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Etc.: The graduation advice they won’t give you (we will) Up Front: How much should we spend for one pretty road? Scope: Spotting the cute, the fierce—and the utterly fake


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


Etc.: The graduation advice they won’t give you (we will) Up Front: How much should we spend for one pretty road? Scope: Spotting the cute, the fierce—and the utterly fake


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Pony Up for

Cover Story On his recent journey from Atlanta to Missoula, Dan Hollis found himself at a Holiday Inn somewhere between Idaho Falls and Dillon. A flight mishap left him stranded in Chicago, he was detoured through Salt Lake City, and then, instead of waiting overnight for a flight to Missoula, Cover by Kou Moua he decided to rent a car and drive. It was a trying couple of days, he said, but he was hoping there’d be a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. And there might be ...................................................................................................14

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News Letters Leave med pot alone, stop the wolf wars, look at the clowns..................... 4 The Week in Review State takes wolves, a butterfly won’t wear her wings.............6 Briefs Pot could return to ballot, bison could go to Fort Peck .................................6 Etc. Graduating class of 2011, we have some practical advice ..................................7 Up Front Glacier braces for epic spring conditions ..................................................8 Up Front Frenchtown schools get voters’ cold shoulder ..........................................9 Ochenski What’s good for Utah could work for Montana ......................................10 Writers on the Range Montana’s shameful horse problem....................................11 Agenda A fundraiser for healing through art and nature ........................................12

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan When salad mix grows up, it gets braised ...................................18 Happiest Hour Rowdy’s Cabin................................................................................19 8 Days a Week Collie hunts beaver, wildflowers bloom.........................................21 Mountain High Best in the West Freestyle Kayak Competition ..............................29 Scope Wildlife filmmakers mull the ethics of their craft..........................................30 Noise Cowboy and Indian, Mad Rad, Leo Kottke, Long Long Long........................31 Theater Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night transplanted to Old California .....................32 Film Four reviews from the Wildlife Film Fest, three keepers ................................33 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films..................................................34

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Exclusives Street Talk ..................................................................................................................4 In Other News..........................................................................................................13 Classifieds ...............................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ..............................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrology ................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle ..................................................................................................C-7 This Modern World..............................................................................................C-15

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Robert Meyerowitz PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson ASSOCIATE EDITOR Matthew Frank PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Ira Sather-Olson STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Skylar Browning COPY EDITORS David Loos, David Merrill ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Chris Melton, Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Rhonda Urbanski, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Teal Kenny FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold EDITORIAL INTERN Jed Nussbaum CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Dave Loos, Ednor Therriault, Ali Gadbow, Azita Osanloo, Cathrine L. Walters, Anne Medley, Jesse Froehling

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2011 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

Missoula Independent

Page 3 May 12–May 19, 2011


STREET TALK

by Chad Harder

Asked Saturday afternoon in Caras Park during the 19th Annual Garden City Brewfest.

Q:

With more than 60 diverse beers on tap at this year’s Brewfest, what flavor of beer not yet offered would you like to see brewed in the future? Follow-up: What’s the worst beer you’ve ever tasted?

Kaitlin Kominsky: Pine. Mmmm! How good would that be? A slight taste of pine in beer is just what I need. A real fruit:: Flathead Cherry. It’s just that it’s got a fake fruity flavor. I actually like fruity beers, but the Flathead Cherry just tastes artificial. Am I a bad person for saying that?

Alex Duncan: I’d say a beer in between a dark and a light, a medium beer that doesn’t have too much hops. I love high-alcohol-content beers, but IPAs are just too hoppy for me. Hatin‘ on hops: The worst beer ever is the Big Sky antelope beer, their IPA. I’m sorry, I love Big Sky Brewing, I even have a shirt and a sticker of theirs. But I just hate their IPA.

Sam Berglund: My favorite beer is the Blackfoot Brewery’s IPA. I just love really strong hoppy beers, and I really, really love strong flavors. The more flavor available, the more I love it. Now, with less beer! The worst beer I ever had was when a friend bought a sixpack of Bud Select 55 calorie beer back in college. Yuck. It sat in the fridge for a long time. No one would drink it.

Arty Canfield: There’s pretty much every kind of beer style and flavor available already. It’s a beer drinker’s paradise here. Hoppy Halloween: I’ve tried a lot of homebrews that have gone awry. But as far as commercial beer, I’d say the Blue Moon Pumpkin Ale. You should never fruit the beer. You should never vegetable the beer. I don’t even know if pumpkins are a fruit or a vegetable, but don’t put it in beer.

Missoula Independent

Page 4 May 12–May 19, 2011

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Bad medicine I am writing to express my frustration with Senate Bill 423. Medical marijuana was legal, being prescribed by physicians to their patients who in turn purchased it from entrepreneurial souls with a green thumb. The cultivation of cannabis to achieve a pharmacological effect is fairly tricky and involves segregating plants by gender and restricting their pollination. My gardening skills and, I suspect, many people’s skills are not up to the task and probably never will be. Cannabis is an effective analgesic and anti-emetic for many people and its propensity for stimulating an appetite is well known. While its concurrent use with mainstream psychotropic medication and psychopathology needs to be approached with caution, the physiological toxicity of THC is miniscule. By comparison, acetaminophen is the numberone over-the-counter drug of overdose. It competes with alcohol, a highly toxic psychotropic medication, for the same excretion route. Cannabis is no worse than many other drugs of choice and darn safer in many ways. SB 423 is an attempt by legislators to give medical advice. Advice is a dangerous gift; medical advice even more so. Speaking as a medical professional, I have found successful medication management to have several recurring features: listening, humility, and fact. SB 423 hamstrings the feasibility of medical marijuana for most people and this shows a disregard for the voice of the body politic. Denying mentally competent people an effective medicine—that grows on trees—smacks of hubris. Prohibition doesn’t work. It didn’t work in the Old Testament: God himself said don’t eat that apple and that didn’t work. The prohibition of alcohol by the 18th constitutional amendment didn’t work as evidenced by the 21st amendment that voided it. It has been my experience that most people, the majority, in the home environment, don’t take their medicines as directed. I wish it were otherwise, but if they have some semi-defensible reason for doing so and are not in immediate jeopardy then I respond with accurate information palatably presented. This helps some and does no harm. We can’t live people’s lives for them. I think that we as a people should be content if we can help some and do no harm. SB 423 is bad medicine and social

injustice and we would be well served without it. Brooke H. Stanley Missoula

Stop the wolf war On Wednesday, May 4, Department of the Interior Secretary Ken Salazar announced that gray wolves will be delisted from the Endangered Species Act, removing federal protection and returning management authority to states. This is the latest decision in what has been a decade-long battle surround-

“Denying mentally competent people an effective medicine— that grows on trees—smacks of hubris.”

reduce numbers to the “brink of extinction” and advocate for re-listing of wolves in the Northern Rockies. Although environmental advocacy groups hope to challenge the decision to turn wolf management to states, the “best available science” supports the most recent de-listing decision. Studies published as recently as 2010 indicate that within the Northern Rockies, wolves are more genetically connected and occupy more territory since their reintroduction. Since their reintroduction to the Northern Rockies in the 1990s, wolves have successfully colonized vast expanses of wildlands, proving their ability to exist within a matrix of human communities. What’s more, overall numbers are rising: wolf numbers in the Northern Rockies have grown from 100 in 1995 to over 1,700 in 2009. Given this success, it’s important to ask: Why not turn management over to states? Despite the wolves’ high genetic connectivity, extensive territory, and growing numbers, environmental advocacy groups are unwilling to allow states to assume management authority of gray wolves. This continued “adversarial legalism” compounds existing conflict and starves management agencies of precious dollars needed for planning and management. Ultimately, the future of wolves in the Northern Rockies will depend on how well humans are able to work together toward a solution. Collaborative solutions can be developed for contentious issues, but it involves a compromise from all involved parties. Wolves aren’t going anywhere in the Northern Rockies. It is time to stop fighting, start talking, and finally work toward a solution. Wes Swaffar Missoula

Clowns and elephants ing how gray wolves are managed in the Northern Rockies. In response to the recent de-listing, environmental groups, states, and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service are donning their legal armor for what will surely be a vicious and litigious battle. Already, environmental advocacy groups such as Alliance for the Wild Rockies are filing suit to challenge the recent delisting on grounds that it was unconstitutional. These groups warn that a return to state management will

Flashback: Seventy years ago I had thoughts of running away and joining the circus. I thought that being a clown would be a great job because they made people laugh. I also believed that only circuses had clowns. Forward to 2011: I learned that one did not need to go to the circus to see clowns. All that was necessary was to take a trip to Helena while the legislature was in session. There were more clowns there than in any Barnum and Bailey show. Pete Daniels Polson

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via e-mail: editor@missoulanews.com.

L


Missoula Independent

Page 5 May 12–May 19, 2011


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, May 4

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

VIEWFINDER

Agenda

News Quirks by Elizabeth Costigan

The Green Investment Group, Inc. announces that it’s purchased Smurfit-Stone Container Corp.’s paperboard mill in Frenchtown for about $20 million. The company specializes in brownfield redevelopment. It says it hopes to recruit green businesses to the 3,200-acre site.

• Thursday, May 5 Montana and Idaho regain management of wolves following Congress’s approval of an unprecedented budget bill rider, written by Sen. Jon Tester, removing the wolves from the endangered species list. “It’s what’s right for the wolves themselves,” Tester says. Montana proposes hunting 220 wolves this fall.

• Friday, May 6 A twenty-something man parks his truck on Broadway, pulls out golf clubs, an Xbox, and a handful of games, and mumbles “Fucking economy” as he walks into Downtown Pawn. He says he works in the construction industry, adding, “Maybe it’ll turn around.”

• Saturday, May 7 Hundreds of beer lovers descend on downtown Missoula to sample more than 60 beers on tap during the 19th Annual Garden City Brewfest. As the sun goes down, Higgins Avenue is dotted with individuals who appear to be struggling with their equilibrium.

A flash mob congregates at the Clark Fork River Market Saturday morning for “an organized, spontaneous dance party.” The event was organized by the YWCA’s Girls Using Their Strengths program, in support of alternative transportation and Bike Walk Bus Week.

Kalispell Sexual Harassment complaint settled

• Sunday, May 8 Locals dress up like animals to march in Missoula’s 34th annual Wild Walk Parade. The event signals the beginning of the International Wildlife Film Festival. Creatures present include a massive elephant, a bear, a pack of miniature pandas, and one small butterfly who refuses to put on her wings.

• Monday, May 9 Gov. Brian Schweitzer vetoes a Republican-backed bill that would have made it more difficult for lowincome children to qualify for taxpayer-subsidized health insurance. Schweitzer refers to the bill as another example of an “incompetent legislature,” The Associated Press reports.

• Tuesday, May 10 Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribal Council members and other state tribal leaders descend on Helena to meet with Gov. Brian Schweitzer during an annual tribal summit. As temperatures warm and streams flow high, members of the Flathead Reservation’s governing body express concerns about potential flooding in their communities.

A man selected by the Kalispell Chamber of Commerce as its 2010 Businessman of the Year has agreed to pay $25,000 to settle a complaint alleging he routinely forced a female employee to view pornography. A claim filed in 2009 with the Montana Human Rights Bureau and settled in March alleges that the manager of Stock Building Supply, Brent Hall, subjected Leona Dickson, a long-time employee, to sexual harassment and discrimination. “That was the worst part for me, was the atmosphere,” the 48-year-old Dickson told the Independent last week. “To me, there was no way a female could get any respect.” The business was sold in 2009 and now operates under the name Pro-Build. Hall remains the manager. One of Dickson’s primary responsibilities while working as assistant manager at the lumberyard entailed sending, receiving, and printing email for Hall. Dickson says his email regularly contained

explicit pictures and videos of naked women. Despite the fact that she voiced unease about fielding pornographic email, Dickson says, Hall insisted she continue. In 2009, after her job was reclassified and her salary was cut as part of a companywide cost-saving effort, Dickson says she was unwilling to stomach the working conditions anymore. She resigned in May 2009 and filed the complaint in June of that year. An investigation into Dickson’s allegations by the Montana Human Rights Bureau found reasonable cause to believe that misconduct occurred. In a filing with the Human Rights Bureau, Hall admits that Dickson was exposed to pornography in the workplace. But he says she viewed it of her own accord. Hall’s attorney, Sarah Simkins, of Kalispell, says her client isn’t guilty of any unlawful activity. Simkins adds that he opted to settle rather than endure an expensive, drawn-out hearing. Hall and the company each have agreed to pay Dickson $25,000, without admitting to any wrongdoing. Hall is a 71-year-old grandfather with deep roots in Kalispell. He says he’s saddened by Dickson’s allegations. His voice shakes as he talks

about the toll Dickson’s claims are taking on his family and his reputation. “This thing is killing me,” he says. “It just tears my heart out.” Dickson says she wants Hall to understand why she filed the complaint: “I didn’t feel like I was being looked at as a fellow employee, but as one of these bodies.” Jessica Mayrer

City Council Wolken tries to stick Missoula City Councilwoman Cynthia Wolken is already knocking on doors and introducing herself to constituents in advance of this November’s municipal elections. “People are busy,” says the representative, who last week registered as a candidate in Ward 2. “A lot of people don’t even know that I’m their city councilperson.” The city council selected the soft-spoken attorney to replace Roy Houseman, who left unexpectedly to take another job in January. When the governing body picked her from a list of candidates vying for the gig, Wolken was hardly a household name.

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Page 6 May 12–May 19, 2011

The only antidote to the poison of war is the public's courage to disagree with their leader. ~Ramman Kenoun


Inside

Letters

Briefs

Yet, despite her relative anonymity, she’s been shaping policy in Montana for years. Her résumé reads like a list of progressive pursuits. As chair of the Montana Human Rights Network Board of Directors, she works to advance gay rights. Through her employment with the Center for Rural Affairs, she’s pushing to ensure that federal health care reform mandates take root in Montana. Wolken is also an unapologetic supporter of legalizing marijuana for adults and is employed as a lobbyist by the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws. “I have a pretty good libertarian streak,” she says. “I really don’t feel like it’s anyone’s business, if you’re not hurting yourself, what you’re doing inside your house.” That streak shapes her work on council. Last month Wolken backed a less stringent version of Councilman Dave Strohmaier’s social host ordinance, which proposed fining and jailing adults who host underage individuals that consume alcohol in private settings. Missoula City Councilwoman Pam Walzer appreciates the fact that Wolken looks out for personal freedoms. Yet Walzer also says her new colleague appreciates the value of crafting laws to curb destructive behavior. “I know she has the balance,” Walzer says. As of Tuesday, no one else had filed to run against Wolken. Hers is one of seven seats that will be contested in November. Candidates have until June 30 to file. Wolken says if she’s elected to serve a full term, transportation issues will be a priority. She and Walzer are both excited to see plans for a new roundabout at Spruce and Scott streets come to fruition. Wolken also aims to help find ways to improve gridlock at the I-90 interchange at Grant Creek. Wolken says she’ll continue zeroing in on legislative priorities as she knocks on doors and hears from locals. “I have a lot of faith in democracy,” she says. “I’d like to engage it as long as I can.” Jessica Mayrer

Bison Greener pastures Frustration was palpable on Montana’s Fort Peck Reservation earlier this year. Dozens of Yellowstone bison were quarantined near Gardiner—bison that the Assiniboine and Sioux tribes have hoped to obtain for nearly a decade. Public pressure over possible brucellosis exposure prompted officials to consider slaughtering the ani-

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

mals. Only a temporary stay of execution from Gov. Brian Schweitzer finally silenced the debate. So when Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks’s Rebecca Cooper trucked to eastern Montana this week, Fort Peck Fish and Game Director Robert Magnan welcomed the visit as good tidings. He’d been waiting two years for the agency to review the $200,000 infrastructure the tribes set up to accommodate a splinter herd of bison from Yellowstone. Cooper’s tour—part of a pending bison translocation proposal—marked the first step forward in a long time. “I asked her, ‘Where does Fort Peck stand?’” Magnan told the Indy. “She said, ‘Right now, you’re standing pretty good because you’re pretty much ready for everything.’”

Magnan says the agency is pushing to relocate the bison from Gardiner in late summer or early fall. Cooper was bound for Fort Belknap for a similar review Tuesday, but her work isn’t restricted to tribal lands. She’s also reviewed several plots of state land, including the Spotted Dog Wildlife Management Area near Deer Lodge, that FWP is considering for bison relocation. “We wanted to transfer bison to [Fort Peck] in the last round, but there was a question of inadequate fencing, so we didn’t,” says FWP Deputy Director Art Noonan. “It’s been our intention to transfer to the tribes when they became capable of holding the bison.” Magnan feels that time is now, though he understands relocation itself is still up in the air. FWP’s proposal has to go through public comment, and a bill on Schweitzer’s desk to restrict bison transportation could set plans back at least another two years. Magnan is cautiously optimistic, but says that with nothing grazing those 4,800 acres, he needs an answer soon.

Agenda

News Quirks

“My grasses are getting so thick in there it’s getting me scared that a fire could happen,” he says. “I need to find out. If not, I need to get my present herd in there to eat it down a bit.” Alex Sakariassen

BY THE NUMBERS

$12

Last gasp Pot could go back to ballot The medical marijuana industry isn’t going down without a fight. On Friday, Senate Bill 423 will hit the books. When the law takes effect July 1, patients will still be allowed medical marijuana but it will be much harder to obtain. The multimillion-dollar industry that’s grown around the Medical Marijuana Act will be outlawed. Unless, that is, the industry succeeds in its lastgasp effort to suspend the law—perhaps the measure most debated by the 2011 Montana Legislature, other than the budget—and put the issue to voters in November. “It’s an incredibly difficult task,” says John Masterson of Montana NORML. There are two steps. First, to get an initiative referendum on the ballot—a citizen response to a legislative act—at least 5 percent of qualified voters in each of at least one-third of the legislative representative districts, a total of 24,337 people, must sign a petition. That’s the relatively easy part. The second step—to suspend the law until voters can weigh in—requires between 31,238 and 43,247 signatures. Petitions must be signed by at least 15 percent of the registered voters in each of at least 51 of the legislative representative districts. The entire process doesn’t require two separate petitions, but separate thresholds. Before signatures can be collected, though, the petition language needs to be approved. Terri Knap, the Secretary of State’s communications director, explains that her office, the state’s legislative services division, and the Attorney General’s office all need to OK it. An initiative referendum was last attempted in 2002, and was last successful in 1994. It’s a tall task, but the Montana Cannabis Industry Association announced this week that it was able to raise $50,000 in a few days to hire bigtime Bozeman attorney Jim Goetz, who will lead the effort to delay and ultimately kill SB 423. “The people of Montana aren’t going to take the decimation of Montana’s medical marijuana law lying down,” said MCIA board member Kate Cholewa. Matthew Frank

Amount Missoula Rep. Michele Reinhart paid for Three Cups of Tea, an allegedly embellished bestseller by Bozeman’s Greg Mortenson. Reinhart filed a lawsuit last Thursday against Mortenson—the target of a recent “60 Minutes” exposé—for committing fraud by inducing her to buy his book.

etc.

