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BOOKS NEWS

HIGH ON HOG: NEW BOOK HIGHLIGHTS MONTANA NATIVE’S FIGHT TO HELP THE HMONG FLEE LAOS

WESTBORO BAPTISTS BRING THE CRAZY

OPINION

JUDGE BAUGH’S DEBACLE SIGNALS CALL FOR HELP

LOBBYIST THEATER FROM TO PLAYWRIGHT


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


BOOKS NEWS

HIGH ON HOG: NEW BOOK HIGHLIGHTS MONTANA NATIVE’S FIGHT TO HELP THE HMONG FLEE LAOS

WESTBORO BAPTISTS BRING THE CRAZY

OPINION

JUDGE BAUGH’S DEBACLE SIGNALS CALL FOR HELP

LOBBYIST THEATER FROM TO PLAYWRIGHT


[2] Missoula Independent • September 12–September 19, 2013


cover photo by Cathrine L. Walters

News Voices/Letters ALEC, pro-choice and trapping.............................................................4 The Week in Review Breakdowns, beer and cellos ....................................................6 Briefs Water, dogs and arm wrestling ................................................................................6 Etc. Senators get an earful at listening session..................................................................7 News Blue Mountain Clinic offers rural doctors a different view .....................................8 News West Borough Baptist Church brings the crazy home .............................................9 Opinion Judge Baugh’s botched apology signals a call for help ....................................10 Opinion Alaska fishing shows what’s been lost in the Lower 48 ....................................11 Feature Small-scale artistry meets big-time obsession ....................................................14

Arts & Entertainment Arts A former lobbyist tackles a story about a Butte madam...........................................18 Music White Lung, Magpies/VTO, Windhand and Action Bronson .................................19 Books Doig’s latest doesn’t offer enough storm .............................................................20 Books New book chronicles how a Montana native helped the Hmong........................21 Film Grohl’s Sound City hits the right note ....................................................................22 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films ........................................................23 Flash in the Pan Superbug situation...............................................................................24 Happiest Hour Silvertip Casino ......................................................................................26 8 Days a Week It’s a small world, after all ......................................................................27 Mountain High The Rut Ultra Marathon ........................................................................41 Agenda Ambassador Kathleen Stephens..........................................................................42

Exclusives

Street Talk.................................................................................................................4 In Other News.........................................................................................................12 Classifieds .............................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ..............................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle..................................................................................................C-7 Camp Sleepover ..................................................................................................C-11 This Modern World..............................................................................................C-12

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL PROJECTS Christie Anderson ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Cathrine L. Walters CALENDAR EDITOR Kate Whittle STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen, Dameon Pesanti COPY EDITOR Kate Whittle ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Pumpernickel Stewart, Jonathan Marquis CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Allen MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, Chris Dombrowski, Brad Tyer, Nick Davis, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Matthew Frank, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Melissa Mylchreest, Rob Rusignola, Josh Quick, Brooks Johnson

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2013 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • September 12–September 19, 2013 [3]


[voices]

Stay tuned

STREET TALK

Kudos to Alex Sakariassen for covering ALEC’s influence in the Montana Legislature (see “No-love letter,” Aug. 29). The school charter bills weren’t the only “model legislation” that ALEC’s policy thugs shoved down our legislative throats. One of ALEC’s biggest national efforts is to disenfranchise voters, read as: making sure low-income people, students, and people of color don’t vote. Their attempt to eliminate same day voter registration failed by the stroke of a veto pen but it will be back before voters via ballot initiative next fall. Stay tuned. The free luncheons offered to Republican lawmakers are literally held inside the halls of the Capitol and they are buying your democracy and taking your rights. State Rep. Ellie Hill Missoula

by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked Tuesday, Sept. 10, near the corner of Spruce and Higgins. What is your hobby? Follow-up: If you could create your own world, what would be some of its defining factors?

Samuel Samson: I like to breakdance. Footloose: I think Missoula needs more spaces for gatherings and shows. I would want a place to dance, where people can gather around and just dance.

Defining pro-choice It is an incredibly exciting and challenging time for the reproductive justice movement in Montana. With new leaders at both NARAL Pro-Choice Montana and at Planned Parenthood of Montana, we have an amazing opportunity to educate the public and legislators on what it means to be pro-choice and why it is so important to ensure that privacy and individual freedoms are secure in our state. As a leader of the reproductive justice movement, I would like to clarify what it truly means to be pro-choice. First, being pro-choice means we believe that everyone should have access to all reproductive health options—this includes access to birth control, infertility treatments, steril-

Trent Heichelbech: I like to fish a lot. I guess its a hobby, but maybe a little more. Don’t have to go far: Sweet trout streams and mountains. Pretty women and bars.

Randy Neel: I serve the community for my hobby. My job is my hobby. I run the His Food Pantry. Close to home: Clearly detailed and marked roads and tracks. Everyone would get along, everybody helps everybody. I would build a community that is a mirror of what we have here in Missoula.

ization, and, yes, abortion. However, being pro-choice also means advocating for preventative techniques that reduce the need for abortion. This means believing in access to affordable birth control and family planning resources, as well as honest and accurate sex education for young people. It is through these techniques, as well as advocating healthy relationships and reducing sexual violence against women, that we will reduce the number of unintended pregnancies, making abortion rare. When faced with an unintended pregnancy, the decision to parent, adopt or terminate the pregnancy

“Any person with half a brain knows that wolves have no place in the wild.” is an incredibly private and personal one—one that should be made only by a woman with council from her family, loved ones and physician—not politicians. This is what being pro-choice truly means. As I begin my tenure here in Montana, I will work consistently to bring these prochoice beliefs from the public to the legislature. We must ensure that reproductive rights and privacy for personal decisions

are secure in our state. My goal is to grow our dynamic cadre of activists from all backgrounds and provide them with a direct line to the elected officials who represent them. I also strive to ensure that every young person has comprehensive, medically accurate sex education, which includes information on sexuality, gender identity and healthy relationships. In short, my goal is to ensure that every Montanan has access to affordable reproductive healthcare, is fully informed of their choices and has the freedom to plan their family how they see fit. Lofty goals, yes. But I am certainly not alone in the fight. I would like to thank the Montana Reproductive Rights Coalition for their commitment to reproductive justice and support of NARAL Pro-Choice Montana in the past and into the future. Organizations like Planned Parenthood Advocates of Montana, Blue Mountain Clinic, the Montana Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence, Montana Human Rights Network, and the ACLU of Montana bring important perspectives and enthusiasm for our goals. I am honored to be a part of such an amazing team. I am committed to working alongside our allies throughout the state on issues of reproductive justice. There are many ways you can support NARAL Pro-Choice Montana. Go to prochoicemontana.org for more information. I welcome your conversations, ideas, and activism as we work hard every day to protect all Montanans’ civil rights. Maggie Moran Executive Director NARAL Pro-Choice Montana Helena

[Comments from MissoulaNews.com] Backtalk from “Setting the line,” Sept. 5 Ross McMonies: Soccer. Just kickin’ it: I think it would be based a lot on Missoula. I’m from England and this is a whole other world for me—the green, the seasons, the downtown area is always vibrant and full of people … but I’d definitely have more soccer fields.

No place in the wild “I don’t expect much from public school educated idiots and city dwellers. But I do expect that those of us who were actually raised in Montana and have chosen to live as far away from places such as zoo town should be allowed to try to clean up the mess that fools like you started. Yes, we need to trap and shoot as many of the wolves as we can. Any person with half a brain knows that wolves have no place in the wild.”

Carol Lipp: Running. Happy trails: My dogs, sunshine with light fluffy marshmallow clouds, and flowers. Tulips, roses, green vines and running trails in the forest that are tree-lined and softsurfaced.

[4] Missoula Independent • September 12–September 19, 2013

L

Posted Sept. 5 at 12:37 p.m.

What wild? “Wolves have no place in the wild? You don’t even have half a brain. Please get an education. What is the ‘wild’ you are referring to? Do elk have a place in the wild, and how is that any different than a wolf, or a deer, or a bear?” Posted Sept. 5 at 6:31 p.m.

A day in their paws “If a trapper had to endure what they

put an animal through with a trap that makes the animal suffer for hours and/or days, there would be no trapping/animal abuse.” Posted Sept. 5 at 4:15 p.m.

How do you really feel? “TRAPPERS are lowlife wildlife terrorists. Hunters and trappers are sick psychopaths. They are terrorists to our wildlife. Every trap should be destroyed.” Posted Sept. 8 at 6:46 p.m.

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via email: editor@missoulanews.com.


missoulanews.com • September 12–September 19, 2013 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Cathrine L. Walters

Wednesday, September 4 The Missoula City Council continues to hash out an emergency ordinance that aims to make it more difficult for soup kitchens and homeless shelters to open in residential neighborhoods. The ordinance is in response to the Union Gospel Mission’s planned move to West Broadway, and passes on Monday.

Thursday, September 5 The Missoula Sheriff’s Department asks for help finding a man who, according to a news release, “has been exposing himself to female employees near businesses in the Wye area.” The man is described as roughly 5-foot-8 and either skinny or barrel chested.

Friday, September 6 Imbibers and ale heads alike convene in Caras Park to sample more than 40 varieties of beer at the 15th annual Maverick Brewfest. Luke Dowler & The Savage Gentlemen provide live music.

Saturday, September 7 Portland Cello Project plays a spirited mix of Bach and Kanye West to a sold-out Top Hat audience. The show ends early enough that locals Baby & Bukowski can play a free set before bar break. The way we see it, PCP basically opened for the Missoula duo.

Sunday, September 8 Former Griz and current St. Louis Rams defensive back Trumaine Johnson records three tackles and an interception in a 2724 victory over the Arizona Cardinals. Fellow UM alum and Rams teammate Chase Reynolds is active for his first NFL game.

Monday, September 9 Two Indy staffers get stranded on Homestake Pass outside of Butte when the newspaper’s trusty red truck breaks down. A kind motorist ends up fixing the rig right on the side of the road, allowing the grateful staffers to safely coast home.

Tuesday, September 10 U.S. Sen. Max Baucus tells The Associated Press he’s not sure how he’ll vote on proposed military action in Syria because the situation is too fluid. The day before, Rep. Steve Daines says he’s against the resolution.

The “Before I die...” art installation at the Central Parking Structure in downtown Missoula drew considerable attention after being unveiled for First Friday, Sept. 6. New Orleans artist Candy Chang created the 24-by-7 chalkboards, which are now located in 50 different countries and written in more than 20 languages.

Rivers

Trigger point The Bitterroot River hit historic lows this summer, prompting Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks to enact fishing restrictions in August. A similar story simultaneously unfolded on the Clark Fork. But even as those restrictions lifted this month, fishing on the crowded Blackfoot River shut down completely for only the third time in a decade. It was likely a confusing message for local anglers and outfitters, says FWP’s Vivaca Crowser. “When you get to this time of year, if we’ve had closures we’re usually looking at reopening, not adding additional ones.” The situation on the Blackfoot developed quickly as the discharge rate approached 500 cubic feet per second going into Labor Day weekend. That figure happens to be a trigger point in the Blackfoot Drought Response Plan, a document established to more evenly distribute sacrifice among irrigators, outfitters and river users. As the river level dropped, the committee responsible for executing the plan discussed recommending that FWP close the waterway.

[6] Missoula Independent • September 12–September 19, 2013

“On the Tuesday before Labor Day, it had not hit 500,” says Blackfoot Challenge Executive Director Gary Burnett. “So the committee looked at the projection and said, ‘We anticipate by the end of the week we might hit it.’” The Blackfoot had been holding steady around 520 cfs, and Crowser says it looked like the agency might “barely slide by.” But another development compounded the discussion: A recalibration, or “shift adjustment,” at the Bonner gauge station Aug. 28 dropped the discharge rate to roughly 488 cfs. When the drought committee met the following Tuesday, they recommended a full closure. “It was one of those random things that happened at that exact week and time when things were so close and people were watching so closely,” Crowser says, adding it’s possible the Blackfoot had hit the closure trigger before the gauge was readjusted. The USGS, which is responsible for overseeing most of the state’s water gauges, tries to visit those gauges 10 times a year, says USGS hydrologic surveillance section chief Wayne Berkas. But with the Blackfoot tracking well below average discharge rates all summer,

the USGS has had to pay more visits to the Bonner gauge than usual. “So far, we’ve made 11 measurements at this site,” Berkas says. He’s quick to add that the situation’s been more demanding on the Bitterroot. The Blackfoot has slowly climbed back above 500 cfs in recent days. But Burnett says this year presented something of a phenomenon as water temperatures remained well below drought plan triggers despite the lower flows. As the committee revises the drought plan this offseason, these new developments will have to be addressed. “These conditions are changing,” Burnett says. “And we need to go back, look at it and say what did we learn this year that we need to address in a larger conversation.” Alex Sakariassen

GCLAW

Wrestling for a cause For Sean Janzer, nothing would’ve been more fun than having professional wrestlers duke it out at this week’s KBGA Birthday Bash. But bringing the spectacle


[news]

Justice

“American Taliban” on trial The Rev. Harris Himes is used to defending himself. The Bitterroot Valley resident has long engaged in a “family values” crusade calling for criminalizing abortion, cutting off access to family planning funds and fighting any legislation that furthers gay rights. His strident views have prompted critics to brand him the “American Taliban.” But on Sept. 16, Himes will need to defend himself against allegations that he helped steal $150,000. “The maximum that he’s facing is 40 years,” says Jessie Laslovich, chief legal council to Montana’s Com-

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missioner of Securities and Insurance and one of two prosecutors on the case. Charging documents allege that in 2008 Himes and another pastor, James “Jeb” Bryant, lured an alleged victim, referred to as “G.S.,” into investing his recent inheritance in a construction-goods company in which Bryant and Himes claimed to have partnership stakes. According to charging documents, “The money has not been returned to G.S. and despite the Defendant’s representations otherwise, G.S. has received no ownership ...” In addition to being a regular speaker in front of state legislators, Himes is also an attorney who will represent himself during next week’s trial. He has consistently maintained his innocence, alleging that state

The Rev. Harris Himes

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

to Missoula turned out to be a little more complex than he thought. “Well, we never officially renounced the idea of pro wrestling, then we realized the cost would be really, really high,” says Janzer, KBGA’s promotions director. “But we still wanted to fit as much stuff into the VFW’s tiny space as possible.” Organizers might not have landed World Wrestling Entertainment, but they did get a different collection of performers to sign up: the Garden City Lady Arm Wresters. GCLAW is a group of Missoula women who dress up as characters like “Evil Witch,” “The PURPetrator” and “Indigo Montoya” to support a good cause and flex a little muscle in the process. During a tournament, eight women meet head-tohead until one is declared the champion. Contestants enter the competition with theme songs blaring, then battle it out on a custom-built arm wrestling table― complete with elbow pads and a grip for the non-dueling hand―while their managers and posse take bribes and hype up the audience. Wrestlers aren’t in it for the money, though—all proceeds go to the nonprofit they’re supporting that night, in this case Missoula’s college radio station. “The contestants are in it for the ultimate glory,” says GCLAW founder and emcee Elizabeth Costello. “But I think more than anything the women care about the causes.” KBGA news director Ruth Eddy says that GCLAW was a natural fit for the station’s 17th anniversary. “We want our birthday to be more than just a concert,” she says. “We’re a radio station, we have those all the time. But we wanted to invite people who are inline with our energetic, community-positive ways and they’re easy to match with us.” KBGA hosts its Birthday Bash Sept. 14 at 4 p.m. at the VFW. The GCLAW tournament will take place between music sets and begins at 7. Dameon Pesanti

Securities Commissioner Monica Lindeen’s office has engaged in a witch hunt to stifle his vocal and persistent advocacy. “We’ve been adversarial on those particular issues,” Himes says. Himes also alleges that Laslovich filed the high-profile case to boost his profile in advance of an unsuccessful bid last year to become Montana Attorney General. “The evidence will show that I really had nothing to do with this in the first place,” Himes says. For his part, Laslovich says that the state has a solid case, while noting that both the Montana Supreme Court and the Ravalli County District Court have scrutinized Himes’ claims that he’s been targeted unfairly. “The selective prosecution allegations were dismissed resoundingly by the District Court and the Montana Supreme Court,” he says. Himes’ trial is being held in Ravalli County District Court and is expected to last seven days. Jessica Mayrer

Bitterroot

Stray dog snafu The Ravalli County Commission kicked up a bit of controversy a few weeks back when it opted not to

BY THE NUMBERS Federal Title X funding

Ravalli County was $50,000 that set to receive for family planning services over the next year. The county commission voted 3-2 to reject the funds last week. award a government contract for boarding lost dogs to the Bitter Root Humane Association, a Hamilton-based shelter that’s held the contract for nearly three decades. Commissioners instead voted to turn the contract over to the Victor-based Noah’s Ark Veterinary Hospital. The decision stirred emotions at BRHA, prompting President Kathy Good to draft a heated letter. Good stressed that the average funding allotted to BRHA has gradually decreased in recent years, from as much as $30,000 annually to just $10,000 last year. “Without BRHA, there would be NO services for county residents to help stray and homeless animals,” Good wrote, “and many more would be abandoned, become feral and run wild, risking public safety.” The county did offer to appoint BRHA as a secondary vendor for lost dogs. The association’s board turned it down, with Good stating that multiple vendors would just confuse pet owners searching for lost dogs. Shura Bugreeff, owner and veterinarian at Noah’s Ark, says she never intended to get caught up in a political mess. For the past six years, she’s been housing stray animals “on my own dime and finding them homes,” she says. But earlier this year, she was approached by a group of citizens looking for alternatives to continuing the contract with BRHA. Then, Bugreeff says, she got a call from one of the Ravalli County commissioners. So she applied. “I do it anyway for free, so the fact that someone was actually going to pay me or there might be a possibility that I could get compensated a little bit for what I already do seemed like kind of the smart move,” says Bugreeff, who hopes to use the contract to involve children and the community in caring for lost dogs. Since getting the contract in late August, Bugreeff has taken in four dogs from the Ravalli County Sheriff ’s Office. Three of them were reclaimed by their owners. “They have enough dogs to carry,” she says of BRHA. “If I can do a little bit to relieve the burden, I know it’s easier for everybody.” Good declined to elaborate further on the political fallout when contacted by the Independent, except to say that BRHA would continue to accept any lost animals from citizens and county law enforcement. “To turn them away would be against our mission,” she says. Alex Sakariassen

ETC. Sens. Jon Tester, D-Mont., and Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., heard some hard truths from Indian Country last week. During a listening session in Missoula, leaders from all eight Montana tribes underscored the importance of encouraging economic growth on tribal lands and lamented how the United States government has failed to hold up its end. For the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, the trouble lies with a lack of federal support for the development of an industrial park in Pablo. For the Chippewa Cree, concerns were as basic as the need for clean drinking water on the Rocky Boy Reservation, where waterborne diseases remain a constant health risk. Even news of high morale on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation due to last year’s reintroduction of Yellowstone bison quickly gave way to a much graver tone as officials suggested that federal programs serving Indian Country should not be subject to sequestration. “Unfortunately, the federal government’s commitment to economic development in Indian Country has been merely symbolic at best,” said Fort Peck’s Stoney Anketell, reading a statement from chairman Floyd Azure. “To the contrary, this nation’s economy was built at the expense of America’s indigenous people … Nationally, Indians continue to rank at the bottom of every social and economic indicator: unemployment, income, infant mortality, life expectancy, chemical dependency, suicide.” The talk of water-, land- and assistance-based issues may not have come as any great shock to Cantwell, who currently chairs the Senate Indian Affairs Committee. But one voice spoke for a group in Indian Country to which many of those concerns still don’t apply. Gerald Gray, chairman of the Little Shell Tribe, opened with one of the hardest truths of all: His people still aren’t federally recognized. In other words, Little Shell’s 5,200-and-counting members don’t enjoy the same access to federal grants and contracts that other tribes do. “We have a lot of smart, independent businessmen and businesswomen that have to go after business just like everybody else in the United States because we don’t have these federal funds coming in,” Gray said. Tester later emphasized that he continues to fight for federal recognition for the Little Shell. “It’s the first bill I introduced when I got to the Senate,” he said. He and Sen. Max Baucus are currently the only sponsors of the Senate’s Little Shell bill. Rep. Steve Daines stands alone as the sole sponsor of the House version. Gray made a concise yet compelling case among a host of similarly moving cases. But he went for the hard sell, concluding his testimony with a glance toward Cantwell. “We’re always looking for a co-sponsor.”

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missoulanews.com • September 12–September 19, 2013 [7]


[news]

Second opinion Blue Mountain Clinic offers rural doctors a different view by Dameon Pesanti

Lynsey Bourke cuts right to the chase ACGME’s guidelines—current or proJoey Banks, a board certified family when explaining Blue Mountain Clinic’s posed—addresses abortion. practice physician at Blue Mountain Clinic, The situation causes concern for Blue says she’s most concerned about ACGME poapproach to providing primary care in western Montana. In fact, the nonprofit’s Mountain staff who worry that basic care tentially stripping the required reproductive director of development, outreach and will fall by the wayside, but also puts the health care training from its residency procommunications tells one story to make clinic in position to help educate future grams. That would mean family doctors family practice doctors with issues they will would no longer be required to learn how her point. “This is the example I love: The guy inevitably face. to prescribe birth control, insert intrauterine sitting next to you who devices, or IUDs, or manjust looks like your Average miscarriages. Banks age Joe dude could actusays that could have ally be a transgender man serious implications for who’s there for his aborwomen across the state. tion because he still has a “In rural Montana vagina and he’s having there are doctors who gay sex with a male partwon’t even prescribe ner with a penis,” she contraception,” she says. says. “We just view it all as “There are very few famthe same.” ily doctors who will Blue Mountain’s pa(prescribe) an IUD or tient-centered, choiceother contraceptive debased outlook has long vices. People have to established it as a valuable drive four or five hours resource in Missoula, and just to get one of those, now Bourke believes the let alone four to nine clinic is playing a pivotal hours for an abortion. role in addressing a growI’m worried about the ing concern across the things that aren’t hapstate. pening rurally.” In rural Montana, a Nerissa Koehn, the family physician is likely to associate program direcbe the only doctor around, tor of the Family Medicine and statistics show the maResidency of Western jority of those doctors are Montana, says that even if photo by Cathrine L. Walters reaching retirement age. the ACGME changes its How dire is the situation? Blue Mountain Clinic physician Joey Banks is concerned that gynecological requireAt least 52 of the state’s 56 changing requirements to medical training programs will impact ments, the residency procounties have a federally how family doctors handle basic reproductive care. “In rural gram will continue to Montana there are doctors who won’t even prescribe contraceprecognized shortage of pri- tion,” she says. teach a broad spectrum of mary care physicians, acwomen’s health. “This was sort of prompted because cording to MHA, an association of Montana “It’s absolutely essential to provide certain aspects of gynecologic care aren’t re- comprehensive care in family medicine— Health Care Providers. To help address this issue, the Univer- quired by national residency standards, so especially when they’ll be working in rural sity of Montana last year launched the Fam- in that way we’re filling in a void,” Bourke areas,” Koehn says. ily Medicine Residency of Western Montana says. “Across the nation it’s often family docShe also emphasizes that Blue Mounprogram, which aims to train 10 new family tors who are providing abortions discreetly tain Clinic’s pro-choice philosophy has physicians per year with the hope that most to patients they’ve known for a long time. nothing to do with why it was chosen to will continue to practice in the state. The That’s why it’s so important to have family participate in the program. Rather, it was three-year residency covers a broad range doctors trained in those skills.” picked because of the range of services it Bourke specifies that residents don’t offers and Banks’ experience in other resof medical disciplines and follows guidelines created by the Accreditation Council have to learn about abortion at Blue Moun- idency programs. Koehn adds that resifor Graduate Medical Education, the group tain Clinic. Overall, she says it’s only a small dents see patients at Partnership Health that oversees physician training programs portion of what the clinic does. Center and, as part of their gynecological “We don’t care if people that don’t rotations, spend time at Planned Parentnationwide. In an effort to create more flexibility in want to give abortions don’t give abor- hood and Alpine Physical Therapy, as well its training programs, ACGME is consider- tions, but for doctors to not even see that as Blue Mountain. ing changes with how it covers full-scope as an option … it’s a serious problem,” “We’re not trying to imprint upon them reproductive care. The proposed updates she says. “This is the best kind of feminist any particular political or philosophical would remove existing requirements, such health care in the world just sitting here bent,” she says. “We try to maintain as broad as annual pelvic exams and birth control in Missoula, offering great care to our of a perspective as we can.” treatments, and leave it up to the discretion community. But I feel it should be availof each residency program. Nothing in able worldwide.” dpesanti@missoulanews.com

[8] Missoula Independent • September 12–September 19, 2013


[news]

Three’s a crowd Westboro Baptist Church brings the crazy to Bozeman by Jessica Mayrer

A woman dressed as Chewbacca mingled with clergy members, students, bikers and gay rights activists Monday afternoon on the Montana State University campus in Bozeman, and waited. The early crowd of a few dozen held signs that read, “Sorry I didn’t have time to make a sign, I was too busy having gay sex� and “God hates figs.� As it approached 2:30 p.m., one anxious man

Shirley Phelps-Roper was among the protesters. She wore a turquoise T-shirt with the website “GodHatesFags.Com� printed on the front, and hoisted a sign reading, “Death Penalty 4 Fags.� Her 11year-old son, Luke, held his own sign with the words “Fag sin� and the silhouettes of two men who appeared to be engaging in anal sex.

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Shirley Phelps-Roper of the Westboro Baptist Church sings during a protest in Bozeman. Her husband and son were the only other Westboro protesters in attendance.

asked, “Where are these trolls?� They waited for the arrival of the Westboro Baptist Church. Founded by Fred Phelps in 1955, the small congregation composed almost wholly of Phelps’ family preaches a fire-and-brimstone interpretation of the Bible that far exceeds even the most fundamentalist interpretations. Specifically, Westboro members blame a rash of societal ailments, most notably war, for the country’s increasing acceptance of homosexuality. That belief motivates Westboro to picket the funerals of fallen military veterans while carrying signs that read, “God hates fags.� Chewbacca and the others descended on MSU to greet the church, which was expected to protest the university’s failure to prepare students, as the church says on its website, “for the final day of judgment.� But when the Westboro representatives finally did pull up, the crowd was slow to notice. That’s in part because its delegation included all of three people.

While Luke and Shirley’s husband, Brent Roper, remained silent, the matriarch started to sing along with religious music playing on a portable radio near her feet. Alerted by the singing, a handful of counterprotesters finally trickled across the street to take a closer look. One of them was less than impressed by the church’s lackluster turnout. “You call this a protest?� he asked. At first, only a few people circled the family. The crowd, however, quickly swelled to hundreds. Many yelled at the family, “Go back to Kansas!� One Westboro opponent held up a charcoal drawing of two men embracing. Meanwhile, members of the Patriot Guard Riders, a national biker group that formed specifically to combat Westboro’s protests, revved their motorcycle engines to further drown out the singing. During a brief break from her singing, Phelps-Roper told a reporter that the scene didn’t bother her. To the contrary, it was exactly the response Westboro hoped for.

