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NEWS ARTS

TIME AS MONEY: MISSOULA’S NEW BARTER COMMUNITY SPINS AN OLD COMMODITY

365 VIEWS OF COUGAR PEAK

OPINION

WHO’S TO BLAME FOR GRIZ SAGA? RAINBOW GATHERING

FILM

DETROIT’S DEATH COMES KNOCKING

Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com

TASTE TEST!

NEWS ARTS

TIME AS MONEY: MISSOULA’S NEW BARTER COMMUNITY SPINS AN OLD COMMODITY

365 VIEWS OF COUGAR PEAK

OPINION

WHO’S TO BLAME FOR GRIZ SAGA? RAINBOW GATHERING

FILM

DETROIT’S DEATH COMES KNOCKING

[2] Missoula Independent • August 1–August 8, 2013

cover photo illustration by Pumpernickel Stewart

News Voices/Letters The Rainbow Gathering and taxes.............................................................4 The Week in Review Fire, probation and a lockout .........................................................6 Briefs Homelessness, hotline and cameras........................................................................6 Etc. Is it over yet?................................................................................................................7 News Missoula’s new barter community spins an old commodity....................................8 News Small breweries find big challenges distributing beer .............................................9 Opinion It’s all the Rainbow Gathering’s fault—even the Griz mess ..............................10 Opinion James Watt turned out to be great for conservation .........................................11 Feature The quest for justice in Lake County..................................................................14

Arts & Entertainment Arts Your guide to becoming a vinyl aficionado...............................................................20 Music The Orators, Wild Moth, Underhill Rose and Ditch Tiger.....................................21 Arts Jared Shear’s 365 ways to view Cougar Peak............................................................22 Arts Total Fest exhibit puts the visual in audio ................................................................23 Film Death recovers the story of an unconventional punk band....................................24 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films .........................................................25 Flash in the Pan Bickering about obesity........................................................................26 Happiest Hour Lisa’s Pasty Pantry...................................................................................28 8 Days a Week Cheers, y’all ............................................................................................29 Mountain High Trail runners Jason Schlarb and Jeremy Wolf ........................................37 Agenda Huey Lewis and Eden Atwood ............................................................................38

Exclusives Street Talk..........................................................................................................................4 In Other News .................................................................................................................12 Classifieds ......................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess......................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y .......................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle..........................................................................................................C-5 This Modern World .....................................................................................................C-12

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL PROJECTS Christie Anderson ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Cathrine L. Walters PHOTO INTERN Tommy Martino CALENDAR EDITOR Kate Whittle STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen, Dameon Pesanti, Eben Wragge-Keller COPY EDITOR Kate Whittle EDITORIAL INTERN Eben Wragge-Keller ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Pumpernickel Stewart, Jonathan Marquis CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Allen MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, Chris Dombrowski Andy Smetanka, Brad Tyer, Nick Davis, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Matthew Frank, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Melissa Mylchreest

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2013 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • August 1–August 8, 2013 [3]

[voices]

Family values

STREET TALK

by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked Tuesday, July 30, near the corner of Spruce and Higgins. This week’s Indy talks about the rise of Montana distilleries. What’s your cocktail of choice? Follow-up: Have you tried a Montana-made spirit?

Jen Certa: White Russian. Close to home: Yes. I’ve been to Montgomery Distillery and it is something different for Missoula. I really liked it.

John Bardsley: Whiskey sour. Whiskey a go go: Yes. I drink good whiskey in the backcountry and just had a whiskey sour at Headframe Spirits in Butte this past weekend…It was good.

Gary Stein: Glenlivet, neat. Straight shooter: I’ve tried one or two. I tried the Neversweat Whiskey (from Headframe) at the James Bar. I had it neat and it was good.

Jessica Wing: Back in the day it would be some nice vodka, like when the Old Post Pub had the distilled vodka with fruit infused. Hopped up: Not yet. I just had a baby so it’s been a good 16 months. I’m sticking to the beer while I’m breastfeeding.

Jason Paranto: A dirty martini with three olives. Moderation: Yes. I’ve been to Montgomery Distillery and had the vodka drinks. I like the portion sizes there and the two-drink limit. It keeps it classy.

[4] Missoula Independent • August 1–August 8, 2013

On a recent afternoon stroll along Higgins, my girlfriend and I passed a couple of folks and their dog, sitting in repose on the sidewalk, with seemingly all of their possessions. Their appearance was disheveled, but their vibe was light and their faces optimistic. Then I noticed their sign, which read, “not rainbow, just hobo.” As if that is somehow a positive contrast. True, the Rainbow gathering has been a hot topic this summer, and it seems at times that popular opinion, as well as articles both in print and online, consider the gathering an unmitigated disaster. In general, the Rainbow Family seems to have garnered a reputation as a rough collection of jobless, homeless, sketchy, vapidly arrogant, drug-addicted, aggressive panhandlers that exude a mysterious sense of entitlement. A blight upon our fair, hardworking society. Well, occasionally I would say that’s pretty fair, at least as an assessment of what people often see out here in the cities. However, as someone who has attended 15 Rainbow Gatherings, both regional and “national” (national simply referring to there being one really big one in the states each summer), I can tell you it’s quite a bit more complex than that. For starters, despite various casual media commentary discussing “official dates of the gathering” and the like, no such official dates exist. The Rainbow Family of Living Light, as it is unofficially known, is actually not a group at all. It is a spiritual and social movement, an outgrowth of the well known hippie era of the late ’60s and ’70s that now, in the minds of the mainstream, dwells in the realm of counter culture. Really, it is just a different culture, a tribal culture, like you might find in other countries or in this one perhaps a hundred years ago. It is not clearly defined by any constructs of organization, such as forest service land use permits or dates. True, the main part of the national gathering is July 1-7, but that is only a temporal guideline. People arrive much earlier than and stay much later than that week. There is no gate, no admission, no money exchanged (except discreetly between individuals), no explicit rules and no judgment of individual behavior (except that which occurs in one’s own mind). It is not a festival. It is not an excuse to do acid in the woods with naked people, although that does occur. It is, as is suggested by the name Rainbow, a broad spectrum of opportunities, experiences and energies. It is a chance to create a totally unique version of yourself, if only for a few days or weeks, against the unspoiled canvas of wild meadows and forest. It’s a place where kindness really matters, where artistic endeavors are social currency and where fun, love and laughter reverberate amidst the ebb and flow of drums, flutes,

sitars and wildflowers. It is a place where saying “I love you” to total strangers before 8 a.m. and meaning it with all your heart is completely normal. It is a place where moments of spiritual transcendence are encouraged. It is a place where you can be whoever you want. No strings. Just the uninhibited dance of life set to the music of the soul. Haters need not apply. Thomas Schaffnit Missoula

Tax fairly Sen. Max Baucus has taken on the gargantuan task of reforming our nation’s tax code. If done right, it could turn out to be the most significant accomplishment of his career. But with well-established

“It is a place where you can be whoever you want. No strings. Just the uninhibited dance of life set to the music of the soul.” special interest groups standing in the way, it might be more likely that we just get more of the same, or worse yet, a bad deal for Montana. Baucus’ decision to start from a “clean slate” differentiates this effort from past attempts at major tax reform. In other words, Baucus’ finance committee will begin by completely eliminating the existing tax code, and then rebuild it from the ground up. The idea is to force special interests to justify why certain tax policies, like credits and deductions, should be included moving forward. The ultimate objective is to reduce tax rates for everyone and make the system far simpler to navigate. That would have positive economic impacts across the board and energize America’s recovery. This clean slate approach makes perfect sense. Our existing tax code is notoriously voluminous and complicated. Each year, American families and businesses spend an estimated six billion hours and $160 billion to complete their taxes. The vast morass of rules, regulations, credits and deductions makes it difficult for anyone to understand.

An unintended result of such a convoluted tax code is that we’ve made it our nation’s policy to treat some individuals and businesses as winners with preferred tax treatment—and others as losers. That’s because most tax rules were designed to incentivize certain behaviors, like home ownership or saving for your child’s college education. But as any good economist will tell you, when you use government policy to incentivize one behavior, it inevitably results in bad outcomes somewhere else. For instance, allowing home mortgage interest deductions has helped millions of Americans achieve home ownership, but it has also incentivized buying bigger, more expensive homes and ultimately driven up the cost of housing for everyone. It also means that we pay higher tax rates, overall, to “pay” for these tax deductions. Clearly, the more complicated we make the tax code, the more likely it is that we will have these winner vs. loser scenarios. That’s why the most important tenets of any tax reform package must be fairness and simplicity. Sticking to these we can produce a flatter, more equal progressive tax structure that everyone can understand. It sounds so simple, but unfortunately, tax fairness will be very difficult to achieve. There are a myriad of special interest groups who will try to game the system, or worse, use the tax code to create disadvantages for specific industries. For instance, over the last several years the oil and gas industry has been targeted for unequal tax treatment. The Obama administration and allies in Congress have attempted to single-out energy companies by eliminating certain credits and deductions that are standard for businesses in every other economic sector. Such policies run contrary to what most of us consider fair play, but even so they have been very real threats to Montana’s energy industry. And they certainly run contrary to the “clean slate” approach being taken with tax reform. Nevertheless, it’s important for Senator Baucus and his tax reform allies to keep a wary eye out for attempts to leverage the new tax code to create favorable tax treatment, or to punish certain industries as a way to pursue a political agenda. This is a very big task Sen. Baucus has taken on, and he needs to know that Montana is backing him. Go and weigh in with your comments about what you think should be included in the tax reform package at taxreform.gov, and urge Baucus and his colleagues to keep fairness and simplicity central to the reform package. Sen. Bruce Tutvedt Chairman Montana Senate Taxation Committee Kalispell

missoulanews.com • August 1–August 8, 2013 [5]

[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Cathrine L. Walters

Wednesday, July 24 Missoula law enforcement asks locals to be on the lookout for two young men wearing baggy shorts and baseball hats who three days earlier allegedly used bolt cutters to break into a South Avenue storage locker.

Thursday, July 25 A Missoula County Sheriff’s Department deputy spots a woman throwing fast food bags out of her car window. The woman is allegedly intoxicated and disposing of the remains of a late-night stop. She’s charged with DUI and littering.

Friday, July 26 The NCAA releases its findings from an investigation into University of Montana athletics, penalizing the department and former head football coach Robin Pflugrad for “failure to monitor the football program.”

Saturday, July 27 A helicopter crashes 10 miles outside of Thompson Falls, killing the pilot and seriously injuring a passenger. A third passenger walks away with only minor injuries. The group had been photographing and filming power lines leading up to the crash.

Sunday, July 28 Samantha French, 20, is separated from her friends while tubing the Clark Fork near Kona Ranch. She’s found the next day and says that she slept at a friend’s house after catching a ride from the takeout and being locked out of her own home.

Monday, July 29 As fires continue to spark around western Montana, wildland fire officials announce that Missoula’s fire danger will be elevated to “extreme,” effective Aug. 1.

Tuesday, July 30 Stephanie Schriock, another top choice among Democrats to replace retiring Sen. Max Baucus, announces she will not run for Senate. The Butte native helped run Sen. John Tester’s 2006 campaign and currently heads EMILY’s List.

Crews recently demolished The Little Store, on the corner of Lolo and Raymond in the Rattlesnake. One of the new owners, Erin Nostrant, grew up in the neighborhood and recalls buying candy there after school until it went out of business more than 25 years ago. The new owners intend to build to suit or construct a spec house to sell.

Film

Tinkering with stability For several months now, Missoula filmmaker Jesse Spaulding has been tinkering on a large workbench in the back of his South Avenue home. Bolts, wires and camera housings of various sizes litter the surface, a testament to his Frankensteinian pursuit of creating better filmmaking tools. Trial and error have culminated in a single camera rig Spaulding calls The Ghost, a robotic stabilizer for digital cameras under 3.5 pounds. “I’ve always been intrigued by having really smooth footage on the ground,” Spaulding says. “I kind of left that behind when I got into the aerial stuff … But now it’s coming back around to the ground.” Last month, Spaulding launched a Kickstarter campaign with the goal of raising $20,000 to fund mass production of The Ghost. His campaign reached its goal in a week. Donors have so far pledged $49,289. “I’m planning on producing probably 100 by Christmas,” Spaulding says. “But if Kickstarter takes off even more, we’ll have to hire more people.” Spaulding currently works solely with the help of his fiancée, Hannah Weinert. The Ghost evolved

from Spaulding’s work with camera-toting helicopters called Cinestars, a technique he’s marketed through his company SIC Visuals. It was partly Weinert’s frustrations with lag-time on those rigs that prodded Spaulding to invent The Ghost. “I’m the one viewing all that, ’cause I control the pan and tilt of the camera mount,” Weinert says. “So I would complain to Jesse, ‘We have this radian, which works. But it’s not perfect.’” Spaulding was also keen to develop a lighterweight alternative to traditional Steadicams. Spaulding’s not a “big or bulky” guy, Weinert says, making it difficult for him to wield a Steadicam for long stints. The Ghost is a breeze in comparison. “Even Jesse’s cousin, she’s 8 and she ran around with this thing.” Spaulding isn’t the only one to note a need for such a camera mount. Freefly Systems, the same company that manufactures the Cinestar, recently released a handheld camera stabilizer strikingly similar to The Ghost. But Freefly’s Movi rig is priced at $15,000—or $5,000 for a smaller model—a price-point Spaulding feels is well outside the budgets of independent filmmakers. Spaulding is currently offering The Ghost

through Kickstarter for $2,000. The industry “needs it at this price level,” Spaulding says, “because there are a lot of independent filmmakers. There are a lot of independent filmmakers in Missoula.” Spaulding plans to continue tweaking The Ghost until it goes into mass production this fall. Alex Sakariassen

Inmates

Creating a call for help Nearly a decade after President George W. Bush signed the Prison Rape Elimination Act into law, Scott Catey has been tasked with applying those new safeguards for Montana inmates. As the state’s new PREA coordinator, Catey will help ensure that inmates at the Montana State Prison and other jails and pre-release facilities have access to a special crisis line operated by YWCA Missoula. The line provides a way for inmates to report sexual assaults and sexual harassment by facility staff or other prisoners, without fear of reprisal. The line is expected to be up and running by early August.

Be Unconventional. 101 E. Broadway Downtown Missoula www.bhavanahome.com [6] Missoula Independent • August 1–August 8, 2013

[news] “It’s a big job for ( YWCA Missoula),” Catey says. “I’m pretty happy to have them on board doing that.” PREA faces the difficult task of walking a fine line between maintaining certain security protocols and providing resources to inmates. For instance, Catey says inmate phone calls are recorded by facility staff, but not automatically listened to. Recordings of hotline calls would be flagged to maintain privacy for the victim. Another problem deals with “blind spots” in each facility. PREA’s budget originally allocated funding for the installation of security cameras that would monitor areas where crimes can occur. That funding, consisting of more than $1 million split between state and federal dollars, has been redirected mostly toward hiring new staff. “Showers are a real problem,” says Catey. “Some of them are just open.” The biggest issue is privacy. Most inmates do not have access to phones in an area where other inmates can’t overhear a crisis hotline call. Catey says there’s no easy solution. “It’s not a perfect situation, to be honest,” he says. “Short of redesigning the prison I don’t know how we can get around that, but that’s the way it is for now.” Mike Gerrity

contemporary, approachable dining destination specializing in a blend of world cuisine, and will include a premium all-alcoholic beverage selection…” On the second, third and fourth floors, the new structure would serve commercial and residential purposes. A rooftop garden would adorn the building, according to the permit request, “with herbs and vegetables to support sustainability of our restaurant.” If the project evolves as proposed, the building would be constructed atop land that once housed Birdwatchers Country Store, one block off Higgins Avenue. It’s now mostly used for parking and, according to Missoula County records, is held by KDJ Properties.

Downtown

Rumor plans revealed On July 12, John and Colleen Powers, former owners of the Ranch Club, asked Missoula officials to begin evaluating their proposal to build a four-story building at the corner of Main and Pattee. The new structure would include, among other things, a bar, casino and restaurant. “We have sent it out for adjacent property owner notification,” says Mary McCrae of Missoula Development Services. “Comment is being taken.” Until last spring, John and Colleen Powers owned the Ranch Club, a high-end residential golf community off Mullan Road. In 2012, a First Interstate Bank-operated limited liability company called FIRC assumed ownership of the embattled development. A First Interstate Bank spokesperson told the Independent that the Ranch Club property is now for sale. When reached by phone, John Powers hesitated to discuss the new downtown proposal, noting it’s too early in the process. “We don’t own the property... Nothing is final,” he says. According to the couple’s request for a conditional use permit—a prerequisite to opening the tavern and casino at 202 East Main St.—they intend to open “‘Rumor Restaurant and Bar’…(It) will be a vibrant,

On Aug. 21, Missoula’s Land Use and Planning Committee will vet the couple’s application for conditional use permits enabling them to operate a tavern and casino. On Aug. 26, their proposal goes before the Missoula City Council. Jessica Mayrer

Homelessness

Camp cleanup challenges Roughly two weeks before laborers began hauling refuse, including human waste, makeshift houses and beer cans, from a homeless encampment near the Reserve Street bridge, Poverello Center staffers began conducting outreach. The staffers’ message was simple: There are options other than living on the banks of the Clark Fork, and resources available. “For some, there is a positive outcome,” says Poverello Center Executive Director Eran Fowler Pehan. “For others, it’s just relocation.” Law enforcement and social service workers agree that relocation—and the Reserve Street encampment’s

BY THE NUMBERS

ETC.

Teams scheduled to compete Sept. 21 in the Red Bull Flugtag, a national human-powered flying competition. One of those teams is a group of University of Montana students.

The NCAA released the findings from its 18month-long investigation into the University of Montana’s football program last friday, and the much-anticipated announcement included fairly minimal penalties. The Griz will spend the next three years on probation, vacate wins from the 2011 season and lose a handful of scholarships, while former head coach Robin Pflugrad—now the offensive coordinator for Weber State—will be suspended from coaching the first game of his 2013 football season. The apparent close of this rough three-year chapter in UM football history drew mixed responses from those close to the issue. Former Athletic Director Jim O’Day, who was fired in March 2012, told the Missoulian “there’s so much more to the story.” Until that story comes out, he added, the NCAA’s findings are “kind of a disappointment.” Pflugrad, who was fired at the same time as O’Day, also alluded to another side of the story. In particular, he spoke about what happened when Trumaine Johnson and Gerald Kemp were arrested and Tased in October 2011 for a string of charges that included obstructing a police officer. The NCAA says UM erred by letting a booster bail the players out of jail and by Pflugrad not reporting the incident to the appropriate higher-ups. “If you read through the NCAA (report), I did have concerns that there was the possibility of some civil rights violations that did exist,” Pflugrad told Ogden, Utah’s Standard-Examiner about the Johnson and Kemp arrests. “My concern was to control the emotions of my minority players and my minority coaching staff.” Pflugrad went on to tell the paper there was never any intention to hide anything from the university’s compliance department. “It was just down on the totem pole because of all the other things that were going on with these mitigating circumstances,” he said. “It was somewhat like a war zone at the time. The minute I knew none of our coaches had bailed players out, I moved on from that.” Speaking of moving on, most of Griz Nation would prefer to do just that when it comes to all of the recent problems. UM President Royce Engstrom said as much in a statement that declared the NCAA’s report “an end to this chapter in UM’s history.” Athletic Director Kent Haslam echoed the sentiment in his own announcement, proclaiming UM has “emerged stronger and more focused.” Perhaps, but if the past three years have taught us anything, it’s that clear endings are hard to come by. Jury verdicts, community forums, press conferences, pep rallies, different investigation reports—each has come and gone with the same false promise of closure. This chapter isn’t over, especially not with some key players still waiting for the full story to be revealed.

32

potentially costly return—is almost inevitable. This year’s cleanup will cost the state $17,000. “I have no illusion that people won’t move back in there,” says Missoula County Sheriff ’s Department Capt. Rob Taylor. Those most likely to return are individuals that social workers call “chronically homeless,” a demographic that typically steers clear of services, often because of the sobriety mandates they impose. The Pov, for instance, requires sobriety as a condition of residency. Rough estimates hold that approximately 11 percent of any given homeless population is chronically homeless. Though not representative of the working poor and single mothers that compose the vast majority of people living on the streets, in cars and area encampments, the chronically homeless often suffer from addiction problems and, as such, consume 50 percent or more of all resources dedicated to helping the houseless. Acutely aware of those numbers, Missoula officials last year set to work identifying strategies to address that imbalance as part of a 10-year plan to end area homelessness altogether. Titled “Reaching Home,” the document highlights the efforts and successes achieved by other communities grappling with similar problems. Specifically, the plan notes that in 2005 Seattle launched a “wet-housing project,” which provides long-term accommodations for alcoholics not deemed a safety risk. Participants in that project receive counseling. According to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the program resulted in an almost 33-percent decrease in alcohol use among participants. It also saved roughly $2,500 per month per resident—costs that were previously incurred in jails, hospitals and detox facilities. Missoula is in the process of hiring a 10-year plan coordinator to guide the city’s homelessness eradication efforts. As it does, Missoula City Councilman Jason Wiener, who co-chairs a working group guiding the plan, sees programs like Seattle’s as a smart way to go. “It’s worth investing resources in folks who are hardest to house,” he says. Jessica Mayrer

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missoulanews.com • August 1–August 8, 2013 [7]

[news]

Time as money Missoula’s new barter community spins an old commodity by Alex Sakariassen

August 8

August 15

Western Union

Jelly Bread

Family Activity

Family Activity

Mismo Gymnastics

Historical Museum at Fort Missoula

August 7

August 14

Mike Bader Bear Jam

Gladys Friday

Family Activity

Family Activity

spectrUM Science Center

spectrUM Science Center

[8] Missoula Independent • August 1–August 8, 2013

Over the past five years, Missoula ter of weeks, she says, she and four others there are a lot of things we have to offer weaver Bonnie Tarses had always meant were gathering several times a month to that aren’t valued by the monetary system.” Clarion and Widhalm add that the to compile an Excel spreadsheet of past make the Missoula Time Bank a reality. “Missoula’s a progressive, liberal Time Bank isn’t a strict hour-for-hour exclients. She felt the people who had purchased weaving kits from her or attended city,” Widhalm says. “It’s one of the rea- change system. Members can accrue up to her regional workshops would be the sons I moved here. And it’s very commu- 25 hours without spending, or spend up ideal recipients for a monthly newsletter— nity oriented. It just seemed like a to 25 hours without building any credit. The software works largely on an honor something she hoped could take the place concept that would go in Missoula.” It wasn’t an easy process. As Susie Clar- system, though Widhalm feels confident of her blog. But time passed and she simion, one of Widhalm’s fellow Time Bank that abuse won’t be a serious problem. ply never got around to it. Clarion acknowledges Tarses recently found that the Missoula Time Bank herself with some extra time can only go so far in coveron her hands, though not in ing the needs of the comthe traditional sense. She’d munity. While the intent is joined the new Missoula to take a step away from the Time Bank, an online barterestablished economy, “it ing community launched also works parallel,” she early last month, and had acsays. Some people may not crued several hours of credit normally be able to afford by offering one-hour weavthe kinds of goods and serving lessons. So she asked a ices offered by Time Bank fellow Time Bank member members, but can now offer to help her with the spreadtime in lieu of money. Widsheet, and the task was done halm believes the Time in less than a day. Bank could be particularly “It’s really very new,” advantageous to unemTarses says of the Missoula ployed or under-employed Time Bank. “But what I individuals in Missoula. know for sure is that some“You can maybe get thing I’ve been procrastisomebody to help you nating on for five years got photo courtesy of Bonnie Tarses done in an hour and a half Bonnie Tarses teaches a weaving lesson in Arlee in 2012—one write a resume, or someby my putting it out on the of the very services she’s now offering through Missoula’s body to help you get the skills to apply for a job,” Time Bank … I put it out newly established Time Bank. Widhalm says. there, and right away The Missoula Time Bank has a long somebody popped up, came over, picked founders, says, “we had to stretch ourselves.” No one in the group knew quite way to go before it catches up with estabup the hard copies and finished it.” Missoula is one of the latest additions how to secure the necessary software to lished time banks like that in Portland, to a list of more than 300 communities start such a project, and other time banks Maine (1,042 members) or Dane County, worldwide hosting active time banks. The they turned to for advice warned them that Wisc. (2,153 members). But as Tarses disconcept originated about two decades ago they’d eventually need a paid coordinator covered, time is a valuable commodity. with Washington, D.C., law professor Edgar to keep the bank operational. They forged She says she’s always been keen on the Cahn, who felt the wealth of communities ahead regardless, teaming with the Jean- traditional barter system. She jokes that could just as easily be measured in time as nette Rankin Peace Center to spread the she “wove” her divorce back in the 1970s, in dollars. Time banks work on a simple no- word and collect the recommended $25 weaving a piece for the attorney who reption: You donate an hour of your time pro- donation from each Time Bank member. resented her. Those exchanges, in her viding a service or manufacturing a product The Missoula Time Bank went live in early worldview, aren’t always direct either. “I’ve always believed that if you give for someone and register that hour with a July (missoulatimebank.org), and now has time bank. You can then “cash in” that hour roughly 50 members offering a range of me something, I may not give something with any other member of the time bank. A services from dog walking to audio/video back directly to you, but I will give somecomputer specialist, for example, could work to elder care. As of July 25, 153 hours thing back to somebody else,” she says. “It’s a bigger circle.” spend an hour fixing someone’s computer, had been exchanged. Tarses plans to continue building and “The community part of it, I think then use that hour to get a massage. Evelyn Widhalm heard about the time that was the most attractive part,” Wid- spending credit with the Missoula Time bank phenomenon last summer from an halm says. “It brings people together in a Bank. She’s already negotiating for several interview National Public Radio aired with community of helping each other as jars of jam from another member. Two othCahn. Widham brought up the idea for a neighbors. I went to Susie [Clarion] for ers might help her organize a yard sale. “It makes it easier for people to do faMissoula Time Bank during a reading an acupuncture treatment, and afterwards group with Transition Town Missoula, the it was like, ‘Oh, I don’t have to pay.’ It was vors they might normally do anyway,” Tarses says. local chapter of an international sustain- the weirdest feeling.” “And I don’t have to charge,” Clarion ability initiative, and asked if anyone else would be interested in helping. In a mat- adds, “which feels really good, because asakariassen@missoulanews.com

[news]

Shelf wars

YOU’RE INVITED... PARTY WITH YOUR PETS!

Small breweries find big challenges distributing beer by Dameon Pesanti

Jim Lueders holds his seven-month- product that isn’t represented by a distrib- word and the distributor’s, and they old daughter Leika in a carrier on his chest utor. Even if a store does carry Lueders’ worry the law disproportionately favors as he walks the floor of his Stevensville beer, he faces the issue of fighting for shelf the distributors. “We’re sheepish about this,” says brewery and talks about trust, responsi- space. The Wildwood founder says he’s put bility and his worries for the future. He’s his beer in coolers and hung signs, only to Grant. “When you have to prove that the not talking about Leika, but rather the fu- return to the store and find the beer moved people you’re doing business with are not ture of Wildwood Brewing and, more and the signs taken away, allegedly by a dis- meeting your needs and that still might not specifically, the smaller brewery’s plans tributor. Another time, he says, a distributor be enough, it’s a scary proposition. Yet it’s told mutual clients that Lueders didn’t have exactly how the law’s written in Montana.” for wider distribution. The concerns and risks also apply to Wildwood is barely 18 months old and a license to distribute his own products. occupies a restored Wisconsin barn set The last straw was when a client told him a the distributors, says Zip Beverage Genalongside Highway 93. Inside, the modest taproom is overwhelmed by the giant production tuns. A handful of tables dot the walls. The surrounding grounds are currently full of weeds and dry grass, but Lueders envisions turning the property into a small farm complete with rows of vegetables, a few animals and hops for brewing. With an eye toward sustainability, he plans on feeding his spent grains to bacterial ponds behind the brewery from which he’ll capture methane to fire boilers heating his wort. To make this grand vision happen, Lueders says he has to sell more beer than what currently flows from photo by Cathrine L. Walters his taproom and what he can handdeliver to local bars and grocery Wildwood Brewing owner and brewmaster Jim Lueders wants to sign a contract stores. To expand, he needs to sign with a local distributor but, like other craft breweries, is worried about how it could change his business. “This is my passion and I’ll be damned if I’m going to sign a with a local distribution company. “It’s a big choice for me,” he contract and put my fate in their hands after all the hard work I’ve done,” he says. says. “I’ve invested a lot of time and a lot of money. This is my passion and I’ll deliveryman boosted the gas on Wildwood eral Manager Harry Watkins. If a particular be damned if I’m going to sign a contract kegs, causing them to pour all foam. Lued- brand doesn’t sell, Watkins says it occuand put my faith in their hands after all ers says he confronted the distributor only pies warehouse and retail shelf space that could go to a brand that would. to be told it was an anomaly. the hard work I’ve done.” Missoula’s two largest distribution “They’re courting me to my face but For an up-and-coming brewery like Wildwood, choosing a distribution strat- they’re sabotaging me behind my back,” companies are Zip and Summit Beverage. egy can be a stressful process. If he de- Lueders says. “I’m close to picking a dis- Zip, which contracts with Anheuser-Busch, also distributes local craft brews from Big cides to switch from his current DIY setup tributor but it’s a very difficult choice.” Lueders isn’t alone in wrestling with Sky Brewing. Summit, which contracts with and sign with a local distributor, he can potentially move higher volumes of beer the distribution question. After a few years MillerCoors, boasts “over 149 beer brands,” into previously unreachable markets, but of methodical growth, Draught Works including locals Bayern and Kettlehouse. “[Small brewers have] a legitimate conlose his direct contact with customers and owners Paul Marshall and Jeff Grant are ability to monitor quality control. His now planning the next phase of expanding cern, but we’re cautious too because we workload would increase to bring up pro- their Northside business: increasing pro- don’t want to fail somebody,” Watkins says. duction, but profits aren’t guaranteed to duction and beginning to distribute kegs. “To be successful it’s gotta be a partnership. “We’ve been spending money like Alone they maybe do well in a small market, follow. More than anything, Lueders wants to avoid becoming just another crazy lately, but this is a decision I lose but we can give them big-market access.” That access is what ultimately leaves beer to a distributor working with hun- sleep over,” says Marshall. “When you sign one of these contracts you’re married to Lueders leaning toward a decision to sign dreds of different brands. “After a month of honeymooning the distributor but getting out of it is a distribution contract. After all, he says, “exposure is the name of the game.” they’re done with you and you’re left harder than a divorce.” “I’m down here in Stevensville—how If a brewer is unsatisfied with their floundering on the shelf,” says Lueders. “Then they move on to the next big thing.” distribution contract, they can only escape else can I reach thousands of people? If Lueders’ alternative of sticking with his it if they prove “just cause.” Marshall and you don’t play under their tent you can’t hand deliveries isn’t much better. Under Grant say it’s a notoriously long and get in.” current state law, small breweries can self drawn-out process that often leaves a distribute, but a few big stores won’t carry court deciding between the brewer’s depesanti@missoulanews.com

Join us on Friday, August 23rd at the 11th Annual Bone Ball at Caras Park Pavilion. All proceeds help the Humane Society maintain a 98% adpotion rate. Tickets: www.myhswm.org

Saving Every Animal. Every Time.

missoulanews.com • August 1–August 8, 2013 [9]

[opinion]

Blame game It’s all the Rainbow Gathering’s fault—even the Griz mess by Dan Brooks

MARCUSFEST

Due to an unfor tunate turn of events beyond our control, the MarcusFest 2013 Cancer Benefit Fundraiser scheduled for Saturday, August 3, 2013 at Fort Missoula has been CANCELLED. The Hart Family and the Mark Alan Hart Foundation are extremely disappointed by this unfortunate turn of events, and we truly apologize for any inconvenience. We want to thank all the volunteers and sponsors for donating so much time and effort to this event; we can’t thank you enough for your support.

