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ARTS

THE END OF TASTE: WITH GREATER ACCESS TO ONLINE MUSIC, WE’VE CREATED AURAL ANARCHY

MASALA FOOD CART COOKS SECOND THOUGHTS STARTS TO RECRUIT FOOD NEWS RABBI OPINION UP AUTHENTIC INDIAN FARE ON PRIMARY RESULTS FOR ORTHODOX CHABAD


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


ARTS

THE END OF TASTE: WITH GREATER ACCESS TO ONLINE MUSIC, WE’VE CREATED AURAL ANARCHY

MASALA FOOD CART COOKS SECOND THOUGHTS STARTS TO RECRUIT FOOD NEWS RABBI OPINION UP AUTHENTIC INDIAN FARE ON PRIMARY RESULTS FOR ORTHODOX CHABAD


[2] Missoula Independent • June 12–June 19, 2014


cover photo by Cathrine L. Walters

News Voices/Letters Creationism, Daines and Louie Bond ....................................................4 The Week in Review Sexual assault, Our Missoula and Mark Harmon ........................6 Briefs New brewery, coffee and block parties................................................................6 Etc. The tricky business of revitalizing old industrial sites.............................................7 News How Democrats broke from the norm in the 2014 primaries..............................8 News Orthodox movement looks to attract a following in Missoula .............................9 Opinion Second thoughts on last week’s primary elections .......................................10 Opinion A protected Flathead River is still vulnerable to spills...................................11 Feature A Montana man rallies the nation’s militia......................................................14

Arts & Entertainment Arts The end of taste.....................................................................................................18 Music The Helligans, Don Williams and Old 97’s ........................................................19 Books Rachel Toor’s Road re-inspires the YA genre ....................................................20 Film Favreau’s Chef lacks a few key ingredients...........................................................21 Film No fault in faithful adaptation of John Green’s novel..........................................22 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films ......................................................23 What’s Good Here Masala food cart............................................................................24 Happiest Hour Black Coffee’s cold brew ....................................................................26 8 Days a Week God bless ’Merica ................................................................................27 Mountain High Montana Senior Olympics..................................................................33 Agenda Flag Day celebration ........................................................................................34

Exclusives

Street Talk..............................................................................................................4 In Other News......................................................................................................12 Classifieds ..........................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ...........................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y.............................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle...............................................................................................C-7 Camp Sleepover ...............................................................................................C-11 This Modern World...........................................................................................C-12

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Heidi Starrett CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL PROJECTS Christie Anderson ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Cathrine L. Walters CALENDAR EDITOR Kate Whittle STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen, Ted McDermott COPY EDITOR Kate Whittle PHOTO INTERN Grace Ryan ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Pumpernickel Stewart, Jonathan Marquis CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Allen MARKETING, PROMOTION & EVENTS COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, Jason McMackin, Brad Tyer, Nick Davis, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Matthew Frank, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Melissa Mylchreest, Rob Rusignola, Josh Quick, Brooks Johnson

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2014 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • June 12–June 19, 2014 [3]


[voices]

STREET TALK

by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked Tuesday, June 10, along North Higgins Avenue. What source do you rely on to discover new music? Follow-up: What’s your summertime jam?

Kat Itz: An app called 8tracks. You can type in a combo of words, like hip-hop and country, and hit “next,” then get a tailored mix of songs that’s man-made and not generated by a computer. Summer camp: It’s called “Girls Chase Boys” by Ingrid Michaelson. Her YouTube video is really goofy.

Jarom Hein: I still listen to Pandora but I use my friends. My other musician friends are always turning me on to new stuff. Funky summer: “The Give Back” by Reverend Slanky.

Willy Miller: Ninebullets.net. It’s a blog that reviews records. And Facebook band pages. And from friends posting about new bands. Udderly in love: Probably Two Cow Garage. They played in Missoula last week.

Weird science Thanks to the Indy for the “etc.” column on Steve Daines’ flirtation with creationism (May 22). Just a few years ago, this was mentioned in some publications, but his campaign hasn’t uttered a word about it since. The story involved a fundraiser at the Creation Museum in Petersburg, Ky., but one wonders why he had to go so far from Montana when he was even then awash in campaign money. A good investigative journalist might uncover other such visits, perhaps to the Dinosaur and Fossil Museum in Glendive, to which Daines’ former boss and friend, Greg Gianforte, donated over $200,000 for its construction. But is Daines a creationist? Don’t expect a straight answer. It’s not his style. He does recommend that it be taught in schools alongside evolution and the kids can make up their own minds as to whether biblical literalism or scientific explanation is best. If that doesn’t work, local school boards could decide. Creation museums feature two principles: Earth history (it’s 6,000 years old) and that dinosaurs shared our planet simultaneously. Of course, Earth is really about 4 billion years old and while the dinosaurs went extinct about 60 million years ago, hominids came on the scene closer to a million years in the past. Daines is from Bozeman and the renowned Museum of the Rockies has been there for some time. A few visits there could have straightened him out. Instead we may have to deal with a senator with limited scientific understanding. Mike Chessin Missoula

Take a hike Hannah Leitner: Locally, I go to Caras Park to hear new bands. But I do a lot of YouTubing so I get a lot of my music there and check out people’s music pages on Facebook. Drop it like it’s hot: The style in general would be dubstep but no particular artist or song. I like it all.

Steve Daines is upset. President Obama made a vitally important decision to bypass a do-nothing Congress and limit greenhouse gas emissions from existing coal plants with EPA rulemaking. This is a

desperate move by Obama to limit global warming, which will raise sea levels enough to swamp coastal cities, turn America’s food belt in the West into a desert, while drenching the rest of the nation, and disrupt our ecosystem so dangerously that species will become extinct at a rate that has happened only a handful of times in our planet’s history. Global warming will cause famine,

Spare the spray

“Don’t expect a

Sincere apology

straight answer. It’s not his style.”

war and ultimately threaten our civilization. We already see its effects in the dying forest around us in Montana. But Steve Daines and many of his fellow Republicans say Obama has declared a “war on coal.” We might wonder why Steve Daines is so worried about saving coal when Obama is trying to save the planet. But really we shouldn’t. The answer is simple, I think. Rich people own the coal mines and oil fields. Nobody owns the sun or the wind, the sources of renewable energy which Obama’s rule would steer us toward. Steve Daines has the back of the billionaires financing his campaign. Obama is doing what is desperately needed to save the rest of us. Maybe we should thank Obama and tell Steve Daines to take a long hike with his billionaire friends. Wade Sikorski Baker

Please do not spray dandelions or any other weed for that matter. They are important players in the ecosystem which provide food for the pollinators. Without pollinators, the world will not be able to support humans and all the other wildlife that we appreciate. Please save our drinking water from being polluted with herbicides! There are many non-toxic ways to deal with problem plants that don’t require poisons. Jacob Chessin Wustner Stevensville

As the historian and graves registration chairman of Corvallis Post #91, The American Legion, Department of Montana, I want to apologize for the lack of attention to detail during the flag placement on veteran’s graves at the Corvallis Cemetery. I also want to apologize for the names that were not mentioned during the post’s memorial ceremony at the cemetery this past Memorial Day. I am in charge of both of these activities and I am responsible for everything that happens and fails to happen with them. Memorial Day is very special day for those of us who served, because it is when we remember those veterans who have died. I failed to uphold our expectations in 2014 and for that I am deeply sorry. We have already implemented new procedures, such as an additional data backup system, that will immediately fix some problems. Other problems are just a lack of focus and we will strive to correct that as well. To my fellow veterans and veteran families again I apologize and we will do better next year. Doug Mason Historian Corvallis Post #91 The American Legion

[Comments from MissoulaNews.com] Backtalk from “The Lifer,” June 5

Better guitar Bill Birkenbuel: SoundCloud. It’s like the hip ReverbNation. It’s a forum for bands and individual artists. And I also use Grooveshark. Beach boy: The Tarnished Gold album by Beachwood Sparks.

[4] Missoula Independent • June 12–June 19, 2014

“Boy did this bring back some memories and names I had long forgotten!! I don’t get around as much as in the old day to see who’s playing, I got here a little later than Louie, ’78 to be exact, and the Cabin and the Park were my favorite places along with the Top Hat and Luke’s for open mic nights haahha ... Sure glad the Top Hat is still going strong. Maybe things will change, would love to go back to the ’70s and ’80s, especially since I have

a much better guitar hahahah. Thanks for a great article, good luck Louie!” Posted June 9 at 3:51 p.m.

Kudos “Fascinating article! Tremendous respect for this man.” Posted June 5 at 10:43 a.m.

Lots of smiles “Fantastic article on a fantastic man.

Well-deserved respect. Love the line ‘now there’s all this technology—guitar players have a small city under their feet of pedals.’ Louie has brought smiles to tens of thousands of people, myself included. Thanks Louie!” Posted June 10 at 10:40 a.m.

The real deal “This is really great. Louie is the real deal and such a nice guy to boot.” Posted June 5 at 12:21 p.m.


missoulanews.com • June 12–June 19, 2014 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Cathrine L. Walters

Wednesday, June 4 More than 100 people turn up at the Doubletree Hotel for the launch of Our Missoula, a city planning initiative that will chart Missoula’s growth for the next 20 years.

Thursday, June 5 The Occupational Safety and Health Administration fines Missoula’s Dollar Tree store $217,000 for repeatedly failing to handle and store compressed helium gas cylinders correctly and for obstructing exit routes, among other willful and repeat violations.

Friday, June 6 The 14.5-acre Silver Park officially opens along the Clark Fork and adjacent to the Osprey baseball stadium. The new park’s pavilion and picnic shelter include wood from buildings that once stood on the former sawmill site.

Saturday, June 7 Actor Mark Harmon, famous from his roles in movies like Stealing Home and Summer School and his current role on the CBS drama “NCIS,” is spotted shopping downtown at a used sporting goods store. He says he needs a nice fleece.

Sunday, June 8 The Missoula County Sheriff’s Department receives a report that two generators were stolen from a camper parked near Lolo Hot Springs. The generators are valued at $1,300 each.

Monday, June 9 In new legal documents filed with the U.S. District Court, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service lays out a timeline for completion of a recovery plan for threatened Canada lynx. The agency anticipates a plan will be finished by January 2018—18 years after the species was first granted federal protection.

Tuesday, June 10 The Missoula County Attorney’s Office and the U.S. Department of Justice release a pair of agreements ending their longstanding dispute. One of the agreements allows state Attorney General Tim Fox to oversee implementation of new standards and procedures for the handling of sexual assault cases in Missoula County.

Missoula Parks & Recreation employees Tuline Kinaci, front, and Breanne Bornemann plant zinnias, snapdragons and dahlias in the median at the corner of Front and Orange on June 9. Greenways & Horticulture, a division of Parks & Rec, purchased 4,978 annual flowers this spring to be planted throughout the city.

Crime

Alleged assailant identified Six months after a brutal beating left Missoula resident Russ Talmo unconscious downtown and sparked outrage in the community about the unprovoked attack, law enforcement thinks they know who’s responsible. “There was a warrant issued for his arrest on May 28,” says Missoula Police Department Public Information Officer Travis Welsh. Police have identified Talmo’s assailant as Stuart Richard Brown, 25. Brown remains at large and, Welsh says, may have returned to Browning, where “he has ties.” Talmo was pleased to learn that charges have been filed. “It made my day,” he says. Absent a missing tooth, Talmo’s recovered from the Dec. 7 assault that left him hospitalized for several days. Early that winter morning, Talmo left a graduation party at Charlie B’s with three friends. As they walked south on Higgins Avenue, a man approached Talmo from behind and struck him on the back of the head. Talmo again hit his head when landing on the pavement. Witnesses reported the attack was unprovoked and appeared to come out of nowhere.

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[6] Missoula Independent • June 12–June 19, 2014

Talmo sustained bleeding and swelling on the brain, multiple hairline skull fractures and a fractured orbital socket. He also lost a tooth. Doctors used staples to close a gash in the back of the head. In the days after the assault, locals decried the attack on social media and in news articles documenting the incident. Many wondered publicly how such a random act of violence could occur in Missoula. A community fundraising effort, meanwhile, raised enough money to pay all of Talmo’s medical bills, which, he says, amounted to more than $50,000. “I was super just blown away and grateful for all of the community support,” Talmo says. He adds that the outpouring of goodwill far overshadowed the ugliness of the attack. “It’s just really reassuring on a lot of levels.” Until now, Talmo and his supporters have only been able to speculate about who could be capable of such an assault. Witnesses didn’t actually see the blow land, and Talmo doesn’t remember the incident at all. Court records indicate that Brown has a criminal record. In 2008, he pleaded guilty in federal court to assault with a dangerous weapon after admitting to beating another man with a baseball bat on the Blackfeet Reservation. Jessica Mayrer

City council

Fight for the right to party In an effort to forge stronger community ties among neighbors, Missoula City Councilwoman Emily Bentley this week asked her colleagues to make it easier for locals to throw block parties. “I think every block in the city should have a party at some point,” Bentley says. On Wednesday, the Missoula City Council Public Safety and Health Committee began hashing out Bentley’s request to streamline the block party application process. As it stands, gaining approval is daunting, Bentley says. Prior to receiving authorization, a party planner must fill out a six-page application, which requires, among other things, obtaining signatures from seven different municipal department heads, including those who oversee finance, traffic, fire, parking, parks and recreation, police and the mayor’s office. “The application is pretty onerous,” Bentley says. “It seems like maybe we could [make it easier] … for people, so they don’t have as much trouble.” A Slant Streets constituent alerted Bentley to the red tape after being forced to take an entire day off work to complete the application, Bentley says.


[news] While researching the issue, Bentley has become something of a block party expert. She rattles off the benefits of such social gatherings, noting, for example, that when people get to know their neighbors, they’re more likely to discuss problems that may arise and thereby alleviate conflict. Similarly, Bentley references social science studies that have found cohesive communities have significantly lower crime rates. Many cities in recent years have made it easier to host block parties. Oakland, for instance, distributes a block party guide complete with suggested party activities and invitations that can be duplicated. Oakland’s effort is done in conjunction with a broader plan facilitated by a nonprofit called “National Night Out,” which in 1984 began helping people across the country launch the gatherings to cultivate healthier communities. The cities of Longmont, Colo., and Redwood City, Calif., meanwhile, actually offer grants to pay for block parties. In light of what’s being done elsewhere, Bentley says the least Missoula can do is cut through some of its red tape. “Block parties are exactly the type of activity we want neighbors involved in,” she says. Jessica Mayrer

While restraint has paid off for Black Coffee Roasting regarding Brazil, crops across Central America have struggled to rebound from leaf rust, an airborne fungus that chokes the plant. In the last few years leaf rust has devastated crops in Panama, Guatemala and Colombia, countries famed for their yields of organic coffee. El Salvador’s leaf rust has been especially brutal, and Chapman says now that it resulted in its exclusion from his company’s Single Origin series.

Coffee

Bitter grounds Craven’s Coffee Company co-founder Simon Craven Thompson likes to drop an expression when discussing Brazil’s impact on the global coffee market. “If Brazil sneezes, the rest of the coffee world gets a cold,” Thompson says, “and that’s because of the sheer enormity of their supply.” That sneeze was heard around the world this year after a series of poor coffee bean harvests in Brazil gave coffee markets a panic attack, driving up prices for local roasters, like Thompson, who purchase beans from the region. Shortly after news of the disappointing yields broke alongside viral photos of wilted plants, Thompson says prices nearly doubled. “It almost became sort of a social media event,” he says. Brazilian prices have just recently stabilized, but the incident demonstrates just how volatile the coffee market can be. Black Coffee Roasting Co. co-founder Jim Chapman says the company took a wait-and-see approach to the market crisis before making any price adjustments. “The coffee market has been like that the past few years,” Chapman wrote in an email when prices first spiked in March. “Periods of great volatility during some weather crisis, speculators drive up the costs tremendously, but as soon as the event plays out, crops turn out not to be as poor as speculated, and prices stabilize at a more reasonable level.”

“We weren’t able to find any organics from El Salvador this year that were a reasonable price,” Chapman says. Florence Coffee Company, on the other hand, has managed to keep its supply line drama-free by importing beans from Costa Rica, which uses more sophisticated farming methods to avoid the drought and blight plaguing other countries’ crops. Mike Gerrity

Business

Brewing community When Robert Rivers and Fernanda Krum started looking for a space to start a new Missoula brewery called One Nation, they went downtown. They found a spot on Alder Street, just west of the Double Front, but couldn’t quite make it work despite five months of trying; rent and renovations would have been too expensive. The couple expanded their search and ended up at an unlikely location: a used car lot on a busy stretch of West Broadway.

BY THE NUMBERS Approximate number of sheep that will be grazing in the North Hills for the next several weeks as part of the city’s effort to naturally combat weeds such as leafy spurge, spotted knapweed and dalmation toadflax.

70

On June 9, the Missoula City Council unanimously approved a conditional use permit that will allow Rivers and Krum to transform 1151 West Broadway into a brewery designed to foster “social change and community transformation.” To that end, the couple’s plans for the site include not just a taproom but also a designated space for community meetings, classes and workshops. They hope to develop programs to benefit various local organizations, including the Poverello Center, which is building its new shelter across the street. Rivers and Krum aren’t the only ones who see the brewery’s potential to initiate change. Ellen Buchanan, director of the Missoula Redevelopment Agency, thinks One Nation will help transform West Broadway from a busy commercial stretch into a thriving extension of downtown’s core. “It’s past time for downtown to jump Orange Street,” Buchanan says, “and development of Riverfront Triangle will make that happen.” The Riverfront Triangle Urban Renewal District extends between Broadway and the Clark Fork, and it abuts another urban renewal district known as Urban Renewal District II. These districts are areas where the city can leverage tax revenue to generate development. That leverage was key to One Nation’s ability to pursue the site on West Broadway. Using urban renewal district funding, MRA is planning to transform a currently unoccupied river island into a new park where swimmers, tubers, kayakers and surfers will congregate. That park is just steps away from where One Nation will eventually open. When it does, it will presumably help drive customers to the brewery. At the same time, the park will create increased need for public parking in the area. To meet that need, One Nation has agreed to sell part of its parking lot to the city. The funds from the sale will help the owners develop the property. Buchanan says it was “a match made in heaven.” Rivers calls it “uncanny.” Rochelle Glasgow, president of the Westside Neighborhood Association, is also optimistic about the arrangement. “Instead of used car lots and shabby hotels,” she says, “we want to see thriving businesses come in which will create a better neighborhood and then better businesses and prosperity and values.” Ted McDermott

ETC. Last Friday, the city celebrated the opening of its latest park, a sparkling 14.5-acre expanse of green grass, bike paths and gorgeous wooden structures situated along the Clark Fork. Silver Park is by all accounts a huge accomplishment, another step toward revitalizing the long dormant Champion-Intermountain mill site next to the Osprey baseball stadium. If the crowds over the weekend are any indication, it’s going to be as popular as any riverfront trail in the area. There were countless bicyclists, pickup soccer games and kids’ birthday parties taking advantage of the newly accessible scenery. There were also remnants of the site’s past, most notably some old industrial machinery piled not far from the gleaming new picnic shelters. If a curious onlooker explored that machinery and the other piles of rubble and soil not yet dealt with, they may have been surprised by what they found: a modest homeless camp. Stuffed within the columns of the machinery were at least three sleeping bags. Camouflaged tents covered a small center area, almost like a courtyard, not visible from the park’s trails. Suitcases were stuffed into other nooks of the enclosure. This camp wasn’t any different than those found under the Reserve Street bridge or down the Kim Williams Trail except for the fact that it happened to be 50 yards from the latest jewel in the city’s crown. It showed, if nothing else, that Friday’s opening ceremony hardly marks an endpoint to the city’s revitalization efforts. Another noteworthy juxtaposition played out last weekend at a different industrial site. On Saturday night, Headwaters Dance Co. treated a busload of art lovers to a touring site-specific performance. Dance pieces were set all along the Blackfoot River, deep in the woods and right on the roadside. The last piece took place at the old Stimson Lumber mill in Bonner, a site that’s seen spurts of activity in recent years, and holds the promise of a new company moving in to, in part, assemble megaload equipment for transport to Canada. But the mill has yet to fully recapture the bustle of its heyday. It’s also probably never hosted a dance concert. That’s why the presence of a half-dozen dancers, live music and a busload of onlookers prompted neighbors to pour out onto their porches or yards and take in the scene. Those neighbors know as well as anyone that reviving an industrial site takes time, and can happen in many ways—including, for at least one night, with a dance.

Times Run 6/13/14 - 6/19/14

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

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missoulanews.com • June 12–June 19, 2014 [7]


[news]

Bucking tradition How Democrats broke from the norm in the 2014 primaries by Alex Sakariassen

Shortly after former Gov. Brian Schweitzer announced last year that he would not run for U.S. Senate in 2014, Schweitzer’s former lieutenant governor, John Bohlinger, began kicking the tires on a campaign of his own. Some had asked if he’d seek the office, and Bohlinger felt that his two decades in state government combined with three decades as a small business owner would go over well with voters. So on Nov. 5, the man who once served as a Republican in the Montana Legislature officially stated his intent to run on the Democratic ticket. Not everyone seemed keen on the idea. According to a story Bohlinger shared widely with the media last fall—and reiter-

Sen. Jon Tester. Even the Montana Democratic Party gave Walsh its endorsement, deviating from a long-standing tradition of avoiding participation in primaries. The organization has only done so for two candidates in the past decade: Schweitzer and Baucus. In an even rarer move, the MDP also endorsed U.S. House candidate John Lewis against past Democratic primary spoiler John Driscoll. Lewis won with 13,913 more votes than Driscoll. “We stood with the majority of Democrats behind the strongest candidates to fight for our values and our working families this fall,” says MDP spokesperson Bryan Watt. The state party wasn’t the only Democratic entity to break from the norm in

photo courtesy of TJ McDermott

Missoula County Democrats changed the organization’s bylaws in order to endorse sheriff candidate T.J. McDermott, pictured above flanked by Mayor John Engen and County Commissioner Jean Curtiss. McDermott was one of many endorsed Democratic candidates to win during the June 3 primaries.

ated to the Indy several weeks ago—that November declaration was preceded one day earlier by a call from U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid. Bohlinger claims Reid told him the Democrats had “chosen their candidate and didn’t want a contested primary” in Montana. The candidate was thenLt. Gov. John Walsh. Bohlinger was unfazed. “I’m not a cry baby or a whiner,” he said. Three months later, with Max Baucus named the new U.S. ambassador to China, Gov. Steve Bullock appointed Walsh to fill the Senate vacancy. Just like that the Democratic primary had an incumbent. On June 3, Walsh won handily, defeating Bohlinger by 31,346 votes ( Wilsall rancher Dirk Adams, the third primary candidate, lost to Walsh by more than 38,000 votes). Walsh’s campaign virtually ignored the Democratic competition, instead concentrating its message on Republican frontrunner and acting Congressman Steve Daines. Many in the party lined up squarely behind him, including Bullock, Baucus and

[8] Missoula Independent • June 12–June 19, 2014

what looked to be a tense and competitive primary season. There were no official endorsements involved, but the Gallatin County Democratic Central Committee did decide to step up communication efforts relating to three legislative battles. Kathy Hollenback, Mike Comstock and Dane Peeples were all pegged by the committee as “fake” Democrats—Republican spoilers looking to oust primary candidates April Buonamici, Tom Woods and Denise Hayman. “Usually the people that file have been vetted by us and encouraged by the Gallatin County Democrats to file,” says Committee Chair Julie Quenemoen. “And when their names came up we started looking into them and found various things that were obviously not Democrat values in their background, such as donating to Republican candidates and being part of some militia organizations and participating in Tea Party events … Plus, we’d never had them at any of our events or no one really knew them or had met them, so it was pretty obvious.”

Former Committee Chair Bill McWilliams adds that the organization has “always been relatively quiet” during the Democratic primaries. But the presence on the ballot of three potential spoilers pushed the party to phone and email voters with information on those it considered the true Democrats. McWilliams is confident the effort paid off; all three of the questionable candidates failed at the polls. Frankly, McWilliams says, the development helped. “It gets our base excited to vote, we collect more money and it allows our candidate to be better known in the district,” he says. “So I’m not sure that [the suspect Democrats] were rocket scientists running for office.” The most notable aberration in Missoula came in the form of a change in the Missoula County Democrats’ bylaws—a change that enabled the group to endorse a candidate in the county sheriff ’s race. During one candidate forum, members of the central committee began to feel that two of the candidates were not espousing entirely Democratic values. Seeley Lake-based Senior Deputy Bob Parcell even acknowledged that he’d voted for Republican Mitt Romney in the last presidential election. Committee members discussed the matter at length, says chair Dave Kendall, before deciding to breach a longstanding rule: They endorsed Detective Sgt. T.J. McDermott. “Clearly, we didn’t take this lightly,” Kendall says. “We generally want to have good, competitive races in the Democratic party. That’s a good thing for everybody, and we’re not trying to limit—we don’t have any power to limit—peoples’ participation in the primary. What we are simply offering is our opinion about who we thought was a good Democrat in the race to give people that knowledge of our judgment.” McDermott won by 2,902 votes over his closest challenger, Undersheriff Josh Clark. Kendall says that while the committee likely won’t reverse the bylaw change, endorsements will not become commonplace. As with other Democratic primary races this year, the Missoula County sheriff ’s race was one in which party members saw stakes too high not to act. “We thought it was an important race because of the problems in the sheriff ’s office,” Kendall says. “There’s been numerous management issues, people there are not happy … Of all the races, this was one Democrats felt was really important to get right.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com


[news]

Recruitment rabbi Orthodox movement looks to attract a following in Missoula by Ted McDermott

Chabad has been remarkably successful, especially since 1950, when Menachem Mendel Schneerson assumed leadership of the movement. Though the Rebbe, as he is commonly known, died in 1994, the movement’s growth has continued since his passing. According to a recent article in Israeli news source Haaretz, there are now Chabad institutions in more than 1,200 cities. One such institution was founded in

doors. Much like other fundamentalist groups, they knock on doors and insist that you do immediately what they’ve come to tell you you have to do. They will come and insist you do morning prayers with them. … I’ve had—I know of people in Whitefish who have said, ‘Leave me alone. Please do not come back again.’ They are zealots. That’s the right term. They’re zealots, and their zealotry, on occasion, can become aggressive.” Some in Montana’s Jewish community worry as well that the local growth of Chabad will come at the expense of the sustainability of existing congregations. Missoula’s Reform congregation, Har Shalom, has only about 55 member families. Bozeman’s congregation Beth Shalom, which is affiliated with the Reform and Renewal movements, has an estimated 120 member families. Because Chabad aims to attract non-Orthodox Jews, the movement will almost inevitably compete for these members. Rabbi Nash, however, sees his outreach efforts not as a form photo by Cathrine L. Walters of competition but as a vital way of life. Though only 25, he has Rabbi Berry Nash, 25, recently moved to Missoula with his family to establish a Chabad institution. The Orthodox movement has been criticized by some for its aggressive re- been spreading the Chabad message for more than a decade, cruitment techniques and “in-your-face brand of Judaism.” since he was 14. “Every week, I’ve walked out of my more traditional and rigorous form of reli- Bozeman in 2007. Its success led to the decision to start the new center in Missoula. house for hours,” he says, “looking for Jews, gious practice. As Chabad has grown, criticism of the stopping people on the street.” “We just want to give Judaism,” Nash says. “We want to give what people want to movement has increased. In The Rebbe’s Those streets were in Manhattan, Montake. We’re not forcing anyone. There’s no Army, a book-length account of Chabad, treal and other large cities with substantial all or nothing. The ability to take what you Sue Fishkoff writes, “The movement’s Jewish populations. In Missoula, Nash wish. What we want to do is give people the highly public, in-your-face brand of Judaism knows, the challenge will be different. He opportunity to grow at the standards that makes it off-putting to some American Jews, plans to look for potential converts however as does the way shlichim seem to steamroll he can—online, on the University of Monthey choose.” Though Nash insists he intends only to into town setting up shop with great fanfare tana campus, through word of mouth and offer instruction to those who want it, in the in communities where the Jewish popula- by offering free classes. way they want it, some in western Mon- tion has maintained a more circumspect “The numbers are definitely gonna be tana’s small Jewish community are con- profile. Chabad’s refusal to recognize non- fewer,” he says, “but it’s not the quantity. It’s cerned about the message Nash will bring, Orthodox Jewish denominations puts the really, every person counts.” how he will deliver it and what it will mean group at odds with the majority of rabbis Laurie Franklin, the spiritual leader of for the region’s few existing congregations. working in this country, and with most na- Missoula’s Har Shalom, acknowledges the Their concern derives from the brand of Or- tional Jewish organizations. … Chabad is difference between Chabad and her congrecriticized for both being too religious and gation’s progressive form of practice, but thodox Judaism that Nash espouses. Nash is a follower of Chabad, a strict, for pushing the outreach envelope too far.” she doesn’t hold the same concerns as othAllen Secher, a now retired rabbi who ers. She remains optimistic that the two mystical and messianic movement that began 250 years ago in Poland. Whereas previously served congregations in Boze- practices will be able to coexist. most Jewish congregations are locally man and Whitefish, shares many of these “I have a great appreciation of Orthofunded and eschew missionary work, concerns, citing the movement’s tendency doxy in its many forms,” she says. “I wish Chabad has created a complex infrastruc- not to tolerate differences within Judaism, them well. What can I say? Will they be able ture for sending emissaries known as its mandate that the sexes be separated dur- to establish a stable base in Missoula? I don’t shlichim around the world to reach out to ing services and the aggressive outreach tac- have a crystal ball. I have no idea. But hopeother Jews, encourage them to adopt its tics of local Chabad. fully, there will be room for both.” brand of belief and establish new centers “Sometimes there’s no limit in their and synagogues for Orthodox practice. reach out,” Secher says. “They knock on tmcdermott@missoulanews.com Rabbi Berry Nash sits in the kitchen of an unfurnished house on Missoula’s Southside, at a small table that’s empty except for a few bottles of water and a paper bowl full of kosher chocolate chip cookies. He’s more than 2,400 miles from his home in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn, an enclave of deeply Orthodox Jews, because he’s on a mission. Nash wants to reach out to Jews in Montana and lead them toward a

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missoulanews.com • June 12–June 19, 2014 [9]


[opinion]

Turnout trouble Second thoughts on last week’s primary elections by Dan Brooks

June 19 Ryan Chrys & The Rough Cuts Family Activity

Montana Natural History Center

June 26 Off in the Woods Family Activity

Children's Museum Missoula

June 18

June 25

Kevin Van Dort Band

Ed Norton Big Band

Family Activity

Historical Museum at Fort Missoula

Family Activity

Mismo Gymnastics

[10] Missoula Independent • June 12–June 19, 2014

I don’t mean to alarm you, but last week in Ravalli County, 351 people voted to reelect treasurer Valerie Stamey. The primary happened while she was on paid leave, pending the results of an investigation that has spent several months and $70,000 trying to figure out what happened while she was in office, and 351 people voted to hire her again. That doesn’t include the people who wanted to cast their ballots for Stamey but, when they pulled the lever, only poured soft-serve onto the floor of Dairy Queen until they were asked to leave. I wish the voters of Missoula had such could-do spirit. We’re a fickle bunch, as incumbent County Commissioner Michele Landquist learned when she lost her Democratic primary to Nicole “Cola” Rowley. Rowley is a relative unknown. Landquist, on the other hand, is known to anyone who reads the news as Missoula’s most reliable quote. She seems to hold no opinion that she will not put frankly, and she laid the blame for her loss where it belonged: on the voters. “Missoula let Missoula down,” she told the Missoulian. “I thought Missoulians were much more engaged in the election process and getting people in office that they trust.” That’ll teach you to overestimate us, Landquist—the rubes win again! I’m not certain that an incumbent losing her primary to a well-run campaign is necessarily an instance of voter apathy. Landquist seems to be showing off her knack for speaking eloquently in the moments just before she thinks, which is too bad because she also happens to be right. Of the 85,000 registered voters in Missoula County, 21,000 voted last week, putting the number of us who exercise any influence on the government of our county at one in four. That’s like loading up a car with friends, asking everyone where they want to go, then sitting silently while the driver mechanically takes you to his office. For the analogy to be complete, you have to

complain once you get there. “This office sucks,” you say, having refused to pick a destination. “Why did we come here? Why were the roads so bad?” It’s not as if our county government offered nothing to vote about. Besides being an election year, 2014 was also the year that Missoula County sued the Department of Justice. The county has paid out over $530,000 in claims and legal fees since 2010, including $120,000 for claims that originated within the sheriff ’s department.