Greetings, graduates of the University of Montana’s class of 2011. In the next few days you’ll hear addresses about the promises ahead from newly anointed UM President Royce Engstrom and revered broadcaster Tom Brokaw. You’ll sit through brunch with parents who will offer similar pearls of wisdom. But here’s the rub: A large number of you won’t, in fact, go anywhere. Missoula has this funny way of holding onto even the most promising aspiring executive. So settle in, class of 2011. You could be here awhile. We were fresh UM grads not long ago. And we can’t for the life of us remember what our esteemed commencement speakers said. That’s because there are lessons you won’t learn during all that pomp. Post-college life in Missoula requires a skill set usually reserved for scroungers in World War II P.O.W. flicks and survivors of the zombie apocalypse. It’s grad-eat-grad out here. Our first tip: use the powers of positivity as often as possible. If you’re jobless, you’re not unemployed—you’re “fun-employed.” A checking account is never empty, just interest-challenged. There’s no shame in admitting the highlight of your Tuesday afternoon was catching an eight-inch rainbow on the Blackfoot; you were merely fishing for bait. Of course, it always helps to surround yourself with people who are a little more successful than you. Practice your “I’ll be rich someday” shtick and make it convincing. You might not have a job for your first year or so, but a good story can sway friends into thinking you’re good for any money they throw down. There’s a lot of easy cash to be had around Missoula. One look at the bathroom wall advertisements around town should tell you how much demand there is for blood, plasma, and certain other “contributions.” But you don’t have to sacrifice the next generation to make ends meet. When Mom and Dad are tapped out, grab that guitar and start plucking near the Saturday markets. Or take advantage of the GOP’s war on medical marijuana and mark up your product. It’ll be in high demand. We could offer an endless list of tips on winning “Survivor: Missoula,” but the bottom line is you shouldn’t feel embarrassed about sticking around Missoula. After all, this is one of the few towns on the planet where your garbage man has a Ph.D. in philosophy and your barista majored in international politics. You’ll find your niche eventually. So we’ll leave you with one last nugget we doubt you’ll hear from Brokaw: As long as you have a tent, you’ll never be homeless.

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Missoula Independent

Page 7 May 12–May 19, 2011


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Going-to-the-wallet Glacier braces for monumental melt by Matthew Frank

Every year, winter sends a message plowing and repairs, they’ll be added to Baucus spokeswoman Kate Downen. “It to Glacier National Park: That famous Glacier’s tab for the first restoration of the will be a considerable challenge though, road clinging to the mountainside, the 50-mile Going-to-the-Sun Road since the because right now we have to operate one that more than a million visitors 1930s—the most expensive road project in under the assumption that earmarks won’t drive every summer for incredible views the history of the National Park System. be included in the highway bill, and there is of glacier-carved peaks? It probably About $140 million has been secured, and a lot of uncertainty about what’s going to mostly spent, since 2004, and another $30- happen.” shouldn’t be there. Foster says the park’s predicament The message is sent by way of ava- 40 million will be needed to finish the projlanches and snowdrifts that can pile 80 ect. That $170 million amounts to nearly actually isn’t as bad as it could be. For starters, he says, the recession’s feet deep. And every year, the park allowed the park to stretch the $50 works furiously to undo what eight million in the highway bill “to the nth months of alpine winter did to the degree,” since construction bids are Going-to-the-Sun Road, all to open it coming in, he says, between 10 and 20 for just two or three months before percent lower than before the econothe snows come again. my tanked. Plus, a couple of “fluky” This year, the message is louder things happened: The road project than ever. received an extra $15 million through “We’ve got more snow…than we the FY2010 continuing resolution, know what to do with,” says Jim Foster says, and another $5 million in Foster, Glacier’s chief of facility manstimulus funds that the original recipiagement. “We can’t even find places to ent couldn’t spend. put the snow, it’s so deep. You’re talk“All of those things stacking up ing about driving through tunnels of puts us in a financial situation that’s snow that are six to seven feet deep.” much, much better than we ever anticAnd that’s at the park’s lower ipated,” Foster says. elevations. He expects improvements to the Crews haven’t reached—nor have alpine sections of the Going-to-thethey even seen—the “Big Drift” that Sun Road, from Avalanche Creek to awaits them at Logan Pass. Siyeh Bend on the east side of Logan “We’re so far away from it it’s Pass, to be completed by the fall of crazy,” Foster says. “This is monumen2012. The focus will then shift to the tal. Not in any history of any of the sections between West Glacier and people working here do we rememPhoto by Chad Harder Avalanche Creek, and from Siyeh ber anything like this.” Bend to St. Mary, which should be While the snow means plows are A car passes through the plowed-out “Big working overtime, the real conse- Drift” on Glacier’s Going-to-the-Sun Road a completed by 2015. But the immediate focus is on the quences would come with heavy few years ago. It’s a whole lot bigger this spring thaw—and any rain in the forerains. Foster fears massive flooding. year. cast. Foster says it’s too soon to preHe says it could be on par with the dict when the road will actually open. aftermath of the “Pineapple Express” storm in November 2006, a freak rain event half of the Montana Department of In 1964, it didn’t open until June 30. that caused $6 million in flood damage in Transportation’s annual budget for the Whenever the park gives the green light, Foster says visitors can expect construction entire state. the park. Where the rest of the restoration delays of 30-40 minutes. And that might be a best-case scenario. Is it all worth it? Foster says current conditions call to money will come from is unclear. The park “It’s a great question,” Foster says. mind the epic spring of 1964, when a two- has long relied on federal appropriations to He believes the park must, in line with day torrent of rain falling on deep moun- upgrade the road. Sen. Max Baucus eartain snowpack caused a flash flood so pow- marked a total of $13 million in 2004 and the Park Service’s mission, preserve the hiserful it washed out roads, bridges, and 2005, and secured $50 million in the 2005 toric landmark and engineering marvel. “We’re dedicated to keep it open as houses throughout the Flathead River highway bill. But a few months ago System, causing $63 million in damage, Congress banned earmarks for the next two long as the mountain allows us,” he continaccording to the Daily Inter Lake. The years. Making matters worse, the Highway ues. “If a catastrophic failure were to hapFlathead’s peak streamflow at Columbia Trust Fund faces a severe funding shortfall, pen and we were to drop a significant secFalls, according to the U.S. Geological which will complicate efforts to find money tion of road off the mountain, we probably Survey, reached 176,000 cubic feet per sec- for Glacier when Congress gets around to wouldn’t be able to fix it. And the reality is ond. (The average peak flow over the last reauthorizing the highway bill. And the park if we were to propose a road like that 10 years was 38,380 cubic feet per second.) can’t expect another $27.6 million in stimu- today, it would never be built—ever…So The potential for catastrophic damage lus money. It all adds up to a potential fund- it’s a treasure, a treasure for the American people…a treasure that we feel is worth now is high, Foster says, “and that puts us ing gap as deep as Lake McDonald. “Going-to-the-Sun Road is an iconic the investment to maintain.” into another category, where we’d be Montana road and Max has always been requesting emergency money.” Whatever the costs of this spring’s supportive of completing the project,” says mfrank@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 8 May 12–May 19, 2011


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

No soup for you Frenchtown battles a perfect storm in school funding by Alex Sakariassen

The Frenchtown School District was thriving five years ago. Enrollment had increased steadily by 3 percent annually since 1970, and a booming housing market bolstered the district’s growth. Schools could no longer accommodate the number of students; broom closets became offices and offices became classrooms. Frenchtown moved from class C to class B to class A status. The district shut its doors to non-district students and launched a $20 million expansion project in 2006 that included a junior high and a new vocational facility. “Right next to the school here, there was a plat for an 80-house addition,” says district superintendent Randy Cline. “We saw the growth there. We were pre-

fact that his district is suffering. Frenchtown voters shot down a $175,000 schools levy request last week 1,130 to 569. It was the first time in five years that the schools had requested a levy increase. District administrators had hoped to retain five staff members with the money. Additional layoffs were imminent regardless; the district has a projected budget deficit of $649,166 for the 2011-2012 school year. Trustees are now looking at terminating up to nine teachers and several administrators. “A lot of them are going to be firstyear teachers or second-year teachers, and a lot of them might show great promise,” says school board chair Dianne Burke. “But because of contractual obligations, those

Photo by Alex Sakariassen

Frenchtown schools superintendent Randy Cline is trying to look on the bright side.

pared for it…The building project itself wasn’t so much about preparing for growth as it was just catching up.” That growth screeched to a halt with the recession in 2008, and Cline says he’s often heard the phrase “perfect storm” used to describe the problems his district has faced in the subsequent three years. First the real estate market bottomed out. Then the state plugged stimulus dollars into budgets, which delayed funding shortfalls but left them looming. Then, in early 2010, Smurfit-Stone Container shuttered its pulp mill and took with it hundreds of jobs and tens of thousands of dollars in tax revenue. Cline says there’s no death knell for Frenchtown, but he doesn’t sugarcoat the

are going to be the first ones let go.” Cline says it’s hard to know why the levy failed. One reason might be fear of increased taxes in a time of economic uncertainty. Smurfit accounted for 24 percent of the taxable property in the district in 2009; this year the figure is projected at around 10 percent. “That taxable value doesn’t go away,” Cline says. “It just shifts to other property owners in the district.” Before the election, Cline says, he got a call from a woman in the district who runs a homebased business. She told Cline that even the smallest tax increase would be detrimental for her family: “She said, ‘I want you to know I really support the school. But I’m sorry, I can’t vote for the levy.’”

Such concerns may explain why most voters turned down the district’s request. Harlan Ockler doesn’t feel that justifies it. Ockler served on the Frenchtown school board for 17 years. He owns the King Ranch Golf Course, which, he points out, means a property tax increase is a pretty big deal for him. Yet he says he would have voted for the levy if it had been three times the amount requested. “A lot of folks probably thought, ‘Gosh, we just can’t stand any more of a burden,’” Ockler says. “But you don’t have to be an MIT graduate to take a look at a $200,000 home and you’re talking $49 a year you’re going to invest in the education for a child? Something’s the matter.” The district’s concerns aren’t limited to the failure of a levy, however. Last October, Cline appeared before the board with some troubling news: According to the Montana Office of Public Instruction, 60 students had dropped out of the Frenchtown schools since fall 2009. Cline had predicted an enrollment slump in the aftermath of the Smurfit closure, but the reality was three times higher than what he’d initially guessed. The school board voted last month to begin accepting non-district students again this fall. Burke says they’ll discuss a potential tuition charge for those students in the coming weeks. Still, Cline’s mood has improved somewhat since last week’s election. One day after the levy votes were tallied, executives from the Illinois-based Green Investment Group appeared at the Smurfit plant alongside Gov. Brian Schweitzer to announce a purchase. The company says it intends to bring recycling and alternative energy business to the site; a prospective buyer earlier this year merely intended to scrap the facility. Cline took the announcement to mean new jobs for Frenchtown residents and a revived tax base. So the picture is brighter than it was in February, he says. Yet with all the setbacks his district has experienced in three years, he can’t help defaulting to a “what if ” mentality. “If Green [Investment Group] had announced last week that they were coming in and they were going to reopen the Smurfit-Stone site and put businesses in there and create jobs, what effect would that have had on our mill levy?” he asks. “It was defeated by such a wide margin, I don’t know if it would have passed. But it would have been a lot closer.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 9 May 12–May 19, 2011


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Monumental jive Impacts of Clinton designation were vastly overblown

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406-459-5936 www.wildrockiesalliance.org Missoula Independent

Page 10 May 12–May 19, 2011

It’s been 22 years since my last visit to the area around Boulder and Escalante, Utah, so it was interesting to see what changes had occurred in the interim. When President Bill Clinton designated 1.9 million acres of this area as the Escalante-Grand Staircase National Monument, in 1996, there were howls of protest from a variety of special interests saying the designation would radically change the nature of the area. To put it bluntly, their case was largely built on speculative fears and, as anyone visiting Boulder today can see, those fears turned out to be completely jive. For those who aren’t familiar with this area, it is incredibly remote, rugged country characterized primarily by deep rock canyons carved over millennia by water and wind. What little vegetation it can support is typical of Utah’s desert country—some scrub oak, piñon pine, gnarly junipers, and, along the water courses, some willows and cottonwoods. In the higher elevations, winter snows provide enough water for ponderosa pine and aspen to survive, but this isn’t what you’d call logging country. Nor, since virtually every form of plant has evolved with cactus-like spines and thorns or is outright poisonous, would a Montanan think of it as ranching country. If you were to give a Montana cow a choice of going to the slaughterhouse or trying to survive on the sparse desert forage, it would likely say “send me to slaughter—it’ll be quicker than slowly starving to death.” But that would be a Montana cow. Down in Utah, cattle ranching on millions of acres of vast but sparsely-vegetated public lands continues to exist and, at least for some, thrive. When Clinton announced his intention to designate the national monument, many of the protests and dire predictions came from cattle ranchers. They were, of course, joined by the powerful energy corporations who seem incapable of finding reasons to save landscapes and natural ecosystems for future generations. If you can drill it for oil and gas, it should be drilled. If you can mine it for coal, copper, or gold, it should be mined. Many believe, after all, that man was given dominion over the earth, so why not exploit it to the maximum possible extent? Yet Clinton, in perhaps the most lasting accomplishment of his presidency, bucked these special interests and declared that this place of stunning visuals, and unique landforms and their resident flora and fauna, should be preserved intact for the future.

Let’s be clear here. Getting to Boulder, Utah is not easy. If you come in from the north, you take a narrow, steep, and incredibly twisting, two-lane asphalt road up and over a 10,000 foot plateau that, as of this second week of May, is still deep in snow. If you come up from the south, the road from Escalante winds

While it’s true that a few days in Boulder do not tell the whole tale, it’s also fair to say that if what’s going on in Utah today is what’s feared in northeast Montana, those concerns are baseless. along a backbone of rock that is not for the faint-hearted. In many places the canyon walls virtually touch the fog line of the road with drop-offs on both sides of thousands of very vertical feet to canyons far below. For most of the 35 miles between Boulder and Escalante there are no guardrails and, should the careless driver not pay very careful attention, a mistake would prove fatal. When the national monument designation was proposed, many feared the theoretical impacts that would accrue. We’ve heard it all before many times in Montana and elsewhere. The “newcomers” would ruin the lifestyle for existing residents, new restrictions on the land would crush the local economies, and speculators would hack private lands into smaller and smaller pieces for getrich-quick subdivisions. But what actually happened? Well, the Boulder Mountain Lodge, where we stayed, wasn’t there in 1989, but was

built prior to the monument designation. As far as a few days of observation could tell, the lodge and a couple of restaurants at the junction of Highway 12 and the Burr Trail are about the extent of the development. There were no subdivisions in sight, or signs for same. The cattle still stand contentedly in the fields of those lucky enough to have irrigation rights to the precious water that runs off the nearby mountains and cow pies are still in evidence wherever we went in the backcountry. In short, if this is the feared development and economic restriction, the fear was vastly overblown. We ate at Hell’s Backbone Grill, which takes its name from a nearby tortuous rib of rock. Given the sparse population of the area, it was amazing to see that reservations were required. The clientele seemed more than happy to eat, drink, and enjoy the spectacular views while leaving behind not insignificant amounts of money to keep the local economy alive. Today the population of the Boulder area is around 230 hardy souls—about 100 folks less than Jordan, Montana. As many Montanans know, the Department of Interior is studying the feasibility of designating significant portions of public land in far northeastern Montana as a national monument. The fears we hear now are very much like those voiced 15 years ago when Clinton designated Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument: An influx of newcomers, changing lifestyles, reduced economic opportunities and restrictive new land use regulations. While it’s true that a few days in Boulder do not tell the whole tale of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, it’s also fair to say that if what’s going on in Boulder, Utah, today is what’s feared in northeast Montana, those concerns are baseless. As UM professor emeritus Tom Power commented just this week, the economies of counties near wilderness areas and national parks continue to outperform other rural areas. Perhaps the time has come to dump the fanciful fears and take a clear-headed look at what a national monument in our great northern plains could actually do for, not to, Montana. We, and the nation, may have much more to gain than to lose. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Big sky, bigger abuse Montana’s shameful animal problems

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Sustainability Tour Saturday, June 11 • 12-5pm Showcasing innovative residential green building techniques & sustainable living practices!

By Wendy Beye

We seem to have a morbid fascination with news stories and photographs of dead, dying, or distressed animals—something Montana has provided plenty of in the past two years. The number of animals involved has been staggering, the evidence of abuse extreme. The first such news on a grand scale came last February, when a man in northcentral Montana was accused of abandoning over 200 goats to starvation. Sheriff ’s deputies who arrived on the scene were sickened at the sight of dead animals piled in drifts against fences. The perpetrator was recently fined $17,000, and sentenced to six years of jail time deferred. The next big story broke in northwestern Montana, when an animal-rescue ranch went broke. Nearly a thousand assorted animals, from potbellied pigs and llamas to a cow named “Molly B,” an escapee from a meatpacking plant, were found suffering from malnutrition and neglect when the ranch manager finally called for help. The last of the animals to leave were two Bactrian camels that were less than thrilled with the idea of being loaded into a trailer. The ranch went on the auction block shortly after that. The most recent case involved a rancher in south-central Montana. He had been a high roller in the cattle genetics business for a number of years until being forced to leave that business under the threat of several lawsuits. He re-invented himself as a quarter horse breeder in 2002 and spent thousands of dollars on lavish auction parties each year at his ranch. In its glory days, his operation spread over nearly 15,000 acres of deeded land and 30,000 acres of leased land. He finally went bankrupt and lost both of his ranches. The neighbors who purchased the largest of those ranches at a U.S Marshal’s auction last summer moved in with their cattle and pushed more than 700 horses onto a remote area of the property that

couldn’t support them through the winter. The new owners maintained that the horses were not their responsibility, while the rancher insisted that he could keep his horses on the property until a one-year redemption period expires next summer.

This January, sheriff’s deputies visited the area and found a number of dead horses, and more that needed to be destroyed.

The courts ordered the breeder to liquidate the stock to pay creditors, but with horse prices tanking, he never got around to rounding them up. This January, sheriff ’s deputies visited the area and found a number of dead horses, and more that needed to be destroyed. Publicity bought some time for the remaining animals as donations of hay and cash poured in. Over the next two months, $50,000 was spent feeding and watering the horses until their rib cages began to fill out. The owner faces 14 counts of animal abuse for the horses that died or were likely to die. The case is scheduled for jury trial in June.

