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 29th day of August, 2011. GEISZLER & FROINES, PC /s/ Timothy D. Geiszler, Attorneys for the Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP-11-173 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HELEN V. KIDDER a/k/a HELEN ROSS KIDDER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to CHARLES W. SCHUYLER, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Marsillo & Schuyler, PLLC, 103 South 5th Street East, Missoula, MT 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 22nd day of September, 2011. /s/ Charles W. Schuyler, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-11-169 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF SARA LYON JAMES, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to SHAWN E. ROSSCUP, attorney for the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at PO Box 9410, Missoula, Montana 59807 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED September 19, 2011. /s/ Suzanne Artley, Personal Representative. /s/ Shawn E. Rosscup, Attorney for Personal Representative INVITATION TO BID Separate sealed bids for construction of the Missoula Irrigation District Log Grate Project will be received by Missoula Irrigation District at the office of Morrison-Maierle, Inc. in Missoula until 4 p.m. local time on October 26th, 2011, and then publicly opened and read aloud. The project generally consists of installation of log grate structure at Missoula Irrigation District’s control structure. Work includes but is not necessarily limited to, the following major items: Dewatering of project area; Installation of concrete piers; Installation of steel beams; Installation of walkway grate and handrail; Cleanup activities. The Contract Documents consisting of half size Drawings and Project Manual may be examined or obtained at the office of Morrison-Maierle, Inc. 3011 Palmer Street, Missoula, MT 59801. Required deposit is $50.00 per set, which is not refundable, by regular mail or United Parcel Service (UPS). There will be a Pre-Bid Conference at the Missoula office of Morrison-Maierle, Inc., at 2 p.m. on October 20th, 2011. Interested CONTRACTORS are encouraged to attend. CONTRACTOR(s) and any of the CONTRACTOR’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI). Forms for registration are available from the Department of Labor and Industry, P.O. Box 8011, 1805 Prospect, Helena, Montana 59604-8011. Information on registration can be obtained by calling 1-406-444-7734. Forms for registration can also be obtained online at MT.Contractor.Com. CONTRACTOR’s are not required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project, but must have registered prior to execution of the Construction Agreement. All laborers and mechanics employed by CONTRACTOR(s) or subcontractors in performance of the construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by the laws of the State of Montana in accordance with the schedule of Davis-Bacon prevailing wage rates established by the United States Department of Labor and/or the schedule of Montana Prevailing Wage Rates established by the Montana Department of Labor and Industry included in the Project Manual. Each bid or proposal must be accompanied by a Certified Check, Cashier's Check, or Bid Bond payable to Missoula Irrigation District, in an amount not less than ten percent (10%) of the total amount of the bid. Successful BIDDERS shall furnish an approved Construction Performance Bond and a Construction (Labor and Materials) Payment Bond, each in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Insurance as required shall be provided by the successful BIDDER(s) and a certificate(s) of that insurance shall be provided. No bid may be

withdrawn after the scheduled time for the public opening of the Bids specified above. The right is reserved to reject any or all Proposals received, to waive informalities, to postpone the award of the contract for a period of not to exceed 30 days, and to accept the lowest responsive and responsible bid which is in the best interest of the Missoula Irrigation District. Published this 6th day of October, 2011. /s/ Ray Tipp, Secretary Missoula Irrigation District NOTICE OF TRUSTEE S SALE Trustee Sale Number: 11-03692-3 Loan Number: 0083453092 APN: 5838618 TO BE SOLD for cash at Trustee’s Sale on January 23, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, recognized local time, on the front steps to the County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula the following described real properly in Missoula County, Montana, to-wit: LOT 10 IN SHELBY ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY. MONTANA ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. APN # 5838618 More commonly known as:12978 KIMWOOO DRIVE, LOLO, MT TERl S LERCH, A SINGLE PERSON, as the original grantor(s), conveyed said real property to ALLIANCE TITLE & ESCROW CORP., as the original trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as the original beneficiary, by a Trust Indenture dated as of February 8, 2008, and recorded on February 15, 2008 under Document No. 200803260, in the Official Records of the Office of the Record of Missoula County, Montana {“Deed of Trust”). The current beneficiary is: Wells Fargo Bank, NA. (the “Beneficiary”). FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY was named as Successor Trustee (the “Trustee”) by virtue of a Substitution of Trustee dated August 29, 2011 and recorded in the records of Missoula County, Montana. There has been a default in the performance of said Deed of Trust: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears as of August 18,2011: Balance due on monthly payments from April 1, 2011 and which payments total: $996.48: Late charges; $79.72: Advances: $0.00 There is presently due on the obligation the principal sum of $151,375.25 plus accrued interest thereon at the rate of 4.50000% per annum from March 1, 2011, plus late charges. Interest and late charges continue to accrue. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds include the trustee’s or attorney’s fees and costs and expenses of sale. The beneficiary has elected to sell the property to satisfy the obligation and has directed the trustee to commence such sale proceedings. The beneficiary declares that the grantor is in default as described above and has directed the Trustee to commence proceedings to sell the property described above at public sale in accordance with the terms and provisions of this notice. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the aforesaid property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default theretofore existing. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714.730.2727 DATED:September 8, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee, By: Mariah Booker, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4093065 09/29/2011, 10/06/2011, 10/13/2011 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/30/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200703700, Bk 791, Pg 1721, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which David S. Zrowka and Jeanne A Zrowka, husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Quicken Loans Inc. was Beneficiary and Title Source, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Source, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract 9-B-2 of Certificate of Survey No. 1813, located in the NE1/4 of Section 35 and the NW1/4 of Section 36, Township 14 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. Bk. 866, Pg. 409, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for J.P. Morgan Alternative Loan Trust 2007-A2. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”)

secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 06/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of August 11, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $420,804.18. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $383,846.53, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 22, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.09748) 1002.171712-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/10/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200514158, Bk-754 Pg-463, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Anirban Mitra, a married man was Grantor, JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Insured Titles, LLC was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles, LLC as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 10 of Canyon View Two, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200808559, B:817, P:0336, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/07 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of August 11, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $224,825.13. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $165,696.52, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 22, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion


PUBLIC NOTICES of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.74055) 1002.185641-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/30/09, recorded as Instrument No. 200928678, Bk 851, Pg 1128, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Todd Hoose and Tracie Hoose, as joint tenants (and not as tenants in common), and to the survivor of them, and to the heirs and assigns of such survivor married was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Parcel 20B2 of Certificate of Survey No. 2665, located in the SE1/4 of Section 27, Township 14 North, Range 23 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of August 17, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $236,677.63. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $219,417.80, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 28, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.91238) 1002.180737-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on December 5, 2011, 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 7 IN BLOCK 4 OF ELMS ADDITION NO. 4, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Jennie J. Coyne, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title and Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Associates Financial Services Company of Montana, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of trust dated September 25, 1995 and Recorded September 26, 1995 in Book 452, Page 2226 under Document Number 31162. The beneficial interest is currently held by The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, NA, fka The Bank of New York Trust Company, NA, as successor to JPMorgan Chase Bank, NA, as trustee, in trust for the Holders of Truman Mortgage Loan Trust 2002-1, Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2002-1. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution

of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,156.25, beginning April 1,1999, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of June 24, 2011 is $97,335.00 principal, interest at the rate of 13.90% now totaling $153,817.44, late charges in the amount of $1,176.49, escrow advances of $44,469.44, and other fees and expenses advanced of $46,316.57, plus accruing interest at the rate of $37.07 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: August 2, 2011 /s/ Becky Stucki First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ) )ss. County of Bingham ) On this 2nd day of August, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Becky Stucki, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the forgoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Sonja L Monson Notary Public Bonneville County, Idaho Falls, ID Commission expires: 11/23/2015 Select Portfolio V Coyne/Tom & Jennie 41477.139 October 6, 13 and 20, 2011 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 14, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County. Montana: Lots 13 and 14 in Block 46 of Daly’s Addition, a platted Subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official recorded plat thereof Mary Trochmann, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed lo Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems. Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated November 9, 2006 and recorded November 15, 2006 in Book 787, Page 423 under Document No. 200629648. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. This beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,195.97. beginning February 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the properly or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of May 14, 2011 is $154,828.92 principal, interest at the rate of

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r 6.1250% now totaling $3,498.84, late charges in the amount of $149.46, escrow advances of $19.83, and other fees and expenses advanced of $47.50 plus accruing interest at the rate of $25.98 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only The Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty. Including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint mold or other environmental or health hazards The sale purchase shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by pubic proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMAIONn OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.Dated: July 14, 2011 /s/ Becky Stucki First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 14th day of July, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Becky Stucki, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the forgoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Juanita C Monson Notary Public Bingham, County, Blackfoot, ID Commission expires: 9/18/2016 Citimortgage V Trochmann 42011.446 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 21, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: LOT 34 OF SWEET GRASS ADDITION AT MALONEY RANCH PHASE I, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Barry A. Philbert and Trudie M. Philbert, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 12, 2002 and recorded on September 20, 2002 in Book 688, Page 1807 as Document #200227148. The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,416.19, beginning October 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of July 28, 2011 is $201,083.23 principal, interest at the rate of 6.375% now totaling $11,630.76, late charges in the amount of $1,274.40, escrow advances of $3,204.33, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,619.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $35.12 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If

such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default.The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WJLL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: July 13, 2011 /s/ Dalia Martinez First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 13th day of July, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the forgoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Viki D Bauer Notary Public State of Idaho County, Bingham Commission expires: 3/29/14 GMACV. Philbert 41965.439 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 01/06/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which CLARK G. ANDERSON as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to STEWART TITLE as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 05/25/2007 and recorded 05/31/2007, in document No. 200713508 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 798 at Page Number 594 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 2 OF TOWER LOTS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 1125 TOWER STREET, Missoula, MT 59804. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWABS, INC., ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-12. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 09/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of