“Missoula’s low turnout increases the relative power of weirdos by a factor of more than four, since nuts are statistically overrepresented in local elections.” It’s a lively government that generated these stories, and people know about them. As with the weather, though, everybody talks about county politics but no one ever seems to do anything. One-in-four voter turnout isn’t just a problem because it disconnects us from our government. It’s also a problem because, as we all know, one in four people is crazy. You keep three people around that guy and he can live normally in society, but leave him alone and he turns to projects. And crazy people love to vote. Mis-

soula’s low turnout increases the relative power of weirdos by a factor of more than four, since nuts are statistically overrepresented in local elections. Consider the 351 souls who voted to reelect Stamey as Ravalli County treasurer. Those are some hardcore voters, right there. The people who come out for the suspended treasurer who broke the county are going to come out every time, and they will influence the government according to some inscrutable value system that is not your own. That’s the only thing we know for certain about the 25 percent of registered voters who determined the course of Missoula government last week: They differ from most people in the county, at least in one way. Maybe they voted the way we all secretly feel, in a neat statistical representation of the silent majority. Or maybe we have ceded too much power to the pathologically engaged, to the party hacks and the fervent believers. Make no mistake—those people are happy to see the ordinary voter stop meddling in electoral politics. You don’t need to convince people to join your side to win an election. You just need to convince the people who aren’t on your side not to care. Last week, 75 percent of Missoula’s electorate did not care enough to vote, and that gave a lot of power to whoever showed up. Those people got to shape a government that was a little bigger than it was last time, that moves around a little more money and influences the lives of a few thousand more people. Missoula County is growing fast. Unless more of us take an interest in how we are governed, the weirdos’ share of power will grow, too. Dan Brooks writes about politics, culture and weirdos at combatblog.net. His column appears every other week in the Independent. editor@missoulanews.com


[opinion]

Oil and water A protected Flathead River is still vulnerable to spills by Hilary Hutcheson

In every stage of life, I’ve lived near railroad tracks. The haunting sounds of night trains with their short-blast-long-howl whistles and steady rumble have always been grounding and comforting to me. I used to love watching gritty, graffiti-clad train cars pushing forward to get an important job done somewhere to my east or west. The history of the Great Northern Railway is fascinating, and as a river guide on the Middle Fork of the Flathead River, I’ve chronicled to guests how John F. Stevens found a route for the railway over Marias Pass and along the beautiful river in 1889. But now, with the fracking boom in eastern Montana and North Dakota, the haunting feeling I get when a train sounds its whistle isn’t comforting at all. It’s a dark, foreboding moan with a connotation that keeps me up at night. This year, hundreds of millions of barrels of crude oil from the Bakken fields will be hauled on BNSF Railway’s riverside tracks to refineries in Oregon and Washington. In October, the Department of Transportation released a report explaining that each oil car holds 700 barrels of crude, with each train carrying 120 cars. Currently, one of these trains passes through John F. Stevens Canyon along the Middle Fork of the Flathead River each day. Tasked with hauling much of this fossil fuel is an aged fleet of 78,000 tank cars prone to splitting open during accidents. Since it would take only one car breaking into the river to damage the native cutthroat and protected bull trout fishery, I have difficulty with BNSF’s affirmation that it is “a safety leader,” and that its “incident rate is consistently lower than the industry average.” BNSF averages 14 accident-related hazmat releases each year, and it has reported 2,800 accident and non-

accident hazmat incidents since 1995. The Federal Railroad Administration states that in North Dakota it found tens of thousands of track defects and issued more than 700 violations against BNSF since 2006, and that’s in just one state. BNSF has vowed to beef up its tanker fleet with 5,000 oil cars equipped with one-half-inch thick steel shields to prevent them from cracking open. But the company admits that the process of building these cars is backed up for two years. Meanwhile, the National Transporta-

“Tasked with hauling much of this fossil fuel is an aged fleet of 78,000 tank cars prone to splitting open during accidents.” tion Safety Board calls the current tanker fleet “an unacceptable safety risk.” That means BNSF’s commitment to safety translates into a two-year wait for new cars, not one of which is guaranteed to be used along the Middle Fork of the Flathead River. BNSF says it will release an oil-train derailment response plan for the Middle Fork, including instructions on using containment booms. These precautions reveal that it’s not whether there will be a derailment at the

river on Glacier National Park’s southern boundary, but when. There has been one good development: Citing numerous derailments, including an oil car explosion that killed 47 people in Quebec last summer, federal transportation regulators in the United States and Canada recently announced they’d be pushing enhanced oil tank standards with exact rules released this summer. Less than one-quarter of 1 percent of our nation’s rivers are protected as part of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. The Middle Fork is one of those special few. With its federal designation as a Wild and Scenic River, this pristine home water should not be faced with an elevated risk of ruin. My 11-year-old daughter, Ella, earned a blue ribbon at her school’s science fair for her project about oil cleanup methods. She experimented with tactics like containment booms, skimmers and dispersants. Ella was never able to remove all of the motor oil from her water pans. Afterward, we vowed to keep her science project alive by studying possible oil spill prevention strategies. Today, I’m reminded that what we’re faced with on the Middle Fork isn’t child’s play, and no blue ribbons will be handed out for demonstrating the cleanup of a toxic spill. My younger daughter, Delaney, 9, who is still afraid of the dark, recently asked me what I was afraid of. Nothing, I told her. “That’s not true,” Delaney said. “Daddy says you’re afraid that something bad might happen to the river.” Kids say the darnedest things. Hilary Hutcheson is a contributor to Writers on the Range, the opinion syndicate of High Country News (hcn.org). She lives in Columbia Falls, and is a guide and host of the fly-fishing television show “Trout TV.”

photo by Alex Sakariassen

missoulanews.com • June 12–June 19, 2014 [11]


[quirks]

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - Dean Richard Smith, 27, entered a bank in Treorchy, Wales, holding a breadknife, covering his face and wearing socks over his shoes. When he demanded money, teller Catherine Stockton stood behind her glass partition and pressed the alarm. Meanwhile, a gentleman in his 70s standing next to Smith offered him 20 pounds ($33) to leave. Smith declined the offer but left anyway, emptyhanded, according to prosecutor Rachel Knight, upon hearing that bank managers were preparing to lock the doors. “After the incident, they closed the bank and made a cup of tea for the elderly gentleman,” Knight said after Smith pleaded guilty, adding that since the incident Stockton “has been very wary about people who look like him.” (Wales Online) Police charged Luke David Payne, 36, with holding up the same Louisville, Ky., doughnut shop twice in one week. The first time Payne wore a mask, police said, but the second time he skipped the mask, and all the employees recognized him as a coworker. (Louisville’s WAVE-TV)

UNCLEAR ON THE CONCEPT - Intent on making solo diners feel less self-conscious, Tokyo’s Moomin Café began seating them at tables across from giant stuffed animals representing characters from a Finnish picture book series. (Time) LITIGATION NATION - Families with autistic children are suing Walt Disney Co. because its theme parks stopped letting the kids bypass lines for rides. Disney parks used to offer autistic visitors a “guest assistance card” that let them and their families board rides without waiting. The company cited instances of visitors hiring disabled people to obtain the cards as the reason it switched to “disability access service” cards, which let autistic children schedule times for park attractions. The 16 plaintiffs who’re suing Disney under the Americans with Disabilities Act insist scheduling times amounts to waiting, which autistic children have difficulty doing. (Reuters) ROLE MODELS OF THE WEEK - Sheriff’s officials charged high school football coach Rodney Barnes, 43, with stealing $950 from the wallets of nine of his players in Volusia County, Fla. Barnes confessed to these and other thefts. (Associated Press) State police who pulled over University of Alaska Fairbanks campus priest Father Sean P. Thomson, 52, said he confessed to driving drunk and told trooper Christopher Bitz that he had a .357-caliber handgun in the back of his pickup. He clammed up when Bitz also found a 9mm handgun in his back pocket and a small bag of marijuana in his jumper. (Fairbanks Daily News-Miner)

MUCH BETTER - Residents of Castrillo Matajudios, Spain, voted to change the name of their village, but only by 10 votes. The name translates as “Little Fort of Jew Killers.” In announcing the 29-19 vote, Mayor Lorenzo Rodriguez said the village would be renamed Castrillo Mota de Judios, or Little Hill Fort of Jews. One explanation for the original name is that Jewish converts to Catholicism living there in the 17th century wanted to avoid further persecution by making clear their position. (The New York Times) MIXED MESSAGE - Hours after Allegheny County, Pa., announced that wireless users could start texting emergency dispatchers instead of calling, the 911 center received a text message about a drunk driver from a sender. The message indicated the sender was texting while driving, which county official Amie Downs pointed out is illegal, adding, “This is one that probably should have been better served by a phone call.” (Pittsburgh Tribune-Review)

LAWN ORDER - After covering the yard of her home in Kansas City, Mo., with 80 tons of sand, Georgianna Reid explained, “Now being over 60, I’ve decided that I’ve owned the house for 33 years and that I wasn’t going to mow any more or water.” Neighbors complained, but city inspectors said they found no violations because the sand is being used for landscaping. (United Press International) WHEN GUNS ARE OUTLAWED - Andrew Murray, 33, used a stick to rob a bank in Neptune Beach, Fla. Police said he wrapped the stick in a black plastic bag and produced it to back up his demand for “$50,000 from the vault.” (Jacksonville’s WJXT-TV) After Celestino Moras, 25, opened fire into at a church picnic and rodeo in Cassville, Ga., he was apprehended by one of the rodeo cowboys who lassoed him after he ran out of bullets. Other guests tied Moras up until deputies arrived. (Atlanta’s WSB-TV) When a masked man ordered Miyo Koba, 89, to open the cash register at her store in Moses Lake, Wash., she refused and threatened the robber with scissors. He countered by pulling a 3-foot-long sword out of his jacket. Koba trumped his move by grabbing a golf club and hitting him in the legs. The man fled on a bicycle with the cash register and sword, but police said he dropped the register nearby with the money still in it. (USA Today)

KIDS TODAY - Hours after graduating high school in Catersville, Ga., Chance Werner, 18, drowned while tied to a shopping cart. Investigators said his friends were taking turns sitting in a shopping cart tied to a pole on a dock at Lake Allatoona. Others pushed the cart off the dock, flinging the occupant into the lake, then used the rope to pull the shopping cart out of the water. Werner tied the rope to his belt loop instead of the pole, however, so that when he hit the water, the weight of the cart pulled him to the bottom of the lake. Melissa Cummings of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources called the drowning a tragedy and pointed out that kids playing with ropes and heavy objects is “an accident waiting to happen.” (The Atlanta Journal-Constitution) After causing a three-car crash while driving through a tunnel near Manning, Ore., Daniel J. Calhoun, 19, told investigators that he fainted while holding his breath. State Police Lt. Gregg Hastings called the crash “odd” but indicated some people hold their breath in tunnels as part of a game or superstition. (Associated Press)

FLATWARE FOLLIES - Someone broke into the tomb of President James A. Garfield and stole 13 commemorative spoons from a display case, leaving other memorabilia and cash in a donation box. Katharine Goss, president and chief executive of Cleveland’s Lake View Cemetery, which houses Garfield’s tomb, noted that the spoons were “flimsy little things” with practically no monetary value and “would be hard to sell in a historical auction because everyone would wonder where they came from.” (The Washington Post)

[12] Missoula Independent • June 12–June 19, 2014


missoulanews.com • June 12–June 19, 2014 [13]


n April 7, Ryan Payne, a 30-yearold Iraq War veteran, packed his ’93 Jeep Cherokee with two sleeping bags, two cots, the rucksack he’d more or less lived out of during his five years in the military and a Rock River Arms Operator LAR-15. He was on his way to the southern Nevada desert to defend the oppressed from the tyrannical force of the federal government, and he knew he might have to fight. Payne was leaving his family and his home south of Anaconda to support Cliven Bundy, an elderly Nevada rancher engaged in a tense conflict with the Bureau of Land Management, which was rounding up cattle Bundy had been illegally grazing on federal land for some 20 years. When the roundup started on April 5, Payne followed the action from afar. He saw images that seemed to show BLM snipers aiming guns at the Bundy family to prevent them from interfering in the impounding process. He read online that Bundy’s son Davey was arrested on April 6 for “refusing to disperse” while protesting the agency’s actions. He read that BLM agents had allegedly roughed up Davey Bundy while he was in their custody. Ryan Payne watched what was happening, and he saw a striking example of what he observed more and more throughout the country: the U.S. government acting far outside its constitutional authority to control and confine the American people. As he watched, Payne felt not merely compelled but obliged to respond, to uphold the oath he’d taken at 17 when he joined the U.S. Army: “I, Ryan Payne, do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic….” He’d fought foreign enemies before. Now, he believed, the enemy was domestic.

O

[14] Missoula Independent • June 12–June 19, 2014

So on April 6, Payne called Cliven Bundy and offered his help. “I told him what OMA was,” Payne says, “and that, if he requested assistance, I would be calling in militia from all over the country and individuals to come, armed, to protect his family and his community from whoever it was that was trying to harm them.” OMA is Operation Mutual Aid, a loose coalition of militias and sympathetic individuals from across the United States. Payne started the organization in 2013 with Pennsylvania resident Jerry Bruckhart. They designed OMA as a mechanism for using the power of the nation’s hundreds of disparate militias to defend all oppressed Americans. If anyone made a request for OMA’s aid, the organization would alert its members, who would, if they desired, act together to defend that individual’s rights. No such request had ever come, so OMA started to solicit them. Cliven Bundy was the first to accept OMA’s offer of support. When he did, Payne and Bruckhart spread the word online and over the phone. Jim Lardy, who lives in Philipsburg and belongs to the West Mountain Rangers, a local militia Payne founded in 2012, immediately said he wanted to go, too. Payne agreed to give Lardy a ride. After he’d packed his Jeep, Payne said goodbye to his wife, their two young children and his grandparents, who live with them. Not wanting to leave his family


without a means of defense, he left behind his FN FAL, an assault rifle used by so many NATO militaries during the Cold War that it got the nickname “the Right Arm of the Free World.” Then Payne and Lardy drove to Nevada through the night.

“It started when … I saw that movie Sniper,” Payne says, “and I go, ‘I want to be a sniper.’” After finishing high school in Southern California, Payne went to a Military Entrance Processing Station in 2001 to act on that desire. He went to join the Marines first, but the Marines recruiter couldn’t guarantee that he would end up becoming a sniper. “So, I went over to talk to the Army people,” Payne says, “and they said, ‘Well, we can give you a Ranger contract and, most likely, if you go into that type of unit then you’ll get to go to school and be a sniper.’” He ended up becoming not quite a sniper and not quite a Ranger, though he has claimed in online forums and elsewhere that he was. In fact, he served in the 18th Airborne Corps’ Long Range Surveillance Company. He learned sniper techniques such as stalking and concealment, and he foresaw a long career in military intelligence. “[A]t that point I devoted my life to the cause of liberty and freedom and the pursuit of it for the rest of my life,” he says. His goal was to become an agent for the CIA or a non-official cover. “I believed that that would be the pinnacle of patriotism.” When the United States invaded Iraq in 2003, Payne was part of the initial push as a member of a six-man team that moved far behind enemy lines and far from friendly support. They moved only at night, under the cover of darkness. It was dangerous and difficult work, but Payne excelled. He rose to the rank of sergeant and became an assistant team leader of his LRS unit. According to Ben Fisher, who served with Payne during two tours in Iraq, “Everyone that worked with his group and his team, they had good things to say about him.” Then, one night in 2008, Payne’s military experience took a turn while his team was pursuing an unspecified intelligence target south of the Sinjar Mountains and west of the city of Tal Afar, in a flat landscape of unfamiliar wheat fields. They’d been informed ahead of time, Payne says, that the estimated strength of the enemy was 77. His six-man team would be outmatched, but that wasn’t supposed to matter. Their mission was to avoid detection—and if they were identified and attacked, a plan was in place for AH-64 Apaches and other air support to come rapidly to the team’s aid. But things didn’t go as planned. First, the target wasn’t where they thought it would be. “So we kept moving closer and closer,” Payne says. His team came to a Bedouin encampment and dogs there began to bark. “Eventually, the dogs compromised us and people came out of their tents and started shooting, and it went silly,” he says.

Ryan Payne keeps a notebook that includes hand-written mission statements, editorials and ideas pertaining to his work with Operation Mutual Aid, the West Mountain Rangers and the U.S. militia movement at large.

Payne says his team suddenly faced 26 combatants. As the situation worsened, Payne’s team tried to call in the air support that had been arranged—but it didn’t come. “For some reason, the rear, who was our ops center, was canceling all of our requests for gun runs,” Payne says. “You know, we’re staring at 26 guys in front of us that are shooting at us and stuff, and we’re requesting strafing runs—denied, denied.” The air support never came, and Payne says his team was in “a very bad spot for very many hours, fighting for our lives.” All six men survived, but Payne was furious. “I lost it, man,” he says. At a debriefing afterward, Payne went off on those who he felt had failed him. “I’m cussing these guys out,” he says. “They are officers—captains and things— and I am a sergeant. And, you know, ‘Why did it go this way?’ And, ‘The reason it went this way is because you didn’t your job. And people almost died because of it.’” In the aftermath of the botched mission, Payne became convinced the lack of support wasn’t a matter of negligence but

of a deliberate decision. “We all came back,” he says. “I don’t think that was the plan.” Though he won’t speculate about what his superiors’ plan might have been, his experience that night catalyzed a change in Payne. He became suspicious of the military and came to question its intentions. “I discovered that I was working for the wrong team if I were in the pursuit of liberty and freedom,” he says, “because we’re the great oppressors of the world right now, unfortunately. We’re the ones who are pushing oppression upon a lot of the world. And I have found that out, especially once I got out and I can look in and I can see what we’re doing. It just isn’t right.”

Payne and Lardy arrived at the Bundy ranch early on April 8. They were among the first supporters to show up. The Bundys were impressed that Payne had delivered on his commitment to come from so far away and were relieved to see help arrive. The BLM, fearful for the safety

of its own agents, had brought in armed law enforcement for protection and was using helicopters to assist with the roundup. “We’re just a little farm family down here,” says Ryan Bundy, who is one of Cliven Bundy’s sons and who lives and works on the family’s ranch, in an interview with the Indy. “We have a few hunting rifles and so forth, but we don’t have military training, we don’t have military equipment, we don’t even have a decent shotgun that works right. And so, what are we gonna do against the might and force of the federal government and their paramilitary agents? So, when Ryan Payne shows up and the militia starts showing up, we can finally have a sigh of relief, a ray of hope that we have a little bit of defense.” The Bundy family’s conflict with the federal government had been brewing for 20 years. It began in 1993, when the BLM eliminated some grazing privileges of Bundy and other local ranchers in order to protect the threatened desert tortoise. Cliven Bundy refused to obey, calling the action a “land grab” and letting his cattle graze on the now protected area. He was

missoulanews.com • June 12–June 19, 2014 [15]


fined repeatedly for doing so but steadfastly refused to pay. Bundy wasn’t the only rancher to clash with the BLM, but he was notable for his persistent defiance and his threats to resist enforcement, should it ever be attempted. In April, in response to a federal court order, the BLM finally acted to stop Bundy’s illegal grazing. The agency shut down 322,000 acres of public land and began rounding up his “trespass cattle,” which would be auctioned off unless Bundy paid his fees. By the time Payne arrived on the ranch, cowboys working for the BLM had gathered around 100 head of Bundy cattle. Bundy wanted them back, and Payne outlined a plan for retrieving them. The plan would require a strong response to OMA’s call for militia support. Payne was confident it would come. “We sat down and we discussed three objectives for the militia effort there,” Payne says. “And I presented these objectives to him, and he agreed that they were good. He liked them. The first objective was the safety and security of all people involved—the Bundy family, the supporters and all of the law enforcement and pseudo law enforcement that was involved. … The second objective was to reopen all public lands that had been shut down by the BLM. They had their signs up everywhere. You heard about the First Amendment Zones [designated protest areas], I’m sure. What a ridiculous notion that is. … And the third one was the return of all stolen cattle and infrastructure.” As they waited for more supporters to arrive, tensions built. On April 9, they erupted. That Wednesday, members of Bundy’s family and a small contingent of supporters clashed with BLM agents outside the ranch. Smartphones and cameras recorded as armed BLM agents pushed a woman to the ground, allegedly threatened a pregnant woman with a police dog and tasered Cliven’s son Ammon Bundy.

The footage went viral. Then mainstream news outlets began to cover the rising tensions, some casting Bundy as a brave and righteous rebel fighting the brutal and impersonal government machine. Meanwhile, OMA’s call for support spread in message boards and elsewhere online. Militia members, Patriots and other sympathizers from around the country responded, flocking to the ranch with weapons and supplies, forming encampments and preparing for a bigger confrontation with the BLM. As people came, Payne emerged—reluctantly, he says—as the militia’s de facto leader. “I’m an advisor and coordinator for OMA,” Payne says, “and I was Mr. Bundy’s militia liaison. He would tell me what he had planned, and then I would advise him as to what the militia could accomplish in support of that.” He organized the militia into units and pursued the objectives he and Bundy had agreed upon. As he set about planning a strategy for accomplishing those goals, Payne drew heavily on his Army experience. “It’s all in the Ranger handbook,” he says. “The Ranger handbook is like the quintessential fighting man’s story. You know, how to do this—everything to be a fighting guy. And having served in that type of unit, that was my Bible. I carried it around on me everywhere I went.”

Twenty years ago, when Ryan Payne was 10 and living in Southern California, the American militia movement was emerging just 240 miles northwest of Anaconda, in the town of Noxon. “Beginning on February 15, 1994, the organizers of the Militia of Montana— John, David, and Randy Trochmann—used gun control as fuel to launch America’s first active militia group,” writes Kenneth S. Stern in A Force Upon the Plain: The

Payne lives with his wife, their two children and his grandparents in a cabin south of Anaconda. The house is located up a steep dirt road and off the grid.

[16] Missoula Independent • June 12–June 19, 2014


American Militia Movement and the Politics of Hate. The Trochmanns, Stern continues, effectively argued “that gun control is not really to control guns, but for ‘people control’ by an evil government.” The message resonated in Montana. Crowds came to hear the Trochmanns speak about foreign control of the federal government, the “banking elite” that controlled the world economy, the need for a return to constitutional principles, and the American citizen’s right and duty to stop the tyranny of the federal government by organizing into armed militias. The Militia of Montana added members, and similar groups emerged in other states. As the militia movement grew in the mid-1990s, federal ownership and regulation of public land became another prominent source of anti-government anger, especially in Western states, where substantial amounts of land are federally owned. “As with gun control,” Stern writes, “the issues around land use were made for militia. Not only did they involve strongly felt concerns, but also the question of who was ‘in control’ was meat and drink to conspiracy theorists.” Environmental laws, the U.S. Forest Service and the BLM all became sources of suspicion and conflict. The rapid growth of the American militia movement culminated on April 19, 1995, when Timothy McVeigh, a veteran from Michigan, detonated a truck bomb outside the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. The explosion collapsed the building and killed 168 people. All of the movement’s theorizing, organizing and threats had led to a horrific act of terrorism. Though the bombing inspired many extremists and instigated a brief surge in militia growth, it also created polarization within the movement and marginalized militias from mainstream American political culture. According to data complied by the Southern Poverty Law Center, a nonprofit organization that promotes civil rights, combats hate groups and monitors militias, the number of Patriot groups in the United States peaked in 1996, when 858 militia and other extremist groups existed. That number dipped to 149 in 2008. The election of Barack Obama, however, triggered a resurgence in militia activity and sympathy. SPLC counted 512 Patriot groups in 2009, 1,018 in 2011 and 939 in 2013. In a recent article for The New Yorker, Nadya Labi wrote, “The times are conducive to extremist anger: there is a black President, a sputtering economy, a disappearing white majority, and recurring talk of stricter gun laws.” Another important factor in the revival of Patriot groups is the growing population—and disaffection—of veterans who served in the War on Terror. In 2009, the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Intelligence and Analysis produced an assessment titled “Rightwing Extremism: Current Economic and Political Climate Fueling Resurgence in Radicalization and Recruitment.” While

the report was never officially released due to objections from politicians about the focus on domestic rather than foreign threats from radicals, it was leaked. The report warned that “rightwing extremists will attempt to recruit and radicalize returning veterans in order to exploit their skills and knowledge derived from military training and combat. … The willing-

a stage decorated in red, white and blue and heavily guarded by militia. “Let’s go get ’er done.” A throng of militia, Patriots, ranchers, supporters and observers rushed off to the area about two miles away where his cattle were being held behind a fence. When they arrived, they encountered a group of BLM and law enforcement agents

“And literally people that were on the ground were saying, ‘Look, we’ve got air support,’” Payne says. “And people felt like everything was going to be okay. … Right after that, the BLM started backing their vehicles up and let [the Bundys’ cowboys] in to get the cattle. “Was it an omen? Well, who knows,” Payne continues. “People say that’s super-

“I discovered that I was working for the wrong team if I were in the pursuit of liberty and freedom, because we’re the great oppressors of the world right now, unfortunately.” —Ryan Payne ness of a small percentage of military personnel to join extremist groups during the 1990s because they were disgruntled, disillusioned or suffering from the psychological effects of war is being replicated today.”