2013 CANCELLATION

For more information, please call 406 317-1118.

This morning I slipped on the bath mat and grabbed the shower curtain for support, only to yank it down on top of me and fall backwards onto my shampoo, which exploded. “Damn you, Rainbow Gathering!” I shouted up into the ventilation fan. It was filled with dead bugs, probably left there by some hippies. I blame the Rainbow Gathering for everything. Who has been accosting me outside the grocery store for the last month? Refugees from the Rainbow Gathering. Who left a dozen stray dogs in Dillon? According to the Beaverhead County Humane Society, probably the Rainbow Gathering. Who built that paper nest under my porch light? The buzzing, stinging Rainbow Gathering. Those people are a menace. Between making a mess of Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest and playing the ukelele outside Feruqi’s, it seems there is no depravity to which they will not stoop. I thought my resentment of the Rainbow Gathering could not get any deeper, but then they turned the NCAA against the Griz. Last week, that puppet of the hippieeducational complex announced the conclusion of its 18-month investigation into the University of Montana football program. Among other infractions, the NCAA found that boosters had improperly provided players with benefits including bail money and free legal representation. The Rainbow Gathering is more organized than we thought. Strange as it seems, the same people who asked me for toilet paper at the post office were able to field $3,000 in legal representation for Trumaine Johnson and Gerald Kemp. It sounds farfetched, but as Sherlock Holmes pointed out, when you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how improbable, must be the truth. It must have been the Rainbow Gathering who arranged meals, laundry and lawyers for Grizzly football players, because the only other explanation is that the boosters did it themselves. And that makes no

sense, because the very purpose of the boosters is to help the Griz. Only a fool—probably one who lives in a bus with another, nicer bus painted on the side of it—would blame Missoula residents for what happened last week. Where is the motive? Everyone knows that this town loves the Griz. From downtown businesses to window muralists to maybe the county attorney’s office, support for UM football is as unanimous as it is wellintended. The good people of Missoula

“A hot meal is one thing, and a free lawyer is another. That’s where the story crosses over from normal small-town love of football into something more troubling.” would never do anything to hurt the Griz, with the possible exception of Tasing one or two of them outside a party. But even that falls under the rubric of tough love. So how to explain last week’s disaster? Certainly, some of the blame falls on NCAA regulations themselves. No one wants to go back to the college football of 50 years ago, when boosters across the country routinely provided players with free cars, housing and jobs they didn’t have to show up for. Yet a sensible system of rules should distinguish between that kind of obvious corruption and the mere friendliness of people like “Griz Mom,”

who according to the investigation provided regular home-cooked meals to players for the last decade. Is that against NCAA regulations? Definitely, and former coach Robin Pflugrad and former UM Athletic Director Jim O’Day should have put a stop to it. Still, there seems to be an intuitive difference between that kind of down-home community support and giving players bail money and legal representation. A hot meal is one thing, and a free lawyer is another. That’s where the story crosses over from normal small-town love of football into something more troubling— something an uncharitable observer might call a permissive culture. And what is the most permissive culture of all? I’ll give you a hint: Even if they offered free laundry services, no one would be interested. I’m talking about the Rainbow Gathering. It must have been those filthy hippies who sabotaged Grizzly football, got our playoff wins vacated and made us vulnerable to UC Davis, probably because of their natural affinity for California. The only other explanation is that the very people who support the Griz most fervently have mired the program in its worst scandal in 40 years. They loved UM football so much that they stopped thinking about what was good for it, costing the program scholarship money, playoff victories and national reputation in their haste to be fans. That’s the bad kind of irony, and I refuse to accept it. Griz fans are not like Lenny from Of Mice and Men, loving their football team so much that they inadvertently break its neck. You know who is like Lenny, though—wandering from town to town, sleeping in fields, angering every community they pass through and constantly talking about a farm that doesn’t exist? I don’t think I need to say the name, and I don’t think you need me to tell you who’s responsible for what happened last week. We all know how this town works. Dan Brooks writes about politics, culture and lying at combatblog.net.

photo by Chad Harder

[10] Missoula Independent • August 1–August 8, 2013

[opinion]

Rallying point James Watt turned out to be great for conservation by Jeff Welsch

Of all the names synonymous with American conservation—Aldo Leopold, John Muir, Wallace Stegner, Edward Abbey and Teddy Roosevelt, among others—one towers far above the rest in the Greater Yellowstone region as the signature force behind a generation of accomplishments. And that is, odd as it seems, James Watt. Yes, baby boomers, that James Watt. Many longtime Westerners will easily recall that he was Interior Secretary from 1981-1983. They remember Watt quintupling leases for coal mining and boasting about opening more than a billion acres of coastal waters for oil and gas development. Watt believed that the only good tree was a dead tree stacked in a sawmill lumberyard. He also sought to de-authorize many national parks. And he said, half-jokingly, “If the troubles from environmentalists cannot be solved in the jury box or at the ballot box, perhaps the cartridge box should be used.” All of which explains why, as a conservationist, I owe a lot to Mr. Watt—my employment with the Greater Yellowstone Coalition, which turns 30 this year, included. Hearken back to 1980. Greater Yellowstone’s conservation community had precious few full-time staffers patrolling the 20-million-acre region, consisting of the national park and adjacent state, federal and private land. The term “ecosystem” had yet to come from the lips of anyone in any official capacity. Enter James Watt. Citing divine inspiration and obligation, the Reagan appointee with the big eyeglasses from Lusk, Wyo., earned instant infamy for promising, “We will mine more, drill more, cut more.” Lusting after even the lands and waters of his home state, Watt revealed plans to drill on 350,000 acres in the rugged Washakie Wilderness adjacent to Yellowstone National Park. Alarm bells rang from sea to still-shining sea. “It was a scary time,” remembers Rick Reese of Bozeman, a Greater Yellowstone

Coalition co-founder. “( Watt) was only secretary for a couple of years, but he came out with both barrels blazing. And he was just getting started.” As radical an idea as it was to open wilderness to industry, even more ominous was the realization that such activities would put Yellowstone itself at grave risk. The park’s health, we were only beginning to fully understand, was inextricably linked to the health of the lands around it.

“There is something to be said for the man whose vision of an industrial juggernaut created an entire generation of conservationists.” That the Greater Yellowstone Coalition was formed in Jackson Hole, Wyo., in the final year of Watt’s brief, controversial reign was no coincidence. At the time, the future of the grizzly bear—a symbol of America’s rapidly vanishing wildness—looked grim and was of immediate concern. But it was quickly evident to our founders that preserving the park required protecting a larger landscape, and the coalition has been America’s “Voice for a Greater Yellowstone” ever since. Today, it has a supporting cast of 40,000 “voices” worldwide and an annual operating budget of $2.7 million. Meanwhile, consider the conservation achievements here since Watt exited

the scene in 1983. Grizzly bears have more than tripled in numbers and today roam places they’ve been absent from for generations. With wolves restored in 1995, Greater Yellowstone became one of the last significant largely intact ecosystems on the planet. “Ecosystem” is now part of our everyday lexicon, and at least 200 conservationoriented nonprofit groups have fingers in the 20-million-acre Greater Yellowstone pie. As the coalition celebrates its 30th anniversary this fall in West Yellowstone, the region arguably is healthier ecologically and economically than at any time since the park’s creation in 1872. These accomplishments bode well for a future where new challenges await: Rising human population, a warming climate and extreme forest fires. A comprehensive study by Bozeman’s Headwaters Economics suggests that prosperity in the West will increasingly hinge on a town’s proximity to public lands with strong protections. Many visionaries merit a robust “thank you” for the incomparable quality of life we cherish today in Greater Yellowstone, and so we honor Leopold, Muir, Stegner, Abbey and Teddy Roosevelt. But there is something to be said for the man whose vision of an industrial juggernaut throughout the West galvanized millions and created an entire generation of conservationists. “If you talk to anybody who was in American conservation at the time, they would tell you Watt did us a huge favor,” Reese says. Indeed, with enemies like that, it was easy to make new friends. Jeff Welsch is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News. He is communications director for the Greater Yellowstone Coalition, a Bozeman-based conservation advocacy group that is celebrating its 30th anniversary this year.

missoulanews.com • August 1–August 8, 2013 [11]

[quirks] Times Run 8/2/13 - 8/8/13

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

The Kings of Summer (R) Nightly at 7 and 9 Sat matinee at 1 and 3

Much Ado about Nothing (PG-13) Nightly at 7 and 9 Sat matinee at 1 and 3

www.thewilma.com

Beer & Wine AVAILABLE

131 S. Higgins Ave. Downtown Missoula 406-728-2521

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN – Police charged four people with theft after they used a stolen credit card to buy tickets at a movie theater in Crofton, Md. Anne Arundel County police identified the three teenagers and a 20-year-old as suspects after they posed for pictures in the theater’s souvenir-photo booth. After police posted the photos, community members provided their names. (Bowie, Md., Patch) Ontario police caught Jorden Morin, 25, driving a stolen vehicle 90 miles to a Toronto-area jail to serve his weekend jail sentence for assault. “It’s clear from the record, you are not getting the message of deterrence,” Judge Kevin Sherwood said after adding time to his sentence for violating probation and possession of stolen property. (Canada’s QMI Agency) SPACED OUT – The House Committee on Science, Space and Technology approved funding for NASA but specifically banned the agency from moving forward with President Obama’s proposed mission to capture an asteroid. It also sharply cut money to research climate change. The asteroid retrieval mission (ARM) would entail using an unmanned spacecraft to use a giant net to haul in an asteroid 20 to 30 feet wide and release it into an orbit around the moon. Astronauts would then examine the asteroid to learn how to develop ways to deflect any larger asteroid headed directly for Earth. Denying that the partyline vote was an automatic anti-Obama response, Rep. Steven M. Palazzo, R-Miss., insisted that NASA’s priority should be human spaceflight: “launching American astronauts on American rockets from America.” (The Washington Post) A bill introduced in Congress would create a U.S. national park on the moon. H.R. 2617—“The Apollo Lunar Legacy Act”—identifies six Apollo landing sites with artifacts that could be pirated away “as spacefaring commercial entities and foreign nations begin to achieve the technical capabilities necessary to land spacecraft on the surface of the moon,” the bill’s co-sponsor, Rep. Donna Edwards, D-Md., explained. Among the designated artifacts are the Eagle lunar lander’s descent and ascent stages, lunar exploration vehicles and three golf balls. (Brevard County’s Florida Today) HAPPY ENDING – After a Chinese court overturned prostitution charges against a Foshan hair salon whose staff provided sexual services, Chinese media and law enforcers began a national debate on whether sexual services that don’t involve actual sexual intercourse count as crimes. The Foshan Intermediate People’s Court ruled that oral sex and other types of sexual services facilitated by body parts excluding genitals fall outside the legal definition of prostitution. On its official microblog, however, the court urged the legislature to clarify the matter, noting that, though legal, such services “significantly damage social order and have a certain degree of social harm.” (Associated Press) DRIVE-IN SERVICE – Austrian firefighters were doing chores at their station in Pregarten when a car pulled up with flames shooting from beneath it. Fireman Roland Brandl said one firefighter grabbed an extinguisher and doused the blaze, which apparently was caused by a cleaning cloth that had been left under the hood. (Associated Press)

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[12] Missoula Independent • August 1–August 8, 2013

DRONE ON – The Air Force has been flying U.S. flags on secret drone flights out of Incirlik Air Base in Turkey, then retrieving them from the 22-hour round-trip missions and presenting them to visitors or delivering them to stateside recipients. Each flag is accompanied by a personalized certificate that includes details of the surveillance operation and the Predator drone that carried the flag. “A lot of people don’t know about it until we present it to someone they know or a friend,” an Air Force captain identified only as “Cedric,” commented on the Incirlik Air Base website. “Then they’re like, ‘Oh, I want one. What do I need to do?’” (The Washington Post) A Philadelphia dry cleaner began using a drone to deliver clothes to customers. “I’m all about technology, and I see a lot of these cleaners, it’s so old school. You come in and you just pick it up,” Harout Vartanian, 24, the owner of Manayunk Cleaners, said, explaining he converted an unmanned four-bladed DJI Phantom quadracopter, designed for taking aerial photography. “We fly it to your house, it makes a noise, you pick it up, and that’s that.” Vartanian said he doesn’t think Federal Aviation Administration guidelines on unmanned aircraft systems apply to him because it’s “just a toy” used to promote his business. (Philadelphia’s WCAU-TV) DATE OF THE WEEK – A grand jury in Butler County, Ohio, indicted Edwin Charles Tobergta, 34, after police reported he “stepped out of his back door, naked, and was having sexual relations with a rubber pool float … in front of several children who saw his genitals and his actions with the float.” It was not Tobergta’s first pool-toy encounter. In 2011, he was accused of having sex with a neighbor’s pool float, and in 2002, a woman told police he had sex with an inflatable pumpkin in her yard. (Cincinnati’s WLWT-TV) JUST WHAT WE NEEDED – A French company has developed an analytical tool to detect sarcasm. Spotter said its analytics software uses a combination of linguistics, semantics and heuristics to create algorithms that can recognize sarcastic comments posted online. It has an accuracy rate of up to 80 percent, according to Spotter’s U.K. director Richard May, who conceded, “Nothing is fool-proof; we are talking about automated systems. But five years ago, you couldn’t get this level of accuracy. We were at the 50 percent mark.” Noting that one of Spotter’s clients is Air France, May explained that one of the most common subjects for sarcasm is bad service. (BBC News) PRY THEM FROM MY COLD DEAD HANDS – Former German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt, 94, is hoarding 38,000 menthol cigarettes because he fears the European Union might ban them. Schmidt, who is allowed to smoke wherever and whenever he pleases, has stockpiled 200 cartons of Reyno, his preferred brand, enabling him to smoke a pack a day until he turns 100, according to Chancellor candidate Peer Steinbrück of Schmidt’s Social Democrats party, who revealed news of Schmidt’s stash while admitting he has his own stash of special French light bulbs that he fears the EU will ban. (Germany’s The Local) WHERE’S A GOOD SECOND AMENDMENT WHEN YOU NEED ONE? – After evacuating flooded High River, Alberta, Royal Canadian Mounted Police seized “a large quantity of firearms” from vacated homes and set up a blockade at a checkpoint to keep out residents. “This,” resident Charles Timpano declared, pointing to the blockade, “is the reason the U.S. has the right to bear arms.” (Canada’s National Post)

Tickets are going fast! For tickets, visit the MSO Hub Box Office, call 543-3300 or log onto

MissoulaOsprey.com

August 1 vs Helena Brewers

August 2 vs Helena Brewers

$50K THURSDAY:

MIGUEL MONTERO BOBBLEHEAD NIGHT:

Osprey fans will have a chance to go home $50,000 richer! If an Osprey player hits for the cycle during the game and you guess the correct player, you’ll have a chance to win $50K Gates open at 6:30; Game time 7:05.

First 750 people through the gate. Former Osprey catcher and current Arizona Diamondbacks catcher and 2011 Major League All-Star, Miguel, better known as Miggy, was a fan favorite during his two seasons in Missoula. Gates open at 6:30; Game time 7:05. Sponsored by Full Circle Counseling, Nightingale Nursing and ABC-FOX News.

August 3 vs Billings Mustangs

August 4 vs Billings Mustangs

August 5 vs Billings Mustangs

August 6 vs Billings Mustangs

BEAT BILLINGS T-SHIRT NIGHT:

FLOAT TO THE BALLPARK:

FAMILY NIGHT:

FREE DRAWSTRING BACKPACKS:

First 750 people through the gates will get a complimentary BEAT BILLINGS, Osprey logoed T-shirt. Come out and root on the Osprey as they take on their RIVAL, the Billings Mustangs!

Gates open at 6:30; Game time 7:05. T-shirts courtesy of the Comfort Inn-University.

Contact the Osprey in advance to participate in a guided float to the game, complete with a pre-game BBQ and Osprey caps and programs. Also, Kids’ Day with kids’ promotions, music & activities. Following the game, all fans can run around the bases and play catch on the field.

Four general admission tickets, hot dogs, chips, sodas, & one super scorecard for $30 with the donation of nonperishable food items. All food collected benefits the Poverello Center.

Gates open at 4:30; Game time 5:05.

Gates open at 6:30; Game time 7:05.

Kids’ Day sponsored by Jiffy Lube & Zoo 107.5.

Sponsored by Dr. Torrie Mauerman at Maximized Living

First 750 fans. Brought to you by Tobacco-Free Missoula, Remember to Play Tobacco Free. Also, Bike to the Ballpark brought to you by Missoula in Motion and Trail103.3: 2-for-1 Tickets for anyone who bikes to the game. Gates open at 6:30; Game time 7:05.

5missoulanews.com • August 1–August 8, 2013 [13]

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

O

n a recent Wednesday evening, most of the activity at the Rhino in downtown Missoula is concentrated around a cluster of cocktail glasses and liquor bottles at the end of the bar. Each label brandishes some quirky name, like Orphan Girl, Glacier Dew and Whyte Laydie. No two are the same. There’s gin, vodka, rum and a whiskey that one distillery rep describes as “Montana-style tequila.” But every bottle shares at least one bragging right: The word “Montana” enjoys a prominent spot on the label. Rhino owner Kevin Head lingers near the bar, soaking in his latest Cocktail Corral tasting event. He’s managed to gather people and product from four microdistilleries, each within a few hours of town. Glacier Distilling has come the farthest—160 miles from its still

up in Coram. Montgomery Distillery is so close you can practically see it out the window, just across Front Street. “These distilleries have really sparked a resurgence for Montana’s cocktail culture,” Head says. “We’re seeing new and unique recipes coming out of the tasting rooms, and some really old ones that no one’s served in a long, long time.” The chatter at the event sways from new developments at the distilleries to the all-Montana sourcing of ingredients. Each bottle seems to be a celebration of the rich agricultural commodities of the Treasure State, from mint and basil to barley and Flathead Valley wheat. A few newer bottles dot the counter. Glacier Distilling just announced the release of Mule Kick, a jalapeño, garlic and black pepper infused whiskey that happens to be one of

[14] Missoula Independent • August 1–August 8, 2013

tonight’s main attractions. Headframe’s tasting room manager, Heidi Rosenleaf, singles out a bottle of Destroying Angel on the bar—the Montana-style tequila referenced earlier. “We name each of our products after an old mine in Butte, and at one point, there were 420 or 430 mines there,” Rosenleaf says. “We’ve got a lot of products to name.” The microdistillery industry has grown fast in Montana in recent years. The first—Bozeman’s RoughStock Distillery—opened for business in 2009. According to the Montana Department of Revenue, there are now nine microdistilleries operating statewide, with three more in the works. State tax revenue generated by retail sales of spirits in Montana tasting rooms totaled a mere $2,179

in 2011. That figure jumped to $22,000 in 2012 and $44,000 so far in 2013. The trend has mimicked the surge of microdistilling activity nationwide over the past decade. There were fewer than 70 licensed craft distilleries in the United States when the American Distilling Institute was founded in 2003. The organization now has 400 members, and projects that there will be between 600 and 800 microdistilleries in the United States and Canada by 2016. “This is a viable industry in the state,” says former state Rep. Brady Wiseman, D-Bozeman, who sponsored a bill in 2005 enabling microdistilleries to operate in Montana. “It’s a viable business model that you can come up with this $300,000, $400,000, $500,000 or more investment and produce a product and actually be able to compete.”

Back in 2005, the microdistillery movement was only just beginning in the United States. Montana hoped to capitalize on the trend, but Prohibition had left much to change before the industry could take root in the state. “A hundred years ago, the country was awash in saloons and public drunkenness, and the reason it was happening was that the national producers of both beer and spirits were basically running franchise bar operations,” Wiseman says. “You didn’t have to have any money to start a bar. You just needed to rent a joint and the beer company would come in, completely furnish it and provide you with beer. All you had to do was pay the bill. Same with liquor.” With the repeal of Prohibition in 1933, Montana handed the responsibility of pricing and distributing liquor over to the state Liquor Control Board. Eventually that duty passed to the Department of Revenue, which continues to control the sale of distilled spirits at the wholesale level. Every bottle of liquor sold in Montana passes through a state warehouse, where it’s inventoried, taxed and marked up for retail. The taxes leveled at that warehouse were one of the key hurdles to microdistilling in the state, a cost-restrictive system that Helena attorney Mike Uda—who had dreams of opening Vigilante Distilling—vowed to change in 2005. Wiseman sponsored a bill on Uda’s behalf in the 2005 Montana Legislature. House Bill 517, better known as the Microdistillery Act, sought to establish a Montana distillery license and knock the high tax rates down for liquor produced in-state. Wiseman had come to Helena largely to improve Montana’s economy, and says he’d seen a friend succeed wildly in the craft brewing business in Bozeman. He simply saw microdistilling as “the next logical step.” “From an economic standpoint, it just makes perfect sense that we make it for ourselves,” Wiseman says. “We grow the barley. Why would we ship in beer from St. Louis or Milwaukee or Seattle when we can make it for ourselves, and have a really virtuous economic cycle where those entrepreneurs are building

equity and ownership and employment? So when the microdistillery bill got put in front of me, I thought, ‘Hell yeah. It’s the same thing.’” The bill passed neatly in the House, 70 - 27, and went on to the Senate, where it was picked up by then-Senate President Jon Tester. HB 517 was revised and amended and passed 37 - 13. Then, in Wiseman’s words, “all hell broke loose” on the House floor. Former supporters turned on the legislation, Wiseman explains, after “a faction” of the tavern owners “went ape-shit.” Several provisions in the bill were altered. The number of bottles and drinks microdistilleries were allowed to sell on-site were reduced. But the bill passed, and newly elected Gov. Brian Schweitzer signed it into law May 6, 2005. “Then, nothing happened for quite some time,” Wiseman says. Four years passed with no microdistilling activity in the state. Only after Wiseman revisited a second liquor tax during the 2009 session did the floodgates finally open. That same spring, in the halls of the state Capitol, he got word that Montana’s first microdistillery had finally opened: RoughStock Distillery in Bozeman.

Ask Bryan Schultz which of the whiskeys he distills is his favorite and he’ll tell you it’s “like asking which kid you love most.” So he defaults to RoughStock’s most popular bottle—the Pure Malt, which, to extend Schultz’s metaphor, happens to be his first child. Schultz had first thought to open a microdistillery in 2005, following the passage of Wiseman’s original bill. But with the state’s liquor excise tax still set at 16 percent even for small producers, the distribution end of the business was financially unfavorable. Once Wiseman’s 2009 tax revision had leveled the playing field for microdistilleries, Schultz moved on to the next hurdle: brand recognition. “Starting a new distillery from scratch, being a small guy and growing into our distribution shoes, so to speak, as far as what we could make, took a lot of education,” Schultz says. “It took a lot of just going out and talking to liquor store owners, bar and restau-

rant owners, [and] trying to get everybody to notice and realize there was something here, that we weren’t just some rebranded bulk alcohol made somewhere else that had some fancy marketing behind it.” Schultz had traveled widely in Europe and seen firsthand the operations in Scotland and Ireland that perfected the art of distilling whiskey. RoughStock never really had much of a plan to manufacture anything else, Schultz says. The grain-growing regions of Montana reminded him too much of northern Europe for him to be interested in much beyond whiskey. “The abundance of grain and natural water— good water—we have in the western part of the state was kind of the formula for what we wanted to do,” Schultz says. “We kind of modeled ourselves after a lot of the scotch distilleries and some of the other smaller whiskey distilleries that you never hear of that dot the western European landscape.” Schultz and his wife, Kari, both came from agricultural backgrounds in the state. Through bottles of booze, the two thought to give Montana “a spot on the map.” Their tasting room, situated on the corridor between Bozeman and Big Sky, draws mostly tourists curious about what Montana can produce. That exposure helped the couple “put something in a bottle that’s representative of Montana agriculture.” Tourism, in fact, has become the main driver for many of the state’s distilleries. As Brady Wiseman puts it, Montana’s population is a deceptive figure. The state may only have one million residents, but it averages nearly 10 million visitors a year. Each bottle of Montana spirits acts as a sort of ambassador, a sentiment shared widely among state distillers. But these ambassadors didn’t arrive overnight. Microdistilling requires a hefty investment up front. Schultz estimates the initial overhead of legal fees, still equipment, raw materials and other necessities came to well over $500,000. Distillers have to secure licensing and equipment before they can even begin producing a product. Whiskey in particular requires aging, sometimes for years, so Schultz found himself looking far ahead from the very beginning, before the customer base was even there. “We knew we weren’t going to make any money for a very long time,” Schultz says. “Talk to me here

at the 10- to 15-year mark and I might have a better report for you as far as money making. “We didn’t get into this to make a million dollars overnight,” he continues. “It’s a slow-growth process. We can’t make whiskey any faster than we do, and we certainly can’t age it any faster.” For the first two years, Schultz and his wife did everything at RoughStock themselves. They’ve since moved to a larger facility, hired nine employees and opened a tasting room in May 2011. This year, the distillery is planning to move again. Schultz says that at this point, “we’re making enough to keep the lights on and increase production without amassing a huge debt.”

Brian Anderson, co-owner of Whistling Andy Distillery in Bigfork, knows all too well the pains of sitting on an aging product. Whistling Andy opened New Year’s Eve 2010, and Anderson wasted no time perfecting his recipes for vodka, gin and, particularly, his hibiscus coconut rum. He filled several barrels with bourbon close to two years ago, which he hopes will be ready later this year. Whistling Andy has already released an unaged whiskey—or moonshine— as well as a whiskey aged for just over a year. The first release of the latter, about 375 bottles, sold out in a day and a half during St. Patty’s 2012. The third barrel sold out just as quickly last holiday season. Standing in the distillery’s backroom, Anderson talks about the ups and downs of the business over the last few years. The rum’s been a big seller, he says, and even won a platinum award at the Spirits International Prestige competition in fall 2011. Whistling Andy now distributes in nine states, three Canadian provinces and Australia. “We just wrapped up negotiations for another distribution deal a couple days ago,” Anderson says. “We’re going to be in Taiwan now, too.” Anderson has always had a passion for liquor. He’s a self-proclaimed science geek and former geo-hydrologist who grew up in the Flathead. The mash tank in his distillery is a repurposed 600-gallon ice cream maker, once a “God-awful battleship blue color,” that used to make Eskimo Pies. Beakers and test tubes litter the place,

photos by Cathrine L. Walters

missoulanews.com • August 1–August 8, 2013 [15]

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

along with huge oak casks from Kentucky. Anderson can’t imagine being surrounded by anything else. “I make liquor,” he says. “I could be servicing port-a-potties. I could be sitting in a cubicle in Kansas.” The scene down at Montgomery Distillery in downtown Missoula isn’t much different. Co-owner Ryan Montgomery has his desk and worktable situated in the shadow of a two-story-tall copper still column. After nearly a year of business his Front Street space already looks well-worn. On his desk are one bottle each of his Quicksilver Vodka and Whyte Laydie Gin. The bottles and labels, he says, come from a company in London that dramatically discounted the cost for both on account of Montgomery’s small size. Visit the Missoula tasting room any given day of the week and bar space will be at a premium. The cocktail menu changes with each season, sometimes faster if a bartender invents a tasty new concoction. “In general, things are going great,” Montgomery says, his eyes shifting occasionally to a set of temperatures gauges on the wall. “Basically what our strategy is is to, production-wise, meet the demand for vodka and gin and spend all of our spare production time and spare money making whiskey. It’s a difficult proposition because all the money goes in up front, and you don’t see any revenue from that for years in the future, however long you want to age the whiskey.” Montgomery has kept the business predominantly local during his first year. The distillery’s products are in roughly 40 Montana state liquor stores and scores of bars across the state, but only within the past few months has he been working toward out-of-state distribution. “You’ve gotta prove yourself in the home market first, build a following and a loyalty there,” he says. The modest start is just one of the many threads casual observers tend to tie between the microdistilling world and the craft brewing industry. Montgomery acknowledges those similarities—the emphasis on locally sourced ingredi-

ents, the biennial struggle in Helena to make Montana law more flexible—but feels there are some key differences as well. When the craft beer movement started roughly two decades ago, the major competitors were primarily domestics like Budweiser and Coors that put out a generic product. When craft brewers hit the market with an array of stouts and IPAs and porters, it meant instant and almost guaranteed success with consumers, Montgomery says. Microdistilleries, on the other hand, are up against an array of established companies, from Grey Goose to Jameson, many of which put out excellent products. That’s largely why Montgomery is taking it slow, and why distillers like Anderson celebrate when they receive international accolades. Both owners anticipate an industry-wide shake-out in the future, when the newness of microdistilling wears off and small businesses will need to rely on something beyond novelty to compete with major labels. “Flavor ultimately wins out,” Mongomery says. “You can throw a lot of money into packaging and marketing, but if it doesn’t taste good you’re not going to last.”