Meanwhile, the Crow Tribe complained to the Bureau of Indian Affairs that many of those neglected horses had been illegally eating reservation grass for several years. After the Crow Agency conducted an old-fashioned Montana roundup at BIA expense, 829 horses thundered into corrals to be sorted, brand-inspected, and checked by veterinarians in preparation for sale. The owner had an opportunity to redeem his animals right up until the day of the auction. Horse blogs were abuzz with news of the BIA auction, and as a result, a number of past issues with the breeder came to light. Apparently, as early as 2004, registration papers for horses purchased at the lavish ranch sales were nearly impossible to obtain. Despite the registration problems, buyers flocked to Montana from all parts of the country and Canada, and a thousand curious onlookers swelled the crowd on the day of the auction. The BIA announced gross proceeds of $380,000 from the auction, but declared that after all expenses including rangeland damages were totaled up, the agency and the Crow Tribe probably lost money. The good news is that nearly all of the horses on the block found homes. The bad news is that one of the successful bidders on nearly 70 of the horses was the son of the breeder charged with abuse. He was apparently acting as a purchasing agent for his father, who showed up with a certified check to claim the horses, even though he no longer owns or leases property suitable for sustaining a herd of that size. His reclaimed stock includes both studs and mares—almost guaranteeing a repeat performance of this High Plains horse opera with its tragic cast.

Tickets on sale May 15 at www.homeword.org 127 N Higgins, Suite 307 Missoula, MT • 532-HOME

Wendy Beye is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). She lives in Roundup, where she’s a pilot and freelance writer.

Missoula Independent

Page 11 May 12–May 19, 2011


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Since 1993, the Missoula-based nonprofit organization Living Art of Montana has helped support healing through the arts and nature for those facing acute or chronic disease. To date, over 4,200 people facing illness or loss have utilized Living Art of Montana’s free programs, which include workshops that offer activities including mask making and writing. This week, you can support the organization’s worthwhile work during its annual fundraiser, “The Light Show.” It’s a dinner/art auction that helps support Living Art of Montana’s free service programs while offering the chance to decorate your abode

THURSDAY MAY 12 Destination Missoula, the official convention and visitors bureau for Missoula, hosts its monthly board meeting from 3–5 PM at the conference room of MonTEC, 1121 E. Broadway St. Free. Call 532-3250.

by bidding on nonfunctional and functional art pieces—like artistically altered lamps—by local artists including Matthew English and Hanna Hannan. As a bonus, the event includes tango performances by members of the Downtown Dance Collective. –Ira Sather-Olson Living Art of Montana’s “The Light Show” 2011 Fundraiser begins at 5:45 PM on Sat., May 14, at the Hilton Garden Inn, 3720 N. Reserve St. $60 per person/$450 table of eight/$540 table of 10. Call 549-5329 for tickets and visit livingartofmontana.org

If you have some non-perishable canned food lying around your pad, donate it to a good cause during the Missoula Food Bank/U.S. Postal Service Food Drive, which runs throughout today. All you need to do to participate is to leave your donations by your mailbox. Call 549-0543.

Shake a peacemaker’s hand when the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center presents an awards celebration for its peacemaker of the year, Jane McAllister, from 6:30–8:30 PM at Lewis and Clark School, 2901 Park St. Free. Call 543-3955 or visit jrpc.org.

TUESDAY MAY 17

SATURDAY MAY 14

WEDNESDAY MAY 18

Smack around a softball or just watch a slew of female softball players do the same during the Porky’s Women’s Benefit Softball Tournament, which raises money for a cancer patient in Missoula and occurs today and tomorrow at around 8:30 AM at McCormick Park. $175 per team, but players must be sanctioned by the Amateur Softball Association of America. The tournament is free for spectators. Call Elaine at 728-4179.

Enjoy a local brew and support a local organization during the Kettlehouse Northside Tap Room’s Community U-NITE Pint Nights, which occur this and every Wed. from 5–8 PM at the tap room, 313 N. First St. W. A portion of the proceeds from each pint sold goes to a different organization each week. Free to attend. Visit kettlehouse.com.

Get the good word on owning your own digs during homeWORD’s Get Ready for Home Ownership workshop, which meets from 9 AM–6 PM at Mountain West Bank, 3301 Great Northern Ave. Childcare vouchers are also available for the Busy Hands Fun Center. $10 per person. Register online at homeword.org.

THURSDAY MAY 19

YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts YWCA Support Groups for women every Tue. from 6:30–8 PM. An American Indian-led talking circle is also available, along with age-appropriate children’s groups. Free. Call 543-6691.

All AmeriCorps members, alumni, and their supporters are hereby invited to a cookout and potluck in recognition of AmeriCorps Week, which runs from 6–8 PM at the Greenough Park shelter, off of Monroe St. Free, but bring a dish to share. Call 243-5531 to RSVP.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent

Page 12 May 12–May 19, 2011


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - Harold Luken, 45, walked into a New York City bank and reportedly yelled, “I am going to rob the bank. I have a gun, but I’m going to wait on line.” When his turn came, he repeated his intentions to the teller, adding, “First, I’m going to pass you a note.” Teller Sean Knudsen declined to hand over any money, however, so Luken asked for the balance in his own account. Knudsen again refused. “OK, I will go to Citibank,” Luken said. “I will rob them instead.” Police intercepted him en route. (New York Post) Two men who fled from a home invasion in Charlotte, N.C., left behind a black T-shirt that showed a photo of a man and the caption “Making money is my thang.” The homeowner recognized the photo as one of the men who had just robbed him. He turned out to be Tyrone Huntley, 25, whom police arrested. (The Charlotte Observer) WHO YOU GONNA CALL? - A little-known Philadelphia company has quietly gained control of nearly a quarter of the 7.87 million toll-free, 1-800 numbers in the United States and Canada, often snapping them up the moment the previous users relinquish them. As of March, PrimeTel Communications administered 1.7 million 1-800 numbers—more than any other company, including Verizon and AT&T. The numbers 1-800-Chicago, 1-800-FIRETIP, 1-800-Cadillac, 1-800-Minolta, 1-800-Cameras, 1-800-Worship, 1-800-Beatles and 1-800-Whirlpool, for example, all connect to a recording of a woman offering “one-on-one talk with a nasty girl” for $2.99 a minute. Although most numbers reach erotic chat lines, some connect to ads for a mortgage brokerage based in New Jersey, a dieting website and a travel reservation service. Prime-Tel also owns a dominant share of toll-free numbers with other prefixes, such as 1-888 and 1-866. “They started by getting numbers for phone sex, then getting good numbers in general, then they started taking all phone numbers,” said Bill Quimby, whose company specializes in helping businesses obtain easy-to-remember digits to connect with customers. (Associated Press) FOTO FOLLIES - Joseph Connelly, publisher of the “vegetarian-lifestyle” magazine VegNews, apologized after revelations that its editors regularly used photographs of foods containing meat and dairy to accompany vegan recipes. The vegan blog Quarrygirl.com reported finding free online stock photos that matched images appearing in VegNews and on its website. In one case, the magazine retouched a photo of grilled ribs to remove the bones. Quarrygirl.com bloggers protested by saying they were returning an award they had received two years ago from VegNews for an investigative article about nonvegan ingredients being served at vegan restaurants in Los Angeles. (The New York Times) The U.S. Postal Service acknowledged that the image of the Statue of Liberty it used on a forever stamp is actually a Lady Liberty replica outside the New York-New York casino hotel in Las Vegas. A sharp-eyed philatelist discovered the replica was used shortly after the post office issued the stamp in December and notified Linn’s Stamp News, which alerted readers. Explaining it selected the image from a stock-photo service, which licensed it as simply “Statue of Liberty,” the post office said it regrets the error but doesn’t plan to stop circulating the stamp. “We still love the stamp design and would have selected this photo anyway,” USPS official Roy Betts declared. (The New York Times) FRIENDSHIP TEST - After asking friends walking with him if they would save him if he were drowning, Samson Lindsey, 24, jumped into the Coosa River in Gadsden, Ala. Knowing he couldn’t swim, the friends did jump in to rescue him but couldn’t. A rescue squad from the Etowah County Sheriff’s Office later found his body. (Gadsden Times) DON’T LIKE - Michigan authorities charged Richard Leon Barton Jr., 34, with polygamy after his first wife, living in Rhode Island, became suspicious because he unfriended her on Facebook. The woman told police she married Barton in 2004 after the two met online, but he was arrested for parole violation in Michigan and imprisoned there until October 2009. He remained in that state. After he unfriended her, she searched online and found her husband’s wedding photos with a Grand Rapids woman on the Facebook pages of Barton’s friends and family. (The Grand Rapids Press) STAND-OFF - A 55-year-old woman and her daughter returned to their home in Portland, Ore., and heard a man’s voice coming from the bathroom. She yelled that she was calling the police, and he said he was doing the same. The intruder identified himself as Timothy James Chapek, 24, and told the dispatcher he’d broken into the house and was taking a shower when the owner came home. He said she had two barking German shepherds and that he feared she might also have a gun. Police arrested him without incident. (The Oregonian) SEX IS ITS OWN PUNISHMENT - Chicago police said prostitute Ashley Nicole Steele, 21, was with client Derrick Gray, 40, and another person, identified as a witness, at Gray’s home when a woman began pounding on the front door and screaming at Gray. According to court records, Gray got dressed and went to the door. Steele grabbed a handgun from a table and followed. The woman at the door said Gray had given her herpes and showed Steele text messages he sent her, apologizing for giving her a sexually transmitted disease. Steele then shot Gray in the head, body and arms, prosecutors said after charging her with first-degree murder. (Chicago Sun-Times) HEIR APPARENT - Prince Frederic von Anhalt, 67, ninth husband of Zsa Zsa Gabor, announced his 94-year-old wife intends on becoming a mother again. The 94-year-old Hungarian-born actress had hip-replacement surgery and a leg amputation last year and hasn’t been able to walk since a 2002 car accident. Von Anhalt indicated he’s looking for an egg donor and a surrogate mother for the child, who would carry on the Gabor name. Her two sisters didn’t have children, and her only daughter took the name of her father, hotel magnate Conrad Hilton, who was Gabor’s second husband. “That’s just weird,” Francesca Hilton, 64, said after learning of her mother’s plan. (CNN) MY BAD - Houston police said Gboweh Dickson George, 32, fired several rounds into an apartment, killing an 11-year-old boy and injuring two members of his family. Other family members said George hopped over the balcony, entered the home, looked around and announced, “I have the wrong house.” (Houston’s KHOU-TV)

Missoula Independent

Page 13 May 12–May 19, 2011


n his recent journey from Atlanta to Missoula, Dan Hollis found himself at a Holiday Inn somewhere between Idaho Falls and Dillon. A flight mishap left him stranded in Chicago, he was detoured through Salt Lake City, and then, instead of waiting overnight for a flight to Missoula, he decided to rent a car and drive. It was a trying couple of days, he said, but he was hoping there’d be a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. And there might be. Hollis is the CEO of Dutch Gold Resources, a small, Atlanta-based mining company that has its sights set on a claim about 15 miles west of Philipsburg, in the hills above Upper Rock Creek, the blue-ribbon trout stream that feeds into the Clark Fork. He was headed to the site, known as Basin Gulch, to monitor the progress of his

O

company’s exploratory drilling, which the Montana Department of Environmental Quality approved in February. “We’ve had a reserve report completed that shows that there’s an exceptionally large gold body on the property,” he says. He’s also coming in search of other mining prospects, because, he says, Dutch Gold is seeking “a significant presence” in Montana. “We’re doing drilling for the purpose of defining the resources that could be high-grade underground mines,” he says. “Our hope would be that over the next six months we’re able to identify and develop, consistent with permitting and regulatory issues, a small-scale mine that could be into production—let me emphasize, test production—next year.” Proposals like Dutch Gold’s don’t signal the kind of boom that had people

heading for Sutter’s Mill in 1849 or the Klondike in 1897—or even Montana in the 1860s—but Hollis could be in the vanguard of a new, 21st-century-style rush for Western metals. From a regulatory standpoint, the Basin Gulch Mine hasn’t even been officially proposed, but Dutch Gold already has bet $4 million in exploration costs, according to the company’s annual report, that it will be able tap “several million ounces” of gold in the rugged terrain above Upper Rock Creek. And that gold is as valuable as it’s ever been: On May 2, two days before Hollis departed for Missoula, the price of an ounce reached an all-time high of $1,575.79, topping records that had been set in 11 out of the 12 previous trading sessions. “We’ve been very, very excited,” Hollis says, “and we think it’s going to

continue to go up at a reasonably modest pace…We think gold’s made a base somewhere between $1,000 and $1,200 now, and at that price, we can build what we hope will be a very profitable operation at Basin Gulch. And if gold prices continue to go up, we’ll be much happier.” Gold prices began to spike with the onset of the recession in 2008, and they’ve generally inched upward since, propped up by low interest rates and unease about inflation. “A lot of this is just the fear in the world and the country about the economy,” says economist Larry Swanson of the O’Connor Center for the Rocky Mountain West at the University of Montana. “We’ve spent about three years where we’ve been in terror about what’s happening to banking, what’s happening to housing, and what people do when

GOLD FEVER REACHES UPPER ROCK CREEK story by Matthew Frank • photos by Chad Harder

Drumlummon miners drive pneumatic drills into rock.

Missoula Independent

Page 14 May 12–May 19, 2011


ent. Bardswich and Whiteley are both there’s a lot of fear, particularly when thick, raspy-voiced throwbacks. the stock market is plummeting, is Bardswich first went underground in they invest in gold.” 1963, he says, and ever since he’s The Missoula Gold and Silver worked mines in Europe, Africa, and Exchange, on Brooks Street, has seen Canada; he’s from Ontario. Whiteley, its business nearly double in recent whom Bardswich chides for his months thanks to the record-high smoking habit, has worked mines all gold prices and 31-year-high silver over the U.S. since 1983, following in prices, says owner David Hakes. his father’s footsteps. “We’ve been absolutely swamped We enter the Gunsinger Decline, over the past two months with peonamed for Operations Manager Mike ple buying and selling,” he says. “Oh Gunsinger. Bardswich says Gunsinger boy, have we.” Kevin Pfaul, owner of discovered the Charly Vein. The the pawn shop Liquid Assets, in decline, completed in early April at a downtown Missoula, has seen a surge cost of more than $4 million, gives in the number of customers selling the mine a second route underjewelry, gold nuggets, placer gold, ground. and even dental fillings. “The gold The truck rumbles forward. market’s been real active now for Daylight slowly diminishes behind about two and a half years, and dogus. We find ourselves winding gonit, actually, I hope it doesn’t go through a dank, cavernous tunnel. much higher,” Pfaul says. “It doesn’t We hear the coming-and-going throb bode well for our economy. It shows of drills penetrating deep into rock. the weakness of the dollar, and all in Whitely stops the truck whenever we all, that’s just not good for America.” encounter the bobbing headlamps of But it’s certainly good for mining miners, to check with them on the companies, which dismays many Photo courtesy of U.S.G.S. day’s progress. environmentalists. Record-high gold prices have the Dutch Gold’s interest in Basin Atlanta-based Dutch Gold says it’s spent about $4 million in exploration costs Gulch “is one of a number of on its Basin Gulch prospect, which sits about 15 miles west of Philipsburg and Drumlummon Mine ramping up production. Now they’re able make a [prospective mines],” says DEQ about two miles away from Upper Rock Creek. profit on ore they’d typically throw Environmental Management Bureau Chief Warren McCullough. “And in fact, I Drumlummon Mine. A collection of 70,000 ounces of gold and nearly two away, Bardswich says. He hopes they’ll would say that the immediate future of buildings and trailers are perched on the m i l l i o n o u n c e s o f s i l v e r. “ T h e soon be able to haul out 500 tons a day; mining in Montana, as far as new projects hillside, buttressed by a wall of gray rock Drumlummon Mine is a ‘bonanza’-style out of that, they’ll yield about 100 go, will probably focus mainly on rela- hauled out of the earth. A couple dozen epithermal deposit…characterized by ounces of gold, which, at the current tively small, high-grade, underground of pickups line the narrow road that very high-grade gold and silver,” the com- value, would be more than $150,000 leads to one of the mine’s adits. The pany reported. worth. Then it’s trucked to either the mill gold mines.” Gold prices hovered around $750 an RX leases in Philipsburg or the Golden Like in Marysville, where the 140- license plates reveal where these miners year old Drumlummon Mine—a rough used to work: Virginia, Tennessee, ounce at the time. At current prices, that Sunlight Mine, in Whitehall. Ultimately, model, Hollis says, for Basin Gulch—has Arkansas, Nevada. Many hail from gold alone would be worth $110 million. about 85 percent of the gold gets “[The Charly Vein] opened up a shipped to a broker in Reno, Bardswich Montana, I’m later told; they’d been waitcome back to life. whole new world,” says Joe Bardswich, says, and ends up at a smelter in Mexico. ing for the opportunity to come back. The opportunity came with the 2008 RX’s chief mining engineer. Only six miners are down here durBardswich lends a photographer and ing today’s 10-hour shift, two fewer than discovery of another mother lode of gold A WHOLE NEW WORLD Montana designated Marysville one known as the Charly Vein. Drilling by the me hard hats, headlamps, steel-toed n o r m a l . T h e D r u m l u m m o n m i n e of its official ghost towns. About 70 peo- Canadian company RX Exploration, boots, and emergency respirators. Then employs around 140 people in some ple still live there, but the town does which had acquired the claims, revealed the three of us climb into a truck with capacity or another—surveyors, assayers, seem like an artifact. Many of its weath- that the Charly Vein contained more than Dave Whiteley, the mine’s superintend- carpenters, truckers, engineering conered, wooden buildings are boarded up. The hillsides are dotted with half-collapsed shanties and rusted-out cars. The only outward clues of its significance are the hanging wooden signs at the entrance to the town that boast of its improbable history. In the late 19th century, gold from the Drumlummon Mine made Marysville one of the richest mining areas in the world. By 1900, it produced $30 million in gold bullion and about 4,000 people lived in the tiny valley in the mountains about 40 miles north of Helena. By one account the town supported 60 businesses, including 27 bars, seven hotels, three newspapers, two railroads, and an opera. Three mills ran around the clock. Drumlummon gold graced the Cathedral of St. Helena, Carroll College, and the Montana Capitol. But the boom was busted in 1910 when mine operators lost a key court case. Mining continued intermittently until 1951, when a fire destroyed the mine. The town would similarly flame out. Sixty years later, while the town remains quiet, there’s a buzz up at the Workers at the revived Drumlummon gold mine in Marysville drill for core samples.