On the morning of Saturday, April 12, Clark County Sheriff Doug Gillespie showed up at one of the First Amendment Zones the BLM had established near the Bundy ranch. Cliven Bundy had invited him there to give him an ultimatum, but Gillespie preempted Bundy with news intended to diffuse the increasingly hostile

positioned to protect the livestock. A standoff ensued, and Payne took charge of organizing the militia forces and acted, he says, “as a kind of on-the-ground commander.” “We locked them down,” Payne says. “We had counter-sniper positions on their sniper positions. We had at least one guy— sometimes two guys—per BLM agent in there. So, it was a complete tactical superiority. … If they made one wrong move, every single BLM agent in that camp would’ve died.” Craig Leff, deputy assistant BLM director, denies the BLM employs snipers. “The BLM went through extraordinary lengths to avoid coming into contact with the

stitious and blah blah blah. Well, I’ve had way too many coincidences happen in my life to believe in coincidence.”

“What does it mean to have ‘a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence’? Do you know?” Ryan Payne is sitting on his couch, in the living room of his family’s log cabin near Anaconda. At his request, a guest has just read aloud the first half of the last line of the Declaration of Independence: “And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence. ...

Payne and Josh “Pony” Hartle both participated in the militia action on Cliven Bundy’s ranch. Hartle stayed in an RV in Payne’s driveway after they left Nevada, and he plans to move permanently to the Anaconda area soon.

situation. Gillespie told Bundy and a crowd of his supporters the BLM was going to end its roundup. Bundy responded not with conciliation but by setting some conditions. He wanted the BLM agents disarmed, public land access restored and his confiscated cattle returned—and he gave Gillespie one hour to make it happen. When it didn’t, Bundy told his supporters it was time to act. “Get it going cowboys,” he said from

Bundy family and protesters,” he writes in an email. Whether or not anyone was aiming back at them, the militia members believed they were being targeted. The perceived threat was defused, according to Payne, Ryan Bundy and other supporters present that day, by the providential appearance of thousands of cranes flying low and circling over the situation several times.

“‘Divine’ obviously means ‘the Creator’, but what is providence?” Payne asks. “Providence is the Creator’s plan, his involvement with every aspect of every part of the universe. Thus, we are moving along a plan and the only reason that we feel discomfort is when we are not in line with that plan and He gives us pain or evil to make us feel uncomfortable. But when you’re completely in line with the Creator’s plan, there’s no discomfort, there’s no pain, there’s no suffering.

“You see, these are the concepts that are talked about in the Bible that people have lost,” he explains. “But how did the Founders, who all knew they were signing their death warrants—why were they comfortable with this? Because they had a firm reliance on the protection of divine providence, that they were in line with the plan. And you can kill me, you can take all of my money, you can steal all of my possessions, but as long as I know that I’m moving in the right direction, that I have maintained the moral high ground, that I focus on truth, love and unity at all times, there’s no fear. There’s no suffering. I enjoy the pain that happens, because I know that it’s for the right reasons. A greater cause than myself.” Payne then moves to the second part of the sentence: “… we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.” “So what are you willing to pledge your life to?” Payne asks. “Your life, your fortune and your sacred honor—are you willing to put it up for freedom? That’s the question that people need to ask themselves.”

On April 17, five days after the BLM drew back and the Bundys recovered their cattle, Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., said of the Bundy supporters, “Those people who hold themselves out to be patriots are not. They’re nothing more than domestic terrorists.” For Payne, the Bundys and the hundreds of others who had engaged in the standoff with the BLM, the comments were an affront and a terrifying escalation in the terms of the conflict. “Why it is an escalation?” Payne says. “Because we know how the government deals with terrorists. They don’t negotiate, do they? They kill them. … So that’s a gigantic escalation. That’s a statement of war. You have made yourself my enemy now. If I’m a domestic terrorist, then you’re my enemy, right? Because you want me dead.” Soon after Reid labeled the Bundy supporters “terrorists,” the FBI began to investigate militia members and protesters involved in the standoff for making death threats, intimidation, weapons violations and pointing loaded weapons at federal agents. Those investigations are ongoing. Asked how he’s able to continue living his normal life—taking care of his kids, working on his house, going out for dinner, visiting with relatives—amid the seemingly inevitable threat of arrest and prosecution, Payne says, “If you were planning to go rob a bank, you’d be scared the whole time. You’d be making sure there wasn’t infiltrators. You’re always looking over you’re shoulder. But, if you were protecting a bank, wouldn’t you go home and sleep peacefully at night? Okay. Well, that’s why we’re so calm. ’Cause we’re doing the right thing and we know it.”

The SPLC’s Ryan Lenz was on the Bundy ranch on April 12, and he later spoke at length with Payne and others in-

missoulanews.com • June 12–June 19, 2014 [17]


volved in the standoff about their beliefs and their motivations. Lenz says Bundy supporters relied on a convoluted conspiracy to justify their aggression against the BLM in Nevada. The conspiracy was based, Lenz says, on a web of premises that simply aren’t true: that the BLM isn’t part of the government but is rather “a private corporation employed by the federal government to enforce federal rules;” that the BLM introduced non-native desert tortoises in the early 1990s in a deliberate effort to justify closing the land for grazing and recreational use; and that Sen. Reid orchestrated this closure in order to make possible a profitable deal to sell the land to Chinese developers seeking to develop solar farms on the land. While Lenz acknowledges the room for legitimate policy debate about the BLM and public land policy in Clark County and elsewhere, he says such conspiratorial beliefs and the taking up of arms undermine any possibility for productive discussion. “It’s no longer just a debate about policy,” he says. “The debate is null and void, because you believe the debate exists on a premise that’s a lie ... and that’s where things get really complicated, because this issue about federal lands being managed by the BLM and being managed poorly, that’s one for those who debate policy to discuss. But once the militias come in and threaten violence to the federal government if they dare do anything, the discussion is over. The debate is done. What happens at that point is, the only debate that’s going to be had is going to be had at the barrel of a gun.”

After five years and two tours in Iraq, Payne returned home to Southern California in 2006. He was 23 and married. Later that same year, he and an uncle started a company, SoCal Sand Cars. They built custom, high-end dune buggies that sold for between $40,000 and $100,000. When the housing market started to falter late in 2006, so did the once-booming dune buggy and sand car market. Though they started losing money, Payne and his uncle kept their business going until the California Air Resources Board implemented stricter emissions regulations on dune buggies in the state. “When they redefined the criteria that sand cars and desert race cars fell under,” Payne says, “it destroyed turn-key builders like myself, unless you had a giant buy-in.” That “buy-in” was the high cost of purchasing a dynamometer, a machine that tests emissions, or of paying a lab to do the emissions tests. Unable to afford the price of complying with the new regulations, SoCal Sand Cars closed down. “And that’s what we see in the entire country,” Payne says, “that specific entities are being given certain privileges by government regulation and the inability of the little guy, the small business owner, to really keep his head above water. There has to be purpose in this. They claim to have all the answers, they claim to be taking us down the correct path, and yet it seems

like there’s a lot of destruction and pain and suffering going on. … Here’s the way you have to look at it. Either they’re not smart, they don’t know what they’re doing and they’re just downright incompetent. Or they have a plan, and they’re doing these things on purpose.” Payne came to believe the latter, that the government uses regulations to deliberately undermine the average American, “that they are purposely destroying industry, they are purposely taking this land from people.” The more he looked, the more he saw a deliberate and nefarious plan being orchestrated by a small num-

so they can maintain that control,” Payne says, “because they believe they are God.” As Payne became convinced that conspiracies exist to control the world’s people, he also moved from agnosticism to a deep belief in a Creator. “I’m a Jew,” Payne says. “A Messianic Jew. A Kabbalist, even.” These mystical and often controversial traditions of Judaism accommodated his faith as well as his suspicions of religion, which he considers “clothing for the truth.” With faith, rebelling against control became a matter of fighting to bring about the utopian world God wants for us, a world of complete and perfect liberty.

been campaigning the BLM to reopen it. While the agency conducted environmental and archeological assessments to determine if there were a way to do so, people became restless. San Juan County Commissioner Phil Lyman responded to this restlessness by organizing a protest. On May 10, locals would push past a BLM gate and drive the 11-mile Recapture Canyon loop to protest the closure. The man from Blanding wanted Payne to come and do what he’d done for the Bundys: protect the ATV riders from the BLM. Payne agreed to do it. He and some others from the ranch, including Ryan

Payne joined the U.S. Army at 17. He served in a long-range surveillance unit that moved far behind enemy lines during and after the U.S. invasion of Iraq. Though he considers himself a fervent patriot, he now sees the government he once served as a threat to the Constitution he pledged to defend.

ber of people wielding enormous power. He saw a pervasive conspiracy to control all aspects of the media, the financial system, the entertainment industry, the military and the government. More specifically, he came to believe that slavery never really existed in the United States and that African Americans in the antebellum South “didn’t view themselves as slaves.” He came to believe in “an effort by some Jews to control the world.” He came to believe the founders of the United States intended for the states to act as sovereign countries. He came to believe taxes are a form of “legal plunder.” He came to believe names are spelled in allcaps on driver’s licenses because U.S. citizens are actually “corporate entities.” He came to believe U.S. courts are actually foreign admiralty courts. He came to believe that “in most states you have the lawful authority to kill a police officer that is unlawfully trying to arrest you.” He came to believe when a newborn child’s footprint is made on a birth certificate, that child is effectively entering a life of servitude to the U.S. government, which borrows money from China based on that child’s estimated lifetime earning potential. He came to see all aspects of government, culture and society as mechanisms of control. “And they’ve set everything up

[18] Missoula Independent • June 12–June 19, 2014

“The point is,” Payne says, “communism is a utopian society. There is not government in communism. The government is the people. So, in order for that to exist, mankind has to reach a state where he is— where he, as a whole, has the responsibility and the morality to control himself. Self-government. Communism is full selfgovernment. What is this an experiment in, America? Self-government.”

Payne remained on the Bundy ranch for nearly a month, organizing the militia elements to defend against any potential efforts by the BLM to return and clashing with other supporters. Then, in early May, a man and his family came and asked for Payne’s help. Payne was “ungodly sick at the time,” he says, but he listened while the man requested he come to Utah and help the people of Blanding, near the Four Corners, open an ATV trail that the BLM had closed. The trail ran through Recapture Canyon, an area rich with Ancestral Puebloan ruins and artifacts, with ancient cliff dwellings and a prehistoric village. The trail was created illegally in 2005 and severely damaged the valuable archaeological site. Local ATV riders, however, had

Bundy, drove east to Utah. The BLM, meanwhile, decided to avoid confrontation, pull its agents back and allow the ride to proceed. In a statement, the agency’s state head, Juan Palma, assured the public, though, that “BLM-Utah has not and will not authorize the proposed ride and will seek appropriate civil and criminal penalties against anyone who uses a motorized vehicle within the closed area.” With no ostensible need to protect the protest, Ryan Payne participated that Saturday, May 10, driving the loop with everyone else. “So here’s another win,” he says.

Days after the Recapture ride, Payne finally returned home to Anaconda. His wife, his infant daughter, his 4-year-old son and his elderly grandparents had been making do without him for more than a month, living off the grid. Payne had lots to catch up on around the house, but he wasn’t leaving the last month behind. The proof was in his driveway, where an RV was parked. Josh “Pony” Hartle, an itinerant militiaman from Minnesota, and another man, an amateur geologist and confirmed Patriot who does not want to be

named, were staying inside. They were here to help keep the effort that had begun on the Bundy ranch moving forward. “One of the things that the powers that be—and I say that as meaning all those that desire control over mankind—really, really hate about the Bundy situation is that it brought a bunch of people that all have the same ideas but have been moving in different directions together,” Payne says, with Hartle and the amateur geologist sitting on the couch beside him. “And now, we’ll all focus our energies in this way or that. Or utilize our different skills to approach the entire battle in a full manner, encompassing every avenue of engagement: legal, financial, military, every single aspect of it is being put together now on how to counter this control mechanism that’s been set up. This is what they fear the most.” The geologist is committed to staying in the area; he believes he’s found valuable meteoritic rocks near Payne’s house and is hoping to have them verified. Hartle is planning to return to Minnesota, sell his house and then move with his wife back to Anaconda. They would live, Hartle explains, in a 32-foot school bus he’s converted into a mobile home, so he could keep working with Payne. Meanwhile, Payne is training with the West Mountain Rangers and pursuing a philanthropic business venture that would employ outof-work and homeless veterans. He is also trying to get back to his normal life as a father and an electrician. “They want to paint militia in this light of complete insanity and extremism,” Payne says, “but you see my house. You see my family. I live with my grandparents. My wife’s at work. My kids are here. I live in this place, this beautiful place. I would much rather work as we were intended. You should be working for your own prosperity, shouldn’t you?” While Payne says he would rather not leave his family again, it seems inevitable that he will. He could be forced to leave, if charges against him are pursued and he’s arrested for his part in the Bundy standoff. Or he might leave of his own free will, to respond to OMA’s next request for aid. Either way, Payne says he’s willing to lay down his life to resist and defend against tyranny. “Not only would we take a shot for each other,” he says, “we’d take one for you. If somebody infringed on your rights, you call me up. I’ll come stand in between you and the police. It doesn’t bother me, if they’re infringing on your rights. Whoever it is. If somebody’s threatening your life, if somebody’s trying to say, ‘You’re not allowed to do this because we’re the authority’—no. You’re the authority. You’re free to do whatever you want in your life as long as you don’t take your brother’s feet out from under him. That’s what freedom is.” Though Payne keeps talking for another hour or so, eventually he has to go. He canceled plans earlier in the afternoon to shoot gophers with visiting relatives, and he can’t be late for dinner. His family is counting on him being there. tmcdermott@missoulanews.com


missoulanews.com • June 12–June 19, 2014 [19]


[arts]

The end of taste With greater access to online music, we got what we wanted—if only we felt better about it by Dan Brooks

T

he snobbiest record store I ever went to was Other Music on East Fourth Street in New York City, circa 1999. They filed everything by genre, for example: “trance” versus “dream.” There was no ska section. They did, however, have “twotone,” “third wave,” “skacore,” “trad,” and “ska-jazz.” To look for The Slackers within this system was to confront your own ignorance, and to ask a clerk was to turn yourself in to the Inquisition. Other Music was kind of awful, but it was much better than what I grew up with: Musicland, a mall chain store eventually purchased by Sam Goody. Musicland did not sell ska of any kind, much less divided into five subgenres, but at least they had Public Enemy. In 1990s Des Moines, you could not hear Public Enemy on the radio. All you got from the radio was contemporary country and classic rock, a format for people who wish that music had been outlawed after 1985. In a now-famous essay for The Baffler, Steve Albini called this phenomenon “The Problem With Music.” Bands love music—difficult, obscure, experimental, their own. A large number of listeners also love music, but between them and bands lay a massive industry determined to market music to people who didn’t like it at all. The major labels did not want to ship Camper Van Beethoven CDs to Des Moines. They wanted to sell Paula Abdul singles to people who heard “Opposites Attract” in Target, and they had the radio, MTV, chain retailers and a distribution oligopoly to make it happen. Then dorks invented the Internet, and all that disappeared. I’m simplifying events, obviously. But the way people get music now—from a list of literally all digital recordings, without the physical distribution schemes of major labels and, increasingly, directly from musicians themselves—is completely different from how things worked 15 years ago. Steve Albini won. The major labels lost their stranglehold and barely cling to life, to say nothing of hegemony. There is a mainstream, but it has shrunk so much that the term is questionably meaningful. People who don’t like music listen to the radio, as they always have. Those of us who do like music can use Spotify, BitTorrent, blogs or even iTunes to listen to whatever we want, all the time. The music industry stopped being a stultifying mass entertainment and became a market of pluralities, just as we always wanted it to. Or so we said. I’d like to return to Other Music for a second, and note that every woman who worked there was fascinating. The men were less so, at least for people not prone to getting fascinated by dudes, but I still wanted them to think I was cool. Mandarin and scary though they may have been, the clerks at Other Music were valuable to me, because they knew about bands and albums that I didn’t. Previous generations called that taste. We now know that taste is completely arbitrary—or, worse, an instrument for reinforcing class distinctions—and

P

illustration by Jonathan Marquis

Vic Chesnutt is not objectively better than Randy Travis. Except if you made me listen to Randy Travis for the rest of my life, I would shorten the rest of my life to as long as it took to get the cap off a bottle of Drano. In 1994, I understood the world as a machine for making me listen to Randy Travis. I defined myself against that machine, and as a result my tastes—what I listened to instead of, in spite of Randy Travis—became a large part of my identity. The particular bands were important, but it was also important that whatever I listened to simply was not on the radio, and ideally not on a major label, either. It was an aesthetic position that bordered on ethics. I refused what the industry tried to sell me because I didn’t like the songs, but also because I cared about art, about self-expression, about my esoteric little life. It followed that other people who listened to weird bands were like me. Even if they didn’t like the same bands I did, they cared enough about sound as art to find what wasn’t available at Musicland. A person who liked a bunch of stuff I hadn’t heard of was doubly valuable, as a source of new music and as a sort of comrade in arms. Even if our tastes differed, we were working on the same project: keeping major labels from wrecking music forever. When I first came to Missoula in 2004, I went to the grocery store and then Ear Candy. I hardly knew

[20] Missoula Independent • June 12–June 19, 2014

anyone, and wandering around a record store comforts me. I flipped through what was on offer, heartened to find that people here seemed way more into Mr. Bungle, and did not strike up a welcoming conversation with the clerk—precisely because we were both the kind of people who would rather go home and listen to records. We nodded at each other in passing for the next two years. Ear Candy still exists somehow, selling not so much the music as the vanishing habitat of the music store. Most of the merchandise can appear in your house at the literal push of a button, but your house doesn’t smell right. There’s no dude working there who kind of looks like you, who likes a band that you would love if only you heard them, and who one day will be playing that band when you walk in. Back when we labored under The Problem of Music, there were two kinds of people: radio listeners and us. The power of this kind of affinity can be seen in the most successful music marketing scheme of all time: punk rock. When mainstream rock reached its nadir (“Hot Blooded” by Foreigner, 1978) punk rock emerged as not just an alternative genre but an alternative identity. Nobody liked The Ramones and Journey. You listened to one to the exclusion of the other, and eventually you started dressing punk to the exclusion of mainstream fashion, and then dating punks to the ex-

clusion of your high school girlfriend, and so on. It was taste as a way to organize not just your record collection but your life. Punk rock codified a foundational principle of music consumption after 1980: Cool music cannot be heard on the radio, and ideally it should be something other people don’t know about. The corollary to this principle—music other people don’t know about is therefore cool—is called hipsterism and will not be discussed. The point is that A) liking obscure music showed you cared, and B) since we all got what we wanted and the major labels fell apart, this system of values that once guided our lives is useless to us. By “us” I mean “me.” Now that there is no meaningful mainstream in music, the possibility of knowing whom I like just by knowing what they listen to feels remote, even kind of laughable. Of course it makes no sense that we would be friends just because we both like Jay Reatard. Everybody likes Jay Reatard, now that they can listen to him. When the occupation is over, the members of the underground don’t recognize one another anymore. Here we are, everyone free to listen to what music he or she likes, the way we always wanted. Now we just need some way of remembering who we are. arts@missoulanews.com


[music]

Hell, yeah

n #48 life lesso

Partying like pirates with The Helligans Great Falls is about as far from the ocean blue as it gets, but that doesn’t stop The Helligans from rocking the “hillbilly pirate punk metal” genre. (This band may, in fact, be the only one in that genre.) I highly recommend you peruse The Helligans’ site, at helligans.com, which features some mesmerizing flash animation and an incomprehensible band bio, written by singer Harry Pickle, that alludes to taking a crap in a parking lot outside a show, but does not seem to mention The Helligans anything about the band. Also, the site navigation icons include brass knuckPerhaps this band’s most memorable asset is its belly les, a gun and a gym sock, so you know The Helligans dancer, Pearl McLanahan, an agile woman who adds mean business. oomph and a vaudeville element to the live show. Anyhow, if all this sounds like something you can The Helligans seem pretty determined to have a good dig, then anticipate having a hell (ha!) of a time time and not give a damn, and to that, I raise my watching The Helligans. The band plays rockabilly glass. (Kate Whittle) and punk tunes, with titles like “Aborted At Fourteen” The Helligans play the VFW Fri., June 13, and lyrics about getting thrown in Deer Lodge prison. along with Whiskey Hooves. $6.

Don Williams, Reflections Don Williams has been crooning country songs since the early ’70s; long enough to have already had at least one “Farewell World Tour,” which he did in 2006. Reflections is his second release since un-retiring in 2012. Williams has one of those rich, smooth country voices that sounds like it could have come from a man a third his age. If you’re a fan of slow- to midtempo easy listening music, it’s probably perfect. Herein lies the problem. Songs like Townes Van Zandt’s “I’ll Be Here in the Morning” and Merle Haggard’s “Sing Me Back Home,” both appearing on Reflections, would sound so much more gut-wrenching delivered by a man with some grit in his voice. On this record they just kind of purr out of the speakers.

I want them to gargle and growl a little. I’m not saying everyone needs to live a life that leaves one’s voice punished by cigarettes and alcohol, but the country music I love most at least shows signs of road miles, tire wear, metal braids visible between thin layers of rubber. For fans of Williams, this record is probably the aural equivalent of wrapping up in a thick comforter on a pensive evening. Me, I’d rather be shivering out in the pickup, chasing headlights with the windows down so I don’t fall asleep at the wheel. (Chris La Tray) Don Williams plays the Dennison Theatre Wed., June 18, at 7:30 PM. $39.50 to $55, available at griztix.com.

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Old 97’s, Most Messed Up This is the Old 97’s album we’ve been waiting for, the hard rockin’ backyard barbecue soundtrack of the summer. Forty quick minutes of foot-stomping rhythm and hilariously dysfunctional songs, Most Messed Up is more cohesive and pugnacious than the band’s 2008 effort, Blame It On Gravity. The 97’s attack these unapologetic romps about professional-grade debauchery with the loose, aggressive confidence of a seasoned rock band with a deep country vocabulary. Take note as you crank it up— these ain’t no frat-boy, country lite anthems. They’re edgy songs about messy grown-up lives, and that usually involves drinking. “I’m better off being wasted than working my whole life through,” sings Rhett Miller on “Wasted,” as Murry Hammond’s reliable harmony comes in on the chorus to leave no doubt who you’re listening to. The group’s trademark sound has only become more distilled in the 20 years since these Dallas rockers first pressed their red-hot brand into the plump haunch of insurgent country.

With the exception of the Bottle Rockets and Robbie Fulks when he tries, the Old 97’s are the last band standing from alt-country’s Class of ’94, when Bloodshot Records was country music’s Alamo, defending honest music against the onslaught of Garth, Toby and Shania. Alt-country brethren Wilco showed some promise early on, but its devolution into self-indulgent purveyors of dissonance and noise have relegated them to a “critic’s band” to be fawned over by the hipsterati. Who’s left? Honky tonk godhead Dale Watson can’t get played on country radio, Blue Mountain’s reunion fizzled and the Jayhawks split into inferior solo acts. Even nextgeneration “Americana” bands like the Avett Brothers have snipped the balls from alt-country and pushed it into Banjoland. The Old 97’s have outlasted them all (even surviving Rhett Miller’s solo career) and kept its sound intact. Most Messed Up is expertly cooked, country-drizzled rock-and-roll for adults who have a sense of humor and a burning desire to shake their ass. (Bob Wire)

missoulanews.com • June 12–June 19, 2014 [21]


[books]

Rat race

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Now with child care! [22] Missoula Independent • June 12–June 19, 2014

There are literally thousands of Young Adult novels about first kisses, college decisions and fighting with your mother. What makes Rachel Toor’s new YA novel any different? The book touches on many of the predictable themes and formulas found in the sea of teen fiction, but it also contains some distinctive subject matter and an uncommon approach that makes it surprising and fun. Or, to put it a better way: By the end of the book, no matter your age, you will most likely want to strap on some running shoes and purchase a rat. Yes, I said “rat.” On the Road to Find Out follows high school senior Alice Davis as she navigates a small world that includes her best friend Jenni, her successful parents, her family’s oddball friend Walter and her pet rat (also named Walter; not a coincidence). She’s just suffered her first real rejection in life (an application denial from Yale) and she’s just started a new hobby (running). She’s never dated, she’s never participated in extracurricular activities and she’s never really thought about what she wants out of life. She’s also the valedictorian of her class and a self-described cookiecutter of a student. What will her life after high school hold? It seems like a pat plot summary on the surface, but the true life of the book centers on Alice’s relationship with her rat as well as her blooming relationship with running. Toor, who has written about her own odd parade of pets and her running career in two of her adult nonfiction books, Personal Record and The Pig and I, is at her best when exploring Alice’s (and Toor’s) passions. While our hearts expect to jump when Alice gets up the courage to talk to her crush or when she finally connects with her mom, the most sincere and genuine emotional scenes of the book take the reader completely by surprise: Alice watching Walter (the rat) eat a piece of macaroni. Alice running all the way to the bridge on the edge of town and beyond for the first time. Alice realizing, through running, that failure is a necessary component of living a daring, happy and full life. The other great surprise of On the Road to Find Out is Toor’s ability to harness the power of the first person unreliable narrator in a way that is initially funny and ultimately touching—and in a way that is accessible to teens. Throughout Part One of the book, we can gladly accept Alice at her word—that she is smart and quirky, that she is misunderstood by others, that her best friend is always at her side. It isn’t until an event halfway through the book—her mother’s birthday party—that we discover just how unaware and self-absorbed she is. It’s a shock for everyone, including Alice. As it turns out, she has been ignoring the people who love her most, brooding over her Yale denial in an unhealthy way and never paying attention to anyone’s feelings but her own. Alice is, in many ways, an exaggerated version of most teens. She is comically lacking in self-awareness and stubbornly refusing help, advice or even the simple truth. By having her misrepresent her life at the beginning of the book—and taking her audience

along for the ride—Toor has found an ingenious way to help young readers come to the same realizations. As you might guess from the title, On the Road to Find Out is about appreciating the journey over the achievement. It’s also about learning to take the good with the bad and understanding that trying is more important than either victory or defeat. In other words, it’s about running. And it’s about your first really awesome pet. And, yeah, it’s also about your first kiss. Adults probably don’t need to be inspired to, say, touch their crush on the shoulder or consider the full spectrum of post-high school options. But the book’s

On the Road to Find Out Rachel Toor Hardcover, Farrar, Straus and Giroux 320 pages, $17.99

running passages are enjoyable for those of us past our teen angst years. They’re even inspiring. Montana residents might also enjoy the handful of nods to Missoula (Toor is a 2006 graduate of the University of Montana’s creative nonfiction writing program and currently teaches writing at Eastern Washington University). Here’s one for starters: Alice gets a job working at a running store called Runner’s Edge. YA literature often gets a bad rap—sometimes for good reason—for being about teens in love with other teens. (See also wizard teens in love with other wizard teens, teens in love with teen vampires, etc.) On the Road to Find Out does include a bit of the expected teen romance, but it’s worth the read for the other types of new love it explores: loving a pet, loving a sport and sure, I’ll say it, loving yourself. Rachel Toor reads from On the Road to Find Out at Shakespeare & Co. Wed., June 18, at 7 PM. arts@missoulanews.com


[film]

Leftovers Favreau’s Chef lacks a few key ingredients by Nick Davis

Blow on it, first.