Schultz can see that industry shake-out on the horizon, and to him it appears much closer than one might expect. After four years, he’s continuing to tweak his whiskey recipes, always with an eye for consistency and flavor. The results of any given experiment could take many years to unfold, so “we don’t experiment too wildly,” he says. Restraint is part of staying competitive in a market dominated by Kentucky distilleries that have been dialing in recipes for 80 years, or by Scottish and Irish distilleries that perfected the system a century or more ago. Even as Montana’s first distillery, RoughStock has just four years of experience. And already Schultz is noting shelf space for other products dwindling. “Every large major brand right now makes 30 different flavored vodkas, so [retailers] are starting to cut down on some of that stuff,” Schultz says. “You’re starting to see a lot of these unaged moonshinetype products come in, which is a very cool novelty. We make one, too, an unaged corn whiskey. But there’s a lot of distributors and retailers that will not take any more or hold any inventory whatsoever

of the unaged whiskeys … They’re done with it. They’ve moved on, moved past it.” If and when the nation’s microdistilling industry reaches that consumer saturation point, many of Montana’s businesses will theoretically be ready. Distillers are constantly working on new products and expanding certain aspects of their respective operations. For example, Montgomery Distillery recently began bottling its non-alcoholic mixing syrups and shrubs for sale at the Clark Fork Farmers Market, allowing consumers to recreate those same cocktails at home. Anderson’s staff at Whistling Andy has been busy over the past several weeks preparing to move its distilling operation into a larger space behind the existing tasting room, doubling the distillery’s size and freeing the company to increase its production, bottling and experimentation in new types of spirits. “I think we have everything here to make this an outstanding industry in Montana,” Anderson says. “We’ve got the best raw materials. Our grain is top notch. And fruit? We’ve got tons of apples, cherries, pears ...” At the Rhino, the distillery reps gathered for the Cocktail Corral seem to focus more on the next big thing than the bottles already set out on the bar. Headframe opened just 18 months ago, Heidi Rosenleaf says, and through Chicago-based Binny’s Beverage Depot, they’re already distributing online in over half the country. About six months ago, Rosenleaf adds, Headframe owners John and Courtney McKee decided to start manufacturing small-column stills for other start-up microdistilleries nationwide. Headframe Manufacturing is delivering its first still to a client in late July. Lauren Oscilowski, lead distiller at Glacier Distilling, is also touting new features at her facility. After getting fed up with using small pots, Glacier recently purchased a 55-gallon drum of honey from East Glacier. They’ll use it to sweeten up a new product coming out this fall, Oscilowski says, “just in time for Cabin Fever Days,” an annual event that features live music and bar stool races. She stops there, not wanting to ruin the surprise. asakariassen@missoulanews.com

“ These distilleries have really sparked a resurgence for Montana’s cocktail culture. We’re seeing new and unique recipes coming out of the tasting rooms, and some really old ones that no one’s served in a long, long time.” —Kevin Head, owner of the Rhino [16] Missoula Independent • August 1–August 8, 2013

But how do es it taste? The Indy part akes in a blind test to see ho w loca

l spirits stack

up

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Reading about Montana’s emerging microdistillery industry is nice and all, but deciding to spend hard-earned cash on a still-maturing product is another thing entirely. In the name of independent journalism and in the interest of new discoveries, we selected 15 bottles for a blind taste test that would not only grade Montana spirits, but also see how they stacked up against top-selling national brands.

The setup We invited a dozen people to partake in the blind taste test and split them into two teams: vodka and gin. We focused on vodka and gin because those are the two types of spirits with the most in-state variety. We made it blind to avoid any favoritism. And we split our tasters into two teams because we wanted to protect the integrity of their palates (and perhaps their livers). In addition to tasting either the vodkas or the gins, everyone took part in a wild card round that allowed us to try some of the distilleries’ more creative selections.

The contenders Our selection of booze came directly from what’s available—and proudly displayed with “Made in Montana” signage—at Grizzly Liquor. We selected all five Montana vodkas available for purchase (not including the flavored varieties) and all four Montana gins. We also selected two outliers—Smirnoff vodka and Gordon’s gin—just to see how our judges would react. The wild card selections included distilleries not otherwise represented in the gin or vodka categories, as well as whatever looked the most interesting.

The methodology The term “methodology” assumes some level of professionalism and expertise, both of which this event certainly lacked, but we did put some thought into how it was organized. Two people unaffiliated with the scoring were responsible for numbering clear plastic cups, pouring samples, delivering these samples to the judges and collecting scoring sheets. Before the tasting

commenced, we provided each judge with a detailed list of characteristics they should be attuned to when tasting their respective beverage. Local drink aficionado Ryan Newhouse, who has consulted for a start-up distillery and enjoys foraging for his own cocktail ingredients (and who recently released his first book, Montana Beer: A Guide to Breweries in Big Sky Country), helped deliver some pre-tasting instructions, spur conversation among the judges and provide a general air of legitimacy to the event. Our judges were asked to score each drink on its look, aroma, mouthfeel, finish and overall impression. The vodka had been placed in a freezer for four hours before being poured. The gin was served at room temperature. None of the drinks included mixers, although water was available to everyone and the gin team had the option of adding tonic after an initial tasting. The effervescence of the tonic (or the mix of water) can help release the flavors of the botanicals used in a gin. The highest possible score a spirit could receive was 50. After tallying the results, we awarded one vodka winner and one gin winner. The wild card entries were not judged against each other, but we did award special jury prizes to the two that scored the highest. In addition to scoring the five categories, we asked judges to scribble down comments about each drink. Without further ado, here’s how we graded the entries:

Vodka High Ore, Headframe Spirits, Butte $26.45, 80 proof Distillery description: “Made from the freshest waters of the Montana snowmelt, and crafted with care and attention to detail, High Ore Vodka is just

as refined, just as satisfying.” Our score: 32 Refined wasn’t the first word that came to mind for our judges. One described the finish as “gritty and harsh.” Another called it “a campfire vodka,” explaining it was “not smooth enough for a fancy cocktail, but refreshing enough for backpackers in the mountains.” Best comment: “Great for a martini in the same way binoculars are great for meeting people.” Cliffhanger, Spirit of Montana, Billings $21.65, 90 proof Distillery description: “Hand-crafted using the highest quality ingredients, including spring water from the ice fields of Froze to Death Plateau high above Red Lodge.” Our score: 34 The judges came in all over the map on this one. One judge thought it tasted “like plastic,” while another noted a smooth finish with no burn and said she would serve it at a wedding. Best comment: “Nothing stands out in a good way. This is a versatile vodka.” Smirnoff No. 21, Diageo, Russia $16, 80 proof Distillery description: “The world’s No. 1 vodka. Its classic taste has inspired other varieties throughout all four corners of the world.” Our score: 27 The world’s top-selling vodka came in dead-last in our blind taste test, which is a good sign for Montana distilleries looking to knock Smirnoff—and its dozens of flavors—off precious shelf space. One judge said he’d only drink it at a “European nite club while wearing tight white pants.” Another called the taste “hot and antiseptic, like meeting someone in the ER.” Best comment: “This tastes like college.”

missoulanews.com • August 1–August 8, 2013 [17]

FIRST PLACE FLASK WINNER Great North Vodka, Trailhead Spirits, Billings $26.20, 86 proof Distillery description: “A small-batch vodka handcrafted in Billings, made with wheat grown on the family farm near Great Falls.” Our score: 37 The vodka category winner is about as understated as its description, but impressed all of our judges with a smooth, flavorful finish. Every judge remarked that they would try this vodka again, with one saying it was the only vodka that didn’t need a mixer. “Just put this on ice,” he noted. Best comment: “A smooth sort of vodka that could sneak up on you.” Flathead Vodka, The Montana Distillery (formerly Flathead Distillers), Eureka $20.80, 84 proof Distillery description: “I’m an 84 proof vodka derived from sugar beets. By myself, I am warming and slightly sweet with a smooth finish.” Our score: 32 That smooth finish didn’t translate to our judges. One felt it tasted like “plant matter” and another likened it to “sucking on swim shorts after a day at Splash Montana.” Yikes. While the taste suffered, Flathead Vodka scored high with a sweet aroma and thick texture. Best comment: “Neutral, but with a still-present aftertaste, like a delicious tongue depressor.” Quicksilver, Montgomery Distillery, Missoula $25.55, 80 proof Distillery description: “Produced from local wheat in our traditional still, which employs a towering 21-plate rectifying column to bring the alcohol vapor to its ideal concentration, while maximum contact with copper helps purify the spirit of off-flavors. We make large ‘heads’ and ‘tails’ cuts, bottling only the purest ‘heart’ of the run. A final chill-filtration finishes the spirit.” Our score: 35 Our judges were allured by Quicksilver’s distinctive aroma, which one described as “like heavily buttered corn.” Another picked up on the same flavor notes in its taste, saying she liked it “because it tastes like margarine.” Overall, it rated the most consistent between all of the judges, although just a few points below Great North. Best comment: “Sweetest in the lineup. A very pleasant, almost creamy taste.”

Gin Silvertip, Vilya Spirits (formerly Ridge Distillery), Kalispell $24.80, 88 proof Distillery description: “An American dry gin produced using handcrafted copper alembic stills from Portugal, and only the finest botanicals available, including many grown in the Northwest Rocky Mountains.” Our score: 31 Our panel of judges envisioned this robust gin working best in a dirty—or “very dirty,” as one specified—martini. “This is a heavy gin that needs a powerful mixer to pull forward some of the subtle flavors,” said another judge, summing up the group’s consensus. Best comment: “It has a strong anise flavor. No, not anus, anise.” Healy’s Gin, Trailhead Spirits, Billings $27, 86 proof Distillery description: “Small-batch gin distilled from Montana wheat and local botanicals.” Our score: 29 Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

[18] Missoula Independent • August 1–August 8, 2013

Healy’s had some trouble standing out among the other gins tested. One judge said it had a “pleasant aroma, but short-lived flavor.” Another thought it tasted more like a mainstream gin, saying it reminded her of something used in collegiate G&Ts. Best comment: “Weak sauce.” Anselmo, Headframe Spirits, Butte $28.50, 80 proof Distillery description: “A unique blend of 12 different botanicals, including citrus and huckleberry, that give it a distinct, fresh flavor.” Our score: 17 A few of the local spirits took a beating in our blind taste test, but none more than Anselmo. The botanicals failed to come through in the aroma, and none of our judges appreciated the harsh finish and unpleasant mouthfeel. “This is like drinking a mistake,” said one unhappy judge. Best comment: “Reminds me of my Dad’s cologne.” Gordon’s London Dry Gin, Diageo, England $14, 80 proof Distillery description: “The distinctively refreshing taste comes from the finest handpicked juniper berries and a selection of other botanicals.” Our score: 26 The world’s best-selling London dry gin failed to impress our judges, who immediately pegged it as a tasteless mainstream offering. “Is this amateur hour?” asked one judge. “I’d mix this with some punch at a high school dance,” said another. If it’s any consolation for local distilleries, their small-batch flavor consistently stood out against outliers like Gordon’s. Best comment: “God knows I’d drink anything, but this tastes gross and cheap.”

FIRST PLACE FLASK WINNER Whyte Laydie, Montgomery Distillery, Missoula $28.70, 80 proof Distillery description: “A dry gin incorporating Rocky Mountain juniper and a variety of native botanicals with European juniper and other imported ingredients traditional to gin: fresh citrus, orris and angelica root, cardamom, grains of paradise, and more.” Our score: 39 When our judges found a gin they liked, they really liked it. This runaway winner initially impressed with a pleasant aroma (“very floral”), and further impressed with a smooth first taste (“crisp on the front of the tongue”) and clean finish (“that taste sticks around but doesn’t feel dry”). Best comment: “You know that Phish song about a bathtub full of gin? I’d bathe in it if this were the gin.”

Wild cards Glacier Dew Light Whiskey, Glacier Distilling, Coram $24.25, 80 proof Distillery description: “A whiskey distilled from rye, barley and corn. It is minimally aged so the natural flavors of the grains shine through. The result is a crystal clear whiskey perfect for sipping or mixing.” Our score: 30 The judges’ first whiskey met mixed results. The aroma was described as “overpowering,” but the taste varied from “hot and woody” to “well balanced with a clean finish.” Many judges said they wanted to try the Glacier Dew with a sweet mixer that would cut through the nose and soften the taste. Best comment: “Smooth, clean and sweet, but not with an overwhelming body. I’d like to date this one.”

SPECIAL JURY PRIZE SNIFTER Hopshnop, Whistling Andy Distillery, Bigfork $37.20, 68 proof Distillery description: “A unique spirit distilled from grain with hops from Blackfoot River Brewing Company’s single malt IPA.” Our score: 35 This format-buster immediately turned heads and many judges asked for a second tasting. Part of the appeal was simply trying to figure out how to classify it. “Tastes extremely familiar, but can’t quite place it,” said one judge who called Hopshnop a “sip-worthy spirit.” The floral aroma also wowed most judges, with one saying she’d almost rather “dab it on her wrists” than drink it. Overall, the mellow finish left our judges intrigued and wanting more. Best comment: “Light some candles, put on some R. Kelly, I wanna make love.” Montana Moonshine, Willie’s Distillery, Ennis $26.20, 90 proof Distillery description: “Made with four Montana grains and gently distilled to bring out the full flavor. It is what whiskey looks and tastes like before it goes into a barrel.” Our score: 26 Our judges immediately pegged this one as moonshine based on its distinct corn flavor and aroma. “I’d only drink this if I were below the Mason-

Dixon line,” said one. “Deliverance,” quipped another. But even those who weren’t huge fans appreciated some of its flavors: “Not for me, but lots of character in every sip.” Best comment: “Down home meets downtown.” SPECIAL JURY PRIZE SNIFTER RoughStock Black Label, RoughStock Distillery, Bozeman $64.10, 125 proof Distillery description: “The single barrel version of Roughstock’s Montana Pure Malt Whiskey. The whiskey is untouched: uncut, unfiltered, and unadulterated in any way and at actual cask strength.” Our score: 35 Whoa, Nellie. This cask-strength whiskey will put some hair on your chest. Our judges were excited to see an actual brown liquor arrive at the tasting, but those feelings were quickly tempered by Black Label’s overpowering taste. “This just kicks you upside the head!” said one judge. “You could light your breath on fire with this, right?” asked another. Despite its aggressiveness, fans of traditional whiskeys appreciated the Black Label’s long legs in the glass (“Cindy Crawford would be jealous”) and picked up the wood notes in the finish. Overall, it turned out to be an all-or-nothing selection for the judges, with enough alls to put it on the podium. Best comment: “Wise beyond its years—and bodes well for how it might taste in a couple more years.” photo by Alex Sakariassen

missoulanews.com • August 1–August 8, 2013 [19]

[arts]

Record rapture Your guide to becoming a vinyl aficionado by Kate Whittle

illustration by Pumpernickel Stewart

I

blame Ear Candy’s bins of used records. Back when I was a senior at the University of Montana, my roommate had a record player, which we used to play classic country compilations and Bob Dylan while drinking in our teensy two-bedroom off Front Street. To flesh out the collection, I bought a bunch of records by the likes of Nazareth and Dolly Parton and Great White for a few dollars. I loved the ritual of pulling out the LP, placing it on the platter and lifting and setting the needle. But then I graduated and moved away to take a job. I still had the records, but nothing to play them on. I endeavored to get a turntable of my very own. My roommate’s set-up didn’t seem so complicated, and it provided hours of enjoyment for what I thought wasn’t much investment. Unfortunately, it’s not necessarily easy to get into vinyl if you’re starting completely from scratch. It’s a hell of a lot easier to find cheap records than it is to find a decent turntable and stereo system these days. My parents had a turntable when I was a kid, but they threw it out during a basement-cleaning frenzy in the late ’90s, never anticipating the hipster vinyl resurgence. Several of my friends have turntables, but none were immediately on hand to help me when I had questions. It’s been a long road, full of confusion and

Craigslist hunting and heartbreak. Here, I offer some tips to aspiring vinyl nerds.

The equipment Let’s talk about what you actually need to play records. Of course, you need a record player, also called a turntable. But you also need a receiver and speakers. Some units will have all of these components stacked together in the same piece of equipment, in which case, lucky you. Otherwise, the record player plugs into the receiver, which sends the signal to the speakers. Receivers need to have an analog input on the back; it will be labeled something like “tape/phono.” If it doesn’t have that input, it won’t work with a record player. Still with me? You might also need a preamplifier, depending on what kind of record player you have. It boosts the turntable’s electrical signal before it goes to the receiver. My record player plugs into the preamp, which plugs into the receiver, which is wired to the speakers.

Where to find it Try looking through pawn shops, thrift stores, Craigslist, Grandma’s attic and garage sales. Make sure that before you buy any component, someone turns it on and shows you that it really works.

[20] Missoula Independent • August 1–August 8, 2013

You can also buy new stuff, which has two drawbacks: It will either be poorly made, or it will be hella expensive. Those old-timey-looking fake-wood players often sell for less than $200, but I’ve had friends say they don’t last more than a couple years. On the flip side, you can easily drop a few grand on high-quality DJing equipment. I decided it was worth it to find the middle road and cobble together second-hand, decent-quality gear. I bought my turntable and preamp for about $250 from a dude on Craigslist. He plugged it in and showed me how it worked before I forked over the dough. It turns out I made a good choice; it’s a hefty Technics with a fully automated arm and precise speed controls.

Care and maintenance Vinyl Maintenance 101: Records can melt. Hot sun + plastic = ruined records. Keep them in a cool, dark place, and only handle them by the edges or center hole. Wipe off dust with a lint-free cloth. Record players sometimes need dust or dirt gently wiped off the needle. If you feel your receiver getting too hot, like my ancient tube-amp does, shut it off and let it cool down. And then, what if all the nice equipment you bought craps out? Turntable repair experts are few and far between these days, though you might try a Google search or Sears. I’d suggest Dudley Chichoine at Tech1 (check out tech1electronics.com). He works out of his home,

and as soon as you walk into his living room and take a look at the floor-to-ceiling sound system set-up, you’ll see he really knows his stuff. He also sells all kinds of stereo equipment, often at very reasonable prices.

Rocking out Now for the fun part: Buying records. Finding great albums in Missoula is as easy as hopping over to Ear Candy or Record Heaven, both on Higgins. And the family attics: I love my mom’s old Meatloaf and Slade LPs. I also love perusing record stores when I’m visiting big cities; I’ll always treasure my Mean Jeans full-lengths I bought from Green Noise Records in Portland and the Warcry 7-inch I found in downtown Seattle, not just because I love the music, but because the record itself brings back a memory of a place and time. Another place to score vinyl and geek out with others is the annual Total Fest Big Dipper Record Swap, scheduled for Aug. 17 this year. Records are an investment of time and money, for sure. But in an era when a musician can spend months crafting an album, and listeners can spend two minutes downloading it for free on the internet, listening to records is a way to remember that music is still more than a disposable commodity. kwhittle@missoulanews.com

[music]

Getting it right No Mulligans fits into Missoula’s rap scene No Mulligans, the first tape by Missoula hip-hop trio The Orators, is pleasingly rough. Part of that is likely due to bona fide amateurishness. Many of the rhymes struggle to fit in the bars that contain them, and the beats often have the airless quality of exports from Fruity Loops. Yet the group’s sound is also glum and evocative in a way that makes the most of the bare production, creating a desolate atmosphere that contrasts starkly with the contemporary fashion for Big Rap. The Orators sound real, both honest and earnest. It makes their project immediately sympathetic.

Almost all of the vocal tracks are doubled, with the second lagging a little behind, as if The Orators were absently rapping along with their own album. The effect fits well with the mildly ironic tone of No Mulligans, which handles the problem of being white rappers from Montana with only a modicum of comic detachment. Not a stunt and not misplaced self-aggrandizement either, the album is a modest and enjoyable contribution to local music. Missoula can have a rap scene, and it doesn’t have to be a joke. It only needs more artists like The Orators to do more projects like this one. (Dan Brooks)

Wild Moth Remember the first bands you saw during your reckless formative years? Some local dudes and/or lady dudes shredding for the hell of it, happy just to be on a stage in the back of a billiard hall or in shattered-glass parking lots? I bet kids in San Francisco will look back on Wild Moth with the same fondness I have for those late-night shows. But, while Wild Moth sounds like adolescence, the Bay Area trio is showing signs of changing styles. Between the band’s eponymous debut EP from last year and its first single from the forthcoming full-length, Over, Again (due

out Sept. 17), the difference is clear. The EP’s first few tracks are a spacey and mellow variety of melodic punk, while the new song, “Souvenir (No Future),” is grinding and relentless with a hint of thrash. The vocals on the latter are heavy, if not atonal at times, which works well with the satisfying clashing of instrumentals. Though the band’s direction seems to have changed, its penchant for evoking devil-may-care nights has not. (Brooks Johnson) Wild Moth plays the ZACC, 235 N. First St., Sun., Aug. 4, at 7:30 PM with Avair, Ditch Tiger, Boys, The All-Hail, Buddy Jackson and Posture. $5.

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Underhill Rose, Something Real Folk and bluegrass are best when politically and emotionally charged and lyrically poignant, or so much fun all you want to do is get in your car and drive with the windows down, screaming every song at the top of your lungs. Something Real, the second album from Asheville, N.C.’s Underhill Rose, almost hits both marks, but not quite. “They Got My Back” has a nice hometown sentiment, but the cutesy attempt at slang is a bit misplaced. “Unused to You” is reminiscent of The Civil Wars’ “Poison and Wine” but lacks the gut-punch poetry. The predictability keeps it from ever attaining depth. Eleanor Underhill has a killer voice. It’s rich and potentially far-reaching, and the combination with Molly

Rose’s sweet lilt and the twangy vocals of University of Montana graduate Salley Williamson sounds as solid as you’d expect from a band that’s been playing together since 2009. The musicianship is convincing, whether they’re attempting old country in “Little House,” blues in “I Wanna Love You” or folk in “Bare Little Rooms.” The last song on the album, the plucky “End of 27,” is full of clever lyrics rolled together with a delicious little trumpet. Ultimately, each song is almost fulfilling. “Drive Me to Drinking,” the grittiest song on the album, is the closest the band actually gets to feeling like something real. (Gaaby Patterson) Underhill Rose plays Monk’s Bar Fri., Aug. 2, at 9 PM. Free.

Ditch Tiger “III,” the pre-released track from Ditch Tiger’s forthcoming album Old Growth, begins with a quiet arpeggio of math rock guitar. It is a reminder that the song is constructed and not simply a burst of noise, as post-hardcore often seems to be. “III” is a lumbering, head-nodding beast. It crashes without losing its forward momentum, thereby avoiding what is often the defining problem of the genre. Post-hardcore too often means post-structure, postideas and post-enjoyment. Ditch Tiger manages to walk the line between noisy and noise, however, and the band’s songs preserve the robust frustration of hardcore without taking it out on the listener. Some of the tracks on the ear-

lier demo succumb to the temptation to simply ride the cymbals and jerk the guitar, but for the most part Ditch Tiger’s arrangements display the phrasal coordination that distinguishes the enthusiastic from the merely messy. It sounds like it’s trying something, in other words, within a genre that can ask for too little in the way of craft or vision. Ditch Tiger stands apart from the legion of post-hardcore bands that charge without knowing where they’re going. This band is just as loud, but thankfully it is a little more smart. (Dan Brooks) Ditch Tiger plays the ZACC Sun., Aug. 4, at 7:30 PM, with Avair, Wild Moth, Boys, The All-Hail, Buddy Jackson and Posture. $5.

missoulanews.com • August 1–August 8, 2013 [21]

[arts]

Paint and repeat Jared Shear’s 365 ways to view Cougar Peak by Eben Wragge-Keller

ductive. “Hey, I’ll just paint Cougar Peak every day for the year,” he said to himself. But within a matter of weeks he realized the gravity of his commitment. In the winter, the days are short, the light is thin and the conditions can be brutal. As Shear began the process of painting the peak once a day, he recalls thinking, “My god, what have I gotten myself into?” But as the seasons changed, the peak and its surrounding land remained interesting, and kept Shear focused on his goal. Though he always painted from the same vantage point, the time of day, the weather conditions—everything—varied within the scene. “The way it’s angled you get these really nice shadows laying across it in the evening, and the sun lays in the canyon in the mornings,” he says. “So there’s always a weather pattern or storm system moving up and it sort of slams into the mountain. There’s always sort of wonderful, beautiful chaos going on around it.” In an effort to stay even more engaged, Shear allowed every other factor of the paintings to become a variable. He switched between acrylic, watercolor and pastel. He used Photoshop. The surface he used changed, as well, from canvas to scraps of wood. Once, he even used a Klondike Bar wrapper. The other variable was Shear himself. Shear says he worked through a wide photo by Cathrine L. Walters range of emotions and daily life experiJared Shear painted 365 versions of this view of Cougar ences, all of which come through in the Peak over the course of a year. paintings. He recalls forcing himself to go his art studio, and has been a constant fixture in his and paint the mountain after attending his grandfalife. The paintings illustrate the mountain as it changes ther’s funeral. “That painting really stands out to me in the series through the seasons—from white snowstorms to blue skies, from sunrise to sunset. Cougar Peak-A-Boo, because it’s so dark and gloomy—it sort of looks like Shear’s current exhibit at the Missoula Art Museum, the end of the world is coming,” Shear says. “That was showcases the entire series of small paintings from his one of the days that I didn’t really want to paint, but year-long endeavor, the sum of which displays over- it’s one of the most powerful images in the series.” Despite this huge undertaking, Shear also created whelming diligence. “There’s a lot of fear built into art,” Shear says. more than 100 other paintings in 2007, making it one “You’re afraid of failure. When you’re looking at a blank of his most productive years. He continues to paint canvas there is a lot of fear to even put a mark down. I four to five hours per day, but the Cougar Peak project thought this would be a good way to teach me to paint has stuck with him. Long after its completion, Shear found himself going back to paint the landscape again every day whether I want to or not.” Shear grew up in Montana and moved to Seattle and again. To this day, whenever Shear goes to visit his parto study computer animation in college. He worked with networks like MSNBC and Nickelodeon, on proj- ents, he still finds himself staring out the window, lookects ranging from the animated television series “The ing in the direction of Cougar Peak. “I’m still fascinated by the mountain,” he says. Angry Beavers” to a Pampers commercial. In television work, big cities are the place to be. “Every time I see it there’s something different and But as time went by, Shear grew tired of having to work amazing going on with it, and I want to try to capture out of Seattle and Los Angeles. He decided to move it with paint. So, I still have a love affair with it. I’m still back to rural Montana to be closer to his family, to obsessed.” Jared Shear’s Cougar Peak-A-Boo is on display spend time with his parents in that landscape miles from the nearest stoplight and in view of Cougar Peak. at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. The Art was still his passion, he says, but his focus changed First Friday reception Fri., Aug. 2, goes from 5 to to helping his father run a True Value hardware store 8 PM. Shear’s artist talk and tour is Sat., Aug. 3, at MAM from 1:30 to 4:30 PM. Free. in Thompson Falls. Then, on New Year’s Eve 2007, Shear decided to make a resolution that was simple, reasonable and proarts@missoulanews.com Art requires as much discipline as it does creativity. But it takes a special kind of person—possibly even a crazy person—to sit exposed to the elements and paint the same scene, once a day, every day, for an entire year. Recently, 36-year-old Thompson Falls artist Jared Shear did just that, painting a mountain scene from his hometown 365 times. That scene features Cougar Peak, which looms over relics from Shear’s childhood. The barn you see in the paintings is his grandfather’s, and the ranch that stretches beneath the mountains is owned by his family as well. The peak sits right outside the front door of

[22] Missoula Independent • August 1–August 8, 2013

[arts]

Art school sux Total Fest exhibit puts the visual in audio by Erika Fredrickson

work, exposing independent DIY artists that don’t really have a chance to show elsewhere in Missoula—to bring something new to the valley.” The 14-piece exhibit features collage, paintings, woodcuts, drawings and one 3D work. Images include a painting of a tiger with the legs and breasts of a woman, holding a tambourine. Another is a photograph of a bloodied Mark Heimer from No Fi Soul Rebellion—a former Missoula, now-Bellingham band that often plays Total Fest. In the spirit of punk bricolage, a few pieces feature things like dried noodles and everyday garbage rather than more high-brow materials used by the average gallery artist. There’s a Xerox style to other works that hearkens to the way zines were made before blogs became popular. Some artists in Visual Audio are primarily known in the music scene as either regular show-goers or members of bands, such as Lukas Phelan of J. Sherri and Dane Hansen, a KBGA DJ and the musician behind Bad Naked. Some of the exhibit’s artists—Adelaide Every and Jack Metcalf, in particular— are already established in the Missoula arts community. “I don’t think any of us make a living off of art,” Metcalf says. “Most of the artists work at record stores, bars, radio stations and coffee shops.” Metcalf, whose work was exhibited a few months ago at the Crystal Theatre in a show titled A Synthetic Spring, has designed the stage on which the exhibit will be displayed. Ultimately, the entire Michael Workman’s “Over Achiever” is one of 14 pieces by exhibit will be relocated to the VFW’s various artists that will be on display First Friday for the stage where, like Browder’s installation, show Visual Audio. it’ll be showcased during Total Fest, can find the DIY aesthetic among the merch tables which begins August 15. Visual Audio was juried by Ian Vanek and Matt where bands show off their screen-printed T-shirts, patches, album art, buttons, tote bags and koozies. Ad- Reilly of the Brooklyn band Japanther, which has played ditionally, an anonymous low-brow zine called Dog Dick Total Fest a handful of times. The decision to have them choose the pieces makes sense: Vanek and Reilly formed sometimes shows up for attendees to peruse. Last year, however, art made a much more high-pro- their band while attending the Pratt Institute and are file appearance when Missoula native and current known to play at art museums. There’s a rebellious feel to the pieces in the exBrooklyn artist Amanda Browder sewed together a “rock” cave installation called Spelunca. The art piece— hibit—the kind of “art-school-sux” attitude and crass made of more than 100 donated rock-themed T-shirts— humor that often goes hand-in-hand with the punk served as a backdrop for one of the Total Fest stages, scene. But even in Visual Audio’s most provocative and all weekend the colorful stalactites and stalagmites pieces there’s a sweet playfulness; you won’t find any G.G. Allin-inspired shock art here. added visual spice to the concerts. “I don’t think there’s anything offensive,” Metcalf This year, Total Fest organizers have decided to set up a First Friday exhibit in a downtown band practice says. “It’s pretty all-ages, just like Total Fest is. The [art space featuring DIY art that pairs well with the festival’s pieces] range from sarcastic to satirical to just really colphilosophy. Visual Audio Club: The Art of Total Fest XII orful. And it doesn’t take itself too seriously.” Visual Audio Club: the Art of Total Fest XII is a kind of random assortment of punk and amateur opens with a First Friday reception Fri., Aug., 2, art inspired by music. “We wanted to make Total Fest more total, and have from 5 to 9 PM in the band practice space in the an art side to it,” says Kari Workman, the Total Fest art alley between Spruce and Pine on the block west coordinator. “There are always musicians coming of Higgins. J. Sherri plays and there will be live Tthrough that are also artists—they press their own shirt screening. Free. records or make their own shirts. So we wanted to take efredrickson@missoulanews.com the whole Total Fest mission and translate that into art

F U N IS

Photo © Noah Clayton

Missoula’s Total Fest is all about listening. Each year, the three-day independent music festival showcases bands from the far corners of the country (and beyond), with styles ranging from sludgy two-person outfits to raucous experimental party bands to straight-up metalheads to spastic punk rockers to the occasional poppunk acoustic guitarist. In addition to this sonic onslaught, a visual art aspect seeps into the event. For several years, Seattle-viaMissoula artist Tom Dewar has created popular poster prints to advertise each festival. And during the fest, you

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missoulanews.com • August 1–August 8, 2013 [23]

[film]

A bird in the hand...