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sultants. It plans to hire additional experienced miners in the coming months. Wages range between $20 and $40 an hour, Whiteley says, plus productionbased incentives than can double the hourly rate. “There are an awful lot of Montanans [who are miners] spread from Alaska to Mexico and into Canada and down into South America, and a lot of them want to come home,” Bardswich says. “Montana’s a beautiful state and people who grew up here enjoy the hunting and fishing…they want to come back and work here.” We arrive at the No. 9 Drill Station, a hollowed-out room lit with spotlights, a short walk through standing water from the decline. Two ear-plugged contractors are at work pointing diamond drill bits into the rock in order to extract core samples. One minds the machinery’s controls, driving the drill deeper and deeper. When the long, pipe-like drill extension is pulled back up, the other worker slides a tube of rock out of it, feeding the sample into the rows of a shallow cardboard box, breaking the rock with a hammer every couple of feet

The entrance of the Drumlummon Mine’s Gunsinger Decline.

says mining companies around the world have a negative perception of Montana because of its environmental regulations. The state’s missing out on hundreds of millions of dollars of investment, he contends.

where they don’t give a shit. I look at Flathead Lake and I understand there’s mercury that blows over from the coalfired plants in China, because they have no controls on it, so Flathead Lake is getting polluted with mercury from over-

the world market…We’re competing for those exploration dollars with Australia and Russia and India and everybody else. It’s not state-by-state. We have to compete on an international basis—and it’s tough.”

“High prices encourage scoundrels in the gold mining industry. They always have and apparently always will…It’s a time for people to be very cautious about small operators like this that make a mess and go away.” —Jim Jensen, Montana Environmental Information Center so it fits. The rock shimmers black, brown, and gray. It will go to the assayers on the surface. This has been an uncommon scene in Montana over the last two decades. Bardswich believes it shouldn’t be. He

“[Environmentalists] are right: make sure it’s done right,” he says after we escape the loud thrum of the drill. “But we’re not cleaning up the world’s environment by shutting down mines in Montana and shipping them to China

seas. If we’re the best at doing things environmentally, then we should encourage the development in our own country.” After driving more than a half-mile underground, we turn around and head for daylight. When we emerge, two men stand in front of the trailers, legs wide, hands in pockets, eagerly awaiting Bardswich and Whitely’s return. They’re looking for work.

‘THESE EVIL MINERS’

Dave Whiteley, the Drumlummon Mine’s president and superintendent, says the mine plans to hire additional experienced miners in the coming months.

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Page 16 May 12–May 19, 2011

Drumlummon is something of an anomaly. Its revival probably doesn’t portend a return to Montana’s gold mining heyday, although Robin McCulloch wishes it did. The mining engineer with the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, in Butte, laments that Montana’s metal mining infrastructure is nearly gone, leaving a vacuum in which sky-high gold prices reap little reward. “Everybody says, ‘Those evil miners, we need to get them under control,’” McCulloch says. “I hate to tell them, but they need to go out and put flowers on their graves. They’re dead. There’s nobody left...The major mines over the last 75 to 100 years no longer exist, and what we have left are small to mediumsized companies, mostly homegrown, that are depending on financing through

McCulloch, echoing Bardswich, says outside investors cringe at the thought of doing business in Montana. “Our reputation at this point for an investment dollar, we’re not in the toilet, but we’re close, on an international basis. Part of it isn’t that the law is so severe, but the permitting cycles and the litigation is so severe as to not allow anybody to want to invest in Montana.” He points to the Fraser Institute’s annual global mining survey. The most recent results, published in March, show that 83 percent of mining companies surveyed said Montana’s environmental regulations are a deterrent to investment. Montana ranks eighth on Fraser’s list of the 15 worst mining districts in the world for 2011. Mining exploration projects have dropped from about 140 in 1991 to around 10 today, according to data from the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology. The number of gold mining operations of all sizes dropped from 23 in 1989 to five in 2000, and has rebounded to seven today—“and that includes everything right down to the little guy shuffling and dancing with a backhoe,” McCulloch says. McCulloch blames Montana’s flagging mining industry partly on citizen Initiative 137 that, in 1998, banned cyanide heap-leach mining. “It wasn’t the


cyanide ban itself,” he says, “but it harbored an attitude toward business.” The Montana Environmental Information Center (MEIC) led that effort, in response to what it said was the “abysmal track record of open pit cyanide leach mining in Montana, as exemplified by cleanup fiascos at the Golden Sunlight, Zortman-Landusky, and Ke n d a l l m i n e s a n d t h e M o n t a n a Department of Environmental Quality’s failure to adequately regulate such mines as required by state law.” Canyon Resources, the company that wanted to open a cyanide heap-leach gold mine in the Upper Blackfoot Valley, attempted to repeal the ban with its own initiative, but voters rejected it in 2004. Canyon also lost a protracted court battle. The 2011 Montana Legislature approved a bill to effectively reverse the ban, but Gov. Brian Schweitzer has promised to veto it. “The infrastructure that went away was the cyanide-based infrastructure, and it’s a good thing for Montana that it went away,” says MEIC director Jim Jensen. Golden Sunlight is the only mine left in Montana that uses it, he says, “and one day it will go away, too.” Jensen says he hopes Schweitzer will also veto Senate Bill 312, sponsored by Chas Vincent, R-Libby, which eases the permitting process for mining operations and would apply to the Basin Gulch Mine. The bill stems from frustration over the years-long regulatory approval processes for the proposed Montanore and Rock Creek mines southwest of Libby, both of which would tunnel beneath the Cabinet Mountains Wilderness to access massive silver and copper deposits. The shuttered Zortman-Landusky Mine, south of the Fort Belknap Reservation in north-central Montana, stands out as perhaps the most environmentally harmful gold and silver mine in the history of the state. In 1982, three years after it opened, about 50,000 gallons of cyanide spilled, poisoning the community of Zortman’s water supply. There were several other spills between then and 1997, when the mine closed. A year later, the company filed for bankruptcy, leaving the state with the liability. The total cleanup tab through 2010 amounts to $55.9 million, according to the DEQ. The mine will require water treatment in perpetuity. Golden Sunlight, which produced 28,000 ounces of gold in 2009, still uses cyanide because it was grandfathered in. Its track record includes the leak of 19 million gallons of cyanide solution in 1983. Vancouver, B.C.-based Placer Dome Inc. opened the mine in 1974. Toronto-based Barrick Gold Corp., the largest gold mining company in the world, acquired Placer Dome, and Golden Sunlight with it, in 2006 for $10.4 billion. Two weeks ago, Barrick reported that its first quarter adjusted net earnings rose 32 percent to $1 billion. “First quarter operating results exceeded our expectations and combined with

A truck passes through the Drumlummon Mine’s Gunsinger Decline.

strong metal prices and good cost control, resulted in significant growth in earnings and operating cash flow,” said Aaron Regent, Barrick’s president and CEO. To be sure, the environmental impacts of vast, open-pit, cyanide heapleach mines like Golden Sunlight are far more severe than the impacts of, say, the arsenic-tainted water coming out of the underground Drumlummon Mine. “Some companies are doing a very good job,” says economist Larry Swanson, “and others do as bad a job as you possibly can.” Montanans familiar with gold mining’s toxic legacy in the state tend not to make a distinction.

one of the most beautiful areas in the world, and when I talk about being environmentally conscious, and serving all of the stakeholders, one of the stakeholders are the fishermen.” Bruce Farling, the director of Montana Trout Unlimited, doesn’t buy it. He says Dutch Gold, whose portfolio consists of three properties, none of which are operational mines, is “trying to mine investors as much as they’re trying to mine gold.” “It’s a real mistake to do it in Rock Creek,” Farling continues, “and [Hollis] ought to know that…Trying to permit a mine on Rock Creek is just going to be a nightmare for these guys.”

Farling promises that Trout Unlimited will fight the mine whenever it’s officially proposed. And it won’t be alone. Groups like MEIC, the Clark Fork Coalition, and the Rock Creek Protective Association will also vigorously oppose it. The RCPA has concerns about the mine sending sediment downstream and exacerbating whirling disease. Says MEIC’s Jensen: “It’s a real bad idea to have a mine at the headwaters of Rock Creek. Period.” “High prices encourage scoundrels in the gold mining industry,” Jensen continues. “They always have and apparently always will…It’s a time for people to be very cautious about small operators like this that make a mess and go away, and leave the mess. I guess I’d hark back to Mark Twain’s prescient analysis on the subject, and that was this: ‘The definition of a miner is a liar with a hole in the ground.’ It seems to be a truism for the ages.” Jensen is in Helena. Closer to Basin Gulch, at least some are less wary of mining. One Philipsburg-area resident, Barbara Clark, says, “Floaters do more damage to the river than the mine would.” Hollis maintains that his company can mine in an “environmentally prudent way.” “This isn’t greenwashing,” he says. “We think that Montana is a great place for us to do business, and our hope is to find additional properties in the area and that we can build a significant presence in the state, and be a real contributor to the tax base and an employer that people want to come work for.” Historically, that’s been an irresistible proposition in the Treasure State, and it’s essentially no different today. Farling says it’s a haul he’d rather let get away: “If we actually need gold for real things, like industrial purposes and stuff, there’s plenty of gold to be mined in the pawn shops of America. There really is—especially now.” mfrank@missoulanews.com

‘A NIGHTMARE FOR THESE GUYS’ Dutch Gold’s Dan Hollis insists the Basin Gulch Mine’s environmental footprint would be minimal. “I know that there are people who are worried about the environment, frankly, based on some of the things that have happened in the state of Montana in the past,” he says. “I understand their concerns, but the technology’s changed, and one of our core values is sustainability. It’s not lip service, it’s something that we really believe.” Hollis says Dutch Gold doesn’t have “any plans any time in the near future” to pursue open-pit mining, even though the exploration focuses, according to the company website, on “identifying a large open-pit minable reserve.” “Our intention is to stay underground so that any impact on Rock Creek could certainly be minimized,” he says, “and frankly, we wouldn’t enter into a program that was going to have any negative impact on Rock Creek. I mean, it’s

Photo by Matt Gibson

The Basin Gulch mine would sit in the hills above Rock Creek, a blue-ribbon trout stream.

Missoula Independent

Page 17 May 12–May 19, 2011


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I’ll see you and braise you FLASHINTHEPAN Great Food No Attitude. Mon-Fri

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Ever wonder what happens to salad mix when it grows up? Those tender baby leaves get big and leathery in a matter of weeks and farmers can no longer sell them for the premium that salad mix commands. The adolescent foliage remains supple and delicious by almost any standard, but in the jungle of salad mix economics, only the smallest and most tender survive. Enter “braising mix,” a marketing category created by farmers who’d grown tired of watching beautiful, nutritious, and valuable food go to the chickens or get plowed back under. With the advent of braising mix, the only people who lost out were the farmhands who used to take it home by the bagful after work. Oh, and some consumers are losing out too, but only the rare few who actually try to braise the stuff. Indeed, “braising mix” is a misleading choice of name. As any dictionary and most braising recipes indicate, braising involves first browning something, typically meat, and then cooking it in a closed container with liquid for a very long time. It’s a technique designed for turning tough things like shank into falling-offthe-bone delicacies like osso bucco. Those leaves of overgrown salad mix may be getting a bit chewy, but braising them is still like using a cruise missile to hunt deer. Not only is it overkill, there’d be nothing left to enjoy. Luckily for the coiners of the term, few among the general public, including many good cooks, seem to know what braising is. The word sounds brief, glancing, teasing, and suggests a quick spin around the sauté pan rather than the commitment that true braising entails. I’ve no reason to believe that anyone has literally braised a batch of braising greens the way one braises meat. Luckily for aspiring leaf braisers, a new generation of braising mix recipes have emerged. Most of these recipes can be found on the websites of farms that grow and market braising mix, and who can blame them? Just a few weeks ago at my local co-op, braising mix was priced $3 a pound more than salad mix or baby spinach.

by ARI LeVAUX

careful not to splatter yourself in the eye. Ideally, have someone toss the salad while you pour the hot dressing in, allowing as much hot dressing as possible to come into contact with raw, chewy leaf. There are lots of more-complicated hot salad dressings out there, but beware of such recipes online. Many are full of fat and thickeners. While I can appreciate some bacon in my hot salad dressing, I don’t need the flour, butter, eggs, and sugar that some people—evidently salad haters—require to make leaves palatable. While braising mix started out as a way to salvage overgrown salad mix, nowadays it’s typically grown from a special mix of seeds. Gone are the days when farmers picked through the overgrown salad mix to harvest the cookable greens like kale, mizuna, chard, bok choy, and radicchio, while leaving the lettuce behind. The more in need of cooking a particular leaf is, the longer shelf life it tends to have. If you forget about a sack of braising mix in the back of the fridge for a week, it will be no worse for wear. But any lettuce in the braising mix would be reduced to slime after a few days in the bag. The creation of braising mix produced a beautiful gimmick. Less overgrown salad mix went to waste, more got eaten, farmers made more money, and nobody got hurt. The biggest victim was the poor word “braise.” Even though braising mix is just a few days past salad-like tenderness, it’s named for a cooking technique that brings you about as far from salad as you can get and still be in the kitchen. Today, the well-deserved popularity of braising mix adds to the misunderstanding of the meanPhoto by Ari LeVaux ing of its namesake. You could make the argument that braising pulling out a prepped ingredient. After a quick greens are actually really good when braised, albeit rinse, it’s ready for the frying pan, steamer, soup for a very short time in a very small amount of liquid. In fact, I do this a lot on a stovetop. If you add oil to pot, or even salad bowl. If your braising mix is a little too tough for a nor- the pot, when the liquid evaporates the dish phases mal salad, but salad is what you want, one good from steaming to frying. Because it’s like frying and option is to douse it with a hot salad dressing. At the steaming at the same time, I’ve been calling this techsimple end, a hot dressing can be little more than nique “freaming” for years. But do the marketers call minced garlic sautéed in oil with salt and pepper; as it “freaming mix?” No, they do not. Am I bitter? Well, soon as you smell cooking garlic, add vinegar, being maybe just a little. That price inversion, while not typical, shows how strong the demand is for braising mix. It’s become a regular in many high-end kitchens, both commercial and private. Just as salad mix is a labor saver in that you don’t have to trim, clean, and cut a head of lettuce, braising mix allows the same convenience of reaching into a bag and

LISTINGS Congrats to Grads, from Your Friends at Food For Thought!

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Missoula Independent

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culinary creations in the great room; visit with the chefs and dine in the kitchen or enjoy the fresh air on the Outdoor Patio. Parties and special events can be enjoyed in the Bison Room. Winter Hours: 4pm - 9 pm Seven Days a Week. $$-$$$

Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway (across from courthouse) • 728-8900 Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wifi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$

Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced beega) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$

The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to late. $-$$

Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 May is Cupcake-Maynia month at Bernice’s. Each year Bernice’s spends the entire month showcasing 16 amazing cupcakes. Try one or enjoy all 16! And don’t forget mom on Mother’s Day. Sweet tooth not your thing? Fresh daily lunches are served at Bernice’s M – F from 11am – 4pm. Check out our delicious deli sandwich-

Blue Canyon Kitchen 3720 N. Reserve 541-BLUE (adjacent to the Hilton Garden Inn) www.bluecanyonrestaurant.com We offer creatively-prepared American cooking served in the comfortable elegance of their lodge restaurant featuring unique dining rooms. Kick back in the Tavern; relish the cowboy chic and

Page 18 May 12–May 19, 2011

Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 39 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $


the Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross • 549-5595 Cold Stone Creamery offers the Ultimate Ice Cream Experience. Ice Cream, Ice Cream Cakes, Shakes, and Smoothies the Way You Want It. Come in for our weekday specials. Get Gift Cards any time. Remember, it's a great day for ice cream at Cold Stone Creamery. $-$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery service within a 3 mile radius. Family Dental Group Southgate Mall 541-2886 Stress is tough on your teeth. People with a lot stress are more likely to grind their teeth. This can cause jaw pain and loss of tooth structure. Your dentist can help by making night guards to reduce the affects of grinding. Of course, managing the source of your stress is much better than just treating the symptoms. Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and an espresso bar till close. WE DELIVER On Campus & to the area between Beckwith, Higgins & 5th Street. Delivery hours: M-F 11-2. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$

Hunter Bay Coffee and Sandwich Bar First Interstate Center 101 East Front St hunterbay.com • 800.805.2263 Missoula’s local roaster since 1991 - now open downtown in the First Interstate Center! Stop by for hand-crafted gourmet coffees and espressos plus made-from-scratch , healthy sandwiches and soups. Enjoy the sunshine from our patio! Free Wi-Fi and Free Parking in the upper deck lot. Open Monday through Saturday. Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Spring weather brings patio seating! Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins Ave. • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com All our menu items are made from scratch, featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive tea menu. Missoula's Original Bubble Teas. Beer, Wine and Sake available. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Jazz Wednesdays starting at 7pm. Lunch 11:30-3:00, Happy Hour 3-6, Dinner 5 - close. $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West • 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $

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HAPPIESTHOUR Rowdy’s Cabin Atmosphere: The bar’s namesake says it all: Rowdy Yates, the famed silver screen cowboy from “Rawhide” played by then-rising star Clint Eastwood. Rustic Western flavor doesn’t stop at the log cabin façade outside. The place looks like the kind of lounge you’d find at a dude ranch, all animal mounts and timber paneling. From the antler chandelier to the sprawling steer horns above the bar, everything about Rowdy’s screams “giddy-up.” About the only thing missing is Clint himself, scowling over a glass of moonshine.

party. The bar raffles off a trip to Mexico every year. In winter, Snowbowlers tend to stop in after a day on the slopes. Carte says the summer months pick up, too, thanks to the proximity of North Reserve’s hotels. “If there are fires in the summer, that’s when we get really busy,” she says. “We even have a firefighter special. If you’re a firefighter, every third drink is free.”

Happy Hour: Rowdy’s is solidly in the running for best happy hour in town. Every Photo by Alex Sakariassen Sunday to Thursday from 4 to 6 What you’re drinking: Rowdy’s special- p.m. you can get two-for-one margaritas, izes in Mexican fare—tequila and margaritas to Coronas, and Bud Lights with Lime. The bar also match the food served up by Fiesta en Jalisco, knocks $2 off all pitchers and 50 cents off botthe attached restaurant. And they make one tles, pints, and well drinks. And when the party hell of a Jose Cuervo Black-based Bloody Mary, ends, it’s good to know Rowdy’s does growler dubbed the “Black Maria” by bar manager fills. Yeah, that’s right. Growler fills at the bar. Clint Sadie Carte. But drinks are where the West would be proud. ends and the fun begins. Rowdy’s offers a line Where to find it: Just across from Stone of pop culture digs. Try the Fireball-inspired F Bomb, or the Lindsay Lohan, billed as a “red of Accord at 4880 North Reserve St. —Alex Sakariassen headed slut with a splash of coke.” “We just try to make people laugh,” Carte says. Happiest Hour celebrates western When to show up: Most nights of the Montana watering holes. To recommend a week promise to get a bit wild, but Rowdy’s is bar, bartender, or beverage for Happiest Hour, known around town for its Cinco de Mayo e-mail editor@missoulanews.com.