Jon Favreau just might be the coolest guy in Hollywood. The self-made writer/actor/director/producer parlayed an improv-comedy career and early friendship with Vince Vaughn into Swingers (1996), the seminal indie pic that launched both of their careers. While Vaughn has gone on to mega-stardom in front of the camera, Favreau moved behind it and, by directing the first two Iron Man blockbusters, turned arguably the coolest of all comic-book superheroes into the gold standard of comic-book film adaptations. But there have been stumbles along the way— both 2009’s Couples Retreat (writer, star) and 2011’s Cowboys & Aliens (director, producer) were hammered by critics (though according to the Box Office Mojo website, each film has grossed upwards of $170 million worldwide, so critical turds appear to be no match against Favreau’s Midas-like powers). In Chef, Favreau gets back to his quadruple-crown roots, serving as producer, writer, director and leading man. It’s a sweet, beautifully constructed and highly enjoyable movie. But there’s a hole in the middle of this film’s heart, and even though I find it generally distasteful to put a creative on the couch, it’s hard not to in this case. Chef appears to be a cinematic middle finger pointed at the business of arts criticism in general and at insensitive critics in particular. That’s just a personal theory, of course, but if it’s correct I would venture to suggest that Chef would have benefited greatly from a bit less attention to sending a message and a bit more to shoring up the handful of major narrative flaws that ultimately prevent it from being the tour de force it could have, and maybe should have, been. Favreau plays Carl Casper, a famous Los Angeles chef who parlayed early critical success into a seemingly lucrative career running the kitchen at one of the city’s most popular restaurants (sound familiar?). Casper works up a dynamic new menu to present for a prominent food critic, but the restaurant’s owner demands that he “play the hits” of the standard menu. The resulting aggressively unfavorable review sends Casper into a tailspin that wrecks his career and his self-confidence, before he regains them both by going back to his humble roots and learning some valuable life lessons along the way (can’t be a coincidence, right?). Where this movie shines, it really shines. Favreau is a master at scene construction, and Chef is jam-

packed with brilliant ones. The food preparation scenes were so lovingly shot that they had my stomach literally growling even though I had eaten shortly before going to the theater. The sense of timing and comic dialogue that so define the first two Iron Man films is here in spades, and had me laughing out loud at the nearly vacant matinee showing (side note: personal experience has led me to believe that empty theaters reduce a film’s humor profile by at least 25 percent). And the music—man, the music. Favreau uses everything from Marvin Gaye to Cuban salsa (and even a salsa cover of Marvin Gaye) to set the tone in some scenes and carry the weight in others. But a series of baffling plot constructs keep tripping Chef’s flow and eventually overwhelm its architectural artistry. Why would the restaurant’s owner force his chef, whom he hired for his creativity, to go against his instincts and serve a decade-old menu (not once, but twice) to a critic seeking culinary innovation? Why would a sous chef quit a fast-track job at that prominent restaurant to join his former boss on a food truck? After finally connecting with his somewhat estranged son on an exhilarating journey through the American South, why does it take a highlight video to convince Casper that he should remain connected to said son? Why do the high-powered cameos (Dustin Hoffman, Robert Downey Jr., Oliver Platt) in Chef feel so gratuitous? If one chose to extend Favreau’s couch session, further speculation about certain elements of Chef come into play. Does the fact that the critic snarkily references Casper’s weight gain reflect Favreau’s insecurity about his own? Is Favreau’s casting of uberbombshells Scarlett Johansson and Sofia Vergara as Casper’s love interests a thinly-veiled message that hot chicks love fat guys, as long as they’re creative and cool enough, more than critics? Okay, that last stuff might be a bit overreaching. But frankly, Favreau’s mishandling of the core narrative elements of the film invite such speculation. Ironically, that makes Chef feel more like the standard menu Casper was forced to serve the critic instead of the creative triumph he intended. Doggie bag, please. Chef screens at the Carmike 12 Thursday, June 12. arts@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • June 12–June 19, 2014 [23]


[film]

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Rising Stars No fault in faithful adaptation of John Green’s novel by Molly Laich

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[24] Missoula Independent • June 12–June 19, 2014

“The flowers are actually for Roy Hibbert.”

Who would have guessed that a romance about teens with cancer, with no special effects, horror or sci-fi elements, based on a novel of high literary quality, managed to beat out the new Tom Cruise action picture for a $48 million opening weekend? Is it true? Are kids reading again? The Fault in Our Stars features Shailene Woodley as Hazel, a 17-year-old cancer survivor who should have died, but has stayed alive indefinitely thanks to a miracle drug and the oxygen tank she wheels around behind her to supplement what she charmingly calls her “shitty lungs.” Her parents are Frannie and Michael, played by Laura Dern and Sam Trammell with just the right amount of levity and concern. Every day Hazel stays alive is a gift or whatever, but who wouldn’t want something more? Enter Augustus, or “Gus,” played by Ansel Elgort. Their meet-cute is a microcosm of everything about this film that could be hokey and dreary, but somehow isn’t. They crash in the hallway and look into each other’s eyes. We’ve all seen the poster, we know what’s in store for them, but even at 32 years old and cynical as all hell about the possibilities of true love, I believed in the very realness of their crush. The Fault in Our Stars is based on a novel by John Green, brother of our hometown hero Hank Green and the other half of YouTube’s Vlogbrothers, among his many accolades. The film’s directed by Josh Boone and adapted by Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber, although John Green was on set as an advisor and it shows; this is maybe the most faithful adaptation of a novel I’ve ever seen. If you enjoyed the book, then you will accept the film wholeheartedly. For me, Hazel’s the very best thing about John Green’s novel. She’s kind, hilarious and warm. Woodley plays her with such an effortless grace, and maybe it’s just lucky for me, but her slightly husky voice is just how I imagined it in my head. Ansel Elgort as Gus didn’t look the way I wanted him to, and it took some getting used to. He’s the kind of handsome that gets scouted by model agencies from shopping malls, with brooding eyes and thick lips. He’s too much the

teenage fantasy; he belongs taped up in lockers. I wanted him to be more real, but even Elgort eventually won me over. He’s got cancer too, of course, and when he tells Hazel he’s an 18-year-old virgin on account of his prosthetic leg, he does it with a genuine aw shucks teenage body language, and I almost, nearly believe him. The two of them start hanging out after their cancer support group (led adorably by comedian Mike Birbiglia) which thankfully they are of sound enough mind to make fun of. They talk a little like characters from “Dawson’s Creek,” that is, just a little too eloquently, but then, teenagers who’ve been homeschooled due to chronic illness probably have more time to read. They share an obsession with a made-up novel, A Serious Affliction, written by an eccentric American author (Willem Dafoe) living in Amsterdam. The book ends with its cancer-afflicted heroine dying off in mid-sentence, which is provocative but unsatisfying. The author disapproves of the world and refuses to answer fan letters, until one day he does, and the couple decide to use Gus’s “Make a Wish” to visit the reclusive author in Amsterdam and see if they can’t get some answers. Other things happen in the plot, of course: Childhood dreams are abandoned and people get sick, but we came to see the tender romance blossom between the two, and so it is. The Fault in Our Stars belongs to smart people who know that kindness is its own reward, and the few mean people among them are dealt with, handily. Something bad happens at the end, and keeps happening. Your heartstrings get pulled until you think they’re spent, and then they’re pulled on some more. The film critic in me has to warn you that the closing act drags on a bit much. Then again, there’s something undeniably cathartic about tragedy. I heard teenage girls weeping all around me in the theater in stereo, and it was weirdly nice. It felt like we were all in it together. The Fault in Our Stars continues at Carmike 12. arts@missoulanews.com


[film]

OPENING THIS WEEK 22 JUMP STREET Officers Schmidt and Jenko go “deep undercover” at a local college, which entails a lot of multiple choice tests and stressful late-night essay writing. Lol, JK, they totally party it up, brah. Starring Channing Tatum, Jonah Hill and Ice Cube. Rated R. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex, Showboat. BROTHERS ON THE LINE This 2012 doc follows the three Reuther brothers’ rise from auto worker organizers in 1930s Detroit to prominence in international labor activism and collective bargaining rights. Narrated by Martin Sheen. Screening at the Top Hat Mon., June 16, at 8 PM, as part of the Big Sky Film Series. FED UP Filmmaker Stephanie Soechtig and TV’s Katie Couric explore America’s screwy food regulations and the connection to poor health and cancer rates. Rated PG. Wilma. GUNS N’ ROSES APPETITE FOR DEMOCRACY 3D LIVE AT HARD ROCK LAS VEGAS Welcome to the jungle of enfranchisement in the first official G ‘n’ R concert film since 1992. And how the years have flown by, kids. Not rated. Screening at Carmike 12 June 18 and 19 at 10:30 PM. HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 2 Hiccup and Toothless discover a secret ice cave full of mysteriously adorable wild dragons and something called a Dragon Rider. Standing up for what they believe in and the power of friendship ensues. Starring the voices of Jay Baruchel, Cate Blanchett and Craig Ferguson. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex, Showboat. STOP MAKING SENSE The widescreen remaster really comes in handy for viewing David Byrne’s kickass suit in this legendary 1984 Talking Heads concert film. Not rated. Screening at the Roxy June 13-15 and 20-21 at 7:15 and 9:15 PM.

NOW PLAYING

Prepare for the worst helmet hair ever. 22 Jump Street opens Friday at Carmike 12.

soldiers relive the same fight over and over. Starring Tom Cruise, Emily Blunt and Bill Paxton. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex.

Farlane. To be fair, I would cast Charlize Theron as my love interest, too. Also starring Liam Neeson. Rated R. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex.

THE FAULT IN OUR STARS Cute, hipstery teens meet through their cancer support group and fall in love. Get out the hanky, y’all. Starring Shailene Woodley, Ansel Elgort and Nat Wolff. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex, Entertainer. (See Film.)

NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME The award-winning stage adaptation of the Mark Haddon novel follows a brilliant autistic 15-year-old who tries to solve a murder. Screening at the Roxy Tuesdays on June 10 and 17 at 7:30 PM. $11-$16. Visit mtlive.org.

THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL Quirk-lovers rejoice, Wes Anderson brings us the lighthearted adventures of a mid-1930s concierge and a lobby boy. Starring Ralph Fiennes, F. Murray Abraham and Mathieu Amalric. Rated R. Wilma. THE LUNCHBOX (DABBA) A young housewife befriends an older man through notes in Mumbai’s famous lunchbox delivery system. Starring Irrfan Khan, Nimrat Kaur and Nawazuddin Siddiqui. Rated PG. Wilma.

NEIGHBORS In an alternate universe where Seth Rogen is even remotely in the same league as Rose Byrne, they play a couple with a newborn baby who encounter comedic shenanigans when a frat moves in next door. Zac Efron plays the frat guy. Rated R. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex.

BLENDED Adam Sandler and Drew Barrymore are back as an unlikely rom-com pair, this time as two single parents who meet at a resort. Also starring Wendi McLendon-Covey and Kevin Nealon. Rated PG13. Carmike 12.

MALEFICENT Angelina Jolie rocks a bitchin’ horn headdress in a weird version of Sleeping Beauty. Also starring Elle Fanning and Sharlto Copley. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex.

THE UNKNOWN KNOWN Documentarian Errol Morris catches Donald Rumsfeld in his contradictions, as Rumsfeld reads from memos from his defense secretary days. Screening at the Roxy June 6-8 at 7:15 and 9:15 PM.

EDGE OF TOMORROW A video game meets Groundhog Day, basically, when a blip in the space-time continuum lets

A MILLION WAYS TO DIE IN THE WEST Charlize Theron is the love interest in the comedy western directed by and starring Seth Mac-

X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST Wolverine gets sent into the past to prevent catastrophe, and possibly erase our memories of

the last several terrible X-Men spinoff films. Starring Hugh Jackman, Patrick Stewart and, ooh, James McAvoy as beardy young Xavier. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12. Capsule reviews by Kate Whittle. Planning your outing to the cinema? Visit the arts section of missoulanews.com to find up-to-date movie times for theaters in the area. You can also contact theaters to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 and Village 6 at 541-7469; Wilma at 728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603.

missoulanews.com • June 12–June 19, 2014 [25]


[dish]

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Masala on my mind by Jule Banville Outside the screen door at Theo Smith’s house, my senses get hit on two fronts. One: whatever’s on vinyl right now is super loud and will need to be turned down if I’m going to talk to him about... Two: the smell. It’s all warm and toasty-spice, familiar and foreign. So I inhale and want to write love notes to every half-decent Indian restaurant I’ve sat in. But I am not here to write love notes. I’m here to deliver good news. Smith, the owner and chef of what can sometimes seem like the elusive food cart called Masala, is looking in a serious way to open a yearround place in the Indian-restaurant desert of Missoula. He came close to closing on space on South Higgins before it fell through. “But I’m not too worried,” says Smith, 37, some time after he turned down the record player and poured iced tea from a growler. “I’ve got time.” After all, it’s prime cart season right now. And Smith’s also got a knack for knowing what works with his. Almost always, there are three aromatic curries in the steam table: one vegan, one with Montana lentils and one for paleos, often featuring animals that grazed not far away. The curries are balanced: authentic and spicy, but friendly to people in a town with no Indian restaurant (right now). On a good day, you might also get street snacks like flaky samosas or pani puris, described on Masala’s Facebook page as “three thin crispy semolina shells filled with spiced potato, peas, cucumber, tomato and onion. Last second, add the sweet and sour cilantro water and bite!” The Masala cart’s in its third season and, if you plan well, totally findable. On Tuesday nights, it’s at Draught Works. On Wednesdays, Caras Park for Out-to-Lunch and then back to Draught Works for dinner. On Thursdays, Caras again for Downtown ToNight. On the second Friday of the month, it’s at Ten Spoon Winery. You can also follow Masala on Facebook for updates. Got it? Now let’s talk about Theo, because he’s got a good story. It didn’t exactly start in Indonesia, where he was born and where his parents found him and adopted him. Theo is, truly, all about food. And the food thing started with his mom, a good cook who was always giving him dough and letting him page through her recipes. By the time he was a teenager, he was responsible for at least one family dinner each week. That idea of planning, cooking and presenting food took hold. But, well, his grandfather had been the head of the

[26] Missoula Independent • June 12–June 19, 2014

WHAT’S GOOD HERE

economics department at the University of Montana. He grew up in Edmonton, where his dad was the dean of the business school at the University of Alberta and his mom was a full-time teacher. So he was going to college, like it or not. Three credits shy of an art degree at the University of Puget Sound, Theo convinced his academic family he was serious about cooking. But before enrolling in culinary school, he took off for Southeast Asia. He went to Thailand, Vietnam and Indonesia. “Growing up, I kept hearing about how I was from this exotic, tropical place and here I was on the Canadian prairie,” he says. “I wanted to see how I’d respond.” He trained in classic techniques and then had a set of jobs at high-end Seattle restaurants. But he wanted a different kind of life and wound up in Missoula. Before long, he figured his itch for more ethnic choices was something he’d have to scratch himself. He and a business partner, Tobin Aroner, opened Iza on the Hip Strip in 2009, focusing on Asian dishes. Smith worked big hours, sometimes 100 a week. It was hard to have a life. Plus, “we knew a restaurant of that size couldn’t sustain two owners,” he said, and he amicably agreed to sell his share to Aroner in 2011. Then he was off to the Missions, where he was offered a head-chef position to open the Allentown Restaurant at Ninepipes Lodge in St. Ignatius. But six months in, Smith missed Missoula and knew he had another itch. He wanted the flexibility of a food truck or cart. He found it, licensed it, opened it and learned from some early mistakes. Two winters ago, he took advantage of the seasonal nature of carts and took off for India, where he covered 4,000 miles “by train, bus and motorcycle,” eating everywhere. He got ideas from places like a five-chair dirt-floor stall in the southern part of the country. “There was this one older man in there with a cigarette and a big pot,” he says. In that pot was the one dish the guy made, a chickpea curry with coconut milk, turmeric and curry leaves. “It blew me away. The simplicity and the flavor and this person making and perfecting this one dish,” he says. Smith admires it—and has come close to recreating it for Masala—but he knows he couldn’t be happy cooking just one dish. As it is, his Indian food cart sometimes morphs into an Ethiopian one. For a guy who’s all about food, “there are limitations with this setup,” he said. Lucky for us, he’s itchy again.


[dish] Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway 728-8900 (across from courthouse) Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Come to Bernice's in June for a cupcake. So many flavors you won't know what to take. Chicken & Waffles and Dante's Inferno (Siracha!!). The Irish Car Bomb is back and a specialty cupcake featuring a signature spice from Silk Road is on the menu. Looking for something simpler? Try a Muddy Pig or a High Hat. Come and check out Bernice's 16 all-time creative flavors of cupcakes in June! And while you're in cruise by our breakfast pastry case for Bernice's new Croissant flavors. They pop out daily: Mixed Berry, Ruby Tuesday, Hummade, Parmesan Garlic and more! Bernice's: Keepin' it creative and promoting community for 36 years! xoxo bernice Open 6a - 8p seven days a week.. bernicesbakerymt.com $-$$ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Mon.–Fri., 7:30–4, Sat. 8-4. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. $ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$ Brooks & Browns Inside Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. 532-2056 This week at Brooks and Browns: Thursday 6/12 Big Brains Trivia 7-10 pm. Friday 6/13 Live Music with Captain Wilson Conspiracy 5:30 - 8:30 pm. Monday 6/16 Martini Mania $4 Martinis Tuesday 6/17 Burger + Beer $8 Wednesday 6/18 $2 Wells & $2 PBR Tall Boys. Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 42 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great

$…Under $5

ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$ El Cazador 101 S. Higgins Ave. 728-3657 Missoula Independent readers’ choice for Best Mexican Restaurant. Come taste Alfredo's original recipes for authentic Mexican food where we cook with love. From seafood to carne asada, enjoy dinner or stop by for our daily lunch specials. We are a locally owned Mexican family restaurant, and we want to make your visit with us one to remember. Open daily for lunch and dinner. $-$$ The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and gluten-free options, plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Stop on for lunch and check out the World Cup on our BIG SCREEN. TAKE AND BAKE available too! Mon-Thu 11am-5pm Fri-Sat 11am-8pm. $ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West 541-FOOD The GFS Deli features made-to-order sandwiches, a rotating selection of six soups, an award-winning salad bar, an olive & antipasto bar and a self-serve hot bar offering a variety of housemade breakfast, lunch and dinner entrées. A seasonally changing selection of deli salads and rotisserie-roasted chickens are also available. Locally-roasted coffee/espresso drinks and an extensive smoothie menu complement bakery goodies from the GFS ovens and from Missoula’s favorite bakeries. Indoor and patio seating. Open every day, 7am – 10pm. $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St. 549-7723 www.grizzlyliquor.com Voted Missoula's Best Liquor Store! Largest selection of spirits in the Northwest, including all Montana microdistilleries. Your headquarters for unique spirits and wines! Free customer parking. Open Monday-Saturday 9-7:30 www.grizzlyliquor.com. $-$$$ Heraldo's Mexican Food 116 Glacier Dr. Lolo, MT 59847 406-203-4060 HeraldosMexicanRestaurant.com Lunch and Dinner. Open 7 Days • Eat-in or Carry-out • Handmade Tamales • Burritos • Chimichangas • Flautas • Fajitas • Combo plates and MORE. See our menu at www.heraldosmexicanrestaurant.com. Order Your Holiday Tamales Now! Also sold year-round. Call for details. $-$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We’re the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we’ll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$

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SATURDAYS 4PM-9PM

MONDAYS & THURSDAYS ALL DAY

$1

SUSHI Not available for To-Go orders

missoulanews.com • June 12–June 19, 2014 [27]


[dish]

Black Coffee’s cold brew HAPPIEST HOUR What you’re drinking: Cold brew, aka “toddy” brew, is just one more way coffee fiends can enjoy the smooth, rich beverage. Missoula’s Black Coffee Roasting Co. takes its popular AM roast, finely ground, and steeps it in cold water for 24 hours in a refrigerator, after which they drain and strain the brew, slightly dilute it and—voila!— out comes a coffee to die for.

Or, beer drinkers rejoice! You can bring a 64-ounce growler in and fill it up for $18. Just want something to take into work for the morning? A 16-ounce cup of toddy is $3.

What’s in the future: There’s no Magic 8-ball to predict our lives, but we do know changes are on the horizon for BCRC. In the very near future the company will be selling bottles of cold brew at the Good Food Store. (Prices on How it tastes: Co-owner Jim shelves will likely change a bit.) In Chapman says unlike traditional late August or early September, coffee that often has bright notes the headquarters will move to its and fruit tones, the cold brew tends photo by Cathrine L. Walters new space on Spruce Street near to be darker and more chocolatey, with hints of caramel. It can be heated up or Madison. Chapman says patrons will be able even poured on ice for a summer treat. Chap- to get the brew on tap. Now if only someone man says it can be diluted to taste, but he would start making rum in this town. prefers it straight. Or with rum and half ‘n half. How to find it: For now, cold brew is Coffee has a pretty long shelf-life, but Chapman recommends to keep the brew refrigerated and available at Black Coffee Roasting Company, 1515 Wyoming, Ste. 200, next to Home Reuse within two weeks for the freshest flavor. Source. —Erika Fredrickson What you’re buying: At the BCRC’s headquarters you can pick up a classy 34-ounce Happiest Hour celebrates western Monglass bottle of cold brew for $15, with refills costing $9. You can also buy an 8-ounce per- tana watering holes. To recommend a bar, sonal size serving in a cool blue apothecary- bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, style glass bottle for $5.50, with refills for $2.50. email editor@missoulanews.com.

Iza 529 S. Higgins 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Contemporary Asian cuisine featuring local, vegan, gluten free and organic options as well as wild caught seafood, Idaho trout and buffalo. Join us for lunch and dinner. Happy Hour 3-6 weekdays with specials on food and drink. Extensive sake, wine and tea menu. Closed Sundays. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm, Dinner 5pm-close. Sat: Dinner 5pm-close. $-$$ Jimmy John’s 420 N. Higgins 542-1100 jimmyjohns.com Jimmy John’s - America’s Favorite Sandwich Delivery Guys! Unlike any other sub shop, Jimmy John’s is all about the freshest ingredients and fastest service. Freaky Fast, Freaky Good - that’s Jimmy John’s. Order online, call for delivery or visit us on Higgins. $-$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ Lucky Strike Sports Bar. Casino. Restaurant 1515 Dearborn Ave. 406-549-4152 Our restaurant offers breakfast, lunch and dinner. Are you looking for Delivery without all the extra charges? Call 549-4152 and talk to Jacquie or Judy for more details. You can also get lunch and Coffee from Bold Coffee in the parking lot. Come into the casino for your chance to play Plinko, Spin the Wheel, or Roll the Dice for machine play. Open Mon-Sun 7am-2am. $-$$ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. 543-7154 (on the hip strip) Did you know that the Missoula Senior Center serves delicious hearty lunches every week day for only $6? Anyone is welcome to join us for a delicious meal from 11:30-12:30 Monday- Friday for delicious food, great conversation and take some time to find a treasured item or garment in our thrift shop. For a full menu and other activities, visit our website at www.missoulaseniorcenter.org. The Mustard Seed Asian Cafe Southgate Mall 542-7333 Contemporary Asian fusion cuisine. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combine the best of Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences. Full menu available at the bar. Award winning desserts made fresh daily , local and regional micro brews, fine wines & signature cocktails. Vegetarian and Gluten free menu available. Takeout & delivery. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Parkers’ Restaurant 32 East Front Street Exit 153, Drummond 406-288-2333 Find us on Facebook, Yelp or Foursquare. Offering over 125 different Burgers. Parker’s burgers

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[28] Missoula Independent • June 12–June 19, 2014

are ground fresh daily. We patty them 1/4 pound at a time. We also have 1/2 pound and pound burgers! Most burgers are available all the time too, except for seasonal items. We’re open Tuesday thru Saturday 11am to 8 pm. We’ve also got Steaks, Pastas, Salads, Daily Specials and NOT the usual variety of home made desserts. Private parties and catering available. $-$$ Pearl Cafe 231 East Front St. 541-0231 pearlcafe.us Country French meets the Northwest. Idaho Trout with Dungeness Crab, Rabbit with Wild Mushroom Ragout, Snake River Farms Beef, Fresh Seafood Specials Daily. House Made Charcuterie, Sourdough Bread & Delectable Desserts. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Plonk 322 N Higgins 926-1791 www.plonkwine.com Plonk is an excursion into the world of fine wine, food, cocktails, service and atmosphere. With an environment designed to engage the senses, the downtown establishment blends quality and creativity in an all-encompassing dining experience. Described as an urban hot spot dropped into the heart of the Missoula Valley and lifestyle, Plonk embodies metropolitan personalities driven by Montana passions. Roxiberry Gourmet Frozen Yogurt Southgate Mall Across from Noodle Express 317.1814 • roxiberry.com Bringing Missoula gourmet, frozen yogurt, using the finest ingredients (no frozen mixes), to satisfy your intense cravings with our intense flavors. Our home-made blends offer healthy, nutritional profiles. We also offer smoothies, fresh-made waffle cones, and select baked goods (gluten-free choices available). Join Club Roxi for special offers. See us in-store or visit our website for information. $-$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins 327-8929 Stop in when you’re in the neighborhood. We’ll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula’s best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 11-10 Sun 12-9. $-$$ Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you’ll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

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PM, at 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 549-8703. Visit tenspoon.com. Clinical herbalist Britta Bloedorn hosts a short evening herb walk, where you’ll learn about common medicinal plants in Greenough Park. 6-8:15 PM. $25. Contact 830-0949 or email britta.bloedorn@gmail.com to register. The Miracle of America Museum celebrates Flag Day early with a presentation on the flag’s history and explanation of etiquette by Marine Sgt. Chuck Lewis, who walked across America for wounded veterans. 36094 Memory Lane in Polson. 6:30 PM. Free.

June 12–June 19, 2014

Laura Pritchett reads from her novel about family strife and vengeance, Stars Go Blue, at Fact and Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. 7 PM. It’ll be a sight for sore eyes when singer-songwriter Joe Purdy plays the Top Hat, along with Brian Wright. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $20/$17 in advance. Check out tophatlounge.com. It ain’t the wallflower who gets to take home the cutie, so get out there on the floor for the Country Two-Step dance class with Cathy Clark of NW Country Swing. Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave. Due to popularity, there are now two levels: beginning two-step from 6:45 to 7:30, intermediate two-step from 7:45 to 8:30. Live band starting at 9. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place, plus specials on beer. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM. During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, talented folks may titillate your eardrums. 9 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up. And lo, June 12 is the last Open Mic, since renovations are on the horizon. photo courtesy of Amy Donovan

The drummer can barely contain his excitement. The Magpies play a tour kickoff show along with VTO at Le Petit, 129 S. Fourth St, Fri., June 13. 8-10 PM sharp. Free, but donations for gas money appreciated.

THURSDAYJUNE12

Release some stress during t’ai chi classes at 10 AM at The Open Way Center, 702 Brooks St. $10 drop-in class. Visit openway.org.

Haters are just gonna have to deal, ‘cause rapper Jess J Jones does his Get Money, Stop Hatin’ tour thang at the Palace. 10 PM. $12/$10 in advance. $15 for ages 18-20.

Undo that keyboard hunchback with Lunch Re-Boot Yoga, a gentle practice with Mary Hanson. Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent Ave. Noon-1 PM. $40 for six classes/$9 drop-in.

The international annual Morning Sojourn dance/meditation event runs weekday mornings June 10-13 and 16-20, from 7:15-8:15 AM. Find your nearest location at themorningsojourn.com/program. $140 includes a printed event-specfic Sojournal, or $120 for online copy.

Flex your head and pick up a skateboard, skiing, bike or equestrian helmet for $8-$23 each, plus $5 bike lights at the St. Patrick Trauma Services sale, at the Old Western Montana Clinic Building, 515 W. Front St. Noon-3 PM. The Thursday Young Artists After School Program gets the chilluns involved with all

Hone your performance skills at the Broadway Inn’s open mic night, with Big Sky Pool Party in the Cabana starting at 5 PM, singing and prizes at 9 PM. Includes $3 Big Sky beer special. 1609 W. Broadway St. No cover.

manner of art history and media. ZACC. 2:15-5 PM. $12/$10 for members. Ages 6-11. Call 549-7555 to learn more. The program takes a break for the summer after June 12.

Come in like a wrecking ball when the Badlander hosts the new TNT dance party, featuring hot Top 40 trax and a rotating cast of DJs. $2 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight. No cover.

Soon-to-be mommas can feel empowered, relaxed and nurtured during a prenatal yoga class, this and every Thu. at the Open Way Center, 702 Brooks Ave., at 4 PM. $11/$10 with card. Drop-ins welcome. Call 360-1521.