Life to Death Doc recovers the story of an unlikely punk band by Jason McMackin

There are two narratives that dominate documentaries about rock and roll musicians. First, there is the, “They done good, got famous, did tons of blow, then lost ‘what mattered most’ before returning to the stage and $185-per-ticket tours.” Examples of this include the entirety of VH1’s “Behind the Music” series. The second dominant storyline could be called “What might have been.” This narrative is the most heartbreaking and ultimately most satisfying rock and roll tale; and this is the story of Detroit’s Hackney brothers, the subjects of the 2013 film titled A Band Called Death. Death’s sound is often described as proto-punk. It is loud, driving, ass-kicking hard rock. Other Michiganbased acts like MC5 and the Stooges worked the same musical mine as Death and received a lot of attention from music rags like Rolling Stone and writers such as Lester Bangs. Death didn’t receive that attention. What makes Death’s story different is that the musicians are African-American. To play what one relative in the film calls “white boy music” in the 1960s, in the Motor City, the home of Motown Records (of Marvin Gaye, people!), in a predominately black neighborhood is unusual enough. To be great at doing it is a whole other game. Like many other American musicians, guitarist and band visionary David Hackney picked up a guitar after seeing the Beatles on the “Ed Sullivan Show” in 1964. With the support of their parents, the boys–David on guitar, Bobby on drums and Dannis on bass–relentlessly rehearsed in a cramped upstairs bedroom for years while neighbors howled about the noise and called the police. An early incarnation of the band was known by the awesome moniker Rock Fire Funk Express. That original band name is illustrative of the way in which the brothers straddled the “white” and “black” music worlds. “If I could play chords like Pete Townsend and leads like Jimi Hendrix, I‘d be the perfect guitarist,” David says at one point in the film. (That is still a fact.) Death’s major influences also included white artists such as Alice Cooper, and groups predominately influenced by black rhythm and blues. The film doesn’t dig too much into the racial segregation of musical flavors. Instead, it offers a “show, don’t tell” approach. While it seems cool—nay, required—for white artists to be influenced by black artists, the inverse doesn’t seem to be the case for black artists who, like Death, can find

[24] Missoula Independent • August 1–August 8, 2013

themselves pariahs in their musical and social communities, particularly when it comes to rock music. The search for acceptance, recognition and fame becomes even more elusive once David rechristens the band Death in 1971, after a car accident kills their father. The negative response to the new name by the suits at record companies (including the Mephistophelian star-finder Clive Davis) seems a bit old-fashioned these days, especially considering how raw and wellplayed Death’s recordings sound. But David wanted complete control of his vision, telling Bobby and Dannis, “If you give them the title of the band, then you give them everything else.” Ultimately, the lack of success took its toll on the members. In 1977, the same year punk “broke,” Death dissolved. It was a musical era that undoubtedly would’ve embraced the band’s name and sound (After all, ’77 is the year all-black punk rock legends Bad Brains formed). With few photos, no live footage of the original threesome, and little professionally recorded music, filmmakers Mark Covino and Jeff Howlett seem to stumble right from the beginning with “Behind the Music”-esque sound bites from usual suspects Henry Rollins and self-anointed Detroit Ambassador, Kid Rock. Not to worry, the filmmakers quickly eschew this format and instead find an emotional center for the film via interviews with brothers Dannis and Bobby, whose big smiles, massive dreads and incredible leather coats make you want to root for them. David, the undisputed leader and musical prophet, passed away in 2000, but his presence is felt in the brothers’ voices. They share stories about his faith in what they were doing and his faith in the world, which he saw as a place where death wasn’t something to be feared, but rather explored and embraced. The final act of the film follows the unlikely rediscovery of the band by recordcollecting super-geeks and by Bobby Hackney’s own children, who were unaware the band had existed—all of which supports David’s prophecy that the world will come looking for Death’s music someday. A Band Called Death screens at the Roxy Theater Fri., Aug. 2, through Sun., Aug. 4, at 7:15 and 9:15 PM. $7/$6 seniors and students/$5 kids 13 and under.

arts@missoulanews.com

[film]

That’s what I call a wet martini. Much Ado About Nothing opens this week at the Wilma.

OPENING THIS WEEK 2 GUNS Don’t you love discovering the things you have in common with buddies, like, say, being undercover agents? I suspect there won’t be many BFF necklaces, though, when a DEA agent and a naval intelligence officer form a shaky alliance after trying to sneak into a drug cartel. Starring Denzel Washington, Mark Wahlberg and Paula Patton. Rated R. Village 6, Carmike 12, Pharaohplex. A BAND CALLED DEATH Th e l e g e n d a r y D e t r o i t p r o t o - p u n k b a n d Death finally gets its due in a documentary. Interviewees include Alice Cooper, Dannis Hackney and Henry Rollins. Not rated. Screening at the Roxy Aug. 2-4, at 7:15 and 9:15 PM. $7/$6 for seniors and students/$5 for children 13 and under. Visit theroxytheater.org. (See Film.) THE KINGS OF SUMMER Three teen boys say to hell with society, run away to the woods and try to live off the land all summer. Here’s hoping this works out more like My Side of the Mountain and less like Into the Wild. Starring Nick Robinson, Gabriel Basso and Moises Arias. Rated R. Wilma. MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING Joss Whedon uses modern costuming to retell this classic Shakespeare comedy about romantic confusion. Iambic pentameter really gets the ladies going, I hear. Starring Amy Acker, Alexis Denisof and Fran Kranz (and watch for the ever-adorable Nathan Fillion). Rated PG13. Wilma.

THE SMURFS 2 Papa, Clumsy, Grouchy and Vanity must join forces with humans to rescue Smurfette from the clutches of the evil sorcerer Gargamel. Official film tagline, which I am not making up: “Get ready to get naughty!” Starring the voices of Hank Azaria, Neil Patrick Harris and Jayma Mays. Rated PG. Village 6, Carmike 12, Pharaohplex. THE WAY, WAY BACK A 14-year-old boy having a rough summer vacation strikes up an unusual friendship with the manager of a water park. Brought to you by the makers of Little Miss Sunshine and Juno. Starring Steve Carell, Toni Collette and Allison Janney. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12.

NOW PLAYING THE CONJURING You can bet your Milk Duds it’s not the cat knocking stuff over this time. Paranormal investigators arrive to help a family terrorized by a dark presence in their home. Starring Vera Farmiga, Patrick Wilson and Lili Taylor. Rated R. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex, Showboat. DESPICABLE ME 2 The somewhat inept but well-meaning Gru is put to work for the Anti-Villain league to fight a new super criminal in the follow-up to the 2010 family friendly animated comedy. Starring the voices of Steve Carell, Kristen Wiig and Miranda Cosgrove. Rated PG. Pharaohplex, Carmike 12. GROWN UPS 2 Adam Sandler and co. get into and out of various

preposterous shenanigans in their hometown. Drunk ski-cops, bullies, tropes about men and women are all on tap for your amusement. Also starring David Spade, Chris Rock and Kevin James. PG-13. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex, Showboat. THE HEAT An uptight FBI agent teams up with a rambunctious Boston police officer in this buddy-cop romp. The twist: They’re ladeez! Yes, even women can cuss, wear pants, hold guns and star in formulaic comedies. Starring Sandra Bullock, Melissa McCarthy and Demián Bichir. Rated R. Carmike 12. THE LONE RANGER This blockbuster promises to combine all the complexity of old-timey TV westerns with all the subtlety of modern-day special FX. Starring Johnny Depp, Armie Hammer and William Fichtner. (Fun fact: Armie’s dad is the CEO of Armand Hammer Corporation.) Rated PG-13. Carmike 12. PACIFIC RIM Guillermo del Toro directs this flick that is as thoughtful and character-driven as an action film involving giant robotic suits and invading lizards can be, no doubt. Starring Charlie Hunnam (AKA the dude from “Sons of Anarchy”), plus Idris Elba and Rinko Kikuchi. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12. R.I.P.D. After a cop dies, afterlife authorities assign him to a team of undead police officers, the Rest in Peace Department. If Ghost and Beverly Hills Cop had a baby, this would be it. Starring Ryan Reynolds, Jeff Bridges and Kevin Bacon. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12.

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RED 2 Bruce Willis is a retired black-ops CIA agent must reunite his oddball team of operatives to prevent nuclear detonation. But forget Bruce, Helen Mirren shows up to kick ass, and that’s what really matters. Also starring John Malkovich, MaryLouise Parker and Catherine Zeta-Zones. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex. TURBO A weird accident puts the “go” into “escargot” in this animated Dreamworks underdog tale of a garden snail aiming to win the Indy 500. Starring the voices of Ryan Reynolds, Paul Giamatti and Samuel L. Jackson. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex. THE WOLVERINE Hugh Jackman is back as everyone’s favorite rendition of the large, carnivorous species of the weasel family. This time Wolverine must travel to Japan to battle bad guys and his personal demons in the process. Also starring Rila Fukushima and Will Yun Lee. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Village 6, Entertainer, Pharaohplex. Capsule reviews by Kate Whittle. Planning your outing to the cinema? Visit missoulanews.com’s arts section to find up-to-date movie times for theaters in the area. You can also contact theaters to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 and Village 6 at 541-7469; Wilma at 7282521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603.

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missoulanews.com • August 1–August 8, 2013 [25]

[dish]

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Bickering about obesity by Ari LeVaux

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[26] Missoula Independent • August 1–August 8, 2013

Mexico is now more obese than the United States, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. A third of Mexico’s population carries a body mass index of at least 30, obesity’s official threshold. The American Medical Association recently classified obesity as a disease in and of itself, and it’s a well-known gateway to other illnesses like heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. Obesity can take years off your life, disproportionately affects the poor and adds billions of dollars of drag to our health care system. It’s a problem worth solving. In the July issue of The Atlantic, David Freedman argues that the most efficient way to solve the obesity crisis, especially among the fast-food-eating poor, is to improve the quality of fast food. This solution, Freedman argues, is threatened by the “Pollanites,” devotees of the local-food, small-farm, minimally processed food paradigm famously articulated by journalist Michael Pollan. He casts the Pollanites as ineffective hypocrites, who enjoy food that’s just as “obesogenic”—that is, obesity causing—as the average fast-food meal. He cites a Pollanite recipe for corn and bacon as an example. Freedman makes no secret of his fear of fat; he admits to years ago dropping the oil from his oil and vinegar salad dressing. “[The] science is, in fact, fairly straightforward,” Freedman writes. “Fat carries more than twice as many calories as carbohydrates and proteins do per gram, which means just a little fat can turn a serving of food into a calorie bomb.” This simplified view of fat makes Freedman’s simple fix for obesity seem within reach. Fast-food companies can dial down the fat and other obesogens, replace them with palatable substitutes, and cure obesity. Freedman’s fat science has been addressed in more detail by others, so I won’t go further. Freedman called Tom Philpott at Mother Jones an Atkinite, based on Philpott’s rebuttal, a reference to Richard Atkins and his infamously fat-philic Atkins Diet. The other obesogens Freedman frets over are sugars and refined carbohydrates, or “problem carbs,” as he calls them. I agree with him here. But at the same time, he should acknowledge that food processing has the effect of making carbohydrates more accessible. In other words, processing, in general, turns non-problem carbs into problem carbs. This is as true with a sack of whole-wheat flour from Whole Foods as it is with a tortilla from Taco Bell. Feedman doesn’t distinguish between good and bad fats the way he differentiates among carbs. Perhaps he doesn’t mention good fats because good fat is hard to find in the fast-food world. There are fats that are less bad, such as non-trans-fats, but few undisputedly good fats, like olive oil, can be purchased at the drive-thru. Or found in the 10,000-plus words of Freedman’s article. While the debate rages on over which nutrients more readily pack on cellulite, it’s important to re-

FLASH IN THE PAN

member that caloric intake is only half of the equation behind weight gain or loss. Equally important to the calories you consume is the number of calories you burn, which is a function of your metabolism. The body’s metabolism is in constant flux, depending on factors like activity level, age and weight. Earlier this month in Science, researchers presented compelling evidence of a gene that controls metabolism. They deleted a certain mouse gene that had been suspected of playing a role in regulating metabolism. The engineered mice that lacked this gene became obese, while eating and exercising the same amount as their control counterparts, who weighed about half as much. The human genome includes a nearly identical gene, and this gene has been found missing in an obese human. It’s possible that this gene, even when present, might express itself differently, or be regulated differently, in different individuals. Perhaps it is expressed differently with age. Any veteran of a high-school reunion has noticed what happens to some of their friends when they hit their 30s. They start to puff out, even while purporting to eat and exercise the same as they always have. Until they figure out that their bodies now require less food, the gain continues. It’s possible that an age-related slowdown in metabolism is programmed into our genes, but such a pathway is far from known. The mouse gene discovery also supports a long speculated relationship between diet, genetics and obesity, called the “thrifty gene” hypothesis. It credits high rates of obesity in certain Native American populations to their genes being “thrifty” with ingested calories, thanks to generations of near-starvation conditions. The Pima tribe of Arizona, for example, has nearly double the obesity rate of Mexico. According to this hypothesis, when carriers of the thrifty gene, or genes, are given the rich food of the modern Western diet, their bodies save every calorie they can, in the form of fat, for a caloric rainy day. As the evidence mounts for a genetic component of obesity—one that likely interacts with diet—we should be open to the great complexity in which the ultimate causes of obesity are enshrouded. There is also growing evidence that the timing of eating and exercise, with respect to each other, can influence how many calories are burned in a given workout. Exercising during an hours-long fast appears to burn more calories than the same activity in a non-fasted state. Wherever they lead, the roots of obesity are not as straightforward as Freedman describes. I won’t argue that there isn’t room for improvement in the quality of fast food. But I can’t see how bashing Pollanites, a segment of the population that’s noticeably non-obese, will help. And I can’t see how the obesity problem is likely to be solved by doubling down on the very system that helped create it.

[dish] Alcan Bar and Grill 16780 Beckwith St. Frenchtown • 626-9930 Tantalize your taste buds with Angus beef burgers, chicken strips, shrimp, and biscuits and gravy from Alcan Bar & Grill. With more than 20 years of experience and 10 years in the business, we have been offering fresh meals and beverages at the area’s most competitive prices. Our friendly professionals offer personalized service and make sure you leave our restaurant as one of our friends. We offer have a variety of specials for ladies night and sports events featuring drink specials and free food. Contact us today and enjoy our incredible menu selection. 9 am – 2 am Mon-Sun. $ Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway • 728-8900 (across from courthouse) Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 Bernice’s Bakery has been a Missoula Landmark since 1978. If you haven’t been you should! If you come every day you know what we’re talkin' about: Huckleberry Danishes, fresh baked breads daily, crazy cheap lunches showcasing delicious flavors, one of the nation’s top cupcakes, handmade croissants and so much more. Sit inside in one of Missoula’s homiest of atmospheres or scoot out back to enjoy a view of downtown Missoula at one of the picnic tables. And don’t forget to try the best cup o’joe around or Bernice’s toddy brewed iced coffee. There is a lot of hard rollin’ action around this joint. Come and see just what we're talkin’ about. $-$$ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced beega) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Mon.–Fri., 7:30–4, Sat. 84. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. $ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$

Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks • 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm Sun-Wed and 11am-10pm Thurs-Sat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$ El Cazador 101 S. Higgins Ave. • 728-3657 Missoula Independent readers’ choice for Best Mexican Restaurant. Come taste Alfredo's original recipes for authentic Mexican food where we cook with love. From seafood to carne asada, enjoy dinner or stop by for our daily lunch specials. We are a locally owned Mexican family restaurant, and we want to make your visit with us one to remember. Open daily for lunch and dinner. $-$$ eMpanadas at the Clark Fork Market under the Higgins St. Bridge 728-2030 Hechas a mano con amor...¡Qué sabor! Made by hand with love…what flavor! Carne de búfalo, pollo, lamb, salchicha, humita, acelga & more. Since 2005, Missoula’s original Argentine-style empanadas are crafted from premium, homegrown ingredients and delivered by bicycle, straight from the oven to the farmers market, every Saturday 8am – 1pm. Taste the difference. The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. • 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and gluten-free options. NOW SERVING BREAKFAST Empanadas! Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. 10am-6pm Mon-Thurs/10am-7pm Fri+Sat. Downtown Missoula. $ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. M-TH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am4pm, Sat 8am-4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$

Brooks & Browns Inside Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. 532-2056 This week at Brooks and Browns... THURSDAY is Trivia Night (7:30-10 pm). SUNDAY: Sunday Funday (Happy Hour all day). Martini MONDAY ($4 select martinis). TUESDAY (Burger + any draught beer $8). Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. $-$$

Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West • 541-FOOD he GFS Deli features made-to-order sandwiches, a rotating selection of six soups, an award-winning salad bar, an olive & antipasto bar and a self-serve hot bar offering a variety of housemade breakfast, lunch and dinner entrées. A seasonally changing selection of deli salads and rotisserie-roasted chickens are also available. Locally-roasted coffee/espresso drinks and an extensive smoothie menu complement bakery goodies from the GFS ovens and from Missoula’s favorite bakeries. Indoor and patio seating. Open every day, 7am – 10pm. $-$$

Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 41 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $

GoodieVille Paxson Plaza by Southgate Mall • 728-0010 www.goodieville.com Missoula’s only Gluten-Free Bakery and Restaurant offers a full line of savories and sweets. We serve breakfast, lunch and dinner including Pancakes, Pizza, American and Indian fare. We also have extensive vegetarian and vegan options. Open Wed-Sat 7am-9pm and Sun 7am-2pm. $-$$

Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 • ciaomambo.com The vibrant energy at Ciao Mambo is fantastically accompanied by steaming hot pizzas, delicious assortments of pastas and of course authentic Italian wine. We focus on making sure that whether it be date night, family night, or business dinners we accommodate whatever the need! And do not forget there are always leftovers! Open 5 to close every day, come make us your go to dinner destination! $-$$

Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St • 549-7723 www.grizzlyliquor.com Missoula’s Tailgate Headquarters! We carry all of the spirits & accessories to make your tailgate party a success! Largest selection of spirits in Montana, including locally made whiskey, vodka, gin, rum and wine. We’re located downtown with free customer parking. Grizzly Liquor was voted Missoula’s #1 Liquor Store! Open M-F 9-6:30, Sat 9-6. $-$$$

$…Under $5

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AUGUST

COFFEE SPECIAL

Colombia Supreme I TA L I A N R O A S T

$10.95/lb. E x c e l l e n t fo r i c e d c o f f e e s

BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

BUTTERFLY 232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

$$–$$$…$15 and over

missoulanews.com • August 1–August 8, 2013 [27]

[dish]

Lisa’s Pasty Pantry HANGRIEST HOUR Exceptional ethnic food is difficult to find away from its native land, unless it’s made by the people who grew up eating those very dishes. Pasties are no exceptions, and the Butte natives who run Lisa’s Pasty Pantry serve some of the largest and finest you’re likely to find this far from the Berkeley Pit’s golden shores. What we’re talking about: Southwestern Montana soul food brought by Cornish immigrants to feed the men toiling back in the day in Butte’s underground mines. The pasty (pass-TEE) is a hand pie filled with beef, potatoes and onions, best eaten when smothered in brown gravy. What it comes with: A cup of hot gravy to slather on the golden-brown crust. There’s also a hearty side of coleslaw that, while delicious, does little to soothe the “Oh my God, I should be eating a salad” pangs of guilt that accompany any pasty dinner. Finally, a $8.95 meal at Lisa’s includes a delicious fruit turnover that looks like the miniature frosted offspring of the main course. Why you’re eating it: Three possible reasons: First, because the savory carb-, proteinand fat-loaded dish fills and satisfies in a way that a veggie burger could never touch. Second,

Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We’re the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we’ll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$

photo courtesy of Lisa’s Pasty Pantry

you need several days worth of calories in one sitting. Third, there’s a vein of ore somewhere that needs to be dug up and smelted. Bonus: In addition to the meaty original pasty, Lisa’s offers a vegetarian option as well as teeny-tiny “cocktail pasties.” All of these can be bought frozen and saved for another day. Where to find ’em: Lisa’s Pasty Pantry is located at 2004 West Sussex in Missoula. The small but cozy dining room pays homage to Butte’s Irish and mining roots. —Dameon Pesanti Hangriest Hour serves up fresh details on western Montana eats. To recommend a restaurant, dish or chef for Hangriest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com

Iza 529 S. Higgins 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Contemporary Asian cuisine featuring local, vegan, gluten free and organic options as well as wild caught seafood, Idaho trout and buffalo. Join us for lunch and dinner. Happy Hour 3-6 weekdays with specials on food and drink. Extensive sake, wine and tea menu. Closed Sundays. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm, Dinner 5pm-close. Sat: Dinner 5pm-close. $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Jimmy John’s 420 N. Higgins 542-1100 jimmyjohns.com Jimmy John’s - America’s Favorite Sandwich Delivery Guys! Unlike any other sub shop, Jimmy John’s is all about the freshest ingredients and fastest service. Freaky Fast, Freaky Good - that’s Jimmy John’s. Order online, call for delivery or visit us on Higgins. $-$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. • 543-7154 (on the hip strip) Did you know that the Missoula Senior Center serves delicious hearty lunches every week day for only $6? Anyone is welcome to join us for a delicious meal from 11:3012:30 Monday- Friday for delicious food, great conversation and take some time to find a treasured item or garment in our thrift shop. For a full menu and other activities, visit our website at www.missoulaseniorcenter.org. The Mustard Seed Asian Cafe Southgate Mall • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian fusion cuisine. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combine the best of Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences. Full menu available at the bar. Award winning desserts made fresh daily , local and regional micro brews, fine wines & signature cocktails. Vegetarian and Gluten free menu available. Takeout & delivery. $$-$$$ Pearl Cafe 231 East Front St. 541-0231 pearlcafe.us Country French meets the Northwest. Idaho Trout with Dungeness Crab, Rabbit with Wild Mushroom Ragout, Snake River Farms Beef, Fresh Seafood Specials Daily. House Made Charcuterie, Sourdough Bread & Delectable Desserts. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$

$…Under $5

[28] Missoula Independent • August 1–August 8, 2013

Romaines 3075 N. Reserve Suite N 406-214-2659 www.romainessalads.com We provide you with the convenience of delicious salads, sandwiches and soups. Our salads include over 30 wholesome ingredients. Our homemade soups change with the season as different ingredients become available. If hearty sandwiches are your favorite, then visit Romaines for one of our braised meat sandwiches. We also have a Montana Hummus sandwich made from Montana grown garbanzo beans. At last, local, fresh, and healthy! $-$$ Silvertip Casino 680 SW Higgins • 728-5643 The Silvertip Casino is Missoula’s premiere casino offering 20 Video gaming machines, best live poker in Missoula, full beverage liquor, 11 flat screen tv’s and great food at great prices. Breakfast Specials starting at $2.99 (7-11am) For a complete menu, go to www.silvertipcasino.com. Open 24/7. $-$$ Sis’s Kitchen 531-5034 sisskitchen.com Wheat, Gluten & Allergen Free Foods. Frozen & Dry Mix Products. Sis’s Kitchen plays a part in Best of Missoula “Best Pizza” Winner’s for 2008-2012. Find our products at: The Good Food Store • Biga Pizza • Bridge Pizza • Pizza Cafe in Ronan (12”crust). $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI We have quick and delicious lunch specials 6 days a week starting at $7, and are open for dinner 7 nights a week. Try our comfort food items like Pork Katsu and Chicken Teriyaki. We also offer party platters to go and catering for all culinary styles. Lunch 11:30-3 Mon-Sat. Dinner 5-9:30 Every Night. Corner of Pine and Higgins. Very Family Friendly. 549-7979. $-$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins 327-8929 Stop in when you’re in the neighborhood. We’ll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula’s best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 1110 Sun 12-9. $-$$ Taco John’s 623 W Broadway 2600 S Reserve West-Mex® is about fresh taste and BOLD flavors. Taco John’s recipes make you smile and yell “OLÉ”. We combine hearty helpings of seasoned meats, crispy Potato Olés®, and flavorful cheeses with fresh-made Mexican specialties like burritos, tacos, and quesadillas. All topped off with bold sauces, spices and salsas. You’ll find West-Mex® cooking makes for an unbeatably satisfying meal. See you soon ... Amigo :) $-$$ Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you’ll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Walking Moustache 206 W. Main St. 549-3800 www.walkingmoustache.com Our aim is to offer excellent food with five star service. Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner, Daily Specials + 2 am Special. Restaurant Hours: 24/6. Tues–Sun 6:00am–11:00pm. Closed Mondays. Winebar Hours: Tues–Sun 11:00am–11:00pm. Closed Mondays. Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

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He’ll give ya the shirt off his back. Singer-songwriter Ben Taylor plays the Top Hat, along with Tom Catmull and Places, Fri., Aug 2, at 9:30 PM. $10, tickets at Rockin Rudy's, the Top Hat and tophatlounge.com.

THURSDAYAUGUST01 Texan singer-songwriter Hayes Carll croons his scruffy way into yer heart, along with James and Fogarty, at Stage 112, at 112 Pattee St. inside the Elk’s Lodge. 8 PM. $20/$15 in advance at stageonetwelve.com.

The ZACC’s Printshop Orientation Class teaches peeps everything you need to know in order to use the print shop. In just two hours you’ll be able to impress your friends and family with your knowledge in silk-screening, relief printing, and woodcut printing. Once you get the tour, you can work there during business hours. Limited to six people per month. To register call 549-7555.

Perhaps you’ll be inspired to work on your penmanship. Swing on by the Missoula Public Library all this month to check out the very lovely handwriting by the Missoula Calligrapher’s Guild. Alphabet Challenge is on display on the lower floor of the library. Find the Missoula Calligrapher’s Guild Facebook page to learn more. Release some stress during t’ai chi classes every Thursday at 10 AM at The Open

Way Center, 702 Brooks St. $10 drop-in class. Visit openway.org. It’ll definitely be a relaxing lunch hour at the Lori Lavender Workshop, where you’ll learn how to weave fresh lavender wands at the Bitterroot Public Library in Hamilton from noon to 1 PM. Free. The Print-It class with Hailey Schofield at the Missoula Art Museum teaches kids ages 7-11 the history and art of printmaking.

missoulanews.com • August 1–August 8, 2013 [29]

[calendar] Campers can make copies of their original work and decorate cards and T-shirts. Check out missoulaartmuseum.org to learn more. Who has two green thumbs and likes learning about native plants? Potential Fort Missoula Native Plant Garden volunteers, that’s who. Work beside botanists and gardeners and become an expert on local flora. Thursdays from 4–6 PM at the Fort Missoula Native Plant Gardens. Visit montana naturalist.org.

nightlife End your afternoon with a fine glass of grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 8303296 and visit missoulawinery.com.

