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NEWS

WATER FIGHT: DISCHARGE PERMITS MARK LATEST ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUE AT FORMER SMURFIT SITE

BMX PARK JUMPS BUNDY FIASCO PROVIDES PERFECT BOOK INTRODUCES ARTS NEW OPINION NEWS ANOTHER HURDLE CHANCE TO TALK CONSERVATION OHRMANN TO THE WORLD


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


NEWS

WATER FIGHT: DISCHARGE PERMITS MARK LATEST ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUE AT FORMER SMURFIT SITE

BMX PARK JUMPS BUNDY FIASCO PROVIDES PERFECT BOOK INTRODUCES ARTS NEW OPINION NEWS ANOTHER HURDLE CHANCE TO TALK CONSERVATION OHRMANN TO THE WORLD


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[2] Missoula Independent • May 22–May 29, 2014

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cover illustration by Pumpernickel Stewart

News Voices/Letters Zinke, Rankin and abortion ...................................................................4 The Week in Review Hyundai, Tinkle and graduation..................................................6 Briefs The Merc, BMX Park and transgender rights .......................................................6 Etc. Daines hides creationism past .................................................................................7 News Discharge permits mark the latest tussle at former Smurfit site...........................8 News Tribal health official chooses grassroots effort over fed office ............................9 Opinion What the president can do right now for conservation.................................10 Feature A bear named Irene .........................................................................................14

Arts & Entertainment Arts Bill Ohrmann finally gets his due in Joe Nickell’s Tainted Revelations ...............18 Music Benny the Jet Rodriguez, PAPA and The Hard Pans ...........................................19 Music Gigee aims for an online niche ..........................................................................20 Books Light looks beyond the shadows of war............................................................21 Film Hoffman puts his all in God’s Pocket ...................................................................22 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films .....................................................23 Flash in the Pan The bitter belongs.............................................................................24 Happiest Hour Alcan Bar & Grille ...............................................................................26 8 Days a Week Bear hugs all around ...........................................................................27 Mountain High Bob Marshall Wilderness Volunteer Vacation ....................................33 Agenda NPR correspondent Gregory Feifer.................................................................34

Exclusives

Street Talk..............................................................................................................4 In Other News......................................................................................................12 Classifieds ..........................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ...........................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y.............................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle...............................................................................................C-5 Camp Sleepover ...............................................................................................C-11 This Modern World...........................................................................................C-12

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Heidi Starrett CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL PROJECTS Christie Anderson ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Cathrine L. Walters CALENDAR EDITOR Kate Whittle STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen, Ted McDermott COPY EDITOR Kate Whittle ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Pumpernickel Stewart, Jonathan Marquis CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Allen MARKETING, PROMOTION & EVENTS COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, Jason McMackin, Brad Tyer, Nick Davis, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Matthew Frank, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Melissa Mylchreest, Rob Rusignola, Josh Quick, Brooks Johnson

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2014 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • May 22–May 29, 2014 [3]


[voices]

Rallying for Ryan

STREET TALK

by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked Tuesday, May 20, near the corner of Higgins and Spruce. Give us your best bear story. Follow-up: There’s talk of delisting grizzlies in the next year or two in certain regions of the state. Do you think this is a good idea? Chris Stube: I was up in the Rattlesnake National Recreation Area and saw a pair of black bears romp around a meadow up there. It looked like a mother and her cub, it was fun to watch. Golden bear: I like grizzlies and don’t see a reason to kill off the species like when they were managed to be extinguished in California. If there’s plenty of griz then people can hunt, but why do away with one of the natural wonders in this area? Clara Meinershagen: A mama bear and her cub snuck up on us while cooking dinner in the backcountry of Glacier National Park. We got spooked and ran away but then turned around and started throwing rocks and chased them out of camp. Bear beware: Not really. I know there’s a lot of people that would be interested in hunting and removing grizzlies from the ESA listing but I think that could have a detrimental effect on their population. Thayne Ulschmid: I was riding my bike into the Rattlesnake on the main corridor and I saw a flash that ran off the trail and up a tree. Then it jumped down and ran down the trail in front of me. He kept looking back as he ran. It was pretty comical. Paws up: I believe it could be beneficial for state agencies to be able to manage grizzly bears because sportsmen bring in a lot of conservation money to protect habitat. It would be best mandated at the state level.

As the smears against Ryan Zinke continue to arrive, we feel it’s time to put some perspective on the congressional race (see “Zinke zinged,” May 15). It’s pretty easy to represent yourself as the true American in the race, but it’s a whole lot tougher to put your life on the line to defend the principles of freedom in the fight against terrorism. Congressional candidate Matt Rosendale pretends to shoot down a drone aircraft in his television ad to prove how tough he is. But Rosendale’s negative gimmickry pales in comparison to Zinke’s decorated record of defending this nation’s freedoms. Zinke’s patriotism is no act. While Rosendale was making his millions in Maryland, Zinke was risking his life for our nation as a Navy SEAL. It is deeply offensive for us, all military veterans who have known Ryan for most of his life, to see him attacked by someone who has never worn the uniform of this great country. It’s also extremely revealing to compare campaigns. Typical of someone whose character is proven through his life experiences, Zinke has remained positive, while Rosendale stoops to new lows with each vicious attack. Earlier this spring, Ryan Zinke stood up and delivered a fitting and moving eulogy for his mentor, Sen. Bob DePratu, a true Montana statesman. It seems only fitting that we who were friends of Bob’s now stand up as DePratu would have done in a forthright defense of Zinke, as fine, brave and capable a man as any of us have known. We will vote for real character over character assassination. Ryan Zinke is a genuine and proven leader with the guts to think independently and the will to

fight to get this country back on track. He is exactly who we need in Congress. Charlie Abell Bill Beck Bob Brown Bob Lawson Whitefish

“Maybe voters just don’t want to accept what their government has become. Maybe they just aren’t ready.” More on Zinke Since this is an important election it is important for the individual to make wise choices. I would like to recommend Ryan Zinke for some of the following reasons. There are very few veterans in Congress. Since they are the ones who send our citizens to war, it is important that the person authorizing the action have some knowledge of just what is going to happen. Ryan has had a long and distinguished career in the military and understands the risks. He is a fiscal conservative. We have had very few representatives from western Montana in the past several years. Based on my experience in the leg-

islature I know that the needs are very different here than on the east side. Please support him for this important job. Marge Fisher Whitefish

Sad for Sam Sam Rankin has ended his bid for the Senate. Running as an Independent, he needed to collect nearly 18,000 voter signatures to put his name on the November ballot, and fell short. But Sam tried. For 30 years, through his work with Common Cause and a few political campaigns, he tried to show voters that the solid, moral foundation on which our country was built is rapidly being undermined by money corruption. It’s a shame more Americans do not recognize the problem. Our representatives cannot be trusted to represent the people because they are already indebted to those with deep pockets—the special interest PACS, super PACS and armies of lobbyists that put them in office and keep them there. Washington is a revolving door; industry employees become regulators to the very industries they left, and our representatives take jobs with the industries they champion. Each election cycle millions of dollars are spent to influence elections, much of it coming from rich and powerful anonymous sources, who prefer to manipulate voters from the shadows. If our country continues down this path, it isn’t going to end well. Sam tried to warn people, to help them see the problem and understand. Maybe voters just don’t want to accept what their government has become. Maybe they just aren’t ready. But Sam Rankin started a conversation and other leaders will rise to follow his lead. For that, I thank him for his service. David Scott Smith Billings

[Comments from MissoulaNews.com] Joe Blackman: I was scouting elk up Rock Creek when a black bear started walking toward me. When it got within five feet I said “Hi” and scared her and she ran away. She didn’t even know I was there! Bear necessity: Absolutely not. They are an apex predator and a keystone species in our environment. That tells me they need a lot more protection than they are getting. Besides, they are really neat.

Lynn Barlow: I was hiking in Glacier National Park where a bear was right on the trail and just looked at us as we hiked by. He was pretty tame. It was actually kind of lame. Bare essentials: If they’re not endangered anymore then it makes sense to delist, but I don’t agree if they will be hunted.

[4] Missoula Independent • May 22–May 29, 2014

Backtalk from “Can’t do it alone,” May 15

Murder mills

No right

My God

“Good time for her to sit and reflect and maybe even repent for all of the lives she ruined. We often talk about the helpless lives lost by these murder mills. Do we ever count the cost of the years of torment to the women who get talked into murdering their children when they finally wake up and realize what they did? The cost of murder weighs heavy on women after they get a conscience. I am pleased to see that this murderer is out of business. I hope she repents for all of the damage she has done.” Posted May 15 at 8:43 a.m.

“You are no different than third world countries that force women into slavery or cut off their clitoris to keep them under control in the name of their ‘RELIGION’! How dare you or any person decide for a woman what she will do with her body! God sure as hell didn’t give you that right and neither did Jesus!” Posted May 15 at 9:07 a.m.

“Susan, you are a wonderful human being and a good doctor and sadly the women that need you will have to find another way … You, my dear, need to let it go and if you can just leave this behind you and move on. It is sad that the mentality is so low in this state (and others) that heroic individuals are forced to leave … God (my God) blessed you Susan and He will continue to do so!!!” Posted May 15 at 9:20 a.m.

L

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via email: editor@missoulanews.com.


missoulanews.com • May 22–May 29, 2014 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Cathrine L. Walters

Wednesday, May 14 Hyundai announces it will appeal a Lake County jury’s decision to award $248 million in punitive damages and lost earnings to the family of two teenage cousins killed in 2011 while driving an allegedly defective Tiburon.

Thursday, May 15 Tristan Alfred Staber, 18, is arraigned on charges that he and an unnamed minor stole marijuana, a glass bong and other items last month from the garage of Markus Kaarma, who later shot exchange student Diren Dede for trespassing in the same garage.

Friday, May 16 The University of Montana receives the largest research award in the institution’s history when the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers grants a team of researchers $45 million to conduct a broad study of natural and cultural resources throughout the United States.

Saturday, May 17 Gov. Steve Bullock reveals that he once considered bartending at Jimmy Buffett’s Margaritaville in Key West during his commencement address at the University of Montana. Thousands of hungover graduates immediately imagine landing such a chill gig.

Sunday, May 18 While driving northeast of Ronan, Iva Skelton, 45, hits two signs and the guardrail of a bridge. Her car flips and lands upsidedown in the canal below. Skelton and passenger Karen Jore, 56, are declared dead at the scene.

Monday, May 19 After eight years, three NCAA tournament appearances and 158 wins, University of Montana men’s basketball coach Wayne Tinkle accepts the same position at Oregon State University.

Tuesday, May 20 Missoula Mayor John Engen declares it Mark Heyka Day, honoring the beloved meteorologist’s 15th anniversary with NBC Montana. Engen cracks that Heyka may be wrong more than the mayor, but “he’s more well liked.”

Abbey, a toy poodle, runs out of a large tunnel while following commands from her owner and trainer Leone Harmon at an agility training course in McCormick Park. The May 18 event followed the third annual Doggie Dash, where runners could bring their canine companions on a 1 mile or 5K run.

LGBT

Chicken and the egg Councilwoman Caitlin Copple confronted the Missoula City Council last week about a discrepancy in the city’s anti-discrimination ordinance, which makes it unlawful to discriminate based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Specifically, Copple says that denying sexual reassignment surgery and hormone replacement therapy to transgender municipal staffers runs contrary to the law’s intent. “It feels pretty hypocritical to me that we don’t even offer what is unequivocally deemed necessary medical care for transgender employees,” Copple said. As it stands, testosterone and estrogen therapy for transgender people is not covered under the city’s insurance policy. But hormone therapy for menopausal biological females is. Similarly, sexual reassignment surgery is listed alongside nearly two dozen insurance plan benefit exclusions the municipal policy won’t pay for. Other off-limits procedures include abortion, fertility studies and artificial insemination. Aiming to ensure that all municipal employees are treated equally, Copple is proposing to add full coverage for transgender employees. The challenge comes

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[6] Missoula Independent • May 22–May 29, 2014

in quantifying how much that would cost and identifying where the money would come from. “We don’t really know,” says Missoula Chief Executive Officer Bruce Bender. “That’s one of the problems with this.” According to the city’s Human Resources Department, the municipal health plan covers 533 employees, including retirees. Copple says she’s not aware of any city employees who are transgender. However, “until we offer trans benefits, we’re probably not going to have any out trans employees,” she says. “It’s a little bit chicken and the egg.” Copple notes that cities offering full coverage, including Seattle, Portland and San Francisco, have experienced a negligible increase in associated insurance claims and premium costs. For example, according to data collected by the Williams Institute at the University of Southern California Los Angeles School of Law, claims filed between 2001 and 2006 under San Francisco’s extended coverage totaled $386,417. “I think one of the biggest misconceptions is that there’s gong to be this big run on gender-affirmation surgeries,” Copple said in an interview after last week’s committee meeting. “We know that certainly a significant number of trans people don’t necessary want what’s commonly still known as a ‘sex-change operation.’ They

just want hormones. And they want to be able to present their gender effectively in the workplace.” Jessica Mayrer

Downtown

Merc still looks for options For nearly four years, Missoula’s most prominent downtown retail space has remained vacant. While the Missoula Mercantile building has turned into little more than a billboard for art shows, what with its windows filled with posters and displays, officials say it’s an exception to an otherwise healthy downtown. The Merc, which has been empty since Macy’s closed in 2010, has proven more difficult to fill than its Virginiabased owner expected. Octagon Partners bought the 80,000-square-foot building for $2.3 million in 2011 and put nearly another million into deconstructing it to its historically accurate bones—minus the lead and asbestos that contractors removed. But the owner is still looking for tenants willing to move in or someone to buy the site outright. Several bars and restaurants wanted to move in, says Jed Dennison of Zillastate Realty, the local firm handling the property. But it’s been a hard sell because the construction timeline requires signing a lease at


[news] least 15 months before a shopkeeper could even start painting the walls, let alone open for business. “It doesn’t make sense to pull the trigger on a $12 million renovation for a 2,000-square-foot tenant,” says JP Williamson, of Octagon. Plus, Dennison says the bank won’t fork over the renovation loan without safe, reliable office tenants signed up on the second floor and several retailers on the ground floor. While the rental situation is caught in a catch-22, Dennison says three local buyers have expressed interest in the building, including the Missoula Public Library. The 40-year-old library has outlived its original lifespan by a decade and outgrown its capacity. With more than 1,700 visitors a day, Executive Director Honore Bray says the library turns down 50 to 100 requests for meeting spaces weekly. “We’d love [to move into the Merc], but we can’t say yes or no yet,” Bray says, noting the library is waiting for architects to assess whether the historic building, built in 1887, would be able to support the weight of the bookshelves. If the library purchases the building, it comes with good and bad news. Bad: The city would lose roughly $1 million a year in taxes, says Missoula Downtown Association Executive Director Linda McCarthy. Good: A single owner-occupier would simplify securing funds for construction, and could finally fill the biggest hole in downtown. “In a big-picture sense,” McCarthy says, “it would be great if it was an active (retail) space and remains on the tax rolls. But having a library in that building is better than a vacant building.” McCarthy adds that while the Merc remains the elephant on the corner of Higgins and Front, downtown is largely healthy. Its 12.8-percent vacancy rate is less than half the national average and shows the area continues to attract new businesses. “But I wouldn’t say it’s thriving yet,” McCarthy says. Ketti Wilhelm

Outdoors

BMX park nears goal For just under three years, donations have been trickling in to the Tanner Olson Memorial BMX Park fund. Local businesses and nonprofits have hosted nearly a dozen fundraisers ranging from rail jams and slopestyle competitions to Missoula Bicycle Works’ Helmet Project, which last month raised an estimated $6,100. Kathy Jackson, Olson’s mother, is optimistic that within the next few weeks, donations will finally hit the organization’s original fundraising goal.

“We’re waiting on some donations that have been promised to us, and once those donations arrive we should be at or very near $100,000,” Jackson says, adding that sales of “I Ride for Tanner” merchandise account for about a quarter of the money raised so far. Jackson’s push to build a BMX park began shortly after Olson’s death in a car accident outside Arlee in July 2011. Olson was 14; his cousin, 19-year-old Trevor Olson, was also killed. Jackson and other family members won a subsequent lawsuit against Hyundai this month, with a Lake County jury ruling that the car manufacturer owes the family $248 million. Hyundai promptly announced its intent to appeal. Nearing her fundraising goal isn’t the only big news on Jackson’s horizon. She and others have been meet-

ing more frequently with Missoula Parks and Recreation in recent months in an attempt to select a site for the BMX park. Jackson says the list of options has been narrowed to three “promising” locations, and the final choice could be made within the next few months. “Optimistically, we’d like to have a location nailed down by the end of summer so we could break ground this fall,” she says. Alex Gallego, owner of Missoula Bicycle Works and an active voice in the park discussion, says once the final site selection is made the design process can officially begin. Much of that work will fall to professionals, he adds, but those behind the park effort will be reaching out to local cyclists for input on what they’d like to see. Based on what Gallego’s heard, an easily accessible city bike park geared toward all ages and skill levels has been a long time coming. “Working at the bike shop, we have folks coming in regularly wondering about this park—where’s it going to be, when’s it going to get built, what can they do to

BY THE NUMBERS

ETC.

Cost to purchase and maintain 94 flower baskets that the Missoula Downtown Association hung this week on streetlights in the city’s urban core.

Republican Rep. Steve Daines is proving that in the race for Montana’s open Senate seat this year, you can’t run from your past but you can sure try to hide. Late last week, Mother Jones dug up an old piece of creation theory criticism from back in Daines’ congressional campaign days. The story read like an electoral time capsule, dusting off questions about a 2012 Daines fundraiser initially scheduled for the Creation Museum in Petersburg, Ky., and quoting Daines from a Montana Public Radio interview saying he’d support teaching creationism in public schools. Fun, fond remembrances for some of us. For Daines and his Senate campaign, apparently, not so much. Mother Jones’ requests for comment were met with silence. The campaign declined to comment for the Indy. That silence is puzzling in light of the reaction Daines’ House campaign had to the Indy’s initial queries about the Creation Museum fundraiser in July 2012. At the time, campaign spokesman Zach Lahn quickly shifted responsibility for the event’s bizarre Young Earth venue to campaign supporters who knew Daines from his private sector days. Lahn stated via email that “all location details and speaker invitations have been made by these supporters.” The fundraising venue was promptly changed when the news hit the Internet. In 2012, the Daines campaign dismissed the apparent creationist tie as an innocuous and unintentional hiccup. Two years later the Senate hopeful is ducking the issue entirely. Any mention of the fundraiser’s original location has vanished. Even Lahn, who is now working as campaign manager for U.S. House candidate Matt Schultz in Iowa, did not respond when contacted by email this week. All that’s left are dead links and silence. Concerned Montanans can still fall back on Daines’ creation theory commentary from his November 2012 interview with MTPR’s Sally Mauk. It’s there that Daines really tipped his hand, saying public schools should teach students about evolution and intelligent design and “allow the students to make up their minds.” The talking point didn’t attract much attention outside the state at the time; Daines’ congressional bout against Democrat Kim Gillan was conveniently overshadowed by the contentious Senate showdown between Jon Tester and Denny Rehberg. But now that he’s polling as the frontrunner in a race that could help the GOP retake the Senate majority this fall, Daines is increasingly on the nation’s radar. With that level of scrutiny, you can’t hide forever.

$11,400

help,” Gallego says. “We’re super motivated to make that happen because they’ve been waiting for a long time.” Alex Sakariassen

Urban forest

Trimming trees The city of Missoula’s largest new budget request for 2015 isn’t to pay for improved public transportation, park management or employee salary increases. It’s a $320,000 request for pruning Norway maple trees. If the funding is approved, it will be used to hire crews to remove dead wood from the shady deciduous trees that dominate the local landscape. By pruning the trees, the city hopes to delay the death of nearly half of the urban forest. According to a tree census the city began last summer and has nearly completed, Norway maples comprise approximately 40 percent of Missoula’s street-tree population. A significant portion of these trees were planted at approximately the same time, in the early 20th century, and many of them are now nearing the ends of their lifespans. “The idea or goal is by pruning and treating these trees to almost a pampering level is that we extend the life as long as possible to give us sufficient time to try and get other trees to grow, so that when they do start to die off, there’s a forest coming behind them,” Parks and Recreation Director Donna Gaukler says. In addition to buying time for other trees to grow, the city hopes to keep the Norway maples alive long enough to complete a long-term urban forest management plan. That long-term plan will aim to develop a more diverse stand of trees citywide. Greater diversity will mean more manageable tree die-offs in the future and better protection against the spread of tree disease. As the city develops its urban forest master plan, Parks and Recreation is seeking public input. In April, some 1,000 residents were selected to complete an online survey about how they would like to see city trees maintained. “All those benefits are things that we can begin to assign actual numbers or measures to help citizens not only subconsciously know that they like trees,” Gaukler says, “but help them consciously articulate what it is they’re getting from those trees.” Ted McDermott

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missoulanews.com • May 22–May 29, 2014 [7]


[news]

A different approach Tribal health official chooses grassroots effort over fed office by Ted McDermott

“I strongly support Michele Landquist for re-election to the Board of County Commissioners, she has the most courage, integrity, honesty and character of all the candidates running.“ ~Carolyn Squires 1987-2000 Montana House of Representatives, 2003-2011 Montana State Senate

“Michele has always voted right on transportation issues. She understands that people need convenient transportation choices for our economy to prosper.” ~Andy Sponseller, Missoula Businessman

“Michele Landquist is a keeper! She is a longtime resident of Missoula County, a real public servant with no hidden agenda and makes well-reasoned decisions.” ~Jon Wilkins, Ward Four Missoula City Council

“Michele’s work with community councils and individual citizens, and her willingness to consider all sides of issues has impressed me. She has the experience, knowledge and responsiveness we need in Missoula County!” ~Sue Malek, Montana State Senate District 46

ENDORSEMENTS Barbara Berens Dick Barrett Ann Mary Dussault Ron Erickson Nancy Erickson Barbara Evans Sue Malek

Tim Fury Carolyn Squires T. J. McDermott Jean Curtiss Ed Childers Mike O’Herron Jon Wilkins

Terry Kelley Jean Belangie-Nye Neva Larson Nancy Tempel Laura Smith Drew Smith Pete Ridgeway

Bill Shea Elaine Shea Marnie Russ Tim Lovely Bob Clark

WWW.ELECTLANDQUIST.COM I'd like to hear your ideas; please feel free to call me at 273-2363. Paid for by Re-elect Michele Landquist, Box 533, Lolo, MT 59847 Barbara Berens, Treasurer

[8] Missoula Independent • May 22–May 29, 2014

Anna Whiting-Sorrell felt elated when the depth and intractability of the agency’s if I really wanted to accomplish what I beshe was named director of the Billings problems. In a statement issued in re- lieved was needed for Indian people—and Area Regional Office of the Indian Health sponse to Whiting-Sorrell’s resignation, that was a consolidated, coordinated health Service in January. She had fought for 10 Tester said her “leadership on Indian care system—that it really needed to be months to get the job, and she was opti- health issues is unmatched in Montana” done at the grassroots level,” she says. As the new director of operations, mistic about the change she could make and credited her with leading “the charge in the lives of American Indians through- to improve health care in Indian country.” planning and policy, Whiting-Sorrell beout Montana and Wyoming from the helm Tester, who is chair of the Senate commit- lieves she’ll be able to use her hands-on exof a powerful federal agency’s regional of- tee on Indian Affairs, will host a hearing in perience at the tribal, state and federal levels to finally make a difference. fice. In some ways, it was the “You can’t study it, you can’t culmination of a career that drop in,” she says. “I know those started on the Flathead Reservasystems now. ... And I believe tion working with its substancethat what I will be able to do abuse program and led to a here is bring that experience position with Sen. John Kerry’s and actually put it in place for presidential campaign and to the people here.” her becoming director of MonWhile she is familiar with tana’s Department of Public many of the resources available Health and Human Services to CSKT, Whiting-Sorrell thinks under Gov. Brian Schweitzer. a new component of the federal Sixteen months after starting health care system—the Affordat IHS, however, she resigned. able Care Act—will be crucial to “I had this vision of being closing the huge health gap that able to make change through exists between American Indians building these partnerships on a and whites. That gap is illusnational level, and really be able trated by the striking disparity in to impact the care that Indian longevity between these populapeople got on the ground…,” tions in Montana. According to she says. “What I found is that the 2013 State of the State’s there was a lot of bureaucracy Health report, white men in that just got in the way of getting Montana live 19 years longer care out. The focus oftentimes than American Indian men and was on other things.” photo courtesy of Bernie Azure white women live 20 years Whiting-Sorrell wasn’t the longer than American Indian only one dismayed with IHS After 16 disenchanting months with the Indian Health when she tendered her resigna- Service in Billings, Anna Whiting-Sorrell returned to women. The Affordable Care Act intion last month. Around the the Flathead Indian Reservation to try to directly imcludes a number of Indian-specific same time, the Crow Tribal Leg- prove health care for American Indians. provisions that Whiting-Sorrell islature passed a resolution calling for Montana’s congressional Billings on May 27 to inquire about IHS’s will seek to maximize in order to improve the length and quality of life for CSKT memdelegation to “take all necessary and delivery and management of care. While the federal government looks bers. For example, enrolled members of proper measures to investigate the Billings Area Office” after tribal officials re- to address issues at IHS, Whiting-Sorrell federally recognized tribes who purchase ceived hundreds of complaints from is looking to make a difference with In- insurance through government marketmembers about the quality of care pro- dian health care by heading back to her places and who are up to three times the vided through IHS. Then, on May 2, just roots. The Confederated Salish and poverty level are exempt from paying codays after IHS accepted Whiting-Sorrell’s Kootenai Tribes recently created a new pays and deductibles. “If we can figure this out right,” Whitresignation, U.S. Sens. Jon Tester and position within the Tribal Health and John Walsh issued a joint letter to the Gov- Human Services Department that would ing-Sorrell says, “we can make sure that ernment Accountability Office requesting improve members’ access to health ben- people up to 300 percent of poverty have an “investigation of the Indian Health efits available through IHS as well as insurance.” Though she has returned to the FlatService, with a particular emphasis on the Medicare, Medicaid, the Department of Billings Area Regional Office.” In making Veterans Affairs, the Affordable Care Act head and refocused on CKST, Whitingtheir request, Tester and Walsh wrote that and other avenues. It seemed like a per- Sorrell sees her work within a larger patients “endure poor to no services and fect fit for Whiting-Sorrell, an enrolled context. “I don’t believe that I am exiting extraordinary delays in seeing physicians member of CSKT who even helped estab- from the larger stage,” she says. “I just or filling prescriptions.” On May 16, the lish the Tribal Health and Human Serv- think that I’m taking a different apGAO accepted the request to investigate. ices Department earlier in her career. She proach. I know that I am committed to Whiting-Sorrell’s leadership wasn’t applied for the position, was hired and teach the lessons that we learn here to other tribes.” viewed as the cause of IHS’s trouble. started May 5. “I knew in my heart that I needed to Rather, her inability to make change within the Billings office was seen as evidence of make a different decision for me and that tmcdermott@missoulanews.com