FRIDAYJUNE13

nightlife Taste la dolce vita when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs Thu-Sat from 4–9 PM, with last call at 8:30

The Zombie Vignettes are a staged reading of short plays by Nick Pavelich for your lucky Friday the 13th pleasure. Palace. 7:30 PM. No cover, all ages. “Viewer discretion is advised.” Hot Springs Homesteader Days gets off to an auspicious start with arts and crafts shows,

missoulanews.com • June 12–June 19, 2014 [29]


[calendar] street games, kids’ parade, 3K and 6K runs, live music and rodeo on Saturday night. Hot Springs, off Highway 28 between Plains and Elmo. Check out hotspringsmtchamber.org.

Cut a rug when the Golden Age Club hosts dancing and live music in an alcohol-free environment. 727 S. Fifth St. in Hamilton. 7:30-10 PM. $3. Call 240-9617 to learn more.

All manner of talented Treasure State folk are on display for the Montana Professional Artists Association’s annual art show at the Bitterroot River Inn, 139 Bitterroot Plaza Drive in Hamilton. Open Fri., June 13 from 69 PM, Sat., June 14 10 AM-5 PM and Sun., June 15 from 10 AM-4 PM.

You’ll just havta to check out Zootown Improv to find out what’s in store for this sketch comedy and improv evening at the Stensrud Playhouse, 314 N. First St. W. 8 PM and 10 PM. Beer and wine bar available. 8 PM show is $12 per person/$22 for two, if bought in advance at stensrudplayhouse.com. 10 PM show is $5/free with 8 PM ticket stub.

My stubborn aunt Sally just might meet her match at Montana Mule Days, the state’s largest mule and donkey show with several competitions, food and family entertainment at the American Legion Rodeo Grounds in Drummond, June 13-15. Visit montanamuledays.com. Get a hit of cardiovascular exercise during Nia: The Joy of Movement, from 9-10 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $12/$10 members. Call 5417240.

Night walkers. Bozeman’s Modern Sons play the Palace Fri., June 13. 9 PM. No cover. Teens go toward the literary light during the Missoula Public Library’s Teen Writers Group, which meets every Fri. at 3:30 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

8:30 PM; exhibit on display through June.

Rattlesnake Drive. Tunes from 6-8:30 PM. No cover.

Wild Coyote Band does the bootscoot-boogie at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W. 8 PM. No cover.

Don’t yell out your ex-girlfriend’s name during Hump Day Bingo with Bob at the Lucky Strike Casino. Prizes for winners. Beware: $5 minifishbowls served all day. Bingo starts at 6:30 PM.

Soak it up and sing it down to some 67,000 tunes when The Outpost Restaurant & Saloon, 38500 W. Hwy. 12 at Lolo Hot Springs, presents karaoke with KJ Mark, starting at 9 PM. Free. Call 273-4733.

Enjoy zee cinema at Missoula Public Library’s World Wide Cinema night, the second Friday of every month. The series showcases indie and foreign films. Doors open at 6:45, show at 7 PM. Check missoulapub library.org for info. Free.

Sing a happy tune at the Evaro Bar’s Friday night karaoke and you just might win a prize. Starts at 9 PM, free to sing. 17025 US Highway 93 North.

The Western Montana Fundraisers Association, which supports local philanthropy and fundraising professionals, honors Martha Newell at an awards luncheon at the Doubletree Hotel. 11:30 AM-1:15 PM. $15.

nightlife

Chilluns can play while Mom and Pop get their whiskey on with Family Friendly Friday at the Top Hat, 6-8 PM. No cover. June 13 features John Adam Smith.

The little ones can get a dose of global learnin’ with Cultural Friday at the Children’s Museum of Missoula. 11:30 AM-noon. May 9 features Switzerland.

The fruits of the past school year are on display with the Expansion: A Journey through New Mediums exhibit of the Young Artists After-School program. ZACC. Reception from 5:30-

David Horgan and Beth Lo team up to add some spice to the proceedings while you sip on local vino. Biga antipasto available, or bring your own snacks. Ten Spoon Winery, 4175

The Missoula Dream Center presents a local rendition of the Rogers and Hammerstein classic Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. 2023 S. Higgins Ave. June 5-6 and 13-14 at 7 PM. $10. Check out missouladreamcenter.com. Singer-songwriter Maiah Wynne plays a fun show geared toward all ages at Break Espresso, 7-10 PM. Free.

[30] Missoula Independent • June 12–June 19, 2014

Before they fly away on a midwest junket, The Magpies party down for an early show along with VTO at Le Petit, 129 S. Fourth St. 810 PM sharp, at which point you can either go to bed, or keep raging it up elsewhere. Free, but donations for gas money appreciated.

Livingston-based outfit the Busdriver Tour plays the Top Hat. 10 PM. No cover. DJ Dubwise spins hot old-school and new dance party traxx at Feruqis, 318 N. Higgins Ave., starting at 10 PM. Free. Great Fallsian pirate punks The Helligans tear it up at the VFW, along with Whiskey Hooves. 9 PM. $6. (See Music.)


[calendar] The Milkcrate Mechanic and other heavy hitters like Goliath, Durazzo and Zaphod Lange are dropping beats and sippin’ drinks at the Palace. 9 PM. No cover. Indie “soul-ternative” duo Erin and the Project hangs out and plays tunes at Sean Kelly’s. 9 PM. No cover. John “Poncho” Dobson hosts open mic at Fergie’s Pub every Fri., where you’re bound to mingle with a mix of resort celebs, odd locals and dizzy soakers. You never know who’ll show up and play. It could be you. Starts at 3 PM. 213 Main Street in Hot Springs. Sign up ahead at 406721-2416 or just show up. Get into the right kinda trouble when Idle Ranch Hands play the Union Club, starting at 9:30 PM. No cover. Burn a little shoe leather when Zeppo plays tunes at the Dark Horse, 1805 Regent. 9:30 PM. No cover.

like to party Would a festival, by any other name, be as much of a party? That’s the question we’ll just have to find the answer to at Bearmouth Music Festival, which was called Love Your Mother Earth in previous years. LYME started in 2007, taking place at venues like Lolo Hot Springs, Ryan Creek Meadows and the Rock Creek Lodge in Clinton. While it’s always had a crunchy reputation, the music lineup has also been inclusive of everything from bluegrass and rock to reggae and hip-hop, and, in recent years, EDM. Past headliners included The Shook Twins, Gypsy Lumberjacks and Whitewater Ramble. LYME has also emphasized arts, crafts, community activities and advocating for sustainability.

WHAT: Bearmouth Festival

Work the creases outta your Wranglers when Paydirt plays pure country gold at the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave. 9:30 PM to bar time.

WHEN: Thu., June 19,–Sat., June 21

Find out that there’s more to life than being ridiculously good-looking when Aaron Traylor hosts the new Top-40 dance night Zoolander at the Badlander. 10 PM. No cover, plus Montana Moonshine drink specials.

MORE INFO: bearmouthmusicfest.com

SATURDAYJUNE14 Vietnamese-American author Teresa Mei Chuc reads from her poetry collection, Red Thread, and hosts open mic poetry at Fact and Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. 11:30 AM-1 PM. Get hot coffee, baked treats, fresh produce and bump into all the friendly acquaintances you can handle at the Missoula Farmers Market, now running for 42 years. 8 AM-1 PM. All manner of talented Treasure State folk are on display for the Montana Professional Artists Association’s annual art show at the Bitterroot River Inn in Hamilton. Open Fri., June 13 from

music Vinyasa yoga class, which features music by Nathan Zavalney, every Sat. from 9:30–10:45 AM at Inner Harmony Yoga, 214 E. Main St. Ste. B. $10/$8 students drop-in. Visit yogainmissoula.com.

WHERE: 50,000 Silver Dollar in Haugan HOW MUCH: $65, includes tent camping

Bearmouth sports a nifty new logo, changed location and a name that’s thankfully less of a mouthful. But the outdoorsy vibe remains. This year’s venue is out at the quirky, charming 50,000 Silver Dollar up in Haugan, about an hour’s drive west of Missoula on I-90. The eclectic lineup is definitely an 6-9 PM, Sat., June 14 10 AM-5 PM and Sun., June 15 from 10 AM-4 PM. Check out some classic history brought to life (briefly) with the George Ives trial and hanging recreation in Virginia City, June 14-15. Visit virginiacitymt.com. Early rising produce-seekers, occasional walk-of-shamers and waffle sandwich lovers rejoice, the Clark Fork Market is back in action under the Higgins Bridge. Saturdays through October from 8 AM-1 PM. Bring your A-game to the Garden City Shootout 3-on-3 basketball tour-

The Wild Medicinal Plant and Herbal Medicine Field Exploration with Britta Bloedorn heads up the Blackfoot to find medicinal roots like anrica, balsam root, mullein and many more. 10 AM-5 PM. $60-$90 sliding scale. Prepare for short walks and being outside most of the day. Pre-registration required by contacting Britta at britta.bloedorn@gmail.com or 830-0949.

Heartless Bastards

asset, too. At Bearmouth, you can rock out with Austin, Texas’ Heartless Bastards or The Boxcutters. Get your down-home Montucky groove on with blues, folk and bluegrass-type acts, like Three-Eared Dog and Ted Ness and the Rusty Nails. Twerk to your heart’s content with DJs ESKMO and Helicopter Showdown. Get funky with Locksaw Cartel and Shakewell. Oh, and the Dead Hipster Dance Party arises once again for a special set. Lots of other acts are lined up, too, and the Bearmouth website has a handy feature where you can sort the musicians by genre, which is a neat way to discover artists you haven’t heard of who might be up your alley. The festival runs for three days, with music and frivolity well into the night and some DJs doing special sunrise sets. That sounds like a major party.

nament, where players from ages 9 to adult can compete to win prizes while raising money for the City Life Community Center. Southgate Mall. Games begin at 8 AM. Register a team at CityLifeMT.com/events/3on3. Get a hit of cardiovascular exercise during Nia: The Joy of Movement, from 9-10 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $12/$10 members. Call 541-7240. The Herbal Foundations SEED Program offers an in-depth course in the healing power of plants, particularly herbs native to the Rockies. Stu-

—Kate Whittle

dents will learn how to grow and use herbs for medicinal purposes. Meets on the second Saturday of every month at Meadowsweet Herbs, 180 S. Third St. W., at 9 AM, through August. $650. Call 728-0543 or email gp@herbsmt.com to learn more. Prime people-watching is available for the Missoula People’s Market, which features all kindsa arts and crafts and tasty treats on the street at E. Pine and Higgins. Saturday mornings through September. Get musical while finding your flow when Brian Baty leads a live

Your bedtime tales of college-age debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like storytelling, finger plays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM on Sat. and 2 PM on Sun. at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. The special Father’s Day Storytime features the book The Mighty Dads, in the children’s department of Barnes and Noble. 2640 N. Reserve St. 11 AM. The whole fambly can get groovy with the Saturday Family Art Workshop: Tie dye with Erin Roberts. Bring any white T-shirt, pillowcase or other garment. Missoula Art Museum. 11 AM-12:30 PM. Free, on a first-come, first-served basis. Hawt dog, the Hot Rod Lewie’s Rock Creek Rod Run starts at the East Missoula Ole’s on Saturday at noon and leads to a car show at the Rock Creek Lodge outside Clinton, where swap meet, silent auction, pin-up show and burlesque is on tap. Proceeds benefit the Sherie Dalton Kidney Fund. Check out Hot Rod Lewie’s on Facebook for more info.

nightlife Sport a spiffy top hat and eyelashes when Hellgate Rollergirls present Blockwork Orange, a doubleheader bout with the Hellions junior league against the Spokane Cherry Bomb Brawlers and the Hellgate ladies against the B.C. Anarchy Angels. Glacier Ice Rink. Doors at 5 PM.

missoulanews.com • June 12–June 19, 2014 [31]


[calendar] $10/$8 in advance/$8 for students. Kids under 12 free. Check out hellgaterollergirls.org.

joint at the Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2-for-1 Absolut drinks until midnight. Now free.

The Benefit Kirtan with Cami Cote presents joyous, call-and-response singing, plus original poetry by Rain, at the Yoga Fitness Center, 123 Alder St. 5-7 PM. $10-$20 suggested donation. Proceeds benefit the Tamarack Grief Resource Center.

DJ Dubwise spins hot old-school and new dance party traxx at Feruqis, 318 N. Higgins Ave., starting at 10 PM. Free.

Kick the evening off right with some colorful characters when El 3-OH plays jazzy hip-hop or hip-hoppy jazz at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 6-8 PM. No cover.

Soul City Cowboys slap a dash of country into their rock and rock into their country at the Lumberjack Saloon. 9:15 PM. No cover.

I’m seeing hay bales in black and white, yes, hmm, and dames chewin’ blades of grass when Hillfolk Noir plays the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6-8:30 PM. No cover. Larry Hirshberg is your aural sommelier for the Ten Spoon Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Tunes from 6-8:30 PM. No cover. Biga antipasto available, or bring your own snacks. Transform assorted bits and pieces into sassy duds with the Trash to Class Workshop, hosted by Subliminal Submission at VonCommon, 1909 Wyoming St., No. 7. 6-10 PM. Free. Winning designs will be featured in an ecofriendly fashion show at the Bearmouth Music Festival, June 19-21. Singer-songwriter Maiah Wynne sings for her supper while you have yours at Walking Moustache, 206 W. Main St. 6:30-8:30 PM. The Missoula Dream Center presents a local rendition of the Rogers and Hammerstein classic Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. 2023 S. Higgins Ave. June 5-6 and 13-14 at 7 PM. $10. Check out missouladreamcenter.com. Discover the color of your energy at Bioluminescence 2, a wobbly basement shindig with DJs including 3DHR, Geeter Tron, Hauli, Web, Ir8Prim8, Mr. Wizard and Atom, with Pyschonaut sound and lighting. Basement of Stage 112. 7 PM-bar time. Wild Coyote Band does the boot-scoot-boogie at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W. 8 PM. No cover. Ke$ha won’t know what hit her when Bouviér Family Productions presents the theatrical spectacle and cautionary moral tale Her Dead Heart of Glitter, starring such fantastic drag queens as Ophelia Uppe- Bouviér and Angelique LaRose. Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins. 8-10 PM. $15. You can be positively sure that Absolutely DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo will juice up the

You bring the peanut butter, Bozeman’s Modern Sons brings the jam to the Palace. 9 PM. No cover.

Work the creases outta your Wranglers when Paydirt plays pure country gold at the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave. 9:30 PM to bar time. Zeppo MT fits in with the beat just fine at the Union Club. 9:30 PM. No cover. Missoula’s own Baby Tyger presents two sets in tribute to the Jerry Garcia Band at the Top Hat. 10 PM. No cover.

SUNDAYJUNE15 The Stensrud Dinner Theatre presents Bullets for Broadway, a musical murder mystery. 314 N. First St., with booze and dinner catered by Silk Road. $50. Tickets at stensrudplayhouse.com. Final show is June 15 at 5:30 PM. All manner of talented Treasure State folk are on display for the Montana Professional Artists Association’s annual art show at the Bitterroot River Inn, 139 Bitterroot Plaza Drive in Hamilton. Open Fri., June 13 from 6-9 PM, Sat., June 14 10 AM-5 PM and Sun., June 15 from 10 AM-4 PM. My stubborn aunt Sally just might meet her match at Montana Mule Days, the state’s largest mule and donkey show with several competitions, food and family entertainment at the American Legion Rodeo Grounds in Drummond, June 1315. Visit montanamuledays.com. Your bedtime tales of college-age debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like storytelling, finger plays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM on Sat. and 2 PM on Sun. at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721BOOK. Kick out the jams down the ‘Root at the dining room of the Sapphire Lutheran Homes, corner of 10th and River streets. Players of all levels are invited to bring their acoustic instrument, or

The Bardstown Bourbon Club and The Golden Rose presents:

American Whiskey Tasting Classic American Whiskey-Session One Tuesday, June 17 | $25 full tasting or $15 for three | 5pm to 8pm The Golden Rose | 123 West Broadway Ave., Downtown, Missoula >> Jack Daniels Black Label >> Wild Turkey 101 >> Elijah Craig 12 year old

>> Four Roses Small Batch >> Neversweat-Headframe Distillery >> Angels Envy >> Jefferson-Chef's Collaborative

Buy tickets at the door or reserve your spot by emailing jeffc@grizzlywineandspirits.com To get a discount off of your ticket and find out more about the Bardstown Bourbon Club check us out at Grizzly Liquor on Facebook.

[32] Missoula Independent • June 12–June 19, 2014


[calendar]

Harmonica blues. Joe Purdy plays the Top Hat Thu., June 12, along with Brian Wright. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $20/$17 in advance. Check out tophatlounge.com. just sit a spell and listen. 2-4 PM. Call John at 381-2483. Free.

nightlife Tip back a dose or three of Vitamin B while Brian Smith plays tunes at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 5-7 PM. No cover. The Western Union Swing Band gets the ball rollin’ at the Missoula Winery, 5646 W. Harrier St., at 6 PM. $7. Country music’s “The Rolling Stones of Country Music” Sawyer Brown play the Western Montana Fairgrounds. 7 PM. $31. Tickets at the Adams Center, griztix.com and other Griz Tix outlets. Ask yourself WWHRD (What Would Henry Rollins Do) before checking out Chico, Calif.’s gnarly hardcore outfit Badger, playing the ZACC along with freshly minted Missoula crushers Earthbound and Wet Willy. Plus, there’s a standup set from Duane “the Raider” Raider. 7:30-10:30 PM. All ages. $5 for ages 21 and up, $3 for ages 18 and under. Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Starts at 8 PM with Front Street Jazz. Free. Bellow out your favorite pop tune so you can impress your friends and perhaps win a prize during a karaoke contest this and every Sun. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. $3 Fireball specials. Call 721-1798.

MONDAYJUNE16 That old Schwinn’ll be in ship-shape after the bicycle maintenance workshop at the Missoula Public Library’s new bike repair vending machine, led by mechanic Nick Wethington. 6:30 PM. Free. Today kicks off the Eco Books camp week, where students ages 6-12 will make a book each day out of stuff like cereal boxes, old maps, matchsticks and tea bags. ZACC. 9 AM-noon through June 20. $90/$80 for members. Visit zootownarts.org/ summer to learn more about this and other art camps offered throughout the season. Bust out the epee for the Learn to Fence day camp series with the Missoula Fencing Association, 1200 Shakespeare St., Unit A. Ages 69 from June 16-20, ages 10-16 from July 7-11. $95. Call 251-4623 or visit missoulafencing.net. Calling all burgeoning literati, the children’s story time at Barnes and Nobles is 10:30-11 AM on Mondays. Free. Therapeutic Yoga for Wellness meets for a dose of gentle yoga to ease your anxiety, chronic fatigue or other maladies. Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent Ave. Noon-1 PM. $9 drop-in. Call 721-0033. Brush up on your skillz with the Bridge Group for beginners/those in need of a refresher course. Missoula Senior Center, Mondays at 1 PM. $1.25.

missoulanews.com • June 12–June 19, 2014 [33]


[calendar]

Thursday

June 19 VS Great Falls Voyagers Gates open at 6; game time 7:05.

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[34] Missoula Independent • June 12–June 19, 2014

Sponsored by Fire Ready Montana & KVGO 101.5

Gates: 4:30; game time 5:05

Four general admission tickets, hotdogs, chips, sodas & one super scorecard for $30 with donation of nonperishable food items. All food collected benefits the Poverello Center.

2-for-1 tickets for anyone who bikes to the game. Gates: 6:30; Game time 7:05

Gates: 6:30; game time 7:05 Sponsored by Missoula Family Chiropractic and Cherry Creek Radio

Sponsored by PacificSource Health Plans, Missoula in Motion and Trail 103.3.


[calendar]

Cannabis Clinic Hangin’ out by the bleachers. Lee Bains III and the Glory Fires play the Palace Mon., June 16, along with Monks and the Mothers. 10 PM. No cover. The afternoon Fun with Felt and Dye class uses that handy ol’ Kool-Aid to dye wool into pretty fabrics for potholders and throw pillows. Ages 612. ZACC. Meets from 1-4 PM, June 16-20. $90/$80 for members. Visit zootownarts.org/summer to find more info about this and other art camps offered throughout the season.

nightlife Local Deadheads have got you covered when the Top Hat presents Raising the Dead, a curated broadcast of two hours of Jerry Garcia and co. from 5 to 7 PM. Free, all ages. Let’s get physical, physical, at the Zumba Fitness Classes at Lolo School cafeteria. Mondays and Wednesdays from 6-7 PM. $2/free for Lolo residents. Register by calling Kathy at 273-0451. Grab that ol’ trombone and head on over to Sentinel High School’s band room, where the Missoula City Band rehearses from 7-9 PM to practice before the Wednesday concert at Bonner Park. Call 728-2400, ext. 7041. It’ll be “nothing short of David Copperfield magic” so watch for the occasional rabbit when Larry Hirshberg plays the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave., from 7-10 PM. No cover. Get mindful at Be Here Now, a mindfulness meditation group that meets Mondays from 7:30 to 8:45 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Open to all religions and levels of practice. Free, but donations appreciated. Visit openway.org. Maintain dignity for best results at Super Trivia Freakout. Winners get cash prizes and shots after the five rounds of trivia at the Badlander. 9 PM. Free.

Butt-kicking Alabama rock band Lee Bains III and the Glory Fires play the Palace, along with Monks and the Mothers. 10 PM. No cover.

TUESDAYJUNE17 Get on down when San Franciscan garage band The Come Ups play the Badlander. 9 PM. No cover, plus $3 Montgomery drink special. Brianna Randall and other expecting mamas host a Prenatal Strengthen and Stretch Class that combines yoga and toning exercises. Oula Studio, 1900 W. Broadway Suite E, Tuesdays through July 8 from 10:4511:45 AM. $7. Bring a yoga mat. Watch your little ones master tree pose in no time during yoga at the Children’s Museum of Missoula. 11 AM. 225 W. Front. $4.25. Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room for Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters, at 5205 Grant Creek Dr., and work on your elk-camp locution with the best. All are invited. Noon–1 PM. Free.

nightlife Put on your red shoes and dance at the Country Dance Lessons, Tuesdays at the Hamilton Senior Center. The shindig steps off at 6 PM with a line dance, followed by 7 PM twostep and 8 PM country cha-cha. Dust off that banjolin and join in the Top Hat’s picking circle, from 6 to 8 PM. All ages. Cyclists of a certain age are welcome to the Singles of Missoula Tuesday evening summer bike rides, where you’ll meet behind Conlin’s Furniture near 1600 S. North St. W. to ride the bike trail and possible get ice

cream. Call 251-2616 for info. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free pub trivia, which takes place every Tuesday at 8 PM. Here’s a question to tickle your brainwaves: What is the name of the record store in High Fidelity? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.)

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WEDNESDAYJUNE18 Rhymesayers rapper Blueprint presents the Respect the Architect Tour at Stage 112, with guests Count Bass D, DJ Rare Groove and Wormwood. 9 PM. $10/$8 in advance. Check out seafarerentertainment.com. Hold all my calls, Sally, for I’m stepping down to Caras Park for Out to Lunch, which runs from 11 AM-2 PM on Wednesdays with live local music and all manner of tasty things served out of food trucks. Brianna Randall and other expecting mamas host a Prenatal Strengthen and Stretch Class that combines yoga and toning exercises. Downtown Dance Collective, Wednesdays through July 2 from 4-5 PM. $35 for four classes/$25 for members. Bring a yoga mat. The Jocko Valley Farmers Market presents wholesome produce, tasty baked goods and general cheer at the parking lot of the Hangin’ Art Gallery in Arlee. 4-7 PM on Wednesdays.

nightlife Dena Saedi presents the Yoga for Chronic Pain class at the Learning Center at Red Willow, which uses gentle stretches, meditation and breath work geared toward easing conditions like chronic back pain, fibromyalgia and arthritis. Wednesdays from 5-6

missoulanews.com • June 12–June 19, 2014 [35]


[calendar] PM. Prescreening with Dena required. To schedule an appointment, call 406-721-0033.

Zeppo presents its old-school rhythm ‘n blues revue at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave., from 6-8 PM. No cover.

Kick it with the cool cats in Arlee at the summer live music series accompanying the farmers market at the new outdoor stage at Hangin Art Gallery, on Highway 93. 5-7 PM.

The Missoula Osprey face off against the Great Falls Voyagers for the first at-home game of the season in at Ogren Park. 7:05 PM. Visit missoulaosprey.com.

Let’s get physical, physical, at the Zumba Fitness Classes at Lolo School cafeteria. Mondays and Wednesdays from 6-7 PM. $2/free for Lolo residents. Register by calling Kathy at 273-0451.

A farmer’s grip of musical types will be raging it up for the Cream of the Crop All-Star Jam at Sean Kelly’s. 8 PM. No cover.

Writer, runner and UM alumna Rachel Toor reads from On the Road to Find Out, a young adult novel about a gal who gets back on her feet by, er, getting back on her feet. Shakespeare and Co. 7 PM. (See Books.)

Find the John Corbett look-alike of your dreams when Julie Bug and Northern Exposure play the Sunrise Saloon. 9 PM. No cover. Aww yeah, let it all hang out when Chicago’s eight-piece funk outfit Fatbook plays the Palace, along with the Kung Fu Revival. 9 PM. $5.

Country legend Don Williams plays his goodnatured tunes at the Dennison Theatre. 7:30 PM. $39.50-$55. GrizTix outlets. (See Music.) Let the Milkcrate Mechanic and co. do the heavy lifting at Milkcrate Wednesday. Palace. 9 PM. No cover, plus pitcher specials and free pool. (Trivia answer: Championship Vinyl.)

THURSDAYJUNE19 Richard Manning reads from Go Wild: Free Your Body and Mind from the Afflictions of Civilization, which analyzes everything from tai chi to the Paleo diet to find an across-theboard approach to health. (I’m willing to bet that exercise and vegetables are somehow involved.) Shakespeare and Co., 103 S. Third St. W. 7 PM.

All horned up with no place to go. Chicago funk band Fatbook plays the Palace Thu., June 19, along with Kung Fu Revival. 9 PM. $5. Release some stress during t’ai chi classes every Thursday at 10 AM at The Open Way Center, 702 Brooks St. $10 drop-in class. Visit openway.org. Undo that keyboard hunchback with Lunch Re-Boot Yoga, a gentle practice with Mary Hanson. Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent Ave. Thursdays, noon-1 PM. $40 for six classes/$9 drop-in.

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nightlife Drummond artist Bill Ohrmann gets the long-deserved star treatment with a reception and release for the Joe Nickell’s book, Tainted Revelations: The Art of Bill Ohrmann. Missoula Art Museum. 5-8 PM, with reading at 7 PM. Joe and Vicki Price play finger-style and new blues tunes at the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6-8:30 PM. No cover.

Boston alternative outfit Bent Knee plays the VFW, helping kick off the Slowglass residency along with Ryan Chrys and the Rough Cuts and Shramana. VFW. 10 PM. $5. This week’s calendar brought to you by gas station coffee. Submit events to Calapatra the Calendar Mistress at calendar@ missoulanews.com at least two weeks in advance of the event. Don’t forget to include the date, time and cost. If you must, snail mail to Calapatra c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801. You can also submit online. Just find the “submit an event” link under the Spotlight on the right corner at missoulanews.com.

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Sat, 6/21 vs Helena Brewers Summit Independent Living

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To get your organization signed up, for Community Corner, send a written request on your organization's letterhead to: Missoula Osprey c/o Community Corner MSO Hub 140 N. Higgins, Missoula 59802 or call 543-3300

[36] Missoula Independent • June 12–June 19, 2014

Sponsored by


[outdoors]

MOUNTAIN HIGH

W

hen everyone is hanging out at home for the holidays, my siblings and I sometimes arrange family games like street hockey or a round of H.O.R.S.E. basketball. The three of us children are all in our early 20s, fairly outdoorsy and active. Times like these, my 60-year-old father will amiably stroll out, bottle of beer in hand, and absolutely whoop our asses at whatever we’re playing. My father is a gentle, kind man, until it comes time to score against his own children. And he cheats atrociously. In a hockey scuffle, he’ll pick up the puck barehanded and throw it in the net. So I’m well aware of the lesson that what one can lack in youth and agility, one can make up for with wisdom and treachery. And, I have to hand it to Dad, staying active into one’s golden years can make a huge difference in physical health, mental well-being–and

bragging rights. For older folks who still run, walk and play, the Montana Senior Olympics are coming up in Great Falls. The MSO features competition in two winter and 13 summer sports, with divisions for ages 50 and up, plus a special 45-49 age group for skiing. Sports include archery, basketball, horseshoes, table tennis and, new this year, pickleball. May the best competitor win—and hopefully nobody’s as big a cheater as my pa. —Kate Whittle The Montana Senior Olympics Summer Games, June 19-21 in Great Falls, feature 15 sports, including basketball, cycling, golf, racewalk, tennis, bowling, swimming and road race. Visit montanaseniorolympics.org for a full schedule of events.