Win $50 by using your giant egg to answer trivia questions at Brains on Broadway Trivia Night at the Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway Ave. 7 PM. Plus, all-youcan-eat wings, $10 two-topping pizzas, $6 domestic pitchers and $7 Blue Moon pitchers. You’ll certainly be inspired to find adventure of your own when local pro trail runner Jason Schlarb, along with Jeremy Wolf, give a multimedia presentation on their epic five-day run through the Italian Dolomites mountain range. Runner’s Edge, 304 N. Higgins Ave. 7 PM. Includes gear giveaway from sponsors. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains

Fight for your right to belt out tunes at the Dark Horse’s karaoke accompanied bydrink specials. 1805 Regent St. 9 PM. Free. Gotta hydrate before you gyrate to the latest hip tunes and underground tracks at Dead Hipster Dance Party. 9 PM. Badlander. $1 well dranks til’ midnight. Catch our arts editor line-dancing when Julie Bug and Northern Exposure play the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St (at 1100 Strand Ave). 9 PM. No cover. Slide on a blazer (don’t forget to roll up the sleeves) and drop some “In Soviet Russia” jokes at Missoula’s Homegrown Stand-Up Comedy at the Union Club. Sign up by 9:30 PM to perform. Free.

I already know whether you’re going to attend the Psychic Fair, hosted by Water Lilies’ Body Mind Spirit store, 1537 S> Reserve St. Opens Friday from 4-9 PM, Saturday 11 AM-8 PM, Sunday 11 AM-5 PM.

Lovable, scruffy mutts might be afoot when Three Eared Dog brings its bluesy tunage to Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave., from 5-8 PM. No cover.

nightlife End your afternoon with a fine glass of grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 8303296 and visit missoulawinery.com.

Get a taste of la dolce vita and a li’l vino when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 549-8703. Visit tenspoon.com.

Revenge is likely served cold and the pasta will be properly firm when Leslie Budewitz reads from her Food Lover’s Village mystery Death Al Dente, from 5 to 7 PM at Fact and Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free.

Get your grub on, but don’t pig out, and give a girl a call who you wanna take out to Downtown ToNight, where local food and beer vendors as well as local musicians have a good day down at Caras Park. 5:30– 8:30 PM. Free to hang and bang, but the grub and beer will cost you a couple ducats.

Might we recommend the gin rickey whilst you enjoy the musical stylings of The Good Ol’ Fashioned at Montgomery Distillery, 129 W. Front St. 6 PM. Free. Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free. Let us adjourn from the workday and enjoy tunes from Curtis Rathburn when he plays the Top Hat from 6-8 PM. Free.

The Print-It class with Hailey Schofield at the Missoula Art Museum teaches kids ages 7-11 the history and art of printmaking. Campers can make copies of their original work and decorate cards and T-shirts. Check out missoulaartmuseum.org to learn more.

Teens go toward the literary light during the Missoula Public Library’s Teen Writers Group, which meets every Fri. at 3:30 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721BOOK.

Hot House Yoga presents “Living And Learning In India,” a presentation from a yogi who just returned from living in India, with Ashtanga and breathing practice to follow. 127 N. Higgins Ave. 5-8 PM. Presentation is free. Class is $12/regular rates for Hot House members.

Have a cold one and let Rebekah Pulley’s soulful Americana twang massage your brainwaves at the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton from 6 to 8:30 PM. Free.

Check out the art and science that is quilting at the “Places In the Heart” show from Cabin Fever Quilters in the Superior High School multipurpose room in Superior, off I-90 exit 47. 10 AM-6 PM. Call Susan at 396-4731 for more info.

The Women’s Circle Group Acupuncture at Mountain Sage Acupuncture Clinic, 725 W. Alder St. Ste. 1, focuses on women’s health issues and sounds comfy and nice. 2–5 PM, last appointment at 4 PM. Sliding scale treatments $20-40 with a first time administration fee of $10. Call (503) 593-7073.

Kick back at the lovely Travelers’ Rest State Park with tunes from Shane Clouse and Kevin Van Dort at the third annual summer concert fundraiser. Proceeds support kids’ education programs. $10 per person, free for ages 12 and under. $5 per plate of barbecue. Lawn chairs and coolers welcome.

After the revolution, we’ll need a new Betsy Ross, which is why you should pick up some tips every Thu. at Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., where its Sewing Lounge goes from 6 to 8 PM. $9–10/hour. Call 541-7171.

barbecue competition. Saturday kicks off at 8:30 AM with a 5K and 10K Milk Run, starting at the U.S. Forest Service Building. Learn more at creamerypicnic.com.

Get a taste of la dolce vita and a li’l vino when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 549-8703. Visit tenspoon.com.

Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM.

FRIDAYAUGUST02

It’ll be a whiskey-soaked’ kinda night fer sure when Shooter Jennings plays the Top Hat. Doors at 8 PM, show at 9. $20/$18 in advance plus fees at Rockin Rudy’s, the Top Hat and tophatlounge.com.

Bozeman funk-rock outfit Cure For the Common soothes what ails ya with an album release party at Stage 112, 112 Pattee St., along with Kung Fu Kongress. 9 PM. $5.

Show ‘em that pop culture knowledge is just as important as having a job during Trivial Beersuit at the Lucky Strike Casino. Prizes for podium finishers. Karaoke follows. 1515 Dearborn. 8–10 PM. During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, local talented folks may titillate your eardrums. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up.

[30] Missoula Independent • August 1–August 8, 2013

Support the intersex community at an evening of music and dining when Huey Lewis and Eden Atwood & Friends present SOULSVILLE: A Benefit for The Interface Project. MCT Center for the Performing Arts. Cocktails and hors d’oeuvres at 6 PM, music at 7:30 PM. $100. Visit interface project.org/soulsville. There’s enough juice for kids and grownups alike at the Top Hat’s Family Friendly Friday, with music from Joan Zen this week. Free. 6-8 PM.

Get a hit of cardiovascular exercise during Nia: The Joy of Movement, from 9 AM to 10 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $12/$10 members. Call 541-7240.

Don’t yell out your ex-girlfriend’s name during Hump Day Bingo with Bob at the Lucky Strike Casino. Prizes for winners. Beware: $5 mini-fishbowls served all day. Bingo starts at 6:30 PM.

As Prince once said: Cream, get on top. The 101st Creamery Picnic in Stevensville includes a bevy of family fun, like a parade and

Slap on the flippers and dive on in during Fishbowl Friday, where DJs like Simpleton, MAD, Kapture, Kount Dubula and Digerati will

FIRST FRIDAY The esteemed beer aficionados at the Rhino present the monthly Firkin Friday, in which a different cask conditioned beer is tapped. The special of today is Kettlehouse’s Grapefruit Eddy Out. 158 Ryman St. Firkin tap opens at 4 PM.

1106-A Hawthorne St. 5:30-9 PM. Self-taught artist Emily Hall, who worked in Portland and relocated to Missoula,

presents her illustrative, autobiographical acrylic work at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 West Main St. 5 PM.

Santa Fe-based artist Sheila Miles exhibits her works at Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., from 5-8 PM. Tasty morsels and beverages provided. Perhaps you’ll revisit the periodic table when photographer Genevieve Fix presents her exhibit, Past Elements, at Your Energy Fix, 415 N. Higgins Ave. No. 19. 5-8 PM.

Louise Lamontagne, Donna Gans and Jared Shear exhibit the fruits of their artistic experimentation at the Missoula Art Museum, with surrealist paintings, an installation and more. Reception from 5-8 PM, with artists’ talk at 7. (See Art.)

Butterfly Herbs exhibits Emotascope, a giant installation with “Christensen, McTague and kids,” which will be on display through the month with a closing reception Aug. 30 at 5 PM.

Wesley Delano exhibits largescaled stenciled/painted works in Coming Up at Riverside Cafe, 247 W. Front St. Opening reception Friday evening.

Find out whether our state has its own Frank Lloyd Wright when A&E Architects presents the opening reception for Montana’s Modernist Architecture, with drawings and photographs from the ‘50s through ‘70s. 5 PM.

Skip the crackers and white zin and go straight for the Jack, up, when the Union Club hosts Art in the Bar for First Friday, this month with surrealist paintings by John N.W. Ryan. 5-8 PM.

Tunes from Keith Hardin and David Scott will accompany visual delights when the Monte Dolack Gallery, 139 W. Front St., exhibits a collection titled Imagining Montana for First Friday. 5 PM.

Your eyes will delight in the freshness at the 11th Annual Plein Air Exhibition, wherein artists show the fruits of their paint-out labors. Dana Gallery, 246 N. Higgins Ave. 5-8 PM.

The art world and wilderness collide to pluck at your heartstrings at Wilderspiel, an art exhibit opening at the Brink Gallery, 111 W. Front St., with reception from 5-10 PM.

We can’t guarantee there’ll be as much booty-bumping as Thursdays at the Badlander, but it should be a lotta fun anyway when Dead Hipster Dance Party presents a First Friday event at Betty’s Divine, 521 S. Higgins Ave. Prints of Abi Halland’s photos will be on sale while Mike Gill spins thumpin’ hot trax. 5-8 PM. Free refreshments. Be on the look out for some mighty, mighty brick houses when Perry Haas presents his wood-fired ceramic series, Stacked. The Clay Studio,

Intrepid artistic pioneers Cait Finley and Molly Clevenger present Stacks, an installation in the Frontierspace gallery, in the alley between Pine and Spruce Streets by Sean Kelly’s. 5-10 PM.

Wilderspiel, by artists Jonathan Marquis and David Miles Lusk, bends minds with a melding of wilderness imagery and artistic concepts. Opening at the Brink Gallery, 111 W. Front St., Fri., Aug. 2, with a reception from 5-10 PM.

be dropping the bass all night long, starting at 7 PM. Free, with $5 fishbowl special.

opens. Palace. 9 PM. $15, $20 for ages 1820. Tickets at brownpapertickets.com.

Show the young’uns that you invented Friday night when Russ and Sam Nasset play the Missoula Senior Center, 705 S Higgins Ave., from 7-10 PM. Free.

You’ll get your money’s worth when Cash For Junkers plays the Union Club, starting around 9 PM. No cover.

Kira Means might be young, but that doesn’t mean she’s too wet behind the ears to dazzle you all when she plays the terrace at The Keep, 102 Ben Hogan Drive, from 710 PM. No cover. Soak it up and sing when The Outpost Restaurant & Saloon, 38500 W. Hwy. 12 at Lolo Hot Springs, presents karaoke with KJ Mark, starting at 9 PM. Free. Call 273-4733. Sing a happy tune at the Evaro Bar’s Friday night karaoke and you just might win a prize. Starts at 9 PM, free to sing. 17025 US Highway 93 North. DJ Dubwise spins hot old-school and new dance party traxxx at Feruqis, 318 N. Higgins Ave., starting at 10 PM. Free. Indie folk and rap collide when The Uncluded, featuring Aesop Rock and Kimya Dawson, come to town with the Hokey Fright Tour. Folk punker Hammell on Trial

Dynamic duo Erin and the Project plays Sean Kelly’s,130 W. Pine St. 9 PM. No cover. Underhill Rose, an Americana trio, plays Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St., at 9 PM. Free. (See Music.) John “Poncho” Dobson hosts open mic at Fergie’s Pub every Fri., where you’re bound to mingle with a mix of resort celebs, odd locals and dizzy soakers. You never know who’ll show up and play. It could be you. Starts at 3 PM. 213 Main Street in Hot Springs. Sign up ahead at 406-721-2416 or just show up. Howl at the moon and party til dawn when the Wild Coyote Band plays the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St, at 9:30 PM. No cover. Singer songwriter Ben Taylor (whose parents happen to be Carly Simon and James Taylor, coughcough) plays the Top Hat, along with Tom Catmull and Places. 9:30 PM. $10, tickets at Rockin’ Rudy’s, the Top Hat and tophatlounge.com.

SATURDAYAUGUST03 Mike Stud, Former Star Baseball Player and Normal Guy Who Eats at Applebees, brings the hip-hop Relief Tour to the Top Hat, along with MTK & Kurt. Doors at 8 PM, show at 9. $15/$13 in advance at Jadepresents.com, Rockin Rudy’s or 866300-8300. Pretty people, fresh num-nums, seas of strollers, a man eating a waffle barehanded—it must be summer and time for folks to make the pilgrimage to farmers’ markets. In Missoula at Circle Square (missoulafarmersmarket.com), on Pine Street (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), under the Higgins Avenue bridge (clarkforkrive rmarket.com) and in Hamilton at South Third and Bedford Streets. Hours vary slightly, but most take place between 8 AM and 1 PM. Get a hit of cardiovascular exercise during Nia: The Joy of Movement, from 9 AM to 10 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $12/$10 members. Call 541-7240.

Violinist Beth Youngblood and co. entrance your ears with world music when they play Bhavana, 101 E. Broadway, from 5:30-7:30 PM.

Veg out with your carrot out during the Hamilton Farmers Market, where folks can purchase all sorts of dee-lish local goodies from area farmers. Third and Bedford Streets. 9 AM to 12:30 PM. Get musical while finding your flow when Brian Baty leads a live music Vinyasa yoga class, which features music by Nathan Zavalney, this and every Sat. from 9:30–10:45 AM at Inner Harmony Yoga, 214 E. Main St. Ste. B. $10 drop-in/$8 students drop-in, with various prices for punch-card holders. Call 581-4093 or visit yogainmissoula.com. As Prince once said: Cream, get on top. The 101st Creamery Picnic in Stevensville includes a bevy of family fun, like a parade and barbecue competition. Saturday kicks off at 8:30 AM with a 5K and 10K Milk Run, starting at the U.S. Forest Service Building. Learn more at creamerypicnic.com. Step one: Admit you have a problem (usually it’s a propensity for exaggeration and/or filling out dream journals). Step two: Attend Writers Anonymous, an adult writing workshop in the Missoula Public Library boardroom every first Sat. of the month. 10 AM–noon. Free.

missoulanews.com • August 1–August 8, 2013 [31]

Always there for you in an emergency. The California alt-rock band Cake plays Big Sky Amphitheater Sat., Aug 3., at 8 PM. $35. Visit ticketweb.com.

Check out the art and science that is quilting at the “Places In the Heart” show from Cabin Fever Quilters in the Superior High School multipurpose room in Superior, off I-90 exit 47. 10 AM-6 PM. Call Susan at 396-4731 for more info. Your bedtime tales of collegeage debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like storytelling, finger plays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM on Sat. and 2 PM on Sun. at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721BOOK. Celebrate the sparkling waters of the Clark Fork that sustain our town at Missoula River Fest, which includes a float from Milltown to downtown, Lake Missoula SUP Classic, Surf Jam on Brennan’s Wave, music at Caras Park and beer and food. It all kicks off at 11 AM. Check out MissoulaRiverFest.com. Kiddos might ponder berrymunching bruins when Laura Budds, author of Have You Ever Seen A Bear With A Purple Smile, presents storytime and a signing at

Fact and Fiction, 220 Higgins Ave. 11 am-12:30 PM.

on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 8303296 and visit missoulawinery.com.

Find out if art galleries are the hangover cure we’ve all been looking for when The Missoula Art Museum hosts a tour every Saturday at noon. Various exhibiting artists, guides and teachers host. Visit missoulaartmuseum.org to find out schedule details. Free.

Get a taste of la dolce vita and a li’l vino when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 549-8703. Visit tenspoon.com.

The guild that sews together, stays together, so join Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., at Craft Vigilantes, its monthly Modern Quilt Guild for beginners and pros alike. 12–5 PM. $20 (first few sign-ups are free). I already know whether you’re going to attend the Psychic Fair, hosted by Water Lilies’ Body Mind Spirit store, 1537 S> Reserve St. Opens Friday from 4-9 PM, Saturday 11 AM-8 PM, Sunday 11 AM-5 PM.

nightlife End your afternoon with a fine glass of grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2–5 PM

[32] Missoula Independent • August 1–August 8, 2013

Billy Shaddox and Kara Tauchman soothe your senses with the power of live music when they play Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave., from 6-8 PM. Free. Feel free to grin when Har-diHar, a Midwestern duo with a “Beach Boys by way of Sufjan Stevens” vibe, plays the Bitter Root Brewery from 6-8:30 PM. No cover. A bunch of ragtag musicians with who-knows-what kind of instruments get together from 7 to 9:30 PM on the first Sat. of every month for the Bitterroot Valley Good-Time Jamboree at the Grange Hall, 1436 South First St. in Hamilton. This month there’s Irish tunes, cowboy poetry, jazz and western swing. $3 donations are encouraged. Call Clem at 961-4949.

If Satan is your motor, or if you will survive, or if you’re going the distance, and especially if you know what band I’m referencing (not King Missile), then you are certainly psyched for California alt-rockin’ superheroes Cake, who perform for you and all the other humanoids out at Big Sky Brewing. 8 PM. $35. Visit ticketweb.com. Soak it up and sing it down to some 67,000 tunes when The Outpost Restaurant & Saloon, 38500 W. Hwy. 12 at Lolo Hot Springs, presents karaoke with KJ Mark, starting at 9 PM. Free. Call 273-4733.

lease, along with DJs Phoniks, SolidState and more. 9 PM. Palace. Free. If you’re all revved up from the Missoula River Fest, head on over to the official afterparty, a benefit for the Max Wave, at Monk’s, 225 Ryman St. Tunes from Tim Carey, Kapture and Jason Woo are all on deck. 9 PM. $5, 18plus. Check out themaxmissoula.org to find out about this plan to transform a degraded section of the river.

Absolutely DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are like Shabba-Doo and Boogaloo Shrimp, saving rec centers one beat at at time. Get hip to their jamz, hippies. Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2-for-1 Absolut drinks until midnight. $2.

There is gonna be Pussy Galore on the big screen when Missoula Outdoor Cinema presents the James Bond classic Goldfinger, at 9:05 PM on the lawn of Head Start School, 1001 Worden Ave. $5 suggested donation. Call 8290873 and visit missoulaoutdoor cinema.org.

DJ Dubwise spins hot oldschool and new dance party traxxx at Feruqis, 318 N. Higgins Ave., starting at 10 PM. Free.

Find your own Patrick Swayze when the Roadhouse Band plays the Sunrise Saloon, from 9:30 PM to close. No cover.

It’ll be a gem of an evening when local electronic artist Emythist parties down in honor of its CD re-

Head on up to Lolo Hot Springs to kick up your boots to the Wild Coyote Band. 10 PM. No cover.

[calendar]

SUNDAYAUGUST04 Get your Sunday rawk on when San Francisco’s Wild Moth, along with Boise’s Ditch Tigers, Idahoans Avair and our own Buddy Jackson and The All-Hail play the ZACC, 235 N. First St. Expect facial hair, sonic chaos, sweert jamz and tight jeans. 7-11 PM. All ages, alcoholfree. $5. Catch new thoughts with the Science of Mind Community during a Sunday service via the internet when Rev. Kathianne Lewis spreads a spiritual message at the Carriage House in Hamilton, 310 N. Fourth St., at 10 AM every Sun. Free. Call Barb at 375-9996. Take a chill pill and ride a pony during the Carousel Sunday Market, every Sunday from 10 AM to 2 PM. Produce, psychic readings, live food, music, kids’ activities and, yes, pony rides, are all going down. Artist Lisa Hofman is set up on the street corner outside the Import Market at Broadway and Ryman to sell prints and cards from original paintings. Proceeds go to the Humane Society of Western Montana. 10 AM-2 PM. Your bedtime tales of collegeage debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like storytelling, finger plays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM on Sat. and 2 PM on Sun. at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Kick out the jams down the ‘Root at the dining room of the Sapphire Lutheran Homes, corner of 10th and River streets. Players of all levels are invited to bring their guitars, mandolins, harmonicas, fiddles, banjos, dobros, or other acoustic instrument. Music includes old-time country, bluegrass, swing, cowboy, folk, old standards, etc. Folks who want to play or just listen are encouraged to come. For more information, call John at 3812483. Free. Singer-songwriter Kristi Neumann plays Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave., to wind down your Sunday funday. 4-6 PM. I already know whether you’re going to attend the Psychic Fair, hosted by Water Lilies’ Body Mind Spirit store, 1537 S. Reserve St. Opens Friday from 4-9 PM, Saturday 11 AM-8 PM, Sunday 11 AM-5 PM.

nightlife End your afternoon with a fine glass of grape juice when the Mis-

soula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 830-3296 and visit missoulawinery.com. Pizza/music/beer lovers (and that oughta be near all of you), it’s that time once again: Total Feast, the fundraiser for the nonprofit, all-ages Total Fest, includes all-you-can-eat Biga pizza and $1 beer. 5-9 PM. 241 W. Main. $10. Check out totalfest.org. Explore the idea of open intelligence and the peace, happiness and skillfulness that exists within you during the Balanced View open meeting, which runs every Sun. from 6-7 PM in the meeting room of the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free, but donations accepted. Enter from the back entrance. Visit greatfreedom.org for more info. Put some centripetal motion into your Sunday when Western Union plays the Top Hat from 7-9 PM. No cover, all ages. After all that pizza and beer, enjoy a Total Feast digestif at the VFW, where Hammshandy and The Hounds play starting around 7:30 or 8 PM. A very special guest (Bauhaus cover band, hint, hint) plays also. Cover TBA.

Those looking for motherto-mother breast feeding support can find it when the La Leche League meets every first Mon. of the month at 10 AM and every third Monday of the month at 6 PM at the First Presbyterian Church, 201 S. Fifth St. W. Free. Children and babies are always welcome. Anyone affected by epilepsy can come to the Epilepsy Support Group at Summit Independent Living Center, 700 SW Higgins Ave. 2– 3:30 PM. Free. Call 721-0707.

nightlife Show how big your gray matter can get at Super Trivia Freakout. Win a bar tab, shots and other mystery prizes during the five rounds of trivia at the Badlander. 8:30 PM. Free. Argue whether “xi” really counts as a word during Missoula Public Library’s Scrabble group, which meets in the board room on Monday nights at 6. Boards and nerds, I mean competitors, included. Bingo at the VFW: the easiest way to make rent since keno. 245 W. Main. 6:45 PM. $12 buy-in.

Npustin’s KwKwusm Theatre Project presents the Third Annual Native American Playwriting Festival, Aug. 5-9, which kicks off with Trickster and Dirty Corner, by Victor A. Charlo and Zan Agzigian, and includes The Hell Gate Treaty: We Are This Land by Jennifer Finley and The Dink Brothers, by Julie Cajune and Jennifer Finley. All performances are at 7 PM at the Hangin’ Art Gallery in Arlee. Free will donation. Check out npustin.org. Spit out that gum before joining the Missoula City Band rehearsal, every Monday from 7-9 PM in the Sentinel High School band room. All players welcome. Learn more at missoulacityband.org. John Sporman and Travis Yost do the jailhouse rock when Next Door Prison Hotel plays the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave., from 7-10 PM. Free. Get mindful at Be Here Now, a mindfulness meditation group that meets Mondays from 7:30 to 8:45 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Open to all religions and levels of practice. Free, but donations appreciated. Visit openway.org.

Open Mic with Joey Running Crane at the VFW, 245 W. Main, seems like a fine idea, especially with 2-for-1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. 10 PM. Free. Call him up and get yourself a slot at 229-0488. Rock the mic when DJ Super Steve rocks the karaoke with the hottest Kamikaze tuneage this side of the hemisphere at the Dark Horse. Are you brave enough to let the computer pick your songs? 9 PM. Free.

TUESDAYAUGUST06 The Western Montana Fair and Rodeo is the jam every summer: vikings to nosh on, sheep to pet, bulls to battle, Zipper rides and flirtin’ with boys. But you know what? The demo derby is where things get really real. Check it all out at the Western Montana Fairgrounds, 1101 South Ave., today through Sun., Aug. 11. Visit missoulafairgrounds.com. Dance cuz everybody’s watching at the American Cabaret Style bellydance class at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St.

Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Starts at 8 PM with Front Street Jazz. Free. Bellow out your favorite pop tune so you can impress your friends and perhaps win a prize during a karaoke contest this and every Sun. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. $3 Fireball specials. Call 721-1798.

MONDAYAUGUST05 Sensational country music sensations Gloriana attack your aural sense with country tunes that make you question your musical sensibilities. Top Hat, 134 W. Front St. Doors at 8 PM, 9 PM. $22/$18 advance. Visit tophatlounge.com, the Top Hat or Rockin Rudy’s.

If the summer daze has a hold on you, get up on your feet and head to the Jazz and African Dance Workshop at River Street Dance Theater, 421 N. Second St. in Hamilton. Workshop is open to ages 7 to adult. Call 363-1203 for schedule and info.

missoulanews.com • August 1–August 8, 2013 [33]

• Featuring vendors that use or grow raspberries, huckleberries, strawberries and CHERRIES • MUD will present a canning for berries and cherries, plus a cherry pitting and grinding demo (starting at 11am) • Library will have books to check out about fruit (science/health/children related)

Visit clarkforkmarket.com, facebook for music calendar, what's in season, coupons and deals

• Msla County Ext. will have info on growing fruit trees/shrubs as well as pest management • Buy the featured fruit or products that use these fruits, or mention this ad and be entered for a drawing to win a flat of cherries and market tote bag (inquire at Market Info Booth) • Music provided by a select quartet from the Msla Symphony starting around 10am

photo courtesy Chrissy Piper

Nothin’ but net. The Uncluded, featuring Aesop Rock and Kimya Dawson, come to town with the Hokey Fright Tour. Folk punker Hammell on Trial opens. Palace. Fri., Aug. 2 at 9 PM. $15, plus $5 surcharge for ages 18-20. Tickets at brownpapertickets.com.

This class is great for beginners and experienced dancers alike. 6–7 PM. Visit madronadance.wordpress.com. If the summer daze has a hold on you, get up on your feet and head to the Jazz and African Dance Workshop at River Street Dance Theater, 421 N. Second St. in Hamilton. Workshop is open to ages 7 to adult. Call 363-1203 for schedule and info. Brush your teeth, cowboy, before the seventh annual National Smokeless and Spit Tobacco Summit, hosted at the University Center on campus. Various national experts will speak on preventing smokeless tobacco use and oral cancer. Visit smokelesstobaccosummit.com. Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room for Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters, at 5205 Grant Creek Dr., and work on your elk-camp locution

[34] Missoula Independent • August 1–August 8, 2013

with the best. All are invited. Noon– 1 PM. Free.

nightlife Draught Works Brewery hosts a pint night in benefit of the National Forest Foundation, which protects the 193-million-acre forest system. Drink up, play games and hang out with foresty folks from 58 PM. 915 Toole Ave. If early morning grub grabbing isn’t for you, head to the Tuesday Farmer’s Market at Circle Square on the north end of Higgins Ave. Veggies, flowers and pretty people are bountiful. 5:30–7 PM. It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Boys Bluegrass from 5:30 to 8 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. Dust off that banjolin and join in the Top Hat’s picking circle, from 6 to 8 PM. All ages.

Npustin’s KwKwusm Theatre Project presents the Third Annual Native American Playwriting Festival, Aug. 5-9, which kicks off with Trickster and Dirty Corner, by Victor A. Charlo and Zan Agzigian, and includes The Hell Gate Treaty: We Are This Land by Jennifer Finley and The Dink Brothers, by Julie Cajune and Jennifer Finley. All showings at 7 PM at the Hangin’ Art Gallery in Arlee. Free will donation. Check out npustin.org. Award-winning author Amy Leach is back in town to share more of her imaginative book of essays, Things That Are, which ponders everything from intergalactic dust to beaver dams. Fact and Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. 7 PM. The Unity Dance and Drum African Dance Class is sure to teach you some moves you didn’t learn in junior high when it meets Tuesday from 7 to 8:30 PM at the Missoula Senior Center, 705

[calendar] S. Higgins Ave. All ages and skill levels welcome. $10, $35 for four classes. Email tarn.ream@umontana.edu or call 549-7933 for more information. Drink from the cup of knowledge during the Socrates Café at the Bitterroot Public Library West Meeting room in Hamilton. Questions are chosen, terms discussed and thoughts given. 7–9 PM. Free. It’s a veritable smorgasboard of tasty underground bands when LA’s mathy hardcore/emo band Calculator. plays the ZACC, along with the Plurals, Sama Dams, Catherine Feeny, you.may.die.in.the.desert and Commissure. Everything from singer-songwriter to post rock, plus those silly Whoopass Girls might show up, too. 235 N. First St. $5. 711 PM. All ages, no alcohol. Find your dance and yourself at Turning the Wheel’s Tapestry class, which is a self-expression-filled improvisational bonanza. Headwaters Dance Company studio, 1042 Monroe St. 7:30-9 PM. $10. Proceeds benefit Turning the Wheel’s school programs. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free pub trivia, which takes place every Tuesday at 8 PM. Here’s a question to tickle your brainwaves: Aug. 1 is Tempestt Bledsoe’s 40th birthday. Which sister did she play on the “Cosby” show? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.) “So much depends upon a red wheelbarrow...” Learn to mine great lines from that fabulous mind of yours just like William Carlos Williams when you join other seasoned and novice poets for Poetry Club every Tuesday at 8 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First W. The winningest USian will get a $25 bar tab at KBGA’s Tuesday Trivia night, which includes music and picture rounds, plus drank specials. Pro tip: $25 is enough to buy almost everybody in the bar a Natty Light. Free to play. VFW, 245 W. Main St. 8-10 PM. The Montana Musicians and Artists Coalition hosts the Musician Showcase at Stage 112, inside the Elk’s at 112 Pattee St., an evening of tuneful live tuneage made by locals for locals. 8–11 PM. Free. 18 plus.

Rockin Rudy’s, Top Hat and tophatlounge.com.

on campus. Various national experts will speak on preventing smokeless tobacco use and oral cancer. Visit smokelesstobaccosummit.com.