Pita Madness 4-6 PM • 10 PM - MIDNIGHT

$1 PITA OFF ANY

541-PITA(7482) 130 North Higgins Ave • Missoula

Open 7 Days a Week 11:30 am - 9:00 pm 3075 N. Reserve Street Missoula • 327-0731

Congratulations to UM's 2011 Graduating Class! YOUR DOWNTOWN SANDWICHES CONNECTION SOUPS SALADS FOR FAMILY, ESPRESSO GOOD FRIENDS, FREE WIFI AND GOOD FOOD ! 728-8900 • 223 W. BROADWAY • OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

Mondays & Thursdays - $1 SUSHI (all day) (Not available for To-Go orders)

Daily TEMPURA Special - $1.25 for 2 pieces - 11:30am-2:30pm Tuesdays - LADIES’ NIGHT, $5 Sake Bombs & Special Menu Missoula Independent

Page 19 May 12–May 19, 2011


The Mustard Seed Asian Café Southgate Mall • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our all-new bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our non-smoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, microbrews, fine wines & signature drinks. Takeout & delivery available. $$-$$$

COOL

COFFEE ICE CREAMS

Oil & Vinegar Southgate Mall • 549-7800 Mon.-Sat. 10:00 AM-9:00 PM Sun. 11:00 AM6:00 PM. With a visit to Oil & Vinegar, you will discover an international selection of over 40 estate-produced oils & vinegars suspended in glass amphora-shaped containers on a dramatic backlit wall. Guests can sample the varieties and select from various shapes & sizes of bottles to have filled with an “on-tap” product of choice.

IN OUR COFFEE BAR

BUTTERFLY 232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

GIFTS FOR GRADS

BUTTERFLY HERBS 232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE

d o w n t o w n

Sushi Bar & Japanese Bistro

Congratulations Graduating Class of 2011! Celebrate in Good Health and Style at Sushi Hana this Weekend!

FOOD CONTESTS • PRIZES • RAFFLES • AND MORE…

403 North Higgins Ave • 406.549.7979 www.sushihanamissoula.com

Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. • 543-3188 Don’t feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $8.50. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $7.75. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$. Pearl Café 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French specialties, bison, elk, trout, fresh fish daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Three course bistro menu with wine $30, Tues. Wed. Thurs. nights, November through March. Extensive wine list, 18 wines by the glass, local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the warm and inviting dining areas. Go to our website Pearlcafe.us to check out nightly specials and bistro menus, make reservations or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Pita Pit 130 North Higgins Avenue 541-PITA (7482) • pitapitusa.com Fresh Thinking Healthy Eating. Enjoy a pita rolled just for you. Hot meat and cool fresh veggies topped with your favorite sauce. Try our Chicken Caesar, Gyro, Philly Steak, Breakfast Pita, or Vegetarian Falafel to name just a few. For your convenience we are open until 3am 7 nights a week. Call if you need us to deliver! Red Robin 2901 Brooks Street • 830-3170 www.redrobin.com Half the price, twice the fun! Halfy Hour at the Southgate Mall Red Robin®! Half price bar drinks Monday – Friday, 4-6 p.m. and Monday – Saturday, 9-10 p.m. Enjoy a drink with one of our insanely delicious Gourmet Burgers, Bottomless Steak Fries. Or, snack on one of our shareable starters with friends! $-$$ SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway • 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavorsno MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. • 549-2790 Share a meal within the warm elegance of our location at the historic Wilma Building. Enjoy our seasonal menu of classic Mediterranean and European fare with a contemporary American twist, featuring the freshest local ingredients. Serving lunch Tues-Sat 11:00-2:30, and dinner Tues-Sun 5:00-Close. Beer and Wine available. $$-$$$

$…Under $5

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The Sunrise Saloon & Casino 1100 block of Strand 728-1559 Every day is a great day at the Sunrise Saloon! Enjoy two happy hours daily, plus daily drink specials. Wednesday is Ladies night. Missoula's only dedicated country bar with live country music Thursday Saturday. Play our liberal machines while enjoying great entertainment and friendly service. 21+ only. Open daily 8 a.m. 2:00 a.m. NOT JUST SUSHI Sushi Hana Downtown offering a new idea for your dining experience. Meat, poultry, vegetables and grain are a large part of Japanese cuisine. We also love our fried comfort food too. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. Corner of Pine & Higgins. 549-7979. $$–$$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins 327-8929 Stop in when you’re in the neighborhood. We’ll do our best to treat you right. Home of the Famous Fish Taco. Crowned Missoulas best lunch for under $6. Mon-Sat. 11-10 Sun. 12-9. Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you'll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Drive 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 14 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Sun - Wed 83pm, Thurs - Sat 8-8pm $-$$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

BITTERROOT Spice of Life 163 S. 2nd St., Hamilton 363-4433 Spice of Life welcomes you to the Bitterroot’s best locavore dining experience. Serving up fresh and fun food in a conscientious manner. For lunch try one of our hand made burgers from Lolo Locker or one of our fabulous fresh salads. Dinner selections include natural beef which contains no growth hormones or antibiotics ever, sustainable seafood selections and pasta dishes made from Montana wheat from Pasta Montana. Quench your thirst with beer from right here in Hamilton or try one of our reasonably priced yet fantastic wine selections. Children’s menu available. No reservations. So come as you are to Spice of Life! 163 S 2nd St. Hamilton, MT. Lunch: Mon - Fri 11:00 to 2:00 Dinner: Wed - Sat 5:00 to 9:00. 363-4433.

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over


Arts & Entertainment listings May 12–May 19, 2011

8

days a week

It’s all about musical hugs, but not drugs, when Portland, Ore.’s Keegan Smith and the Fam plays a mix of pop, funk, soul and reggae at 6 PM at the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton, 101 Marcus St. Free. Call 363-PINT. Shake a peacemaker’s hand when the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center presents an awards celebration for its peacemaker of the year, Jane McAllister, from 6:30–8:30 PM at Lewis and Clark School, 2901 Park St. Free. Call 543-3955 or visit jrpc.org. Get in the know about permaculture—aka permanent agriculture—when local expert Paul Wheaton presents Sepp Holzer Permaculture Films Part 1, featuring screenings of Farming with Nature and Terraces and Hugelkultur, at 6:30 PM in the large conference room of the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Visit permies.com/permaculture/missoula.

Just horsin’ around. American Indian flautist Robert Mirabal performs at the Wilma Theatre Thu., May 12, at 9 PM. $20, admission includes a 7 PM screening of the film Horses & Renegades. Get tickets at the Roxy Theater and Rockin Rudy’s.

THURSDAY May

12

Nature continues to get nurtured on the big screen when the 34th International Wildlife Film Festival continues with a slew of wildlife films on a variety of topics, with the first screening starting at 9:30 AM at the Wilma Theatre. $7/$6 seniors/$5 students/$3 youth per film, or $45 full pass. Visit wildlifefilms.org for a complete schedule. (See Scope in this issue.)

Destination Missoula, the official convention and visitors bureau for Missoula, hosts its monthly board meeting from 3–5 PM at the conference room of MonTEC, 1121 E. Broadway St. Free. Call 532-3250.

nightlife It’s all about the biz when UM’s Gallagher Business Building hosts the 22nd annual John Ruffatto Business Plan Competition, which runs from 5–10 PM. Free. Call 243-4830. Run Ronnie, run: Local folk musician Ron Dunbar plays the Top Hat’s monthly artist-in-residence series every Thu. in May from 6–8 PM. Free, all ages.

Get wild with a moving picture about wild horses, plus music by an American Indian flute player, when the International Wildlife Film Festival presents a screening of Wild Horses & Renegades at 7 PM, followed with a performance by Robert Mirabal at 9 PM. $20, with tickets at the Roxy Theater and Rockin Rudy’s. Get intimate with the slimy stuff when the Institute of Noetic Sciences Community Group meets for the presentation Turning Algae Into Soil: A Project for Balancing and Revitalizing Our Planet While Regenerating Its Natural Resources, at 7 PM at the Bohemian Grange, 125 Blanchard Lake Road in Whitefish. Free. Call 862-9591. end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., May 13, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

Missoula Independent

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Witness the piano tickling talents of Joey Calderazzo when he performs with Orlando Le Fleming and Donald Edwards, during a live recording session at 7 PM at DalyJazz, 240 Daly Ave. $45/$15 students with RSVP required by emailing dalyjazz@gmail.com. Visit dalyjazz.com.

open. $8/$13 for those aged 18–20, with advance tickets at Zoo Mountain Natural Care.

Chuckle the night away with a classic comedy about mistaken identity when the Montana Actors’ Theatre presents a performance o f Wi l l i a m S h a k e s p e a r e ’ s Twelfth Night, at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $12/$6 student rush tickets only at the box office the night of the show. Visit mtactors.com for advance tickets. (See Theater in this issue.)

Stick a dirty carrot in a player hater’s ear when DJ MVP plays at 9 PM at The Dark Horse, 1805 Regent St. Free. Call 728-1559.

Broadway music and scenes collide with the talents of local teens when the MCT Community Theatre presents East Broadway Rocks! with a performance at 8 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $20. Call 7287529 for tickets or visit mctinc.org. Story and song coalesce in a musical about four adults who ask classic coming-of-age questions when the Missoula Winery, 5646 W. Harrier, presents Edges–The Musical, with a performance at 8:30 PM. $16/$6 students, with tickets at Ear Candy Music, Rockin Rudy’s and by calling 830-3296.

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Put your winning personality up for auction on eBay when Cash for Junkers plays Americana with a swing at 9 PM at the Sunrise Saloon & Casino, on the 1100 block of Strand Ave. Free. Call 728-1559.

Don’t even ask about a beard rub when locals the Dodgy Mountain Men play a set of its self-described “stompgrass” music at 10 PM at the

FRIDAY May Top Hat. $3.

13

The 34th International Wildlife Film Festival continues with an array of wildlife films on a variety of topics with the first screening starting at 9:30 AM at the Wilma Theatre. $7/$6 seniors/$5 students/$3 youth per film, or $45 full pass. Visit wildlifefilms.org for a complete schedule. (See Scope in this issue)

nightlife

for ZACC founder Hanna Hannan’’s exhibit Ocular: Transitions, from 5:30–8:30 PM. The ZACC is also hosting a free silkscreening night at the same time. Both events are free. Call 549-7555. Let six-string sensei Richie Reinhold bedazzle you with his chops when he performs in the tasting room of the Ten Spoon Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive, at 6 PM. Free. Call 549-8703. Singer/songwriter Garret Hendricks won’t hold your liver up for ransom when he plays the Top Hat’s Family-Friendly Friday concert series, from 6–8 PM. Free, all ages. Rock out with some ladies when The Girls Way, 1515 Wyoming St. Ste. 300, presents the Girls Rock Party, which begins at 6 PM and includes sets by The Scribblers, Andrea Harsell, The Wedge, Amy Martin and Caroline Keys. $5, all ages. Visit thegirlsway.org. Story and song coalesce in a musical about four adults who ask classic coming-of-age questions when the Missoula Winery, 5646 W. Harrier, presents Edges–The Musical, with a performance at 6:30 PM, and again at 8:30 PM. $16/$6 students, with tickets at Ear Candy Music, Rockin Rudy’s and by calling 830-3296.

Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptopfueled hip hop, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets booties bumpin’ at 9 PM. $3.

Jam out with your steak during the 3J Rap Sword BBQ Party, which runs from 5–8 PM at the House of Possibilities, 1615 S. Fourth St. W., and features sets by local jam band 3J Rap Sword, plus local electronic music producer Simpleton. Free, all ages.

Witness the piano tickling talents of Joey Calderazzo when he performs with Orlando Le Fleming and Donald Edwards, during a live recording session at 7 PM at DalyJazz, 240 Daly Ave. $45/$15 students with RSVP required by emailing dalyjazz@gmail.com. Visit dalyjazz.com.

Feel the rush of a Rocky Mountain high with crunchy crunk beats when Denver’s Unlimited Gravity plays glitch hop and other electronic styles at 9 PM at the Palace. Balthazar, Fractl and Mikee Sev

Step out of the ordinary and into a series of art pieces utilizing intaglio, relief and planographic printing processes when the Zootown Arts Community Center (ZACC), 235 N. First St. W., presents a Second Friday opening reception

Party on in your gorilla suit when the U n i v e r s i t y Th e a t r e h o s t s i t s International Wildlife Film Festival Awards Gala, which spotlights the festival’s films and its producers, and offers the chance to


SPOTLIGHT DIY guy On “Garden City Hardcore,” the opening track of local musician Tyson Ballew’s latest album, The Escape Artist Kids, the folk punk artist laments the loss of Missoula’s hardcore punk scene that flourished in the mid 2000s. “At our softest we’d play apartments, and at our loudest we rocked basements/And I can show you movements that don’t have age limits,” he sings, as a ukulele and overdriven bass guitar drive the track forward. It’s an endearing tribute that yearns for the return of a music scene that once was, and a fitting start to a tightly produced album of punk-influenced folk that offers revealing lyrics and deft songwriting. But what I really dig about Ballew’s new album is that he’s an excellent storyteller. Autobiographical stories that illustrate a keen sense of humility and bare-it-all honesty suck you in, like on “Warped Tour Kids,” a track about how he wanted to “make it” as a musician in his early 20s, only to come to realization that it wasn’t going to happen. On “The Great Theft of Ghosty Manor,” he chides an unstable “friend” who stole skateboards and WHAT: Tyson Ballew CD release party with openers City O’ City, All Eyes West and Loki Fights The Bear WHEN: Sat., May 14, at 8 PM WHERE: Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W. HOW MUCH: $5, all ages

photo courtesy Jon Manning

music from an old residence of Ballew’s. Guest artist Genevieve Smith’s mournful cello, along with piano tickling by Ryan Shmedly Maynes—who recorded the album and heads up local power pop group Secret Powers—adds weight to an already heavy song about deceit and lost friendship. A Great Falls native and longtime resident of town, Ballew’s been a constant fixture in Missoula’s music scene for several years, playing in bands like Old Shoes, and more recently as a solo artist. The do-it-yourselfer also runs his own label, Tummy Rock Records, and in 2009 was picked to play the record swap for the local independent music showcase Total Fest. You might also recognize Ballew as one of Missoula’s most steadfast promoter of all-ages shows. In fact, he’s thrown them in various locales over the years—from garages and now-defunct art galleries like Area 5, to his CD release party this weekend at the Zootown Arts Community Center. —Ira Sather-Olson

meet the filmmakers and hear them speak about their work, at 7 PM at the University Theatre. A reception occurs before the ceremony and requires tickets. Admission to the ceremony is free. Call 728-9380 or visit wildlifefilms.org.

with the talents of local teens when the MCT Community Theatre presents East Broadway Rocks! with a performance at 8 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $20. Call 7287529 for tickets or visit mctinc.org.

Halt the impending new world disorder by busting a smooth two-step move to Sho Down when it plays country at 9:30 PM at the Sunrise Salooon & Casino, on the 1100 block of Strand Ave. Free. Call 728-1559.

Inject some culture into your oculars when the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., presents its World Wide Cinema series with a screening of How I Ended This Summer, at 7 PM. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

The Stevensville Playhouse, 319 Main St., presents a performance of Little Shop of Horrors at 8 PM. $10. Call 777-2722 or visit stevensvilleplayhouse.org for tickets.

Walk that thin line between loathing and chastity when County Line plays country at 9:30 PM at Harry Davids, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H. $2.

Put those jazz hands where I can see them when jazz musician Byrd-D plays at 7 PM at The Banque Club in Hamilton, 225 W. Main St. Free. Chuckle the night away with a classic comedy about mistaken identity when the Montana Actors Theatre presents a performance of William Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night, at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15/$7.50 student rush tickets only at the box office the night of the show. Visit mtactors.com for advance tickets. (See Theater in this issue.) Broadway music and scenes collide

Get an aural uppercut when The Badlander and Palace complex hosts The Heavy Hitters Ball, an electronic music extravaganza starting at 9 PM that features Seattle’s Vincent Parker and locals Kris Moon, Logisticalone and ir8prim8 in the Badlander, and Brooklyn’s Eliot Lipp, along with ETeam, KidTraxiom, Cadence and Illegitimate Children in the Palace. $10/$15 for those aged 18–20/$7 advance/$12 advance for those aged 18–20, with tickets at Ear Candy Music and Rockin Rudy’s. Head on down that lonesome trail to catch Bob Wire and the Magnificent Bastards when they play honky-tonk at the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free.

He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. Kindly remove that skinless pinky from my hearing receptacles when Bozeman’s Pinky & The Floyd plays Pink Floyd cover tunes at 10 PM at the Top Hat. $7.

SATURDAY May

14

Keep it local every Sat. from 8 AM–noon as you head down to the Clark Fork River Market (clarkforkrivermarket.com), which takes

Missoula Independent

Page 23 May 12–May 19, 2011


place beneath the Higgins Street bridge, and to the Missoula Farmers’ Market (missoulafarmersmarket.com), which opens at 8:30 at the north end of Higgins Avenue. If you’re after non-edibles, check out East Pine Street’s Missoula Saturday Market (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), which runs 9 AM–1 PM. Free to spectate, and often to sample. Smack around a softball or just watch a slew of female softball players do the same during the Porky’s Wo m e n ’ s B e n e f i t S o f t b a l l Tournament, which raises money for a cancer patient in Missoula and occurs today and tomorrow at around 8:30 AM at McCormick Park. $175 per team, but players must be sanctioned by the Amateur Softball Association of America. The tournament is free for spectators. Call Elaine at 728-4179. Get the good word on owning your own digs during homeWORD’s Get Ready for Home Ownership workshop, which meets from 9 AM–6 PM at Mountain West Bank, 3301 Great Northern Ave. Childcare vouchers are also available for the Busy Hands Fun Center. $10 per person. Register online at homeword.org.

another installment of The Met: Live at the Roxy with a screening of Wagner’s Die Walküre, which clocks in at just over five hours and begins at 10 AM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $19/$17 students and seniors. Get tickets every Thu. at the Roxy Theater, or at Rockin Rudy’s and online at morrisproductions.org.

photo courtesy Jack Hartin

Aerial moonwalkers. The world famous Irish dance company Riverdance performs at UM’s Adams Center Wed., May 18, at 7:30 PM. $50–$60 plus fees depending on seats. Visit griztix.com for tickets or call 243-4051.

Teens in the Flathead can get an intro to leadership development during the workshop The Roots and Wings Movement, which meets from 9 AM–3 PM, with registration at 8:30 AM, in Room 139 of the Arts and Technology Building at Flathead Valley Community College, 777 Grandview Drive in Kalispell. Open to teens ages 14–18. Free. Call 250-3138 to RSVP.

Missoula Independent

Keep the liquid love fair and tasty when Fair Trade City Missoula presents a celebration for World Fair

Trade Day during Missoula’s third annual Largest Coffee Break, which features free Fair Trade coffee samples from 10 AM–noon at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, Zootown Brew, The Good Food Store, Butterfly Herbs, Le Petit Outre Breads and the Missoula Community Food Co-op. Free.

