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UP FRONT

HOW’D YOU LIKE TO LIVE NEXT TO TOXIC TAILINGS FROM THE MIKE HORSE DAM?

WHOOPASS GIRLS ARE ON HUNGER AND MOVING RIVERS AROUND: FLASH BET RANGE NOISE NO MERE BOYS YOU COULD BE RICH PROBABLY A BAD IDEA


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


UP FRONT

HOW’D YOU LIKE TO LIVE NEXT TO TOXIC TAILINGS FROM THE MIKE HORSE DAM?

WHOOPASS GIRLS ARE ON HUNGER AND MOVING RIVERS AROUND: FLASH BET RANGE NOISE NO MERE BOYS YOU COULD BE RICH PROBABLY A BAD IDEA


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Missoula Independent

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nside Cover Story

Our big 2011 Griz package, with tailgating do’s and don’ts, tips for surviving homecoming, the tale of a Griz football walk-on, a gameday report, and more .....................................14

Cover photo by Chad Harder

News Letters Grabby Homeland Security, poisoned streams, and streaker comments .....4 The Week in Review Harry Martz falls, the Griz lose—coincidence? ........................6 Briefs Fewer fires mean bad news for some, a search miracle, and more .................6 Etc. We pin down Sen. Tester and win $100! ..............................................................7 Up Front Could more coal mining cause headaches for Missoula’s Northside? ........8 Up Front Shockingly, no one wants toxic tailings from the Mike Horse Dam...........9 Ochenski Montana just wants the illusion of free-roaming bison............................10 Writers on the Range Think twice before you divert a waterway ...........................11 Agenda The first-ever Northside vs. Westside Softball Showdown. ..........................12

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan How to get rich by betting on hunger ..........................................19 Happiest Hour Karaoke at the Reno Casino ............................................................20 8 Days a Week There are still tubers on the Clark Fork ..........................................22 Mountain High Northern Rockies Avalanche Safety Workshop ...............................33 Scope Sick Kids XOXO rediscover pop......................................................................34 Noise Starfucker, Whoopass Girls, Star Anna, Das Racist..........................................35 Books A vindicating biography of labor leader James Hill........................................36 Film At last, a sports movie for brainy girls...............................................................37 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films ...................................................38

Exclusives Street Talk....................................................................................................................4 In Other News...........................................................................................................13 Classifieds ................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y .................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle....................................................................................................C-7 This Modern World ...............................................................................................C-15

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Robert Meyerowitz PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson ASSOCIATE EDITOR Matthew Frank PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Molly Laich STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Skylar Browning COPY EDITOR David Loos ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Chris Melton, Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Rhonda Urbanski, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Jon Baker MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Dave Loos, Ednor Therriault, Ali Gadbow, Azita Osanloo, Cathrine L. Walters, Anne Medley, Jesse Froehling

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2011 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

Missoula Independent

Page 3 September 29–October 6, 2011


STREET TALK

by Steele Williams

Asked Sunday, Sept. 25 at the bottom of the “M” trail. Last year, the La Niña weather pattern brought us a longer winter and record snowfall. Forecasters are now predicting a similar pattern, likely to bring similar wintery results. What do you think of that? Follow-up: What’s your favorite indoor activity? Cameron Simpson: First things first: Do you want to hit this?…I’m from Guam so it might be a little chilly for me. I do have a scarf, but haven’t got a winter hat yet. Oh, and I’ve got big headphones to keep my ears warm. Milking the goat: When I’m bored, I like to explore my body in my room while staring at my sleeping roommate. After I’m done doing that, I usually enjoy a tall, cool glass of Guam milk. I know my rights, dude—Guam milk is cruelty-free, so don’t try to put a spin on this.

Mihai Mirea: Of course I want a winter like last year’s. I’m from Romania, but I lived in Jackson, Wyo. all last winter, so when I’m in powder, I’m in my element. Why would you live in Montana if you didn’t like the snow? Shreddin’ da gnar: I don’t know, maybe like sitting in a hot tub with a cold beer after a long day of skiing? I’d probably have a big bottle of Tylenol nearby, because when I hit the slopes, I hit them hard. Peter Salvato: Fuck the snow. I don’t like being in a car when the roads are slick. There’s a much higher chance of going into a ditch or flipping over, and the more it snows, the more we pay in taxes to get the city to clear the roads. Cabin fever: I like going to the gym to play basketball during the day and then at night, maybe watch a movie or go clubbing. There’s not much to do during the winter, it’s not like you can hike the “M” trail when it’s covered in snow. Katie Hausauer: I’m from Monfuckingtucky, so I’m not afraid of snow. I drink moonshine and Kentucky straight bourbon whiskey to stay warm...What do I use for a chaser? That would be a Marlboro Red. Virtual DUI: My favorite thing to do indoors is to hang out with friends or pick on my banjo, and maybe an occasional game of Mario Cart on my Wii. It sucks that we can’t drink in the dorms. Mario Cart is way more fun when you’re drunk. Paul Ryan: Bring it on, I love the snow. There’s a ton to do during a Missoula winter. I love to ski, snowshoe, and snowmobile…you know, the whole nine yards. If it’s going to be cold, you might as well have a bunch of snow to do fun things in. Family values: Indoor activity? Me and my 6-year-old daughter Zoe like to play imagination games. It’s just really great to play and have fun with such a fun, free-spirited little girl.

Missoula Independent

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Border boondoggle I would like to thank George Ochenski for bringing attention to an extreme assault on America’s public lands and environmental laws (see “What a steal,” Sept. 22, 2011). If it passes, the misnamed National Security and Federal Lands Protection Act (H.R. 1505) will waive more than 30 environmental laws along the entire U.S.Mexico border, the entire U.S.-Canada border, and along all U.S. coastlines. The lawless zone would then extend 100 miles into the U.S. from the borders and coasts for any activity of the Department of Homeland Security intended to stop undocumented immigrants or contraband from entering the country. Roughly two-thirds of the U.S. population lives in the area covered by this waiver. Cities from San Francisco to Boston to New Orleans to Honolulu would no longer have the safeguards of the Safe Drinking Water Act and many other public health laws when it comes to DHS activities. Huge areas of public land in Montana, including Glacier National Park, would likewise be put at risk. With environmental laws waived throughout so much of the country, the potential for severe damage is enormous. In addition, H.R. 1505 prohibits the departments of the Interior and Agriculture, which oversee our national parks, wilderness areas and wildlife refuges, from taking any actions to preserve the natural integrity of the lands that they oversee if their actions or advice conflict with the desires of DHS. This is despite the fact that Customs and Border Protection recently testified that the agencies have a good working relationship, and that public land managers are not get-

ting in the way of their operations. The Department of Homeland Security has not requested either the waivers or carte blanche on protected lands. The National Security and Federal Lands Protection Act has nothing to do

“The National Security and Federal Lands Protection Act has nothing to do with security. It is s imply an assault on environmental laws and federal lands, using national security as a cover.” with security. It is simply an assault on environmental laws and federal lands, using national security as a cover. Sean Sullivan National Sierra Club Borderlands Team Talent, Oregon

I miss the brook trout I am writing to alert your readers to the Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks current and ongoing program to poison our creeks, streams and lakes with rotenone and other poisons. Back in the 1970s, my husband and our sons could still fish for brook and rainbow trout, but those days are just a memory. Ask yourself, when was the last time you could find a little creek with brook trout in it? Last month, Matt Boyer, the FWP project leader, was quoted as saying they had “wonderful luck” in the reproduction of their favorite fish, the westslope cutthroat, after they had killed everything else. That’s what most people forget. When rotenone is put into the water, anything that swims, hops or flies is exterminated. Their next body of water was to be Smokey Creek, located north of Holland Lake, an outlet stream that flows toward the South Fork of the Flathead River. Someone else who has paid attention to this is Dr. Vernon Grove, a retired physician, living in Whitefish. Grove wrote a letter to the Daily Interlake, in Kalispell, detailing the connection between the use of rotenone in water to the incidence of Parkinson’s disease in our population, as was reported in the American Medical Journal. I am urging anyone who reads this to write to people who are involved in the business of tourism and water activities. And also write the governor and FWP. Tell them two wrongs don’t make a right—don’t poison the water, kill the fish and expect the public to approve. Clare Hafferman Kalispell

Comments from MissoulaNews.com

Stupid streak Drunk driving and guns are enshrined as Montana traditions (see “etc.,” September 22, 2011). Good grief, driving after drinking was even defended in the state legislature. But streaking— that’s the domain of effete hippies and commies in their havens otherwise known as universities. And where do those types come from? Yes, East Coast/West Coast liberal hellholes like, uh, Wisconsin. Perhaps we can get some perspective by asking the outraged folks this: Whom would you rather have plow into your family, a drunk Montanan in a two-and-ahalf-ton pickup or a drunk college kid on foot and naked? I’m not defending

Page 4 September 29–October 6, 2011

Daniel Thew’s idiotic stunt, but any parent worthy of the title could have turned that sorry exhibition into a memorable lesson on the dangers of drinking and succumbing to peer pressure. Posted on September 22, 2011 at 9:54 a.m.

A splendid member And a mighty fine penis it was! The university would be wise to shrug this off as a bit of spontaneous drunken fun not involving a motor vehicle that provided comic relief to thousands. Perhaps more students will show their support of Daniel Thew with a group streak at the next game. The Full Montana Monty could become a tradition! Better than let-

ting the authorities hang him out by the penis to dry. Posted on September 22, 2011 at 11:08 a.m.

That’s no felony Good grief! What or who have we become? Not that long ago streaking was viewed as little more than cheap entertainment, usually performed by fun-loving if somewhat impaired individuals and groups. Misguided, yes; harmful, no. Now we want these kids charged with all sorts of felonies. It makes no sense. How did we get from there to here? Posted September 22, 2011 at 2:02 p.m.


Griz vs. Eastern Washington Friday, September 30th @ 3pm YMCA Soccer Day – Free Admission for Any YMCA Soccer Player wearing their team jersey

UM Homecoming 2011 “We Are Family” Join the Spirit Squad, UM Marching Band and the entire Griz football team for the homecoming Pep Rally on

Friday, Sept. 30th at 8 pm! Hear from Coach Pflugrad and the players as they rally the team for Saturday’s homecoming game against N. Colorado. Stay for the bonfire and the lighting of the “M!”

Missoula Independent

Page 5 September 29–October 6, 2011


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, September 21

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

News Quirks by Steele Williams

Harry Martz, husband of former Montana Gov. Judy Martz, is airlifted from near Melrose to St. Patrick Hospital in Missoula after he loses control of his allterrain vehicle and tumbles to the bottom of a steep drainage. He’s listed in fair condition.

• Thursday, September 22 The University of Montana women’s soccer team falls behind 4-1 to Southern Utah in Cedar City, but the Grizzlies claw back in the second half to earn a double-overtime 4-4 draw. Junior Erin Craig notches a hat trick and freshman Allie Simon knocks home the equalizer in the 87th minute.

• Friday, September 23 Authorities say Steve Stevenson, 39, of Winnemucca, Nev., who was attacked by a wounded grizzly bear while hunting it near the Montana-Idaho border on Sept. 16, actually died of a gunshot to the chest fired by his hunting companion, Ty Bell, 20, also of Winnemucca. Bell says he was attempting to save Stevenson.

• Saturday, September 24 For the first time ever, Sacramento State beats the University of Montana football team—and it isn’t even close: The Hornets sting the Griz 42-28 in California’s capital. The Griz fall to 2-2, and tumble nine spots to No. 19 in the FCS media poll.

• Sunday, September 25 The wife of a man convicted last month of driving drunk and hitting and killing a man on Brooks Street is charged with driving under the influence. Law enforcement says Nancy L. Holm, 52, was driving with her headlights off when they pulled her over in the early morning hours. Holm refused to submit to a Breathalyzer.

• Monday, September 26 The Montana Public Service Commission holds a hearing in Missoula to hash out whether it will sign off on a deal that proposes to sell Mountain Water Company, which provides Missoula’s water, to the world’s largest private equity firm, the Carlyle Group. PSC aims to decide whether to approve the sale by year’s end.

• Tuesday, September 27 Gov. Brian Schweitzer, Missoula Mayor John Engen and University of Montana President Royce Engstrom join 920 high school freshmen from five Missoula County public schools at Washington-Grizzly Stadium. The event marks the first Graduation Matters Freshman Rally, to encourage academic success.

Kevin Battle, left, scarfs down hot dog number six at the first annual Hot Dog Eating Contest at the Rhinoceros Bar on Saturday, Sept. 24. More than 20 contestants had 10 minutes to see how many hot dogs they could get down. The fundraiser brought in about $3,000 for Habitat for Humanity.

Backcountry The man from Michigan Rosalie Pippin swears it was a miracle. Early last week, Lewis and Clark County search and rescue ventured into the Bob Marshall Wilderness to look for clues in the disappearance of her son, Noah, who vanished along the Chinese Wall over a year ago. County volunteers came back empty-handed in the Pippin case, but they managed to save the life of a man from Pippin’s home state, Michigan. Sheriff Leo Dutton says that in the late afternoon of Sept. 19, Dennis Latshaw and his 22-yearold son Kevin wandered into the search crew’s camp with a medical emergency. Kevin was nearing diabetic shock. “The father told me his son was having trouble with his insulin delivery unit and didn’t have any way to deliver it,” Dutton says. Search and rescue quickly gave Kevin a dose of insulin. They kept a close eye on him that night and flew him out on Sept. 20. Kevin was rushed to the emergency room in Helena. Dutton had already been marveling at the

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Missoula Independent

Page 6 September 29–October 6, 2011

unprecedented nature of the search effort. His department was acting on a tip from a group of Missoula Boy Scouts who discovered shreds of cloth along the Chinese Wall in August. The Montana National Guard agreed to fly 27 people into the area by Chinook helicopter and the U.S. Forest Service agreed to let the chopper land. The weather turned nasty fast. As volunteers scoured the wilderness for signs of Pippin—they found a scrap of cloth and a few bones, but nothing conclusive—it began to rain. Then snow. Soon the thunder and lightning started. “It’s something I’ve never experienced,” Dutton says. “You’re so high in the mountains that the thunder rolls through you.” The snow was so heavy it collapsed the crew’s tents. With Latshaw’s need for medical attention, Dutton called off the search early Sept. 20. Rosalie Pippin and her husband Mike received the results of the search with “a bit of disappointment mixed with relief,” Mike says. They’d gone to church the day before the search crew left. Mike says Dutton had talked to them about their prayers and “specifically asked for a miracle.” From the Pippins’ standpoint, and Dutton’s,

they got what he asked for. “Whether you’re a believin’ man or not, I think the good lord put us there for Mr. Latshaw,” Dutton says. Dutton adds that he hopes to launch another search for Pippin before fall sets in. Alex Sakariassen

Gardening Let them eat carrots About two years ago, University of Montana student Max Smith and civic activist Geoff Badenoch settled on a number: 1,000. That’s how many free backyard vegetable gardens they planned to establish for Missoula homeowners. They have 889 to go. But then, their organization, 1,000 New Gardens, doesn’t really plan on stopping at 1,000 anyway. “Certainly we won’t stop producing or giving out gardens for free,” says David Wise, a UM student and volunteer organizer. “There’s no reason to stop… “We basically go to people’s backyards, or any patch of ground they have available to them, and

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Inside

Letters

Briefs

put in a garden for them in the hopes they can grow their own food.” 1,000 New Gardens has depended largely on student labor over the years. Beyond the core group of 10 or 15 members, Wise says, each designated “dig day” draws between 30 and 50 volunteers. The group hosts an average of two dig days a semester. Smith and Badenoch have found creative ways to bankroll the effort over the years. In addition to donations, they’ve managed to hook up with other projects such as Missoula’s Green Block Program, a city initiative offering free energy-efficient upgrades to select homeowners. The garden group’s primary source of funding is its Coffee to Compost Program, which collects coffee grounds from local cafes using a bicycle trailer. “We charge them a small fee to remove their coffee ground waste, then we use those coffee grounds as compost for the gardens we install,” Wise explains. But the challenge for 1,000 New Gardens hasn’t been funding; the costs of straw, compost, newspaper and topsoil for each 8-by-10 garden averages only $20. Nor has it been volunteer support. “The biggest issue, I think, is finding people” who need gardens, Wise says. “I don’t think many community members know about” 1,000 New Gardens. So far they’ve limited their promotion to flyers and tables at community events. But the need to get the word out is growing. The group has two dig days scheduled this fall—Oct. 16 and Oct. 30—and co-founder Max Smith has since started a second branch of 1,000 New Gardens in Bozeman, where he now lives. “It’s a movement I hope will continue,” cofounder Badenoch says. “I plan to stay with it and encourage and advise the people involved to continue with what they’re doing.” Alex Sakariassen

Fire Feast or famine State Forester Bob Harrington looks back over the last decade of wildfire activity in Montana and says, “There really isn’t such a thing as average anymore.” In 2006 and 2007, the state’s annual fire suppression costs climbed upward of $40 million. The following three seasons cost about $5 million a year or less. And as of Sept. 21, Harrington says, the state has spent $13.6 million this year (more than $5 million of that on the West Riverside Fire

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

north of Bonner). The economic implications are big. The light fire seasons of the past four years have been great for the state’s bottom line, “but the flip side of that,” Harrington says, “is that a pretty extreme fire season, where you have $40 or $50 million expended, that’s $40 or $50 million going to firefighters, contractors, equipment operators, all the people who respond to fires. What we’ve seen over the last three years…is a lot of folks—private entities, primarily—that were either partly or wholly dependent upon fire seasons as a source of income. They’re not doing very well.” It’s feast or famine for many local fire-dependent businesses. Big Sky Mobile Catering, for exam-

ple, did more than $53 million worth of work for the U.S. Forest Service between 2000 and 2008, including more than $23 million during the historic summer of 2003, but the agency hasn’t needed the company at all over the last three years, according to USAspending.gov. Smokejumpers like Missoula’s Seth Hansen were kept busy this summer by wildfires in Arizona and New Mexico, but those who stayed in Montana found themselves, for the fourth straight year, not getting the hours they’d hoped for. A lot of them, Hansen says, “will be trying to round up winter work, when a lot of guys would like to take the time off and travel or hang out with their families.” When this year’s few fires are all mopped up, Harrington expects the state to have around $6 million remaining in the $40 million pot the legislature

Agenda

News Quirks

created for firefighting during the 2007 special session. That may be enough to fight next summer’s fires—or not even close. Matthew Frank

Health Equal opportunity chi Prior to leading me into a dimly lit room, asking me to lie back in a recliner and inserting needles in my forearms, shins and head, acupuncturist Michael Peluso reminds me of my mother. “How’s your digestion? Do you sleep well?…Are you digesting your food?…In Chinese medicine, we like details,” he explains. Peluso opened Missoula Community Acupuncture Clinic, on North Higgins Avenue, Sept. 1. The clinic is unusual: Peluso charges clients based on what they can afford, even if it’s as little as $15. He’s part of a nationwide provider group, Community Acupuncture Network, composed of likeminded practitioners who aim to ensure that everyone who wants access to acupuncture can get it. Peluso examines my tongue and places his fingers on my wrists to gauge my vitality before settling on a treatment plan. When he sticks one of 11 small silver needles into my right shin, I feel a dull ache. Peluso says some of his patients—the “chi junkies,” as he calls them—enjoy that ache. An ache reinforces the feeling of being healed, he says. In Chinese medicine, “chi” refers to life energy. When chi drifts out of whack, illness often ensues. Acupuncture works to smooth the flow of chi. Used for thousands of years in Asia, acupuncture didn’t emerge in the U.S. until the 1970s, and it’s become increasingly popular since. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that a million more adults sought acupuncture treatment in 2007 than in 2002, and that about 3.2 million Americans received acupuncture in 2006. It can be beneficial for ailments ranging from headaches to back pain and more serious conditions such as Parkinson’s disease and the effects of strokes. A typical acupuncture session costs upwards of $60. Peluso says more people would seek out acupuncture if it weren’t so expensive. At his Missoula clinic, he aims to democratize access. “Medicine,” he says, “is a human right.” Jessica Mayrer

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BY THE NUMBERS

15,163

People living below the poverty level in Missoula County in 2010. The number, released by the U.S. Census Bureau Sept. 22, constitutes 14.2 percent of all county residents.

etc.

Montana’s no stranger to the sepia-tone mystique of the “Wanted” poster. Still, when one picturing Sen. Jon Tester landed in our email inbox last week, we were intrigued. Tester wasn’t wanted for the kind of activity that landed outlaws on posters a century ago—he didn’t hold up the Union Pacific Flyer and he hadn’t fled with coin-filled burlap sacks. According to the Montana Republican Party, his offense was far graver: riding the fence. And the GOP was offering a reward: $100 for the person who could get Tester himself to state whether he was for or against President Barack Obama’s American Jobs Act. The offer echoed like a starter’s pistol for any journalist struggling to pay the bar tab in today’s economy. Washington, D.C.-based Roll Call was first in line to claim the prize. They’d learned of Tester’s dissenting opinion on the jobs act through his spokesman, Aaron Murphy. Murphy said technically, he won. But he wasn’t in it for the money. Instead, he turned the GOP’s campaign season gimmick back around. “The Montana GOP can make its check payable to the Billings Fire Department to help with legal fees brought on by Congressman Dennis Rehberg’s lawsuit against firefighters,” he told Roll Call. Roll Call contacted GOP spokesman Bowen Greenwood and turned down the cash—ethics, they said. Greenwood responded that Murphy’s word didn’t count. The race was still on. Enter the Indy. We put the question to Tester straight. His $100 answer? “No.” Money. Obama’s proposal comes with many pros, Tester said, like investment in infrastructure and education, incentives for hiring veterans, and closing tax loopholes for the wealthy. Those points would directly benefit Montana, he said, where our roads need work and our unemployed need jobs. But there was a list of cons for Tester. Extending the payroll-tax holiday? Threatens to undermine Social Security. Aid to states? Not the fed’s problem. He appreciated Obama’s attempt, but, he said, “this isn’t a plan I would have written.” We called Greenwood to share the news. “It sounds like we have a winner,” he told us. But as journalists, now we’re on the fence. Do we donate the winnings to the Billings Fire Department, as Tester would like us to, or stay out of the political fray and pay down our tab at Charlie B’s?

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Missoula Independent

Page 7 September 29–October 6, 2011


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Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Breathe that train Could more coal mining hurt Missoula’s Northside? by Jessica Mayrer

Mark Kersting wakes up many nights to the squeals, screeches and crashes that come with living down the street from Montana Rail Link’s downtown Missoula rail yard. “I’ve nearly had plate glass windows broken in my business,” he says. “There is physical evidence that literally, over the years, houses have shifted off of their naturally set foundations, because of just years and years of vibration.” What’s worse, Kersting says, is the train emissions that fill his North 1st Street West home. “I’ve been made physically ill,” he says. “You become nauseous.” Kersting lives and works in the 120year-old Stensrud Building, on Missoula’s

Locomotives today are significantly easier on the environment and human health than they were a century ago. Throughout the past several years, Montana Rail Link, which operates the Missoula train yard, and Burlington Northern Santa Fe, which owns the rail lines that come through it, have upgraded their fleets with new trains and technology, aiming in part to curb emissions. “New technology allows railroads to shut down locomotives more often, which reduces overall idle time and noise,” says MRL spokesperson Lynda Frost. “More than 90 percent of the locomotives that pass through Missoula are the property of BNSF and are state-of-the-art engines.”

Photo by Chad Harder

The Missoula railyard could someday see a spike in coal train traffic.

Northside. He purchased the historic Victorian 10 years ago and renovated the redbrick building. Despite his love for the structure and the neighborhood, over the years, Kersting says, he’s become increasingly worried about how rail operations are affecting his health and that of his neighbors. “If I’d have known what I know now,” he says, “I probably would have not renovated the Stensrud Building.” Train emissions carry small particulate matter capable of bypassing the body’s defenses and lodging in the lungs. Locomotive engines also produce carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxide and polycyclic hydrocarbons, says Missoula City County Health Department Air Quality Specialist Benjamin Schmidt. “Emissions coming from diesel fumes do have cancer-causing effects, potentially,” Schmidt says. People who live near a rail yard are most vulnerable, he adds. “If you’re in a plume, you’re getting a pretty thick blast of it…It’s more of a localized concern.”

Missoula Independent

Page 8 September 29–October 6, 2011

MRL is also quick to point out that rails are a more efficient way to transport goods than, say, trucks. A freight train can carry the load of 280 or more trucks. And according to a 2009 report by the Association of American Railroads, freight rails account for just 2.6 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions from transportation-related sources. Yet Kersting is worried now more than ever. His concerns stem largely from the fact that the second-largest U.S. coal producer, Arch Coal, is attempting to mine 1.4 billion tons of coal in Southeastern Montana’s Otter Creek Valley. The coal would be transported by rail to West Coast ports and on to markets in Asia. “You think it’s bad now?” Kersting says. “You just wait until they start shipping all these uncovered coal cars.” Railcars would head west on Montana’s northern or southern rail routes, or both. University of Montana economist Tom Power calculates that if planned coal export terminals on the West Coast realize an

export capacity of 140 million tons per year, as some estimate, it would require about 30 loaded coal trains, 125 cars long, to cross the state every day. Then they’d come back. That’s 60 trains a day. If the trains were split evenly between the northern and southern routes, they would pass through Missoula— and right past Kersting’s building—about once every hour. Spiking traffic will bring more emissions, and also more coal dust. According to BNSF, individual coal cars lose roughly 500 pounds of coal and coal dust in every 500 miles traveled. Coal dust causes pneumoconiosis, bronchitis and emphysema. It also jeopardizes the structural integrity of railroad tracks. Dust clogs ballast pathways, reducing drainage. With all that in mind, BNSF is moving to better contain coal, telling shippers that they must use a chemical suppression topper agent or reduce dust by another means by at least 85 percent by Oct. 1. According to MRL, all coal trains that pass through Missoula originate with BNSF. Even with BNSF’s new rule in place, environmental groups warn that transporting millions of tons of Otter Creek coal remains an unhealthy prospect. “I don’t think anybody is under the impression that they’ve eliminated that problem,” says Earthjustice attorney Jan Hasselman. “The second question is, what’s in the [suppression] chemicals?” As for Kersting, he’s lobbying lawmakers to intervene. Among those he’s calling upon is Missoula City Councilman Dave Strohmaier. “I will probably, at some point in the not too distant future, be making a referral on this subject,” says Strohmaier, who represents downtown and part of the Northside. He also presides over Missoula’s Public Safety and Health Committee. “I have a vested interest in making sure we do our best to mitigate adverse impacts.” In Kersting’s perfect world, MRL, with help from the city and taxpayers, would move its rail yard to a less populated area. As far as he’s concerned, that’s only fair. “We’re paying the same tax rate as anyone else in most districts of the city,” he says. “But we’re getting a much (worse) quality of life.” jmayrer@missoulanews.com


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Damned if you do Where to bury the Mike Horse Dam’s toxic tailings? by Matthew Frank

Ranch, which is owned by John Baucus, brother of U.S. Sen. Max Baucus. DEQ Chief Remediation Counsel Bill Kirley says that if the state ultimately selects Section 35, the ranch would be paid $255,000 to relinquish its rights. John Baucus and the state finalized the deal in the last few weeks. “We have talked with them and talked with them and tried to reason with them that this is a crazy place to put a repository site,” Grimes says of the agencies. “Regardless of my personal involvement in it, the repository is bordered by the Blackfoot River and a tributary, and it’s full of groundwater.” But the other options have perhaps more significant drawRogers Pass backs. Take Paymaster, an existing repository created years ago by ASARCO that could be expanded. It’s very close to the dam, which reduces transportation costs, but Mike Horse Dam it’s only about 50 feet from the Blackfoot and would require expensive engineering due to the Section 35 steepness of the terrain. According y to the study, Paymaster would w H cost, between $11 and 13 million, while Section 35 would cost about $10 million. Grimes, for one, believes the tailings should stay right where Lincoln they are, above a wastewater plant Map by Jonathan Marquis that treats the drainage still coming out of the old mines. “It’s pretty clear that nothing that and it’s going to carry the contaminants groundwater, there’s a certainly a concern,” onto my property, into Nora Creek, and says Shellie Haaland, the DEQ’s reclama- they’re looking at so far is ideal,” says Chris tion specialist on the project. She acknowl- Brick, science director of the Clark Fork into the Blackfoot.” Grimes might be the most vocal edges that there are some places on Section Coalition. “There are some tough realties critic of the Montana Department of 35 unsuitable for a repository, but other to consider. We absolutely need to get the Environmental Quality and U.S. Forest test wells have shown depths to groundwa- safest repository we can get—safest enviService’s preference to haul the tailings to ter as great as 70 feet. “What we’ll have to ronmentally and safest with respect to a 365-acre piece of ground known as do is put in some piezometers and make human hazards. But we also have to be Section 35. On Sept. 21, the agencies sure we understand how the groundwater careful to not squander the money that the state has for the site, because there is a limreleased their long-awaited Repository is reacting across the board,” she says. NIMBYism is at the core of Grimes’s ited pot of money there. And we can’t wait Siting Study, which identifies Section 35 as the most suitable site among the 10 and some of his neighbors’ opposition to forever. They saw significant water up there the burial of tailings across the road. But [at the Mike Horse Dam] this year…It was they’ve evaluated over the last few years. The document comes 36 years after there’s also suspicion, even after the scary,” she says, waiting to see if the dam the earthen Mike Horse Dam gave way, release of an exhaustive, 83-page evalua- would fail again, as it did in 1975. Public comments on the relocation of washing 100,000 tons of fine-grain tailings tion, that the state arbitrarily prefers laced with silver, gold, zinc, lead, cadmium, Section 35. Stimson Lumber Company the Mike Horse Dam’s tailings are due to iron, copper and arsenic into Beartrap owns the land, and it owes the state the Helena National Forest by Oct. 21. Creek and the upper Blackfoot River. The $300,000 for environmental cleanup work Haaland urges people to weigh in on all of devastation led to a $37 million settlement at its Bonner mill, at the other end of the the possible repository sites, not just between the state and American Smelting Blackfoot River. The struggling timber com- Section 35, because “there’s potential that and Refining Co., and Atlantic Richfield, the pany has offered to give the state Section 35 we’ll go out there and find something we didn’t expect, and have to go to the next operators of the long-defunct Mike Horse to use as a repository in lieu of payment. Also fueling suspicion is the fact that one on the list.” Mine. The siting recommendation, which is Section 35’s mineral rights and restrictive now open for public comment, puts a “big easements are held by the nearby Sieben mfrank@missoulanews.com This spring, Mike Grimes, who lives on 140 wooded acres off Highway 279, east of Lincoln, found that his well became artesian, flooding his property and threatening to swamp plans to host his son’s wedding there. But what was equally disconcerting, he says, was the overflowing well across the road, on land where the state wants to entomb a million cubic yards of toxic mine tailings from the nearby Mike Horse Dam. The dam is part of a state Superfund site that sits at the headwaters of the Blackfoot River. “If they’re successful putting this over there,” Grimes says, “they are going to be working with groundwater every spring,

twist” in Grimes’s gut, he says, since it portends dump trucks making some 40,000 roundtrips between the Mike Horse Dam and a 30-acre impoundment, just across the road, over the course of the next decade. But the agencies found that there aren’t suitable alternatives within the upper Blackfoot watershed that are more protective or cost less. The area’s mountainous terrain and marshy creek bottoms doesn’t lend it to landfills. Section 35’s benched topography, the agencies say, is the best bet—even if there are worries about the depth to groundwater. “Obviously, anywhere where there’s