[news]

Water fight Discharge permits mark the latest tussle at former Smurfit site by Jessica Mayrer

Nielsen notes that, among the prob- bow trout and northern pike collected Inside the former Smurfit-Stone Container Corp site, concrete footings rise up lems with DEQ’s decision, is the discharge from a 105-mile stretch of the Clark Fork into the air not far from piles of rubble and levels could apply to nearly any hypothet- surrounding the Smurfit site were contaminated with dioxins, furans and polychlorired “Danger” tape strewn on the ground. ical operation at the site. “It could be almost anything that’s nated biphenyls—or, as the advisory put it, More than four years after the SmurfitStone site shuttered, and 22 months after high-strength wastewater,” Nielsen says. “contaminants commonly associated with the Environmental Protection Agency doc- “In terms of industrial activity, or factory the pulp and paper mill industry.” Those findings prompted the state to umented extensive contamination at the farms, you name it—or another city.” On April 11, Missoula County for- warn locals not to eat pike caught on the former paper mill, the facility sits vacant. The inactivity masks a significant mally appealed DEQ’s decision, arguing Clark Fork between the Bitterroot and amount of behind-the-scenes legal wran- that the agency made legal and factual er- Flathead confluences. They said rainbow gling as state regulators propose authoriz- rors prior to signing off on the discharge trout harvested from that area should ing the site’s new owners, M2 Green permit. The county argues DEQ has “ex- compose less than four meals per month. Health officials don’t Redevelopment, to continue know how extensive the polluting the neighboring pollution is along this Clark Fork at the same level stretch of the Clark Fork. allowed under SmurfitAmong the reasons for the Stone’s operation. The decilack of information is the sion is drawing considerable fact that fish sampling is exopposition from local and pensive. Nielsen says a Sutribal officials who don’t unperfund designation would derstand why the state enable scientists to do addiwould continue to endanger tional testing, as well as rethe river for a business with mediate the property. With no clear direction. photo by Cathrine L. Walters the support of city, county, “This doesn’t make sense,” says Missoula Valley Local and tribal officials warn the Clark Fork could suffer if tribal and state officials, the the state allows the new owners of the former Smurfit-Stone EPA proposed adding the Water Quality District Super- site to again pollute the river. site to the Superfund provisor Peter Nielsen. In 2011, M2 Green, a subsidiary of hibited a clearly unwarranted exercise of gram’s National Priorities List in May 2013. The earliest it could be finalized for Green Investment Group Inc., purchased discretion.” The Confederated Salish and Koote- the NPL would be this fall. the shuttered paper mill in Frenchtown, Without a Superfund designation it stating its intention to erect a wind turbine nai Tribes and the Clark Fork Coalition are manufacturing operation on the site. GIGI also protesting. Each requests an over- will be tough, if not impossible, to secure had purchased several other shuttered sight body, the Montana Board of Envi- the resources needed to further study the Smurfit properties throughout North Amer- ronmental Review, scrutinize the agency’s site. When Smurfit-Stone sold the mill, ica and, in the months following its local an- findings. The county, Clark Fork Coalition the paper manufacturer passed on all ennouncement, GIGI garnered criticism for and the tribes each contend the DEQ is vi- vironmental liability to M2 Green. Soon after the transaction, and about a year failing to fulfill development promises at olating its own rules and federal law. Among the county’s primary qualms after emerging from Chapter 11 bankother defunct paper mills in Illinois and Ohio. GIGI’s legal challenges, including at with DEQ’s proposed discharge limits, ruptcy protection, Smurfit-Stone was acleast four lawsuits alleging breach of con- Nielsen says, is the cap it set on nitrogen and quired by RockTenn, one of the largest tract and failure to pay contractors, raised phosphorous. These nutrients feed algae, paper and packaging manufacturers in which consume oxygen and ultimately harm North America. A Superfund designation additional questions about its solvency. Uncertainty about the landowners’ fish. The appellants add that DEQ’s nutrient would allow the federal government to plans only grew in March, when a newly cap is twice the average load emitted from force RockTenn and and all other former mill owners or their corporate heirs to named millsite redevelopment director the Missoula Wastewater Treatment Plant. “There is only so much nitrogen and pay for the cleanup. announced a new proposal at a commuAs for the discharge permit, the nity meeting. Steve Malsam, a Seattle- phosphorous that the river can absorb based developer who loaned money to before it becomes unacceptably pol- county hopes to have DEQ’s decision on M2 Green to purchase the Frenchtown luted,” says Chris Brick from the Clark the review by the end of the year. Nielsen says from his perspective it’s easy to see mill, explained that property owners now Fork Coalition. DEQ declined to comment on the dis- that the agency badly erred when moving envision “a small city”—not a wind turbine charge permit citing the pending appeal. to transfer the permit to M2 Green. factory—at the site. “Basically it’s treating (the permit) as With that backdrop, the Montana De- M2 Green also declined comment. In the local scientific community, a property right,” Nielsen says. “When the partment of Environmental Quality approved M2 Green’s application to renew there’s already a significant amount of con- permit goes away, you don’t just get to sell the former Smurfit operation’s wastewater cern about how historic operations at the it to somebody else. It’s not a marketable discharge permit. DEQ’s Final Notice of former Smurfit site have impacted the wa- thing to be able to pollute our water. Decision sets wastewater discharge stan- terway and aquatic life. In October, Mon- That’s just fundamentally the problem.” dards at limits that were in effect when the tana Fish, Wildlife and Parks issued a fish consumption advisory after finding rainpaper mill was running at full steam. jmayrer@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • May 22–May 29, 2014 [9]


[opinion]

Double down What the president can do right now for conservation by Bruce Babbitt

When a racist rancher in Nevada and his armed supporters can command headlines by claiming to own and control publicly owned lands, perhaps it’s time to remind Westerners about the history of the nation’s public-land heritage. Recall that it is we, the American people, who own the public lands that make up so much of our Western states. These great open spaces are the birthright of all of us, not just the residents of Nevada or Arizona or other Western states. The question of ownership of the public lands was settled by the founding fathers, in favor of you and me, by the Maryland compromise reached in 1781, and carried forward in the property clause of Article IV in the United States Constitution. On occasion, diehard malcontents such as Cliven Bundy emerge to promote so-called “Sagebrush Rebellions” to turn the public lands over to the states as a conduit for handing them out to resource raiders and private interests. Governors and state legislatures, most recently in Utah, are sometimes drawn into endorsing these movements, only to see them fade away in the face of public opinion. Now, while this latest fracas is fresh in our minds, let me speak up for the employees of the Bureau of Land Management who have been demonized by Fox pundit Sean Hannity and threatened by Bundy and his followers. BLM staffers are dedicated public servants who struggle with the unenviable task of juggling the conflicting demands of ranchers, miners, oil and gas companies, sportsmen and conservationists. They deserve our respect and our gratitude. I believe that the whole sorry Bundy episode has given us an opportunity to renew our commitment to conservation. We can do that by calling on President Barack Obama to take action to protect more of the special places on our public lands. He can begin by using the Antiquities Act to establish more national monuments. Some may counsel caution in light of the recent House passage of a bill by Utah Re-

[10] Missoula Independent • May 22–May 29, 2014

publican Rep. Rob Bishop to gut the law. However, the best way to protect and preserve the Antiquities Act is to use it visibly and vigorously, thereby demonstrating once again the broad public support it has enjoyed for more than 100 years. The president could start with California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s bill to protect a million acres in the Mojave Desert of California. Or he could take up Maine Democratic Rep. Mike Michaud’s

“I believe that the whole sorry Bundy episode has given us an opportunity to renew our commitment to conservation.” bill to protect the scores of small islands that host seabird colonies off the coast of Maine. The president can use his authority under the Antiquities Act to take these bills and their establishing language and designate the lands in questions as new national monuments. President Obama could also review the list of our existing national parks and monuments, many of which are in need of expansion because these areas are threatened by encroaching strip mining, drilling or other incompatible development. He could start out in the majestic expanses of southern Utah, where Canyonlands, Arches and Capitol Reef national parks all need additional lands to protect their archaeological sites and unique geological formations. And at Yellowstone National Park, the migratory herds of bison, elk and other wildlife all need more space, which can

be best obtained by designating the forest lands to the West as a national monument. There are many other areas where local residents are voicing support for new national monuments, including the BoulderWhite Cloud Mountains in Idaho, the Vermillion Basin in Colorado and the Owyhee Canyons in Oregon. The president also has the authority to add lands to our National Wildlife Refuge System. There is an urgent need to create a system of refuges to protect the endangered greater sage grouse that inhabits the sagebrush seas that stretch across public lands in seven Western states. In addition, the Antiquities Act could be used to protect fisheries and endangered coral system in our marine waters. Bristol Bay off western Alaska is the most prolific of our fisheries, the passage through which millions of salmon migrate to spawn throughout the river systems of Alaska. The little-known deep-water corals adjoining the Pribilof Islands in the Bering Sea also deserve enhanced protection. There is much to be done, and President Obama should not wait until the eleventh hour to act. He should start now by advancing proposals, explaining the urgency of conservation, generating the visibility of the issues at stake and asking all Americans to voice their opinions. He should invite Congress to take legislative action, making it clear that he will act if it doesn’t. A robust conservation program, following in the tradition begun by President Theodore Roosevelt, will be an enduring accomplishment for President Obama, a gift to future generations from his time in office. Bruce Babbitt, former Interior Department secretary appointed by President Bill Clinton, is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a syndicated column service of High Country News (hcn.org). He lives in Washington, D.C., where he is working on conservation planning in the Amazon River Basin as a fellow of the Blue Moon Fund.


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CURSES, FOILED AGAIN – Before three men who broke into a lingerie store in Houston, Texas, could steal anything, one with a revolver backed into another holding a rifle. Surveillance video showed the jolt caused the rifle to fire, “which then spooked the suspects,” police Officer Jeff Brieden said. Believing they were being fired upon, both armed men opened fire, discharging nearly a dozen rounds, one of which went through a mannequin, before all three fled. (Houston’s KHOU-TV) Australian police investigating the murder of Russell Hammond, 49, arrested Gareth Giles, 26, after they found his 18-point, step-by-step plan detailing the perfect murder, written two months before Hammond’s body was found. Supreme Court Justice Betty King said the murder plan corresponded with the actual killing in “a remarkable way.” (International Business Times) DIGGING A DEEPER HOLE – When a sheriff’s deputy arrested Blair Kelli Kaluahine, 36, after complaints he refused to stop groping a restaurant server in Palm Beach County, Fla., the suspect vowed to shoot the deputy. While being driven to the jail, Kaluahine changed tactics, the deputy said, offering him $3,000 and volunteering to paint and pressure wash his house “if I let him go without charging him.” (Palm Beach Post) LIFE’S IRONIES – Former New York City police officer Gilberto Valle, 30, who was convicted of conspiring to kidnap, murder, cook and eat women, was assigned to cook for his fellow inmates at Manhattan’s Metropolitan Correctional Center. The so-called cannibal cop earns 44 cents an hour making breakfast and lunch. (New York’s Daily News)

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After Brett Bouchard, 17, lost his right arm while cleaning a pasta-making machine at the restaurant where he worked in Massena, N.Y., the Elks Lodge raised money to help defray his medical bills by holding a pasta dinner. (Potsdam’s North Country Now) Members of France’s biggest pilots’ union called a month-long strike to protest the rules surrounding their right to strike. The pilots seek repeal of the law that forces them to give their companies 48 hours notice before any walkout. The airlines explained the notice allows time to notify passengers, but the union insisted it gives the airlines time to find replacements to minimize the walkout’s impact. (France’s The Local) After Sir Young, 20, pleaded guilty to sexual assault in Dallas, Texas, he faced up to 20 years in prison. Instead, Dallas County District Judge Jeanine Howard ordered him to serve 45 days in jail and then “start 250 hours of Community Service at the Rape Crisis Center.” (Dallas Observer) Former Illinois State Rep. Keith Farnham, 66, who twice sponsored bills calling for tougher penalties for child pornography, was charged with possession of child porn. In addition, authorities linked Farnham‘s email account to an online forum where users chat about their sexual preference. “12 is about as old as I can handle,” Farnham reportedly said in one chat. “I love them at 6 7 8.” In another, he declared, “I wish I had access to all the vids and pics ever made.” (Chicago Tribune) After successfully campaigning for a stricter anti-gay law, Ugandan pastor Martin Ssempa could be charged under that same law, according to Mbarara University of Science and Technology professor Paul Kaliisa. “Pastor Ssempa has, if anything, promoted homosexuality where he is allegedly trying to fight it,” Kaliisa said, pointing out that Ssempa repeatedly screens gay porn to his congregation, ostensibly to show it is evil. “Very soon people are going to get used to the idea at some point, men can have sex with fellow men, and armed with the knowledge Ssempa has distributed, they will know exactly what to do.” (Britain’s Gay Star News) WHEN GUNS ARE OUTLAWED – Police accused Jeffrey Willard Wooten, 50, of robbing a Waffle House restaurant in Norcross, Ga., with a pitchfork, which he used to force workers into the back of the restaurant while he grabbed the cash register and ran. “It wouldn’t be an offensive weapon in your garden,” police Chief Warren Summers said, “but it was in a Waffle House.” (Atlanta Journal-Constitution) TANGLED WEB – A 30-year-old employee at Japan’s biggest travel agency forgot to order 11 buses for a high school outing, so the day before the trip he wrote a note purporting to be from a student threatening suicide unless the trip was canceled. He gave the note to the principal, who decided to go ahead with the excursion as planned. After no buses arrived the next morning, regulators from the Japan Tourism Agency raided the offices of JTB Corp, which promised to punish the worker. The school, meanwhile, rescheduled its trip with a different agency. (Agence France-Presse) SOUNDS OF SILENCE – Sales of gun silencers are booming, according to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, which noted the market soared 37 percent in 2013, resulting in a ninemonth backlog for ATF approval of registrations. Silencers, which sell for between $750 and $1,300, are just one way gun owners are accessorizing their firearms purchases, according to gun-industry analyst Ben Shim of CRT Capital Group in Stamford, Conn. Other popular add-ons are flashlights, laser scopes, stock, pistol grips and rail systems for attaching even more accessories. (CNN) A new anti-noise law aimed at late-night revelers in Arlington County, Va., bans “wailing” after 2 a.m., also yelling, shouting and screaming. The County Board pointed out it’s the first in metro Washington, D.C., to target “over-conversation,” or the human voice. “We’re not Mayberry RFD,” board member John Vihstadt said, “but we’re not Manhattan on the Potomac either.” (The Washington Post) FURNITURE IN THE NEWS – After a police officer stopped a man who was riding a bicycle with a dining chair strapped to his back in Oklahoma City, a car slammed into the back of his patrol car and then took off. The officer checked that the bicyclist wasn’t injured, then chased the car to a gas station, where the occupants ran away. Authorities caught several juveniles but gave no explanation why the bicyclist had a chair strapped to his back. (Oklahoma City’s KFOR-TV) French lawmakers on the National Assembly legal committee voted to alter the country’s 210-year-old civil code to upgrade the status of pets, which currently is “no different to a chair or a table,” according to Reha Hutin, president of the animal-rights group Fondation 30 Millions d’Amis (30 Millions Friends Foundation). If the full assembly approves the measure, cats and dogs will go from “personal property” to “sentient living being.” (France’s The Local)

[12] Missoula Independent • May 22–May 29, 2014


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missoulanews.com • May 22–May 29, 2014 [13]


photo courtesy of Philip DeManczuk/The Vital Ground Foundation

[14] Missoula Independent • May 22–May 29, 2014


Mike Madel, left, and Seth Thompson with Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks pose with a radio-collared female grizzly captured for the NCDE population trend research study.

photo courtesy of Philip DeManczuk/The Vital Ground Foundation

n July 14, 1993, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service crew trapped a 2-year-old female grizzly bear in British Columbia’s Flathead Valley, a wild river-carved lowland just northwest of Glacier National Park. Officially, the 80-pound grizzly was designated Bear 286. Unofficially, the crew named her Irene. The team fitted Irene with a radio-collar, packed her onto a truck and drove 150 miles through the night to the Cabinet Mountains, a rugged swath of snow-covered peaks and conifer forests tucked in Montana’s northwest corner. The next morning, biologist Wayne Kasworm turned Irene loose near Lost Girl Creek. Rarely had such great expectations been pinned on a single animal. Irene had been designated one of the involuntary saviors of the Cabinet-Yaak Ecosystem, a 2,600-square-mile region on the MontanaIdaho border abutting Canada. It’s one of six designated recovery zones in the Lower 48 where the federal government aims to protect or boost threatened grizzlies. While some recovery zones, like the lands around Glacier and Yellowstone national parks, supported growing populations, bears in the Cabinet-Yaak were spiraling toward extinction. Kasworm estimated that only 15 bears roamed the Cabinets. Kasworm believed the only way to save the population was to supplement it with more grizzlies. The

O

In 2009, a camera trap captured this image of Irene with two yearlings. The line across the middle of the frame is barbed wire meant to snag bear fur to be used for DNA testing; the pile of sticks between the young bears hides a lure.

strategy, called augmentation, made biological sense, but it was politically contentious. The same year Irene moved to the Cabinet Mountains, a biologist who hoped to transplant bears to Washington’s North Cascades was spat on at a public meeting. “Nobody had ever moved bears to bolster a population before the Cabinet-Yaak program,” Kasworm recalls. “Obviously, it was a controversial idea.” Today, though, the strategy appears to have paid off: According to a recent DNA study, around 45 grizzlies now reside in the Cabinet-Yaak. Once on the verge of vanishing, the population is nearly halfway to 100—the threshold at which it would be deemed no longer at risk. The bears’ persistence gives scientists hope that the Cabinet-Yaak could someday serve as a node of connection for isolated pockets of grizzlies throughout the Rockies. Yet that optimism is tempered by serious challenges, none greater than keeping bears alive in a landscape shared with humans.

n 1987, when Kasworm first floated the idea of transplanting bears to the Cabinet Mountains, locals responded with suspicion. Previous recovery efforts had been blamed for the region’s floundering timber economy and the closure of backcountry roads.

I

photo courtesy of MT Fish, Wildlife & Parks

“When I was a kid, people would drive up to our house excited because they’d seen a bear,” says Bruce Vincent, a logger whose family has lived around Libby, a town of 2,700 that’s the Cabinet-Yaak’s largest population center, since 1904. “But attitudes changed. The bears became ‘goddamned grizzly bears.’” Vincent wasn’t opposed to augmentation, but he and the USFWS agreed that locals deserved a voice in how it was implemented. He and other community leaders, including elected officials and timber and mining industry representatives, created a committee to guide the plan. Kasworm agreed to delay relocation to hold meetings and modify the program. Finally, the committee consented to a conservative experiment: Starting in 1990, Fish and Wildlife would relocate four young females over a five-year period. If the bears stuck around and reproduced, the augmentation would proceed. If not, it would be years before the scientists got another shot. “That citizens’ committee was how we were able to pull this off,” Kasworm says. Initially, though, the bears didn’t cooperate: The first shed her radio-collar and disappeared, and the second was found dead just a year after being released. Irene, however, survived and stayed out of trouble. Kasworm gave biweekly updates on her whereabouts on a local radio show.

Then, in 1995, Irene slipped her collar. She was gone, the augmentation in jeopardy. For several years, scientists tried in vain to recapture Irene and two other introduced bears. Were they still alive? Had they wandered away, or stayed to reproduce? Nobody knew—until 2004, when a barbed-wire snare snagged a clump of hair that DNA analysis identified as Irene’s. She was alive, and as later hair-snares revealed, had borne nine cubs. Her cubs in turn gave birth to eight more. By 2012, Kasworm had identified 35 individual bears; 20 were Irene’s descendants or mates. Almost singlehandedly, she’d rescued the Cabinet population. Encouraged by Irene’s success, and with the community’s cautious blessing, Kasworm and Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks began relocating more bears, about one a year. They’ve now introduced 15 grizzlies altogether, most recently a 3-year-old male in 2013.

ugmentation only works, however, if the bears survive. The Cabinet-Yaak is just a fraction the size of the recovery zones centered around Yellowstone and Glacier, and though its human inhabitants are few in number, the ecosystem has been fractured by nearly 4,000 miles of open roads and scattered pockets of logging and mining. That frag-

A

“By 2012, Kasworm had identified 35 individual bears; 20 were Irene’s descendants or mates. Almost singlehandedly, she’d rescued the Cabinet population.” photo courtesy of Wayne Kasworm/USFWS

missoulanews.com • May 22–May 29, 2014 [15]


“The science shows that most grizzlies are killed near roads. You can’t keep bringing in bears without protecting their habitat.” –Mike Garrity, Alliance for the Wild Rockies

photo courtesy of Jean-Guy Dallaire

mentation makes fatal conflicts with wide-ranging bears almost inevitable. Grizzlies have been slaughtered by poachers, hit by trains and shot legally by people who felt threatened. Still more have been mistakenly slain by black bear hunters, or euthanized after developing a taste for human food. Altogether, at least 48 Cabinet-Yaak grizzlies have been killed by humans since 1982, about three times as many as have died from natural causes. In other words, the Cabinet-Yaak is losing bears as fast as it’s gaining them. “The main reason our population hasn’t grown much in the last 10 years is human-caused mortality,” says Kim Annis, bear management specialist at the Montana wildlife agency. That mortality, combined with the population’s narrow gene pool—granddaughters have bred with their own grandfathers—means augmentation won’t cease anytime soon. Though Kasworm predicts that “there will come a point when we can let this population go its own way,” he adds, “Right now, I can’t tell you when that point will be.” The vague timetable frustrates some locals who are ready for the recovery process, and resulting road restrictions, to be over. “We need to have

a frank discussion about what success looks like,” Vincent says. “Living with bears is part of the romance of calling this place home. But it’s hard for people to accept the management regime.” In a 2008 survey, over 70 percent of locals believed bears should be conserved, but less than half supported the federal goal of 100 grizzlies. The bears are hardly the sole point at issue: Volatile lumber markets have shuttered sawmills, and road closures have as much to do with maintenance costs as bears. Environmental groups also frustrate locals, especially the Helena-based Alliance for the Wild Rockies, which often comments on and challenges timber sales that threaten grizzly habitat. Between 2006 and 2008, it filed more lawsuits against the U.S. Forest Service than any other group did during that time—42 altogether. “The science shows that most grizzlies are killed near roads,” explains Executive Director Mike Garrity, who estimates the organization wins 85 percent of its lawsuits and appeals. “You can’t keep bringing in bears without protecting their habitat.” Kasworm, who fears the lawsuits are eroding local support for grizzlies, has supported timber projects that he thinks wouldn’t harm bears. Some,

[16] Missoula Independent • May 22–May 29, 2014

he says, could even benefit the animals by clearing space for huckleberries, a primary food source. “No bears are dying for lack of huckleberries,” retorts Garrity. “The limiting factor for grizzlies is secure habitat.”

ltimately, the most serious problem might be isolation. The Cabinets’ bears are cut off from populations that could grow their numbers and diversify their genetic pool. Although bears occasionally wander over from the Selkirk Mountains, the Whitefish Range and Canada, those nomads haven’t reproduced. Increasing the exchange of bears between ecosystems, says Chris Servheen, grizzly recovery coordinator for Fish and Wildlife, will help restore the health and resilience of bears throughout the Rockies. “This was all part of their continuous range,” he says. “Grizzlies shrank into these small units because of human impacts.” The Cabinet-Yaak population might be small, but its central location between Glacier, the Selkirks and Canada makes it an important piece in the bigger bear puzzle. Ryan Lutey, director of lands at Vital

U

Ground, a nonprofit that seeks to connect grizzly populations through strategic land acquisitions, dreams of a day when the region is capable of supplying bears to other ecosystems—especially the Bitterroot, a 5,600-square-mile recovery zone 120 miles south. Although the designated wilderness at its core makes it prime habitat, the Bitterroot has no grizzlies, in part because a planned relocation program fell victim to anti-bear politics in 2001. For now, simply surviving is challenge enough for the Cabinet-Yaak’s bears. One casualty occurred in November 2009, when an elk hunter shot an old female he claimed was threatening him. When Kasworm examined the corpse, he noticed small holes in its ears, where tags had once hung. This was one of his bears, and though he hadn’t seen her in 16 years, he suspected he knew which one. DNA analysis confirmed it: Irene was dead. Rather than mourn her death, though, Kasworm chose to celebrate Irene’s extraordinary life. “She contributed so much,” he says. “I don’t know where this population would be without her.” This story originally appeared in the May 8 issue of High County News (hcn.org).


or several years now, conversations about the future of grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone and Northern Continental Divide ecosystems have repeatedly turned to the same topic: the seeming inevitability of delisting proposals from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Populations in those areas have responded to decades of recovery efforts by gradually growing in size. The latest estimates put those numbers at 740 bears in the Greater Yellowstone and roughly 1,000 in the NCDE. Agencies at the state, tribal and federal levels continue to work in tandem to maintain and build on that success. During a meeting of Montana’s Environmental Quality Council May 15, Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Director Jeff Hagener offered an update on grizzly bear management with a nod to the delisting timeline. Hagener told officials at the meeting that he expects FWS to propose a rule removing Endangered Species Act protections for grizzlies in Yellowstone by late 2015. A similar rule for bears in the NCDE would likely follow in late 2016, Hagener added. Populations in the Cabinet-Yaak and Selway-Bitterroot ecosystems are still too far from recovery to receive similar considerations.