Leave your stained shirt at home and get swirly when the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St., presents its Saturday Family Art Workshop: Tie Dye T-Shirts with Erin Roberts, where kids and their families can dip into tie dying from 11 AM–12:30 PM. Participants should bring a white t-shirt, and children under age 7 should be accompanied by an adult. $5, with scholarships available. Call 728-0447.

Expect nothing more than epic arias when Morris Productions presents

Enjoy an afternoon of films by students from the Bitterroot Valley when

Mary & Rose feature some of Missoula's finest handmade quilts in varied designs.

Local pottery and pottery lessons. Home of the famous "Missoula Peace Sign" T-shirts and pins, too!

THANK YOU

If you have some non-perishable canned food lying around your pad, donate it to a good cause during the Missoula Food Bank/U.S. Postal Service Food Drive, which runs throughout today. All you need to do to participate is to leave donations by your mailbox. Call 549-0543.

The 34th International Wildlife Film Festival finishes off its run with an array of wildlife films on a variety of topics, with the first screening starting at 10 AM at the Wilma Theatre. $7/$6 seniors/$5 students/$3 youth per film, or $45 full pass. Visit wildlifefilms.org for a complete schedule. (See Scope in this issue.)

Gene & Vilerne Herter offer some sweet Montana-made puzzles and custom knives.

TO OUR SPONSORS & PARTICIPATING ORGANIZATIONS 119 Employers, and everyone listed below A Carousel for Missoula Adventure Cycling Association ASUM Office of Transportation Bagels on Broadway Bernice’s Bakery Betty’s Divine Bicycle Pedestrian Advisory Board Big Dipper Big Sky Brewing Bike Doctor Bike Walk Alliance for Missoula Bitterroot Flower Shop Bob Oaks BOB Bike Trailers Bonner Milltown History Center Bookstore at UM Break Espresso Buttercup Market and Café Butterfly Herbs Camp Mak a Dream/RATPOD Chief Charlo School

Page 24 May 12–May 19, 2011

City of Missoula Clark Fork School Daniel Kemmis Dark Room Dean McGovern Depot Families First / Children’s Museum Franklin Elementary School Free Cycles Missoula Go Fetch! Golgi Clinic Good Food Store Great Harvest Bread Company Griz Card Office at UM GUTS – Girls Using Their Strengths Hellgate Cyclery Hellgate Rollergirls Hide & Sole Historical Museum at Fort Missoula Holiday Inn Parkside homeWORD Jeanette Rankin Peace Resource Center Jimmy John’s

Kettle House Brewing Le Petite Outre Lewis and Clark Elementary School Lewis Kelly Liquid Planet Lolo National Forest Loose Caboose Lowell Elementary School MCAT Mackenzie River Pizza Company Meadowsweet Herbs Missoula Animal Control Shelter Missoula Aquatic Club Missoula Bicycle Works Missoula Cemetery Missoula Downtown Association Missoula Federal Credit Union Missoula Historic Preservation Commission Missoula Independent Missoula In Motion Missoula Institute for Sustainable Transportation

Missoula International School Missoula Office of Neighborhoods and Community Forum Missoula Office of Planning and Grants Missoula Parks and Recreation Dept. Missoula Public Library Missoula Ravalli Transportation Management Association Missoulians on Bicycles, Inc. Montana Natural History Center Mountain Line National Forest Foundation New Belgium Brewing Co. N. Missoula Community Development Corp Open Road Paxson Elementary School Pizza on the Fly Rattlesnake Elementary School Red Bird REI The Rhino Rockin Rudy’s Run Wild Missoula

Russell Elementary School Selvedge Studio Shirt Shop Sotto Voce Southgate Mall St. Patrick Hospital Trauma Center Sussex School Taco del Sol UC Market UC Movie Theater UM Dining Services UM Facilities Services UM President’s Office UM Public Safety Vital Ground Watershed Education Network Willard School Chain Links Wilma Theater YMCA YWCA Secret Seconds Zimorino’s Zoo City Apparel Zootown Arts Community Center


Media Arts in the Public Schools presents its annual MAPS film festival, which begins at noon at the Pharaohplex Theater in Hamilton, 582 Old Corvallis Road. Free. Tap into the soul of the Garden City and celebrate all things local during the annual Garden City LocalFest: Celebrating the Soul of Missoula, a party at Caras Park from 12:30–8 PM featuring local food and sustainable vendors, a beer garden, kids’ activities, and other events, plus music by Portland, Ore.’s Keegan Smith and The Fam, and the Fat Cats of Augusta. Free. Broadway music and scenes collide with the talents of local teens when the MCT Community Theatre presents East Broadway Rocks! with a performance at 2 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $16. Call 7287529 for tickets or visit mctinc.org. The Stevensville Playhouse, 319 Main St., presents a performance of Little Shop of Horrors at 2 PM. $10. Call 777-2722 or visit stevensvilleplayhouse.org for tickets.

nightlife Pull my strings and you’ll go far when the Shannon Soderlund Quartet performs from 5:30–7:30 PM at the Top Hat. Cost TBA. Do your part to help individuals heal through the power of art during Living Art of Montana’’s The Light Show fundraiser, which features auctions of functional art and light-themed pieces, along with a gourmet dinner and dance performance, starting with a silent auction/reception at 5:45 PM at the Hilton Garden Inn, 3720 N. Reserve St. $60 per person/$450 table of eight/$540 table of ten. Call 5495329 for tickets and visit livingartofmontana.org. (See Agenda in this issue.) Let the music do the talking when the “one-man soul band” known as Dan Dubuque plays a set in the tasting room of the Ten Spoon Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive, at 6 PM. Free. Call 549-8703. Put the lime in a proletariat’s coconut when The Workers play a mix of Americana, country and rock at 6 PM at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-PINT. Witness the piano tickling talents of Joey Calderazzo when he performs with Orlando Le Fleming and Donald Edwards, during a live recording session at 7 PM at DalyJazz, 240 Daly Ave. $45/$15 students with RSVP required by emailing dalyjazz@gmail.com. Visit dalyjazz.com. Chuckle the night away with a classic comedy about mistaken identity when the Montana Actors Theatre presents a performance o f Wi l l i a m S h a k e s p e a r e ’ s Twelfth Night, at 7:30 PM at the

Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15/$7.50 student rush tickets only at the box office the night of the show. Visit mtactors.com for advance tickets. (See Theater in this issue.) Broadway music and scenes collide with the talents of local teens when the MCT Community Theatre presents East Broadway Rocks! with a performance at 8 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $20. Call 7287529 for tickets or visit mctinc.org. The Stevensville Playhouse, 319 Main St., presents a performance of Little Shop of Horrors at 8 PM. $10. Call 777-2722 or visit stevensvilleplayhouse.org for tickets. Give it up for T-Dawg when local folk punk Tyson Ballew plays a CD release show with openers City O’ City, Chicago’s All Eyes West and Loki Fights The Bear, at 8 PM at the Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W. $5, all ages. (See Spotlight in this issue.) DJs K ris Moon and Monty Carlo are guaranteed to keep you dancing to an assortment of hip hop, electronic and other bass-heavy beats ‘til the bar closes during Absolutely at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free, with visuals by V3R. Swig drinks while listening to old school rock hits, ‘80s tunes or modern indie rock songs when Dead Hipster presents Takeover!, which features “drinkin’ music” DJ’d by the Dead Hipster DJs starting at 9 PM at the Central Bar & Grill, 143 W. Broadway St. Includes drink specials and photos with Abi Halland. Free. Is that an acorn in your shoes, or are you just unhappy to see me? Bellingham, Wash.’s The Acorn Project plays “electro-funk rock” at 9 PM at the Palace. Locals Secret Powers and Airstream Safari open. $5. It’ll be pouring rain and coffee beans when The Dark Horse, 1805 Regent St., presents The Seattle Invasion, a concert featuring hard rock, metal and other styles from Serous, Lacero and Mind Vice, at 9 PM. Cost TBA. Be a feline freak and scratch the nearest pole when The Tom Cats play at 9:30 PM at Harry Davids, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H. $2. Mix a little uprising into your glass of moonshine and shake it well when the Whiskey Rebellion plays outlaw country at the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. Escape the funky bunch in your skivvies when Mark Dubois plays at 9:30 PM at the Sunrise Saloon & Casino, on the 1100 block of Strand Ave. Free. DJ Dubwise supplies dance tracks all night long so you can take advantage of Sexy Saturday and rub up against the gender of your choice at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

Let me anoint you with the oily essence of le funk when Reverend Slanky plays funk and soul at 10 PM at the Top Hat. $5.

SUNDAY May

15

The renowned Ugandan Orphans Choir hits all the right notes when it performs at 9 AM, and again at 11 AM, at Immanuel Lutheran Church, 830 South Ave. W. Admission is a free will offering. Yet another opportunity to peruse and purchase local crafts and produce hits Missoula during the Sunday Market and Festival, which runs from 11 AM–3 PM this and every Sun. until Oct. 16 at the New Park parking lot, between A Carousel of Missoula and the Caras Park Pavilion. This week features music by the Blue Mountain Music Makers. Free. Visit carrousel.com/carousel-sunday-market-and-fes. Go with the jam when The Rocky Mountain Grange Hall, 1436 S. First St. south of Hamilton, hosts a weekly acoustic jam session for guitarists, mandolin players and others, from 2–4 PM. Free. Call Clem at 961-4949.

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Public Information / Open House Former Blue Mountain Training Area Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study The Montana Army National Guard has scheduled a public information / open house on May 17, 2011, from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm at the Quality Inn & Conference Center, 3803 Brooks Street, Missoula, MT. A short presentation will be followed by an opportunity to view displays and visit with MTARNG, USFS and contractor staff regarding the project. Field work is scheduled to begin in early June. For additional information, please contact Dr. Clif Youmans, MTARNG UXO Program Manager, (406) 324-3085 or Ms. Sundi West, Deputy UXO Program Manager, (406) 324-3088 or visit the website at www.bluemountainRIFS.org.

Broadway music and scenes collide with the talents of local teens when the MCT Community Theatre presents East Broadway Rocks! with a performance at 2 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $16. Call 7287529 for tickets or visit mctinc.org. The Stevensville Playhouse, 319 Main St., presents a performance of Little Shop of Horrors at 2 PM. $10. Call 777-2722 or visit stevensvilleplayhouse.org for tickets. Experience songs from the far side of the world when the Ugandan Orphans Choir performs at the First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St., at 4 PM. Free.

nightlife Broadway music and scenes collide with the talents of local teens when the MCT Community Theatre presents East Broadway Rocks! with a performance at 6:30 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $18/$15 children. Call 728-7529 for tickets or visit mctinc.org. Witness the piano tickling talents of Joey Calderazzo when he performs with Orlando Le Fleming and Donald Edwards, during a live recording session at 7 PM at DalyJazz, 240 Daly Ave. $45/$15 students with RSVP required by emailing dalyjazz@gmail.com. Visit dalyjazz.com. Chuckle the night away with a classic comedy about mistaken identity when the Montana Actors’

Missoula Independent

Page 25 May 12–May 19, 2011


The Missoula Convention and Visitors Bureau presents its Full Moon Dinner Series, which features a multi-course dinner, plus wine and live jazz, at 6:30 PM at the Ranch Club Barn, 8501 Ranch Club Road. $110 per person. Call 5323250 for tickets or visit missolacvb.org/fullmoon. Shoot away when the Rocky Mountain School of Photography, 216 N. Higgins Ave., presents the lecture Photographing Your Child’s Sporting Events with Michael Schweizer, at 7 PM in the quarry of the school. Free. Visit rmsp.com/aboutus/lectureseries.as px for details.

Photo courtesy ionphoto.net

1000 Hands Buddha Qigong with Libby McIntyre 1000 Hands Buddha is a seated qigong form utilizing simple and elegant hand movements to open and balance the heart energy. This form helps: Reduce fear • Improve sleep • Move towards greater overall health Rediscover your innate noble heart!

Mondays, June 6-27, 6-7:30pm $125.00 includes manual For more information or to register, please contact Kathy Mangan at 406-721-0033 or rwlcmt@gmail.com. For a complete listing of our classes, please visit www.redwillowlearning.org. Sliding scale fee available. Red Willow Learning Center, 825 West Kent Street, Missoula

Strike a pose. Brooklyn’s Eliot Lipp plays electro-funk and other electronic music styles at the Palace Fri., May 13, at 9 PM with several openers during the Palace/Badlander’s Heavy Hitters Ball. $10/$15 for those aged 18–20/$7 advance/$12 advance for those aged 18–20, with tickets at Ear Candy Music and Rockin Rudy’s.

Theatre presents a performance o f Wi l l i a m S h a k e s p e a r e ’ s Twelfth Night, at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $12/$6 student rush tickets only at the box office the night of the show. Visit mtactors.com for advance tickets. (See Theater in this issue.)

111 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 100, from 7–10 PM. Free.

Figure out what band makes you purr the most when the Top Hat hosts the Hot Cats! Music Showcase, an event featuring five local bands who you get to judge is the best, starting at 8 PM. Tonight’s performers are Richie Reinholdt, Mega Karma, Stan Anglen and Headwaters, Three-Eared Dog and Too Fools On Stools. $5, includes a free drink and a ballot.

Have a meow mix lickoff with some hot beats in the background when Milkcrate Monday’s presents Random Music For Random Kitties, featuring electronic music sets from Logisticalone, Hedg3Hawgg, Dub Budda and the Milkcrate Mechanic, at 9 PM at the Palace. Free.

Enjoy a brew and a moving picture when the Palace hosts a movie night, which tonight features Lost Boys and Event Horizon at 9 PM. Free. Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with jazz DJs and jazz bands starting at 9:30 PM. Free. This week: jazz from The Front Street Jazz Group and DJ Mermaid.

MONDAY May nightlife

16

Red, wine and folk collide when John Sporman and Amy Martin play a set at the Red Bird Wine Bar,

Missoula Independent

Page 26 May 12–May 19, 2011

See if you can become a star under the spotlight at Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery every Mon. at 9 PM. Free. Call 5421471 after 10 AM on Monday to sign-up.

Axshin Slax sows your seeds into something sustainable when it plays a mix of rock, ska, punk and other styles at 10 PM at the Top Hat. $5.

TUESDAY May

17

nightlife Let the jam flow openly during open mic/jam night hosted by Louie Bond and Teri Llovet every Tue. at the Brooks and Browns Lounge at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St., from 7–10 PM, with signup at 6 PM. Free. E-mail terillovet@hotmail.com.

Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready?. In Greek mythology, who was the warrior that commanded a group of fighters called the Myrmidons? (Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.) Witness the fluttery phalanges of a pickin’ master when folk musician Leo Kottke plays at 8 PM at the U n i v e r s i t y Th e a t r e . $ 25 / $ 23 advance plus fees with advance tickets at all GrizTix outlets and online at griztix.com. (See Noise in this issue.) Don’t blame me for wearing short shorts when Halifax, Nova Scotia’s Long Long Long plays experimental guitar pop at 8 PM at the Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W. Locals Velcro Kicks, The Lion The Tamer and Great Falls’ Grand Cave Experiment opens. $5, all ages. (See Noise in this issue.) Find out who’s the best singer of them all when Harry Davids, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, presents Talent Quest 2011, where you can record yourself singing your best and favorite song, starting with sign-up at 8:30 PM, and recording at 9. The video of your performance will then be submitted to the Talent Quest National Karaoke Singing Contest for a vote. $10 registration fee requested. All royalty gets irie during Royal Reggae Night, which features free pool plus reggae, dancehall and hip hop remixes spun by an array of DJs starting at 9 PM at the Palace. Free. Quell that burning sensation in your friend’s loins with a set of folk when Red Lodge’s Morning Fire plays the Badlander’s Live and Local night at 9 PM. Larry Hirshberg opens. Free. Life ain’t nothin’ but glitches and coinage when New Orleans’ Curren$y plays rap at 9:30 PM at the Top Hat. Shaymlusly Elliterate opens. $15/$13 advance plus fees at Ear Candy Music and Rockin Rudy’s.


SPOTLIGHT a l te r n a te a n g l e s The image is stark, to say the least—a black and white portrait of vast Montana grasslands devoid of any extrinsic features save for a single flourishing tree in the distance. While the picture itself seems simple, Rhode Island-based photographer Jill Brody’s title for the image, “Evidence of Water,” implies a subtle attention to detail that goes beyond the surface impression of much of Brody’s work. Rather than cram as much into her pictures as possible, she lets the fundamental elements of her subject matter tell volumes about what’s happening behind the scenes. In contrast, photog rapher Lucy Capehart’s images are full of vibrant colors, characters and surroundings shot from a The Missoula Art Museum’s event Artini: Focus features much more intimate perspective. While this photo by Lucy Capehart. Brody’s photos often pull back for a better view, Capehart zooms in on the tiles of a permanent hues of artificial flowers at the base of bathroom wall, the patterns of the carpet, or the a roadside cross. The UM MFA photography student—whose work has been exhibited in galleries WHAT: Artini: “Focus” featuring the in Portland, Ore. and New York City—has a flair for finding unusual beauty in familiar places. photography of Jill Brody and Lucy Capehart The approach of these photographers is different, but they share the common abilit to capture WHEN: Thu., May 19, from 5:30–9 PM everyday life with an acute sense of what others overlook. Both will have their work—currently on WHERE: Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. display in the Missoula Art Museum (MAM) exhibPattee St. it MAM Collections: Jill Brody and Lucy Capehart— HOW MUCH: Free showcased Thursday during the MAM’s monthly Artini event, appropriately titled “Focus.” So be sure MORE INFO: Call 728-0447 or visit to take a second look, or you might just miss missoulaartmuseum.org something. —Jed Nussbaum

WEDNESDAY May

18

The Bitterroot Public Library presents its preschool story time, which meets at 10:30 AM in the children’s corner of the library and features the program “That’s What It’s All About.” Free. Call 363-1670. Get a tour and learn more about an important DIY art institution when the Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W., hosts a tour of the ZACC starting at noon. Free. Call 549-7555. Download the day away when the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., presents a free computer class on downloading books and music, at 12:30 PM. The class “Intro to E-mail” follows at 6 PM at the library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. The Ugandan Orphans Choir hits all the right notes when it performs at 1 PM at St. Anthony Parish, 217 Tremont St. Admission is a free will offering.

nightlife Enjoy a local brew and support a local organization during the Kettlehouse Northside Tap Room’s Community U-NITE Pint Nights, which occur this and every Wed. from 5–8 PM at the tap room, 313 N. First St. W. A portion of the proceeds from each pint sold goes to a different organization each week. Free to attend. Visit kettlehouse.com. Lace up those bowling shoes and support the cause at Bowling for Animals, a fundraiser for Animal Wonders Inc., at Westside Lanes, 1615 Wyoming St., at 5 PM. $15 for adults/$10 for children under 12. visit animalwonders.org for more info. The Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W., presents its BOGO night, which features the chance to buy a ceramic pottery piece and get one free, plus paint ceramic pottery, and fuse glass or handbuild with wet clay, from 6–8 PM at the center. Free to attend, but the pottery is buy one get one free.