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Missoula Independent

Page 9 September 29–October 6, 2011


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

A wild trick Bison plan comes up short Montana’s interaction with the n a t i o n’ s l a s t w i l d b i s o n h e r d , i n Yellowstone National Park, has been a long and heartbreaking story. For decades, bison that crossed the park’s boundaries in search of forage and calving grounds have been shot by wildlife agents, captured and shipped to slaughter by the thousands and hunted as big game animals. When plans were announced to consider moving a select group of bison to other areas within the state, many were hopeful that the last remnants of the herds that once numbered in the millions might run free again. But a preliminary plan offered by Governor Schweitzer and the Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks raises questions of just how free those bison will be. To understand the bison issue, one has to reach back at least a few decades. In the ’80s, Yellowstone’s bison, although loved and revered by the nation’s citizens, were not so loved by Montana’s livestock industry. The reason was straightforward if you looked at it from a stockgrower’s point of view. Brucellosis, a disease that causes cattle to abort, had originally been introduced to Yellowstone’s bison by ranchers intent on settling the West. But then the nation undertook a stringent brucellosis eradication campaign and, over years and at a cost of millions of dollars, was able to nearly eliminate the disease—except in Yellowstone’s bison. Under harsh federal management, any infected cattle were immediately slaughtered, as was the rest of the herd from which they came. The state was subject to restrictions on trade in order to prevent the transmission of brucellosis to other herds. Facing such strict measures, the livestock industry took few chances of infection from Yellowstone’s bison. Since transmission could occur simply by cattle coming in contact with a bison’s afterbirth, a thick red line was drawn around Yellowstone National Park. Bison that crossed the line were eliminated. The reaction to that policy was global shock and outrage. Pictures of dead and bloody bison appeared on the front pages

Missoula Independent

Page 10 September 29–October 6, 2011

of newspapers in London and throughout Europe as well as in the U.S. What Montana’s ranching community called necessary, tens of thousands of people around the world called an atrocity. Then the state legislature passed a law that allowed the capture and containment of bison leaving the park. They would be quarantined for years until they were determined to be free of brucellosis. They would then be available for distribution to Indian

Some have described these hunts as akin to shooting a parked car. In the end, the result was the same—dead buffalo in the snow. tribes that wished to repopulate their lands with the massive animals that hold cultural and religious significance for North America’s first people. But years dragged on, funding was hard to come by, and, as Yellowstone’s herd continued to grow, the bison slaughters continued. More bison have been killed under Brian Schweitzer’s governorship than at any time in the history of the state, with the number totaling in the thousands. To ameliorate the state and federal role in these slaughters, Schweitzer initiated a bison hunt. Some have described these hunts as akin to shooting a parked car. In the end, the result was the same— dead buffalo in the snow. In the meantime, federal rules were changed to eliminate many of the most onerous brucellosis provisions. Entire states were no longer quarantined, entire herds didn’t have to be slaughtered if one

cow was found to have brucellosis, and the rules were particularly adapted to the area around Yellowstone National Park. Schweitzer has announced plans to move quarantined, brucellosis-free bison to both tribal nations that want them and state Wildlife Management Areas. This year’s state legislature, however, had different ideas about translocating bison, and loaded up any such effort with significant sidebars contained in SB 212, which passed and was signed into law by Schweitzer. Which brings us to the current controversy. Fish, Wildlife & Parks is legally required to develop a management plan that comports with SB212’s provisions and put it out for public comment before any bison transfers can occur. The problem—at least if you thought bison were going to be allowed to roam free once more—is that under the management plan, the bison will be penned behind 7-foot multi-strand fences, herded and fed by FWP staff on ATVs and tractors, and virtually indistinguishable from animals in standard cattle ranching. (Read and comment on the plan at fwp.mt.gov) One former legislator who’s been active in the bison issue for decades told me recently, “I thought we outlawed game farms in Montana, but this plan sure looks like a state-run game farm.” And the fencing plan may well do more damage to other truly wild animals, such as elk, deer and antelope, while providing the illusion of free-roaming bison. It’s time for this expensive and unnecessary charade to end. Schweitzer says Montana should be “run like a ranch,” but these brucellosis-free bison pose no disease threat to Montana’s cattle. Like any other big game animal in Montana, the bison should be allowed to truly roam free once again. To do otherwise is little more than a feeble attempt to buffalo the public about “wild” bison. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@ missoulanews.com.


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Like water for schemers Think twice before you re-engineer a river by Craig Rowe

The West’s history of developing water sources, occasionally stained with instances of outright theft, is probably best described as “complicated.” Our decisions about who should get what water—and how, and from which source—usually teetered to the side of whatever person in power had the least tolerance for ethical behavior. We built dams, carved canals, bullied people. Sometimes we lied outright, and no matter how many times a poorly engineered dam flooded out a community or tribe, depriving them of their farm land, we marched ahead with a hostile takeover of nature’s most precious asset. Today’s methods for collecting water and sending it elsewhere aren’t much more sophisticated. Improved technology and our arcane water policies simply allow our grand plans to fester longer before they materialize. The most recent case in point: At a July U.S. Chamber of Commerce conference in Las Vegas, the general manager of the powerful Southern Nevada Water Authority, the indefatigable Pat Mulroy, suggested taking floodplain waters from the Upper Mississippi and its tributaries to alleviate strain on the Colorado River system. The scheme, she said, would also help restore the Ogallala aquifer. The Colorado River’s Upper Basin states of Colorado, Utah, Wyoming and New Mexico, and even parts of Arizona, would see their water shares reduced and potentially eliminated. Growing metropolitan regions farther downriver could then hoard the surplus. This is a grand plan indeed, involving the movement of river water many hundreds of miles. Barbara Naramore, executive director of the Upper Mississippi River Basin Association, noted that while she did not hear Mulroy’s specific comments, this was not the first time the Mississippi River has been the target of a transfer. “These instances are a good reminder of how very complex these issues are when you start to

move water around between basins. A lot of economic development decisions get made … and then at some point down the line, we find ourselves scratching our heads, trying to figure a way out from the corner we just painted ourselves into.”

The Colorado River’s Upper Basin states of Colorado, Utah, Wyoming and New Mexico, and even parts of Arizona, would see their water shares reduced and potentially eliminated. J.C. Davis, a spokesman for the Southern Nevada Water Authority, said Mulroy’s suggestions were taken out of context, although Mulroy was speaking as part of a Chamber of Commerce’s national “Invest in Water” initiative and the Las Vegas Sun, Las Vegas Review-Journal and Salt Lake Tribune all seemed to hear and report the same thing. Asked to put the plan into context, Davis explained that it “would be a series of exchanges, not necessarily piping water from the upper portion of the Mississippi River complex all the way out to the Great Divide.” At this point, he added, “it would be fair to characterize it as a concept.” So where could the “series of exchanges” begin?

Every river, stream and babbling brook east of the Rockies eventually finds its way to the Upper Mississippi, including the Musselshell in Montana, a Missouri tributary that recently flooded Roundup, 600 miles north of the Colorado’s headwaters. Perhaps Mulroy’s pipeline could somehow move floodwater from Pierre, S.D., to Lake Powell, 1,000 miles southwest, where it would benefit the Upper Colorado Basin states. Historically, a “concept” is typically all we’ve ever needed to implement absurdly expensive and geographically labyrinthine water access plans, very much like the one currently close to fruition that will seize water from underneath the Great Basin in rural eastern Nevada and pump it through a $3 billion pipe to the Las Vegas Valley. A significant portion of western Utah will also be impacted by that plan. Those entertaining the idea of controlling the Upper Mississippi’s floodwaters seem to have difficulty associating such a plan with the possibility of failure already established by concepts just as ambitious. Let’s not forget that not long after the Civil War, government officials and profiteers convinced homesteaders of the vast fertility of an arid region that eventually became the Dust Bowl. It’s Mulroy’s job to secure and protect her constituents’ water supply, and for decades she has gone about her job with gusto. It’s up to the rest of us to urge caution and the smart usage of the water we’ve already got rather than succumbing to grandiose plans that once again could prove destructive. Craig Rowe is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). He is a freelance writer in Las Vegas.

Missoula Independent

Page 11 September 29–October 6, 2011


Times Run 9/30- 10/6

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater The Whistleblower (R) Nightly at 7 & 9 9 ONLY Sat 10/1, Sun 10/2, Tue 10/4 & Thur 10/6 Sarah's Key Nightly at 7 The Guard Nightly at 9 NO show Sat 10/1, Sun 10/2, Tue 10/4 & Thur 10/6

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Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Beer & Wine AVAILABLE 131 S. Higgins Ave.

Our handmade futons are just as well-made and just as natural.

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Get a load of the rabble rousing I’ve been reading about Tuesday’s first ever Northside vs. Westside Softball Showdown: “For decades, the Northside and Westside have jockeyed for the title of Missoula’s coolest neighborhood and the debate has intensified in recent years with no end in sight.” Sports contests settle everything, right? Remember in “The Wire” when they had the Eastside-Westside basketball match? (This is not a good example.) This game is brought to you by the NorthMissoula Community Development Corporation. I’ve lived on both sides of the tracks. Currently I haunt a spooky attic apartment just seconds away from the creepy sidewalk under the railroad tracks on Orange Street and so I am Northside-4-Life and consider any and all Westsiders to be my sworn enemy! Here is the set-up and conditions for the game. Fifteen players from each side have gathered at least $50 in donations to sponsor their position and help benefit their respective neighborhoods. The winners are awarded supremacy, while the losers have agreed to a day of volunteer labor next spring on a project of the

winning team’s choosing. Spectators will descend on the Northside Softball field, where they will be treated to free beer, with hot dogs and Big Dipper ice cream available for purchase. City council candidates will be milling about to shake your hand. There will be an acoustic picking circle and a dessert potluck. I may bring my hacky sack, so look out for that. The field is equipped with bleachers but lawn chairs are also encouraged. Admission is free, but donations to support the NMCDC are always appreciated. This should be one for the record books. —Molly Laich

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 29

TUESDAY OCTOBER 4

Citizens are invited to a celebration of the five year anniversary of the Open Space Bond, 6–8 PM at City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine Street.

The Northern Rockies Rising Tide has weekly meetings this and every Tue. at Freecycles, 732 S. First St. W. at 6:00 PM, where participants fight climate change through grassroots resistance.

Learn how China affects us here in Big Sky country at the talk, Environmental Issues in China and Montana: Shared Experiences, 7 PM at the Stensrud Building, 314 N. First St. W. Call 243-2988.

FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 30

The Inaugural Northside Vs. Westside Softball Showdown takes place on Tue., Oct. 4, starting 5:30 PM at Northside Softball field, on the corner of Cooley and Worden. Free, with donations benefiting the NMCDC (North-Missoula Community Development Corporation). Game is at 6:30 PM. Those looking to sponsor a player can contact Gabriel Furshong at gfurshong@gmail.com.

YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts YWCA Support Groups for women every Tue. from 6:30–8 PM. An American Indian-led talking circle is also available, along with age-appropriate children’s groups. Free. Call 543-6691.

Practice being peaceful in a world of differences during the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center’s Intercultural Dialogue Group, a monthly meeting that aims to bring together people from various backgrounds for an afternoon of conversation and peacemaking, every last Fri. of the month at 4:30 PM in the library of the Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call Betsy at 543-3955 or email peace@jrpc.org for more info.

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 5

Kick off Breast Cancer awareness month and celebrate hip women at Breasty Festy 2, starting at 5 PM in Caras Park, brought to you by Faux Pink. Go to fauxpink.org.

THURSDAY OCTOBER 6

Catch Tom DeWeese’’s lecture, Agenda 21 and how sustainable development negatively affects your family and community, 7 PM at Guest House Inn, 3803 Brooks St. $5. Call 251-5961.

MONDAY OCTOBER 3 The Epilepsy Support Group is designed for anyone affected by epilepsy: patients, friend, family, and care workers are all welcome at the Providence Center, Room 107, 902 N. Orange St. on the first Mon. of every month, 2–3:30 PM. Call Debbie at 721-0707. Usually you order a local beef (or veggie) burger, fries and a beer at Scotty’s Table and it means nothing. This time, 5–8:30 PM, the $15 spent benefits The Flagship Program. 131 S. Higgins.

As a Kapha body-type, it might take me awhile to roll out the door and attend this Ayurvedic Public Talk: Healing Through Simple Ayurvedic Practices, 6–7 PM at the Ewam Buddhist Center, 180 S. Third St. W. (above Meadowsweet Herbs). But so worth it. Free.

Talk transit with the Transportation Technical Advisory Committee, which meets the first Thu. of every month. Join them at 10 AM at the Missoula Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine. Hang out with Tom Catmull and the Clerics and support Planned Parenthood of Montana all at once at their benefit dance at The Florence Hotel’s Governor’s Ballroom, 6 PM ,with food, auctions, dancing, door prizes and more, plus Stacey James, PPMT CEO as guest speaker. Tickets are $50/$20 students. 111 N. Higgins Ave. Fight the power/give peace a chance at the Fall 2011 Peace & Justice Film Series, which brings you a new rabble-rousing film every Thu. This week see Pax Americana and the Weaponization of Space in the Gallagher Building, Rm. 123, starting at 7 PM. Donation-based and open to the public.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent

Page 12 September 29–October 6, 2011


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

UM ALUMNI!! (Save the University Golf Course)

I N OTHER N EWS

And build the College of Technology in an already approved location at Fort Missoula

Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - When Colby Wade Cardoso, 20, came upon a car crash that killed two people in Hillsborough County, Fla., authorities said he parked his vehicle near the scene and tried to steal a pickup truck belonging to a witness. The truck wouldn’t start, however, so he ran, only to be chased by sheriff’s Deputy Carl Luis, 53, and arrested. (Tampa’s WFLA-AM) Dionette L. Price, 26, jumped on the hood of a car in Kansas City, Mo., pointed a gun at driver Rayna Garrett and ordered her to “drive, or I will blow your head off,” according to Jackson County prosecutors. She headed to the Kansas City police station, nearly two miles away, and honked to alert officers. The suspect leapt off the hood and fled, but police soon spotted him waiting at a bus stop. (Reuters) SCHLEMIEL, SHEMOZZLE, HASENPFEFFER INCORPORATED - After the Australian Defense Force took 12 years to complete the purchase of MU90 anti-submarine torpedoes, ADF officials admitted they have no idea how the European-designed weapons work because secret technical documents pertaining to them are written only in Italian and French. As a result, Australia’s Defense Materiel Organization now has to hire a translator, at a reported cost of $110,000 (US$114,000). “They’ll be having to look for somebody who has the technical ability to translate technical documents, and that is not straightforward,” Andrew Davies, director of operations and capability for the Australian Strategic Policy Institute, said, adding, “I believe the technical term for this project is a shemozzle.” (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) LOW-RISE LIVING - Hindered by the world’s most expensive real estate prices and strict zoning laws that forbid changing the perimeter of a house or adding to its height, well-to-do Londoners eager to enlarge their homes have begun excavating beneath them. Extending as many as four levels, underground expansion includes not just swimming pools, but also home theaters, fitness centers, gyms, wine cellars, bowling alleys, squash courts, climbing walls, servants’ quarters, saunas, waterfalls, Jacuzzis, hair salons and multi-car garages with elevators to move vintage car collections to and from the surface. Projects involve hauling away as many as 400 truckloads of dirt. (The New York Times) FOOL FOR A CLIENT - Gary DeVaughn LaBon, 50, elected to act as his own lawyer after being accused of kidnapping, raping and beating a 69-year-old woman in Hawthorne, Calif. He introduced little evidence to refute the prosecution’s case and didn’t testify on his own behalf, but in his closing argument he denied raping the woman, telling an Airport Courthouse jury that he beat her in self-defense because he feared for his life, believing the victim was a gang member. Judge Kathryn Solorzano ordered jurors to disregard most of what LaBon said. (Torrance’s Daily Breeze)

Happy Homecoming! We need your support! At present the University plans to build the COT on this South Avenue near Higgins location. The Golf Course Open Space would be gone forever. Activities currently occurring on these properties include golf leagues, annual charity golf tournaments, cross country races, and more than 22,000 rounds of golf annually. These activities are participated in by students of all ages, University men and women, and local business people. All would have to search for, some never to find, a different location.

If you agree email us at: save_umgc@tsimissoula.com Committee to Save the University Golf Course 2425 W. Central Avenue, Suite 200 • Missoula, MT 59801

SECOND-AMENDMENT FOLLIES - Garrett Bauernschmidt, 75, tried to shoot a large snake near the front door of his house in Volusia, Fla., but missed. While he was manipulating the safety on the .38 caliber handgun, the weapon accidentally fired, wounding his left hand. (Daytona Beach News-Journal) Three tourists were hospitalized after being shot while watching an Old West shootout in Hill City, S.D. Authorities couldn’t say whether bullets or shrapnel from a blank caused the injuries and won’t speculate until they complete their investigation, which Pennington County sheriff’s Lt. Marty Graves indicated could take months. (Rapid City Journal) RULES, RULES, EVERYWHERE A RULE - Mayor Ray Alborn of Ruidoso, N.M., issued an executive order prohibiting anyone from entering a village building with a firearm. When citizens protested that the gun ban is unconstitutional, Alborn refused to change his mind, declaring, “I don’t care where they carry the guns, they just don’t need to carry them in village buildings.” (El Paso’s KVIA-TV) When Principal Traci Williams banned miniskirts at Piedmont Hills High School in San Jose, Calif., she explained the policy meant cheerleaders would have to cover their newly shortened uniform skirts with sweat pants except at games. Some cheerleaders objected, insisting that not being able to wear their uniforms to classes would dampen school spirit, but Williams defended the dress code, declaring, “Cheeks are hanging out.” (San Jose Mercury News) The City Council of Gould, Ark., adopted an ordinance making it illegal to form any kind of group without its permission. (The New York Times) Florida Gov. Rick Scott said he wants the legislature to repeal more than 1,000 state rules and change more than 1,200 others. Many of the rules duplicate federal regulations, or are obsolete or unnecessary and hinder the state’s economic growth, Scott noted, explaining they’re “so complicated people have to hire consultants to figure out how to comply.” (The Miami Herald) LOVE ON A COLLISION COURSE - Pilots Kristen Sprague, 26, and her boyfriend, Scott Veal, 24, were talking to each other while flying separate planes, when they collided in midair over Nightmute, Alaska. “They meet up in the air,” National Transportation Safety Board investigator Clint Johnson said. “The next thing she knows is his airplane strikes her right wing and nearly severs the right wing.” Veal’s Cessna 208 crashed and burned, killing him, while Sprague managed to land her Cessna 207 and escaped injury. (Anchorage Daily News) ENHANCEMENT FOLLIES - After a 26-year-old woman’s silicone breast implant burst when she was shot in the chest by a paintball, UK Paintball, which operates 50 paintball centers, began asking “surgically enhanced female participants” to identify themselves when making reservations so they can sign a disclaimer and be issued extra padding to protect their implants while paintballing. “We want as many people to enjoy paintball as possible, regardless of whether their breasts are fake or real,” a company official said. Noting that paintball bullets travel “at around 190 mph,” the official added, “Part of the fun of paintball is that it hurts a bit when you get shot.” (Britain’s Daily Mail) FRED FLINTSTONE WANNABE - Police in Roseville, Mich., said a 26-year-old roofer stopped to check his brakes, which apparently had failed, then continued driving, using his feet outside the car door as brakes. He wasn’t able to stop in time to avoid running a red light at an intersection and hit two cars. He drove off, still using his feet as brakes, and hit two more cars at another intersection. He then stopped and was arrested, according to Deputy Chief James Berlin, who said the man would face a judge “to explain his moronic decision making.” (Detroit Free Press)

Missoula Independent

Page 13 September 29–October 6, 2011


HOW TO SURVIVE HOMECOMING undreds of extra bodies will swarm into Missoula the first weekend in March, as outof-town Griz fans and University of Montana alumni gather for the annual glut of Homecoming festivities. Hotels are booked up. The Homecoming parade is locked in. Tickets for the football game are going for as much as $61 on eBay. Griz Nation, in other words, is primed for a hell of a party. So what’s a local to do when the bars are full, the traffic’s backed up and the streets are awash in maroon and silver? The easy solution is to hunker down at home and wait out the crowds. But cabin fever’s a nasty ailment. Disrupting the usual Missoula routine of Saturday markets, mid-afternoon hikes and lazy beer garden get-togethers can feel like a wasted weekend, especially in these waning days of summer. And there’s really no need to—provided you follow a few simple survivor steps for Homecoming. Know the lay of the land. Sure, homework was a total buzz-kill in college, but studying the calendar of events for UM’s Homecoming week can save time and stress. The All Alumni Dance and Social, hosted at the Holiday Inn Downtown at the Park by the Office of Alumni Relations, promises to be a hotbed of Homecoming activity on Friday, Sept. 30. And where do all those thirsty UM grads of yore end up when the live jazz winds down? According to events coordinator Jay Kettering, probably at their old college haunts. That means long lines for drinks downtown, the bane of any Friday night. Finding a quieter bar away from the bustle—The Sunrise Saloon, Desperado, or any joint at the south end of Brooks Street—seems an obvious choice. The real trick comes on Saturday morning, when popular brunch spots like the Old Post and the Shack swell at the seams. Reservations are vir-

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tually non-existent around town, and everyone’s in a rush to get their meals before the start of the Homecoming parade. Adding to the downtown chaos are UM’s 5K Homecoming Hustle and the usual host of market shoppers. By 10 a.m.—the start time for the parade—driving is more a hin-

“The alternatives are slim,” he adds. “It’s either bike, walk or bus, or park a good distance away. I don’t know if there’s really any magic solution.” Kettering had no estimates to offer on the number of alumni traveling in for the weekend. His best guess? Thousands.

Photo by Steele Williams

drance than a convenience. To avoid getting “marooned” on the wrong side of Higgins when the marching bands and floats start their trek toward campus, Kettering suggests biking or busing to your destination. His advice for managing UM’s temporary dominion over Missoula is simple: “Be aware of it.”

But there’s an appealing alternative to all-out avoidance of the Homecoming throngs: Don’t fight the wave of Griz mania, ride it. Most of the festivities are open to the public and offer enough free music and complementary eats to make up for the mild inconveniences. Immediately following the bonfire and fireworks show on the Oval Sept. 30, the alum-

ni jazz band and local rock quartet House of Quist are set to play the alumni social at the Holiday Inn. The biggest perk to jumping on the Homecoming wagon, however, comes on Saturday afternoon when the Griz go head to head with the University of Northern Colorado Bears. Homecoming tickets are a rare commodity these days due to increases in season ticket sales and reserved student seating. Alumni Relations began selling its allotted Homecoming tickets to registered members of the 1971 class reunion—with a limit of two per alumnus—back in July. “It’s probably more difficult than ever to get a Homecoming ticket,” Kettering says. “Even though they’ve added more seats to the stadium, the popularity is still so great.” To accommodate the hundreds of inbound alumni not lucky enough to snag a seat at the game, Alumni Relations began hosting a TV Tailgate in the Adams Center four years ago. By Kettering’s account, it’s just about the best alternative in town to watching the game in Washington-Grizzly Stadium—and it’s open to the public. They leave the gym doors open, he says, so those watching the 11-foot projector screen can hear the cannon and the roar of the crowd. It’s “growing every year,” Kettering says. “It’s a pretty good alternative if you want to be on campus and as close to the stadium as you can get without being in the stadium. It’s probably easier to get a seat there than at the Press Box or trying to find a sports bar.” And for those ready to fully immerse themselves in the Homecoming hoopla, the TV Tailgate comes with an added bonus: A raffle for two stadium tickets, held just before kickoff. As for the post-game exodus, you’re on your own. —Alex Sakariassen

Photo by Chad Harder

Missoula Independent

Page 14 September 29–October 6, 2011


THE CONTEST here was a big football game on campus the day Holden Caulfield got kicked out of school in The Catcher In The Rye. “You were supposed to commit suicide or something if old Pencey didn’t win,” he said. That’s just the kind of goth-girl, can’t-do attitude I’m determined to bring with me to the University of Montana versus Eastern Washington football contest. I’m hung over from last night, so we’re off on the right foot. It’s a cruel joke that I’ve been sent on this assignment. You’d be hard pressed to find a girl with less school spirit. But, believe it or not, I know the rules of football. I leave my house at 12:30 on foot for the 1:05 kickoff. I should have known that to get the full spectacle, you should aim to arrive six months early. I talk to a girl from a sorority who’s been playing beer pong in the parking lot since 10 a.m. By the time I get my press pass and filter in, the Griz have already scored a touchdown and spirits are high. Looking down into the stadium is mesmerizing. The players seem so close, like toys you could pick up and move around. Maroon-clad fans envelope the field in a warm hug. I’m wearing my black hoodie with a bleeding heart on the chest, the one that makes me feel safe. The cheerleaders are wearing black as well, but it’s not the same. My outfit implies dark sunglasses and a cigarette. Usually, I’m a vegetarian, but I’m alone and suddenly I want to fit in, so I buy a hotdog. I hope it will temper my pounding head, but I’m pretty sure that by anybody’s standards it’s a bad hotdog, cold and rubbery. Every time, I’m startled by how long it takes to chew and swallow an animal. The Griz kick a field goal, and here’s something you might not know: Whenever the home team scores, there’s a very loud gunshot. I jump. A man standing next to me with a walkie-talkie laughs. “I wasn’t expecting that,” I say, pointlessly. There’s nowhere to sit and I don’t want to, really, so I spend much of the game walking along the periphery. The hotdog is starting to make me sick, or I’m still hung over, or both. I pause at a garbage bag thinking I’m going to hurl when a man taps me on the shoulder. “Where can I get one of those cushion seats,” he asks, “and where can I get a coke?” How the fuck should I know? I want to tell him, but then I realize my press pass must grant me authority. I think I’m important, too, but not like that. “The stadium is a big circle, dude,” I say. “Just walk in any direction and you’ll find what you’re looking for.” The nausea passes. I eat a mini pizza. I notice a sign dangling above my head: “Not in Our House.” “What does that mean?” I ask its owner. The sign means that the other team is not permitted to score more points than our team because this is our stadium and we would instead prefer to win. The man with the sign tells me he’s a season ticket holder. He seems delighted to talk to a reporter about his love for his team, his city, his country. I notice a cluster of red shirts behind the end zone— the Eastern Washington crowd—and decide to head down there in search of someone with a bad attitude. I find instead an incredibly congenial Eastern Washington fan named Mike. “What’s it like to be an away fan at these games?” I ask him. “It’s great,” Mike says. Missoula is great. He comes to all of these match-ups. The Griz fans are warm and accommodating, he says, and he loves the town and the people in it. There’s a little bit of friendly heckling, which is all part of the fun. He says

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we’re especially nice when we win. Eastern Washington won the FCS National Championship last year but so far they have a losing season. The Griz are 1-1. I overheard all this at the bar last night, and now I converse with Mike about it freely, like I’m some sort of expert. Then I go back to wandering around like a lost child. I pass a couple of teenagers and I ask them my ace-in-the-hole question: “Why are you here?” “We’re pre-recruits,” They say. One of them shows me a pass that says “Pre-recruits.” “I don’t know what that means.”