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THURSDAY JUNE 12 The Montana Natural History Center presents an educational talk on native plant identification while volunteers help out in the Fort Missoula Native Plant Garden. 3-6:30 PM, with talk from 5-6 PM. Free. Visit montananaturalist.org for more info.

FRIDAY JUNE 13 Make sure your first time is special by attending First Timer Friday at the Freestone Climbing Center, 935 Toole Ave. in Missoula, at 7 PM. Free if it’s your first visit.

SATURDAY JUNE 14 Learn from your dad’s patience as he untangles your line once again at the Father’s Day Family Fishing Festival, where northern pike, yellow perch, kokanee and rainbow trout are all up for grabs at the Thompson Chain of Lakes. $20 to enter, limited to 125 people. Robert’s rules of order are in effect for the 41st annual Governor’s Cup, which includes a marathon, half-marathon, 10K, 5K and fun run in Helena. For motivation, consider that Heather Lieberg smashed the marathon record last year with a time of 2:45:59. Check out govcupmt.com. You’ll be bright eyed and bushy tailed after Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which start at 8 AM every Saturday at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. Grab breakfast with other participants afterward. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org. The sights will take your breath away if the climb doesn’t at the annual Pedal the Pintlers, featuring 25-, 50- and 100-mile routes departing from Anaconda’s Washoe Park. $55 to register day of the

race, includes T-shirt and food. Visit anacondabikefest.org. The Missoulians on Bicycles are back at it with a 55-mile Drummond to Philipsburg ride. Meet at the Eastgate Center in Missoula at 9 AM to carpool or at the Drummond Conoco at 10. Visit missoulabike.org. Giddy-up and go to the 406 Family Aid Foundation 5K and 1-mile fun run, which starts at Hideout Mountain Park in Florence and goes through town. 9 AM. Proceeds benefit the 406 Family Aid Foundation’s mission to help families experiencing financial hardship to due illness or disaster. The Geology Tour of the Bitterroot, led by UM professor George Furniss, goes on a van ride to check out the still-visible results of the Ice Ages and Glacial Lake Missoula, with a stop for lunch at Lake Como. Meet at the Hamilton Kmart parking lot at 10 AM for a five-hour trip; pack food and water. $10. Call Jill at 642-3601 for any questions.

SUNDAY JUNE 15 Find your inner strength during the Discovery XC mountain bike race near Anaconda, with distances from 5.4 miles to 25.8 miles, and divisions for juniors, men and women. Check out montanacycling.net.

TUESDAY JUNE 17 The always down-to-earth Montana Dirt Girls host a hike or bike ride every Tuesday at 6 PM. Check out the Montana Dirt Girls page on Facebook for ride info. calendar@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • June 12–June 19, 2014 [37]


[community]

Flag Day is oft neglected, as far as patriotic holidays go, probably because it’s not an excuse for a three-day weekend or barbecues the way Memorial Day and Fourth of July have become. (Feel free to invite me to your Flag Day barbecue, though.) On June 14, 1777, the Stars and Stripes were adopted as the American flag. In the late 1880s, when America was still a new-ish country, with fresh memories of the Civil War and in the mood to start national holiday traditions, a Wisconsin schoolteacher advocated that June 14 be set aside to celebrate the adoption of the flag. Then and now, Flag Day was primarily meant for teaching children about the flag and what it represents. These days, what the American flag might mean to you or I could be quite different. Former Marine Sgt. Chuck Lewis, a Ronan resident who walked across America in 2013 to raise money for wounded veterans, takes the flag—and the men and women who have fought for it—as a living symbol representing the freedoms and responsibilities U.S. citizens have. Lewis gives a presentation on the history of the Stars and Stripes as part of an early Flag Day celebration on June 12 in Polson, plus an explanation

photo courtesy of LCpl Geoffrey T. Campbell

of etiquette. Not everyone can be as dedicated as Lewis, but it’s worth taking a moment to consider what the flag has stood for. —Kate Whittle The Miracle of America Museum celebrates Flag Day on Thu., June 12 with a presentation on the flag's history and explanation of etiquette by Marine Sgt. Chuck Lewis. 36094 Memory Lane in Polson. 6:30 PM. Free.

[AGENDA LISTINGS] FRIDAY JUNE 13 Clinical psychologist Joyce Hocker presents the Learning from Ourselves course, oriented toward helping health care providers learn how to maintain distance and foster beneficial relationships with clients or patients. Meets at the Learning Center for Red Willow, 825 W. Kent Ave., from 11 AM-1 PM until June 13. $145. Call 721-0033 to learn more. The Senior Roaming Congregate Meals lunch sits down with teens from the Youth Farm, who will chat about the work they do. Orchard Garden Homes, 210 Grove St. 1 PM. Call Missoula Aging Services to make a reservation at 728-7682.

SATURDAY JUNE 14 The Love For Lauren Benefit features a multi-family yard sale, plus a bunch of homemade baked goods. Corner of Sixth and Helen. 8 AM. Proceeds benefit Lauren Holt, a 3-year-old girl battling cancer. Help plant seeds of peace with the flower planting volunteer events at the Ewam Garden of 1,000 Buddhas, from 10 AM-5 PM on May 31 and June 14, 21. Monetary donations and gardening help are both needed. Visit ewambuddhagarden.org to learn more. The Cartwheels For Camp fundraiser supports a summer camp trip for Boy Scout Troop 1959 and local LDS teens, with open gym time, hot dogs and family fun at Mismo Gymnastics, 1900 W. Broadway. 5-7 PM. $10 per person/$30 per family, or $5 for dinner only. Call Jan at 543-3544 to learn more.

SUNDAY JUNE 15 The Sundog Ecovillage and Missoula Time Bank

team up for a potluck and bike-tire-sandal-making workshop, out in Potomac. 2 PM, with sandal-making at 4 PM. Bring dishware, a beverage and something tasty. Visit sundogvillage.org.

MONDAY JUNE 16 Learn everything solar, from installing solar systems for a small building to caring for electric vehicles to adding a heliostat, at the Solar Workshop at Paul Wheaton’s, June 16-20. $680. Learn more and sign up at permies.com/t/33051.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 18 Creative Connections for Cancer Survivors presents Three Kinds of Courage: An Exploration in Poetry, a workshop with Beth Ferris at Living Art, 725 W. Alder St. Unit 17. Noon-1:30 PM. Free, but donations appreciated. Visit livingartofmontana.org or call 5495329 for more info.

THURSDAY JUNE 19 The Intercultural Dialogue event with visiting Hubert H. Humphrey Fellows features Emiliano Respighi, Liana Sahakyan and Jean Bosco Abderamane, from Argentina, Armenia and the Central African Republic, respectively. Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 5-7 PM. Free, with light refreshments served. Join Hospice of Missoula for Community Conversations on Death and Dying, where facilitators educate people on how to talk about this oft-uncomfortable subject. The Loft, 119 W. Main St. 6–8 PM. Free.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

[38] Missoula Independent • June 12–June 19, 2014


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control 541-7387 LAVENDER• Lavender is a shorthaired, female black cat. She loves to be brushed and be held. Lavender is very easy-going and would be a great companion to any home. She has been at the shelter far too long and deserves a great home. HENRY•Henry is a medium-haired, brown tabby and white male cat. We can tell he has had a hard life so far due to his scruffy coat and scrapes on his face. Henry loves to be brushed and will climb in your lap to make it easier to do so. With a great home who will cherish him, Henry will soon be a gorgeous cat. He just needs some TLC.

Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MontanaSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

TIGGER•Tigger is a male, orange tiger cat. His owners were moving and couldn't take him with them. He is very timid at first but once he gets comfortable, he is 2330 South Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59801 truly a delight. He would make a great lap Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) cat for any home. Come to the shelter and 3708 North Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59808 meet Tigger. You won't regret that you Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri) Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 9:00am-12:00pm (Sat) did.

HANK•Hank is a male heeler around 4 years old. He would do best in a home without any other dogs. Hank is great on walks and is very easily trained. He is very attentive and playful. If you love heelers, you should come meet Hank.

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

KIRBY•Kirby is a male shepherd mix. He is a medium sized dog with lots of personality. He would do best in a home where he is the only dog. Kirby will keep you active due his high energy level. If you are looking for a running buddy, look no further.

Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

CASPER•Casper is a male Parson Russell Terrier mix puppy. He is very hyper and loves to jump and play. Casper is a puppy that will need a lot of training and patience from his owner, but he has great potential.

www.dolack.com Original Paintings, Prints and Posters 139 W. Front St., Missoula (406) 549-3248

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana 549-3934 MISSY & YODA• Missy & Yoda are six-year-old sibling bobtail cats, who love people and each other. Missy enjoys chatting and snuggling, and Yoda is a goofball who likes to play with toys. Two cats are better than one, and Missy and Yoda are a great pair!

Serving the community’s framing needs since 1993 using environmentally sustainable practices.

139 West Front St. inside the Monte Dolack Gallery, Downtown Missoula, MT

(406) 549-3248 • dolack.com

CHEWBACCA• Chewbacca is a nineyear-old tiger, who likes to snooze on the couch, chat with his people, and play with string. Sounds like a pretty great cat! He'd prefer be the only pet in his new home, and he likes to stay inside - so he can be near his people. During the month of June, Chewie's adoption fee is waived when adopters make a donation to the Cat Corner!

JANE JETSON•Jane Jetson is a very special kitty. She came to HSWM with two nursing kittens - and a serious medical condition. Thanks to the ASPCA's Lil' Bib fund, she received the surgery she needed, and is on the mend! This beautiful three-yearold Siamese mix is a sweet, brave girl, and deserves the best home ever.

CAMILLE• Camille is a two-year-old, long-haired tortoiseshell beauty. Unlike some other torties, she is very affectionate and friendly! She loves being petted and having her belly rubbed. Sound like the perfect kitty for you? Come meet her during Adopt-a-Cat month!

EMMA•Emma is a lovely 7-year-old Manx kitty, who just wants a cozy home and a person to be her buddy. She loves being snuggled and having her belly rubbed. Don't forget that June is Adopt-aCat month, and adoption fees are waived in exchange for donations to the Cat Corner Spruce-Up Fund!

RJ• RJ is a sweet 12-year-old girl, with gorgeous markings and slightly crossed eyes - which are very endearing! She's a friendly, social snuggle bug who likes everyone, including kids. She also really loves her sister, Furry, who is also awaiting a new home. Come meet them both!

MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

Missoula’s Locally Owned Neighborhood Pet Supply Store

www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275 East Broadway • South Russell • North Reserve

missoulanews.com • June 12–June 19, 2014 [39]


Photo by Jonathan Marquis

M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

June 12 - June 19 , 2014

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD ADD/ADHD relief ... Naturally! Reiki • CranioSacral Therapy • Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT). Your Energy Fix. James V. Fix, RMT, EFT, CST 360840-3492, 415 N. Higgins Ave #19 • Missoula, MT 59802. yourenergyfix.com CHERRY FESTIVAL SEEKING VENDORS Wanted: Seeking vendors for Polson’s Main Street Flathead Cherry Festival. This is a very well-attended event, held on the main streets of Polson July 19th and 20th. This

unique celebration of Montana’s cherries draws many thousands of visitors each year. Three booth sizes are available, making this affordable for anyone. Local Montana-made and cherrythemed products are preferred. Food vendors welcome. To view and fill out an application, please visit www.flatheadcherryfestival.com. Booth spaces are limited and our deadline is June 20, 2014. This is a two-day event and we reserve the right to refuse duplicate products. You can direct questions to

HYPNOSIS

A clinical approach to negative self-talk • bad habits stress • depression Empower Yourself

728-5693 • Mary Place MSW, CHT, GIS

vendors@flatheadcherryfestival.c om, or 406-686-1155. Missoula Medical Aid: Working for Health in Honduras. In 1998 we responded after a devastating hurricane. The need still continues, and so do we. Will you help? Volunteer or donate today! missoulamedicalaid.org Missoula Medical Aid: Working for Health in Honduras. Please donate now at missoulamedicalaid.org!

LOST & FOUND Found: Cat 1 year old male, unneutered, orange tabby, very affectionate, seen near River Street area for about a week, brought to AniMeals 6-2-14, photo on AniMeals’ Facebook page.

Found: Cat, 6-8 month old female, white and brown tabby, very friendly, had been hanging around Highwood Drive for a few weeks, brought to AniMeals 6-5-14, photo on AniMeals’ Facebook page.

TO GIVE AWAY First Friday Free For All. Haircuts will be donated to the first 20 people in the door & you may receive one free haircut every three months. Noon to 4 pm, 1st come, 1st served. Mighty Aphrodite Salon. 406-7211866. 736A S. 1st W. Missoula (next to Free Cycles). Find us on Facebook.

ANNOUNCEMENTS D’Vine Palette - PAINT . SIP . LEARN. *Pick painting *Tell friends to come *Drink & paint. 4 LOCATIONS! MISSOULA’S FIRSTPAINT & SIP STUDIO. WWW.DVINEPALETTE.COM. 406.239.6856 Hooper Park Flea Market. Lincoln Montana. July 18, 19 & 20. $60 30ft spot. 406-362-4550

Estimates

406-880-0688

bladesofglorylawncarellc.com

Over 20 years experience. Call immediately for a FREE consultation.

541-7307 www.fletchlaw.net

Public Notices . . . . . . . .C6

This Modern World . .C12

FREE

Accidents & Personal Injury

Free Will Astrology . . .C4

Camp Sleepover . . . .C11

546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

Steve M. Fletcher Attorney at Law

Advice Goddess . . . . . .C2

Crossword . . . . . . . . . .C7

Peace happens... One heart at a time.

Fletch Law, PLLC

Table of contents

I BUY

Honda • Subaru • VW Toyota • Nissan Japanese/German Cars Trucks SUVs

Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not

327-0300 ANY TIME

P L AC E YOUR AD:

Walk it. 317 S. Orange

( :

Talk it. 543-6609 x121 or x115

Send it. Post it. classified@missoulanews.com

PET OF THE WEEK Craig & Al: This week, we don't have one Pet-of-the-Week, but two! Craig & Al are sweet, shy 8month-old brothers who would love to find a home together. This handsome black-and-white duo loves nothing more than to snuggle and play together, and peer bashfully out at the world through their lovely yellow eyes. The brothers want to remind you that June is Adopt-a-Cat month, and their adoption fees are waived in exchange for a donation toward the Cat Corner Spruce-Up Fund!

"Music was my refuge. I could crawl into the space between notes and curl back my lonliness." – Maya Angelou


COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

ADVICE GODDESS By Amy Alkon THE SCORN IDENTITY There's this girl in my social circle I'd wanted to ask out for a while. Two months ago, I finally got up the nerve, but she politely declined, saying she wasn't "ready to date yet" after her last relationship. Since then, she's started dating some other guy, and their pictures are all over Facebook. I unfollowed her from my News Feed, but I still see her with this guy in friends' photos. Would it be completely petty to unfriend her? I feel like that would make me look even more jilted and bitter. And I still have to see her at parties and stuff. —Grim Facebook is complicated. Sure, there are privacy settings and other controls, but these tend to be more porous than the U.S.-Mexican border. In fact, there's only one surefire way to avoid seeing somebody in your News Feed, and that's covering your computer screen with duct tape. Unfortunately, this won't help you at parties or the supermarket, since you can only unfriend somebody; you can't unexist them. Well, not without the possibility of life in prison. But take a step back. You're feeling "jilted and bitter"? A woman you asked out left you in limbo; she didn't make a run for it while you were standing together at the altar. She also didn't wrong you by saying she wasn't "ready to date yet." Maybe that was the truth at the time; maybe she won't be ready to date you ever. A person you ask out doesn't owe you complete honesty— well, except on whether they'll open the door and come out when you swing by on Friday night or stockpile weapons and barricade themselves in their house. Chances are, you wouldn't be so Mr. Resentypants if you hadn't pined after this girl for eons and "finally" asked her out. Turning her into a months-long project for your ego made getting a "yes" from her way too important. You probably did this because you're rejection-avoidant. This isn't to say the rest of us are all, "Yay, rejection. More, please." But that sort of attitude—constantly flipping the bird at your fears and taking social risks—is how you get okay enough with rejection to live your life like you'll be dead soon instead of like you're dead now. Getting comfortable in Rejectionville is easier if your self-worth comes from the inside. This is something you may need to work toward. But even if you can't immediately stop seeing every rejection as confirmation of your loserhood, you can at least stop acting as if you do. Just reinterpret each rejection as a sign to go after the

next woman. (Acknowledge disappointment, lick wounds, move on.) Before long, you should be bouncing back surprisingly fast. You should also find yourself reserving your scorn for the truly deserving, like if you ask a woman whether she'd like to have a drink sometime and her response is, "Sure I would. Here's my address. Leave a bottle of chilled white wine on my doorstep, ring the bell, and run."

MAY I HAVE THIS GLANCE? I'm a 23-year-old woman who's clueless about how to flirt with a stranger. I'm not really good at small talk, and sometimes I'll see a cute guy at the coffeehouse and wonder later whether I could have sent some signals his way. All my boyfriends have started as friends, so I never really learned this stuff. —Clueless

INSTRUCTION

ADOPTION

AIRLINE JOBS Start Here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 844-210-3935

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com

1114 Cedar St, Missoula, MT• 728-3957

Single or taken, come mingle. GREAT DRINK SPECIALS

$4.95 Taco & Tot Basket 4pm-9pm KARAOKE CONTEST EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT DRIVING LESSONS M&M Driving School Call or Text

317-3272

missouladrivingschool.com

EMPLOYMENT GENERAL

Flirting isn't the only way to get a stranger to stop for you—but it tends to be more socially acceptable than shooting a tranquilizer dart into their neck. Flirting from across a coffee shop is an expert-level maneuver and requires time you may not have if a guy is just running in for a latte. Behavioral science researchers find that it generally takes repeated instances (say, three) of a woman making eye contact with a man and then looking away for him to go, "Wait—who, me?" A better bet is moseying over while the guy is at the coffee fixings bar or sitting down at the table next to his and casually saying something. You don't need to be good at small talk—just small questions. Ask about something. Anything. His antique watch. His haircut. Where the whole milk ran off to. And then, instead of trying to sell him on you, keep asking him about himself. (When you keep a conversation focused on another person, they're more likely to warm to you.) Don't worry if you come off a little nervous or awkward. If a guy's into you, it won't matter. Even if he isn't, he'll probably be pleasantly surprised by your interest, as men who are not movie stars are rarely approached by women who aren't begging for drug money or out on the street after gnawing through their bed restraints.

Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! “http://www.oneworldcenter.org” www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com www.advicegoddess.com

Bookkeeper Payroll PartTime RUTHERFORD MACDONALD & OLSON PC. Part-Time Bookkeeper/Payroll person for CPA firm. Ability to work with different types of clients/industries along with professional demeanor to work directly with clients off site. Experi-

[C2] Missoula Independent • June 12 – June 19, 2014

Ken's Barber Shop Children & Walk-in Welcome • 8:30AM-5:30PM • Tue-Sat Haircuts $10 • Beard Trims $5 Senior Citizens $9

BEHAVIOR SUPPORT COORDINATOR Social services organization is seeking a Behavior Support Coordinator for the Missoula area. Will be working with individuals who are struggling with behavioral and emotional issues. Requires High School Diploma or GED, past employment experience, valid Montana Driver’s License, current vehicle liability insurance policy, vehicle to use during shift and acceptable motor vehicle record. Must have knowledge of behavioral techniques and interventions and an understanding of the emotional and behavioral needs of individuals with emotional and behavior issues. Requires good oral and written communications skills, including adequate penmanship, spelling skills, strong inter-personal skills, and basic assessment abilities. Requires the abilities to work as a team member, to make observations and to report them accurately, and to follow oral and written instructions. Will provide support services to individuals in community, family, home and recreational setting. Will work closely with clinical professionals in providing services as assigned and developed through prescribed curriculum lesson plans. Will work Monday-Friday, shifts will vary. Approximately 40 hours per week. Pay is $10.25 + full benefits. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10054999

ence with QuickBooks required. Tax prep experience helpful, not required. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10054802 childcare needed Looking for a responsible, good driver with basic life support skills to watch my three kids part time this summer. Two to three days per week, weekdays only, 6 hrs per day. $11 per hour. References required. mebarnett@saintpatrick.org

Part Time CAREGiver for Elderly Veterans Do

you think that our Veterans deserve the utmost respect? Are you someone that likes to reminisce about days gone by? Do you like helping others in need? If you answered yes to all of these questions, then this is the job for you! We are looking for a few compassionate, dedicated, caring individuals to help Veterans in our community. Jobs duties may include; meal preparation, light housekeeping, companionship, personal care, and lending an ear to some great stories! Our selection process includes an interview process, reference checks, and an all-inclusive background check. Why go to so much trouble you ask? It’s simple, we only want to hire the absolute best, and the best is what our Veterans deserve!!! If you are looking for a part time career that is rewarding, search no more! If you have any questions please call Tony anytime Monday - Friday 8:00am to 5:00pm (406) 5239909; or stop by the office located at 400 Exxpressway Ste. C, Missoula to talk with him. Apply Online at: https://missoulamt.in-homecare-jobs.com/x/detail/ a20v4fazyakl/aab9. $9.00 $12.00 Hourly. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10055008 SECRETARY / BOOKKEEPER / RECEPTIONIST A local CPA-management company seeks a full-time SECRETARY / BOOKKEEPER / RECEPTIONIST. The employee must be adept at Microsoft Word, Word Perfect, basic

bookkeeping, Quicken, and spreadsheets. Candidates will perform office duties as assigned. Must be an outgoing and welcoming person, available immediately. This is a full-time position, Monday through Friday, 8am - 5pm. Wage is $8.50 per hour. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10054860 Water Commissioner for Carlton Creek 2014 water season. Must be familiar with water measurement devices, in good physical condition, able to calculate water flow and communicate well with adverse water users. Must be able to prepare own billing spreadsheets for filing with 4th District Court. Approx. 20 variable hrs per week, seasonal. $20/hr plus travel expenses. Call 273-2798.

PROFESSIONAL Assistant Case Manager Part-time Missoula Early Head Start - year-round program 20 hours per week. This position works directly with Early Head Start (EHS) Case Managers in the development and implementation of parent/child interaction group activities and with the service delivery of home visits. $11.22 per hour IMPORTANT NOTE: This hourly wage is effective 07/01/2014 and the position begins effective 07/01/2014 Formal education and experience working with infants and toddlers in an educational setting. Other combinations of education and experience will be evaluated on an individual basis. Preference will be given for individuals with knowledge of Family Development Systems. KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND ABILITIES: Proven ability to maintain confidential information. Excellent interpersonal skills and proven ability to work well with staff, infants & toddlers, parents and outside agents. Proven knowledge of Infant & Toddler development. Ability to follow and implement plans. Good organization skills; and, ability to take direction. Awareness of home visitation and adult learning theory. Awareness of

family development and family systems The employment application and a full job description are available through the Missoula Job Service office. CLOSING DATE: June 17, 2014. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10054882 Attorney Public Defender Assistant Public Defenders represent indigent clients in cases including: felony and misdemeanor criminal charges; delinquent youth proceedings; involuntary mental health or developmental disability commitments; abuse and neglect proceedings; dependent/neglect matters; and guardianship or conservatorship proceedings, as described in the Montana Public Defender Act. http://leg.mt.gov/bills/MCA_toc/ 47.htm Assistant Public Defenders are expected to exercise their own professional judgment and provide competent indigent defense casework pursuant to the Public Defender Commission standards [ http://publicdefender.mt.gov/form s/pdf/Standards.pdf ]. Case assignments are determined by the Regional Deputy Public Defender. Assistant Public Defenders duties include but are not limited to case investigation and strategy, discovery review, motion work, plea negotiations, trial preparation and completion, and sentencing. $51,362.00 $69,555.00 Yearly. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10054958 Class A or B license delivery driver Heavy lifting involved!! Class A or B license required! A constructions materials company is seeking someone to fill a permanent full time temp to hire position. Looking at a starting wage of $13-$15/hr D.O.E. This position will be filled quickly! $13.00 $15.00 Hourly. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10055037 Communications Director Adventure Cycling Association seeks a creative, well organized, and detail-oriented person to fill the role of Communications Director.


EMPLOYMENT This is an extraordinary opportunity for a self-starter with initiative to boost the profile of Adventure Cycling and bike travel nationally and even globally. The ideal candidate will be a team player with outstanding project management skills who works well in a fast-paced environment, meets deadlines and works well under pressure. The candidate will also be creative in brand development and application, as well as public relations. We are looking for individuals who have experience in public relations, marketing, video production, and experience with strategy and management of websites, social-media channels, and ecommunications, as well as an enthusiasm for cycling and bicycle travel. The position is based at Adventure Cycling’s headquarters in beautiful and bike-friendly Missoula, Montana. Please submit a resume and cover letter directly to ssnyder@adventurecycling.org. We will begin reviewing resumes and requesting interviews on June 12, 2014. Delivery Driver Hiring now for a full time permanent Delivery Driver. $13 per hour. Looking for a qualified individual to do delivery driving, CDL is required. This is a full time position. Most of the driving would be in town and the individual would be back home every night. The farthest the person would be asked to drive to is Great Falls Montana and Salmon Idaho. This individual must also be very physically capable as they will be required to lift 80 pounds consistently while loading and unloading shingles. A qualified candidate must also be very dependable, motivated, and have a clean driving record. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10055064 Legal Secretary - Job #2563 Legal Secretary-Full-time or Parttime -Missoula Dorsey & Whitney LLP accepts online applications. Please go to the ‘Careers’ section of the Dorsey website at www.Dorsey.com and complete Dorsey’s online application form. We do not accept application materials by mail or email except as a reasonable accommodation for qualified disabled applicants. Individuals who are unable to use our online process due to a disability should call 612-492-5302. There is a position available for a Legal Secretary in Dorsey’s Missoula office. Both full-time and part-time candidates will be considered. Duties: Create and revise documents from handwritten, typed or electronic copy; compose letters as directed; answer telephones and interact professionally with firm clients; file paper/electronic documents and information promptly and accurately; time entry, travel arrangements and expense report preparation; assist with special projects, a variety of general office duties and cooperate as a team member with co-workers; may be requested to perform other duties not mentioned above. Requirements: High school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent; typing of 50 wpm with a high degree of accuracy; proficiency in Word; strong proofreading and organizational skills; at least 3+ years litigation legal secretary experience preferred; excellent oral and written communications skills; flexibility regarding hours desired (overtime may be requested). Dorsey & Whitney LLP is one of the 100 largest law firms in the United States with 18 of-

fices across the U.S., Canada, Europe and Asia-Pacific. We are a premiere legal advisor to technology, life sciences, financial services, energy, mining, retail and manufacturing companies worldwide. Dorsey offers a competitive salary and benefits package including health care plans, a generous paid time off policy, paid holidays, retirement savings plan, profit sharing contribution, and more. DORSEY & WHITNEY IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER Parent Educator Women’s Opportunity and Resource Development, Inc. (WORD) is seeking two full time Parent Educators to work with families with young children enrolled in Parents as Teachers (PAT), an evidence-based home visiting program. $27,500.00 $27,500.00 Yearly. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10055045 Shift Supervisor This position contributes to Starbucks success by assisting the store manager in executing store operations during scheduled shifts.This job deploys partners and delegates tasks so that partners can create and maintain the Starbucks Experience for our customers. Models and acts in accordance with Starbucks guiding principles. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10054504 SYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR Technology consulting firm seeks Windows System Administrator in Northeast MT to service our public school customers. Candidate will have outstanding communication, planning, teaming, and technical skills. Excellent pay for quality candidate with recent education or experience. Send resume to anita.freeman@freemangaffney.com

SKILLED LABOR CHOKERS SALMON RIVER WOOD PRODUCTS. Seeking experienced choker-setters. Must be able to work in all weather conditions. Must be able to pass drug test. Competitive pay is based on skills/experience. Health benefits available. Will train those with aptitude/background. Work is in Missoula, MT area. COMPETITIVE PAY IS BASED ON SKILLS AND EXPERI-

ENCE. Essential Functions: Must be able to lift, stand, bend, twist, haul. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10054842 CLEANING TECHNICIAN / WORKER Missoula Maintenance, Inc., a building maintenance company, is seeking a Cleaning Technician/Worker. Must have a valid driver’s license, vehicle to use during work hours and insurance for this vehicle. Need previous cleaning experience. Must be dependable and reliable, able to take direction and work independently to complete tasks in a timely and thorough manner. Must be able to provide good customer service to clients, work well with co-workers and management, and represent the company in a positive manner. Need to be groomed for public contact. Will complete interior apartment and house cleaning and light grounds clean-up. Will travel to various residences throughout the day. Position will be full time for the summer. Missoula Maintenance operates Monday through Friday, day shift. Will work up to 40 hours per week, depending on work load and skill set. This is a temporary position to start. Pay is $10 to $12/hour, depending on experience. $10.00 - $12.00 Hourly. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10055027 INSULATION LABORER Local Missoula construction company looking for a great candidate to fill a general labor position in the insulation department FULL TIME PERM. POSITION AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY! $10/hr, starts as soon as we find the right candidate! Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10054979 Maintenance Carpenter Plans, assigns and performs MDT facilities maintenance and construction work. Inspects facilities to assess repair needs; determines repair estimates based upon state and local codes and within budget guidelines. Notifies Maintenance Superintendent of projects and safety issues. Responsible for inventory of assets and supplies. Purchases materials, monitors material usage and material purchase invoices for accuracy. Completes and maintains documentation for water wells and water samples within DEQ regulations. Makes recommendations regarding construction, maintenance and re-

pairs of all facilities within the maintenance division. Performs contract administration in conjunction with major repairs, remodels, new construction and upgrades of MDT facilities. $20.61 Hourly. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10054784 Route Driver A Missoula based septic company is seeking to immediately hire a route driver. This positions duties include the delivery and maintenance of porta-potties as well as some plumbing. To apply for this position you must have good customer service skills, the ability to lift 50 to 75 pounds, pass a drug screening and have a clean drivers record. Raises and benefits are an option after the probationary period. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10054865

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION Annual Wildland Fire Refresher Training 406-543-0013 www.blackbull-wildfire.com MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION CLASS Train online to work from home as a medical transcriptionist with Career Step. Career Step offers high level training and real world experience that fully prepares you to enter the field of medical transcription. Perfect for stay at home moms, military spouses, or anyone simply wanting to work at home and make their own hours. Visit http://referral.careerstep. com/ref10228 or call 1-800-

411-7078 and use code ref10228 for free shipping on materials. TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-5454546

HEALTH CAREERS Abortion Peer Counselor Blue Mountain Clinic is seeking applicants for part-time abortion peer counselors. Experience in women’s health care issues preferred, but not necessary. Send resume via e-mail to annie@bluemountainclinic.org, or via snail mail to Blue Mountain Clinic, 610 N California ST, Missoula, MT 59802

ing merchandising and window displays. You will open and close the store independently, count the till and be held responsible for daily deposits and end of day tallies. This position requires data entry for new product inventory and precise maintenance of our point-of-sale inventory software. You will be trained in all areas of custom stationery and wedding invitation sales. You will learn about all things paper and printing, as well as work one-on-one with brides, wedding planners, businesses and stationery clients to design invitations and stationery for their personal use and events. You will be responsible for custom client and vendor communication, as well as submitting and tracking custom orders. We are looking for a professional, detail oriented, upbeat, creative selfstarter with great follow through and initiative. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10054915

SENIOR SYSTEMS INFORMATION MANAGER Starting 2014-2015 School Year Visit www.mcpsmt.org for application instructions, job requirements, and job description.