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“[This timeline] has been in numerous discussions recently, over the last year and a half,” Hagener told the Indy. Hagener’s update generated an Associated Press report and headlines across the state, but the details didn’t come as much of a surprise to those keeping an eye on the grizzly management discussion. Agencies have been on track to hitting those tentative dates for some time, completing a series of steps on the path to delisting. Just last year, FWS published a draft Conservation Strateg y Plan for NCDE grizzlies, drawing thousands of public comments. Officials are now in the process of incorporating that feedback into a final document they expect to release later this year. “That has to be done first because it demonstrates the existence of adequate regulatory mechanisms,” says FWS Grizzly Bear Recovery Coordinator Chris Servheen. Biologists will then conduct a threat analysis to determine if the species is still at risk before making any decision on whether to propose delisting. Servheen anticipates that step will probably begin next year. In the Greater Yellowstone, delisting is a far more advanced and familiar

issue. ESA protections were already lifted for the bears in 2007, but a legal challenge by several environmental groups led to re-listing two years later. Biologists have since completed a food synthesis study to address the concerns raised in court—primarily, the impacts of declining whitebark pine on grizzly bear diet and health. The results of that report prompted the Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee’s Yellowstone Ecosystem Subcommittee last November to hold a vote over offering “strong but conditioned support” for the advancement of a proposed delisting rule. The motion passed the subcommittee 10-4, with representatives from both FWP and Yellowstone National Park voting against. There have been some recent hiccups in the recovery process. Last fall’s government shutdown kept federal biologists out of the field for 16 days during the height of grizzly trapping and monitoring season. Members of the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team were forced to call off the final month of their fall trapping schedule in Yellowstone National Park, during which they’d intended to collect biological samples from and apply radio collars to grizzlies. The shutdown also delayed the release of

the Yellowstone food synthesis report due to the inability of some IGBC members to gather for previously scheduled meetings. Servheen refers to the setbacks as “kind of a bump in the road.” “We missed some tracking time, so we didn’t catch some bears we wanted to catch,” he says. “Just erodes our sample size somewhat. It wasn’t a crisis, but if that kind of foolishness continues, it will really make things difficult for us.” Despite how often 2015 and 2016 have come up in the delisting discussion, the timeline remains tentative. There are still steps for various agencies to complete, and FWS has repeatedly declined to speculate on when a proposed delisting rule might be expected even for Yellowstone grizzlies. “The Service is currently evaluating the status of grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem with regards to a potential delisting proposal,” says FWS spokesman Gavin Shire in Washington, D.C. “We do not have a timeline for this process. If proposed, the rule would go through a transparent process, including a public comment period.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com

photo courtesy of William S. Keller/NPS

missoulanews.com • May 22–May 29, 2014 [17]


[arts]

From Drummond to the rest of the world Artist Bill Ohrmann finally gets his due in Joe Nickell’s Tainted Revelations by Erika Fredrickson

Bill Ohrmann’s 1999 painting “Origins of Man” is one of several paintings included in Tainted Revelations, a coffee table book and biography by Joe Nickell about the Drummond artist.

S

even years ago, Joe Nickell stepped into Bill Ohrmann’s art museum and realized he had found an artist about whom everyone needed to know. Ohrmann, a 95-year-old retired rancher, has created hundreds of colorful paintings with images depicting war, animal cruelty, environmental degradation, racism and other human follies with unapologetic, often satirical criticism. Despite their harsh themes, the paintings—inspired, in part, by Van Gogh—are beautifully vibrant. Some even reveal Ohrmann’s romantic vision of an ideal world, marked by harmonious images of animals or, in some cases of karma, mankind getting its comeuppance. Nickell, a writer and former arts and entertainment editor at the Missoulian, compiled a collection of those paintings and other images of Ohrmann’s work for a coffee table book titled Tainted Revelations, named after one of Ohrmann’s pieces. It’s a striking tribute to a passionate artist, a Treasure State secret who lives outside of Drummond on a highway that feels like the middle of nowhere. The book includes an introduction by the Missoula Art Museum’s curator and longtime Ohrmann fan Steve Glueckert and a letter from Ohrmann to Nickell. Nickell’s biographical essay on Ohrmann doesn’t just give a timeline on the artist’s life, it also unveils the local legend surrounding the man—including the somewhat exaggerated story about how Ohrmann started painting when he was 76 years old. And the essay provides a peek into the psyche of an artist who began his life as a boy with little regard for the world, but who grew up to be passionate about how we should live. How did you first get to know Bill Ohrmann and his artwork? Joe Nickell: When I saw his show in ’99 at the [Missoula] Art Museum, I was pretty well blown away and then all of a sudden I realized that the person who had painted all this stuff was the cowboy in the corner with the cowboy hat and boots and the big smile across his face. It was so incongruous. I didn’t get a chance to meet him or talk with him then, but in 2007 [Missoulian pho-

tographer] Linda Thompson wanted to do a story about Bill, and so I went out there and did a story for the Territory section of the paper. It was at that point I realized somebody had to do a book about this guy. What inspired you to take it on? JN: What intrigued me, and what has always captured a lot of the media attention, is the idea of this guy who at 76 years old suddenly, out of nowhere, starts doing art. Well, that wasn’t really the story, as it turns out. He had painted before that, quite a bit. But as a rancher, he had such narrow windows—an hour here and an hour there—to do art and it bothered him that his paint would dry up on the palette in between sessions, so he did things that he could pick up and put down at a moment’s notice, like woodcarving. And so really it was because he was retired that he was able to focus on painting. A friend of his gave him a book of Van Gogh’s work and it kind of fired that specific inspiration of style for him, and so in 1996 it took off from there and that’s where there’s a core truth to the story. I had one professional goal in mind that has carried through my entire adult life and that was to have a book published by the time I was 40. I’m 45 now so I’m 5 years late—and even 40, when I first planned that in my 20s, seemed like I was giving myself way too long. And so here, with Bill, is a story of somebody who completely reinvented himself at the age of 76 and has gone on to establish what I think will ultimately be an international reputation. I think he will be internationally significant someday. That’s a story that could inspire, really, everybody. Why did you think it was important to get this book out into the world? JN: I feel like this work is so hard to access. It’s in a little gallery in Drummond, Mont., and he has no real interest in selling any of it. It’s not like some dealer from New York is going to walk in and say, “I’ll sell these for you.” Bill would probably say “I want to keep them here.”

[18] Missoula Independent • May 22–May 29, 2014

This was, to me, about making it possible for a wider audience to really see his artwork in a form that will also hopefully give good context. In your essay, you talk about Ohrmann as being mischievous. Can you talk about that aspect of his personality? JN: I consider myself a self-deprecating person, not a good self-promoter, I don’t like taking praise—Bill is all of those characteristics times 10. He is not about to take credit for anything. And so his defense mechanism to any sense of pride or hubris is this combination of exaggeration and kind of jokingly not telling the truth, but in ways that you can obviously tell he’s not telling the truth. He is adamant that he doesn’t have a beat on truth, despite the fact that he is obviously very opinionated in his work. More than anything I think he wants people to come into his gallery and walk out with their heads swirling with their own ideas. And that to me is the best thing that an artist can do. Does he talk about political and social issues or does he let his paintings do that for him? JN: He will talk about the issues. He won’t talk about the paintings much. He wants viewers to take their own ideas from the paintings. But if you ask him about proselytizing preachers, he’ll sure tell you. He might not tell you the first time he meets you, but there are some things that will get him really animated. He has no sympathy for people who abuse the land or animals in any way. And people are just animals in his worldview. His blissful visions of the future always include some bear eating a human just as a human shoots a deer, because that’s the cycle. What are the most striking pieces to you? JN: I think maybe the painting that would likely become most emblematic of him and his style and his place in history 50 or 100 years from now would be “How Colonels Become Generals.” It’s these soldiers burning

down a bunch of tipis and killing people and so it’s terribly dark, but it is such a skewering comment. And I have a very soft place in my heart for “Next Level of Civilization,” which is the painting of the aliens sitting in their living room with a bunch of human head trophies on the wall. You mention that Ohrmann is inspired by the romantics like Emerson and Thoreau. How does their vision fit into the dark theme? JN: It’s easy for me to talk a lot about the dark themes because I think I’m personally somewhat cynical about our civilization. I would even go so far as to say the challenging part for me was to make sure to include a representative sample of how often he paints things that are beautifully idyllic and hopeful. He’s very attracted to more romantic idealists and a lot of that viewpoint is even tucked into some of the darker paintings. He has a magical feel to his works that makes me think they’re meant to evoke an idea rather than being taken literally. JN: I think none of it can be taken completely literally, even though, because his paintings are very narrative, it’s tempting to do that. But if you look just beneath the surface of all of it there’s a message that is a lot more realistic than it might appear sometimes, and more hopeful even in the darkest paintings. I think in those paintings there’s the reflection of the fact that he knows we know better and can do better and he’s just asking us to do that. Joe Nickell’s Tainted Revelations: The Art of Bill Ohrmann is available at local bookstores, the Ohrmann Museum in Drummond and at MAM. An exhibit of Ohrmann’s work opens at MAM for First Friday, June 6, and runs through Oct. 12. An opening reception for the book and exhibit Thu., June 19, from 5 to 8 PM includes a 7 PM reading. efredrickson@missoulanews.com


[music] Times Run 5/23/14 - 5/29/14

Left field

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

The Grand Budapest Hotel

Benny makes Home. Run a lo-fi pop hit Benny the Jet Rodriguez sings poppy beach tunes for people who hate the beach and makes baseball movie references for kids who aren’t team players. The self-described “pot-punk” outfit, formed in 2012 in San Pedro, became a trio when the apparently tireless Todd Congelliere joined on keys. ( You may remember Con-

Nightly at 7 and 9 Sat matinee at 1 & 3

August 2013 album Home. Run. “Summer Hatin’ (happened so fast)” is the single, and I highly suggest watching the cute music video for it where a little girl in a Pikachu outfit plays a rock show for her stuffed animals. But “Aloha, Mr. Hand” is a standout track on Home. Run, both for being the longest at a whopping

God’s Pocket Nightly at 7 and 9 Sat matinee at 1 & 3

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Benny the Jet Rodriguez

2:48 minutes and having the most cohesive, driving arrangement of keyboards, crashy drums and sweetly sad lyrics. “My girl left me/ I don’t know what they’re asking me,” L. Freeman sings. I can’t make out half of the rest of the lyrics, but I’m happy to make up my own and sing along anyway. (Kate Whittle) Benny the Jet Rodriguez plays the VFW Wed., May 28, along with J. Sherri and The Hounds. 10 PM. $5/$7 for ages 18-20.

PAPA, Tender Madness room, except with the order only a studio can provide, then it dives right into piano- and guitar-led rock. Carefully selected synths fill the backdrop in songs like “Forgotten Days,” leaving the unmistakable feeling of New Order in your ears. On “I Am The Lion King,” singer Darren Weiss croons in his shaky way, “It’s not a means to an end, no, baby baby hold.” Though the best songs on the album have the Boss as a background, Tender Madness draws funky influences on “Cotton Candy” and even goes a little country on the last track, “Replacements.” Despite lacking a singular stylistic direction, PAPA’s just getting started, and this Springsteen-loving guy likes what he hears. (Brooks Johnson) PAPA plays the Top Hat Mon., May 26, at 9 PM. $10/$8 advance.

The Hard Pans, Budget Cuts Last year, Americana-rock staple The Gourds announced an indefinite hiatus, leaving legions of fans crying into each others’ beer mugs and wallowing in lament. Who the hell is going to headline River City Roots Fest this year?! Thankfully, those Gourds are an industrious bunch of fellas who wasted no time cranking out some tasty side projects. Budget Cuts, the first release from guitarist-frontman Jimmy Smith and multiinstrumentalist Claude Bernard’s new group, The Hard Pans, fills the gap nicely, with memorable hooks, gritty guitar licks and bar-beaten stories to spare. These guys are champions of smart but simple songs. The first track, “Ain’t Gonna Have It,” is a perfect

example, starting with the repeating line, “If I have what I have tomorrow, then I ain’t gonna have none tonight.” Not exactly master’s thesis material, but it sure is fun to sing. The lyrics get denser elsewhere on the album but the attitude stays the same, delivered with angular guitar tones, a steady backbeat and kissmy-ass drawl. Budget Cuts was released through Missoula’s High Plains Films, the company that made the recent Gourds documentary All the Labor. The album will offer a sigh of relief for any Gourdians feeling neglected, and is a tremendous stand-alone offering for any fans of low-key, busted-knuckle garage rock with a southern twang. (Jed Nussbaum)

7 DAYS A WEEK

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11:30 AM DEPART

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11:50 AM DEPART 12:00 PM DEPART Flag Stop DEPART 2:15 PM DEPART 1:00 PM DEPART 1:25 PM DEPART 2:10 PM DEPART 2:30 PM DEPART 3:10 PM ARRIVE

Evaro 8:05 PM DEPART Arlee 7:55 PM DEPART Ravalli Flag Stop DEPART St. Ignatius 7:40 PM DEPART Pablo 6:40 PM DEPART Polson 6:30 PM DEPART Lakeside 5:45 PM DEPART 5:25 PM DEPART Kalispell 4:45 PM DEPART Whitefish

SOUTH BOUND

If you’re a fan of the Boss like I am, it’s hard to keep it a secret. When you’re not wildly spilling beer while blasting Born in the U.S.A., you’re belting out a sultry karaoke version of “I’m on Fire.” (Really, there should be no guilt to this simple pleasure.) That kind of dedication makes it easy to dig the neo-Springsteenian PAPA, a rollicking duo from Los Angeles. On the band’s 2013 debut, Tender Madness, “If You’re My Girl Then I’m Your Man” wins for its simple story and hookfilled structure, reminiscent of Bruce’s most popular songs. It’s one of the last songs you’ll hear on the record, but the songs that come before it, with their folksy lyrics, subtle ballads and driving beats, make it worth the wait. Tender Madness begins with a brief instrumental opening that feels like the buzz and clatter of a bar-

TAKE THE BUS NORTH BOUND

gelliere as the head honcho at Recess Records and singer in FYP, Toys That Kill, Underground Railroad to Candyland and I forget how many other bands.) But Congelliere isn’t the star attraction here—Benny the Jet’s charm is largely because of the bouncy sense of humor, sugar-sweet vocals and stage presence of singer L. Freeman, who calls herself a “studdly queer babe.” Not every lo-fi band that claims to be poppy actually is, but catchy hooks abound on Benny the Jet’s

READ UP

Tickets online at greyhound.com or at a local ticket agent. For more info, call Shawna at 275-2877

FLATHEAD TRANSIT missoulanews.com • May 22–May 29, 2014 [19]


[music]

Island in the stream Missoula startup Gigee aims for an online niche by Erika Fredrickson

We pride ourselves in providing the highest quality medical marijuana available in Missoula and beyond. Grown with love by a trained + experienced plant physiologist.

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[20] Missoula Independent • May 22–May 29, 2014

Even 15 years ago, James Wasem and David Boone believed that musicians should be able to make a living on music alone. The two childhood friends grew up in Seeley Lake, started a band called Faucet when they were teenagers and, at 18, left the small town for Spokane, determined to make it work. But figuring out how to tour and market a band and end up with some money at the end continued to elude them. “Our experience on the road was feeling like as independent artists you’re the last one to get paid,” Wasem says. “There are so many expenses. And that’s the way it is with a lot of independent business owners in the arts community. There seems to be this notion that it’s all about the art. But it ends up being all about who can make the money off of the artists’ work.” He pauses, catching himself. “I guess that’s the negative view.” For Wasem and Boone, the positive view is that you can change the rules of the game. The friends recently started a new project with the goal of getting more money back into the hands of the artist. It’s an entirely different tack than what they’ve done before, an Internet startup called Gigee (as in “gig-y”) that allows musicians and other people to go into the website, set up an event and live stream their performances for online audiences. Members buy tickets to watch the show from the comfort of their home and the musician makes 80 percent of the ticket fees (the other 20 percent goes to Gigee to cover streaming bandwidth, site hosting, authentication and financial transactions). Because Boone and Wasem are adamant that what musicians do is worth something, they have a minimum ticket price of $3 (with few exceptions), and the number of tickets an artist wants to sell can range from 10 to 200. Wasem knows what you’re thinking: Why would you ever pay money to watch a concert on your computer screen? This has been one of the biggest questions Gigee has encountered. The idea, though, is to connect with fans who wouldn’t go to the live show anyway. They might live too far away. They might be housebound with kids or they’re too young to get into a bar venue, too old to go to a 10 p.m. show or just too lazy to leave the couch. “It’s never going to be a replacement for the live in-person, bass hitting you in the chest experience,” Wasem says. “There’s nothing that’s going to replace that and there should never be anything that replaces that, even if we get to the point of going totally virtual reality with it. You can have more kinetic interaction, great, but it’s still not going to be the same thing.” Since September, the Gigee founders have been in beta and development to test the potential benefits of the service. Gigee began with a vision about how artists could reach wider audiences, but the service goes beyond that. If you’re a fitness instructor, for instance, you could produce a live streaming yoga class. A nonprofit could offer a live feed into a benefit concert

(with the opportunity to contribute online) for those not able to make it in person. A food fanatic could teach a cooking class. So far, Gigee has streamed about 40 events, some from Missoula. One of Wasem’s favorites was when a singer-songwriter produced a live stream from his backyard. He had a small group of in-person friends hanging out on lounge chairs, but the majority of viewers were online. Another musician did a show from his living room in front of a roaring fire, though Wasem had to get him to tone down his strobe lights and fog machine—the camera’s focus and lighting couldn’t handle it. Wasem is still ironing out those glitches. But conceivably, with even just a cellphone, an artist could put on a show from a front porch or at the top of Waterworks Hill or on a beach. Still, there are ongoing barriers Wasem and Boone have to tackle. Besides trying to change perceptions about the online concert experience, Gigee also has

the challenge of trying to bridge the technology gap. A basic amount of technology knowledge is required for artists or venues to set up their own streaming. And once they are streaming, Gigee users have to remember to engage their online viewers. “You don’t want to feel like you’re in the nosebleeds, you don’t want to be a fly on the wall,” Wasem says. “It involves some simple things that are super critical, like lighting your space right or setting your backdrop properly or giving shout-outs to your online audience.” This week Missoula Community Access Television is producing a concert at Stage 112, a four-camera event with interspersed band interviews, and Gigee will be live-streaming the show for online audiences. It’s a chance to change hearts and minds and introduce this new service to Wasem and Boone’s old stomping ground—for free. “The goal is to set a benchmark for what’s possible in Missoula’s music scene specifically using the technology and venues that are already here with local resources,” Wasem says. “We want to provide a real life local case study of how this new media can be successful.” MCAT presents a concert with The Hasslers, Hunter and the Gatherers, Comatose Smile and BOYS Sat., May 24, at Stage 112 at 10 PM. Free. Stream it online at gigee.me.

efredrickson@missoulanews.com


[books]

Not blind Light looks beyond the shadows of war by Jo Deurbrouck

Last winter, a handful of marbles made internaWerner’s future is not bright. His drafty twotional news. They came to light among the belongings story orphanage stands in a gray-skied coal mining of an Amsterdam woman who’d been given them for town. It is “populated with the coughs of sick chilsafekeeping in 1942. Their owner was a playmate dren and the crying of newborns and battered trunks preparing to go into hiding from the Nazis, a girl inside which drowse the last possessions of deceased named Anne Frank. parents: patchwork dresses, tarnished wedding cutThose faded bits of glass reminded me that the lery, faded ambrotypes of fathers swallowed by the author of that iconic book, The Diary of A Young Girl, mines.” He has been told that at 15 he must descend into had been a child—a hunted, hungry child, to all appearances a victim—who had nevertheless dared to those same mines. All the orphanage boys are required to. He has been told it’s an honor to serve dream and create and perhaps even thrive. The day I heard about those marbles, I read the final Germany in this way. Growing up in that environment, Werner’s weakpages of a new novel set in Europe during World War II. It’s called All the Light We Cannot See by Idaho writer ness is heartbreakingly understandable. He will do anything to escape his and short story master assigned fate, even Anthony Doerr. And it, convince himself that too, reminded me of letting the Nazis send something important. him to school does not The novel centers make him a Nazi. on Marie-Laure, a girl Werner and Mariewhose enviable childLaure’s separate stories hood is spent in pre-inare shaped into chapvasion Paris. She is ters as small, dense and blind, but her world is polished as marbles, not dark. It’s vivid. Her then gathered into two father is a good man intricately interwoven made wise by his care timelines. In the first, for this preternaturally the two are children. In sensitive daughter. He the second they are crafts a rich childhood teenagers on the eve of for her. For instance, he a major Allied bombing builds a scale model of raid, one of the final their neighborhood, battles in the war. In sort of a three dimenthis later timeline their sional braille map, then paths finally intersect, walks his daughter out and although this meetinto the streets day ing is constrained by a after day so she can try lifetime of choices— to lead him home. The theirs as well as othfirst time she succeeds, All the Light We Cannot See ers’—it is also theirs to she is 8. She feels him Anthony Doerr seize. at her back as they hardcover, Scribner I sometimes grow reach their building. 544 pages, $27 frustrated with comHe grins silently at the plexly plotted novels sky, then picks her up because they demand that I attend more to weaving and swings her, victorious, through the air. Marie-Laure’s father works in a museum, and the their mass of threads into coherence than to enjoying museum collections become her toys and her teachers. the tapestry, the story itself. But Doerr’s tiny chapters She learns early that “To really touch something…is seemed almost to weave themselves. I found myself to love it.” As she grows, she hones her senses and rereading chapters often, but always for their spare, imagination until, at 16, she is able to give us this mag- pitch-perfect grace, never because I had lost a thread. ical vision: “…to shut your eyes is to guess nothing of Beyond the pleasure of watching its story take blindness. Beneath your world of skies and faces and shape, Doerr’s novel gave me a powerful gift. Like every buildings exists a rawer and older world, a place where other book I’ve loved that is set amid the horrors of surface planes disintegrate and sounds ribbon in shoals war, from The Things They Carried to Slaughterhouse through the air.” Five, All the Light We Cannot See refuses to be about The novel is also about Werner, a German orphan victims. It’s about the necessity of believing, against a whose childhood is as exposed and malnourished as preponderance of evidence, that there are none. Doerr Marie-Laure’s is sheltered and enriched. Werner is smart has written a modern classic about goodness in the and likable, with a startling mechanical aptitude. When shadow of evil and the beauty that can be wrought by he is 8, he finds a broken radio. He studies, then repairs, people fighting simply for a chance to thrive. then improves it until it conjures magical voices—illicit voices from outside Germany—from Rome, Paris, Verona. arts@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • May 22–May 29, 2014 [21]


[film]

No secrets Hoffman puts his all in God’s Pocket by Molly Laich

MAY 24

2014 8:30PM

SEAN KELLY’S

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[22] Missoula Independent • May 22–May 29, 2014

“That’s the last time I play shake-a-day.”

The citizens of the rough and tumble Philadelphia neighborhood in the 1970s known affectionately as God’s Pocket are really into their heritage. No matter the situation at hand, the local barflies, scrappers and steel workers are fond of pointing out that if you weren’t born there, you couldn’t possibly understand. The film by the same name is an adaptation of beloved author Pete Dexter’s novel, rendered with marginal success by screenwriter Alex Metcalf and directed by newcomer John Slattery. Most people know Slattery as Roger Sterling in AMC’s “Mad Men,” but he also directed a few episodes. ( You might also remember him as the actor who wanted to pee on Carrie Bradshaw in an early episode of “Sex and the City.”) The number-one reason to put on your shoes and see this flawed, but not without its charms, film is that it’s one of the last pictures Philip Seymour Hoffman gave us before abruptly leaving the earth earlier this year. After this, our last chances to see Hoffman are a small movie shot in Germany called A Most Wanted Man and the last of The Hunger Games trilogy, although that hardly counts. In God’s Pocket, Hoffman stars as Mickey Scarpato, a man who’s not from the neighborhood but seems to have assimilated just fine; he makes a living selling stuff that falls off trucks. Mickey’s married to Jeanie (played by the other “Mad Men” alumna Christina Hendricks) and they live with her son Leon (Caleb Landry Jones). From the moment Leon wakes up in the morning to his untimely death just a few hours later, Leon proves himself to be a thoroughly terrible person. I mean, his mom lovingly makes him a sandwich for work and the kid swallows a bunch of pills and throws the sandwich out the car window. What a brat. When the old black man he’s been taunting with racial slurs on the job site has had enough and takes him out in a swift, fatal blow, the witnesses on the scene unite—as is the custom of proud God’s Pocket citizens—and tell the cops it was an ordinary on-the-job accident that slayed the beast. If it sounds like I’m giving away a vital plot point, I assure you that’s not the case. The movie opens on the kid’s funeral, so he’s a marked man from the start, and

anything that happens thereafter unfolds plainly and in chronological order for everyone to see. This is a movie with no real secrets and no ambiguities for an intelligent audience to poke its head around. On the other side of the tracks lives Richard Shellburn, an alcoholic and pretentious news columnist played by Richard Jenkins. Shellburn’s been writing affectionately about the blue-collar workers of God’s Pocket for years and seems universally read and beloved by everyone. Shellburn brazenly drinks a pint of whiskey behind his desk at the office and shrugs off his boss’ gentle cajoling to maybe lay off the sauce a while. This was the 1970s, remember, when journalists didn’t live in terror of the sure knowledge that their jobs were marginalized and easily expendable. The fact that everyone in this town reads the newspaper feeds into my journalistic fantasies but still seems a little far-fetched. Everybody’s content to shrug off Leon’s murder as an accident but his mother Jeanie, who correctly intuits foul play, and now the competing storylines intersect when Shellburn’s assigned to investigate the story further. He’s attracted to Jeanie, because who wouldn’t be? Somewhere in this extramarital courtship, the movie has a thing to say about puny writers using their marginal celebrity to seduce women, and it’s not nice. Meanwhile, Mickey can’t afford to pay the coroner, who gets mad and throws Leon’s body on the street. If the sudden Weekend at Bernie’s inspired subplot strikes you as out of place tonally, you’re not alone. In some ways, a movie’s only job is to make you forget that you’re watching actors playing make believe, but with this one, given our grief and what we know of his untimely death, you can’t help but want to watch Hoffman act. As the cuckolded, put-upon man, Hoffman plays the part with a sharp, gruff accent and resigned coolness. He looks heavy and tired, and watching him in this way made me feel equal parts sad and grateful. Here was a man suffering on the inside but too committed to his craft to hold anything back. God’s Pocket continues at the Carmike 12.

arts@missoulanews.com


[film]

OPENING THIS WEEK BLENDED Adam Sandler and Drew Barrymore are back as an unlikely rom-com pair, this time as two single parents who meet at a resort. Also starring Wendi McLendon-Covey and Kevin Nealon. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex, Showboat. PARTICLE FEVER Bring your thinking caps for physicist Mark Levinson’s documentary of the effort involved to launch the Large Hadron Collider; contemplation of how and why we exist is involved. Oof. Not rated. Screening at the Roxy May 23-25 at 7:15 and 9:15 PM. PERSONA A nurse starts to absorb her patient’s personality in Ingmar Bergman’s enigmatic 1966 classic. Starring Bibi Andersson, Liv Ullmann and Margaretha Krook. Not rated. Screening at the Roxy May 23-25 at 7 and 9 PM. WHEN THE IRON BIRD FLIES Tibetan Buddhists contemplate the faith’s interaction with Western culture and ask how we can create a more compassionate world. Screening at the Roxy Sun., May 25 at 7 PM. X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST Wolverine gets sent into the past to prevent a world-ending catastrophe and possibly erase our memories of the last several terrible X-Men spinoff films. Starring Hugh Jackman, Patrick Stewart and, ooh, James McAvoy as beardy young Xavier. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex, Entertainer.