“Our job is to warn the living,� she said. “This is a doomed nation.� Since 1990, the family has conducted more than 51,000 protests like this, PhelpsRoper said. She’s raised each of her 11 children on the picket line. Luke is the youngest. Phelps-Roper is proud of her family’s power to draw such attention, despite their relatively small numbers. On Monday, an estimated 1,500 people—including those at MSU and at a separate appearance at Bozeman High School—came out to counterprotest Westboro’s presence. “They all came out for three little souls,� Phelps-Roper said before adding, “and God’s word.� While Westboro worked to cause a stir, gay-equality groups including the American Civil Liberties Union and the Montana Human Rights Network held separate rallies in the area. The Human Rights Network’s Jamee Greer says that the allies aimed to foster understanding, rather than hate, with their gatherings. “People were just so upset and so disgusted that Westboro had picked us,� he says. “They felt like they had to do something.� In an effort to alleviate potential conflict and draw attention away from the church, the gay-equality groups arranged for a DJ to play in a separate area of the MSU campus. And when Westboro picketed Bozeman High, LGBT supporters several blocks away handed out 1,500 scoops of free ice cream in Cooper Park. Greer stayed busy shepherding counter-protesters, but he wasn’t too preoccupied to note the tenor of the church’s rhetoric. Even for a seasoned organizer, he found it startling. “I’ve seen some crazy things over the years, and I still felt pretty sick to my stomach when I saw the sign that said, ‘Death Penalty 4 Fags,’� he says. “That, to me, was shocking.� Despite the rhetoric and attention, no violence erupted. And Greer, who’s a Bozeman native, says that the church’s angry messages were so disturbing that it actually galvanized the community, bringing together people who might not otherwise have allied themselves with the gay rights movement. In the end he sees the church’s presence in Bozeman as responsible for fostering another victory on the road to equality. “We really tried to view what happened over the last 36 hours as part of the broader LGBT movement,� he says. “I’m just really proud of my hometown.�

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missoulanews.com • September 12–September 19, 2013 [9]


[opinion]

Contempt of court Judge Baugh’s botched apology signals a call for help by Dan Brooks

On Aug. 28, Montana District Court Judge G. Todd Baugh read a public apology in which he described himself as a “blithering idiot” for remarks he made from the bench while sentencing high school teacher Stacey Dean Rambold. It was the first time in several days that something his honor said was met with widespread agreement. The previous week, Baugh had sentenced Rambold to 30 days for sexually abusing 14-year-old Billings student Cherice Moralez—15 years suspended, 31 days in prison and credit for one day already served. During the sentencing, Baugh suggested that Moralez had been in control of her sexual relationship with the 54-year-old Rambold, remarking that the adolescent girl was “older than her chronological age.” It was an awful thing to say about any 14-year-old, but it was a particularly awful thing to say about Moralez, who killed herself in 2010. Under Montana law, a 14-year-old cannot consent to sex with an adult, and Rambold’s relationship with her constituted statutory rape. Baugh’s “chronological age” claim was not only irrelevant to the law, but also manifestly false in the context of Moralez’s suicide. The psychological agony she suffered as a result of Rambold’s abuse shows that she was absolutely not in control of that relationship, as no child could be. Baugh’s remarks and the sentence that accompanied them prompted an outcry in the national media, and a petition circulated calling for the judge’s resignation. Baugh backtracked quickly, but he botched his apology nearly as badly as he botched Rambold’s sentencing. First, he apologized for what he said but stood by the sentence. Shortly after reporters discovered that he had never signed a written sentencing order, Baugh scheduled a new hearing for Sept. 6, arguing that the first sentence had been “illegal.” That plan would have undermined the appeal that Attorney General Tim Fox filed

[10] Missoula Independent • September 12–September 19, 2013

with the Montana Supreme Court on Sept. 4. In a weirdly perfect perversion of how an apology is supposed to work, Baugh’s attempt to show everyone that he regretted what he did threatened the state’s attempt to actually undo it. The judge went ahead with his planned resentencing anyway, telling reporters that he intended to hold the Friday hearing even if he was the only person present. Less than an hour before the scheduled time, the Mon-

“Baugh’s claim that Moralez was somehow older than her actual age is closer to the mindset of her abuser than to the law.” tana Supreme Court ordered him to stop. That afternoon, Baugh told Billings NBC affiliate KULR that the fiasco could have been avoided “if I’d been more alert or if the state had pointed out to the court the correct mandatory minimum.” Which brings us to where we are now. It seems there are two lessons to be learned here, and I’ll start with the most obvious. First, the honorable G. Todd Baugh has absurdly poor judgment. He showed it when he sentenced Rambold, and he showed it in the days that followed, as he persisted in his bizarre attempts to save face even when they threatened efforts to undo his mistake. That is a man who does not understand what contrition is. I hesitate to think how he applied this warped faculty over three decades as a professional judge.

Second, and perhaps less obviously, this mess underscores the need for statewide training in how judges approach sexual abuse cases. Baugh’s claim that Moralez was somehow older than her actual age is closer to the mindset of her abuser than to the law. It reflects a victim-blaming attitude that is too common in certain pockets of a state that did not establish an age of consent until 1973, when Baugh was in his 30s. For whatever reasons, it has been a bad couple of years for Montana and rape. The Department of Justice continues its investigation into how the Missoula County Attorney’s Office handles sexual assault cases. A related inquiry concluded in May that the police department showed pervasive gender bias in its own responses to complaints. Perhaps these instances only show that the federal government is overstepping its authority, as County Attorney Fred Van Valkenburg has suggested. Perhaps the national press has made too much of Baugh’s stupid mistake. Regardless of why, though, the Montana criminal justice system’s attitude toward sexual assaults has been very publicly out of line with the rest of the nation’s on multiple occasions in the last two years. Why not do something about it? Why not provide standardized training to Montana police, prosecutors and judges, so that men like Baugh cannot claim ignorance of the laws they are trusted to enforce? After 29 years as a district judge, his honor claimed that he did not know the mandatory minimum sentence for statutory rape. He says that prosecutors should have told him. Maybe he’s right. Maybe we should hold a few seminars, or print out a packet or two, so that the state of Montana can do justice even with a blithering idiot on the bench. Dan Brooks writes about politics, culture and lying at combatblog.net. His column appears every other week in the Independent.


[opinion]

True harvest Alaska fishing shows what’s been lost in the Lower 48 by Ben Goldfarb

Summer on Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula is a bad month to schedule meetings. When the sockeye salmon start running, all bets are off. As a native New Yorker who recently arrived in Alaska, I learned this truth the hard way: My emails went unanswered, my calls unreturned. Some days, when a pulse of sockeye in the Kenai River set online fishing forums abuzz, my office sat empty as a fairground in February. Coworkers vanished by unspoken agreement—no “Gone Fishing” placard necessary. Then again, when the sockeye run, Alaskans don’t fish, they harvest. The head of every household can take 25 sockeye by dip net, plus another 10 fish for each family member. My own fishing privileges are still restricted to hook-and-line. But when my friend Brandon headed to the Kenai one July afternoon to net his winter meat, I tagged along to witness the action. The fish counts had spiked that morning, and most of Anchorage, Homer and Seward seemed to have gathered at the Kenai’s mouth. On the beach, a sprawling tent village flapped like prayer flags in the salt breeze gusting off Cook Inlet. A church group distributed hot dogs and bibles; scrums of brown-skinned kids wrestled over footballs; a Chinese family in matching limegreen hats cut fish in a coordinated effort. It all felt familiar: The eclectic crowd resembled a more purposeful version of the hordes at Coney Island. Brandon assembled his dip net, a long aluminum handle culminating in a hula hoop-sized mesh bag, and splashed into the estuary. Up the beach, hundreds of dip netters huddled like wading birds, nets extended into the incoming tide. I couldn’t imagine enough fish to feed the masses, but I needn’t have worried; every few seconds, a dip netter broke from the line and lurched toward the land, a sea-bright sockeye thrashing in the mesh. On shore, a

waiting husband, wife or child clobbered the fish with a club and heaved it into a cooler. Other families had pressed ironing boards into service as makeshift fillet tables. They laid slabs of orange flesh onto ice and tossed heads and guts back into the Kenai, the next tide’s flotsam. The surf turned slimy with offal, and stacked salmon rose like firewood. The scene was ritualistic and spectacular, unlike anything that exists on the East

“The scene was ritualistic and spectacular, unlike anything that exists on the East Coast I left behind” Coast I left behind, where salmon cycles have slipped, perhaps terminally, out of whack. The Connecticut River, in whose valley I lived for years, once supported waves of Atlantic salmon that sustained white and native settlements through New England winters. Two centuries of habitat destruction and over-harvesting eradicated the fish, and $80 million of restoration has failed to bring them back. In 2012, 58 lonely salmon entered the Connecticut. Not all the news from back East spells salmon doom. Last month, the Veazie Dam, a superannuated blockade on Maine’s Penobscot River, was finally demolished, a triumph that could boost runs from 2,000 fish per year to 20,000.

Yet success stories are the exception. Just 137 salmon returned to the damclogged Merrimack River in 2012, no more than when counts began 30 years ago. Scientists counted a meager five fish on Maine’s Kennebec River. And the federal government finally decided to abandon restoration on the Connecticut River after decades of failed attempts. When salmon return in such low numbers that they can’t be eaten, they surrender their corner of the public consciousness. Eventually, empty rivers don’t seem so bad, or so unusual. That gradual forgetting isn’t unique to the East, either; wild runs throughout the Pacific Northwest have been so depressed by dams, irrigation withdrawals and overzealous use of hatcheries that their apparent health is an illusion created by our lack of historical reference points. The Kenai provides an antidote to such inaccurate baselines. The rivers here still brim with salmon, harvest rituals still attend the fish’s return and citizens raise hell when the system goes awry—when Chinook runs mysteriously decline, as they have in recent years, or when projects like the Chuitna coal mine threaten to destroy vital streams. Alaskans understand what their state still has. I’m reminded of what my home has lost. As the sky turned pink, Brandon trudged ashore with one final fish. A nickelsized hole in his waders had soaked him through, and his body jackhammered with the cold, but he had 70 pounds of sockeye to provide ample comfort in winter. A smile moved his blue lips. This was how a river was supposed to behave. Ben Goldfarb is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). He is a freelance writer, former editor of Sage Magazine and proud new Westerner.

missoulanews.com • September 12–September 19, 2013 [11]


[quirks]

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - Instead of pulling over when a police officer caught him running a stop sign in Palm Beach County, Fla., Alexander Webster, 29, led the officer on a high-speed chase. He lost control and crashed into a hedgerow, then fled on foot until the officer drew his pistol and ordered him to stop. Webster’s 6-year-old son was found unhurt in the backseat of the crashed car. Webster said he fled because he didn’t want to be charged with driving with a suspended license. Police checked and found his license was valid. (The Palm Beach Post) Police arrested Ashton Powers, 24, in Tempe, Ariz., for slashing a tire on a police car with an officer in it. “I don’t know what this guy was thinking,” police Sgt. Michael Pooley said. “It’s a fully marked car, the car was running, the officer was inside with the air conditioning on and you could hear the car running. It still didn’t stop him.” Powers admitted slashing the tire but said he didn’t notice anyone inside. (Phoenix’s KNXV-TV)

SONS OF BEACHES - After a bridge collapsed in Uganda’s Nebbi District, cutting off access to a health center, a school and businesses, authorities took five years to rebuild it. Three days after the new bridge opened, it collapsed. Chief Administrative Officer Seraphine Ali blamed sand mining, which cleared all the supporting grass to the bridge while it was being rebuilt. (Uganda’s Daily Monitor) Florida’s beaches are running out of sand. Even worse, communities that have replenished storm-eroded beaches by dredging up offshore sand are discovering that there’s little sand left offshore. As a result, beach communities are competing to find more sand. “You have counties starting wars with each other over sand,” Broward County mayor Kristin Jacobs said. “Everybody feels like these other counties are going to steal their sand.” Broward officials are considering a proposal to grind down recycled glass into substitute beach sand. Another option is trucking sand to beaches from sand mines in central Florida. (The New York Times)

HITTING BELOW ROCK BOTTOM - New York City mayoral hopeful Anthony Weiner reportedly hired a California firm to provide actors to pose as supporters at an August Dominican Day Parade. The actors, recruited by Crowds on Demand, were paid $15 an hour to seem “like either supporters or the people who met him and became supporters as a result of that encounter.” After the Weiner campaign denied using actors, it released a commercial using unpaid interns, including Joel Acevedo, 18, to pose as regular New Yorkers supporting the long-shot candidate. (New York Post) FUTURE FARMERS - Researchers are designing robots that can harvest fresh produce without bruising it by integrating advanced sensors, robotic hardware and GPS technologies. Farmers say the robots are costly, but they ultimately save money, avoid labor shortages and yield a more consistent product. Farm workers counter that using robots results in lost jobs and greater pesticide use. (Associated Press) A Massachusetts enterprise, New Earth Robotics, announced it’s teaming up with Worcester Polytechnic Institute to develop self-powering robots to destroy weeds and harmful pests, rendering herbicides and pesticides obsolete. “The robots’ artificial intelligence will make them able to tell crops from weeds and good bugs from the bad,” the company’s Dean Cook explained, adding that the first step is to raise $65,000 to begin research. (NewEarthRobotics.com)

PROBLEM SOLVED - The way to stop recidivism, according to Maryland’s attorney general, is to give prisoners tablet computers with Internet access. Android tablet, for example, would allow inmates to benefit from e-books, law resources and online learning programs. “It has to work,” Douglas F. Gansler, declared. “It’s common sense that it will work.” Coincidentally, American Prison Data Systems is seeking to sell prison systems tablets that it promises are indestructible and designed so they can’t be used as weapons. CEO Christopher Grewe said tablet and Internet access would cost $500 a year per inmate. (The Washington Times)

COUNTRY IN NEED OF A FIRST AMENDMENT - Indonesian authorities detained Broderick Chin,

photos: Jim Woodill

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a manager at a vegetable oil company in Riau province, after workers who couldn’t find a red-and-white Indonesian flag to fly on Independence Day complained that he told them, “Just use my underpants. I have red underpants, and my wife has white ones.” National police official Agus Rianto said Chin was charged with insulting a state symbol and faces five years in prison. (Malaysia Chronicle)

VIP FOLLIES - Within months of offering visitors to the Denver Zoo exclusive access to pet and feed a rhinoceros for an extra $60, zoo officials had to suspend the program because the rhino bit the finger of a woman who fed it. After the woman was taken to the hospital, Brian Aucone, the zoo’s vice president for animal care, couldn’t explain the black rhino’s action but insisted it “is a gentle animal” that “has been hand fed safely thousands of times.” (Denver’s KMGH-TV) WHAT’S YOUR EMERGENCY? - Authorities in Hooksett, N.H., charged Jeanie Dufresne with misuse of 911 after she made 10 non-emergency calls in one month, including one asking for a pen. Earlier this year, Hooksett resident Elizabeth Niemi was arrested for calling 911 to ask for help ordering Chinese food. Police Chief Peter Bartlett said he hoped that holding Dufresne and Niemi accountable would send a warning that the emergency system is “not for something frivolous.” (Boston’s WBZ-TV)

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Police told citizens of Fairfield, Conn., to stop calling 911 to complain about losing their cable television service after the emergency system was inundated with calls from distressed Cablevision customers. “Misuse of the 911 system may result in arrest,” police posted on the department’s Facebook page. (The Washington Times)

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Japanese authorities charged Teruo Nozaki, 44, a part-time convenience store worker in Tokyo, with making 28,000 emergency phone calls between January 2012 and June 2013. Nozaki would make as many as 1,500 calls a day. When someone answered, he hung up. After he was arrested, he explained he made the calls “because I was irritated by the fact that I was always watched by police.” (Japan Today)

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[12] Missoula Independent • September 12–September 19, 2013

SECOND-AMENDMENT FOLLIES - While demonstrating handgun safety at a class in Lancaster, Ohio, instructor Terry J. Dunlap Sr. fired a .38-caliber bullet that ricocheted off a desk and hit student Michael Piemonte, 26, in the arm. Noting that many students in the class were nurses who helped stabilize him before he was taken to a Columbus hospital, Piemonte said Dunlap didn’t know the gun was loaded. (The Columbus Dispatch)


missoulanews.com • September 12–September 19, 2013 [13]


Small-scale artistry meets big-time obsession when western Montana enthusiasts create their own miniature world by Ednor Therriault • photos by Cathrine L. Walters When you’re playing God, the devil is in the details. It’s been said that the moment a hunter squeezes the trigger and drops his prey, the fun is over. That same watershed moment hits every model railroader when he paints the final letter on a tiny water tower or pokes his last wee pine tree into place on a foam hillside. His layout is complete; there’s nothing left to do but hit the switch and watch his trains go ‘round and ‘round. No matter how many tunnels or trestles are in his layout, it’s all downhill from there. For most model railroad buffs, the kick comes from creating a world over which they have complete control. The allure of this basement omnipotence fuels countless

magazines, hobby shops, websites, online forums and local clubs, all devoted to the “World’s Biggest Hobby.” The National Model Railroad Association lists 78 registered clubs in the U.S., and there are hundreds of independent groups across the country that gather regularly to share their passion for model railroading. The association estimates that there are 300,000 hobbyists in the U.S., and more than half a million worldwide. “I pity a man who doesn’t have a hobby like this one. It’s just the most supreme relaxation. Every person should have one hobby that really captures his interest,” said Rod Stewart in a 2007 cover story for Model Railroader Magazine. Yes, that Rod Stewart. The rooster-

[14] Missoula Independent • September 12–September 19, 2013

haired rocker always arranges to have an extra hotel room when he’s on tour, where he can set up tables and spend his mornings crafting buildings for his massive HO-scale layout. Stewart is among a number of famous folk who spend a lot of their time and cash building model railroads. Tom Brokaw, Neil Young, Mandy Patinkin, Merle Haggard and Tom Hanks are celebrated model railroaders, as were Frank Sinatra, Walt Disney and Joe DiMaggio. As suggested by that list of luminaries, the hobby tends to attract mostly older, male devotees. Baby boomers were at the perfect age in the mid-20th century as the model train craze hit its stride. Millions of little

boys ran down the hallway on Christmas morning to find a model train set—usually a tin-sheathed, O-scale Lionel—whistling and clattering its way around the tree. Nowadays, precision-milled scale locomotives, some costing thousands of dollars, pull trains through intricate layouts that can have the square footage of a racquetball court. By now those baby boomers are cruising past the outer reaches of middle age, and they have the resources to fund larger, more complex layouts loaded with intricate features and fascinating detail. Many of these layouts sport the eye-popping scale buildings and dioramas created by a guitar-slinging mad scientist of miniatures based right here in western Montana.


own train cars and engines, while others dive headlong into creating a complete environment over which they have total control. “Ideally, they’re trying to tell a story,” he says.

stainless steel, butane-fired, live steam locomotive offered by Accucraft goes for $5,000 online. Between state-of-the-art digital controls, professionally constructed panoramas and scenery, electrical wiring and complex carpentry to support the whole thing, it’s possible to pour hundreds of thousands of dollars into a layout. According to Model Railroad publisher Terry Thompson, the model railroading industry is stoked by more than $500 million a year shoveled in by aficionados. But it’s not just a hobby for the well-heeled. Gyles points to a complete entry-level setup, including train, track and power supply selling for just over a hundred bucks. “Every socioeconomic class is involved in model railroading,” he says. So what attracts Gyles to the world of foam mountains, plastic rivers and variable DC power packs?

When Randy Pepprock moved back to Missoula from Los Angeles in 1993, he, like many in this highcost/low-pay town, invented his own job. The job he invented involves creating the pieces and parts for people For any guy who spent his Wonder Years woozy and who want to create their own worlds. In his workshop south of Hamilton, Pepprock de- thick-tongued from Testors glue fumes putting together signs and fabricates hyper-detailed architectural minia- plastic models of airplanes, cars and boats, it’s easy to tures, most of which are sold to model railroad see the appeal of model railroading. Building things is enthusiasts. His company, Downtown Deco, caters to fun. But the reasons people get into model railroading the verisimilitude freaks who want a more grimy, run- are as numerous as the lumps of coal in a tender car. To most laypeople, the stereotype model railroader down look to their train layouts. Of the handful of companies that create this particular style of miniature, conjures the image of the dad sporting a striped engiPepprock says his is probably the oldest and most well- neer’s cap, a pipe clamped between his teeth, who known. He’s even sold a few of his kits to Stewart, ship- would rather be in the basement running his model ping them to the rocker’s Beverly Hills and U.K. trains than making time for his family. The truth is there mansions, or to the hotel where he happens to be staying while on tour. Having recently returned from a convention in Pasadena, Calif., Pepprock had the opportunity to take in the work of fellow miniatures artists from around the world in dozens of layout modules on display. He’s been posting photos from the show on his Facebook page. “My stuff is okay, but there are lots of guys whose stuff is better than mine,” he says. One of those guys Pepprock refers to is George Sellios of Massachussets, who has built the grungy, king-hell Mona Lisa of model railroad towns: the Franklin and South Manchester Railroad. The massive, 23 feet by 42 feet HO-scale layout is legend among model railroaders. Using the touch of a neurosurgeon and the patience of a sniper, Stellios has let no grubby detail escape his sprawling town, from hobos taking a leak in Houligan’s Alley to the pigeons scattered on the roof of the Brownsville Depot. Spend a few minutes online perusing the photos of various scenes in the grimy, Depression-era cityscape, and you’ll feel like showering off the dust. Sellios offers kits made from several individual scenes within the layout at his website, finescaleminiatures.com Like Sellios, Pepprock prefers grime to shine. “I like urban settings with lots of Mike Brown, president of the Missoula Model Railroad Club, works in the group’s headquarters at Fort the Drummond Depot. character and grittiness,” he says. One look at a recent Downtown Deco “All that little detail stuff appeals to me,” he says. “I creation, a prototype of Butte’s historic Metals Bank is no “standard” type of model railroader, because there was a gold and silversmith for 10 years. I’m approaching building, bears him out. The chipped wall plaster, is no standard type of model railroad. First off, there’s the variety of sizes. Hobbyists refer 50 now,” he says as he smiles, “and now I’m the guy weathered bricks and rust-flecked tin covering the stairway evoke the battered character of Butte itself. The O- to “scale” and “gauge,” but these terms are not synony- with all the cool stuff.” As Gyles and his coworker Rich Blacketer patiently scale (1:48) model also features a pair of functional, mous. Scale is the size relative to the actual railroad, and vintage streetlights, a ’40s-era State Police car parked at gauge indicates the distance between the rails of the expound on the arcane world of model railroading, two the curb, and a gun-wielding bank robber fleeing with track. Wikipedia lists more than 50 recognized scales, trains circle nearby on a compact, two-tiered layout set a satchel of cash. Stray bills flutter behind him. There’s but there are eight scales that are commonly used. They on a 4-by-8 platform at eye level. The HO-scale (1:87.1) range from the G-scale (or Garden Scale), which fea- and the smaller N-scale (1:160) circling above it are even a tiny bullet hole lasered into the front window. Why on earth would a seemingly sane, well-ad- tures cars as big as a loaf of French bread, down to the model railroading’s most popular sizes. The two men greet by name every model railroad justed man spend countless hours crafting tiny buildings super tiny T-scale, with diesel locomotives that would and scenery in a painstaking process that sits some- fit into a headphone jack. Available space typically has a buff who drifts into Treasure Chest throughout the afwhere between building a ship in a bottle and etching big influence on the scale chosen by the model rail- ternoon. It’s their hangout, Blacketer says. Steam-androader, but beyond that the only limitations to layout diesel fanatics stand around swapping gossip or talking the Old Testament onto the head of a pin? “I’m like Geppetto, only I’m working with plaster size are imagination and funding (and the wife, noted transition-era layouts and narrow gauge lines, much like a bunch of musicians hang out at the local music store instead of wood. I have to remind myself that this detail one model railroader). “How far can you go? How high is up?” says Joe debating the merits of different guitar amps or kick is what my customers are paying for,” Pepprock says. “People who are into this are either cool and hip artistic Gyles, a self-proclaimed “railroad nerd” who works at drum pedals. All that’s missing is a potbelly stove. Model railroad nuts harbor different ideologies guys or they’re real nerdy like Sheldon Cooper (the neu- Missoula’s Treasure Chest. He notes a local enthusiast rosis-riddled science geek on TV’s ‘Big Bang Theory’).” who built a 30-by-60 building in the Bitterroot Valley to when it comes to building a layout and assembling their Pepprock’s customers occupy a niche within a house his layout, on which he runs hundreds of trains. trains. Some guys are prototypers, Gyles says. They build The costs involved can be staggering. Locomo- replicas of real-life trains to scale, accurate to the tiniest niche inside a sub-genre among model railroaders. Some modelers focus on collecting or building their tives can run to several hundred dollars. A brass and detail. “They count every damn rivet. Gotta be just right.”

And it’s not just the train itself. Some of the more ambitious prototypers (like Stellios) construct an entire layout modeled on an actual railroad line and the town it runs through, faithfully recreating all the topography, man-made structures and natural terrain, down to the last sagebrush. Another approach is to adhere to a particular era, sometimes even to a single day. All vehicles in the layout must be from a certain model year. Clothing painted on the people must reflect the fashion of the times. Architectural details and the lettering on store signs must properly represent the style of that moment in history. The fanatical attention to period accuracy coupled with the proportional demands of sticking to a particular scale seems like it would be enough to feed the monkey of even the most tightly wrapped model train geeks. Then there are those wild-eyed anarchists who freely mix and match the details of their layouts without regard to history, scale or physical accuracy. They’re called freelancers. Anything goes. “If I like it, it’s mine,” says Gyles, reciting the freelancer’s manifesto with a mischievous grin. Obviously, the lack of a rigid set of design criteria can be a powerful lure to the more freewheeling personality who prefers to let his imagination and sense of humor run amok on the rails, giving him total dominion over not only the environment, but its very creation.

At Downtown Deco, Pepprock tempers his ultra-detailed designs with a bit of stylistic fudging to allow their use in a wide range of eras. He’s drawn to the architecture and style of the early 20th century (hence the company’s name), but he wants to make sure his customers are not hemmed into a narrow chronological window. He has created replicas of several actual buildings, though many of his works are an amalgam of different structures. “I try to make things generic enough so they’ll fit in. East Coast, West Coast, any era right up to modMissoula in ern day,” he says. He’s also aware of the space limitations inherent in most layouts. Modelers tend to use the bulk of their space for scenery, track and various features such as bridges, trestles, tunnels and forests. Downtown real estate is even more scarce than in real life. Urban buildings of the Metals Bank style are usually long, tall and narrow. In order to maintain realism but fit more buildings into less space, he uses a technique called “selective compression.” He compares it to buildings in Disneyland, which give the impression of being full-sized with an impressive façade, but with a footprint nowhere near as big as the real thing. Think Haunted Mansion and the iconic Sleeping Beauty castle. Selective compression is one valuable tool in a bag of tricks Pepprock developed during his stint as a scenic artist for the film industry in Hollywood, a short-lived career that was long on adventure. He recalls a gang movie he worked on, filmed in part on location in East Los Angeles, where things got out of hand. “I was an on-set painter. We were painting tombstones for a graveyard scene.” The crew apparently was impinging on gang turf, people got nervous, words were exchanged. “The caterer wound up getting shot in the leg,” he says with a chuckle.

missoulanews.com • September 12–September 19, 2013 [15]


Randy Pepprock’s company, Downtown Deco, caters to the verisimilitude freaks who want a more grimy, run-down look to their train layouts.

Like many creative souls, Pepprock has other talents. During his Hollywood period in the mid-’80s, he played guitar in a few rock bands, rubbing elbows with dozens of big-haired musicians who created the notorious hard rock scene on the Sunset Strip. In Missoula, he pinned a few ears back with the band Shangri-La Speedway in the mid-’90s, and he currently writes, records and jams with hard rockers Letters to Luci. He is also the busy father of two teenage daughters, one of whom just started her first year of college. Still, the miniatures business takes up most of his time. Downtown Deco is a one-horse operation; he does all the tedious scutwork like ordering supplies, accounting, packaging and shipping products. Although he’s not into model railroading, Pepprock can definitely relate to the people who buy his products through his online store at downtowndeco.com. “People spend so much time on it, but it’s just a thing. Like mowing your lawn or fishing or camping or driving a speedboat,” he says. “When you think about Michelangelo, people said he was a nut, but painting the Sistine Chapel was just a thing. It can definitely be an obsession.” It’s not clear if he’s referring to model railroaders, or to himself. “It gives us our humanity. The weird stuff.”

The Missoula Model Railroad Club is headquartered, appropriately, in the Drummond Depot at Fort Missoula. Of the 35 or so members, only a handful are active in the club, reports MMRC president Mike Brown. He’s an O-gauge man, having received a Lionel model train set when he was 6 years old. Longtime Missoula attorney R.H. “Ty” Robinson spearheaded the relocation of the depot from Drummond to the Fort in 1982. The MMRC was able to secure

a long-term lease on the baggage room and meets there monthly. The club also opens it up to the public twice a month for “Run Days.” The dates and times are listed on their website, missoulamodelrail.org. Brown spent a recent afternoon with fellow model railroader Mac Palmer at the depot, showing off the club’s two complete layouts, which are riddled with tunnels and bristling with tiny forests and urban vignettes. Both layouts are modular, so they can be easily disassembled and moved to different locations for display. A third, bi-level layout is being constructed across the entire length of the end wall of the depot. Palmer, spry and wiry at 81, is retired from a long career as a railroad man. He’s the vice president of the

local chapter of the National Railway Historical Society, as well as the MMRC’s liaison to the Fort. “I used to like scratchbuilding cars,” he says. “I used the slats from Venetian blinds because they were so flat.” He still has a few handmade collectibles stashed away in boxes, but says his favorite scale is 12 inches to the foot, which he calls FS-scale. Full Size. Palmer’s love of railroads and their history is as visible as the striped Montana Rail Link conductors cap perched on his head, and it goes way beyond modeling or collecting miniatures. For him, the romance of the rails is what keeps the wheels turning. There are a lot of model railroaders who also collect memorabilia of the real thing, he says, like signal lanterns and tin signs

Joe Gyles and Rich Blacketer work at the Treasure Chest in Missoula, where model railroad fanatics tend to congregate.