I’m standing to the side on the concrete steps when a very drunk man comes lumbering down. The man in front of him catches his fall, and the drunken man says, “You wanna knock me out?” But it’s clear nobody wants to knock anybody out. They’re both wearing the same maroon outfit. A third man emerges, smiling, and gently escorts the drunk man down the stairs and out of the stadium. “You’re alright, buddy,” he says. It’s a touching, slightly sad moment and I feel lucky to be alive to see it. Remember the football game? Eastern Washington is advancing toward the end zone and there’s a rule to

Photo by Steele Williams

“It means they brought us to the game because we might play for the Griz!” But they look so tiny! I’ve already grown attached. I don’t want my little cubs to get hurt. They’re from “Butte, America” and they ask me to emphasize this point. I will never get over how considerate Montana teenagers are. In Michigan, where I come from, these kids would have insulted my mother and then violated the Eastern Washington mascot. I’m struck by all the families and children here. I see a few drunken people outside, but most everyone inside seems lucid and interested in having a nice time. There’s nowhere to buy booze in the stadium.

spectating: The crowd gets super loud when the other team is on offense. It gives us a sense of control in a world full of chaos. We feel like we’re helping. It’s first and goal and the Griz shuts them down. It’s second and goal, less than a yard to the end zone, and they try to edge their way through. Everyone piles up like hamsters and Washington is thwarted again. I’m starting to get emotionally involved. I want them to prevent this touchdown. It’s third and goal. Washington opts for a passing play, and…there’s an interception! The Griz player runs it down the field for a 50-yard gain and the crowd goes wild! I actually clap and cheer for

Missoula Independent

the first time, before I become embarrassed by my outburst. It’s halftime. I mindlessly follow the throng into the parking lot. Two shirtless men walk in front of me with the words “Down” and “First” written on their backs. I consider tapping them on the shoulders and asking them to switch places. I wander out onto the grass where there is much beer drinking, more hotdog eating, and a bunch of little kids running around in Griz wear, which is painfully cute. I watch two little ones wrestling. They have to be twins, with their matching maroon hoodies and tiny jean shorts and oh my god. I hadn’t anticipated the football contest would make my clock tick. They each cling to one of their father’s legs and he pats them on their heads and laughs. I start to think about my own father, how we used to go to the Detroit Lions games and watch Barry Sanders play and how special that was. I wonder if my father is watching me from heaven and if he’s proud of me— which is weird, because he’s not dead. Halftime is about over and I think I should go find some potential husbands to “interview,” but I can’t find anybody worthy. We have nothing in common; they’re all football fans. Football is a neat but flawed sport. It seems unfair that only some people on the team get to catch the ball and only one person gets to throw it. That’s why an interception is so extraordinary. That defensive player wasn’t groomed to run down the field like that. It wasn’t supposed to happen. College ball is less crisp and stylized than pro football. Earlier I saw an Eastern Washington player catch the ball and then down himself because the defensive players rushed at him. Apparently he got scared and fell over. And college ball is not yet ruined by fantasy football. Have you ever watched a game with one of those fools? Ask them who they want to win and they’ll say, “Well, I’m rooting for the Seahawks defensive line, but I hope the Raiders have a good running game, because…” zzzzzz. There is a mildly infectious mood in this stadium. Whenever Montana gets a first down, the announcer yells “First Down!” and the crowd screams back, “MONTANA!” It reminds me of Catholic mass, when everybody says “and also with you” at secret times I’m not privy to. I’m told there are over 26,000 people in the stadium, and almost all of them seem bent on one precious, albeit inconsequential outcome. Montana never loses the lead, which makes us all feel safe. The stadium hums with love. Eastern Washington gets close in the fourth quarter. They combine a couple of tight passing plays for a touchdown, plus a thrilling 2-point conversion, putting the score at 17-14 Griz with about 5 minutes left. That means we’re a field goal away from a tie game, and I’m thinking, “Dear God, don’t let this game go into overtime.” It’s fun and all, but Jesus, we’ve been here for three hours. We win the game and I’m happy everyone is so happy. The stadium roars. I listen intently to the post-game chatter. The fans seem pleased but a little sleepy after so much fun in the sun. A red shirt passes through the crowd, and a guy near me says to his friend—he’s not even talking to Red Shirt; he’s having an implied, safe conversation with his friend about what he might have said— “You guys played a good game…” He trails off, searching fort the perfect words. “Just not good enough!” Bears, as we know, are both fierce killers of men and plush comfort objects for children. Clearly, this Griz fan has claws. And that theoretical Eastern Washington fan is going to cry his eyes out. —Molly Laich

Page 15 September 29–October 6, 2011


TAILGATING DO’S AND DON’TS isdom gleaned from the throng of Griz fans grilling and imbibing around Washington-Grizzly stadium before the Sept. 17 game against rival Eastern Washington:

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DO: “Have your tailgate marked well so your friends can find you,” says Michelle Farris, who points to the pirate flag with the words “Time flies when you’re having rum” aloft above the pickup behind her. You might want to look for the pirate flag, too, because Farris and company make tasty bacon-wrapped water chestnuts. DON’T: “Don’t leave the stereo on too long, because you’ll have to have the porta-potty truck jump start you,” says Tom Johns. Yes, this happened to Johns, a 25-year tailgating veteran who’s expecting 50 to 60 people to arrive shortly—which explains the five tables of food. DO: “Have a wife that likes to shop for this stuff,” says Johns, smiling at his wife, Boo Johns. DON’T: “Don’t get so falling-down drunk that you streak,” says Kris Hosick, lounging in a camp chair and drinking a beer. He’s referring to UM student Daniel Thew, who during the Sept. 10 game tore off his clothes, stole a cheerleader’s megaphone and traipsed around the field. DO: “Keep your clothes on—or at least shave. You have to groom.” So says Mark, standing in a circle of friends outside an RV. He didn’t want his full name attached to such a lewd comment. DON’T: “Don’t dump your used charcoal in the field,” says Lisa Schindler. “That’s what the frat boys do sometimes.” She’s clearly perturbed by this.

Photo by Steele Williams

DO: If a youngish person asks for a beer, check their ID, says Kathy Brodie. Last week, she says, a 20something offered to trade beef jerky for a cold one. “I gave him a beer. Why not? But I ID’d him first. I wasn’t about to get busted for that.”

DON’T: “Don’t bitch about the music,” hollers Jeff Bragg, who’s blaring AC/DC out the back of his pickup. He yells that he plays music louder than anyone else in the lot.

DO: “Always have an Italian on your team,” says David Paoli, who wears a white apron and stands over a grill and a ridiculously delicious-looking platter of marinated tri-tip steaks. DON’T: Smoke. It’s illegal now on campus. And don’t get Rex Boller started. He says the new rule is “an infringement on my personal Grizzly rights…I used to have a cigar to celebrate the game. No more. Are they going to outlaw alcohol next?” Another smoker, Marcy Best, says, “We’re just killing ourselves—why can’t they just let us be?” DO: Start drinking early. “If you don’t get started early, you can’t drink all day long,” says a whitebearded man named Tom, who’s leaning on his tailgate, gleefully drunk at 11 a.m. DON’T: “Don’t count the beers coming out of your cooler,” says Bob Lins. “There’s no accounting.” Mi cerveza, su cerveza. DO: “Always make sure your food’s prepared well so you’re not getting anyone sick,” says Bryce Lawrence, with the scent of bratwurst rising from a nearby grill. DON’T: “Don’t leave your stuff sitting around at halftime, because it will disappear,” says Kathy Brodie, who learned this lesson the hard way. DO: Play beer pong with the Kappa Psi guys, who have a table set up in front of the Adams Center. Why play beer pong before a game? “It really brings the fans together,” says frat-boy Bryan. DON’T: Leave your crap behind. Bharat Acharya urges others to practice the “Leave no trace” ethic in this Grizzly semi-wilderness. “Pack it in, pack it out.” —Matthew Frank

Photo by Steele Williams

Missoula Independent

Page 16 September 29–October 6, 2011


THE SUPERFAN ance Hughes, a superfan’s superfan, has a tattoo inside his lower lip that says “FTC” for “Fuck the Cats.” He’s 6 feet 5-and-three quarters inches, 6 feet 6 inches with his boots on, and 238 pounds, with red hair and a red beard. When he yells “Go Griz!” in his booming voice, all other sound seems to disappear. Hughes has another tattoo, on his right calf: a maroon Grizzly paw with an “H” for “Hughes” in the middle. He and his two brothers all got that same one together, when his younger brother was facing his first deployment to Iraq. And his ankle has an inked “’91” to commemorate Tim Bush, a former Griz football All-America player with whom Hughes worked at Stockman’s Bar and who died last summer in a mining accident. “He was an awesome Griz player,” says Hughes. “He was one of the greatest dudes ever.” At the tailgate party Sept. 17, Hughes is eating pulled pork after having just shot-gunned a Pabst Blue Ribbon. It’s two hours to the game, and family and friends show up to greet him and gather around his van, which is set up in Parking Lot Z— prime tailgate space, next to the University of Montana’s Washington-Grizzly Stadium. “These spaces are, like, you die and then somebody gets it,” he says, laughing. “It’s the kind of thing that’s willed to people.” On the night before the game, Hughes had cleaned his coolers and bought 39 boxes of Twinkies and Ding Dongs. Almost all of his preparation had to do with the party, not the game: making sure there was enough meat to barbecue and enough beer and liquor. The Twinkies and Ding Dongs, though, are for the game itself. Hughes and other superfans sit in the front two rows of section 107. Every time the Griz score, they throw snack cakes into the crowd after the extra point. (They always save some for the players after the game, too.) It’s a tradition Hughes’s older brother, Bubba, helped start 20 years ago, when Bubba was a kid.

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Lance Hughes, superfan.

Photo by Steele Williams

Lance, who is 34, comes from a family of Griz fans. His father, Gary, was a UM assistant athletic director for 34 years, and his three brothers and two sisters all root for the Griz. But until he was in his early 20s, Lance says, he really only cared about skateboarding. Then he attended a Griz game with some rabid fans and found himself stirred as he joined in a cry of “Dee-fense! Dee-fense!” Ever since, he’s been smitten. On game days he wakes his family. “It’s like Christmas morning for me,” he says. “I get up like a little kid yelling at the wife, ‘You excited?’

“And she’s, like, ‘No. Not yet, stop yelling at me!’ “And I yell, ‘You should be excited!’” Then he turns up the Kanye or Metallica on his iPod, puts on his Griz shirt and starts loading the van. He and his wife, Jessica, have three kids ages 5, 3 and 1. They’re not old enough to care about football yet, Lance says, so they don’t get to go to the game. Still, it’s game day, so they do have to wear their jerseys, even if it’s just for the babysitter. “My middle one doesn’t like to put hers on,” Lance says. “So she doesn’t get anything special until she puts it on. My niece watches all the kids and they get root beer floats. But

Photo by Steele Williams

Missoula Independent

she doesn’t get one until she puts the jersey on. She does eventually. Oh yeah. It’s game day. It’s important. You have to wear your damn jersey.” Lance departs at 10:30 sharp. “He’s in the car at 10:20,” says Jessica. “And you better be in the car at 10:30. The only time I didn’t get left behind when I was a little bit late was when I was pregnant and I threw a fit: ‘You are not leaving a pregnant lady!’” She laughs. “It’s serious. He has left people behind, and it will happen—even to me.” When everyone’s aboard, they listen to loud party music. No one sings any Griz anthems until the car reaches the light on 6th Street. “We’re not allowed to sing the song they come out of the tunnel to—we start that at the light,” says Jessica. “And when we get into the parking lot, we do the ‘Griz Fight Song’—but not a second before.” Jessica isn’t one to complain. She’s a big Griz fan, too. When Lance yelled “Go Griz” at the end of his wedding vows, at Caras Park, she didn’t flinch, she says. “I didn’t expect it, but I wasn’t surprised.” She knew what she was getting into. Lance was already a Griz fan when they met. She was teaching in Alaska when they talked about getting married. He asked her if she’d start planning a wedding, and she said yes, so they planned a Christmas engagement. But Lance had other plans. When Jessica returned to Missoula in October for homecoming, he had it all set up. He invited family and friends to a game, a ring in his pocket. “We’re going to the game, and we’re standing in the student section,” he says, “and I’m not drinking because I’m so nervous.” The plan was to propose at the end of the first quarter. “I’m standing there sweating bullets, hand in my pocket rubbing the ring box.” Suddenly the Griztron lit up with the words “Jessica, will you marry me? Lance Hughes.” And Lance was on one knee. Jessica says she loved the proposal. “It was pretty rad,” Lance says. “22,000 people saw it...I did make sure she wanted to marry me beforehand. People say, ‘That’s terrible. I would never want anybody to propose that way.’ And I tell them, ‘I did that.’ And they say, ‘Yeah, well, it’s different—it’s you.’” —Erika Fredrickson

Page 17 September 29–October 6, 2011


eGRIZ NATION nappy barbs to regurgitate while drinking tall boys and sitting on a tailgate in front of WashingtonGrizzly Stadium are plentiful at eGriz.com. Here’s one that might win you friends next time you mingle at a Griz football game:

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Q: “What does the average MSU player get on his SATs?” A: “Drool.” The humor is fitting, considering that eGriz.com founder Chris Lynn conceptualized the message board in 2001 while he was in Bozeman, attending Montana State University. Lynn is a diehard Griz fan from Spokane who landed in enemy territory: The Bobcat blueand-gold that fuels instinctual competitiveness in Griz fans was everywhere. Fortunately, he was able to transfer to UM after his freshman year. The Garden City offered more comfortable surroundings. Not only does the home team wear a pleasing maroon, it also significantly outclasses the MSU Bobcats. Lynn, a computer whiz, went on to earn a bachelor’s in business information systems from UM and grow eGriz into a sprawling site that reflects the best—and worst—of Grizzly sports. eGriz offers multiple forums for fans to exchange thoughts on topics ranging from cheerleader attractiveness to the way Monte the Griz mascot entered the stadium during the last game. Scores and schedules are easy to find. And site contributors, all of them volunteers, often break news. If you want to know who has verbally agreed to join the Griz football team next year, or

which UM athlete most recently was charged with DUI, chances are eGriz will be among the first to report it. “There’s fans out there, I don’t know how they do it, they know stuff before I think the people that it’s happening to know it,” Lynn says. “I don’t know what they do in their free time.” eGriz had more than 1.5 million page views during a recent 30-day period. Jokes, scores and breaking news draw traffic, but it’s the smack talking—

that are Missoula. There are some people who are extremely passionate and nothing could be wrong with Grizzly athletics. They’re always 100 percent right—they call it maroon-colored glasses. Some fans will defend them on anything, and cause big arguments. There’s a few of those people out there that go a little over the top.” And then there are the trolls, the people who appear to the cruise the site just to make waves. In a sports venue, where competitiveness already runs high, the tension created by such figures can be especially acute. Word is that “David2” is a troll. “CDA Griz” thinks he’s an old guy. Some posters surmise that he’s crabby because the cheerleader-rating threads offend him. Many seem to agree that he’s a know-it-all. The trolls “just come to upset people, whether or not they believe what they are saying,” Lynn says. When anonymous eGriz participants are particularly abrasive, self-policing site regulars go out of their way to track them. “Those characters sometimes disappear once they’re outed,” Lynn says. “It’s kind of Photo by Steele Williams humorous.” Trash talking sometimes makes barb eGriz offers the opportunity to talk about pounding the crap out of opposing teams among like-minded recipients angry. Because Lynn received no formal education in media law prior to launching the site, folks—that seems to lure many. This post from eGriz commenter “tojo70,” writ- he’s had to educate himself on the ins and outs of ten just before UM clashed with Eastern Washington, libel and slander, to ensure he’s protected. “At first, reflects typical fare: Eastern Washington players “act I didn’t even think about it,” he says. “You know, like they’re the talk of the town and can do anything young kid, I’m just having fun…And then, once I they want. They brag about their red field and how got my first threat of a lawsuit, I was like, ‘Okay, I it’s the greatest thing in the world…They like to jaw better get serious about this.” Lynn has become adept at navigating the chaland act like they’re so great...and they’re not. lenges of moderating comments, something that They’re cheap, chippy BS’ers.” Lynn says that after 10 years hosting the website, often still confounds mainstream media. For he’s grown accustomed to the fervor that fuels instance, Lynn’s solution to highly abrasive or online discussions. He chalks much of it up to the crude comments was to create a forum, “The loyalty locals have for their hometown. “Everybody Bench,” for high-intensity smack-talking and explicin Missoula seems to be passionate about the things it discussions.

THE WALK-ON niversity of Montana freshman Matt Berg starts most days at 6:30 a.m. for the football team’s weightlifting session. His nights end with a mandatory “Study Table” that wraps up nearly 15 hours later, around 9 p.m. In between, Berg hustles from a full course load of classes to film sessions and position meetings with his coaches to practice on the field. Somewhere in there, he eats. “At the end of the day, I pretty much crash,” says the former high school quarterback and All-State kicker. Berg’s schedule is typical for a UM football player, but Berg’s situation isn’t. While most of his teammates compete with the reward of a full academic scholarship, Berg pays his own way through school and essentially volunteers to take part in the team’s rigorous regimen of training, meeting, studying and competing. There’s virtually no chance Berg will play in a game this year—in fact, he watches the games from the stands—and there’s no guarantee he’ll ever see real action on the field. Berg is what’s known as a walk-on. “I just want to play football,” he says. “I grew up watching the Griz and going to a few games here in the stadium. The support from the community and the students, that atmosphere, is

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Photo by Steele Williams

Missoula Independent

Page 18 September 29–October 6, 2011

something I wanted to be a part of. I wanted to be a part of a great team.” The opportunity also puts Berg in position to add to a growing legacy in the Griz football program. In recent years, two players who started their UM careers as undersized, undervalued, bottom-ofthe-roster tackling dummies vaulted not just to full scholarships, but to the holy grail of any aspiring ballplayer—a spot in the National Football League. Marc Mariani was a scrawny wide receiver from Havre when he walked on with the Griz in 2006. He didn’t earn a scholarship until his junior season, but ended his career as the most prolific receiver and all-purpose player in Montana history. He’s now an All-Pro kick returner for the Tennessee Titans. Colt Anderson walked on for the Griz in 2004 and, during his first two years on campus, only saw action in five games. Under the guidance of position coach Tim Hauck, a former UM walk-on who eventually played professionally for the Philadelphia Eagles, Anderson became one of the university’s alltime leading tacklers—and biggest hitters. He now plays for Hauck’s old team, the Eagles. Berg knows all too well about UM’s history with walk-ons, especially Anderson’s. “I’m from Butte, and that’s where Colt Anderson is from, so I


Lynn is 29 now. Even though his site is breaking even after years of running in the red, he still has a day job, as a web specialist in UM’s Admission’s Office. He also runs internet forums for every Big Sky school except Montana State. eGriz volunteers make Lynn’s juggling act easier by consistently posting pictures and video and helping to moderate the site. It’s that kind of support and camaraderie Lynn appreciates most about eGriz. Connections he’s made there in the past decade go beyond the virtu-

al. He tailgates with eGriz friends. They hang out and tell Bobcat jokes, referring to each other by their user names. As they do online, they stake out passionate and often divergent perspectives on their home team. “It’s a great community out there,” Lynn says. “There’s tons of different opinions. I think that’s what the success is…people can go out there and talk about what they love 24 hours a day.” —Jessica Mayrer

Photo by Chad Harder

hear about it,” he says when asked about his chances of following a similarly long-shot path. “It’s hard not to think about it a little bit. But I try not to think about it too much. I need to focus on just getting better every day.” Berg starred for the Butte Bulldogs as both a quarterback and a kicker, rewriting his high school’s record books. He started for three years at quarterback, and, as a senior, averaged 250 passing yards per game and threw for 30 touchdowns. As a kicker, he earned All-State honors both his junior and senior year, and once successfully booted an attempt from 50 yards. Despite his accomplishments, Berg had one major strike against him as he pursued a college career: He’s listed as 5 feet 9 inches, which is criminally short for a quarterback. He received just one offer from an NAIA school, and it was without a scholarship. He also received a personal visit from UM head coach Robin Pflugrad and recruiting coordinator Mick Delaney. “They came to Butte and told me they’d give me a shot,” recalls Berg, “and that’s all I wanted.” Berg, however, quickly realized that his best shot was to focus exclusively on kicking. While not as glamorous or complex as playing quarterback, the position still requires a ton of adjustment at the

next level. For one, college kickers aren’t allowed to use tees; they must kick off the ground. The speed of the game is also jarringly fast, and the players rushing to block Berg’s kicks are a little bigger than the AA division high schoolers he faced last year. So while Berg tries to keep his head as he juggles college life for the first time, he’s also trying to keep pace on the field. “It can be a lot,” says the business and accounting major, who just turned 19. “I think for any freshman, adjusting to the skill, speed and size of the other players is the hardest part. That’s just part of it, though. You adjust.” Berg currently sits as one of two kickers backing up senior Brody McKnight, arguably UM’s best player and an All-America candidate. Berg says he’s learning a lot from McKnight about the finer points of the position, and puts his current kicking range at 45 yards. With McKnight’s eligibility up at the end of the year, there could be a chance for Berg next season. But the freshman walk-on knows better than to project too far into the future: “I keep it simple: Work hard and show your teammates and coaches you’re there to get better. That’s my biggest responsibility right now. I can’t worry about the other stuff.” —Skylar Browning

Missoula Independent

Page 19 September 29–October 6, 2011


dish

the

Betting on hunger FLASHINTHEPAN Mon-Fri

7am - 4pm (Breakfast ‘til Noon)

Sat & Sun 8am - 4pm

(Breakfast all day)

Great Food No Attitude.

531 S. Higgins

541-4622 www.justinshobnobcafe.com

3621 Brooks St. Missoula 728-3228 paradisefallsmissoula.com

Best Breakfast in Town! www.thinkfft.com Mon-Thurs 7am - 8pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

Residential real estate may be slumping, but ag land is booming. In Iowa, farmland prices have never been higher, having increased a whopping 34 percent in the past year, according to The Des Moines Register. The boom is driven in part by agribusiness expansion, but also by a new player in the agriculture game: private investment firms. Both are bidding up land values for the same reason: the price of food. They’re betting on hunger, and their reasoning, unfortunately, is sound. This is bad news for wouldbe small farmers who can’t afford land, and much worse news for the world’s hungriest people, who already spend 80 percent of their income on food. Thanks to the world’s growing population of eaters and the fixed amount of land suitable for growing food to feed them, supply and demand tilts the long term forecast toward higher prices. More immediate concerns—like increasing demand for grain-intensive meat and the rise of the corn-hungry ethanol industry—have fanned the flames of a speculative run-up in agricultural commodities like corn, wheat, and soy. Add cheap money to the mix in the form of low interest rates, along with an army of traders chasing the next bubble, and you’ve got a bidding war waiting to happen. The Commodity Futures Modernization Act of 2000 allowed the bidding to begin by allowing the trade of food commodities without limits, disclosure requirements, or regulatory oversight. The law also permitted derivatives contracts whereby neither party was hedging against a pre-existing risk; i.e. where both buyer and seller were speculating on paper, and neither party had any intention of ever physically acquiring the commodity in question. Agricultural commodities markets were created so that traders of food could hedge their positions against big swings in prices. If you’re sitting on a warehouse full of corn, it’s worth making a significant bet that the price will go down, just in case it does, and makes your corn worthless. That way at least you make money on the bet. Derivatives can add leverage to your bet, so you don’t need to bet the entire value of your corn in order to protect it. Derivatives, it turns out, are also really cool if you want to make a ton of money by betting just a little. And if you can bet a lot, even better, as long as you keep winning. The golden years of commodities trading lasted from 2002 to 2008, when prices

moved steadily, but not manically, upward. Then they crashed. And then they rose even higher than before. This is the kind of volatility, except worse, that commodities trading was created to prevent. UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food Olivier De Schutter recently released a “briefing note” titled “Food Commodities Speculation and Food Price Crises.” “Beginning at the end of 2001, food commodities derivatives markets, and commodities indexes in particular, began to see an influx of non-traditional investors, such as pension funds, hedge funds, sovereign wealth funds, and large banks,” he writes. “The reason for this was simply because other markets dried up one by one:

Photo courtesy of Frapstaartje via Flickr

the dotcoms vanished at the end of 2001, the stock market soon after, and the U.S. housing market in August 2007. As each bubble burst, these large institutional investors moved into other markets, each traditionally considered more stable than the last.” In those years, the market value of agriculture commodities derivatives grew from $750 billion in 2002 to more than $7.5 trillion in 2007, while the percentage of speculators among agriculture commodities traders grew from 15 to 60 percent. The total number of commodities derivatives traded globally increased more than five-fold between 2002 and 2008. The rush of speculators into agricultural commodities created something like a virtual food grab. While a traditional speculator might drive up the price of a commodity by physically hoarding it, now speculators, fund managers, sovereign nations, and anyone else with the money can do the same by hoarding futures contracts for food commodities, but with no expectation that they will have to physically deal with actual commodities. No messing with deliveries, maintaining warehouses, trapping mice,

by ARI LeVAUX

or other reality-based headaches unless they happen to truly want the commodity. Americans may not be starving, but we are feeling the pinch, paying upwards of a dollar for an ear of sweet corn at farmers markets, while in the southwest, dried corn chicos, a local delicacy, have doubled in price. In D.C., a group of livestock producers addressed the House Agriculture Committee last week, seeking the elimination of federal mandates for ethanol use in gasoline. The meat makers blame high corn prices on the biofuels industry. If this was just about corn, I would say let the cows and cars fight over it. They can have it. After all, whatever corn doesn’t get converted to chicken feed and gasoline probably isn’t going to be made into chicos anyway. It’s going to be made into corn syrup for the young and the obese. But the commodities markets of the world are connected, running together in a herd, which makes this about a lot more than corn. It is likely that increased demand for meat and the rise of ethanol were indeed a trigger in rising corn prices, De Schutter says, dragging the rest of the grain markets into the bubble. But it was deregulation that opened the doors to betting on hunger. A logical place to start calming food prices would be to regulate them. And there’s hope of that happening. The United States, by far the biggest player on the commodities stage, just made a step in that direction with the passage of the recent Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. It puts size limits on individual holdings, including agriculture commodities and derivatives. Unfortunately, given the global nature of capital, even if the U.S. were to completely shut down speculation, it would just move offshore. International regulation is what’s needed, and since the U.S. opened this Pandora’s box of speculative horrors with deregulation, we have the moral responsibility, not to mention the political firepower, to shut it. With financial regulators underfunded and understandably distracted, a strong show of public support could help get their attention. But if our biggest inconvenience is higher prices for meat and sweet corn, that public display might be hard to come by. Especially if our retirement portfolio, wisely diversified with commodity index funds and ag land holdings from Iowa to Ethiopia, is growing.

LISTINGS

Missoula Independent

$…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over

Old World Artisan Breads or Parker House Rolls. Having a party? Someone’s birthday? Falling in love? Never forget Bernice’s has the best, made from scratch, cakes in town. Xoxo Bernice. www.bernicesbakerymt.com.

Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway (across from courthouse) • 728-8900 Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$

Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$

Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 School is back and Bernice’s is kickin! Try us for a rockin’ cup of joe and a pastry at 6am. At noon hop on over and dig into lunch! At 3pm take a walk by the river with a cupcake and afternoon pick-me-up of iced tea in your hand. Dinner? Try our Blinkies,

Big Sky Drive In 1016 W. Broadway 549-5431 Big Sky Drive In opened June 2nd 1962. We feature soft serve ice cream, shakes, malts, spins, burger, hot dogs, pork chop sandwiches and breaded mushrooms all made to order. Enjoy our 23 shake and malt flavors or the orange twist

Page 20 September 29–October 6, 2011

ice cream. Drive thru or stay and enjoy your food in our outdoor seating area. Lunch and dinner, seven days a week. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Monday – Friday, 7:30 – 2. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. Blue Canyon Kitchen 3720 N. Reserve 541-BLUE (adjacent to the Hilton Garden Inn) www.bluecanyonrestaurant.com We offer creatively-prepared American cooking served in the comfortable elegance of their lodge restaurant featuring unique dining rooms. Kick back in the Tavern; relish the cowboy chic and culinary creations in the great room; visit with the chefs and dine in the kitchen or enjoy the fresh air on the Outdoor Patio. Parties and special events can be enjoyed in the Bison Room. Winter Hours: 4pm - 9 pm Seven Days a Week. $$-$$$


the The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins • 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to late. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 39 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks • 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am-2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm SunWed and 11am-10pm Thurs-Sat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$$ Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 Cold Stone Creamery offers the Ultimate Ice Cream Experience. Ice Cream, Ice Cream Cakes, Shakes, and Smoothies the Way You Want It. Come in for our weekday specials. Get Gift Cards any time. Remember, it's a great day for ice cream at Cold Stone Creamery. $-$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery service within a 3 mile radius. Family Dental Group Southgate Mall • 541-2886 What are Veneers? Veneers are thin pieces of porcelain or plastic placed over the front teeth

CELEBRATING 39 YEARS OF

to change the color or shape of your teeth. Veneers are used on teeth with uneven surfaces or are chipped, discolored, oddly shaped, unevenly spaced or crooked. Farm to Family 241-6689 Farm to Family MT is a local food delivery business in Missoula. Through convenient online ordering we bring you fresh, local and regional groceries right to your door. We offer community supported agriculture shares, local produce, Bernice's and Le Petite breads, Black coffee, Lifeline cheese, grass-fed beef and more. Deliveries occur on Wednesdays. Find out more: farmtofamilymt.com. Flathead Lake Brewing Company of Missoula 424 N. Higgins • 542-3847 www.flbcofmissoula.com Known for their “Bar Burgers” a masterpiece of deliciousness; Flathead Lake Brewing Co. of Missoula is unfiltered sophistication atop the skyline of Missoula Montana. Downtown or Uptown, any way you look at it, Flathead Lake Brewing Co. of Missoula is your best destination for great food, wine and spirits. Come on in and join us. We can't wait to see you. Cheers!!! $-$$ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and an espresso bar till close. WE DELIVER On Campus & to the area between Beckwith, Higgins & 5th Street. Open Mon.-Thur. 7am-8pm, Fri. & Sat. 7am-4pm and Sun. 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$

dish

HAPPIESTHOUR The Reno’s Karaoke Who’s hosting: Jesse LaRocque isn’t just a KJ at the Reno bar in East Missoula, queueing up songs for out-of-tune drunks. He’s also a DJ/VJ who plays some of his own mash-ups between karaoke songs and projects music videos on a big screen for everyone’s viewing pleasure. You might see the Flying Lizards’ 1979 video “Money, That’s What I Want” or Twisted Sister’s “We’re Not Gonna Take It.” In other words, cool videos you haven’t laid eyes on since MTV got so lame a decade ago. What you’re drinking: If you hit happy hour between 4 and 6:30 p.m. any day of the week, you get 75 cents off any drink. But if you’re showing up for karaoke to belt out some tunes, you’re drinking a Pabst pounder for $3. What you’re singing: Almost anything. The karaoke books are gigantic and organized by song and artist. Bad English? Check. MGMT? Check. Garth Brooks? Of course. Who you’re drinking/singing with: A diverse crowd. On a recent late night, the dance floor is populated with a handful of bachelor and bachleorette partiers wearing dangerously short shorts and tube socks, plus one white-haired older gentleman in worn Levis who, frankly, has some pretty slick moves. The karaoke singers were a mix of talent, but

Photo courtesy of the Reno Casino

one top-notch singer tackled Cherry Poppin’ Daddies “Zoot Suit Riot” with nary a stumble. When to go: You could spend a full Saturday at the Reno, which provides $2 drafts, breakfast, lunch and dinner, plus a free Griz bus into town on game days. But if you want to get your karaoke on, just stroll in any Friday, Saturday or Sunday night at 9 p.m. and live out your singing fantasy. How to find it: The Reno Casino bar and restaurant sits in plain view at 3650 Highway 200 East, in East Missoula. —Erika Fredrickson Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender, or beverage for Happiest Hour, e-mail editor@missoulanews.com.

COOL

COFFEE ICE CREAMS

SERVING FREE THINKERS IN OUR COFFEE BAR

BUTTERFLY HERBS COFFEE, TEAS AND THE UNUSUAL 232 N. HIGGINS • DOWNTOWN

BUTTERFLY 232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

d o w n t o w n

Sushi Bar & Japanese Bistro

We have your Happiest Hours! Now, on Thursdays and Saturdays, join us from 7-9 PM for $2.50 Sake Bombs and Half Price Appetizers Join us for Monday $1 night and try our expanded Sushi menu!