Visit zootownarts.org/bogo to register and call 549-7555. Wear your patented magic pants during Hump Night Theatre, an evening featuring music, performances by hypnotist Mark King, magic by Evan Disney, plus appetizers and drink specials, this and every Wed. from 7–9 PM at Deano’s Casino, 5318 W. Harrier. $7. The Ugandan Orphans Choir hits all the right notes when it performs at 7 PM at the Hamilton Assembly of God, 601 W. Main St. Admission is a free will offering. Get saddled back into your baby’s arms when the Whitefish Theatre Co. presents Always...Patsy Cline, a revue of Cline’s music featured during a sneak preview performance at 7:30 PM at the O’Shaughnessy Center, 1 Central Ave. in Whitefish. $10, with tickets sold only at the door. Call 862-5371. Treat your non-Irish buddies to an evening of Irish music, song and dance during a performance by the company Riverdance, at 7:30 PM in the Adams Center. $50–$60

Missoula Independent

Page 27 May 12–May 19, 2011


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You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. The warrior Achilles commanded the Myrmidons. Shoot some citrus juice in your crunk mind when Seattle’s Mad Rad plays a mix of hip hop, electro, dance and rock, at 9 PM at the Palace. $5. (See Noise in this issue.) Dance with your replica of Custer’s severed hand when Austin, Texas’ Cowboy and Indian plays indie folk at 10 PM at the Top Hat. $5. (See Noise in this issue.)

THURSDAY

19

May nightlife

Sharpen your aesthetic appreciation for photography when the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St., presents Artini: Focus, a celebration of its photography exhibit MAM Collections: Jill Brody and Lucy Capehart that runs from 5:30–9 PM and features a gallery talk with Brody and Capehart at 6 PM, plus music by Sick Kids XOXO and photothemed DIY projects. Free. Call 728-0447. (See Spotlight in this issue.)

Run Ronnie, run: Local folk musician Ron Dunbar plays the Top Hat’s monthly artist-in-residence series every Thu. in May from 6–8 PM. Free, all ages. It’s not you, it’s them: Local duo Him & Her (aka Travis Yost and Caroline Keys) play originals and covers featuring upright bass, acoustic guitar and banjo at 6 PM at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-PINT. Get back in baby’s arms when the Whitefish Theatre Co. presents Always...Patsy Cline, a revue of Cline’s music with a performance at 7:30 PM at the O’Shaughnessy Center, 1 Central Ave. in Whitefish. $20. Call 862-5371 or visit whitefishtheatreco.org for tickets. Witness one man versus his sarcastic musical machines when San Francisco’s Captured! By Robots plays metal, pop and other styles at 9 PM at the Palace. Destroyed opens. $8. Squeeze some spongecake over your lover’s sweat glands when Vancouver, British Columbia’s The Clumsy Lovers plays folk rock at 10 PM at the Top Hat. Aran Buzzas opens. $5. Point and click your arts goods to me by sending your event info by 5 PM on Fri., May 13 t o c a l e n d a r @ m i s s o u l a n e w s . c o m . Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff to me online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”

Thank You 2011

Mayfly Fling Sponsors! Together we are growing the next generation of watershed stewards! First Security Bank Good Food Store Allied Waste Services Orange Street Food Farms

West Slope Chapter TU Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery Bruce Brabec & Marlene Robinson AMEC Geomatrix The Trail 103.3 AXIOM IT Solutions Tangles AVISTA Utilities Missoulian Angler

Pattee Creek Market Big Sky Brewery Jim & Midge Bergman Monte Dolack Gallery Missoula Independent Blue Marmot Music Friends of Two Rivers Matt ‘Doc’ Davies & The Kingfisher Jack & Wendy Sturgis Clark Fork Coalition MUD Missoula Writing Collaborative

And all of the amazing WEN volunteers! Contact www.MontanaWatershed.org for our summer programs. Phone: 541.9287 Missoula Independent

Page 28 May 12–May 19, 2011


MOUNTAIN HIGH F olks, the time has come to suit up and perfect your flip turns, spins and other playboating moves. That’s because on Sat., May 14, the Zoo Town Surfers host the 12th annual Best in the West Freestyle Kayak Competition at Brennan’s Wave, which organizers dub as the “longest standing kayak competition in the west.� It begins with registration and practice rides for any and all interested kayakers from 10 AM–noon, followed by a competitors meeting at 12:30 PM. The contest, which attracts throngs of spectators (just check YouTube for evidence), follows from 1–6 PM and promises the winner the prize of a “legendary belt buckle.�

Besides some water wise fun, the event also doubles as a fundraiser for The Max Wave—a surf wave that’s planned for the Clark Fork River near downtown Missoula in memory of late local kayaker Max Lentz, who died at the age of 17 while kayaking in West Virginia. The 12th annual Best in the West Freestyle Kayak Competition is Sat., May 14, with competition from 1–6 PM at Brennan’s Wave on the Clark Fork River at Caras Park. $35 registration with a T-Shirt/$25 registration without/free to spectate. Call 546-0370 or visit zootownsurfers.com.

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THURSDAY MAY 12 Walk off your flub to help raise money for playground improvements at Arlee Elementary School during the third annual Walk-A-Thon, from 6-9 PM at the track and surrounding grounds of Arlee High School, 72220 Fyant St. Participants are asked to solicit donations before their walk, and the event also includes a chili feed, bake sale and door prizes. For more info or to donate, call Dori at 726-3216 Ext. 2221.

FRIDAY MAY 13 Learn how to prepare for high water when Montana River Guides presents a Swiftwater Rescue Technician course, which is tailored for raft guides and private boaters and meets today through May 15 at TBA locations on the Blackfoot River and Alberton Gorge near Missoula. $335. RSVP and get directions by calling 777-4837. Visit montanariverguides.com. Kids in Missoula can hike, bike, raft, canoe and swim to their heart’s content, and learn skills in leadership, selfconfidence and teamwork, during Missoula Outdoor Learning Adventures’ Outdoor Adventure Summer Camp, which is currently open for registration. Camps run each week from June 6–Aug. 26. $150 per one-week session, with a $50 deposit check per week. Get details at missoulaoutdoors.com.

SATURDAY MAY 14 Double the fun by passing through divides and passes on your bicycle when Missoulians on Bicycles presents its Paul O’ Connell Memorial Ride, an 80mile jaunt from Sula to Wisdom that begins with carpool departure at 7:30 AM from Kmart, 3626 Brooks St. Alternately, you can meet at the Sula Store in Sula at 9 AM. Free. Call Norman at 370-3876 and visit missoulabike.org/ride-details for updates on other rides. Youth ages 6 and up get the good word on birds when Missoula Children and Nature presents a birding adventure with Larry Weeks of The Five Valleys Audubon Society, which consists of a stroll along the Kim Williams Trail to look for birds beginning with a meet up at 8 AM at the Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St. Free. Call Ian at 396-9562. Push your soles to the limit during the Great Northern 5K Fun Run and Walk, a race that raises funds for Rails to Trails of Northwest Montana and

begins with day-of registration at 8 AM at the Meridian Court Business Complex cul-de-sac in Kalispell, near the corner of Center and Meridian streets. A 1-mile kids sprint follows at 9:30 AM, followed by the race at 10. $50 for a family of four/$20 per person. Visit gn5k.com for details. Smack around a softball or just watch a slew of female softball players do the same during the Porky’s Women’s Benefit Softball Tournament, which raises money for a cancer patient in Missoula and occurs today and tomorrow at around 8:30 AM at McCormick Park. $175 per team, but players must be sanctioned by the Amateur Softball Association of America. The tournament is free for spectators. Call Elaine at 728-4179. Wear your avian appreciation shades during the National Bison Range’s International Migratory Bird Day in Moiese. The celebration features a number of activities starting at 8 AM, including bird watching on the 19-mile Red Sleep Mountain Drive (weather permitting), bird ID workshops, and even a seminar on gardening for wildlife and birds. Register and get more info by calling 644-2211 ext. 207 or by e-mailing bisonrange@fws.gov. Have a pack off with a guy named Smoke when the Glacier Outdoor Center, 12400 Hwy. 2 E. in West Glacier, presents Smoke Elser’s Wilderness Outfitting and Packing Course, from 9 AM–5 PM today, and at the same time on Sun. $200, includes lunch. Call 888-5454 to register. Give Sgt. Pepper a reason to twist and shout on the ice rink when the Missoula Figure Skating Club presents its 14th annual Showcase on Ice with The Beatles iShow, an ice skating performance featuring group and solo performances by club members of hits by The Beatles, starting at 6:30 PM at the Glacier Ice Rink, 1101 South Ave. W. $20 family/$8 adults/$4 children. Call 529-5496 or visit missoulafsc.org.

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Missoula Independent

Page 29 May 12–May 19, 2011


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Is that a real shark?

Missoula Independent

Wildlife Film Fest sorts the good and the ugly in film ethics by Dave Loos

If you’re familiar with Shark Week on the Discovery Channel—and if you have basic cable it would be nearly impossible to miss the avalanche of advertising and selfpromotion for one of the channel’s most popular series of shows—you are no doubt familiar with the general tone. If not, the titles alone from the lineup of 2010 shows are good enough indicators: “Ultimate Air Jaws,” “Into the Shark Bite,” “Shark Attack Survival Guide,” Day of the Shark 3,” and “Shark Bite Beach.” Also showing that week: “Saving the Sharks!” And therein lies one of the fundamental problems in today’s world of wildlife films and nature documentaries. In an ultra-competitive industry, where ratings and awards are often king and viewers crave ever-closer looks at the world’s largest, most dangerous, and most poisonous animals, ethical wildlife filmmaking has become as murky as the waters where many sharks live. Shark Week is just one of the more glaring examples. Despite what the filmmakers may say, “it’s essentially an anti-conservation message,” says Chris Palmer, Director of American University’s Center for Environmental Filmmaking and author of Shooting in the Wild: An Insider’s Account of Making Movies in the Animal Kingdom. “These programs show the sharks as menacing man-eaters, and it may get 20 million viewers, but we’re trying to protect them and this doesn’t help.” Palmer, who is also an International Wildlife Film Festival board member, is in town this week as the festival winds down. But the greater purpose of this veteran filmmaker’s visit is to finally hash out the IWFF’s first official, written ethical guidelines. With a rough draft in hand that’s been written in concert with IWFF staffers, Palmer and others will solicit public input on the guidelines at a seminar this Thursday (May 12). Palmer is aware of the challenges in both writing and enforcing ethical guidelines for wildlife filmmakers. “Things go on out in the field that you may never know about, so you can’t police them 24-7,” he says. Take nighttime lighting, for instance, a constant source of disagreement in this ever-growing community. How muted should night lights be? Make them too bright and animal behavior changes. As Palmer notes, “lights can change the predator/prey relationship…one could go out and use powerful lights and get tremendous footage, but it wouldn’t be realistic.” It’s a form of animal harassment that falls under one of the three main ethical lapses Palmer says they hope to address in the guidelines. The late Steve Irwin of “Crocodile Hunter” fame; Animal Planet’s Jeff Corwin; and Jeremy Wade, host of “River Monsters,” are three names that come up most often as violators in this category. “Steve Irwin seemed to do things to show how great he was, not how great the animals were,” says IWFF executive director Janet Rose. But violations can be subtle as well. Rose remembers a submitted film from last year in which birds were collared for tracking, and followed closely by a

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plane for filming. “The birds are obviously stressed, and the judges had concerns,” she says, noting that the new guidelines must attempt to answer the question, “at what price science?” The second pillar of ethical wildlife filmmaking is all about stemming audience deception, a broad category that includes holding back information regarding captive animals, editing tricks, and deceptive use of CGI to enhance the film. “It’s important for viewers to be made aware of what they’re seeing, whether it’s a captive animal or a contrived scene,” says Missoula-based filmmaker Colin Rugierro. “It’s really easy to distort the truth on screen. There has to be full transparency.” Shark Week is particularly irksome to Rugierro, who has spent time filming sharks in the wild, but in environments far different than what audiences see on Discovery Channel. “Every tiger shark you see in any of these shows is filmed in one of two locations in contrived situations where they are baited,” he says. “You can go and film for years in shark habitat and never see a shark. You might catch one out of the corner of your eye, but they try to avoid humans. You don’t get that impression from watching Shark Week.” Filmmakers who disclose ethical lapses aren’t necessarily absolved of wrongdoing. Rose recounted a film submitted by Montana-based naturalist Casey Anderson for the 2010 IWFF in which an otherwise solid-filmmaker crossed the line. In a National Geographic episode of Expedition Wild with Casey Anderson, the host is filmed petting wolves and walking with

mountain lions. “He says very quickly that these are captive animals,” Rose says, “but the overall impression given to viewers is that these are wild creatures.” Rose, who praised Anderson’s other films, noted the danger in conveying to audiences that it was okay to get so close to predators. “Ethically, this message is not constructive.” Self-described conservation films that ignore basic conservation practices violate the third main tenet of the proposed ethical guidelines. It becomes more relevant by the day as new programs emerge from the Animal Planet, Discovery Channel, and National Geographic wildlife show factories. Palmer says sometimes the omission is deliberate, spurred by a fear that audiences will become bored if the shows delve into behavioral science and climate change issues. Yet filmmakers have a responsibility to promote conservation, says Palmer, because it is the morally right thing for them to do, especially since they exploit natural resources to earn a living. Attempts like these to create ethical guidelines are not without critics, as Palmer discovered after his book was published last year. One man in particular, who runs a game farm and rents out wolverines and other animals to film crews, called Palmer a parasitic bottom feeder guilty of biting the hand that feeds him. Palmer doesn’t downplay the difficulty and challenges of both writing and enforcing the guidelines. “If we were to cover everything we would have a 150-page document,” he says. “So we need to focus on the main principles. We’re very aware of the pitfalls.” The IWFF seminar and panel discussion “Ethics and Ethical Issues: At What Price Science? At What Cost Entertainment? Is Wildlife the Unwitting Victim?” will take place Thursday, May 12, at 4 PM at the Roxy Theater. arts@missoulanews.com


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Cowboy and Indian Cowboy and Indian doesn’t necessarily deserve the Billy Bob Thornton treatment, but it’s inevitable: For the time being, the most notable thing about this promising but relatively unknown folk trio is the acting career of one of its members. Jesse Plemons is best recognized as Landry from “Friday Night Lights.” On the critically acclaimed television drama about Texas and football (produced, incidentally, by sometime Missoula resident Ron Fitzgerald), Plemons played the awkward everykid whose interests rarely meshed with those of his small town. For example, Landry started a wonderfully awful metal band with the school’s only lesbian. They practiced in a garage and usually played in front of about 10 people at a local club. The band’s name: Crucifictorious. Cowboy and Indian is no Crucifictorious. Plemons and fellow vocalist Jazz Mills produce delicate harmonies over sparse, Southwestern-tinged tracks about heart-

Mad Rad Here’s a poorly kept secret: live hip-hop shows are pretty terrible. Over-bassed sound. Hands predictably extolled to wave like they just don’t care. More hyperbolic posturing than audience-engaging performance. That goes for up-and-comers and veterans, especially the veterans. I’m looking at you, 50 Cent. Judging from Mad Rad’s collection of live YouTube videos, the Seattle foursome looks to buck that trend with vigorous vocal performances of party-in-the-

Leo Kottke Many of Leo Kottke’s fingerstyle acoustic guitar compositions are so complex that when I first realized it was a single guy producing all that sound, my first question was “How many fingers does this man have?” In reality, he’s only endowed with the same 10 digits that most of us can claim, but he makes them dance around his guitar neck in a display of multi-tasking efficiency that has been his trademark for over 40 years. Bass lines, melodies, and chord structures simultaneously pour out of his instrument, filling the sonic spectrum to a degree most solo performers fail to achieve. His overzealous playing style even led to tendonitis in the early ’80s, but two decades later, Kottke is still pickin’. The Georgia native’s music isn’t just for guitar

Long Long Long Brief, blustery, and above all, unpredictable, the music of Long Long Long is a solid aural accompaniment to the springtime weather. The Nova Scotia experimental guitar pop band has a knack for lulling the listener into complacency before unleashing a sonic downpour on unsuspecting ears. Like getting caught in a spring shower, the experience will no doubt divide audiences, but as the band members themselves phrased it on their EP, Shorts, “It’s not about being liked. It’s about being respected.”

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break and hard living. There’s the occasional bootstomper, but most of the live performances posted online (predominately by “FNL” fans) feature more of a low-key, back porch vibe. Plemons plays guitar and harmonica, and sings with a distinct Texas drawl. Mills sounds more like Joni Mitchell, and usually dons a full Indian headdress. The group—guitarist/vocalist Daniel James completes the trio—plans to release its debut album later this year. To its credit, Cowboy and Indian is gaining traction for its music rather than just Plemons’s résumé. The band deserves the attention, as well as a better turnout than the typical Crucifictorious show. (Skylar Browning) Cowboy and Indian plays the Top Hat Wednesday, May 18, at 10 PM. $5.

U.S.A., radio-ready jamz. Watching the videos, it’s easy to see that these cats work the crowd hard, assiduously passing the mic and punctuating whip-snap raps with live drums. The only time I’ve seen more mugging for the camera is in ancient Bill Cosby Pudding Pop™ spots. P Smoov’s production is in clear contrast to the kinetic rhymes, featuring a mellow, modern electronica and chilled out beats. Oh, and a spot of cello, because I swear, in 2011 even grindcore bands gotsta have cello. This synthesis of sound has a lot in common with good music, just not quite. The brosephs from Mad Rad seem poised to move on and be something other than a milquetoast party crew. (Jason McMackin) Mad Rad plays the Palace Thursday, May 18, at 9 PM. $5.

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geeks such as myself, however. Kottke’s name has popped up everywhere from People to Playboy and he’s recorded with artists as diverse as Lyle Lovett and Phish bassist Mike Gordon. He hasn’t released a new album since 2005’s Sixty Six Steps (in collaboration with Gordon), but with over two dozen albums under his belt, Kottke should have no problem coming up with material for his live show. (Jed Nussbaum) Leo Kottke plays the University Theatre Tuesday, May 17, at 8 PM. $25/$23 advance plus fees.