said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $194,451.04 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 3.02% per annum from 09/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 08/23/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 110085495 FEI NO. 1006.142564 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 01/10/2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which THOMAS D. ERVING AND MIKELL K POTTER, AS JOINT TENANTS WITH RIGHT OF SURVIVORSHIP as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 11/14/2007 and recorded 11/20/2007, in document No. 200730276 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 809 at Page Number 177 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 21 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS TRACT 11A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 1872. Property Address: 16600 TOUCHETTE LANE, Frenchtown, MT 59834. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 01/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $397,581.09 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.375% per annum from 12/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 08/25/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.,

d s

"Aftermath"–finally calling it quits.

by Matt Jones

ACROSS 1 "You are not!" retort 6 Antlered beast 9 First word of two Springsteen albums 13 Skeezy type 14 "___ So High" (Blur song) 16 "Peek-___!" 17 Dorothy's aunt's precipitation is surprisingly mild? 19 "Te ___" (hymn title) 20 Miss Scarlet's game 21 Record player parts 23 "The Fifth Beatle" Sutcliffe 25 The guy who always dyes eggs in springtime? 27 Cigarette ingredient 28 Palme ___ (Cannes Film Festival prize) 29 Tool that breaks ground 30 Humble dwelling 32 It's a little dirtier than "bum" 35 Hail ___ 39 Fictional spy who's really a giant department store founder? 42 Cubs all-time home run leader 43 Attachable brick brand 44 Spot in the water 45 Emerald, for one 47 Hot Topic founder ___ Madden 49 Some fish bait 50 Command for this flan-like dessert to jump in my mouth already? 55 "...___ and buts were candy and nuts..." 56 Shout after an unhappy return 57 Perched upon 59 "Squawk Box" network 60 Announcement/event of September 2011, or what happened to the theme answers 64 End in ___ 65 Swiss painter Paul 66 Flightless birds 67 Rick of the radio 68 Pig's digs Last week’s solution

69 Late jazz musician who insisted he was from Saturn

DOWN 1 Word in many beer names 2 Give guns to 3 Full of a liquid metal 4 Insignia 5 Turn-of-the-century place to get high 6 Key near F1 7 ___ Apso 8 Seaweed varieties 9 Nightmares 10 "Divided by" symbols (BE OIL anagram) 11 French city where Joan of Arc died 12 Claim on some Chinese menus 15 Alan ___ (pseudonym used by film directors) 18 Roman emperor who fiddled around 22 Role reprised by Keanu in 2003 23 Wild guesses 24 Deed not to be done 26 Rub out 31 Competes on the street33 Bad toupee 34 Thread holder 36 Baseball Jr. nicknamed "Iron Man" 37 "___ Cakes" (Food Network show) 38 8-bit units 40 Herbal remedy from trees 41 Rosie, et al. 46 Brain waves monitor: abbr. 48 Tail end 50 Seed plant (DC CAY anagram) 51 ___ Carlo 52 "Memories of You" pianist Blake 53 Cambodian currency 54 Like some needs 58 Where North Shore surfers go 61 Richard of 1990s talk show fame 62 Egypt and Syr., from 19581961 63 "Don't do drugs" ad, for short

©2011 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com)

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 October 6 – October 13, 2011


PUBLIC NOTICES MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 8445 WISE RIVER RD, Missoula, MT 59803-9637. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 07/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $330,734.08 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.75% per annum from 07/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by

Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0026415 FEI NO. 1006.131552 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 01/09/2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which VENIAMIN DENISHCHICH, AND NATASHA DENISHCHICH as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON, ATTORNEY as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to COUNTRYWIDE BANK, FSB., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 04/21/2008 and recorded 06/05/2008, in document No. 200812480 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 820 at Page Number 58 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PREMISES, IN MISSOULA COUNTY, STATE OF MONTANA, TO-WIT: LOT 37 OF STILLWATER ADDITION AT MALONEY RANCH, PHASE II, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN

the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 08/24/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0086452 FEI NO. 1006.142732 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 01/18/2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which ROBERT HURT as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to AMERICAN PIONEER TITLE as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 07/24/2006 and recorded 09/18/2007, in document No. 200724262 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 805 at Page

Number 1268 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: THE LAND REFERRED TO IN THIS COMMITMENT IS LOCATED IN THE COUNTY OF MISSOULA, AND IS KNOWN AS 1317 COOPER STREET, MISSOULA, MT 59802 BEING FURTHER DESCRIBED AS: THE REAL PROPERTY SITUATED IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, AND PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOTS 5, 6 AND THE EAST 20 FEET OF LOT 7, IN BLOCK 57 OF SCHOOL ADDITION, CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. REFERENCE FOR RECORDING PURPOSES; BOOK 165, PAGE 161, MICRO RECORDS OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Property Address: 1317 COOPER ST, Missoula, MT 598022317. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-15. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 08/01/2009, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE.