403 North Higgins Ave • 406.549.7979

www.sushihanamissoula.com Missoula Independent

Page 21 September 29–October 6, 2011


Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. • 532-2056 Enjoy Happy Hour every afternoon from 4 to 7 pm on the Patio at Brooks and Browns. Microbrews or margaritas are $3.00 or enjoy a Micro pitcher with friends for $9.00. Our full menu runs the range from homemade Chips and Salsa up to a 16 oz. Ribeye steak with Bistro fries. You can bring your family, too. It’s a perfect spot to play Bocce or Croquet. Pastimes are family times, so enjoy time with yours in Bess Reed Park while we cook dinner for you. Brooks and Browns is the most peaceful patio in town. 200 S. Pattee Street, just off the Atrium at The Holiday Inn Downtown Missoula. Hunter Bay Coffee and Sandwich Bar First Interstate Center • 101 East Front St hunterbay.com • 800.805.2263 Missoula’s local roaster since 1991 - now open downtown in the First Interstate Center! Stop by for hand-crafted gourmet coffees and espressos plus madefrom-scratch, healthy sandwiches and soups. Enjoy the sunshine from our patio! Free Wi-Fi and Free Parking in the upper deck lot. Open Monday through Saturday. Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West • 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ The Mustard Seed Asian Café Southgate Mall • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our all-new bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our non-smoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, microbrews, fine wines & signature drinks. Takeout & delivery available. $$-$$$ Oil & Vinegar Southgate Mall • 549-7800 Mon.-Sat. 10:00 AM-9:00 PM Sun. 11:00 AM-6:00 PM. With a visit to Oil & Vinegar, you will discover an international selection of over 40 estate-produced oils & vinegars suspended in glass amphora-shaped containers on a dramatic backlit wall. Guests can sample the varieties and select from various shapes & sizes of bottles to have filled with an “on-tap” product of choice.

SATURDAYS $1 SUSHI 4pm-9pm Mondays & Thursdays - $1 SUSHI

(all day)

Tuesdays - LADIES' NIGHT Not available for To-Go orders

Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. • 543-3188 Don’t feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paradise Falls 3621 Brooks St. • 728-3228 paradisefallsmissoula.com We’re the place for all things Griz! Tailgate with us and catch a ride to and from every home football game! Join us every Tuesday for the Coaches Show, broadcast live at 6pm. Chat with the coaches and have a pound and a pitcher for $12! $-$$ Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $8.50. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $7.75. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$. Pearl Café 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French specialties, bison, elk, trout, fresh fish daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Three course bistro menu with wine $30, Tues. Wed. Thurs. nights, November through March. Extensive wine list, 18 wines by the glass, local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the warm and inviting dining areas. Go to our website Pearlcafe.us to check out nightly specials and bistro menus, make reservations or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$

$…Under $5

Missoula Independent

Page 22 September 29–October 6, 2011

Philly West 134 W. Broadway • 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday - Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. Pita Pit 130 North Higgins Avenue 541-PITA (7482) • pitapitusa.com Fresh Thinking Healthy Eating. Enjoy a pita rolled just for you. Hot meat and cool fresh veggies topped with your favorite sauce. Try our Chicken Caesar, Gyro, Philly Steak, Breakfast Pita, or Vegetarian Falafel to name just a few. For your convenience we are open until 3am 7 nights a week. Call if you need us to deliver! SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway • 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Sean Kelly's Empire Grill 130 W. Pine St. • 542-1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for lunch & dinner. Featuring brunch Saturday & Sunday from 11-2pm. Serving international & Irish pub fare. Full bar, beer, wine , martinis. $-$$ Second Street Sushi 322 S. 2nd, Hamilton • 363-0600 JOIN US at Second Street Sushi, Sunday October 2nd for "A Taste of Europe", a 7-Course European Wine Pairing Event. (5 European wines will be featured.) 7 PM. $75 per person. Please call ahead for reservations. The Shack Restaurant & Catering 222 W. Main • 549-9903 Voted Best Breakfast in Missoula again and again, a Missoula favorite since 1949. Extended summer hours all day from the time the rooster crows til the cows come home. Tues.-Sun. 7am - 9pm, Mon. 7am-3pm. Fine wine & beer selection, weekly specials. Sidewalk dining in good weather. See our complete breakfast, lunch and dinner menu online at www.theshackcafe.com. NOT JUST SUSHI Sushi Hana Downtown offering a new idea for your dining experience. Meat, poultry, vegetables and grain are a large part of Japanese cuisine. We also love our fried comfort food too. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. Corner of Pine & Higgins. 549-7979. $$–$$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins • 327-8929 Stop in when you’re in the neighborhood. We'll do our best to treat you right. Home of the Famous Fish Taco. Crowned Missoulas best lunch for under $6. Mon-Sat. 11-10 Sun. 12-9. Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you'll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Drive 549-8703 • www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins • 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 14 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Sun Wed 8-3pm, Thurs - Sat 8-8pm $-$$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming • 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$ YoWaffle Yogurt 216 W. Main St. • 543-6072 (Between Thai Spicy and The Shack) www.yowaffle.com Grand Opening! Come join us Saturday, October 1st. Guess the weight of your purchase and it's free! Free mini cones and samples. YoWaffle is a self-serve frozen yogurt and Belgian waffle eatery that offers 10 continuously changing flavors of yogurt, over 60 toppings, as well as gluten free cones and waffles. Coffee and a selection of cold beverages. Open 7 days a week. Sun-Thurs 11 AM to 11 PM, Fri 11 AM to 12 AM, Sat. 10 AM to 12 PM. Facebook, WiFi, Loyalty Cards, UMONEY.

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over


8

days a week

Arts & Entertainment listings September 29–October 6, 2011

THURSDAY September

29

The MiniNaturalists Pre-K program lets young people explore the world through hands-on activities, games and play in a natural setting, this and every Thu. through Sept. 29. Cost is $3/$1 for MNHC members. Learn more at MontanaNaturalist.org. Hang out at the Fort Missoula Native Plant Gardens for a day of Creating Landscapes for Play. It’s a chance to talk to landscape designers, community professionals and outdoor education specialists. Free, with snacks and beverages. Help yourself by attending a signing of Roberta Swartz’s “self health” book, Me, Myself and Mind: Reclaim Yourself, Your Health, and Your Life, 10 AM–1 PM and 4 PM–7 PM at The Women’s Club, 2105 Bow St. Call 728-4410. Free. This workshop really knows how to call a spade a spade! Be sure to attend Institutionalizing Diversity and Equity in your Organization, 11:30 AM–1 PM. Location TBD. RSVP and find out where to go by emailing Leah Borow at leah@missoulanonprofit.org.

nightlife Lots of chances to catch the High Holiday Services at Har Shalom, 3035 S. Russell St. A 9 AM and 10 AM service on Thu., Sept. 29, and a Kabbalat Shabbat 6 PM potluck on Fri., Sept. 30 at the Greenough Park picnic shelter. Donation based. Visit har-shalom.org. Margaret Johnson is coming at you with a celebration signing for her book Drama Teacher’s Survival Guide, 5–7 PM at Fact & Fiction Books, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free.

You don’t need a weathered man to know which way the wind blows. Hank III plays Tue., Oct. 4 at 8 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $24/$22 in advance at Rockin’ Rudy’s, at 877-4-FLY-TIX or online at TicketFly.com.

Learn all about two-dimensional design at a Presentation and Demonstration by Visiting Louisiana Artist Jeff Brown in the Arts and Technology Building, Rm

end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Sept. 30, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Molly Llama c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

Come get a piece at

Fridays

$20 PIERCING basic jewelry included

549-8544 • 103 Brooks St. • Open 7 DAYS A WEEK

www.alteredskin.com Missoula Independent

Page 23 September 29–October 6, 2011


108 at FVCC, today starting at 6 PM, 777 Grandview Dr. in Kalispell. Call David Smith at 7563993. Free. Citizens are invited to a celebration of the five-year anniversary of the Open Space Bond, 6–8 PM at City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine Street. The Bridge Club is holding lessons in the fine art of playing Bridge for the next four Thursdays. The first four lessons are free. That’s how they get you!

Starting at 6:15 PM, 3108 Clark St. Email bridge@montana.com or call 239-1240. Fight the power/give peace a chance at the Fall 2011 Peace & Justice Film Series, which brings you a new rabble-rousing film every Thu. This week see Blue Gold: World Water Wars in the Gallagher Building, Rm. 123, starting at 7 PM. Donation based and open to the public. Learn how China affects us here in Big Sky Country at the talk,

Environmental Issues in China and Montana: Shared Experiences, 7 PM at the Stensrud Building, 314 N. First St. W. Call 243-2988. Take a little time for some devotional singing, 7–8:30 PM at 607 B Grantsdale Road in Hamilton. Live music led by Brian Vayu Jameson whose gentle nature and humor encourages the shy singers. Contact Brian at 381-0617. The Klavier Konzert at Free

United Methodist Church offers Baroque music for a broke society, with sonatas, chaconnes, and g i g u e s b y H a n d e l , M oz a r t , Beethoven and all the other greats, 7–10 PM, 300 E. Main St. $5/12 and under free. Leisure suit plus beer goggles not required: Trivial Beersuit, Missoula’s trivia night for the layperson begins with sign ups at 7:30 PM and trivia shortly thereafter at the Lucky Strike Bar & Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Includes prizes like a $50 bar tab, and trivia categories that change weekly. Free. E-mail Katie at kcgt27@gmail.com. Montan Rep Missoula presents Direct, directed by Greg Johnson, 7:30 PM at the Masquer Theatre’s PAR/TV Center on the UM Campus, Sept. 27–Oct. 1 at 7:30 PM. $11 Tue.–Thu./$16 Fri.–Sat. Visit montanarep.org or call 243-6809. Party without future consequences at the Badlander during their Thursday night dance party, Prehab, with sets of hip hop and electronic music from local DJs Vyces and Hotpantz, plus $1 wells and $1 Pabst from 9 PM to midnight, begining at 9 PM. $2. Tom Catmull is playing acoustic alone but never lonely on the Brooks and Brown patio with $7 Bayern pitchers all night long and great food specials, 200 S. Pattee. Free. Oh alt-country Americana, you harsh mistress, you. See Ellensburg Wash.’s Star Anna and the Laughing Dogs, with locals Fiancee and The Boxcutters, 9 PM at the Palace for $5. Nate Hegyi, lead singer/songwriter of Wartime Blues, keeps the folk and Americana flowing freely when he plays with a rotating cast of friends this and every other Thu. at the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., at 10 PM. Free. Things have changed and so can you! Check out Dead Hipster Dance Party at its new location: Sean Kelly’s. Party starts at 10 PM, and, oh lordy, there are $1 well drinks until midnight. $3. Check out deadhipster.com. So we have the ambient, down tempo sounds of Bluetech, followed by the disco, psychedelic rock of Boombox,

Missoula Independent

Page 24 September 29–October 6, 2011

and maybe a sandwich for after? 1 0 P M a t t h e To p H a t . Logisticalone will be there, too. $16/$14 advance.

FRIDAY

30

September

Stars rule the sky and our hearts and minds when the UM Physics and Astronomy Department celebrates its centenniel (100 years in action) with a conference at the University Center at 1:10 PM, followed by a reception at Silk Road at 6 PM, and a night of observation at the Blue Mountain Observatory around 9 PM. Call Ware at 243-6221. Get happy at The Jolly Corks, downstairs at the Elk’s Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St., which opens at 4 PM and has a happy hour from 5–7 PM. 2 for 1 drinks! You can’t afford not to! Practice being peaceful in a world of differences during the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center’s Intercultural Dialogue Group, a monthly meeting that aims to bring together people from various backgrounds for an afternoon of conversation and peacemaking, every last Fri. of the month at 4:30 PM in the library of the Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call Betsy at 543-3955 or e-mail peace@ jrpc.org for more info.

nightlife Learn all about two-dimensional design at a Presentation and Demonstration by Visiting Louisiana Artist Jeff Brown in the Arts and Technology Building, Rm 108 at FVCC, today from 10 AM to 6 PM, 777 Grandview Dr. in Kalispell. Call David Smith at 7563993. Free. Kick off Breast Cancer awareness month and celebrate hip women at Breasty Festy 2, starting at 5 PM in Caras Park, brought to you by Faux Pink. Go to fauxpink.org. High Har Shalom presents a Kabbalat Shabbat 6 PM potluck on Fri., Sept. 30 at the Greenough Park picnic shelter. Donation based. Visit har-shalom.org. 907 Britt will sing to you and only you, 6–8 PM at Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. Free. Catch Tom DeWeese’’s lecture Agenda 21 and how sustainable


The one in yellow sneaks has a secret. New York garage rockers Benyaro want to love and entertain you, along with Tucson’s Lenguas Largas and locals Bitter Crane, Fri., Sept. 30, 9 PM at the Badlander. Cost TBA.

development negatively affects your family and community, 7 PM at Guest House Inn, 3803 Brooks St. $5. Call 251-5961.

Pep Rally at 8 PM. The rally features a bonfire, lighting of the M and other luminaries, all free. Visit grizalum.org.

Get the stories of ranch women not quite from the horses mouth, but something like that, when Wendy Woollett’s show, The Montana Monologues, hits the Roxy Theater, with music by Paul Kelley, directed by Gretchen Spiess. Shows are Sept. 23–24 and Sept. 30–Oct. 1, at 7 PM. $18 door/$15 general/$10 students. 718 S. Higgins.

I wear clothes bordering on pajamas pretty much all the time, but tonight’s pajama party, featuring The Whoopass Girls, I Like Girls and Cat Heaven might be very novel for you! See them at 8 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. for a suggested $5 donation or free in your jammies. (See Noise in this issue.)

Montan Rep Missoula presents Direct, directed by Greg J o h n s o n , 7 : 30 P M a t t h e Masquer Theatre’s PAR/TV Center on the UM Campus, Sept. 22–24 and Sept. 27–Oct. 1 at 7:30 PM. $11 Tue.–Thu./$16 Fri.–Sat. Visit montanarep.org or call 243-6809.

Get what all the buzz is about (sorry) at The Bee Play or Venn

Diagrams, written by Kate Morris and directed by D. Marie Long, Sept. 30–Oct. 1 and Oct. 7–8 at 8 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $10/$8 students. I spy with my little eye that the play Something’s Afoot! will be performed at the Stevensville Playhouse for the first three weekends in October, Fri. and Sat. at 8 PM and Sun. at 2 PM. Call 777-2722. 319 Main St. in Stevensville. Liven things up in your love life, or just take comfort in watching the

Teresa Waldorf is back by popular demand for her one and a half woman show, Finding Funny, with Michelle Dufflocq and Rosie Ayers, 7:30 PM at Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins. $10. Ah, the healing, nourishing qualities of comedy or whatever. Join comedians Matt Kettelhake, John Howard, Michael Beers and Tate Hoskins in their show, Laugh for a Change, 8 PM at the Elk’s Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St. $7 gets you in, and bring three cans of canned food to benefit the Missoula Food Bank. They’re setting things on fire in the UM Oval for the Yell Night

Missoula Independent

Page 25 September 29–October 6, 2011


cosmos, during public observing night at the Blue Mountain Observatory where you’ll get to gander at nearby planets, stars and nebulae at an estimated observing time of 8:30 PM. Free. Call 243-5179 before you go and get directions by clicking over to physics.umt.edu/ bluemountain. Bring the kids with you, but leave the dog at home, for the Top Hat’s Family Friendly Fridays at 6 PM, this week with Freetown Turnaround. Free. New York City’s garage rockers

Benyaro and Tucson’s Lenguas Largas want to love and entertain you, along with locals Bitter Crane, 9 PM at the Badlander. Cost TBA. Land of 10,000 lakes, Minnesota rappers Kristoff Krane, Junkyard Empire and No Bird Sing are going to rhyme things, with locals Codepend-ents, 9 PM at the Palace. $7/$12 ages 18–20. Not a clue why they call him that but nevertheless, witness Erik “Fingers” Ray play live honkeytonk at Sean Kelly’s, Fri. and Sat.

night from 9:30 PM to close, 130 W. Pine St. Free. Get your fix of raucous, live and local music this and every Friday night at the Union Club, this week with Cash for Junkers, starting at 9:30 PM and always free. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. Testify to the funk, brought to you by Reverend Slanky, 10 PM at the Top Hat. $5.

SATURDAY

01

October

Live it up and enjoy an early afternoon High Tea & Tour of the Conrad Mansion Museum. Check out the 26 rooms built in 1895 and all the grandeur therein. $25. Register by the Wed. before. 330 Woodland Ave. conradmansion.com. Everything you need to know about the big, highly anticipated Avalanche Safety Workshop can be found at avalanchesafetyworkshop.com. It goes down at 8 AM at Grouse Mountain Lodge in Whitefish. $20/$15 pre-registered. (See Mountain High in this issue.) Talents are on the line at the MidYe l l o w s t o n e S m a l l m o u t h Bash, a catfish and bass fishing derby on the Lower Yellowstone River. Learn everything at montanaoutdoor.com. Travel to a raptor-banding site with Five Valleys Audubon for an allday field trip to the Raptor View Institute’s banding site at Flesher Pass to look at Migrating Raptors. Meet at 6:00 AM in the middle of the UM Adams Center parking lot. To sign up, call Larry Weeks at 549-5632. Keep it local every Sat. from 8 AM–1 PM as you head down to the Clark Fork River Market (clarkforkrivermarket.com), which takes place beneath the Higgins Ave. bridge, and to the Missoula Farmers’ Market (missoulafarmersmarket.com), which opens at 8:30 at the north end of Higgins Avenue. If you’re after non-edibles, check out East Pine Street’s Missoula Saturday Market (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), which runs 9 AM–1 PM. Free to spectate, and often to sample. Activities directly related to Homecoming today include, but are not limited to: The 5k Homecoming Hustle beginning at Higgins and Broadway at 9:45 AM, the Homecoming Parade at 10 AM and the Homecoming TV Tailgate at the Adams Center at 11 AM. Get all the facts at grizalum.org. Stock up at the Friends of the Library Book Sale, 10 AM in the west meeting room of Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St. Longtime Montana artist Louise Lamontagne is sharing her work from 10 AM–4 PM in an open studio for the first time in St.

Missoula Independent

Page 26 January 6–January 13, 2011

Ignatius. For details and directions, call 360-6792 or email louise@louiselamontagne.net. Join Ed Jenne for a signing of Poster of Missoula, 11 AM–1 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. The big deal, of course, is the UM homecoming football game, where the Griz take on Northern Colorado at Washington-Grizzly Stadium, beginning at 1 PM. Go to gogriz.com. Join Best of Missoula hairstylist winner Katt Ahlstrom for the grand opening of her new Canvas Studios 4–8 PM, with raffles, prizes, temporary tattoos and other fun stuff at 429 Madison. 926-1440.

nightlife The Discount Quartet drink rich, 6–8 PM at Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. Free. Get the stories of ranch women not quite from the horses mouth, but something like that, when Wendy Woollett’s show, The Montana Monologues, hits the Roxy Theater, with music by Paul Kelley, directed by Gretchen Spiess. Shows are Sept. 23–24 and Sept. 30–Oct. 1, at 7 PM. $18 door/$15 general/$10 students/seniors. 718 S. Higgins. I’m told you can expect soul drivin’ rockin’ from Lars Pointer Project, 6–8:30 PM at Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton. Free. Diane Smith’’s book The New Rural is the new black, and she’ll be around to talk about it 7 PM at Grizzly Claw Trading Co., 3187 MT Highway 83 in Seeley Lake. Free. A bunch of rag tag musicians with who knows what kind of instruments get together on the first Sat. of every month for The Bitterroot Valley Good-Time Jamboree, a musical concert from 7–9:30 PM at The Grange Hall, 1436 South 1st St. Call Clem at 961-4949. Montan Rep Missoula presents Direct, directed by Greg Johnson, 7:30 PM at the Masquer Theatre’s PAR/TV Center on the UM Campus, Sept. 22–24 and Sept. 27–Oct. 1 at 7:30 PM. $11 Tue.–Thu./$16 Fri.–Sat. Visit montanarep.org or call 243-6809. Witness Troy Evans tell a series of tales some call “an autobiography told by ghosts,” 7:30 PM at KM Theatre, 40 2nd St East in Kalispell. $20. Call 755-5321.


THUNDER ALLEY BOWLING on Fridays at 9pm Live music by DIESEL RADIO on 9/30... Classic Rock

Mon. & Wed. evenings 9pm - 2am bowling special. ONLY $1.00 per person per game (shoe rental not included) Karaoke on Wed, Thurs, and Sat evenings. Text to 72727 funcenter or funcenter 2 for specials & promotions!

Standing at the gates of Hell? Tune in to the psychedelic rock of Boombox, with the ambient, down tempo sounds of Bluetech, Thu., Sept. 29, 10 PM at the Top Hat. Logisticalone will be there, too. $16/$14 advance.

Flail about with grace at the Missoula Folklore Society Contra Dances, with a workshop at 7:30 PM followed by the dance from 8–11 at the Union Hall, 208 E. Main St., upstairs. $8/$6 MFS members. Visit missoulafolk.org.

8 PM at the WIlma. Tickets are $27 and available at Rockin’ Rudy’s, by calling 877.4.FLY.TIX and online at TicketFly.com.

Kris Moon and special guest DJ Hotpantz guarantee to keep you dancing all night long to an assortment of hip hop, electronic

Get what all the buzz is about (sorry) at The Bee Play or Venn Diagrams, written by Kate Morris and directed by D. Marie Long, Sept. 30–Oct. 1 and Oct. 7–8 at 8 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $10/$8 students. I spy with my little eye that the play Something’s Afoot! will be performed at the Stevensville Playhouse for the first three weekends in October, Fri. and Sat. at 8 PM and Sun. at 2 PM. Call 777-2722. 319 Main St. in Stevensville. To be fair, do you really know how magnets work either? It’s the moment every Juggalo in town has been waiting for! Insane Clown Posse is taking the stage,

Missoula Independent

Page 27 January 6–January 13, 2011


and other bass-heavy beats ‘til the bar closes during Absolutely at the Badlander, 208 Ryman, at 9 PM. Free. Swig drinks while listening to old-school rock hits, ‘80s tunes or modern indie rock songs when Dead Hipster presents Takeover!, which features “drinkin’ music” DJ’d by the Dead Hipster DJs starting at 9 PM at the Central Bar & Grill, 143 W. Broadway St. Includes drink specials and photos with Abi Halland. Free. Get out of Missoula for a second at the Lumberjack Saloon for a free night of music and dancing, this week with Sho Down. Show starts at 9 PM, and there are cabins for rent and a shuttle bus available. Call 273-6264. The Mantis is the T-rex of the insect world, and Madison Wis., Man Mantis know hip hop, 9 PM at the Palace, with locals DubBuddha and Sounds! ThatHappen.$3/$8 ages 18–20. Not a clue why they call him that but nevertheless, witness Erik “Fingers” Ray play live honkey-tonk at Sean Kelly’s, Fri. and Sat. night from 9:30 PM to close, 130 W. Pine St. Free. Fill your Saturday nights with live and local music, this week with Shane Clouse & Stomping Ground, 9:30 PM at Union Club. Free.

DJ Dubwise supplies dance tracks all night long so take advantage of Sexy Saturday and rub up against the someone at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

SUNDAY October

02

Locavores unite at the Target Range Community Farmers’ Market, which features a plethora of local foods and assorted goods and runs from 10 AM–1 PM every Sun. until Oct. 9 at the parking lot of Target Range School, 4095 South Ave. W. Free. Call Peggie at 728-5302. Renowned choral conductor Anton Armstrong of St. Olaf College will conduct Missoula’s premier vocal ensemble Dolce Canto in a brief concert, 10:00 AM in the sanctuary of the First Lutheran Church, 2808 South Ave. West. Free. Go around and around at the Carousel Sunday Market and Festival, which features arts and crafts, local vendors, food and entertainment in a family friendly atmosphere from 11 AM–3 PM at A Carousel for Missoula. This week fea-

Time to make a change in your life

Learn more about the benefits of Peace Corps service:

Tuesday, October 4 • 6:30 to 8 p.m. The Trail Head, Downtown Store • 221 E. Front St. • Missoula, MT 59802

800.424.8580 • www.peacecorps.gov Missoula Independent

Page 28 January 6–January 13, 2011


tures music from Bob Mislevic. 101 Carousel Dr. 549-8382. Go with the jam when The Rocky Mountain Grange Hall, 1436 S. First St. south of Hamilton, hosts a weekly acoustic jam session for guitarists, mandolin players and others, from 2–4 PM. Free. Call Clem at 961-4949. We can do it! This and every Sun. through October, come to Ladies’ Night at Freecycles from 2–6 PM to learn to build and fix bikes plus hang out with other chicks, 732 S. First St. W.

nightlife Some of the best shows are off the beaten path. David Gans who hosts the nationally syndicated “Grateful Dead Hour,” record producer and allaround music veteran plays a house show in Ovando at cabins on the North Fork of the Blackfoot that’s open to the public. It’s a potluck and dinner starts at 6 PM, music starts at 7. Call Barry and Celeste at 406-541-6616 for reservations and more info. I spy with my little eye that the play Something’s Afoot! will be performed at the Stevensville Playhouse for the first three weekends in October, Fri. and Sat. at 8 PM and Sun. at 2 PM. Call 777-

2722. 319 Main St. in Stevensville. Reading out loud is fundamental when the UM MFA students pair up with esteemed writers in the community for the Second Wind Reading Series, 5 PM at the Top Hat. This week features Jayme Feary and Greg Pape. Free. There’s a wolf at the door, and it’s 10 Years, with Redlight King, 7:30 PM at the Wilma. Tickets are $20/$17.50 in advance and available at Rockin Rudy’s, by calling 877.4.FLY.TIX and online at TicketFly.com. Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike. This week features the Josh Farmer, The Front Street River Band and $4 martinis as always, beginning around 8 PM. Free.

MONDAY October

03

Learn about Southwest Asia while eating a sandwich you brought in a bag at the Brown Bag series, Noon to 1 PM in the University Center at UM, with Dan Menkin’s talk, Contemporary Film Production in Israel. Free.

Missoula Independent

Page 29 January 6–January 13, 2011


20% OFF Perennials â&#x20AC;˘ Fruit Trees Shade Trees, Herbs Berries, Lilacs, Roses Bulbs have arrived

Tincture Sale!

Monday-Saturday, Sept 26 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Oct 1

35-50% off! All Meadowsweet tinctures - stock up while they last!

Asters & Mums Flowering Cabbage and Kale

10% off! All tinctures from ¡ Herb Pharm ¡ Herbs Etc. ¡ Simplers Botanicals bulk tinctures

nightlife Usually you order a local beef (or veggie) burger, fries and a beer at Scottyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Table and it means nothing. This time, 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8:30 PM, the $15 spent benefits The Flagship Program. 131 S. Higgins. Animals are so awesome and humans are so violent and lame. These and other themes are explored in a screening of Dolphin Boy, 7 PM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Get some much needed spiritual guidance at Between the Worlds, 205 W. Main St. in Hamilton at their Spiritual Discussion Group, this Monday with Star Jamison. Call 363-2939 with questions.

As well as compost, we carry Topdress, Clay Buster, our Outdoor Mix, and our Potting Mix. Please call for more info.

Hold on to your hats, because UM is presenting a Junior Student Recital Series featuring Arik Sabin and Clint Whittle on Oboe, 7:30 PM at the Music Building. Free.

406-721-1423 1125 Clark Fork Lane

1804 North Ave W, Suite F 406-214-3112 â&#x20AC;˘ shearartsalon.com

(right behind the Super Wal-Mart)

So you think you can fill in the blank? Prove it at Sean Kellyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Open Mic Night this and every Monday at 8:30 PM. Call 5421471 after 10 AM on Monday to sign up.

Dropping Off / Tipping Hours are 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. (seven days a week, excluding holidays) Picking Up / Purchasing Hours are 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. (Wednesday & Saturday only)

Join Us For

VOLUNTEER TRAINING When: Thursdays 10/13, 10/20, 10/27, 11/3, & 11/10. Time: 6 pm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9 pm Where: Hospice of Missoula 800 Kensington, suite 204 It is one of the beautiful compensations of this life that no one can sincerely try to help another without helping himself. ~Ralph Waldo Emerson To sign up for this class please contact:

Hospice of Missoula

406-543-4408

www.hospiceofmissoula.com/contactus Join us for a dance party! Planned Parenthood presents

Thursday, 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 pm

October 6 , 2011 Florence Hotel

111 N. Higgins ) MissoulA

For tickets call

830.3483

$ 50 each/$ 20 students Z_ng]kZbl^k_hk

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Missoula Independent

Wine goes good with everything, but especially Monday night music, this week with Rio playing Bossa Nova (Brazilian Jazz), with Tim Drakert & Julie Yates, 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10 PM at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. Free.

Page 30 September 29â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 6, 2011

Have a drink and take a load off in the company of your fellow laborers during the Badlanderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Service Industry Night, which runs this and every Mon. and includes drink specials for service industry workers starting at 9 PM. Also, if you have an iPod, bring it in and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll play it. Free. Somebodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got a case of the Milkcrate Mondays. This week theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re presenting Missoula Area Dubstep Monday, with local DJs Giga, Osiris, Primecutz and the Milkcrate Mechanic at 9 PM, with free pool and $6 pitchers of PBR. Free. And wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t we all like to be one. Starfucker are playing dancey, indie electronic pop, 9 PM at the Badlander, with Sick Kids XOXO, plus DJs Mike Gill & JT Baker. $10. (See Scope in this issue.)

TUESDAY October

04

Here be the first in the Marjorie A. Crawford Literature Seminars, 9:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 11:30 AM at the Bitterroot Public Library, with a talk on Madness and Civiliza-tion by Michel Foucault. Call 363-1670. 306 State St. Free. Eat a sandwich and soak in The Benefits of Student Participation in Short-Term Study Abroad Courses by Keith Bosak, 1

PM in the Mansfield Conference room at the UM library. Free.

nightlife Here it is, the bout youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve all been waiting for, the Inaugural Northside Vs. Westside Softball Showdown, starting 5:30 PM at Northside Softball field on the corner of Cooley and Worden, free, with donations benefiting the NMCDC (NorthMissoula Community Develop-ment Corporation. Free beer! Hotdogs for purchase. Game is at 6:30 PM. (See Agenda in this issue.) Let someone else do the dishes this and every week for the Tuesday Night â&#x20AC;&#x153;Earlyâ&#x20AC;? Dinner at the Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St., 5:30 to 7 PM for $9 ($14.95 on the last Tues. of the month for prime rib). Membership not required. Call 549-05423 by noon on Mon. to make reservations. Cancer, Courage and Creativity is an 8week workshop for men and women experiencing the effects of cancer, 5:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7:30 PM this and every Thu. at the Living Art Studio, 725 W. Alder #17. Free. Call 5495329. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a new sheriff in town, but he has no judicial authority, he just loves to rock. The Tuesday Night Open Mic/Jam Night is now at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave, hosted by Louie Bond, Teri Llovet and the UFOkies. Sign up is at 6 PM and music goes 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10 PM. The Northern Rockies Rising Tide has weekly meetings this and every Tue. at at Freecycles, 732 S. First St. W. at 6:00 PM, where participants fight climate change through grassroots resistance. Throw your jazz hands in the air and join Chris Duparri and Ruthie Dada every Tuesday evening for a Jazz Martini Night, with $2 martinis at Brooks and Brown, 200 S. Pattee. Free. YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts YWCA Support Groups for women every Tue. from 6:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8 PM. An American Indianled talking circle is also available, along with age-appropriate childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s groups. Free. Call 543-6691. UM is bringing you another installment of their Junior Music Recital Series, with Tully Olson on trumpet and Campbell Youngblood-Petersen on percussion, 7:30 PM at the Music Building on campus. Free. A mesmerizing drama about compassion, exploitation, and redemption awaits you when UM presents The Elephant Man by Bernard Pomerance, Oct. 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8 and Nov. 15 at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors & students. Visit umttheatredance.org. Sean Kellyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with.