“Dammit, IKEA said this was a futon.” Ingmar Bergman’s Persona screens Friday through Sunday at the Roxy.

NOW PLAYING THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2 Peter Parker, Oscorp, supervillains, web shooting as weird visual metaphor for adolescence, crappy reboot, blah blah blah. Starring Andrew Garfield, Emma Stone and Jamie Foxx. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex. GOD’S POCKET A man in a rough Philly working-class neighborhood tries to deal with a dead son, an unhappy wife and dark-comedy mishaps. Starring Philip Seymour Hoffman, John Turturro and Christina Hendricks. Rated R. Wilma. (See Film.)

GODZILLA Rawr! The eponymous monster goes up against other monsters and humanity gets caught inbetween. Starring Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Elizabeth Olsen, Bryan Cranston. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex, Showboat. THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL Quirk-lovers rejoice, Wes Anderson brings us the lighthearted adventures of a mid-1930s concierge and a lobby boy. Starring Ralph Fiennes, F. Murray Abraham and Mathieu Amalric. Rated R. Wilma. MILLION DOLLAR ARM Jon Hamm plays a sports agent trying to recruit Indian cricket players to play MLB. Thanks, white

guy, for recognizing a minority’s potential. Also starring Aasif Mandvi and Alan Arkin. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex.

Mann and Kate Upton. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex, Showboat.

NEIGHBORS In an alternate universe where Seth Rogen is even remotely in the same league as Rose Byrne, they play a couple with a newborn baby who encounter comedic shenanigans when a frat moves in next door. Zac Efron plays the frat guy. Rated R. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex.

Capsule reviews by Kate Whittle.

THE OTHER WOMAN Gals team up to get revenge on the cheatin’ dude who’s been, er, three-timing them. IMDB Plot keywords include “woman in bikini,” so this sounds pretty intellectual. Cameron Diaz, Leslie

Planning your outing to the cinema? Visit the arts section of missoulanews.com to find up-to-date movie times for theaters in the area. You can also contact theaters to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 and Village 6 at 541-7469; Wilma at 728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603.

missoulanews.com • May 22–May 29, 2014 [23]


[dish]

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

The bitterness belongs by Ari LeVaux

Mon-Fri 7am - 4pm

(Breakfast ‘til Noon)

531 S. Higgins

541-4622

Sat & Sun 8am - 4pm

(Breakfast all day)

Memorial Day Sale! 20% Off

Hanging Baskets Lilacs • Planters • Roses Flowering Crabs

Congrats to our Mother’s Day drawing winners 1st Trish Girst 2nd Anne Rupkalirs 3rd Courtney Lang

1845 S 3rd W. • 542-2544 Thurs-Sat: 9-530 •

[24] Missoula Independent • May 22–May 29, 2014

Sun-Mon: 10:30-4:30

The bright glow of dandelions emerging in springtime is an important seasonal milestone for many creatures. For bees, the golden flowers are an important source of early season nourishment from pollen and nectar. For lawn keepers, the return of those persistent weeds marks the beginning of another frustrating summer. While it can be a stubborn adversary, a dandelion can be valuable friend as well, and not just to the bees. Humans use every part of the plant, making wine from the petals, tea from the root and salad and juice from the leaves. Each section of the plant has a different set of nutrients and compounds with demonstrated properties like antioxidant, antibiotic and even anti-carcinogenic activity. But despite their health perks and sweet smiles, dandelions are so bitter that few people will touch them. The bitterness issue isn’t exclusive to would-be dandelion eaters. Many of the most nutritious plant foods we eat are also the most bitter. Bitterness, like sweetness, is a taste that multiple substances can trigger. This is in stark contrast to the other three basic tastes: salt, umami and sour, each of which is triggered by a specific agent—sodium chloride, glutamate, and acid, respectively. Bitter is the only basic taste the purpose of which is to help us avoid eating things. While the other four tastes can all make food more delicious, adding something bitter to the mix rarely does. Bitter things can be made to taste better by adding other basic tastes. Chocolate combines bitter with sugar and kimchi mixes bitter with salt and sour. The consensus explanation for the unique culinary properties of bitter is that the ability to detect it evolved as a way of avoiding poisonous plants. Most toxic plant compounds are bitter-flavored. These compounds are not toxic by accident, but as part of the plant’s survival strategy, manufactured as a defense against hungry bugs and animals. And many of these toxins are the very same chemicals that are also beneficial to humans in the plants we eat. As the saying goes, the dose makes the poison, and the same goes for a substance’s medicinal qualities. The medicinal value of bitter things is hardly old news. Many of the bitters commonly used in mixed drinks were once used as medicine. Cultures around the world have similar traditions of foraging for greens, dandelions included, in springtime, bitter as they may be. Spring greens were thought to be a tonic, helping the body cleanse and recharge its micronutrient levels after the long winter with a plant-free diet. Before agriculture, when virtually all of the plants our ancestors ate were wild, humans had to deal with dietary bitterness on a daily basis. And perhaps it did their bodies good. But as we began cultivating wild plants and selecting for the traits they desired, bitterness was given the boot, writes Jo Robinson in Eating on the Wild Side: The Missing Link to Optimum Health: “Early

FLASH IN THE PAN

farmers favored plants that were relatively low in fiber and high in sugar, starch and oil.” Along with bitter flavor, deep pigmentation is also a telltale sign of nutrient-density. “The most nutritious greens in the supermarket are not green at all but red, purple, or reddish brown. These particular hues come from phytonutrients called anthocyanins,” Robinson writes, “powerful antioxidants that show great promise in fighting cancer, lowering blood pressure, slowing age-related memory loss, and even reducing the negative effects of eating high-sugar and high-fat foods.” Not all people perceive bitter the same way. In 2006 a gene was discovered, its existence having been suspected since the 1930s, that codes for a taste bud which makes carriers more sensitive to certain bitter compounds. One such trigger is glucosinolate, found in members of the cabbage family like Brussels sprouts and broccoli, but not in the chicory family of bitter greens, which includes escarole, endive, radicchio and dandelions. Those sensitive to bitter have a higher body mass index, according to one study, suggesting that their sensitivity to bitterness tilts their diets toward sweet things, rather than veggies. Another study found that those who taste less bitterness are more likely to be beer drinkers. Irrespective of one’s preferences in alcoholic beverages, a little booze will make the bitter go down easier. I’m no mixologist, but the long history of bitters in mixed drinks makes me wonder what would happen if one were to pour a shot of dandelion-leaf juice into a Bloody Mary, which normally contains Angostura bitters, along with other bitter donors like celery and olives. Indeed, part of the bloody magic is how the drink combines bitterness with every other basic taste: including sweet, sour, umami and salt. The blog Disco Ginferno presents a Dandelion Black Jack recipe in which roasted dandelion root is used as a substitute for coffee, with a dandelion flower garnish. Meanwhile, a beautiful gin and tonic-like cocktail, Impending Bloom, was created by Chicago bartender Sean Patrick Riley. It makes use of Dr. Adam Elmegirab’s Dandelion & Burdock Bitters, the website for which states that dandelion and burdock bitters were created in the 1300s by St. Thomas Aquinas. Dandelion wine has a poetic ring to it, and I love Ray Bradbury’s book by the same name (which has absolutely nothing to do with dandelion wine). But in my experience, dandelion wine generally tastes like any other homemade wine. Not very good, in other words. And it’s painstaking to make, as you need a bunch of dandelion flower petals. These petals do make the liquid look pretty, but I’m happy looking at a field of dandelion flowers, preferably buzzing with bees. And I’m happy chopping some dandelion greens into my salad, or my stir-fry. And when I drink my dandelion, it’s usually juiced, along with carrot, ginger and apple. The bitterness remains, but balanced with the sweet apple and carrot, and spicy ginger, the bitterness also belongs.


[dish] Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway 728-8900 (across from courthouse) Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 When the sun shines, the trail along the Clark Fork beckons me for a stroll. As I pass Boone & Crockett I realize one quick side step up the hillside and I can stop at Bernice's. Mmmmm. Iced coffee to help me kick into the last leg of my cruise and a chocolate chip cookie. Or an herb cream cheese croissant and a deli container of Bernice’s Signature Curried Chicken Salad. Tradition. While you embrace the sunshine remember Bernice's. Open 6a - 8p seven days a week. xoxo bernice. bernicesbakerymt.com $-$$ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Mon.–Fri., 7:30–4, Sat. 8-4. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. $ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$ Brooks & Browns Inside Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. 532-2056 This week at Brooks and Browns: Thursday 5/22 Big Brains Trivia 7-10 pm. Friday 5/23 Live Music with Andrea Harsell 6-9 pm. Monday 5/26 Martini Mania $4 Martinis Tuesday 5/27 Burger + Beer $8 Wednesday 5/28 $2 Wells & $2 PBR Tall Boys. Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 42 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$

$…Under $5

El Cazador 101 S. Higgins Ave. 728-3657 Missoula Independent readers’ choice for Best Mexican Restaurant. Come taste Alfredo's original recipes for authentic Mexican food where we cook with love. From seafood to carne asada, enjoy dinner or stop by for our daily lunch specials. We are a locally owned Mexican family restaurant, and we want to make your visit with us one to remember. Open daily for lunch and dinner. $-$$ The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and gluten-free options. Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. Mon-Sat 11am5pm. Downtown Missoula. $ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West 541-FOOD The GFS Deli features made-to-order sandwiches, a rotating selection of six soups, an award-winning salad bar, an olive & antipasto bar and a self-serve hot bar offering a variety of housemade breakfast, lunch and dinner entrées. A seasonally changing selection of deli salads and rotisserie-roasted chickens are also available. Locally-roasted coffee/espresso drinks and an extensive smoothie menu complement bakery goodies from the GFS ovens and from Missoula’s favorite bakeries. Indoor and patio seating. Open every day, 7am – 10pm. $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St. 549-7723 www.grizzlyliquor.com Voted Missoula's Best Liquor Store! Largest selection of spirits in the Northwest, including all Montana micro-distilleries. Your headquarters for unique spirits and wines! Free customer parking. Open Monday-Saturday 9-7:30 www.grizzlyliquor.com. $-$$$

SUSHI TUESDAYS 5pm to close • Reservations accepted.

Veggie options, too!

HAPPY HOUR 3-6PM M-F

BUY ONE GET ONE

FREE Not valid with other offers or certificates. Expires 6/1/14

In Russell Square • 830-3231 Like us on Facebook for more great deals!

MAY

COFFEE SPECIAL Heraldo's Mexican Food 116 Glacier Dr. Lolo, MT 59847 406-203-4060 HeraldosMexicanRestaurant.com Lunch and Dinner. Open 7 Days • Eat-in or Carry-out • Handmade Tamales • Burritos • Chimichangas • Flautas • Fajitas • Combo plates and MORE. See our menu at www.heraldosmexicanrestaurant.com. Order Your Holiday Tamales Now! Also sold year-round. Call for details. $-$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$

Organic Montana Liberal

Blend Shade grown Fair trade

$10.95/lb.

BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

BUTTERFLY 232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We’re the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we’ll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Iza 529 S. Higgins • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Contemporary Asian cuisine featuring local, vegan, gluten free and organic options as well as wild caught seafood, Idaho trout and buffalo. Join us for lunch and dinner. Happy Hour 3-6 weekdays with specials on food and drink. Extensive sake, wine and tea menu. Closed Sundays. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm, Dinner 5pm-close. Sat: Dinner 5pm-close. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over

SATURDAYS 4PM-9PM

MONDAYS & THURSDAYS ALL DAY

$1

SUSHI Not available for To-Go orders

missoulanews.com • May 22–May 29, 2014 [25]


[dish]

Alcan Bar and Grille HAPPIEST HOUR Ambience: On a recent Friday afternoon the aroma of fried food fills the air inside Frenchtown’s Alcan Bar and Grille. Bartender Kelsey Wigal chats with a man in a black cap and blue jeans who drinks a Miller High Life at the wooden bar, which, facing two large-screen TVs and emblazoned with cattle brands, looks inviting. Who you’re drinking with: Today, it’s Wigal, the man in the black cap and three Japanese tourists looking for pizza. Wigal says the crowd is typically composed of workingclass locals. Or, she adds, nodding toward the black-capped regular at the bar, “Not working.” What you’re eating: The Alcan doesn’t serve pizza, as Wigal tells the tourists. But it does offer an eclectic menu that features empanadas, hot wings and Indian tacos, among other things. We like the Wazoo Burger, made with local beef and topped with mushrooms, egg and ham. For $8, the Wazoo comes on a sesame bun and is served alongside a side of fries, tater tots or a salad. What you’re drinking: At $2.25 a pint, Bud Light is the most popular beverage among Alcan patrons, Wigal says. Regulars also like Kettlehouse’s Cold Smoke and Big Sky’s Summer Honey, both of which sell for $3 a pint. The Alcan also offers a full bar.

photo courtesy of Susie Rosett

What you’re doing: On Friday nights, performing karaoke. On Saturdays, dancing to live music. “We get cover bands that just sing whatever,” Wigal says. “And we get country bands. Every now and then, a group of fiddlers comes through.” Happy Hour specials: Monday through Friday afternoons between 4 and 6, the Alcan knocks 25 cents off all drinks. How to find it: Take I-90 west from Missoula for 14.7 miles to exit 89, turn left on Demur Street and make another left on Beckwith. The Alcan is at 16780 Beckwith. —Jessica Mayrer Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

Jimmy John’s 420 N. Higgins 542-1100 jimmyjohns.com Jimmy John’s - America’s Favorite Sandwich Delivery Guys! Unlike any other sub shop, Jimmy John’s is all about the freshest ingredients and fastest service. Freaky Fast, Freaky Good - that’s Jimmy John’s. Order online, call for delivery or visit us on Higgins. $-$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ Lucky Strike Sports Bar. Casino. Restaurant 1515 Dearborn Ave. 406-549-4152 Our restaurant offers breakfast, lunch and dinner. Are you looking for Delivery without all the extra charges? Call 549-4152 and talk to Jacquie or Judy for more details. You can also get lunch and Coffee from Bold Coffee in the parking lot. Come into the casino for your chance to play Plinko, Spin the Wheel, or Roll the Dice for machine play. Open Mon-Sun 7am-2am. $-$$ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. 543-7154 (on the hip strip) Did you know that the Missoula Senior Center serves delicious hearty lunches every week day for only $6? Anyone is welcome to join us for a delicious meal from 11:30-12:30 Monday- Friday for delicious food, great conversation and take some time to find a treasured item or garment in our thrift shop. For a full menu and other activities, visit our website at www.missoulaseniorcenter.org. The Mustard Seed Asian Cafe Southgate Mall 542-7333 Contemporary Asian fusion cuisine. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combine the best of Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences. Full menu available at the bar. Award winning desserts made fresh daily , local and regional micro brews, fine wines & signature cocktails. Vegetarian and Gluten free menu available. Takeout & delivery. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Parkers’ Restaurant 32 East Front Street Exit 153, Drummond 406-288-2333 Find us on Facebook, Yelp or Foursquare. Offering over 125 different Burgers. Parker’s burgers are ground fresh daily. We patty them 1/4 pound at a time. We also have 1/2 pound and pound burgers! Most burgers are available all the time too, except for seasonal items. We’re open Tuesday thru Saturday 11am to 8 pm. We’ve also got Steaks, Pastas, Salads, Daily Specials and NOT the usual variety of home made desserts. Private parties and catering available. $-$$ Pearl Cafe 231 East Front St. 541-0231 pearlcafe.us Country French meets the Northwest. Idaho Trout with Dungeness Crab, Rabbit with Wild Mushroom Ragout, Snake River Farms Beef, Fresh Seafood Specials Daily. House Made Charcuterie, Sourdough Bread & Delectable Desserts. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers

$…Under $5

[26] Missoula Independent • May 22–May 29, 2014

on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Philly West 134 W. Broadwa • 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday - Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. $-$$ Plonk 322 N Higgins • 926-1791 www.plonkwine.com Plonk is an excursion into the world of fine wine, food, cocktails, service and atmosphere. With an environment designed to engage the senses, the downtown establishment blends quality and creativity in an allencompassing dining experience. Described as an urban hot spot dropped into the heart of the Missoula Valley and lifestyle, Plonk embodies metropolitan personalities driven by Montana passions. Romaines 3075 N. Reserve Suite N 406-317-1829 www.romainessalads.com We provide you with the convenience of delicious salads, sandwiches and soups. Our salads include over 30 wholesome ingredients. Our homemade soups change with the season as different ingredients become available. If hearty sandwiches are your favorite, then visit Romaines for one of our braised meat sandwiches. We also have a Montana Hummus sandwich made from Montana grown garbanzo beans. Now serving omelettes and mimosas on Sunday, 11-4. At last, local, fresh, and healthy! $-$$ Roxiberry Gourmet Frozen Yogurt Southgate Mall Across from Noodle Express 317.1814 • roxiberry.com Bringing Missoula gourmet, frozen yogurt, using the finest ingredients (no frozen mixes), to satisfy your intense cravings with our intense flavors. Our home-made blends offer healthy, nutritional profiles. We also offer smoothies, fresh-made waffle cones, and select baked goods (gluten-free choices available). Join Club Roxi for special offers. See us in-store or visit our website for information. $-$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins 327-8929 Stop in when you’re in the neighborhood. We’ll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula’s best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 11-10 Sun 12-9. $$$ Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you’ll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over


Ave. Thursdays, noon-1 PM. $40 for six classes/$9 drop-in. The Thursday Young Artists After School Program gets the chilluns involved with all manner of art history and media. ZACC. 2:15-5 PM. $12/$10 for members. Ages 6-11. Call 549-7555 to learn more.

nightlife

May 22–May 29, 2014

Celebrate all things avian with the Community Bird Day Festival, featuring vendors, crafts, info stations and live birds on display, plus short films screening. Salish Kootenai College’s Joe McDonald Health and Athletic Center. 5-8 PM. Visit cskt.org/birdday.htm. Get elevated while John Smith plays tunes to sip by at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 6-8 PM. No cover. Missoula County Public Schools honors Native American Seniors with a formal dinner at the Holiday Inn, and guest speakers including Superintendent Denise Juneau and representatives from the governor’s office. 6-8 PM. Call 406-728-2400 ext. 1047 to learn more. Go the whole bundle and knock back a few buckets of suds when Captain Wilson Conspiracy plays the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6-8:30 PM. No cover. The Northern Plains Resource Council celebrates its ongoing fight against irresponsible coal development with a benefit dinner at Burns Street Bistro, 1500 Burns St., with local meat, live music, silent auction and cash bar. 68 PM. $15 suggested donation. Check out northernplains.org. Overcome your fears and take a stand when Treasure State Toastmasters mentors folks in leadership and public speaking. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free. Find the Yost-ess with the most-ess when Ron Dunbar and Travis Yost play the Top Hat dinner show. 7 PM. No cover, all ages.

Tag, you’re it. The Koffin Kats plays the Top Hat Fri., May 23, along with Against the Grain. 10 PM. $5.

THURSDAYMAY22 The Monster Flicks: Big Fires on the Big Screen festival features films and commentary from Arizona State University’s Steve Pyne. Wilma. Doors at 6:30 PM, introductory remarks at 7 PM. $5.

The Water Rights Permit and Change Application Workshop is oriented toward consultants, attorneys and landowners trying to change their water permits or rights. Wingate Hotel Conference Room, 5252 Airway Blvd. 9:30 AM-3:30 PM. $20, includes lunch. Register at 994-1910 or nsandve@montana.edu. The Family Promise and Southgate Mall Charity Golf Classic invites teams and individ-

uals to don the finest of plaid shorts and enjoy golf, a $5,000 putting contest, hole-in-one, food, awards and more. Ranch Club, 8501 Ranch Club Road. 11 AM. $150 per person/$20 for additional dinner guests. Proceeds benefit Family Promise of Missoula. Undo that keyboard hunchback with Lunch Re-Boot Yoga, a gentle practice with Mary Hanson. Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent

You don’t have to be a time lord or a doctor to check out the Missoula Time Bank, in which members exchange skills and services instead of money. Orientations at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center on the fourth Thursdays of the month. 7 PM. RSVP required at info@missoulatimebank.org. Check out missoulatimebank.org. Sentinel High School’s Spartan and symphony bands play an awards concert at the Margaret Johnson Theater in Sentinel at 7:30 PM. Awards banquet first in the school cafeteria at 6 PM. Free.

missoulanews.com • May 22–May 29, 2014 [27]


[calendar] The Bat Honey Puppeteers present Iron Will Tate, featuring a family encountering mishaps like drunken zoo animals and giant robots on a road trip. Roxy Theater. 8 PM. $10. Some language and mature themes, so this ain’t for the little ones.

2173 to learn more, or visit montanasquaredancing.com for schedule and registration info. Celebrate #tbt all weekend long at the Sapphire Mountain Men’s 34th annual Wildhorse Rendezvous, with fur trade-era camps, black powder shoot-

Little ones can go on a global journey, no passport needed, with the Cultural Friday series at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 1111:30 AM. May 23 features Bali. Clinical psychologist Joyce Hocker presents the Learning

The four-day Life Equals Change workshop with Kathleen Macferran and Mary MacKenzie will challenge you to “step toward and embrace the life you want.” Boulder Hot Springs Inn and Conference Center. Kicks off on May 23 at 6:30 PM.

During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, local talented folks may titillate your eardrums. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up. Pogo before you go-go to see snappy Illinois-based punk outfit Hospital Job (featuring the singer dude from the Copyrights) play the Palace, along with Buddy Jackson and guests. 9 PM. Free, but donations requested.

Get up close and real personal when Missoula Homegrown Standup, Jester Fest and Laugh For a Change present comedians Rochelle Cote, Tate Hoskins, Zack Jarvis and Matthew “Cuddleup” Kettelhake, along with Kyle Kulseth and Michael O’Boyle. Press Box, 835 E. Broadway. 9 PM. $7/$5 in advance at the Press Box.

Four buddies, 40 fingers and 22 strings add up to a raucous time when Ted Ness and the Rusty Nails play the Top Hat. 10 PM. No cover.

The whole crew will be brighteyed and bushy tailed at the Foxy Friday dance night at the Badlander. 9 PM. No cover.

It just so happens to be National Goth Day, so dig out that old black trenchcoat and head over to the VFW, where Finisher, Juveniles and American Falcon play tunes that, while likely not gothy, will probably be emotive in some fashion. 10 PM. Free.

NextDoorPrisonHotel and crow’s share present an antifolk antirebellion (that’s hopefully antisobriety) as a special Headwaters Dance Co. Underground Studio Series event. 7:30 PM. Park in the Greenough Park lot and find directions and more info at headwatersdance.net.

The annual Montana State Square Dance Festival invites one and all to swing around to Sentinel High School, with the 2014 theme of “Canoe Join Us?” Mike Sikorski has the call, and Larry and Susan Sperry are cuers. May 23-26, with grand march on Saturday at 7:45 PM. Call Tim or Dee at 251-

You’ll just havta to check out Zootown Improv to find out what’s in store for this sketch comedy and improv evening at the Stensrud Playhouse, 314 N. First St. W. 8 PM and 10 PM. Beer and wine bar available. 8 PM show is $12 per person/$22 for two, if bought in advance at stensrudplayhouse.com. 10 PM show is $5/free with 8 PM ticket stub. Boot-scoot-boogie all night long when the Soul City Cowboys play country at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W. 8 PM. No cover.

It’s going down, I’m yelling timber when the Badlander hosts the Drop Culture Dance Party, featuring hot trax and a rotating cast of DJs. $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight; women get in free before 10.

FRIDAYMAY23

an alcohol-free environment. 727 S. Fifth St. in Hamilton. 7:30-10 PM. $3. Call 240-9617 to learn more.

Vonnegut-quoting Oklahoma rapper Jabee tears it up at the Palace, along with Rude Max, B Mune and Wormwood. 9 PM. $5/$10 for ages 18-20. Tickets available at Ear Candy and standupmt.com. Not gonna reach my telephone. Lio Nicol plays Sean Kelly’s, along with Andrea Harsell, Fri., May 23, at 9 PM. No cover. ing, knife and tomahawk throwing and more. Five miles west of Alberton; take exit 70 at Cyr and follow the signs. May 23-26, with cannon shoot on Sunday at 1 PM. Free, all ages. MisCon 28 arrives for another intrigue-filled year of sci-fi gaming, panels, roleplaying and gaming at Ruby’s Inn, 4825 N. Reserve St., plus guests like stuntman Peter Kent and author Steven Erikson. May 23-26. $40 for adult four-day pass/$15 for youth ages 7-15. $20 for one-day pass/$10 for youth. Visit miscon.org. (See Spotlight.)

[28] Missoula Independent • May 22–May 29, 2014

from Ourselves course, oriented toward helping health care providers learn how to maintain distance and foster beneficial relationships with clients or patients. Meets at the Learning Center for Red Willow, 825 W. Kent Ave., from 11 AM-1 PM until June 13. $145. Call 721-0033 to learn more.

nightlife Chilluns can play while Mom and Pop get their whiskey on with Family Friendly Friday at the Top Hat, 6-8 PM. No cover. May 23 features Britchy.

$235/$199 if you register before April 11. Visit strengthofconnection.com, call 406-461-5135 or email aimee.m.ryan@gmail.com. Micah LaRae, Gerygone & Twig and Gil and the Spills all get together to play music and kick back at the E3 Convergence Gallery, 229 W. Main St., from 7-10 PM. Mandy Moonbird does live painting, too. Proceeds benefit Seedlings of Change. $5 suggested donation gets you tickets for Draught Works beer and an art raffle. All ages. Cut a rug when the Golden Age Club hosts dancing and live music in

Mine everybody for compliments when Copper Mountain Band plays the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave. 9 PM to close. The Mighty Flick delivers rockin’ tunes and tuneful rocking at the Dark Horse. 9:30 PM. Get down with the fish when Cash For Junkers play another raucous evening at the Union Club. 9:30 PM. No cover. Wet your tonsils and enjoy the local tuneage when Confidence Man and Darshan Pulse play Sean Kelly’s. 9:30 PM. No cover. Dance the polish off your shoes when the Koffin Kats, one of the most athletic rockabilly outfits around, plays the Top Hat along with Against the Grain. 10 PM. $5.