Wild Coyote Band slaps some fun into your weeknights at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St. 9 PM. No cover.

Food served out of a truck always tastes better, so check out the goods at Out to Lunch in Caras Park, from 11 AM–2 PM. Free to hang out and people-watch, food will cost you.

Reg Adgerson presents “Band in Motion: Blues and Beyond” at Stage 112, 112 Pattee St., at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

exactly pumping out the good stuff these days, so get off your bum for a few and take Cathy Clark’s West Coast Swing Class at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent Ave. 7 PM. $5. Npustin’s KwKwusm Theatre Project presents the Third Annual Native American Playwriting Festival, Aug. 5-9, which kicks off with Trickster and Dirty Corner,

street art Street art (or, “graffiti,” as some would call it) has been around since the dawn of urban communities and language. Pompeii, the town buried by Mount Vesuvius, is covered in explicit and silly graffiti. Fast forward a few centuries, and Joseph Kyselak, a Vienna man whose name can still be seen engraved on 19th-century era brick walls in Austria, is considered the father of modern tagging.

There’s no stopping people from decorating the spaces around them; but as some government projects are demonstrating, you can foster a more engaging and artistic public sphere. You’ve no doubt seen the Traffic Box Art Project around Missoula. The project is now in its fifth year, thanks to the city’s Public Art Committee. Private donations and municipal funds help pay each artist a commission of $1,000. The art ranges from Kip Sikoras’ splashy-neon portrayal of bison and elk, “Long May the Wilderness Be Wild,” on 39th and Dore Lane, to the cavorting cartoon characters of Josh Quick’s “Alternative Transporation Missoula” on Broadway and Toole.

Today, of course, we might first think of the ever-provocative Banksy or “Obey” artist Shepard Fairey, as seen in the engrossing 2010 documentary Exit Through the Gift Shop. The best street art is smart, funny and, hopefully, adds a little beauty and vibrancy to oth- Abby Sweet’s “Untitled” at erwise drab spaces. Out of archi- Higgins and Pine. tectural necessity, or perhaps just Seven new projects, finished a lack of imagination, cities often seem to be domi- over the last weekend of July, have spruced up nated by gray sidewalks, pavement and buildings. boxes stretching from downtown to Reserve and WHAT: Traffic Box Art reception and artist talk WHERE: Dana Gallery WHEN: Fri., Aug 2, at 6 PM HOW MUCH: Free

Mullan. The work includes Meaghan Gately’s “The Light and the Dark,” on Brooks and Paxson streets, Karl Stein’s “Tank Fulla Trout” at Russell and South Third St., and two pieces from Claire Rose KleeseMencel. (The artists will give a talk about their work at the Dana Gallery on First Friday.) Local artists getting paid to beautify our streets: It’s street art, taken to its highest level.

MORE INFO: ci.missoula.mt.us, under the Public Art Committee section

WEDNESDAYAUGUST07 Boston band Skyfoot brings the peanut butter and jam when it plays the Top Hat, starting at 10 PM. Free.

Missoula’s own funky parliamentarians Kung Fu Kongress play their last show tonight, so y’all better take this last chance to dance. Badlander. 9 PM. $5.

If the summer daze has a hold on you, get up on your feet and head to the Jazz and African Dance Workshop at River Street Dance Theater, 421 N. Second St. in Hamilton. Workshop is open to ages 7 to adult. Call 3631203 for schedule and info.

Come to Fruition and enjoy a li’l string band music, Portland-style, when it plays the Top Hat. Show at 9 PM. $8/$6 in advance at

Brush your teeth, cowboy, before the seventh annual National Smokeless and Spit Tobacco Summit, hosted at the University Center

Until the day comes that we can install GPS locators in our kids, do the next best thing and get a free Child ID, at an event hosted by local law enforcement every Wednesday at Caras Park at 11:30 AM. Child IDs record information like fingerprints and contact info, which are needed in case of an abduction and Amber Alert. The Jocko Valley Farmers Market offers treats, produce, tunes and more in The Hangin Art Gallery parking lot, 92555 Highway 93 in Arlee, from 4-7 PM. For more information or to become a vendor, call Kelley at 726-5550.

nightlife Hey, spring is here and TV ain’t

—Kate Whittle

by Victor A. Charlo and Zan Agzigian, and includes The Hell Gate Treaty: We Are This Land by Jennifer Finley and The Dink Brothers, by Julie Cajune and Jennifer Finley. All showings at 7 PM at the Hangin’ Art Gallery in Arlee. Free will donation. Check out npustin.org. Here’s some scary news: doctors are already seeing new infections, increased environmental toxins and more ER visits and hospitalizations as result of climate change. Dr. Wendy Ring presents “Climate Change: How Is It Affecting Our Health?” at Adventure Cycling Association, 150 E. Pine St., at 7 PM, to present some ideas on how to combat the problem.

KVD! KVD! KVD! The one and only Kevin Van Dort Band plays the Top Hat from 7-9 PM. Free, all ages. Feel the grass under your toes, let the breeze ruffle your hair and kick back to the sonic stylings of the Missoula City Band, which presents its annual summer concerts every Wednesday evening at 8 PM in Bonner Park, on the corner of Ronald and Hastings Streets. Free. Check missoulacityband.org for artist info. Reggae band John Brown’s Body—named after a song about an abolitionist—brings its brand of “future roots” music to Stage 112 tonight at 8 PM. 112 Pattee St. $18/$15 in advance at stageonetwelve.com. Let me tell you something I learned the hard way: Meatloaf songs are not appropriate for karaoke. Now go forth to Kraptastic Karaoke at the Badlander, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $6 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free. Wild Coyote Band slaps some fun into your weeknights at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St. 9 PM. No cover. If you’re wandering about the fair today, mosey over to the free stage to catch Band In Motion: Blues and Beyond, a musical experience that’s sure to be energetic, at 9 PM. Western Montana Fairgrounds. Let the worb work its way into your heart at Missoula Area Dubstep Wednesday, with beats from Djs Milkcrate Mechanic, Ebrola and Broken Stihletto. 10:30 PM. Free. (Trivia answer: Vanessa Huxtable.)

THURSDAYAUGUST08 Npustin’s KwKwusm Theatre Project presents the Third Annual Native American Playwriting Festival, Aug. 5-9, which kicks off with Trickster and Dirty Corner, by Victor A. Charlo and Zan Agzigian, and includes The Hell Gate Treaty: We Are This Land by Jennifer Finley and The Dink Brothers, by Julie Cajune and Jennifer Finley. All showings at 7 PM at the Hangin’ Art Gallery in Arlee. Free will donation. Check out npustin.org.

If the summer daze has a hold on you, get up on your feet and head to the Jazz and African Dance Workshop at River Street Dance Theater, 421 N. Second St. in Hamilton. Workshop is open to

missoulanews.com • August 1–August 8, 2013 [35]

[calendar]

This looks suit-able. Vintage Trouble brings a retro-rock-n-roll vibe to the Missoula Winery and Event Center, 5646 Harrier St, Thu., Aug. 8. 7 PM. $15/$13 in advance. Check out ticketfly.com.

ages 7 to adult. Call 363-1203 for schedule and info. Brush your teeth, cowboy, before the seventh annual National Smokeless and Spit Tobacco Summit, hosted at the University Center on campus. Various national experts will speak on preventing smokeless tobacco use and oral cancer. Visit smokelesstobaccosummit.com. Take a lis-zen when Joan Zen Jazz group plays Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6-8:30 PM. No cover. Release some stress during t’ai chi classes every Thursday at 10 AM at The Open Way Center, 702 Brooks St. $10 drop-in class. Visit openway.org. The Missoula Parkinson’s Disease Support Group meets the second Thursday of each month at the Montana First Credit Union, 3708 N. Reserve St. Call Cindy Cone at 728-8283 or Ann Houston at 543-8939 for more info. Free. Who has two green thumbs and likes learning about native plants? Potential Fort Missoula Native Plant Garden volunteers, that’s who. Work beside botanists and gardeners and become an expert on local flora. Thursdays from 4–6 PM at the Fort Missoula Native Plant Gardens. Visit montana naturalist.org.

nightlife End your afternoon with a fine glass of grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 8303296 and visit missoulawinery.com. Get a taste of la dolce vita and a li’l vino when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 549-8703. Visit tenspoon.com. Get your grub on, but don’t pig out, and give a girl a call who you wanna take out to Downtown ToNight, where local food and beer vendors as well as local musicians have a good day down at Caras Park. 5:30– 8:30 PM. Free to hang and bang, but the grub and beer will cost you a couple ducats. Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free. Discuss how to become a real leader in your community when the Bitterroot Public Library’s Fellowship Club meets to discuss Deepak Chopra’s The Soul of Leadership: Unlocking Your Potential for Greatness. 6-7:30 PM. Email jacostant@gmail.com for more info.

[36] Missoula Independent • August 1–August 8, 2013

Those cheeky Hasslers play indie rock and Americana at Draught Works Brewery from 6-8 PM. Free. Win $50 by using your giant egg to answer trivia questions at Brains on Broadway Trivia Night at the Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway Ave. 7 PM. Plus, all-youcan-eat wings, $10 two-topping pizzas, $6 domestic pitchers and $7 Blue Moon pitchers. “Sensational, soulful” four-man band Vintage Trouble brings a retro-rock-n-roll vibe to the Missoula Winery and Event Center, 5646 Harrier St. 7 PM. $15/$13 in advance. Check out ticketfly.com. Fierce two-piece Erin and the Project plays the Top Hat from 7-9 PM. Free, all ages. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM. Show ‘em that pop culture knowledge is just as important as having a job during Trivial Beersuit at the Lucky Strike Casino. Prizes for podium finishers. Karaoke follows. 1515 Dearborn. 8–10 PM. During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, local talented folks may titillate your eardrums. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up.

Fight for your right to belt out tunes at the Dark Horse’s Combat Karaoke, hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free. Gotta hydrate before you gyrate to the latest hip tunes and underground tracks at Dead Hipster Dance Party. 9 PM. Badlander. You won’t get your teeth knocked out, but your socks will surely be knocked off when Hockey, Saint Motel and Swimm play Stage 112, at 112 Pattee St. 9 PM. $15/$10 in advance. 18-plus. Check out stageonetwelve.com. Continue your Fair Week country fun when The Ryan Larsen Band plays the Sunrise Saloon, 9 PM to close. No cover. Fiddlers’ fingers will be flyin’ when Lil’ Smokies and Colorado string band Finnders & Youngberg play the Top Hat. 9:30 PM. $5. “I once shook hands with Pat Boone and my whole right side sobered up.”– Dean Martin. Submit events by 5 PM on Friday to calendar@missoulanews.com to ensure publication in print and online. Include the who-what-whenwhere-why and a picture, if you would be so kind. Alternately, mail to Calapatra c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit events at missoulanews.com.

[outdoors]

MOUNTAIN HIGH

I

If you aren’t sure how candid a professional endurance runner’s blog might be, check out Missoula athlete Jason Schlarb’s writing. Take this, from a post about last year’s Grindstone100-mile ultramarathon in Virginia, which he finished in 18:35: “On the way home while pushing up a hill I took in too much water and before I could even think about it, I puked like a cartoon character. Three huge fountain blasts later I was done.” It relates a humility that I, personally, would not have if I were physically capable of running 100 miles. He’s also a fan of beer, which is endearing. You can likely expect that down-to-earth vibe when Schlarb and his fellow runner, Jeremy Wolf, give a presentation on Aug. 1 about their recent five-day point-to-point run through the Italian Dolomites mountain range. The write-up on irunfar.com contains as-

tonishing tidbits, like the fact they arrived at the trip’s starting point without even a trail map. The run took them through the rugged, compact range and along rifugios, a network of B&B-type support stops intended for hikers. I’m not sure that I’m brave enough to attempt such a thing; but Schlarb’s enthusiasm makes me think I ought to start somewhere. –Kate Whittle Pro trail runners Jason Schlarb and Jeremy Wolf give a multimedia presentation on their epic five-day run through the Italian Dolomites mountain range. Runner's Edge, 304 N. Higgins Ave. Thu., Aug. 1, at 7 PM. Includes gear giveaway from sponsors.

OUR SPECIAL NONPROFIT GUESTS: August 1 vs Helena Brewers Opportunity Resources

August 6 vs Billings Mustangs Missoula County Relay for Life

August 2 vs Helena Brewers Sharehouse

August 13 vs Grand Junction Rockies NCBI

August 3 vs Billings Mustangs Available August 5 vs Billings Mustangs Biomimicry 3.8

August 14 vs Grand Junction Rockies PEO

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To get your organization signed up, for next year’s Community Corner, send a written request on your organization's letterhead to: Missoula Osprey c/o Community Corner MSO Hub 140 N. Higgins, Missoula 59802 or call 543-3300

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

THURSDAY AUGUST 1 The Thursday Night Mountain Bike Group meets on Tuesdays to play polo. Kidding, kidding, they meet on Thursdays at 6 PM to ride trails in the Missoula area. Check thursdaynightmtbr.org to find out locations.

FRIDAY AUGUST 2 Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s weekly meeting to talk about past glories and upcoming activities at Bigfork’s Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free. Make sure your first time is special by attending First Timer Friday at the Freestone Climbing Center, 935 Toole Ave. in Missoula, at 7 PM. Free if it’s your first visit. No need for bear spray at the “Getting To Know Grizzlies” talk from FWP biologist James Jonkel, who discusses bear research and management in western Montana as part of the “Montana’s Multitude of Myths, Misconceptions and Little Known Facts” series. Beavertail Hill State Park amphitheater near Clinton. 8-9 PM. Folks are welcome to just come up for the talk or to camp for the evening. See stateparks.mt.gov.

SATURDAY AUGUST 3 Leave it to the organizers of the HURL Elkhorn Endurance Runs to describe their event: “Run ‘til you hurl, then run some more.” Sound like fun? Sign up for the 50-mile, 50K or 23K race—each along trails and primitive Forest Service roads near Montana City, outside Helena—at vigilanterunning.org. No need to dress like a Disney princess, but you can certainly enjoy a lot of darling woodland creatures during the Heart and

Pearl Lakes hike, guided by Lolo National Forest botanist Craig Odegarde. The eight-mile hike includes elevation gain of 1,600 feet. Meet up to carpool at Starbucks, 5620 Grant Creek Road at 7 AM. Call Claire at 728-0189 for more info. You’ll be bright eyed and bushy tailed after Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which start at 8 AM every Saturday at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. Grab breakfast with other participants afterward. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org. Ride the gorgeous Route of the Hiawatha at Lookout Pass Ski Area, exit 0 on I-90, and zip through train tunnels and trestles, as part of a Special Olympics Montana benefit. 10 AM-5 PM. Register at fvar.somt.org/hiawatha-cycle-forchampions. Cozy up by Salmon Lake and enjoy “Favorite Montana Stories, Myths, and Tall Tales” with Hal Stearns. Stop by for the talk or camp out for the night. Salmon Lake State Park, five miles south of Seeley Lake on Highway 83. 8-9 PM.

TUESDAY AUGUST 6 Meet other free-wheeling gals when Montana Dirt Girls meet every Tuesday around 6 PM on Tuesdays for hiking or mountain biking in the Missoula area. For locations and more information, visit mtdirtgirls.tripod.com. Free.

THURSDAY AUGUST 8 The Thursday Night Mountain Bike Group meets on Tuesdays to play polo. Kidding, kidding, they meet on Thursdays at 6 PM to ride trails in the Missoula area. Check thursdaynightmtbr.org to find out locations. calendar@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • August 1–August 8, 2013 [37]

[community]

When you’re born, someone ticks a box for “M” or “F,” and for the rest of your life, you’re expected to fit in that box. But what if you don’t? Many cultures have designations for folks who don’t fit the binary: from Indian hijras to Nandi female husbands to Native American two-spirits. Newer schools of thought on the matter theorize that there’s shades of gender expression, with complete masculinity or femininity on either end of the spectrum. (Check out the Fifty Shades of Gender Tumblr.) No one fits completely on either end. The idea of gender theory is that, no matter what you identify as or what your body looks like, you are still a worthy human being. This is part of the ethos behind Soulsville, an event supporting the Interface project, which benefits people born intersex. “No body is shameful,” goes its tagline. People can be intersex in many ways, from ambiguous genital formations to chromosome complications. Local jazz singer and musician, Eden Atwood, pictured, has

been vocal about her experience with intersex. She explains that her body looks outwardly female, but she actually has XY chromosomes and had internal testes removed, without her knowledge, when she was young. Intersex babies are often operated on in hopes that they’ll grow up “normal” and none the wiser, but that sometimes leads to health problems and psychological trauma. It’s the aim of groups like the Interface Project to prevent this. No one perfectly fits in a box; and no one should have to, either.

—Kate Whittle Support the intersex community at an evening of music and dining when Huey Lewis and Eden Atwood & Friends present SOULSVILLE: A Benefit for The Interface Project at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, Fri., Aug. 2. Cocktails and hors d'oeuvres at 6 PM, music at 7:30 PM. $100. Visit interfaceproject.org.

[AGENDA LISTINGS] THURSDAY AUGUST 1 Losing a pet is losing a friend. Hospice of Missoula presents Pet Bereavement Support, an opportunity to work through your grief with others in the community. The four-week group meets Thursday evenings at 6:30 PM at Natural Grocers, 2530 S. Third St. W. Free, but call Hospice of Missoula to register and learn more at 543-4408.

SATURDAY AUGUST 3 Anyone facing illness or loss is welcome to join the Unified Design From Pencil to 3D: Create a Jeweled Mandala class, the first of a two-part series, from 10:30 AM-12:30 PM. Living Art of Montana, 725 W. Alder St. Unit 17. Free. Living Art’s mission is to promote healing through the arts. See livingartofmontana.org.

SUNDAY AUGUST 4 This is the kind of mass I can really get behind. The Missoula Area Secular Society presents its Sunday M.A.S.S. Lunch, where atheists, secular humanists, agnostics and other freethinkers meet the first Sun. of every month for lunch at 11:30 AM in the Elbow Room. 1855 Stephens Ave. Free to attend, but the food costs you. Visit secularmissoula.org.

MONDAY AUGUST 5 Come on down for Moscow Monday at the Montgomery Distillery, 129 W. Front St., where the distillery redistributes the wealth. (It ain’t called Wall Street Wednesday, amiright?) $1 from every drink sold is donated to a different non-profit each Monday. Family friendly, from noon–8 PM. July 29’s event benefits the Missoula Food Bank. Folks working to reactivate the Montana chapter of Veterans For Peace meet at 3 PM at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 102 McLeod. 3 PM. Visit veteransforpeace.org or call Patrick at 363-6150 or Dave at 541-2556.

The UM Climate Action Now Meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM FLAT, 633 Fifth St. E. 6:30 PM. Find out how the Garden City grows at the weekly Missoula City Council meeting, where you can no doubt expect ranting public commenters, PowerPoint presentations and subtle wit from Mayor Engen. Missoula council chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Meetings are the first four Mondays of every month at 7 PM, except for holidays.

TUESDAY AUGUST 6 Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. Third St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1–3 PM. For information, call 543-3955. Give your two cents on local urban design at the Missoula Consolidated Planning Board, which meets at 7 PM in City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St. On the agenda: public hearings for county subdivision regulations and Canyon River subdivision rezoning. Call Community and Planning Services at 258-3432 for more. Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication, a non-violent communication weekly practice group, at the Jeanette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Noon. Free.

THURSDAY AUGUST 8 Take care of yourself today at the Walgreens Way to Well Health Tour, which offers free health tests measuring the important stuff like blood pressure, metabolism and glucose levels. Must be 18-plus, tests take about 20 minutes. Walgreens locations throughout town. 11 AM to close. Losing a pet is losing a friend. Hospice of Missoula presents Pet Bereavement Support, an opportunity to work through your grief with others in the community. The four-week group meets Thursday evenings at 6:30 PM at Natural Grocers, 2530 S. Third St. W. Free, but call Hospice of Missoula to register and learn more at 543-4408.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

[38] Missoula Independent • August 1–August 8, 2013

missoulanews.com • August 1–August 8, 2013 [39]

M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

August 1 - August 8, 2013

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Advertise your business or product in alternative papers across the U.S. for just $995/week. New advertiser discount “Buy 3 Weeks, Get 1 Free” www.altweeklies.com/ads Big Sky Bouncers Your biggest and best bouncer house rental company this side of the divide. Half and full day rental (free delivery within 15 miles of Lolo). (406) 273-9001 www.bigskybouncers.com Grout Rite Your tile & grout specialists. Free Estimates. Over 31 yrs exp. 406-273-9938. www.groutrite.com

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PET OF THE WEEK MITCH This little guy named Mitch looks like a character straight from a Disney movie. With a personality to match and at 8-years young, this Terrier is sweet, affectionate, and quite social. Good with most dogs, Mitch is friendly and prefers men, truth be told. Tan in color and handsomely scruffy, Mitch likes hiking, a good old-fashioned walk, hanging out with you, and learning new things. Want to meet this actor? Come to the Humane Society of Western Montana. 406.549.4796.

“To deny people their human rights is to challenege their very humanity.” – Nelson Mandela

Talk it.

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

ADVICE GODDESS By Amy Alkon THE JAWS OF EX-WIFE I have had a huge crush on a man for several months and finally asked him out for drinks. During our "date," he mentioned his friend he wanted to set me up with, and I told him that HE is the person I'm interested in. He laughed nervously and seemed a little shocked. We went back to his place and spent hours just talking. He revealed that he's dating his ex-wife. She lives four hours away, and he visits her a couple times a month. We've since hung out at the pool and had drinks, but he again mentioned that he's dating his ex-wife. I've never been this attracted to a man, and I can't stop fantasizing about meeting him for much more than drinks! Do I lie low, waiting for him to drop his ex-wife, or do I make a move? —Magnetized There was a reason the guy wasn't asking you out, and it wasn't because a cartoon witch put a spell on him and he was unable to say "How about a drink on Friday night?" until three animated teapots and several woodland animals broke the evil curse. The wisdom of grandmas remains wise: If you want to catch a boy, don't run after him. As I explain with some frequency, women evolved to be the harder-to-get sex because having sex meant they could end up a single mother dragging a kid around the Sahara. Men coevolved to expect women to be choosier and to suspect that something's wrong with a woman when she's doing the chasing. This evolution and coevolution got burned into human psychology over millions of years—as contrasted by the drop in the bucket of human existence that is the women's movement in the past 50-some years. So, even if a man's ego is saying "Well, how groovy that she's pursuing me!" his genes are probably starting a betting pool for whether you are seriously loose, are seriously needy, or will soon be frying up his pet koi and feeding it to him in a little lemon butter sauce. Assuming some guy isn't too fragile a flower to lay his ego on the line (in which case he's lame partner material anyway), if he isn't asking you out, he either isn't interested enough or isn't available enough. You're now making this guy out to be the greatest thing since the four-slice toaster, probably to justify hanging around like a dog waiting for a scrap of food to get knocked off the counter. (In the wake of making a mistake, we have an unfortunate ego-coddling tendency to come up with reasons

it wasn't a mistake instead of admitting that, in fact, it was, which would allow us to move on.) Any further date-flavored get-togethers with this man are a bad idea. By continuing to throw yourself at him, you'll turn your self-respect into a chew toy. And even if he eventually detached himself from his exwife, there's a good chance that, by chasing him, you've already screwed up the equilibrium for any relationship. A more productive deployment of your time and ego would be dating that man he offered up as a decoy or finding men on your own—the available kind—and flirting with them, which alerts them that you're there for the chasing and interested in being chased. Flirting actually allows a woman to to make the first move—but far more alluringly than by yelling "Can't you see I want you, you moron?!" while clubbing a man over the head with the poolside clue phone.

ZERO THUMB GAME Do you text a guy after getting home from a fabulous date to hint that you want to see him again? Maybe to tell him how awesome he is or hint at your schedule? My girlfriend says no, but I think a guy should know you liked him so he feels he can ask for a second date. —Considerate There are times when a guy knows better than to ask a woman for a second date, like when she ended the first one by throwing herself out of his car while it was still moving. Otherwise, a man doesn't need hand-holding and encouragement in the form of texts: "Here are all the dates I'm free through 2015. Also, I'm doublejointed. Pick me! Pick me!" When you like a guy, you tell him so during your date by seeming happy and engaged and thanking him for a great time at the end, which suggests you'd be amenable to another date without also suggesting that you're controlling and desperate. Just because we have all these fabulous high-tech ways of communicating doesn't mean we should always be quick to use them, tempting as it can be to help a man along to the thought, "Wow...what a wonderful helicopter mom she'll make someday."

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

[C2] Missoula Independent • August 1 – August 8, 2013

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$300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training available. 1800-965-6520 ext. 278 CNA CAREGiver It takes a special person to become a CAREGiver, not a special degree. Working with seniors in their homes can be challenging but at the same time, tremendously rewarding. Enjoy training, support, flexible shifts that fit your life, and a job that nurtures the soul. No Medical Degree Necessary - Training and support provided - Flexible Shifts. Part-time, days, evenings, week end shifts are all available! Applicants must have reliable transportation. $8.25 -

DESERT NDT is looking for Radiographer Assistant in Williston, ND. No experience needed - $16/hr We Train You! Email resume - employment@desertndt.com

Home Entertainment Technician We are building a great team of motivated people to grow with. Learn a trade you can use nationwide. We provide paid certified training. Enjoy the security that comes with steady employment, competitive wages, and excellent benefits. Join a dedicated group of people who enjoy working with customers in a positive, professional environment. Submit your application online today. $12.00 Hourly. JOB# 9979089, Missoula Job Service 728-7060 Housekeeper A luxury ranch resort situated on a sprawling 37,000-acre cattle ranch thirty minutes east of Missoula. This position is responsible for maintaining cleanliness standards in all homes and areas assigned. Prior housekeeping experience in a high end resort setting preferred ~No felony convictions (must be willing to submit to a background check) ~Availability to work all days of the week ~Prior knowledge of area preferred ~Valid drivers license. $7.80 Hourly. JOB# 9979111, Missoula Job Service 728-7060 HOUSEKEEPER Missoula hotel is seeking Housekeepers. Must be neat and clean in appearance, have basic customer service skills— need to be polite and courteous with all guests, work well with a team and independently, have ability to follow directions, be dependable and reliable, and have strong

attention to detail. Shift starts at 9am and goes until assigned areas are cleaned. Must be available on Saturdays and Sundays. Schedule to be discussed at interview. Hours per week may vary. Starts at $8.25 per hour. JOB# 2984905, Missoula Job Service 728-7060 NEED A JOB NOW? Our company currently operates over 200 websites and a call center located in Missoula Must have phone, email, computer and internet skills. We offer paid training at $320 per week and commissions based pay to our trained sales people. Average wage is $18/HR +plus benefits and bonuses. For interviews call 406.329.7662 Now Hiring Call Today! 273-2266 SHOP LABORER / DELIVERY DRIVERS Valid driver’s license required with clean driving record. Knowledge of the greater Missoula area. Hiring for two full-time positions. Will be delivering materials from shop to work sites and other duties as assigned. Will be driving a standard transmission company vehicle. Monday - Friday, 8am - 4:30pm. $8.00 per hour. Must submit to drug test. Background check will be conducted. $8.00 Hourly. JOB# 9979056, Missoula Job Service 728-7060

EMPLOYMENT PROFESSIONAL Accounts Payable Clerk Processing of invoices, employee travel claims and other reimbursements, and contracted personnel payments. Reconcile vendor accounts and respond to vendor inquiries. Collection of W-9 and Workers Compensation insurance data. Backup administrative bank deposits. Assist with other projects as needed. $12.00 - $13.00 Hourly. JOB# 9979082, Missoula Job Service 728-7060 CLINICAL DOCUMENT COORDINATOR / #2984087 $40,560.00 $46,800.00 Yearly. Associate degree in Nursing or Medical Coding. Minimum 5 years experience adult inpatient medical surgical or critical care nursing; or minimum 5 years inpatient coding. Full time; M-F; day shift. Full benefit package provided. /lat. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 Development Coordinator Adventure Cycling Association seeks an energetic, well-organized, and detail-oriented person to fill the role of Development Coordinator in our Development Department. This is a unique opportunity for a selfstarter with initiative to join a fastgrowing development program. We seek a team player, with some development or client-services background with an enthusiasm for cycling. Please send a cover letter, writing sample and resume to ssnyder@adventurecycling.org. To see full job description go to adventurecycling.org Full-time qualified CPA for public accounting firm with 5-15 recent years of public accounting work experience. Send resume and cover letter to Rutherford, MacDonald & Olson, rmo@rmo-pc.com or 619 SW Higgins Ave., Suite R, Missoula, MT 59803. JOB# 9979099, Missoula Job Service 728-7060

LAND SURVEY INTERN (TECH) Must have 1 of the following: 1) a Bachelor of Science degree in a board-approved curriculum that includes a minimum of 27 semester or 40 quarter credit hours in surveying techniques, principles, and practices and evidence of having passed the written examinations required by the board; 2) at least 2 years of formal education in an approved curriculum that includes a minimum of 27 semester or 40 quarter credit hours in surveying techniques, principles, and practices, above high school level, with at least 60 semester or 90 quarter credit hours or equivalent semester hours passed, or the equivalent approved by the board, and evidence of having passed the written examinations required by the board; 3) a Bachelor of Science degree in a board-approved curriculum and evidence satisfactory to the board that, in addition, the applicant has had at least 2 years of combined office and field experience in land surveying, with a minimum of 1 year in charge of land surveying projects under the supervision of a professional land surveyor, and evidence of having passed the written examinations required by the board; or 4) at least 6 years of combined office and field experience in land surveying, with a minimum of 4 years of experience in charge of land surveying projects under the supervision of a professional land surveyor, and evidence of having passed the examinations required by the board. *Must have a valid Driver’s license. WAGE:

$19.70, after 6 mos probation $20.21. JOB# 2984903, Missoula Job Service 728-7060 RECREATION SPECIALIST – OUTDOOR RECREATION - Complete job description and required City application available at City of Missoula Human Resources Dept., 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT 59802-4297, (406) 552-6130 or apply on-line at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/jobs. Closing Date: 5:00 p.m., Tuesday, August 20, 2013. EEO/AA/ADA Employer. Qualified women, veterans, minority and handicapped individuals are strongly encouraged to apply.

roofers and concrete workers for our Eastern Montana division. Competitive wages. Job locations include Miles City, Glendive, Sidney, and Baker. Send inquiries with job history and references to Rotherham Construction, 240 Falcon Lane, Bozeman, MT 59718, or email rci@rothconst.com or fax to (406)582-1657. TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL.

Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings /Missoula, 1-800-545-4546

HEALTH CAREERS NORTHERN ROCKIES MEDICAL CENTER in Cut Bank a 20 bed Hospital is recruiting RN’s. FT, PT and PRN. Kandie Lemieux, HR, 406873-3737 or nrmchr@nrmcinc.org

Phlebotomist Providence is calling a Phlebotomist to Providence St. Patrick Hospital in Missoula, MT. JOB# 9644180, Missoula Job Service 728-7060

SALES

preferably in media sales. Thoroughly familiar with Microsoft Office Suite. Excellent communication, presentation and interpersonal skills. New or non-traditional media sales experience a plus. Solution based selling background. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

INTERACTIVE / ONLINE ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE / #2984085 A minimum of 3 years successful sales experience,

GIVE BACK. GET MORE.

SKILLED LABOR

HAB TECH I

Donate life-saving plasma.

LOOKING FOR PROFESSIONAL DRIVERS for auto transport company. Class A CDL required. Experience preferred but not required. Competitive wages and benefits, plus bonuses. Call 406-259-1528 or online www.jandstransport.com

FT Position providing services in a res/com setting. Sup exp preferred. Su: 7a-8p, M and Tu: 2p-12a, W: 2p-9p. $9.60-10.00/hr. Closes: 8/6/13, 5p

RECEIVE RECEI EC IV VE UP U TO $ $320 32 YOUR 1st MONTH!

ROTHERHAM CONSTRUCTION is hiring experienced carpenters,

DIRECT CARE

SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT AT BIOLIFEPLASMA.COM

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Weekday and weekend overnight hours assisting adults w/disabilities. $9.00$9.50/hr. Position open until filled.

for

PCA/CNA Training provided. Flexible shifts available. For more information please call 291-0732

Valid MT driver license No history of abuse, neglect or exploitation

Applications available at: OPPORTUNITY RESOURCES, INC., 2821 S. Russell, Missoula, MT 59801 or online at: www.orimt.org. Extensive background checks will be completed. NO RESUMES. EOE

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Must present this coupon prior to the initial donation to receive a total of $40 on your first, a total of $50 on your second, a total of $60 on your third, and a total of $70 on your fourth successful donation. Initial donation must be completed by 8.31.13 and subsequent donations within 30 days. Coupon redeemable only upon completing successful donations. May not be combined with any other offer. Only at participating locations.

Hiring Part-Time

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FLATBED DRIVERS NEEDED FROM THE MISSOULA AREA • Home weekly to Bi-weekly • Top pay • Full benefits • New equipment • 2 years exp. required • Clean driving record

406-493-7876 Call 9am-5pm M-F only

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • August 1 – August 8, 2013

[C3]

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): To add zest to mealtime, you might choose food that has been seasoned with red chili peppers, cumin, or other piquant flavors. Some chimpanzees have a similar inclination, which is why they like to snack on red fire ants. Judging from the astrological omens, I'm guessing you are currently in a phase when your attraction to spicy things is at a peak -- not just for dinner but in other areas of your life, as well. I have a suggestion: Pursue rowdy fun with adventures that have metaphorical resemblances to red chili peppers, but stay away from those that are like red fire ants. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The 19th-century English artist John Constable specialized in painting landscapes. The countryside near his home especially excited him. He said, "The sound of water escaping from mill dams, willows, old rotten planks, slimy posts, and brickwork, I love such things. They made me a painter, and I am grateful." Take a cue from Constable, Taurus. Spend quality time appreciating the simple scenes and earthy pleasures that nourish your creative spirit. Give your senses the joy of getting filled up with vivid impressions. Immerse yourself in experiences that thrill your animal intelligence.

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Escape with MassageSwedish, Deep Tissue and Reiki. Open days, evenings and weekends. In my office at 127 N Higgins or in your home. Janit Bishop, LMT • 207-7358

Mobile Mondays Haircare for the Homebound, Group Homes, Disabled, Elderly

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): This is Grand Unification Week for you Geminis. If your left hand has been at war with your right hand, it's a perfect moment to declare a truce. If your head and heart have not been seeing eye to eye, they are ready to find common ground and start conspiring together for your greater glory. Are there any rips or rifts in your life? You will generate good fortune for yourself if you get to work on healing them. Have you been alienated from an ally or at odds with a beloved dream or separated from a valuable resource? You have a lot of power to fix glitches like those.

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In an episode of the TV show Twin Peaks, special agent Dale Cooper gives the following advice to his colleague Harry: "I'm going to let you in on a little secret. Every day, once a day, give yourself a present. Don't plan it, don't wait for it, just let it happen." Now I'm passing on this advice to you, Cancerian. It's a perfect time for you to try out this fun game. You are in a phase of your astrological cycle when you'll be wise to intensify your commitment to self-care . . . and deepen your devotion to making yourself feel good . . . and increase your artistry at providing yourself with everything you need to thrive.

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Sergei Diaghilev was a Russian ballet impresario who founded Ballets Russes, one of the 20th century's great ballet companies. At one point in his career he met French playwright Jean Cocteau. Diaghilev dared Cocteau to write a piece for a future Ballets Russes production. "Astonish me!" he said. It took seven years, but Cocteau met the challenge. He created Parade, a ballet that also featured music by Eric Satie and sets by Pablo Picasso. Now let's pretend I'm Diaghilev and you're Cocteau. Imagine that I've just told you, "Astonish me!" How will you respond? What surprising beauty will you come up with? What marvels will you unleash?

c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Since 1948, the chemical known as warfarin has been used as a pesticide to poison rats. Beginning in 1954, it also became a medicine prescribed to treat thrombosis and other blood ailments in humans. Is there anything in your own life that resembles warfarin? A person or an asset or an activity that can either be destructive or constructive, depending on the situation? The time will soon be right for you to employ that metaphorical version of warfarin in both capacities. Make sure you're very clear about which is which.

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): "My heart was a hysterical, unreliable organ," wrote Vladimir Nabokov in his novel Lolita. We have all gone through phases when we could have uttered a similar statement. But I doubt that this is one of those times for you, Libra. On the contrary. I suspect your heart is very smart right now -- poised and lucid and gracious. In fact, I suggest you regard the messages coming from your heart as more trustworthy than any other part of you -- wiser than your head and your gut and your genitals put together.

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The Holy Grail of skateboarding tricks is called the 1080. To pull it off, a skateboarder has to do three complete 360-degree revolutions in mid-air and land cleanly. No one had ever pulled it off until 12-year-old Tom Schaar did it in 2012. Since then, two other teenage boys have managed the same feat. But I predict that a Scorpio skateboarder will break the record sometime soon, managing a 1260, or three and a half full revolutions. Why? First, because your tribe is unusually geared to accomplish peak performances right now. And second, you have a knack for doing complex maneuvers that require a lot of concentration.

f

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Can you think of ways that you have been colonized? Have any powerful institutions filled up your brain with ideas and desires that aren't in alignment with your highest values? For instance, has your imagination gotten imprinted with conditioning that makes you worry that your body's not beautiful enough or your bank account's not big enough or your style isn't cool enough? If so, Sagittarius, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to get uncolonized. There has rarely been a better time than now to purge any brainwashing that puts you at odds with your deepest self.

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): An old Chinese poem tells us that "the true measure of a mountain's greatness is not its height but whether it is charming enough to attract dragons." You and I know there are no such things as dragons, so we can't take this literally. But what if we treat it as we might a fairy tale? I suggest we draw a metaphorical meaning from it and apply it to your life. Let's say that you shouldn't be impressed with how big and strong anything is; you shouldn't give your mojo to people or institutions simply because they have worldly power. Rather, you will be best served by aligning yourself with what's mysterious and fabulous. You're more likely to have fun and generate good fortune for yourself by seeking out stories that appeal to your soul instead of your ego.

h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The questions you have been asking aren't terrible. But they could be formulated better. They might be framed in such a way as to encourage life to give you crisp insights you can really use rather than what you've been getting lately, which are fuzzy conjectures that are only partially relevant. Would you like some inspiration? See if any of these inquiries help hone your spirit of inquiry. 1. What kind of teacher or teaching do you need the most right now? 2. What part of you is too tame, and what can you do about it? 3. What could you do to make yourself even more attractive and interesting to people than you already are? 4. What is the pain that potentially has the most power to awaken your dormant intelligence?

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): "There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness is the true method." So says Ishmael, the hero of Herman Melville's 19th-century novel Moby Dick. He is ostensibly referring to whale hunting, which is his job, but some modern critics suggest he's also talking about the art of storytelling. I suspect his statement applies to a certain enterprise you are currently engaged in, as well. Can you wrap your mind and heart around the phrase "careful disorderliness," Pisces? I hope so, because I think it's the true method. Here are some other terms to describe it: benevolent chaos; strategic messiness; purposeful improvisation; playful experiments. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

[C4] Missoula Independent • August 1 – August 8, 2013

736A South 1st W. • 546-3846 Find us on Facebook

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BLACK BEAR NATUROPATHIC

Family Care • Nutritional Consultation & IV Therapy • Herbal Medicine • Women’s Health • Massage

Christine White N.D. & Elizabeth Axelrod N.D. Monday-Thursday 9:00-4:00 Friday & Saturday appointments available

2204 Dixon, Missoula • 542-2147 • MontanaNaturalMedicine.com

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT If you think you are ready for EMDR, call our Mental Health Counselor Lois Doubleday, LCPC today!

721-1646 www.bluemountainclinic.org

MASSAGE TRAINING INSTITUTE MONTANA ENROLL FOR FALL 2013 CLASS

*Online Curriculum *Hands-On Class 1-Weekend/Month 500 Hr Certification for MT License

(406) 250-9616 • Kalispell, MT www.mtimontana.com

MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS MASSAGE TABLE WITH DUAL E Retiring massage therapist selling massage table massage chair and other office equipment must be out of the office by end of July. please call 406 240-0692 TIMBER FRAME BARNS. #1&BTR-DF, Reclaimed Timber & Barnwood. Complete packages, installed. Standard plans free. www.bitterroottimberframes.com Brett 406-5813014. 2 year warranty

SPORTING GOODS SEVYLOR RAFT. 6 man raft with 2 life vests. Only used one time. $100. 273-2382

ELECTRONICS REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL! 4Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $24.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to new callers. CALL 1-866-755-3285

MARKETPLACE MUSIC MUSIC LESSONS Inhouse lessons on guitar, ukelele and piano. Sign up now! MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds entrance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 549-0013. www.montanamusic.com Outlaw Music Got Gear? We Do! Missoula’s Pro Guitar Shop specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, Tuesday-Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 5417 5 3 3 . Outlawmusicguitarshop.com Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

PETS & ANIMALS 2 big geldings; 1 registered quarter horse $1200. 1 thoroughbred cross $1000. Sell only to experienced horseman. 544-9040

Thift Stores 1136 W. Broadway 930 Kensington

Basset Rescue of Montana www.bassetrescueofmontana.o rg 406-207-0765 CATS: #2455 Black, ASH/Bombay X, SF, 6yrs; #3142 Orange, DSH, SF, 12yrs; #3187 Torbie, ASH, SF, 7yrs; #3226 Grey/white, Persian X, SF, 4yrs; #3238 Blk/white, DLH, NM, 3yrs; #3240 Calico, DSH, SF, 8yrs; #3248 Black, DMH, NM, 2yrs; #3255 Torbie(red/grey), Persian X, SF, 2yrs; # 3313 Flame Point, Siamese, SF, 6yrs; #3340 Blk/tan, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #3429 White/grey, Siamese/DSH, 12yrs; #3435 Black, DSH, NM, 1yr; #3454 Grey/white, DSH, NM, 4yrs; #3468 Black, DSH, SF, 2yrs; #3477 Black, ASH, SF, 6yrs; #3482 White/Buff, DSH, SF, 4yrs; #3505 White/grey, ASH, SF, 8yrs; #3520 Blk/white, ASH, NM, 4 mo; #3527 Blk/white, ASH, SF, 6yrs; #3529 Blk/white, ASH, SF, 4 mo: #3540 Black Torti, Persian X, SF, 6yrs; #3550 Blk/white, ASH, NM, 4mo; #3553 Blk/white, ASH, NM, 9mo;

Summertime Sale! 111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

#3576 Grey/white, DSH, NM, 1yr; #3581 Grey/Torti, DSH, SF, 6yrs; #3614 Black, DSH, NM, 10yrs. For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840. DOGS: #2564 Brindle, Catahoula, NM, 2yrs; #3149 White, Malamute, NM, 7yrs; #3291 Brindle, Pit Bull, NM, 3yrs; #3432 Blk/white, Pit, NM, 3yrs; #3455 Tri, Beagle, SF, 10yrs; #3483 Grey/blk, Akita, NM, 2yrs; #3485 White/blk, Pointer/Pit X, NM, 2yrs; #3488 B&W, Pointer, NM, 2yrs; #3489 Blk/tan, Shepherd X, NM, 2yrs; #3490 Golden, Pit X, NM, 3yrs; #3502 Black, Shi Tzu, SF, 8yrs; #3503 Black/tan, Rott/Shep X, NM, 9 mo; #3512 Brindle/White, American Bull Terrier, SF, 7yr; #3575 Blk/white, BC/Heeler, SF, 8yrs; #3580 Chocolate, Hound X, SF, 2yr: #3588 Yellow, Lab,

Outlaw Music

Missoula's Stringed Instrument Pro Shop! Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

NM, 6yrs; #3600 White w/brown, English Setter, SF, 5yrs; #3602 White w/brown, English Setter, SF, 5yrs; #3603a Blk/white, Malamute, SF, 2yrs; #3603 White/blk, Spitz/PitX, SF, 2yrs; #3606 Grey/white, Pointer/Pit, SF, 3yrs; #3621 Ta n / w h i t e / b r o w n , Shep/Chow/Boxer, SF, 4yrs; #3623 Bluetick Hound, NM, 4yrs; #3625 Brown/Brindle, Mastiff X, NM, 2yrs; #3637 Tri, Jack Russell, NM, 2yrs. For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840. Pekingese puppies AKC PEKINGESE male puppies. Excellant pedigrees. Show potenial. $950.00 406-490-3306 or 406-560-1145

TOOLS Trash Pump, 3 inch, MultiQuip,

high volume, 416 GPM, 8 HP Honda engine, hoses & fittings. Good water tender. $695. 406-883-4159

OUTDOOR GEAR 2012 Monte Carlo 5th wheel. 4 slides, 2 ACs, lots of storage and options. $28,000 OBO. 307-247-5735 The Sports Exchange - Great Gear. Great Prices. Buy • Sell • Trade • Consignment. 111 S. 3rd W., Missoula, on the Hip Strip. 406-721-6056

AUTOMOBILE CASH FOR CARS: Any Car or Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com 78 DATSUN 280Z. Auto transmission. 164K. Good condition. $4800. 273-2382

541-7533

724 Burlington Ave. outlawmusicguitarshop.com

IT'S TIME TO

PLAY

OUTSIDE! SWINGS! BIKES! TOYS!

Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

829 S. Higgins On the Hip Strip

406.543.1179 Mon-Sat 10:30-6 • Sun 12-4

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • August 1 – August 8, 2013

[C5]

PUBLIC NOTICES CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of Missoula, Montana will meet Monday, August 12, 2013 at 7:00 o’clock p.m. in the City Council Chambers,140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to hear public comment on a resolution to levy a special assessment and tax upon all property situated within pooled sidewalk curb, gutter and alley approach bonds series 2013 of the City of Missoula, Montana, in the total amount of $393,000 excluding debt service, to defray the cost of installing sidewalks, curbs, gutters and alley approaches pursuant to resolution number 7792 ratifying the sale of bonds. For further information contact Marty Rehbein, CMC, City Clerk, at 552-6078. All persons interested may appear to be heard or may file written comments with the City Clerk prior to the date of hearing. Mail any comments to: Public Hearing Comment, City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. BY ORDER OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MONTANA. Martha L. Rehbein City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on August 26, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to hear public comment on the following resolution: A resolution to establish regulations and a fee for the acceptance and review of applications for the creation of a building for lease or rent on one parcel of land in the City of Missoula. All persons interested

may appear and provide comments at the hearing or may file written comments with the City Clerk prior to the date of hearing. Mail any comments to: Public Hearing Comment, City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. For further information contact Tom Zavitz Development Services at 552-6632 or Laval Means, Development Services at 552-6628. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk

one (1) and ten (10) of Block 2 of Amended Plat of MARTINWOOD ADDITION NO. THREE (3) is being brought up under United States patent #924. No claim is made herein that claimant has been assigned the entire tract described in the original patent. The filing of this Declaration of Land Patent shall not deny or infringe on any right, privilege or immunity of any other assignee to any portion of land covered in the described patent #924. Submit any questions to the Claimant: Lovella V. Torp, 3116 Old Pond Rd., Missoula, Montana 59802

CITY OF MISSOULA PUBLIC NOTICE The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following items on Tuesday, August 20, 2013, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. An Ordinance to Amend Title 20 City Zoning: Proposed 2013 Maintenance Amendments This is a consideration of proposed annual maintenance amendments to the City of Missoula Title 20 Zoning Ordinance. The proposed amendments were drafted after consideration of comments from interested parties and city agencies. Thirteen proposed amendments are intended to correct and clarify various sections throughout the ordinance. The amendments and agenda can be viewed at Development Services, City Hall, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana, (406) 552-6630 or at http://www.ci.missoula.mt.us/index.as px?nid=1149 The Missoula City Council will conduct a public hearing on this item on a date yet to be determined.

GARDEN CITY STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 3, 12. Units contain furniture, clothes, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, hunting equipment, & other misc. household goods. These units may be viewed starting Friday 8/9 All auction units will only be shown each day at 10:00 A.M. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage office at 2310 Fairview Missoula, MT 59801 prior to Tuesday, August, 13, 2013 at 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

DECLARATION OF LAND PATENT Notice is hereby given to interested parties that the following property: S11, T13N, 19W, Lot

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-13-148 Dept. No. 3 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF SHIRLEY C. NYSTROM, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Jacqueline R. Flottmann and Stephen M. Cruze have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Jacqueline R. Flotmann and Stephen M. Cruze, Co-Personal Representatives, return receipt requested, c/o Anne Blanche Adams, PO Box 8234, Missoula, Montana 59807-8234, or

filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 24th day of July, 2013. CEDERBERG LAW OFFICES, P.C., 269 West Front Street, PO Box 8234, Missoula, MT 598078234 /s/ Anne Blanche Adams, Attorneys for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-13-151 Dept. No. 1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ARNOLD KOBER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Vicki Lee Kober, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 4110 Weeping Willow Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803, or filed with the Clerk of the above-named Court. I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 19th day of July, 2013, in Missoula, Montana. /s/ Vicki Lee Kober, Personal Representative GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC /s/ Nancy P. Gibson, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-13-644 Dept. No. 2 Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Shannon Lynn Foley, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Shannon Lynn Foley to Shannon Lynn Drye. The hearing will be on 8/13/2013 at 11:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: June 13, 2013. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By; /s/ Andy Brunkhart, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 3 Cause No. DA-13-20 NOTICE OF HEARING IN RE THE MATTER

OF ADOPTION OF F.A.E. A minor child. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Petitioner, Henry Ferris Jensen (“Jensen”), has filed a Petition with this Court requesting to terminate the parental rights of Samsun Michael Emmons (“Emmons”) with respect to the minor child F.A.E., and has filed a Petition to adopt the minor child, born on August 31, 2006, in University of Washington Medical Center, in Seattle, Washington. NOW, therefore, notice is hereby given to Emmons and all persons interested in the matter that a hearing on the Petitions will be held at the Courthouse in Missoula County, Montana, on August 22, 2013, at 9:00 a.m., in the above-named Court, whose telephone number is (406) 258-4780, at which time objections to said Petitions will be heard. Emmons must mail his objections, if any, to Jensen at St. Peter Law Offices, P.C., PO Box 17255, Missoula, Montana, 59808, or file it with the Clerk of the above entitled Court. Emmons’ failure to appear at the hearing constitutes his waiver of interest in custody of the minor child and it will result in the Court’s termination of his parental rights to the minor child, and the entry of a decree establishing a relationship between the Petitioner and the minor child. DATED this 11th day of July, 2013. ST. PETER LAW OFFICES, P.C. /s/ Linda Osorio St. Peter MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 3 Cause No. DP-13-132 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF PATRICIA A. MCBRIDE, Decedent. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed as Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Jon M. McBride, at St. Peter Law Offices, P.C., 2820 Radio Way, PO Box 17255, Missoula, MT 59808 or filed with the Clerk of the aboveentitled Court. DATED this 5th day of July, 2013. /s/ Jon M. McBride, Personal Representative DATED this 9th day of July, 2013.

ST. PETER LAW OFFICES, P.C. /s/ Rochelle L. Loveland STATE OF MONTANA ):ss County of Flathead) I, Jon M. McBride, declare under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is true and correct. /s/ Jon M. McBride, Personal Representative SUBSCRIBED AND SWORN TO before me this 5th day of July, 2013. /s/ Amanda S. Piilola Notary Pubic for the State of Montana, Residing at Columbia Falls, Montana My Commission Expires: January 30, 2017 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-13-135 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JACQUELINE F. SCOVILLE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to James D. Scoville, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane PC, PO Box 4747, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 2nd day of July, 2013. /s/ James D. Scoville, Personal Representative I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. /s/ James D. Scoville WORDEN THANE PC Attorneys for Personal Representative /s/ Gail M. Haviland MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-13-150 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF EDWARD ALLEN MARCURE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representatives of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Stephan Edward Marcure and Andre Alverd Marcure, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane PC, PO Box 4747, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 25th day of July, 2013. /s/ Stephan Edward Marcure, Personal Representative /s/ Andre Alverd Marcure I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. /s/ Stephan Edward Marcure I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. /s/ Andre Alverd, Personal Representative WORDEN THANE PC Attorneys for Personal Representative /s/ William E. McCarthy MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY, Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-13-145 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ESTHER L. ENGLAND, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Patricia England Brown, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at Ryan Law Offices, PLLC, PO Box 9453, Missoula, MT 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 22nd day of July, 2013. /s/ Patricia England Brown, Personal Representative NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE The following described personal property will be sold to the highest bidder for cash or certified funds on August 2, 2013. Proceeds from the sale for said personal property shall be applied to the debt owed to Bitterroot Property Management, Inc. Abandoned personal property can be viewed by making viewing arrangement with BPM, Inc. whose phone number is 406549-9631. The personal property is from 1524 S. 12th W., Unit B, Missoula, MT and 803 Van Buren, Missoula, MT. Sale location will be 414 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. bpm@montana.com Call 406-5499631 for showings. The sale will be to the highest bidder. Sold “as is”, “where is” for cash or certified funds. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE S SALE Trustee Sale Number: 11-01664-5 Loan Number: 1205271905 APN: 5844006 TO BE SOLD for cash at Trustee’s Sale on October 16, 2013 at the hour of 11:00 AM, recognized local time, on the front steps to the County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula the following described real property in Missoula County, Montana, to-wit: LOT 17H OF THE AMENDED PLAT OF COBBAN AND DISNMORE’S ORCHARD HOMES, LOT 17, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. More commonly known as:142 SMALL LANE, MISSOULA, MT. DALE S. MARTELL,

[C6] Missoula Independent • August 1 – August 8, 2013

SUSAN L MARTELL, AS HUSBAND AND WIFE, as the original grantor(s), conveyed said real property to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the original trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, as the original beneficiary, by a Trust Indenture dated as of December 23, 2005, and recorded on January 4, 2006 in Film No. 767 at Page 104 under Document No. 200600274, in the Official Records of the Office of the Record of Missoula County, Montana (“Deed of Trust”). The current beneficiary is: U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for Credit Suisse First Boston Mortgage Securities Corp., CSMC Mortgage-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-4 (the “Beneficiary”). FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY was named as Successor Trustee (the “Trustee”) by virtue of a Substitution of Trustee dated May 6, 2011 and recorded in the records of Missoula County, Montana. There has been a default in the performance of said Deed of Trust: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears as of June 5, 2013: Balance due on monthly payments from February 1, 2011 and which payments total: $34,585.14: Late charges: $901.74 Net Other Fees: $40.00 Advances: $6,270.61 There is presently due on the obligation the principal sum of $190,585.93 plus accrued interest thereon at the rate of 3.50000% per annum from January 1, 2011, plus late charges. Interest and late charges continue to accrue. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds include the trustee’s or attorney’s fees and costs and expenses of sale. The beneficiary has elected to sell the property to satisfy the obligation and has directed the trustee to commence such sale proceedings. The beneficiary declares that the grantor is in default as described above and has directed the Trustee to commence proceedings to sell the property described above at public sale in accordance with the terms and provisions of this notice. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the aforesaid property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default theretofore existing. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714.730.2727 DATED: June 7, 2013 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee, By: Megan Curtis, Authorized Signature A-4395598 07/18/2013, 07/25/2013, 08/01/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/29/04, recorded as Instrument No. 200411846 Bk-731 Pg-707, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Matthew D. Campbell and Judith R. Campbell was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Financial Inc. d/b/a Mann Mortgage was Beneficiary and Title Services Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 13 of Southpointe, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201304550 B:909 P:716, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 7, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $210,814.60. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $202,932.91, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public

PUBLIC NOTICES auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 15, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.105993) 1002.251321-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/27/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200710258 Bk: 796 Pg: 300, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which Amy C Ganguli, and Christian M Leibbrandt was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc, it successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Charles J. Peterson, Attorney at Law was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Charles J. Peterson, Attorney at Law as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 14 of Drew Creek Addition - Phase VII to the Double Arrow Ranch, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201202745 Bk: 889 Pg: 822, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Bank of America, N.A., Successor by Merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP FKA Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of May 31, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $201,961.71. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $171,560.55, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 11, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7021.16158) 1002.251043-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust

indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 07/27/11, recorded as Instrument No. 201112523, Bk:880, Pg: 1138, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which George L. Frisby and Kathy L. Frisby, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: The S1/2 SE1/4 NW1/4 of Section 27, Township 13 North, Range 15 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana.. Recording Reference: Book 663 Micro Records at Page 251 Together with an Easement for Ingress & egress 60’ in width from County Road across the Northerly boundary of Lots 11, 13 and 14 Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 13, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $174,365.80. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $165,214.29, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 23, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-

The City of Missoula Design Review Board will conduct a public hearing on Wednesday, August 14, 2013 in the City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine Street, Missoula, at 7:30 p.m. to consider the following applications: A request from MMEC Architecture; Signs as Part of Building for Taco Bell, located at 3400 Brooks St. (SEE MAP V).

Your attendance and your comments are welcome and encouraged. E-mails can be sent to kcolenso@ci.missoula.mt.us. Project files may be viewed at the Missoula Development Services at 435 Ryman St., Missoula, Montana. If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling 552-6636. The City of Missoula will provide auxiliary aids and services.

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s "Oddly Enough"–you'll only need every other letter.

by Matt Jones

$185,000 216 Tower • Cute 2 bed, 1 bath home • 1/2 acre near Clark Fork River • Lots of natural light • Garage with shop monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.105868) 1002.251679-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/10/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200808297, Bk 817, Pg 0074, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Robert D. Hughes was Grantor, Mort-

PUBLIC NOTICE The Missoula City Council will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Monday, August 12, 2013, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana: 3640-3690 Brooks – Enterprise Commerical Conditional Use Request from Woodbury Corporation for approval of an Enterprise Commercial Conditional Use at 3640-3690 Brooks (former Kmart site) (see Map S), zoned C1-4 (Neighborhood Commercial). Enterprise Commercial Uses are defined as developments that contain more than 30,000 sq. ft. of gross floor area, whether contained in a single building or contained within multiple buildings on a single development site. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request and case file are available for public inspection at the Development Services office, 435 Ryman Street. Call 552-6638 for further assistance.

Pat McCormick Real Estate Broker Real Estate With Real Experience

pat@properties2000.com 406-240-SOLD (7653)

Properties2000.com

As the General Contractor/Construction Manager, Jackson Contractor Group, Inc. on behalf of Missoula County, will be accepting pricing for all scopes of work for the Missoula County Courthouse/Annex, Office Remodel Phase 3. Mechanical, electrical and plumbing subcontracting firms have been pre-selected. Only pre-selected mechanical, electrical and plumbing subcontractors may submit a bid for their respective scopes of work. All bids are due on August 8th at 2:00pm MST to the Office of Missoula County Auditor, located at 199 West Pine, Room #136, Missoula, MT 59802. Bid documents may be obtained through the Missoula Plans Exchange, through our ftp site or a hardcopy may be obtained for a plans deposit fee of $200.00 at the Jackson Contractor Group, Inc. office located at 5800 Highway 93 South, Missoula, MT 59804. Please contact Hattie Redmon at hattier@jacksoncontractorgroup.com or 406-542-9150 to gain access to the plans through our ftp site or to obtain a hardcopy.