Ready? What ‘80s film starred both Mario van Peebles and Michael Caine? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.) Here comes the third in a long line of Hanks, when Hank III plays 8 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $24/$22 in advance at Rockin’ Rudy’s, at 877-4-FLY-TIX or online at TicketFly.com. Just the name Three Eared Dog gives me the blues. See them live at Flathead Lake Brewing Co., 424 N. Higgins Ave. at 8 PM. Free. All royalty gets irie during Royal Reggae Night, which features free pool plus reggae, dancehall and hip hop remixes spun by an array of DJs starting at 9 PM at the Palace. This week features DJs Supa J, General Smiley and Green. Free. Come unpeeled with Japan’s punk, noise group Melt Banana, plus Brooklyn’s Unstoppable Death Machine, 9 PM at the Badlander. $8. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Take in some funk, soul and blues with Andy Frasco and a little folk and rock from Javier Ryan, 10 PM at the Top Hat, $2.

WEDNESDAY October

05

Settle in for a screening of the film, Prophecy: Understanding Our Times, narrated by John Van Aiken, 10 AM–3 PM at Unity Church, 546 South Ave. W. $15 suggested contribution. Country bumpkin needs will be met at the J o c k o Va l l e y Fa r m e r ’ s M a r k e t . Celebraate the last week of the season with a Harvest Festival, featuring food and live music from Joan Zen Duo, Gravely Mountan Boys and Cootehill, 4–8 PM, located on Hwy 93 in downtown Arlee and now accepting SNAP, credit and debit cards. Call 726-5550.

nightlife Check out The Wild Mare in Corvallis for

Cheers to learning how to speak eloquently in public and stuff! The Speechcraft program offered by Bitterroot Toastmasters Club offers six-weeks of instruction every Wed., 6:30–8 PM, Oct. 5–Nov. 9 at Perkins Restaurant, 1285 N. First St. in Hamilton. $60 includes a workbook.

SPOTLIGHT

film saves Don’t confuse Dolphin Boy, the internationally acclaimed and award-winning documentary playing this Monday night at the Roxy Theatre, with Dolphin Tale, the similarly named and themed commercial film playing in select multiplexes. This is a comparison to rival Armageddon vs. Deep Impact, Friday Night Lights vs. Varsity Blues or possibly Hulk vs. The Incredible Hulk. (I’m not sure on that last one; I didn’t see either of them.) Dolphin Tale is the story of a boy who, with Morgan Freeman’s help, fashions a prosthetic tail for an injured dolphin and in the WHAT: Dolphin Boy film screening WHEN: Mon. Oct. 3 at 7 PM WHERE: Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. MORE INFO: dolphinboyfilm.com process comes to learn true values, and it may be a good film, but it is needlessly in 3D, a format I revile, and so it is dead to me. Sorry. I won’t mention it again. Dolphin Boy is the product of Dani Menkin, who wrote, directed and produced the film. It won the Academy Award for Best Documentary in Israel and was short listed in the same category at the 2006 American Academy Awards. If you were as wounded as I was by the, heartbreaking documentary about the plight of dolphins in captivity, The Cove, this film might do something to heal your

their First Wednesday Wine Tasting at 6 PM, where you can taste some wine, have some appetizers, you know, whatever. This month features wine from Oregon. 283 2nd St. thewildmare.com. Pub Trivia Answer: Jaws 4. “This time, it’s personal.”

Pizza and trivia go together like two things that don’t necessarily but could at Front Street Trivia Night. Note the move to Wednesday night, (because of football) 7 PM at the Mackenzie River Pizza, 137 W. Front St. Free.

wounded heart. It centers on Morad, a teenager in Northern Israel who is traumatized by a violent attack that leaves him speechless. He manages to recover when his father takes him as a last resort to be treated with dolphins. Most Montanans are familiar with the healing powers of horses (known as equestrian therapy) and you’re probably aware of how sensitive and intelligent dolphins are, so it’s not such a leap. Morad makes deep connections with the dolphins and is able to speak again. But the world isn’t made up of animals, it’s filled with violent, conflicted humans, and Morad’s struggle to reconcile with the people who betrayed him is the film’s central struggle. Dolphin Boy is a documentary, but from what I’ve seen, it plays with the fluidity of a scripted film. It appears to me simultaneously eerie and beautiful. The film event is co-sponsored and co-hosted by The International Wildlife Media Center & International Programs of The University of Montana in a special, one-night-only screening, with a reception beforehand. Dani Menkin will be present to meet with the audience and talk about the film. —Molly Laich

As a Kapha body-type, it might take me awhile to roll out the door and attend this Ay u r v e d i c P u b l i c Ta l k : H e a l i n g Through Simple Ayurvedic Practices, 6–7 PM at the Ewam Buddhist Center, 180 S. Third St. W. But so worth it. Free.

William M. Adler is the man who fell to earth for a book signing of, The Man Who Never Died: The Life, Times, and Legacy of Joe Hill, American Labor Icon, 7 PM at Shakespeare & Co., 103 S. Third St. W. Visit themanwho neverdied.com. They’re back! Join Dr. Fred Allendorf in his talk, Evolution Today: Return of the Bed Bugs, 7 PM at the Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St. $4 suggested donation. MNHC members are always free. Get some much needed spiritual guidance at Between the Worlds, 205 W. Main St. in Hamilton at their Spiritual Discussion Group, this Monday with Star Jamison. Call 363-2939 with questions. A mesmerizing drama about compassion, exploitation, and redemption awaits you when UM presents The Elephant Man by Bernard Pomerance, Oct. 4–8 and Nov. 15 at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors & students. Visit umttheatredance.org. Your search for that high, lonesome sound ends, because the Old Post hosts a Pickin’ Circle this and every Wed. at 9 PM. Free. Be sure you’ve downed enough pitchers of PBR in order to have the courage to sing the epically long, house favorite tune, “Total Eclipse of the Heart” and other fine staples during Kraptastic Karaoke at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. Just don’t speak in acronyms during WTF Wednesdays and Ladies’ Night at Harry

OCT 1 Homecoming parade entry honoring Poet Laureate Sheryl Noethe OCT 6 Young poets on the Pea Green Boat KUFM 4 pm David Cates and Caroline Patterson reading at Fact and Fiction, 120 N. Higgins, 5 p.m. OCT 7 Poetry in Motion Kickoff Reading Mountain Line Transfer Center, 4:30 p.m. MWC exhibit at Missoula Children's Museum First Friday launch, 5-7 p.m. OCT 8 MWC Festival of the Book panel discussion "When I Was a Rabbit - Creativity and Corrections in the Classroom,” 2:30 p.m., Holiday Inn Festival of the Book Gala Reading, 7:30 p.m., The Wilma Mary Clearman Blew, Bonnie Jo Campbell and MWC Artistic Director Sheryl Noethe, Montana’s Poet Laureate

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David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, where drink specials mix with music every Wed. starting at 9 PM at the bar. Free. The music is coming from inside the machine when the Palace hosts Harvest Kitties, a night of various styles of electronic music with Metatron, Illegitimate Children, DubBudda and Soundsiva, 9 PM. Free.

THURSDAY October

06

Talk transit with the Transportation Technical Advisory Committee, which meets the first Thu. of every month. Join them at 10 AM at the Missoula Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine. Learn about Southwest Asia while eating a sandwich you brought in a bag at the Brown Bag series, Noon to 1 PM in Stone Hall, Room 303 on the UM Campus, with Abdujabbor Shirinov’s talk, Tajikistan in 20 Years: Challenges and Achievements. Free.

nightlife Hang out with Tom Catmull and the Clerics and support Planned Parent-hood of Montana all at once at their benefit

Missoula Independent

dance, 6 PM ,with food, auctions, dancing, door prizes and more, plus Stacey James, PPMT CEO as guest speaker. Tickets are $50/$20 students. 111 N. Higgins Ave. Chicago’s most vibrant musician could very well be Keith Scott, playing 6–8:30 PM at Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton. Free. Celebrate Dia da los Muertos, or “Day of the Dead” at Stumptown Art Studio during Thursday gallery nights, 6–9 PM at 145 Central Ave. in Whitefish. Free. Visit stumptownartstudio.org. Fight the power/give peace a chance at the Fall 2011 Peace & Justice Film Series, which brings you a new rabble rousing film every Thu. This week see Pax Americana and the Weaponization of Space in the Gallagher Building, Rm. 123, starting at 7 PM. Donation based and open to the public. The 6th Annual REEL ROCK Film Tour promises audiences a mind-blowing selection of climbing flicks, 7 PM at the Urey Lecture Hall on the UM Campus. Tickets are $10/$8 advance. Visit reelrocktour.com. Leisure suit plus beer goggles not required: Trivial Beersuit, Missoula’s trivia night for the layperson begins with sign ups at 7:30 PM and trivia shortly thereafter at the Lucky Strike Bar & Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Includes prizes like a $50 bar tab, and triv-

Page 32 September 29–October 6, 2011

ia categories that change weekly. Free. Email Katie at kcgt27@gmail.com. A mesmerizing drama about compassion, exploitation, and redemption awaits you when UM presents The Elephant Man by Bernard Pomerance, Oct. 4–8 and Nov. 15 at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors & students. Visit umttheatredance.org. Our armed men and women are multi-talented apparently and eager to present, United States Air Force Concert and Singing Sergeants, 7:30 PM at the University Theatre on UM’s Campus. Free. Sure, Tamarack Brewing Company has been open since April, but whatever, they’re having their big Grand Opening party now, from 8 PM to question mark, with food, live music, a photo booth, door prizes and other things I’m sure. 231 W. Front St. Party without future consequences at the Badlander during their Thursday night dance party, Prehab, with sets of hip hop and electronic music from local DJs Vyces and Hotpantz, plus $1 wells and $1 Pabst from 9 PM to midnight, begining at 9 PM. $2. Only Reno, Nev., could produce outlaw country such as Hellbound Glory, with local artist Aran Buzzas, 9 PM at the Palace. $8.

LoL at the Missoula Homegrown Stand Up Comedy Open Mic, 10 PM at Union Club. Get there by 9:30 PM if you want to sign up to perform. Free. He’ll cure your tremors with a sweet shot of country: Russ Nasset hits up the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., for a solo set this and every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free. Things have changed and so can you! Check out Dead Hipster Dance Party at its new location: Sean Kelly’s. Party starts at 10 PM, and oh lordy, there are $1 well drinks until midnight. $3. Check out deadhipster.com. They tried to make me go to Rehab, the southern rock, hip hop and country group, 10 PM at the Top Hat, and I said, I don’t know, maybe. $18/$15 advance. Calendar fans should prepare themselves for some exciting/devastating changes in the next couple of weeks. Stay tuned! In the meantime, please send your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Sept. 30 to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternatively, snail mail your events to Molly Llama c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax 543-4367. Find me also on twitter.com/#!/8 DaysMissoula. Finally, you can submit things online in the arts section of our website. Scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says, “submit an event.”


MOUNTAIN HIGH A lot of people have willfully forgotten the brilliance of the1993 film Aspen Extreme, ignored by the Academy in favor of Schindler’s List or whatever. In this unsung drama, T.J. and Dexter leave the comforts of Detroit to become ski instructors in Colorado. T.J. falls in love, while Dexter prefers danger. He gets mixed up in a drug trade and brazenly skis the uncharted slopes, despite the many warnings peppered throughout the story of avalanches. Well, you can guess what happens. The mountain swallows Dexter, and we learn a lesson about drugs, caution and love. It is because of Dexter that winter-sports enthusiasts must, must attend the Northern Rockies Avalanche Safety Workshop this Saturday in Whitefish. Five of the region’s prominent avalanche professionals will present

practical safety information and research. You will see demos of safety skills and learn about the current state of the snow safety industry, all of it designed to keep you safe in avalanche-prone terrain. Session topics include, “Stability Test and the Role of Spatial Variability,” “Highmarking, Boondocking and Hill Climbing,” and my personal favorite: “The Human Condition: How selfknowledge can help us make better decisions.” T.J. knew himself. That’s why he was the most popular ski instructor, he stayed out of the drug trade and he got the girl.

The Northern Rockies Avalanche Safety Workshop (NRASW) goes down Sat., Oct. 1 starting at 8 AM at Grouse Mountain Lodge in Whitefish. Cost is $20 at the door or $15 when you pre-register at avalanchesafetyworkshop.com.

Photo by Chad Harder

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 29 The MiniNaturalists Pre-K program lets young people explore the world through hands-on activities, games and play in a natural setting, this and every Thu. through Sept. 29. Cost is $3/$1 for MNHC members. Learn more at MontanaNaturalist.org. Hang out at the Fort Missoula Native Plant Gardens for a day of Creating Landscapes for Play. It’s a chance to talk to landscape designers, community professionals and outdoor education specialists. Free, with snacks and beverages.

FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 30 Stars rule the sky and our hearts and minds when the UM Physics and Astronomy department celebrates their centenniel (100 years in action) with a conference at the University Center at 1:10 PM, followed by a reception at Silk Road at 6, and a night of observation at the Blue Mountain Observatory around 9 PM. Call Ware at 243-6221. Liven things up in your love life, or just take comfort in watching the cosmos, during public observing night at the Blue Mountain Observatory where you’ll get to gander at nearby planets, stars and nebulae at an estimated observing time of 8:30 PM. Free. Call 243-5179 before you go and get directions by clicking over to physics.umt.edu/bluemountain.

SATURDAY OCTOBER 1 Talents are on the line at the Mid-Yellowstone Smallmouth Bash, a catfish and bass fishing derby on the Lower Yellowstone River.Learn everything at montanaoutdoor.com.

Travel to a raptor-banding site with Five Valleys Audubon for an all-day field trip to the Raptor View Institute’s banding site at Flesher Pass to look at Migrating Raptors. Meet at 6 AM in the middle of the UM Adams Center parking lot. To sign up, call Larry Weeks at 549-5632. The big deal, of course, is the UM homecoming football game, where the Griz take on Northern Colorado at Washington-Grizzly Stadium, beginning at 1 PM. Go to gogriz.com.

SUNDAY OCTOBER 2 We can do it! This and every Sun. through October, come to Ladies’ Night at Freecycles from 2–6 PM to learn to build and fix bikes plus hang out with other chicks, 732 S. First St. W.

TUESDAY OCTOBER 4 Here it is, the bout you’ve all been waiting for, the Inaugural Northside Vs. Westside Softball Showdown, starting 5:30 PM at Northside Softball field on the corner of Cooley and Worden, free, with donations benefiting the NMCDC (NorthMissoula Community Development Corporation. Free beer! Hotdogs for purchase. Game is at 6:30 PM. (See Agenda in this issue.)

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 5 They’re back! Join Dr. Fred Allendorf in his talk, Evolution Today: Return of the Bed Bugs, 7 PM at the Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St. $4 suggested donation. MNHC members are always free. calendar@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 33 September 29–October 6, 2011


scope

Mass pop Sick Kids XOXO spread the dance party fever by Erika Fredrickson

The band name Sick Kids XOXO was born at the Good Food Store in late 2010. Guitarist/singer Michael Gill recalls being hung over, having just woken up from a wild night of DJing for his popular Dead Hipster dance party shows at the Badlander bar. He was in need of a herd of beverages and a dark, quiet room. But as he stood staring at rows of healthy coconut drinks and other thirstquenching remedies, a baby started crying incessantly in the shopping cart next to him. “The baby was screaming its head off,” says Gill. “And I’m rubbing my forehead, dying silently.” The mother of the baby noticed Gill’s pain and was sympathetic. She patted Gill on the shoulder and told him that she was sorry but the baby was sick and that’s what the screaming was all about. Gill’s annoyance turned to sudden warmth, he says. The baby almost seemed cute now. “I left the store thinking that was such a good concept for a band name,” says Gill. “Here’s this injured teeny person that typically would be driving you insane, but all of a sudden it becomes this adorable, more personable thing.”

Gill brought the idea of “Sick Kids” as a name back to the members of his newly formed pop rock band. The name was already taken by a raunchy all-girl London rap group, so the Missoula group decided to add XOXO to the end, which, says Gill, drove home the sweet, goodnatured tone he was looking for. “Hugs and kisses from Sick Kids solidifies the concept,” he says. Sick Kids XOXO is six musicians—two sets of brothers and a married couple. Drummer JT Baker grew up with Gill in Kalispell. He and his wife, lead singer/keyboardist Karma Baker, recently moved back to Missoula from Chicago where they’d each played in bands. Gill’s brother, Patrick, plays percussion. The brothers and bassist Hoyt Smith started playing together eight years ago in the Victory Smokes—a now-defunct band with a New-Wave dissonance and political slant. When I first heard them in their infancy they reignited that feeling The Cure and David Bowie did when I was 14 and somber. It’s dance music as much as it was brooding music, but not necessarily the kind of thing kids go out clubbing to, which is probably why it seemed more rebellious to me. There are some similarities between Victory Smokes and Sick Kids XOXO, but Victory Smokes was on the darker side, and lonelier. Sick Kids XOXO (which also includes Hoyt’s brother Andrew on auxiliary instruments and synth) signifies a change in their approach. For Hoyt, it was a matter of admitting he truly liked pop. “I’ve been struggling with that for many years,” he laughs. “I was in punk rock bands, and in a nasty rock band in LA. When I got to Missoula… I was fighting myself, saying, ‘Pop music is okay.’” Michael, who says he’s always admitted to loving pop, was finally ready to really start playing it. “We wanted to be more of a poppy band,” says Michael. “But I don’t necessarily always write that way. My songs aren’t negative but they’re on the darker side.” You can hear New Wave in everything now, mostly because it’s never

Photo by Chad Harder

Sick Kids XOXO includes, from left, Hoyt Smith, Patrick Gill, Karma Baker, JT Baker and Michael Gill.

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really died, just mutated from punk to popular and back again. MGMT started another popular wave of it when they exploded in 2007. Sick Kids XOXO has a similar sound to MGMT (so does, for that matter, Victory Smokes, which predates MGMT’s popular rise). Sick Kids XOXO has released two songs so far. “Tanlines,” written by Karma, is a sparkly, upbeat summer jam about having no fear and ignoring naysayers. “Locate and Run” is a spontaneous, dramatic synthinfused pop song that’s meant to evoke a feeling rather than a storyline. “It is a very cut-and-dried expression capturing that moment that you decide to do something big,” says Michael. “It’s that moment right before you make that decision to go find someone who might be a million miles away.” Despite having only formed in late October of last year, Sick Kids XOXO went on tour this spring, networking on Facebook to set up shows and wrangle audiences. Their strangest show was in Spokane where they played at the largest three-on-three hoop fest in the nation. “The three-on-three basketball crowd is not necessarily my crowd,” says Michael. “And so we were like, ‘Okay, let’s get out of the car without being beat up, let’s load back up without getting beat up.’” But when they set up and started playing at Mootsy’s bar, the crowd went wild. “There were all of these people on the tables dancing and apparently two of them died…the tables, not people,” says Michael. After the Sick Kids XOXO set, Michael and JT performed what they call DJ Drums where Michael does a dance party DJ set and JT drums along—something they’ll do for their upcoming Missoula show. “JT ended up drumming for three hours straight without stopping,” says Michael. “Hoyt was laying on the floor playing tambourine. That was our best experience.” Sick Kids XOXO is on the brink of releasing an album they’re currently recording at Club Shmed. At their show this week they’ll offer a limited set of the albums that they mixed themselves. They hope the next batch will be mixed by an exciting, but currently unnamed celebrity. They don’t want to jinx it by telling. In the meantime, says Michael, they’ll continue writing songs that appeal to large audiences—ones that people can really dance to. “When we started Victory Smokes I was 23 and wanted to write in a political garage rock band and it was fun, but I wanted to push my opinions on people,” he says. “I’ve learned to let people make up their own mind rather than throw something in their face. Rather than hucking a beer at a show, this is a nightcap-on-a-platter kind of project. Now I’d rather dissect something without tearing it apart.” Sick Kids XOXO and DJ Drums open for Starfucker at the Badlander Monday, October 3, at 9 PM. $10. efredrickson@missoulanews.com


Scope Noise Books Film Movie Shorts Starfucker The Portland trio Starfucker is publicly dedicated to making what frontman Joshua Hodges calls “dance music you can actually listen to.” Mostly that means real drums and muted rock production, which their newest album Reptilians puts to varying use. The album alternates between upbeat-though-quiet rock tunes like “Born” and more openly dancey tracks like “Millions.” A little more bass and it would be club music, but instead we get acoustic guitar. So really what we’re talking about is pop. That’s a dirty word among the sort of hip young persons who make up Starfucker’s audience, but anyone who rejects the music as bubblegum indie is missing out. By channeling the epic aesthetic of dance through the restrained instrumentation of rock, Starfucker makes tracks that feel big but sound small. The result

The Whoopass Girls The Whoopass Girls self-released

First off these girls are boys. A trio of under-agers whose tenderfootedness is as much a blessing as it is a hindrance. Because we like these boys it means we will not go easy on them. The recording is a self-produced, lo-fi affair chock full of questionable tuning and timekeeping, which, in the band’s own words, is “about being awesome, eating pizza and losing our hearing.” Jokes aside, there is maturity in vocalist/guitarist Ethan Uhl’s songwriting that belies any technical issues

Star Anna and the Laughing Dogs Alone in This Together Local 638 Records

Star Anna has the singer-songwriter style down, which means that sometimes she’s fit for coffee shops or compilations populated with musicians like Sarah McLaughlin and Bonnie Raitt. Her voice is soulful but a little raspy, like Raitt’s. She’s not too saccharine and not too predictable, and yet she’s music you could introduce to your parents. That’s not to say she’s safe. Even in her most beautiful ballads she’s talking about cigarette smoke and roads to hell. She sings “You are to me like a moon to a tide” in one song, but in another she “can’t stand another minute of this cryin’.” Mike McCready of Peal Jam plays on three of the tracks, and especially on “Wolves

Das Racist Relax Greedhead Music

Das Racist is not joke rap. There was some question after the breakout “Combination Pizza Hut and Taco Bell,” but Relax puts it confidently to rest. Certainly Himanshu “Heems” Singh and Victor “Kool AD” Vazquez are still screwing around, as tracks like “Brand New Dance” suggest. That jam is sluggish enough to stretch the chorus “it’s a brand new dance / give us all your money / everybody / love everybody” over four bars. It’s

is twitchy and upbeat even as it remains understated—headphone music for a rainy day. Sometimes preciousness wins out, and Reptilians periodically runs into the Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots problem of sounding like it was written while someone played Nintendo in the background. Mostly, though, it’s catchy and inventive in a way that reminds us pop music doesn’t have to be stupid. It only has to be fun. (Dan Brooks) Starfucker plays the Badlander Monday, October 3, at 9 PM with Sick Kids XOXO, plus DJs Michael Gill and TJ Baker. $10. one may have with the album. He captures the angst of youth without cloying clichés. In “Memorial” he sings of the emotional burden of desire with quiet aplomb: “Last summer I was in love with a girl / Now this summer I’m in love with another one / I hope next summer that I’m alone / ’Cause I don’t wanna be in love with anyone.” The meandering morose vocal line, noisy crescendo and quiet dénouement are reminiscent of J. Mascis or Mission of Burma (look ’em up, Millennials). “Sunrise,” notable for its lack of chorus and Uhl’s wrenching squelched scream, is the kind of track a band with nothing to lose would record, and the kind of gamble we could use more of. (Jason McMackin) The Whoopass Girls play a pajama party at the Zootown Arts Community Center Friday, September 30 at 8 PM with I Like Girls and Cat Heaven. $5 donation or free if you wear pajamas. in Disguise,” he kicks the guitar solo factor up several notches. Could be a dealbreaker for some listeners, but I think it just adds another texture to the album, keeping us from ever getting too comfortable. Star Anna’s backup band, the Laughing Dogs, adds just as much spice as McCready. The organ-infused ballad “For When I Go” reminds me of other modern bands—The Mynabirds and Detroit Cobras—that pull off vintage soul well. What’s best about Star Anna, besides her mesmerizing voice, is that her heart isn’t just breaking, she’s ripping it out. (Erika Fredrickson) Star Anna and the Laughing Dogs play the Palace Thursday, September 29, at 9 PM with Fiancee and The Boxcutters. $5. the kind of smart idiocy that made Das Racist internet famous, but it’s songs like “Girl” and “Michael Jackson” that make them legitimate. What that means is a legitimate question. Chuck D called hip hop “the black man’s CNN.” Twenty years later, it’s more like the Home Shopping Network: repetitive, apolitical, obsessed with more and bigger jewelry. Punjabi, and Latin graduates of Wesleyan College, Singh and Vazquez don’t fit the template. Yet when Heems raps about his mother “holding me while bagging groceries at the Pathmark,” it sounds realer than Nas’s Tec on the dresser. That famous line gets a nod later on Relax, which is just self-conscious enough to tell the truth. Hip hop is materialistic and fake, except when you do it right. Then it’s great. (Dan Brooks)

Missoula Independent

Page 35 September 29–October 6, 2011


Scope Noise Books Film Movie Shorts

Labor pains Joe Hill bio digs into music and mystery by Erika Fredrickson

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Missoula Independent

Page 36 September 29–October 6, 2011

Denver author William Adler is in Madison, Wis. fruition, but the would-be novelist’s daughter pulled when I call him to talk about labor activist and folk her deceased father’s research from the attic and handsinger Joe Hill. He’s on a three-month tour with his fam- ed it over to Adler. In the pile of notes he found a letily to promote his new book The Man Who Never Died: ter written in 1949 by Hill’s former sweetheart, Hilda The Life, Times and Legacy of Joe Hill, American Labor Erickson, to the novelist. “What she claimed in the letter backed up Joe Icon, which he reads from this week in Missoula. It details the life of the Swedish-born activist and member Hill’s original alibi which was that he had been shot by a friend in a quarrel over of the International Workers [Hilda],” says Adler. “It was of the World who wrote basically this lovers’ triangle songs such as “The Rebel that ended up turning into Girl” and “Casey Jones—the this cause célèbre.” Union Scab,” and who was Adler hasn’t been able executed by firing squad in to answer the question of November 1915. Back then, why Erickson, who died in Hill was convicted of murderthe early 1970s, didn’t step ing a Salt Lake City grocer (a forward with the alibi during former cop) and the grocer’s Hill’s trial. He does know son—but the century-old that she met with Hill every case was controversial, as eviSunday for the entire 22 denced by the numerous months he was in prison songs and stories that sprung until his execution. up about Hill after his death. “Maybe he wanted to Over the last six years, protect her privacy and her Adler has pieced together a reputation as a chaste biography of Hill’s dynamic woman,” he says. “She could life. The mystery surrounding have stepped forward and I Hill’s alleged crime comdon’t know why she didn’t pelled Adler to delve into nor do I know why she some of the murkier aspects decided, 35 years later, to of the trial, and, eventually, step forward and write the led him to a letter that alludes to Hill’s innocence. “When I William Adler reads from The Man Who letter.” Adler also thinks he started the book I thought of Never Died at Shakespeare & Co. Wednesday, Oct. 5, at 7 PM, accompanied it as a murder mystery and a by musicians Anne Feeney and Evan knows who the real murderwhodunit,” Adler says. “It was Greer. And catch him at the Festival of er was—a man, Magnus a great unresolved crime of the Book on Fri, Oct. 7. humanitiesmon- Olson, aka Frank Z. Wilson, with 16 aliases over his 50the 20th century and I thought tana.org. Free. year criminal career who was maybe I could reopen it as a in Salt Lake City at the time and was the first suspect in cold case.” Hill’s link to the grocery murder was simple: on the case. Police documents say Olson convinced the Salt the same night the two men were murdered, Hill Lake City police department of his innocence and was showed up at a doctor’s office with a gunshot wound. turned over to Elko County, Nev. for a different crime. “I spent a year tracking him down,” Adler says. Hill mentioned he was shot in a fight over a woman, but he didn’t elaborate and the prosecution took the “Later, in 1929, he owned the getaway car that Al coincidence and ran with it. Hill didn’t help his own Capone’s men drove in the St. Valentine’s Day massacre case. Despite pleas from his supporters, he refused to in Chicago.” The mysteries have been part of the fun, but on testify on his own behalf. But like the story of union man Frank Little of Butte who was lynched in 1917 for Adler’s book tour, he’s shining a light on Joe Hill’s life his pro-union, anti-war activities, Hill’s story isn’t really as a political activist and musician. After all, he says, unions and immigrants are still being scapegoated for about a murder so much as it’s about labor politics. “Joe Hill was recklessly principled,” says Adler. American’s economic woes just as they were in Hill’s “The evidence against him was extremely sketchy. But time. In honor of Hill’s music, Adler’s having local he felt that to testify was to have to prove his own inno- musicians play Hill’s songs at his readings. “Joe Hill understood the power of music as a cence rather than make the state prove him guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. He didn’t quite under- weapon of social protest and also to unite people of stand how the judicial system was going to treat a rad- disparate backgrounds,” Adler says. “People could ical. He thought that in the end the truth would come unite around a song…and in some ways it’s hard to out, but the fact is that he wasn’t on trial so much for appreciate that today. On the other hand, I’m in murder as his radical union the Wobblies was on trial Madison and they’ve been singing every day at the state capital since February. They’re still singing. So there for its very existence.” In an effort to dig up more material on Hill, Adler must be something to it.” tracked down the family of a writer who had been researching Hill for a novel. The novel never came to efredrickson@missoulanews.com


Scope Noise Books Film Movie Shorts

Numbers game Moneyball’s smart despite Brad Pitt by Molly Laich

We don’t go to sports movies that are based on real-life events for the surprise ending. We go to feel things and to be inspired. Many of you may already be familiar with Moneyball’s story, but I had the benefit of remembering nothing about who had good seasons in 2001 and 2002 (the time period the film spans) or, indeed, any era of baseball ever. Who even won the World Series last year? I don’t know. Of course, the movie isn’t really about baseball.