[calendar]

Cannabis Clinic

hard knocks

Medical Marijuana Card Renewal & New Patient Physician Appointments $125 In Kalispell on June 13

In case you’re interested in becoming a Hollywood stunt double, wikiHow.com has a 15-step guide. Step one is “develop a wide range of skills.” Follow that up with getting a black belt in karate, building your resume, taking a professional headshot and finding a mentor. The guide warns that long hours, travel and possibility of fiery death might be involved. (This sounds a lot like a career path in journalism, actually.) Or perhaps, judging by the careers of actual stunt doubles, stunt work is just something you fall—ha!— into. Consider Peter Kent, a Canadian-born dude with a life story that sounds a lot like a movie. He survived some nasty car wrecks in the ’80s, and moved to LA in search of

Professional and discrete Call 406-589-5516 for more information and to schedule your appointment

cannabisclinicbozeman.com

Peter Kent, left, with Arnold Schwarzenegger and James Cameron.

WHO: Hollywood stuntman Peter Kent WHAT: MisCon 28 WHEN: Q&A session Sat., May 24 at 10 AM WHERE: Ruby’s Inn, 4825 N. Reserve St. HOW MUCH: $20 for adult single-day pass MORE INFO: miscon.org

a movie career, without any experience or friends. While homeless and living at the Hollywood YMCA, Kent was spotted by director James Cameron. Kent wound up doubling for Arnold Schwarzenegger during the filming of Terminator, and went on to bePour some syrup on it when Pancakes, Vera, Muff Dive and Portland’s Marriage + Cancer (formerly Nucular Aminals) party down at the Weird Missoula showcase at the VFW. 10 PM. $5.

SATURDAYMAY24 Find out what the funk’s going down tonight when Reverend Slanky and Shakewell play the second annual Funk Off at the Top Hat. 10 PM. $5. Get hot coffee, baked treats, fresh produce and bump into all the friendly acquaintances you can handle at the Missoula Farmers Market, now running for 42 years. 8 AM-1 PM. The annual Montana State Square Dance Festival invites one and all to swing around to Sentinel High School, with the 2014 theme of “Canoe Join Us?” Mike Sikorski has the call, and Larry and Susan Sperry are cuers. May 23-26, with grand march on Saturday at 7:45 PM. Call Tim or Dee at 2512173 to learn more, or visit montanasquaredancing.com for schedule and registration info.

come Arnold’workout buddy, friend and stunt double for more than a dozen films. Kent called it quits on stunting after an accident nearly killed him while shooting 1996’s Eraser. Kent has since returned to his hometown of Vancouver, Canada, to produce, write, teach film classes to grade-school students and run Peter Kent’s School of Hard Knocks, which trains aspiring stunt doubles. Kent makes several appearances at the 28th annual MisCon sci-fi gaming, roleplaying and comic convention, including a Q&A session on Saturday morning. Perhaps you can ask him how to get involved in the business—or maybe you’re just content to sit back and listen to Kent’s real-life death-defying stories.

Celebrate #tbt all weekend long at the Sapphire Mountain Men’s 34th annual Wildhorse Rendezvous, with fur trade-era camps, black powder shooting, knife and tomahawk throwing and more. Five miles west of Alberton; take exit 70 at Cyr and follow the signs. May 23-26, with cannon shoot on Sunday at 1 PM. Free, all ages. MisCon 28 arrives for another intrigue-filled year of sci-fi gaming, panels, roleplaying and gaming at Ruby’s Inn, 4825 N. Reserve St., plus guests like stuntman Peter Kent and author Steven Erikson. May 23-26. $40 for adult four-day pass/$15 for youth ages 7-15. $20 for one-day pass/$10 for youth. Visit miscon.org. (See Spotlight.) Early rising produce-seekers, occasional walk-of-shamers and waffle sandwich lovers rejoice, the Clark Fork Market is back in action under the Higgins Bridge. Saturdays through October from 8 AM-1 PM. Check out some of the cutest li’l sailors you ever did see when Andy Smetanka displays and sells his cut-paper art pieces used in the making of the upcoming And We Were Young WWI film, along with T-shirts,

—Kate Whittle

silkscreens and possibly some Pearl Jam and Decemberists video artifacts. Prices range from $10-$100. Le Petit Outre, 9 AM-1 PM. Tap into the power of plants with the Herbal Foundation Root Program, a series of classes offering in-depth study of herbal medicine. Topics include aromatherapy, first aid, nutrition, gardening and medicine making. Meadowsweet Herbs, 180 S. Third St. at 9 AM. $525. Call 274-2009 or email gp@herbsmt.com to learn more. Big Sky Mind’s David Curtis presents A Day of Buddhist Practice: Cultivating Love and Compassion retreat, where beginners can learn about bringing Buddhist wisdom and compassion into daily routines. 102 McLeod Ave. 9:30 AM-5 PM, with a break for potluck lunch. Suggested donation $25-$50, or free for students. Call 961-5131 to register. Help plant seeds of peace with the flower planting volunteer events at the Ewam Garden of 1,000 Buddhas, from 10 AM-5 PM on May 24, 31 and June 14, 21. Monetary donations and gardening help are both needed. Visit ewambuddhagarden.org to learn more.

missoulanews.com • May 22–May 29, 2014 [29]


MISSOULA COMMUNITY ACCESS TELEVISION PRESENTS

[calendar] Learn about therapeutic plants with doTerra’s Intro to Essential Oils at the conference room of Noodle Express, 2000 W. Broadway. 10:30 AM12:30 PM. Free, but RSVP to Nancy at nancysmk@yahoo.com or 5442597. Missoulians join a global rally for sustainable agriculture and biodiversity, when the March Against Monsanto rally meets at the Missoula County Courthouse and parades to Caras Park for speeches and music. 14 PM. Visit the March Against Monsanto Missoula Facebook page.

2014 Summer Camps in Media (for kids ages 9 through 13)

Register for: MEDIA CAMP Monday thru Friday June 16th - 20th

ANIMATION CAMP Monday thru Friday July 7th - 11th

Movie-Making Camp Monday thru Friday July 28th - August 1st

All camps run from 1 to 5 pm The registration fee is $100 per week

Visit www.mcat.org or call 542-6228 to register or find out more

MCAT 500 N. Higgins, Suite 105 Downtown Missoula

nightlife Might as well do tomorrow’s drinking today when Mudslide Charley plays bluesy originals at the Bitter Root Brewery. 6-8:30 PM. No cover. Quit wasting away in Margaritaville and head on down to catch jazzy tunes from Triple Sec at Draught Works, 915 Toole Ave. 6-8 PM. No cover. The Stensrud Dinner Theatre presents Bullets for Broadway, a musical murder mystery. 314 N. First St. Performances on Saturday at 7 PM, with booze and dinner catered by Silk Road. $50, or discounted if purchased in advance. Tickets at stensrudplayhouse.com. Get hot to trot with the Missoula Tango’s dance, on the fourth Satur-

day of every month at Red Bird. 7:30 to 10 PM. No cover, with impromptu lessons for beginners. Learn more at tangomissoula.com. Boot-scoot-boogie all night long when the Soul City Cowboys play country for dancin’ to at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W. 8 PM. No cover. Mine everybody for compliments when Copper Mountain Band plays the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave. 9 PM to close. LA-based Missoula native Lio Nicol sings pop classics and soulful originals at Sean Kelly’s, along with Andrea Harsell. 9 PM. Knock back some party potions before Band in Motion plays the Union Club. 9:30 PM. No cover. Rock out with your locks out at the Queer Party: Wig Out edition. I call dibs on the Jareth from Labyrinth one. Palace. 9 PM. No cover. Plenty of corn in a jar will be on hand for the country/blues party with Good Old Fashioned and Black Mountain Moan at the VFW. 9 PM. No cover. You can be positively sure that Absolutely DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo will juice up the joint at the Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2-for-1 Absolut drinks until midnight. Now free. The Mighty Flick delivers rockin’ tunes and tuneful rocking at the Dark Horse. 9:30 PM.

Don’t miss your shot to mug for the cameras when Comatose Smile, Hunter and the Gatherers, Boys and The Hasslers play a show at Stage 112 to be filmed by four MCAT cameras and streamed live on giggee.me, a n d b r o a d c a s t o n M C AT a n d YouTube. 10 PM. Free. (See Music.)

SUNDAYMAY25 Juan Wauters, who you might remember from catchy li’l outfit The Beets, plays the VFW, along with Fuuls, Comatose Smile and Carson Luther. 9 PM. $3/$5 for ages 18-20. The annual Montana State Square Dance Festival invites one and all to swing around to Sentinel High School, with the 2014 theme of “Canoe Join Us?” Mike Sikorski has the call, and Larry and Susan Sperry are cuers. May 23-26, with grand march on Saturday at 7:45 PM. Call Tim or Dee at 2512173 to learn more, or visit montanasquaredancing.com for schedule and registration info. Celebrate #tbt all weekend long at the Sapphire Mountain Men’s 34th annual Wildhorse Rendezvous, with fur trade-era camps, black powder shooting, knife and tomahawk throwing and more. Five miles west of Alberton; take exit 70 at Cyr and follow the signs. May 23-26, with cannon shoot on Sunday at 1 PM. Free, all ages. MisCon 28 arrives for another intrigue-filled year of sci-fi gaming, panels, roleplaying and gaming at Ruby’s Inn, 4825 N. Reserve St., plus guests like stuntman Peter Kent and author Steven Erikson. May 23-26. $40 for adult four-day pass/$15 for youth ages 7-15. $20 for one-day pass/$10 for youth. Visit miscon.org. (See Spotlight.) Summer is nigh, so get lucky when the Voodoo Horseshoes play tunes at the Memorial Day weekend barbecue hosted by the Symes Hot Springs Hotel and Mineral Baths. 4 PM. Passthe-hat donation.

nightlife Montana-raised, Nashville-honed gal Kristi Neumann plays singersongwriter tunes at Draught Works, 915 Toole Ave. 5-7 PM. No cover. Bob Wills is still the king of Western swing, but our very own Western Union is looking to commit some regicide and make some fine old Western swing tunes for you all to dance by at the Missoula Winery, 5646 Harrier Way. 6 PM. $5. Sip on your daily dose of antioxidants while Kimberlee Carlson Jazz Trio plays the Ten Spoon Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive, at 6 PM. No cover. Knock back some ethanol alcohol for a scientific buzz with the The Missoula Area Secular Society’s viewing party of “Cosmos” with Neil deGrasse Tyson. 501 Lounge in the upstairs of the Iron Horse. Get there

[30] Missoula Independent • May 22–May 29, 2014


[calendar] and order your dranks at 6 PM or so. Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Starts at 8 PM with Front Street Jazz. Free.

MONDAYMAY26 The son of Johnny Cash’s manager explores talented but troubled figures in My Father and the Man in Black, screening as part of the Big Sky Film Series at the Top Hat. 8 PM. Free. The annual Montana State Square Dance Festival invites one and all to swing around to Sentinel High School, with the 2014 theme of “Canoe Join Us?” Mike Sikorski has the call, and Larry and Susan Sperry are cuers. May 23-26, with grand march on Saturday at 7:45 PM. Call Tim or Dee at 2512173 to learn more, or visit montanasquaredancing.com for schedule and registration info. Celebrate #tbt all weekend long at the Sapphire Mountain Men’s 34th annual Wildhorse Rendezvous, with fur trade-era camps, black powder shooting, knife and tomahawk throwing and more. Five miles west of Alberton; take exit 70 at Cyr and follow the signs. May 23-26, with cannon shoot on Sunday at 1 PM. Free, all ages. MisCon 28 arrives for another intrigue-filled year of sci-fi gaming, panels, roleplaying and gaming at Ruby’s Inn, 4825 N. Reserve St., plus guests like stuntman Peter Kent and author Steven Erikson. May 23-26. $40 for adult four-day pass/$15 for youth ages 7-15. $20 for one-day pass/$10 for youth. Visit miscon.org. Today is Memorial Day, when we commemorate the men and women who’ve fallen while fighting for the United States. Most government offices are closed. Brush up on your skillz with the Bridge Group for beginners/those in need of a refresher course. Missoula Senior Center, Mondays at 1 PM. $1.25.

nightlife Local Deadheads have got you covered when the Top Hat presents Raising the Dead, a curated broadcast of two hours of Jerry Garcia and co. from 5 to 7 PM. Free, all ages. Maintain dignity for best results at Super Trivia Freakout. Winners get cash prizes and shots after the five rounds of trivia at the Badlander. 9 PM. Free. Open mic at the VFW, 245 W. Main St., seems like a fine idea, especially with 2-for-1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. 10 PM. Free. LA-based rock outfit PAPA won’t preach when it plays Springsteenianstyled tunes at the Top Hat. 9 PM. $10/$8 in advance at the Top Hat,

Somebody needs you. Andy Smetanka displays and sells his cutpaper art pieces, used in music videos and his upcoming film And We Were Young , at Le Petit Outre on Sat., May 24, from 9 AM-1 PM. Rockin Rudy’s or tophatlounge.com. (See Music.)

TUESDAYMAY27 Photographer and adventurous fellow Lee Silliman presents The Yellowstone You’ve Never Seen, of horseback excursions into the park, with display and reception at the Trail Head, 221 E. Front St. 7 PM. The Smurfit-Stone Briefing with Chris Brick and Peter Nielsen gives the latest info on cleanup plans for the former Frenchtown mill. Clark Fork Coalition, 140 S. Fourth St. W. Noon-1 PM. Learn more at clarkfork.org. Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room for Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters, at 5205 Grant Creek Dr., and work on your elk-camp locution with the best. All are invited. Noon–1 PM. Free.

nightlife Put on your red shoes and dance at the Country Dance Lessons, Tuesdays at the Hamilton Senior Center. The shindig steps off at 6 PM with a line dance, followed by 7 PM twostep and 8 PM country cha-cha. Dust off that banjolin and join in the Top Hat’s picking circle, from 6 to 8 PM. All ages. Writers of all stripes can meet somewhere besides a bar for once with the Writer’s Group facilitated by

John Robinson at Bitterroot Public Library. 6:30-8 PM every other Tuesday. An aging king, his daughters and descent into madness are portrayed in the National Theatre Live’s production of Shakespeare’s King Lear. Screening at the Roxy on May 13, 20 and 27 at 6:30 PM. $16/$14 seniors/$11 students and kids. Visit mtlive.org. Hope you got your eatin’ pants on for the Top Hat’s Spring Craft Beer Dinner, with seven courses paired with seven tasters from Philipsburg Brewery. 7 PM. $40. Tickets at the Top Hat and tophatlounge.com. Take down the Athenian hegemony but pass on the hemlock tea at the Socrates Cafe, in which facilitator Kris Bayer encourages philosophical discussion. Bitterroot Public Library. 7-9 PM. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free pub trivia, which takes place every Tuesday at 8 PM. Here’s a question to tickle your brainwaves: Why is a grizzly bear the University of Montana mascot? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.) Declare who is Lord Smartypants of Them All and get a $20 bar tab at KBGA’s Tuesday Trivia night, which includes music and picture rounds, plus drank specials. VFW, 245 W. Main St. 8-10 PM. The one-man John Adam Smith band lays down the boogie at the Badlander. 9 PM. No cover, plus $3 Montgomery gin or vodka drank special.

missoulanews.com • May 22–May 29, 2014 [31]


[calendar] All manner of strange beasts shall be slurping dadcans when shoegazey outfit Lorelle Meets the Obsolete plays the VFW, along with Jesse the Ocelot, Mr. Soap and Javier Ryan. 10 PM. $4/$6 for ages 18-20.

WEDNESDAYMAY28 The 2014 MAM Award night honors Dean Emerita Sharon Alexander, fundraises for the annual campaign goal and includes refreshments and live music. Missoula Art Museum. 5-7 PM. Free, but RSVP to alison@missoulaartmuseum.org or 728-0447, ext. 221.

and Mega Trees, plus live painting by Neeko Page, art installations and sound design by Psychonaut Sound and Milkcrate Productions. Palace. 9 PM. No cover, plus pitcher special and free pool. (Trivia answer: Starting in 1897, UM promoted its athletic teams with live bear cubs, who were sometimes chained up and visibly uncomfortable during games. UM switched to costumed mascots in the ‘70s.)

THURSDAYMAY29

The Thursday Young Artists After School Program gets the chilluns involved with all manner of art history and media. ZACC. 2:15-5 PM. $12/$10 for members. Ages 6-11. Call 549-7555 to learn more.

Self-effacing poet BJ Soloy presents a reading at Shakespeare and Co., along with sci-fi fan Bridget Carson. 7 PM. Visit shakespeareandco.com.

nightlife

Singer-songwriter Luke Dowler plays pop-inspired tunes at the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6-8:30 PM. No cover.

Overcome your fears and take a stand when Treasure State Toastmasters mentors folks in leadership and public speaking. Community

When Finisher starts a residency, they end it, by golly, so the last May residency entails the CATCH, Shramana, Arctodus, and some Minneapolis outfit called Scaphe. VFW. 8 PM. $5/$7 for ages 18-20.

The Temple of Ruin Tour, featuring burlesque sensations Surlie Temple and Ruby Ruin, brings an “international trail of destruction and sparkles” to the Top Hat, along with our own sparkly Cigarette Girls. 8 PM. $10. Tickets at the Top Hat, Rockin’ Rudy’s and tophatlounge.com.

The Individuation and the Relationship with the Self class provides ways to develop a richer life and become more self-actualized. Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent Ave. Wednesdays from noon-1 PM until May 28. $100 for five-week series.

During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, local talented folks may titillate your eardrums. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 to sign up.

nightlife The Fiction Writer’s Workshop invites all aspiring scribes to get together for dynamic, interactive workshopping at the ZACC. Every other week on Wednesday at 6 PM through June 11. Open to everyone ‘cept for UM writing students (and really, they ought to be busy enough as it is). Free.

Cool off after summer shenanigans when Colorado six-piece Cold River City plays funky reggae tunes at the Palace, along with Mendelssohn. 9 PM. No cover. It’s going down, I’m yelling timber when the Badlander hosts the Drop Culture Dance Party, featuring hot trax and a rotating cast of DJs. $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight; women get in free before 10.

Sip a giggle water and get zozzled, baby, with the Top Hat’s weekly Jazz Night. 7 PM. Free, all ages. May 28 features Blue Moon.

Dar’s Dusky Cass CD/video release party includes help from Tonsofun, Enzymes, Traff The Wiz, Geeter Tron

Author and former Moscow correspondent for NPR Gregory Fiefer presents his new book, Russians: The People Behind the Power, as part of the Montana World Affairs Council’s Distinguished Speakers Program. Turner Hall. 7 PM.

The Whitefish Theatre Co. presents the ‘60s-era French farce Boeing Boeing, about flight attendants and a philanderer, at the O’Shaughnessy Center. May 28-31 and June 5-7 at 7:30 PM. $20. Visit whitefishtheatreco.org.

Get a calming start to the morning with the Weekly Sit Meditation at the Learning Center at Red Willow. Wednesdays, 7:30-8:15 AM. Previous experience meditating is helpful. $35 for four weeks/$8 drop-in.

The Whitefish Theatre Co. presents the ‘60s-era French farce Boeing Boeing, about flight attendants and a philanderer, at the O’Shaughnessy Center. May 28-31 and June 5-7 at 7:30 PM. $20. Visit whitefishtheatreco.org.

Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave., from 6-8 PM. No cover.

Ready for her close-up. New Zealand burlesque dancer Ruby Ruin performs in the Temple of Ruin tour, along with Denver’s Surlie Temple and Missoula’s Cigarette Girls. Top Hat. Thu., May 29, at 8 PM. $10. Knock it outta the park when Benny the Jet Rodriguez plays “pot-punk” at the VFW, along with The Hounds, Idaho Green and J. Sherri. 9 PM. $5/$7 for ages 18-20. (See Music.)

Undo that keyboard hunchback with Lunch Re-Boot Yoga, with Mary Hanson. Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent Ave. Noon-1 PM. $40 for six classes/$9 drop-in.

Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free. Tom Catmull plays his Missoulafied brand of tunes at Draught

You gotta sell some effing bananas. Submit events to Calapatra the Calendar Mistress at calendar@missoulanews.com at least two weeks in advance of the event. Don’t forget to include the date, time and cost. If you must, snail mail to Calapatra c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801. You can also submit online at missoulanews.com.

BIKE SALE MAY 11-24 20% OFF ALL NEW IN-STOCK BIKES PLUS, GET A 10% BONUS WHEN YOU TRADE IN YOUR OLD BIKE NORTH RESERVE & MULLAN IN THE NORTHGATE PLAZA PLAYITAGAINSPORTSMISSOULA.COM 406-549-1580

[32] Missoula Independent • May 22–May 29, 2014


[outdoors]

MOUNTAIN HIGH

A

s much as you might love the idea of pristine wilderness, untouched by humans, the fact is that to access any of it, you generally have to hike or bike on trails that require a whole lot of human labor to maintain. It’s often up to a handful of people to clear logs and repair washed-out sections on hundreds of miles of trails in forests throughout Montana. Trail maintenance budgets get chipped away every year, partly because of the increasing cost of fighting wildfires, leaving a big gap that needs to be made up somehow. The Bob Marshall Wilderness Foundation hosts “volunteer vacation” trips throughout the summer, where you can help with much-needed trail maintenance while meeting buddies and logging (ha!) some serious workouts. If you want, that is. Volunteer trips range from easier, front-country projects with day hikes and car-camping, up to strenuous 15-mile-plus highelevation backpacking junkets with intensive labor like

chopping and sawing. All trips are led by an expert and supported with food, which you’ll definitely need—hiking and trail work can burn around 6,000 calories a day. If this sounds intimidating, consider the single-day project on June 7, which will clear fallen trees in the Stanton Lake/Rescue Basin area. There’s 2 to 4 miles of hiking and less than 600 feet of elevation gain, and a barbecue at the Hungry Horse Ranger Station afterward. At the very least, you could gain an appreciation of how much work it takes to maintain a simple trail. And you can gain barbecue for dinner. —Kate Whittle The first Bob Marshall Wilderness Volunteer Vacation trip is May 27, and run throughout summer with trail maintenance, weeding and campground restoration projects led by a trip leader and pack support. Visit bmwf.org.

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

THURSDAY MAY 22 The Montana Natural History Center puts on the second annual Women’s Luncheon and Greenhouse Tour to support the Summer Outdoor Discovery Camp scholarship fund. 11:30 AM-1 PM at a private home. Visit montananaturalist.org.

FRIDAY MAY 23 Make sure your first time is special by attending First Timer Friday at the Freestone Climbing Center, 935 Toole Ave. in Missoula, at 7 PM. Free if it’s your first visit.

SATURDAY MAY 24 Insert your own Adaptation references when the Montana Native Plant Society hosts a carpool out to look for Cypripedium fasiculatum, a rare Montana orchid, near St. Regis. Bushwacking may be involved. Meet at the Town Pump gas station, 5310 Grant Creek Road, at 7:30 AM, and bring a waterbottle and snacks. Call Clare at 728-0189 for info. Riparian habitat is the feature of today’s Five Valleys Audubon trip out to Council Grove State Park. Meet in the northwest corner of the Adams Center parking lot for a 7:30 AM departure or at Council Grove at 8 AM. Call Terry for info at 2141194. You’ll be bright eyed and bushy tailed after Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which start at 8 AM every Saturday at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. Grab breakfast with other participants afterward. Free to run. Visit runwild missoula.org.

Test your mettle on Class V rapids during the Bigfork Whitewater Festival on the Swan River’s Wild Mile, which includes head-to-head time trials and slaloms. Visit bigforkwhitewaterfestival.com to learn more. The Missoulians on Bicycles are grinnin’ from ear to ear for the 78-mile Happy Trails ride, which meets at the Conoco in Lolo at 9 AM and cruises the bike path to Hamilton for lunch and return via side roads. Call Nancy for info at 549-0328.

SUNDAY MAY 25 All sorts of quackery is likely for the six-hour Five Valleys Audubon trip out to see waterfowl on the settling ponds outside Smurfit-Stone. Meet at the Adams Center parking lot to carpool before an 8 AM departure, or at the intersection of Mullan and Pulp Mill roads at 8:30 AM. Call Terry for info at 2141194. Since y’all been training hard for the upcoming May 31 TOSRV (riiiiiight?) the MOBI Turah Taper Ride is an easy 25-mile junket that meets at the Eastgate Center at 11 AM. Call Jan for info at 317-1408.

TUESDAY MAY 27 The always down-to-earth Montana Dirt Girls host a hike or bike ride every Tuesday at 6 PM. Check out the Montana Dirt Girls page on Facebook for ride info. calendar@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • May 22–May 29, 2014 [33]


[community]

As interesting as it was to follow #sochiproblems on Twitter, with tales of unfinished hotel rooms, yellow water, confusion and poor planning at the 2014 Winter Olympics, journalists’ reactions also reflected a hell of a lot of first-world privilege. Subpar contractors, government ineptitude and questionable drinking water are fairly normal parts of life around the world. Plenty of Russians were confused as to why American and British journalists were making such a big deal out of things that are everyday nuisances. According to a Feb. 9 article on Policy Mic, Russians had taken to calling the #sochiproblems jokes “zloradstvo,” or “malicious glee.” Even Putin admitted that his drinking water is rusty. Russia, which spans nine time zones, isn’t an easy place to understand. (I must admit that I followed the #sochiproblems hashtag with amusement until I read that Policy Mic piece.) Journalist Gregory Feifer, who’s spent years as an NPR correspondent in Moscow, depicts the current Putin era in his new book, Russians: The People Behind the Power. Reviews describe it as a “collagelike” book, with political assessments, historical snapshots and background on Feifer’s own family—his mother grew up in there in the Soviet Union era. Feifer gives a talk about the book on May 29, where he offers insight on the centuries of history and multiple cultures that shape

Russian character. We’d do well to listen to perspectives from people who live in foreign nations before we jump to making Twitter jokes. —Kate Whittle NPR correspondent Gregory Feifer presents Russians: The People Behind the Power Thu., May 29, as part of the Montana World Affairs Council's Distinguished Speakers Program. Dell Brown Room of Turner Hall. 7 PM.