By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $172,666.20 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 7.375% per annum from 08/01/2009 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 08/31/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0089870 FEI NO. 1006.142991 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 01/17/2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in inter-

est acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which MARK D KING, A SINGLE MAN as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 09/15/2003 and recorded 09/17/2003, in document No. 200335293 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 718 at Page Number 98 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 18A OF FIRST AMENDED PLAT OF LOW’S ADDITION, BLOCK 6, LOTS 17 AND 18 AND FIRSTAMENDED PLAT OF BENNETT ADDITION, BLOCK 6, LOT 17, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 2004 SOUTH 4TH STREET WEST, Missoula, MT 59801. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWABS, INC., ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 20035. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in

the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 11/01/2009, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $123,117.94 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 8.75% per annum from 11/01/2009 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 09/01/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0089873 FEI NO. 1006.142982

HOME PAGE

Clearing fall debris By Diane Beck, 2011 MOR President Just for fun, take an inventory of all the leaf removal tools cluttering your garage. If you’re like me, you’ve got a half-dozen rakes of different sizes and materials, a couple of blowers in various states of disrepair, and a couple of infomercial gadgets that promise to make annual leaf gathering faster and easier. In fact, you need only a few essential leaf removal items in your landscape tool collection to accomplish your autumn goal — removing the heavy leaves that smother grass and make your lawn a splotchy mess in spring. Fewer gizmos and more elbow grease help homeowners remove leaves and keep up with lawn maintenance. The reality is, you can’t avoid the hard work

when it comes to fall landscaping chores. There are some tools that will help us, but the best help is family and friends. The more hands, the better! Whether you rake, blow, or tie a mower to a stick, you should remove leaves at least twice each fall. Here are four essential leaf-removal tools that’ll help you clear your lawn before winter sets in: • Rigid leaf rake. This plastic, fan-shaped rake is your go-to rake for collecting leaves. Pick one with a cushion handle and a 30- to 36-inch fan. Avoid the super-wide fans that can spread to 48 inches; they’re too big to rake between shrubs and in flower beds. Cost: $10-$20 (30inch fan). • Leaf tarp. Instead of scooping leaves into a million plastic bags, rake or blow them into a big pile on top of

Featured Listing • • • • •

$296,750 MLS# 20111993

Tex Cates (406) 728-6100

Happy gathering!

DON'T MISS OUT!

3 bed, 2 bath, double garage Desirable Rattlesnake area! Low maintenance, main level living Close to DT, parks, trails, and the U Basement

1219 Lolo St. Missoula

a polypropylene leaf tarp. Then drag the tarp to the curb and dump. Cost: $22 for 12’.5” x 10’ tarp.• Leaf blower. Select a two-cycle, gasoline-powered blower to collect leaves in tarps or blow them directly to the curb. If you have a large yard, buy a backpack model, which is more expensive but more comfortable than handheld blowers. Cost: 2-cycle handheld blower: $180; 2-cycle backpack blower: $300. • Yard vacuum. This tool vacuums, shreds, chips, and bags leaves and other yard debris. Once leaves are ground up, they’ll decompose quickly in your compost pile. Cost: $400-$650.

New Price • 3 BD, 2 BA, 2 car garage • Beautiful treed private lot • Newer roof • Tennis court, patio, campfire ring and privacy in this great fenced in area. • Zoning allows splitting lot!

• 4 bed, 3 bath • 2 car garage • Backs a 4 acre park/Mt Jumbo • Close to Rattlesnake Trail Head

$439,900

1589 Cornerstone

MLS# 20113404 SADDLEBACK REALTY LLC

catesrealty@montana.com

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C8 October 6 – October 13, 2011

$374,000

506 Redwood Missoula

406-546-5317

MLS # 20114255 Sharon M Scarborough Montana (406) 329-2034

leitchmt@gmail.com

Sharon.scarborough@prumt.com • www.prumt.com

Travis Leitch


RENTALS

SUSTAINAFIEDS Ask about our line of efficient and gas appliances. Oasis Montana located in Western Montana, open weekdays. 406777-4309. www.oasismontana.com IDeal Green Cleaning. Residential/Commercial. Movein/Move-out. One time, weekly or monthly. All Green Seal certi-

Natural Housebuilders, Inc. ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes Additions/Remodels • Solar Heating HIGHER-COMFORT crafted building