Mannequin or man?

Moneyball is written by Steven Zaillian and Aaron Sorkin (the man behind The Social Network), based on the book by Michael Lewis (The Big Short, The Blind Side) and it’s directed by Bennett Miller. (He directed Capote, which is even better than you remember. Rent it today!) The Social Network worked because of its smart, dynamic characters, and because it’s about something so creative and historically unprecedented: the creation of Facebook. This is what I came to Moneyball hoping for, and these are indeed the film’s strengths. The Oakland A’s are trying to compete in a system where a team’s success tends to correlate with how much money they spend. Billy Beane (Brad Pitt) is the general manager looking for an edge, and he finds it by using a computer algorithm created by Peter Brand (Jonah Hill) that values runs scored over individual players. They take a big chance by enacting Brand’s theories, which fly in the face of a century’s worth of tradition. It doesn’t work at first, and then it does, and— voilà!—they’ve changed the game forever. Some of my favorite scenes take place around a big table, where old, seasoned men take on the monumental task of building a winning team with no money and using tired principles. A baseball championship isn’t just won on the field—it’s the result of many minds working together toward a desired outcome. Watching these characters plot, prepare and argue about how best to win is one of the film’s chief pleasures. Pitt’s character is the centerpiece of the story, and I guess it needs such an anchor, but somehow I

wish it were another way. The pressure is on Billy Beane to win, just like it was 20 years ago when he played pro ball and failed to live up to expectations. Outside the game, there’s his failed marriage and the love of his daughter to consider. Much of the film’s humanity is meant to come out of these problems, but that’s not where I found it. This is probably one of Pitt’s best roles, but, meh. I can tell when he’s about to cry but doesn’t, by that same weird face he does at the end of Seven when he finds Gwyneth Paltrow’s head in the box. The real tenderness comes through in every other performance, and it doesn’t get better than Hill, who plays the Yale graduate in economics with the big new ideas. Hill plays Peter with awkwardness proportional to his confidence. He is both kind and funny. This is Hill’s breakthrough role, and he is the heart of the film. Moneyball runs us through the ringer a bit. A lot of time is spent watching the new system fail. These scenes feel long, but maybe the story has to punish us a little so we can feel even better when things finally turn around. The team manager needs to be made to understand the new system. (Philip Seymour Hoffman plays Art Howe with an understated coolness. The man has never given a bad performance.) The players need to understand their roles and they need to be treated like human beings instead of the statistics they represent. Waiting for Beane to slowly come to a conclusion that seems obvious from the start is frustrating, but who knows, maybe it really happened that way. Beane is frustrated by the losses, too, as evidenced by him throwing things a lot. Flipping a desk is startling, and then there’s the ultimate sports cliché turned on its head, when he hurls a big jug of Gatorade against the lockers in anger instead of celebration—oh no he didn’t! A sudden U-turn on a road very literally symbolizes the turning point in the film, although it’s probably not as conspicuous as I’m making it sound. There’s a lesson here about the value of truly original thinking and the courage it takes to enact it. There is Rookie of the Year, Angels in the Outfield and Major League levels of feel-good inspiration at play, with an added layer of realism and intelligence. Peter refers to the players as an “Island of Misfit Toys.” When the team comes back from 11 straight losses with a record-breaking 20-game win streak, being made to sit through an hour of disappointment and desk flipping is so worth it. Moneyball continues at the Carmike 10.

FACULTY AND GUEST ARTIST SERIES Renowned guest artists join UM faculty for an unparalleled season of live music! Enjoy our entire Faculty and Guest artist series for only $50!*

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OCTOBER 8 MUSIC RECITAL HALL

arts@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 37 September 29–October 6, 2011


Scope Noise Books Film Movie Shorts OPENING THIS WEEK 50/50 50/50 refers to the odds Joseph Gordon-Levitt has of beating the cancer he’s been diagnosed with at 27, but his buddy Seth Rogen and his therapist Anna Kendrick are going to help him through it. I love Levitt so much! I hope he makes it. Carmike 10: 1:15, 4:10, 7 and 9:30. Mon.–Thu: No 1:15 show. Stadium 14: Fri.–Sun: 12:05, 2:35, 4:55, 7:20 and 9:40, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. Mon.–Thu: 1:30, 4:10, 7:20 and 9:40. COURAGEOUS Four police officers face a tragedy that changes everything. They spend the rest of the story dealing with whatever that tragedy is, but mostly, the movie seems to be about fatherhood. Alex Kendrick directs, writes and stars. Carmike 10: 1, 4, 7 and 10. Mon–Thu: no 1 PM show. Stadium 14: Fri.–Sun: 12, 3:15, 6:35 and 9:25, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. Mon.–Thu: 1, 3:50, 6:45 and 9:35.

show on Sun. Stadium 14: 1:15, 4:15, 7:05 and 9:45, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. THE WHISTLEBLOWER The U.N. thinks they can get away with any ol’ post-war Bosnia era sex scandal they please, that is until a Nebraskan cop played by Rachel Weisz comes around. Monica Belluci and Vanessa Redgrave also star. Wilma Theatre: 7 and 9. No 7 PM shows on Sat, Sun, Tue and thu.

NOW PLAYING ABDUCTION Taylor Lautner (you may know him from “Team Jacob” fame) stars as a dreamboat/physically gifted young adult who discovers he was kidnapped as a child. Now he must uncover a web of lies! Lily Collins and Alfred Molina are also there. Carmike 10: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 and 10. Mon.–Thu: No 1:30 show. Village 6: Fri: 4:30, 7 and 9:25. Sat: 1, 4:30, 7 and 9:25. Sun: 1, 4:30 and 7. Mon.–Thu: 4:30 and 7. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.

CRAZY, STUPID, LOVE Like How Stella Got her Groove Back, but with Steve Carrell, this comedy explores what it is to be a man looking to charm a woman in these weird, difficult times of demasculinization, or something. Ryan Gossling, Julianne Moore and Emma Stone also star. The Oxford comma makes a rare cameo, also. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:30 and 6:40, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. DOLPHIN TALE This inspirational saga of a boy who builds a dolphin a prosthetic tail and teaches everyone around him to love again is family-friendly and heartwarming. Pardon me, I’m not made of wood. Morgan Freeman and Ashley Judd star. Wait, it’s in 3D. I take it all back. Carmike 10: 6:45 and 9:15. in 2D: 1 and 4. Mon.–Thu: No 1 PM show. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: in 2D: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show. Showboat in Polson: 4, 7:15 and 9:20. Mountain in Whitefish: 1:30, 4, 7 and 9:15. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun: 12:45, 3:45, 7 and 9:35, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. Mon.–Thu: 1:15, 4:05, 7 and 9:40. DRIVE Here is a film about a stunt driver, played by Ryan Gosling, that seems to take itself deathly seriously, what with the Godfatheresque music and the constant suggestion of faces being flattened by hammers. Albert Brooks and Ron Perlman also star. Carmike 10: Fri.–Tue: 7 and 9:15. Tue.–Thu.: 4, 7 and 9:40. Village 6: Fri: 4:20, 7:30 and 9:55. Sat: 1:20, 4:20, 7:30 and 9:55. Sun: 1:20, 4:20 and 7:30. Mon.–Thu: 4:20 and 7:30. Mountain in Whitefish: 1:45, 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30. Stadium 14: Fri–Sun: 6:50 and 9:25, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. THE GUARD This buddy cop comedy pairs Don Cheadle, the straight-laced FBI agent, with Brandon Gleason, the unorthodox Irish firecracker, to investigate an International drugsmuggling ring. Will they fall in love? John Michael McDonagh writes and directs. Wilma Theatre: 9. No shows on Sat, Sun, Tue and Thu.

Seriously, girls. What are you looking at? Dream House opens Friday at the Village 6.

DREAM HOUSE Dream House, viewers will come to learn, is a somewhat facetious title, the meaning of which is layered and many, in this horror film starring Daniel Craig, Rachel Weisz and Naomi Watts, plus a couple of creepy little girls for good measure. Village 6: Fri: 4:10, 7:20 and 9:50. Sat: 1:30, 4:10 and 7:20. Sun: 1:30, 4:10 and 7:20. Mon.–Thu: 4:10 and 7:20. Stadium 14: 1:10, 4:10, 7:10 and 9:45, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. WHAT’S YOUR NUMBER? Anna Faris comes to the kind of conclusion only someone starring in a romantic comedy ever possibly would: that she should draw from the pool of 20 men she’s slept with to find a husband. Chris Evans has second billing, so I’m going to go ahead and guess he’s the one she picks. Carmike 10: 1:20, 4:20, 7:20 and 9:45. Mon.–Thu: No 1:20 show. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 PM

Missoula Independent

and Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 PM show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:05, 4:05, 7:05 and 9:45, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. CONTAGION It’s been awhile since the movies have reminded us of our human frailty via an unstoppable, spreading contagion. Notable actors Matt Damon and Kate Winslet star in this one, and Steven Soderbergh directs, so I think it has a fighting chance of not sucking. Stadium 14: Fri–Sun: 12:05, 2:30, 4:50, 7:20 and 9:45, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. Mon–Thu: 1:05, 4, 7:20 and 9:45. COWBOYS & ALIENS Plastic hasn’t even been invented yet and already aliens are invading the Old West. It’s always something! Will Harrison Ford and Daniel Craig triumph? John Favreau directs. Stadium 14: Fri.–Sun: 12:30 and 6:45. Mon.–Thu: 1:05 and 6:45.

Page 38 September 29–October 6, 2011

THE HELP It’s 1962 in Mississippi and Emma Stone has forged an unlikely friendship with Viola Davis and Octavia Spencer, social conventions be damned! Tate Taylor writes and directs. Carmike 10: 1, 4, 7 and 10. Mon–Thu: No 1 PM show. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun.: 12:10, 3:15, 6:15 and 9:15, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. Mon.–Thu.: 1:15, 4:10 and 7:45. I DON’T KNOW HOW SHE DOES IT Sarah Jessica Parker stars as a savvy career woman and mother in a film that struggles to know just how she does it! Spoiler alert: it’s not that hard to figure out how she does it. Poor women work full-time jobs with two kids at home every day. Stadium 14: 4:20 and 9:30. KILLER ELITE Trained assassins jump through windows, leap from building to building, screech tires and duck and roll with firebombs exploding all around them on a mission to save someone from something and also kill people. Robert De Niro, Jason Statham and Clive Owen star. Carmike 10: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 and 10. Mon.–Thu: no 1:30 show.

Village 6: Fri: 4, 7 and 9:35. Sat: 1, 4, 7 and 9:35. Sun: 1, 4 and 7. Mon.–Thu: 4 and 7. Entertainer in Ronan: 4, 7 and 9:15. Mountain in Whitefish: 1:45, 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:15, 4, 6:45 and 9:25, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. THE LION KING 3D You’ve already seen this movie (it’s Hamlet with lions) but now you can see it in 3D. I just watched the trailer, but on a 2D computer, so I can’t speak to the differences. You will probably want to grab at hot embers during the hyena scenes. Carmike 10: Fri.–Sun: 1 and 4. Mon: 4 PM only. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat. and Sun matinees at 3 and no 9 PM show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri-Sun: 12, 2:25, 4:50, 7:15 and 9:30, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. Mon–Thu: 1:20, 4, 7:15 and 9:30. MONEYBALL Brad Pitt and Jonah Hill have a computer logarithm and a vision to turn the Oakland A’s into a winning team. Nobody believes in them and everything goes wrong, but then the music changes and maybe they will win after all? Aaron Sorkin (The Social Network) has a writing credit! Carmike 10: 1:10, 4:10, 7:10 and 10. Mon.–Thu: no 1:10 show. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:45 and 9:10, with Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Mountain in Whitefish: 1:30, 4, 6:45 and 9:15. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 12:15, 3:15, 6:20 and 9:20, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. SARAH’S KEY A Parisian journalist, played by Kristen Scott Thomas, becomes entwined with a young girl from 1942 in this French-language film where people clutch books and stare off in in the distance, remembering. Wilma Theatre: 7. THE SMURFS Great news, everyone. Those annoying little creatures from your childhood are coming back at you in the third dimension. You can thank Gargamel, who is still extremely uncool. Neil Patrick Harris is in it! Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1 and 3:30. STRAW DOGS James Marsden and Kate Bosworth star as a couple who venture into the deep South, where things go really well until the locals turn out to be evil and try to kill them and stuff. Village 6: Fri: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:40. Sat: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 and 9:40. Sun: 1:15, 4:15 and 7:15. Mon.–Thu: 4:15 and 7:15. WARRIOR Tom Hardy and his former pro boxing, grizzled father, played by Nick Nolte, sweat it out and discover emotional truths when Hardy trains to be an MMA fighter. This film will undoubtedly do for cagefighting enthusiasts today what Wall Street did for ‘80s guys way back when. Village 6: Fri: 4, 7 and 10. Sat: 1, 4, 7 and 10. Sun: 1, 4 and 7. Mon.–Thu: 4 and 7. Showboat in Polson: 4, 7 and 9:30. Mountain in Whitefish: 1:15, 4, 6:50 and 9:30. Stadium 14: Fri–Sun: 3 and 9:15, with Fri. and Sat. shows at midnight. Mon–Thu: 3:45 and 9:15. Capsule reviews by Molly Laich. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., Sept. 30. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-F I LM; S t a d i u m 14 i n K a l i s p e l l – 752 - 78 0 0 . Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana

541-7387 SHELBY

Shelby is a great medium-sized dog who is a dynamo of energy and a very pretty girl too. She has striking blue eyes and a sleek, glossy coat, and she always behaves well in her kennel. She does, however, need a high fence; she's a leaper!

549-3934 SKY

DOZER

Dozer was given to a new owner several months ago, but that fellow didn't come reclaim him when he ended up at the shelter. Of course Dozer wonders why he's still with us, and we do too! He's a very nice dog who just wants a family of his own.

Sky is a 5-year-old Australian Shepherd cross in search of a loving family of her own. She'd enjoy keeping you company on walks through the park or simply sitting at your feet while you read. Sky prefers a quieter household without small children.

Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MTSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

LUCY

Lucy has lots of energy, but she's not hyper and seems to be happiest when she's stretched out in the doorway of a dog house in one of our outdoor kennels. She does like to play fetch, and she loves children.

2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

SKIPPER

Skipper has a handsome orange tiger coat, some interesting notches in one ear, and a great personality. He has obviously spent time living on his own, but he has decided that having people to take care of him is really the way to go!

APOLLO

2-year-old Apollo is a fun-loving Newfie mix. This big fellow is fantastic company and needs a family that will work with him on his manners. He is learning to walk on a gentle leader; a head harness that is a great tool for larger breeds or avid pullers.

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

QUINCY

Quincy really wants to live in a real home instead of in our cat room. She puts on a show of being a really independent lady, but she actually likes to be held, and she'll sit still as long as someone is petting her. Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org

SAMPSON

SYDNEY

Sydney is a 10-year-old, medium-haired, torti-tiger in search of her retirement home! Sydney arrived at the shelter in horrible pain from an ear infection. Once treated, her lovely, purry personality came bursting through! Sydney is a staff favorite at the shelter and her adoption comes with her own cat tower!

Regal Sampson is one of the longest residents at the Humane Society of Western Montana. He is a stunning, long-haired, black cat. Sampson may be 11 years old but recent blood work and x-rays show he's still fit and frisky!

Flowers for every bride. In Trouble or in Love? The Flower Bed has

For more info, please call 549-0543

affordable flowers for all your needs.

Improving Lives One Pet at a Time

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

The Flower Bed

Missoula’s Unique Alternative for pet Supplies

CASSY

Cassy loves people, but she doesn't enjoy the company of other cats, so she just never leaves her cage in our cat room. In a real family where she was the only cat, we know she would be the most loving, loyal companion anyone could want.

www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275

2405 McDonald Ave. 721-9233

627 Woody • 3275 N. Reserve Street Corner of 39th and Russell in Russell Square

BLOSSOM

KOEN

1-year-old Koen is a playful, blue, shorthaired boy. Somedays it seems he's imagining himself in the jungle! This silver "panther" loves to stalk toys and play on his cat tree. Koen eats a high-protein diet due to some past digestive issues - maybe that's why he hears the call of the wild!

Blossom is a stunning tortoiseshell who was surrendered because she was pregnant. She was a very sweet and dedicated Mom while she spent time raising her kittens in foster care. Now she's back at the shelter and ready to find a home of her own!

MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

These pets may be adopted at AniMeals 721-4710 MEEKA

Meeka’s my name and sass is my game! I’m fun and flirty and would make the perfect roommate! My story is kind of sad, but trust me I don’t dwell on it. A girls got to deal with what a girls got to deal with. Instead of wasting my time thinking of the past, I love to make plans for my future

A Nice Little Bead Store In A Nice Little Town 105 Ravalli St Suite G, Stevensville, MT 59870 406.777.2141

BEVERLY

They threw her out of the car and sped off in a cloud of dust and gravel. Beverly was devastated that her family would do such a thing. She didn’t know what to do or where to go….and the kids in the neighborhood pelted her with rocks every time they saw her. Equus & Paws, L.L.C. SALE on Natural Balance pet food.

2825 Stockyard Rd. www.equusandpaws.com • 406.552.2157

SHY

P O RT E R

Hi I’m Porter; don’t be alarmed by my scowl - it’s just for show. I am truly a sweetheart. I don’t need to put on a tough act; I just do to see who is really going to give me special attention. I would love nothing more than to have a nice forever family to call my own. 715 Kensington Ste 8

Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

406-240-1113 Find me on FACEBOOK jessicagoulding.zenfolio.com specializing in weddings, pets, families, babies, senior J. Willis Photography pictures, fine art, and more!

Missoula Independent

Hi there. My name is Shy, so it should be no surprise that I am a little timid when you first meet me. The only home I knew before AniMeals was a very stressful and unsafe situation. I am learning that life doesn’t have to be so nerve-racking.

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

Page 39 September 29–October 6, 2011


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

September 29 - October 6, 2011

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Birth Mama Doula Training Oct 7-9. contact 546.6452 or chardoula@msn.com Check out Red Willow’s Facebook page and become a fan today!

Have sexual health questions? The Montana Access Project (MAP) Receive answers to your sexual health questions via text from sexual health experts. Text 666746 Type ASKMAP (space) enter your question. Free & Confidential. askmap.info

Red Willow Learning Center now available to rent. 1000’ space for classes or meetings. Video conferencing, AV, beverage service. 825 West Kent. Call Kathy 880-2639.

FALL INTO ICE CREAM!

Table of contents Advice Goddess . . . .C2 Free Will Astrology . .C4

FREE

THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE

Estimates

Hot Stone, Deep Tissue & Swedish

Snow Plowing /Removal

Rosemary Polichio

I BUY

Missoula 3:16

Public Notices . . . . . .C6

Thrift Boutique Downtown

Crossword . . . . . . . . .C7

Hondas, Subarus, Toyotas Japanese/German Cars & Trucks

Corner of Orange & Front

Sustainafieds . . . . . . .C9

Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not.

Tues-Sat/10am-6pm 728-5538

This Modern World C11

Piano Lessons

FAST CASH 24 HOURS

Lifting the Weight of Hunger

At YOUR Home All Ages, All Levels

327-0300

406-880-0688

239-0474

bladesofglorylawncarellc.com

Bruce- 546-5541

The boutique is participating in this food drive! Stop by and pick up your "bag" and be sure to allow time to check out our most-magnificent store.

P L A C E YOU R AD: Deadline: Monday at Noon

Walk it.

Ken's Barber Shop Children & Walk-ins Welcome Haircuts-$8.50 • Beard Trims-$4 8:30am - 5:30pm • Tuesday-Saturday 1114 Cedar St, Missoula, MT • 728-3957

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION ADVICE Call

721-7744 Today!

Bulmanlaw.com Montana’s Health & Safety Lawyers

416 E. Pine Street Missoula MT

317 S. Orange



Talk it.



Send it. Post it.

543-6609 x121 or x115

classified@missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

PET OF THE WEEK Kestrel Easy going Kestrel is a fun dog to spend time with. She’d love to keep you company on trips to the river or evening strolls. Kestrel is an adult Shepherd cross who was transferred to the Humane Society of Western Montana from an overcrowded shelter. October is Adopt-a-Dog month! All dogs adopted in October will receive a FREE microchip! Call (406) 549-3934 or visit www.myhswm.org for more information.


ADVICE GODDESS

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

By Amy Alkon

LOST & FOUND

VOLUNTEERS

LOST b/w tuxedo CAT Lost near Orange St Food Farm. Fixed male. 406-531-1456

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR OWEN SOWERWINE NATURAL AREA WORK DAY Flathead Audubon’s annual Owen Sowerwine Natural Area Work Day will be Saturday, October 1. Audubon is looking for volunteers from 9 to 11 a.m. to help with several different projects. Projects on which volunteers may work that will help manage and protect the area include: Trail and bridge maintenance, updating kiosk materials, weed control, fence repair and filling holes. Thirty volunteers are needed for Jane Lopp and Associates of Kalispell to apply for a $1,000 Prudential Global Volunteer Day grant. The grant will enable Flathead

FRAUD PRINCE When my boyfriend moved across the country to Manhattan for two years, we pledged we’d be faithful. We talk and text daily, and he tells me he loves me and that I’m the only person for him. Well, my best girlfriend visited her brother, my boyfriend’s roommate, and returned with some real fun facts: Last year, my boyfriend became obsessed with some girl and got into an “open relationship” with her—all year. He claims only she slept with others; he didn’t. Yeah, right. He also insists he only slept with her once and didn’t tell me because he didn’t think I could handle the truth. That’s ridiculous because he knows honesty is everything to me. I now feel I have reason to leave him. Still, I’m 24, he’s my first boyfriend, and we’ve been together for four years, so I’m reluctant to end it. Please give me a silver lining to this dark cloud over my head! —Last Straw Sorry, but this cloud’s lining isn’t silver; it’s cheap polyester with one of those “remove under penalty of law” tags: WARNING! Boyfriend with scruples of spandex has relocated to the North American capital of hot women—”The City That Never Sleeps” (except when people roll over after sex instead of smoking a cigarette or having a cuddle). For some, a wake-up call is a gentle nudge or the delicate tinkle of a fine watch; others need to be bludgeoned over the head with an alarm clock. In case you’re wondering, you’re in the sound sleepers group. In our email exchange, you revealed that in addition to a number of friends warning you about your boyfriend, a complete stranger who spotted you with him in a bar took you aside to hint that he had zipper issues. In red flag terms, this is a call to start shopping for an Eiffel Towersized flagpole. Although women typically stick with dirtbag boyfriends out of a lack of selfrespect, your problem seems to be an excess of respect for The Relationship. Okay, he’s your first boyfriend and you’ve been together for four years. This is merely interpersonal census data, not reason to stick around to be lied to and cheated on for another four years. To this day, your boyfriend shows you that his words are suspect anytime he says anything weightier than “pass the Cheerios.” In fact, he may be in Manhattan, but the old joke about the Hollywood agent applies: “Hello,” he lied. What you need isn’t a silver lining, but a diving pool of louse shampoo. You also need to understand that boyfriends

who are liars and cheaters go for girlfriends who put up with lying and cheating. If you want honesty, don’t swallow lies like they’ve been buttered, and don’t let wanting a man to be ethical get in the way of looking to see whether he actually is. You might also take a more realistic approach to human nature. The 20s are our prime rutting time. Send any twentysomething man off for two years, and unless he’s on a solo mission to Mars, you’d better ask him to supplement his daily “ur the only 1!” texts with a webcam so you can see the girl he isn’t sleeping with in the background, motioning him to get back into bed.

Lost camera Camera in waterproof case lost on Bitterroot river, between florence and lolo. $100 reward! 406880-6285

ANNOUNCEMENTS No matter what I do, I can’t find a job. Not even for $1.00/hour and now I’ve been down to $0.00/hour for the past 16 years. OM 327-7859

VULTURE SHOCK My boyfriend dumped me, and I’m besieged with inquiries about how I’m handling it, both from friends and people who don’t care about me and just want to pry. How do I field questions from the latter without getting into a lot of discussion? —Exhausted Without gossip, people would have to sit around talking about particle physics, the economic downturn, and what’s going on in Libya. Gnawing on your life is much more fun: “Yeah, they broke up, and she’s alone, and I counted 62 empty pork rind bags and 73 beer bottles in her trash.” Recognize that you have no obligation to feed the info vultures, and plan in advance exactly how you won’t be answering their questions. However you decide to shut them down—with humor, vagueness, wild invention, or deflection (“Finehowareyou?!”)—keep responding that way until they get the message that it’s all the message they’re gonna get. Preserving your emotional energy means you can channel it where you need it most—into working your way through the “Seven Stages of Grief”: 1. Drunk dialing; 2. Watching “Law & Order” reruns; 3. Looking up elementary school boyfriends on Facebook; 4. And then not writing them; 5. Tearing pages from “Chicken Soup for the Soul” and lighting them on fire; 6. Putting on shadow puppet shows of brutal murders; 7. Making hangup calls at 3 a.m. to nosy buggers who ask you prying questions about your breakup.

G o t a p r o b l e m ? Wr i te A m y Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2

September 29 – October 6, 2011

Audubon to buy needed materials for Owen Sowerwine projects. Meet at 9 a.m. at the Montessori Elementary School at 349 Willow Glen Drive, Kalispell for a short orientation session, then break into small groups and head out into various parts of Owen Sowerwine to work under team leaders. Bring work gloves, wear sturdy footwear and dress for the weather—rain or shine. Bring loppers and pruners if possible. Some tools will also be available for those who can’t bring their own, and other necessary equipment will be provided. Work will finish by noon. Call Linda Winnie at 755-1406 or Richard Kuhl at 257-5793 for further information.

INSTRUCTION ALLIED HEALTH CAREER TRAINING - Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-4819409 www.CenturaOnline.com ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com EARN $75-$200 HOUR (Now 25% Off), Media Makeup & Airbrush Training. For Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. 1 week class &. p o r t f o l i o . Aw a r d M a k e U p S c h o o l . c o m 310-364-0665

Fletch Law, PLLC Steve M. Fletcher Attorney at Law

Accidents & Personal Injury Over 20 years experience. Call immediately for a FREE consultation.

541-7307 www.fletchlaw.net

Realtor®

ABR, e-PRO, CRS

MBN ’s 2011 Business Woman of the Year.

546-5816 www.MoveMontana.com


COMMUNITY French Lessons for Adults Beginning French lessons $100 + $10 text Thursdays Sept. 22nd-Dec.8th 6:30-8:30 p.m. Alliance Française of Missoula HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com

Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

Peace happens... One heart at a time. 546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

GENERAL ! BECOME A BARTENDER ! $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training courses available. 1-800-965-6520 ext. 278 CUSTODIAN. #9956359 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 CUSTOMER SERVICE REP. #2980562 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

ADOPTION PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-4136293

EMPLOYMENT

FINANCIAL ADVISOR TRAINEE. #9619001 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

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NOW OPEN EVERY DAY!

ADULT

AVENUE

137 E. MAI N 54 3 - 34 23

Super-Sexy

Lingerie DVDs Sales & Rentals

T o y s

PT MEDICAL OFFICE RECEPTIONIST. 9956362 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 SPARKS AUTO PLAZA in Lewistown, MT is currently seeking a Parts Manager. Experience in management preferred. Contact Duane at 406-5353455 to get more information or email a resume to dnifni@hotmail.com Wanted: 29 Serious People to Work From Home using a computer. Up to $1,500-$5,000 PT/FT. www.3DCWglobal.com

FOOD SERVER. #9956367 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

PROFESSIONAL

Job hunting is stressful. You deserve a break. Get started at www.MissoulaEvents.net

ATTORNEY/PUBLIC DEFENDER. #9811462 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

CHILD PROTECTIVE SERVICES REGIONAL ADMINISTRATOR. #9811459 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 Executive Director sought by Working Dogs for Conservation, a small, MTbased, but globally active, nonprofit. For full announcement contact WDCEDSearch@workingdogsforconservation.org. Linux Systems Administrator Modwest is looking for Linux Systems Admin w/3+ yrs experience in production environment. Visit our website, modwest.com/jobs for job details. Send resume to: jobs@modwest.com Linux Systems Administrator Modwest is looking for Linux Systems Admin w/3+ yrs experience in production environment. Visit our website, modwest.com/jobs for job details. Send resume to: jobs@modwest.com PAYROLL ACCOUNTING MANAGER. #2980559 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 PSYCHIATRIC TECH. #9619113 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

Temporary Research Assistant II Position in Chemistry/Biochemistry in the Laboratory of Dr. Klara Briknarova http://www.cas.umt.edu/ chemistry/facultyDetails.cfm?id=926. Bachelor’s degree in biochemistry or related field required, FT, $10.31/hr.- $11.00/hr + full benefits package. For specific details, qualifications, and online application instructions, visit http://umjobs.silkroad.com ADA/EOE/AA/Veteran’s Preference Employer

SKILLED LABOR Transystems is currently seeking a diesel mechanic for our Sidney, MT project. Call us today at 406-433-5522 or check us out at www.transystemsllc.com Transystems is now hiring professional truck drivers for their Sidney, MT project. Home every day, safe equipment, housing available. Call us today at 406433-5522 or check us out at www.transystemsllc.com

TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1800-545-4546

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION Piano Lessons! Learn Music! Learn how to play any song, fast! Theory, technique, repertoire. Call Jim at 7218947

HEALTH CAREERS Medical Transcriptionist Work from home as a Medical Transcriptionist. Career Step offers top-of-the-line training for an exciting new career in the growing healthcare field. Enroll today and take the course that will change your life. Free laptop incentive for September enrollment. Call 1-800-4117073 to inquire and mention referral code 10228 for $50 off, or visit http://referral.careerstep.com/ref10228 for more info. Career Step also offers training for careers as a Medical Administrative Assistant, Pharmacy Technician, and Medical Coder. REHABILITATION AIDE. #9619071 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 Seeking par t time PA/NP Blue Mountain Clinic is seeking a part time Independent Contractor Family Physician Assistant or Nurse Practitioner. Experience in primary care and reproduc-

tive health a plus. Position will be temporary through May 2012 with possibility of permanent position at that time. Send resume and cover letter to Annie Hansen at Blue Mountain Clinic, 610 N California, Missoula MT 59802, or e-mail to annie@bluemountainclinic.org

OPPORTUNITIES ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150$300/day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1-800-5608672 A-109. For casting times/locations $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-4057619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-greatpay.com MOVIE EXTRAS to stand in background of major film productions. Earn up to $200/day. Experience not required. All looks needed. Call 877-824-6285 Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

WORK WANTED MONTANA RN LOOKING FOR WORK. Please call 542-3192

TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED in Eastern Montana to haul crude oil. Class A CDL with HazMat endorsement and driving experience required. Call 406-654-1263 for more information.