[16] Missoula Independent • September 12–September 19, 2013

from particular railroad lines. A student of railroad history and an engineer who’s driven everything from steam engines to electric trolleys, his knowledge of the evolution of rail travel seems to be endless. And he’s more than happy to share some of the tales of his travels. “I learned to speak Spanish in the cab of a steam locomotive in Mexico,” he says. When it comes to locomotives, he’s an old-school steam guy all the way. “Grew up with steam locomotives,” Palmer says. “Diesel locomotive”—he waves a dismissive hand—“you’ve seen one, you’ve seen ’em all.” “Not true!” exclaims Brown, perhaps revealing his own locomotive preference. What he lacks in Palmer’s real railroad experience, Brown makes up for in scale model enthusiasm. “There’s a ton of things you can do with ’em. You don’t have to sit with your wife and listen to her talk about her sister.” Model railroading does have its female enthusiasts, including Brown’s wife Elaine, the MMRC treasurer. But it has always been a heavily male-dominated pursuit. “The female equivalent would be dollhouses,” says Palmer, trying to pinpoint the appeal of building model trains and layouts. “But it’s the same sort of thing— miniaturizing the real world.”

Creating tiny versions of a particular tableau takes patience and an eye for accuracy. And it’s not cheap. Close examination of Pepprock’s architectural miniatures reveals an intensity of detail that simply can’t be achieved by normal mass production, but the manhours involved in carving, building, painting and aging by hand every tiny structure he sells would make them cost-prohibitive to his customers.


Pepprock’s solution is to create molds from his hand-carved originals so he can cast copies out of plaster and sell the buildings to collectors as unpainted kits, complete with step-bystep instructions. “It’s both the saving grace and the biggest pain,â€? he says of the process, which involves using a jeweler’s loupe and an X-Acto knife to precisely sculpt the walls of the structure from sheets of Âźinch plaster. This includes each individual brick and stone, every ornamental flourish on the building. Once he’s finished creating the building’s components, he makes a silicone cast of each wall to use as a mold for Hydrocal, a mixture of plaster of Paris and Portland cement. The Hydrocal, he feels, is the key to the stunning realism of his miniatures. It’s lightweight and strong, with a matte surface that takes paint exceptionally well so the finished models don’t look glossy and toy-like. After the molds are made he tricks out the prototype with aged-look paint, ghost murals, store signs, tiny figures and other details. Then he arranges the buildings in a realistic setting to photograph for listings in his online catalog, model magazines and press releases. Between the fine detail of the model and the careful staging and lighting in various locations, sometimes the recipients of the photos believe they are looking at a life-sized building. “When a model magazine contacts me and says, ‘You can’t send us photos of the real thing, we need a photo of the model,’ that’s the ultimate compliment.â€?

Like Mike Brown of the MMRC, past club president Bill Taylor received his first model train set—a Lionel, of course—as a young boy. He was hooked right away. “There’s something about trains that’s kind of mesmerizing.� Now he loves seeing others being drawn to the hobby. “Sometimes people get into watching actual trains. Then they get their first (model railroad) set, then they work their way into studying the history of it.� Taylor is an avid student of railroad history, and with his wife Jan he’s written five books on the subject. As far as his model railroading goes, creating scenery is his favorite aspect. “The technology is making modeling so it’s very detailed. The computer allows me to do backdrops and things I couldn’t otherwise do,� he says. “Modeling is kind of a way to capture things —Bill Taylor and make them yours. I call it ‘the God Syndrome.’ When you build a model railroad, you are God. It’s all up to you and you create the world.� For Taylor, as with many other model railroad fanatics, the layout is never finished. That’s how they like it. “It’s never done. When it gets done, it’s no longer any fun. Operating the thing isn’t as much fun as creating the thing. I find it incredibly boring to watch a train go around in a circle.� The Missoula Model Railroad Club hosts its annual “Swap/Meet� Sunday, Sept. 15, at Big Sky High School, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. $3. Free for ages 15 and under. More info at missoulamodelrail.org.

“I call it ‘the God

Syndrome.’ When you

build a model railroad, you are God. It’s all up to you and you create the world.�

editor@missoulanews.com

Pepprock works on a miniature building in his shop in Conner. “I have to remind myself that this detail is what my customers are paying for,� he says.

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missoulanews.com • September 12–September 19, 2013 [17]


[arts]

Happy endings? How a former lobbyist decided to tackle a story about a Butte madam by Erika Fredrickson

photo by Tommy Martino

I

t takes a few minutes for Carrie Ann Mallino to open the door to her Missoula house. When she does, she apologizes with a big smile and explains that she’s fighting with her father. Inside the living room, her father, David Mallino, sits in one chair, his wife, Margaret, in another. As it turns out, “fighting” for the Mallinos just means good-natured debate with a heavy dose or ribbing. The family is discussing David’s new play, Ruby, a story about Ruby Garrett, the real life Butte madam and owner of the Dumas Brothel who killed her abusive husband in 1959 and served nine months for it. Carrie, 40, is directing the play, which opens this week at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts. She has a production company called Sunshine Unlimited and a theater background that includes directing several Shakespeare plays and other productions in Hamilton, Stevensville and Missoula. Despite the looming deadline, the Mallinos are still tying up a few loose ends that seem like pretty big ones. “First of all, we have no idea how it’s going to end,” David says. “We have been fighting over the ending since I copyrighted it. [Carrie] didn’t like my ending. My ending fit the historical story, or came close. She didn’t think we should do that. So we went back and forth. I finally gave up and said I’m going to write three endings. So the copy of the play now has three different endings—and I’m not sure she’s going to pick any of the three.” Ruby is David’s first play. At 70, he’s accomplished a lot of things, none of which appear, at first glance, to lead to playwriting. Carrie recalls

that her father took her to see A Midsummer Night’s Dream when she was 10, and introduced her to the theater world. But he spent most of his working life in Washington, D.C., as a journalist for The National Journal, after which he worked for the political magazine’s consulting arm doing public policy and research. He went to Capitol Hill to work for the Department of Labor and then, as he says, he found his “true calling” in 1980 when he became a lobbyist for the steelworkers union. He devoted 30 years to labor rights, during which time he became a partner at a law firm (without a law degree, no less) and got his doctorate at the University of Maryland in government and politics. He’s a person who makes tough work sound easy. Between his sharp one-liners and gruff delivery, he’s a joker. “I always wanted to write a play,” he says. “It’s fiction—though some people claim I’ve been writing fiction my whole life.” David first heard about Ruby when he read her obituary last year. The former madam died at 94, leaving behind a colorful history that captured his imagination. “So I just sat here on my laptop and I just started writing,” he says. “The more I wrote, the more fun it became. And, frankly, I surprised myself, because it didn’t take very long.” Carrie laughs at this. “The first copy didn’t take very long,” she says. “Yes. The first copy,” says David. “We’re now on about the 30th.”

[18] Missoula Independent • September 12–September 19, 2013

David’s knowledge of Butte came through Montana Congressman Pat Williams, a Butte native whom he befriended in D.C. But he also felt a kinship with the city, having grown up in a Pennsylvania steel town where, as in Butte, labor issues were central to the public discussion. He’s fierce about the importance of good lobbying and annoyed that it’s become a dirty word. “There was a bumper sticker floating around Washington, D.C., for a while and it basically said, ‘Don’t tell my mother I’m a lobbyist. She thinks I’m a piano player in a whorehouse,’” he says and laughs. “So, there’s the connection.” David also had Williams take a look at the script during a lunchtime gathering. “I said, ‘You’re from Butte. You were a teenager when this happened. Tell me if I captured the flavor of the town.’” David says that Williams read it silently as the other people at the table talked. “He’s paging through the thing and he wasn’t saying a word. And then he looks up and he says, ‘I want to be a part of this.’ I came back and said, ‘Carrie, we’ve got an issue. Pat says he wants to be a part of it. Is there a part for him?’” “He would make the perfect judge,” Carrie said. Williams was cast as Judge Jack Flynn. (He requested a good Irish name, Carrie says.) Originally, David had written an unruly 26 characters into the play and Carrie managed to pare it down to 22. The play uses live action and shadow puppets to tell Ruby’s story. It’s not overly violent or sexual, but, though it’s at MCT, it’s not a play for children, Carrie

warns. Musicians Grace Decker and Rebekah Cryder perform in the role of brothel ghosts, serving as a kind of Greek chorus. Composer/musician John Sporman created the score. He’s arranged versions of Willie Nelson’s “Red-headed Stranger” and “Cakewalk Into Town,” which was made famous by Taj Mahal. But the other songs are originals. For those, Sporman wrote the instrumentation and David wrote the lyrics. “I had never written lyrics before so I went ahead and tried my hand at that,” David says. “And it didn’t come out too bad.” Carrie won’t allow her father to see the rehearsals because, as it turns out, she has chosen an ending to Ruby, though she won’t say what it is or if it’s one of the endings her father wrote. “There are a couple of surprises in there for him,” she says. “He wanted the play to end with a version of Puck’s epilogue from A Midsummer Night’s Dream. I said, ‘You cannot end every play with Puck’s epilogue.’ And we went back and forth on that. But I created the ending that I think is appropriate. I would like the people of Missoula to enjoy it, but making him proud of his play is my ultimate goal.” Ruby opens at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts Thu., Sept. 12 and runs through Sun., Sept. 15. Shows are at 8 PM nightly Thu. through Sat., with matinees at 2 PM on Sat. and Sun. $15. efredrickson@missoulanews.com


[music]

Chaos theory White Lung rocks with discipline The female voice is better suited to punk rock than the male. Those of us who espouse this scientific truth meet a lot of resistance from various hardcore bros, and so we are glad to have White Lung as evidence. The Vancouver quartet plays aggressive, melodic punk that howls without shrieking, hurtling through tightly structured tracks like a valkyrie on a roller coaster. They’re like Bow Wow Wow ghostwriting for Bad Brains; SleaterKinney with three minutes to catch the bus. They rock, is what I’m saying, and they do it with tight discipline. The longest song on their sophomore LP, Sorry, clocks in at 2:14. White Lung has adopted the early NOFX practice of repeating choruses as little as possible, building

each song to a single, wailing climax and then letting it be done. It’s a pro move, demanding new material and an unwavering confidence in it. You can hear that confidence in Mish Way’s voice, which arches like a tin roof over a tight rhythm section and Kenneth William’s snaky, frantic guitar. That balanced sound allows White Lung to spin wildly without toppling. Their songs are controlled chaos, bursting with energy that only feels designed when it snaps to a stop. (Dan Brooks) White Lung was scheduled to play KBGA’s 17th Birthday Bash but canceled. The bash kicks off at the VFW Sat., Sept. 14, at 9 PM with Serengeti, Jel and DJ Tony Trimm. Garden City Ladies Arm Wrestling also in attendance. $15/$12 advance.

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Magpies/VTO 7” split Every evening, at about the same time, a small motorbike buzzes past my house. It has a powerful little engine, but not like a chest-puffing Harley. This is, oddly enough, what I think about while listening to the Magpies’ new track, “Barn Burner,” just released on a 7” split with VTO. The song is feisty and badass, but the pretty, fuzzed-out chords and vocal melodies undercut any potential aggression. Like most of the Missoula band’s music and lyrics, there’s a mysterious edge and a curious story buried beneath the wave of sound. The Magpies’ music always comes across like a midnight road trip, and this song is no exception— the yellow lines emerging out of darkness and speeding by as you wind your way around another bend. The new video for the song was also just released and it features cool animation created by Cade Donovan,

the 12-year-old son of guitarist Hank Donovan. In the vid, a stick figure plummets from a plane. Rockets fly to the sun and, of course, there’s a burning barn. On the other side of the record, back on earth, VTO’s “Kick Ass Blasters” seems like the perfect tune for late night shenanigans. This is a band that always seems mischievous without being menacing, punk rock without being self-conscious. “Kick Ass Blasters” is literally about tearing a town apart—smashing windows and such. Because, as Charlie Beaton sings, “Hey, hey, it’s Friday night. It’s all right.” VTO started in the mid-1990s, took a decade breather and recently reunited. The band is still having a good time, and this carefree song shows it. (Erika Fredrickson) VTO and the Mag pies play a release party at the VFW Fri., Sept. 13, at 9 PM with Thee Hounds. $2.

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Windhand, Soma Many of us fantasize about existing in an anachronistic world wherein Viking Ulfbrecht swords vanquish thine enemies as buzzsaw electric bass tuned down to Z-flat renders battlefield PA speakers flaccid. While Ulfbrechts are, alas, rare, heavy doom metal bands like Windhand appear to be on the rise. For those not in the know, “doom” is a subgenre of metal that tends toward the atmospheric— think Black Sabbath’s “Into the Void” making babies with shoegazers My Bloody Valentine: sluggish, dark, repetitive and grinding, with stratospheric vocals that soar above the roil of molten earth below. While Soma opens with a fine track in “Orchard,” the second number, “Woodbine” is a con-

tender for a Doomie™ song of the year award (not a real thing, btdubs). For six minutes the band essentially pounds two riffs into your earholes as vocalist Dorthia Cottrell effectively moans and drones over the instrumentation. Cottrell’s lamentations are in stark contrast with the brutal guitars and cascade of crashing cymbals as she sings well within her range rather than shrieking or channeling the Cookie Monster. During the sixth minute of this nine-minute Herculian number, the sky cracks and the darkness of outer space rains down heavy, a fitting finish for today’s end times. (Jason McMackin) Windhand plays the Badlander Mon., Sept. 16, at 9 PM with Shramana and Swamp Ritual. Free. Donations encouraged.

Action Bronson, Saaab Stories I first encountered hip-hop at summer camp in Iowa, where Paul’s Boutique seemed like a handdrawn map of a distant country. It presented Brooklyn as a series of baffling allusions that both evoked and obviously distorted another land. Nearly 25 years later, Action Bronson has done the same for Flushing with Saaab Stories—the extra “a” is for avoiding trademark infringement—magnifying the details until the big picture becomes blearily surreal. The EP is only 25 minutes long, but his majorlabel debut distills the richly developed world Bronson has described in seven releases since 2011. Here are the grindhouse exaggerations, obscure wrestling ref-

erences and disjointed similes—“shorty doing lines like a sketch,” for example, or “my trunk slapping like a tambourine”—that have raised his work beyond rap cliché to the level of ecstatic vision. Fortunately, here also is Harry Fraud. With the exception of the loose intro track, the producer’s beats are uniformly tight and catchy throughout, providing a rhythmic gravity that keeps Bronson’s wheeling images in orbit. Saaab Stories is certainly Action Bronson’s most danceable album and probably his most disciplined. He has always been prolific. This gem suggests that now he is focused, too. (Dan Brooks)

Enter to win on f or at www.mountainline.com. missoulanews.com • September 12–September 19, 2013 [19]


[books] Times Run 9/13/13 - 9/19/13

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umt.edu/profdev Work. Learn. Thrive. [20] Missoula Independent • September 12–September 19, 2013

Sweet Thunder, Ivan Doig’s newest novel about of the book. While Anaconda owned all of Montana’s miners vs. management in 1921 Butte, is true to its major newspapers until 1960 and in reality faced no title. It is sweet. Maybe too much so. It’s an interest- significant rival, it’s fun to imagine a paper like the ing yarn set at a turbulent time in Montana history, Thunder “afflicting the comfortable” when the soulbut it is weakened by thinly drawn characters, the less suits of the Anaconda Mining Company most needed it. age-old plot device of It would also be mistaken identity and fun to imagine a more the author’s seeming tangible figure to perunwillingness to let sonify the company’s the conflict get much worst misdeeds. But beyond a simmer. The except for its someending seems a bit too what two-dimenpat and perfunctory. sional editorialist, the Still, Doig knows company remains his Montana history. mostly faceless. That’s His period detail inthe way soulless suits volving Butte in its are, I guess. Still, a mining heyday is a trip good book needs back in time. If you’ve a good antagonist, ever driven through and Sweet Thunder Butte and wondered doesn’t really have one why it was once numconvincing enough to ber one of the state’s carry the tale. When cities, this will remind the denouement you. They didn’t call it comes, it’s as exthe Richest Hill on pected—and so easy Earth for nothing. The you wonder what all hill is mostly gone and the fuss was about. so are the riches, but Sweet Thunder Anaconda isn’t the colorful and often Ivan Doig Morrie’s only problem, Hardcover, Riverhead grim history remains. 320 pages, $27.95 of course. Even The book’s prothough he’s writing tagonist, Morrie Morunder a pseudonym, gan, is back for a third his new occupation outing. Doig fans first met Morrie in The Whistling Season (2005), when he has slightly too high a profile, one that might jeoparrived from Chicago with a murky past and quickly ardize his efforts to outrun a checkered past. First, the shadowy Chicago mob would still like hijacked the book from its young narrator. He resurfaced in Work Song (2010), finding himself to get its hands on him for his profiting handat odds with the tyrannical Anaconda Copper Mining somely on a fixed fight and, later, a fixed World Series involving the Chicago White Sox. Perhaps Co. Anaconda is again the villain here. But, as a ruth- you’ve heard of it. If that’s not enough, Morrie disless exploiter of men and mineral wealth, the com- covers that he is a dead-ringer for the dangerous pany has plenty of villainy to go around. Morrie still bootlegger known as the Highliner, and he fears carries his brass knuckles, but this time he does battle the complications that are sure to ensue. Finally, with his typewriter and his command of the classics. his new bride, Grace, is largely clueless about his Against his better judgment, he takes a job writing shady past—and she isn’t the sort of woman who editorials for the Butte Thunder, a union newspaper will stick with a liar. These are all interesting enough side stories. But formed to counter the iron rule of Anaconda. In response, the copper giant brings in its own word- in none of them does a real sense of tension or jeopardy ever emerge. slinger from Chicago. Sorry, Ivan. I know: It’s me, not you. For me, it Writing under pseudonyms, the two men trade insults, irony, sarcasm and bombast of the sort you has come down to a matter of trust. With writers like see these days only in blogs. It’s a nice reminder that Joyce Carol Oates or Cormac McCarthy, for example, modern journalism’s mantra of total objectivity was I have learned to trust that the worst can happen and fairly recent, and, as we see now, fairly short-lived. probably will. With this series by Doig, I have learned Hard as it is to imagine a time when local newspapers to trust that everything will always work out fine, no took a stand on anything besides careful study of the matter the complications. It’s a sweet worldview, and maybe even a realistic issues, Doig creates a believable battle of wits between the cynical bully and the idealistic underdog. one most of the time. In Sweet Thunder, it does make I can tell he had a good time writing the excerpts of for pleasant reading. But it doesn’t make for truly memorable fiction. the competing editorials. This war between newspapers, at a time when arts@missoulanews.com newspapers mattered, forms the most interesting part


[books]

High on Hog Montana native’s covert life with the Hmong by Kate Whittle

Somebody ought to write the movie treatment to camps in Thailand and on to the United States. to Gayle L. Morrison’s new book, Hog’s Exit: Jerry Gen. Vang, sentenced to death by the Pathet Lao, fled Daniels, the Hmong, and the CIA. It should start with with his family to a ranch in the Bitterroot Valley. Though Daniels often talked about missing Flata scene in the Missoula airport in May 1982, where more than 150 people, including CIA agents, grizzled head Lake and other Montana landmarks in his letters smokejumpers, Hmong immigrants and a former home to his family, he stayed in Thailand for years after the war as a refugee coordinator. In 1982, State general, sat drinking beer. As Deirdre McNamer, a reporter with the Missou- Department officials cabled the news of Daniels’ death to his friends and lian at the time, recounts family. The official story is in the book, “There were that when Daniels hadn’t these people who showed shown up to work for up who looked like old three days, his swollen, disAsia hands with white figured body was found in linen suits on … a look his apartment, the victim that you don’t often see of carbon monoxide poiwalking down the street in soning from a faulty gas Missoula, Montana.” They water heater. were waiting for an aircraft It seems suspicious bearing the sealed casket that a savvy CIA agent, who of one remarkable man: survived a brutal war and Jerry Daniels, nicknamed was wanted dead by com“Hog.” munist forces, could be unHog’s Exit is an oral done by such an accident. history that tells Daniels’ One of several eyebrowstory through letters, raising details: Some news newspaper articles, Dereports mentioned that a partment of State cables young Thai man was found and quotes from dozens of unconscious in another his family and friends. The room of Daniels’ apartbook has everything you’d ment, but there’s no other want from a gritty politiHog’s Exit: Jerry Daniels, trace explaining who he cal thriller: revelations the Hmong, and the CIA was or how he survived. about the secret war the Gayle L. Morrison Oral histories can be a CIA orchestrated in Laos, paperback, Texas Tech University Press little difficult to follow, and heartening camaraderie, 512 pages, $39.95 I sometimes got lost in glimpses into a foreign Hog’s Exit’s plethora of culture, hard-drinking American boys and a mysterious death to top it off. I military acronyms and unfamiliar geography. I’d also highly recommend Hog’s Exit to people intrigued by recommend knowing a bit about the role the CIA war, U.S. government meddling, or anyone who’s played in Laos during the Vietnam War before delving ever wondered why Missoula is home to a Hmong into the book, and about the Hmong people, an ethnic group from regions of China, Thailand, Laos and community. Daniels, a blue-eyed, dark-haired man, grew up Vietnam. (Hmongmissoula.com is a good place to in Montana and worked as a smokejumper from 1958 start, actually.) But for the most part, Morrison finds the most to 1960. At the age of 19, the CIA recruited him to help with supply drops in Laos, where the U.S. gov- compelling quotes and stories from her subjects, and ernment had committed to fund a fight against invad- keeps the narrative fresh with chapters that alternate ing communist forces, concurrent with the war in with stories from Daniels’ life and of his death and fuVietnam. The CIA liked smokejumpers because, as nerals, which included a Buddhist memorial in one State Department employee says, “Smoke- Bangkok and a three-day traditional Hmong ceremony jumpers were people with special skills that were in Missoula. Testimonies ring with feeling. Xuwicha picked up during a time of crisis and told to keep “Noi” Hiranprueck, a Thai who organized the Buddhist ceremony, says, “I shared years of friendship their mouths shut. They did that superbly.” Daniels, an avid outdoorsman, fit in among the with Hog, and he is a man I am looking forward to Hmong people and their mountainous, rugged seeing in the afterworld.” Other stories in Hog’s Exit are more uplifting. homeland. He served as the CIA liaison and operations officer for Gen. Vang Pao, who led the Hmong Daniels certainly died too young, but it does him a guerrilla army. When it became clear that the war in disservice to dwell too much on his death. His astonsoutheast Asia was unwinnable, the CIA pulled all ishing legacy is that he saved thousands of lives. Gayle L. Morrison reads from Hog’s Exit: Americans out of Laos. The Hmong were left stranded, facing persecution by the new Pathet Lao Jerry Daniels, the Hmong, and the CIA at Shakecommunist government. Daniels was the lone CIA speare and Co. Tue., Sept. 13, at 7 PM. Free. representative who stayed behind and coordinated kwhittle@missoulanews.com flights, helping get more than 2,500 Hmong refugees

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missoulanews.com • September 12–September 19, 2013 [21]


[film]

Behind the music Grohl’s Sound City hits the right note www.theshippingdepot.com

by Chris La Tray

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September 26, 27, 28, 29 Ballet Arts Academy 1620 Rogers, Suite 3, Missoula Classes in flamenco dance, guitar, song, castanets and jaleo/cuadro communication for all levels. Evening events at 7 PM are open to the public. Tickets are $10, $5 for students & seniors. Register now!

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Festival Finale Sept. 29, Stensrud Events Hall, 8 p.m. Tickets $15 single/$25 couple at the door

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Carlos Lomas

[22] Missoula Independent • September 12–September 19, 2013

“Smells like what?”

One of my favorite elements of Dave Grohl’s documentary, Sound City, is how artists in the film—musicians, producers, engineers—attempt to define the indefinable. When a musician says, “I’m just not feeling” the music, what is that abstract sense they’re talking about, exactly? Or, for example, what is it about music recorded with analog technology that makes it sound better? There aren’t any correct answers to these questions, of course. And though it seems like a kind of distraction from the film for Grohl to attempt to pin these answers down, it still doesn’t take away from the film’s excellent achievement. Sound City is Grohl’s love letter to the studio that launched his career. Nirvana recorded its world-dominating second album, Nevermind, at the Van Nuys, Calif., facility and Grohl, the drummer, went on to be one of the music industry’s biggest stars fronting the Foo Fighters. Grohl tells the story of how the studio was founded in 1969 when Tom Skeeter, an entrepreneur looking to break into the “entertainment business,” threw his money behind studio owner Joe Gottfried. Skeeter’s hope was to find success not just as a recording studio but in managing artists. Success came shortly after 1972, when the studio paid $76,000 for a Neve 8028 analog mixing console, one of only four in the world and the only one built to custom specifications. For whatever inexplicable reason, the combination of that board and the rooms that comprised the Sound City facility created a distinct sound—particularly when it comes to drums—that many musicians said could not be matched anywhere. In 1973, Mick Fleetwood was in Los Angeles looking for a studio. Touring Sound City, he heard a track from the first record recorded on the Neve console. When Fleetwood Mac’s guitarist, Bob Welch, left the band, Fleetwood sought out the guitarist he’d heard on that track, Lindsey Buckingham, to fill the slot. Buckingham agreed, provided they also take on his “girlfriend,” Stevie Nicks. The new lineup recorded the self-titled Fleetwood Mac album at Sound City, and the LP reached No. 1 on U.S. charts and sold over five million copies. The studio had its first hit. The arc of the documentary follows the rise of the studio in the wake of its success with Fleetwood Mac, its fall in the 1980s as CDs and digital recording technology

arrived on the scene, then its rise again with the success of Nirvana. Grohl does a fantastic job of tracking down bands who recorded there, as well as former employees, to talk about the “magic” of Sound City. The final act—and I won’t describe it here, because for some it could be something of a spoiler—is maybe the weakest. But even this section of the film offers gems that provide a window into the world of how artists work. That is the real strength of this film—the intimate look at a process that may seem like sorcery to the average music fan. There are the more recent clips of Grohl, Trent Reznor and Queens of the Stone Age frontman Josh Homme building a song together in studio. And there’s actual footage of Rage Against the Machine recording its landmark first album live in the main room. As a guy who has made music with friends for many, many hours in recording studios, the film hits me where my heart is when it comes to the creative process and how music should be recorded. Forget digital cutting and pasting. Forget perfect performances. I want bands live in a room, making music together, playing the songs as a unit to capture living, breathing, human performances. Other musicians and music geeks of similar values—those graybeards and kids digging through vinyl bins at record stores—will no doubt agree. The film is also a personal trip down memory lane, as the list of recordings at Sound City in the ’70s and ’80s essentially builds a playlist of my formative years. Post-Nirvana, records recorded there by other bands including Tool, Slipknot and Red Hot Chili Peppers equally inspired (for better or worse) an entirely different legion of musicians and fans. I haven’t been a fan of Grohl’s music since the end of Nirvana, but I do respect how he’s used his considerable influence in the industry. Sound City is nothing short of a gift to all of us who love music, particularly those of us who remember it as something other than an arena to make cash-generating stars out of brightfaced teenagers. I will be watching this film for years. Sound City screens at the Top Hat for the Big Sky Documentary Film Series Mon., Sept. 16, at 8 PM. Free. arts@missoulanews.com.


[film] RIDDICK Revenge will be served colder than the vacuum of space in this latest installment of the Riddick series. Starring Vin Diesel, Karl Urban and Katee Sackhoff. Rated R. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex.

OPENING THIS WEEK AUSTENLAND A Pride and Prejudice-obsessed single woman visits a Jane Austen theme park; maybe, just maybe, she’ll find her own unlikely Mr. Darcy. Starring Keri Russell, Jennifer Coolidge and Bret McKenzie. Rated PG-13. Wilma.

THIS IS THE END “Drug and penis humor” earned This Is The End its rating, which is probably all some of you need to know. James Franco, Jonah Hill and Seth Rogen star in this comedy about the end of the world. Rated R. Village 6.

DR. STRANGELOVE Politicians and generals must stop a nuclear holocaust started by a crazy general in this Kubrick classic. PG. Starring Peter Sellers, George C. Scott and Sterling Hayden. Showing at the Roxy Theatre Thu., Sept. 12 at 7 PM.

WE’RE THE MILLERS A drug dealer asks oddballs to pretend to be his family to avoid suspicion while moving a large amount of weed over the U.S/Canada border. Dude, strippers look like normal women when they put pants on! Lolz! Starring Jennifer Aniston, Jason Sudeikis and Emma Roberts. Rated R. Carmike 12, Village 6, Showboat, Pharaohplex.

THE FAMILY Robert De Niro and Michelle Pfeiffer star as a mafia couple that’s not so great at staying on the DL under the witness protection program. Also starring Dianna Agron. Rated R. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex. INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2 The Lambert family must uncover what evil presence is terrorizing them and possibly inhabiting their kiddo. Starring Patrick Wilson, Rose Byrne and Barbara Hershey. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex, Village 6. A TEACHER A Texas school teacher sees her life unraveling during her sexual relationship with a student. Not rated. Starring Lindsay Burdge, Will Brittain and Jennifer Prediger. Showing at the Roxy Theatre Sept. 16–19 at 7 and 9 PM.