369-0940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net

fied products. We’ll leave your place shiny! 207-2445 “Missoula’s Clean Spots.” Dry Cleaning/Laundromats/Car Wash. Eco-friendly Cleaners. WI-FI, Alterations, & FREE laundry soap. Clean & Comfortable. Green Hanger has two convenient locations 146 Woodford St. 728-1948 and 960 E. Broadway 728-1919 Natural Housebuilders, Inc., *ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes* Additions/Remodels* HIGHER-COMFORT crafted building* Solar Heating* 3690940 or 642-6863* www.naturalhousebuilder.net Renewable Energy Supply and Design. Oasis Montana located

in Western Montana, open weekdays. 406-777-4309. www.oasismontana.com Residential and commercial remote and utility-tied power systems and solar water pumping. Call us about your power project! Oasis Montana located in Western Montana, open weekdays. 406-777-4309. www.oasismontana.com Through creative partnerships and innovative development, the Missoula Housing Authority provides quality housing solutions for low and middle income households in Missoula and the surrounding area. Visit us at missoulahousing.org

APARTMENTS 20165 Nine Mile Rd.: 20 miles West of Missoula, Remodeled doublewide, 3 bedroom, 2 bathrooms, Den, Hook-ups, Dishwasher, Dining area with built-ins, Yard, No smoking allowed, Pet considered GCPM , $875, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com 2320 55th St.: 2-bedrooms, South Hills, Main Floor, Off street parking, free cable, w/d hookups, water and garbage paid, GCPM , $675, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

Homeword.org

146 Woodford St. 728-1948

960 E. Broadway 728-1919

FREE LAUNDRY SOAP

825 SW Higgins Ave B5 2 bd/1 ba, single garage, gas fireplace, dw, w/d hkups, close to shopping & parks ... $800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 Home on South Reserve 2bd/2bath, garbage sewer and lawn care included, 2 car garage, brand new construction, 1200/month & dep. GATEWEST 728-7333 North Russell apartments- 2 bedrooms ($595). Off street parking & storage. GATEWEST 728-7333 RENT INCENTIVE!!! 3714 W. Central #2 2 bd/1 ba, w/d hkups, some recent interior remodeling, carport, shared yard, $700. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

MOBILE HOMES Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent w/s/g/elec included $400/month 406-273-6034

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

549-7711 Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com

1535 Liberty Ln. 0, 1, 2 BR apts Call for details. 3137 Home Harvest Lp. 1BR all utilities pd. $550 mo./$600 dep. 149 W. Broadway 1BR h/w/s/g paid Laundry onsite $500 mo./$525 dep. 149 W. Broadway 2BR h/w/s/g paid Laundry onsite $550 mo./$575 dep.

GREEN TAXI Green Taxi is a hybrid taxi service for Missoula County from 6am to 3am. Green Taxi provides citizens and guests of Missoula with a more fuel efficient environmentally friendly transportation option. Green Taxi uses a Toyota Prius because of its low emmissions and fuel efficiency, which was purchased locally. We recycle and intend to educate riders on the benefits of a more sustainable transportation option.

www.missoulagreentaxi.com• 406-728-8294 (Taxi) • Missoula, MT.

4 Bdrm Log Cabin, 20 Acres St. Ignatius (45 Miles from Msla), 2 story, 2000 sq ft. Wood heat, creek on property. Well behaved pets allowed. No hunting. No smoking. Year lease. $1000/Month. Email for rental application.

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit www.Roommates.com

Looking for someone to take care of your property? Greener MT Prop Mgmt offers flat fee management starting at $50 a month. Call today 370-7009.

Lolo Vista Apartments

Brand New In Lolo Affordable Housing 2 Bdrms $599 & $705 3 Bdrms $675 & $805 Includes: Washer/Dryer All kitchen appliances Carports•Walk-in closets

Find your new home with

Professional Property Management 1511 S Russell • 721-8990

professionalproperty.com

(406) 493-0912 www.highland-propertymanagement.com

www.missoulanews.com 1&2

Now Leasing Solstice

ROOMMATES

Did you know? Posting a classified ad is FREE!

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

MHA Management An affiliation of the Missoula Housing Authority

HOUSES

FIDELITY Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

251- 4707

2 BD Apt Uncle Robert Ln. $645/mo. 3 BD, Garage, Yard, Bonus rooms, Hookups 332 Central $975/mo. Visit our website at www.fidelityproperty.com

GardenCity

Property Management

422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. "Let us tend your den" Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

Finalist

Finalist

1601 South Ave • 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

330 N. 1st St. W. 2 BR $691/$715 dep. All utilities paid 1914 Scott St. Lg. 2BR $595/$700 dep. w/d hookups Some restrictions apply. For more information contact MHA Management at

549-4113

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals • Professional Office & Retail Leasing

30 years in Missoula

Call for Current Listings & Services Email: gatewest@montana.com

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 October 6 – October 13, 2011


REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 5 Bed, 4+ bath, 2 car garage townhome at The Ranch Club. Closest to clubhouse, basement finished. $422,000. MLS# 10007754. Call Anne 5465816 for showing. www.movemontana.com 1531 S 11th St W: 3 bed, 1 1/2 bath, 2 Car Garage. Turn-key home on a large lot with a double detached garage, privacy fenced yard and one level living! This home has a great floor plan and was remodeled in 2007. $213,900 - MLS # 20114611. Call Shannon Hilliard at 2398350 today! 1531 S 11th St W: 3 bed, 1 1/2 bath, 2 Car Garage. Turn-key home on a large lot with a double detached garage, privacy fenced yard and one level living! This home has a great floor plan and was remodeled in 2007. $213,900 - MLS # 20114611. Call Shannon Hilliard at 2398350 today! 1725A Park Place. Priced reduced to $147,900. CLEAN 3 bed, 1-1/2 bath, 1 car attached garage, private yard. Call Anne 546-5816 for showing. www.movemontana.com 18737 Sorrel Springs Lane, Frenchtown, $389,000 MLS # 20113420, 4 bedroom 2 1/2 bath, Beautiful home on 4 acres with spectacular views. Call Betsy Milyard for a showing today at 880-4749. 2511 Sunridge Court $255,000 MLS # 20116337 5 bedroom 3 bath THE HOUSE HAS CENTRAL AIR, VAULTED CEILINGS, A MASSIVE FAMILY ROOM WITH GAS FIREPLACE AND MUCH MORE. OVER 2800 SQ. FT. OF FINISHED LIVING SPACE, THERE IS PLENTY OF ROOM FOR ENTERTAINING FRIENDS AND FAMILY. Call Betsy Milyard for a showing today at 880-4749. 345 Brooks St. Great Investment potential near university. Price reduced to $289,000. Call Anne 546-5816 for showing. www.movemontana.com 6106 Longview $235,000 MLS # 20116338 ˜Large 4 Bedroom 2 Bath home located in the South Hills. This home features hardwood floors, open floor plan, and large fenced yard. Call Betsy Milyard for more info 880-4749. 860 Haley, Florence $550,000 - MLS# 20115636 5 bedroom, 3 bath, 2 car garage home available. Over 5000 finished square ft. Tons of space, game room and its own movie theater - perfect for living and entertaining! Your own private movie theater comes with 55” LED 3D TV, seven theater chairs, and an awesome sound system. Call Betsy Milyard for more info 880-4749. Affordable Condo, Didn’t think you could afford to buy your own place? This sweet new, green-built development may be your ticket. 1400 Burns, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com AMAZING PANORAMIC VIEWS OF THE BITTERROOT MOUNTAINS. 3 Bdr/2 Bath

Stevensville area on on 10 acres. Gorgeous, open floor plan, beautifully landscaped, great patio and deck with hot tub. $489,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com BEAUTIFUL LOLO AREA CUSTOM HOME ON 1.65 ACRES. 5 Bdr/4 Bath, soaring cathedral ceilings, hand-peeled log, exposed beam, and stacked stone accents, gorgeous kitchen and master, amazing deck, and much, much more. $525,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free comparative market analysis. 360-8234 Classic Mid-century Rattlesnake Home with lots of character: coved ceilings, hardwood floors, fireplace, cedar shingles, huge lot with mature landscape and perennial beds. 2618 Rattlesnake Dr, 3278787 porticorealestate.com Did you find the perfect place? Now plan your perfect weekend at MissoulaEvents.net Farm Houses w/land in Missoula, these funky farm houses boast lots of land to spread out and do your thing, Development potential. 231 & 211 Grove, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com GORGEOUS HANDCRAFTED HOME ON 3.3 ACRES ON PETTY CREEK. 3 Bdr/2.5 Baths, Main floor master suite, great room, gorgeous kitchen, hardwood floors, heated double garage, with guest quarters, and great views. $425,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. Looking for a place to call home? Call me! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com Looking for homebuyer education? Call me! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com Megan Lane, Frenchtown, $199,900 MLS: 10007166 BRAND NEW 3 BED, 2 BATH HOME ON 1 ACRE. HOME TO BE BUILT SO YOU CAN PICK YOUR COLORS AND SOME FINISHING TOUCHES. GENEROUS $2000 APPLIANCE ALLOWANCE AND $1300 LANDSCAPING ALLOWANCE. Call Betsy for more info 8804749. PRICE REDUCED! 2 bdrm 2 bath manufactured home. Addition for possible den or office. Shop & extra space in dbl garage. Zoned for multifamily or commercial. NOW ONLY $104,900. MLS#906610. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. Rattlesnake dream property with a 1 bedroom apartment! 3 bed, 2 bath, 3 car garage located on over 1/2 acre manicured & landscaped gardens & lawn. UG sprinkler, “secret garden” & fenced yard. $425,000. MLS#20114396. Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.2404rattlesnake.com.