Did you know? Posting a classified ad online is

FREE!

www.missoulanews.com montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3

September 29 – October 6, 2011


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): I’ve got a challenging assignment for you. In accordance with your current astrological omens, I am inviting you to cultivate a special kind of receptivity—a rigorously innocent openness to experience that will allow you to be penetrated by life’s beauty with sublime intensity. To understand the exact nature of this receptivity, study Abraham Maslow’s definition of real listening: to listen “without presupposing, classifying, improving, controverting, evaluating, approving or disapproving, without dueling what is being said, without rehearsing the rebuttal in advance, without freeassociating to portions of what is being said so that succeeding portions are not heard at all.” TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Government officials in Southern Sudan are proposing to build cities in fantastic shapes. They say that the regional capital of Juba would be recreated to resemble a rhinoceros, as seen from the air. The town of Yambio is destined to look like a pineapple and the city of Wau will be a giraffe. I’m confused by all this, since I know that most of the people in South Sudan live on less than a dollar a day. Is that really how they want their country’s wealth spent? Please consider the possibility, Taurus, that there are also some misplaced priorities in your own sphere right now. Hopefully they’re nothing on the scale of what’s happening in South Sudan, but still: Allocate your resources with high discernment, please. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You have cosmic clearance to fall deeply, madly, and frequently in love, Gemini. In fact, it’s OK with the gods of fate and the angels of karma if you swell up with a flood of infatuation and longing big enough to engorge an entire city block. The only stipulation those gods and angels insist on is that you do not make any rash decisions or huge life changes while in the throes of this stupendous vortex. Don’t quit your job, for instance, or sell all your belongings, or dump your temporarily out-of-favor friends and loved ones. For the foreseeable future, simply enjoy being enthralled by the lush sexy glory of the liquid blue fire.



CANCER (June 21-July 22): Among the surprises spilled by WikiLeaks some months back was the revelation that U.S. diplomats think Canadians feel “condemned to always play ‘Robin’ to the U.S. ‘Batman.’” If that’s true, it shouldn’t be. While Canada may not be able to rival the war-mongering, plutocrat-coddling, environment-despoiling talents of my home country America, it is a more reliable source of reason, compassion, and civility. Are you suffering from a similar disjunction, Cancerian? Do you imagine yourself “Robin” in relationship to some overweening “Batman”? This would be an excellent time to free yourself of that dynamic.

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist Susan Clarion RNC CA MATS 5527919 Classes at Meadowsweet Herbs: Basic Soap Making, Saturday, 9/17, 11am-4pm, Cost: $50,

Materials fee $25. Making your own Natural Bath & Body Care, Wednesday, 9/21, 6:30-9pm, Cost: $25, Materials fee $8. Making your own Lotions and Creams, Saturday, 9/24, 11am-2:30pm. Cost: $35, Materials fee $10. Glycerine Melt and Pour Soaps, Wednesday, 9/28, 7-9pm. Cost: $20, Materials fee: $10. Environmental Effects on

If you think you are ready for EMDR, call our Mental Health Counselor Lois Doubleday, LCPC today!

721-1646 www.bluemountainclinic.org

Preconception and Pregnancy, Thursday, 10/6, 7:-9 pm. Cost: $20. Childhood Vaccinations: A Naturopathic Perspective, Tuesday,10/11, 7-9 pm. Cost: $20. Making your own Mineral Make Up, Wednesday, 10/12, 6:30-9 pm. Cost: $25, Materials fee: $10. Natural Perfumery, Wednesday, 10/19, 6-9 pm. Cost: $25, Materials fee: $10. Advanced Soap Making, Saturday, 10/22, 11 am-4 pm. Cost: $50, Materials fee: $35. Homeopathy for the Cold & Flu Season. Thursday, 12/1, 7-9 pm. Cost: FREE. Please register early as class space is limited. Meadowsweet Herbs, 180 S. 3rd St. W., Missoula, MT

59801 728-0543 www.meadowsweet-herbs.com Cosmic Spirit Energy Healing $25 406-543-3290 DR Naturopathic Take the Natural Path to Health with DR. NATUROPATHIC. Specializing in: Primary care & midwifery, Pain management, naturopathic manipulation, metabolic disorders, Wilson’s temperature syndrome, herbal medicine, and HCG diet. Call DR. Nesbit at 541-7672. 2016 Strand Avenue in Missoula. www.DrNesbit.com HEALING CIRCLE - Sunday Oct. 2, from 1 - 3 p.m. Come boost your energy or heal with us at

Headaches?

Try Acupuncture 728-2325

Acupuncture & Herbal Care

Since 1992



LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Enigmatology” is an infrequently used word that means the study of puzzles and how to solve them. I’m invoking it now to highlight the fact that you need to call on some unusual and idiosyncratic and possibly even farfetched resources as you intensify your efforts to solve the puzzles that are spread out before you. The help you’ve called on in the past just won’t be enough for this new round of gamesmanship. The theories and beliefs and strategies that have brought you this far can’t take you to the next stage.



VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): This would not be a good time for you to read the book called The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Enhancing Self-Esteem. In fact, it will never be the right time to read it. While it’s true that at this juncture in your life story you can make exceptional progress in boosting your confidence and feeling positive about yourself, you’re not an idiot and you don’t need idiotlevel assistance. If there was a book called The Impish Guide to Accessing and Expressing Your Idiosyncratic Genius, I’d definitely recommend it. Likewise a book titled The Wild-Eyed Guide to Activating Your HalfDormant Potential or The Brilliant Life-Lover’s Guide to Becoming a Brilliant Life-Lover.

Christine Brasmer



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “When I was born,” said comedian Gracie Allen, “I was so surprised I didn’t talk for a year and a half.” I suspect you will soon be experiencing a metaphorical rebirth that has some of the power of the event she was referring to. And so I won’t be shocked if you find it challenging to formulate an articulate response, at least in the short term. In fact, it may take you a while to even register, let alone express, the full impact of the upgrade you will be blessed with.



SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “During a game of Apocalypse against the Witchhunters,” reports Andrew_88 in an online forum, “I authorized my Chaos Lord to throw his vortex grenade at the oncoming Cannoness and her bodyguard. Safe to say he fluffed it and the vortex grenade scattered back on top of him. Then he proceeded to take out my allies, the Havocs, Land Raider, and Baneblade, before disappearing, having done no damage to my opponent.” I suggest you regard this as a helpful lesson to guide your own actions in the coming days, Scorpio. Do not, under any circumstances, unleash your Chaos Lord or let him throw his vortex grenade at anyone. He could damage your own interests more than those of your adversaries.

www.freeofficevisit.info

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): According to my analysis of the astrological omens, it’s high time for you to receive a flood of presents, compliments, rewards, and blessings. You got a problem with that? I hope not. I hope you are at peace with the fact that you deserve more than your usual share of recognition, appreciation, flirtations, and shortcuts. Please, Sagittarius? Please don’t let your chronic struggles or your cynical views of the state of the world blind you to the sudden, massive influx of luck. Pretty please open your tough heart and skeptical mind to the bounty that the universe is aching to send your way.



CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I like how astrologer Hunter Reynolds encapsulates the Capricornian imperative. If you “can manage your ego’s erratic moods and uneven motivations well enough to offer a service with consistent quality,” he says, “the world confers social recognition and its accompanying material advantages on you.” The members of other signs may appear warmer and fuzzier than you, but only because you express your care for people through a “strictness of focus,” “disciplined work,” and by being a “dependable helpmate.” This describes you at your best, of course; it’s not easy to meet such high standards. But here’s the good news: The omens suggest you now have an excellent opportunity to function at your very best.



AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Not being omniscient is a really big drag for me,” says poet Charles Harper Webb. I sympathize with him. My life would be so much easier and my power would be so much more graceful if only I knew everything there is to know. That’s why I’m going to be a little jealous of you in the coming weeks, Aquarius. You may not be supremely authoritative about every single subject, but you will have access to far more intuitive wisdom than usual, and you’ll be making extra good use of the analytical understandings you have. Bonus: You will also be absorbing new lessons at an elevated rate.



PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): John Tyler was President of the United States from 1841 to 1845. Believe it or not, two of his grandsons are still alive today. They’re Lyon Gardiner Tyler and Harrison Ruffin Tyler, born late in the life of their father, who was born late in John Tyler’s life. I invite you to find some equally amazing connection you have to the past, Pisces. How is your destiny linked to the long ago and faraway? I suspect you might find that distant history will be more vital and important than usual in the coming weeks. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4

September 29 – October 6, 2011

LPN / Nationally Certified Massage Therapist Specializing in chronic pain management, stress reduction & health maintenance 406.239.9189 christinebrasmer.com


BODY, MIND & SPIRIT the Red Willow Center, 825 W. Kent. We use Reiki and similar methods to help you. Call 8290504, Harry.

Hypnosis & Imager y * Smoking * Weight * Negative self-talk * Str e s s * D e p r e s s i o n * E m p o w e r y o u r s e l f

Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie Clarion 406-552-7919 MASSAGE BY JANIT, CMT Swedish-Deep TissueReiki-Vibrational Energy WorkChakra Clearing $1/per minute 207-7358 Moondance Healing Therapies. Massage & BodyTalk. Rosie Smith CBP/LMT 240-9103 www.redwillowcenter.org Past life regression. Find out what your soul has experienced in other lifetimes. It helps you understand your strengths, talents, fears and relationships. 406-961-4449. Serving Western Montana. Trinity Body, Mind, Spirit Tarot readings $25 406-543-3290 Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 2413405 With over 500 events per month, you’re sure to find something for Body, Mind and Spirit at www.MissoulaEvents.net

MITCHELL MASSAGE THERAPY ERIC MITCHELL, LMT Massage Therapist/Owner

406-207-9480 MitchellMassage.abmp.com

728-5693 • Mar y Place MSW, CHT, GIS

Kaimu Mystical Poet looking for Muse.

808-443-1786 Aurora Family Therapeutic Massage Virginia Bazo, LMT

Swedish, Deep Tissue & Reiki 370-4175 Located in Shear Perfection at UC Center

MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS 1st Interstate Pawn. 3110 South Reserve, is now open! Buying gold and silver. Buying, selling, and pawning items large and small. We pay more and sell for less. 406-721-(PAWN)7296. FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation non-denominational 1-800-475-0876

redwillowlearning.org 721-0033 Professional Instruction

Spanish & Flamenco Beginners-Intermediate

Downtown Dance Collective, Missoula

Elenita Brown Dance

777-5956

AUCTIONS RETIREMENT AUCTION: Saturday, Oct. 8, 10am, 141 Springdale Lane, Townsend, MT. Spraying equipment/ trucks, pumps/tanks/ hoses, fire truck, semi trailers, boats, shop equipment, vintage auto glass shop, antiques/ collectibles. Listing/photos: w w w. s t e v e m a n d e v i l l e . c o m / 208.html 406-439-5793. Mandeville Auction Service

COMPUTERS Even Macs are computers! Need help with yours? CLARKE CONSULTING @ 5496214 RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway 543-8287

APPLIANCES Bosch front load laundry set. European size. $500 Call (406) 546-8796

FURNITURE Small Wonders queen size futon. Double wool with 2 covers. Asking $600; $1200 new. 2404499

MUSIC ADULTS....PIANO CLASS FORMING Learn to play the piano in a fun, informal way with the latest in technology to enhance your learning. 12 weeks $89.00 includes materials. Missoula’s #1 Music Store. MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds entrance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 5 4 9 - 0 0 1 3 . www.montanamusic.com Banjo lessons not just for guys anymore. Bennett’s Music Studio 7210190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

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Outlaw Music Specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, TuesdayFriday 10am-6pm, Saturday

11am-6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 5 4 1 - 7 5 3 3 . Outlawmusicguitarshop.com WWW.GREGBOYD.COM One of the world’s premier music stores. (406) 327-9925.

PETS & ANIMALS DOGS: #1219 Black, McNabb Blue Heeler X, NM, 2yrs; #1694 Black, Lab/Pit, NM, 2yrs; #1715 Black/creme, St Bernard/Rott X, SF, 2yrs; #1727 Brown/white, St Bernard X, SF, 3yrs; #1733 Tan/Blk, GSD X, NM, 6yrs; #1747 Black, Lab, SF, 2.5 yrs; #1748 Black, Lab, SF, 2.5yrs; #1785 Yellow, Lab, SF, 11yrs; #1798 Black/silver, Husky X, NM, 5.5 yrs; #1824 Black/brown, MinPin, NM, 7yrs #1834 Brown, Poodle, NM, 9yrs; #1835 Black, Poodle, NM, 9yrs; #1842 Black, Lab/collie X, SF, 4yrs; #1855 Black, Lab X, SF, 1yr; #1858 Yellow, Lab, NM, 1yr; #1859 Brown, Puggle, NM, 3yrs; #1872 Black/tan, Lab/Husky X, NM, 1.5yrs; #1879 Blue Merle, Heeler X, SF, 4.5 yrs; #1883 Liver, GSP, SF, 9yrs; #1884 Brown/white, Pit, SF, 1 1/2yrs; #1888 Black, Boxer X, NM, 8mo; #1903 Black, Lab, SF, 7yrs; #1912 Black, Lab, SF, 10yrs; #1923 Brn/white, Corgi/Beagle X, SF, 2yrs; #1946 Blk/grey, Heeler/BC X, SF, 1.5 yrs; #1947 Blk/grey, Heeler/BC X, NM, 2.5mo; #1954 Black, Heeler X, SF, 2.5yrs; #1955 Black, Lab, NM, 1.5 yrs; #1956 White, Golden Retriever, NM, 2.5yrs; #2020 Blk/white, Malamute X, NM, 2yrs.For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 3635311 www.montanapets.org/ hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840. EQUINES: #1522 White, Burro-G. CATS: #0588 Grey Tabby, Am Short Hair, SF; #0624 Black, Am Short Hair, NM, 4 yr; #1230 White/Grey, Tabby, ALH, SF, 9yrs; #1255 Tuxedo, DLH, SF, 2 yrs; #1330 Black/white, ASH, SF; #1333 Black, Maine Coon X, NM, 7yrs; #1364 Tan/Black, DSH, SF, 1 yr; #1413 Grey/white Tux, ASH, SF, 3yr; #1551 Dilute Torti, DMH, SF; #1552 Dilute Calico, ASH, SF;

#1553 Black, Bombay X, SF; #1587 Tan/black, ASH, NM; #1596 White/grey, ASH, NM, 4yrs; #1604 Orange/white, M, DSH, 1 1/2yrs; #1621 Dilute Torti, SF, BSH, 8 yrs; #1623 Orange Tabby, DSH, SF, 2yr; #1627 Grey/white, DLH, NM, 2yr; #1628 Black/white, DLH, NM, 1yr; #1629 Dilute Torti, DLH, SF, 10yrs; #1635 Black/white Tux, ASH, NM, 6yrs; # 1642 Black/tan Tabby, SLH, SF, 2.5mo; # 1643 Blk/tan Tabby, ASH, NM, 2.5mo; #1650 Black, ALH, NM, 2 mo; #1653 Tan/white/grey, DLH, NM, 15yrs; #1667 Grey, DSH, SF, 1yr; #1676 Orange Tabby, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #1678 Tan TAbby, DMH, SF, 1yr; #1718 DMH, NM, 4.5yrs; #1738 White/buff, DSH, NM, 4yrs; #1745 Black/white, DMH, SF, 4yrs; #1758 Orange/white, DSH, NM; #1786 Blk Tabby, Maine Coon , SF, 1 1/2yrs; #1805-1812 Siamese X, KITTENS 8 months; #1813 White/creme, Juvanese, NM, 8mo; #1818 Black/white, Siamese X, SF, 2yrs; #1819 Dilute Calico, Siamese X, SF, 2yrs; #1826 Grey, DSH, NM, 11yrs; #1833 Black, DSH, SF, 5yrs; #1840 Orange/white, DMH, NM, 9 weeks; #1846 Silver Tabby, DSH, NM, 10yrs; #1849 Grey, DSH, NM, 10 mo; #1857 DMH, SF, 4yrs; #1874 Grey/tan, DSH, SF,

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

GARAGE SALES After you scour the sales, plan your savvy weekend at MissoulaEvents.net

Outlaw Music

541-7533

Missoula's Stringed Instrument Pro Shop!

Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

724 Burlington Ave. outlawmusicguitarshop.com Volunteers needed! 543-6691 1136 W. Broadway 930 Kensington 1221 Helen Ave

ADULTS ...

PIANO CLASS FORMING. Learn to play the piano in a fun, informal way with the latest in technology to enhance your learning. 12 weeks $89.00 includes materials.

MORGENROTH MUSIC 1105 W Sussex, Missoula 549-0013 www.montanamusic.com

EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

549-6214

Great Inventory of Road & Mtn Bikes! 111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

Steel Buildings Reduced Factory Inventory 30x36 – Reg $12,300

Now $9,970 36x58 – Reg $20,300

Now $16,930 48x96 – Reg $42,400

Now $36,200 81x130 – Reg $104,800

Now $89,940 Source# 01S, 406-545-4580

ADULT

AUTO CRUISEGENERAL

14yrs; #1876 Orange Tabby, ASH, NM, 8yrs; #1886 Black, DSH, NM, 6mo; #1913 Blk/white, DSH, SF, 14yrs; #1921 Grey/white, DSH, SF, 2yrs; #1924 Yellow, DSH, SF, 2yrs; #1942 Orange Tabby, ASH, NM, 3yrs; #1948 Grey, DSH, SF, 10ys; #1949 Black, DMH, SF, 1yr; #1950-1953 Black, KITTENS, DMH, 1 mo. For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

2004 JEEP LIBERTY Silver,Trail Rated,72k miles,4WD,CD Player,VERY CLEAN, black cloth interior,RUNS FLAWLESSLY,college student looking to downsize, call 406-590-5439

SCOOTERS Tomas Scooter 2010 50cc’s. Purchased from Scooterville in Missoula. $1,350, 11 miles new, Best Offer. Leave message. 406-375-7543.

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5

SWEET & DISCRETE Escort Referral Service

829-6394

NOW HIRING

September 29 – October 6, 2011


PUBLIC NOTICES

SERVICES CHILDCARE

LANDSCAPING

Iddy Biddies Preschool has preschool openings for children 2-6 years of age. Encouraging a love for nature, adventure, and the arts. We are located at 2901 Eaton St (Between the mall and Shop-Ko) Stop by or call for an apointment 406-728-5055

Environmental Enhancements Irrigation Get current system upgrades including: wireless solar controllers, smart self adjusting controllers, and drip irrigation retrofits. EEI is a Full ServiceLawn Sprinkler Company with extensive industry experience. Call today for summer specials! 406-880-3064 • www.eeirrigation.com

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CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on October 3, 2011, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, on the Tourism Business Improvement District budget, work plan and a resolution levying annual assessments on the hotels located in the Tourism Business Improvement District of the City of Missoula for fiscal year 2012 in the amount of $1 per occupied room night in accordance with 7-12-1132 MCA. For further information, contact Marty Rehbein, City Clerk at 552-6078. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk

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CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on October 3, 2011, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider a resolution amending the annual appropriations for the City of Missoula, Montana, as set forth in the fiscal year 2011 budget and capital improvement program that increases the total City budget by $18,427,671. For further information, contact Brentt Ramharter, Finance Director, at 552-6108. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein CMC, City Clerk

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MISSOULA COUNTY INVITATION FOR BID Dental Digital X-Ray Equipment Partnership Health Center, a 501(c)(3) Federally Qualified Health Center, is currently soliciting sealed bids for digital x-ray equipment. The proposal should

The City of Missoula Design Review Board will conduct a public hearing on Wednesday, October 12, 2011 in the City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine Street, Missoula, at 7:30 p.m. to consider the following application: A request from CTA Architects for Special Signs; Review by the Design Review Board, Chapter 20.75.100B.5, Building Graphics . The subject property is located at 101 E. Front St. (SEE MAP E).

Your attendance and your comments are welcome and encouraged. E-mails c a n b e s e n t t o hkinnear@co.missoula.mt. us. Project files may be viewed at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants at 435 Ryman St., Missoula, Montana. If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C6

September 29 – October 6, 2011

include delivery, installation and training on the second floor at the Partnership Health Center Clinic located at 401 West Railroad Street, Missoula, Montana. Each proposal shall specify each and every item as set forth in the attached specifications. Any and all exceptions must be clearly stated in the proposal. Failure to set forth any item in the specifications without taking exception may be grounds for rejection. Partnership Health Center reserves the right to reject all proposals and to waive any informality. Proposals must be accompanied by security in the amount of ten per cent (10%) of the amount bid and must be in a form specified in MCA 18-1-201 thru 206. The security is subject to forfeiture if the successful bidder does not enter into the contract within 30 days of bid acceptance. Bids will be accepted at the office of the Missoula County Auditor, 200 W Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 until 3:00 PM, Monday, October 17, 2011, at which time bids will be opened and read

The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following items on Tuesday, October 18, 2011, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. 1. Rezoning Request — Mahlum Meadows A request from Tom Mahlum to zone property along Mahlum Lane from being Unzoned to C-RR1 (Residential). The property is located on the south side of Waldo Road and west of Highway 93 in the Wye vicinity. See Map D. 2. Rezoning Request — Baker Apartments A request from Gregg Baker, represented by William Nerison of WRN Architects, to rezone property located on the east side of Peacock Street between Highway 200 E and Minnesota Street (in East Missoula) from C-C2

(General Commercial) to C-R3 (Residential). See Map F. The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing on item #1 at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, October 26, 2011, and on item #2 at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, November 9, 2011. Both hearings will be held in Room 201 of the Missoula County Courthouse at 200 West Broadway. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request and exact legal description is available for public inspection at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants, City Hall, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana. Telephone 258-4657. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 258-4657. The Office of Planning and Grants will provide auxiliary aids and services.

aloud. Bids must be sealed and marked “Proposal for Partnership Health Center Digital X-Ray Equipment.” Interested firms may obtain a complete project description on Missoula County’s website at http://www.co.missoula.mt.us/bidsandproposals or by contacting Barbara Berens, 406-258-3227 or bberens@co.missoula.mt.us. If you have any questions relating to Partnership Health Center and its operations, please contact Dr. Joe Byington, Dental Director at byingtonj@phc.missoula.mt.us, 406-258-4172. MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE INVITING PROPOSALS Notice is hereby given that sealed proposals will be received at the MISSOULA COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808, until 10:00 o’clock a.m. October 6, 2011 at which time the bids will be opened and read in the conference room at Missoula County Public Works for the purpose of purchasing of FOUR HUNDRED FIFTY (450) tons of LIQUID DEICER. Specifications and bid procedures for this purchase can be obtained at Missoula County Public Works, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808. Proposals must be accompanied by a certified check, cashier’s check, bank draft, or bid bond in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the amount of the bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the contract. The Board of County Commissioners of Missoula County, Montana, reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Proposals shall be sealed and marked “Proposal for Liquid Deicer – 2011” and addressed to: Missoula County Public Works Attn: Jeff Seaton 6089 Training Drive Missoula, MT 59808 MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF CLOSE OF REGISTRATION Notice is hereby given that registration for the Municipal General Election to be held November 8, 2011, will close at 5:00 P.M., on October 11, 2011.. All qualified registered electors of the City of Missoula are entitled to vote at said election. Ballots will be automatically mailed to Active Electors only. If you are a registered voter who resides within the City of Missoula and do not receive a ballot, contact the county election office to update your information as necessary and receive a ballot. Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the Election Administrator in the Courthouse Annex, 2nd floor. If moving has made a change of precinct, it is necessary to have your registration transferred to your new address. NOTE: If you miss this regular registration deadline, you may still register for the election by showing up at the Missoula County Fairgrounds building 15 starting October 12 through November 8, 2011 until close of polls at 8:00 p.m. Dated this 20th day of September, 2011 /s/ Vickie Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County By /s/ Debbe Merseal, Chief Deputy, Clerk & Recorder/Elections MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is hereby given that the following described public property will be sold to the highest bidder for cash or certified funds: 1.) 1 1995 GMC Sonoma 4x4 (119,410 miles) Minimum Bid: $1,129.00 2.) 1 1999 Ford F150 4x4 (131,426 miles) Minimum Bid: $1,841.00 3.) 1 1999 Chevy 3/4T Suburban (93,419 miles) Minimum Bid: $2,540.00 4.) 3 1989 Henderson 4.8 CY Sanders Minimum Bid: $400.00 each 5.) 1 1978 Vanmark Paint Striper Minimum Bid: $3,800.00 6.) 1 1975 John Deere 500C Backbone Minimum Bid: $8,500.00. Sealed bids will be accepted until 3:00 p.m. Thursday, October 6th, 2011 at: Missoula County Public Works, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808 TERMS OF SALE: Bids must be submitted in a sealed envelope and legibly labeled “Missoula County Bid Sale of Surplus Equipment, Opening 3:00 p.m.


PUBLIC NOTICES October 6th 2011” content of the envelope must include the Item Number, Item Description, Bid Amount, Method of Payment, and Name/Address/Phone Number of the bidder. Bids received after the time set for the bid opening will be rejected. Missoula County reserves the right to waive any and all informalities, to reject all bids, accept any bid deemed to be in the County’s best interest, and to negotiate terms with the bidders on item. The sale is on an “as is, where is” basis. No warranty is expressed, implied or is being extended by Missoula County or any of its representatives to prospective buyers. Missoula County assumes no responsibility for the item(s) after the purchase or liability associated with the use or sale of equipment after purchase. Any costs associated with the removal of the equipment from Missoula County premises are the responsibility of the successful bidder(s). Payment of any and all equipment shall be completed within five working days from the date of the sale and all equipment shall be

removed from MIssoula County premises no later than 3:00 p.m. Thursday, October 20th, 2011 MISSOULA COUNTY SHERIFF’S SALE VEHICLE TECHNICIAN SERVICES, INC., VTEC, RANDY L. MINEER, Claimants Against JOHN DOUGLAS HEFFERNAN, Registered Owner BOB HERRERNAN, Registered Owner. To Be Sold at Sheriff’s Sale:TERMS: CASH, or its equivalent; NO personal checks On the 6th day of October A.D., 2011, at Ten (10:00) o’clock A.M., at 2420 Benton Avenue, in the City of Missoula, County of Missoula, State of Montana, that certain personal property situate in said Missoula County, and particularly described as follows, to-wit: 1994 Honda Accord, 2D, VIN/1HGCD725XRA008425 Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining. No warranty is made as to the condition or title of the

Missoula Police Department Sale ABANDONED VEHICLES TERMS: $85.00 MINIMUM BID Notice is hereby given to all legal owners of the following vehicles; unless vehicle is reclaimed, the following vehicles will be sold at the Missoula Police Department Sale on THURSDAY the 6th of October, 2011, at 9:00 am at Pro-Towing @ 1922 S 3rd St W, Missoula, in the County of Missoula, State of Montana, that certain personal property situate in the said County of Missoula, and particularly described as follows, to wit: Agency #. . . . . . . . Vehicle Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VIN PAV11 147. . . . . . . 1982 Toyota Pk Tk White. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JT4RN44S2C0082216 PAV11 163. . . . . . . 1990 Ford Tk Van White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1FTFE24Y2LHB46722 PAV11 164. . . . . . . 1985 Porsche 944 2D Red . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WP0AA0946FN450979 PAV11 165. . . . . . . 1993 GMC Safari Van White. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1GKDM19Z2PB534035 PAV11 166. . . . . . . 1992 Honda Accord 4D White . . . . . . . . . . . 1HGCB7678NA132432 PAV11 167. . . . . . . 1994 Nissan Altima 4D Silver . . . . . . . . . . . 1N4BU31D9RC205950 PAV11 172. . . . . . . 1994 Nissan Sentra 4D Grey . . . . . . . . . . . . 1N4EB31P2RC775477 PAV11 174. . . . . . . 1988 Ford Aerostar Van Grey. . . . . . . . . . . . 1FMCA11U1JZB07844 PAV11 175. . . . . . . 1999 Oldsmobile Integra 4D Silver . . . . . . . 1G3WH52K8XF322410 PAV11 179. . . . . . . 1977 Toyota CST HB Blue. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RA29074238 PAV11 180. . . . . . . 1990 Cadillac Fleetwood 4D White. . . . . . . . 1G6CB5339L4367523 PAV11 181. . . . . . . 1993 Lincoln Town Car 4D White . . . . . . . . . 1LNLM81W6PY752277 PAV11 182. . . . . . . 1987 Ford Bronco SUV Grey. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1FMCU14T7HUB98068 PAV11 183. . . . . . . 1995 Toyota Camry 4D Dk Green . . . . . . . . 4T1SK12EXSU533367 PAV11 184. . . . . . . 1997 Ford Escort 2D Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1FALP13P5VW144838 PAV11 186. . . . . . . 1995 Ford Pk Tk Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1FTCR10U9SUA66067 PAV11 187. . . . . . . 1994 Cadillac Concours 4D Red . . . . . . . . . . 1G6KF52Y8RU200656 PAV11 189. . . . . . . 1977 Ford Pk Tk White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F26HRY85533 PAV11 190. . . . . . . 1993 Dodge Dakota Pk Tk Yellow/Black . . . . 1B7FL26GXPS224442 PAV11 193. . . . . . . 1994 Lincoln Town Car 4D White . . . . . . . . . 1LNLM81W8RY693350 PAV11 196. . . . . . . 1996 Ford Escort SW Purple. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1FASP15J3TW160229 PAV11 198. . . . . . . 1995 Dodge Ram Van Blue . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2B7HB21X4SK551201 PAV11 200 . . . . . . 1990 Ford Tempo 4D Red . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2FAPP36X6LB223880 PAV11 202 . . . . . . 1995 Ford Thunderbird 2D Silver. . . . . . . . . 1FALP62W8SH192923 PAV11 203 . . . . . . 1989 Honda Civic 4D Maroon . . . . . . . . . . . JHMCA5536KC103790 PAV11 204 . . . . . . 2000 Oldsmobile Alero Coupe Red. . . . . . . . 1G3NL12T3YC332096 PAV11 207 . . . . . . 1995 Mazda MVP SUV Dk Green . . . . . . . . . JM3LV5237S0711451 PAV11 208 . . . . . . 1963 Dodge Pk Tk Blue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1161299481 PAV12 001 . . . . . . 1998 Volkswagen Jetta 4D White. . . . . . . . . 3VWSB81H3WM153500 PAV12 003 . . . . . . 1978 Cove MH Cream . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F44CK7V057086 PAV12 004 . . . . . . 1991 GMC Safari Van Silver . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1GKDM19Z8MB537212 PAV12 006 . . . . . . 1988 Mercury Cougar 2D Blue. . . . . . . . . . . 1MEBM60F6JH612919 PAV12 008 . . . . . . 1999 Chevrolet Suburban SUV Grey. . . . . . . 1GNFK16R6XJ560844 PAV12 009 . . . . . . 1990 Honda Accord 4D Blue . . . . . . . . . . . . 1HGCB7554LA173055 PAV12 010. . . . . . . 1988 Chevrolet Cavalier SW Blue. . . . . . . . . 1G1JC84T2LJ167823 PAV12 011. . . . . . . 1977 Drea Van Motor Home White. . . . . . . . CGL257U161122 PAV12 012. . . . . . . 1999 Subaru Forester SW Green . . . . . . . . . JF1SF6354XG720264 PAV12 013. . . . . . . 1997 Nissan Altima 4D Red . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1N4BU31D5VC112868 PAV12 015 . . . . . . 1986 Ford Ranger Pk Tk Whi. . . . . . . . . . . . 1FTBR10C1GUB77349 PAV12 016 . . . . . . 1997 Pontiac Grand Am 4DR red . . . . . . . . . 1G2NE52M2VC713173 PAV12 017. . . . . . . 1992 Pontiac Bonneville 4DR silver . . . . . . . 1G2HX53L8N1251002 PAV12 018. . . . . . . 1994 Pontiac Grand Prix 2DR teal . . . . . . . . 1G2WJ12X9RF286923 PAV12 020 . . . . . . 1985 Toyota Supra 2DR blue . . . . . . . . . . . . JT2MA67L5F0164282 PAV12 021 . . . . . . 1992 Toyota Camry 4DR white . . . . . . . . . . 4T1VK13E6NU025476 PAV12 024 . . . . . . 1987 Mercury Cougar 2DR white . . . . . . . . . 1MEBM6037HH662180

Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining. NO WARRANTY is made as to the condition or title of these vehicles. Vehicles are not available for preview prior to Oct 6th at 8:45 am. Payment by Cash or Check, at time of Sale Dated this the 23rd day of Sept, 2011. Mark Muir, Chief of Police Suzanne Mirabito, Abandoned Vehicles

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r vehicle. Dated this 29th day of September A.D., 2011. /s/ CARL C. IBSEN Sheriff of Missoula County, Montana By /s/ Patrick A. Turner, Deputy Missoula County Western Montana Fair Request for Proposals (RFP) The Western Montana Fair, a department of Missoula County, is seeking proposals from qualified stock contractors to produce 4 days of rodeo, bull riding, or mixed rough stock events at the annual county fair during the second week of August. The proposed contract term is three years beginning in August 2012 with two oneyear optional renewal periods. Interested parties may obtain full proposal details from Barbara Berens, Missoula County Auditor, 200 W Broadway, Room 212, Missoula, MT 59802, 406-258-3227, or by emailing bberens@co.missoula.mt.us. The full RFP is also available on the County’s website at http://www.co.missoula.mt.us/bidsandproposals/bidandproposals.htm. Interested parties are asked to submit four (4) copies of their proposal to the County Auditor’s Office by 5:00PM, Friday, October 14, 2011. No late proposals will be accepted. Envelopes must be sealed and marked “RFP – WMF Stock Contractor”. Missoula County reserves the right to reject any and all bids. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-11-164 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF VIOLET E. DUMONTIER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to EDITH G. LOVE, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Reely Law Firm, P.C., 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 8th day of September, 2011 /s/ Edith G. Love, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT Dept. No. 3 Probate No. DP11-166 Dept. No. 2 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ERIKA CAMP, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Thomas H. Camp, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Milodragovich, Dale, Steinbrenner & Nygren, P.C., 620 High Park Way, PO Box 4947, Missoula, Montana 59806-4947, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 7th day of September, 2011. /s/ Thomas H. Camp, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-11-163 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HENRY RALPH BUTZEL, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Marcia Butzel, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at c/o Paul E. Fickes, 310 West Spruce, Missoula, MT 59802 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 6th day of September, 2011. /s/ Marcia Butzel c/o Paul E. Fickes, 310 West Spruce Street, Missoula, MT 59802 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-11-162 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF BENNIE JOHN VO0RHIES, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Nicole J. Chaffin, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested,in care of Thiel Law Office, PLLC, 315 West Pine, PO Box 8125, Missoula, Montana 59807 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 6th day of September, 2011. THIEL LAW OFFICE, /s/ Matthew B. Thiel Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP-11-158 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF MARGO A. KIDDER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Raine J. Kidder has been appointed Personal Representative of

the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Raine J. Kidder, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Timothy D. Geiszler, GEISZLER & FROINES, PC, 619 Southwest Higgins, Suite K, Missoula, Montana 59803 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 29th day of August, 2011. GEISZLER & FROINES, PC /s/ Timothy D. Geiszler, Attorneys for the Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP-11-173 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HELEN V. KIDDER a/k/a HELEN ROSS KIDDER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to CHARLES W. SCHUYLER, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Marsillo & Schuyler, PLLC, 103 South 5th Street East, Missoula, MT 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 22nd day of September, 2011. /s/ Charles W. Schuyler, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-11-169 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF SARA LYON JAMES, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to SHAWN E. ROSSCUP, attorney for the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at PO Box 9410, Missoula, Montana 59807 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED September 19, 2011. /s/ Suzanne Artley, Personal Representative. /s/ Shawn E. Rosscup, Attorney for Personal Representative Announcement of Mount Sentinel Little League Elections 7:00 pm, October 13, 2011 Southgate Mall Community Room NOTICE OF TRUSTEE S SALE Trustee Sale Number: 11-03692-3 Loan Number: 0083453092 APN: 5838618 TO BE SOLD for cash at Trustee’s Sale on January 23, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, recognized local time, on the front steps to the County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula the following described real properly in Missoula County, Montana, to-wit: LOT 10 IN SHELBY ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY. MONTANA ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. APN # 5838618 More commonly known as:12978 KIMWOOO DRIVE, LOLO, MT TERl S LERCH, A SINGLE PERSON, as the original grantor(s), conveyed said real property to ALLIANCE TITLE & ESCROW CORP., as the original trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as the original beneficiary, by a Trust Indenture dated as of February 8, 2008, and recorded on February 15, 2008 under Document No. 200803260, in the Official Records of the Office of the Record of Missoula County, Montana {“Deed of Trust”). The current beneficiary is: Wells Fargo Bank, NA. (the “Beneficiary”). FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY was named as Successor Trustee (the “Trustee”) by virtue of a Substitution of Trustee dated August 29, 2011 and recorded in the records of Missoula County, Montana. There has been a default in the performance of said Deed of Trust: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears as of August 18,2011: Balance due on monthly payments from April 1, 2011 and which payments total: $996.48: Late charges; $79.72: Advances: $0.00 There is presently due on the obligation the principal sum of $151,375.25 plus accrued interest thereon at the rate of 4.50000% per annum from March 1, 2011, plus late charges. Interest and late charges continue to accrue. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds include the trustee’s or attorney’s fees and costs and expenses of sale. The beneficiary has elected to sell the property to satisfy the obligation and has directed the trustee to commence such sale proceedings. The beneficiary declares that the grantor is in default as described above and has directed the Trustee to commence proceedings to sell the property described above at public sale in accordance with the terms and provisions of this notice. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The

grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the aforesaid property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default theretofore existing. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714.730.2727 DATED:September 8, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee, By: Mariah Booker, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4093065 09/29/2011, 10/06/2011, 10/13/2011 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/23/04, recorded as Instrument No. 200411500, Bk 731, Pg 361, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Kraig A. Michels and Marie L. Michels, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc. was Beneficiary and First American Title Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lots 6, 7, 8, and the East One-Half of Lot 9 in Block 58 of Daly’s Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Recording Reference: Book 662 of Micro Records at Page 560 Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of July 28, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $260,314.56. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $241,305.77, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 7, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. T.S. #7023.92066. 1002.184338-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 09/24/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200822332, Bk 827, Pg 117, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Patricia L. Morgan and Dennis R. Morgan as joint tenants was Grantor, Acceptance Capital Mortgage Corporation was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow Corp was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow Corp as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 20 of Wallace Creek Estates, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200822333, Bk 827, Pg 118, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure

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"Cornering the Market"–it's a fringe benefit.

by Matt Jones

ACROSS

1 See 1-down 7 ___global.net 10 With 13-down, it's placed in the upper right corner of an envelope 14 Further from A-quality work 15 Sine ___ non 16 Elbow-wrist connection 17 Weather phenomenon with a Spanish name 18 Cartoon superhero dressed in red, white and blue 20 Yale grads 21 ___ Bator, Mongolia 23 Academy newbie 24 Camcorder button 25 Distinct groups of species populations 27 Uneasy (with tension) 29 "What did I tell you?" 30 Denali or Whitney, e.g. 33 Concept embodying yin and yang 34 Camping bottle 36 Kidded around 39 Alexander who claimed he was "in charge" after Reagan was shot 40 Arctic reindeer herder 41 Prefix like "ultra" 42 It may be consolidated 43 In a fog 44 Woman-hating 46 ___ artist (swindler) 47 Winter hrs. in San Francisco 48 Color to stop on 49 Tranquilizer shooter 53 Place for chalk drawings 55 Inseparable 56 Abou Ben ___ (James Henry Leigh Hunt poem subject) 59 "___ Tuesday" 60 Nimrod 61 Aviation almost-accident 63 Chinese gambling game with dominoes 65 Fail to include 66 Icelandic band Sigur ___ 67 Gas station name 68 With 56-down, state that makes up the lower left corner of the Four Corners Monument 69 Some amount Last week’s solution

70 See 52-down

DOWN

1 With 1-across, space that occupies the upper left corner of a Monopoly board 2 ___ derby 3 Japanese camera company until 2003 4 Where eye color comes from 5 Former Giants pitcher Robb 6 Marx who novelty glasses are modeled on 7 Zilch 8 Costume seen around Easter 9 Knave 10 Knitting stitches 11 Ye ___ Gift Shoppe 12 Holier-than-thou type 13 See 10-across 19 Fencing swords 22 Auction section 25 Posh word of surprise 26 Simon of "Shaun of the Dead" 28 "In ___" (Nirvana album) 30 "The Beauty in Ugly" singer Jason 31 CD predecessor 32 Dennis Franz's former TV employer 34 Who nobody puts in the corner, according to a line from "Dirty Dancing" 35 Actor hiding in the audience, perhaps 36 Hit for The Pointer Sisters, Van Halen or Kris Kross 37 Wading bird sacred to Egyptians 38 Sleeveless garment 39 Florence who played Carol Brady 42 Turned blue, maybe 43 Uncool dude 45 Big name in fairy tales 46 Caribbean music 49 Do some fingerpainting 50 1 followed by 100 zeroes 51 Get the right combination to 52 With 70-across, it's often seen in the bottom right corner of a TV screen 53 Sealy competitor 54 Not at all manly 56 See 68-across 57 Ashton's wife 58 Brushed stuff 60 Fred's pet 62 401(k) alternative 64 Mo. with no major holidays

©2011 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com)

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 September 29 – October 6, 2011


PUBLIC NOTICES timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 08/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of July 28, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $299,009.61. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $253,372.09, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 7, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. T.S. 7023.09403. 1002.141380-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/30/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200703700, Bk 791, Pg 1721, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which David S. Zrowka and Jeanne A Zrowka, husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Quicken Loans Inc. was Beneficiary and Title Source, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance

Company has succeeded Title Source, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract 9-B-2 of Certificate of Survey No. 1813, located in the NE1/4 of Section 35 and the NW1/4 of Section 36, Township 14 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. Bk. 866, Pg. 409, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for J.P. Morgan Alternative Loan Trust 2007-A2. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 06/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of August 11, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $420,804.18. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $383,846.53, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 22, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction

may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7037.09748) 1002.171712-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/10/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200514158, Bk-754 Pg-463, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Anirban Mitra, a married man was Grantor, JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Insured Titles, LLC was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles, LLC as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 10 of Canyon View Two, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200808559, B:817, P:0336, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/07 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of August 11, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $224,825.13. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $165,696.52, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 22, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis.

Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7037.74055) 1002.185641-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 14, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 56 of Avalon Meadows, Phase 2 and 3, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Casey T. Weitz and Andreah M. Weitz, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on October 8, 2009 and recorded on October 14, 2009 in Book 849, Page 114, under Document No. 200924866. The beneficial interest is currently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,177.86, beginning September 1,2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of July 13, 2011 is $211,474.13 principal, interest at the rate of 5.0% now totaling $10,040.17, escrow advances of $1,527.95, suspense balance of $-542.16 and other fees and expenses advanced of $187.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $28.97 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such

amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED TOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: July 6, 2011 Becky Stucki First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho) )ss. County of Bingham) On this 6th day of July, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Becky Stucki, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the forgoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Amy Gough Notary Public Bingham, County, Blackfoot, ID Commission expires: 5/26/2015 Bac V Weitz 42019.196 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 14, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M.

at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County. Montana: Lots 13 and 14 in Block 46 of Daly’s Addition, a platted Subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official recorded plat thereof Mary Trochmann, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed lo Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems. Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated November 9, 2006 and recorded November 15, 2006 in Book 787, Page 423 under Document No. 200629648. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. This beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,195.97. beginning February 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the properly or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of May 14, 2011 is $154,828.92 principal, interest at the rate of 6.1250% now totaling $3,498.84, late charges in the amount of $149.46, escrow advances of $19.83, and other fees and expenses advanced of $47.50 plus accruing interest at the rate of $25.98 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only The Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty. Including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint mold or other environmental or health hazards The sale purchase shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by pubic proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMAIONn OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.Dated: July 14, 2011 /s/ Becky Stucki First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 14th day of July, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Becky Stucki, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the forgoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Juanita C Monson Notary Public Bingham, County, Blackfoot, ID Commission expires: 9/18/2016 Citimortgage V Trochmann 42011.446 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 21, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: LOT 34 OF SWEET GRASS ADDITION AT MALONEY RANCH PHASE I, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Barry A. Philbert and Trudie M. Philbert, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 12, 2002 and recorded on September 20, 2002 in Book 688, Page 1807 as Document #200227148. The beneficial

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C8

September 29 – October 6, 2011

interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,416.19, beginning October 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of July 28, 2011 is $201,083.23 principal, interest at the rate of 6.375% now totaling $11,630.76, late charges in the amount of $1,274.40, escrow advances of $3,204.33, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,619.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $35.12 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WJLL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: July 13, 2011 /s/ Dalia Martinez First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 13th day of July, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the forgoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Viki D Bauer Notary Public State of Idaho County, Bingham Commission expires: 3/29/14 GMACV. Philbert 41965.439 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 01/06/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which CLARK G. ANDERSON as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to STEWART TITLE as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 05/25/2007 and recorded 05/31/2007, in document No. 200713508 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 798 at Page Number 594 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 2 OF TOWER LOTS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 1125 TOWER STREET, Missoula, MT 59804. The beneficial interest under said


PUBLIC NOTICES Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-12. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 09/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $194,451.04 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 3.02% per annum from 09/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 08/23/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380

Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0085495 FEI NO. 1006.142564 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 01/10/2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which THOMAS D. ERVING AND MIKELL K POTTER, AS JOINT TENANTS WITH RIGHT OF SURVIVORSHIP as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 11/14/2007 and recorded 11/20/2007, in document No. 200730276 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 809 at Page Number 177 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 21 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS TRACT 11A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 1872. Property Address: 16600 TOUCHETTE LANE, Frenchtown, MT 59834. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCES-

RENTALS SOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 01/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $397,581.09 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.375% per annum from 12/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 08/25/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0026415 FEI NO. 1006.131552

SUSTAINAFIEDS Ask about our line of efficient and gas appliances. Oasis Montana located in Western Montana, open weekdays. 406777-4309. www.oasismontana.com IDeal Green Cleaning. Residential/Commercial. Movein/Move-out. One time, weekly or monthly. All Green Seal certified products. We’ll leave your place shiny! 207-2445

“Missoula’s Clean Spots.” Dry Cleaning/Laundromats/Car Wash. Eco-friendly Cleaners. WI-FI, Alterations, & FREE laundry soap. Clean & Comfortable. Green Hanger has two convenient locations 146 Woodford St. 728-1948 and 960 E. Broadway 728-1919 Natural Housebuilders, Inc., *ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes* Additions/Remodels* HIGHER-COMFORT crafted building* Solar Heating* 3690940 or 642-6863* www.naturalhousebuilder.net Renewable Energy Supply and Design. Oasis Montana located in Western Montana, open weekdays. 406-777-4309. www.oasismontana.com Residential and commercial remote and utility-tied power

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systems and solar water pumping. Call us about your power project! Oasis Montana located in Western Montana, open weekdays. 406-777-4309. www.oasismontana.com Through creative partnerships and innovative development, the Missoula Housing Authority provides quality housing solutions for low and middle income households in Missoula and the surrounding area. Visit us at missoulahousing.org

Natural Housebuilders, Inc. ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes Additions/Remodels • Solar Heating HIGHER-COMFORT crafted building

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APARTMENTS 20165 Nine Mile Rd.: 20 miles West of Missoula, Remodeled doublewide, 3 bedroom, 2 bathrooms, Den, Hook-ups, Dishwasher,

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

Lolo Vista Apartments

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Dining area with built-ins, Yard, No smoking allowed, Pet considered GCPM , $875, 549-6106, gcpmmt.com 2320 55th St.: 2-bedrooms, South Hills, Main Floor, Off street parking, free cable, w/d hookups, water and garbage paid, GCPM , $675, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com 825 SW Higgins Ave B5 2 bd/1 ba, single garage, gas fireplace, dw, w/d hkups, close to shopping & parks ... $800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 Dickinson Condo - ($1050) 3bed 1.5 bath up Rattlesnake. D/W, W/D, yard, patio, carport & storage. PET ON APPROVAL. GATEWEST 728-7333 Lynnwood Condos on Ronald w/required age 62 & over – 2 bed ($695/$350 dep) & 1 bed ($575/$350 dep). Expanded basic cable & H/W/S/G paid. Coin-op laundry. *2 WEEKS FREE RENT* NO PETS. GATEWEST 728-7333 North Russell apartments-Studio ($465), 1 Bed ($525) & 2 bed-

rooms ($595). Off street parking & storage. GATEWEST 728-7333 RENT INCENTIVE!!! 3714 W. Central #2 2 bd/1 ba, w/d hkups, some recent interior remodeling, carport, shared yard, $700. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

MOBILE HOMES Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent w/s/g/elec included $400/month 406-273-6034

HOUSES 4 Bdrm Log Cabin, 20

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Now Leasing Solstice 1535 Liberty Ln. 0, 1, 2 BR apts Call for details. 3137 Home Harvest Lp. 1BR all utilities pd. $550 mo./$600 dep. 149 W. Broadway 1BR h/w/s/g paid Laundry onsite $500 mo./$525 dep.

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Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 September 29 – October 6, 2011


REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 10250 Valley Grove. Fantastic Value $229,000! Log Home on 1.83 lightly wooded acres close to Missoula. Call Anne 546-5816 for showing. www.movemontana.com 1531 S 11th St W: 3 bed, 1 1/2 bath, 2 Car Garage. Turn-key home on a large lot with a double detached garage, privacy fenced yard and one level living! This home has a great floor plan and was remodeled in 2007. $213,900 - MLS # 20114611. Call Shannon Hilliard at 239-8350 today! 1531 S 11th St W: 3 bed, 1 1/2 bath, 2 Car Garage. Turn-key home on a large lot with a double detached garage, privacy fenced yard and one level living! This home has a great floor plan and was remodeled in 2007. $213,900 - MLS # 20114611. Call Shannon Hilliard at 239-8350 today! 1725A Park Place. Priced reduced to $147,900. CLEAN 3 bed, 1-1/2 bath, 1 car attached garage, private yard. Call Anne 546-5816 for showing. www.movemontana.com 18737 Sorrel Springs Lane, Frenchtown, $389,000 MLS # 20113420, 4 bedroom 2 1/2 bath, Beautiful home on 4 acres with spectacular views. Call Betsy Milyard for a showing today at 880-4749. 2511 Sunridge Court $255,000 MLS # 20116337 5 bedroom 3 bath THE HOUSE HAS CENTRAL AIR, VAULTED CEILINGS, A MASSIVE FAMILY ROOM WITH GAS FIREPLACE AND MUCH MORE. OVER 2800 SQ. FT. OF FINISHED LIVING SPACE, THERE IS PLENTY OF ROOM FOR ENTERTAINING FRIENDS AND FAMILY. Call Betsy Milyard for a showing today at 880-4749. 345 Brooks St. Great Investment potential near university. Price reduced to $289,000. Call Anne 546-5816 for showing. www.movemontana.com 6106 Longview $235,000 MLS # 20116338 Large 4 Bedroom 2 Bath home located in the South Hills. This home features hardwood floors, open floor plan, and large fenced yard. Call Betsy Milyard for more info 880-4749. 860 Haley, Florence $550,000 - MLS# 20115636 5 bedroom, 3 bath, 2 car garage home available. Over 5000 finished square ft. Tons of space, game room and its own movie theater - perfect for living and entertaining! Your own private movie theater comes with 55” LED 3D TV, seven theater chairs, and an awesome sound system. Call Betsy Milyard for more info 880-4749. AMAZING PANORAMIC VIEWS OF THE BITTERROOT MOUNTAINS. 3 Bdr/2 Bath Stevensville area on on 10 acres. Gorgeous, open floor plan, beautifully landscaped, great patio and deck with hot tub. $489,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

BEAUTIFUL LOLO AREA CUSTOM HOME ON 1.65 ACRES. 5 Bdr/4 Bath, soaring cathedral ceilings, hand-peeled log, exposed beam, and stacked stone accents, gorgeous kitchen and master, amazing deck, and much, much more. $525,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free comparative market analysis. 360-8234 Classic Mid-century Rattlesnake Home with lots of character: coved ceilings, hardwood floors, fireplace, cedar shingles, huge lot with mature landscape and perennial beds. 2618 Rattlesnake Dr, 3278787 porticorealestate.com Did you find the perfect place? Now plan your perfect weekend at MissoulaEvents.net Enjoy country living close to town, 3 bed, 2.5 bath home. Covered deck front and back. Large double detached garage with additional living quarters. Carport behind garage for extra storage. Nice views and close to Forest Service land for horse back riding and hiking. Lolo Creek close for fishing. Park on the North boundary. Fence between Lot 1 and 2 not on property line. Will sell with adjacent 1.71 acre lot. $299,900. MLS#20115937. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 2406503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. Farm Houses w/land in Missoula, these funky farm houses boast lots of land to spread out and do your thing, Development potential. 231 & 211 Grove, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com GORGEOUS HANDCRAFTED HOME ON 3.3 ACRES ON PETTY CREEK. 3 Bdr/2.5 Baths, Main floor master suite, great room, gorgeous kitchen, hardwood floors, heated double garage, with guest quarters, and great views. $425,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

Megan Lane, Frenchtown, $199,900 MLS: 10007166 BRAND NEW 3 BED, 2 BATH HOME ON 1 ACRE. HOME TO BE BUILT SO YOU CAN PICK YOUR COLORS AND SOME FINISHING TOUCHES. GENEROUS $2000 APPLIANCE ALLOWANCE AND $1300 LANDSCAPING ALLOWANCE. Call Betsy for more info 880-4749. SINGLE LEVEL HIDDEN TRAILS HOME. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, double garage, cathedral ceilings, wood laminate flooring, dining area, and more, all just a few minutes from UM and downtown. $174,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

@ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Super Location Near River Trail– this mid-century 4 bdrm, 2 bth home has a ton of potential. It sits in a beautifully established old neighborhood. 603 1st St., 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Turn Key Home! 219 N Johnson...3bed/2bath home w/vaulted cielings, laminate floors, master suite w/ walk-in closet. Large yard, double attatched garage. South on Russel right on MT. Call 2391691 for a showing!

SINGLE LEVEL LIVING CLOSE TO THE BITTERROOT RIVER. 4 Bdr/3 Bath single-level Stevensville home. Great, open floor plan, incredible mountain views, next to public park, walk to Downtown Stevi or Bitterroot River. $219,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com SPACIOUS PLEASANT VIEW HOME PRICED TO SELL. 3 Bdr/2 Bath, double garage, corner lot, open floor plan, cathedral ceilings, main floor master and laundry, great deck and more. $216,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com SPECTACULAR HORSE PROPERTY ON THE BITTERROOT RIVER. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, 10.4 acres, cross-fenced, 4 stall custom barn with hay loft, hardwood & tile floors, gourmet kitchen, arched doorways, 2 decks, spectacular mountain views, 400 feet of river frontage. $475,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer

Unique Lower Rattlesnake home near Bugbee Nature Area, 3Brm, 4Ba, Tree-top views, Lots of upgrades like granite countertops and lots of gorgeous wood, 909 Herbert, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com View or list properties for sale By Owner at www.byownermissoula.com OR call 550-3077

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES Affordable Condo, Didn’t think you could afford to

RICE TEAM

Immaculate Rose Park Area Home, This light filled home offers a fantastic floorplan, 2 family rooms, large deck and nice backyard for entertaining. 300 Central, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Like New Affordable Home Close to U, - this 2 Br/1 Ba home has great views and has Mount Jumbo as it’s backyard!, 929 Discovery Way 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10

LAND FOR SALE

The Uptown Flats have two one bed one bath units still for sale at $149,900. Only a few units left in this great gated development near downtown. Call Anne 5465816 for showing. www.movemontana.com

Almost 1/2 acre building site with great views. Close to Ranch Club Golf course and fishing access. City sewer stubbed to the property line. NOW ONLY $69,900. MLS# 10007449. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 2406503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

301 O'Connell Dr., Lolo

19370 Trout Lane, Bonner

Large corner lot, fenced, 3bd, 2bth. Updating done. Landscaping with shrubs, perennials. Shop & garden.

Calling all outdoor enthusiasts. 3 bed, 2 bath, l.7 acres. Oversized garage w/ extra high double doors. New private decks.

$208,500 • MLS# 20113289

$150,000 • MLS# 20115417

Beverly Kiker

Beverly Kiker

544-0708

544-0708

riceteam@bigsky.net Robin Rice Janet Rice missoularealestate4sale.com 240-6503 240-3932 • 3 Bed, 2 Bath, 2 Car Garage • Beautiful landscaped yard • Zoned commercial, 48'x30' shop • 102 Boardwalk, Stevensville • $298,500 • MLS#20114242

55+ COMMUNITY • 2 Bed, 2 Bath, large family room • Homeowners fee is $370/mo. • Includes clubhouse, sewer, garbage • Land lease, snow removal & lawn care • $124,900 • MLS#10006023

• 3 Bed, 2 Bath, 2 Car Garage • Landscaped corner lot • AC, Fenced, UG Sprinklers • Hollywood floor plan • $226,500 • MLS#20111249

PRICE REDUCED • 4 Bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage • Large deck over looks yard • Lots of room & basement • New furnace & water heater • $229,000• MLS# 20110384

2404 & 2404 1/2 Rattlesnake Dr., Msla $425,000 MLS# 20114396

Handsome, Spacious Home on Prime Upper Miller Creek Acreage, 5+ bedrooms, with out of town living on quiet cul-de-sac, and acres. Rodeo Rd. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Huge Lot Bungalow Style Home, middle of Missoula, close to Good Food Store, lots of room in huge shop, needs some updating, priced accordingly! 203 Curtis, 3278787 porticorealestate.com

your own place? This sweet new, green-built development may be your ticket. 1400 Burns, 3278787 porticorealestate.com

buy

&Y]MRKELSYWI# ;I´PPWLS[]SY XLI[E]LSQI 'LYGO7GLQEYX^6IEP)WXEXI0SER3JJMGIV

21079-

Rattlesnake dream property with 1 bedroom apartment! 3 bed 2 bath home located on over 1/2 acre manicured & landscaped gardens & lawn. UG sprinkler & "secret garden", fenced yard. This solid home boasts huge picture windows, hardwood floors under carpet. New exterior paint and a 3 car garage! 2 bonus, bath & family room in basement. www.2404rattlesnake.com Wonderful 5 bed, 3 bath home @ top of Fairviews. Level lot! Borders open space. All new carpet & interior 110 Artemos Dr., Msla paint. Trex deck off dining r o o m . G r e a t v i e w s ! $275,000 MLS# 20116161 Amazing new bathroom downstairs. Large family room downstairs. Ready to move into. Back yard is fenced. www.110artemos.com

For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Rochelle

6IEP)WXEXI0IRHMRK'IRXIV`+EVJMIPH` GWGLQEYX^$JWFQWPEGSQ

September 29 – October 6, 2011

Missoula Properties Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com


REAL ESTATE

Beautiful 14 acre parcel just west of Huson. Meadow with trees & pasture. Modulars or double wides on foundation ok. $169,900. MLS#906774. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. Beautiful wooded 3.69 acres with 550 feet of Twin Creeks frontage. Easy access from Hwy

200 on well maintained county road. Modulars or manufactured homes on a permanent foundation are allowed. Seller will carry contract with $50,000 down at 7 % interest. PRICE REDUCED $184,900. MLS#10005586. Janet 2403932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

Great building site, with electricity right at the property line. 13.46 Acres with small stream on property. $150,000. MLS#20111016. 10882 Crystal Creek Road, Clinton. Janet 2403932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

ties. Was $49,900 - Now $19,900. 170 acres Borders BLM was $299,900 now $89,900. More property under $1,000/acre. Close to Roundup, Billings & Lewistown. The best elk and deer country! Call 888-361-3006

MONTANA RANCH LANDS MUST SELL 20 ACRES w/utili-

COMMERCIAL 321 N. Higgins Commercial building on coveted downtown location with lots of foot traffic. Building only for sale. Call Anne 546-5816 for showing. www.movemontana.com

UPSCALE DOWNTOWN LIFESTYLE

Historic Victorian either Residential or Commercial â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This majestic home in fantastic shape offers many options. 436 S 3rd W, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

AT THE UPTOWN FLATS 1 and 2 bedroom condos available

Two units at the low price of

$149,900 OPEN HOUSE: Sunday noon-4pm or call Jeff or Anne for Appointment

Jeff Ellis

Anne Jablonski

529-5087

546-5816

www.theuptownflatsmissoula.com

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 September 29 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; October 6, 2011


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