[AGENDA LISTINGS] THURSDAY MAY 22 The Water Rights Permit and Change Application Workshop is oriented toward consultants, attorneys and landowners trying to change their water permits or rights. Wingate Hotel Conference Room, 5252 Airway Boulevard. 9:30 AM-3:30 PM. $20, includes lunch. Register at 994-1910 or nsandve@montana.edu. Missoula County Public Schools honors Native American Seniors with a formal dinner at the Holiday Inn, and guest speakers including Superintendent Denise Juneau and representatives from the governor’s office. 6-8 PM. Call 406-728-2400 ext. 1047 to learn more. You don’t have to be a time lord or a doctor to check out the Missoula Time Bank, in which members exchange skills and services instead of money. Orientations at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center on the fourth Thursdays of the month. 7 PM. RSVP required at info@missoulatimebank.org. Check out missoulatimebank.org.

low, 825 W. Kent Ave., from 11 AM-1 PM until June 13. $145. Call 721-0033 to learn more.

SATURDAY MAY 24 Big Sky Mind’s David Curtis presents A Day of Buddhist Practice: Cultivating Love and Compassion retreat, where beginners can learn about bringing Buddhist wisdom and compassion into daily routines. 102 McLeod Ave. 9:30 AM-5 PM, with a break for potluck lunch. Suggested donation $25-$50, or free for students. Call 961-5131 to register. Help plant seeds of peace with the flower planting volunteer events at the Ewam Garden of 1,000 Buddhas, from 10 AM-5 PM on May 24, 31 and June 14, 21. Monetary donations and gardening help are both needed. Visit ewambuddhagarden.org to learn more. Missoulians join a global rally for sustainable agriculture and biodiversity, when the March Against Monsanto rally meets at the Missoula County Courthouse and parades to Caras Park for speeches and music. 1-4 PM. Visit the March Against Monsanto Missoula Facebook page.

FRIDAY MAY 23

TUESDAY MAY 27

Clinical psychologist Joyce Hocker presents the Learning from Ourselves course, oriented toward helping health care providers learn how to maintain distance and foster beneficial relationships with clients or patients. Meets at the Learning Center for Red Wil-

The Smurfit-Stone Briefing with Chris Brick and Peter Nielsen gives the latest info on cleanup plans for the former Frenchtown mill. Clark Fork Coalition, 140 S. Fourth St. W. Noon-1 PM. Learn more at clarkfork.org.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

[34] Missoula Independent • May 22–May 29, 2014


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control 541-7387 MICKEY• Mickey is a Brown tabby and tan, short haired cat. He is around 7 years old. Mickey's special quality is that he weighs 22 pounds! He, by far, is one of the most overweight cats we have seen in a long time. He is declawed so he needs to be an indoor cat only. Come meet Mickey and you will be sure to fall in love! CRISSY•Crissy is our long-term resident at the shelter. She is around 3-4 years old and is short-haired. Crissy needs to be the only cat in the household. We keep Crissy in our lobby cage so that she is readily available to provide shelter guests with purrs and head rubs. Are you the family that she has been waiting so long for?

Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MontanaSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

FELICITY•Felicity is a black tiger, short-haired cat around 3-4 years old. Felicity would make a great mouser as she gets bored easily and needs a job to 2330 South Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59801 do. She is not happy living at the shelter Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) in a cage and desperately wants a home. 3708 North Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59808 Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri) If you are looking for a spunky cat who Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 9:00am-12:00pm (Sat) is independent, look no further.

BUCK•Buck has been at the shelter for almost a year. He was seized for cruelty back in July and just came up for adoption. He is a young adult who has lots of energy to burn. Buck is a wonderful dog who loves getting attention and going for walks. He hasn't had a good home in the past and truly deserves the best.

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

BOWSER•Bowser is a schnauzer mix around 5-6 years old. He is a little nervous with strangers but once he gets comfortable with you, he is truly a delight. Bowser would be the perfect dog for a family who appreciates having a lively dog in a small package. He loves to play with squeaky toys and go for walks.

Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

JASMINE•Jasmine is a young pitbull who came to the shelter because her owner was arrested. She is very playful and has lots of energy. Jasmine is looking for an active home that will take her for hikes and play fetch with her. She will welcome you with kisses when you meet her at the shelter.

www.dolack.com Original Paintings, Prints and Posters 139 W. Front St., Missoula (406) 549-3248

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana 549-3934 MOBY• Moby is a big, handsome orange tiger cat, who loves to lounge in the sunshine. (Preferably indoors, since he's declawed.) He lounges so much, in fact, that he's a little overweight - he weighs 20 pounds! He's on diet food right now to help him slim down. Surely your home has a nice sunny spot for this big fella?

Serving the community’s framing needs since 1993 using environmentally sustainable practices.

139 West Front St. inside the Monte Dolack Gallery, Downtown Missoula, MT

(406) 549-3248 • dolack.com

SPRINT• Sprint looks like a Muppet! When this 2-year-old terrier-mix was transferred to the shelter from California, he was scared and timid. Since then he's come a long way, but he'd still like a calm and gentle family where he can continue to come out of his shell. Do you have room for this shy little munchkin in your home?

CRAIG & AL•Craig & Al are sweet, shy 8-month-old brothers who would love to find a home together. This handsome black-and-white duo love nothing more than to snuggle and play together, and peer bashfully out at the world through their lovely yellow eyes. Bring this fantastic pair of kitties home today!

BEAR• Bear arrived at the shelter when his owner passed away. He's sad, but he's looking forward to finding a new family where he can spend time with people - and maybe some other dogs, too! This 8-year-old chihuahua encourages senior humans (who will qualify for the Seniors for Seniors program) to stop by and meet him!

ANGELICA•Angelica loves laps! This

ROCKSTAR•Rockstar has no problem living up to his name! This 3-year-old Plott hound is active, outgoing, playful, and loves attention from humans and other dogs alike. He has all the great qualities of a hound, and has plenty of energy. Don't you think you need to add a Rockstar to your family?

8-year-old torti also enjoys feather toys, and being part of the family. She qualifies for the Seniors for Seniors program, but don't tell her that. She says, "Senior? I'm barely middle-aged!" Come check out this beauty today.

MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

Missoula’s Locally Owned Neighborhood Pet Supply Store

www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275 East Broadway • South Russell • North Reserve

missoulanews.com • May 22–May 29, 2014 [35]


Photo by Jonathan Marquis

www.missoulanews.com

May 22 - May 29, 2014

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD ADD/ADHD relief ... Naturally! Reiki • CranioSacral Therapy • Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT). Your Energy Fix. James V. Fix, RMT, EFT, CST 360840-3492, 415 N. Higgins Ave #19 • Missoula, MT 59802. yourenergyfix.com CHERRY FESTIVAL SEEKING VENDORS Wanted: Seeking vendors for Polson’s Main Street Flathead Cherry Festival. This is a very well-attended event, held on the main streets of Polson July 19th and 20th. This unique celebration of Montana’s cherries draws many thousands of visitors each year. Three booth sizes are available, making this affordable for anyone. Local Montana-made and cherrythemed products are preferred. Food vendors welcome. To view and fill out an application, please visit www.flatheadcherry festival.com. Booth spaces are limited and our deadline is June 20, 2014. This is a two-day event and we reserve the right to refuse duplicate products. You can direct questions to vendors@flatheadcherryfestival.com, or 406-686-1155.

Donate used building materials to Home Resource, a non-profit that sells building materials and deconstructs buildings for reuse. Keeping stuff that ain’t garbage outta the dump! Open everyday. 541.8300. homeresource.org Missoula Medical Aid: Working for Health in Honduras. In 1998 we responded after a devastating hurricane. The need still continues, and so do we. Will you help? Volunteer or donate today! missoulamedicalaid.org Missoula Medical Aid: Working for Health in Honduras. Please donate now at missoulamedicalaid.org! PATIENCE AQUILA and GABRIEL ANTHONY please contact your father, David Anthony (Hill) Almeida. Cell # 509.270.3821. If any one knows them, please tell them about this ad.

proximately 5-6 years old, found on 5-17-14. Fosters needed! AniMeals is in desperate need of foster families for kittens. Fostering is a 1-2 month commitment, AniMeals supplies the food, litter, and other supplies, and you supply the love. Call 721-4710 or visit http://animeals.com/FOSTER.html for more information.

TO GIVE AWAY First Friday Free For All. Haircuts will be donated to the first 20 people in the door & you may receive one free haircut every three months. Noon to 4 pm, 1st come, 1st served. Mighty Aphrodite Salon. 406-7211866. 736A S. 1st W. Missoula (next to Free Cycles). Find us on Facebook.

In need of a broken foot brace, size medium. No insurance, no money. 207-7358

ANNOUNCEMENTS D’Vine Palette - PAINT . SIP . LEARN. *Pick painting *Tell friends to come *Drink & paint. 4 LOCATIONS! MISSOULA’S FIRST PAINT & SIP STUDIO. WWW.DVINEPALETTE.COM. 406.239.6856 Low Cost Vaccination Clinic sponsored by the Bitter Root Humane Association - Saturday 5/31/14 at the Bitter Root Humane Association Animal Shelter, 262 Fairgrounds Rd., Hamilton. Clinic kicks off at 10:00am and runs until 2:00pm. Vaccinations, nail trims, microchips, and name tags available. $15 dog booster, ra-

bies, or kennel cough; $25 cat booster with leukemia. All proceeds benefit the Bitter Root Humane Association. For more information, please contact the Shelter at 363-5311.

VOLUNTEERS Basset Rescue of Montana. Looking for a volunteer web master. 406-207-0765 facebook.com/bassethoundrescue

Found Cat: female, long hair tabby, light gray & brown, white patches on chest and paws, ap-

FREE

Estimates

Free Will Astrology . . .C4 Public Notices . . . . . . . .C6 Camp Sleepover . . . .C11 This Modern World . .C12

406-880-0688

bladesofglorylawncarellc.com

546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

I BUY

Honda • Subaru • VW Toyota • Nissan Japanese/German Cars Trucks SUVs

Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not

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"Nothing happens unless first we dream." – Carl Sandburg

Advice Goddess . . . . . .C2

Crossword . . . . . . . . . .C7

Most of us quit going to church for the same reasons you did. Then we found...

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P L AC E YOUR AD:

Walk it. 317 S. Orange

( :

Talk it. 543-6609 x121 or x115

Send it. Post it. classified@missoulanews.com

PET OF THE WEEK Cindy is just too cute to be real. With her adorable under-bite, perky ears, and sweet demeanor, she is simply irresistible. Although this Brittany Spaniel/Border Collie mix is nine years old, she still has plenty of energy, and loves going for walks. She also love snuggling and napping! Gentle and affectionate, Cindy has recently had the opportunity to visit a few schools and nursing homes, and has loved everyone she has met. Wouldn't you love to add this sweet girl to your family? Come meet Cindy today! www.myHSWM.org


COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

ADVICE GODDESS By Amy Alkon SNEER PRESSURE My boyfriend of eight years and I love each other to death and are very happy. Still, I'd be lying if I said it doesn't bother me that some people think we aren't in a "real" relationship because we aren't married and live separately. Is there a way to get them to respect the validity of our relationship without walking down the aisle? —Unwed Being married does allow for some convenient social shorthand. "Meet my husband" is easier than "If I eat a bad clam and end up puking my guts out at 3 a.m., this is the man who'll be holding my hair back." You can either rebel against convention or be accepted by the masses. Expecting to have it both ways is like running off to the jungle to live with revolutionaries and then demanding your tent be equipped with a microwave and a panini-maker. Is it possible that in some small way, you buy into the thinking of your detractors? Like one of those Louis Vuitton handbags that cost as much as a Ford Fiesta, a husband is a status symbol for women— one that women have been psychologically primed to want. Because women always have a high potential cost from any sex act—pregnancy and a mouth to feed— we evolved to look for reliable signals that a man will commit. The most reliable are what evolutionary psychologists call "costly signals"—those so pricey that only a man who truly loves a woman would be willing to shell out for. A diamond engagement ring is one of these, as is a man signing a contract to spend the rest of his life with one woman when it's in his genetic interest (and lots of fun!) to pursue a more McDonald's-like dream: "Billions and billions, um, serviced." This isn't to say your unaccredited love lacks value. In fact, a marriage license is like a dog license. If you don't get your dog a license, it doesn't mean he isn't real or worthy of a head scratch. But where unmarried partnerships do fall short is in the legal protections department. Rights that come with marriage—like the right to be by your partner's bedside in the hospital—will, for the coupled but unwed, require filling out documents to get. You can have a lawyer draw these up, but my boyfriend of 11 years and I used Nolo's WillMaker Plus 2014 software, which, for about $40, has the essentials—a will, a living

INSTRUCTION

will, and power of attorney for health care and for finances (designating somebody to, say, pay your mortgage if you get clocked over the head and are too comatose to do it yourself). Unfortunately, WillMaker Plus is PConly, but the health care directive and power of attorney only ask for names and contact info of the people you're designating, so if you have a Mac, you could fill this out on a friend's PC without worrying about identity theft. As for the will, Nolo's editor suggested putting in only the most general details about your accounts and attaching a letter with the specifics. In other words, with a little paperwork, it really is possible to not have your wedding cake and eat it, too—that is, if you can come to accept that your relationship's approval ratings will never match those of that married woman you see in the supermarket aisle screaming her husband into a small pile of ash.

ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563

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Ken's Barber Shop Children & Walk-in Welcome • 8:30AM-5:30PM • Tue-Sat Haircuts $10 • Beard Trims $5 Senior Citizens $9 1114 Cedar St, Missoula, MT• 728-3957

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ALONG CAME POLYGRAPH My girlfriend is really insecure and gets furious that I meet my ex-girlfriend for lunch a few times a year. This ex and I broke up years ago, but I'd never cheat anyway, and I've explained that I have zero romantic interest in her. Still, she's a good friend and part of my life. How can I make my girlfriend understand? —Badgered Some people read poetry; your girlfriend lives it: "How do I love thee? You'll soon find out—after I attach this car battery to your nipples and interrogate you about your lunch." Although your girlfriend's the one coming at you with the clamps, the truly unreasonable person in this relationship is you—dating an insecure person and then expecting her to act otherwise. Sure, you could encourage her to build her self-esteem, but until she hits bottom—like in a breakup—she probably has no incentive to change. You need to either accept the trade-offs—the hassle, the not being trusted—or leave and get into a relationship where, as the saying goes, "love means never having to say 'I'm sorry the shackle attaching you to the basement wall is a little tight.'"

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com www.advicegoddess.com

[C2] Missoula Independent • May 22 – May 29, 2014

EMPLOYMENT GENERAL AVON - Earn extra income with a new career! Sell from home, work, online. $15 startup. For information, call: 888-770-1075 (M-F 9-7 & Sat 9-1 central.) (Ind Sls Rep) childcare needed Looking for a responsible, good driver with basic life support skills to watch my three kids

part time this summer. Two to three days per week, weekdays only, 6 hrs per day. $11 per hour. References required. CLERKS/CASHIERS A Missoula business is seeking full time Clerks/Cashiers for the graveyard shift. No experience is required. Must be able to lift between 20 and 35 lbs and be well-groomed for high customer contact. Will provide excellent customer service, serve

as cashier, operate lottery machines, stock shelves and clean. Must be flexible and available for all days—days will vary. Will work 11:00 pm until 7:00 am. Pay is $8.50/hour, depending on experience. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10052017 Housekeeper **Providence is calling a Part-time Housekeeper to Providence St.

Patrick Hospital in Missoula, MT.** We are seeking a detailoriented individual to perform a variety of cleaning duties in support of maintaining a sanitary, safe and attractive health care environment. *This is a part-time position (32hours/week) with benefits. Evening shift.* Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10051822


EMPLOYMENT Housekeeper **Providence is calling a Temporary Full Time Housekeeper to Providence St. Patrick Hospital in Missoula, MT.** We are seeking a detail-oriented individual to perform a variety of cleaning duties in support of maintaining a sanitary, safe and attractive health care environment. *This is a temporary position (40 hours/week) with no benefits. Day shift.* Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10051823 Housekeeper - Part and Full Time Duties of the Housekeeper Include: Carries out duties of cleaning hotel rooms, hallways, common areas and grounds. These duties include, but are not limited to, the following: Strip and make beds, clean bathrooms and other areas of the hotel within allotted timeframe Replenish supplies such as towels, in room coffee supplies, paper and writing supplies Perform seasonal deep cleaning tasks. Clean lobbies, lounges, rest rooms, corridors, elevators, and other common areas of the hotel Competencies include ability to respond to customer needs, excellent customer service skills. Demonstrate ability to interact professionally with coworkers, guests and management. Qualifications include high school degree or GED and three months experience in hospitality or related field and/or equivalent combination of education and experience. All job offers are contingent upon successful completion of a drug check. This is a safety sensitive position. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10052005

PROFESSIONAL Fleet Mechanic MECHANIC (Greenough, MT) compensation: DOE Position Title: Fleet Mechanic Job Description: Fleet Mechanic is responsible for the day-to-day maintenance of all ranch and resort vehicles and equipment. Must have the ability to prioritize work and schedule accordingly. Will be working on passenger vehicles, 15 passenger vans, trucks, tractors, heavy equipment, including ATV’s, boats, jet ski’s, golf carts, small engines, lawn and garden equipment. Performing diagnostic work, trailer repair and wiring; 12 volt electrical systems, and generators. To include but not limited to diesel, 4 stroke and 2 stroke experience. Classification: Non-exempt, Full-Time Regular Position Qualifications/Responsibilities: • 3+ years experience in auto/passenger vehicle repair, not an entry level position • Must have own required hand and air tools to perform a timely and quality repair • Road test vehicles to ensure quality of repair and safety of employees and guests v Tire repair, mounting and balancing • Must be able to use computer and email • knowledge of

parts look-up, ordering parts and documentation of all work performed • Keeping track of shop tools and replacing when they are lost or broken • Helping cattle crew with farming and cattle operations when possible • Filling out proper paper work for necessary repairs, and parts • Keeping track of outgoing fuel records and employee fuel codes • Purchasing and keeping track of fuel • Buy and sell all vehicles and equipment as needed • Licensing all new vehicles and renewing all old vehicles • Metal work and fabrication • Keep track all vehicles, and reallocate when necessary • Write and enforce resort vehicle policy • Keep current and accurate service records on all vehicles and equipment • Personally responsible for the condition of the Lipson fleet Educational Requirements: • High School Diploma or GED • 2 years of mechanic based education or equivalent • 4 years work base experience Licensure/Permits Required: • Valid MT drivers license • CDL a plus • Welding certification a plus Perks of Working for Paws Up • Free shuttle service to Missoula (when resort is open) • Complimentary lunch provided to all employees (when resort is open) • Housing provided when available • Carpool reimbursement opportunities • Bonuses provided throughout the year (when available & qualified) To Apply: Please respond with your cover letter and resume (in a single .doc file) to hrmanager@pawsup.com. Be sure to include your name in the resume file title. List Fleet Mechanic in the subject line. Guitar Instructor The Missoula Childbloom Guitar Program is seeking a part-time instructor to work with children ages 5-12. Applicants must have music reading skills, an understanding of classical guitar technique, and experience teaching music to children. Email office@missoulachildbloom.com for more information and to schedule an appointment to drop off a resume(no e-mailed resumes please). OFFICE ADMINISTRATIVE/RECEPTIONIST Missoula insurance office seeking reliable individual for the position of part time to full time OFFICE ADMINISTRATIVE/RECEPTIONIST. Exceptional customer service skills, multi-line telephones, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Word, and other computer tasks. Must have a minimum of two years office experience with those having insurance office experience preferred. Greeting customers, making telephone calls, answering telephones, data input, filing, taking messages, operating various office equipment and other duties as assigned. $10.00 Hourly. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10051981 Patient Service Representative The Patient Service Rep telephones Home

Health patients who are scheduled for clinical visits the next day. Position confirms visits and patient availability, then notifies clinicians and Scheduler of cancellations and changes. Work schedule is from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. weekdays (approximately 20 hours per week). Requirements include 1 year of general office experience, plus working knowledge of office productivity software. High school graduate preferred. Prior experience in a medical setting preferred. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10052013 Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor The Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor provides guidance and counseling to individuals with disabilities in achieving employment outcomes. Duties are as follows: Counseling and Guidance bull; Identifies consumersrsquo; unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, and abilities related to planning and achieving employment outcomes. bull; Counsels consumers on job and career development goals. bull; Counsels consumers on disability adjustment and employment issues. bull; Provides guidance to help consumers understand disability rights and promote self-advocacy. bull; Reviews labor market information and shares occupational information with consumers. bull; Assesses consumersrsquo; mental health status and implements crisis intervention strategies as necessary. bull; Guides students, parents, and education staff to prepare students for transition services. bull; Maintains contact with consumers during job training and placements and resolves potential issues. Plan Development and Case Management bull; Develops rehabilitation plans based on clientsrsquo; aptitudes, education levels, physical abilities and career goals. bull; Manages a culturally diverse caseload including outreach to rural communities. bull; Monitors and documents consumersrsquo; progress and goal obtainment. bull; Monitors onsite job coaching. $16.75 $19.80 Hourly Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10051606

SKILLED LABOR Truck Engine Technician WESTERN STATES TRUCK CENTERS. This position is responsible for the maintenance and technical repair of on-highway trucks and engines (including diagnosis, removing, repairing, installing, disassembling, assembling, rebuilding, reconditioning according to specifications, and applying parts reusability guidelines). (Responsibilities vary by technician level and are assigned according to skill.) Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10051980

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION Annual Wildland Fire Refresher Training 406-543-0013 www.blackbull-wildfire.com

HEALTH CAREERS Certified Nursing Assistant **Providence is

calling a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) Surgical Pediatrics, to St. Patrick Hospital and Health Sciences Center in Missoula, MT.** We are seeking a compassionate and caring individual to provide safe and reliable routine daily care to patients admitted to the hospital. *This is a 24 FLEX night shift position, with 24-36 hours per week.* Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10051697 Certified Nursing Assistant **Providence is calling a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) Surgical/Pediatric, to St. Patrick Hospital and Health Sciences Center in Missoula, MT.** We are seeking a compassionate and caring individual to provide safe and reliable routine daily care to patients admitted to the hospital. *This is a per diem position, with no guaranteed hours or benefits.* Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10051695 Certified Nursing Assistant Oncology **Providence is calling a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) - Oncology, to St. Patrick Hospital and Health Sciences Center in Missoula, MT.** We are seeking a compassionate and

caring individual to provide safe and reliable routine daily care to patients admitted to the hospital. *This is a .9 FTE night shift position, 36 hours per week, from 7:00pm-7:00am, with rotating weekends required.* Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10051694 Electrocardiograph Technician - 32 Hours **Providence is calling a Electrocardiograph Technician to St. Patrick Hospital in Missoula, MT.** We are seeking a detail-oriented ECG Tech to perform non-invasive, electrodiagnostic tests for use in the diagnosis of heart disorders. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10051941 Laboratory Manager **Providence is calling a Laboratory Manager to Providence St. Patrick Hospital in Missoula, Montana.** The Laboratory Manager is responsible for planning, coordinating and directly supervising the activities of the Laboratory department in accordance with Providence philosophy, objectives, policies, procedures and standards. Conducts clinical diagnostic testing on patients, and residents to included blood draws and specimen collections for processing. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10051942 Process Improvement Consultant **Providence is calling a Full Time Process Improvement Consultant to St. Patrick Hospital in Missoula, MT.** We are seeking an individual to partner with managers and employees to facilitate, create and imple-

ment process and systems improvement (Lean Healthcare). Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10051940 RN - IV Therapy The IV Therapy Nurse is responsible for on-going patient/caregiver education, problem solving and direct patient nursing care for infusion patients. IV nursing services are provided both in the office and in the residences of patients throughout the greater Missoula area. Schedule is part-time (approximately 16 hours per week), including rotating coverage of weekends, holidays and oncall. Requirements include Montana RN license (BSN preferred); and valid driver license, auto insurance & reliable transportation. 2 or more years of RN experience, with recent infusion experience in chemotherapy, pediatric or medical/surgical areas preferred. CRNI certification preferred. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10052039

ing a Surgical Tech to collaborate with an Operating Room (OR) team in providing efficient, safe, cost effective patient care outcomes before, during and after surgery. *This is an on-call variable shift, with no guaranteed hours or benefits.* Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10051696

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SALES Part Time Sales/Photography Mom365 has an opening for a sales & customer service oriented person to take babies’ first official photos at Community Medical Center in Missoula, MT. We’ll provide you with photography training and you’ll use our equipment. Please submit your resume to: Careers@mom365.com Surgical Technologist **Providence is calling a Surgical Technician to St. Patrick Hospital in Missoula, MT.** We are seek-

Lifeguards/Swim Instructors, Currents & Splash Montana. Apply at

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CASE MANAGER FT position providing targeted case management/ coordinating support services to persons age 16 or older w/developmental disabilities in Helena, MT. Minimum requirements: BA in Human Services and 1 year exp w/individuals with disabilities. M-F: Varied hours $15.14-$15.39/hour. Closes: 6/3/14, 5p.

SHIFT SUPERVISOR FT Position supporting persons with disabilities residentially. Supervisory exp preferred. $9.60-$9.85/hr. Tu: 3p- 10p, W: 1p- 8p, Th: 3p-10p, F: 10a-10p, Sa: 8a-3p. Closes: 5/28/14

DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONAL Supporting Persons with Disabilities in Enhancing their Quality of Life. Evenings, Overnights & Weekend hours available. $9.00-$10.40/hr.

CSW FT position assisting adults w/disabilities in their day to day living. Experience working with adults preferred. M-F: 7a- 3p. $9.25-$9.65/hr. Closes: 6/3/14, 5p. Valid MT Driver License, no history of abuse, neglect or exploitation Applications available at OPPORTUNITY RESOURCES, INC., 2821 S. Russell, Missoula, MT. 59801 or online at www.orimt.org. Extensive background checks will be completed. NO RESUMES. EOE.

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • May 22 – May 29, 2014 [C3]


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT

By Rob Brezsny

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): During the next 12 months you will have exceptional opportunities to soak up knowledge, add to your skill set, and get the training you need to pursue interesting kinds of success in the coming six to eight years. What's the best way to prepare? Develop an exciting new plan for your future education. To get in the mood, try the following: make a list of your most promising but still unripe potentials; meditate on the subjects that evoke your greatest curiosity; brainstorm about what kinds of experiences would give you more control over your destiny; and study three people you know who have improved their lives by taking aggressive steps to enhance their proficiency.

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): The moon shows us a different phase every 24 hours, which makes it seem changeable. But in fact, not much actually happens on the moon. It has no atmosphere, no weather, no wind, no plant life, no seasons. There is some water, but it's all frozen. Is there anything like this in your own life, Cancerian? Something that on the surface of things seems to be in constant motion, but whose underlying state never actually shifts or develops? According to my analysis, now would be an excellent time for you to revise the way you understand this part of your world, and then update your relationship with it.