PUBLIC NOTICE MAGNET RECOGNITION PROGRAM® SITE VISIT • St. Patrick Hospital and Health Sciences Center has applied to the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) for the prestigious designation of Magnet. The Magnet designation recognizes excellence in nursing services. • Patients, family members, staff, and interested parties who would like to provide comments are encouraged to do so. Anyone may send comments via e-mail, fax, and direct mail. All phone comments to the Magnet Program Office must be followed up in writing. • YOUR COMMENTS ARE CONFIDENTIAL AND NEVER SHARED WITH THE FACILITY. IF YOU CHOOSE, YOUR COMMENTS MAY BE ANONYMOUS, BUT MUST BE IN WRITING. • YOUR COMMENTS MUST BE RECEIVED BY August 9, 2013.

If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 552-6638. The Development Services office will provide auxiliary aids and services.

Address: AMERICAN NURSES CREDENTIALING CENTER (ANCC) MAGNET RECOGNITION PROGRAM OFFICE 8515 Georgia Ave., Suite 400 Silver Spring, MD 20910-3492 Fax: 301-628-5217 • E-Mail: magnet@ana.org Phone: 866-588-3301 (toll free)

ACROSS

1 "Double Dare" host Summers 5 Inc., in Canterbury 8 Square peg in a round hole 14 Jesus in the outfield 15 Carlos's treasure 16 British actress ___ Staunton 17 "You can't forget the cheese and crust" rebuke? 19 Opt not to get carry-out 20 Duo behind "Is Dave there?" "[spin spin spin]"? 22 Snake Eyes' team 25 It may be crude 26 Jumping chess pieces: abbr. 27 Tempe sch. 28 Great conductors 33 Mourner of Osiris 35 Home of the D-backs 36 String instruments 40 Sajak, after a radioactive run-in gives him superhuman abilities? 43 Greet at the door 44 First-rate 45 Company behind Sonic the Hedgehog 46 Lack of good sense 49 Rule, for short 50 Years, to Yves 53 Chinese-born actress ___ Ling 54 Fully informed 56 With 62-across, unable-tosee-the-movie phenomenon? 61 Tax dodger 62 See 56-across 66 Enlightenment, to Zen Buddhists 67 Simile words 68 Small teams 69 African bloodsucker 70 Uno follower 71 Restaurant reviewer's website

Last week’s solution

DOWN

1 Information booth handout 2 Boxer Laila 3 "Frasier" producer 4 Capital of the Inca Empire 5 Big deposit 6 Pop quiz response 7 Engine type, in mechanic shorthand (anagram of OH, DC) 8 Like some collisions 9 Cry while swooning 10 Cell phone button 11 Bela on banjo 12 Blithering fool 13 Zesty flavors 18 "Attention, please!" 21 1994 bestseller about Ebola, with "The" 22 Market upticks 23 Magazine copy 24 Electricity 29 Small battery 30 Unpredictable 31 Drink from a straw 32 Lancelot and Mix-a-Lot, for two 34 Arrived feet-first 37 "Nixon in China," e.g. 38 Brewery product 39 Put on, as a performance 41 They're not really helping 42 "Bottle Rocket" director Anderson 47 "The ___ Queene" (Spenser work) 48 Band over a gown, maybe 50 "This is ___ of the emergency..." 51 Bright stars 52 Winnemac, in Sinclair Lewis novels 55 Full of dandelions 57 "Is he ___ or is he..." (They Might Be Giants line) 58 Full washer 59 "Based on that..." 60 After-school orgs. 63 Orange or yellow 64 Alternative to Prodigy or CompuServe 65 Cook's amt.

©2013 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • August 1 – August 8, 2013

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PUBLIC NOTICES gage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage, LLC was Beneficiary and Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc., a corporation was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc., a corporation as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 11 in Block 2 of Elms Addition No. 1, to the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201209706, BK 894, Pg. 783, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 14, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $236,143.75. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $215,235.66, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 24, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.103345) 1002.238946-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/27/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200717008 Bk-800 Pg-1213, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which Donald R. Foreman and Markay Foreman was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Affiliated Financial Group, Inc., its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Western Title and Escrow was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded

Western Title and Escrow as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 31 of Stillwater Addition at Maloney Ranch Phase I, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201208765 B: 893 P: 1242, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Bank of America, N.A., Successor by Merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP FKA Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 6, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $229,159.47. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $206,036.93, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 18, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7021.16986) 1002.251093-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 05/04/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200711278 Bk-796 Pg-1320, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Roy A. Spain & Lavena L. Spain, as joint tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage LLC was Beneficiary and Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula

County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 5B of Bean Addition, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana according to the Official Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201115939 Bk. 883, Pg. 366, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 15, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $160,621.69. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $151,882.46, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 23, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.105861) 1002.251676-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/19/09, recorded as Instrument No. 200920963, B: 846, P: 408, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Joshua A. Johnson, a married person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 3A of Carlton Tracts No. 4, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all

[C8] Missoula Independent • August 1 – August 8, 2013

monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 02/01/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 10, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $249,976.67. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $240,860.29, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 21, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.106063) 1002.251585-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on August 30, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 67 OF PLEASANT VIEW HOMES NO. 2, PHASE 2, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA, COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Charles Brian Taylor and Janna M. Taylor, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated December 26, 2007 and recorded December 31, 2007 under document number 200733268 Bk. 811 Micro Records Pg. 140.The beneficial interest is currently held by Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,333.51, beginning August 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other

charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of April 1, 2013 is $206,242.70 principal, interest at the rate of 6.12500% now totaling $9,474.30, late charges in the amount of $134.14, escrow advances of $1,783.15, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,959.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $34.61 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: April 25, 2013 Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 25th day of April, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 GMAC vs. Taylor 41965.761 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 16, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 24 IN BLOCK 2 OF TREASURE STATE ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Creg T Dieziger, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated November 29, 2006 and recorded December 6, 2006 in Book 788, on Page 643, under Document No. 200631374. The beneficial interest is currently held by Fannie Mae (“Federal National Mortgage Association”). First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,218.76, beginning January 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, Which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of April 18, 2013 is $198,045.70 principal, interest at the rate of 5.125% now totaling $3,856.01, late charges in the amount of $303.62, escrow advances of $546.20 and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,389.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $27.80 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be re-

quired to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed Of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 7, 2013 Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho) )ss. County of Bingham ) On this 7th day of May, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Seterus v Dieziger 42008.271 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 23, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A TRACT OF LAND IN THE NE1/4SW1/4 OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 20 NORTH, RANGE 16 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, MORE SUBSTANTIALLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE TRACT WHICH IS A 24 INCH CAR AXLE FROM WHICH THE CENTER QUARTER OF SECTION 7 BEARS N.56°20’E., 1,228.4 FEET; THENCE S. 24°45’E., 300 FEET TO A 24 INCH CAR AXLE ; THENCE S.89° 47’ W., 180.75 FEET TO A 3/4 INCH PIPE; THENCE S.89° 47’ W., 87.8 FEET; THENCE N. 14° 48’ W., 53.7 FEET; THENCE N.14°48’W, 228.3 FEET; THENCE N.89°47’ E., 215 FEET THE POINT OF BEGINNING. RECORDING REFERENCE: DEED EXHIBIT NO. 2479 AND BOOK 364 OF MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 821 Scott B. Jungers, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated November 5, 2004 and recorded November 5, 2004 in Book 742, Page 1458, under Document No. 200431445. The beneficial interest is currently held by U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association as Trustee as Successor by merger to LaSalle Bank, National Association as Trustee for Washington Mutual Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates WMALT 2005-1. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,091.39, beginning July 1, 2010, and each month subsequent which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of June 14, 2013 is $169,447.01 principal, interest at the rate of 5.875% now

totaling $30,246.72, late charges in the amount of $491.13, escrow advances of $8,374.99, and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,352.06, plus accruing interest at the rate of $27.27 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 17, 2013 /s/ Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 17th day of May, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Chase Vs. Jungers 41916.656 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 23, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lots 1 and 2 in Block 6 of the SOUTHSIDE ADDITION to the City of Missoula, according to the official map or plat thereof on file and of record in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of the County of Missoula, State of Montana Sharon A Lowry, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title and Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on September 16, 2009 and recorded on September 21, 2009, Book 847, Page M 915, as Document No. 200922869. The beneficial interest is currently held by One West Bank, FSB. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust due to death of the borrower on March 11, 2012. The total amount due on this obligation as of April 4, 2013 is $144,319.54 principal, interest at the rate of .0556% now totaling $24,239.03, and other fees and expenses advanced of $6,959.77, plus accruing interest at the rate of $.22 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected,

PUBLIC NOTICES and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 17, 2013 /s/ Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 17th day of May, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 Financial Freedom Vs Lowry 41742.486 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEES SALE on September 16, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT A13 OF ALLOMONT, PHASE 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Rachel Monson, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Insurance Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated October 2, 2007 and recorded October 3, 2007 in Book 806, Page 1531, under Document No. 200726378.. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. successor in interest to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc.. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,477.07, beginning November 1, 2011 and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of May 16, 2012 is $379,274.47 principal, interest at the rate of 4.0000% now totaling $9,473.21, late

charges in the amount of $530.39, escrow advances of $845.17, other fees and expenses advanced of $776.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $41.56 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 9, 2013 Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho) )ss. County of Bingham) On this 9th day of May, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 Citimortgage Vs. Monson 42011.197 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee Sale Number: 12-03253-3 Loan Number: 1127137821 APN: 1758557 TO BE SOLD for cash at Trustee’s Sale on October 16, 2013 at the hour of 11:00 AM, recognized local time, on the front steps to the County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula the following described real property in Missoula County, Montana, to-wit: LOT 6 IN BLOCK 2 OF MEADOW LARK ADDITION NO. 2, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. More commonly known as: 3516 WASHBURN ST, MISSOULA, MT TREVOR DELANEY, as the original grantor(s), conveyed said real property to TITLE SERVICES, as the original trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION AS NOMI-

SUSTAINAFIEDS Models Wanted for Green Eco Show. Men, Women & Kids. 8/24/13 Missoula. Making video. www.greenecoshow.com Anna Herman 406-645-1252

Natural Housebuilders, Inc. Energy efficient, small homes, additions/remodels, higher-comfort crafted buildings, solar heating. 369-0940 or 6426863. www.naturalhousebuilder.net

Natural Housebuilders, Inc. Building the energy-efficient

NEE FOR FIRST INDEPENDENT MORTGAGE COMPANY, as the original beneficiary, by a Trust Indenture dated as of August 16, 2006, and recorded on August 18, 2006 in Film No. 781 at Page 512 under Document No. 200621098., in the Official Records of the Office of the Record of Missoula County, Montana (“Deed of Trust”). The current beneficiary is: U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association, as Trustee, successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for Morgan Stanley Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-15XS (the “Beneficiary”). FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY was named as Successor Trustee (the “Trustee”) by virtue of a Substitution of Trustee dated May 2, 2011 and recorded

Diaper Service averages 18 cents per change, so why are you throwing your money away? Local cloth diaper sales & service. Missoula peeps order online and get your goods delivered during diaper route Wednesdays. 406.728.1408 or natureboymontana.com

+$200 refundable Cleaning/Damage Deposit. Capacity 299 people. Chairs, tables, etc. included. Wet Bar with large round tables, two 58” TV’s with plugins. Floating wood floor installed on dance floor and bar area. **Very Special Rate for Post 27 and Auxiliary Members** American Legion Hellgate Post 27. 825 Ronan St., Missoula. 406-543-7391

CLEANING

MASSAGE

House Keeping Offering housekeeping anytime 7 days a week. The charge is $15 per hour. Call at 406-560-3661.

$45/hour Deep Tissue Massage. Zoo City Massage located at 1526 S. Reserve St., Missoula. Call (406) 370-3131 to schedule an appointment. zoocitymassage.com.

CHILDCARE

THOMAS CLEANING Residential/Commercial. 8+ years experience. Licensed/Insured. Free estimates. Fast, friendly, and professional. References. (406) 396-4847

GARDEN/ LANDSCAPING A-1 Enterprises Bark • Soil Prep • Gravel • Road Mix • Top Soil. Price is Right. Cash/Check. We deliver. 3330 South 3rd St. Missoula, call first. 406-728-0051

under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default theretofore existing. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714.730.2727 DATED: June 6, 2013 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee By: Megan Curtis, Authorized Signature A-4395424 07/18/2013, 07/25/2013, 08/01/2013 Rainbow Mini Storage will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units 16, 37, 49 and 52 owing delinquent storage rent. Units contains household items. Viewing will

be held August 7th, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. Written sealed bids must be mailed to P.O. Box 425, Milltown, MT 59851 to arrive no later than August 10, 2013. Buyers bids will be for entire contents of each unit. Only cash will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

LEGAL SERVICES GOT HURT? GET HELP! www.bulmanlaw.com Montana’s Best Health & Safety Lawyers FREE CONSULTATION. 721-7744

WINDOWS Alpine Window Cleaning

Commercial or Residential

880-6211

Commercial and Residential. 406-880-6211 ImprovingYourOutlook.com

AUTOMOBILE CASH FOR CARS: Any Car or Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com 78 DATSUN 280Z. Auto transmission. 164K. Good condition. $4800. 273-2382

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Able Garden Design & Services LLC Full-service Commercial/Residential Lawn Care & Garden Maintenance. Competitive pricing. Call Rik 406-549-3667

HOME IMPROVEMENT Natural Housebuilders, Inc. Building the energy-efficient SOLAR ACTIVE HOME • Custom crafted buildings • Additions/Remodels. 369-0940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator. Testimonials Available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642 SBS Solar offers design and installation services for Solar Systems: residential, commercial, on- and off-grid. We also specialize in Energy Audits for home or business. www.SBSlink.com

MISCELLANEOUS

369-0940 or 642-6863

POST 27 HALL IS NOW AVAILABLE FOR RENTING. $350* (*$450 w/ band) Per Day

www.naturalhousebuilder.net

the trustee to commence such sale proceedings. The beneficiary declares that the grantor is in default as described above and has directed the Trustee to commence proceedings to sell the property described above at public sale in accordance with the terms and provisions of this notice. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash. The conveyance will be made by Trustee s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the aforesaid property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due

SERVICES

SOLAR ACTIVE HOME

• Custom crafted buildings • Additions/Remodels

in the records of Missoula County, Montana. There has been a default in the performance of said Deed of Trust: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears as of June 6, 2013; Balance due on monthly payments from September 1, 2012 and which payments total: $16,812.80: Late charges: $140.08 Net Other Fees: $30.00 Advances; $-1,028.67 There is presently due on the obligation the principal sum of $189,123.37 plus accrued interest thereon at the rate of 7.37500% per annum from August 1, 2012, plus late charges. Interest and late charges continue to accrue. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds include the trustee’s or attorney’s fees and costs and expenses of sale. The beneficiary has elected to sell the property to satisfy the obligation and has directed

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • August 1 – August 8, 2013

[C9]

RENTALS APARTMENTS

zly Property 542-2060

Management

1800 4th: 1 bedroom, patio, laundry, parking, cable & heat paid, cat ok!, $645 GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!

921 Helen: 1 bedroom, By the University, 2nd floor, laundry, free cable, $725 GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!

1914 Scott Street: Large 2 bedroom daylight basement. $753/$650 deposit. W/S/G paid. W/D hookups. Dishwasher. Missoula Housing Authority 549-4113

Garden District. 2 bedroom $580 & $711 W/S/G paid. Washer/dryer included Contact Jordan Lyons at 406-549-4113, ext. 127. jlyons@missoulahousing.org

2 bedroom, 1 bath $795 W/S/G paid, newly renovated, Southside location, DW, W/D hookups, carport. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

Gold Dust Apartments. 2 bedrooms $691 all utilities paid. 3 bedroom $798 all utilities paid. Contact Jordan Lyons at 406549-4113, ext. 127 or jlyons@missoulahousing.org

237 1/2 E. Front “D” studio, downtown, coin-ops on site. $550 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 440 Washington 1bed/1bath, downtown, coin-ops on site. $700 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 825 SW Higgins Ave. B7. 2 bed/1 bath, single garage, DW, W/D hookups, near Pattee Creek Market $800. Griz-

Palace Apartments. (3) 1 bedrooms $438-$556 H/W/S/G paid. Contact Matty Reed at 406-549-4113, ext. 130. mreed@missoulahousing.org

Quiet, private 1 bedroom 8 miles from town with Bitterroot River access. NS/NP. $600 + deposit includes utilities, satellite TV & Internet. 273-2382 Solstice Apartments. (2) 2 bedrooms $620-$751 W/S/G paid. Missoula Housing Authority. Contact Colin Woodrow at 406-549-4113, ext. 113 or cwoodrow@missoulahousing.org

MOBILE HOMES

Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 2207 38th Street 2bd/1ba, shared yard, single car garage, w/d hkups. $725. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 2423 55th St. “A” 3 bed/1 bath, shared yard, single garage, South Hills. $900. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 722 1/2 Bulwer. Studio/1 bath, lower level, shared fenced yard, pet? $525. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent. W/S/G/Electric included. $425/month 406-273-6034

HOUSES

DUPLEXES

107 E. Kent. 2 bed/1.5 bath, single garage, fenced back yard, extra storage. $1050. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

205 1/2 W. Kent. Studio/1 bath, lower level, shared yard, all utilities included. $600.

120 South Ave East. 3 bed/2 bath, close to University, fenced back yard. $1450. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 2017 W. Sussex: 3 Bedroom house, 1 1/2 Baths, 2-story, Porch, By the mall, Storage shed, Dishwasher, $1095. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!! 713 Stephens 3bed/2 bath, triple car garage, fenced yard, pet? $1450. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

OUT OF TOWN 20230 Ninemile: 2 Bedroom house, Full unfinished basement, Garage stall, Hook-ups, Pet OK, $825. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!!

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

549-7711 Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com

GardenCity

[C10] Missoula Independent • August 1 – August 8, 2013

Rent Incentive

WANTED!

1250 3rd Street 2 Bed House $850/Month

Residential Rentals in Missoula, Lolo and Florence.

107 Johnson 1 Bed Apt. $485/month

544-1274

Uncle Robert Lane 2 Bed Apt. $645/month Visit our website at

MHA Management manages 10 properties throughout Missoula.

Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

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For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

Did you know? Posting a classified ad ONLINE is FREE!

Property Management

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing

FIDELITY

fidelityproperty.com

422 Madison • 549-6106 PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

1&2

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

"Let us tend your den"

All properties are part of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program.

Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

Finalist

Finalist

The Missoula Housing Authority complies with the Fair Housing Act and offers Reasonable Accommodations to persons with Disabilities.

1235 34th St. • Missoula (406) 549-4113 missoulahousing.org

REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 1010 Vine. 2 bed, 1 bath in Lower Rattlesnake close to Mount Jumbo trails, UM & downtown. Many upgrades. $179,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240—7653. pat@properties2000.com 11689 Stolen Rock Court. 5 bed, 3 bath, 2 car garage on 3.15 acres. $315,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net 1716 Schilling. Adorable 2 bed, 1 bath in central Missoula. Patio & double garage. $190,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7355 milyardhomes@yahoo.com 1807 Missoula Avenue. Lovely Bavarian-style 3 bed, 2 bath in Lower Rattlesnake. Mount Jumbo views & 2 car garage. $319,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com 1926 S 6th W $169,000 Centrally located 2BD/1BA private home with large front yard. Call Nora 880-7508 MLS 20134144

Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com 2607 Deer Canyon Court. 6 bed, 3 bath on Prospect Meadows cul-de-sac. Fenced yard, deck, hot tub and sweeping views. $449,000. Properties 2000. Pat McCormick 2407653. pat@properties2000.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath Windsor Park home. $195,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Big Flat home on 5.3 acres. $451,250. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Wye area home on 3+ acres. $255,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3010 West Central. 3 bed, 1 bath on 5 acres in Target Range. Borders DNRC land. $499,900. Properties 2000. Pat McCormick 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com

2 Bdr, 1 Bath Northside home. $160,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

4 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Rose Park/Slant Streets home. $395,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

216 Tower. Cute 2 bed, 1 bath on 1/2 acre close to Clark Fork River. Single car garage. $185,000. Pat McCormick,

4834 Scott Allen Drive. 4 bed, 3 bath 4-level on approximately 1/3 beautifully landscaped acre. $372,500. Betsy

Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com 6544 McArthur. 3 bed, 2.5 bath with gas fireplace and 2 car garage. $240,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net 9755 Horseback Ridge. 3 bed, 3 bath on 5 acres overlooking Clark Fork River. Missoula Valley and Mission Mountain views. $420,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free comparative market analysis. 360-8234 Central Business District Home! 426 Alder. $244,900. 3 bedroom, 2 bath. Gorgeous little home blocks from downtown. Can be used for residential or professional office space. Refinished hardwoods, new paint/windows/doors. Ton of storage space. KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

Grant Creek Frontage. 4 bed, 3 bath with open floor plan, fireplace, deck & 2 car garage. $655,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7365 milyardhomes@yahoo.com Location Location Location! 1289 River Street: 4 bed, 2 bath newer home near the river, bike trails, Good Food Store, Home Resource and more! This location rocks! $212,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com LOWERED $15,000 MUST SEE STEVENSVILLE; 3 BEDROOMS AND 2 BATHS ON ONE LEVEL. CUSTOM HIGHEND RE-MODEL AND UPDATING DONE IN 2012 ON THIS 12 YEAR OLD HOME. Call: 310889-4448. PRICE JUST LOWERED $15,000 TO $199,999. Rose Park Beauty 403 Mount. 4bed, 1bath. New windows, refinished floors, newer roof and furnace. MLS#

20133900 $227,500 KD 2405227 porticorealestate.com Sweet Home With Character 533 Stephens. $255,000. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, finished attic space for extra room, hardwood floors, front covered porch, private back yard, so much charm and sweetness here. KD: 240-5227. porticorealestate.com WESTBROOK Property Management WANTED! Residential Rentals in Missoula, Lolo and Florence. 544-1274 www.westbrookpm.com

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES 1545C Cooley upper level 2 bedroom condo with views and close to the food co-op and town. Excellent condition, well maintained, great neighborhood and affordable! KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com 1845 B West Central. 3 bed, 1.5 bath on quiet cul-de-sac. Large, open kitchen, patio & garage. No HOA dues! $158,900. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270 glasgow@montana.com 2025 Mullan Road. Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos. Large secure units with affordable HOA dues. Starting at

$159,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 8804749. montpref@bigsky.net

LAND FOR SALE

526 Minnesota #B. 2 bed, 1.5 bath energy-efficient condo with large front yard. $120,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com

20 ACRES FREE! Own 60 acres for 40 acre price/payment. $0 down, $198/month. Money back guarantee, no credit checks. Beautiful views, West Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.TexasLandBuys.com

6614 MacArthur. 2 bed, 2.5 bath townhome with amazing views. $194,500. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properites. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net

531 Minnesota. Building Lot 9. $55,000. Robin Rice Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

6632 MacArthur. 3 bed, 2 bath with gas fireplace, Jacuzzi and wonderful views. $273,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503, riceteam@bigsky.net Uptown Flats #306. 1 bed, 1 bath top floor unit with lots of light. W/D, carport, storage & access to exercise room. $162,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com Uptown Flats. From $155,000. Upscale gated community near downtown. All SS appliances, car port, storage and access to community room and exercise room plus more. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5465816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com Why Rent? Own Your Own 1400 Burns. Designed with energy efficiency, comfort and affordability in mind. Next to Bistro cafe and Missoula Food Co-op. Starting at $79,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

East Missoula Building Lot Sweet lot with mature trees and a great middle of town location. $55,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Frenchtown area, 14.9 Acres, existing well, adjacent to Forest Service land. $225,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com Near Riverfront Park. 1265 Dakota #B. To-be-built, 3 bed, 2 bath with 2 car garage. Lot: $55,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com NHN Mormon Creek Road. 12 acres with Sapphire Mountain views. $150,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties.2000.com Noxon Reservoir Avista frontage lots near Trout Creek, MT. Red Carpet Realty 728-7262 www.redcarpet-realty.com

Six Mile Road • Huson, MT • $335,000 • MSL# 20126356 Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos $144,900 - $249,900 Under new ownership! 1 and 2 bedrooms. Large units, nice finishes, secure entry, secure U/G parking, riverfront, affordable HOA dues and much more. Owner financing comparable to FHA terms available with as little as 3.5% down! Units, pricing and info available at www.mullanheights.com

Land For Sale • Unsurpassed 27 acres, creek front, mountain views, lush meadows, with 2 county-approved lots. Great horse/farm property potential, only 20 minutes from Missoula.

Jeremy Williams • Windermere Real Estate 532-7919 • jeremyw@windermere.com

RICE TEAM

Robin Rice 240-6503

riceteam@bigsky.net missoularealestate4sale.com

NEW LISTING! 19655 Mullan Road, Frenchtown $319,900 • Log & frame 3 bed, 2 bath on 15 acres • Mother-in-law apartment • Oversize garage with 1 bed, 1 bath apt. PRICE REDUCED! 11082 Cherokee Lane $237,900. Well-maintained 3 bed, 3 bath. Large kitchen & dining area. Large deck with great view of the Lolo Valley

SELLER MOTIVATED! BRING OFFER! 13465 Crystal Creek $244,000 3 bed, 2 bath. Two wood stoves, large deck & bonus room for small shop. Near Turah fishing access

MUST SELL! 15305 Spring Hill $445,000 Beautiful 4 bed, 3 bath cedar home with 3 car garage. Large kitchen, dining & finished basement. Borders Forest Service

THE UPTOWN FLATS Unit #103 One bedroom, one bath with full washer and dryer. Handicap accessible unit. Ask Anne About The Great Investment

$155,000

Call Anne for more details

546-5816

Opportunities In This Highly Sought-After Condo Development Close To Downtown Missoula

theuptownflatsmissoula.com

Anne Jablonski annierealtor@gmail.com movemontana.com

PORTICO REAL ESTATE

missoulanews.com • August 1 – August 8, 2013

[C11]

REAL ESTATE COMMERCIAL

OUT OF TOWN

Commercial Lease Space Fantastic opportunity to be neighbors with the award-winning Homeword Organization. New, LEED registered, high quality, sustainably-built office space close to river and downtown. $11-$15 per sq.ft. KD 2405227. porticorealestate.com

102 Boardwalk, Stevensville. 3 bed, 2 bath on almost 3 acres with large 48’x30’ heated shop. $285,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties, 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net 11082 Cherokee Lane, Lolo. 3 bed, 3 bath with basement, deck, 2 car garage & fantastic views. $237,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503, riceteam@bigsky.net

Gorgeous Victorian home zoned for commercial use in a great location $395,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

13475 Crystal Creek, Clinton. 3 bed, 2 bath with large deck, 2 wood stoves & 2 car garage. $244,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

HISTORIC STENSRUD BUILDING. Renovated 1890’s building with 95% original hardware. Residential or commercial zoning. Lovely opportunity. $868,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-9270. glasgow@montana.com

15305 Spring Hill Road, Frenchtown. Beautiful cedar 4 bed, 2.5 bath with 3 car garage & deck on acreage bordering Forest Service. $445,000.

Ronan, Montana 406 Main Street SE

$249,900 PRICED BELOW MARKET VALUE

Beautiful large family custom built home.

This home features 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, wrap around covered porch, triple car garage, large fenced yard with lots of trees. There is separate living quarters with its own bath and kitchenette. Judy Coulter, GRI • Wright Real Estate Co. • 406.249.4101

1845 B West Central $158,900 MLS# 20132764 3 bed, 1.5 bath 2 story townhome with open floor plan on quiet cul-de-sac. AC, UG sprinklers, patio & garage. No HOA fees!

Stensrud Building Downtown Missoula • $868,000 First time on the market! With it's Excellence in Historic Preservation Award. Lovingly and completely renovated by Mark Kersting, this turn key building offers a tasty treat for the discerning history buff! Mark has kept the original flare and flavor of this 1890's building alive and beautiful. The zoning designation offers many varied uses from residential to commercial, and many other uses in between. The back 900 sq ft area is ADA compliant.

For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Rochelle

Missoula Properties Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com

Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

in the winter! KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

19655 Mullan Road, Frenchtown. 3 bed, 2 bath log/timber home on 15 acres with pond, fenced pasture, 2 car garage & 1 bed rental. $319,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL

3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Stevensville area home on 6+ acres. $325,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Florence area home on 12.6 irrigated acres. $500,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 5 Bdr, 3 Bath, Florence area home on 3.2 acres. $575,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com 5905 Ocean View, Clinton. 4 bed, 3 bath on 1.63 acres with 3 fireplaces, 2 car garage and many new improvements. $300,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com Blackfoot River Corridor 19500 Highway 200 East. 2 acres, beautiful newer 2 story, 3 bed, 2.5 bath home across the road from the river and set back in the trees with lovely landscaped yard. Attached garage and detached enormous insulated shop. $299,900. KD 2405227. porticorealestate.com Gorgeous Wooded Property Bordering Forest Service Land 17290 Remount, Huson. $190,000. 2 bedroom, 3 bath, 2.4 acres. Remodeled bedrooms with laminate floors, updated bathroom, newer windows and added insulation. A hop skip and a jump from the freeway. KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com LotB MacArthur. 3 bed, 2 bath to be built with fantastic views. $189,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net Potomac Log Cabin 1961 Blaine, Potomac. $200,000. 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath, 8.77 acres. Light-filled log cabin with an open floor plan with high ceilings and large windows. Hiking in the summer with a great little sled hill

[C12] Missoula Independent • August 1 – August 8, 2013

EQUITY LOANS ON NONOWNER OCCUPIED MONTANA REAL ESTATE. We also buy Notes & Mortgages. Call Creative Finance & Investments @ 406-721-1444 or visit www.creative-finance.com Looking for a local mortgage lender? Call Lisa Holcomb, Loan Officer at Guild Mortgage Company. 1001 S Higgins Suite A2, Missoula. Cell: 406-370-8792 or Office: 258-7519

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[40] Missoula Independent • April 13–April 20, 2012


Missoula Independent