SINGLE LEVEL HIDDEN TRAILS HOME. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, double garage, cathedral ceilings, wood laminate flooring, dining area, and more, all just a few minutes from UM and downtown. $174,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com SINGLE LEVEL HIDDEN TRAILS HOME. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, double garage, cathedral ceilings, wood laminate flooring, dining area, and more, all just a few minutes from UM and downtown. $174,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com SINGLE LEVEL HIDDEN TRAILS HOME. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, double garage, cathedral ceilings, wood laminate flooring, dining area, and more, all just a few minutes from UM and downtown. $174,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com SINGLE LEVEL LIVING CLOSE TO THE BITTERROOT RIVER. 4 Bdr/3 Bath single-level Stevensville home. Great, open floor plan, incredible mountain views, next to public park, walk to Downtown Stevi or Bitterroot River. $219,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

SPECTACULAR HORSE PROPERTY ON THE BITTERROOT RIVER. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, 10.4 acres, cross-fenced, 4 stall custom barn with hay loft, hardwood & tile floors, gourmet kitchen, arched doorways, 2 decks, spectacular mountain views, 400 feet of river frontage.

Turn Key Home! 219 N Johnson...3bed/2bath home w/vaulted cielings, laminate floors, master suite w/ walk-in closet. Large yard, double attatched garage. South on Russel right on MT. Call 2391691 for a showing!

Janet Rice • 240-3932

Unique Lower Rattlesnake home near Bugbee Nature Area, 3Brm, 4Ba, Tree-top views, Lots of upgrades like granite countertops and lots of gorgeous wood, 909 Herbert, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com View or list properties for sale By Owner at www.byownermissoula.com OR call 550-3077 Wonderful 5 bed, 3 bath home @ top of Fairviews with 2 car garage. Level lot! Borders open space. All new carpet & interior paint. Trex deck off dining room. Great views! Back yard is fenced. $275,000. MLS# 20116161. Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.110artemos.com

Rochelle Glasgow

544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

Missoula Proper ties

It's football Season and for a limited time a purchase of a condo at the Uptown Flats

RICE TEAM

will include a large flat screen TV and assistance with up to $5000 Buyers closing costs!

Robin Rice • 240-6503

UPSCALE DOWNTOWN LIFESTYLE AT THE UPTOWN FLATS

Historic Victorian either Residential or Commercial – This majestic home in fantastic shape offers many options. 436 S 3rd W, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

1 and 2 bedroom condos available

Two units at the low price of

$149,900

Huge Lot Bungalow Style Home, middle of Missoula, close to Good Food Store, lots of room in huge shop, needs some updating, priced accordingly! 203 Curtis, 3278787 porticorealestate.com

Landscaped corner lot. 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 2 story, top of line Frigidaire stainless steel appliances, fenced yard, UG sprinklers, 10 x 12 storage shed, 12 x 20 Trex deck in back, covered front Trex deck, 3 blocks from Hellgate Elementary School, $20/mo HOA dues. $227,000. MLS#20111249. Janet 2403932 or Robin 240-6503.

This 3 bed, 2 bath home features one level living with a beautifully landscaped fenced yard. Lot is zoned commercial so you could run a small business out of the separate office with attached 3 car garage. 101 Boardwalk, Stevensville. MLS# 20116174. $320,000. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

SPACIOUS PLEASANT VIEW HOME PRICED TO SELL. 3 Bdr/2 Bath, double garage, corner lot, open floor plan, cathedral ceilings, main floor master and laundry, great deck and more. $216,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

SPACIOUS PLEASANT VIEW HOME PRICED TO SELL. 3 Bdr/2 Bath, double garage, corner lot, open floor plan, cathedral ceilings, main floor master and laundry,

Handsome, Spacious Home on Prime Upper Miller Creek Acreage, 5+ bedrooms, with out of town living on quiet cul-de-sac, and acres. Rodeo Rd. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

Immaculate Rose Park Area Home, This light filled home offers a fantastic floorplan, 2 family rooms, large deck and nice backyard for entertaining. 300 Central, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

$475,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

great deck and more. $216,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

Change for the better is a good thing. I have moved into a better position to offer my clients the best programs and service available. Since 1960, my new company has led the way with innovative programs designed to help home buyers fly to new heights. Please call to congratulate me on my transformation. I look forward to supporting you with all your real estate financing needs. Astrid Oliver Please call me with any questions Senior Loan Originator Guild Mortgage Company 1001 S. Higgins Ave 2A Missoula, MT 59801 Phone: 406-258-7522 Cell: 406-550-3587 NMLS # 395211, Guild License #3274, Branch 206 NMLS # 398152

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10 October 6 – October 13, 2011

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday noon-4pm or call Jeff or Anne for Appointment

Jeff Ellis

Anne Jablonski

529-5087

546-5816

www.theuptownflatsmissoula.com


REAL ESTATE

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES The Uptown Flats have two one bed one bath units still for sale at $149,900. Only a few units left in this great gated development near downtown. Call Anne 546-

5816 for showing. www.movemontana.com

LAND Beautiful 20 acres fenced pasture land. Seasonal stream and pond. Great get away or build

your dream home. No power to area. $170 per year road maintenance fee. $149,900. MLS#10007447. Janet 2403932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