NOW PLAYING 2 GUNS Don’t you love discovering the things you have in common with buddies, like, say, being undercover agents? I suspect there won’t be many BFF necklaces, though, when a DEA agent and a naval intelligence officer form a shaky alliance after trying to sneak into a drug cartel. Starring Denzel Washington, Mark Wahlberg and Paula Patton. Rated R. Carmike 12, Entertainer. BLUE JASMINE Woody Allen brings us this tale of a narcissistic socialite, played by Cate Blanchett, who undergoes a nervous breakdown and transformation after her life hits rock bottom. Also starring Alec Baldwin and Sally Hawkins. Rated PG-13. Wilma. CUTIE AND THE BOXER New Yorker Ushio Shinohara, the Boxing Painter, and his wife, illustrator Noriko, have been married for 40 years. Find out how they keep their marriage—and art—vibrant. Rated R. Showing at the Roxy Sept. 13-16 at 7:15 and 9:15 PM.

Gone with the wind. Austenland opens this week at the Wilma

DESPICABLE ME 2 The somewhat inept but well-meaning Gru is put to work for the Anti-Villain league to fight a new super criminal in the follow-up to the 2010 family friendly animated comedy. Starring the voices of Steve Carell, Kristen Wiig and Miranda Cosgrove. Rated PG. Carmike 12. ELYSIUM It’s the year 2154, and rich people live on a space station while the poors live down on the ruined earth. It’s up to Jason Bourne, er, Matt Damon I mean, to bridge the two worlds. Also starring Jodie Foster and Sharlto Copley. Rated R. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex. LEE DANIELS’ THE BUTLER See notable American events of the 20th century from an interesting perspective: an AfricanAmerican White House butler. Starring Forest Whitaker, Lenny Kravitz and Oprah Winfrey. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex. MONSTERS UNIVERSITY This prequel to 2001’s Monsters, Inc., visits Sulley and Mike during their college days. I bet they threw some beastly frat parties. Starring the voices of Billy Crystal, John Goodman and Steve Buscemi. Rated G. Village 6. ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US IN 3D Super Size Me director Morgan Spurlock focuses his lense on another guilty pleasure for many Americans: heartthrob band One Direction. Footage includes “gratuitous naked torsos,” according to one reviewer. Starring Liam Payne, Harry Styles and Zayn Malik. Rated PG. Carmike 12. PACIFIC RIM Guillermo del Toro directs this flick that is as thoughtful and character-driven as an action film

involving giant robotic suits and invading lizards can be, no doubt. Starring Charlie Hunnam (AKA the dude from “Sons of Anarchy”), plus Idris Elba and Rinko Kikuchi. Rated PG-13. Entertainer. PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS In this sequel to 2010’s Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief, good ol’ Percy and crew must find the Golden Fleece and, presumably, throw it into Mordor to prevent evil from taking over the world. Starring Logan Lerman, Alexandra Daddario and Brandon T. Jackson. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Village 6, Showboat, Pharaohplex. PLANES The makers of Cars bring you Planes, in which Dusty, a plucky cropduster, longs to compete in a famous race, but is afraid of heights. Wah-wah. We look forward to the inevitable sequels; Boats, Trains, Amish Buggies and Rickshaws. Starring the voices of Dane Cook, Stacy Keach and Brad Garrett. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex. R.I.P.D. After a cop dies, afterlife authorities assign him to a team of undead police officers, the Rest in Peace Department. Ghostly police antics ensue! Starring Ryan Reynolds, Jeff Bridges and Kevin Bacon. Rated PG-13. Pharaohplex.

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YOU’RE NEXT A family’s annual reunion gets a whole lot more interesting when, wouldn’t you know, a gang of gosh-darned ax murderers invades their secluded getaway. Starring Sharni Vinson, Nicholas Tucci and AJ Bowen. Rated R. Showboat. Capsule reviews by Kate Whittle. Planning your outing to the cinema? Visit missoulanews.com’s arts section to find upto-date movie times for theaters in the area. You can also contact theaters to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 and Village 6 at 541-7469; Wilma at 728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603

RED 2 Bruce Willis is a retired black-ops CIA agent and must reunite his oddball team of operatives to prevent nuclear detonation. But forget Bruce, Helen Mirren shows up to kick ass, and that’s what really matters. Also starring John Malkovich, Mary-Louise Parker and Catherine Zeta-Zones. Rated PG-13. Showboat.

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THE WORLD’S END Five buddies on an epic pub crawl have no idea they’re about to join a really epic battle for humanity’s survival. It’s brought to you by the Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz dudes, so British witticisms and smashed pint glasses abound. Starring Simon Pegg, Nick Frost and Martin Freeman. Rated R. Village 6.

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missoulanews.com • September 12–September 19, 2013 [23]


[dish]

SUSHI TUESDAYS 5pm to close • Reservations accepted.

Veggie options, too!

Superbug situation by Ari LeVaux

SATURDAYS 4PM-9PM

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[24] Missoula Independent • September 12–September 19, 2013

For decades, livestock producers have used low doses of antibiotics to expedite animal growth. The practice, dubbed sub-therapeutic antibiotic therapy, or STAT, lowers feed costs while increasing meat production, and nearly 80 percent of the antibiotics used in the United States are for this purpose. Because STAT can encourage the growth of antibiotic-resistant “superbugs,” it’s banned in many countries, but remains common in the U.S.—despite recent public pleas to stop it by two former Food and Drug Administration commissioners. Although STAT has been in use since the 1950s, how it works has long been a mystery. But evidence is mounting that it might be due to antibiotics killing microorganisms that populate animals’ guts. If so, antibiotics could do the same thing to humans. In support of this idea, a paper published last month in Nature identifies a correlation between diversity of gut microflora and human obesity. A nineyear study, led by S. Dusko Ehrlich of France’s National Institute for Agricultural Research, compared microbiotas—the 100-trillion-member microbial ecosystems that populate the body—of slim and obese people. The team found obese people have lower microbial diversity in their bellies. This is consistent with earlier research in mice, as well as a paper published last year in Journal of Obesity that found a strong correlation between young children’s exposure to antibiotics and later obesity. Perhaps more significantly, the team behind the Nature study found a correlation between low microbial diversity and heart disease, diabetes and cancer, regardless of weight. “Even lean people who are poor in bacterial species have a higher risk of developing these pathologies,” Ehrlich told NPR. Our understanding of human microbiota is in its infancy, but the possible implications of such research are profound. Could our frequent use of antibiotics, both to treat human sickness and to encourage animal growth, deliver unintended consequences to our health? There are strict limits on the amount of antibiotic residues allowed in commercial meat, and according to the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service, violations of these limits are extremely rare. But this could be interpreted in two ways: Maybe there isn’t much antibiotic residue in meat, or maybe the legal thresholds are set too high. Research published last year in the journal of the American Society for Microbiology found that legal amounts of antibiotic residues in cured meats can still be high enough to kill bacteria that sausage manufacturers intentionally apply to their products. Sausage is treated with lactic acid-producing microbes to make it more acidic, which kills dangerous microbes like salmonella and E. coli. The researchers found that

FLASH IN THE PAN

while legal levels of antibiotic residues in meat don’t kill the pathogenic microbes, they can kill the acidifying microbes intended to keep the “bad” bugs at bay. The growing recognition of the importance of gut flora has spawned an industry valued at $8.7 billion, according to Carl Zimmer at National Geographic’s Phenomena blog. Currently, the retail products of that industry are regulated as food and cosmetics, not as medicine. Zimmer notes: “It’s possible that the bottle of probiotics you buy in the drug store really will help your digestion, or your immune system, or your bad breath. But it’s also possible that the bacteria you’re buying will get annihilated in the ruthless jungle that is your body. A lot of species you’ll find in probiotic products do not actually belong to the dominant groups of species in the human microbiome. Stop eating them, and they’ll disappear from your body.” That said, the Nature study did identify eight species of bacteria generally missing from underpopulated guts, and there is talk of putting those in a probiotic. But until such a product is available, there are other promising approaches to managing your microflora. Another article by Ehrlich’s team, in the same issue of Nature, reports putting overweight people on low-calorie diets quickly increased their gut diversity. Together, the two studies suggest eating less could help enrich your gut flora, which could help you stay lean, in turn reducing your risk of associated diseases. Another option is to consume microbe-rich fermented foods. In a recent New York Times article about the human microbiota, Michael Pollan wrote that several researchers he’d spoken to had added fermented foods like yogurt, kimchi and sauerkraut to their diets, as well as having cut back on processed foods. And finally, no discussion of microbiota enrichment would be complete without mention of the fecal transplant, a medical procedure wherein fecal matter from a person with healthy microbiota is used as a suppository to seed the intestinal flora of a sick person. Fecal transplants are proving incredibly effective at treating some diseases. Some researchers are now contemplating probiotics made from the patients’ own feces, collected earlier in their lives, before whatever health problem may have emerged, and stored cryogenically until needed. Transplanting one’s own feces makes sense, given how distinct each person’s microbiota is. And it’s slightly less icky, arguably. If you wish to freeze your own microbiota sample, we recommend labeling that package really well. But a more preventative approach would be to avoid unnecessary antibiotics, and antibiotic-laced meats.


[dish] Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway • 728-8900 (across from courthouse) Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 Welcome Back Students!! Happy Fall!! Fall is Bernice’s time of year. The smell of fresh baked goods waft around the Hip Strip as Bernice’s prepares to serve a rockin’ cup of joe, danishes, cookies, croissants, muffins, and a whole lot more. The crisp Missoula air is the perfect complement to a slice of apple pie in the afternoon or a warm Tipus Chai around 6pm. Fall BBQ’s are topped off with Bernice's Parkerhouse Rolls, Curried Chicken Salad and an 8” Chocolate Chocolate cake for dessert. Stop by the UC, COT and Book Exchange to see what goodies Bernice’s is showcasing this school year. A spinach croissant just before class is a great wake-me-up! xoxo bernice. $-$$ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Mon.–Fri., 7:30–4, Sat. 84. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. $ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$ Brooks & Browns Inside Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. • 532-2056 This week at Brooks and Browns... THURSDAY is Trivia Night (7:30-10 pm). FRIDAY 8/30: Britchy Duo 6-9 pm. SUNDAY: Sunday Funday (Happy Hour all day). Martini MONDAY ($4 select martinis). TUESDAY (Burger + any draught beer $8). Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 41 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 • ciaomambo.com The vibrant energy at Ciao Mambo is fantastically accompanied by steaming hot pizzas, delicious assortments of pastas and of course authentic Italian wine. We focus on making sure that whether it be date night, family night, or business dinners we accommodate whatever the need! And do not forget there are always leftovers! Open 5 to close every day, come make us your go to dinner destination! $-$$ Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks • 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am-2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm Sun-Wed and 11am-10pm Thurs-Sat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$

$…Under $5

Dickey’s Barbecue Pit 143 W. Broadway Downtown Missoula • 203.1557 Taste why Dickey’s Barbecue is the world’s best barbecue since 1941! Try our 8 juicy hot pit smoked meats, like our southern pulled pork or our family recipe polish sausage. We even offer 11 home-style sides, like our creamy cole slaw and fried okra. Don’t forget we’re also your catering experts! Any event, any size – let Dickey’s do the cooking, and you can take the credit. Graduation parties, weddings, office functions, you name it! Dickey’s Barbecue is the perfect catering choice for groups of all sizes – from 10 to 10,000! Don’t forget-Kids Eat Free Sundays & everyone enjoys FREE ice cream every day! Dickey’s Barbecue. Seriously, Pit Smoked. Open 7 days a week. Offering a full liquor bar. $-$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$ El Cazador 101 S. Higgins Ave. • 728-3657 Missoula Independent readers’ choice for Best Mexican Restaurant. Come taste Alfredo's original recipes for authentic Mexican food where we cook with love. From seafood to carne asada, enjoy dinner or stop by for our daily lunch specials. We are a locally owned Mexican family restaurant, and we want to make your visit with us one to remember. Open daily for lunch and dinner. $-$$ The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. • 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and gluten-free options. NOW SERVING BREAKFAST Empanadas! Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. 10am-6pm Mon-Thurs/10am-7pm Fri+Sat. Downtown Missoula. $ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. M-TH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am-4pm, Sat 8am-4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West • 541-FOOD The GFS Deli features made-to-order sandwiches, a rotating selection of six soups, an award-winning salad bar, an olive & antipasto bar and a self-serve hot bar offering a variety of housemade breakfast, lunch and dinner entrées. A seasonally changing selection of deli salads and rotisserie-roasted chickens are also available. Locally-roasted coffee/espresso drinks and an extensive smoothie menu complement bakery goodies from the GFS ovens and from Missoula’s favorite bakeries. Indoor and patio seating. Open every day, 7am – 10pm. $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St • 549-7723 www.grizzlyliquor.com Voted Missoula's Best Liquor Store! Largest selection of spirits in the Northwest, including all Montana micro-distilleries. Your headquarters for unique spirits and wines! Free customer parking. Open Monday-Saturday 97:30 www.grizzlyliquor.com. $-$$$

SEPTEMBER

COFFEE SPECIAL

Butterfly House Blend $10.95/lb.

BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

BUTTERFLY 232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We’re the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we’ll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Iza 529 S. Higgins • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Contemporary Asian cuisine featuring local, vegan, gluten free and organic options as well as wild

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over

missoulanews.com • September 12–September 19, 2013 [25]


[dish]

Silvertip Casino HAPPIEST HOUR Ambiance: Mirrored walls make the already spacious bar and restaurant seem even larger. Patrons take breaks from their conversations to keep tabs on the baseball and football games playing on bigscreen televisions on the wall. Not far from the bar is a casino area, where mostly white-haired locals try their luck at Keno and video poker machines.

photo by Jessica Mayrer

Who you’re drinking with: Among the people at the gaming machines and those enjoying lunch in the Silvertip Restaurant is 84year-old Gene Shuler. He’s sipping a brandy and soda at the bar. “I’m an educated drinker,” says Shuler, who attributes his ongoing virility to his beverage of choice while flexing his biceps. “I’m feeling pretty gosh-darned good.” The Silvertip is a 24-hour, seven-day-a-week establishment and, as such, draws a smattering of college students on the weekends. But the casino’s typical clientele, at least during our visits, more often looks like Shuler. What you’re eating: Tasty American cuisine, but you probably already knew that from the restaurant’s ad campaign featuring “The Silvertip

Food Guy,” who strikes a suspicious resemblance to a certain celebrity chef. The Silvertip serves pork chops, steak, prawns and chicken. It also offers a full breakfast menu featuring eggs Benedict, corned beef hash and “the Big Boy,” which is chickenfried steak served with gravy, hash browns and toast for $7.95. Keep an eye out for lunch and dinner specials.

What you’re doing: In addition to playing a host of gaming machines, you’re scrutinizing your opponents during nightly live poker games. What you’re drinking: The Silvertip offers screaming Happy Hour specials. Weekday afternoons between 4 and 6, well drinks run $1.50, domestic drafts are $1.75 and microbrews set you back just $2.50. How to find it: 680 SW Higgins Ave., at the corner of Bancroft. —Jessica Mayrer Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

caught seafood, Idaho trout and buffalo. Join us for lunch and dinner. Happy Hour 3-6 weekdays with specials on food and drink. Extensive sake, wine and tea menu. Closed Sundays. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm, Dinner 5pm-close. Sat: Dinner 5pm-close. $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Jimmy John’s 420 N. Higgins • 542-1100 jimmyjohns.com Jimmy John’s - America’s Favorite Sandwich Delivery Guys! Unlike any other sub shop, Jimmy John’s is all about the freshest ingredients and fastest service. Freaky Fast, Freaky Good - that’s Jimmy John’s. Order online, call for delivery or visit us on Higgins. $-$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West • 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. • 543-7154 (on the hip strip) Did you know that the Missoula Senior Center serves delicious hearty lunches every week day for only $6? Anyone is welcome to join us for a delicious meal from 11:3012:30 Monday- Friday for delicious food, great conversation and take some time to find a treasured item or garment in our thrift shop. For a full menu and other activities, visit our website at www.missoulaseniorcenter.org. The Mustard Seed Asian Cafe Southgate Mall • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian fusion cuisine. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combine the best of Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences. Full menu available at the bar. Award winning desserts made fresh daily , local and regional micro brews, fine wines & signature cocktails. Vegetarian and Gluten free menu available. Takeout & delivery. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Pearl Cafe 231 East Front St. 541-0231 • pearlcafe.us Country French meets the Northwest. Idaho Trout with Dungeness Crab, Rabbit with Wild Mushroom Ragout, Snake River Farms Beef, Fresh Seafood Specials Daily. House Made Charcuterie, Sourdough Bread & Delectable Desserts. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$

Roxiberry Gourmet Frozen Yogurt Southgate Mall Across from Noodle Express 317.1814 • roxiberry.com Bringing Missoula gourmet, frozen yogurt, using the finest ingredients (no frozen mixes), to satisfy your intense cravings with our intense flavors. Our home-made blends offer healthy, nutritional profiles. We also offer smoothies, fresh-made waffle cones, and select baked goods (gluten-free choices available). Join Club Roxi for special offers. See us in-store or visit our website for information. $-$$ Silvertip Casino 680 SW Higgins • 728-5643 The Silvertip Casino is Missoula’s premiere casino offering 20 Video gaming machines, best live poker in Missoula, full beverage liquor, 11 flat screen tv’s and great food at great prices. Breakfast Specials starting at $2.99 (7-11am) For a complete menu, go to www.silvertipcasino.com. Open 24/7. $-$$ Sis’s Kitchen 531-5034 • sisskitchen.com Wheat, Gluten & Allergen Free Foods. Frozen & Dry Mix Products. Sis’s Kitchen plays a part in Best of Missoula “Best Pizza” Winner’s for 2008-2012. Find our products at: The Good Food Store • Biga Pizza • Bridge Pizza • Pizza Cafe in Ronan (12”crust). $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI We have quick and delicious lunch specials 6 days a week starting at $7, and are open for dinner 7 nights a week. Try our comfort food items like Pork Katsu and Chicken Teriyaki. We also offer party platters to go and catering for all culinary styles. Lunch 11:30-3 Mon-Sat. Dinner 5-9:30 Every Night. Corner of Pine and Higgins. Very Family Friendly. 549-7979. $-$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins • 327-8929 Stop in when you’re in the neighborhood. We’ll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula’s best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 11-10 Sun 12-9. $-$$ Taco John’s 623 W Broadway 2600 S Reserve West-Mex® is about fresh taste and BOLD flavors. Taco John’s recipes make you smile and yell “OLÉ”. We combine hearty helpings of seasoned meats, crispy Potato Olés®, and flavorful cheeses with fresh-made Mexican specialties like burritos, tacos, and quesadillas. All topped off with bold sauces, spices and salsas. You’ll find West-Mex® cooking makes for an unbeatably satisfying meal. See you soon ... Amigo :) $-$$ Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you’ll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$

Philly West 134 W. Broadway • 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday - Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. $-$$

Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. • 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$

Plonk 322 N Higgins • 926-1791 www.plonkwine.com Plonk is an excursion into the world of fine wine, food, cocktails, service and atmosphere. With an environment designed to engage the senses, the downtown establishment blends quality and creativity in an all-encompassing dining experience. Described as an urban hot spot dropped into the heart of the Missoula Valley and lifestyle, Plonk embodies metropolitan personalities driven by Montana passions.

Walking Moustache 206 W. Main St. 549-3800 www.walkingmoustache.com Our aim is to offer excellent food with five star service. Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner, Daily Specials + 2 am Special. Restaurant Hours: 24/6. Tues–Sun 6:00am–11:00pm. Closed Mondays. Winebar Hours: Tues–Sun 11:00am–11:00pm. Closed Mondays.

Romaines 3075 N. Reserve Suite N 406-214-2659 www.romainessalads.com We provide you with the convenience of delicious salads, sandwiches and soups. Our salads include over 30 whole-

$…Under $5

[26] Missoula Independent • September 12–September 19, 2013

some ingredients. Our homemade soups change with the season as different ingredients become available. If hearty sandwiches are your favorite, then visit Romaines for one of our braised meat sandwiches. We also have a Montana Hummus sandwich made from Montana grown garbanzo beans. At last, local, fresh, and healthy! $-$$

Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over


September 12–September 19, 2013

THURSDAYSEPT12 Rock into the night when .38 Special brings its Southern rock to the Adams Center on the UM Campus at 7:30 PM. $25 plus fees, available at GrizTix locations, 1888-MONTANA or umt.edu/griztix. Release some stress during t’ai chi classes every Thursday at 10 AM at The Open Way Center, 702 Brooks St. $10 drop-in class. Visit openway.org. Get on your bikes and ride, gals, to win prizes during Missoula Biking Betties’ push to encourage more women to commute sustainably during Bike Walk Bus Week. Visit Missoula Biking Betties on Facebook to learn how to receive prizes for commuting. The Missoula Parkinson’s Disease Support Group meets the second Thursday of each month at the Montana First Credit Union, 3708 N. Reserve St. Call Cindy Cone at 728-8283 or Ann Houston at 543-8939 for more info. Free. Celebrate 10 years of the UM Farm to College program today on the UM Oval, with an anniversary celebration dinner from 4:30-7 PM. $10.25/$8.75 for kids 6-12/$3 for ages 2-5. UM students can use their meal plans, too.

nightlife

photo courtesy of Howard Petrella

That’s Captain Hammerpants to you, sir. Portland’s own eclectic MarchFourth Marching Band plays the Top Hat Sat., Sept. 14. 10 PM. $16/$14 in advance at Rockin Rudy's, the Top Hat or tophatlounge.com.

End your afternoon with a fine glass of grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 830-3296 and visit missoulawinery.com.

missoulanews.com • September 12–September 19, 2013 [27]


[calendar] Montana Conservation Voters and others host a fundraiser for Bryan von Lossberg’s run for Missoula City Council Ward 1 seat at the Stensrud, 314 N. First St. W. 5:30-8 PM. Get a taste of la dolce vita and a li’l vino when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5– 9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 5498703. Visit tenspoon.com. The Thursday Night Mountain Bike Group meets on Sundays for underwater basketweaving. Kidding, kidding, they meet on Thursdays at 6 PM to ride trails in the Missoula area. Check thursdaynightmtbr.org to find out locations. Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free. Win $50 by using your giant egg to answer trivia questions at Brains on Broadway Trivia Night at the Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway Ave. 8 PM, plus specials on wings, pizza, domestic pitchers and $7 Harvest Moon pitchers. Big Gigantic ain’t no small deal when the duo plays their genreblending provocative, danceable sound at the Wilma tonight, along with Ill-Esha. Doors at 7 PM. $22/$20.50 in advance plus fees at Rockin Rudy’s, 866-468-7624 or knittingfactory.com. Get the down-low on how exporting Montana coal affects us and Chinese folks during From Otter Creek to Asia: The Coal Hard Truth about Coal Export from a Concerned Chinese Citizen. Beijing resident Lifeng Fang will give a talk on how to reduce coal use. North Underground Lecture Hall. 7 PM. Tell ‘em you’re a big fan of Mastodon when Doug Peacock reads from In the Shadow of the Sabertooth: A Renegade Naturalist Considers Global Warming, the First Americans and the Terrible Beasts of the Pleistocene. Shakespeare and Co, 103 S. Third St. W. 7 PM. Mark the 20th annual Unity World Day of Prayer with an

[28] Missoula Independent • September 12–September 19, 2013

interfaith service at the Unity Church of Missoula, 546 South Ave. W. This year’s theme is “Living Well: Nurturing Mind, Body and Spirit.” 7 PM. The eco-minded folks at Upcycled host a Kickstarter fundraiser party for their line of wallets made out of recycled material. Crystal Theater, 7 PM. No cover and free beer; at-will donations requested. You don’t have to be a time lord or a doctor to check out the Missoula Time Bank, in which members exchange skills and services instead of money. Orientations are at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center on the second and fourth Thursdays of the month. Enter through the alley door. 7 PM. Learn more at missoulatimebank.org. Barnaby Wild just might cut loose at the Top Hat dinner show, playing from 7-9 PM. Free. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM. Find out how Madam Ruby got away with murdering her husband in Ruby, a play by David Mallino and featuring music by John Sporman, plus a special guest appearance from a certain former U.S. representative. MCT Center for the Performing Arts. 8 PM nightly, plus 2 PM matinee on Saturday. $10-$15. Tickets at 728PLAY or mctinc.org. (See Theater.) Show ‘em that pop culture knowledge is just as important as having a job during Trivial Beersuit at the Lucky Strike Casino. Prizes for podium finishers. Karaoke follows. 1515 Dearborn. 8–10 PM. During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, local talented folks may titillate your eardrums. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up. Fight for your right to belt out tunes at the Dark Horse’s Combat Karaoke, hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free. Crash your car into a bridge, I don’t care when carousing to hip

tunes and underground tracks at Dead Hipster Dance Party. 9 PM. Badlander. $1 well dranks til’ midnight, lifelong memories for free. Hone your performance skills at the Broadway Inn’s open mic night, with Big Sky Pool Party in the Cabana starting at 5 PM, singing and prizes at 9 PM. Includes $3 Big Sky beer special. 1609 W. Broadway St. Free to attend. In honor of KBGA’s birthday and month-long residency, the cool college radio cats host a showing of excellent Sylvester Stallone film, Over the Top, at the VFW, 245 W. Main St. 9 PM. This must be the place to spend your Thursday night. The Top Hat presents Naïve Melodies, a Talking Heads tribute band, plus 80s party and costume contest for men and women. Top prize wins a $75 bar tab. $6. Take a chill pill, brocephus, with Aaron Williams of In Walks Bud at Stage 112’s Acoustic Nights. 10 PM. Free, 21-plus.

FRIDAYSEPT13 Don’t be afraid to get a li’l saucy when Kimberlee Carlson Jazz Trio, with Ron Meissner and Pete Hand, play Higherground Brewing, 518 N. First St. in Hamilton. 6-8 PM. No cover. Get a hit of cardiovascular exercise during Nia: The Joy of Movement, from 9 AM to 10 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $12/$10 members. Call 541-7240. Get some produce in your sights and head to the Target Range Farmers Market, Sundays in the east parking lot of Target Range School. 10 AM. Get on your bikes and ride, gals, to win prizes during Missoula Biking Betties’ push to encourage more women to commute sustainably during Bike Walk Bus Week. Visit Missoula Biking Betties on Facebook to learn how to receive prizes for commuting. The YWCA Secret Seconds thrift store, now newly gussied-up with 5,800 square feet of extra space, celebrates the occasion with a grand reopening shopping event with food,


[calendar] music and chances to win prizes. Proceeds go toward the YWCA’s mission of helping victims of domestic violence and campaigning against racism. 1136 W. Broadway St. 10 AM-6 PM. Installation provocateurs Edward Kienholz and Nancy Reddin Kienholz present The Jesus Corner at the Missoula Art Museum, showing from now until Jan. 2014. The Women’s Circle Group Acupuncture at Mountain Sage Acupuncture Clinic, 725 W. Alder St. Ste. 1, focuses on women’s health issues and sounds comfy and nice. 2–5 PM, last appointment at 4 PM. Sliding scale treatments $20-40 with a first time administration fee of $10. Call (503) 593-7073. Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor receives an honorary doctorate today in a ceremony at the Dennison Theatre. 3 PM. Free. Doug Peacock reads from In the Shadow of the Sabertooth: A Renegade Naturalist Considers Global Warming, the First Americans and the Terrible Beasts of the Pleistocene, at Shakespeare and Co., Thu., Sept. 12, at 7 PM.

Teens go toward the literary light during the Missoula Public Library’s Teen Writers Group,

which meets every Fri. at 3:30 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

nightlife End your afternoon with a fine glass of grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 830-3296 and visit missoulawinery.com. Get a taste of la dolce vita and a li’l vino when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5– 9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 5498703. Visit tenspoon.com. Oil and vinegar. Chocolate and peanut butter. Apples and oranges. See how different artists and concepts can blend at Disparateness, by Heather Swartz and Kari Goin, opening at the ZACC’s Second Friday. Viewers are invited to become the artists, move the pieces and take Polaroids to document the process. 235 N. First St. W. 5:30-8:30 PM.

missoulanews.com • September 12–September 19, 2013 [29]


[calendar]

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Totally tubular performance. Kate Morris presents her one-woman play, Fake Yr Death in 6 (Lonesome) Steps, at the ZACC basement, 235 N. First St. W., Sat., Sept. 14. 7:30 PM. $2-$10 sliding fee.

Missoula Patriots host a meeting with speaker Derek Skees and his talk, “Restore the Constitution, restore America. How can we do this?” Missoula County Courthouse gazebo, 200 W. Broadway. 6 PM. Leon Young plays piano and takes requests at the Top Hat’s Family Friendly Friday, starting at 6 PM. Free, all ages. Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s weekly meeting to talk about past glories and upcoming activities at Bigfork’s Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free. Don’t yell out your ex-girlfriend’s name during Hump Day Bingo with Bob at the

[30] Missoula Independent • September 12–September 19, 2013

Lucky Strike Casino. Prizes for winners. Beware: $5 mini-fishbowls served all day. Bingo starts at 6:30 PM. Enjoy zee cinema at Missoula Public Library’s World Wide Cinema night, the second Friday of every month. The series showcases indie and foreign films. Doors open at 6:45, show at 7 PM. Check missoulapublibrary.org for info. Free. Make sure your first time is special by attending First Timer Friday at the Freestone Climbing Center, 935 Toole Ave. in Missoula, at 7 PM. Free if it’s your first visit. Climb that rocky top when Blue Mountain Music plays the

Keep, 102 Ben Hogan Drive, from 7-10 PM. No cover. Find out how Madam Ruby got away with murdering her husband in Ruby, a play by David Mallino and featuring music by John Sporman, plus a special guest appearance from a certain former U.S. representative. MCT Center for the Performing Arts. 8 PM nightly, plus 2 PM matinee on Saturday. $10-$15. Tickets at 728PLAY or mctinc.org. Soak it up and sing it down to some 67,000 tunes when The Outpost Restaurant & Saloon, 38500 W. Hwy. 12 at Lolo Hot Springs, presents karaoke with KJ Mark, starting at 9 PM. Free. Call 273-4733.


[calendar] Sing a happy tune at the Evaro Bar’s Friday night karaoke and you just might win a prize. Starts at 9 PM, free to sing. 17025 US Highway 93 North.

Pour some sugar on me when Needlecraft, Skin Flowers, Pancakes and Jacob Milstein play a local-tastic show at Stage 112, 112 Pattee St. 9 PM. Free.

Get funky with friends when Zoopa Groupa plays the Badlander, starting at 9 PM. Free.

John “Poncho” Dobson hosts open mic at Fergie’s Pub every Fri., where you’re bound to mingle with a mix of resort celebs, odd locals and dizzy soakers. You never know who’ll show up and play. It could be you. Starts at 3 PM. 213 Main Street in Hot Springs. Sign up ahead at 406721-2416 or just show up.

Gurl, you betta werk during the ISCSM drag show tonight, with DJ Tyger Lily and more. 9 PM. 18plus. Cover TBA. Escape the urban grind when Run From the City and guests play Sean Kelly’s. 9 PM. No cover. That rugged hottie ships out for a 10-day hitch on trail crew tomorrow, so best make your move quick whilst Tom Catmull and the Clerics play the Union Club. 9 PM. No cover. VTO, the Magpies and The Hounds are ready to put some rock into your lobster this evening at the VFW, with a show to celebrate the release of their killer new 7-inch. VFW, 245 W. Main St. 9 PM. $2.

Get busy when the Idle Ranch Hands play the Sunrise Saloon. 9:30 PM. No cover. Maybe you’ll get lucky on this Friday the 13th when Voodoo Horseshoes plays the Dark Horse, 1805 Regent Ave., starting at 9:30 PM. Free. Get psyched, man, when Miller Creek plays the funky rock ‘n’ roll with a light show at the Top Hat. 10 PM. Free.

elevation gain, plus single-track through forest and jeep roads leading to the summit. Visit bigskyresort.com/events.

Missoula’s own ferocious feline indie rockers, Catamount, promise they are “hungry and meaner than ever” and ready to rule the roost, along with Adam Schulte, at a show at Feruqui’s, 318 N. Higgins Ave. 10 PM. Free. 21-plus.

Find out whether “no pain, no gain” is bunk with Community Medical Center and TITLE Boxing Club’s injury and exercise event. Physical therapists will be available to discuss proper exercising and injuries, plus the club offers free Power Hour classes at 8 and 10 AM. 1200 W. Kent Ave. 7:30 AM. Learn more about the club at missoula.titleboxingclub.com.

SATURDAYSEPT14 If you’re wondering what the collages in the Paxson Gallery are all about, find out from the artist’s mouth when Henry Freedman presents a gallery tour of his Imagining New Worlds in the PARTV building. Noon. Limited to 28 people, so RSVP by calling 243-2019.

More events online: missoulanews.com You’ll be bright eyed and bushy tailed after Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which start at 8 AM every Saturday at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. Grab breakfast with other participants afterward. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org.

All right, you gluttons for punishment, here’s a gnarly one: the first-ever Big Sky Resort Ultramarathon, known as The Rut. There’s a 50k and 12K course, each of which traverses the expansive beauty of Lone Peak. The 50K — “not for the faint of heart” — includes 8,200 feet of

Feel free to lope, gallop, skip, hop, jump or stroll during Teen

Smooch

Cosmetic Boutique

bareMinerals

philosophy, DuWop theBalm, RGB, Lola, and more... 406.541.1600

125 East Main Street Downtown Missoula

508 Evan Kelly, Missoula • $399,900 Rattlesnake neighborhood features quiet street, park-like lots, and amazing views of Mt. Jumbo. Landscaped yard is partially fenced w/ garden beds and UG sprinklers. 2 two-car garages both with attached mudrooms and accessible to inside of home. Main floor has 3 beds and 2 baths. Basement has large family area and is plumbed for wet bar, 2 additional bonus rooms, bathroom w/ shower, storage rooms and a craft/hobby room. Sellers are offering 13-month Home Warranty upon closing.

Lara Dorman Realtor GRI (406) 531-5582 •

laradorman@aol.com

missoulanews.com • September 12–September 19, 2013 [31]


[calendar]

Blonds on the right. .38 Special plays the Adams Center Thu., Sept. 12 at 7:30 PM. $25 plus fees, available at GrizTix locations, 1-888-MONTANA or umt.edu/griztix.

Challenge Pacific Northwest’s annual 5K Run/Walk for Freedom, beginning at the center headquarters, 3815 S. Seventh St. W. Check-in at 8 AM, race at 9, with prizes and games to follow. $25/$20 in advance at eventbrite.com. Proceeds benefit Montana Women’s Outreach. Get a hit of cardiovascular exercise during Nia: The Joy of Movement, from 9 AM to 10 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $12/$10 members. Call 541-7240. You’ll be rewarded with the fruits of your labors at the Huckleberry 100 departing from Kalispell, a breathtaking and buttbusting 100-mile course through the Flathead Valley. Register for a short family ride, 25-,50- or 100miler, if you dare. Learn more at huckleberry100.com. Veg out with your carrot out during the Hamilton Farmers Market, where folks can purchase all sorts of dee-lish local goodies from area farmers. Third and Bedford Streets. 9 AM to 12:30 PM. The Soul Writing Workshop with Valerie Harms offers “tools for making decisions that bring you the most meaning

[32] Missoula Independent • September 12–September 19, 2013

and joy” at the Learning Center at Red Willow. 9 AM-5 PM. $90. Register and learn more by calling 721-0033 or visiting redwillowlearning.org.

commute sustainably during Bike Walk Bus Week. Visit Missoula Biking Betties on Facebook to learn how to receive prizes for commuting.

Get musical while finding your flow when Brian Baty leads a live music Vinyasa yoga class, which features music by Nathan Zavalney, this and every Sat. from 9:30–10:45 AM at Inner Harmony Yoga, 214 E. Main St. Ste. B. $10 drop-in/$8 students dropin, with various prices for punchcard holders. Call 581-4093 or visit yogainmissoula.com.

Get a grand view of Helena and the mountains beyond at the 38 th Annual Mount Helena Run, a 5.6-mile course starting from Last Chance Gulch downtown, heading up the summit of Mount Helena. Visit vigilanterunning.org.

Quiet your monkey mind at A Day of Buddhist Practice: One Day Meditation Retreat, sponsored by Big Sky Mind and the Tibetan Language Institute. 102 McLeod. 9:30 AM-5 PM, with break for potluck lunch between 12:30 and 2. $25-$50 suggested donation, free for students. Learn more by calling 961-5131. Get some produce in your sights and head to the Target Range Farmers Market, Sundays in the east parking lot of Target Range School. 10 AM. Get on your bikes and ride, gals, to win prizes during Missoula Biking Betties’ push to encourage more women to

One does not earn a four-year degree after running the Diploma Dash, but proceeds do go toward scholarships to help folks make it through school. This 5K fun run/walk and one-mile walk starts at the Van Buren Street Footbridge at 10 AM. $25/$20 for UM students. Check out umt.edu/staffsenate. Let your child foster her inner Toni Morrison or Joyce Carol Oates during The Place Where You Live creative writing workshops aimed at ages 8-12, taught by Missoula Writing Collaborative’s Micah Fields and Rachel Mindell. Fort Missoula, Officer’s Row, No. 28, second floor. 10 AM-2 PM on Saturdays through Sept. 28. Kids are welcome to come to as many classes as they like. Free.


[calendar] Your bedtime tales of collegeage debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like storytelling, finger plays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM on Sat. and 2 PM on Sun. at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Double your pleasure, double your fun with a signing from Darrell Berkheimer, author of Abuses in Trucking and Stories from the Golden Throne, and Warner Bair, author of The Manse and Kismet. Fact and Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. 11 AM12:30 pm. The dogs really can have their day at the Humane Society of Northwestern Montana’s Dog-

gie Dayz at Kalispell’s Depot Park. Show off your pooch’s mettle with dog tricks, dog/owner lookalike, ugliest/cutest and best costume contests. 11 AM-2 PM. Free to spectate, $2 to compete. Proceeds benefit the Humane Society.

Tickets on sale at the museum; learn more at brvhsmuseum.org.

Celebrate Missoula’s cycling culture with the wheelin’, dealin’ folks of Free Cycles at the 16th annual Festival of Cycles, with art, games, vehicle demos, music, food, races and more. McCormick Park, noon-4 PM. Free.

Do your part in keeping the Bitterroot River pristine by helping with a river clean-up today. Call 375-2272 or email heather@brwaterforum.org to get assigned a stretch of river, then pick up a bag at locations including the Hamilton Farmer’s Market and River Otter Fly Shop. Bring the trash you pick up to Angler’s Roost, 815 Hwy 93 at 3 PM for a barbecue, live music and prizes in the “Best Of” Trash Awards. Free.

Let your cayuse graze while you sit a spell at the Afternoon of Cowboy Music and Poetry at Ravalli County Museum, 205 Bedford St., in Hamilton. 2-5 PM.

Once bitten, no-longer-shy rock ‘n rollsters Great White are in town, along with Slaughter, to play Ogren Park at Allegiance Field. 4 PM. $20, tickets available

at MSO HUB, Grizzly Harley Davidson or the Osprey site, milb.com/index.jsp?sid=t518. Celebrate 15 years of local artists getting their hands dirty at the Clay Studio’s anniversary celebration, with music from Abe Coley, refreshments, facility tours and more. 1106 Hawthorne St., Unit A. 4-9 PM. Free, all ages.

nightlife End your afternoon with a fine glass of grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 830-3296 and visit missoulawinery.com. Get a taste of la dolce vita and a li’l vino when Ten Spoon Vine-

Beach babes. Legendary hair rockers Great White, along with Slaughter, play Ogren Park at Allegiance Field Sat., Sept. 14. Gates at 4 PM. $20, tickets available at MSO HUB, Grizzly Harley Davidson or the Osprey site at milb.com.

missoulanews.com • September 12–September 19, 2013 [33]


[calendar]

political pioneer

Left to right: Sandra Day O’Connor, Sonia Sotomayor, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Elena Kagan.

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[34] Missoula Independent • September 12–September 19, 2013

established that employers can’t retaliate against employees who report discrimination. And though she agreed with limiting abortion access, she wouldn’t overturn Roe v. Wade, writing this elegant plurality opinion in 1992: “At the heart of liberty is the right to define one’s own concept of existence, of meaning, of the universe, and of the mystery of human life. Beliefs about these matters could not define the attributes of personhood were they formed under compulsion of the State.” O’Connor will receive an honorary doctorate of laws at the Dennison Theatre, but hopefully, besides the pomp and circumstance, she’ll also impart a few words of wisdom like she did at Boise State last week. According to an Idaho Statesman arWHO: U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor ticle, she’s currently crusading against American ignorance, saying, “Less than WHERE: Dennison Theatre one-third of eighth-graders can identify the historical purpose of the Declaration of InWHEN: Fri., Sept. 13, at 3 PM dependence, and it’s right there in the HOW MUCH: Free name.” She’s advocating for icivics.org, a site aimed at teaching schoolchildren about Supreme Court justice, she still got a barrage of mi- American government in a more fun, accessible way, sogyny after her appointment. One of the 60,000 let- with games like “People’s Pie,” where the player sets ters she received in her first year said, “Back to your up their own federal budget. I’m a little embarrassed kitchen and home female! This is a job for a man and to say it has plenty to teach college graduates, too. We’ve come a long way from the 1950s, but O’Cononly he can make the rough decisions.” In court, she had a reputation for being conser- nor would be the first to say that we still have a long vative, but wasn’t as easy to peg when it came down way to go. —Kate Whittle to her votes. She was the deciding vote, for instance, in Jackson v. Birmingham Board of Education, which Pay attention, history buffs: A real-life pioneer will be in Missoula when retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor is honored at a ceremony this Friday. In case you need some background: In 1981, O’Connor became the first woman appointed to the Supreme Court; we can thank Ronald Reagan for that. She’d climbed to that achievement by battling sexism for years; when she graduated from Stanford Law School in 1952, the only job offers she received were secretary positions. She persevered, starting a career in law and running for political office, raising three kids along the way. While women’s equality had made great strides by the time O’Connor became a


[calendar] yard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5– 9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 5498703. Visit tenspoon.com. Load up on antioxidants when the Kimberlee Carlson Jazz Trio, with Ron Meissner and Pete Hand, play Ten Spoon Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 6 PM. No cover. It’ll be a beery good time when Russ and Sam Nasset play Blacksmith Brewing in Stevensville, starting at 6 PM. Free. It’s back y’all, so get to steppin’ at the Bitterroot Contra Dance which takes place at the Church of the Nazarene Gym, Victor (Fifth Ave and A Street). Leave the cologne and hairspray at home, hombres. Lessons at 6:30 PM, dance 7–9:30 PM. $5/$10 per family. Call 642-3601. You’ll be feeling spry when the Starlighter’s Swing Band plays the Missoula Senior Center from 79:30 PM. Free. The Coke’s in the icebox, popcorn’s on the table, and you and your baby can dance the night away at the Weekly Country Dances at the Hamilton Eagles Lodge, 125 N. Second St., with the Bitterroot Dancers and appearances from live bands like Northern Lights and the Revelators. $7. Back by popular demand, Kate Morris presents her one-woman performance, Fake Yr Death in 6 (Lonesome) Steps, at the ZACC basement, 235 N. First St. W. 7:30 PM. $2-$10 sliding fee. Find out how Madam Ruby got away with murdering her husband in Ruby, a play by David Mallino and featuring music by John Sporman, plus a special guest appearance from a certain former U.S. representative. MCT Center for the Performing Arts. 8 PM nightly, plus 2 PM matinee on Saturday. $10-$15. Tickets at 728-PLAY or mctinc.org. Pam Shortt’s broken both her legs and I wanna dance with you when Buenos Aires tango dancers Daniela Roig and Hernan Prieto present a grand milonga (i.e. social dance) with beginner’s class and performance at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., starting at 8 PM.

$12/$8 for students. Learn more at tangomissoula.com/danielahernan. Soak it up and sing it down to some 67,000 tunes when The Outpost Restaurant & Saloon, 38500 W. Hwy. 12 at Lolo Hot Springs, presents karaoke with KJ Mark, starting at 9 PM. Free. Call 273-4733. Absolutely DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are like ShabbaDoo and Boogaloo Shrimp, saving rec centers one beat at at time. Get hip to their jamz, hippies. Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2-for1 Absolut drinks until midnight. $2. Celebrate everyone’s favorite Missoula college radio station tonight by gettin’ real trashy at the 2013 KBGA Birthday Bash, with Chicago’s Serengeti and Jel, plus DJ Tony Trimm and Garden City Ladies’ Arm Wrestling. 9 PM. $15/$12 in advance at Ear Candy, or $11/$8 in advance for ages 1820, plus $4 surcharge at the door. Hey, Maverick, now’s your time to shine at the Top Gun Party, hosted by B. Ross and with music by DJ LROCK and the Tallest DJ in America, plus prizes, drink specials, flight attendant dancers and more. It all takes off at Monk’s Bar starting around 9 PM. $5.

hood Ice Cream Social, with live music, Monte appearances and informational tables on the 400 block of University Avenue from 3 to 5 PM. Free. Join Five Valleys Audubon on a half-day jaunt throughout Missoula’s west end to see some neat chirpers today. Meet at the UM Adams Center parking lot for 8 AM departure. Learn more by calling Terry at 214-1194. They say you don’t have to run faster than a bear, you just have to run faster than the guy next to you. Test this theory during the Two Bear Marathon and Half Marathon in Whitefish. 7:30 AM. Check out twobearmarathon.org. Catch new thoughts with the Science of Mind Community during a Sunday service via the internet when Rev. Kathianne Lewis spreads a spiritual message at the Carriage House in Hamilton, 310 N. Fourth St., at 10 AM every Sun. Free. Call Barb at 375-9996. Get some produce in your sights and head to the Target Range Farmers Market, Sundays

in the east parking lot of Target Range School. 10 AM. Get on your bikes and ride, gals, to win prizes during Missoula Biking Betties’ push to encourage more women to commute sustainably during Bike Walk Bus Week. Visit Missoula Biking Betties on Facebook to learn how to receive prizes for commuting. Take a chill pill and ride a pony during the Carousel Sunday Market, every Sunday from 10 AM to 2 PM. Produce, psychic readings, live food, music, kids’ activities and, yes, pony rides, are all going down. Scoot your caboose on over to Big Sky High School today for the Missoula Model Railroad Club’s annual Swap/Meet, with all kindsa crazy, trainy fun. 10 AM-4 PM. $3/free for ages 15 and under. Learn more at missoulamodelrail.org. Sport your cheesehead with pride when the Top Hat hosts a Green Bay party and shows the Packers vs. Redskins game. Brats, sauerkraut, deep-fried cheese curds and more will be available.

Go on a sensual groove journey when Regmachine’s Band In Motion, “Blues and Beyond,” plays the Union Club, starting at 9:30 PM. No cover. Crack a whip and join the circus when Portland’s eclectic gypsy-inspired ensemble MarchFourth Marching Band plays the Top Hat. 10 PM. $16/$14 in advance at Rockin Rudy’s, the Top Hat or tophatlounge.com.

SUNDAYSEPT15 Cellist Joshua Roman performs “Bringing It: Presenting Classical Music in the 21st Century” with the String Orchestra of the Rockies at the UM Musical Recital Hall. 7 PM. $23/$20 for seniors/$10 for students and children, available at grixtix.com. Community members and college kids can bond over sweetened frozen dairy products at the University Neighbor-

missoulanews.com • September 12–September 19, 2013 [35]


[calendar] Game starts at 11 AM. Free, all ages. Your bedtime tales of collegeage debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like storytelling, finger plays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM on Sat. and 2 PM on Sun. at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Kick out the jams down the ‘Root at the dining room of the Sapphire Lutheran Homes, corner of 10th and River streets. Players of all levels are invited to bring their guitars, mandolins, harmonicas, fiddles, banjos, dobros, or other acoustic instrument. Music includes old-time country, bluegrass, swing, cowboy, folk, old standards, etc. Folks who want to play or just listen are encouraged to come. For more information, call John at 381-2483. Free. Envision whirled peas at the annual Jeannette Rankin Center Peace Party at Caras Park, with Rockin Peace Ranch cowboy theme, Homegrown Organics dinner, raffles and auctions, plus bluegrassy tunes by the Shenanigans. 4:30-8 PM. $24/$40 for two/$50 per family/$20 for living lightly folks. Tickets available by calling 543-3955 or at the Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave.

nightlife End your afternoon with a fine glass of grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 830-3296 and visit missoulawinery.com. Explore the idea of open intelligence and the peace, happiness and skillfulness that exists within you during the Balanced View open meeting, which runs every Sun. from 6-7 PM in the meeting room of the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free, but donations accepted. Enter from the back entrance. Visit greatfreedom.org for more info. Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Starts at 8 PM with Front Street Jazz. Free. Find out how Madam Ruby got away with murdering her

[36] Missoula Independent • September 12–September 19, 2013

husband in Ruby, a play by David Mallino and featuring music by John Sporman, plus a special guest appearance from a certain former U.S. representative. MCT Center for the Performing Arts. 8 PM nightly, plus 2 PM matinee on Saturday. $10-$15. Tickets at 728PLAY or mctinc.org. Bellow out your favorite pop tune so you can impress your friends and perhaps win a prize during a karaoke contest this and every Sun. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. $3 Fireball specials. Call 721-1798. Hey, Maverick, now’s your time to shine at the Top Gun Party, hosted by B. Ross and with music by DJ LROCK and the Tallest DJ in America, plus prizes, drink specials, flight attendant dancers and more. It all takes off at Monk’s Bar starting around 9 PM. $5. Detroit’s own crazed punk weirdos, Human Eye (including Timmy Vulgar from Timmy’s Organism), play the VFW, along with Needlecraft, Bad Naked and Boys. 245 W. Main St. 9 PM. $5/$7 for ages 18-20.

MONDAYSEPT16 Sept. 16 is more than just Stay Away From Seattle Day (fact), it’s also Constitution Day. UM hosts distinguished historian Melvin Urofsky and his talk, “Dissent and the Constitutional Dialogue.” North Urey Underground Lecture Hall. 7:30 PM. Free. You’ll be seeing stars at Bingo on Broadway, with cash prizes, $3 Sam Adams pints and food specials. Broadway Inn, 1609 W. Broadway St. 8 PM. $6 buy-in. Get on your bikes and ride, gals, to win prizes during Missoula Biking Betties’ push to encourage more women to commute sustainably during Bike Walk Bus Week. Visit Missoula Biking Betties on Facebook to learn how to receive prizes for commuting. Come on down for Moscow Monday at the Montgomery Distillery, 129 W. Front St., where the distillery redistributes the wealth. (It ain’t called Wall Street Wednesday, amiright?) $1 from every drink sold is donated to a different

non-profit each Monday. Family friendly, from noon–8 PM. Those looking for mother-tomother breast feeding support can find it when the La Leche League meets every first Mon. of the month at 10 AM and every third Monday of the month at 6 PM at the First Presbyterian Church, 201 S. Fifth St. W. Free. Children and babies are always welcome.

nightlife Show how big your gray matter can get at Super Trivia Freakout. Win a bar tab, shots and other mystery prizes during the five rounds of trivia at the Badlander. 8:30 PM. Free. The UM Climate Action Now Meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM FLAT, 633 Fifth St. E. 6:30 PM. Bingo at the VFW: the easiest way to make rent since keno. 245 W. Main. 6:45 PM. $12 buy-in. Find out how the Garden City grows at the weekly Missoula City Council meeting, where you can no doubt expect ranting public commenters, PowerPoint presentations and subtle wit from Mayor Engen. Missoula council chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Meetings are the first four Mondays of every month at 7 PM, except for holidays. Glimpse behind the curtain at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts’ annual open house and volunteer party, with food, fun and prizes, plus opportunities to get involved. 7 PM. Free, all ages. Learn more by calling Matt at 728-1911. Make Earl Scruggs proud and head on down to Bennett’s Music Studio, for a new series of beginner banjo lessons Mondays at 7 PM. Some rentals available. $60 for six weeks. Learn more bennettsmusicstudio.com and call 721-0190. The Acousticals, with Richie Reinholdt, Chad Fadely, Andy Dunnigan and Quinton King, play Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. 7-10 PM. Free. Get mindful at Be Here Now, a mindfulness meditation group that meets Mondays from 7:30 to 8:45 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St.


[calendar] Open to all religions and levels of practice. Free, but donations appreciated. Visit openway.org. The Top Hat hosts a Monday Movie Night showing of Sound City, the Dave Grohl-directed doc about the studio that recorded legends like Tom Petty, Fleetwood Mac, Nirvana and more. 8 PM. Free, all ages. Open Mic at the VFW, 245 W. Main, seems like a fine idea, especially with 2-for-1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. 10 PM. Free. Rock the mic when DJ Super Steve rocks the karaoke with the hottest Kamikaze tuneage this side of the hemisphere at the Dark Horse. Are you brave enough to let the computer pick your songs? 9 PM. Free. Get some metal on your Monday when Richmond, VA’s doomy Windhand plays the Badlander, along with Shramana and Swamp Ritual. 10 PM. Free, donations encouraged.

TUESDAYSEPT17 Ambassador Kathleen Stephens, the first American woman ambassador to Korea, presents “U.S. Public Diplomacy and Leadership in East Asia” at the Dell Brown Room in Turner Hall. 7:30-9 PM. Free. Light refreshments will be available. Dance cuz everybody’s watching at the American Cabaret Style bellydance class at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. This class is great for beginners and experienced dancers alike. 6– 7 PM. Visit madronadance.wordpress.com. Get on your bikes and ride, gals, to win prizes during Missoula Biking Betties’ push to encourage more women to commute sustainably during Bike Walk Bus Week. Visit Missoula Biking Betties on Facebook to learn how to receive prizes for commuting.

Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room for Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters, at 5205 Grant Creek Dr., and work on your elkcamp locution with the best. All are invited. Noon–1 PM. Free. Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. Third St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1–3 PM. For information, call 543-3955. Missoula Aging Services offers its Caregiver Support Group every third Tue. of the month at 337 Stephens Ave from 4–5 PM. Free.

nightlife It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Boys Bluegrass from 5:30 to 8 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. Meet other free-wheeling gals when Montana Dirt Girls meet

every Tuesday around 6 PM for hiking or mountain biking in the Missoula area. For locations and more information, visit mtdirtgirls.tripod.com. Free. Burn the barn and chug that jug when Grandma’s Little Darlings bring their old-timey country/bluegrass sound to Montgomery Distillery, starting at 6 PM. Free. Dust off that banjolin and join in the Top Hat’s picking circle, from 6 to 8 PM. All ages. Find your creative voice at Turning the Wheel’s Tapestry class, which is a self-expressionfilled improvisational movement bonanza. Headwaters Dance Company studio, 1042 Monroe St. 6:30-8 PM. $10. Join any time; register first at lulu.steinberg@turningthewheel.org. Community Conversations on ADD/ADHD with James Fix intends to provide folks with tools, tips and strategies to make your home life less chaotic, all without

Eye see you! Detroit punks Human Eye (including Timmy Vulgar from Timmy’s Organism), play the VFW, along with Needlecraft, Bad Naked and Boys, Sun., Sept. 15. 245 W. Main St. 9 PM. $5/$7 for ages 18-20.

missoulanews.com • September 12–September 19, 2013 [37]


[calendar]

How much for that painting in the window? Edward Kienholz and Nancy Reddin Kienholz present The Jesus Corner, an installation, at the Missoula Art Museum, showing from now until Jan. 2014.

pharmaceuticals. Missoula Public Library. 7 PM. Free. The Unity Dance and Drum African Dance Class is sure to teach you some moves you didn’t learn in junior high when it meets Tuesday from 7 to 8:30 PM at the Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins Ave. All ages and skill levels welcome. $10, $35 for four classes. Email tarn.ream@umontana.edu or call 5497933 for more information.

percentage of the world’s freight cargo is carried by railroad? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.) “So much depends upon a red wheelbarrow...” Learn to mine great lines from that fabulous mind of yours just like William Carlos Williams when you join other seasoned and novice poets for Poetry Club, now meeting every third Tuesday at 8 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First W.

Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication, a non-violent communication weekly practice group, at the Jeanette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Noon. Free.

The winningest USian will get a $25 bar tab at KBGA’s Tuesday Trivia night, which includes music and picture rounds, plus drank specials. Pro tip: $25 is enough to buy almost everybody in the bar a Natty Light. Free to play. VFW, 245 W. Main St. 810 PM.

Drink from the cup of knowledge during the Socrates Café at the Bitterroot Public Library West Meeting room in Hamilton. Questions are chosen, terms discussed and thoughts given. 7–9 PM. Free.

The Montana Musicians and Artists Coalition hosts the Musician Showcase at Stage 112, inside the Elk’s at 112 Pattee St., an evening of tuneful live tuneage made by locals for locals. 8–11 PM. Free. 18 plus.

Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free pub trivia, which takes place every Tuesday at 8 PM. Here’s a question to tickle your brainwaves: What

You might guess that the Acousticals will play acoustic Americana, but you’ll havta show up to find out when they play the Top Hat. 8:30 PM. Free, 21-plus.

[38] Missoula Independent • September 12–September 19, 2013

WEDNESDAYSEPT18 Drop the bass and get low all night long, shorty, at Northwest Fresh IV: A Farewell to Zach Bauer, with DJs and hiphop from Bass Face Krew, Rude and Codependents. 8:30 PM. Free, plus $1.50 shot specials. 21-plus. Get on your bikes and ride, gals, to win prizes during Missoula Biking Betties’ push to encourage more women to commute sustainably during Bike Walk Bus Week. Visit Missoula Biking Betties on Facebook to learn how to receive prizes for commuting. The Jocko Valley Farmers Market offers treats, produce, tunes and more in The Hangin Art Gallery parking lot, 92555 Highway 93 in Arlee, from 4-7 PM. For more information or to become a vendor, call Kelley at 726-5550.

nightlife You’ll be seeing double when alt-folkmeisters Shook Twins play the Missoula Winery and Event Center, along with Baby


[calendar] and Bukowski. 5646 W. Harrier. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $15/$13 in advance at Rockin Rudy’s and ticketfly.com.

from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 549-8703. Visit tenspoon.com.

Ron Dunbar plays his solo tunes for your humpday noshing at the Top Hat’s dinner show, starting at 7 PM. Free, all ages.

Wood you like to come with me to the UM College of Forestry’s student club barbecue at Fort Missoula? The event, which is part of a 100th anniversary celebration, includes a UM Woodsman Team demonstration. 5:30-8 PM. $12.

Find out how to get along with your fellow human beings during the Cultivating Compassion Is Essential three-week class series with Dr. Georgia Milan at the Ewam Buddhist Center and Tibetan Store, 180 S. Third St. W. 7-8:30 PM. $10 suggested donation. Visit ewam.org or call 726-0555 for more.

After the revolution, we’ll need a new Betsy Ross, which is why you should pick up some tips every Thu. at Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., where its Sewing Lounge goes from 6 to 8 PM. $9–10/hour. Call 541-7171.

Oakland-by-way-of-Missoula band Felsen plays pop rock grooves to head-bob to at the Top Hat tonight. 10 PM. Free. (Trivia answer: 40 percent.)

The Thursday Night Mountain Bike Group meets on Sundays for underwater basket-weaving. Kidding, kidding, they meet on Thursdays at 6 PM to ride trails in the Missoula area. Check thursdaynightmtbr.org to find out locations.

Tonight’s the taping of the mind-expanding TEDxUMontana, with speakers including a neuroscientist, art historian and sound designer. UM hosts several webcast viewing parties in the University Center’s third floor, Mansfield Library, Missoula Public Library, Roxy Theater and UM FLAT. 7 PM. Check umt.edu/tedx. Release some stress during t’ai chi classes every Thursday at 10 AM at The Open Way Center, 702 Brooks St. $10 drop-in class. Visit openway.org. Get on your bikes and ride, gals, to win prizes during Missoula Biking Betties’ push to encourage more women to commute sustainably during Bike Walk Bus Week. Visit Missoula Biking Betties on Facebook to learn how to receive prizes for commuting. The miniNaturalists Pre-K Program is aces for outdoorsy learning for ye childrens. The Montana Natural History Center. 10– 11 AM. $3/$1 for members. Visit montananaturalist.org.

nightlife End your afternoon with a fine glass of grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 830-3296 and visit missoulawinery.com. Get a taste of la dolce vita and a li’l vino when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs

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More events online: missoulanews.com

Let me tell you something I learned the hard way: Meatloaf songs are not appropriate for karaoke. Now go forth to Kraptastic Karaoke at the Badlander, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $6 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free.

THURSDAYSEPT19

Work. Learn. Thrive. Š‘”–ǡ‘Ǧ…”‡†‹–…‘—”•‡•ǡ ‘’‡–‘–Š‡’—„Ž‹…Ǥ Get the edge you need to succeed. ĊČĎĘęĊėēđĎēĊĔĉĆĞ

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Take a seat and sip one or two while Sista Otis delights your ears at the Top Hat from 6-8 PM. Free.

School of Extended & Lifelong Learning

Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free. Join Hospice of Missoula for Community Conversations on Death and Dying, where facilitators educate people on how to talk about this oft-uncomfortable subject. The Loft, 119 W. Main St. 6–8 PM. Free. Sip that pint with pizazz when the Kimberlee Carlson Jazz Trio plays the Top Hat Lounge from 6:30-8:30 PM. No cover. Win $50 by using your giant egg to answer trivia questions at Brains on Broadway Trivia Night at the Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway Ave. 8 PM, plus specials on wings, pizza, domestic pitchers and $7 Harvest Moon pitchers. Honor your connection to the earth and the glorious array of life on it during the Children of the Earth Tribe Song and Chant Circle at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. 519 S. Higgins, enter through back alley door. 7 PM. Free will offering. Have a laff in honor of the Clown Prince of Denmark when Adrienne Dussault presents A Tribute to Victor Borge... (and others), with guest appearances from pianist Christopher Hahn, soprano Gina Lapka and Mayor John Engen. MCT Center for the Performing Arts. 7:30 PM. $10. Tickets available at mctinc.org or by calling 728-7529.

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Principles of website design & usability Marketing through paid online advertising Developing relationships & growing your business through social media

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umt.edu/profdev Work.

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missoulanews.com • September 12–September 19, 2013 [39]


[calendar] Question: Did they have harps in the Stone Age? Find out when Simon and Maria O’Dwyer present “3,000 Years of Ancient Ireland’s Music and Instruments,” as part of the UM President’s Lecture Series, at the Dennison Theatre from 7:30-9:30 PM. Free. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM. Show ‘em that pop culture knowledge is just as important as having a job during Trivial Beersuit at the Lucky Strike Casino. Prizes for podium finishers. Karaoke follows. 1515 Dearborn. 8–10 PM. During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, local talented folks may titillate your eardrums. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up. Fight for your right to belt out tunes at the Dark Horse’s Combat Karaoke, hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free. Crash your car into a bridge, I don’t care when carousing to hip tunes and

underground tracks at Dead Hipster Dance Party. 9 PM. Badlander. $1 well dranks til’ midnight, lifelong memories for free. Hone your performance skills at the Broadway Inn’s open mic night, with Big Sky Pool Party in the Cabana starting at 5 PM, singing and prizes at 9 PM. Includes $3 Big Sky beer special. 1609 W. Broadway St. Free to attend. Feel the good vibes from Muzikata when they play a CD release party at the Top Hat, along with Dan Dubuque, starting at 10 PM. Free.

Going off the rails on a crazy train. Submit events by 5 PM on Friday to calendar@missoulanews.com to ensure publication in print and online. Include the who-whatwhen-where-why and a picture, if you would be so kind. Alternately, snail mail to Calapatra c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit events online. Just find the “submit an event” link under the Spotlight event on the right of the front page at missoulanews.com.

Go ahead and do it in the road. Shook Twins play the Missoula Winery and Event Center, along with Baby and Bukowski, Wed., Sept. 18. 5646 W. Harrier. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $15/$13 in advance at Rockin Rudy’s and ticketfly.com.

[40] Missoula Independent • September 12–September 19, 2013


[outdoors]

MOUNTAIN HIGH

Y

ou know those chairlifts, riding high and fast up the mountain at Big Sky Resort? Yeah, you’ll be wishing you were sitting in one of those comparatively comfy seats if you’re out at Lone Peak for the inaugural Big Sky ultramarathon, The Rut. Missoulians Mike Foote and Mike Wolfe organized the event for similar ultra-runners like themselves (or as I call them, pain-seekers) to get a good ol’ 50K in before winter hits. There is the 12K option, but since you’ll already be praying for a sherpa, why not get the full 8,200 feet of elevation gain? Think of it like your best day of skiing last year, but in reverse. Instead of sailing down the peak for

miles back to the base, you’ll be among world-class huffers and puffers as you wind through ridgelines, jeep trails and single-track runs from the bottom to the top and back again. Which means I’ll see you at the hot tub, where I’ll have spent the entire day. —Brooks Johnson The Rut 50K and 12K kicks off at noon Fri., Sept. 13 at Big Sky Resort for registration and a pre-race pasta feed at 6 PM, yum. The 50K begins Sat., Sept. 14 at 6 AM, with the 12K following at 9 AM. Go to bigskyresort.com for registration, spectator tickets and more information.

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 12 The Thursday Night Mountain Bike Group meets on Sundays for underwater basketweaving. Kidding, kidding, they meet on Thursdays at 6 PM to ride trails in the Missoula area. Check thursdaynightmtbr.org to find out locations.

FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 13

short family ride, 25-,50- or 100-miler, if you dare. Learn more at huckleberry100.com. Get a grand view of Helena and the mountains beyond at the 38th Annual Mount Helena Run, a 5.6-mile course starting from Last Chance Gulch downtown, heading up the summit of Mount Helena. Visit vigilanterunning.org.

Make sure your first time is special by attending First Timer Friday at the Freestone Climbing Center, 935 Toole Ave. in Missoula, at 7 PM. Free if it’s your first visit.

Do your part in keeping the Bitterroot River pristine by helping with a river clean-up today. Call 375-2272 or email heather@brwaterforum.org to get assigned a stretch of river, then pick up a bag at locations including the Hamilton Farmer’s Market and River Otter Fly Shop. Bring the trash you pick up to Angler’s Roost, 815 Hwy 93 at 3 PM for a barbecue, live music and prizes in the “Best Of” Trash Awards. Free.

SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 14

SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 15

All right, you gluttons for punishment, here’s a gnarly one: the first-ever Big Sky Resort Ultramarathon, known as The Rut. There’s a 50k and 12K course, each of which traverses the expansive beauty of Lone Peak. The 50K — “not for the faint of heart” — includes 8,200 feet of elevation gain, plus single-track through forest and jeep roads leading to the summit. Visit bigskyresort.com/events.

Join Five Valleys Audubon on a half-day jaunt throughout Missoula’s west end to see some neat chirpers today. Meet at the UM Adams Center parking lot for 8 AM departure. Learn more by calling Terry at 214-1194.

Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s weekly meeting to talk about past glories and upcoming activities at Bigfork’s Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free.

You’ll be bright eyed and bushy tailed after Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which start at 8 AM every Saturday at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. Grab breakfast with other participants afterward. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org. Feel free to lope, gallop, skip, hop, jump or stroll during Teen Challenge Pacific Northwest’s annual 5K Run/Walk for Freedom, beginning at the center headquarters, 3815 S. Seventh St. W. Checkin at 8 AM, race at 9, with prizes and games to follow. $25/$20 in advance at eventbrite.com. Proceeds benefit Montana Women’s Outreach. You’ll be rewarded with the fruits of your labors at the Huckleberry 100 departing from Kalispell, a breathtaking and butt-busting 100-mile course through the Flathead Valley. Register for a

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They say you don’t have to run faster than a bear, you just have to run faster than the guy next to you. Test this theory during the Two Bear Marathon and Half Marathon in Whitefish. 7:30 AM. Check out twobearmarathon.org.

TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 17 Meet other free-wheeling gals when Montana Dirt Girls meet every Tuesday around 6 PM for hiking or mountain biking in the Missoula area. For locations and more information, visit mtdirtgirls.tripod.com. Free.

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 19 The Thursday Night Mountain Bike Group meets on Sundays for underwater basketweaving. Kidding, kidding, they meet on Thursdays at 6 PM to ride trails in the Missoula area. Check thursdaynightmtbr.org to find out locations.

For more info, please visit: NINKASIBREWINGCOM/BEERISLOVE NINKASIBREWING.COM

BREWED IN EUGENE, OR

missoulanews.com • September 12–September 19, 2013 [41]


[community] Everything you need to enjoy the adventure & excitement of radio control (RC) flight right now.

The Firebird Stratos plane can successfully teach you to fly!

The University of Montana is hosting a couple of groundbreaking women this week: first, former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor on Fri., Sept. 13. A Supreme Court justice’s work is never done, and O’Connor is advocating for Americans to brush up on their civics (see the spotlight in our 8 Days A Week section). Another big part of being an informed citizen is knowing what’s going on outside our borders. On Tue., Sept. 17, Kathleen Stephens, the first U.S. woman ambassador to South Korea, presents a talk that will ask us to consider the role the United States plays in East Asia. To put it charitably, it hasn’t always been a great relationship (ahem, see the review of Hog’s Exit in the books section). Stephens got her start in the Peace Corps, teaching English at a Korean middle school. She went on to spend 30 years as a diplomat in Europe and East Asia, and served as ambassador to South Korea in 2008–2011. Stephens ended her tenure as the Obama administration announced a new “Asia rebalance” plan to strengthen relationships with powers in the region. It’s a titanic goal, especially now with the possibility that the United States will become en-

gaged in the conflict in Syria. And you can get an opinion on American involvement in foreign conflicts from just about anybody on the street these days, but I dare say that I’d rather hear what someone with 30 years of experience in diplomacy has to say on the matter. —Kate Whittle Ambassador Kathleen Stephens presents "U.S. Public Diplomacy and Leadership in East Asia" at the Dell Brown Room in Turner Hall Tue., Sept. 17, with Q&A to follow. 7:30–9 PM. Free. Light refreshments will be available.

[AGENDA LISTINGS] THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 12

SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 15

Get the down-low on how exporting Montana coal affects us and Chinese folks during From Otter Creek to Asia: The Coal Hard Truth about Coal Export from a Concerned Chinese Citizen. Beijing resident Lifeng Fang will give a talk on how to reduce coal use. North Underground Lecture Hall. 7 PM.

Envision whirled peas at the annual Jeannette Rankin Center Peace Party at Caras Park, with Rockin Peace Ranch cowboy theme, Homegrown Organics dinner, raffles and auctions, plus bluegrassy tunes by the Shenanigans. 4:30-8 PM. $24/$40 for two/$50 per family/$20 for living lightly folks. Tickets available by calling 543-3955 or at the Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave.

Mark the 20th annual Unity World Day of Prayer with an interfaith service at the Unity Church of Missoula, 546 South Ave. W. This year’s theme is “Living Well: Nurturing Mind, Body and Spirit.” 7 PM. You don’t have to be a time lord or a doctor to check out the Missoula Time Bank, in which members exchange skills and services instead of money. Orientations are at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center on the second and fourth Thursdays of the month. Enter through the alley door. 7 PM. Learn more at missoulatimebank.org.

FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 13 The YWCA Secret Seconds thrift store, now newly gussied-up with 5,800 square feet of extra space, celebrates the occasion with a grand reopening shopping event with food, music and chances to win prizes. Proceeds go toward the YWCA’s mission of helping victims of domestic violence and campaigning against racism. 1136 W. Broadway St. 10 AM-6 PM. Missoula Patriots host a meeting with speaker Derek Skees and his talk, “Restore the Constitution, restore America. How can we do this?” Missoula County Courthouse gazebo, 200 W. Broadway. 6 PM.

SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 14 The Soul Writing Workshop with Valerie Harms offers “tools for making decisions that bring you the most meaning and joy” at the Learning Center at Red Willow. 9 AM-5 PM. $90. Register and learn more by calling 721-0033 or visiting redwillowlearning.org.

MONDAY SEPTEMBER 16 Find out how the Garden City grows at the weekly Missoula City Council meeting, where you can no doubt expect ranting public commenters, PowerPoint presentations and subtle wit from Mayor Engen. Missoula council chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Meetings are the first four Mondays of every month at 7 PM, except for holidays. Sept. 16 is more than just Stay Away From Seattle Day (fact), it’s also Constitution Day. UM hosts distinguished historian Melvin Urofsky and his talk, “Dissent and the Constitutional Dialogue.” North Urey Underground Lecture Hall. 7:30 PM. Free.

TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 17 Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. Third St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1–3 PM. For information, call 543-3955. Ambassador Kathleen Stephens, the first American woman ambassador to Korea, presents “U.S. Public Diplomacy and Leadership in East Asia” at the Dell Brown Room in Turner Hall. 7:309 PM. Free. Light refreshments will be available.

WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 18 Honor your connection to the earth and the glorious array of life on it during the Children of the Earth Tribe Song and Chant Circle at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. 519 S. Higgins, enter through back alley door. 7 PM. Free will offering.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

[42] Missoula Independent • September 12–September 19, 2013


missoulanews.com • September 12–September 19, 2013 [43]


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

September 12 - September 19, 2013

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Beginning Banjo Lessons. Monday September 16th 7pm. A few rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 7210190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

SOCIAL SECURITY DENIED? Call Bulman Law Associates 7217744 www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com

Grout Rite Your tile & grout specialists. Free Estimates. Over 31 yrs exp. 406-273-9938. www.groutrite.com

LOST & FOUND

Missoula Medical Aid: Working for Health in Honduras. Please donate now at missoulamedicalaid.org!

LOST: White male miniature poodle named Benne. He ran away from the scene of an accident on Hwy. 141 at mile marker 27, Montana on 9/2/13. He’s 3 years old, 10 pounds and is wearing a blue collar with tags &

small leash halter. Please help! Nikki Casey 925-708-6396 Reward for Lost Siamese Lost Siamese cat, July 4th in the Whitaker street area. Pink collar & tag, if missing she is micro chipped. Her name is Lucy, 3 yrs old. We love her & miss her, please call 406370-8781. $150 reward.

HYPNOSIS

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546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

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Beginning Banjo Lessons. Monday September 16th 7pm. A few rentals available. Bennett's Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

Table of contents

bladesofglorylawncarellc.com

Public Notices . . . . . . . .C5 Crossword . . . . . . . . . .C7 Camp Sleepover . . . .C11 This Modern World . .C12

Ken's Barber Shop Children and Walk-in Welcome Haircuts-$8.50 • Beard trims-$4 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m Tuesday-Saturday 1114 Cedar St, Missoula, MT• 728-3957

P L AC E YOUR AD:

Walk it.

At YOUR Home All Ages, All Levels

317 S. Orange

Bruce- 546-5541

( : I BUY

ONE-DAY

MEDITATION RETREAT with David Curtis

Honda • Subaru • VW Toyota • Nissan Japanese/German Cars Trucks SUVs

Saturday, Sept 14th, 9:30am to 5pm At 102 McLeod (at Higgins) in Missoula Join us weekly for: Buddhism & Meditation Mondays at 6:30 pm Morning Meditation Tuesdays 7-7:50 am

Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not

327-0300

Big Sky Mind Buddhist Wisdom for Modern Life

ANY TIME

www.tibetanlanguage.org • 406.961.5131

543-6609 x121 or x115

Send it. Post it. classified@missoulanews.com

PET OF THE WEEK Beezy Who is looking for a dog who can make an easy transition into a new home? Beezy just might be your girl. A "good first dog," come meet Beezy today. And don't forget to sign up for the Canine Classic at Paws Up on September 22nd. You can go to www.firstgiving.com/hswm for more information. . 406.549.4796.

“Time has a wonderful way of showing us what really matters.” – Margaret Peters

Talk it.


ADVICE GODDESS

COMMUNITY BULLETIN

By Amy Alkon

TO GIVE AWAY

WHEN HURRY MET SALLY I planned a cross-country trip to introduce my girlfriend of five months to my family. She just sprang on me that she wants my family to meet "all of" her, which includes her 9-year-old daughter. My family knows she has a child, and I really enjoy her daughter, but I'm really not ready to introduce both of them. It would suggest that I'm taking on the role of a father, that she's important to me, that I'm ready to care for her, and that they should accept her as part of my life. I'm okay with their meeting the daughter later if our relationship progresses, but it's still so new that we haven't even had our first big argument yet. Is it okay for me to first want to love the woman and decide whether she's the one? Is it a warning sign that there are already issues regarding her child? —Dating A Package It would be clear you were in the wrong place if you'd spent the first date brimming with child-loathing: "Kids require a total commitment for 18 years—or maybe 13, if you can get them to run away as teenagers." But it's perfectly reasonable to want to be called baby for a while before you commit to having one, and especially one at the soon-to-be-sullen age of 9 who already calls some other guy daddy. Ironically, it's you, the single, childless guy who's taking the more responsible, parental approach: waiting to see whether the relationship has legs before you start acting like you're all a family, which could end badly. Kids need stability. Ideally, "Who's your stepdaddy?" isn't a question a little girl should have to answer while standing by the revolving door outside the men's department. Your girlfriend's apparent attempt to leverage your affection for her into a Very Brady Vacation could be a straightout power play or a fear-driven test to see whether you're up to quasi-daddyhood. Think hard about the day-to-day details of being with a woman with a kid, like how her daughter will ultimately come first and how her presence will change the relationship dynamics. (You can't just tie a kid to a parking meter and make it up to her by taking her to pee in somebody's bushes after lunch.) If, for the right woman, the tradeoffs wouldn't be too much for you, reassure your girlfriend of that, and then lay out the path to a relationship that works for you (more of a get-to-know-you stroll than a get-to-know-you freeway chase). If that timetable doesn't work for her,

well, there's got to be a door there somewhere. But the fact that you have self-knowledge and the integrity to be unwilling to rush things suggests that she'd be prudent to see whether there's something between you—that is, besides an anonymous call to Child Services by someone making serious accusations: adults around her wearing Crocs with socks and not letting her wear makeup like all the other fourthgrade girls.

Free For All First Fridays. Free haircuts for everyone. Mighty Aphrodite Salon. 406-546-3846. 736A S. 1st W. Missoula. Find us on Facebook Pass It On Missoula is now located at 2426 W Central Ave. We are a community supported service offering FREE infant, toddler and maternity clothing to ALL Missoula area families! There are NO eligibility guidelines, simply reduce, reuse, and Pass It On locally! Community donations are accepted on location. PIOM offers FREE clothing to those in need, and affordable for all at 3/$5! Located at 2426 W Central Ave and open Monday-Saturday 10AM-5:30PM. 274-6430. www.passitonmissoula.com

approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com

ADOPTION PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

THE GREEN SCHEME Landscape Design for Homeowners/DIY-ers WHERE: Extension Office 2825 Santa Fe Ct. WHEN: 10 Classes Sept. 16-Oct. 16, 2013 TIME: M & W Evenings 7:00-9:00 p.m.

WAIL WATCHING My girlfriend cries quite easily—over being sick, work getting frustrating, or even our evening plans going awry. I feel the crying makes a small problem bigger, as everything becomes all about her emotions and not the problem. I try to comfort her, but when she starts crying, it's very hard to talk or reach her at all. —Daunted If you can't stop the rain, you might just make the best of a bad situation and position your girlfriend over your Slip'N Slide. As for why she's so often inconsolable, it may be because her tears are, in part, a cry for more attention from you. Holding back on giving it, like those parents who let their babies scream their little lungs out all night long, is exactly what you shouldn't do, according to "the dependency paradox." Social psychologist Brooke C. Feeney, who coined the term, found that in a committed relationship, the more a person feels they can count on their partner to be responsive to their calls for comforting and support the more independent that person can be. So, for three weeks, try being much more affectionate and caring -- and not just when she's crying. Maybe even give yourself a quota of three out-of-the-blue shows of affection per day. When she does cry, don't try to "reach" her, except to hold her in your arms and let her sob into your shirt. Postpone any discussion till the storm subsides, tempting as it is to get right in there all guy-like and solve things—taking her, weeping, to Home Depot and calling over a salesperson: "'Scuse me, sir … got anything to fix this leak?"

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com www.advicegoddess.com

[C2] Missoula Independent • September 12 – September 19, 2013

ANNOUNCEMENTS 100 SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY ????’s & ANSWERS www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com 721-7744

COST: $100.00 Manual Included Contact Billie Gray @ 543-3480 Leave message

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car.com WORN OUT BY YOUR JOB? NO HEALTH INSURANCE? Call Bulman Law Associates 7217744

INSTRUCTION AIRLINE CAREERS – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA

WWW.ADULT-AVE.COM • OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Couples-Friendly Shopping • 137 E MAIN • 543-3423

EMPLOYMENT GENERAL AGRONOMY LOCATION MANAGER. Large cooperative in NW North Dakota with agronomy sales at location over $10 million. New Chemical warehouse, new application equipment. Excellent benefit package, salary DOE with very generous incentive program. Please send resume to John Salvevold, Horizon Resources, 317 2nd St W, Williston ND 58801. Assistant secretary/ bookkeeper Part-time, 5 days/week, some flexible hours. May become full-time in the future. Experience with QuickBooks and Excel needed. Wage DOE. Job# 9980880. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

BARTENDING

Delivery Driver Love to be outdoors? Enjoy driving? Local company looking for a driver to deliver automotive parts to local shops. FT, shifts vary, Mon-Sat 7:30am-6pm. Benefits package available after probationary period. Must have clean driving record. $8.50 - $9.00 Hourly. Job# 9980894. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 Delivery Driver Part Time Needs to be familiar with Missoula and Bitterroot Areas. 20 to 25 Hours per week.MondayFriday.Clean Driving Record,needs to be friendly, able to lift up to 50 pounds,no problem walking and dependable. Drop off resume at Diamond Imaging, 2801 South Russell. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE Now Hiring Call Today! 273-2266

$300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training available. 1800-965-6520 ext. 278

PROFESSIONAL

Collection Agent A collection agency is seeking an individual to contact consumers regarding past due accounts. You will be interacting with the public in person and on the phone. Important skills include pleasant telephone personality, ability to react quickly to situations, multi-tasking including quick keyboarding skills, and familiarity with Word and Excel. $12.00 Hourly. Job# 9980868. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

CLINICAL DOCUMENT COORDINATOR / #2984087 $40,560.00 $46,800.00 Yearly. Associate degree in Nursing or Medical Coding. Minimum 5 years experience adult inpatient medical surgical or critical care nursing; or minimum 5 years inpatient coding. Full time; M-F; day shift. Full benefit package provided. /lat. Missoula Job Service 7287060

COMPLIANCY TECHNICIAN Minimum HS diploma or GED. Prefer Bachelor’s Degree. Exceptional customer service and people skills. Ability to work w/sensitive issues and handle confidential client information. Proficient w/computers Windows software, Word, Adobe, Outlook and Email. $10-$12/hr possibility of bonus structure. Potential for wage increase. Job# 9980914. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 International CSR MUST have at least 2 years education or experience in International Business. $11.50 Hourly Job# 9980916. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 Membership Marketing Adventure Cycling Association seeks an energetic, well-organized, and detail-oriented person to fill the role of Membership Marketing Coordinator in the Membership Department. This is a unique opportunity for a self-starter with initiative to join a growing membership program. We seek a team player, with a marketing background (professional or volunteer) with an enthusiasm for cycling and bicycle travel.Manages our growing corporate membership program. Assists with and maintains new member promotions and manages the bike club and shop membership programs for the Membership Department. Please submit a resume and cover letter to


EMPLOYMENT ssnyder@adventurecycling.org. See full job description at www.adventurecycling.org Open Space Program Manager $24.5412 $25.9680/hr, regular, full time, non-union, exempt position. The City of Missoula Parks and Recreation Department is seeking an individual to coordinate and negotiate all phases of open space, parks and trails acquisition for the greater Missoula area as guided by the Missoula Open Space Plan, Master Parks & Recreation Plan, and Active Transportation Plan. Coordinate and review work of consultants on surveys, title insurance commitments, Phase I Environmental Assessments, Mineral Remoteness Reports, appraisals, and property management plans. Draft and review legal documents, such as deeds, conservation easements, trail easements, encroachment easements, leases and land use agreements in partnership with the City Attorney’s Office. Manage complex closing and post-closing activities. Coordinate implementation of the Missoula Master Parks & Recreation Plan. Lead City staff and local agencies in review of subdivision, annexation, rezoning requests, growth policy and other active transportation and land use plan revisions and updates as they pertain to the mission and goals of the Parks and Recreation Department. Closing Date: 5:00 p.m., Tuesday, September 24, 2013. Complete job description and required City application available at

City of Missoula Human Resources Dept., 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT 59802-4297, (406) 552-6130 or apply on-line at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/jobs. EEO/AA/ADA Employer. Qualified women, veterans, minority and handicapped individuals are strongly encouraged to apply. Rehabilitation Counselor provides guidance and counseling to individuals with disabilities in achieving employment outcomes. Conduct comprehensive needs assessment and develop rehabilitation plans; Counseling consumers on job and career development goals; Coordinating on-site job coaching or providing assistive devices to help consumers adapt to school or work environments; and Approving, purchasing, and monitoring quality of goods and services. $16.75 $19.80 Hourly. Job# 9817136. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

SKILLED LABOR Deli Manager Position Summary Description: Deli Manager for well-established (27 yrs) operation The Deli Manager is responsible for all aspects of daily deli operations. The position requires a comprehensive knowledge of food products, recipes, sanitation as well as a working knowledge of food cost, budget adherence and scheduling practices. The Deli manager will be interacting daily with customers, and will be expected to dis-

Property Manager – LIHTC Properties The Missoula Housing Authority seeks a high-energy, dedicated individual to perform duties of LIHTC Property Manager. Position will be full time. Position starts at $12.95 per hour. Duties include: Under limited supervision, supervises, administers, monitors and implements policies and procedures to ensure peak performance of properties and timely and complete compliance with requirements of various funding agencies. LIHTC Certification is preferred. For required application package visit www.missoulahousing.org/about/employment, or contact Adam Ragsdale, Missoula Housing Authority, 1235 34th Street, Missoula, MT 59801 (406) 549-4113 x 128, aragsdale@missoulahousing.org Applications reviewed every Friday until position is filled.

play excellent customer service skills while overseeing all other aspects of the operation. The Deli manager will be solely responsible for developing and implementing a rotating daily menu including hot specials and cold salads. Duties include but are not limited to: - Menu development, costing and implementation Staff training, hiring and firing with fair practice - Maintain vendor relations ensuring competitive pricing - Maintain equipment to ensure a safe and sanitary work environment - Effectively coordinates production, merchandising and sales through ongoing planning direction, communication, goal setting, brainstorming and teamwork - Ensures customer satisfaction and builds customer loyalty - Assures accuracy and accountability of all Deli Department invoices and expenses Submits all paperwork for the Deli Department including sales and purchase recaps, weekly schedules, monthly margin reports in a timely manner - Ensures quality deli product through proper rotation procedures, monitoring cases for damaged items, and following all health and sanitation guidelines Understands all health, safety and sanitation guidelines/regulations

FLATBED DRIVERS NEEDED FROM THE MISSOULA AREA • Home weekly to Bi-weekly • Top pay • Full benefits • New equipment • 2 years exp. required • Clean driving record

and ensures that other deli team members are also aware of and following these procedures - Requires flexibility to work a varied work schedule, including, weekends, and some holidays - Must be able to tolerate various physical requirements including but not limited to long periods of standing and walking, repeated bending, squatting, twisting and stretching, repeatedly lifting up to 50 lbs. during a standard shift, and other requirements The above statements are intended to describe the general nature and level of the work being performed by people assigned to this work. This is not an exhaustive list of all duties and responsibilities. Management reserves the right to amend and change responsibilities to meet business and organizational needs as necessary. LABORER TEMPORARY for Lewiston, Idaho. Begin 9/15 and run approx. 5 days. Lodging paid, per diem for meals. Travel to Lewiston is paid. Work will include operating high pressure washers and running hose. Work is very physical. Employer will conduct safety training and provide safety gear. You must have hard toe boots. Must be willing to get dirty and work 12 hour shifts. Must pass pre-employment drug test. $16.00 Hourly. Job# 9980875. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

Wages DOE. EOE Contact (406)677-2201, Ext. 22 or DTroutwine@pyramidlumber.com TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-5454546

HEALTH CAREERS Health Care Assistant CNA We are seeking a compassionate and caring individual to provide safe and reliable routine daily care to patients admitted to the hospital. This is a .9 FTE day shift position. * High School diploma or GED * Current Nursing Assistant Certified (NAC) licensure * Current Basic Life Support (BLS) certification. Job# 9980864. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

ice centers, skilled nursing facilities, assisted living locations, and client’s facilities. Job# 9980915. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 PART TIME - PCA CAREGiver We are looking for team members with huge hearts! If you have a special place in your heart for seniors, then why not get paid to reminisce, run errands, go shopping, prepare meals, do light housekeeping, enjoy conversations and just have fun?! Training Provided! Part-time, days, evenings, week end shifts are all available! Applicants must have reliable transportation. $9.00 - $12.00 Hourly. Job# 9980864. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

SALES INTERACTIVE / ONLINE ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE / #2984085 A minimum of 3 years successful sales experience,

Mobile Phlebotomist Evenings and weekends. Perform a variety of specimen collection techniques from patients in patient serv-

MILLWRIGHT POSITION. Western MT Sawmill seeking Experienced Millwright. Family medical & dental, paid holidays/vacation, 401(k).

preferably in media sales. Thoroughly familiar with Microsoft Office Suite. Excellent communication, presentation and interpersonal skills. New or non-traditional media sales experience a plus. Solution based selling background. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

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[C3]


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT

By Rob Brezsny

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The French word sillage means "wake," like the trail created behind a boat as it zips through water. In English, it refers to the fragrance that remains in the air after a person wearing perfume or cologne passes by. For our purposes, we will expand the definition to include any influences and impressions left behind by a powerful presence who has exited the scene. In my astrological opinion, Gemini, sillage is a key theme for you to monitor in the coming days. Be alert for it. Study it. It will be a source of information that helps you make good decisions.

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): "Cataglottism" is a rarely used English word that has the same meaning as French kissing—engaging in liberal use of the tongue as you make out. But I don't recommend that you incorporate such an inelegant, guttural term into your vocabulary. Imagine yourself thinking, while in the midst of French kissing, that what you're doing is "cataglottism." Your pleasure would probably be diminished. This truth applies in a broader sense, too. The language you use to frame your experience has a dramatic impact on how it all unfolds. The coming week will be an excellent time to experiment with this principle. See if you can increase your levels of joy and grace by describing what's happening to you with beautiful and positive words.

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): This is Correct Your First Impressions Week. It's a perfect time for you to reevaluate any of your beliefs that are based on mistaken facts or superficial perceptions. Are you open to the possibility that you might have jumped to unwarranted conclusions? Are you willing to question certainties that hardened in you after just a brief exposure to complicated processes? During Correct Your First Impressions Week, humble examination of your fixed prejudices is one of the greatest gifts you can give yourself. P.S. This is a good time to re-connect with a person you have unjustly judged as unworthy of you.

c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): This is a good time to free yourself from a curse that an immature soul placed on you once upon a time. I'm not talking about a literal spell cast by a master of the dark arts. Rather, I'm referring to an abusive accusation that was heaped on you, perhaps inadvertently, by a careless person whose own pain made them stupid. As I evaluate the astrological omens, I conclude that you now have the power to dissolve this curse all by yourself. You don't need a wizard or a witch to handle it for you. Follow your intuition for clues on how to proceed. Here's a suggestion to stimulate your imagination: Visualize the curse as a dark purple rose. See yourself hurling it into a vat of molten gold.

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The current chapter of your life story may not be quite as epic as I think it is, so my advice may sound melodramatic. Still, what I'm going to tell you is something we all need to hear from time to time. And I'm pretty sure this is one of those moments for you. It comes from writer Charles Bukowski: "Nobody can save you but yourself. You will be put again and again into nearly impossible situations. They will attempt again and again through subterfuge, guise, and force to make you submit, quit and/or die quietly inside. But don't, don't, don't. It's a war not easily won, but if anything is worth winning then this is it. Nobody can save you but yourself, and you're worth saving."

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The cosmos hereby grants you poetic license to be brazen in your craving for the best and brightest experiences . . . to be uninhibited in feeding your obsessions and making them work for you . . . to be shameless as you pursue exactly and only what you really, really want more than anything else. This is a limited time offer, although it may be extended if you pounce eagerly and take full advantage. For best results, suspend your pursuit of trivial wishes and purge yourself of your bitchy complaints about life.

f

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): At the last minute, Elsa Oliver impulsively canceled her vacation to New York. She had a hunch that something exciting would happen if instead she stayed at her home in England. A few hours later, she got a message inviting her to be a contestant on the UK television show Who Wants To Be a Millionaire? In the days and weeks that followed, she won the equivalent of $100,000. I'm not predicting anything quite as dramatic for you, Sagittarius. But I do suspect that good luck is lurking in unexpected places, and to gather it in you may have to trust your intuition, stay alert for late-breaking shifts in fate, and be willing to alter your plans.

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): "The only thing standing between you and your goal," writes American author Jordan Belfort, "is the bullshit story you keep telling yourself as to why you can’t achieve it." I don't entirely agree with that idea. There may be other obstacles over which you have little control. But the bullshit story is often more than half the problem. So that's the bad news, Capricorn. The good news is that right now is a magic moment in your destiny when you have more power than usual to free yourself of your own personal bullshit story.

Family Care • Nutritional Consultation • IV Therapy • Herbal Medicine • Women’s Health • Massage

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Taurus musician David Byrne was asked by an interviewer to compose a seven-word autobiography. In response, he came up with ten words: "unfinished, unprocessed, uncertain, unknown, unadorned, underarms, underpants, unfrozen, unsettled, unfussy." The coming days would be an excellent time for you to carry out similar assignments. I'd love to see you express the essential truth about yourself in bold and playful ways. I will also be happy if you make it clear that even though you're a work-inprogress, you have a succinct understanding of what you need and who you are becoming.

Christine White N.D. Elizabeth Axelrod N.D.

BLACK BEAR NATUROPATHIC

ARIES (March 21-April 19): "A good story should make you laugh, and a moment later break your heart," wrote Chuck Palahniuk in his book Stranger Than Fiction. From what I can tell, Aries, the sequence is the reverse for you. In your story, the disruption has already happened. Next comes the part where you laugh. It may be a sardonic chuckle at first, as you become aware of the illusions you had been under before the jolt exposed them. Eventually I expect you will be giggling and gleeful, eternally grateful for the tricky luck that freed you to pursue a more complete version of your fondest dream.

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h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Is the truth a clear, bright, shiny treasure, like a big diamond glittering in the sunlight? Does it have an objective existence that's independent of our feelings about it? Or is the truth a fuzzy, convoluted thing that resembles a stream of smoke snaking through an underground cavern? Does it have a different meaning for every mind that seeks to grasp it? The answer, of course, is: both. Sometimes the truth is a glittering diamond and at other times it's a stream of smoke. But for you right now, Aquarius, the truth is the latter. You must have a high tolerance for ambiguity as you cultivate your relationship with it. It's more likely to reveal its secrets if you maintain a flexible and cagey frame of mind.

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): It's a good time to indulge in wide-open, high-flying, anythinggoes fantasies about love—IF, that is . . . IF you also do something practical to help those fantasies come true. So I encourage you to dream about revolutionizing your relationship with romance and intimacy—as long as you also make specific adjustments in your own attitudes and behavior that will make the revolution more likely. Two more tips: 1. Free yourself from dogmatic beliefs you might have about love's possibilities. 2. Work to increase your capacity for lusty trust and trusty lust.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

[C4] September 12 – September 19, 2013

(406) 542-2147 2204 Dixon, Missoula MontanaNaturalMedicine.com

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MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS FOR SALE: THE EKALAKA EAGLE, weekly county newspaper in Southeastern Montana. Continuous operation since 1909. Contact Brice Lambert, lambert@midrivers.com

MUSIC Banjo lessons not just for guys anymore. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com Beginning Banjo Lessons. Monday September 16th 7pm. A few rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 7210190 BennettsMusicStudio.com MUSIC LESSONS In-house lessons on guitar, ukelele and piano. Sign up now! MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds entrance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 549-0013. www.montanamusic.com Outlaw Music Got Gear? We Do! Missoula’s Pro Guitar Shop specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, Tuesday-Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533. Outlawmusicguitarshop.com Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

PETS & ANIMALS Basset Rescue of Montana www.bassetrescueofmontana.or g 406-207-0765 CATS: #2455 Black, ASH/Bombay X, SF, 6yrs; #3142 Orange, DSH, SF, 12yrs; #3187 Torbie, ASH, SF, 7yrs; #3226 Grey/white, Persian X, SF, 4yrs; #3238 Blk/white, DLH, NM, 3yrs; #3240 Calico, DSH, SF, 8yrs; #3248 Black, DMH, NM, 2yrs; # 3313 Flame Point, Siamese, SF, 6yrs; #3340 Blk/tan, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #3429 White/grey, Siamese/DSH, 12yrs; #3454 Grey/white, DSH, NM, 4yrs; #3468 Black, DSH, SF, 2yrs; #3477 Black, ASH, SF, 6yrs; #3505 White/grey, ASH, SF, 8yrs; #3527 Blk/white, ASH, SF, 6yrs; #3540 Black Torti, Persian X, SF, 6yrs; #3576 Grey/white, DSH, NM, 1yr; #3581 Grey/Torti, DSH, SF, 6yrs; #3612 Grey/Blk/Whi, Maine Coon X, NM, 3yrs; #3619 Black, ASH, SF, 6wks; #3638 Orange/white, DSH, NM, 8yrs; #3639 Grey/white, DSH, SF, 2yrs; #3640 Grey Tabby, DSH, NM, 9 wks; #3641 Grey Tabby, DSH, NM, 9wks; #3649 Black, DMH, SF, 2yrs; #3666 Black, DMH, SF, 3yrs; #3670 Blk/white, ASH, SF,

9yrs; #3683 Grey/white, DSH, NM, 1yr; #3698 Black, Bombay X, SF, 7yrs; #3704 Blk/orange, DSH, SF, 4yrs; #3710 Blk/tan, Maine Coon, NM, 4yrs; #3712 Orange/white, ASH, NM, 3yrs; #3719 Grey Tabby, ASH, SF, 3 mo; #3720 Blk/white, ASH, NM, 3yrs; #3729 Blk/Gold Torti, DMH, SF, 7yrs; #3731 Grey Tabby, ASH, NM, 6wks; # 3738 Dilute Calico, DMH, SF, 3 mo; #3740 Dilute Calico, DSH, SF, 3mo; #3741 Dulite Calico, DSH, SF, 3mo; #3742 Dilute Calico, DSH, SF, 3mo; #3747 Blk/Orange Calico, Oriental SH X, SF, 3 mo; #3752 Buff, ASH, SF, 4 mo: #3759 Black, DLM, NM, 5yrs: #3763 Buff/white, Maine Coon X, NM, 2yrs;

#3777 Black Seal Pt, Siamese, NM, 3yrs. For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840. DOGS: #2564 Brindle, Catahoula, NM, 2yrs; #3291 Brindle, Pit Bull, NM, 3yrs; #3432 Blk/white, Pit, NM, 3yrs; #3488 B&W, Pointer, NM, 2yrs; #3489 Blk/tan, Shepherd X, NM, 2yrs; #3490 Golden, Pit X, NM, 3yrs; #3503 Black/tan, Rott/Shep X, NM, 9 mo; #3575 Blk/white, BC/Heeler, SF, 8yrs; #3667 Brindle, Pit, NM, 5yrs;

#3668 Blue, American Bull, SF, 2yrs; #3689 Hound X, SF, 2yrs; #3693 Red, Beagle/Hound, SF, 3yrs; #3700 White/Blk, Pointer X, SF, 5yrs; #3721 Brown, Chesapeake X, NM, 1yr; #3727 Black, Lab X, SF, 5yrs; #3734 Black, Heeler, NM, 4yrs; #3757 Tri, Heeler X, NM, 9yrs; #3761 Liver, MinPin X, NM, 1 yr; #3768 Black, Curly Retriever, NM, 11 yrs; #3779 Fawn, Boxer X, NM, 3yrs: #3790 White, Poodle X, SF, 3yrs. For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

GARAGE SALES

AUTOMOBILE

Lolo Community Center presents Christmas Bazar. November 9th, 9-2pm. Tables available $25. Info 880-8903.

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car or Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

OUTDOOR GEAR

97' Jaguar Convertible, 83' Honda Accord. Call Dave @ 396-4050

The Sports Exchange - Great Gear. Great Prices. Buy • Sell • Trade • Consignment. 111 S. 3rd W., Missoula, on the Hip Strip. 406-721-6056

WELCOME BACK STUDENTS!

Bennett’s Music Studio

111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

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Outlaw Music

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BACK-TO-SCHOOL WITH

PLANETBOX LUNCH BOXES FOR THE GREEN GENERATION

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NICKEL AUTO GROUP 3906 Brooks • MSLA • Call Rob 360-8230 01 GMC Denali • 9,995 plus doc Loaded • AWD • Only 115k miles 98 Jeep Grand Cherokee • 3,895 plus doc 4x4 Laredo • Loaded • Sunroof 07 Jeep Liberty 4x4 • 12,888 plus doc Low Low miles • only 53k miles 93 Chevy Conversion van as low as 488 down 91 Ford Explorer 4x4 as low as 88 down 87 Toyota Flatbed 4x4 as low as 128 down

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Blood Drive for the Red Cross 9-16-2013 come down to register or call 251-5803. Free BBQ and Coupon for $100 off any purchase at Nickel Auto Group with donation.

PUBLIC NOTICES MISSOULA COUNTY THE CITY AND COUNTY OF MISSOULA WILL CONDUCT A PUBLIC MEETING to identify housing and community development needs and activities, primarily those benefiting low- to moderate-income households. This meeting will be the public’s opportunity to make comments and ask questions about projects sponsored by the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the State of Montana, including The City’s performance under its CDBG and HOME Programs; Potential City, County and Community Housing Development Organization applications for CDBG, HOME, Treasure State Endowment Program (TSEP), Department of Natural Resources & Conservation and other housing and community development funds; City and County

community-wide needs and priorities for economic development (job creation or retention), housing (such as first-time homeownership opportunities or affordable rentals), public facility projects (such as sewer, water or special community needs projects), public service projects, and programs to assist homeless persons. The meeting will also be used to identify needs and projects, as well as possible changes to community development strategies, to further the City’s strategic objectives during the next five years for inclusion in the City of Missoula’s Consolidated Plan for federal fiscal years 2014 - 2018. The Consolidated Plan is a document adopted by the Missoula City Council that guides housing and community development activities funded by HUD. The current plan covered federal fiscal years 2009 – 2013 and

included ten strategic objectives for HUD spending in Missoula. Persons interested in offering comment should attend the public meeting at: City Council Chambers 140 W. Pine Street, Missoula, Montana Friday, September 13, 2013 12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. If there are projects you would like to see funded or if you wish to comment on any of the current programs or projects in general, please attend the meeting. If you cannot attend, but would like additional information or prefer to submit written proposals, or if you would like to request special accommodations in order to participate fully in the meeting, please contact either Nancy Harte, 258-4934, or Melissa Gordon, 258-4980, at the City/County Department of Grants and Community Programs, office location and mailing address: 127 W. Spruce, Missoula

MT 59802. Persons using a TTY device may contact the Montana Relay Service by dialing 711. DECLARATION OF LAND PATENT Notice is hereby given to interested parties that the following property: S11, T13N, 19W, Lot one (1) and ten (10) of Block 2 of Amended Plat of MARTINWOOD ADDITION NO. THREE (3) is being brought up under United States patent #924. No claim is made herein that claimant has been assigned the entire tract described in the original patent. The filing of this Declaration of Land Patent shall not deny or infringe on any right, privilege or immunity of any other assignee to any portion of land covered in the described patent #924. Submit any questions to the Claimant: Lovella V. Torp, 3116 Old Pond Rd., Missoula, Montana 59802 IN THE JUSTICE COURT OF THE STATE OF MONTANA IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF MISSOULA BEFORE JOHN E. ODLIN, JUSTICE OF THE

PEACE Case No.: CV-2013-0043344 SUMMONS FOR POSSESSION BY PUBLICATION PROFESSIONAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, Plaintiff, v. KARRIE SERRANIA, DAVID SERRANIA, MARQUES BEVEL, et, al, Defendants. TO: Marques Bevel, 5324 Bigfork Road, Missoula, MT 59803 YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer a Complaint filed in Justice Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer upon Plaintiff’s attorney, Thomas C. Orr, Thomas C. Orr Law Offices, P.O.Box 8096, Missoula, Montana 59807, within ten (10) days after service of the Summons,exclusive of the day of service; and in the case of your failure to appear or answer, relief sought by Plaintiff will be taken against you as requested. A $30.00 filing fee must accompany Defendant’s answer. DATED this 27th day of August, 2013. /s/ John E. Odllin, Justice of the Peace

JOHN E. ODLIN, JUSTICE OF THE PEACE Case No.: CV-2013-0043344 SUMMONS FOR POSSESSION BY PUBLICATION PROFESSIONAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, Plaintiff, v. KARRIE SERRANIA, DAVID SERRANIA, MARQUES BEVEL, et, al, Defendants. TO: Karrie Serrania, 5324 Bigfork Road, Missoula, MT 59803 YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer a Complaint filed in Justice Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer upon Plaintiff’s attorney, Thomas C. Orr, Thomas C. Orr Law Offices, P.O.Box 8096, Missoula, Montana 59807, within ten (10) days after service of the Summons,exclusive of the day of service; and in the case of your failure to appear or answer, relief sought by Plaintiff will be taken against you as requested. A $30.00 filing fee must accompany Defendant’s answer. DATED this 27th day of August, 2013. /s/ John E. Odllin

IN THE JUSTICE COURT OF THE STATE OF MONTANA IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF MISSOULA BEFORE

Joan E. Cook LAW OFFICE OF JOAN E. COOK 2423 Mullan Road Missoula, MT 59808 (406) 543-3800

office@cooklaw.com Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: FRITZ DALE PRITCHARD, Deceased. DEPT. NO. 4 PROBATE NO. DP-13-147 NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Diana Denessen has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the above-named as the attorney of record for the Personal Representative, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 23rd day of August, 2013. /s/ JOAN E. COOK MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-13-163 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF KAREN M. KOEFELDA, a/k/a Karen Koefelda, Deceased.

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • September 12 – September 19, 2013

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PUBLIC NOTICES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to JAMES R. KOEFELDA, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Reely Law Firm, P.C., 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 20th day of August, 2013 /s/ James R. Koefelda, Personal Representative. REELY LAW FIRM P.C. 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801 Attorneys for the Personal Representative. By: /s/ Shane N. Reely Esq. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-13-153 Dept. No. 1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF PHILIP EDWARD OWEN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Valerie Dawn McGee, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 4110 Weeping Willow Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803, or filed with the Clerk of the above-named Court. DATED this 22nd day of August, 2013. GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC /s/ Nancy P. Gibson, Attorney for Petitioner I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 22nd day of August, 2013, in Missoula, Montana. /s/ Valerie Dawn McGree, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-13-161 Dept. No. 4 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF LEO W. GAUB, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Steven C. Gaub has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Steven C. Gaub, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Dan G. Cederberg, PO Box 8234, Missoula, Montana 59807-8234, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 15th day of August, 2013. CEDERBERG LAW OFFICES, P.C., 269 West Front Street, PO Box 8234, Missoula, MT 598078234 /s/ Dan G. Cederberg, Attorneys for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-13-165 Dept. No. 2 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF KATHERINE LEE DUVAL, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Nichole Williams has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Nichole Williams, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Anne Blanche Adams, PO Box 8234, Missoula, Montana 59807-8234, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 20th day of August, 2013. CEDERBERG LAW OFFICES, P.C., 269 West Front Street, PO Box 8234, Missoula, MT 59807-8234 /s/ Anne Blanche Adams, Attorneys for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-13-694 Dept. No. 4 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION STAN D. RATLIFF, Individually and as Trustee of the RATLIFF TRUST, Plaintiff, vs. GLORIA M. SCHLEINZ, SALLIE DRUCILLA ACORD, RICARDA JOHNSON and all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate, or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the Complaint or any part thereof adverse to Plaintiffs ownership or any cloud upon Plaintiffs title thereto, whether such claim or possible claim be present or contingent, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA sends greetings to Gloria M. Schleinz and Ricarda Johnson and all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate, or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the Complaint or any part thereof adverse to Plaintiff's ownership or any cloud upon

Plaintiff's title thereto, whether such claim or possible claim be present or contingent: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in this action which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you in the county wherein you reside and to file your Response and serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff's Attorney within twenty-one (21) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or respond, judgment will be taken against you, by default, for the relief prayed for in the Complaint. This action seeks to quiet title to real property located in the County of Missoula, State of Montana and which is more particularly described as follows: Tract 2 of COS 4569, located in the SE 1/4 of S12, T20N, R17W, P.M.M, Missoula County, Montana. Witness my hand and the Seal of said Court August 7, 2013. /s/ Shirely E. Faust, Clerk of said Court By: /s/ Casie Kragh, Deputy Clerk SNYDER LAW OFFICE, P.C. Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. BOX 717, BIGFORK, MONTANA 59911 (406) 837-4383MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 3 Cause No. DP-13-175 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF GARY D. PADILLA, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Kathleen Roseetti, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, 2809 Great Northern Loop, Ste. 100, Missoula, MT 59808, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 9th day of September, 20013. /s/ Kathleen Rosetti, Personal Representative. Bjornson Law Offices, PLLC By: /s/ R. Nick Jones Attorneys for Rosetti, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-13-171 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF CLAYTON OWEN GALLAGHER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Lela C. Tillotson has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the Deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or their claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Christian, Samson & Jones, PLLC, Attorneys for the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 310 West Spruce, Missoula, MT 59802 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of Montana the foregoing is true and correct. Dated this 23rd day of August, 2013 /s/ Lela C. Tillotson, Personal Representative of the Estate of Clayton Owen Gallagher /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP-13-164 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF RUBY L. HUCKABA, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to ANNA M. MARTIN and GWEN M. JEFFREY, the Co-Personal Representatives, return receipt requested, c/o Reely Law Firm, P.C., 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 20th day of August, 2013. /s/ Anna M. Martin, Co-Personal Representative /s/ Gwen M. Jeffrey, CoPersonal Representative REELY LAW FIRM, P.C. 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801 Attorneys for the Personal Representatives. /s/ Shane N. Reely, Esq. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-13-136 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JANIS T. SKILLMAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Jesse Wohlfeil, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane PC, PO Box 4747, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of

the above-entitled Court. DATED this 9th day of July, 2013. /s/ Jesse Wohlfeil, Personal Representative I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. /s/ Jesse Wohlfeil WORDEN THANE PC Attorneys for Personal Representative /s/ William E. McCarthy MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-12-109 Dept. No. 4 Hon. Karen A. Townsend NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF JOSHUA KEN GRUEBELE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the Personal Representative, Alvin J. Gruebele, Jr., return receipt requested, at Tipp & Buley, P.C., PO Box 3778, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 29th day of August, 2013 /s/ Alvin J. Gruebele, Jr. Personal Representative. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-13-166 Dept. No. 1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF CATHERINE MARTIN VINCENT, a/k/a CATHERINE VINCENT a/k/a CATHRINE VINCENT, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to ROBERT A. VINCENT, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 1663 Funston Ave., San Francisco, CA 94122 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 29th day of July, 2013. /s/ Robert A. Vincent, 1663 Funston Ave., San Francisco, CA 94122 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/27/03, recorded as Instrument No. 200341749 Book 721 Page 328, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which John S. Carlson and Rebecca D. Carlson was Grantor, Heritage Bank was Beneficiary and First American Title Company of Montana was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company of Montana as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: The East 40 feet of Lot 10 and the West 10 feet of Lot 11, in Block 69 of Knowles Addition No. 2, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof, recording reference Book 161 of Micro Records at Page 1076. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200341750, Book 721 Page 329, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc., a California Corp.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 08/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of July 9, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $99,200.48. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $93,568.74, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on November 18, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other per-

[C6] Missoula Independent • September 12 – September 19, 2013

son having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.106538) 1002.253395-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 09/26/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200822318 B:827 P:103, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Alexa Hudson, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 43B of Rossignol Orchard Tracts II, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 03/01/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of July 12, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $175,753.35. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $169,466.74, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on November 19, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.106592) 1002.253170-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 12/28/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200700048, Bk: 789, Pg: 1132, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Joseph T. Lacroix was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Group One Lending, a Division of Northwest Mortgage Group, Inc. was Beneficiary and Stewart Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 80 of Maloney Ranch Phase VII, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201307045 B: 911 P: 411, beneficial interest in the Deed

of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 02/01/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of July 12, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $249,924.68. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $239,464.08, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on November 18, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.106255) 1002.253399-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/21/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200716281 Bk-800 Pg-486, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Michael A. Maney and Victoria A. Maney, as joint tenants was Grantor, Wells Fargo Financial Montana, Inc. was Beneficiary and First American Title Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 14 in Block 8 of Wapikiya No. 1, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. . Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of July 18, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $276,460.93. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $261,290.76, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on November 27, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis.

Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.106589) 1002.253917-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/09/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200800671, Book 211 Micro Records, Page 904 and Modified on 3/18/2013 under auditor’s file no. 201305291, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which Billy C Balentine, A Single Person was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Golf Savings Bank, Its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 37 in Block 4 of El Mar Estates Phase I, a platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201217903, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor by merger to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of July 18, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $242,482.46. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $236,190.73, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 2, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.103577) 1002.253989-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 12, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT A8 OF ALLOMONT PHASE 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, AC-

CORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Aaron K. Bell and Taunia R. Bell, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 16, 2008 and recorded June 18, 2008 in Book 821, on Page 156 under Document No. 200813977. The beneficial interest is currently held by Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,146.68, beginning September 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of June 1, 2013 is $236,312.51 principal, interest at the rate of 3.875% now totaling $7,630.90, late charges in the amount of $61.44, escrow advances of $3,713.84, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,037.75, plus accruing interest at the rate of $25.09 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: July 3, 2013 Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho) )ss. County of Bingham ) On this 3rd day of July, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 GmacVBell 41965.361 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on October 15, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN AND BEING PORTIONS OF THE SOUTHEAST ONE-QUARTER (SE1/4) OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 12 NORTH, RANGE 18 WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MONTANA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA AND BEING A PORTION OF TRACT 16 OF HELLGATE PINES ADDITION NO. 1, AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBES AS FOLLOWS: TRACT A


PUBLIC NOTICES

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s

COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID TRACT 16, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THAT 1.455 ACRE TRACT OF LAND AS DESCRIBED IN BOOK 12 (MICRO), PAGE 1325 ON RECORD IN THE MISSOULA COUNTY CLERK AND RECORDER’S OFFICE; THENCE, N. 52°32’30” W. ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID 1.455 ACRE TRACT AND ALONG THE NORTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY OF THE CHICAGO, MILWAUKEE, ST. PAUL AND PACIFIC RAILROAD (CM STP & P RR) A DISTANCE OF 75.00 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUING ALONG SAID COMMON BOUNDARY N. 52°32’30” W. A DISTANCE OF 382.26 FEET TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID 1.455 ACRE TRACT; THENCE, ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID TRACT N. 00°40’00” W. A DISTANCE OF 36.75 FEET TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID TRACT; THENCE, S. 89°58’30” E. ALONG THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY OF HELLGATE DRIVE AND ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID 1.455 ACRE TRACT DESCRIBED IN BOOK 12 (MICRO) PAGE 1325 AND NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF THAT 2.00 ACRE TRACT OF LAND AS DESCRIBED IN BOOK 70 (MICRO), PAGE 916 A DISTANCE OF 380.85 FEET; THENCE, S. 52°32’30” E. ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY OF HELLGATE DRIVE AND ALONG THE NORTHWESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID 2.00 ACRE TRACT A DISTANCE OF 50.95 FEET; THENCE, S. 26°15’14” W., 265.46 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALL ACCORDING TO CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NUMBER 886. RECORDING REFERENCE: BOOK 592 OF MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 1416. Hans A Halverson and Darcy M Halverson, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., a Montana Corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated August 6, 2008 and recorded on August 8, 2008 in Book 824 on Page 789 under Document No 200818807. The beneficial interest is currently held by Guild Mortgage Company, a California Corporation. The beneficiary has declared, a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,414.40, beginning February 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of June 30, 2013 is $179,683.81 principal, interest at the rate of 6.500% now totaling $5,871.64, late charges in the amount of $586.62, plus accruing interest at the rate of $32.44 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by

"O-E-O"–changing of the guard.

public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: June 11, 2013 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 11th day of June, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Guild V Halverson 41291.889 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on October 15, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOTS 3, 4 AND 5 IN BLOCK 22 OF CAR LINE ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Patricia Anne Webb, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., a Montana Corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated May 27, 2009 and recorded May 29, 2009 in Book 840, Page 652 of Document Number 200912813. The beneficial interest is currently held by Guild Mortgage Company. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $993.12, beginning March 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of June 30, 2013 is $174,289.86 principal, interest at the rate of 5.000% now totaling $2,953.62, late charges in the amount of $248.30 and other fees and expenses advanced of $30.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $24.21 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: June 12, 2013 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham

by Matt Jones

MLS# 20134348

$319,900 1807 Missoula Ave 3 bed, 2 bath, charming cottage like home near Rattlesnake Creek and park. Majestic views of MT Jumbo from the large deck. Newer energy efficient furnace, water heater, vinyl windows and a newer roof. There's lots of trees and landscaping creating a country retreat in the heart of the Rattlesnake. ) On this 12th day of June, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Guild v Webb 41291.891 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on October 18, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THAT PORTION OF LOTS 5, 6, 7 AND 8 LYING WEST OF THE MILLERKELLY-CAVE-GANNON CONSOLIDATED IRRIGATION DITCH IN BLOCK 21 OF LOW’S ADDITION TO THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. RECORDING REFERENCE; BOOK 756 OF MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 110 Rory Burmeister, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Insurance Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated January 10, 2008 and recorded January 11, 2008 in Book 811, Page 993 as Document No. 200800760. The beneficial interest is currently held by OneWest Bank, FSB. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $768.37, beginning September 1, 2012, and each month

EAGLE SELF STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 44, 97, 219, 236, 239, 249, 602 and 679 Units contain furniture, clothes, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc. household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday, September 23, 2013 . All auction units will only be shown each day at 3 P.M. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage office at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59804 prior to Thursday, September 26, 2013 at 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of June 21, 2013 is $112,253.50 principal, interest at the rate of 6.625% now totaling $6,604.80, late charges in the amount of $422.62, escrow advances of $1,524.39 and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,547.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $20.37 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire

Pat McCormick Real Estate Broker Real Estate With Real Experience

pat@properties2000.com 406-240-SOLD (7653)

Properties2000.com amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: June 12, 2013 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 12th day of June, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 OneWest v Burmeister 41969.972 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on October 28, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 11 IN BLOCK 2 OF SEELEY LAKE HOMSITES NO. 10A, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF, OF RECORD IN BOOK 6 OF PLATS AT PAGE 40, RECORDS OF MISSOULA

As the General Contractor/Construction Manager, Jackson Contractor Group, Inc. on behalf of Missoula County, will be accepting pricing for select scopes of work for the Missoula County Courthouse/Annex, Office Remodel Phase 3. Only structural steel & metal fabrication, stone panel and base, flooring and tile, and gypsum board, historic treatment of plaster bid packages will be accepted. All bids are due on September 10th, 2013, at 2:00pm MST to the Office of Jackson Contractor Group, located at 5800 Highway 93 South, Missoula, MT 59804. Bids may be faxed to 406-542-9150 or emailed to Mark Kobos at markk@jacksoncontractorgroup.com. Bid documents may be obtained through the Missoula Plans Exchange, through our ftp site or a hardcopy may be obtained for a plans deposit fee of $200.00 at the Jackson Contractor Group, Inc. office. Please contact Hattie Redmon at hattier@jacksoncontractorgroup.com or 406-542-9150 to gain access to the plans through our ftp site or to obtain a hardcopy.

ACROSS

1 Super guy? 6 Nigeria's capital since 1991 11 On the double 14 Adjust to fit 15 "What's Happening!!" role 16 Galena, for one 17 Following the "Whip It" band closely? 19 Put down the first card 20 Bar selections 21 Bumped into 22 Game played "with my little eye" 24 Fellas 25 Blogger Wheaton of interest to geeks everywhere 26 Where cats get chased 29 Film studio site 30 Fidel cohort 31 This, in Tijuana 32 Punk gymnast popular in the 1980s? 35 Telenovelas, in English 37 Joint owners' pronoun 38 Slot machine spinners 39 Hero with a black mask and a big chin? 42 Fisher of "Arrested Development" 43 Choose 44 Creator of M and Q 45 Manager's lists 47 Obama's mother ___ Dunham 48 Breakfast drinks, briefly 51 Like grapefruit juice 52 Award bestowed by Queen Eliz. 53 Thought 54 Norm on a golf course 56 What haters of Miley's August spectacle wanted from the media? 59 Compadre 60 Arctic dweller

Last week’s solution

61 Remains neutral? 62 1980s "truly outrageous" cartoon 63 "Melrose Place" actor Rob 64 Shannon formerly of "SNL"

DOWN

1 Bordello big shot 2 "21" singer 3 Baltimore player 4 Wall St. events 5 Mel with 1,860 RBI 6 "The Little Mermaid" role 7 Orion feature 8 Mentalist Geller 9 Gin flavoring 10 Nervous state 11 Tennis racket string material 12 "Forgot About ___" (2000 single featuring Eminem) 13 End-of-proof abbr. 18 "Jaws" resort 23 11- or 12-year-old 25 What things could always be 26 Spock crewmate 27 Alex who starred in 2007's "The Water Horse" (anagram of LEET) 28 Opposite of "avec" 29 Rio de ___ (Buenos Aires' river) 30 Word after food or kangaroo 32 Powerful whirlpool 33 Plays over and over 34 Keyboard instrument 35 "___ It Up" (Bob Marley) 36 Very, melodramatically 40 TV host Graham and boxer Ken, for two 41 Bay Area football player, for short 46 "Journey to ___" ("Sesame Street" feature) 47 Aids a criminal 48 "Island of the Blue Dolphins" author Scott 49 Singer whose surname is Kilcher 50 Unwilling to be talked down to 52 Boo-boo 53 ___-European languages 54 Brown bag staple, informally 55 "Chances ___" 57 Boy king of Egypt 58 Sister of Khloe and Kourtney ©2013 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • September 12 – September 19, 2013 [C7]


PUBLIC NOTICES COUNTY, MONTANA Randy Livingston, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on March 4, 2008 and recorded on March 11, 2008 on Book 814 and Page 684 as Document No. 200805119. The beneficial interest is currently held by Fannie Mae “Federal National Mortgage Association. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $727.07, beginning July 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of June 28, 2013 is $145,549.83 principal, interest at the rate of 3.625% now totaling $5,666.47, escrow advances of $3,023.73, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,912.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $14.46 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without

limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: June 25, 2013 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 25th day of June, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Seterus V Livingston 42008.208 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on October 29, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Unit A in Building 1823 as shown and defined in the Declaration of Condominium for Orchard Village Condominiums, together with its exhibits as recorded September 14, 2005 in

Book 760 Micro Records, Page 418 and recorded as Condo 000095, records of Missoula County, Montana, located in a parcel of ground located in and being a portion of the Northeast one-quarter (NE 1/4) of Section 20, Township 13 North, Range 19 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana and being more particularly described as follows: Lots 1A, 2A, 3 through 9, 10A, 11A, 12 through 18, 19A and 20A, Block 16, and Lots 1A, 2 through 5, 6A, 7A, 14A, I5A, 16 through 19 and 20A, Block 17, Orchard Village, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana. TOGETHER WITH an undivided 1.4% ownership in the general common elements and right of use of the limited common elements appurtenant to said Unit A in Building 1823 as said general common elements and limited common elements are defined in the Declaration of Condominium and Condo 000095 as referenced above. Debby J. Gore, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Insurance Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 18, 2007 and recorded on June 22, 2007 in Book 800, Page 76 as Document No. 200715871, The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. successor in interest to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc.. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $749.40, beginning February 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of June 30, 2013 is $139,876.29 principal, interest at the rate of 2.00% now totaling $1,387.92, late charges in the amount of $188.51, escrow advances of $486.67, suspense balance of $-26.98 and other fees and expenses advanced of $381.26, plus accruing interest at the rate of $7.66 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and

protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, whereis basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: June 24, 2013 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 24th day of June, 2013, before me, a notary public in and

for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 Citimortgage Vs. Gore 42011.878 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEES SALE on October 28, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 16 IN BLOCK 8 OF HILLVIEW HEIGHTS NO. 6, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Heather A. Adams, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 30, 2004 and Recorded on August 2, 2004 in Book 737, Page 317 as Document No. 200421883. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc.. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,250.78, beginning July 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of June 30, 2013 is $142,357.56 principal, interest at the rate of 6.25% now totaling $9,604.31, late charges in the amount of $547.32, escrow advances of $2,395.83, suspense balance of $-519.74 and other fees and expenses advanced of $531.57, plus accruing interest at the rate of $24.38 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The

Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, whereis basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: June 24, 2013 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss.

County of Bingham ) On this 24th day of June, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Citimortgage vs. Adams 42011.882 REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS(RFP) SNOW REMOVAL SERVICES PLEASANT VIEW HOMES SUBDIVISION MISSOULA, MT. The Pleasant View HOA is requesting proposals for professional snow removal services for a 600 plus home subdivision. Snow removal will include PVHOA common sidewalks, homeowner sidewalks, and alleyways as dictated in the RFP. Tasks will be done on a contractual scheduled basis. Contract will be for 1 year, starting this October, with the option to renew annually for 3 years. Must be licensed and insured in the State of Montana. No proposal can be withdrawn from a period of 90 days from due date. Proposals must be received by certified US mail before 5:00 pm October 4th, 2013. Information about submitting proposals can be obtained by contacting Bill McGlynn at secretary@pleasantviewhomes.org. Dated: 08/29/13 The Regular Board Meeting of the Missoula Housing Authority will be held at 5:30pm on Wednesday, Sept 18th, 2013 at Missoula Housing Authority Headquarters: 1235 34th Street, Missoula Montana 59801.

LEGAL SERVICES GOT HURT? GET HELP! www.bulmanlaw.com Montana’s Best Health & Safety Lawyers FREE CONSULTATION. 7217744

SERVICES CHILDCARE Diaper Service averages 18 cents per change, so why are you throwing your money away? Local cloth diaper sales & service. Missoula peeps order online and get your goods delivered during diaper route Wednesdays. 406.728.1408 or natureboymontana.com Yoga-Based Preschool Peaceful Heart Preschool located in downtown Missoula. Full preschool and kindergarten readiness curriculum all with the grounding, mindful, holistic, fun and movement-filled approach of yoga. Letters, numbers, science, art.... We keep moving! OPEN HOUSE MON, 9/16 10 - 12. 725 W. Alder #3

Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator. Testimonials Available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642

located at 1526 S. Reserve St., Missoula. Call (406) 370-3131 to schedule an appointment. zoocitymassage.com.

SBS Solar offers design and installation services for Solar Systems: residential, commercial, on- and off-grid. We also specialize in Energy Audits for home or business. www.SBSlink.com

WINDOWS

MISCELLANEOUS Beginning Banjo Lessons. Monday September 16th 7pm. A few rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

Abbott’s Glass Vinyl Windows • Wood Windows • Small Commercial Jobs • “The Meticulous Glass Professionals” Since 1992 728-6499 Alpine Window Cleaning Commercial and Residential. 4068 8 0 - 6 2 1 1 ImprovingYourOutlook.com

NICKEL AUTO GROUP 3906 Brooks • MSLA • Call Rob 360-8230

GARDEN/ LANDSCAPING Able Garden Design & Services LLC Summer is winding down and it is time to think about scheduling your fall clean ups and irrigation winterizations. Residential and Commercial services available. Call Rik 406-549-3667

MASSAGE $35/hour Deep Tissue Massage. Zoo City Massage

Commercial or Residential

880-6211

HOME IMPROVEMENT Natural Housebuilders, Inc. Building the energy-efficient SOLAR ACTIVE HOME • Custom crafted buildings • Additions/Remodels. 369-0940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net

[C8] Missoula Independent • September 12 – September 19, 2013

01 GMC Denali • 9,995 plus doc Loaded • AWD • Only 115k miles 98 Jeep Grand Cherokee • 3,895 plus doc 4x4 Laredo • Loaded • Sunroof 07 Jeep Liberty 4x4 • 12,888 plus doc Low Low miles • only 53k miles 93 Chevy Conversion van as low as 488 down 91 Ford Explorer 4x4 as low as 88 down 87 Toyota Flatbed 4x4 as low as 128 down

Blood Drive for the Red Cross 9-16-2013 come down to register or call 251-5803. Free BBQ and Coupon for $100 off any purchase at Nickel Auto Group with donation.


SUSTAINAFIEDS

SERVICES

Natural Housebuilders, Inc. Energy efficient, small homes, additions/remodels, higher-comfort crafted buildings, solar heating. 369-0940 or 6426863. www.naturalhousebuilder.net

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Natural Housebuilders, Inc. Building the energy-efficient

SOLAR ACTIVE HOME

• Custom crafted buildings • Additions/Remodels

369-0940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net

RENTALS APARTMENTS 1 bedroom, 1 bath $550 W/S/G paid, across from Public Library, coin-op laundry, offstreet parking. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 1 bedroom, 1 bath, newer complex, open concept, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 121 Ridgeway: Lolo, 2 Bedroom, On-site coin-op laundry, Fenced yard, Parking, $525. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!!

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

1324 S. 2nd St. W. “B”. 3 bed/2 bath, central location, shared yard, W/D hookups, DW. $1025. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

720 Turner St. “D”. 3 bed/1.5 bath. Northside location, offstreet parking, HEAT PAID, pet? $900 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

RSA 2-bedroom $650 available first week of October. Contact Colin Woodrow at 406-5494113, ext. 113 or cwoodrow@missoulahousing.org

430 Washington 2 bedroom, 1 bath W/S/G paid, DW, W/D hookups, off-street parking, coinops on site. $700. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

1502 #4 Ernest 1 bed/1 bath, W/D hookups, recent remodeling, central location. $600. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

825 SW Higgins Ave. B7. 2 bed/1 bath, single garage, DW, W/D hookups, near Pattee Creek Market $800. Grizzly Property Management 5422060

Solstice Apartments. (1) 2 bedroom $700 w/s/g paid. Contact Colin Woodrow at 406-5494113, ext. 113 or cwoodrow@missoulahousing.org

MOBILE HOMES

2 bedroom, 1 bath $675 W/S/G paid, DW, W/D hookups, off-street parking. free standing gas stove. Cat upon approval. No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bath $695, quiet cul-de-sac, DW, coin-op lndry, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 612 S. 4th St. W.: 3 Bdrm, Wood flrs, 2 Baths Bonus room, Washer & dryer, *FREE WI-FI*, Main flr, Small pet, $1150. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!!

Equinox Apartments. 1 bedroom $517. Contact Colin Woodrow at 406-549-4113, ext. 113 or cwoodrow@missoulahousing.org

Studio, $515, (Handi Cap) separate room for bedroom, w/d hookups, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent. W/S/G/Electric included. $425/month 406-273-6034

DUPLEXES 1213 Cleveland “B” 1bd/1ba, central location, off-street pkng, HEAT PAID. $625. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 205 1/2 W. Kent. Studio/1 bath, lower level, shared yard, all utilities included. $600. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 321 W. Spruce 2 bed/1 bath, downtown, W/D hookups, off-

street parking. $875. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 5600 Ebb Way: 3 Bedrooms, Side by side duplex, Garage, Hook-ups, Fenced back yard, Pet OK! $925. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!!

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Gold Dust Apartments. Gold Dust Apartments. 2 bedroom $691 all utilities paid. 3 bedroom $798 all utilities paid. Contact Matty Reed at 406-5494113, ext. 130 or mreed@missoulahousing.org Palace Apartments. (1) Studio $407. (4) 1 bedrooms $438. (1) 2 bedrooms $527. h/w/s/g paid. Contact Matty Reed at 406-549-4113, ext. 130. mreed@missoulahousing.org

GardenCity

Property Management

422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • September 12 – September 19, 2013 [C9]


RENTALS HOUSES 120 South Ave East. 3 bed/2 bath, close to University, fenced back yard. $1450. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 To lease in Florence 2 BDRM house with bonus room, fireplace, all appliances, 2 car garage with RV space, dog allowed. $945/month. Damage deposit required. 406-880-5261 2203 E. Crescent: 3 Bedroom, Beautiful yard w/ huge deck, Garage, $1195. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!!

Bright, clean 3 bedroom house on 1/2 acre with 750 sqft garage, dogs welcome. $1200/mo + $1000 deposit. 406-549-7151 3+ bedroom, 3 bath house $1,200. Garage, DW, w/d hookups, lawn care provided, W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 4972A Potter Park Loop. 3 bed/1.5 bath condo, newer unit, close to shopping. Double garage, yard, pet? $1200. Grizzly Property Management 5422060

Two bedroom unfurnished basement. W/D hookups, fenced yard, small dog friendly. University area. 204 Livingston. $950/12 month lease. Available 9/1. 880-5261

ROOMMATES

1&2

FIDELITY

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

Management Services, Inc.

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

117 Johnson 1 Bed Apt. $510/month

549-7711 Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com

Uncle Robert Lane 2 Bed Apt. $660/month Visit our website at fidelityproperty.com

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing 30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

www.gatewestrentals.com

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

MHA Management manages 10 properties throughout Missoula.

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. "Let us tend your den"

All properties are part of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program.

Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

Finalist

Finalist

The Missoula Housing Authority complies with the Fair Housing Act and offers Reasonable Accommodations to persons with Disabilities.

1235 34th St. • Missoula (406) 549-4113 missoulahousing.org

REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 1010 Vine. 2 bed, 1 bath in Lower Rattlesnake close to Mount Jumbo trails, UM & downtown. Many upgrades. $169,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240—7653. pat@properties2000.com

216 Tower. Cute 2 bed, 1 bath on 1/2 acre close to Clark Fork River. 750 sq.ft garage/shop. $185,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com 1944 S. 8th W. 2 bed, 1 bath on two lots. Wood floors, garden & front deck. $158,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com

11689 Stolen Rock Court. 5 bed, 3 bath, 2 car garage on 3.15 acres. $315,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net

2607 Deer Canyon Court. 6 bed, 3 bath on Prospect Meadows cul-de-sac. Fenced yard, deck, hot tub and sweeping views. $449,000. Properties 2000. Pat McCormick 2407653. pat@properties2000.com 2607 View Drive. 3 bed, 2 bath ranch-style home in Target Range. Hardwood floors, fireplace & 2 car garage. $239,500. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate. 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com

3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Historic Stevensville home. $250,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

3010 West Central. 3 bed, 1 bath on 5 acres in Target Range. Borders DNRC land. $499,900. Properties 2000. Pat McCormick 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com

4 Bdr, 2 Bath, Miller Creek home on a 0.6 acre lot. $380,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

3 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Big Flat home on 5.3 acres. $451,250. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

309 Benton. 3 bed, 1.5 bath home upgraded throughout. Large fenced yard, patio, deck, fruit trees & 2 car garage. $259,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com

4 Bdr, 2 Bath, Miller Creek home on 1 acre. $250,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

9755 Horseback Ridge. 3 bed, 3 bath on 5 acres overlooking Clark Fork River. Missoula Valley and Mission Mountain views. $420,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free comparative market analysis. 360-8234 Cute Westside Home 1312 Phillips. $185,900. 2 bed-

12646 Conestoga, Lolo $565,000 •

1807 Missoula Avenue. Lovely Bavarian-style 3 bed, 2 bath in Lower Rattlesnake. Mount Jumbo views & 2 car garage. $319,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com

MLS# 20135424

2 Bdr, 1 Bath North Missoula home. $160,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

UPTOWN FLATS #306 Air conditioned 1 bed, 1 bath third floor corner unit. Community room, deck with grill & fitness center

$162,000

4 bed, 4 bath, 4400 sqft, Beyer Meadows. Beautifully landscaped, with views in all directions. Custom home, top of the line finishes throughout. Basement is a private sanctuary with large family room and service bar complete with stainless appliances and black granite counter. Full theater room! The back patio is massive, made of stamped and stained concrete. Completely new paint, both exterior and interior. New plush, deep carpeting on all levels.

Call Anne for more details

546-5816

MLS #20131347

Anne Jablonski annierealtor@gmail.com movemontana.com

PORTICO REAL ESTATE

[C10] Missoula Independent • September 12 – September 19, 2013

Curtis Semenza

406-360-0364 • curtis.semenza@prumt.com


REAL ESTATE room, 1 bath. Established garden and fruit trees. Close to downtown, parks, bike trails. KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Grant Creek Frontage. 4 bed, 3 bath with open floor plan, fireplace, deck & 2 car garage. $655,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7365 milyardhomes@yahoo.com

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES 1845 B West Central. 3 bed, 1.5 bath on quiet cul-de-sac. Large, open kitchen, patio & garage. No HOA dues! $155,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270 glasgow@montana.com 2025 Mullan Road. Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos. Large secure units with affordable HOA dues. Starting at $149,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 8804749. montpref@bigsky.net Burns Street Commons 1400 Burns St. #15. $159,9000. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. Coveted 3 bedroom home in the Burns St. Commons, next to the Burns St. Bistro and the Missoula Community Co-op. KD: 2405227 porticorealestate.com Condo With Views 1545 Cooley, Apt C. 2 bed, 1 bath Westside condo close to downtown, Burns Street Bistro & Missoula Community Co-op. $128,500 MLS# 20134747 KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com Uptown Flats #103. 1 bed, 1 bath with W/D, patio and handicap accessible features. $155,000. Anne Jablonski, Por-

tico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com Uptown Flats #306. 1 bed, 1 bath top floor unit with lots of light. W/D, carport, storage & access to exercise room. $162,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com

Why Rent? Own Your Own 1400 Burns. Designed with energy efficiency, comfort and affordability in mind. Next to Burns Street Bistro and Missoula Community Co-op. Starting at $79,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

RICE TEAM

Robin Rice 240-6503

Uptown Flats. From $155,000. Upscale gated community near downtown. All SS appliances, car port, storage and access to community room and exercise room plus more. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5465816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com

riceteam@bigsky.net missoularealestate4sale.com

NEW LISTING! • SELLER MOTIVATED! 19655 Mullan Road, Frenchtown $319,900 • Log & frame 3 bed, 2 bath on 15 acres • Mother-in-law apartment • Oversize garage with 1 bed, 1 bath apt.

Stensrud Building Downtown Missoula • $868,000 FIRST TIME ON THE MARKET!

GREAT LOLO PROPERTY 11082 Cherokee Lane $237,900. Well-maintained 3 bed, 3 bath. Large kitchen & dining area. Large deck with great view of the Lolo Valley

SELLER MOTIVATED! BRING OFFER! 13465 Crystal Creek $244,000 3 bed, 2 bath. Two wood stoves, large deck & bonus room for small shop. Near Turah fishing access

HOME & SMALL BUSINESS 102 Boardwalk, Stevensville $283,000 3 bed, 2 bath, Landscaped. Zoned commercial for small business. Shop is 48' by 30' w/three 10 x 9' doors

Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos $144,900 - $249,900 Under new ownership! 1 and 2 bedrooms. Large units, nice finishes, secure entry, secure U/G parking, riverfront, affordable HOA dues and much more. Owner financing comparable to FHA terms available with as little as 3.5% down! Units, pricing and info available at www.mullanheights.com

With it's Excellence in Historic Preservation Award. Lovingly and completely renovated by Mark Kersting, this turn key building offers a tasty treat for the discerning history buff! Mark has kept the original flare and flavor of this 1890's building alive and beautiful. The zoning designation offers many varied uses from residential to commercial, and many other uses in between. The back 900 sq ft area is ADA compliant.

1845 B West Central $155,000 3 bed, 1.5 bath 2 story townhome with open floor plan on quiet cul-de-sac. AC, UG sprinklers, patio & garage. No HOA fees!

MLS# 20132764 For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Rochelle

Missoula Properties Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com

missoulanews.com • September 12 – September 19, 2013 [C11]


REAL ESTATE LAND FOR SALE

Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties.2000.com

Florence Acres 944 Pathfinder. 330 gorgeous acres with 1 bed cabin and double garage. This little slice of perfection can be yours! Build your dream home here. $650,000 MLS# 20134863, 20134864 KD: 2405227 porticorealestate.com

Noxon Reservoir Avista frontage lots near Trout Creek, MT. Red Carpet Realty 728-7262 www.redcarpet-realty.com

Frenchtown area, 14.9 Acres, existing well, adjacent to Forest Service land. $225,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

Commercial Lease Space Fantastic opportunity to be neighbors with the award-winning Homeword Organization. New, LEED registered, high quality, sustainably-built office space close to river and downtown. $11-$15 per sq.ft. KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com

Near Riverfront Park. 1265 Dakota #B. To-be-built, 3 bed, 2 bath with 2 car garage. Lot: $55,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com NHN Mormon Creek Road. 12 acres with Sapphire Mountain views. $150,000. Pat McCormick,

COMMERCIAL

HISTORIC STENSRUD BUILDING. Renovated 1890’s building with 95% original hardware. Residential or commercial zoning. Lovely opportunity. $868,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 7289270. glasgow@montana.com

OUT OF TOWN 3 Bdr, 1 Bath Alberton home home. $130,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Stevensville area home on 6+ acres. $325,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Florence area home on 12.6 irrigated acres. $500,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 5 Bdr, 3 Bath, Florence area home on 3.2 acres. $575,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

Ronan, Montana 406 Main Street SE

$249,900

OPEN HOUSE • Sunday 9/15 • 2-4 PM. 1090 Mecate Lane, Potomac $400,000. Gated 5 bed, 4 bath homestead on 40 acres bordering Lubrecht Forest. Greenhouse, yurt, gardens, chicken coop,

PRICED BELOW MARKET VALUE

Beautiful large family custom built home.

This home features 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, wrap around covered porch, triple car garage, large fenced yard with lots of trees. There is separate living quarters with its own bath and kitchenette. Judy Coulter, GRI • Wright Real Estate Co. • 406.249.4101

[C12] Missoula Independent • September 12 – September 19, 2013

finished 40'x60' heated shop and numerous green features. Williams Real Estate. Jeannette Whitney Williams, call me today! 239-2049

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL

Corner Lot in East Missoula! 450 Speedway. 1 bed, 1 bath, garage with attached workspace. Mature trees, easy access to downtown and the UofM. MLS# 20135333 $139,500 KD 2405227 porticorealestate.com

EQUITY LOANS ON NONOWNER OCCUPIED MONTANA REAL ESTATE. We also buy Notes & Mortgages. Call Creative Finance & Investments @ 406-721-1444 or visit www.creative-finance.com

Open House Sun 9/15 from 1-3 Potomac Log Cabin. 1961 Blaine, Potomac. $195,000. 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath, 8.77 acres. Light-filled log cabin with an open floor plan with high ceilings and large windows. Hiking in the summer with a great little sled hill in the winter! KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com.

Looking for a local mortgage lender? Call Lisa Holcomb, Loan Officer at Guild Mortgage Company. 1001 S Higgins Suite A2, Missoula. Cell: 406-370-8792 or Office: 258-7519

Did you know? Posting a classified ad ONLINE is FREE! www.missoulanews.com


Five Valleys Crime Stoppers Presents: Country Music Superstar

PEACE PARTY

JOHN ANDERSON

Annual fundraiser

in concert with special guest Thom Bresh Saturday, September 14th

7:30pm in the University Theater Tickets available in advance at Rockin Rudy’s

Jeannette Rankin Peace Center Sunday, September 15 4:30 to 8 pm in Caras Park For more info: jrpc.org

JAZZ MONDAYS Featuring:

Basement Boys

7 PM @ Monk’s Bar • For more info: monksbarmt.com


Missoula Independent