EEOC

SALES Lead Sales Associate A local company is seeking a Lead Sales Associate to work 30-40 hours, weekends and holidays required. In this position you will be responsible for the retail sales floor during business hours. You will greet and assist customers, make sales based on your knowledge of our products and vendors, handle check out, returns and gift wrapping. You will be responsible for daily upkeep of the sales floor including, but not limited to, cleaning, restocking, receiving inventory, as well as creating unique and inspir-

IT’S A CALLING. GoANG.com/MT 800-TO-GO-ANG

PRODUCTION ASSISTANT The Missoula Independent, Montana’s premier weekly newspaper, is seeking an experienced part-time Production Assistant to help with the construction of the paper, including advertising and editorial content, as well as collateral material. Qualified applicants should have extensive experience working with Quark Xpress and Adobe Photoshop, a keen eye for design, a willingness to adhere to strict deadlines, and a proven ability to work well with others in a high-pressure setting. This job is high-tech, fast-paced, and good fun. Send a digital résumé & portfolio to: Jweston@missoulanews.com

SHIFT SUPERVISOR

Program Assistant and Bear Hugs Coordinator, UM Dining UM Dining is seeking a Program Assistant to manage all activities related to group meals, Summer Contract meals, Bear Hugs and residence hall snack programs and provide administrative support for Residential Dining. Full-time, $10.500/hr-$11.760/hr with a full benefit package. For full consideration, please submit application by June 19, 2014. Position open until filled. For a full job description and to apply, please visit http://umjobs.silkroad.com/ AA/EOE/ADA/Veteran’s Preference employer

FT Position Supporting persons with disabilities residentially.  Supervisory exp preferred. Wednesday & Thursday: 2p-Midnight, Friday: 2p-9p, Saturday: 7a-8p. $9.60- $10.00/hr. Closes:  6/17/14, 5p.

DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONAL Supporting Persons with Disabilities in Enhancing their Quality of Life.  Evenings, Overnights & Weekend hours available.  $9.00-$10.40/hr. Valid MT Driver’s License, No Record of Abuse, Neglect or Exploitation. Applications available at OPPORTUNITY RESOURCES, INC., 2821 S. Russell, Missoula, MT 59801 or online: orimt.org. Extensive background checks will be completed. NO RESUMES. EOE.

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • June 12 – June 19, 2014 [C3]


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT

By Rob Brezsny

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Your brain absorbs about 11 million pieces of information every second, but is consciously aware of less than .001 percent of all that richness. Or at least that's usually the case. Having analyzed your astrological omens, I suspect that you might soon jack that figure up as high as .01 percent—a ten-fold increase! Do you think you can handle that much raw input? Are you amenable to being so acutely perceptive? How will you respond if the world is a ten times more vivid than usual? I'm pretty confident. I suspect you won't become a bug-eyed maniac freaking out on the intensity, but rather will be a soulful, wonder-filled explorer in love with the intensity.

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CANCER (June 21-July 22): You have a strong, intricate understanding of where you have come from. The old days and old ways continue to feed you with their mysterious poignancy. You don't love every one of your past experiences, but you love ruminating about them and feeling the way they changed you. Until the day you die many years from now, your history will keep evolving, providing an endless stream of new teachings. And yet at this particular moment in your destiny, Cancerian, I think your most important task is to focus on where you are going to. That's why I urge you to temporarily forget everything you think you know about your past and instead concentrate on getting excited about the future.

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In 1928, Bobby Pearce won a gold medal in rowing at the Summer Olympics in Amsterdam. An unforeseen event almost sabotaged his victory. As he rowed his boat along the Sloten Canal, a family of ducks swam leisurely from shore to shore directly across his path. He stopped to let them pass, allowing an opponent who was already ahead of him to gain an even bigger advantage. Yet he ultimately won the race, rowing with such vigor after the duck incident that he finished well ahead of his challenger. I foresee a comparable sequence in your life, Leo. Being thoughtful and expressing compassion may seem to slow you down, but in the end that won't hinder you from achieving your goal—and may even help.

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In one of her "Twenty-One Love Poems," Adrienne Rich talks about her old self in the third person. "The woman who cherished / her suffering is dead. I am her descendant. / I love the scar tissue she handed on to me, / but I want to go from here with you / fighting the temptation to make a career of pain." With your approval, Virgo, I'd like to make that passage one of your keynotes in the coming months. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you will have an excellent opportunity to declare your independence from an affliction you've been addicted to. Are you willing to say goodbye to one of your signature forms of suffering?

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): "You should be interviewing roses not people," says a character in Anne Carson's book The Autobiography Of Red. That's sound poetic advice for you in the coming days, Libra. More than you can imagine, you will benefit from being receptive to and learning from non-human sources: roses, cats, dogs, spiders, horses, songbirds, butterflies, trees, rivers, the wind, the moon, and any other intelligences that make themselves available to you. I'm not saying you should ignore the revelations offered by people. But your emphasis should be on gathering in wisdom from life forces that don't communicate with words.

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): William Shockley was a Nobel Prize-winning physicist who co-invented the transistor. He also helped launch the revolution in information technology, and has been called "the man who brought silicon to Silicon Valley." Time magazine named him one of the hundred most influential people of the 20th century. On the other hand, Shockley became a controversial advocate of eugenics, which damaged his reputation, led many to consider him a racist, and played a role in his estrangement from his friends and family. I suspect that you will have to deal with at least one Shockley-type phenomenon in the coming weeks, Scorpio. Will you overlook the bad stuff in order to take advantage of the good? Should you? SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Novelist Herman Melville wrote that in order to create art, "unlike things must meet and mate." Like what? "Sad patience" and "joyous energies," for example; both of them are necessary, he said. "Instinct and study" are crucial ingredients, as well as humility and pride, audacity and reverence, and "a flame to melt" and a "wind to freeze." Based on my interpretation of the astrological omens, Sagittarius, I believe you will soon need to meld opposites like these as you shape that supreme work of art—your life.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Haggis is a Scottish pudding. According to the gourmet food encyclopedia Larousse Gastronomique, it has "an excellent nutty texture and delicious savory flavor." And yet, to be honest, its ingredients don't sound promising. To make it, you gather the lungs, liver, small intestine, and heart of a sheep, put all of that stuff inside the stomach of the sheep along with oatmeal, onions, salt, and suet, and then simmer the whole mess for three hours. I'm guessing that your work in the coming week may have a certain metaphorical resemblance to making haggis, Capricorn. The process could a bit icky, but the result should be pretty tasty.

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In 1947, the impossibly wealthy Duke of Windsor went shopping in Paris to buy a gift for his wife, the Duchess. She already had everything she wanted, so he decided to get creative. He commissioned the luxury-goods manufacturer Hermes to build her a high-fashion black leather wheelbarrow. I am not urging you to acquire something like that for yourself, Taurus. But I do like it as a symbol for what you need in your life right now: a blend of elegance and usefulness, of playful beauty and practical value, of artistry and hard work.

BLACK BEAR NATUROPATHIC

ARIES (March 21-April 19): In its quest for nectar, a hummingbird sips from a thousand flowers every day. As it flaps its wings 70 times a second, zipping from meal to meal, it can fly sideways, backward, or forward. If it so desires, it can also hover or glide upside-down. It remembers every flower it visits, and knows how long it will take before each flower will produce a new batch of nectar. To some Spanish speakers, hummingbirds are known as joyas voladoras, or "flying jewels." Now take everything I've just said, Aries, and use it as a metaphor for who you can be in the coming week.

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[C4] Missoula Independent • June 12 – June 19, 2014

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Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Almost a hundred years ago, world-famous comedian Charlie Chaplin decided to take part in a Charlie Chaplin lookalike contest in San Francisco. He did his best to imitate himself, but it wasn't good enough. He didn't come close to winning. But I think you would have a different fate if you entered a comparable competition in the coming weeks. There's no question in my mind that you would be crowned as the person who most resembles you. Maybe more than ever before, you are completely yourself. You look like your true self, you feel like your true self, and you are acting like your true self. Congratulations! It's hard work to be so authentic. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): "The art of medicine consists in amusing the patient while nature cures the disease," said French philosopher Francois-Marie Voltaire. That principle will be useful for you to invoke in the coming weeks. You definitely need to be cured, although the "disease" you are suffering from is primarily psychospiritual rather than strictly physical. Your task will be to flood yourself with fun adventures, engaging stories, and playtime diversions so that nature can heal you without the interference of your worries and kibitzing.

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SUSTAINAFIEDS

MARKETPLACE ANTIQUES Huff’s Antique Show at Billings MetraPark, - Fri June 13, 5-8. Sat June 14, 9-5. Sun June 15, 10-3. Admission $5.00, good all weekend. (406) 238-9796

AUCTIONS SLEEPY HOLLOW SUBDIVISION LAND AUCTION Tuesday June 24th, 6 PM Lewistown, MT. Selling 6 residential lots (.40 acres – 1.5 acres) with power, city water & sewer. ShobeAuction.com 1406-538-5125

CLOTHING Kid Crossing offers exceptional value on nearly new children’s clothing and equipment. Providing ecofriendly clothing exchange since 2001. Reduce • Reuse • Recycle • Buy Local! 1940 Harve • 406-829-8808 • www.kidcrossingstores.com

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PETS & ANIMALS AniMeals Seniors for Seniors program waives the adoption fee for anyone 65 and older adopting a cat 9 years old and older. All cats are spayed or neutered, vaccinated, and microchipped free of cost before they’re adopted. For more information call AniMeals at 721-4710. Basset Rescue of Montana. Senior bassets needing homes. 406-207-0765. Please like us on Facebook... facebook.com/bassethoundrescue Fosters needed! AniMeals is in desperate need of foster families for kittens. Fostering is a 1-2 month commitment, AniMeals supplies the food, litter, and other supplies, and you supply the love. Call 721-4710 or visit http://animeals.com/FOSTER.ht ml for more information.

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PUBLIC NOTICES LAW OFFICE OF JOAN E. COOK 2423 Mullan Road Missoula, MT 59808 (406) 543-3800 office@cooklaw.com Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-14-102 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: KEITH A. MCDANIEL, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Sean P. Salsbury has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the Decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the above-named as the attorney of record for the Personal Representative, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 21st day of May, 2014. /s/ JOAN E. COOK MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-14-106 Dept. No. 2 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF EDITH BROWN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Mary Emily Brown, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 4110 Weeping Willow Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803, or filed with the Clerk of the above-named Court. I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 22nd day of May, 2014, in Missoula, Montana. /s/ Mary Emily Brown, Personal Representative GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC /s/ Nancy P. Gibson, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-14-110 Dept. No. 1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF GRACE V. LUCAS, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Jane Lucas Rabe, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 4110 Weeping Willow Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803, or filed with the Clerk of the above-named Court. I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 28th day of May, 2014, in Missoula, Montana. /s/ Jane Lucas Rabe, Personal Representative GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC /s/ Nancy P. Gibson, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DV14-535 NOTICE OF PENDING NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF: SONJA MARIE LLOYD, Petitioner. TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED HEREIN: PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a Petition for Name Change of SONJA MARIE LLOYD to obtain an order of this Court granting leave to assume the name of SONJA MARIE CROWN, will be presented to the above-entitled Court, at the Missoula County Courthouse at Missoula, Montana, on July 16, 2014 at 1:30 p.m., or as soon thereafter as counsel can be heard, and that at such time, application will be made for the relief sought in the said Petition. DATED this 19th day of May, 2014. WELLS & MCKITTRICK, P.C. By: /s/ EVONNE SMITH WELLS, Attorneys for Petitioner MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-14-100 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HOMER V. BROWN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Per-

sonal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be certified mailed to Stephen J. Holden, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane P.C., PO Box 4747, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 15th day of May, 2014. /s/ Stephen J. Holden, Personal Representative WORDEN THANE, P.C. Attorneys for Personal Representative By: /s/ Patrick Dougherty MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-14-103 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HANNAH GWEN CAPEN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Nathan Capen, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Boone Karlberg P.C., P. O. Box 9199, Missoula, Montana 59807-9199, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. I declare, under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the state of Montana, that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 10th day of May, 2014, at Missoula, Montana. /s/ Nathan Capen BOONE KARLBERG P.C. By: /s/ Christopher L. Decker P. O. Box 9199 Missoula, Montana 59807 Attorneys for Nathan Capen, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-14-26 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF WILLIAM D. THORNBY, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to HERBERT WILLIAM THORNBY, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Church, Harris, Johnson & Williams, P.C., P.O. Box 1645, Great Falls, Montana 59403, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 14th day of February, 2014. /s/ Herbert William Thornby, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY PROBATE NO. DP-14-89 DEPT. NO. 4 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DELMER ALLEN SHATTO, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Kathryn Haddick has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of the notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims may be mailed to Personal Representative Kathryn Haddick, 41710 Baypoint Road, Polson, Montana 59860 or to Howard Toole, the attorney for Personal Representative Kathryn Haddick at the address of 211 N. Higgins, Suite 350, Missoula, Montana 59802-4537, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 4th day of June, 2014. HOWARD TOOLE LAW OFFICES, 211 N. Higgins, #350, Missoula, MT 59802-4537 /s/ Howard Toole, Attorney for Personal Representative NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/21/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200716281 Bk-800 Pg486, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Michael A. Maney and Victoria A. Maney, as joint tenants was Grantor, Wells Fargo Financial Montana, Inc. was Beneficiary and First American Title Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in

MNAXLP Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 14 in Block 8 of Wapikiya No. 1, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 17, 2014, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $288,040.31. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $261,290.76, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 22, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.106589) 1002.253917-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 05/12/09, recorded as Instrument No. 200911526 Bk: 839 Pg: 764, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Ross Miller was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Golf Savings Bank, a Washington Stock Savings Bank was Beneficiary and Insured Titles was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot B56 of Canyon East Phase 5, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201311244 Bk: 914 Pg: 410, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 14, 2014, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $174,784.62. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $160,797.33, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes

[C6] Missoula Independent • June 12 – June 19, 2014

(if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 22, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.107055) 1002.255316-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 09/09/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200822197 Book 826 and Page 1381, mo rtgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Marko D. Wagenmann, unmarried was Grantor, Charter One, a division of RBS Citizens, N.A. was Beneficiary and First American Title Insurance Company of Montana was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Insurance Company of Montana as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 4 of Overlook Addition, a platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/13/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 23, 2014, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $56,253.84. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $44,237.45, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on September 3, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due

on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 8991.20014) 1002.268132-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 11, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Unit No. 22 of THE CEDARS, a residential condominium situated on Tract D of HILLVIEW HEIGHTS NO. 1, in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof, and according to the Declaration of Condominium on file and of record in the Office of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder in Book 121 at Page 107 Micro Records, filed and recorded pursuant to the provisions of the Montana Unit Ownership Act, Section 67-2301, et seq., R.C.M. 1947 as amended. TOGETHER WITH an undivided fractional interest in the general common elements equal to the fractional ration such unit owner’s unit bears to the total area of units and a 100 per cent right to use the limited common elements appertaining exclusively to his or her unit AND SUBJECT TO the Bylaws of THE CEDARS recorded June 26, 1978 in Book 121 at Page 111 Micro Records, restated June 6, 1983 in Book 189 at Page 989 Micro Records, restated October 6, 1983 in Book 195 at Page 1569 Micro Records, and restated May 21, 1999 in Book 583 at Page 289 Micro Records of Missoula County, Montana Peter J Kelly, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated February 29, 2008 and recorded March 5, 2008 in Book 814, Page 257 under Document No. 200804692. The beneficial interest is currently held by Green Tree Servicing LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $745.73, beginning July 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 18, 2014 is $119,777.89 principal, interest at the rate of 4.625% now totaling $4,412.91, late charges in the amount of $111.32, escrow advances of $3,188.36, and other fees and expenses advanced of $835.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $15.18 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is,

where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 11, 2014 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham) On this 11th day of March, 2014, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shannon Gavin Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 01/19/2018 Greentree V. Kelly 42072.126 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 28, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 7 IN BLOCK 3 OF CATRINA ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Brent Bartz, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated March 1, 2005 and recorded March 3, 2005 in Book 748, Page 1283 as Document No. 200505037. The beneficial interest is currently held by M&T BANK. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $482.38, beginning October 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of April 18, 2014 is $19,752.30 principal, interest at the rate of 5.00% now totaling $622.10, late charges in the amount of $144.72, escrow advances of $3,327.49 and other fees and expenses advanced of $69.74, plus accruing interest at the rate of $2.71 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in

cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 19, 2014 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho )ss. County of Bingham) On this 19th day of March, 2014, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2020 Bayview Vs. Bartz 41902.319 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 7, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 14 AND 15 IN TRACT 14 OF SCHOOL FIVE ACRES TRACTS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Jesse Crowe and Michael E. Crowe, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Chicago Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated April 6, 2004 and Recorded July 9, 2004 in Book 735 on page 1476 under Document No. 200419169. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. successor by merger to Citifinancial Mortgage Company Inc. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $788.88, beginning June 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 19, 2014 is $136,431.91 principal, interest at the rate of 3.0% now totaling $2,930.48, late charges in the amount of $525.12, escrow advances of $2,253.15, and other fees and expenses advanced of $196.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $11.21 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the


PUBLIC NOTICES Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 28, 2014 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham) On this 28th day of February, 2014, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same./s/ Shannon Gavin Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 01/19/2018 Citimortgage V Crowe 42090.072 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee’s Sale No: 08-FSL-127393 Loan No.: 1005215105 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, ALLIANCE TITLE and ESCROW CORP, the duly appointed Successor Trustee, will on September 19, 2014, at the hour of 11:00 AM, of said day, ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 200 WEST BROADWAY, MISSOULA, MT, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, for cash, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, the following described real and personal property (hereafter referred to collectively as the “Property”), situated in the County of MISSOULA, State of Montana, to-wit: SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF MISSOULA AND STATE OF MONTANA: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 12 NORTH, RANGE 19 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF PARCEL 1 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 4880. The Trustee has no knowledge of a more particular description of the above-referenced Property but, the Trustee has been informed that the address of 901 BEN HOGAN DRIVE, MISSOULA, MT 59803, is sometimes associated with said real property. GEORGE L. STEVENS AND GERTRUDE LOUISE STEVENS, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to HOME CONNECTS LENDING SERVICES, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION, A PENNSYLVANIA CORPORATION ITS SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS, as Beneficiary, dated 10/11/2006, recorded 1/16/2007in Volume 790, page 719, of Deeds of Trust, under Instrument No. 200701181,

Mortgage records of MISSOULA County, MONTANA. The beneficial interest is currently held by First Community Bank. The default for which this sale is made is the failure to pay when due under the Deed of Trust Note dated 10/11/2006, THE MONTHLY PAYMENT WHICH BECAME DUE ON 1/20/2013 AND ALL SUBSEQUENT MONTHLY PAYMENTS, PLUS LATE CHARGES AND OTHER COSTS AND FEES AS SET FORTH. Amount due as of May 13, 2014 Delinquent Payments from January 20, 2013 1 payments at $ 1,210.02 each $ 1,210.02 1 payments at $ 1,209.93 each $ 1,209.93 1 payments at $ 1,092.84 each $ 1,092.84 1 payments at $ 1,209.93 each $ 1,209.93 1 payments at $ 1,248.55 each $ 1,248.55 1 payments at $ 1,276.23 each $ 1,276.23 1 payments at $ 1,297.25 each $ 1,297.25 2 payments at $ 1,221.28 each $ 2,442.56 1 payments at $ 1,182.25 each $ 1,182.25 1 payments at $ 2,578.22 each $ 2,578.22 1 payments at $ 1,182.25 each $ 1,182.25 2 payments at $ 1,221.28 each $ 2,442.56 1 payments at $ 1,092.84 each $ 1,092.84 1 payments at $ 1,221.28 each $ 1,221.28 (01-20-13 through 05-13-14) Late Charges: $ 0.00 BENEFICIARY ADVANCES TOTAL UNCOLLECTED $ 0.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 20,686.71 All delinquencies are now due, together with unpaid and accruing taxes, assessments, trustee’s fees, attorney’s fees, costs and advances made to protect the security associated with this foreclosure. The principal balance is $299,914.19, together with interest thereon at 4.750% per annum from 12/20/2012 to 2/20/2013, 4.750% per annum from 2/20/2013 to 3/20/2013, 4.750% per annum from 3/20/2013 to 4/20/2013, 4.750% per annum from 4/20/2013 to 5/20/2013, 4.750% per annum from 5/20/2013 to 6/20/2013, 4.750% per annum from 6/20/2013 to 7/20/2013, 4.750% per annum from 7/20/2013 to 8/20/2013, 4.750% per annum from 8/20/2013 to 10/20/2013, 4.750% per annum from 10/20/2013 to 11/20/2013, 4.750% per annum from 11/20/2013 to 12/20/2013, 4.750% per annum from 12/20/2013 to 1/20/2014, 4.750% per annum from 1/20/2014 to 3/20/2014, 4.750% per annum from 3/20/2014 to 4/20/2014, 4.750% per annum from 4/20/2014 to 5/20/2014, 4.750% per annum from 5/20/2014, until paid. The Beneficiary elects to sell or cause the trust property to be sold to satisfy said obligation. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 5/14/14 ALLIANCE TITLE and ESCROW CORP Trustee By Joel Meng, Asst Secretary c/o REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500 Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 3402550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com A-4460915 05/29/2014, 06/05/2014, 06/12/2014 Trustee Sale Number: 12-02366-5 Loan Number: 7144167207 APN: 3261900 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD for cash at Trustee’s Sale on September 24, 2014 at the hour of 11 :00 AM, recognized local time, ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 200 WEST  BROADWAY, MISSOULA, MT the following described real property in Missoula County, Montana, to-wit: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NE1/4 OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 13 NORTH, RANGE  17 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS TRACT 2 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 4385. More commonly known as:19570 HIGHWAY 200 EAST,BONNER,MT  RICHARD GENSCH AND LYNN GENSCH, as the original grantor(s), conveyed said real property  to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW, as the original trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC., AS NOMINEE FOR CAPITAL FAMILY MORTGAGE COMPANY OF MONTANA, as the original beneficiary, by a Trust Indenture  dated as of April 18,2003, and recorded on April 18, 2003 under Document No. 200313429

MNAXLP BK704  PG-132, in the Official Records of the Office of the Record of Missoula County, Montana (“Deed of Trust”).  The current beneficiary is: Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC (the “Beneficiary”).  FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY was named as Successor Trustee (the “Trustee”) by virtue of a Substitution of Trustee dated February 7, 2014 and recorded in the records of Missoula County, Montana. There has been a default in the performance of said Deed of Trust: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears as of May 14, 2014:  Balance due on monthly payments from August 1, 2012 and which payments total: $22,055.92: Advances: $1,861.10 There is presently due on the obligation the principal sum of $135,251.41 plus accrued interest thereon at the rate of 5.75000% per annum from July 1, 2012, plus late charges. Interest and late charges continue to accrue. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds include the  trustee’s or attorney’s fees and costs and expenses of sale. The beneficiary has elected to sell the property to satisfy the obligation and has directed the trustee  to commence such sale proceedings. The beneficiary declares that the grantor is in default as described above and has directed the Trustee to commence proceedings to sell the property  described above at public sale in accordance with the terms and provisions of this notice. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may  bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s  Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the aforesaid property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s fees)  other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default theretofore existing. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.priorityposting.com  AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714573-1965 DATED: May 14, 2014 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee, 11000 Olson Drive, Suite 101 Rancho Cordova , CA 95670 By: Megan Curtis, Authorized Signature  P1095743 5/29, 6/5, 06/12/2014 Trustee Sale Number: 13-00103-17 Loan Number: 7140061719 APN: 3356906 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD for cash at Trustee’s Sale on September 24, 2014 at the hour of 11:00 AM, recognized local time, ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 200 WEST BROADWAY, MISSOULA, MT following described real property in Missoula County, Montana, to-wit: Lot 13B of Sorrel Springs, Lots 13A and 13B, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. More commonly known as: 18175 MUSTANG LANE,FRENCHTOWN,MT DAVID PARCELL, AN UNMARRIED INDIVIDUAL, as the grantor grantor(s), conveyed said real property to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as the original trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ACCEPTANCE, INC. , as the original beneficiary, by a Trust Indenture dated as of March 14, 2005, and recorded on March 16, 2005 in Film No. 749 at Page 248 under Document No. 200505894, in the Official Records of the Office of the Record of Missoula County, Montana (“Deed of Trust”). The current beneficiary is: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Indenture Trustee for American Home Mortgage Investment Trust 2005-1 (the “Beneficiary”). FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY was named as Successor Trustee (the “Trustee”) by virtue of a Substitution of Trustee dated April 17, 2014 and recorded in the records of Missoula County, Montana. There has been a default in the performance of said Deed of Trust: Failure to pay when due the following

amounts which are now in arrears as of May 15, 2014: Balance due on monthly payments from July 1, 2012 and which payments total: $45,040.95: Late charges: $649.71 Advances: $2,275.91 There is presently due on the obligation the principal sum of $268,816.94 plus accrued interest thereon at the rate of 3.62500% per annum from June 1, 2012, plus late charges. Interest and late charges continue to accrue. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds include the trustee’s or attorney’s fees and costs and expenses of sale. The beneficiary has elected to sell the property to satisfy the obligation and has directed the trustee to commence such sale proceedings. The beneficiary declares that the grantor is in default as described above and has directed the Trustee to commence proceedings to sell the property described above at public sale in accordance with the terms and provisions of this notice. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the aforesaid property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default theretofore existing. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.priorityposting.com AUTOMATED SALESINFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-573-1965 DATED:May 15, 2014 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee, 11000 Olson Drive Ste 101 Rancho Cordova, CA 95670 By: Megan Curtis, Authorized Signature P1095745 5/29, 6/5, 06/12/2014 Trustee Sale Number: 13-01012-5 Loan Number: 707056305 APN: 2486059 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD for cash at Trustee’s Sale on September 30, 2014 at the hour of 11:00 AM, recognized local time, ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 200 WEST BROADWAY, MISSOULA, MT the following described real property in Missoula County, Montana, to-wit: THE SOUTH 60 FEET OF LOTS 9 AND 10 IN BLOCK 46 OF SCHOOL ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. More commonly known as:1018 HAWTHORNE STREET,MISSOULA,MT JOLENE D. NOVAK AKA JOLENE D. STEWART NOVAK, as the original grantor(s), conveyed said real property to TITLE SERVICES, as the original trustee, to secure an obligation owed to NEW CENTURY MORTGAGE CORPORATION, as the original beneficiary, by a Trust Indenture dated as of February 20, 2003, and recorded on February 25, 2003 in Film No. 700 at Page 4 under Document No. 200306409, in the Official Records of the Office of the Record of Missoula County, Montana (“Deed of Trust”). The current beneficiary is: DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, as Trustee for MORGAN STANLEY ABS CAPITAL I INC. TRUST 2003NC5, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2003-NC5 (the “Beneficiary”). FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY was named as Successor Trustee (the “Trustee”) by virtue of a Substitution of Trustee dated February 27, 2014 and recorded in the records of Missoula County, Montana. There has been a default in the performance of said Deed of Trust: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears as of May 22, 2014: Balance due on monthly payments from August 1, 2013 and which payments total: $7,329.62: Late charges: $681.25 Advances: $1,548.56 There is presently due on the obligation the principal sum of $69,825.10 plus accrued interest thereon at the rate of 7.55000% per annum from July 1, 2013, plus late charges. Interest and late charges continue to accrue. Other

expenses to be charged against the proceeds include the trustee’s or attorney’s fees and costs and expenses of sale. The beneficiary has elected to sell the property to satisfy the obligation and has directed the trustee to commence such sale proceedings. The beneficiary declares that the grantor is in default as described above and has directed the Trustee to commence proceedings to sell the property described above at public sale in accordance with the terms and provisions of this notice. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the aforesaid property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default theretofore existing. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.priorityposting.com AUTOMATED SALESINFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-573-1965 DATED:May 22, 2014 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee, 11000 Olson Drive, Suite 101 Rancho Cordova , CA 95670 By: Megan Curtis, Authorized Signature P1096987 6/5, 6/12, 06/19/2014