Agricutural Building. 20.78 Acres. $230,000. MLS#20111015. 10900 Crystal Creek Road, Clinton. Janet 2403932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

Historic Victorian either Residential or Commercial – This majestic home in fantastic shape offers many options. 436 S 3rd W, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

Huge Price Reduction! Beautiful building site with a 40x72

MONTANA RANCH LANDS MUST SELL 20 ACRES w/utilities. Was $49,900 - Now $19,900. 170 acres Borders BLM was $299,900 now $89,900. More property under $1,000/acre. Close to Roundup, Billings & Lewistown. The best elk and deer country! Call 888-361-3006

I can help you sell your home! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com

COMMERCIAL 321 N. Higgins Commercial building on coveted downtown location with lots of foot traffic. Building only for sale. Call Anne 546-5816 for showing. www.movemontana.com

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

8169 Lower Miller Creek • 3 Bed, 2 bath Well kept manufactured home on five productive acres in Upper Miller Creek. • 2 storage sheds, a detached double car garage and a separate shop/garage. • Only be 5 minutes from town. • $250,000 • MLS # 20113133.

“FAMOUS NINE MILE HOUSE” • Purchase the restaurant/bar, the house, outbuildings, & 4 trailer spots for • Dynamite investment for the right person with great potential for income from the rentals and the restaurant. • $449,000 • MLS # 20113100

860 Haley, Florence • 5 Bedroom, 3 Bath, 2 Car Garage • Over 5000 Finished sqft. Amazing home with gorgeous views, & paved road access. Tons of space, game room and its own movie theater - perfect for living and entertaining! • $550,000 • MLS #20115636

PRICE REDUCED 117 Dallas, in LOLO. $184,900 • 3 Bed 2 Bath home on the hill in Lolo. • Spacious living room, large backyard & deck, great views of the mountains, and huge family room in the basement. • Perfect home for RD financing.

,SQIPSERW[MXL WXVIIXWQEVXW 'LYGO7GLQEYX^6IEP)WXEXI0SER3JJMGIV

21079-

6IEP)WXEXI0IRHMRK'IRXIV`+EVJMIPH` GWGLQEYX^$JWFQWPEGSQ

345 Brooks Street, Msla $289,000 • MLS#20114082 PRICE REDUCTION! 4 bed, 1.5 bath, 3+ garage. Close to the U and downtown.

321 N Higgins, Msla $790,000 • MLS#10003360 Downtown commercial building with land. Does not include business. Prime location with over 4,000 sq. ft. retail space plus basement storage.

1725A Park Place, Msla $147,900 • MLS# 20111197 3 Bed, 1.5 Bath, Garage Fenced yard with Patio

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 October 6 – October 13, 2011


Pyramid or Full Sail

Nature's Path Granola Bars

Gold'n Plump Drums or Thighs

Swanson's Bitterroot Macs

$5.99

$2.49

$3.99

89¢ lb.

6 pack

5 count

56 oz.

Rainier or Pabst Blue Ribbon

Dr. Oetker Organic Brownie Mix

$14.99

$1.89

24 pack

13.1 oz.

Menage A Trois Red, White or Chardonnay

Mancini Roasted Red Jalapenos

$8.99

$1.69

.75 liter

12 oz.

Deep Cove Solid Albacore Tuna

Western Family Frozen Corn, Mixed Vegetables, Peas or Green Bean

$1.19

5 oz.

Gold'n Plump Best O' Fryer

Sugar Pie Pumpkins

$6.49 56 oz.

79¢ lb.

Williamette Valley Meats Beef Tenderloin

$7.99 lb.

Holiday Seedless Red Grapes

$1.99 lb.

Williamette Valley Meats Bacon Wrapped Beef Fillet

Washington Green Cabbage

33¢

$8.89

lb.

lb.

58¢ 16 oz.

Boneless Pork Loin Roast

Montana Grown Beefsteak Tomatoes

$2.59

$1.99

lb.

lb.

701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 9 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188 | orangestreetfoodfarm.com


World Headquarters All Compact Discs, New & Used $2 off All Jewelry 25% off All Cards, Journals & Paper Products 25% off All Toys 25% off All Clothing 25% off All Body Products 25% off All Chocolates & Candies 25% off All Posters & Art 25% off Rudy's II Record Heaven All Vinyl, New & Used 25% off All Turntables, Cartridges & Stereo Equipment 25% off SALE ENDS 10/16/11

stival ing Dog Fe n r u B l a u n Fifth An now! Pray for S e for th dation A benefitch e Foun n la va ick Kids Missoula A okies and S

from Lil Sm l Live Music Movie: Breaking Trai Ski 6pm 7, er ob ct O Friday, ompany Brewing C @ Big Sky 77, x114 7 -2 406-549 : fo in e or M

Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture.