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UP FRONT

RESIDENTS FIGHT MOTORIZED TRAIL EXPANSION ON BLACKTAIL MOUNTAIN

$10,000 ISN’T ENOUGH: THE NRA LETS THE SICK JEREMY LURGIO FINDS NEWS WHEN RANGE SCOPE CSKT MEMBERS PROTEST PAY GET AWAY WITH MURDER LOST MONTANA TOWNS


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


UP FRONT

RESIDENTS FIGHT MOTORIZED TRAIL EXPANSION ON BLACKTAIL MOUNTAIN

$10,000 ISN’T ENOUGH: THE NRA LETS THE SICK JEREMY LURGIO FINDS NEWS WHEN RANGE SCOPE CSKT MEMBERS PROTEST PAY GET AWAY WITH MURDER LOST MONTANA TOWNS


Missoula Independent Page 2 August 2 – August 9, 2012


nside

Cover Story

I went to Missoula’s Northside recently to visit Brian Donahue, a construction worker originally from central Illinois, to hear about the celebrated crow-hunting season back where he comes from. As one thing led to another, he told me about the time he found a dead crow in his backyard in Missoula and how, as he was trying to dispose of it, other crows circled him and dove Cover illustration by Pumpernickel Stewart for his head. He had to summon his roommate home to fend them off long enough for him to scoop the dead bird into a garbage bag, he said. “But why were they attacking you?” I asked. “Well, I shoot them off my front porch with an air rifle,” he said. .....................14

News Letters Montana needs a budget controlled by its people ........................................4 The Week in Review Thunderstorms spark fires in the Bitterroot...........................6 Briefs Safeway plays hardball......................................................................................6 Etc. The Tester-Rehberg duel in black-and-white .......................................................7 Up Front Residents fight motorized expansion on Blacktail.....................................8 Up Front The temporary lives of migrant workers in the Flathead ..........................9 Range Mentally ill need drugs, not guns..................................................................11 Agenda Questions Montanans should ask about the energy boom .......................12

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan Fermentation fervor......................................................................18 Happiest Hour Earl Grey Pale Ale at Great Northern Brewery...............................19 8 Days a Week Cherish the birds.............................................................................21 Mountain High Men’s river retreat ..........................................................................29 Scope Lurgio turns his lens on lost—and found—towns of Montana......................30 Soundcheck Tidal Horn is hilariously laid back......................................................31 Noise Gutpanthers, Tender Forever, All Eyes West, Strangled Darlings...................32 Film Aubrey Plaza adds brilliance to Safety..............................................................33 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films ..................................................34

Thursday, August 2nd 9 pm OPEN MIC NIGHT

Live Music To be determined Friday, August 3rd & Saturday, August 4th

Exclusives Street Talk....................................................................................................................4 In Other News...........................................................................................................13 Classifieds ................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y .................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle....................................................................................................C-7 This Modern World ...............................................................................................C-12

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Robert Meyerowitz PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson ASSOCIATE EDITOR Matthew Frank PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Jason McMackin STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Skylar Browning COPY EDITOR Ted McDermott PHOTO INTERN Michelle Gustafson ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Chris Melton, Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Brad Tyer, Dave Loos, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Azita Osanloo, Jamie Rogers, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 Email address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2012 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

Missoula Independent Page 3 August 2 – August 9, 2012


STREET TALK

by Chad Harder

Asked on Monday, July 31, on North Higgins Ave.

Q: This week’s feature story is an essay about crows. What’s the most remarkable experience you’ve ever had with a bird? Follow-up: Ever have to eat crow? Steven Dykes: I once found a crow with a broken wing, so I cut a hole in my sock and slipped it over his head like a body cast and brought it to a place that takes care of sick or injured birds. He pecked the shit out of me the whole way over. Black bird fries: No, but in high school a coach said he’d eat crow if he lost a bet. Well, he lost and someone cooked up a crow—which he ate in front of the entire assembly!

Suzy Nathanson: Well, I know its mythical but the phoenix has surfaced throughout my life. They’re an unusual, rare bird associated with fire and rebirth, only rising from the ashes once every 500 years as part of a cyclical evolution of inner awareness. I’m a rare bird, and all I’ve learned about the phoenix has applied to my life. Circling through: Sure, plenty of times. If anything, I think I’m too ready to take responsibility when things go wrong.

Shelly Conner: One time when I lived in Oregon I was walking to work and a crow flew down and dragged its feet right through my hair! It was really freaky. Taste like chicken? Doesn't everybody have to eat crow sometimes?

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Reject LR-123 For a good number of years, I was a banker here in Montana. If you were to go to any bank and ask for a $100 withdrawal, the first thing a teller would do is make sure you had funds in your account. Verifying that there is money in an account before handing over cash or checks just makes common sense. It is a standard accounting practice whether you are a teller, a businessman or the governor of Montana. My understanding of how to run a good business is just one reason I oppose Legislative Referendum 123, which could be on the Montana ballot this November. LR-123 is an irresponsible referendum that would undermine Montana’s ability to wisely manage our state budget and would subject state government to even more unnecessary political gimmicks and tricks. Under LR-123, if a single state employee, the legislative fiscal analyst, underestimates state revenues, it would trigger an automatic tax kickback, with most of the money going to the wealthiest Montanans. If that sounds crazy to you, you are not alone. LR-123 is so convoluted and complex, even budget experts do not agree on exactly how it would work. You do not need to be a banker to recognize that automatically cutting kickback checks based on projections is irresponsible. Last year, for example, the state legislative fiscal division was hundreds of millions of dollars off in estimating how much money Montana really had. If LR-123 were law of the land back then, the state would have ended up giving away revenues without even being able to consider necessary investments in schools, roads, infrastructure, wild land fire protection, children’s health care and other essential state services.

Up Front

Range

Agenda

Montana has weathered the recent recession better than most states because we saved money in the state budget for a rainy day. As many of our farmers and ranchers would say, we left some “grain in the bin.”

“We need a budget that is controlled by the people of Montana through their elected representatives, not by one unelected legislative analyst.” LR-123 would end that practice in order to line the pockets of a special few. That is not only bad business. It is also not fair. Just look at what happened to Oregon, the only state with a measure like LR-123. In December 2007, just as the country was heading into a recession, Oregon returned $1.1 billion to taxpayers, effectively emptying their grain bin. In 2009, after their state economy crashed and unemployment soared, the Oregon Legislature voted to raise taxes by $727 million and they are still in debt today. This kind of policy in Montana would be equally devastating.

News Quirks

LR-123 even prohibits any kind of override or legislative review—the kickback is automatic. If projections show the state has surplus money, checks go out the door with no questions asked and over 60 percent of rebates would go to the top 20 percent of taxpayers. Projecting revenues is a complicated process. To get the best results, information must be continuously updated from numerous sources. You must have the flexibility to adjust to sudden and often dramatic changes in economic activity, not to mention natural disasters like fighting forest fires and spring floods. The last thing our emergency services need is to become handcuffed because the state is forced to send automatic kickbacks to millionaires. We need a budget that is controlled by the people of Montana through their elected representatives, not by one unelected legislative analyst. LR-123 proposes to shift oversight from the legislature to the state legislative analyst, empowering this person with full authority to disburse our state’s tax surplus. District Judge Jeffrey Sherlock recently cited this fact in ruling that LR-123 is blatantly unconstitutional. The matter is now before our supreme court. If the Montana Supreme Court upholds Judge Sherlock’s ruling before ballots are certified, LR-123 will be taken off the ballot. If not, it will be on the ballot and you the voter will get to decide. If this dangerous and irresponsible measure does appear on the November ballot, I ask all Montanans to do the right thing, and vote NO on LR-123. Learn more about LR-123 and get involved at NoLR123.org today. Ed Jasmin Montanans for Fiscal Accountability Helena

Comments from MissoulaNews.com Charles Chandler: The best bird thing I ever saw was an aerial battle between a bald eagle and a golden eagle while on the Blackfoot. The golden was calling and circling while the bald was defending its nest. They would hook up in the air, tumbling and falling and releasing before they hit the ground. It was amazing. Tomorrow’s menu: Not yet, luckily.

Doug Dykeman: I’m a helicopter pilot and I’ve run into a few starlings but it’s never been a problem. We try to avoid them, but it’s not always possible. I’ve also caught a hummingbird that was stuck in a building. I let it go outside, but it came right back and stared at me for a while before it flew off. Thanks, honey: Yeah, according to my wife I eat it lots.

Missoula Independent Page 4 August 2 – August 9, 2012

Doesn’t pencil out

Entirely wrong pencil

I just had a new roof put on and have looked into solar panels (see “Grants gone dry,” July 26). But without the NorthWestern Energy grant it just won’t work as the cost is still too high, with a very long payback period. With the grant, and some state and federal tax credits, the average homeowner out-of-pocket cost is $2,000-$2,500, which in Montana equals about a 10year payback. Posted on 07/26/2012 at 4:52 p.m.

So, while we’re computing payback, especially if you paid the whole cost instead of using the grant of other people’s money and other people’s taxes, should we also think about what the solar panels will add to the cost of replacing a roof, which in many cases is done every 20 years? Or more often if damaged in a hail or wind storm or if a tree (we have lots of those) falls on a house? Awhile back I read an article that claimed solar panels are not covered

under regular homeowner’s insurance. If that is still true, the payback may take forever, or cost way more than it claims to save. So many times our eco-crazies leave out many of the real cost considerations and distort the reality. I hope if you do use solar panels you will try to find some made in America and not in China. But I understand that may be difficult to do. Posted on 07/27/2012 at 7:24 a.m.

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via email: editor@missoulanews.com.

L


Missoula Independent Page 5 August 2 – August 9, 2012


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, July 25

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Range

Agenda

News Quirks

VIEWFINDER

by Chad Harder

The Missoula City Council asks Police Chief Mark Muir why law enforcement didn’t cite any locals for setting off fireworks on July 3 and July 4 in light of a city ordinance that prohibits them. Muir says his department would like the lawmaking body to clarify its stance on the issue to help guide future policing efforts.

• Thursday, July 26 University of Montana President Royce Engstrom announces UM is signing a two-year contract with interim Grizzly football coach Mick Delany. Delany, 70, took over last spring in the wake of several sexual assault allegations lodged against the team and the subsequent firing of coach Robin Pflugrad and Athletic Director Jim O’Day.

• Friday, July 27 Three Missoula Osprey players tally three hits each en route to a 10-1 thumping of the Great Falls Voyagers before about 2,200 fans at Ogren Park in Missoula. Chris Pack pitches six shutout innings, allowing just three hits and a walk. The Osprey improve to 18-19.

• Saturday, July 28 Locals and tourists wearing tank tops, short shorts and flip-flops flood Caras Park to drink Highlander Beer and celebrate the third annual Missoula Celtic Festival, a celebration of Celtic culture that features food and music from the likes of the Montana Shamrockers, the Screaming Orphans and the Young Dubliners.

• Sunday, July 29 Strong thunderstorms spark nine new fires in the Bitterroot. The blazes prompt a quick response from fire crews, which include 24 smokejumpers who are dispatched to blazes in the Darby, Sula and West Fork ranger districts. The largest fire is the 1.5acre Mosquito Meadows blaze near Darby Road.

• Monday, July 30 A Montana Cannabis Industry Association billboard goes up in Billings that says, “Welcome to Yellowstone County … Where the will of the people doesn’t count. Vote No on IR-124.” That’s a referendum of the legislature’s 2011 medical marijuana law, sponsored by Billings Sen. Jeff Essman, that curtailed the state’s citizen-initiated medical marijuana law.

• Tuesday, July 31 Missoula’s Mountain Water Company, now owned by the global private equity firm The Carlyle Group, announces that it’s filed an application with the Montana Public Service Commission to increase water rates by 5 percent. The company says the adjustment is required to account for rising costs.

The antlers of this whitetail buck, which was spotted in Missoula’s North Hills on July 26, are covered in fast-growing velvet that will soon mineralize and harden, preparing it for the battles of the fall breeding season.

Labor Safeway’s crackdown Safeway suspended at least 15 staffers without pay in the middle of July and fired two employees as punishment for accepting and providing discounted coffee drinks from a Starbucks kiosk inside its Polson store, employees say. “All of this could have been handled with a simple bulletin,” says Naomi Hartman, 32, who worked as the Starbucks kiosk manager in Polson for just more than a year. Officially a Safeway employee, she was terminated July 27. Prior to becoming the coffee kiosk manager in Polson, Hartman had worked other jobs at the Polson Safeway and as a kiosk manager at a Missoula Safeway. When she started managing the Polson Starbucks, Hartman says, it was established practice to give discounts to employees. It made sense, she says, because operational standards for freshness created a “ridiculous amount of waste.”

“I probably threw away at least 100 if not 200 shots of espresso down the drain every day just trying to calibrate my machine,” she says. “A lot of times I was throwing away an entire pot of coffee, because it timed out. I considered a lot of what I was giving a discount on garbage.” After Safeway loss prevention specialists discovered the practice, they conducted interviews with employees. “It was an interrogation,” Hartman says. “We were forced to sign statements. And, honestly, my statement was very much them telling me what I should write down.” A woman who identified herself as a Safeway manager in Polson declined to comment for this article. She referred a reporter to corporate Safeway offices. As of press time, Safeway had not responded to requests for comment. A suspended Safeway employee who spoke to the Independent expressed fear that the grocer would terminate him in retaliation for speaking publicly. To alleviate his concern, the Independent is not publishing his name. “They’re looking for any reason to fire us,” he says.

Though nobody ever told that employee that discounted coffee was against the rules, he’s also contrite. The recent crackdown makes sense, he says, when one takes into account how many staffers were receiving discounts. “It adds up considerably.” Jessica Mayrer

Justice Family of would-be snitch sues On July 27, 2010, 21-year-old Missoula native Colton Peterson committed suicide with a hunting rifle. Three assailants had beaten Peterson in his home on July 23, 2010. Police found marijuana and drug paraphernalia at his house three days later. According to a lawsuit filed against the Missoula Police and Sheriff ’s departments July 6, Peterson’s mother, Juliena Darling, told police immediately after the marijuana bust that her son’s mental health was deteriorating. The suit alleges that law enforcement “promised Plaintiff

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Missoula Independent Page 6 August 2 – August 9, 2012


Inside

Letters

Briefs

Juliena Darling to assist in getting a mental health evaluation for Colton Peterson.” Rather than evaluating Peterson’s mental health, the suit alleges, police pressured him to help set up a sting to lure local drug dealers. The family asserts that Peterson’s suicide was the “result of the efforts of Missoula city and county law enforcement to force him to serve as a police informant.” The suit seeks damages to compensate for an alleged violation of Peterson’s constitutional rights, for loss of income resulting from his death and for his parents’ emotional distress. Missoula Police Chief Mark Muir says that law enforcement acted appropriately. Muir says it’s not unusual for police to use smaller fish like Peterson to lure bigger ones. Police were ultimately trying to give Peterson a way out of trouble in exchange for his cooperation. “If he had information that could have provided us with an opportunity to go after the bigger fish,” Muir says, it could have helped Peterson, too. In light of the ongoing challenges law enforcement faces, Muir says, his officers are doing the best they can with the tools they have. “Dealing with folks in crisis is very challenging and sometimes a very disappointing circumstance.” Jessica Mayrer

CSKT How to spend $150 million In May, the feds struck a $1 billion settlement with 41 American Indian tribes, the plaintiffs in a class-action lawsuit filed in late 2006, Nez Perce Tribe, et al. v. Salazar, et al., alleging that the U.S. government mismanaged tribal funds. The settlement is similar to, but entirely separate from, the $3.4 billion Cobell settlement reached in 2010. The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes is one of the 41 plaintiffs, and they’re due more than $150 million. On July 26, its Tribal Council divvied it up: Each of the tribes’ roughly 7,850 members will receive $10,000. The tribe will squirrel away the rest—about $71.5 million—for “undetermined” cultural and economic programs, says tribal spokesman Robert McDonald. “Nothing’s been earmarked.” The $10,000 isn’t enough for Carlita Gonzalez, a 52-year-old CSKT member who, along with a dozen or so others, stood in the shadow of the

Up Front

Range

pedestrian bridge that spans Highway 93 in Pablo, in the center of the Flathead Reservation, on the morning of Monday, July 30, protesting for more. “We’re out here picketing for 100 percent,” she said—more than $19,000 each. Several passing cars honked in approval. Gonzalez and her fellow protesters, who call themselves “The People’s Voice,” spent all day there, with plans to demonstrate “all this week,

and next week too, if that’s what it takes for them to give it to us.” Gonzalez argued that individual tribal members should decide how to spend the money, not the tribal government. “We don’t even know specifics of where they’re going to put our money, and it’s the people’s money,” she said. She offered a handout, titled “Reasons for the Protest,” stating that not all tribal members will benefit from the programs council could invest in, that such programs could be “under poor management” and that impoverished members could use the cash. But McDonald says the council carefully deliberated, over the course of several public meetings, how best to use the money. He says those who attended the meetings voiced four priorities: providing for elders, preserving native language, cultural programs and economic development. The council’s decision to bank almost half of the $150 million, he says, “is an effort to strike a balance between the needs that were expressed in those meetings as well as an attempt to plan for the future.” Matthew Frank

Agenda

News Quirks

Forests

BY THE NUMBERS $453

million

A tree-fall windfall The storm that ripped through western Montana on June 26 uprooted trees, snapped power lines and left thousands without power. That morning, Mary Miester was driving near Lake Alva, in the Seeley Valley, and told the Missoulian she saw a tree fall on a camper and fold it like a taco. Folks at the campground there told TV station KPAX that the mass splintering of trees sounded like gunshots. The 40,000-acre Swan River State Forest suffered a massive blow-down. Staffers there had never seen anything like it. About 6,000 acres were affected. Now state forest officials are hoping to turn some of those fallen trees— about 1.5 million board feet—into cash by proposing a 1,900-acre timber salvage. Such projects generate funds for the state school system. To conduct the salvage, forest officials have to account for the valley’s grizzly bear population. The area is governed by the Swan Valley Grizzly Bear Conservation Agreement, a pact among the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Forest Service and timber company Plum Creek. The pact, which dates back to 1996, requires a rotational schedule for management activities. The DNRC asked USFWS for an exception that would allow salvage into October, more than a month longer than the agreement allows. USFWS green-lighted the project on July 27, so long as other nearby areas are left alone this summer and next, to minimize the impact on grizzlies. But there are also ecological benefits of blowdowns. “We have requirements to keep what we call ‘coarse woody debris’ out on the forest floor to facilitate nutrient recycling, and we also require that there be some downed material for lynx—denning material,” says DNRC Forest Management Bureau Chief Sonya Germann. “In this case, though, we have to interface all of our management goals. So as well as our biodiversity or ecological objectives, we have to look at our fiduciary responsibility to these lands, too.” And, she says, “When you’re looking at such a broad affected area, where these trees are jack-strawed, they’re going to inhibit regeneration of the next forest to come.” The DNRC expects to complete an environmental assessment for the proposed timber salvage by Aug. 3. Matthew Frank

Unspent funds leftover at the end of Montana’s fiscal year, according to Gov. Brian Schweitzer’s office.

etc. Montana’s Senate race is mired in half-truths. The past few weeks have seen Sen. Jon Tester and Rep. Denny Rehberg trading barbs over who supports cancer prevention more. The controversy is dominating political ads, spurring press releases and prompting third-party responses from various organizations. But unlike campaigning, the underlying issues are rarely black-and-white. Take the Montana Republican Party ad from late June, which touted Rehberg as a politician who “refuses to toe the party line.” The spot praised him for going against the partisan grain in 2008, by voting against President Bush’s Troubled Asset Relief Program, aka the “Wall Street bailout.” It wasn’t the first time TARP made an appearance this election season. One of Rehberg’s earliest campaign ads featured folks claiming Tester “used our tax dollars to give bonuses to Wall Street executives.” Did Tester vote for TARP? No. Did he expect American International Group would pay out millions in bonuses while receiving billions in taxpayer-backed TARP funds? Surely not. Tester and Rehberg were united in their public disgust over AIG’s actions back in the spring of 2009, along with Sen. Max Baucus. Montana’s congressional delegation never minced words on the subject—at least, not until Tester and Rehberg were squaring off for a Senate seat. Shortly after the controversy broke, Congress announced an attempt to recoup some of those misdirected TARP funds in the form of a 90 percent tax on AIG’s bonuses. Rehberg voted in favor of that clawback. Yet he eventually backpedaled on his vote to regulate executive compensation at AIG, saying the clawback was unconstitutional and un-American. He subsequently voted against a proposed cap on executive compensation at companies receiving federal money. Taken out of context, any one of these actions by Tester or Rehberg could be used as ammunition in this tense run-up to the November election. So, does it come as a shock to anyone that Rehberg voted against Title X funding destined for clinics that offer family planning services? Or that he recently re-ignited the GOP’s war against the Affordable Care Act rule that employer-provided health insurance cover contraception? Despite what the state GOP’s June ad would have us believe, the “R” behind Rehberg’s name doesn’t come with an asterisk. And unfortunately, campaigns seldom take nuances into account.

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Missoula Independent Page 7 August 2 – August 9, 2012


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The road more traveled Residents fight motorized expansion on Blacktail by Alex Sakariassen

Leslie Gray has two windsocks in her front yard on Blacktail Mountain, six miles up from Lakeside. Both are clearly visibly through the picture window in her living room. In the dry summer months, they mark the path of the dust billowing up from the dirt road 50 yards from her door—and indicate whether Gray can leave her windows open. “This is where I chose to live the rest of my life,” Gray says. “And I mightily resent the fact that there would be total disregard for those of us that call this place home.” Increased traffic along the Blacktail Mountain Road is just one of the concerns Gray and her neighbors have regarding the Flathead National Forest’s proposal to add 24 miles of new motorized trails to what’s known as the Island Unit. They already note problems with trash, with displaced wildlife, with people shooting up signs and trees. The road is one of two points of entry for the new motorized trails. The forest’s trail addition project, approved July 2, is now in a 45-day appeal period. Gray recently founded the Blacktail Mountain Conservation Group, which is drafting an appeal alongside Missoula-based Wildlands CPR. Some of the Island Unit project’s detractors believe Blacktail Mountain is shouldering the burden of motorized use to save wilder parts of the Flathead. Gray accuses the Forest Service of “throwing the ATV crowd a bone.” Adam Rissien, a policy specialist for Wildlands CPR, calls Blacktail a “sacrifice zone.” Much of the rest of the forest overlaps with federally protected wilderness or falls within the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem’s grizzly bear recovery zone. By comparison, the Island Unit is already densely roaded and heavily used by motorized vehicles. “That shouldn’t mean it’s the best place to put machines,” Rissien says. “It actually means you have to be very careful about what you do on this mountain because it’s already heavily impacted.” Up on the Swan Lake Ranger District, project manager Andrew Johnson couldn’t agree more. While the idea for trail expansion came partly in response to shrinking opportunities for motorized use elsewhere on the forest, he says, officials also recognized a potential solution for concerns on the Island Unit. People were riding closed roads, developing unauthorized trails and cutting down firewood illegally. “The real birth of this project,” Johnson says, “was,

Missoula Independent Page 8 August 2 – August 9, 2012

can we provide more legitimate places for motor vehicle users to recreate at the same time as solving some of the unacceptable stuff we’re seeing out there?” Johnson believes the Island Unit project goes a long way toward alleviating environmental concerns. It avoids designating trails in secure elk habitat where illegal use has been a problem. It calls for strengthening road gates and closure berms that are currently ineffective. It even addresses law enforcement difficulties by strengthening partnerships with motorized clubs, whose members will be trained to educate other users on safe and ethical

the road is owned by the Federal Aviation Administration. They contract out to Flathead County for plowing, Johnson says, but that’s about as far as maintenance goes. Forest officials are currently exploring ways to work with the FAA to meet resident demands for dust abatement. The bottom line is, the Forest Service has both the authority and the responsibility to manage recreation on Blacktail Mountain. When it comes to traffic on Blacktail Mountain Road, the agency has neither. “They go out of their way for these few special interest groups to make them happy, and they totally disregard all the

Photo by Alex Sakariassen

Leslie Gray lists landscape damage as one of her many concerns over the Flathead National Forest’s plan to expand motorized use on Blacktail Mountain.

riding and to collect identifying information on any illegal uses they witness. The project also designates the 11mile Foy’s to Blacktail trail for nonmotorized use. Residents in the Flathead Valley have been pushing for that designation for years. “I think as we move into implementation, we’re going to have a great product out there,” Johnson says. Rissien cries foul on all counts. The project will disrupt elk habitat, he says. It will increase illegal motorized use and possibly conflict with grizzly expansion. Even the Foy’s to Blacktail trail designation seems to him more like a divide-andconquer strategy than an effort to accommodate hikers. “Why,” he asks, “did they have to marry it to this motorized trail project that they knew was controversial and problematic?” The primary concern inevitably comes back to the quality of life along Blacktail Mountain Road. Johnson gets it. “There’s dust, there’s potholes,” he says. But managing for those issues is complex because

property owners and the people who live here,” says Blacktail landowner Becky Tate. “We just have to live with the consequences. … I don’t see the justice in that. It’s so one-sided.” Tate’s property sits below a pinechoked ridgeline a few yards up the road from Gray’s place. In the winter, a trail skirting that ridge is groomed and open for cross-country skiing. It also passes within feet of Tate’s property line, and when the Flathead completes its project, it’ll be open to motorcycles and ATVs. For Tate and her neighbors, expanding motorized use on the Island Unit— already home to Blacktail Mountain Ski Area—is just adding another season of strife. Already, Tate says, “I don’t bring my horses across the street unless I absolutely have to during the winter. I just don’t trust the traffic.” “And it’s not just winter,” Gray adds. “It’s now carrying into a year-round issue.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com


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Up Front

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Here and gone The temporary lives of migrant workers in the Flathead by Jackie Coffin

For Juana Acevédo, a waiting room mercial cattle ranches. But on the bring us to the field or the orchard when we were babies and set us in empty at the doctor’s office is far from an air- Flathead, everything’s mobile. The majority of the workers that boxes,” Rita says. “Then, when we were conditioned space filled with magazines and buzzing electronics. Instead, it’s flock to the Flathead live in the Yakima about four or five, we got our own little plastic patio chairs scattered between Valley in Washington, which is famous for buckets and started helping our parthe clinics—two white RVs with “La clin- its variety of crops. Many of the seasonal ents.” Now, Montana state law mandates ica migrante” imprinted on the sides workers who call it home travel a circuit that children must be 14 or older to and tarp tents that serve as exam rooms that includes picking onions in Oregon, legally work in agriculture. Programs and check-in stations. The temporary potatoes in Idaho and cherries in such as the Flathead Lake Migrant migrant health and dental clinics are Montana. Others stay in the valley to Education Program at Polson Middle stationed in a field adjacent to Finley prune grapes in the winter and pick School provide summer education and Point Cherry Orchard, near Polson. asparagus in the spring. Juana Acevédo’s childcare for migrant children while Many of the patients work late into the family starts the summer picking cherries their parents work. For three days in July, the Flathead night sorting the cherries they spent the in Washington before migrating in midfirst half of the day picking. Acevédo, July to the Flathead to pick the late sea- clinic visited Polson Middle School to who has picked for 15 years, waits with son of cherries. When they return to offer primary check-ups for children. her six children, who all have the same rashes. The rashes turn out to be nothing more than swimmers’ itch—not the bed bugs or pesticideinduced irritation the family thought them to be. “We see the whole gambit,” says Helena nurse Marilyn Greely. “They come in with a lot of skin problems from the insecticides and pesPhoto by Chad Harder ticides on the trees or open wounds from Workers wait outside the mobile clinic at Finley Point Orchard in Polson. falling.” Primary and preventative care are the clinics' main focus, Washington in mid-August, they pick “We go over basic nutrition and dental Greely explains. Greely has worked in pears until the apple season begins in care with the children as well,” Greely says. “You see a lot of kids who are overthe clinics for two years and says that the fall. Families like the Acevédos only trav- weight and have decayed teeth as babies work-related injuries are comparatively low. Most patients are more interested in el in the summertime, when their chil- or toddlers.” The clinics plan their dates of operthe free health care and basic dental dren are out of school. Rita Acevédo, 18, and her sister Mayra, 16, moved to ation around the time the workers say work they can’t afford elsewhere. The clinics are provided and staffed Ranger, Wash., from Michoacán, Mexico, they will return the next summer. This by the Billings-based Montana Migrant with their parents, Juana and José, year, the clinics opened on July 16, as and Seasonal Farmworker Council, bet- when they were toddlers. This is the workers started to arrive. The season ter known as the Montana Migrant second year the family has come to was expected to last until Aug. 11, but Council. MCC Executive Director Polson to live and work in the Glacier on July 20 word started to spread Claudia Stephens estimates the health- Fresh Orchards. The family lives in one through the valley that the factories care network treats about 500 migrant of the multiple cabins provided to work- were prematurely full and no more cherworkers in the Flathead every summer. ers by Glacier Fresh in a camp between ries were needed. It could mean the “They’re very isolated and hard to the orchards, where workers relax dur- workers will go home to Washington reach,” Stephens says. “It makes it very ing their mid-day break. The girls laugh weeks early. If so, the clinics would hard to give them the services they des- as they remember how their mother return to Billings. But many of the workers may decide used to work in the fields until she was perately need.” The Migrant Health Program, found- eight months pregnant. They turn seri- to wait another week in case more work ed in 1971, gets its funding from the U.S. ous when they remember how she fell shows up. “It’s a world based on tempoDepartment of Health and Human from a ladder and landed on a box rary schedules,” Rita says, moving her Services. The MCC has three permanent when she was pregnant with their little chair under the awning of their cabin to clinics in Billings, Fairview and Dillon brother Ángel. Neither was seriously escape the rain. “And sometimes that world is just day-to-day.” that serve different populations of sea- injured. These children have been in the sonal agricultural workers employed everywhere from Hutterite farms to com- fields all their lives. “Our mother used to editor@missoulanews.com

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RX for shootings Mentally ill need drugs, not guns by Eliza Murphy

Moments after I entered the room where the patients locked in the secure area tend to hang out, a young man asked me for enough meds to “put him to sleep” until the day of his commitment hearing. “If I’m asleep, I won’t say anything that they can use against me,” he said calmly, indicating that he wasn’t completely out of his mind and that the methamphetamines had worn off. Someone in the community had found him incoherent and uncooperative and notified the authorities that he needed help. Then his car was found on the interstate with loaded guns inside. On a previous occasion, when he was brought to the emergency room, jacked up on meth, he wore a pistol strapped to his ankle. Still convinced that people were after him, he told me there that he had a “right to carry a sidearm into any public place except a school.” Many things about his delusions and violent statements were downright scary, but even more terrifying was this: Here was someone who thought he had a constitutional right to come to a hospital armed. I work as a psychiatric nurse on a unit where we routinely treat patients who have guns at home, including assault weapons. Many of those patients have been previously committed, which means they have a documented record of mental illness. Yet it is not uncommon to hear these patients brag about the ease with which they can purchase guns without “hassle” (background checks). How is it possible for mentally ill people, especially those with a history of violence, to obtain guns? One chronically mentally ill patient in his 50s, who lives with his mother, told me he walked into Wal-Mart and bought

a rifle because it was “cheap.” His frequent stays in the state hospital were no obstacle to the purchase. During a casual conversation shortly before he was discharged, he told me he bought the gun for just over a hundred dollars, a purchase he made with his disability check. When medicated, this man is easygoing and docile. He doesn’t believe he has a mental illness or that he needs medica-

A single, powerful organization promotes violence through distortion, hate-mongering and paranoia. tion. When he stops taking the pills, however, the demons inside him resurface. His mother, his sole source of support, reported that she knows he’s in trouble when he aims the gun at her. After release from whatever institution will hold them long enough for them to be stabilized, patients frequently refuse to comply with further prescribed treatment. Who wants to wash down pills that make you feel hungry all the time or sluggish or make it impossible to maintain an erection or even make you drool? Their judgment goes down the toilet, along with their prescriptions. Without the drugs that silence the voices or suppress the rage, they again begin to lose touch with reality. It’s only a matter of time before crisis workers or

the police pick them up and bring them to an emergency room. It is the ones who come in armed that give me pause. When I read about the mass murder in Aurora, Colo., it amplified my conviction that something must be done to enact gun control—STAT. Whatever diagnosis this young man gets, he should never have been able to buy assault weapons powerful enough to blast through concrete walls, nor should he have been able to buy an unregulated arsenal of bullets. One of my co-workers defended the Second Amendment’s right to bear arms. Another reminded me that guns are not about to disappear from a country where people distrust the government; people feel the need to be armed in case of internal attack, she said. I don’t win these kinds of arguments at work, and my opinion falls on deaf ears in Washington, D.C. The system is clearly broken. The National Rifle Association calls the shots, and too many elected officials have become afraid to stand up to them. Gun advocates have direct access to media and online outlets to induce fear, generate paranoia and encourage citizens to arm themselves in order to fight for their “constitutional right to bear arms.” The result? A single, powerful organization promotes violence through distortion, hate-mongering and paranoia. It leaves many of us in fear for our lives, robbing us of the freedom to do something as simple as go to the movies without fear of attack from a fellow American. If this isn’t terrorism, I don’t know what is.

Eliza Murphy is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). She writes in the Willamette Valley of Oregon.

Missoula Independent Page 11 August 2 – August 9, 2012


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for FREE! Chances are, you know a person who does travel or has travelled to Wyoming or North Dakota to work in the petroleum or natural gas extraction industries. Chances are, that person has money, has gained a doughy 40 pounds and is perpetually drunk when he returns home for his week off. Now that we have a bus that travels from the Bitterroot all the way to Williston, N.D. (go Coyotes!), it’s gotten even easier for folks in western Montana to seek their fortunes in “the patch”—the oil patch, that is. That must mean that the state of Montana as a whole benefits from all that personal income spent on truckloads of “nachos for four” sold at the Stagecoach Casino in Culbertson, right? I haven’t a clue, but University of Montana economists Patrick Barkey and Paul Polzin might share an insight or two during the Seventh Annual Midyear Economic Update seminar Five Questions Montanans Should Ask About the Energy Boom. One question Barkey and Polzin intend to discuss is this: Is the energy boom in Montana real or hype? Speaking from experience, I’d say a gross of hype and a dash of reality. Much of the work has moved away from the area surrounding Sidney and Fairview to the east toward Minot and the southeast toward Dickinson, both because there’s more oil over that way and

THURSDAY AUGUST 2 Higherground Brewery Pint Night to support the Bitter Root Water Forum makes sense cuz of the water that goes into beer. Perhaps someone should have a pint night for Olympia; stuff is nazty. 518 N. 1st St., Hamilton. 4–8 PM. Free.

SUNDAY AUGUST 5 Total Feast is a fundraiser for Total Fest, the rootenest tootenest rock and roll conflagration this side of the Yakima Boy’s and Girl’s Club. Held at Biga Pizza, attendees can support TF by eating pizza and salad. Plus O-Mega-Tom has the karaoke bumpin’ next door at the VFDubs, 241 W. Main, around 7 PM. Oh word. 5–8 PM. $10.

MONDAY AUGUST 6 For all those affected by epilepsy, come to the Epilepsy Support Group at Summit Independent Living Center, 700 SW Higgins. 2–3:30 PM. Free. Call 721-0707. Occupy Missoula General Assembly meets at the Caras Park fish sculpture at 6 PM. Visit occupymissoula.org.

TUESDAY AUGUST 7 Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication Non-Violent Communication

because of the tax breaks the Peace Garden State offered up. But I’m no economist and there is a lot of investment in petroleum technology going on in Billings. Although Barkey and Polzin may have more questions than answers, they’re questions that need to be asked, because the term “boom” almost always implies a future bust. –Jason McMackin The Seventh Annual Midyear Economic Update seminar Five Questions Montanans Should Ask About the Energy Boom, with UM economists Patrick Barkey and Paul Polzin, takes place on Thu., Aug. 9, from noon until 1:30 PM at the Hilton Garden Inn, 3720 N. Reserve St. $25, includes lunch. Visit bber.umt.edu or call 243-5113.

Weekly Practice Group at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. 519 S. Higgins. Noon–1 PM. Free. Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. 3rd St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1-3 PM. For information, call 543-3955. YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts YWCA Support Groups for women every Tue. from 6:30–8 PM. An American Indianled talking circle is also available, along with age-appropriate children’s groups. Free. Call 543-6691.

WEDNESDAY AUGUST 8 The MDA Lock-Up is a great way to get revenge on your enemies and help a good cause. Local firefighters stuff and cuff local execs and civic leaders at Johnny Carino’s, 2825 Stockyard Rd., and play their harps until you bail them out. 11 AM–2 PM. To nominate someone to lock up or to help out, call 655-9000. Kettlehouse Community U-Nite Pint Night for the Flagship Program donates money to the good eggs at Flagship and makes your beer a tax write-off. Northside Taproom. 5–8 PM.

THURSDAY AUGUST 9 The Riverfront Neighborhood Council Meeting and Soup Social takes place from 4:30–6 PM at the Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory. Let’s talk traffic and playground equipment.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent Page 12 August 2 – August 9, 2012


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I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN – At least five people in Arizona face charges for operating an illegal horse track, where up to 300 people would pay $10 to attend the three-horse, 200-yard races. Illegal betting was rampant, according to Mark Brnovich, director of the Arizona Gaming Department. The track at Pantoji operated in full view of Interstate 10, had its own website, distributed posters advertising weekend races and posted videos on YouTube. Gaming agents raided the track after learning about it from nearby residents who complained because of the noise, dust and traffic. (Phoenix’s KTVK-TV and Associated Press) Authorities arrested Richard Homer Smith, 56, who they said stuffed $53 worth of meat down his pants and darted from a supermarket in Oakland Park, Fla. While driving off, he stopped to remove his license plate and threw it away. Sheriff’s investigators recovered it and used it to identify Smith as their suspect. (South Florida’s Sun-Sentinel) LIMP OLYMPICS – The company that was awarded a $442 million contract to provide security for the London Olympic Games admitted, mere weeks before the event, that it couldn’t provide the required number of guards it agreed to, requiring the government to deploy some 3,500 British troops to make up the difference. G4S, billed as the world’s biggest security firm, agreed to cover the cost of the deployment, putting its loss at up to $78 million. G4S boss Nick Buckles apologized for the company’s failure, explaining, “It’s a very complex process.” Addressing charges that some of the recruits the firm did provide couldn’t speak English, Buckles said it was a “difficult question to answer.” (Associated Press) Olympics organizers banned all 800 food retailers at 40 venues from serving french fries to spectators because of “sponsorship obligations with McDonald’s.” The lone exception, the edict stated, is if the fries are served with fish, as in fish and chips. In addition, in deference to Olympics sponsor Visa, all ATMs that accept rival cards were ordered closed, and all food and souvenir concessions were told to accept only Visa cards. (Britain’s Daily Mail) TIMELESS BEAUTY – A hundred women, ages 74 to 97, competed in the first “Miss Holocaust Survivor” beauty pageant in Haifa, Israel. Winner Hava Hershkovitz, 79, called the victory “her revenge, showing how despite the horrors her family went through, her beauty and personality have endured,” pageant organizer Shimon Sabag said, pointing out, “People don’t have to see the Holocaust survivors mainly as a group of wheelchair-bound victims.” Hershkovitz won a family weekend at a resort, and all contestants were awarded electronic distress buttons. (Reuters) AFTERLIFE EPISODES – The owner of the Robinson Funeral Home in Easley, S.C., is adding a Starbucks Coffee shop. Chris Robinson, who owns the fourth-generation funeral and crematory, said the store will be open to the public as well as mourners but promised it won’t be a distraction from services. “You walk in the front, and it’s off to the side,” he said. “It’s not like it’s right up front.” (Spartansburg’s WSPA-TV) The monks at St. Joseph Abbey, located near Covington, La., won the right to sell its handmade wooden caskets after a federal judge ruled that a Louisiana law giving funeral directors exclusive rights to sell caskets is unconstitutional. “It would be like saying you have to become a podiatrist in order to sell shoes,” said attorney Jeff Rowes, who represents the monks. “It just doesn’t make sense.” (AARP Bulletin) Four-year-old Carson Dean Cheney was visiting a cemetery in Park City, Utah, with his family when he went behind a tombstone and poked his head out trying to make other children smile for a photograph. The 6-foot-tall tombstone toppled and killed the lad. (Associated Press) WHAT, “BANGKOK” NOT SUGGESTIVE ENOUGH? – After Ikea opened its fifth-largest superstore in Bangkok, the Swedish furniture chain learned that several of its products’ names had sexual connotations when transliterated into Thailand’s cursive alphabet. The embarrassed retail giant hired locals to scrutinize product names, in some cases changing a vowel sound or a consonant to prevent unfortunate misunderstandings. “Ikea was actually in a very fortunate position in the context of Thailand in the sense of because there’s a transliteration issue, you have the ability to make some adjustments,” Carleton University marketing professor Robin Ritchie explained. “That’s not the case when you’re talking about using roman characters in a new environment.” Ritchie cited as an example an Ikea work bench sold in Canada called Fartfull. (Toronto Star) SECOND-AMENDMENT FOLLIES – An 18-year-old boy accidentally shot himself in the head during a webcam chat, believing he was handling an unloaded gun. “His manhood or his ego was challenged, and he said something along the lines of, ‘I’ll show you,’” Capt. John Gallagher said. “He thought he was clowning around, trying to shock the other party on the Internet site.” (Philadelphia Daily News) CHUTZPAH – When three women who worked for Kansas attorney Jeremiah Johnson filed a civil suit accusing him of planting cell phones underneath their desks to look up their skirts, Johnson counter-sued, claiming the women didn’t have the right to delete images they found in his phone. A federal judge dismissed his claim. (Kansas City’s WDAF-TV) BREAKTHROUGHS OF THE WEEK – New Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines require businesses to allow miniature horses on their premises as guide animals for the disabled and to limit the height of slope on miniature golf holes to “not steeper than 1:48 at the start of play.” Also, any new or altered rides at amusement parks must provide at least one seat for a person in a wheelchair. Miniature horses were suggested as alternatives to dogs for individuals with allergies or “for those whose religious beliefs preclude the use of dogs,” the rules note, but add that a business owner can deny admission to a miniature horse that isn’t housebroken. Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah) offered an amendment, which passed the House of Representatives, banning funding to implement the miniature-horse provision and wrote an editorial opposing the rule titled “Horses in the Dining Room?” (Cybercast News Service) Hoping to reduce the number of drunk men driving, drinking establishments in three Michigan counties installed state-issued talking urinal deodorizer cakes that remind men to call a cab or a friend for a ride home. “We want to turn some heads and get people talking,” Michael L. Prince, director of the state Office of Highway Safety and Planning, said of the motion-activated messages, without mentioning any provisions to discourage urinating women from driving drunk. (Detroit Free Press)

Missoula Independent Page 13 August 2 – August 9, 2012


went to Missoula’s Northside recently to visit Brian Donahue, a construction worker originally from central Illinois, to hear about the celebrated crow-hunting season back where he comes from. As one thing led to another, he told me about the time he found a dead crow in his backyard in Missoula and how, as he was trying to dispose of it, other crows circled him and dove for his head. He had to summon his roommate home to fend them off long enough for him to scoop the dead bird into a garbage bag, he said. “But why were they attacking you?” I asked. “Well, I shoot them off my front porch with an air rifle,” he said. The words didn’t compute. What good is a rifle that shoots air? My knowledge of weapons is not vast. “What’s an air rifle?” I asked, and then, in the same breath, “Why do you shoot crows?” Donahue was eager to explain the way his gun worked and went into another room to show it to me. It looked like a normal rifle, with a scope attached that reminded me a little of Super Soaker water guns. “It’s like a BB gun, basically,” he explained. Instead of gunpowder, the pellets are expended with a whoosh of air. At close enough range, it packs enough power to take out a 1.5 lb. bird. “But why do you shoot crows?” I asked again. He looked at me as though the answer were in the question. “I just hate them,” he said.

I

Watching crows watching us By Molly Laich

Tattletales Crows and humans have some history. Depending on the time and place, we’ve regarded them both as soothsayers and as malevolent, dirty animals—or worse. The Norse god Odin, for instance, had two ravens, Thought and Memory, that travelled the world collecting intelligence for him. They were talented animals. Also, tattletales. When Noah sent a bird out from his ark to scout for land after the flood, he sent a raven the first time—but black birds do what they want and the raven never returned, so Noah had to contract a second mission, this time with the more virtuous dove. As Christ suffered on Calvary, crows were said to have croaked above the dead and dying, but what does that mean? Whose side were they on? These black birds seem to have an ancient amorality. They evolved from dinosaurs, like all birds; you can see it in their feet and the shapes of their bones. A feather isn’t anything more than a modified scale. Crows, like ravens, are in the corvid family, along with their cousins, jackdaws, rooks, bluejays and magpies. Like humans, crows are warm-blooded, omnivorous scavengers. Technically, corvids are all songbirds, but more in the tradition of Tom Waits than Al Green. Crows can crudely mimic human speech or the dripping of a faucet. These birds have come to depend on our towns and cities. It’s rare to find crows in the wild, or, for that mater, more than a few miles from human establishments. In Missoula, they have more than enough food to scavenge, plus green lawns to pull worms from, roadkill to eat and prime nesting real estate in neighborhoods and on the University of Montana campus. No one’s counted the crows in Missoula, but given their numbers in similar cities, there are likely tens of thousands here.

Missoula Independent Page 14 August 2 – August 9, 2012


Perhaps crows appear smug because they’re so And here’s something: It’s not illegal for Brian Donahue to shoot crows off his front porch. Nearly successful. The key to their success is their resourceall birds are protected under the Migratory Bird fulness, adaptability—in short, their intelligence. Treaty Act of 1918, including their nests, feathers and Humans have long-held antagonistic relationships eggs, but crows are a weird exception. According to with such persistent creatures. We hate rats, pigeons federal guidelines, “Individuals may kill crows with- (“rats with wings”), Canada geese, roaches. We get out a hunting license or permit when [crows] are bored of seeing the same few animals. Floating found committing, or about to commit, depredations down the Clark Fork River on a recent on agricultural crops, or when concentrated in such Sunday, my friends and I saw a bald eagle numbers and manner as to constitute a health hazard perched in a tree along the riverbank and were awed and humbled. We saw or other nuisance.” what may have been the same bird the How many crows constitutes a nuisance? Picture a crow about to commit a depredation: following Wednesday, and halfmocking, half-serious, we rolled our Note the look in her shiny black eye. There are practical reasons to regard crows as eyes and said, “God, a bald eagle pests. A farmer worried about his crops has grounds again. Boring!” Consider the panda, a stubto erect a scarecrow or take them down with a shotgun—but what about the rest of us? What is it about bornly unsuccessful animal—more giant raccoon than bear. Pandas crows we find so unnerving? Vague ideas that they spread diseases are most- seem to hate sex and refuse to eat anyly the stuff of overprotective mothers. Is it some- thing but bamboo. Yet we root for panthing about their blackness? Workers at animal shel- das and spend millions of dollars yearly on spirited camters will sometimes tell you paigns to keep them that black dogs are the hardConsider the panda, breeding. Meanwhile, est to get adopted. Why crows and other corvids are would we disdain black ania stubbornly wildly successful, present on mals? Perhaps for reasons as just about every continent in witless as that darkness is unsuccessful record numbers every year, and unknowable and frightening; so too, therefore, are black animal—more giant we resent them. It seems unfair. We crave the rationed symmethings. During the Black Plague, in the 14th century, raccoon than bear. try of zoos and arks. Too many of one kind of animal means crows were seen feasting on Pandas seem to hate ecological imbalance. It makes human bodies. For all their us feel as though we’ve done intelligence, they’ve learned nothing about reverence— sex and refuse to eat something wrong. It makes us the crows are winning. and for that, we blame them. anything but bamboo. thinkCrows have thrived by borCrows don’t kill humans. Still, we call a group of crows a Yet we root for pandas rowing many of our same strategies. They roost on our “murder.” (Ravens fare a little better. Three or more are and spend millions of lampposts and fences and largely eat what we throw away. merely an “unkindness.”) dollars yearly on It could be that they’re a little The speaker of Edgar too close for comfort. Allan Poe’s poem “The Raven” Think back to the anti-drug calls his midnight visitor a spirited campaigns to commercial in which the mus“grim, ungainly, ghastly, keep them breeding. tached father bursts into his gaunt and ominous bird of room, demanding to yore.” At the start, we find the Meanwhile, crows and son’s know where his son learned narrator alone and listless, that drugs were an effective way pining for a woman, Lenore, other corvids are to manage pain and boredom, who is forever lost to him. The raven raps on the door wildly successful, pres- and the son shouts back, “I learned it from you, Dad!” like a person and steps inside. The bird’s behavior is mad- ent on just about every Watching crows fighting one another for the discarded dening because it’s so subtle continent in record french fries we were too stuffed and inexplicable. “Never flitto finish reminds us of someting,” it does nothing but sit, numbers every year, thing we don’t like about ourstare and repeat the word “Nevermore.” Maybe it means and we resent them. selves, and we can’t help but blame them for it. that Lenore will never return. Our relationship with It could be deeper, that there’s no escape from the clinging, unknowable crows wouldn’t be so complicated if they weren’t so dissatisfaction that lives in the hearts of men. Or it damn smart. Mosquitos swarm in the millions, you could truly mean nothing. In any case, the agony kill them with a bloody, satisfying smack and you forcomes from the raven’s merciless taunting, that he get about them. But there’s something about crows knows something we don’t. And he’s not going to that makes them impossible to ignore: The gears in their heads keep turning. tell us.

We’re not that cool. Erick Greene is a wildlife biologist and has been a professor at the University of Montana for the last 20 years. As part of his current research, Greene has been analyzing crow calls in the wild. For this, he works along the Kim Williams Trail with a falconer. The falconer lets loose predatory birds, mostly hawks, who fly through the woods and return to the falconer’s gloved hand. Greene and his associates then record and analyze the crows’ alarm calls and how they’re heard and interpreted by the surrounding wildlife. The calls can be very specific. Crows have different sounds for “hawk flying,” “hawk sitting,” etc., which is alarmingly like syntax. When a predatory bird flies by and a crow detects it, what follows is something Greene describes as a “wave of information” through the forest. Within seconds, all the animals—the chickadees, the squirrels, the rabbits, the deer—know a predator is coming and appropriately panic. Greene’s work illustrates another aspect of crow intelligence, which is their ability to recognize and remember human faces. It only takes one or two trials before crows in the area come to recognize the falconer and identify him as an enemy. Inelegant but true: Scientists solve the problem with disguises.

Missoula Independent Page 15 August 2 – August 9, 2012


Not only do crows recognize the experimenters who have taunted them, they tell all of their friends. In 2006, researcher John Marzluff and his team began an experiment on the University of Washington campus in Seattle. Wearing rubber masks, the team banded seven crows—a brief, humiliating experience, but one that’s ultimately harmless. One of the human experimenters, wearing a caveman mask, was antagonistic to the birds, while another, wearing a Dick Cheney mask, behaved neutrally. When experimenters walked through the campus again wearing the masks, the crows reacted aggressively toward anyone wearing the caveman mask—and not just the crows that were banded, but dozens of crows throughout the campus. The experiment demonstrates not only the crows’ ability to recognize our faces, but also that they were able to somehow describe the caveman mask to other birds in the area. And they remembered the villain up to six months later. Dustin Gliko, who works at the Albertson’s supermarket on East Broadway, has had ominous encounters with crows. One day, on a cigarette break, Gliko spotted a lonely crow in the parking lot, he says, and fed him some leftover popcorn chicken. It became a standing date, and when Gliko was without popcorn chicken, the crow harassed him. Now, Gliko isn’t like Brian Donahue. He likes crows; he’s always noticed their odd behavior and admired them. So he knew about the two crows that hang around outside his girlfriend’s house. They eat from a garbage can around the corner and roost on the fence. One night, Gliko rode his bike home from the Albertson’s to his girlfriend’s place, about a mile north. Inside, he looked out her window and—here’s a third crow, looking him right in the face and cawing. Did the crow follow him home? “Dustin, Dustin,” quoth the third bird. “Popcorn chicken. Popcorn chicken.” The crows’ ability to remember faces and caw distinctively at one another is a matter of survival. A baby crow isn’t born knowing to fear moving cars or great horned owls. Their parents have to tell them. One might almost call it a cultural tradition. They use facial recognition to differentiate not only humans, but also one another. Crows can hold up to 50 distinct relationships in their heads at once. They’re likely telling each other apart by physical characteristics, body language and voice. In this way, they seem to have a lot more in common with primates, elephants and dolphins than with most other birds.

Missoula Independent Page 16 August 2 – August 9, 2012

So, crows have language and the primitive makings of a society. As humans, we’re starting to run out of things that make us special. Nobody thinks that using tools is exclusive to humans anymore; tool use can be found among all those aforementioned smart animals, as well as among otters and octopuses. There are even species of fish that use rocks as anvils to crack shells. We’re really not that cool. A crow’s use of tools is particularly inventive. Independent of Archimedes’s discovery of displacement as a way of measuring volume in the bathtub, there’s the story about a crow filling a pitcher of water with stones in order to raise the level and get a sip. They know how to pull up a fisherman’s line with their talons, eat the fish and, frighteningly, replace the hook. Where food is plentiful and natural predators are scarce, some crows are perhaps getting a little too comfortable. Like squirrels, they keep caches of food in various places, so abundance isn’t wasted. We imagine wild animals living a hard-knock life of scarcity, braving the elements and fighting tooth and nail for survival. But watch a crow waddle down the street without an agenda or swoop down from the air to land in a puddle. It can almost start to look like leisure. Crows in Russia have been videotaped sliding down wintry slopes with cardboard, carrying the cardboard back up to the top of the hill and then sliding down again. Crows have invented sledding! Like so many Missoulians, they seem to be underemployed.

Where do the children go? Bob Wire, the Missoula humorist, once wrote, apropos of not much, “How come nobody’s ever seen a baby crow?” This struck me as profound. I told everybody about the sentence and went looking for exceptions. Of course, it’s not true that no one has ever seen a baby crow. But I’d never seen one, and I really wanted to. And then, one recent Saturday, when my head hurt and I’d fallen asleep on the porch under the blistering sun, my friend Mackenzie Cole called and said, “I found a baby crow. Do you want to come see a baby crow?” I was on the south side, off Brooks Avenue, and the baby crow was near the north end of the UM campus. I’d have to ride my bike quickly to get there, but

this was my big chance to see a baby crow and I wasn’t going to miss it. Cole told me to be quiet. I set my bike in the grass and tiptoed over to where he was crouched over the sidewalk. Three feet in front of him was a crow, and a few feet farther, a squirrel, harassing the crow about who knows what. “It’s just a crow,” I said. “It’s a baby,” Cole said. He pointed out the smaller beak and the sort of fluffy feathers. Erick Greene told me later that you can tell a baby crow by the pink skin at the corners of their mouths, called “the gape.” Compared to weathered, molting parents, Greene says, the babies have “good-looking clothes on.” Baby crows fledge the nest after about a month, and they hop to the ground nearly full-sized. That’s why everybody thinks they’ve never seen a baby crow. You probably have. If you’ve ever seen crow road kill, it was probably a fledgling. The adults are too smart. This fledgeling was just inches from us. It seemed helpless and lost. Cole shooed the pestering squirrel away. The crow’s parents must have abandoned him, he said. “There were two babies last night. Do you want to see the second one?” He took me around to his friend’s backyard and showed me a mass of black feathers, a few bones licked clean and two dismembered feet curled up in a last embrace with the air. A cat must have gotten it. This was my second time seeing a young crow and it was even more unsatisfying than the first. Cole asked if I wanted one of the crow’s feet. He plucked them from the carnage and started tenderly cleaning them. I said I didn’t. Meanwhile, the first young crow stood in the center of the sidewalk, cawing. I don’t know how to describe how it felt. It hurts to think about now. “Why doesn’t his mother come?” I asked Cole. “I don’t know,” he said. “They’re bad parents.” He looked up and down 6th Street. “This one probably won’t make it through the night either.” The young crow cawed and cawed and cawed. We heard an adult, calling back in the distance. “Maybe that’s its mother,” I said. “I think so,” Cole said. “Maybe it’s not coming around because we’re here. Maybe we should leave it.” And we did. We rode our bikes downtown, but Cole couldn’t stop thinking about that crow. He trains dogs and horses for a living and he writes poetry. I’ve never


met anyone who understands or cares for animals better than he. “Getting a crow at that age is the perfect time to train them and raise them as pets,” he said. Interesting fact: While it’s legal to shoot a crow in Montana, it’s illegal to raise a wild bird yourself unless you’re a licensed bird handler. I try not to be sentimental. Birds come, and then they go. In a nest of eggs, only half are likely to make it into adulthood. I told Cole about as much. “Yeah,” he said. “But I also think that sometimes you come across an animal for a reason.” It was a hot, sticky day that got away from us. Cole went rock climbing and I had writing to do. We never went back to check on the young crow. Nature takes care of itself. It’s got nothing to do with us. Still, we both wonder.

The world in its mouth In some Native American cultures, black is the color of creation and the crow epitomizes the cycle of life and death. Ravens are magicians and shapeshifters. In this way, they’re closely aligned with coyotes, which are also known as tricksters and wise beings both. Earlier this year, I was with some friends about an hour outside of Missoula when a coyote jumped out from the woods and ran in front of our car. I’d never seen a coyote so close before, and it thrilled me. To anyone who would listen, I wouldn’t shut up about that coyote I’d seen. The memory changed with so much retelling. Soon the coyote had something in its mouth. The next day, I told a girl at a party about what had happened. Her eyes got wide and she gasped. “It’s really bad luck to have a coyote run in front of your car.” Two coyotes once leaped in front of her car just moments before a terrible accident, she said. She spoke with a frightening conviction. “What if the coyote had a crow in its mouth?” I asked. Because suddenly, I pulled out the memory and there it was, black and dead in the coyote’s jaws. I don’t know if the coyote actually had a crow in its mouth or not. It seemed as though the crows were rearranging the thoughts in my head. The girl and I decided that if there was in fact a crow in the coyote’s mouth, two wrongs made a right, canceling out the bad omen. Nothing particularly bad has happened to me since the beginning of the summer. Then again, nothing good has happened, either.

Sorrow, joy, marriage “Have you heard the thing about crows following you home?” Dustin Gliko asked me. “One crow is supposed to mean sorrow.” He sort of shrugged this off. He couldn’t remember what two crows meant. (I looked it up later: It means joy.) “And three crows means marriage.” Gliko talked about his girlfriend with a shy smile. I hoped three crows outside her window meant they’re going to get married. The crows of Missoula are tuned into our movements, waiting for us to attack, get married or just drop a Dorito on the sidewalk. The more I noticed them, the more I couldn’t shake the feeling that the crows of Missoula were wielding their indifference over me like a sword. It was time to get my head out of the clouds, so I went to get a more definitive answer to what Brian Donahue had against crows. On a recent late morning, I found him in his front yard, scanning the lawn with a metal detector. “I lost a screw to a machine,” he explained. “Why do you hate crows so much?” I asked yet again. “Because they attack me!” he said. “I’ve been attacked by crows on multiple occasions.” “Did they start attacking you before or after you started shooting them?” “Probably after,” he said. “But like I said, crow hunting season is a big thing in Illinois. Let me think, what are some other reasons I hate crows. … They will destroy a corn field.” Throughout our conversation, it became more and more clear that Donahue doesn’t really hate crows. “I just like shooting birds,” he said with a charming, Midwest contrition. His favorite birds to hunt are ducks and doves. “Why doves?” I cried. “They taste the best!” “Oh, okay.” I hadn’t known people ate doves. “I’ve eaten crow, too,” he said. Crows are one of the Bible’s many forbidden foods, but they’re not as bad as people say, he told me. “They’re pretty oily.” Edgar Allan Poe’s protagonist took a raven waddling through his front door as a confrontation with his soul. That’s pretty goth. Poe and I have this in common: Our imaginations get the better of us. At the site of smart black birds, we let billow inside of us a terrifying and unspecified dread.

Donahue just likes to shoot moving targets. The same way a crow remembers his face, Donahue remembers the crows messing with his family’s crops back in Illinois and takes revenge. “How many crows have you gotten off of your front porch?” I asked him. He smiled and signed “zero” with his fingers. “The scope on my air rifle isn’t sighted in right,” he said. “I’m missing. But once I sight my scope right, they’re done for.”

Crows’ feet I thought Mackenzie Cole had left the crow’s talons with the corpse on the day we met the stranded youngster, but I was mistaken. A couple of weeks after our encounter with the fledglings, he texted me: “Do you want one of those crow’s feet?” This time, I said yes. He met me at the café in Hastings and set the foot down on the table next to my coffee. It was just as I remembered, black and scaled like a dinosaur, with powerful-looking claws. The base of the foot met a tuft of black feathers and white bone. “What did you do to clean it off?” “Not much,” he said. “It creeps me out a little.” “It makes me sad,” he said. When you hold a crow’s foot in your hand, you can see its black talons ripping through a squirrel’s heart on the side of the road. You think that that’s the way the world works, and it’s fine, and what’s the use of wanting to change it? But when you turn the foot around, underneath the curled talons are soft, black pads to stand on, just like a dog’s. Out in the parking lot, a murder awaits. Or is it an unkindness? They flit back and forth overhead, among the telephone wires. They recognize your face and they’re talking about you. editor@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent Page 17 August 2 – August 9, 2012


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At a Korean superstore in Las Vegas, I watched an employee whose sole job, it seemed, was organizing a vast array of kimchee. Her domain consisted of thousands of plastic tubs of fermented fish and vegetables in various combinations, usually spicy. She darted about the immense display cases and scrutinized the tubs’ arrangement, rearranging their contents like beads on a giant abacus. My feeling, observing her that day, roughly sums up how I feel about the process of fermentation generally: a mixture of awe and fear. The process is like some potent voodoo that could give you special powers or torture you to death. Letting food sit at room temperature and become colonized by airborne microorganisms runs counter to everything we’re taught about food safety. But without the guided decomposition that we call fermentation, there would be no bread, cheese, tequila or kimchee. The Art of Fermentation by Sandor Katz is therapy for my split impulses regarding fermentation. It’s a hefty book, with extensive citations, that exhaustively explores the world’s fermentation traditions, including vegetables, fruit, meat, dairy and other foodstuffs. It recounts much of the history of this ancient art, right up to contemporary times, and is rich in practical knowledge that you can start applying immediately. The book has given me the confidence to play with the process, and the understanding to ferment fruits and vegetables from my garden. I hope to become proficient enough to put away significant quantities of the summer's harvest via fermentation. In other words, I’m into it—the process and the book. And I’m not the only one. At last check, The Art of Fermentation sat at number 14 on The New York Times best-seller list. In the forward, Michael Pollan writes, “Katz’s book is the main reason that my kitchen counters and basement floor have lately sprouted an assortment of mason jars, ceramic crocks, jelly jars, bottles and carboys, the clear ones glowing with unearthly colors.” Anyone who reads this book might just find their own house similarly cluttered. My own fermentation-ware collection is rudimentary compared to Pollan’s, but I’ve already caught myself looking at a beer growler in a new light and I doubt it will be long till I spot a crock at a yard sale. In my three-

week fermentation career, I’ve already learned some important things, like how much more peaceful fermentation is than canning and how easy it is to make booze that doesn’t taste terrible. Too easy, really. When Louis Pasteur demonstrated that many diseases are caused by living germs, the “war on bacteria,” as Katz calls it, was officially on. Many lives were saved by the bacteria-killing process that became known as pasteurization and by its many spawn: the countless methods that use heat, pressure, acid and other means of preserving food by killing all the microorganisms in and around it. In

Photo by Ari LeVaux

short order, these methods widely replaced fermentation as the preservation method of choice. While modern canning techniques work by killing, fermentation takes an opposite approach: promoting life. Specifically, promoting the growth of bacteria and yeast that gradually create an alcoholic or acidic environment in which only certain microorganisms can live. “In this environment, salmonella, E. coli, listeria, costridium and other food-borne pathogens cannot survive,” Katz writes. The playing field is tilted to favor either lactic acid bacteria, like lactobacillus, or certain yeasts, like saccharomyces, to which we owe bread and booze. Katz quotes USDA vegetable fermentation specialist Fred Breidt as saying there’s never been a documented case of food poisoning from fermented food. “Risky is not a word I would use to describe vegetable fermentation,” he continues. “It is one of the oldest and safest technologies we have.” Bacterial contamination on raw vegetables, by contrast, Katz points out, sickens people on a nearly daily basis. In the tropics, longterm storage of fermented products is difficult because of the incessantly hot

by ARI LeVAUX

weather. Luckily, food grows year-round in that climate, so storage isn’t necessary. Conversely, the places with the shortest growing seasons have the widest window of cool weather during which fermented products can be stored. Katz regularly stores fermented food all the way to spring, when food starts growing again in the hills of Tennessee, where he lives. Katz refrains as much as possible from giving exact recipes. He instructs with broad strokes rather than micromanagement, teaching the principles behind each step in the process. That said, the book will give you a firm start on any fermentation path you could possibly wish to follow, and in many cases it’s the only source you’ll need for everything from making miso to fermenting mashed potatoes. Embracing fermentation involves a truce in the war on bacteria. Such a peace means accepting that the microbes are basically in charge. In fact, we are mostly them. Of the 3 million different genes identifiable in our bodies, only 30,000 are human genes. The rest are bacterial, representing thousands of species. Making peace with microbes means understanding where and how and when they can hurt you. The first and foremost rule for novices: avoid fermenting animal products until you know what you’re doing. And while this will come as a blow to some, dark green leafy veggies, like kale, can be traumatizingly foul-tasting, if technically non-poisonous, when fermented. I’ve always been an old-school pickle-maker of the water-bathing, vinegar-brining, pressure-canning, kill-’em-all school of food preservation. As I explore fermentation, it’s a relief to leave behind the heavy artillery that canning involves, not to mention the heat of the kitchen. So far I’ve made some hooch from sun-dried apricots, a batch of barely fermented sundried apricot jam that’s got a telltale tang to it and a pint jar of mixed garden veggies: snow peas, baby carrots, garlic flowers and squash blossom buds. Unlike vinegar pickles, you can open a fermenting jar of pickles whenever you want for a snack; and after three days, my veggies started to turn acidic. The flavors are strong, new and often weird. But when done right, like at the Korean superstore, fermentation offers a nearly endless myriad of delicacies that I’m looking forward to exploring.

LISTINGS $…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over

espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wifi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$

Alcan Bar and Grill 16780 Beckwith St. Frenchtown • 626-9930 Tantalize your taste buds with Angus beef burgers, chicken strips, shrimp, and biscuits and gravy from Alcan Bar & Grill. With more than 20 years of experience and 10 years in the business, we have been offering fresh meals and beverages at the area's most competitive prices. Our friendly professionals offer personalized service and make sure you leave our restaurant as one of our friends. We offer have a variety of specials for ladies night and sports events featuring drink specials and free food. Contact us today and enjoy our incredible menu selection. 9 am – 2 am Mon-Sun.

Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 Bernice’s Bakery is a Missoula Landmark. 34 years of baking goodness. Open 6a – 8p Bernice’s offers an incredible selection of breakfast pastries, treats, cakes, breads and a fine, fresh lunch daily. If you’ve never been in you are missin’ out. And if you haven’t been in lately you really should make it a point to stop by. August is a great month for slow walks along the Clark Fork while you sip Bernice’s iced coffee or Mountain Huckleberry iced tea and nibble on a coconut macaroon. Picnic? Bernice’s is your stop. We can load you up with all you need and off you go! Bernice’s: made from scratch for your pleasure. See you soon. Xoxo Bernice. bernicesbakerymt.com

Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway (across from courthouse) • 728-8900 Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and

Missoula Independent Page 18 August 2 – August 9, 2012

Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts.

All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Big Sky Drive In 1016 W. Broadway • 549-5431 Big Sky Drive In opened June 2nd 1962. We feature soft serve ice cream, shakes, malts, spins, burger, hot dogs, pork chop sandwiches and breaded mushrooms all made to order. Enjoy our 23 shake and malt flavors or the orange twist ice cream. Drive thru or stay and enjoy your food in our outdoor seating area. Lunch and dinner, seven days a week. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Monday – Friday, 7:30 – 2. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty.


dish HAPPIESTHOUR the

The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 40 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks • 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am-2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm SunWed and 11am-10pm Thurs-Sat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc's is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you're heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc's is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. eMpanadas @ the Clark Fork River Market Under the Higgins St. Bridge www.empanadalady.com 728-2030 Hechas a mano con amor...¡Qué sabor! Made by hand with love…what flavor! Carne de búfalo, pollo, lamb, salchicha, humita, acelga & more. Since 2005, Missoula’s original Argentine-style empanadas are crafted from premium, homegrown ingredients and delivered by bicycle, straight from the oven to the market, every Saturday 8am – 1pm. Taste the difference.

SATURDAYS 4PM-9PM

MONDAYS & THURSDAYS ALL DAY

The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. 926-2038 The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and gluten-free options. Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. 11am-9pm Tuesday-Sunday. Downtown Missoula. $ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. 721-6033 Missoula's Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. M-TH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am-4pm, Sat 8am-4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West 41-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula's best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. 532-2056 Spring is here! It's the perfect time of year to enjoy our newly expanded patio! Happy Hour from 4-7pm every day! We now have a huge selection of bottled India Pale Ales. Tuesday Music Showcase from 7-10 pm. Thursday is Trivia Night. $6 Bud Light Pitchers plus appetizer specials. Every Thursday 7-10pm. Win your bar tab! 1st place gets $50 tab, 2nd gets $30 tab, & 3rd gets $20 tab. Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula.

Earl Grey Pale Ale at Great Northern Brewery What’s the word: Great Northern Brewery of Whitefish will proudly pour their first barrel of Earl Grey Pale Ale at their upcoming shows featuring Keller Williams and Kyle Hollingsworth of the String Cheese Incident, on August 4 and 5. Great Northern General Manager Marcus Duffey says the new ale is a “taste of summertime.” The flavor is the result of a collaboration between Great Northern brewers and Hollingsworth, an avid home brewer. “It adds one more element to the whole event being ours,” says Duffey. “We control the look, the feel, the taste—everything.” What it tastes like: The Earl Grey Pale Ale is brewed with 20 pounds of Earl Grey tea leaves and bergamot oil. “Our brew water is tea,” explains chief Great Northern brewer Joe Barberis. The beer is dry hopped to mellow out the tea taste. It has a light, flowery taste, with a strong balance of hops. Try it yourself: The beer will debut at the outdoor concert series at Depot Park in downtown Whitefish. Tickets for the concert are $25 in advance, $30 day of the show or $45 for the full weekend. —Jackie Coffin

Photo by Jackie Coffin

Chief brewer Joe Barberis of Great Northern Brewery Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

$1

SUSHI Not available for To-Go orders

Missoula Independent Page 19 August 2 – August 9, 2012


Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Iza 529 S. Higgins 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Contemporary Asian cuisine featuring local, vegan, gluten free and organic options as well as wild caught seafood, Idaho trout and buffalo. Join us for lunch and dinner. Happy Hour 36 weekdays with specials on food and drink. Extensive sake, wine and tea menu. Closed Sundays. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm Happy Hour 3-6pm Dinner 5pm-close. Sat: Dinner 5pm-close $-$$ $-$$

Educate your taste buds! www.thinkfft.com Mon-Thurs 7am - 8pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 *When school is not in session, we often close at 3pm Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

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Silvertip Casino 680 SW Higgins 728-5643 The Silvertip Casino is Missoula’s premiere casino offering 20 Video gaming machines, best live poker in Missoula, full beverage liquor, 11 flat screen tv’s and great food at great prices. Breakfast Specials starting at $2.99 (7-11am) For a complete menu, go to www.silvertipcasino.com. Open 24/7. $-$$

Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$

NOT JUST SUSHI We have quick and delicious lunch specials 6 days a week starting at $7, and are open for dinner 7 nights a week. Try our comfort food items like Pork Katsu and Chicken Teriyaki. We also offer party platters to go and catering for all culinary styles. Lunch 11:30-3 Mon-Sat. Dinner 5-9:30 Every Night. Corner of Pine and Higgins. Very Family Friendly. 549-7979. $$-$$$

Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ The Mercantile Deli 119 S. Higgins Ave. 721-6372 themercantiledeli.com Located next to the historic Wilma Theater, the Merc features a relaxed atmosphere, handcrafted Paninis, Sandwiches, and wholesome Soups and Salads. Try a Monte Cristo for breakfast, a Pork Love Panini for lunch, or have us cater your next company event. Open Monday – Saturday for breakfast and lunch. Downtown delivery available. $-$$ The Mustard Seed Asian Café Southgate Mall 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our allnew bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our non-smoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, microbrews, fine wines & signature drinks. Takeout & delivery available. $$-$$$

Pearl Café 231 E. Front St. 541-0231 Country French specialties, bison, elk, and fresh fish daily. Delicious salads and appetizers, as well as breads and desserts baked in-house. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Philly West 134 W. Broadway 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday - Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. Pita Pit 130 N. Higgins 541-PITA (7482) pitapitusa.com Fresh Thinking Healthy Eating. Enjoy a pita rolled just for you. Hot meat and cool fresh veggies topped with your favorite sauce. Try our Chicken Caesar, Gyro, Philly Steak, Breakfast Pita, or Vegetarian Falafel to name just a few. For your convenience we are open until 3am 7 nights a week. Call if you need us to deliver!

Missoula Independent Page 20 August 2 – August 9, 2012

Sean Kelly’s A Public House 130 W. Pine St. 542-1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for lunch & dinner. Featuring brunch Saturday & Sunday from 11-2pm. Serving international & Irish pub fare. Full bar, beer, wine, martinis. $-$$

Jakers 3515 Brooks St. 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$

Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. 543-3188 Don’t feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$

$10.95/lb.

Sapore 424 N. Higgins Ave. 542-6695 Voted best new restaurant in the Missoula Independent's Best of Missoula, 2011. Located on Higgins Ave., across the street from Wordens. Serving progressive American food consisting of fresh house-made pastas every day, pizza, local beef, and fresh fish delivered from Taste of Alaska. New specials: burger & beer Sundays, 5-7 $9 ~ pizza & beer Tuesdays, 57 $10 ~ draft beers, Tuesday -Thursday, 5-6:30 $3. Business hours: Tues.- Sat. 5-10:30 pm., Sat. 10-3 pm., Sun. 5-10 pm.

Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins 327-8929 Stop in when you're in the neighborhood. We'll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula's best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 1110 Sun 12-9. Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you'll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. Tamarack Brewing Company 231 W. Front Street 830-3113 facebook.com/tamarackmissoula Tamarack Brewing Company opened its first Taphouse in Missoula in 2011. Overlooking Caras Park, Tamarack Missoula has two floors -a sports pub downstairs, and casual dining upstairs. Patrons can find Tamarack’s handcrafted ales and great pub fare on both levels. Enjoy beer-inspired menu items like brew bread wraps, Hat Trick Hop IPA Fish and Chips, and Dock Days Hefeweizen Caesar Salads. Try one of our staple ales like Hat Trick Hop IPA or Yard Sale Amber Ale, or one of our rotating seasonal beers, like, Old 'Stache Whiskey Barrel Porter, Headwall Double IPA, Stoner Kriek and more. Don’t miss $8 growler fills on Wednesday and Sunday, Community Tap Night every Tuesday, Kids Eat Free Mondays, and more. See you at The ‘Rack! $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Drive 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$ YoWaffle Yogurt 216 W. Main St. • 543-6072 (Between Thai Spicy and The Shack) www.yowaffle.com YoWaffle is a self-serve frozen yogurt and Belgian waffle eatery offering 10 continuously changing flavors of yogurt, over 60 toppings, gluten free cones and waffles available, hot and cold beverages, and 2 soups daily. Indoor and outdoor seating. Meetings welcome. Open 7 days a week. Sun-Thurs 11 AM to 11 PM, Fri 11 AM to 12 AM, Sat. 10 AM to 12 AM. Free WiFi. Loyalty punch cards, gift cards and t-shirts available. UMONEY. Like us on facebook. Let YoWaffle host your next birthday party! $


Arts & Entertainment listings August 2 – August 9, 2012

8

days a week

Photo courtesy Rodney Bursiel

Posturing. Raina Rose brings her “sideways Americana” to the Top Hat, 134 W. Front St., on Wed., Aug. 8, at 6 PM, with locals Butter. Cost TBA.

THURSDAY August

02

For summertime learning and such, the Montana Natural History Center’s miniNaturalists Pre-K Program has moved to the Fort Missoula Native Plant Gardens. Bugs, dirt and explorations abound. 10–11 AM. $3/$1 for members. Visit montananaturalist.org.

Even without his Clerics around, he shreds something holy. Tom Catmull plays solo at Draught Works from 5-8 PM. Higherground Brewery Pint Night to support the Bitter Root Water Forum makes sense cuz of the water that goes into beer. Perhaps someone should have a pint night for Olympia; stuff is nazty. 518 N. 1st St., Hamilton. 4–8 PM. Free.

nightlife You’ll be climbing up a wall at Freestone Climbing Center’s Ladies Night. 935

Toole Ave. 5–10 PM. $6.50/$5 students. Meet up with the crew and do that voodoo that you do so well at Downtown ToNight, a weekly food fete at Missoula’s Caras Park from 5:30-8:30 PM. This week’s tunes by Russ Nasset. Free. Visit missoula downtown.com. end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., August 3, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to The Calemander c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

Times Run 8/3- 8/9

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

Monsieur Lazhar (PG-13) Nightly at 7 & 9 Sat. matinee at 1 & 3 Moonrise Kingdom Nightly at 7• Sat. at 1 Safety Not Guaranteed Nightly at 9 Sat. matinee at 3

Beer & Wine AVAILABLE 131 S. Higgins Ave. Downtown Missoula

www.thewilma.com

406-728-2521

Missoula Independent Page 21 August 2 – August 9, 2012


Get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at the weekly meeting of the Treasure State Toastmasters. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Rd. 6–7 PM. Free. Danny Freund and the Tennessee Two Piece get down to biz-natch at the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton from 6–8:30 PM. Free. The Petermans offer up a free and family friendly show at the Top Hat. Now about that bar mitzvah....7–9:30 PM. Free. Fans of grammar, logic and rhetoric, grab your usually useless knowledge and head down to the Central Bar and Grill’s trivia night, hosted by local gallant and possible Swede Thomas Helgerson. 143 W. Broadway. 9 PM. Free. Get sweaty with all the beautiful people at the Dead Hipster Dance Party, where love and funk is in the air. Badlander. 208 Ryman St. $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM–midnight. Show the naysayers that your version of Lou Gramm’s “Midnight Blue” is as passionate as your lovemaking at Sean Kelly’s Open Mic Night. 9 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign-up. Karaoke Battle USA at the Silver Coin in Hamilton is a war of attrition, in which folks with pipes seek to destroy one another’s versions of “Total Eclipse of the Heart” in a bid to attend the national championships. 9 PM–1:30 AM. $10 registration fee. Fill the Silence and Chaos Revelation Theory drop “D” and rock thee at the Dark Horse Bar. 1805 Regent. 9 PM. Cost TBA. The Decrease Your Species Tour (sponsored by the UN’s 50 Year Population CODEX...jokes) features rhymers from way outta here, including Errol Hem, Milky Way and MC Nobody Cares, plus locals the Codependents. Palace. 9 PM. $3/$5 surcharge for those aged 18-20. DJ Bionic builds beats better than they were before. Harder. Better. Faster. Stronger. Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman. 9 PM. Free. The Total Fest Curated VFW Residency Week One includes the sounds of Modality, American Falcon, Cave Cricket and No One and the Somebodies. Now that is

Found Montana might not tell you where those keys went but there are sure some fine photos to be found as he rediscovers 18 Montana towns and tells their stories via a multi-media presentation. Rocky Mountain School of Photography, 216 N. Higgins. 5–8 PM. Free. (See Scope.)

SPOTLIGHT crypto night For all its throaty grunts, its guttural sounds and its protracted word lengths, the German language often manages to succinctly capture an idea or individual in a way English cannot. For example: übermensch. A powerful word which sounds like what it means–Superman or Above-human. It evokes the good and the evil in mankind. Scholars continue to disagree on the exact translation of Nietzsche’s philosophical idea but that makes the word and the world all the better. After all, it is in these liminal spaces, where a single word’s multiple meanings can conflict with one another, that we are forced to question whether the meaning of anything is static or stable. Instability makes the general population uncomfortable. The artists participating in the VonCommon Studio’s Super Show most likely have spent their entire lives comfortably existing within these in between spaces, recreating those imagined worlds for us via their artwork. For the Super Show, a bevy of artists were asked to create and exhibit works inspired by “super heroes, super villains and all things super.”

WHAT: The Super Show at VonCommon Studios WHEN: Fri., Aug. 3, from 5 PM to 10 PM WHERE: Radio Central Building, 127 E. Main St., Ste. 316 HOW MUCH: Free

just plain weird. Perfect. 245 W. Main. 9:30 PM. $3. Party Trained is all our Arts Editor and my gardner talk about, especially after all-you-can-eat hotcakes. Go hear why when they play the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand. 9:30 PM. Free. She’ll leave you with a smile if you take her to Missoula Homegrown Stand-Up Comedy at the Union Club. Sign-up by 9:30 pm to perform. Free. Paydirt, “Missoula’s hottest new country band,” according to the literature, performs for you fairgoers after you’ve spun yourselves sick on the Zipper. Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand. 9:30 PM. Free. Two Story Ranch is more than a dream come true for our parents, it’s a band with a plan, or perhaps a poetical allusion to Western life. What the hell is going on? They also play with Louie Bond and Kimberlee Carlson. 10 PM. $3.

Missoula Independent Page 22 August 2 – August 9, 2012

Courtney Blazon gets down with the intersection between imagination and reality, while Statriot designs presents a new Montanacentric t-shirt by Kari Workman, at Betty’s Divine, 521 S. Higgins starting at 5 PM. Free. The Monte Dolack Gallery and the Montana Music Educators Association will premiere the newly commissioned fine art poster “Montana Music” by Monte Dolack. Julian Jared Ricci provides the music, at the Monte Dolack Gallery 139 W. Front at 5 PM. Free.

Courtesy Lauren Norby

Organizer, participant and VonCommoner Jonathan Marquis says that most of the work is two-dimensional but just about any style or method of work could be unveiled Friday night. With offerings from local favorites like Courtney Blazon, Chase McBride, Adelaide Every, David Turley and many, many other artists, the meaning of super is bound to be tested, manipulated and ignored. Perfect. –Jason McMackin

FRIDAY

03

August

Holy curds, goat boy, it’s the 100th Creamery Picnic in Stevensville and this three-day event is, well, the creme de la creme of summer fun, with a parade, a barbecue contest, food vendors, a foot race and crafters. Visit creamerypicnic.com.

Sam Case argues the case for relating to non-human beings via his exhibit Mirrors Made of Wood at the Montana Natural History Center. 120 Hickory. 4:30–6:30 PM. Free.

nightlife The Coffee Tasting at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center can keep your legs pumping this First Friday and help them fine folks choose a fresh new blend to sell at the joint. 519 S. Higgins. 5–7 PM.

Nancy Rishoff and Jill Logan share their outdoor paintings with us during their exhibition Montana Dreams at Computer Central. I wonder if one of the dreams includes Bozeman’s disappearance? 136 E. Broadway. 5–7:30 PM. Free. Jeff Pernell is gonna blow away your notions about art with his gunpowder and paint works at the One Eleven Boutique. 111 N. Higgins. 5–8 PM. Free. (See Spotlight.) Meghan Hanson’s Grand Canyon to Great Wall: International Sketches of the Built and Natural boasts a journal’s worth of travel drawing and paintings. Art City, 407 W. Main St., Hamilton. 5–8 PM. Free. Photog John K. Mercer pleasures your eyes with his works at Prudential Montana Real Estate, 314 N. Higgins. 5–8 PM. Free. Jeremy Lurgio’s exhibit Lost &

Steven H. Begleiter, photographer extraordinaire, presents his book 50 Lighting Setups for Portrait Photographers, which is a visual journal of the people of Missoula, at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins at 5:30 PM. Miranda Orante’s Costume Collection exhibition of bracelets, hair pieces (not toupees, Gary) and necklaces at the Rising Tides Gallery inside Bathing Beauties Beads is as shiny as the costume jewelry that inspired it. 501 S. Higgins. 5–8 PM. Free. Tabitha Beard burns the wood at both ends with her found wood art, which she paints as well. Upcycled, 517 S. Higgins. 5–8 PM. Free. Monochrome photog Chris Chapman displays his exhibit Understated at the Mercantile Deli, 119 S. Higgins. 5–8 PM. Free. Bones and Skin by Jennifer Johnson is a display of photos depicting, well, bones and skin. Oh, but it is so much more! Promise! Butterfly Herbs, 232 N. Higgins. 5–8 PM. Free. Lisa Autio’s porcelain sculptures and Joyce Koskenmaki’s animal portraits are exhibited at Montana Art and Framing, 709 Ronan. The bear one makes me as sad as it does happy. 5–8 PM. Free. Chelsea Dunsmore brings us her textile art for viewing, but don’t you dare make a poncho out of that business, unless Chelsea says it’s okay. Zoo City Apparel, 139 E. Main. 5–8 PM. Free. The results are on display for the Plein Air 10th Annual Paint Out!


By any other name. Jennifer Johnson’s photgraphy exhibit Bones and Skin is on display at Butterfly Herbs, 232 N. Higgins Ave., as part of the First Friday Art Walk on Fri., Aug. 3, from 5 PM to 8 PM. Free.

Exhibition at the Dana Gallery, 246 N. Higgins. You’ve seen them out and about now view the end product. 5–8 PM. Free. Artists Joel Allen and Toni Matlock guide peeps through the work they made for the Montana Triennial: 2012 at the MAM, 335 N. Pattee. 5–8 PM. Free. laurie e. mitchell exhibits Perpectives, composed of mixed media and found objects, at House Studio Design, 133 N. Higgins, from 5–8 PM. Free. Britchy is an acoustic duo performing songs about you at the Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery. 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 5–9 PM. Free. The VonCommon Studios Super Show features a dozen supa-dupa artists showing off their super works. By the way, I am super, thanks for asking. Tunes by Bad Naked and a trio of super groovy gals djing, too. Radio Central Bldg., 127 E. Main St., Ste. 316. 5–10 PM. Free. (See Spotlight.) Seth Green questions the habitual in his exhibition Not Your Everyday Ritual at the Clay Studio of Missoula, 1106 A Hawthorne. 5:30–9 PM, gallery talk at 8 PM. Free. Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s weekly meeting to talk about past glories and upcoming activities. Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free. Family Friendly Friday with Hanz Araki and Kathryn Claire

is a mixer of sorts: germs for the kids, tonic for you. Top Hat. 6–8 PM. Free. Patricia and GiGi DonDiego are having a mother/daughter show of paintings, beadwork and collage and it is doubtful Zorro will be in attendance. Or is it? Up and coming artist E.J. Hanson is in the house, too. River’s Mist Gallery, 317 Main, Stevi. 6–9 PM. Free. Get back in shape and learn something new at Freestone Climbing Gym’s Intro to Bouldering course, which introduces basic techniques, safety stuff, ethics and more. Class includes 1.5 hours of instruction and two weeks of unlimited climbing. 935 Toole. 7–8:30 PM. $40. Christopher Mario Bianco soothes your summer sun sickness with tunes outside at The Keep, 105 Ben Hogan Dr. 7–10 PM. Free. The Holistic Weight Loss Support Group is facilitated by Tereece Panique and takes place at the Unity Church of Missoula, 546 South Ave., at 7:30 PM. $2 suggested donation. Call 4931210 for more info. Polyphony Marimba bring the many good time sounds of traditional Zimbabwean marimba music with a number of musicians. Missoula Winery, 5645 W. Harrier. 8 PM. $10. Jon Dobson get all kinds of avant

garde when he performs at the Symes Hotel. In fact, I heard he is going use a unicorn horn to play Van Halen’s “Eruption” ... in quadrophonic sound. 8–10 PM. Pass the hat. Ten Foot Polecats come out west to drive some of their bluesy rock grooves straight into your mouf, Captain. With local Aran Buzzas. Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman. 9 PM. Cost TBA. Zeppo MT is mos def going to help you hook up with your old Anthro professor on the dance floor at the Union Club. 9 PM. Free. Fishbowl Friday: The Hendawg Edition is more than a party, it’s a celebration of Badlander coowner Chris Henry’s 40th birthday, so grab some snacks and get waxed for a night of good times and one great oldie, with Cyanwave, Nordic Soul and Kris Moon. 9 PM. Badlander. Free. Memphis May Fire gets its metalcore madness rolling with deathcore purists Born of Osiris, plus locals Amidst the Chaos and A Midnight Drive. Palace. All ages. 7 PM. $15. Paydirt, “Missoula’s hottest new country band,” according to the literature, performs for you fairgoers after you’ve spun yourselves sick on the Zipper. Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand. 9:30 PM. Free. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once

Missoula Independent Page 23 August 2 – August 9, 2012


SPOTLIGHT powder friday

BUILD YOUR OWN ROBOT!

My favorite art-related quote so far this year comes from Jeff Pernell, a man who dabbles in gunpowder and paint: “I like to use stuff that’s normally garbage.” The “stuff” he is referring to is the material which he uses to create dynamic, explosive (literally!) paintings. Pernell knows that when you hear the word gunpowder you think flash, bam, boom, big explosion. Unfortunately for the teenaged boy in all of us, he works with small detonations, mostly made up of home-brewed powder he learned to make after reading an old Japanese fireworks book. The powder is placed between two pieces of wood and masked off. Once detonated, the burning powder seeks the

Digital Fabrication & Electronics Workshop 3D Printing, 3D Laser Scanning, 3D CNC Carving, 2D Craft Cutter, Arduino, Electronics, Robot Brains DIY Books and How-to Manuals ...just bring your imagination.

WHAT: Jeff Pernell First Friday Exhibit

Membership is only $30 a month!

WHEN: Fri., Aug 3, from 5 PM to 8 PM

1701 S. Ave West, Missoula. REPLIK8TR.com (406)241-7846

WHERE: One Eleven Boutique, 111 N. Higgins Ave.

HOW MUCH: Free

path of least resistance through the masked area, spreading and spraying the paint into patterns and splats. Pernell likens his work to a Rorschach test, aka the ink blot test which tests perception and is then interpreted by psychologists. Each person sees something different in Pernell’s work because the patterns mean something different to everyone. Pernell says,“ [The images] pull out what’s inside you, so everybody has a different experience.” –Jason McMackin

they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. Super Saturated Sugar Strings reminds us that China kept a-callin’ Alameda. Top Hat. 10 PM. $5 suggested donation.

SATURDAY August 9

August 16

Mudfoot and the

Joan Zen

Dirty Soles

Family Activity

Family Activity

Mismo Gymnastics

Parks & Rec Climbing Wall

August 8

August 15

Dodgy Mountain Men

Lefty Lucy

Family Activity

Family Activity

Parks & Rec Climbing Wall

Bitterroot Gymnastics

Missoula Independent Page 24 August 2 – August 9, 2012

04

August

See all the beautiful people and purchase fresh-baked yummies, gorgeous veggies and maybe have a taco at one of western Montana’s farmers’ markets. In Missoula at Circle Square (missoulafarmersmarket.com), on Pine Street and under the Higgins Avenue bridge (clarkforkrivermarket.com); in Stevensville on Main Street; and in Hamilton at South Third and Bedford streets. Hours vary for the markets, but it all typically goes down between 8 AM and 1 PM. Paddle on my wayward sons (and daughters), the Epic Shore to Shore Race at Flathead Lake is a scenic bit of torture-riffic racing, with teams and solo participants paddling from 4.5 miles to 24 (!) miles. $45-$75. epicshore toshore.com.

Grab a blanket and enjoy the cinemagic with your special friend(s) under the stars at the Missoula Outdoor Cinema. This evening’s screening is David Bowie’s Oscar-winning performance in Labyrinth, starting around 9 PM at the the Headstart school on the corner of Worden and Phillips on Missoula’s Northside. Free, but donations accepted. Reiki Training I with Carrie Schreiber teaches the Japanese technique for stress reduction at the Intuitive Empowerment Institute, 725 W. Alder. $125. Call 543-7055. The Pioneer Festival running races take place up Potomac way and include distances of 1, 6 and 11 miles. Dudes, the 11-mile Gold Rush Trail Run has a gnarly elevation-gain profile. Barf city. 8 AM. Head to sites.google.com/site/pioneerfestivalruns/. Step one: Admit you have a problem (usually it’s a propensity for exaggeration and/or filling out dream journals). Step two: Attend Writers Anonymous, an adult writing workshop in the Missoula Public Library boardroom. 10 AM–noon. Free.

The Milltown Bridge Market serves up fresh greens, baked good and wares, all while suspended high above the beautiful Blackfoot River. Park across from Town Pump mega-station. 10 AM–2 PM. Free. Festa Firenze Italia is all about Italy (duh), and features pasta making, travel tips (Sardinia rules), trentino traditions, wine tastings and hors d’ oeuvres. Caffé Firenze, 281 Rodeo Dr., Florence. 10–5 PM. $25. Visit caffefirenze.com/ events. The Comprehensive Bike Maintenance class at REI, 3275 N. Reserve, keeps the squeaks to a minimum and allows you to shift when you like, not when your bike wants to. Bring your bike; tools provided. 10:30 AM. $100/$80 members. Call 541-1938. Inuksuk with Odette Grassi explores the stone structures used by Arctic peoples for communication. Living Art of Montana, 725 W. Alder, Ste. 17. 10:30 AM–12:30 PM. Free. Call 549-5329. The Hot Springs Farmers Market busts out the dee-lish grub for all you all from 11 AM–3 PM, with tunes come 4 PM at the


Photo courtesy Polyphony Marimba

Funk? No, man, we don’t do that. Polyphony Marimba performs at the Missoula Winery, 5646 W. Harrier Way, on Fri., Aug. 3, at 8 PM. $10.

Aftermarket Music & Arts Series. The KBGA End of Summer Family Fair takes place at the Oval on the UM campus and features tunes by all sorts of bands, booths with screenprinting, a bouncy castle and, most importantly, a volcano waterslide. Yowza. Let the good times roll, kids. 11 AM–6 PM. Free. The Potomac Pioneer Festival has a host of good times, including an archery shoot, a beef cooking contest, a fire dept. hosedown (not a posedown, Billy Ray), races, food, horseshoes and an evening dance. Potomac Community Center. All day. $5/12 and under free. Visit potomac schoolmontana.us. The Big Hole Battlefield Summer Speaker Series features folks demonstrating the old school Native American stick game. Bring your sneaks, you may have to participate. 16542 Hwy. 43. Noon and 3 PM. Free. Get on board for the Missoula County Chess Championship at Zootown Brew and see the county’s best strategists try to defeat you know who. Format: four games of 30, Swiss, not rated. 121 W. Broadway. $15/$5 juniors and newcomers. To enter, see Greg at Liquid Planet between 7 and 9 PM on Thursdays.

The guild that sews together, stays together, so join Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., at its monthly Modern Quilt Guild for beginners and pros alike. 12–5 PM. $20 (first few sign-ups are free).

nightlife Strangled Darlings entertain you at Draught Works Brewery. Now you should be uncomfortable. 5–8 PM. Free. George Carlton plans to make your special evening more special with a selection of music sure to tickle your inner ear. Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake. 5–9 PM. Free. A bunch of rag-tag musicians with who knows what kind of instruments get together from 7–9:30 PM on the first Sat. of every month for the Bitterroot Valley GoodTime Jamboree at the Grange Hall, 1436 South 1st St. in Hamilton. This week, with a musical concert by Scatter the Mud. Call Clem at 961-4949. There’s an early show at the VFW, 245 W. Main, featuring scads of weird dudes, including Idahoans Tim Blood and the Gutpanthers, Art Fad and Clyde Webb, plus locals King Elephant, Gin Addicts and Monks on Fire. 8 PM. $3/$5 for those aged 18-21. (See Noise.) Same Sex Dictator is here to make you aurally fixated by loud-

ness and melty sounds, with locals Zebulon Kosted and Shramana. Zoo City Apparel, 139 E. Main. 8 PM. $5. Absolutely with DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo bring the kind beats and gnar-gnar kind-grind bro, brah, bree during a dance party featuring every style of rump-shaking tuneage. Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2 for 1 Absolut drinks until 11 PM. Free. Jeanne Jolly helps you get your jollies this fine evening with some country-flavored tunes. With cello and guitar duo Montana Skies. Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman. 9 PM. Cost TBA. Country Boogie Boys make life a little sweeter when they help couples get to couplin’ out at the Lumberjack Saloon up Hwy. 12 west of Lolo. 9 PM. Free. The Boozehounds howl at the moon and shoot out the lights when they play the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand. 9:30 PM. Free. DJ Dubwise supplies dance tracks all night long so you can take advantage of Sexy Saturday and rub up against the gender of your choice at Feruqi’s. 10 PM. Free. Call 728-8799. The Silent Comedy is only a name. They will certainly play tunes for you at the Top Hat. 10 PM. $6.

SUNDAY

05

August

Take a Sunday stroll and a spin on the carousel at the Carousel Sunday Market & Festival, which offers up local veggies, crafts and all sort of yummikins. Every Sunday from 10 AM to 2 PM at the New Park parking lot near A Carousel for Missoula. Visit carrousel.com/acfm/carousel-sundaymarket-and-events. Festa Firenze Italia day two boasts kids soccer clinics, limoncello lessons, food vendors and more, di più, di più, di più! Caffé Firenze, 281 Rodeo Dr., Florence. 10–3 PM. Visit caffefirenze.com/ events. A memorial celebration of long-time music professor and community patriarch Don Simmons takes place at the Music Recital Hall on the UM campus at 11 AM. Get back in shape and learn something new at Freestone Climbing Gym’s Intro to Bouldering course, which introduces basic techniques, safety stuff, ethics and more. Class includes 1.5 hours of instruction and two weeks of unlimited climbing. 935 Toole. Noon–1:30 PM. $40.

Go with the jam when the Rocky Mountain Grange Hall, 1436 S. First St. south of Hamilton, hosts a weekly acoustic jam session for guitarists, mandolin players and others from 2–4 PM. Free. Call Clem at 961-4949. The New Big Sky Singers play ye olde tunes of the Kingston Trio and then some at the St. Timothy Summer Music Festival up Georgetown Lake way. 4 PM. $15/$10 students. Visit sttimothymusic.org. John Floridis plays music at Draught Works Brewery from 4–7 PM. 915 Toole. Free.

nightlife Slide into some slacks and slip on down to the American Legion Hall for Sunday Dance Parties with the Five Valleys Dance Club. Lesson at 5 PM, DJ from 6–9 PM. 825 Ronan St. $7/$12 per couple. Visit fivevalleysdanceclub.com. Total Feast is a fundraiser for Total Fest, the rootenest tootenest rock and roll conflagration this side of the Yakima Boy’s and Girl’s Club. Held at Biga Pizza, attendees can support TF by eating pizza and salad. Plus O-Mega-Tom has the karaoke bumpin’ next door at the VFDubs, 241 W. Main, around 7 PM. Oh word. 5–8 PM. $10. Close out the weekend in style with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to

Missoula Independent Page 25 August 2 – August 9, 2012


midnight, plus live jazz & DJs, during the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with Josh Farmer, The Vanguard Combo and Front Street Jazz. Free. The Tidal Horn blows as these stoner rockers prepare to leave town for a quick washing of the great unwashed. With Paradise in Guyana and local jerks Jercs. Palace. 9 PM. $5. (See Soundcheck.)

MONDAY

06

August

Over-the-counter and surplus licenses go on sale at 5 AM online, and the pickens is slim this year folks. Between death-by-train for the antelope two winters back and epizootic hemorrhagic disease thinning out the white-tailed deer last summer, freezers could be running light this fall. For more info., visit fwp-mt.gov. Those looking for mother-to-mother breast feeding support can find it when the La Leche League meets every first Mon. of the month at 10 AM at the First Presbyterian Church, 201 S. Fifth St. W., and on the third Mon. of the month at 6 PM in the small meeting room of the Missoula Public Library. Free. Children and babies are always welcome. You have the choice to check “yes” and sign up for the Teen Writing Group at the Bitterroot Public Library. 2–3 PM. Free. For all those affected by epilepsy, come to the Epilepsy Support Group at Summit Independent Living Center, 700 SW Higgins. 2–3:30 PM. Free. Call 721-0707.

nightlife At Slacker Mondays, from 6 PM until close, slackline fans can come to the Freestone Climbing Center at 935 Toole Ave. to test their balance. $13/$10 for students. Visit freestoneclimbing.com. Occupy Missoula General Assembly meets at the Caras Park fish sculpture at 6 PM. Visit occupymissoula.org. Basic Bike Maintenance at REI, 3275 N. Reserve, teaches you the difference between a schrader valve and a presta one. This is important people! 6:30 PM. Free. Easiest way to make rent since keno: Bingo at the VFW, 245 W.

Missoula Independent Page 26 August 2 – August 9, 2012

Main. 6:45 PM. $10 buy-in. There’s nothing bland about band, man, so dust off that flugelhorn, Chuck, and join the Missoula City Band for rehearsal in the Sentinel High School band room. How bad could you be? Call 728-2400 or go to missoulacityband.org. Yogesh Simpson and Mason Tuttle done come all the way from Bozeman to please you people as you nibble on nubbins at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins. 7–10 PM. Free. Open Mic with PD Lear at the VFW, 245 W. Main, seems like a fine idea, especially with 2 for 1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. Come by and do you that funk-a-doo. 10:30 PM. Free. Call Phil at 224-0816 to signup. It’s womp, womp, womp Missoula Area Dubstep (MAD) Monday, with DJs Osiris, Tigerlily and the Milkcrate Mechanic. Badlander. 9 PM. Free.

TUESDAY

07

August

Who loves to party? Everybody headed to the Western Montana State Fair, a five-day heartburn inducing, demo derbying, bullridin’, Zipper riding fun-a-pa-looza. Western Montana Fairgrounds, 1101 South Ave. W. Today through Sun., Aug. 12, starting at 11 AM daily. Visit westernmontanastatefair.com or call 721-3247. Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room, 5205 Grant Creek Dr., and work on your elk-camp locution with the Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters. All are invited. Noon–1 PM. Free. Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during the Compassionate Communication Non-Violent Communication Weekly Practice Group at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. 519 S. Higgins. Noon–1 PM. Free. Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. 3rd St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1-3 PM. For information, call 543-3955. Blood banks are extremely low on blood this summer, so donate while you’re secretly checke ing out 50 Shades of Gray at th

Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main., and you’ll be keeping the Universe in balance. 1–4:30 PM. Call 258-3851 to schedule an appt. or for more info.

nightlife You saw House Party, but you still can’t do the Kid ‘N Play. Do something about it by taking the Downtown Dance Collective’s Beg./Int. Hip-Hop dance class with Heidi Michaelson. 1221 W. Main St. 6–7 PM. ddcmontana.com The Pickin’ Circle at the Top Hat would prefer stringed instruments over nostrils, but who’s to judge? 6–9 PM. Free. YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts YWCA Support Groups for women every Tue. from 6:30–8 PM. An American Indian-led talking circle is also available, along with age-appropriate children’s groups. Free. Call 5436691. Unity Dance and Drum’s African Dance Class at the Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins, requests newbies and vets of all ages to join up or drop in anytime for an evening of live music and dancing. 7–8:30 PM. $10 per class or $35 for four. For more info., call 549-7933 or email tarn.ream@umontana.edu. Take a load off while you get a load of some of the area’s better musicians during the Musician Showcase at Brooks and Browns in the Holiday Inn Downtown, 200 S. Pattee St. $7 Big Sky pitchers and $2 pints. Free. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free pub trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with: What five events are part of the Olympic pentathlon? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.) Now this is comedy, Frenchy! Get your chuckle on during Comedy Night at Lucky Strike Casino, 151 Dearborn Ave. 8 PM. $5. Don’t just express yourself, be expressive at the ZACC’s weekly one-hour poetry workshop. 235 N. 1st St. 8 PM. Free. Bow down to the sounds at Royal Reggae, featuring dancehall jams by DJs Supa J, Smiley Banton and Oneness at the Palace at 9 PM. Free.


Photo by Chad Harder

Fair is fair. The Western Montana State Fair begins on Tue., Aug. 7, and rolls on through Sun., Aug. 12., with bull riding, Viking eating and demolition derby. $6/$3 for 5-12 year olds/ free for those 4 and under. Visit westernmontanafair.com.

Badlander’s Live and Local Night with Big in Japan, EQ and B.E. Wart is so huge that we don’t have enough space to describe it. 9 PM. Free. The Mark Duboise Band is joined by a mechanical bull tonight at the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand, where things are about to get downright rural. 9:30 PM. Free. Zootown Throwdown with Javier Ryan and friends ain’t no wrasslin’ match, but you may just get your ears pinned back from all that acoustic rockin’. Top Hat. 10 PM. Free.

WEDNESDAY

08

August

Who loves to party? Everybody headed to the Western Montana State Fair, a five-day heartburn inducing, demo derbying, bullridin’, Zipper riding fun-a-pa-looza. Western Montana Fairgrounds, 1101 South Ave. W. Today through Sun., Aug. 12, starting at 11 AM daily. Visit westernmontanastatefair.com or call 721-3247.

Num-nums and various vittles are the order of the day at Missoula’s Caras Park during Out to Lunch, which runs from 11 AM to 2 PM. This week’s tunage provided by Dodgy Mountain Men. Free. Visit missouladowntown.com The MDA Lock-Up is a great way to get revenge on your enemies and help a good cause. Local firefighters stuff and cuff local execs and civic leaders at Johnny Carino’s, 2825 Stockyard Rd., and play their harps until you bail them out. 11 AM–2 PM. To nominate someone to lock up or to help out, call 655-9000. The Exploring the Question Writing Workshop with Emily Goodburn at Living Art of Montana, 725 W. Alder, Ste. 17, allows those facing loss an opportunity to express their feelings via the written word 3:30–5:30 PM. Free. RSVP at 549-5329. Fill up on your neighbors’ numnums at the Arlee Community Development Corporation’s Jocko Valley Farmers’ Market. Music this week is open mic, so get out your strumming stick. Uptown Arlee. 4–7 PM.

nightlife Let them dance, or at least give it a try, during Kids’ Hip-Hop (for those 7–10 years old) at the Downtown Dance Collective. No dance experience is necessary and drop-ins are welcome. Just wear good clothes for dancing. 121 W. Main St. 5–6 PM. ddc montana.com Kettlehouse Community U-Nite Pint Night for the Flagship Program donates money to the good eggs at Flagship and makes your beer a tax write-off. Northside Taproom. 5–8 PM. Raina Rose is gonna sing you to sleep, pretty pop, with locals Butter. Family friendly. Top Hat. 6 PM. Cost TBA. Pub trivia answers: Pistol shooting, 200M freestyle swim, show jumping, fencing and 3K cross-country run. Get filled up on B12 and iron at Hamilton’s Wednesday Evening Farmers’ Market on Bedford St. 6–8 PM. For over 100 years the Missoula City Band has been your source for concert-band tunes in the Missoula Valley, and they continue that tradition with their weekly con-

cert series at Bonner Park all summer long. This week is the finale and they are joined by Gary Herbig and Jay Straw. Corner of Ronald and Hastings. 9:30 PM. Free. Black Eyed Peas fanatics are welcome to belt out their fave jamz at the Badlander during Kraptastic Karaoke, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $5 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free. The Mark Duboise Band is joined by a mechanical bull tonight at the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand, where things are about to get downright rural. 9:30 PM. Free. The Soul City Cowboys are making their move and playing the Top Hat at 10 PM. What will the guys at the end of the bar say about all this? Free.

THURSDAY

09

August

Who loves to party? Everybody headed to the Western Montana State Fair, a five-day heartburn

inducing, demo derbying, bullridin’, Zipper riding fun-a-pa-looza. Western Montana Fairgrounds, 1101 South Ave. W. Today through Sun., Aug. 12, starting at 11 AM daily. Visit westernmontanastatefair.com or call 721-3247. The North Valley Family Center’s Welcome Baby Meeting gives you a chance to handle your own business after the little one arrives, because if you don’t take care of you, who will? 5501 Hwy. 93. Ste. 3. 10 AM–noon. Free. The Seventh Annual Midyear Economic Update Seminar Five Questions Montanans Should Ask About the Energy Boom, with UM economists Patrick Barkey and Paul Polzin, is unlikely to answer all the questions, but it may make you a lick more smarter. Hilton Garden Inn, 3720 N. Reserve. Noon–1:30 PM. $25, includes lunch. Call 2435113. (See Agenda.) The 4th Annual OREOS Undergraduate Research Symposium pops off at the University Center from 1–4 PM. Free. The Riverfront Neighborhood Council Meeting and Soup

Missoula Independent Page 27 August 2 – August 9, 2012


Social takes place from 4:30–6 PM at the Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory. Let’s talk traffic and playground equipment.

nightlife Dudes, come get your climb on during Freestone Climbing’s Dude’s Night. 935 Toole Ave. 5–10 PM. $6.50/$5 students. The Nature Journaling Workshop with Nancy Seiler increases your ability to draw from nature and express your inner-most thoughts about rhyzomes. Fort Missoula Native Plant Garden. 4:30–7:30 PM. Cost TBA. Call 327-0405 to register. Meet up with the crew and do that voodoo that you do so well at Downtown ToNight, a weekly food fete at Missoula’s Caras Park from 5:30-8:30 PM. This week’s tunes by Mudfoot and the Dirty Soles. Visit missoualdowntown.com. Get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at the weekly meeting of the Treasure State Toastmasters. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Rd. 6–7 PM. Free. Hey fellow lovers of knowledge and spirituality and the ‘Root, this month’s Bitterroot Public Library Fellowship Club meeting is Taking the Leap: Freeing Ourselves from Old Habits and Fears with Buddhism teacher Pema Chadron. 6–7:30 PM. Free. Ethan Tucker sings and songwrites his way into your hearts and into the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6–8:30 PM. Free. Paddling Basics at REI, 3275 N. Reserve, ain’t about spankin’ the chillins, it’s just an overview of various watersports. Not the German kind, Coco. 6:30 PM. Free. The Alpine Theatre Project waits until the hot days of August to spice things up with Hedwig and the Angry Inch, the story of a rock band fronted by an East German transgender singer. It’s all steeped in the androgynous 1970s David Bowie era, and the story is both gleefully trashy and sweetly moving. Catch it at the Whitefish Performing Arts Center, 600 E. Second St., at 8 PM. $18–$39 at alpine theatreproject.com. Fans of grammar, logic and rhetoric, grab your usually useless knowledge and head down to the Central Bar and Grill’s trivia night, hosted by local gallant and possible Swede Thomas Helgerson. 143 W. Broadway. 9 PM. Free.

Missoula Independent Page 28 August 2 – August 9, 2012

Get sweaty with all the beautiful people at the Dead Hipster Dance Party, where love and funk is in the air. Badlander. 208 Ryman St. $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM–midnight. Show the naysayers that your version of Lou Gramm’s “Midnight Blue” is as passionate as your lovemaking at Sean Kelly’s Open Mic Night. 9 PM. Free. Call 5421471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign-up. Karaoke Battle USA at the Silver Coin in Hamilton is a war of attrition, in which folks with pipes seek to destroy one another’s versions of “Total Eclipse of the Heart” in a bid to attend the national championships. 9 PM–1:30 AM. $10 registration fee. Saving Abel ditches Ferris in favor of gerunds like Silverman and Private Ryan when they play music at Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman. 9 PM. Cost TBA. Synergy Sessions: Zookeeperz Edition is better than a chimpanzee orgy and features sets of electronical tuneage by DJs Mega Trees, Enzymes, Milkcrate Mechanic and Mankiisi. Palace. 9 PM. Free. Party Trained is all our Arts Editor and my gardner talk about, especially after all-youcan-eat hotcakes. Go hear why when they play the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand. 9:30 PM. Free. Total Fest Curated VFW Residency Week Two is sure to be as much of a hoot as week one, with TBA bands and all sorts of the good stuff musically, philosophically and deliciously. 9:30 PM. $3. The Chicks ‘n’ Chaps afterparty mos def is not in a hotel lobby but is up in the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand, and does include a mechanical bull. Time to see if there is a thing called dignity in my life. 9:30 PM. Free. He’ll cure your tremors with a sweet shot of country: Russ Nasset hits up the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., for a solo set this and every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free. Host your own backyard pentathlon and celebrate the arrival of August and the track and field events this Olympic week. Send your event info to me by 5 PM on Fri., Aug. 3 to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to The Calemandar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”


MOUNTAIN HIGH I t can sound cliché to say that nature is a place for renewal and restoration of one’s self. However, like the best clichés, it is born from truth and hard to argue against. In the open air of a garden, a park or the wilderness, we can see nature recover from the cold winds of winter or the conflagrations of summer. Once blackened hillsides begin to grow green within weeks of forest fires. Frozen rivers thaw and rage in the spring and nearly dry up in summer before being replenished again. For some, all the renewal and restoration is merely background happenings; they are things which occur with such commonality here in western Montana that we rarely take note. Perhaps, then, it is the quiet of the woods that proves to be most beneficial to us. Quiet should not be confused with silence. Critters cavort in the trees. Breezes blow and crack branches. Leaves crisply fall to the ground. When it is quiet outside, whether you are near a lake or a falls, water is the most intense and persevering sound. It is rhythmic. It

laps. It drips. It cascades and roars. It moves and the earth moves with it, both eroding the soil and replenishing it with moisture. The alpha and the omega. Builder and destroyer. The Tamarack Grief Resource Center knows this, so they are holding a men’s river retreat for those men grieving the loss of a family member (parent, child, spouse, sibling or loved one). The group gathers for support, to share stories, to express emotions and to have fun, too, as there is fishing, barbecue, good old floating and staring at that big blue sky. –Jason McMackin The Tamarack Grief Resource Center’s men’s river retreat takes place on Fri., Aug. 3, from 1 PM to 8:30 PM. Outfitting and boats provided by Missoula Valley Outfitters and Lewis & Clark Adventures. $200 for a guided fishing trip/$100 to float. Scholarships and sliding pay scale available to all. To register, call 541-8472.

Photo by Chad Harder

THURSDAY AUGUST 2 For summertime learning and such, the Montana Natural History Center’s miniNaturalists Pre-K Program has moved to the Fort Missoula Native Plant Gardens. Bugs, dirt and explorations abound. 10–11 AM. $3/$1 for members. Visit montananaturalist.org. You’ll be climbing up a wall at Freestone Climbing Center’s Ladies Night. 935 Toole Ave. 5–10 PM. $6.50/$5 students.

FRIDAY AUGUST 3

The Comprehensive Bike Maintenance class at REI, 3275 N. Reserve, keeps the squeaks to a minimum and allows you to shift when you like, not when your bike wants to. Bring your bike; tools provided. 10:30 AM. $100/$80 members. Call 541-1938. The Big Hole Battlefield Summer Speaker Series features folks demonstrating the old school Native American stick game. Bring your sneaks, you may have to participate. 16542 Hwy. 43. Noon and 3 PM. Free.

SUNDAY AUGUST 5

The MT Chapter of the Sierra Club’s Women’s Hike up the Lake Dinah trail from Lake Elsina is a relaxing chance to walk five miles through the lush brush and grassy meadows of the Mission Mountains and gain only 700’ of elevation. Free. RSVP at janetfiero77@gmail.com.

Get back in shape and learn something new at Freestone Climbing Gym’s Intro to Bouldering course, which introduces basic techniques, safety stuff, ethics and more. Class includes 1.5 hours of instruction and two weeks of unlimited climbing. 935 Toole. Noon–1:30 PM. $40.

The Wilderness Institute Big Snowy Mountains Ridge Walk is chock-full of ice caves, creek canyons and walking. To join up on this four-day research expedition, call 243-5361.

MONDAY AUGUST 6

Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s weekly meeting to talk about past glories and upcoming activities. Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free.

SATURDAY AUGUST 4 Paddle on my wayward sons (and daughters), the Epic Shore to Shore Race at Flathead Lake is a scenic bit of torture-riffic racing, with teams and solo participants paddling from 4.5 miles to 24 (!) miles. $45$75. epicshoretoshore.com. The Pioneer Festival running races take place up Potomac way and include distances of 1, 6 and 11 miles. Dudes, the 11-mile Gold Rush Trail Run has a gnarly elevation-gain profile. Barf city. 8 AM. Head to sites.google.com/site/pioneerfestivalruns/.

Over-the-counter and surplus licenses go on sale at 5 AM online, and the pickens is slim this year folks. Between death-by-train for the antelope two winters back and epizootic hemorrhagic disease thinning out the white-tailed deer last summer, freezers could be running light this fall. For more info., visit fwp-mt.gov. Basic Bike Maintenance at REI, 3275 N. Reserve, teaches you the difference between a schrader valve and a presta one. This is important people! 6:30 PM. Free.

THURSDAY AUGUST 9 Paddling Basics at REI, 3275 N. Reserve, ain’t about spankin’ the chillins, it’s just an overview of various watersports. Not the German kind, Coco. 6:30 PM. Free. calendar@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent Page 29 August 2 – August 9, 2012


scope

Disappearing act Jeremy Lurgio turns his lens on lost—and found—towns of Montana by Erika Fredrickson

In 2000, the Department of Transportation—in its effort to switch from analog to digital mapping—decided to revamp of the Montana map. Maps change constantly, but this rendering put 18 towns on the chopping block. Nine of those towns would stay on the map and 9 would go, and the decision would be based on several criteria: They looked at post offices, population and census data and they did on-the-ground research to see which places still maintained attributes of a town. What does it mean for a town to disappear off the map? That seems like a particularly poignant act—however practical—with psychological consequences. What once was a town for generations is now dust in the wind. The poet Richard Hugo, if he were still with us today, would likely have something to say about the post offices, dilapidated bars and barren schoolyards and about this whole disappearing act. Fortunately, we do have photographer Jeremy Lurgio. Lurgio’s multimedia exhibit Lost & Found Montana opens at the Rocky Mountain School of Photography Gallery this First Friday. It combines 36 photographs with audio interviews, video and written statements profiling each of the 18 lost and saved Montana farming, mining and mountain towns. The ambitious project has taken some time: Lurgio, a freelance photographer and a UM associate professor of journalism and multimedia, first heard of the towns in 2000, when he came across some news articles about them while he was teaching at the Rocky Mountain School of Photography. The idea of the towns ate at him. Several times he had to put his ideas about them on the back burner, but in 2005 he started to really explore the idea of depopulation and town identity. Over the course of the last few years, he’s pieced together grant funding from the Montana Arts Council, the University of Montana Grant Program, Humanities Montana and UM’s School of Journalism, which helped him travel more than 7,000 miles across Montana to report on the towns. “I wanted to go photograph what these places are

Jeremy Lurgio’s photograph of Flatwillow’s community dance

Missoula Independent Page 30 August 2 – August 9, 2012

like—that’s what it started out as,” says Lurgio who grew up on the East Coast, where towns tend to emerge and stay put forever. “It was going to be a gallery show with just photographs. Period.” But one of the first towns he visited, Flatwillow, got him thinking about the narrative of the towns. In Flatwillow, near Lewistown, he met the only two families still living in the town. “I called the guy and talked to him and told him what I was doing,” Lurgio says. “He was very forthright about it. He was one of the guys who spoke out to the newspapers and said, ‘Hey! We’re still here!’” The families thought that if they could preserve the town hall, which had been a community gathering point from the Great Depression through the 1950s, they could keep Flatwillow on the map. They threw a big community dance to raise money for the town hall. The next year they threw a second one. Lurgio attended that second dance and photographed the liveliness of the place. The revival of the town hall kept Flatwillow on the map. So, from there, Lost & Found Montana became more complex. The photographs alone are stunning: towns that stayed on the map are depicted in color and the towns that were erased are in black-and-white. But there’s more: Viewers of the exhibit can connect to QR codes and hear short interviews with town residents. (If you don’t have a smart device, Lurgio will provide a few at the gallery). The interviews are linked to Lurgio’s website, which will have even more material to browse: mini-documentaries, 360-degree panoramas and interactive maps where people can submit photos of their own Montana hometown and say whether it’s still on the map or not. For the project, Lurgio talked with the Department of Transportation to get a better idea of their take on the process. “They said it’s a really hard thing to do, to revise a map,” he says. The department still keeps old maps, which have been useful to historians or people trying to track down an old family homestead. But new maps need to make sense. “It really came down to population,” says

Lurgio. “If you had a population of one or more year-round residents, you had every right to stay on the map. But they looked at [other] town characteristics, too. At the end of the day, they ask county commissioners and sheriffs departments and people in those communities to [evaluate the towns].” Lurgio visited Maiden, an old mining town—essentially a ghost town—that was revamped by one man and preserved by the man’s grandson, a miner who’s now in his 60s. Ross Fork, which did disappear from the map, still has a handful of families farming the area, but there’s virtually nothing else that makes it a town. Alpine, a mountain town south of Roscoe, stayed on the map because the caretaker of the storied seasonal cabins on East Rosebud Lake lives there year-round. He got a chance to see places he didn’t know existed. And it’s possible the people in the towns got to see—through Lurgio’s lens—the last standing monuments of their town in a new light. Lurgio tells the story of the town of Horton, a railroad stop between Miles City and Forsyth. His photograph of Frank Hartman is both lonely and fondly nostalgic. Hartman no longer lives in Horton—though he lives nearby. His father was the last man living in Horton until 1999, when he was hit by a train and killed. Lurgio met with Hartman in Horton and got a tour of the remnants, which Lurgio photographed: an old farmhouse, a schoolyard and aged farm equipment. “There was definitely some sadness to it,” says Lurgio. “It was a railroad town and the last guy got hit by a train, which is just kind of a sad irony. But his son is a really wonderful man. … And he said, ‘Thank you. It’s been nice for me to remember.’ It was cool that he got something out of it.” Lost & Found Montana opens at the RMSP Gallery Friday, Aug. 3, with a reception from 5 to 8 PM. Free. Go to lostandfoundmontana.com to visit Lurgio’s project. efredrickson@missoulanews.com


Scope Soundcheck Noise Film Movie Shorts

Take warning Tidal Horn turns up the volume by Erika Fredrickson

“Holy Diver” with thundering verve. That was a show to remember, and people do, including the inordinate percentage of girl fans the band has. “We can’t explain it,” says McCann with sincerity. (All of them are good musicians and all of them are good-looking.) But they don’t want to jinx anything, so the conversation ends there. They might not be hard metal, but they’re hard partiers. “A certain local booking agent who should not be named hung out with us one night,” says Kaley. “And he forget how it was to get super fucked up, so that was pretty funny. We have a lot of fun with it.” Tidal Horn is hilariously laid back. A soundcheck before any show entails the band asking the sound guy for one thing: to turn up the volume, taking full advantage of their oversized Marshall amps. Kaley notoriously has forgotten his guitar at out-of-town venues, forcing him to drive back to get it. Hughes has a blood spatter on his snare from when Sid La Tray of Judgment Hammer borrowed it and cut his finger open playing. No big deal. Their onstage presence is casual, too. Kaley’s grandfather is the famous jazz saxophonist Lee Photo courtesy of Abi Holland Konitz, who played on Miles Davis’s Birth of the Cool, and There are songs about Yetis and killing zombies, Kaley is also trained on the sax. “I’ve listened to every punctuated by wonderfully gratuitous guitar solos. word he’s said,” says Kaley of Konitz. “We talked about But there’s a little bit of garage and math rock, too. At improvising. I’ve been up on stage and forgotten any rate, it’s not death metal or thrash metal. It’s things. My whole thing is, if you fuck up, just be ready warm, thick and more slow-burning. It’s mythologi- to cover it as opposed to train-wrecking.” cal with a healthy dose of humor. Tidal Horn is strapped for time. All of them work “I go from writing stuff I find humorous to seri- full-time jobs. McCann is a snowboard rep, which puts ous,” says Kaley, who writes the majority of the lyrics. him in Utah half the year. Their bassist, Mat McGrath, is “One of our songs is called ‘Sidewinders,’ and it’s a a rafting guide for Bearpaw River Expeditions and he punk rock song with lyrics about somebody I knew often has to leave Tidal Horn shows at 2 a.m to make it who had really bad drug problems. So it’s a fun to his gig in the Lochsa by 4 a.m. But that won’t stop rockin’ song, but it’s also something I wrote when I them from kicking off a small tour this week through was pissed off.” the much-travelled triangle from Missoula to Portland Kaley and guitarist Kyle McCann had already been to Seattle and back again. They’ll play a Missoula show in one band together a decade ago called Pocket with metal band Paradise in Guyana. In Portland, they’ll Lobotomy. That band got to play its first show at the play a couple of shows, including the New Copper notorious Missoula rock venue Jay’s Upstairs the week Penny with an ’80s-style hair metal band called Angel it shut down—just in time to say they did it. Afterward, Steel. And in Seattle they’ll play with a bunch of super Kaley ended up in the Inhumans, an indie hip-hop heavy metal bands. group that eventually moved to Portland, Ore., for 7 “It’ll be cool,” says McCann. “We’ll be different. months and then disbanded. The Inhumans had a lot of Some people will be stoked. Some people will probafans in Missoula because of their high-energy shows, bly boo.” and when McCann, Kaley and drummer Johnny Hughes It should be a smooth ride. In this band, there started Tidal Horn and played their first show on the are no divas or hard-asses. And even if they call each summer solstice of 2010, the fans transferred over. other out on b.s. sometimes, no one’s taking things A built-in fan base—made up of a lot of friends— too seriously. means Tidal Horn plays to solid crowds every two or McCann grins. “We crack more beers than three weeks. It can’t hurt that they have a strong stage whips.” Tidal Horn kicks off its tour with a show at the performance. They did a magnificent set of Dio covers at the Palace on Halloween night 2011, featuring Chris Palace Sat., Aug. 4, at 9 PM with Paradise in Guyana Bacon (Volumen, Bacon & Egg) on keys and back-up and Jercs. $5. vocals and Kevin Faris (also formerly of Pocket efredrickson@missoulanews.com Lobotomy) as Ronnie James Dio perfectly belting out Tidal Horn wants you to know something: They’re not a metal band. “That is one thing we get pigeonholed with,” says guitarist/singer Sam Kaley. “I mean, we’re heavy but we’re not metal.” They do end up with gigs playing alongside metal bands, but if you were forced at gunpoint to put a label on the Missoula quartet, you might call them stoner rock. They did, after all, fit right in when they opened up for Red Fang— Portland’s PBR-guzzling heavy stoner rock band—last summer. But really, why bother with the labels? Listening to the band’s most recent album, you can imagine going on an epic Nordic journey through icy mountains and along the coasts of stormy oceans. The iron throne is almost in your sights!

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Missoula Independent Page 31 August 2 – August 9, 2012


Scope Soundcheck Noise Film Movie Shorts Tim Blood and the Gutpanthers

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There are three major ways to experience happiness: blowing a car horn inside a tunnel, playing any Wu Tang song that features Ol’ Dirty Bastard and regretlessly embracing the inanities of pop punk on a sunny day. Just because the boys of TB and the GPs often hit the stage in sweat-stained booty shorts doesn’t mean they aren’t capable of telling emotional stories about hiding from cops, suburban/rural boredom and lack of self-confidence, because they are quite capable. Initially, the lyrical imagery can come off as jokey, but the words reveal an angst-filled teenage world that many of us know well. “Orange,” from last year’s Summer of Our Discontent, is a capsule of the band’s style. Vocalist Tim Blood shouts, “These are our favorite places to hang out: / Gas stations, grocery stores and all the diners / Where we can smoke cigarettes / And where we can drink hot chocolate / And where we can hide

Tender Forever DIY has a distinctly punk ring to it, but when you think of all the solo musicians playing all sorts of styles out there, it becomes a broader blanket term. Melanie Valera started a few bands in Bordeaux, France, in the ’90s but by 2003 went solo and started Tender Forever. In just two years she outgrew southwestern France and wound up in Olympia, Wash., on K Records, home to heavy hitters like Atlas Sound and Mirah. Tender Forever follows Imogen Heap’s penchant

All Eyes West All Eyes West Jump Start Records

Discussion question: Are the Foo Fighters cool now? It’s a thought experiment that implicates several other questions. Would that mean Frank Black is cool? Dinosaur Jr.? The web keeps getting stickier, almost as if questions of coolness were a gross trap. It’s good to clear your mind of such hypotheticals before you listen to the Chicagobased All Eyes West, whose self-titled debut offers us a sort of alternate-universe chance to discover the Foo Fighters without connecting them to Nirvana. It’s Justin Miller’s voice that does it. He has that heartfelt rasp, and the resemblance is augmented by muted verses stitched to anthemic choruses with swingy bridges. If you are between the ages of 20 and 40, you

Strangled Darlings Red Yellow & Blue self-released

The Strangled Darlings occupy a place in the growing category of freak folk, with an emphasis on the freak. The Portland, Ore., duo of George Veech and Jessica Anderly offer a puzzling array of death marches, gypsy romps, country rock, jazz instrumentals and operatic ballads on an album that’s as lyrically dark as it is musically twisted. I think fun is supposed to be part of the equa-

Missoula Independent Page 32 August 2 – August 9, 2012

from our families / And where we can hide from the cops.” These guys know hooks and choose to carefully dole them out like your miserly grandmother hands out individual pieces of hard candy. In two-minute bursts of guitar fuzz and jangle, the band energetically sums up young life. Isn’t that what good pop music is supposed to do? (Jason McMackin) Tim Blood and the Gutpanthers play the VFW, 245 W. Main St., on Sat., Aug. 4, at 8 PM, with Art Fad, Clyde Webb, King Elephant, Gin Addicts and Monks on Fire. $3/$5 for those 18-21 for vocal layering and experimenting. The backing tracks get synth-heavy and rhythmically daring, like those found on Xiu Xiu’s Knife Play. Which means Valera’s occasionally juggling too much at once and trying to capture all her cultural influences in one go. It gets messy, if just by one or two too many layers. 2010’s No Snare is filled with darker orchestral sounds that capture a trip to Wonderland with an eloquent Alice. Valera’s 2011 EP, Where Are We From, takes that emotive formula and adds a sense of urgency. Compared with her older stuff, which was super fun and upbeat, Tender Forever proves the sun really never shines in the Northwest, though it still turns out good experimental pop. (Brooks Johnson) Tender Forever plays Zoo City Apparel Thu., August 2, at 8 PM. $6. cannot hear this wellconstructed pop rock without thinking of Dave Grohl’s big hand. How you listen to it therefore depends on how you feel about 1997. People who never liked Foo Fighters will not like All Eyes West; fans of The Colour and the Shape will. If you secretly liked “Everlong” but could not support a sequel band, you should go to Zoo City Apparel and watch All Eyes West make it fresh. I, for one, am grateful for the second chance. (Dan Brooks) All Eyes West plays Zoo City Apparel Mon., Aug. 6, at 8 PM. $5. tion, especially on the more up-tempo and tongue-incheek tracks, but the good times can be hard to find. Perhaps that’s because Veech sings in a stunted howl, like some snake-oil salesman with a short fuse or a disturbed curbside preacher. It’s a frantic vocal style that’s not for everyone. The lyrics can be equally rough, but there’s something to be said for writing a song about the late business magnate best known for marrying model Anna Nicole Smith. “J. Edgar Howard” kicks up some dirt while telling his life story, with Veech delivering devilish lines like “Anna Nicole, girl, / Your tits have grown cold.” It’s a sinister spin—one that Strangled Darlings wouldn’t have any other way. (Skylar Browning) The Strangled Darlings play the Top Hat Fri., August. 3, at 10 PM with the Super Saturated Sugar Strings and Michael Howard. $5.


Scope Soundcheck Noise Film Movie Shorts

Laughs guaranteed Aubrey Plaza adds brilliance to Safety by Dave Loos

Let’s be clear from the start. I’m more than fine with the basic idea behind Safety Not Guaranteed— that a socially awkward and potentially crazy grocery clerk/amateur scientist has invented a time machine and posted an ad in the classifieds looking for someone to reenact Back to the Future with him. There is room in my heart for low-concept science fiction, and there’s certainly no glut of indie sci-fi romantic comedies out there. And it’s not that I disliked the second plot component—that a Seattle magazine writer sees the ad and thinks it would make for a good feature story. But I can-

story for that fictitious ad, an ingenious idea that is bolstered by the wonderful character Kenneth (Mark Duplass), our time-traveling wannabe. That Kenneth is a serious man on a serious mission is evidenced early on, when he quickly rebuffs Jeff ’s attempt to join him on his journey, telling the undercover journalist that he “doesn’t know pain,” as in the pain of life. That leaves it up to Darius to convince Kenneth that she’s qualified to begin training for the mission, and she works her magic in brilliant fashion as he shelves soup cans while working at the grocery store.

Gaping into the future.

not proceed here without calling out The People Who Make Movies for their strange and consistent inability to accurately portray a newsroom, or really anything having to do with the print journalism profession. Because to me, the funniest moment of the entire film is when Jeff (Jake Johnson), our hunky, Mark Ruffalolook-alike, Escalade-driving, Seattle Magazine reporter, pitches the time traveler story to his editor and proceeds to ask for two interns to assist him on what will be a week-long reporting trip to the coast of Washington. And that editor doesn’t raise an eyebrow at the idea of the magazine paying for such a trip—so go ahead and add “fantasy” to this multi-genre film. Those interns are Arnau (Karan Soni), an overachieving undergrad looking to bolster his resume for “diversity” as he applies for doctoral programs, and Darius (Aubrey Plaza), an underachieving college graduate who can’t even land a paying job as a waitress. As preposterous as their existence in this film is, they are a necessary and fun component here for what could also be described as a road trip movie (if you’re playing at home, Safety Not Guaranteed now qualifies under the indie, sci-fi, fantasy, rom-com and road trip categories). And while most films that aim to please so many audiences end up pleasing no one and annoying many, Safety Not Guaranteed manages to juggle a lot here with surprisingly few missteps. The film is based on a 1997 classified ad written by a magazine employee as filler that read: “Wanted: someone to go back in time with me. This is not a joke. You’ll get paid after we get back. Must bring your own weapons. I have only done this once before. Safety not guaranteed.” Creative, right? This film creates the back

In one of her first big film roles, Plaza plays a version of the slacker government employee that she’s perfected on “Parks and Recreation,” though Darius can’t hide her charm as well as April Ludgate can. And that’s a good thing: Plaza is brilliant here as she gets to know Kenneth and his motivations for attempting to build a time machine from technology he has stolen from various labs. Kenneth is rightly concerned that others will not take his endeavor seriously. The skeptical Darius feigns interest with ease in these early scenes. It’s only later on—as she starts to realize her time traveling partner may not fit the “earnest crackpot” narrative that Jeff expects for his story—that the film finds its way. Whether the time machine works, or is even real, are questions the film answers, though it’s at its clunkiest when it tackles the sci-fi component head on: The film’s entire special effects budget is used on one scene near the end that had me laughing, which I’m not sure was the intention of director Colin Trevorrow. There are some odd incongruities in Safety Not Guaranteed, especially a secondary story between Jeff and a former girlfriend that goes nowhere important. But when the camera stays focused on Kenneth and Darius, there is an endearing charisma between the two that is richly dotted with humor and melancholy. It’s an odd film for sure, but wholly original—even if it insists on pretending newspapers and magazines have money to burn. Safety Not Guaranteed continues at the Wilma Theatre. arts@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent Page 33 August 2 – August 9, 2012


Scope Soundcheck Noise Film Movie Shorts OPENING THIS WEEK

NOW PLAYING

DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: DOG DAYS Schools out, now what? Our hero gets a job at the local country club. Here’s to hoping there aren’t any perennially embarrassing social miscues involving Baby Ruths in the pool, right Spalding? Starring Zachary Gordon and Robert Capron. Rated PG. Carmike 12: 1, 4, 7 and 9:15 pm. Village 6: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 and 9:40 pm. Pharaohplex: 7 and 9 pm, with 3 pm matinees on Wed., Sat. and Sun. No 9 pm show in Sun. Showboat: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:15 pm.

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN Peter Parker may just find out what happened to his parents and perhaps where they are; in the meantime, he’s got a nemesis and a lot of CGI to overcome. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12: 3D: 7 and 10 pm. BRAVE A princess gets the whole fruitin’ kingdom in an uproar and finds herself rolling with a witch before she can make it all right again. Starring every Scottish actor except Sean Connery, includ-

change to unsuspecting families. Starring the voices of Ray Romano and Denis Leary. Rated PG. Carmike 12: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30 pm. 3D: 1 and 4 pm. Village 6: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 and 9:35 pm.

and their crew put on a hot and steamy protest and defy authority with...hot and steamy dance! Starring Kathryn McCormick and Ryan Guzman. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12: 4:15 and 9:45 pm. 3D: 1:15 and 7:15 pm.

MAGIC MIKE Oh, hells yeah, girlfriend, a fine looking stud learns the wily and wild ways of the male stripper lifestyle from an older, more experienced performer. Stuff like pumping your hips forward and the best type of tear-away trousers for bachelorette parties on cruise ships. Starring the hunky Channing Tatum, well-tanned Matthew

TED Mark Wahlberg’s childhood wish comes true and his teddy bears turns into “Family Guy”’s Peter Griffin, and his only true pal...until a woman comes along and tries to separate the man from his foul-mouthed friend. Also starring Mila Kunis and Joel McHale. Rated R. Carmike 12: 1:45, 4:45, 7:45 and 10 pm.

McConaughey and female Olivia Munn. Rated R. Village 6: 1:15, 4:30, 7:15 and 10 pm.

THE WATCH Ben Stiller and co. bungle their way through modern male tropes and seek an escape from their work-a-day lives as suburban family men by anointing themselves the neighborhood watch. Also, there are nut shots and alien invasions. Starring Vince Vaughn and Jonah Hill. Rated R. Carmike 12: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 and 10 pm. Village 6: 1:30, 4:20, 7 and 9:45 pm. Pharaohplex: 7 and 9 pm, with matinees on Wed., Sat. and Sun at 3 pm. No 9 pm show on Sun.

This year’s Western Montana State Fair is gonna be SICK! Total Recall opens Friday at Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex and Showboat.

LA BAYADÈRE Love, sex, jealousy, dance and betrothals. It must be the ballet La Bayadère. Carmike 12: Sun., Aug. 5, at 2 pm and Tue., Aug. 7, at 7 pm. MONSIEUR LAZHAR In Montréal, Quebec, an Algerian immigrant replaces a teacher who committed suicide in the classroom. As he helps students deal with their loss, they learn of his own. Starring Mohamed Fellag, Sophie Nélisse and Émilien Néron. Rated PG-13. Wilma: 7 and 9 pm, with Sat. matinees at 1 and 3 pm. TOTAL RECALL You may recall the plot of this remake: A man has had pleasant memories planted in his subconscious by an evil corporation that later hunts the man down. Most likely, however, you recall that there is a woman in this film with three breasts. Starring Colin Farrell and Bokeem Woodbine. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 and 10 pm. Big D: 1, 4, 7 and 9:45 pm. Village 6: 1, 4, 7 and 9:50 pm. Pharaohplex: 6:50 and 9:10 pm, with matinees on Wed., Sat. and Sun at 3 pm, no 9:10 pm show on Sun. Showboat: 4, 7 and 9:20 pm.

ing Billy Connolly, Craig Ferguson and Kelly Macdonald. Rated PG. Carmike 12: 1:30, 4:30, 7 and 9:15 pm. Pharaohplex: 7 and 9 pm, with matinees on Wed., Sat. and Sun. at 3 pm, no 9 pm show on Sun. THE DARK NIGHT RISES The fairly reluctant hero and caped crusader of Gotham City returns to do what the police cannot: stop terrorists from destroying the world, in a mere 164 minutes. His nemesis? Bane, a dude with a face mask that would make Hannibal Lector squee. Starring everyone, including Christian Bale, Gary Oldman, Michael Caine, Anne Hathaway and Matthew Modine. Rated PG13. Carmike 12: 1, 1:30, 2, 4:30, 5, 5:30, 7, 8, 8:30, and 9:30 pm. Village 6: 12:30, 4:05, 7:30 and 10:55 pm. Pharaohplex: 7 pm nightly, with 3 pm matinees Wed., Sat. and Sun. ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT In the fourth installment of this kid-friendly money-making monolith of “jokes that adults get, too” the crew finds itself untethered from land and having adventures as they float aimlessly upon the ocean, all the while secretly dispatching left-wing notions about climate

Missoula Independent Page 34 August 2 – August 9, 2012

MOONRISE KINGDOM Wes Anderson directs this story of young love and follows two 12-year-olds on an adventure after they run away from home. All of Anderson’s guys are in this. Starring Ed Norton, Bruce Willis, Jared Gilman and Kara Hayward. Rated PG-13. Wilma: 7 pm nightly, with 1 pm matinees on Sat. SAFETY NOT GUARANTEED A peculiar classified ad inspires three sardonic Jet City reporters to meet up with the eccentric who placed it. Perhaps the three may learn a little sumpin’-sumpin’ from the aforementioned weird-o? Perhaps about time travel? Belief systems? Or love?! It must be love! Please let it be love! Starring my fourth wife Aubrey Plaza and Jake M. Johnson. Rated R. Wilma: 9 pm nightly, with Sat. matinee at 3 pm. STEP UP REVOLUTION A dancing girl falls for a dancing boy in hot and steamy Miami. The dancing girl’s father is a developer threatening to destroy the dancing boy’s hot and steamy neighborhood. The duo

Capsule reviews by Jason McMackin Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., Aug. 3. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan-883-5603.


Missoula Independent Page 35 August 2 – August 9, 2012


M I S S O U L A

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August 2 - August 9, 2012

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BITTER HOMES AND GARDENS If your wife says another man’s name while making love, what does that mean? It was her ex’s name—my stepson’s dad. She apologized, saying it was only because she remembered needing to call him about problems their son’s having at school. Although I don’t think she’s cheating, I can’t say I believe her excuse, as she compares me negatively with previous men in her life. Had I blurted out another woman’s name, she never would’ve forgiven me. She has lots of anger and a very suspicious nature. She goes through my phone and constantly checks up on me. I know she’s had men cheat on her, but I’ve given her no reason to doubt me. Her response when I try to have a healthy discussion about this or anything is either “whatever” or calling me names and starting a full-blown argument, then suggesting we shouldn’t be together. That’s the last thing I want for our kids. —Upset There you are, trying your best to give your wife an orgasmatastical time in bed, and not only does she belt out another man’s name, she decides to get a head start on her to-do list. (Apparently, what you thought was her sex face is also her “Did I schedule that parent-teacher conference?” face.) Chances are, your wife’s explanation, that this was just a brain burp, is the truth. And people’s minds do wander during sex—especially when it’s not exactly their first time with a particular partner. They just don’t usually let on that they’re talking dirty but staring up at the crown molding and resisting the impulse to reach for the telescoping feather duster. Although every relationship gives rise to wounds, slights, and things you wish you could unhear, how you respond depends largely on what your “base” is—personally and as a couple. If you’re emotionally secure and your relationship is loving, you can shrug off a whole lot—maybe even tease your wife about her sexual faux pas by yelling out your own name in bed or moaning your to-do list: “Ohhh...when you do that to me, it makes me think about calling to change our health insurance to a PPO.” When you get married, it isn’t just to a woman and all her annoying in-laws; you also marry all her unresolved issues. Your wife’s insecurity makes her feel vulnerable, but instead of expressing her fears and giving you the chance to allay them, she takes the emotionally “safe” way out—attacking

you. Her motto: “Don’t go to bed mad. Stay up and scream about what a worthless worm your husband is.” Tell your wife that you need to remake your marriage to save it—because you love her and for your kids’ sake. Because she fights dirty and you seem unable to stand up to her, you should bring in a therapist as a referee. What you can do yourselves is make a pact to never treat each other like you’ve forgotten you love each other. For backup, the way couples have a “safe word” in sex, you can agree to call “Empathy!” if the pooflinging gets out of hand—your signal to stop and call up some compassion for what the other person must be feeling. It won’t teleport you into instant maturity. But, because it’s really hard to be a hugger and a hater at the same time, it should remind you that “till death do us part” is supposed to be a really romantic promise, not a battle cry.

MAKING SHOVE LAST My wife of five years wants us to go to couples counseling. We’ve been fighting a lot these past two years, but I don’t think that’s reason to talk to some stranger about our issues. We love each other. Shouldn’t that be enough for us to work through things together? —Do-It-Yourself-er Is this also your approach to a broken leg? “Who needs some stranger with a medical degree? Lemme see what I got in the garage.” Or when your house is burning down: “I see no reason to invite some stranger from the fire department into my life.” Love might be the answer to some things, like who to get chocolate for on Valentine’s Day, but it doesn’t make you a great communicator. When you aren’t getting through to each other on your own, the wise (and courageous) thing to do is seek help. This does require letting go of the need to be right and overcoming qualms about being judged. But, exposing what isn’t working is your best shot at fixing things...much as you’d probably rather stamp your feet and insist, “Everything I need to know about being married I learned in kindergarten!” (Apparently, “Don’t eat paste” is a littleknown cure for everything from financial woes to erectile dysfunction.)

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2 August 2 – August 9, 2012

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MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS 1st Interstate Pawn. 3110 South Reserve, is now open! Buying gold and silver. Buying, selling, and pawning items large and small. We pay more and sell for less. 406-721(PAWN)7296. 3000 BALES Alfalfa/grass hay. $100/ton. Heavy round bales. Frontier, Sask., 30 miles North of the US border. 306-296-4769 AdvoCare® is a premier health and wellness company offering world-class energy, weight-loss, nutrition, and sports perform-

ance products along with a rewarding business opportunity. www.advocare.com/12062016 8. Tami 544-5859 FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation non-denominational 1-800-475-0876

ELECTRONICS REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL! Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, CALL NOW. 1-800-925-7945

COMPUTERS Even Macs are computers! Need help with yours? CLARKE CONSULTING @ 5496214 RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway 543-8287

FURNITURE king mattress and headboard ENGLANDER KING MATTRESS AND HEADBOARD 1 year old from Mission Mattress (75 inches width) selling

EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

549-6214

for $1200.00. It is an awesome buy, in that the same bed is going for 2000+ now. The mattress is 100% pure latex rubber, with memory foam top. It conforms to your body for more comfort and orthopedic support relieving pressure points and muscle aches. Its cover is a 100% organic cotton cover, providing proper air circulation, cooler in summer, warmer in winter. Make offer. Selling because the bed is too big for the room. The bed is 75 inches across.

MUSIC Banjo lessons not just for guys

Outlaw Music

541-7533

Missoula's Stringed Instrument Pro Shop!

Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

724 Burlington Ave. outlawmusicguitarshop.com

Great Gear Great Prices 111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056

anymore. Bennett’s Music Studio 7 2 1 - 0 1 9 0 BennettsMusicStudio.com MUSIC LESSONS In-house lessons on guitar, ukelele and piano. Sign up now! MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds entrance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 549-0013. www.montanamusic.com Outlaw Music Got Gear? We Do! Missoula’s Pro Guitar Shop specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, Tuesday-Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533. Outlawmusicguitarshop.com

3yrs; #2455 Black, ASH/Bombay X, SF, 6yrs; #2499 Black, DSH, SF, 1.5yrs; #2517 Blk/grey, DSH, SF, 9wks; #2530 Grey Tabby, DSH/Maine Coon X, NM, 3yrs; #2534 Grey Tabby, DSH, NM, 7rs; #2535 White/Blk Calico, DSH, SF, 6yr; #2544 White Calico, DSH, NM, 3yrs; #2561 Black, DSH, NM, 7 1/2yrs; #2569 Black, Siamese/DSH, NM, 10yrs For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840. DOGS: #2169 White/grey, Border/Heeler X, SF, 3 1/2yrs; #2285 Red/Tan, Boxer X, SF, 6yr; #2396 Yellow, Chow/Lab x, SF, 1yr; #2442 Black, Sheltie/Heeler X, NM, 3yrs; #2447 Cream, Sharpei

X, NM, 7 1/2yrs; #2467 Brown, German Shep X, NM, 2yrs; #2480 Beige, Chessy/Lab X, SF, 1yr; #2505 Auss/Doxy/Stan X, Red Merle, SF, 5yrs; #2515 Blk/Tan/White, GSD, SF, 8yrs; #2537 Brn/white, Pit/Hound, NM, 2yrs; #2541 Blk/grey, Heeler X, SF, 2yrs; #2542 Black, Shep/Lab, SF, 9yrs; #2545 Black, Lab X, NM, 2yrs; #2563 Brn/white, St Bernard, NM, 10yrs; #2564 Brindle, Pit X, NM, 2yrs; #2573 Brown/white, Rhodi/Mastiff, NM, 5yrs; #2575 Brn/white, Husky X, NM, 1yr; #2590 Grey/Tan, Schnauzer, NM, 3yrs For photo listings s ee our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

PETS & ANIMALS Baby Cockatiels have been hand fed & tamed, variety of colors, 7 weeks & up, www.bigskybirds.com or call 406-251-5833 Basset Rescue of Montana www.bassetrescueofmontana.or g 406-207-0765 CATS: #2147 Grey, Maine Coon, NM, 2yrs; #2162 Grey Torbi, British Shorthair, SF, 7yrs; #2264 Cali/Rust/Grey, DLH, SF, 5yrs; #2304 Orange/white, DMH, NM. 2yrs; #2305 Torti, DSH, SF, 4yrs;#2312 Grey/white, DMH, SF, 10yrs; #2316 Blk/white, DLH, NM, 2yrs; #2334 Blk/wht, DMH, NM, 15yrs; #2346 Blk/white, DSH, NM, 7yrs; #2348 Grey/white, DLH, NM, 1.5yrs; #2416 BLACK, KITTEN, 8wks; #2445 Grey/white, DSH, NM,

Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

SERVICES CHILDCARE

CLEANING

Quality Child Care Openings Cuddle Bugs Day Care has immediate openings for children ages 6 weeks - 4 years. 2612 South Ave. W, 728-0801

406-396-4083 Jessica • Closets • Garages • Basements • Rooms • Kitchen/Bathroom Cupboards • Cloths • Basic to deep cleaning - indoor/outdoor projects • Occasional regular cleaning • Downsizing • Dub & Scrub team available. Established Dec 2010. Dub & Scrub Organizer & House Cleaning Services

1814 North Ave. W.

550-2375

Oriental & Fine Rug Cleaning

FINANCIAL FREE Booklet and tips on appealing a denial of Social Security Disability Benefits. Bulman Law As-

sociates P.L.L.C. www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com or call 721-7744

General Carpentry, Tile. Reliable, Efficient. 30 Years. Call Debra. 370-6710

HANDYMAN

Squires for Hire. Carpentry, Drywall, Painting, Plumbing, General Handyman. I actually show up on time! Bret 544-4671

ENERGY-EFFICIENT HOME REPAIR. HandyWoman: Painting,

HOME IMPROVEMENT Natural Housebuilders, Inc., *ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes* Additions/Remodels* HIGHERCOMFORT crafted building* Solar

Drive a little, save a lot! Blue Mountain Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x20 $65 Bitterroot Mini Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x10 $45 • 10x15 $55 10x20 $65 • 10x30 $85 • 542-2060

Heating* 369-0940 or 642-6863* www.naturalhousebuilder.net Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator. Ttestimonials Available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642

KITCHEN & BATH Tile Grout Color/ Seal Make your kitchen or bathroom look like new! We clean, color, and seal tile grout. Your tile will be waterproof and mildew resistant. Call Dave for free demo and estimate: (760) 420-8765

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Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

"Let us tend your den"

Black’s Deck Finishing & Residential Painting Licensed & Insured Interior & Exterior Painting Free Estimates

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montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3 August 2 – August 9, 2012


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): The astrological omens suggest that you now have a lot in common with the legendary Most Interesting Man in the World—adventurous, unpredictable, interesting, lucky, one-of-a-kind. To create your horoscope, I have therefore borrowed a few selected details from his ad campaign’s descriptions of him. Here we go: In the coming weeks, you will be the life of parties you don’t even attend. Astronauts will be able to see your charisma from outer space. Up to one-third of your body weight will be gravitas. Your cell phone will always have good reception, even in a subway 100 feet underground. Panhandlers will give you money. You could challenge your reflection to a staring contest—and win. You’ll be able to keep one eye on the past while looking into the future. When you sneeze, God will say “God bless you.”

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Energy Balancing and Acupressure Meridians. Hand and foot reflexology. 493-6824 or 3994363 Garden Mother Herbs Spa Experience is NOW OPEN! Massage - Aromatherapy Music Therapy - Oxygen Pub Herbal Hand & Foot Soaks. Call 529-3834. 345 W. Front St, Suite C.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Psychologist Bruno Bettelheim said the dreams we have at night are “the result of inner pressures which have found no relief, of problems which beset a person to which he knows no solution and to which the dream finds none.” That sounds bleak, doesn’t it? If it’s true, why even bother to remember our dreams? Well, because we are often not consciously aware of the feelings they reveal to us. By portraying our buried psychic material in story form, dreams give us insight into what we’ve been missing. So even though they may not provide a solution, they educate us. Take heed, Taurus! Your upcoming dreams will provide useful information you can use to fix one of your longstanding dilemmas. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): When French composer Georges Auric scored the soundtrack for Jean Cocteau’s movie Blood of a Poet, he produced “love music for love scenes, game music for game scenes and funeral music for funeral scenes.” But Cocteau himself had a different idea about how to use Auric’s work. For the love scenes he decided to use the funeral music, for the game scenes the love music and for the funeral scenes the game music. In accordance with the current astrological omens, Gemini, I recommend that you experiment with that style of mixing and matching. Have fun! (Source: A Ned Rorem Reader, by Ned Rorem.)

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Piglet was so excited at the idea of being useful that he forgot to be frightened any more,” wrote A. A. Milne in his kids’ story Winnie-the-Pooh. That’s my prescription for how to evade the worrisome fantasies that are nipping at you, Cancerian. If no one has invited you to do some engaging and important labor of love, invite yourself. You need to be needed—even more than usual. P.S. Here’s what Rumi advises: “Be a lamp, or a lifeboat, or a ladder.”

LINDA BLAIR is offering computerized homeopathy and testing via the BodyScan 2010 for you and your pets, as well as colonics. 28 years in holistic medicine. 406-471-9035 Looking to lose weight? Increase energy and performance? www.advocare.com/12062016 8. Tami 544-5859

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MARSHA KIRCHNER 406-728-8458

mkirchner@centric.net

Louise Harvey Scents of Wellness Master Touch Reflexology foot treatments with Young Living essential oils.

721-5373

Shamanic counseling

MITCHELL

with Massage and healing energy work. By Janet 207-7358

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4 August 2 – August 9, 2012

ERIC MITCHELL, LMT

Need a boost?

Forget the energy drink! Call our Mental Health Counselor Lois Doubleday, LCPC today!

721-1646 www.bluemountainclinic.org

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In the coming week, you will lose some clout and self-command if you’re too hungry for power. Likewise, if you act too brazenly intelligent, you may alienate potential helpers who are not as mentally well-endowed as you. One other warning, Scorpio: Don’t be so fiercely reasonable that you miss the emotional richness that’s available. In saying these things, I don’t mean to sound as if I’m advising you to dumb yourself down and downplay your strengths. Not at all. Rather, I’m trying to let you know that the best way to get what you really need is to tailor your self-expression to the unique circumstances you find yourself in.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I’m really tired of you not getting all of the appreciation and acknowledgment and rewards you deserve. Is there even a small possibility that you might be harboring some resistance to that good stuff? Could you be giving off a vibe that subtly influences people to withhold the full blessings they might otherwise confer upon you? According to my analysis of the astrological omens, the coming weeks will be an excellent time for you to work on correcting this problem. Do everything you can to make it easy for people to offer you their love and gifts.

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): On a spring day in 1973, an engineer named Martin Cooper debuted the world’s first cell phone. He placed a call as he walked along a New York City street. The phone weighed two and half pounds and resembled a brick. Later he joked that no one would be able to talk very long on his invention, since it took a lot of strength to hold it against one’s ear. Think of how far that amazing device has come since then, Libra. Now imagine some important aspect of your own life that is in a rather primitive state at this moment but could one day be as natural and fully developed as cell phones have become. Are you willing to work hard to make that happen? Now’s a good time to intensify your commitment.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In old China, people used to cool themselves by sipping hot drinks. After taking a bath, they buffed the excess water from their skin by using a wet towel. When greeting a friend, they shook their own hand instead of the friend’s. To erect a new house, they built the roof first. You’re currently in a phase of your astrological cycle when this kind of behavior makes sense. In fact, I suspect you’re most likely to have a successful week if you’re ready to reverse your usual way of doing things on a regular basis.

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A few years ago, a Malaysian man named Lim Boon Hwa arranged to have himself “cooked.” For 30 minutes, he sat on a board covering a pan full of simmering dumplings and corn. The fact that no harm came to him was proof, he said, that Taoist devotees like him are protected by their religion’s deities. I advise you not to try a stunt like that, Virgo—including metaphorical versions. This is no time to stew in your own juices. Or boil in your tormented fantasies. Or broil in your nagging doubts. Or be grilled in your self-accusations. You need to be free from the parts of your mind that try to cook you.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): It’s an excellent time to overthrow false gods and topple small-minded authorities and expose fraudulent claims. Anyone and anything in your environment that do not fully deserve the power they claim should get the brunt of your exuberant skepticism. When you’re done cleaning up those messes, turn your attention to your own inner realms. There might be some good work to be done there. Can you think of any hypocrisy that needs fixing? Any excessive self-importance that could use some tamping down? Any pretending that would benefit from a counter dose of authenticity?

* Smoking * Weight * Negative self-talk

ESCAPE

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Hypnosis & Imagery * Stress * Depression * Empower yourself

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You’ve been making pretty good progress in the School of Life. By my estimates, you’re now the equivalent of a sophomore. You’ve mastered enough lessons so that you can no longer be considered a freshman, and yet you’ve got a lot more to learn. Are you familiar with the etymology of the word “sophomore”? It comes from two Greek words meaning “wise” and “fool.” That’ll be a healthy way to think about yourself in the coming weeks. Be smart enough to know what you don’t know. Cultivate the voracious curiosity necessary to lead you to the next rich teachings.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): For a while, French writer Honoré de Balzac (1799-1850) was very poor. He lived in a place that had no heat and almost no furniture. To enhance his environment, he resorted to the use of fantasy. On one of his bare walls, he wrote the words, “rosewood paneling with ornamental cabinet.” On another, he wrote “Gobelin tapestry with Venetian mirror.” Over the empty fireplace he declared, “Picture by Raphael.” That’s the level of imaginative power I encourage you to summon in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. So much of what you’ll need will come from that simple magic.

National Alliance on Mental Illness, Missoula Affiliate. WEEKLY SUPPORT GROUPS Family & Friends: Tues. 6:30 p.m.,Thurs. 10:00 a.m. Providence.Ctr., 902 N. Orange St., Rm. 109. Recovering? Call 552-5494 for meeting information.

Msla Affiliate.

WEEKLY SUPPORT GROUPS

Family & Friends: Tues. 6:30 p.m.,Thurs. 10:00 a.m. TEMPORARILY MEETING AT MISSOULA PUBLIC LIBRARY, LOWER LEVEL, SMALL MEETING ROOM

Recovering?: Call 552-5494 for mtg. info


PUBLIC NOTICES

EMPLOYMENT Now Hiring! Call today, start tomorrow. FT/PT days, nights & weekends. 273-2266

GENERAL BARTENDING $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training available. 1800-965-6520 ext. 278

TRANSITIONING FROM MILITARY SERVICE TO THE CIVILIAN WORKFORCE? Montana Conservation Corps seeks veterans of OEF and

Advanced Technology Group (ATG) is seeking to hire an energetic, driven and polished Employee Services (HR)Manager/Office Manager supporting our rapidly growing Missoula Solutions Center. Proven experience working human relations, facilities management & general staff support is preferred. Should be comfortable working in a fast-paced, high energy and open environment and operating from a take charge style. For immediate consideration please send resume with contact information to David Mills, VP at

david.mills@atginfo.com or call 303.647.9452 406.721.2584 3050 GREAT NORTHERN AVE MISSOULA, MT 59808 BIOLIFEPLASMA.COM

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ENGINEERING SUPPORT SPECIALIST We are looking for an engineer who enjoys a variety of challenges. You will be asked to wear several hats during your work week, all of which will require solid problem solving skills. You will have the chance to participate in everything from direct product support to system architecture design. We are seeking candidates with solid network management and software configuration skills. We will consider other experience and/or education. Salary is dependent upon experience and qualifications. This is an in-office position at our Polson MT location. Benefits include vacation and sick leave, Simple IRA, health insurance, a flexible benefit plan and the potential for profit sharing. Applicants must use our on-line application process to be considered. The application can be found at: www.blackmountainsoftware.com Point at Company and select Careers Application deadline is August 10, 2012.

OIF for its Veterans Green Corps program. This is a 10 week job skills training program designed to provide forestry and firefighting skills. Participants receive paid training, a living stipend and an education award. Participants obtain S130/190 and S212 certifications through Colorado Fire Camp, First Aid and CPR training and work directly with the USFS and USFWS. Program begins August 14 and concludes October 23. No experience required. Participants camp for the entire duration, so relocation is not necessary. Interested veterans are encouraged to contact Tauzha Grantham at 406-651-1311 or by email at tauzha@mtcorps.org More information at www.mtcorps.org Apply today! Visit my website for cutting-edge nutritional supplements and skincare as well as the opportunity to earn a full time income with a part time commitment by sharing AdvoCare products with others. www.advocare.com/120620168. Tami 544-5859

PROFESSIONAL AGRONOMY RESEARCH ASSOCIATE MSU Western Triangle Ag Research Center, Conrad, MT. Position announcement and application: http://www.montana.edu/jobs/research/1221433 AA/ADA/EEO/Vet Pref Employer

SKILLED LABOR DRIVERS-$1000 SIGN-ON BONUS. *Home Weekly. *Must be Canadian eligible. *$2500+ miles weekly. *$0.42 for all Canadian miles. *$50 border crossing pay. *95% no tarp. (888)691-5705 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services,

Billings/Missoula, 4546

1-800-545-

Wood Flooring Technician Local wood flooring business is seeking a hardworking, highly motivated person to join our team. This position requires occasional heavy lifting, bending and working floor level. The candidate must work well in a team environment, be able to follow directions with a great attention to detail, and possess a positive attitude.

SALES Outside Sales Entry Level Opportunity selling top of the line products and services to businesses in a competitive market. You must have drive, energy and present yourself professionally. You are enthusiastic about helping companies grow and be more efficient with today’s technology. You must be dedicated to building a career in sales and have the ability to create relationships quickly. You have a history of taking initiative and working well in a team environment that rewards personal acceleration. Experience working in sales or serving the public helpful but not necessary. You should have the desire and expectation to earn $40k+ per year. Send your resume to sales2-missoula@jhoe.com

OPPORTUNITIES $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1800-405-7619 EXT 2450 h t t p : / / w w w. e a s y w o r k greatpay.com REACH 5 MILLION hip, forwardthinking consumers across the U.S. When you advertise in alternative newspapers, you become part of the local scene and gain access to an audience you won’t reach anywhere else. http://www.altweeklies.com/ads

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ESCORTS 543-1851

CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT 59802 until 2:00 p.m., Tuesday, August 14th, 2012 and will be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room, City Hall at that time. As soon thereafter as is possible, a contract will be made for the following: Purchase of one Cemetery Utility Vehicle. Bidders shall bid by City bid proposal forms, addressed to the City Clerk’s Office, City of Missoula, enclosed in separate, sealed envelopes marked plainly on the outside, “Bid for Cemetery Utility Vehicle., Closing, 2:00 p.m., Tuesday, August 14th, 2012”. Pursuant to Section 18-1-102 Montana Code Annotated, the City is required to provide purchasing preferences to resident Montana vendors and \ or for products made in Montana equal to the preference provided in the state of the competitor. Each and every bid must be accompanied by cash, a certified check, bid bond, cashier’s check, bank money order or bank draft payable to the City Treasurer, Missoula, Montana, and drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana or by any banking corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Montana for an amount which shall not be less than ten percent (10%) of the bid, as a good faith deposit. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal forms. No bid will be considered which includes Federal excise tax, since the City is exempt there from and will furnish to the successful bidder certificates of exemption. The City reserves the right to determine the significance of all exceptions to bid specifications. Products or services that do not meet bid specifications must be clearly marked as an exception to the specifications. Vendors requesting inclusion or pre-approved alternatives to any of these bid specifications must receive written authorization from the Vehicle Maintenance Superintendent a minimum of five (5) working days prior to the bid closing. The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids and if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. The City reserves the right to waive any technicality in the bidding which is not of substantial nature. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to bid opening at 2:00 p.m., Tuesday, August 14th, 2012. Bidders may obtain further information and specifications from the City Vehicle Maintenance Division at (406) 5526387. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the City’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, until 2:00 p.m., on Tuesday, August 14, 2012, and will then be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for construction of the following: Curb and Sidewalk Improvements Van Buren Street – Poplar to Elm City of Missoula Project 10-025 This project consists of installing approximately 2,200 lineal feet of curb/gutter, 11,000 square feet of four inch sidewalk, 1,100 square feet of six inch sidewalk; all on prepared subgrade and associated improvements. Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project Manual addressed to the City Clerk, City of Missoula, enclosed in sealed envelopes plainly marked on the outside “Proposal for City of Missoula Project 10-025 Van Buren Street – Poplar to Elm curb and sidewalk improvements” The envelopes shall also be marked with the Bidder’s Name, Address and Montana Contractor’s Registration Number. Proposals must be accompanied by cash, cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed

by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of the City of Missoula against liability. A complete set of the Contract Documents and Project Manual will be furnished the Contractors making application therefore from the Office of the City Engineer, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana, upon payment of $50.00 by company check, cashier’s check, or bank money order (cash can not be accepted). Full amount of payment will be refunded upon return of the plans and specifications in good condition within ten (10) days after bid opening. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 399-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1-406444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. The contractor performing work on a “Public works contract” shall not pay less than the latest Montana Labor Standard Provisions minimum wage as determined by the U.S. Secretary of Labor. A copy of said wage rate is attached as part of the contract documents. The provisions of this part do not apply in those instances in which the standard prevailing rate of wages is determined by federal law. “Public works contract” means a contract for construction services let by the state, county, municipality, school district, or political subdivision or for non-construction services let by the state, county, municipality, or political subdivision in which the total cost of the contract is in excess of $25,000. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against on the basis race, ancestry, color, physical or mental disability, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital or familial status, creed, ex-offender status, physical condition, political belief, public assistance status or sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, except where these criteria are reasonable bona fide occupational qualifications. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula Business Licensing requirements. The City of Missoula reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids, and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to the bid opening at 2:00 p.m. on August 14, 2012. The City of Missoula provides accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the City. To request accommodation, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (406)552-6080. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the city’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID RECEIPT OF BIDS: Sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, until August 7, 2012 at 3:00 pm, and will then be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for construction of the Rattlesnake Creek / Broadway Crossing (RUX) Project. DESCRIPTION OF WORK: The work includes constructing approximately 1000 linear feet of new asphalt trail, constructing a new pedestrian bridge at Pine Street over Rattlesnake Creek, new concrete

sidewalks, restriping crosswalks, fencing, trail lighting, landscaping, clearing and grubbing, grading, excavation, removal of existing concrete sidewalks, removal of asphalt pavement, and other miscellaneous work as described in the plans and contract documents. The contract includes bid alternates which may or may not be incorporated into the work at the sole discretion of the City. PROJECT FINANCING – The project is funded by a Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Western Federal Lands (WFL) Division Appropriation, and is subject to all applicable federal/state regulations, as indicated within the specifications. SITE OF WORK: The project is located near the intersection of Broadway Street and Van Buren Street, south of the MRL tracks between Rattlesnake Creek and Van Buren Street in Missoula, Montana. The proposed trail will provide a connection from the intersection of Pine Street and Monroe Street, across Rattlesnake Creek, along Van Buren Street, across Broadway Street to the existing pedestrian bridge over the Clark Fork River. COMPLETION OF WORK: All work must be substantially completed within 120 calendar days after the commencement date stated in the notice to proceed. Additional contract time will not be allowed for any accepted bid alternatives. OPENING OF BIDS: Bids will be publicly opened and read aloud at the time and place stated above. OBTAINING CONTRACT DOCUMENTS: A complete set of the Contract Documents and Project Manual may be obtained from HDR Engineering, Inc. at 1715 South Reserve Street Suite C, Missoula, MT 59801. Copies of the plans and Project Manual may be obtained upon payment of $50.00 by company check, cashier’s check, or bank money order (cash cannot be accepted). This is a nonrefundable fee. An additional $10 charge will be applied for shipping and handling if requested. The following locations will have plans available for review only (not for bidding): Missoula Plan Exchange 201 N Russell, Msla 59801 mpe@vemcoinc.com MT Contractors Accn. 1717 11th Ave. Helena 59604 kathy@mtagc.org BID SECURITY: Each bid shall be accompanied by bid security made payable to the City of Missoula in an amount of ten percent (10%) of the bidder’s maximum bid price and in the form of cash, a cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in Montana or by any banking corporation incorporated under the laws of Montana; or a bid bond (on form attached if a form is prescribed) issued by a surety authorized to do business in Montana meeting the requirements of Paragraph 5.01 of the general conditions. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal forms. The bid bond shall act as a guarantee that the bidder, if his bid is accepted, will promptly execute the contract, secure payment of worker’s compensation insurance, and furnish a satisfactory faithful performance bond in the amount of 100 percent of the contract price and a payment bond in the amount of 100 percent of the contract price. CONTRACTOR’S REGISTRATION: Montana law requires all contractors to register with the Department of Labor prior to execution of the contract agreement. Forms for registration are available from the Department of Labor and Industry, P.O. Box 8011, 1805 Prospect Ave., Helena, Montana 59604-8011. Information on registration can be obtained by calling 1-406-444-7734. All laborers and mechanics employed by the contractor or subcontractors in performance of the construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their race, color, religion, sex or national origin. DOMESTIC MATERIALS: All iron or steel materials to be permanently incorporated into the Project shall be produced in the United States, and certified as indicated within the specifications. BIDS TO REMAIN OPEN: The bidder shall guarantee the total bid price for a period of 60 calendar days from the date of bid opening. Proposals must be sealed and marked “Rattlesnake Creek / Broadway Crossing (RUX), opening “August 7, 2012” and marked “Sealed

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5 August 2 – August 9, 2012


PUBLIC NOTICES Bid” with the contractor’s name, address, and special fuel user permit number and be addressed to: City of Missoula Clerk’s Office 435 Ryman Street Missoula, MT 59802 Facsimile bids will not be accepted. WAGE RATES: The Contractor shall not pay less than the latest Federal Davis Bacon Wage Rates. A copy of the applicable wage rates are attached as part of the specifications in Section 00910. FUNDING AGENCY PROVISIONS: Attention bidders: Please direct your attention to the Funding Agency Special Provisions of the contract documents (section 00900). The successful bidder shall be required to comply with all applicable articles therein. PRE-BID CONFERENCE: Prospective bidders are strongly encouraged to attend a pre-bid conference, which will be conducted jointly by the owner and engineer at 2:00 pm on July 31, 2012, in the Jack Reidy Conference Room located at 140 W. Pine Street, with an optional walk-through of the project site upon completion of the meeting (weather dependent). PROJECT ADMINISTRATION: All questions relative to this project prior to the opening of bids shall be directed to the engineer. It shall be understood, however, that no specification interpretation will be made by telephone, nor will any “or equal” products be considered for approval prior to award of contract. The engineer for this project is: HDR Engineering, Inc., 1715 South Reserve Street, Suite C, Missoula, MT 5801, with questions addressed to Tom Hanou (406) 532-2200. OWNER’S RIGHTS RESERVED: The City of Missoula reserves the right to reject any or all bids, to waive any informality in a bid, or to accept the lowest responsive and responsible bid and bidder, and to make awards in the interest of the city. The low bid shall be determined on the basis of the lowest base bid, or lowest combination of base bid and accepted alternative bids if alternatives are included. The City may accept in any order; any, all, or none of the alternative bids. AWARD CONTINGENT: Without limiting the foregoing, it is expressly stated that final award of the Contract is contingent upon securing appropriate financing. Award of the contract is also contingent upon having all right of way certifications and easements in place and receiving approval from Western Federal Lands. Owner: City of Missoula By: /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC2: City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA PUBLIC HEARING STREET MAINTENANCE DISTRICT #1 The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on August 6, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider a resolution levying a special assessment and tax on the lots, pieces and parcels of land situated within Street Maintenance District #1 of the City of Missoula, Montana, for the purpose of defraying the cost of flushing and removing street rubbish from streets and avenues in the district generally located downtown during the fiscal year 2013. Copies of the resolution are available at the City Clerk Office, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. For further information, contact Marty Rehbein, City Clerk, at 552-6078. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein CMC, City Clerk MISSOULA COUNTY Request for Qualifications for Architectural Services - Missoula City-County Health Department The Missoula CityCounty Health Department (MCCHD), an entity of Missoula County, seeks qualified licensed architects to assist in developing designs for a remodel of the First Floor and Basement of the MCCHD building located at 301 West Alder St, Missoula, MT 59802. Statements of qualifications will be accepted until 5:00 PM, Wednesday, September 5, 2012. Interested firms may obtain a complete project description on Missoula County’s website at http://www.co.missoula.mt.us/bidsandproposals or by contacting Barbara Berens, 406-258-3227 or bberens@co.missoula.mt.us. MISSOULA COUNTY FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT

PERMIT APPLICATION The Office of Planning & Grants has received a floodplain application from Stuart Goldberg to work within the Bitterroot River floodplain. The project is located at 3254 & 4850 Humble Rd and includes the construction of an at-grade road and river access site. The full application is available for review in the Office of Planning and Grants in City Hall. Written comments from anyone interested in County floodplain permit application #13-01 may be submitted prior to 5:00 p.m., August 24, 2012. Address comments to the Floodplain Administrator, Office of Planning & Grants, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802 or call 258-4841 for more information.

Kay Potton to Rachelle Kay Weisenburger. The hearing will be on August 21st, 2012 at 1:30 o’clock p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: July 24, 2012. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Maria Cassidy

MISSOULA COUNTY FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT PERMIT APPLICATION The Office of Planning & Grants has received a floodplain application from David Dill to work within the Clark Fork River floodplain. The project is located at 3489 Kehrwald and includes the relocation of utilities and crawlspace fill to bring the structure into floodplain compliance. The full application is available for review in the Office of Planning and Grants in City Hall. Written comments from anyone interested in County floodplain permit application #13-02 may be submitted prior to 5:00 p.m., August 24, 2012. Please address comments to the Floodplain Administrator, Office of Planning & Grants, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802 or call 258-4841 for more information.

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DV-12-42 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION. FIRST MONTANA BANK, INC., fka FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF MONTANA, INC. Plaintiff, -vs- MILLTOWN MARKET, INC., a Montana corporation; ROBERT P. SCHAAN and DAWN M. SCHAAN, individuals; BSWORKS, LLC, a Montana limited liability company; THOMAS W. FINKBEINER and BECKY E. FINKBEINER; DOE DEFENDANTS I THROUGH X inclusive, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO DOE DEFENDANTS I-X AND TO ALL OTHER PERSONS KNOWN AND UNKNOWN: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in this action which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer and serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff’s attorneys within twenty-one (21) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action is brought for the purpose of foreclosing the real property situated in Missoula County, Montana, and described as follows: Parcel I: That part of the SE1/4NW1/4 of Section 21, Township 13 North, Range 18 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana, commonly described as follows: Beginning at a point from which the center of Section 21, Township 13 North, Range 18 West, M.P.M., bears S.37º46’E., 161.2 feet; thence N.36º48’W., 35 feet; thence S.53º12’W., 90 feet; thence S.36º48’E., 35 feet; thence N.53º12’E., 90 feet to the place of beginning, less a portion deeded to the State of Montana for highway purposes as recorded in Book 145 of Deeds at Page 253, records of Missoula County, Montana. RECORDING REFERENCE: Book 444 of Micro at page 149. Parcel II: A subleasehold as created by that certain unrecorded sublease dated February 15, 1998, No. 500.740, executed by Montana Rail Link, Inc. and The Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railway Company as sublessor and Finky’s Foods as sublessee for a term of 5 years, upon and subject to all the provisions therein contained, in and with regard to the land described therein, and assignment, assumption and amendment to said Sublease No. 500.740, dated November 4, 2005, with Milltown Market as assignee. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court, the 12th day of July, 2012. /s/ SHIRLEY E. FAUST, Missoula County Clerk of Court By: /s/ Diane Overholtzer, Deputy Clerk

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-12-118 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF GLORIA MARY HENSEL, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to JANICE M. HENSEL, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Reely Law Firm, P.C., 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 16th day of July, 2012 /s/ Janice M. Hensel, Personal Representative. REELY LAW FIRM P.C. 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801 Attorneys for the Personal Representative. By: /s/ Shane N. Reely Esq. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP-12-127 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF FRANCES M. DRISCOLL, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to MAUREEN LESLIE NICHOLS, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Reely Law Firm, P.C., 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 26th day of July, 2012 /s/ Maureen Leslie Nichols, Personal Representative. REELY LAW FIRM P.C. 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801 Attorneys for the Personal Representative. By: /s/ Shane N. Reely Esq. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Case No. DP-12-111 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of DEAN CHARLES HOFFMAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the Personal Representative, Jeanne Dennis, return receipt requested, at Tipp & Buley, P.C., PO Box 3778, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 18th day of July, 2012. /s/ Jeanne Dennis, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-12-683 Dept. No. 4 Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Rachelle Kay Potton This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Rachelle

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-12-814 Dept No 4 Karen S. Townsend. Notice of Hearing on Name Change in the Matter of the Name Change of Andrea Alberty, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Andrea Alberty to Andrea Roslie. The hearing will be on 9/4/12 at 2:30 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. DATE: July 24, 2012. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: /s/ Andrew Jenks, Deputy Clerk

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Case No. DP-2003-161 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of DENNIS ROBERT GENG, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the Personal Representative, Karen Hayward, return receipt requested, at Tipp & Buley, P.C., PO Box 3778, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 15th day of July, 2012. /s/ Karen Hayward, Personal Representative NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 02/22/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200804555, BK-814, Pg-120, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Lezlie McKenzie was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Direct Mortgage Corp. was Beneficiary and Stewart Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Unit 715A of Building 4 of Grizzly Place Townhomes, as described and defined in the “Declaration Under Unit Ownership

Act Pertaining to Grizzly Place Townhomes” recorded in Book 753 of Micro at page 674 and Site Plan recorded as Condo#82, records of Missoula County, Montana. Together with said units interest in the limited common elements and the general Common elements appertaining to said unit as set forth defined in said declaration. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201025121, B:871 P:214, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance, LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of May 30, 2012, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $191,509.92. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $183,378.89, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 5, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7037.94004) 1002.218613-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 02/14/01, recorded as Instrument No. 200103390, BK 641, Pg 303, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Jason P. Decunzo was Grantor, Long Beach Mortgage Company was Beneficiary and Chicago Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Chicago Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 10 in Block 2 of Elms Addition No. 3 in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201204489 B: 890, P: 1166, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Deutsche Bank National Trust Company formerly known as Bankers Trust Company of California, N.A., as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Loan Trust 2001-2. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 8, 2012, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $123,579.81. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $109,941.69, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 22, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Mountain

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Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7037.91904) 1002.220570-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 17, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: LOT A110 OF WINDSOR PARK PHASE V, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF JAMES T HUNTLEY & DONNA L. HUNTLEY, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to STEWART TITLE, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, by DEED OF TRUST DATED ON OCTOBER 24, 2008 AND RECORDED ON OCTOBER 29, 2008 IN BOOK 828, PAGE 916, UNDER DOCUMENT NO 200824530. The beneficial interest is currently held by MetLife Home Loans, a division of MetLife Bank, N.A.. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,319.83, beginning July 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of May 11, 2012 is $199,854.04 principal, interest at the rate of 5.0000% now totaling $9,433.80, escrow advances of $1,539.14 and other fees and expenses advanced of $280.34, plus accruing interest at the rate of $27.38 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS

AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 14, 2012 /s/ Marti Ottley Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 14th day of May, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Marti Ottley, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, ID Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Metlife v Huntley 41305.234 Published 8/2, 8/9, 8/16/2012 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 17, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 89 of Drew Creek Addition, Phase VII to the Double Arrow Ranch, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Thadeus D Williams and Kelly A Williams, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to PHH Mortgage Services, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on June 9, 2004 and recorded on June 14, 2004, Book 734, Page 500 as Document No. 200416531. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage Corporation aka PHH Mortgage Services. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,301.39, beginning September 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 27, 2012 is $196,424.61 principal, interest at the rate of 5.875% now totaling $7,553.64, late charges in the amount of $130.12, escrow advances of $2,334.95, and other fees and expenses advanced of $339.67, plus accruing interest at the rate of $31.62 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 8, 2012 /s/ Marti Ottley Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 8th day of May, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Marti

Ottley, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, ID Commission expires: 2/18/2014 PHH V Williams 41392.855 Published 8/2, 8/9 and 8/16/2012 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 24, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock AM. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 9A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 678, A TRACT OF LAND BEING A PORTION OF LOT 9 OF LINCOLN HILLS NO. 4, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Lynn Gmeiner and Barbara A Gmeiner, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated November 14, 2005 was recorded on November 15, 2005 under Document No. 200530391 in Book 764 on Page 375. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc.. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,159.41, beginning June 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of June 11, 2012 is $219,934.35 principal, interest at the rate of 4.375% now totaling $10,687.54, late charges in the amount of $481.08, escrow advances of $3,252.83, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,244.78, plus accruing interest at the rate of $26.36 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE Dated: May 18, 2012 /s/ Marti Ottley Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 18th day of May, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Marti Ottley, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, ID Commission expires:


PUBLIC NOTICES 2/18/2014 42011.571

Citimortgage V Gmeiner

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 24, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 6 OF LAKEWOOD ESTATES PHASE I, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Michelle M Bissonnette and Carl C Johnsen, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson of Mackoff, Kellogg, Kirby and Kloster, PC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 2, 2005 and recorded June 10, 2005 in Book 754, Page 458 under Document Number 200514153 and re-recorded November 8, 2006 in Book 786, Page 1057. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc.. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,743.65, beginning December 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 29, 2012 is $230,905.28 principal, interest at the rate of 3.0% now totaling $2840.44, escrow advances of $-464.00, and other fees and expenses advanced of $404.56, plus accruing interest at the rate of $18.98 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above

described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 18, 2012 /s/ Marti Ottley Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 18th day of May, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Marti Ottley, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, ID Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Citimortgage V. Bissonnette 41926.379 Published 8/2, 8/9 and 8/16/2012 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 24, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 38 OF 44 RANCH, PHASES 1 AND 2, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THREREOF Geoff C. Ramsay, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of trust dated on March 05, 2008 and recorded on March 07, 2008 in BK814, Pg-496, under document No. 200804931. The beneficial interest is currently held by M&T Bank. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,469.57, beginning September 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING THE MISSOULA COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT will be conducting a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday, August 15, 2012 in the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine, Missoula, MT, on the following item: 1. A request by Larry and Bobbi Kuchenreuther for a variance from the 40’ setback requirement from the top of a 25% non-buildable slope for a deck proposed on the property addressed as 3013 Briggs Street, zoned C-RR3. See map X

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following items on Tuesday, August 21, 2012, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. 1.An Ordinance to Amend Title 20 City Zoning: Proposed 2012 Maintenance Amendments. This is a consideration of proposed annual maintenance amendments to the City of Missoula Title 20 Zoning Ordinance. The proposed amendments were drafted after consideration of comments from interested parties and city agencies. Fifteen proposed amendments are intended to correct and clarify various sections throughout the ordinance. The amendments can be viewed at the Office of Planning and Grants, City Hall, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana, (406) 258-4657 or at www.co.missoula.mt.us/opgweb “News and Updates.” The Missoula City Council will conduct a public hearing on this item on a date yet to be determined. 2.Subdivision Request – Triple C Guest Ranch A request from Triple C Ranch, LLC, represented by Territorial-Landworks, Inc., to subdivide a 212.60 acre parcel into 19 lots. The property is located west of Highway 83, and accessed by Pine Ridge Road and Underwood Road, south of Condon. See Map O. The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing on Item #2 at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, September 12, 2012. The hearing will be held in Room B14 of the County Admin Building, located at 199 W. Pine Street in Missoula. The request and exact legal description is available for public inspection at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants, City Hall, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana, (406) 258-4657. Your attendance at the public hearing and comments are welcomed and encouraged. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 258-4657. The Office of Planning and Grants will provide auxiliary aids and services.

2. A request by Jason and Kallie Widaman for a density variance to build two residences on the property addressed as 5410 Primrose Lane, zoned C-A3. See map W.

If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling the Office of Planning and Grants at 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. For a complete legal description or additional information regarding the special exception and variance request you may contact Jamie Erbacher at the same number or by e-mail at jerbacher@co.missoula.mt.us.

The total amount due on this obligation as of April 23, 2012 is $344,093.37 principal, interest at the rate of 5.125000% now totaling $12,819.48, late charges in the amount of $220.44, escrow advances of $3,103.53, and other fees and expenses advanced of $532.06, plus accruing interest at the rate of $48.31 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days

for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 18, 2012 /s/ Marti Ottley Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 18th day of May, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Marti Ottley, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, ID Commission expires: 2/18/2014 M & T Bank v Ramsay 41902.150 Published 8/2, 8/9 and 8/16/2012 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 24, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT 2 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 3755, A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE SOUTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 16, TOWNSHIP 13 NORTH, RANGE 18 WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA Travis Pennock and Natasha Pennock, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title of Missoula County, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on January 21, 2005 and recorded on January 25, 2005 in Book 747 and Page 74 as Document No. 200502026. The beneficial interest is currently held by PNMAC Mortgage Opportunity Fund Investors, LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Suc-

PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC NOTICE

The Missoula City Council will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Monday, August 13, 2012, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana: 322 N Higgins Ave – Tavern/Nightclub Conditional Use

The Missoula City Council will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Monday, August 13, 2012, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana: 1622 South Ave West – Medical Office Conditional Use

Request from Nick Checota for a Conditional Use approval at 322 N Higgins Ave (see Map U),

Request from Rob & Vicky Velin for a Conditional Use approval at 1622 South Ave West (see Map V),

zoned CBD-4 (Central Business District). The applicant requests the Conditional Use in order to utilize an all-liquor beverage license at the site. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request and case file are available for public inspection at the Office of Planning and Grants, 435 Ryman Street. Call 258-4657 for further assistance. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 2584657. The Office of Planning and Grants will provide auxiliary aids and services.

zoned RM1-35 (Residential 1, multi-dwelling). The applicant requests the Conditional Use in order to expand a medical office onto the site. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request and case file are available for public inspection at the Office of Planning and Grants, 435 Ryman Street. Call 258-4657 for further assistance. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 258-4657. The Office of Planning and Grants will provide auxiliary aids and services.

"Mangificent!"–you'll find some bin games here.

by Matt Jones

ACROSS

1 Food brand with a pawprint logo 5 Network that tried a "Charlie's Angels" reboot 8 Ticket leftover 12 ___ Martin (sports car) 13 Kilmer of "The Saint" 14 Complain about the littlest things 15 Bruce Wayne's status during speed dating sessions? 17 House Majority Leader, 1995-2003 18 San Luis ___ 19 Marinade alternative 21 Sea, to Debussy 22 Cowboy philosophers? 26 Austere 29 It's shared between "mi" and "su" 30 Mauna ___ (Hawaiian volcano) 31 Org. headed by Benjamin Jealous 33 The drink of the gods 36 With 39-across, Peter Peter Pumpkin Eater's wife's refusal? 39 See 36-across 40 Big Chevys 41 "___ NBC" (1990s show with a theme by John Tesh) 42 Its second letter stands for "coast" 43 Native Nebraskan 45 Jason of "The Muppets" 49 Scrub down a Beatle? 53 Real Madrid shout 54 Attacked in droves 55 One of Natalie's "Black Swan" co-stars 58 John who's big on farms 60 Malady brought on by incorrectly plugging in appliances? 62 Author Turow 63 Jr.'s junior 64 Site of an 1814 treaty 65 Skate mogul Hawk Last week’s solution

66 "Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!" network 67 Toy manufactured by Duncan

DOWN

1 Sanford of "The Jeffersons" 2 It may be formal 3 Growth on a rock 4 Sound at the barbershop 5 The A of BA 6 Part of a Mr. Clean costume 7 First movie to feature Silent Bob 8 Gesture that goes with "meh" 9 Wherever, colloquially 10 Article written by Voltaire 11 Richard of 1990s talk shows 12 Drop ___ on (shock) 14 Point out danger 16 Neither here ___ there 20 House who won Cycle 2 of "America's Next Top Model" 23 "___ homo" ("Behold the man," in Latin) 24 The last palindromic one was 2002 25 Second-largest island in the Med. 27 The A of A.D. 28 Actress Beckinsale 32 Sop up 34 Traits for blowhards 35 Scoop holder 36 Leaning typeface: abbr. 37 Texas city on the Brazos 38 "Seriously?!?" 39 "Please, ___ of you..." 41 Like some candles or nozzles 44 Clip for men 46 Birdbrained, as it were 47 Cause of some weather conditions 48 Furthest down, priority-wise 50 Malt liquor size 51 Drive the getaway car, say 52 Have power over 56 Pop in rock 57 NYC neighborhood one letter off from another NYC neighborhood 58 It ends when you "fall back": abbr. 59 Prefix for tourism 61 "To hear," to Hernando

©2012 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 August 2 – August 9, 2012


PUBLIC NOTICES cessor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $347.83, beginning March 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of April 26, 2012 is $151,780.20 principal, interest at the rate of 2.75%, late charges in the amount of $213.42, escrow advances of $2,081.13, suspense balance of $-577.52 and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,328.18, plus accruing interest at the rate of $11.44 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 17, 2012 /s/ Marti Ottley Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 17th day of May, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Marti Ottley, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, ID Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Pennymac v Pennock 41961.022 Published 8/2, 8/9 and 8/16/2012 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 28, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 2A of Huson Lots, Lots 2A and 3A, a Recorded Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official Plat of Record in Book 30 of Plats at Page 17 DALE HESS AND SHERRY HESS, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated October 2, 2007 and Recorded October 12, 2007 in Book 807, Page 406 under Document No. 200727046. The beneficial interest is currently held by PNC Bank, National Association successor by merger to National City Mortgage a Division of National City Bank. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $672.01, beginning November 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other

charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of May 30, 2012 is $189,016.67 principal, interest at the rate of 2.0% now totaling $2,505.57, late charges in the amount of $ 168.00, escrow advances of $1,555.69, and other fees and expenses advanced of $70.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $10.36 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the s ale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 24, 2012 /s/ Marti Ottley Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 24th day of May, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Marti Ottley, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shannon Gavin Notary Public Bingham County, ID Commission expires: 1/19/2018 Pnc V Hess 41230.510 Published 8/2, 8/9 and 8/16/2012 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 4, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: The North 50 feet of Lots 26, 27, 28, 29 and 30 in Block 23 of CAR LINE ADDITION, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Recording reference: Book 723 of Micro Records at Page 284 Jason Williams and Nichole Williams, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property, to Insured Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 8, 2006 and recorded September 13, 2006 on Book-783 and Page-12 as Document No. 200623360. The beneficial interest is currently held by OneWest Bank, FSB. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,150.33, beginning November 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 16, 2012 is $190,400.00 principal, interest at the rate of 7.25% now totaling $6,318.94, late charges in the amount of $230.08, and other fees and expenses advanced of $69.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $37.82 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the prop-

erty and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: April 27, 2012 /s/ Marti Ottley Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 27th day of April, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Marti Ottley, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, ID Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Onewest V Williams 41969.616 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 4, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 10 AND THE NORTH 1/2 OF LOT 11 OF BLOCK 53 OF SOUTH MISSOULA, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF, OF RECORD IN BOOK 1 OF PLATS AT PAGE 19, RECORDS OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA ROBERT S. MERWIN, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to STEWART TITLE, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, by DEED OF TRUST DATED ON MAY 14, 2004 AND RECORDED ON MAY 21, 2004 IN BOOK 732, PAGE 1217 UNDER DOCUMENT NO. 200413924. The beneficial interest is currently held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $583.58, beginning June 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of May 4, 2012 is $92,900.15 principal, interest at the rate of 5.75% now totaling $16,083.94, late charges in the amount of $527.66, escrow advances of $7,554.99, suspense balance of $-495.00 and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,308.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $14.63 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors, if such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s

fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: April 26, 2012 /s/ Marti Ottley Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 26th day of April, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Marti Ottley, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, ID Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Chase Vs. Merwin 41916.551 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 4, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 5 of Glaicier Estates, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according the the official recorded Plat thereof Darren Bayer and Tami Bayer, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to American Title & Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Chase Bank USA, N.A., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on August 10, 2005 and recorded on August 15, 2005 in Book 758, Page 117 under Document NO 200520940. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for J.P. Morgan Mortgage Acquisition Trust 2007-CH3, Asset Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-CH3. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,920.02, beginning September 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of May 17, 2012 is $354,160.33 principal, interest at the rate of 8.875% now totaling $87,901.18, late charges in the amount of $3,332.00, escrow advances of $10,640.67, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,994.20, plus accruing interest at the rate of $86.11 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any repre-

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C8 August 2 – August 9, 2012

sentation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: April 25, 2012 /s/ Marti Ottley Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 25th day of April, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Marti Ottley, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, ID Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Chase V Bayer 41954.860 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee Sale Number: 11-01664-5 Loan Number: 1205271905 APN: 5844006 TO BE SOLD for cash at Trustee’s Sale on October 26, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, recognized local time, on the front steps to the County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula the following described real property in Missoula County, Montana, to-wit: LOT 17H OF THE AMENDED PLAT OF COBBAN AND DISNMORE’S ORCHARD HOMES, LOT 17, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. More commonly known as:142 SMALL LANE, MISSOULA, MT DALE S. MARTELL, SUSAN L MARTELL, AS HUSBAND AND WIFE, as the original grantor{s), conveyed said real property to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the original trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, as the original beneficiary, by a Trust Indenture dated as of December 23, 2005, and recorded on January 4, 2006 in Book 767 at Page 104 under Document No. 200600274, in the Official Records of the Office of the Record of Missoula County, Montana (“Deed of Trust’). The current beneficiary is: US Bank National Association, as Trustee for CSMC Mortgage-Backed PassThrough Certificates, Series 2006-4 (the “Beneficiary”). FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY was named as Successor Trustee (the “Trustee”) by virtue of a Substitution of Trustee dated May 6, 2011 and recorded in the records of Missoula County, Montana. There has been a default in the performance of said Deed of Trust: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears as of June 18, 2012: Balance due on monthly payments from February 1,2011 and which payments total: $20,288.82: Late charges: $759.36: Net Other Fees:$40.00 Advances: $3,994.28 There is presently due on the obligation the principal sum of $190,585.93 plus accrued interest thereon at the rate of 3.50000% per annum from January 1, 2011, plus late charges. Interest and late charges continue to accrue. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds include the trustee’s or attorney’s fees and costs and expenses of sale. The beneficiary has elected to sell the property to satisfy the obligation and has directed the trustee to commence such sale proceedings. The beneficiary declares that the grantor is in default as described above and has directed the Trustee to commence proceedings to sell the property described above at public sale in accordance with the terms and provisions of this notice. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the aforesaid property,

at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default theretofore existing. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714.730.2727 DATED: June 18, 2012 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee By: John Catching, Authorized Signature A-4264589 07/19/2012, 07/26/2012, 08/02/2012 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 11/02/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which ROGER W OLSON as Grantors, conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 08/25/2008 and recorded 10/03/2008, in document No. 200822659 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 827 at Page Number 444 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: THE SOUTH 72 FEET OF LOT 11, THE SOUTH 72 FEET OF LOT 12 AND THE SOUTH 72 FEET OF THE WEST 24 FEET OF LOT 13 IN BLOCK 94 OF SCHOOL ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF, RECORDING REFERENCE IN BOOK 265 OF MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 1439. Property Address: 1828 HOWELL ST, Missoula, MT 59802-2136. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 11/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $128,519.12 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 7.25% per annum from 11/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 06/21/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0005244 FEI NO. 1006.152563

Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 11/05/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which MARGARET LOHR, A MARRIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY as Grantors, conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 01/12/2005 and recorded 01/18/2005, in document No. 200501335 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 746 at Page Number 1048 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: PARCEL 73A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 2277. LOCATED IN THE SE1/4 OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 13 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, P.M.M., MONTANA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Property Address: 695 CAMAS RD, BONNER, MT 59823-9503. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWMBS INC., CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH TRUST 2005-03, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-03. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 03/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $226,993.39 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 4.25% per annum from 03/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 06/22/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0128367 FEI NO. 1006.146144 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 11/08/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY,


PUBLIC NOTICES N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which FORREST E EBBS, MARRIED as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to ERIC TRAN as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 03/26/2007 and recorded 04/11/2007, in document No. 200708497 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 795 at Page Number 192 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PREMISES IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, TO-WIT: TRACT 15-B OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5418 LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 13 NORTH, RANGE 16 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY: THE APN IS SHOWN BY THE COUNTY ASSESSOR AS 5865351; SOURCE OF TITLE IS BOOK 736, PAGE 671 (RECORDED 07/16/04) MORE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED AS: TRACT 15-B OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5418 LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 13 NORTH, RANGE 16 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Property Address: 355 MYSTIC MOON, Potomac, MT 59823. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 10/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $371,209.53 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.875% per annum from 10/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as

may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 06/28/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0010697 FEI NO. 1006.153821 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 11/05/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which SANDRA G ROSTAD, A MARRIED WOMAN as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to STEWART TITLE as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 08/18/2003 and recorded 08/26/2003, in document No. 200331595 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 715 at Page Number 1344 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: THE WEST 15 FEET OF LOT 8 AND ALL OF LOTS 9 AND 10 IN BLOCK 20 OF CAR LINE ADDITION TO THE CITY OF MISSOULA, IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK AND RECORDER OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. PARCEL NO. 0037158. Property Address: 2401 WEST KENT AVENUE, MISSOULA, MT 59801. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by HSBC BANK USA, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF DEUTSCHE ALT-A SECURITIES INC.

MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2004-1, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-1. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 03/01/2012, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $109,715.66 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 7.75% per annum from 03/01/2012 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 06/25/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0057023 FEI NO. 1006.162339 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 11/05/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY,

N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which WILLIAM LUEDTKE as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON, ATTORNEY AT LAW as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 05/18/2006 and recorded 05/19/2006, in document No. 200611610 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 774 at Page Number 964 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 4 AND THE WEST 10 FEET OF LOT 5 IN BLOCK 3 OF FOOTHILLS ESTATES NO. 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. RECORDING REFERENCE IN BOOK 603 AT PAGE 2102 MICRO RECORDS. Property Address: 2515 GARLAND DR, Missoula, MT 59803-2011. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-24CB, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-24CB. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 07/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $188,914.55 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.625% per annum from 07/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the

proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 06/26/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0126216 FEI NO. 1006.145362 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 11/09/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which RUSSELL C SMITH, AND TRACI SMITH, AS JOINT TENANTS WITH RIGHTS OF SURVIVORSHIP as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON, ATTORNEY AT LAW as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 06/05/2009 and recorded 06/15/2009, in document No. 200914280 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 841 at Page Number 720 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, TO-WIT: LOT 52 OF SOUTHPOINTE-PHASE III, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT. THEREOF. ASSESSOR’S PARCEL NO: 3471301 Property Address: 3615 BRANDON WAY, MISSOULA, MT 59803-2965. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 04/01/2012, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney

fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $236,299.95 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.00% per annum from 04/01/2012 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 06/28/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-9840407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 120057405 FEI NO. 1006.162753 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 11/13/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which THOMAS SKOOG, A SINGLE PERSON as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON, ATTORNEY AT LAW as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 04/08/2010 and recorded 04/08/2010, in document No. 201006639 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 857 at Page Number 1324 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 3A OF PEERY ADDITION, LOT 3, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY,

MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 2413 39TH ST, Missoula, MT 59803-1122. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 11/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $162,056.97 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.25% per annum from 11/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 07/02/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-9840407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 110011175 FEI NO. 1006.128934

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Studio near downtown. $495 H/W /S/G paid, coin-op laundry, off street parking. CLEAN! No smoking/pets. GATEWEST 728-7333

2 bedroom near North Missoula Community Garden. $625 W/S/G paid. Off-street parking, storage. CLEAN! No smoking, no pets. GATEWEST 728-7333

3 bedroom, 2 bath house in great neighborhood. $1,150 S/G paid. D/W, fenced yard, lawn care provided, attached garage, off street parking. CLEAN! No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

2 bedroom near Shopko. $675 W/S/G paid. Off street parking, washer/dryer hookups, private deck. CLEAN! No smoking, no pets. GATEWEST 728-7333

3714 W. Central #3. 2bed/1bath, lower Target Range unit, W/D hookups, shared yard, pet? $675. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

2 bedroom on quiet cul-de-sac. $695 H/W/S/G paid, coin-op laundry, off street parking, D/W. CLEAN! No smoking, no pets. GATEWEST 728-7333

3901 O’LEARY: 2 BEDROOM, 2 STORY W/ PRIVATE DECK, CARPORT, STRG, * FREE CABLE *, HOOK-UPS+LF, 1 _ BATHROOMS, DISHWASHER, BEHIND HOME DEPOT, NO PETS OR SMOKING $825 . 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property Management 549-6106

3 bed, 2 bath, large lot, furnished, water/sewer/garbage paid, no dogs. $885/mo. 273-6034

735 W. Sussex Ave. #2 2bed/1bath, coin-ops, carport, A/C. $700. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

1511 S Russell • 721-8990

923 HELEN: 1 BEDROOM, CLOST TO THE UNIVERSITY, 2ND FLOOR, ON-SITE LAUNDRY, * FREE CABLE *, DINING NOOK, NICE CONDITION, $725 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property Management 549-6106

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

2 bedroom remodeled apartment near Montana Club on Brooks $850. W/S/G paid, dishwasher, W/D hookups, gas fireplace, covered carport, off street parking, storage. CLEAN! No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2101 DEARBORN: 2 BEDROOM, BEAUTIFUL 2ND FLOOR CONDO!, PRIVATE DECK, WOOD FLOORS, STORAGE, PRIVATE ACCESS BUILDING, SPACE (#16) IN HEATED UNDERGROUND GARAGE, COMMON ROOM, HOOK-UPS, DISHWASHER, NO PETS OR SMOKING $1,050. 1-

MOBILE HOMES 1304 S. 1ST ST. W.: 1 BEDROOM, BREAKFAST BAR., STORAGE, CENTRAL, BIG SHARED YARD, SMALL PET ALLOWED $595. 1YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property Management 549-6106

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

DUPLEXES 722 Bulwer. Garden-level studio, shared yard, central location, garage, cat? $575 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

HOUSES

Grizzly Property 542-2060

Management

2 bedroom 1 & 1/2 bath condo, 2 years new! $750. Washer and dryer in unit, dishwasher, garbage paid, covered parking. CLEAN! No smoking. No pets. GATEWEST 728-7333 2415 Mary. 2 bed, 1.75 bath house. Single garage, patio, fenced yard, W/D & DW. $950. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

1314 Linnea Lane. Newer 3bed/1.5 bath home, double garage, W/D hookups. $1225

2608 O’Shaughnesy 3bed/2 bath, newer home in Hellgate Meadows subdivision, DW, W/D hookups, pet, $1350. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

2 Bedroom, 1.5 bath townhouse $750 S/G paid, W/D in unit, storage, carport & off-street parking.

3 Bedroom House Great neighborhood $1,150 G/S pd. Attached garage, fenced yard, no pets.

2100 Stephens • 728-7333

2100 Stephens • 728-7333

Find your new home with

Professional Property Management

professionalproperty.com 1&2

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

549-7711 Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com

4317 Larkspur 2bed/1bath ranch style, W/D hookups, single garage, dog? $1150. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 9325 HWY 93 S: FOUR BEDROOM FARMHOUSE!, 2 STORY, RECENTLY REDONE!, HOOK-UPS, DW, NEAR LOLO, 2 BATHROOMS, GAS FIREPLACE, NO SMOKING OR CATS, POSSIBLE DOG? $1,095 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property Management 549-6106 9325 HWY 93 S: FOUR BEDROOM FARMHOUSE!, 2 STORY, RECENTLY REDONE!, HOOK-UPS, DW, NEAR LOLO, 2 BATHROOMS, GAS FIREPLACE, NO SMOKING OR PETS ALLOWED $1,195. 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property Management 549-6106 Nice 3bd/2bth home on 1/3ac Newer one level home West of Missoula. $995/mo $600/deposit. Fenced/dogs allowed. All appliances included. 1 yr lease. email: albertonhouse@hotmail.com for more info & application. Thanks!

Office/retail space in Stephens Center. 950-2,170 sq. ft. $895-$1,990 + merchant fees.

2100 Stephens • 728-7333

GardenCity

Property Management

MHA Management An affiliation of the Missoula Housing Authority

422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

ORCHARD APARTMENTS 2 BEDROOM RENT: $691 W/D, ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. "Let us tend your den"

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent w/s/g/elec included $425/month 406-273-6034

Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

FIDELITY Finalist

Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

251-4707 Rent Incentive

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119 Johnson 1 Bed Apt/Hookups $480/month

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing 30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

www.gatewestrentals.com

Uncle Robert Lane 2 Bed Apt $645/month

FIREWEED COURT 3 BEDROOM TOWNHOUSE RENT: $679 DISHWASHER, W/D HOOKUPS TENANT PAYS GAS HEAT, ELECTRICITY GOLD DUST APARTMENTS 2 BEDROOM RENT: $691 INCLUDES ALL UTILITIES DEPOSITS STUDIO: $450 ONE BED: $550 TWO BED: $650 THREE BED: $750

Visit our website at

Some restrictions apply. For more information contact MHA Management at

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549-4113

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10 August 2 – August 9, 2012


REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 1 Russell Park West. 3 bed, 1.5 bath with basement & single garage. Central location. $189,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net 114 Bentley Park Loop. 3 bed, 2 bath 2 story home in central location. Open, airy floor plan. $184,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 1500 Philips. 2 bed, 1 bath with single garage on corner lot. Fenced yard with deck. $154,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential MIssoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com 1537 Defoe. 2 bed, 1 bath with 2 car garage near Lowell School. $162,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com 2 Bdr, 2 Bath Central Missoula home. $184,999. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 2640 Tanbark. 5 bed, 4 bath, basement, 2 decks, 2 car garage. Near Ranch Club Golf Course. Views! $375,000. Ann Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 3 Bdr, 1.5 Bath Rose Park/Slant Streets home with a great yard. $234,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 345 Brooks. 4 bed, 1.5 bath with basement and large 3 car garage near UM. $259,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 4 Bdr, 2 Bath Lower Rattlesnake home. $295,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 428 Jefferson. 3 bed, 1 bath near downtown. Hardwood floors, tile & fantastic fenced yard. $258,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula, 7288270. glasgow@montana.com 4600 Monticello. 3 bed, 2 bath with 2 car garage in Canyon Creek. Private backyard & patio. $189,500. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 5 Bdr, 4 Bath University District Home. $549,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 541-547 South 2nd West. Wonderful 4-plex in great neighborhood. Suitable for condo conversion. Newer rubber membrane roof. $275,000. MLS #20120840 Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.541-547s2ndst.com

6544 McArthur. 3 bed, 2.5 bath with gas fireplace and 2 car garage. $240,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net 815 39th Street. 4 bed, 3 bath, basement & 2 car garage. Wrap around decks. Private neighborhood with pastoral views. $288,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com Affordable Townhomes Didn’t think you could afford to buy your own place? This sweet new, green-built development may be your ticket. STARTING AT $79,000. 1400 Burns, 2405227 porticorealestate.com Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free comparative market analysis. 360-8234 Energy-Efficient Sweet Bungalow in Slant Street ‘hood with double lot and raised beds ready to plant! 835 Rollins. $179,500. 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Five bedroom, 4 bath townhome with 2 car garage on The Ranch Club golf course. Amazing views. Golf everyday! 2640B Tanbark Way MLS #20120690 $375,000. Call Anne for details. 546-5816 www.movemontana.com Four bed, 1-1/2 bath, 3 car garage home at 345 Brooks. Close to downtown, neighborhood coffee shop/restaurant, and university. Long time family home has potential to also have downstairs rental. Just $259,000 MLS 20117301 Call Anne 546-5816 for details. www.movemontana.com Historic Preservation Award-Winning Marshall House Beautiful professional building with great design for offices or home and awesome exposure for business. 436 S 3rd W. $395,000 2405227 porticorealestate.com Huge Lot Bungalow Style Home Middle of Missoula, close to Good Food Store, 1/2 acre + lot, enormous shop, great home. 203 Curtis, 2405227 porticorealestate.com

I can help you sell your home! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com

de-sac. $40 HOA fees. $155,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com

Looking for a place to call home? Call me! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com

2441 McIntosh. 2 bed, 2 bath. Low-maintenance living in lovely 55+ community. MLS #20121579. $106,000. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

Looking for homebuyer education? Call me! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com PRICE REDUCED 4 bed 2 bath house on one full landscaped acre near Wye. Great Well at 30 gpm. 2 gas fireplaces, updated kitchen and bathrooms. $279,000. MLS #20120012. 9869 Lee’s Lane, Missoula. Call Anne 546-5816 for details. www.movemontana.com Rattlesnake Valley 909 Herbert. Perched amidst the trees and canopy of the Rattlesnake Valley, this home is a beauty! $350,000. porticorealestate.com 240-5227 Slant Street Condo 525A Cleveland. Upgraded and beautiful 2 bedroom condo in the Slant Streets: $164,900 porticorealestate.com 240-5227

3 Bdr, 2.5 Bath Central Missoula Condo. $187,400. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4433A Bordeaux Blvd. Newer 3 bed, 2 bath with 2 car garage. Fenced backyard with dog kennel & pergola. Very nice! $179,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com 6614 McArthur. 2 bed, 2.5 bath with 2 car garage. Fantastic views! $194,500. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net 702A Charlo. Newly remodeled 3 bed, 1.5 bath on corner lot with single garage. Fenced yard with deck. $149,000.

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES

Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com Open & Light & Green & Clean Efficiency abounds in this 3 bed, 2.5 bath stand alone super-insulated condo with heated floors and so much more. 1530 S 12th W. Near Good Food Store and bike trails. $250,000. 240-5227. porticorealestate.com The Uptown Flats have two one bed one bath units starting at $139,900. Great downtown living! Call Anne 5465816 for showing. www.movemontana.com Treehouse Feel in this fairly new condo with single garage. Great location close to school, bike trail, Good Food Store and town. 935B Garfield. $117,500. 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

LAND FOR SALE 23645 Mullan Road. Beautiful 14 acre meadow with pasture & trees near Huson. $169,900. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

2238 Hillside. 3 bed, 1.5 bath with 2 car garage on quiet cul-

COMMERCIAL 321 N. Higgins Commercial building on coveted downtown location with lots of foot traffic. Building only for sale. Call Anne 546-5816 for showing. www.movemontana.com

NHN Twin Creek Road/Bonner. 3.69 acres with creek. Mobiles on permanent foundations allowed. $165,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

1060 ARNEGUY, ARLEE $198,500 MLS# 20124452 THIS PLACE IS COOL! GREAT OPEN FLOOR PLAN- NICE KITCHEN-DINING-LIVING AREA. BEAUTIFUL PATIO OFF KITCHEN, GORGEOUS VIEWS! FENCED WITH U/G SPRINKLERS-DOG RUN, AND A FANTASTIC HUGE YARD WITH NEAT PLAYHOUSE. MASTER HAS VANITY AREA, AND WALK-IN CLOSET. 2ND BED ON MAIN HAS ATTACHED TV/DEN AREA (COOL). VERY LARGE GARAGE-LEADS TO A FANTASTIC MUDROOM-LAUNDRY AREA. LOWER LEVER IS A 2 BEDROOM APT, 1080 SF! THIS GREAT APT. COULD POTENTIALLY MAKE HALF YOUR HOUSE PAYMENT!!! VERY CLEAN 3 BED 2 1/2 BATH. VERY OPEN FLOOR PLAN AND CRAZY VIEWS. FENCED WITH U/G SPRINKLERS, AND MATURE LANDSCAPINGNICE DECKS ON BOTH FRONT AND BACK. GARAGE IS FINISHED AND HEATED- 2 ADDITIONAL STORAGE SHEDS. VERY NICE HOME FOR THE MONEY.

Nancy Miles 406-550-7145

4433A Bordeaux

1545 Cooley #H. 2 bed, 1 bath Northside condo with garage & deck. $127,000. $150 HOA fees. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate. 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 1725A Park Place. 3 bed, 1.5 bath with 1 car garage. Fenced, landscaped backyard. No HOA fees. $150,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate. 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail,com

Lot 16A MacArthur. New 3 bed, 2 bath with basement & 2 car garage. Fantastic Missoula views. MLS #20122947. $184,900. Robin Rice @ 2406503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties

206 BRANDI LANE, FLORENCE $219,900 MLS# 20123482

1333 Toole #C14. 2 bed, 2 bath affordable downtown living. Main floor, great southern exposure. $120,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com

Rattlesnake Acreage Rattlesnake 1/4 acre lot at the base of Mt. Jumbo with all utilities stubbed to the site and ready to build on: $160,000. portico realestate.com KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com 240-5227

4,500 square foot lot on the Northside. $59,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

$179,000 MLS# 20123402 • Bellvue model 3 bed, 2 bath • 2 car attached garage

Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos $144,900 - $249,900 Under new ownership! 1 and 2 bedrooms. Large units, nice finishes, secure entry, secure U/G parking, riverfront, affordable HOA dues and much more. Owner financing comparable to FHA terms available with as little as 3.5% down! Units, pricing and info available at www.mullanheights.com

• Fenced backyard, pergola & many upgrades

4433Abordeaux.com

2238 Hillside Dr South Hills

RICE TEAM

Robin Rice 240-6503 15305 Spring Hill, Frenchtown • $595,000 • Beautiful cedar-sided 4 bed, 2.5 bath on over 3 acres • Wrap around deck, finished basement & heated 3 car garage SELLER MOTIVATED! 232 Cap de Villa • $219,900 • Well-maintained 4 bed, 1.5 bath • Fenced backyard with deck & UG sprinklers

MLS #20124281 • 3 bed, 1.5 bath town home on quiet cul-de-sac • 2 car garage & fenced backyard • HOA $40/month include outside maintenance

riceteam@bigsky.net missoularealestate4sale.com 19488 Highway 200 East $399,900 • 4 bed, 3 bath • On 3 acres near Blackfoot River

$155,000

2238hillside.com For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

www.rochelleglasgow.com 1641 Stoddard $99.500 • Single wide 2 bed, 2 bath with 2 car garage • Fenced yard, deck & lots of trees • Great building lot

Missoula Properties

Rochelle Glasgow

Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 August 2 – August 9, 2012


REAL ESTATE 7 COMMERCIAL ACRES FOR SALE, Main Street, Cut Bank, development potential for multifamily housing or motel. Owner financing available. Call 406240-9766, kimkahle@windermere.com Broker/Owner East Missoula Building Lot with great trees and a sweet ‘hood. $65,000. 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

OUT OF TOWN 15305 Spring Hill Road/Frenchtown. Beautiful cedar 4 bed, 2.5 bath with 3 car garage & deck on acreage bordering Forst Service. $595,000. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. 170 South 1st Street, Clinton. 2 bedroom, 1 bath with basement & garage on private 2.2 fenced acres. Close to the river and Forest Service land. $203,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com 19488 Highway 200 East/ Bonner. 5 bed, 3 bath, basement &

3 car garage on 3 mountain view acres. $399,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net 2 Bdr, 1 Bath Stevensville log home on 1.2 acres. $139,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Stevensville area home on 6.3 acres. Large shop. $339,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 32609 Jocko Road, Arlee. 2 bed, 2 bath on almost 6 acres. Fireplace, loft and 3 car garage. $214,900. Robin Rice @ 2406503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. 4 Bdr, 3 Bath Florence area home on 10 acres. $399,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4 Bdr, 3 Bath Stevensville area home on 13 acres. $575,000.

Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

living with creek, main house and guest house? Here it is! $350,000. porticorealestate.com 240-5227

9010 Scharf, Clinton. 2 bed, 1 bath with 3 car garage & heated shop on over 9 private acres. $225,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com

Lolo End of Cul-de-sac Beauty Open, light, private, quiet and in immaculate condition. Huge yard, 3 bedroom, 2 bath home with hardwood, tile and beautiful warm colors. 5697 Explorer Court. $215,000. 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

Beautiful Potomac 25500 Ashby Creek. 20+/- acres. Want beauty, privacy and off-the-grid

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MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL QUICK CASH FOR REAL ESTATE NOTES and Land Installment Contracts. We also lend on Real Estate with strong equity. 406-721-1444 www.Creative-Finance.com

• 20117301 ......345 Brooks ..........................4+ Bed 3 Car............................$259,000 • 20120012 ......9869 Lee's Lane ..................1 Full Acre 4 Bed......................$279,000 • 20120690 ......2640 B Tanbark....................Golf Club Townhome ................$375,000 • 20121623 ......835 Rollins...........................Slant Street Charmer ...............$179,500 • 20122378 ......801 N Orange #208..............Downtown Condo .....................$139,900 • 20122806 ......1333 Toole #C-14 ................Cute Clean Condo.....................$120,000 • 20122925 ......114 Bentley Park Loop .......1 Level Living ++ ...................$183,000 • 20123463 ......1725A Park Place................3 Bed Townhome......................$150,000 • 20123754 ......4600 Monticello Place.........Semi-Corner Private ...............$189,500 • 20124335 ......1545 Cooley #H....................Oh So Cute! New Deck............$127,000 • 20120189 ......321 N Higgins ......................Total Remodel 2nd Level..........$780,000

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C12 August 2 – August 9, 2012

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Missoula Independent