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Have you thought of organizing a crowdfunding campaign to boost your pet project or labor of love? I suggest you get serious about it in the next four weeks. This coming phase of your cycle will be a favorable time to expand your audience, attract new allies, and build a buzz. You will have a sixth sense about how to wield your personal charm to serve your long-term goals. More than usual, your selfish interests will dovetail with the greater good—perhaps in unexpected ways.

c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Years ago I had a Virgo friend who was a talented singer. She had technical skill, stylistic flair, and animal magnetism, making her worthy of being a lead vocalist in almost any great band. And yet when she was asleep and had dreams of performing, she often found herself standing in the shadows, barely visible and singing tentatively, while her back-up singers hogged the spotlight at center stage. Moral of the story: Some of you Virgos are shy about claiming your full authority. It doesn't always come easy for you to shine your light and radiate your power. And yet you can most definitely learn to do so. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to make progress in this direction.

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): "There is always an enormous temptation in all of life," writes Annie Dillard, "to diddle around making itsy-bitsy friends and meals and journeys for itsy-bitsy years on end . . . I won't have it. The world is wider than that in all directions, more dangerous and bitter, more extravagant and bright." Your assignment in the coming weeks, Libra, is to transcend whatever is itsy-bitsy about your life. The alternative? Head toward the frontier and drum up experiences that will thrill your heart and blow your mind.

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): "We are all searching for someone whose demons play well with ours," writes novelist Heidi R. Kling. That's good advice for you to keep in mind these days, Scorpio. Those little imps and rascals that live within you may get you into bad trouble if they feel bored. But if you arrange for them to have play dates with the imps and rascals of people you trust, they are far more likely to get you into good trouble. They may even provide you with bits of gritty inspiration. What's that you say? You don't have any demons? Not true. Everyone has them.

f

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): "When people tell you who they are, believe them," writes blogger Maria Popova (Brainpickings.org). "Just as importantly, however, when people try to tell you who you are, don’t believe them." Those suggestions are especially crucial for you to keep in mind these days. You are entering a phase when your best relationships will be up for review and revision and revitalization. To foster an environment in which intimacy will thrive, you've got to be extra receptive, curious, tolerant, and tender. That's all! Not hard, right? A good place to start is to proceed as if your allies know who they are better than you do—even as you ask them to return the favor.

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): "Kludge" (pronounced klooj) is a slang word that refers to a clumsy but effective fix for an engineering problem. It's a cobbled-together solution that works fine, at least temporarily, even though it is inelegant or seems farfetched. Let's use this concept in a metaphorical way to apply to you. I'm guessing that you will be a kludge master in the coming days. You will be skilled at making the best of mediocre situations. You may have surprising success at doing things that don't come naturally, and I bet you will find unexpected ways to correct glitches that no one else has any idea about how to fix.

h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I hesitate to compare you to your fellow Aquarian Kim Jongil. When he was alive and ruling North Korea, he was an egomaniacal tyrant. You're definitely not that. But there are certain descriptions of him in his official biography that remind me of the kinds of powers you may soon exhibit. He was called The Great Sun of Life and Highest Incarnation of Revolutionary Comradely Love, for instance. Titles like that might suit you. It is said that he invented the hamburger. He could command rain to fall from the sky. He once shot eleven holes-in-one in a single round of golf, was a master of gliding down waterslides, and never had to use a toilet because he produced no waste. You may be able to express comparable feats in the coming weeks. (Do it without falling prey to excessive pride, OK?)

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): If there was a Hall of Fame for scientists, physicist Isaac Newton (1642-1727) would have been the charter member. He was like Elvis Presley and Chuck Berry were to rock and roll, like Babe Ruth was to baseball. The theory of gravity and the three laws of motion were his gifts to the world. He made major contributions to mathematics and optics, and was a central figure in defining modern science. There is also a legend that he invented the cat door, inspired by his pet felines. Whether or not that's true, it serves as an excellent metaphor for this horoscope. It's an excellent time for you to apply your finest talents and highest intelligence to dream up small, mundane, but practical innovations.

Christine White N.D. Elizabeth Axelrod N.D.

BLACK BEAR NATUROPATHIC

ARIES (March 21-April 19): I believe your persuasive powers will be stronger than usual in the weeks ahead. The words coming out of your mouth will sound especially interesting. I also suspect that your intelligence will get at least a temporary upgrade. The clarity of your thoughts will intensify. You will see truths you have been blind to in the past. Innovative solutions to long-running dilemmas are likely to occur to you. The only potential snag is that you might neglect to nurture your emotional riches. You could become a bit too dry and hard. But now that I've warned you of that possibility, let's hope you will take steps to ensure it won't happen.

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i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Even if you had a sensitive, nurturing mommy when you were growing up, and even if she continues to play an important role in your life, now would be a good time to learn how to mother yourself better. You are finally ready to appreciate how important it is to be your own primary caregiver. And I'm hoping you are no longer resistant to or embarrassed about the idea that part of you is still like a child who needs unconditional love 24/7. So get started! Treat yourself with the expert tenderness that a crafty maternal goddess would provide. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

[C4] Missoula Independent • May 22 – May 29, 2014

Bioenergetic, CranioSacral & Physical Therapies. 30 years experience. Bodymind-spirit integration. Shana’s Heart of Healing, Shana Dieterle, LPT 396 5788 Escape with Massage- Swedish, Deep Tissue and Reiki. Open days, evenings and weekends. Insurance accepted. Janit Bishop, LMT • 207-7358 • 127 N Higgins JIN SHIN JYUSTU THERAPY. Eliminate pain & stress on all levels with safe, healing touch. Animals like it too! Hot Springs, MT. Will travel. Lila: 406-741-5709 KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killer Complete Treatment Program/ Kit. Effective results begin after spray dries. Available: Hardware Stores, Buy Online: homedepot.com PEACEFUL HEART YOGA & PRESCHOOL First Friday Kids Art & Music show: May 2nd 4:30 - 6:30 pm. Saturday Morning Yoga Series 11:00 12:15 starts May 3. 406-239-9642, PeacefulHeartYogaMissoula.com; 725 W. Alder #3.

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Soft Touch Therapy Readings by Leslie

Psychic/Medium-Reiki/ Spiritual Healer. I provide a psychic/medium reading, a healing with a soft, loving laying on of the hands approach. All I do, I do within The Light Of God. I consider my abilities a gift from God to provide love, healing and blessings for each and every person I am honored to connect with and during all sessions I do.

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If you think you are ready for EMDR, call our Mental Health Counselor Lois Doubleday, LCPC today!

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BODY, MIND & SPIRIT

MARKETPLACE Thrift Stores

Sunday, June 7th Level 1 $75 Noon to 4 pm

1136 W. Broadway 930 Kensington

SPRING SALE! 111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

at Garden Mother Herbs

(406) 529-3834 Space is limited. Please call to reserve space.

MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS Great pyrenean mastiff puppies available now, $150. Hamilton upright piano, great condition, $550. Looking for Free untreated logs, stumps or branches. 7452202

CLOTHING Kid Crossing offers exceptional value on nearly new children’s clothing and equipment. Providing ecofriendly clothing exchange since 2001. Reduce • Reuse • Recycle • Buy Local! 1940 Harve • 406-829-8808 • www.kidcrossingstores.com

MUSIC Banjo lessons not just for guys anymore. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

PETS & ANIMALS AniMeals Seniors for Seniors program waives the adoption fee for anyone 65 and older adopting a cat 9 years old and older. All cats are spayed or neutered, vaccinated, and microchipped free of cost before they’re adopted. For more information call AniMeals at 721-4710. Basset Rescue of Montana. Senior bassets needing homes. 406-207-0765. Please like us on Facebook... facebook.com/bassethoundrescue

OUTDOOR GEAR The Sports Exchange - Great Gear. Great Prices. Buy • Sell • Trade • Consignment. 111 S. 3rd W., Missoula, on the Hip Strip. 406-721-6056

SUSTAINAFIEDS Kid Crossing offers exceptional value on nearly new children’s clothing and equipment. Providing eco-friendly clothing exchange since 2001. Reduce • Reuse • Recycle • Buy Local! 1940 Harve • 406-829-8808 • www.kidcrossingstores.com Natural Housebuilders, Inc. Energy efficient, small homes, additions/ remodels, higher-comfort crafted buildings, solar heating. 369-0940 or 642-6863. www.naturalhousebuilder.net

Natural Housebuilders & Terry Davenport Design, Inc. Building net zero energy custom homes using solar thermal & solar PV.

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Root Beer Float 1/2 oz. Kahlua 1/2 oz. Galliano 3 oz. Soda Water • 1 oz. Cola Mix in a rocks glass with ice & float with a bit of cream.

AUTOMOBILE CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car.com 1970 Chevrolet Chevelle SS 396, low original miles, 4 speed manual, $9500, serrana5@outlook.com / 406-8386228.

Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

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HABA STILTS ADJUSTABLE FOR EASY LEARNING

829 S. Higgins On the Hip Strip

406.543.1179 Mon-Sat 10:30-6 • Sun 12-4

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montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • May 22 – May 29, 2014 [C5]


PUBLIC NOTICES MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP14-99 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DONNA M. SMITH, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed CoPersonal Representatives of the above named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to JOHN E. SMITH and DEBORA J. PLASTER, the Co-Personal Representatives, return receipt requested, c/o Reely Law Firm, P.C., 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 15th day of May, 2014. /s/ John E. Smith, Co-Personal Representative /s/ Debora J. Plaster, Co-Personal Representative REELY LAW FIRM, P.C. 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201 Missoula, Montana 59801 Attorneys for Co-Personal Representatives By: /s/ Shane N. Reely, Esq. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-14-435 Dept. No. 4 Karen S. Townsend Notice of Hearing on Name Change of Minor Child In the Matter of the Name Change of William Riley Johnson: Tandy Trogdon a/k/a Tandy Roush, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court to change a child’s name from William Riley Johnson to Riley Jay Trogdon. The hearing will bee on 06/03/2014 at 3:00 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Dated: 4/21/2014 /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Darci Lehnerz, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 1 Cause No. DP-14-78 NOTICE OF HEARING IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF NANCY REBECCA PETERS, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner, Martha Lee Gilmore has filed in the above Court and cause a Petition for Formal Probate of Will, Determination of Testacy and Heirs and Appointment of Personal Representative, as Petitioner for the above-named Estate. For further information the Petition, as filed, may be examined in the office of the Clerk of the above Court. Hearing upon said Petition will be held in said Court at the courtroom in the Courthouse at Missoula, Montana, on the 18th day of June, 2014, at the hour of 1:30 p.m. at which time all interested persons may appear and contest the Petition or object to the appointment of such Petitioner. DATED this 13th day of May, 2014. ST. PETER LAW OFFICES, P.C. /s/ Don C. St. Peter MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 4 Cause No. DP-14-98 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DONALD M. BARTH, DECEASED. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed as Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Gloria M. Mielke, at St. Peter Law Offices, P.C., 2620 Radio Way, P.O. Box 17255, Missoula, MT 59808, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 12th day of May, 2014. ST. PETER LAW OFFICES, P.C. /s/ Don C. St. Peter I declare under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is true, accurate and complete to the best of my knowledge and belief. DATED this 5th day of May, 2014. /s/ Gloria M. Mielke, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DV14-535 NOTICE OF PENDING NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF: SONJA MARIE

LLOYD, Petitioner. TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED HEREIN: PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a Petition for Name Change of SONJA MARIE LLOYD to obtain an order of this Court granting leave to assume the name of SONJA MARIE CROWN, will be presented to the above-entitled Court, at the Missoula County Courthouse at Missoula, Montana, on July 16, 2014 at 1:30 p.m., or as soon thereafter as counsel can be heard, and that at such time, application will be made for the relief sought in the said Petition. DATED this 19th day of May, 2014. WELLS & MCKITTRICK, P.C. By: /s/ EVONNE SMITH WELLS, Attorneys for Petitioner MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Probate No. DP-14-88 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DAVID L. DEFORGE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be certified mailed to Charlene Phlypo, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane P.C., PO Box 4747, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the aboveentitled Court. DATED this 25th day of April, 2014. /s/ Charlene Phlypo, Personal Representative WORDEN THANE, P.C. Attorneys for Personal Representative By: /s/ Amy M. Scott Smith MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-14-84 Dept. No. 4 Karen S. Townsend NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT ORLIN LEHMAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Janet Ann Rice, Jeanette Carol Allport, Cheryl Kay Lehman, and Debra Jean Garrick have been appointed Personal Representatives of the above-named estate on April 24, 2014. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Bennett Law Office, P.C., return receipt requested, at PO Box 7967, Missoula, MT 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-14-85 Dept. No. 4 Karen S. Townsend NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MARGUERITE ANN LEHMAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Janet Ann Rice, Jeanette Carol Allport, Cheryl Kay Lehman, and Debra Jean Garrick have been appointed Personal Representatives of the above-named estate on April 24, 2014. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Bennett Law Office, P.C., return receipt requested, at PO Box 7967, Missoula, MT 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-14-97 Dept. No. 3 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF MARGIE E. DONOVAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to M. SHAUN DONOVAN, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at PO Box 668, Superior, Montana 59872 or filed with the Clerk of the above

MNAXLP Court. Dated this 12th day of May, 2014. /s/ M. Shaun Donovan, Personal Representative PO Box 668, Superior, MT 59872 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, the Beneficiary, and MARTIN S. KING, the Successor Trustee, under the Deed of Trust described in this notice (referred to in this notice as the “Trust Indenture”), have elected to sell the property described in this notice, on June 17, 2014, at 10:00 a.m. at the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, located at 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, Montana, and on the terms described in this notice, in order to satisfy the obligations described in this notice, pursuant to the terms of the Trust Indenture and the provisions of the Small Tract Financing Act, Mont. Code Ann. §71-1-301, et. seq. DESCRIPTION OF TRUST INDENTURE: Grantor: Phoebe J. Patterson, not personally but as Trustee on behalf of Phoebe J. Patterson Revocable Trust Original Trustee: Stewart Title of Missoula County Successor Trustee: Martin S. King, Esq. Beneficiary: First Interstate Bank Date: August 27, 2012 DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPERTY COVERED BY THE TRUST INDENTURE: All of Grantor’s right, title, and interest in and to the following described real property, together with all existing or subsequently erected or affixed buildings, improvements and fixtures; all easements, rights of way, and appurtenances; all water, water rights and ditch rights (including stock in utilities with ditch or irrigation rights); and all other rights, royalties, and profits relating to the real property, including without limitation all minerals, oil, gas, geothermal and similar matters, located in Missoula County, State of Montana; Condominium Unit #15 of the Century Condominiums, according to the Declaration of Condominium thereof, recorded on August 21, 2001, in Book 666 Micro Records, page 1341, and amended on March 17, 2003 in Book 701 at page 693 of Micro Records, of the public records of Missoula County, State of Montana. Said Condominium being located on the real property described as Certificate of Survey No. 738, a parcel of ground located in the Southwest one-quarter of Section 33, Township 13 North, Range 19 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Together with an undivided interest in the general common elements and limited common elements appurtenant to said unit and as stated in the Declaration of Condominium. The real property or its address is commonly known at 3811 Stephens #15, Missoula, MT 59803. RECORDING REFERENCE: Trust Indenture recorded on August 30, 2012 Document No. 201216807 records of Missoula County, Montana. OTHER DOCUMENTS RELATING TO THE TRUST INDENTURE: Appointment of Successor Trustee, appointing Martin S. King as trustee in the place of Stewart Title of Missoula County dated January 31, 2014, and recorded February 4, 2014, in the records of the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana, as Document No. 201401449. DEFAULT FOR WHICH THE FORECLOSURE IS MADE: The Grantor has defaulted on the terms of said Trust Indenture and the corresponding Promissory Note in that she failed to pay the payments required thereunder when due. AMOUNTS OWED ON THE OBLIGATIONS SECURED BY THE TRUST INDENTURE as of January 24, 2014, were: Principal $14,338.27 Interest $355.11 Late Charges $75.00 Trustee’s Sale Guarantee $149.00 Total: $14,917.38 In addition, the Grantor is obligated to pay the expenses of this sale, which include the Beneficiary/s costs and expenses advanced to preserve and protect the property, real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, Beneficiary’s costs and attorney fees, and the Successor Trustee’s costs and fees. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, they will be added to the obligation secured by the Trust Indenture. THE TRUSTEE’S OR BENEFICIARY’S ELECTION TO SELL THE PROPERTY TO SATISFY THE OBLIGATION: The Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Successor Trustee to sell the above-described property to satisfy the obligation.

[C6] Missoula Independent • May 22 – May 29, 2014

DATE, PLACE, and TIME OF SALE: Date and Time of sale: June 17, 2014, at 10:00 a.m. Place: At the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana. This communication is from a debt collector. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Dated this 11th day of February, 2014. /s/ Martin S. KIng, Successor Trustee, Worden Thane P.C. PO Box 4747, Missoula, MT 59806-4747 STATE OF MONTANA ):ss. County of Missoula) On the 11th day of February, j2014, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Martin S. King, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within Notice of Trustee’s Sale as Successor Trustee, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same as such Successor Trustee. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and notarial seal the day and year first above written. (SEAL) /s/ Rhonda M. Kolar, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at Stevensville, MT My Commission Expires January 24, 2016 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 07/18/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200618223 BK 779, PG 714, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Barbara A. Marlenee was Grantor, New Century Mortgage Corporation was Beneficiary and Stewart Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract 9D on Certificate of Survey No. 1747, being a Tract of land located in the NW 1/4 of Section 30, Township 14 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Together with a private access and public utility easement as shown on Certificate of Survey No. 1747. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201213443 BK 897 Pg 320, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for Citigroup Mortgage Loan Trust, Inc. 2006-NC2, Asset Backed Pass Through Certificates Series 2006-NC2. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 11/01/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 26, 2014, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $137,155.05. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $130,786.65, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 4, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including fore-

closure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee. com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7777.19731) 1002.267046-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/14/10, recorded as Instrument No. 201001221 Bk:854 Pg:103, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which Keith R Bridenstine was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Bank of America, N.A., its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Charles J Peterson, Attorney at Law was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Charles J Peterson, Attorney at Law as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract 18B of Certificate of Survey No. 1722 located in the Southeast one-quarter of Section 19, Township 14 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201109341 Bk: 878 Pg: 756, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 7, 2014, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $201,990.15. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $150,753.92, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 18, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access

sale status at www.Northwesttrustee. com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7021.18106) 1002.267505-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/28/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200616328 BK 778, PG 388, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Jason Hudson, Jennifer Hudson, husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Suntrust Mortgage, Inc. was Beneficiary and Charles J. Peterson of Mackoff, Kellogg, Kirby, and Kloster, PC was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Charles J. Peterson of Mackoff, Kellogg, Kirby, and Kloster, PC as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 7 in Block 9 of West View, Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201223190 BK 904, PG 267, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 1, 2014, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $176,555.97. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $153,733.74, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 11, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee. com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.109081) 1002.267339-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/31/09, recorded as Instrument No. 200928024 Bk: 851 Pg: 474, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Paul E. Morrison, a married man as his sole and separate property was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Com-

pany has succeeded Alliance Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 17 of Lakewood Estates Phase I, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s non-occupancy and is grounds for acceleration on the Deed of Trust under paragraph 9 (b) (i) The property ceases to be the principal residence of a Borrower for reasons other than death and the Property is not the principal residence of at least one other Borrower. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due in full. As of April 1, 2014, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $257,349.68. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $256,386.68, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 11, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee. com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.108632) 1002.267338-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 7, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 11A OF SOUTHSIDE ADDITION TO BLOCK 11, LOTS 11A AND 12A, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Abraham F Schulz and Lyudmila N Schulz, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 29, 2005 and recorded August 5, 2005 in Book 757, Page 989 as Document No. 200520109. The beneficial interest is currently held by Green Tree Servicing LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,018.43, beginning May 1, 2013, and each month subse-


PUBLIC NOTICES quent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 31, 2014 is $110,801.46 principal, interest at the rate of 6.25% now totaling $5,763.30, late charges in the amount of $109.44, escrow advances of $2,072.57, suspense balance of $384.81 and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,212.94, plus accruing interest at the rate of $18.98 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 28, 2014 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho )ss. County of Bingham) On this 28th day of February, 2014, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shannon Gavin Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 01/19/2018 Green Tree V Schulz 42072.052 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 7, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOTS 3 AND 4 IN BLOCK “E” OF CAR LINE ADDITION NO. 2, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Mary A Elsea and Mark J Elsea, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real prop-

erty to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 09, 2009 and recorded September 10, 2009 in Book 847 page 205 under Document No. 200922159. The beneficial interest is currently held by Lakeview Loan Servicing, LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $964.59, beginning August 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 23, 2014 is $168,917.81 principal, interest at the rate of 5.0% now totaling $5,630.56, late charges in the amount of $307.93, escrow advances of $1,529.76 and other fees and expenses advanced of $309.10, plus accruing interest at the rate of $23.14 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 28, 2014 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham) On this 28th day of February, 2014, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, known to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he exe-

MNAXLP cuted the same. /s/ Shannon Gavin Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 01/19/2018 M&T V. Elsea 41902.341 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 16, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A parcel or tract of land located in the Southwest one-quarter of the Northeast one-quarter (SW1/4 NE1/4) of Section 25, Township 15 North, Range 20 West, Principal Meridian, Montana, and more particularly described as follows, to-wit Beginning at a point on the northeasterly right-of-way of County Road No. 24 as said road exists and is presently constructed, said point bears N. 62°23’51” E., a distance of 746.07 feet from the center one-quarter corner of said Section 25; thence N. 0°03’ E., a distance of 615.65 feet; thence S. 89°51’15”E., a distance of 664.40 feet to the East boundary of the SW1/4 NE1/4 of said Section 25, thence S.0°01 W., along said East boundary a distance of 352.80 feet; thence S 44°02’ W., a distance of 478.73 feet; thence S. 45°32” W., a distance of 143.78 feet to the northeasterly right-of-way of said County Road No. 24; thence N. 46°10’ W., along said right-of-way a distance of 31.47 feet; thence continuing along said right-of-way N. 51 °56’ W., a distance of 262.64 feet to the point of beginning. RECORDING REFERENCE. BOOK 789 OF MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 567 Nathan T Reep and Denise Reep, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Insurance Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated April 20 2007 and recorded April 26, 2007 in Book 796, Page 57 under Document No. 200710015. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. successor in interest to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,815.17, beginning October 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 17, 2014 is $284,746.38 principal, interest at the rate of 2.375% now totaling $2,550.69, late charges in the

amount of $266.20, escrow advances of $2,726.54 and other fees and expenses advanced of $7.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $18.53 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 6, 2014 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho) ss. County of Bingham) On this 6th day of February, 2014, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assis-

tant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shannon Gavin Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 01/19/2018 CitiMortgage v Reep 42090.068 NOTICE THAT A TAX DEED MAY BE ISSUED TO: Alexander, Edmond G., PO Box 196, Frenchtown, MT 59834-0196, Alexander, Edmond G., 17060 Frenchtown Frontage Rd., Frenchtown, MT 59834, Missoula County Treasurer, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 Valley Homes LLC, 924 N. Russell St., MIssoula, MT 59808, Bitterroot Valley Bank, 11300 U.S. Hwy. 93 S., Lolo, MT 59847. TAX ID #3292907 Pursuant to section 1518-212, Montana Code Annotated, Notice is hereby given: 1. As a result of a tax delinquency a property tax lien exists on the real property in which you may have an interest. The real property is described on the tax sale certificate as: NW4, NE4, LESS VALLEY HOMES 1&2, SW4, NE4,NE4, LESS TR1 COS 5472 315-21. 2. The property taxes became delinquent on: DECEMBER 30, 2010. 3. The property tax lien was attached as a result of a tax sale on: JULY 14, 2011. 4. The property tax lien was purchased at a tax sale on: JULY 14, 2011, by Missoula County whose address is 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. 5. The lien was subsequently assigned to M.I.P. Assets LLC, whose address is P.O. Box 16561, Missoula, MT

EAGLE SELF STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 42, 47, 188, 239, 380, 383, 384, 385, 476, 639 and 687. Units contain furniture, clothes, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc. household goods. These units may be viewed starting Tuesday, May 27, 2014. All auction units will only be shown each day at 3 P.M. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage office at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59804 prior to Thursday, May 29, 2014 at 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s "Make It Rain"–it'll be your downfall.

by Matt Jones

ACROSS

1 Brother of Dubya 4 Does nothing 10 "And others" abbreviation 14 Let go 15 Fed. securities 16 1958 Chevalier musical 17 Actress Kirshner 18 Like some fibrillation 19 Agents under J. Edgar Hoover, informally 20 Put effort into test prep 22 Serviceability 23 Ex-R.E.M. lead 24 Hiccups, e.g. 27 "Dang straight!" 30 Certain Sooner 31 Problem while drying out 33 Backside 34 Not quite transparent 35 In-basket stamp: abbr. 37 Necklace part 39 Address for Bill and Ted 40 Detach 42 Become less hostile 44 Irish airline ___ Lingus 45 Research your blind date, say 46 Mister, in Rio 48 Polar expedition vehicle 49 10-rated Bo 51 Amateur 52 Bunk up 56 Cupid's specialty 58 Bar in a steering mechanism 59 "32 Flavors" singer DiFranco 60 Attack of the flu 61 Leisurely walk 62 Alkali in cleansers 63 Barracks bunks

Last week’s solution

64 Where everything from the theme answers collects 65 Young bloke

DOWN

1 Impromptu concerts 2 Goes offstage 3 Reason cosmetology is a no-go? 4 "Freeze!" 5 Where sand and plastic shovels go? 6 When tripled, a 1970 war film 7 Make Kool-Aid 8 Abacus piece 9 Fashionable initials 10 Sandwich spread 11 Party in New York City? 12 Get better in barrels 13 Jeremy of the NBA 21 "Lock Up the Wolves" metal band 22 "___ and Away" 24 The two things tires do best? 25 "Harold and ___" 26 Nasty expression 28 Course for U.S. immigrants 29 "___ how I roll" 31 "Hugs not ___" 32 Carpentry joint part 36 Horse-drawn vehicles, despite their name 38 That naval vessel 41 Cosmetics aisle brand 43 Sweet-talk 47 Day division, in Venice 50 Great Rift Valley locale 52 In ___ (as found) 53 Alpaca group 54 Longtime Yankees nickname 55 Conked out 56 "Resurrection" network 57 Ranch call 58 Cough syrup amt.