EAGLE SELF STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 145, 155, 218, 301, 430, 568, 629 and 687. Units contain furniture, clothes, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc. household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday, June 23, 2014. All auction units will only be shown each day at 3 P.M. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage office at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59804 prior to Thursday, June 26, 2014 at 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

CLARK FORK STORAGE

will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 34, 136, 248, 274. Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting 5/19/2014 by appt only by calling 541-7919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to 6/19/2014 at 4:00 P.M. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s "Late to the Movies"–dang, missed the first two parts. by Matt Jones

ACROSS

1 Cartoon character with blond hair 6 Glove material 11 2002 Olympics host, briefly 14 Bush Supreme Court appointee 15 Central Florida city 16 When doubled, a guitar effect 17 Movie about a road trip spent filling up the car? 19 End of a tongue? 20 Former Turkish title 21 Constricted 23 $, for short 24 "Father of Modern Philosophy" Descartes 28 For-profit university founded in 1931 29 Movie that clears up why Brits pronounce a letter differently? 33 Wired component? 34 Prefix before hedron or gon 35 Conductor ___-Pekka Salonen 36 Movie about booting the laptop again? 39 Flatow who hosts NPR's "Science Friday" 41 Coffee coast of Hawaii 42 "Stop, matey!" 46 Movie focusing on flies in the ointment? 49 "Good Times" actress Esther 50 A long, long time 51 With it 52 Patronize, as a hotel 54 "Dreamgirls" character ___ White (hidden in SHEFFIELD) 57 Michael Jackson hit off "Thriller" 58 Movie that follows an unwelcome school outbreak? 63 David Allan ___ 64 Take the penalty 65 Pearl gatherer Last week’s solution

66 Alpine country, for short 67 Abalone-shell liner 68 Swordfight souvenirs

DOWN

1 "Macbeth" trio member 2 Goes by 3 Totals the total? 4 Rides for the back country, for short 5 2014 Russell Crowe epic 6 Hawaii's Mauna ___ 7 Get busy 8 Mai ___ (bar order) 9 SpaceX CEO Musk 10 1980 hit for Olivia NewtonJohn 11 Yanks the wheel 12 Former Dodgers manager Tommy 13 Granola bar option 18 "Is this your ___?" 22 Set aside 23 "Miami Vice" weapon 25 Transition zone between two plant communities 26 "Sorry, that's impossible" 27 Get on board 30 With respect to hearing 31 Born with the name of 32 Like some chances 37 Calypso cousin 38 ___ in "Edward" 39 "Copy that" 40 Tells, as a story 43 Ambitious-sounding Oldsmobile model 44 Stanley ___ (rental carpet cleaner brand) 45 Unit of meas. that's often leveled 47 Close up securely 48 Fraction of a fraction of a min. 49 UK humane org. (anagram of CRAPS) 53 Funny Fey 55 Passing crazes 56 Abbr. in a bank window 59 300, in Roman numerals 60 Afr. neighbor 61 "___ you for real?" 62 1999 and 2015

©2014 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

%montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • June 12 – June 19, 2014 [C7]


RENTALS

SERVICES GENERAL CONTRACTORS

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Mannix Construction. Residential • Light Commercial • Remodels. 549-4540

Natural Housebuilders and Terry Davenport Design, Inc. Building net zero energy custom homes using solar thermal and solar PV. 3690940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net

ROCKING M DESIGN Residential Architecture - modest to exotic always exquisitely detailed, functional and sustainable. We offer an exceptional range of design and professional services for custom homes - new construction, upgrades and remodels, site planning, energy efficient design. Turning dreams into reality. • 406-541-8647 • www.rockingmdesign.com

HANDYMAN HANDYWOMAN. Paint, tile & garage clean-out. 370-6710

Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator. Testimonials Available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642 SBS Solar specializes in design and installation services for Solar Systems: residential, commercial, on- and off-grid. Serving all of Western Montana. www.SBSlink.com

PAINTING LIGHTEN UP PAINTING. Celebrating 30 glorious years of painting! Lics’d/ insured free estimates. Carrie 207-9255

PETCARE DOODY CALLS! Residential and Commercial Pet Waste Removal. References available. Twice a week or 1x pickup. doodycallsmontana@gmail.com

REAL ESTATE Downsizing • New mortgage options • Housing options for 55+ or 62+ • Life estates • Antique & collectible

ARCHIE’S

BACKYARD BIKE SHOP UBI Certified Bicycle Technician

728-5882

estimates. Clark Fork Realty. 512 E. Broadway. (406) 7282621. www.clarkforkrealty.com

WINDOWS Abbott’s Glass Vinyl Windows • Wood Windows • Small Commercial Jobs • “The Meticulous Glass Professionals” Since 1992 728-6499

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Residential Architecture New Construction Upgrades • Remodels Full services or consulting for design, site planning, energy efficiency...

101 E. Broadway, Suite 612 406-541-8647 www.rockingmdesign.com

JOE'S TILE & STONE, LLC SALES AND INSTALLATIONS

CERAMIC TILE OR STONE 406-777-4207 OR 241-4368 BIGSKYGUY2004@YAHOO.COM ESTABLISHED 1991

APARTMENTS 1 bedroom, 1 bath, $575, Downtown, coin-op laundry, offstreet parking, W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 1 bedroom, 1 bath, $650, Off Broadway, Newer Complex, Walk-in closet, open concept, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 1000 Rollins: New carpet & paint, Second floor, On-site laundry, Slant Street area, Parking, Heat paid, $675. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106 1024 Stephens Ave. #3. 2 bed/1 bath, central location, coin-ops, cat? $675. Grizzly Property Management 542-

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers 2060 are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on 109 Turner Ct. basis. #2.To 2 bed/1 an equal opportunity report discrimination in housing call HUD atstorage, toll-free bath, W/D hook-ups, at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Houspet? $650. Grizzly Property ing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611 Management 542-2060

1315 E. Broadway #4. 2 bed/1.5 bath, close to U, coinops on site, pet? $800. Grizzly Property Management 5422060

801 Prince: 1 Bedroom, Single car garage, Recently redone, Second floor, Heat paid, Central, $695. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106

1326 South. 2nd Street West “B”. 2 bed/1 bath, central location, W/D hookups, shared yard. $675. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

Is your Property Manager a NARPM Member? http://www. westernmontana.narpm.org/

1547 S. Higgins Ave. #5 1 bed/1 bath, central location, A/C, coin-ops. $675. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 1717 S. 13th St. “A”. 3 bed/1 bath, central location, DW, W/D hookups, cat? $1000 Grizzly Property Management 5422060 212 S. 5th St. E. #2. 1 bed/1 bath, University area. $650. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 2236 Foothills: 2 Bedroom, South Hills, Deck overlooking Missoula, Hook-ups, Off-street parking, $675. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106 2341 S. 3rd St. W.: 2 Bedroom, Microwave, Hook-ups, Dishwasher, *Free DirecTV*, Parking, $725. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106

NEW COMPLEX!! Behind Missoula. Federal Credit Union off Russell. Studio, 1 Bedroom & 2 Bedroom units, hardwood laminate flooring, A/C, DW, new appliances, coin op laundry, storage and off-street parking. W/S/G paid. Studio & 1 Bedroom units have large walk-in closets, 2 bedroom units have W/D hookups. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 Our members are: licensed, educated, professional, bound by a code of ethics, and have a duty to provide the best possible service. http://www.westernmontana.narpm.org/

1&2

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

549-7711 Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com

303 E. Spruce St. # 1. 1 bed/1 bath, downtown, coin-ops on site, cat? $575. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 444 Washington St. 1 bed/1 bath, downtown, heat paid, coin-ops on site, cat? $700. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 733 W. Sussex Ave. #2. 2 bed/1bath, central location, coin-ops, storage, A/C $700. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

FIDELITY MANAGEMENT SERVICES, INC. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

251-4707 Uncle Robert Lane 2 Bed Apt. $695/month fidelityproperty.com

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[C8] Missoula Independent • June 12 – June 19, 2014


RENTALS Owners: looking for a professional to take care of your investment? Relax and leave it to the best in the business: Western Montana Chapter of NARPM http://www.westernmontana.na rpm.org/ Rent from the best Property Managers in Western Montana http://www.westernmontana.na rpm.org/ Studio, 1 bath, near Orange Street Food Farm, coin op laundry, storage, off-street parking, ALL Utilities Paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

REAL ESTATE MOBILE HOMES

and have a duty to provide the best possible service. www.westernmontana.narpm.org

Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent. W/S/G/Electric included. $425/month 406-273-6034

Professional Property Management. Find Yourself at Home in the Missoula Rental Market with PPM. 1511 S Russell • (406) 721-8990 • www.professionalproperty.com

HOUSES Is your Property Manager a NARPM Member? Our members are: licensed, educated, professional, bound by a code of ethics,

WHO CARES? We do, in good times & bad... Auto; SR-22; Renters; Homeowners. JT Zinn Insurance. 406-549-8201. 321 SW Higgins. Find us on Facebook.

ROOMMATES

GardenCity

Property Management

422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

108 Colony Court. 3 bed, 2 bath with deck, fenced backyard & single garage. $165,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 2398350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 10955 Cedar Ridge. Loft bedroom, 1 bath on 20+ acres with guest house & sauna near Blue Mountain Recreation Area. $320,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 1290 Lena Lane. 3 bed, 3 bath with 3 car garage near fishing access in Target Range. $320,000. Chris Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 544-8700 chrishonzel@lambrosera.com 1807 Missoula Avenue. 3 bed, 2 bath cottage-style near Rattlesnake Creek and park. $309,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com 1944 South 8th West. Remodeled 2 bed, 1 bath with deck on 2 lots. $158,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653 pat@properties2000.com 1965 Raymond. 4 bed, 2 bath splitlevel in Upper Rattlesnake. Private lower level for mother-in-law apartment. $325,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816 annierealtor@gmail.com

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. "Let us tend your den"

223 West Kent. 3 bed, 2 bath with wood floors, arched doorways, solarium, deck, basement & single garage. $297,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties 2000.com

Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

Finalist

Finalist

MHA Management manages 13 properties throughout Missoula. All properties are part of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program. The Missoula Housing Authority complies with the Fair Housing Act and offers Reasonable Accommodations to persons with Disabilities.

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

HOMES FOR SALE

1235 34th St. • Missoula (406) 549-4113 missoulahousing.org

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing

2515 Klondike Court. 4 bed, 3 bath ranch style in Grant Creek with 2 car garage. Chris Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 544-8700. chrishonzel@lambrosera.com

floors, sky lights, patio and claw foot tub. 1 bed, 1 bath apartment in lower level. $339,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com

756 Angler’s Bend. 3 bed, 2 bath with 3 car gargage on East Missoula golf course. $472,600. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate. 532-9229 tory@montana.com

3501 Paxson.4 bed, 1.5 bath with hardwood floors, basement, fenced yard & garage. $225,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7355. betsy@milyardteammt.com

9755 Horseback Ridge. 3 bed, 3 bath with mother-in-law apartment on 5 view acres. $395,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com

3904 England Blvd. 3 bed, 2 bath with 2 car garage in Pleasantview. $230,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 4101 O’Leary. 3 bed, 2.5 bath with 2 car garage in Hellgate Meadows. $279,000. Chris Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 544-8700 chrishonzel@lambrosera.com 4415 Shepard Lane, East Missoula. 3 bed, 3 bath on 1 acre near Canyon River Golf Course & Sha-Ron river access. $330,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 4571 Heaven’s Gate. 4 bed, 4 bath Farviews home on 2 acres. $995,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 4781 Montrose. 3 bed, 2 bath in Canyon Creek. RD eligible. $182,500. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7355 betsy@milyardteammt.com 507 North Avenue East. 4 bed, 2 bath University area bungalow with single garage. $319,900. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 5454 Canyon River Drive. 6 bed, 4 bath with 3 car garage on Canyon River Golf Course. $550,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com

2607 View Drive. 3 bed, 2 bath ranch-style home in Target Range. Hardwood floors, fireplace & 2 car garage. $238,500. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate. 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com

5619 Prospect. 5 bed, 4 bath wellmaintained Grant Creek home with 3 car garage. $419,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula. 239-8350 shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

2611 Deer Canyon Court. 4 bed, 3 bath with daylight basement, patio, deck & 2 car garage. $439,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate. 532-9229 tory@montana.com

5805 Mainview. 4 bed, 2 bath South Hills home with basement & deck. $220,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Propeties. 541-7355 betsy@milyardteammt.coom

3 Bdr, 2 Bath Central Missoula home. $179,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

6833 Linda Vista. 5 bed, 3 bath with 2 family rooms, extra downstairs kitchen and large fenced yard. Mary Louise ZappKnapp, Lambros ERA Real Estate 406-456-2260 mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com

3 Bdr, 2 Bath, remodeled Central Missoula home. $285,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

3010 West Central. 3 bed, 1 bath on almost 5 Target Range acres bordering DNRC land. $450,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653, pat@properties2000.com

www.gatewestrentals.com

309 Plymouth. 4 bed, 2.5 bath Craftsman bungalow with wood

716 South 6th West. Classic 3 bed, 2 bath with fireplace, deck, fenced yard & single garage. $259,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com 7201 Old Grant Creek Road. 4 bed, 3 bath with Grant Creek frontage, deck & fireplace. $655,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7355 betsy@milyardteammt.com

Anne Jablonski, Realtor with Portico Real Estate, recently obtained her Montana State Broker license. Anne has 12 years of experience helping clients buy and sell real estate in Missoula and surrounding areas. You can find her at www.MoveMontana.com Are your housing needs changing? We can help you explore your options. Clark Fork Realty. 512 E. Broadway. (406) 7282621. www.clarkforkrealty.com Beautiful home on Rattlesnake Creek. 4 bed, 3 bath with gourmet kitchen, fireplace and deck. $850,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7355, betsy@milyardteammt.com Buying or selling homes? Let me help you find your way home. David Loewenwarter. Prudential Montana Real Estate. LOEWENWARTER.COM. 406241-3321 “Find your way home” with David Loewenwarter. Prudential Montana Real Estate. LOEWENWARTER.COM. 406241-3321 I can help you find your new home! Celia Grohmann @ Banana Belt Realty. 406-550-1014 • celiamontana@gmail.com. Visit my website at www.on93.com Let me help save you time and energy. I know about Missoula and have lived here 30+ years. David Loewenwarter. Prudential Montana Real Estate. LOEWENWARTER.COM. 406241-3321 Lot 42 Jeff Drive. To be built 2 bed, 2 bath Hoyt home in Linda Vista with 3 car garage. $369,500. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com More than 35 years of Sales & Marketing experience. JAY GETZ, Prudential Montana Real Estate. (406) 214-4016 • j a y. g e t z @ p r u m t . c o m • www.JayGetzMissoula.com Put my experience and dedication to work for you. JAY GETZ, Prudential Montana Real Estate. (406) 214-4016 • jay.getz@prumt.com • www.JayGetzMissoula.com RE/MAX All Stars; combining local ownership, experienced agents, and the power of #1 RE/MAX. Complimentary real estate advice. Call 406-5428644 Slant Street Charmer 733 Marshall $225,000. Slant Street charmer with lots of light, a wonderful yard with raised beds, and an awesome shop all in a convenient loca-

tion and ready to move in to. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com St Ignatius FARM for sale! Great spot for CSA/Growers Co-Op Biz! Beautiful 80 Acre Family Farm with 4 bd/3 bath home, PLUS GUEST house with HUGE shop & office. Has 2 good sized vegetable gardens, cold frame, plus strawberries, & fruit trees. Corrals,calve shed & more. NICE POND 8’ deep! Breathtaking views of Mission Mountains. This property could easily be transitioned over to support any type of business from mechanics to sheep to manufacturing. Priced @ $595,000/ MLS#327315. MUCH more information available @ www.missionvalleyproperties.com or call our office at 406-745-4940 We’re not only here to sell real estate, we’re your full service senior home specialists. Clark Fork Realty. 512 E. Broadway. (406) 7282621. www.clarkforkrealty.com When considering a move please call Missoula native JAY GETZ, Prudential Montana Real Estate. (406) 214-4016 • j a y. g e t z @ p r u m t . c o m • www.JayGetzMissoula.com WHO CARES? We do, in good times & bad... Auto; SR-22; Renters; Homeowners. JT Zinn Insurance. 406-549-8201. 321 SW Higgins. Find us on Facebook. Wonderful Westside 1722 Defoe. 2 bedroom, 1 bonus, 2 bathroom home on the Wonderful Westside with awesome gardens in the fenced yard. A home with character! $189,000 KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES 1861 East Broadway. 3 bed, 2.5 condo with deck & single garage. $199,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653 pat@properties2000.com 2121B Jasmine Place. 3 bed, 2.5 bath with deck, patio & 2 car garage. $198,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 2800 Highcliff #5. 2 bed, 1.5 bath condo in Grant Creek near Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. $121,500. Chris Honzel, Lammbros ERA Real Estate. 544-8700 chrishonzel@lambrosera.com 324B North Grant. 3 bed, 2 bath condo with fenced yard & 2 car garage. $169,900. Rita Gray, LambrosERA Real Estate 532-9283. ritagray@lambrosera.com 505 California. 3 bed, 2.5 bath stand-alone near Riverfront Trail. No HOA fees. $289,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • June 12 – June 19, 2014 [C9]


REAL ESTATE 5505 Creekstone. 2 bed, 1.5 bath in Grant Creek. $130,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. betsy@milyardteammt.com Cooley Street Condo 1545 Cooley St. #C. This upper level 2 bedroom condo provides for easy, sweet living close to downtown and has great North Hills views. $128,500 KD 2405227 porticorealestate.com

Uptown Flats #306. 1 bed, 1 bath top floor unit with lots of light. W/D, carport, storage & access to exercise room. $162,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com Uptown Flats #307. 1 bed, 1 bath top floor unit. $158,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate. 5465816 annierealtor@gmail.com

521 Hartman. Clark Fork riverfront stand-alone condo. Absolutely GORGEOUS. Beautiful location and views. $829,000 KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

Uptown Flats. Upscale gated community near downtown. All SS appliances, carport, storage and access to community room and exercise room plus more. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com

Northside Condo 1400 Burns Unit #15, 3 bedroom 1 bath, with balcony and tons of light. $150,000. KD 240-5227 or Sarah 370-3995 porticorealestate.com

Why Rent? Own Your Own 1400 Burns. Designed with energy efficiency, comfort and affordability in mind. Next to Burns Street Bistro and Missoula Community Co-op. Start-

Uptown Flats #210. 1 bed, 1 bath modern condo on Missoula’s Northside. $149,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com

ing at $79,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

MANUFACTURED HOMES 1790 Dukes. 3 bed, 2 bath in Katoonah Lodges, a 55+ community. $83,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate, 532-9229 tory@montana.com 4752 Parent. 2 bed, 2 bath with 2 decks and heated shop. Mary Louise Zapp-Knapp, Lambros ERA Real Estate 406-4562260. mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com

Modular Homes Loaded with Upgrades = Starting at $89,500 Elite Homes - Call Troy at 406-696-6282 or Jason at 406-855-2279

LAND FOR SALE 1.35 Acres with Clark Fork River frontage, Superior. $85,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 160 acres in Grant Creek bordered on two sides by Forest

Service land. $650,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 1625 Lot 12A Cote Lane. Level 1 acre with fantastic views. Mary Louise Zapp-Knapp, Lambros ERA Real Estate 5329296. mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com

5402 Canyon River Road. Canyon River Golf Course Lot. 15,901 sq.ft. $150,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 605 Dunkleberg, Drummon. 2 bed, 2 bath on 28 acres with creek. $249,000. Pintlar Terri-

tories R.E. 406-859-3522. pintlarterritories.com 910 Bandmann Trail. Over 1 acre on Canyon River Golf Course with 252 Clark Fork River frontage. $275,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

18.6 Acres in Sleeman Creek, Lolo, Unzoned. $150,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

NEW HOME SPRING BLOWOUT!! Single Wides, Double Wides & Modular Homes at Clearance Prices!! 16 x 80 Single Wides - Tape & Texture Throughout, Oak Cabinets, Glamour Bath, Upgraded Insulation = Starting at $45,900

6 TIPS

FOR BUYING MORE FOR LESS 512 E. Broadway 406-728-2621 matt@clarkforkrealty.com

5505 Creekstone 2 bed, 1.5 bath Grant Creek condo. $130,000 MLS #20140810 5805 Mainview 4 bed, 2 bath South Hills home with great views. $220,000 MLS #20142246 3501 Paxson 4 bed, 1.5 bath with hardwood floors, basement & 2 car garage $225,000 MLS #20140601

NEWLY RESTORED HISTORIC DOWNTOWN APARTMENTS The Palace is located on the Corner of Broadway & Ryman Studios start at $407 a month + $450 deposit 1 Bedrooms start at $554 a month + $550 deposit. 2 Bedrooms start at $707 a month + $650 deposit. Water, sewage, trash, and heat are included in rent. ADA wheelchair-accessible units available.

• On-site property management • Secure building • Coin-op laundry with new machines

Call 549-4113 x130 Matty Reed, Property Manager

[C10] Missoula Independent • June 12 – June 19, 2014


REAL ESTATE Lot 33 Old Mill Loop, St. Regis. 1.02 acre with 150’ of Clark Fork River Frontage. Mary Louise Zapp-Knapp, Lambros ERA Real Estate 532-9296. mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com NHN Arnica. Pattee Canyon acreage with great view of Missoula. Mary Louise ZappKnapp, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 532-9296 mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com NHN Edgewood. 3.35 endof-road acres on east side of Mount Jumbo. Close to river. $89,900. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com NHN Old Freight Road, St. Ignatius. 11 acre Mission Mountain building site. $86,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com NHN Old Freight Road, St. Ignatius. Over 40 acres with 2 creeks near Mission Mountains. $199,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

Rose Park commercial building with rental. $265,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

OUT OF TOWN 109 Church Street, Stevensville. Historic 3 bed, 1 bath with library, parlor & fantastic front porch. $139,000. Rita Gray, LambrosERA Real Estate, 532-9283. ritagray@lambrosera.com 11901 Lewis & Clark Drive, Lolo. 2 bed, 2 bath with many upgrades including roof & windows. $197,500. Rita Gray, LambrosERA Real Estate 532-9283. ritagray@lambrosera.com 1290 Thunder’s Trail, Potomac. 3 bed, 3 bath on 20 acres. $795,000. Tory Dailey, Lam-

bros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 1333 Juniper, Alberton. 5 bed, 3 bath on nearly 20 acres bordered by National Forest. $725,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 210 Red Fox Road, Lolo. 4 bed, 2.5 bath on 2.59 acres along Bitterroot River. $465,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula, 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 280 Hellgate Drive. 3 bed, 2.5 bath Colonial Cottage east of Bonner. Wood stove, deck, fruit arbor & fenced garden. $355,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653

3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Stevensville area home on 6+ acres. $325,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3416 Lupine, Stevensville. 3 bed, 2 bath log-sided home with wraparound deck & Bitterroot views. $239,900. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 5 Bdr, 4 Bath, Stevensville area home on 10 acres. $649,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

575 Killdeer, Stevensville. 5 bed, 3 bath on 7.5 fenced acres. Great mountain views. $335,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 5312605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

Real Estate is not always Black & White Call Rita Gray 406-544-4226

Rochelle Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

ritagray@lambrosera.com Missoula Properties 728-8270

1745 A Park Place Missoula

3 Bdr, 1 Bath Alberton home. $125,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

End unit town home located on Missoula's Northside, convenient to downtown and U. 3 bedrooms 1.5 baths with extra deep single car garage. Open House Sunday 12-2.

$145,000

Mary Marry

NHN Raymond. .62 acre in Lower Rattlesnake bordering Missoula Open Space. $148,000. David Loewenwarter. Prudential Montana Real Estate. LOEWENWARTER.COM. 406241-3321

544-2125 • mmarry@bigsky.net

Rock Creek Acreage. 20 acres adjacent to Forest Service land. $189,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

COMMERCIAL

12336 Frenchtown Frontage Rd $365,000

101 Church Street, Stevensville. Currently Mission Bistro Restaurant, but zoned for commercial or residential. $255,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula. 728-8270 glasgow@montana.com 4 Bdr, 2 Bath Central Missoula home. Commercial or Residential. $185,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

3 bed/3 bath Well-cared-for 2-story modern farm home on 4+ acres. Fenced and landscaped. Room for toys and pets.

missoulanews.com • June 12 – June 19, 2014 [C11]


REAL ESTATE River Access 17430 SixMile, $260,000. Historic 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath home in great condition on stunning 12.51 acre setting with views, fruit trees, tons of gardening space and so much more! KD 2405227 porticorealestate.com TWO IMMACULATE SINGLE FAMILY HOMES in Denton. Each 3 bedroom/2 bath, dining rooms, appliances, kitchen islands, garages, sheds, patios, 6 lots. $75,000 & $150,000 406-366-3265

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL EQUITY LOANS ON NONOWNER OCCUPIED MONTANA REAL ESTATE. We also buy Notes & Mortgages. Call Creative Finance & Investments @ 406-721-1444 or visit www.creative-finance.com

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

1290 Lena Lane • $275,000 • 3 bed, 3 bath on one lovely acre in Target Range • Sun room and 3 car garage • Walking distance to fishing access

$158,000

1944 S. 8th W.

REMODELED • 2 bed, 1 bath • Large 6500 sf lot on Cul-de-sac • Newer roof & windows Pat McCormick Real Estate Broker • Front deck, Real Estate With Real Experience fenced yard with pat@properties2000.com 406-240-SOLD (7653) garden shed Properties2000.com

[C12] Missoula Independent • June 12 – June 19, 2014

PERFECT PICKS 205 7th Street, Clinton, MT • $209,000 2070 Cooper • Unit # 614 • $219,000 333 Martin Lane, Florence, MT • $258,000 2200 Garland # 30 • $112,500



Missoula Independent