©2014 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

%montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • May 22 – May 29, 2014 [C7]


PUBLIC NOTICES 59808. 6. As of the date of this notice, the amount of tax due, including penalties, interest and cost is: Tax: $3,528.02 Penalty & Interest: $447.30 Costs: $525.00 Total: $4,500.32 7. The date that the redemption period expires is 60 days from the giving of this notice. 8. For the property tax lien to be redeemed, the total amount listed in paragraph 6 plus all interest and costs that accrue from the date of this notice until the date of redemption, which amount will be calculated by the County Treasurer upon request, must be paid on or before the date that the redemption period expires. 9. If all taxes, penalties, interest, and costs are not paid to the County Treasurer on or prior to the date the redemption period expires, or on or prior to the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed, a tax deed may be issued to M.I.P. Assets, LLC, on the day following the date on which the redemption period expires or on the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed. 10. The business address and telephone number of the County Treasurer who is responsible for issuing the tax deed is: Missoula County Treasurer, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, (406) 258-4847. Further notice for those persons listed below whose addresses are unknown: 1. The address of the interested party is unknown. 2. The published notice meets the legal requirements for notice of a pending tax deed issuance. 3. The interested parties rights in the property may be in jeopardy. Dated this: MAY 12, 2014 M.I.P. Assets, LLC NOTICE THAT A TAX DEED MAY BE ISSUED TO: Bring, Peter A. 821 Hickory St., Missoula, MT 59801-3844 Bring, Peter A., 1295 Thunder Trl., Bonner, MT 59823 Missoula County Treasurer, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 US Bank & Trust Conational Assoc. 1635 S. Russell St., Missoula, MT 59801 US Bank National Assoc. N.D. 3318 N. 14th St., Bismarck, ND 58503 TAX ID #3143807 Pursuant to section 1518-212, Montana Code Annotated, Notice is hereby given: 1. As a result of a tax delinquency a property tax lien exists on the real property in which you may have an interest. The real property is described on the tax sale certificate as: S27, T13N, R16W, C.O.S. 5240 Parcel 1, IN NW4, NE4. 2. The property taxes became delinquent on: MAY 31, 2011. 3. The property tax lien was attached as a result of a tax sale on: JULY 14, 2011. 4. The property tax lien was purchased at a tax sale on: JULY 14, 2011, by Missoula County whose address is 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. 5. The lien was subsequently assigned to M.I.P. Assets LLC, whose address is P.O. Box 16561, Missoula, MT 59808. 6. As of the date of this notice, the amount of tax due, including penalties, interest and cost is: Tax: $6,019.23 Penalty & Interest: $445.58 Costs: $525.00 Total: $6,989.81. 7. The date that the redemption period expires is 60 days from the giving of this notice. 8. For the property tax lien to be redeemed, the total amount listed in paragraph 6 plus all interest and costs that accrue from the date of this notice until the date of redemption, which amount will be calculated by the County Treasurer upon request, must be paid on or before the date that the redemption period expires. 9. If all taxes, penalties, interest, and costs are not paid to the County Treasurer on or prior to the date the redemption period expires, or on or prior to the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed, a tax deed may be issued to M.I.P. Assets, LLC, on the day following the date on which the redemption period expires or on the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed. 10. The business address and telephone number of the County Treasurer who is responsible for issuing the tax deed is: Missoula County Treasurer, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, (406) 258-4847. Further notice for those persons listed below whose addresses are unknown: 1. The address of the in-

terested party is unknown. 2. The published notice meets the legal requirements for notice of a pending tax deed issuance. 3. The interested parties rights in the property may be in jeopardy. Dated this: MAY 12, 2014 M.I.P. Assets, LLC NOTICE THAT A TAX DEED MAY BE ISSUED TO: HAUSAUER, JAMES W.,1804 Strand Ave.,Missoula, MT 59801-5412 Missoula County Treasurer, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, 1200 S. RESERVE ST. STE. M, MISSOULA, MT 59801 BENEFICIAL MONTANA INC., 3075 N. RESERVE ST., MISSOULA, MT 59808-1389 TAX ID #880902 Pursuant to section 1518-212, Montana Code Annotated, Notice is hereby given: 1. As a result of a tax delinquency a property tax lien exists on the real property in which you may have an interest. The real property is described on the tax sale certificate as: SOUTH SIDE ADDITION, S29, T13N, R19W, BLOCK 4, LOT 41-42. 2. The property taxes became delinquent on: December 30, 2010. 3. The property tax lien was attached as a result of a tax sale on: JULY 14, 2011. 4. The property tax lien was purchased at a tax sale on: JULY 14, 2011, by Missoula County whose address is 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. 5. The lien was subsequently assigned to M.I.P. Assets LLC, whose address is P.O. Box 16561, Missoula, MT 59808. 6. As of the date of this notice, the amount of tax due, including penalties, interest and cost is: Tax: $3,878.22 Penalty & Interest: $353.84 Costs: $525.00 Total: $4,757.06. 7. The date that the redemption period expires is 60 days from the giving of this notice. 8. For the property tax lien to be redeemed, the total amount listed in paragraph 6 plus all interest and costs that accrue from the date of this notice until the date of redemption, which amount will be calculated by the County Treasurer upon request, must be paid on or before the date that the redemption period expires. 9. If all taxes, penalties, interest, and costs are not paid to the County Treasurer on or prior to the date the redemption period expires, or on or prior to the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed, a tax deed may be issued to M.I.P. Assets, LLC, on the day following the date on which the redemption period expires or on the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed. 10. The business address and telephone number of the County Treasurer who is responsible for issuing the tax deed is: Missoula County Treasurer, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, (406) 258-4847. Further notice for those persons listed below whose addresses are unknown: 1. The address of the interested party is unknown. 2. The published notice meets the legal requirements for notice of a pending tax deed issuance.

MNAXLP 3. The interested parties rights in the property may be in jeopardy. Dated this: MAY 12, 2014 M.I.P. Assets, LLC NOTICE THAT A TAX DEED MAY BE ISSUED TO: Trumbull, Roger L., 1960 Hummingbird Dr., Missoula, MT 59808-1035, Missoula County Treasurer, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, State of Montana, 2681 Palmer St., Missoula, MT 59808. TAX ID #5801140 Pursuant to section 15-18212, Montana Code Annotated, Notice is hereby given: 1. As a result of a tax delinquency a property tax lien exists on the real property in which you may have an interest. The real property is described on the tax sale certificate as: EL MAR ESTATES, PHASE 3, S15, T13N, R20W, BLOCK 8, LOT 3. 2. The property taxes became delinquent on: MAY 31, 2011. 3. The property tax lien was attached as a result of a tax sale on: JULY 14, 2011. 4. The property tax lien was purchased at a tax sale on: JULY 14, 2011, by Missoula County whose address is 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. 5. The lien was subsequently assigned to M.I.P. Assets LLC, whose address is P.O. Box 16561, Missoula, MT 59808. 6. As of the date of this notice, the amount of tax due, including penalties, interest and cost is: Tax: $7,236.89 Penalty & Interest: $491.70 Costs: $525.00 Total: $8,253.59 7. The date that the redemption period expires is 60 days from the giving of this notice. 8. For the property tax lien to be redeemed, the total amount listed in paragraph 6 plus all interest and costs that accrue from the date of this notice until the date of redemption, which amount will be calculated by the County Treasurer upon request, must be paid on or before the date that the redemption period expires. 9. If all taxes, penalties, interest, and costs are not paid to the County Treasurer on or prior to the date the redemption period expires, or on or prior to the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed, a tax deed may be issued to M.I.P. Assets, LLC, on the day following the date on which the redemption period expires or on the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed. 10. The business address and telephone number of the County Treasurer who is responsible for issuing the tax deed is: Missoula County Treasurer, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, (406) 258-4847. Further notice for those persons listed below whose addresses are unknown: 1. The address of the interested party is unknown. 2. The published notice meets the legal requirements for notice of a pending tax deed issuance. 3. The interested parties rights in the property may be in jeopardy. Dated this: MAY 12, 2014 M.I.P. Assets, LLC

[C8] Missoula Independent • May 22 – May 29, 2014

SERVICES GENERAL CONTRACTORS

enced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator. Testimonials Available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642

Mannix Construction. Residential • Light Commercial • Remodels. 549-4540

SBS Solar specializes in design and installation services for Solar Systems: residential, commercial, on- and off-grid. Serving all of Western Montana. www.SBSlink.com

ROCKING M DESIGN Residential Architecture - modest to exotic always exquisitely detailed, functional and sustainable. We offer an exceptional range of design and professional services for custom homes - new construction, upgrades and remodels, site planning, energy efficient design. Turning dreams into reality. • 406-541-8647 • www.rockingmdesign.com

HOME IMPROVEMENT Natural Housebuilders and Terry Davenport Design, Inc. Building net zero energy custom homes using solar thermal and solar PV. 3690940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experi-

PAINTING LIGHTEN UP PAINTING. Celebrating 30 glorious years of painting! Lics’d/ insured free estimates. Carrie 207-9255

PETCARE DOODY CALLS! Residential and Commercial Pet Waste Removal. References available. Twice a week or 1x pickup. doodycallsmontana@gmail.com

REAL ESTATE Downsizing • New mortgage options • Housing options for 55+ or 62+ • Life estates • An-

tique & collectible estimates. Clark Fork Realty. 512 E. Broadway. (406) 7282621. www.clarkforkrealty.com

ARCHIE’S

BACKYARD BIKE SHOP

WINDOWS

UBI Certified Bicycle Technician

Abbott’s Glass Vinyl Windows • Wood Windows • Small Commercial Jobs • “The Meticulous Glass Professionals” Since 1992 728-6499

728-5882

Residential Architecture New Construction Upgrades • Remodels Full services or consulting for design, site planning, energy efficiency...

101 E. Broadway, Suite 612 406-541-8647 www.rockingmdesign.com

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

JOE'S TILE & STONE, LLC SALES AND INSTALLATIONS

CERAMIC TILE OR STONE 406-777-4207 OR 241-4368 BIGSKYGUY2004@YAHOO.COM ESTABLISHED 1991


RENTALS APARTMENTS 1 bedroom, 1 bath, $575, Downtown, coin-op laundry, offstreet parking, W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 1 bedroom, 1 bath, $650, Off Broadway, Newer Complex, Walk-in closet, open concept, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 1024 Stephens Ave. #1. 2 bed/1 bath, central location, coin-ops, cat? $675. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 1213 Cleveland St. “A” 1 bed/1 bath, central location, all utilities paid, pet? $725 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1315 E. Broadway #2. 1 bed/1 bath, near U, coin-ops on site, pet? $625. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1326 South. 2nd Street West “B”. 2 bed/1 bath, central location, W/D hookups, shared yard. $675. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings ad1404 Toole: 2 Bedroom, DownvertisedEating in this newspaper are available on town, area, Shared yard, an equal opportunity basis.Nice To report disOff street parking, condicrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free tion, $710. GARDEN CITY at 1-800-877-7353 orMANAGEMENT Montana Fair HousPROPERTY ing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611 549-6106

1717 S. 13th St. “A”. 3 bed/1 bath, central location, DW, W/D hookups, cat? $1000 Grizzly Property Management 5422060

444 Washington St. 1 bed/1 bath, downtown, heat paid, coin-ops on site, cat? $700. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

1800 4th St.: 2 Bedroom, Recently redone, On-site laundry facilities, Carport, Storage, Gas heat paid, Cat OK, $675. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106

733 W. Sussex Ave. #2. 2 bed/1bath, central location, coin-ops, storage, A/C $700. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

2 Bedroom Unit, “Sunset” West Side Location, Available Now, Contract Rent is $707.00, incl. H/W/G/S. On-site Management, Coin Op Laundry, Secure entrance! Premium Downtown Location! Call Matty Reed, Property Manager @ 406.549.4113 x130 for details and showings! 2 bedroom, 1 bath, $595, Southside, DW, W/D hookups, carport, W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 7287333 2 bedroom, 1 bath, $695, Quite Cul-De-Sac, DW, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath, $800, Condo, DW, Microwave, W/D in unit, carport, S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath, $800, Condo, DW, Microwave, W/D in unit, carport, S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom+bonus, 1.5 bath, $800, Rattlesnake area, DW, W/D in unit, carport, storage, H/W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

Are you a first time renter and not sure how to pick the right property choose a NARPM professional property manager. Our members have a code of ethics that require managers to educate our tenants on fair housing laws Got vacancy? Contact a NARPM member and see how you can put their expertise, education and commitment to work for you. Looking for the right property and not sure which one to choose? Choose a NARPM professional property manager. NARPM members have a duty to protect the public against fraud, misrepresentation, unethical practices in property management. You can feel safe knowing you are protected by a NARPM member Tenants from hell? Contact a NARPM member and see how we can restore your sanity.

MOBILE HOMES Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent. W/S/G/Electric included. $425/month 406-273-6034

2306 Hillview Ct. #4. 2 bed/1 bath, South Hills, W/D hookups. $600 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 303 E. Spruce St. # 1. 1 bed/1 bath, downtown, coin-ops on site, cat? $575. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

DUPLEXES 1012 Charlo St. #2. 2 bed/1 bath, Northside, W/D hookups, storage. $675. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

HOUSES 1109 Rollins: 2 Bedroom, Slant Street area, Washer & dryer hook-ups, Big shared yard, Heat paid, $795. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106 Is your Property Manager a NARPM Member? Our members are: licensed, educated, professional, bound by a code of ethics, and have a duty to provide the best possible service. www.westernmontana.narpm.org

Professional Property Management. Find Yourself at Home in the Missoula Rental Market with PPM. 1511 S Russell • (406) 721-8990 • www.professionalproperty.com

ROOMMATES ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

FIDELITY MANAGEMENT SERVICES, INC. 7000

1&2

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

549-7711 Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com

FOR RENT Eagle Apartments in Superior

AVAILABLE NOW 1 bdrm/1bath upstairs unit, W/D; quiet 8-plex; Owner pays s/w/g. Rent subsidized based on income. Deposit $400. Income restrictions apply.

Uncle Robert Ln #7

251-4707 100 South Curtis 2 Bed Duplex W/Garage $725/month

GardenCity

Property Management

422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. "Let us tend your den" Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

The Palace is located on the Corner of Broadway & Ryman Studios start at $407 a month + $450 deposit. 1 Bedrooms start at $554 a month + $550 deposit. 2 Bedrooms start at $707 a month + $650 deposit.

Finalist

2007 Wyoming 1 Bed Apt W/Storage $510/month Uncle Robert Lane 2 Bed Apt. $695/month

Contact HRC Cottages

Visit our website at

822-4251 for application

fidelityproperty.com

MHA Management manages 13 properties throughout Missoula.

3901 O’Leary: 2 Bedroom, Second floor, Hook-ups, Dishwasher, Carport, Storage, Private deck, Heat paid, $825. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106

NEWLY RESTORED HISTORIC DOWNTOWN APARTMENTS

Finalist

All properties are part of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program. The Missoula Housing Authority complies with the Fair Housing Act and offers Reasonable Accommodations to persons with Disabilities.

1235 34th St. • Missoula (406) 549-4113 missoulahousing.org

Water, sewage, trash, and heat are included in rent. ADA wheelchair-accessible units available.

• On-site property management • Secure building • Coin-op laundry with new machines

Call 549-4113 x130 Matty Reed, Property Manager

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing 30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

www.gatewestrentals.com montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • May 22 – May 29, 2014 [C9]


REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 1807 Missoula Avenue. 3 bed, 2 bath cottage-style near Rattlesnake Creek and park. $309,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com 1944 South 8th West. Remodeled 2 bed, 1 bath with deck on 2 lots. $158,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653 pat@properties2000.com 1965 Raymond. 4 bed, 2 bath split-level in Upper Rattlesnake. Private lower level for mother-in-law apartment. $339,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816 annierealtor@gmail.com 223 West Kent. 3 bed, 2 bath with wood floors, arched doorways, solarium, deck, basement & single garage. $297,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties 2000.com

716 South 6th West. Classic 3 bed, 2 bath with fireplace, deck, fenced yard & single garage. $259,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com 7201 Old Grant Creek Road. 4 bed, 3 bath with Grant Creek frontage, deck & fireplace. $655,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 5417355 betsy@milyardteammt.com 9755 Horseback Ridge. 3 bed, 3 bath with mother-in-law apartment on 5 view acres. $395,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com

deck. $850,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7355, betsy@milyardteammt.com Buying or selling homes? Let me help you find your way home. David Loewenwarter. Prudential Montana Real Estate. LOEWENWARTER.COM. 406-241-3321

Visit my website www.on93.com

at

Let me help save you time and energy. I know about Missoula and have lived here 30+ years. David Loewenwarter. Prudential Montana Real Estate. LOEWENWARTER.COM. 406241-3321

Protect Your Home - ADT Authorized Dealer: Burglary, Fire, and Emergency Alerts 24 hours a day, 7 days a week! CALL TODAY, INSTALLED TOMORROW! 888-641-3452

“Find your way home” with David Loewenwarter. Prudential Montana Real Estate. LOEWEN WARTER.COM. 406-241-3321 I can help you find your new home! Celia Grohmann @ Banana Belt Realty. 406-550-1014 • celiamontana@gmail.com.

Are your housing needs changing? We can help you explore your options. Clark Fork Realty. 512 E. Broadway. (406) 728-2621. www.clarkforkrealty.com

6 TIPS

Beautiful home on Rattlesnake Creek. 4 bed, 3 bath with gourmet kitchen, fireplace and

FOR BUYING MORE FOR LESS 512 E. Broadway 406-728-2621

2607 View Drive. 3 bed, 2 bath ranch-style home in Target Range. Hardwood floors, fireplace & 2 car garage. $238,500. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate. 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com

matt@clarkforkrealty.com

3 Bdr, 2 Bath Central Missoula home. $179,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath, remodeled Central Missoula home. $285,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3010 West Central. 3 bed, 1 bath on almost 5 Target Range acres bordering DNRC land. $450,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653, pat@properties2000.com 309 Plymouth. 4 bed, 2.5 bath Craftsman bungalow with wood floors, sky lights, patio and claw foot tub. 1 bed, 1 bath apartment in lower level. $339,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com 3501 Paxson.4 bed, 1.5 bath with hardwood floors, basement, fenced yard & garage. $225,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7355. betsy@milyardteammt.com 4781 Montrose. 3 bed, 2 bath in Canyon Creek. RD eligible. $182,500. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 5417355 betsy@milyardteammt.com 5805 Mainview. 4 bed, 2 bath South Hills home with basement & deck. $220,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Propeties. 541-7355 betsy@milyardteammt.coom 6833 Linda Vista. 5 bed, 3 bath with 2 family rooms, extra downstairs kitchen and large fenced yard. Mary Louise Zapp-Knapp, Lambros ERA Real Estate 406456-2260 mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com

[C10] Missoula Independent • May 22 – May 29, 2014

5505 Creekstone 2 bed, 1.5 bath Grant Creek condo. $130,000 MLS #20140810 5805 Mainview 4 bed, 2 bath South Hills home with great views. $220,000 MLS #20142246 3501 Paxson 4 bed, 1.5 bath with hardwood floors, basement & 2 car garage $225,000 MLS #20140601


REAL ESTATE Put my experience and dedication to work for you. JAY GETZ, Prudential Montana Real Estate. (406) 2144016 • jay.getz@prumt.com • www.JayGetzMissoula.com

When considering a move please call Missoula native JAY GETZ, Prudential Montana Real Estate. (406) 214-4016 • j a y. g e t z @ p r u m t . c o m • www.JayGetzMissoula.com

RE/MAX All Stars; combining local ownership, experienced agents, and the power of #1 RE/MAX. Complimentary real estate advice. Call 406-5428644

Wonderful Westside 1722 Defoe $226,500. 2 bedroom, 1 bonus, 2 bathroom home on the Wonderful Westside with awesome gardens in the fenced yard. A home with character! KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com

Slant Street Charmer 733 Marshall $225,000. Slant Street charmer with lots of light, a wonderful yard with raised beds, and an awesome shop all in a convenient location and ready to move in to. KD 2405227 porticorealestate.com Unfinished LOG HOME! Superior craftsmanship in this unfinished OFF GRID LOG home built on daylight walk out basement with 2nd story. Windows installed, fully wired, septic installed (3000 gal) approved for 5 bedrooms, well, charming barn, stunning Mission Mountain views & water fall. Its been done right finish to your tastes. 20 ac w/FIP irrigation water. Custom 4 or 5 bedrooms,you decide how may baths, 50 yr roof shingles, breakfast nook, incredible elevated bldg site & views. Basement is livable with wood heat, kitchen, shower & compost toilet. Garage area is inside barn. Excludes BUT negotiable: Greenhouses, solar system, stove & fridge in lower level. Greenhouse biz produces extra income! Priced @ $450,000. For more information call our office @ 406745-4940 or visit our website @ www.missionvalleyproperties.com University District 102 East Kent $265,000. University 4 bedroom home with character and a 1 bedroom cottage house. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com We’re not only here to sell real estate, we’re your full service senior home specialists. Clark Fork Realty. 512 E. Broadway. (406) 7282621. www.clarkforkrealty.com

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES 1861 East Broadway. 3 bed, 2.5 condo with deck & single garage. $199,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653 pat@properties2000.com 324B North Grant. 3 bed, 2 bath condo with fenced yard & 2 car garage. $169,900. Rita Gray, LambrosERA Real Estate 532-9283. ritagray@lambrosera.com

5505 Creekstone. 2 bed, 1.5 bath in Grant Creek. $130,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. betsy@milyardteammt.com Cooley Street Condo 1545 Cooley St. #C. This upper level 2 bedroom condo provides for easy, sweet living close to downtown and has great North Hills views. $128,500 KD 2405227 porticorealestate.com Northside Condo 1400 Burns Unit #15, 3 bedroom 1 bath, with balcony and tons of light. $150,000. KD 240-5227 or Sarah 370-3995 porticorealestate.com

Uptown Flats #210. 1 bed, 1 bath modern condo on Missoula’s Northside. $149,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com Uptown Flats #306. 1 bed, 1 bath top floor unit with lots of light. W/D, carport, storage & access to exercise room. $162,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com Uptown Flats #307. 1 bed, 1 bath top floor unit. $158,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate. 546-5816 annierealtor@gmail.com

PERFECT PICKS 1117 Cleveland • $255,000 4 bed, 2 bath with hardwood floors and single garage

2200 Garland • $112,500 2 bed, 1 bath renovated condo that doesn't feel like a condo

Real Estate is not always Black & White Call Rita Gray 406-544-4226

7650 Becca • $42,250 3 bed, 2 bath manufactured home with deck in East Missoula

ritagray@lambrosera.com

THE UPTOWN FLATS Come check out the condos at The Uptown Flats. 1 bed 1 bath plus high-end amenities. Starting at $149,900 Call Anne to learn about the great opportunities available in the Upscale Community of The UPTOWN FLATS.

Anne Jablonski Broker

546-5816

PORTICO REAL ESTATE

www.movemontana.com

missoulanews.com • May 22 – May 29, 2014 [C11]


REAL ESTATE Uptown Flats. Upscale gated community near downtown. All SS appliances, carport, storage and access to community room and exercise room plus more. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com Why Rent? Own Your Own 1400 Burns. Designed with energy efficiency, comfort and affordability in mind. Next to Burns Street Bistro and Missoula Community Co-op. Starting at $79,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

MANUFACTURED HOMES 4752 Parent. 2 bed, 2 bath with 2 decks and heated shop. Mary

Louise Zapp-Knapp, Lambros ERA Real Estate 406-456-2260. mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com

LAND FOR SALE 160 acres in Grant Creek bordered on two sides by Forest Service land. $750,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 1625 Lot 12A Cote Lane. Level 1 acre with fantastic views. Mary Louise Zapp-Knapp, Lambros ERA Real Estate 532-9296. mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com

Estate 532-9296. mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com

53.5 acres overlooking Missoula. Utilities in place, septic approved. $927,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

NHN Arnica. Pattee Canyon acreage with great view of Missoula. Mary Louise Zapp-Knapp, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 5329296 mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com

605 Dunkleberg, Drummon. 2 bed, 2 bath on 28 acres with creek. $249,000. Pintlar Territories R.E. 406-859-3522. pintlarterritories.com

NHN Raymond. .62 acre in Lower Rattlesnake bordering Missoula Open Space. $148,000. David Loewenwarter. Prudential Montana Real Estate. LOEWEN WARTER.COM. 406-241-3321

Lot 33 Old Mill Loop, St. Regis. 1.02 acre with 150’ of Clark Fork River Frontage. Mary Louise Zapp-Knapp, Lambros ERA Real

COMMERCIAL 4 Bdr, 2 Bath Central Missoula

280 Hellgate Drive • $355,900 Colonial Cottage east of Bonner. 3 bed, 2.5 bath with new family room, east deck, fruit arbor, fenced garden & full finished basement.

Pat McCormick Real Estate Broker Real Estate With Real Experience

pat@properties2000.com 406-240-SOLD (7653)

Properties2000.com

[C12] Missoula Independent • May 22 – May 29, 2014

home. Zoned commercial. $190,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

280 Hellgate Drive. 3 bed, 2.5 bath Colonial Cottage east of Bonner. Wood stove, deck, fruit arbor & fenced garden. $355,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653

3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Stevensville area home on 6+ acres. $325,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

condition on stunning 12.51 acre setting with views, fruit trees, tons of gardening space and so much more! KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

OUT OF TOWN

3 Bdr, 1 Bath Alberton home. $125,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

5 Bdr, 4 Bath, Stevensville area home on 10 acres. $649,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL

109 Church Street, Stevensville. Historic 3 bed, 1 bath with library, parlor & fantastic front porch. $139,000. Rita Gray, LambrosERA Real Estate, 5329283. ritagray@lambrosera.com 11901 Lewis & Clark Drive, Lolo. 2 bed, 2 bath with many upgrades including roof & windows. $197,500. Rita Gray, LambrosERA Real Estate 5329283. ritagray@lambrosera.com

3 Bdr, 2 Bath Lolo home. $234,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath, historic Stevensville home. $236,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

Bitterroot Acreage 994 Pathfinder $599,000. 330 acres with knock-your-sock-off views East Side Stevi/Florence area with a small house. KD 2405227 porticorealestate.com River Access 17430 SixMile, $285,000. Historic 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath home in great

We are experts in the home lending process. Call Astrid Oliver, Loan Officer at Guild Mortgage Company. 1001 S Higgins Suite A2, Missoula. Office: 406-258-7522 or Cell: 406-550-3587


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Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture

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