If the band is after respect, then they’re pursuing it by carving out a sound of their own. Their self-titled album is bottled chaos, with waves of percussion and bass perforated by stabs of needle-sharp guitar. It’s all very wild, unhinged, and a bit bewildering. The Shorts EP opens up that sound with a gentler tone and more immediately catchy melodies, but altogether, Long Long Long isn’t a band interested in pandering. Long Long Long is the kind of band that could forge a career based on the loyalty of a small but devoted fan base. For all of the band’s dizzying arrangements, the music is never bland. And blandness is the worst of music’s mortal sins. (Cameron Rassmusson) Long Long Long plays the Zootown Arts Community Center Tuesday, May 17, at 8 PM with Velcro Kicks, The Lion The Tamer, and Grand Cave Experiment. $5 all ages

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Señor Shakespeare Twelfth Night gets a spicy makeover by Erika Fredrickson

Shakespeare’s comedy Twelfth Night was con- vous uncle of Olivia, causes all kinds of fantastic trouble ceived for the revelries of Christmas—to be more exact, with his companion, Sir Andrew, who is played with a for the 12th day after Christmas, as a finale of the winter wonderfully affected simple-mindedness by Payton season; a time to eat, drink, and be merry. There’s no Jessup. Rebecca Schaffer emits hilarious vanity as Olivia, reason the same jolly sentiment can’t apply to spring, which turns to sympathetic desperation as she falls in even a very cold, slow spring such as we’re experienc- love with the pirate-like page Cesario (who is really ing in Montana. There have been just enough sunny Viola). That gender-bending part isn’t easy to pull off, days recently to inspire at least a little beer drinking on but Alexsa Prince gives Cesario a boyish, mustachioed charm. Flustered by Olivia’s advances and by her own outdoor patios and perhaps a barbecue or two. The Montana Actors’ Theatre rendition of Twelfth longing for Orsino, she’s able to do the masculine strut that makes her final Night captures that reveal all the more fun. summer-fever spirit And fabulous British well. Shakespeare’s play actor Jim Badcock (in was set during the late his last performance in 16th and early 17th centuMissoula, sadly) makes ry in the ancient region Olivia’s wretched of Illyria, on the Adriatic steward Malvolio more Sea. Missoula director than entertaining. Linda Grinde has set her Badcock’s played the production in midfool before (the ass in A 1800’s California, when Midsummer Night’s Spanish nobility ruled Dream), but here he’s large swaths of land more complex as an worked by the native arrogant, prim villain population. It’s an apt who finds himself re-imagining. The humiliated by a prank. Spanish nobles in Wearing yellow stockCalifornia, as Grinde ings and cross garters, points out in her direche often steals the spottor’s note, had the same light. There are other idle lifestyle as Illyria’s solid performances— aristocrats in their kingtoo many to name, and dom by the sea: all play that’s a good thing. and amusement. The opening scene If you’ve seen of MAT’s production Twelfth Night before, begins with a stormy you should see it with ocean created by what The Montana Actors’ Theatre puts a Spanish twist this spicy, Spanish look like two silky blue on Twelfth Night. twist. Spanish guitar scarves that the actors scores the show. The flap in the air. Another actor ducks in and out of the characters pepper their lines with Buenos Díases waves holding a toy ship, which he comically bounces and Señors. The set, designed by Reid Reimers, is between the scarves to show that it’s tossed in the simple but rich with bright adobe colors and antique storm. This sets the mood for the entire play, a combi- furniture, and it occupies three corners of the thenation of silly humor, illusions, and romantic airs. ater, giving the audience the sense they’re in the The main illusion starts when Sebastian and his thick of it. sister Viola are separated at sea during a shipwreck. If you haven’t seen Twelfth Night—or even much Thinking her brother dead, Viola disguises herself as a Shakespeare—don’t be afraid. You were able to figure man, Cesario, and begins working for Orsino, an aris- out the dialect in “Deadwood” and get past the first, tocrat who is in love with the rich and fair Olivia. cleverly crafted episodes of “The Wire,” right? And this Orsino sends Cesario to broker a romantic relation- rendition makes it easy because the actors look like ship between him and Olivia, but Olivia ends up falling they’re having so much fun. As with all attempts at in love with Cesario instead, not realizing he is really Shakespeare, there are moments when the actors seem Viola. Meanwhile, Viola has come to love Orsino. And, more focused on just spitting out the words gracefully on top of it all, Sebastian is not dead. Since he and than acting their roles. Those moments are few and far Viola now look like identical men, they are constantly between, however, buried by a natural flow in spite of mistaken for one another. Mayhem erupts. Pranks are all that iambic pentameter. played. Hilarity ensues. Like A Midsummer Night’s Dream and other Shakespeare comedies, a big, soapTwelfth Night continues at the Crystal Theatre operatic mess has to be made before everything can be Thursday, May 12, through Sunday, May 15, at 7:30 put back in order. PM nightly. $12/$6 student rush tickets. There are plenty of reasons to see this show. Sam Williamson as Sir Toby Belch, the drunk, jolly, mischieefredrickson@missoulanews.com

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Wild at heart Elephants, lions, and pandas close out the IWFF by Dave Loos

Consider this hypothesis: If David Attenborough appears in a wildlife documentary, then by default it becomes at least 20 percent better, no matter how large or small a role the legendary naturalist plays in the production of that film. The institutional knowledge and gravitas that Attenborough lends to any production is no fluke, whether it’s as producer, contributor, or narrator. I thought a lot about the quirky Brit when screening these four films for the final days of the International Wildlife Film Festival (three of which he appears in), especially the fact that after more than 60 years in the business, Sir David has so deftly avoided becoming a caricature of himself. Note that the worst of these four documentaries is the one in which he does not appear. Coincidence, perhaps, but the more troubling fact is that as he turns 85 years old this week, Attenborough has no heir apparent—and that should be cause for concern among all who document wildlife.

Elsa’s Legacy: The Born Free Story The book Born Free became an international sensation upon its release in 1960, selling more than six million copies and altering the way many people viewed wildlife. The idea that every animal is unique was, at the time, a revolutionary concept. The story of Elsa, the lion raised from infancy by Kenyan game warden George Adamson and his wife Joy, challenged previous notions that one could not relate to wild animals as individuals. It’s also a story that would never happen today, given the daily risk of living side-by-side with a fullgrown lion, not to mention the serious and legitimate ethical questions of doing so (see Scope). But this was a different time, and one captured well by Elsa’s Legacy as it examines the story behind the story of Born Free, first as a book and later as a Hollywood film. It dismantles the fairytale partnership of George and Joy, giving us an honest look at a marriage that ultimately crumbled. And it does so in the context of the life of Elsa and her cubs, and other lions that followed later. The documentary focuses much of its attention on the 1966 filming of Born Free

and the impact the movie had on its actors, particularly Virginia McKenna, who played Joy Adamson. Filming on location in Africa with the assistance of George Adamson, the filmmakers originally brought in captive circus lions to play the parts of Elsa and her cubs. When that failed, wild lions were used, at great risk to the cast and crew. McKenna is a bit melodramatic as she visits the Adamsons’ old camp and reflects on the couple and their legacy, but at its core the documentary presents both a moving story and a cautionary tale that still resonates today. Elsa’s Legacy: The Born Free Story plays at the Wilma Thursday, May 12, at 5 PM with Panthera Promo and Lost Land of the Tiger. 55 min.

when we watch Echo help her newborn son, whose leg joints have locked up, attempt to stand. Her devotion and persistence are inspiring. Echo: An Unforgettable Elephant plays at the Wilma Friday, May 13, at 9:30 AM, followed by guest speaker and IWFF Lifetime Achievement Award recipient Dr. Iain Douglas Hamilton, plus Panda Makers. The film also screens at the Wilma Saturday, May 14, at 7 PM with Panda Makers. 60 min.

Echo: An Unforgettable Elephant Echo isn’t so much a documentary as it is a eulogy to a fallen elephant, and if you enter with that mindset there’s something to appreciate here. It’s not the most riveting of wildlife films, and most of the footage is a decade or two old, but it did win Best of Festival, and there’s something to be said for a film about a dead elephant that doesn’t turn into a 60-minute Elsa’s Legacy: The Born Free Story tear-fest. Plus, David Attenborough handles the narration, which never hurts. Echo, who has been called the world’s most famous elephant, was 65 when she died in 2009, the victim of old age and a horrendous drought in Kenya and Tanzania. An Unforgettable Elephant is a mix of reflections by the naturalists and film crews who studied and filmed her, edited together with footage of the matriarch leading her herd. The format is a bit clunky, and given that it moves so often between time periods, you’re never quite sure if we’re in present day or 15 years ago. But the footage is at times very good and quite moving, most notably

Panda Makers

Panda Makers, which got the IWFF Special Jury award this year, is yet another entry out of the BBC’s Natural World wildlife film factory, so at the very least one can expect top production quality. And if anyone is going to speak at length about the detailed mating habits and sexual positions of panda bears, as well as the disproportionately small panda penis, I want that person to be David Attenborough. Here he leads us on a 60-minute exploration of the Chendu Breeding Center in China’s Sichuan province, where a team of biologists are attempting to increase the population of one of the world’s most endangered animals. What’s most interesting about Panda Makers is the history of the animal in China. For many years the panda was used as political propaganda, with Communist leaders often giving animals to other nations as way to curry favor or extend appreciation. It was less than two decades ago—as panda populations further dwindled—when this practice came to an end, and the government began a leasing program with zoos around the world. Now, for $1 million per year, you too can rent a panda. Just remember that any offspring produced during the leasing period automatically belong to China. Panda Makers gets bogged down a bit by extraneous information about panda inbreeding and artificial insemination, but most of the science is well presented and the rare footage of a live panda birth is riveting. And, as one who experienced firsthand the Echo: An Unforgettable Elephant

hubbub surrounding a panda birth at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., I can tell you they live up to the hype. As we see many times in this film, panda babies are really damn cute. Panda Makers plays at the Wilma Friday, May 13, at 9:30 AM, with Echo and Saturday, May 14, with Echo. 60 min.

Wild Horses & Renegades Why is it so hard to make a quality horse documentary? The BBC might want to think about making one of their own, because Wild Horses makes for two sub-par horse entries in this year’s IWFF, following last week’s Saving America’s Horses: A Nation Betrayed. Wild Horses is the better of the two, but it suffers from similar ailments, the most glaring of which is serious editing problems. In trying to make the case that the Bureau of Land Management is managing wild horses to extinction, the Panda Makers filmmakers do an okay job at connecting the line between wild horse roundups and the BLM catering to the needs of the livestock and mining industries. But this is a sloppy and overlong 90-minute production that desperately needs a narrator as much as it needs an editing tool to cut out 30 minutes. There is some good footage here, especially video

Missoula Independent

Wild Horses & Renegades

that shows the stress on the wild horses as they are rounded up and corralled by low-flying helicopters. But clips from that same video are replayed over and over to little effect. Wild Horses & Renegades also features some of the strangest celebrity cameos in recent memory, with Willie Nelson, Sheryl Crow, and Darryl Hannah all getting more screen time than they deserve here. Oddly, many of the other interview subjects are filmmakers who also made documentaries about the plight of wild horses. Maybe that’s why so much of this feels redundant. There’s a decent advocacy film hidden inside a below-average wildlife documentary here. If you have the patience, there’s a reward lurking somewhere in its depths. Wild Horses & Renegades plays at the Wilma Thursday, May 12, at 7 PM. 90 min. arts@missoulanews.com

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Scope OPENING THIS WEEK BRIDESMAIDS Kristen Wiig realizes how difficult life is as a maid of honor when her best friend Maya Rudolph appoints her to the task in this new Judd Apatow comedy. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:50, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1, 3:50, 7 and 9:45, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. OF GODS AND MEN A group of French Christian monks living in peace among Muslims in North Africa have to decide whether they should stay in their monastery or hit the road after an Islamic fundamentalist group

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survive the wilds of the African savanna. Carmike 10: 4, 6:45 and 9:15, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 6:30 and 8:45. FAST FIVE Vin Diesel, Paul Walker and other testosterone filled dudes return in the fifth installment of this series, which this time features even more fast cars—duh!—as the boys try to pull off one final job in Rio de Janeiro. Carmike 10: 4, 4:45, 7, 7:45 and 9:55, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 1:45. Village 6: 4 and 7, with additional Fri.–Sat. shows at 9:50, and Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:05, 1:05, 3:05, 4:05, 6:05, 7:05, 9:05 and 9:50, with an additional

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Brontë’s famous 19th century romantic novel. Cary Joji Fukunaga, whose film Sin Nombre won awards at the 2009 Sundance Film Fest, directs. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 6:50 and 9:15, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. JUMPING THE BROOM A wedding serves as the catalyst for a clash of the socioeconomic classes between two AfricanAmerican families in this comedy featuring Angela Bassett. Village 6: 4:30 and 7:30, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at 10, and Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. PROM Disney brings teenage awkwardness, anxiety and anticipation to the screen in this flick about high schoolers and that oh-so-meaningful social event

on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:10, 4:10, 7:10 and 9:45, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Entertainer in Ronan: 4, 7 and 9. SOUL SURFER A teen surfer with high hopes on the waves has to relearn the sport after a shark gnaws off her arm. Helen Hunt and Dennis Quaid co-star. Carmike 10: 4:15, 6:45 and 9:15, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:15. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 1:25, 4:20, 6:45 and 9:15, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:25, 4:20, 6:50 and 9:15. SOURCE CODE Jake Gyllenhaal wakes up in the body of another man, and finds out the government assigned him the loathsome task of re-living the last minutes of the man’s life in order to get to the bottom of a gruesome train bombing in Chicago. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 2:30, 7:30 and 9:45, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 7:05 and 9:20. THOR Chris Hemsworth is the arrogant son of Odin who gets kicked out of his homeland and banished to Earth, where he’s found by Natalie Portman and soon forced to go head-to-head with an automaton unleashed by his conniving brother. Anthony Hopkins co-stars in this 3-D saga, which is based on the Marvel Comics character of the same name. Carmike 10: 4, 4:45, 7, 7:45 and 9:50, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 1:45. Village 6 in 2-D: 4 and 7:15, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at 10, and Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8:45 and 9:45, with an additional Fri.–Sun. show at noon, and an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Stadium 14 in Kalispell in 2-D: Fri.–Sun. at 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 and 9:15, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 2, 6:30 and 9:15. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 6:50 and 9:15, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4:15, 7 and 9:15.

“You fool! The tanning salon is up there!” Priest opens Friday at the Carmike 10.

threatens the region with terrorism. This film, loosely based on the life of Trappist monks in Algeria, won the Grand Prix award at the 2010 Cannes Film Festival. Wilma Theatre: nightly starting Sun. at 7 and 9:10, with Sun. matinees at 1 and 3:10. PRIEST In a dystopian world where vampires and humans have duked it out for ages, warrior priest Paul Bettany springs into ass-kicking action when a bloodsucker kidnaps his niece. This western/horror/sci-fi 3-D flick is based on the Korean comic of the same name. Carmike 10: 4:30, 7:30 and 9:45, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3, and no Sun. show at 9. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:10, 2:30, 4:50, 7:20 and 9:45, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:30, 4:05, 7:20 and 9:45. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45.

NOW PLAYING AFRICAN CATS Disney offers us an outdoors documentary about three families of animals headed by three tough mamas—a lion, leopard and a cheetah—who try to

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Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:05, 2:30, 3:55, 6:05, 6:45, 9:05 and 9:35. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4, 6:50 and 9:20.

known as prom. Village 6: 4:20 and 7:20, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at 9:40, and Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:20.

HANNA Trained by her father Eric Bana to be a stealthy assassin, teenager Saoirse Ronan embarks across Europe on a deadly family mission, and uses her wicked survival skills in order to elude Cate Blanchett and her crew of intelligence agents. Village 6: 4:15 and 7:15, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at 9:45, and Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:20, 4:15, 7:15 and 9:40, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight.

RIO A rare macaw who never learned how to fly high in the sky has to tackle the task after he escapes some smugglers during a trip to Rio de Janeiro. Tracy Morgan, Jamie Foxx, George Lopez and others lend their voices to this 3-D animated flick. Carmike 10 in 2-D: 4:20, 6:45 and 9:15, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:20. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:15, 4:20, 6:55 and 9:20, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:30, 4:20, 6:55 and 9:20. Stadium 14 in Kalispell in 2-D: Fri.–Sun. at 12:45 and 3:30, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1 and 3:30.

HOODWINKED TOO! HOOD VS EVIL This 3-D sequel to the popular animated children’s film returns with a story that centers on getting to the bottom of the disappearance of Hansel and Gretel. Includes voice cameos by Amy Poehler, Glenn Close, Tommy Chong and others. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:10 and 4:45, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:45 and 4. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45. JANE EYRE Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender hit the screen in this film that’s based on Charlotte

Page 34 May 12–May 19, 2011

SOMETHING BORROWED Ginnifer Goodwin’s a single attorney who gets lovestruck by her best friend Kate Hudson’s soonto-be husband, Colin Egglesfield, after they drunkenly hook up on her 30th birthday. John Krasinski (The Office) also stars in this romcom based on Emily Giffin’s novel of the same name. Carmike 10: 4:10, 7:10 and 9:35, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:10. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3, and no 9:10 show

WATER FOR ELEPHANTS Hal Holbrook reminisces about his life in the 1930s as a vet in the circus—and the elephant that brought him and Reese Witherspoon together—in this adaptation of Sara Gruen’s novel of the same name. Robert Pattinson and Christopher Waltz costar. Village 6: 4 and 7, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at 9:50, and Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:05, 3:55, 6:50 and 9:35, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. WIN WIN Paul Giamatti’s an attorney in dire financial straits by day and a high school wrestling coach by afternoon who finds himself in a pickle after getting into a shady business deal with a client, and then coddling his client’s grandson. Amy Ryan co-stars in this flick, which critics seem to really dig. Wilma Theatre: nightly at 7 and 9, with Sun. matinees at 1 and 3. Capsule reviews by Ira Sather-Olson. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., May 13. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-FILM; Stadium 14 in Kalispell–752-7800. Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana

541-7387 M O L LY

Molly is quiet and mellow, which are qualities we especially appreciate at the shelter! She is also wellbehaved, and as far as we can tell, she gets along with absolutely everyone.

549-3934 HORACE

GUS

Gus is our shelter oldtimer, having been here for many months. He doesn't present himself well to new people, but those of us who know him realize he's an absolute sweetheart. Also, his total adoption fee has been sponsored!

D E LTA

Horace is a friendly 4year-old feline who was rescued while wandering the streets of Missoula. He is foodmotivated and will work for his treats. Horace gets along well with other cats and would make an excellent feline companion for just about anybody.

Delta is a 3-year-old sweet-natured Manx. She is quite possibly one of the cutest cats in the world and is simply looking to be someone’s kitty sidekick. Delta is updated on all of her vaccines and her adoption fee is sponsored!

Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MTSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

M E RY L

Yes, Meryl was named for an actress; after all, she's beautiful, intelligent, and full of pizzazz. That should bring her success if she decides to go into show business! What she'd really like, however, is to be in the home and family business. 2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

ROBBY

Robbyis quite reserved and dignified (except for a very short tail that can only be described as cute). He needs a quiet, adult home where he can relax and be admired. His total adoption fee has been sponsored.

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

CAMEO

Cameo was raised in a home with no other cats, and she's a bit uncomfortable living in a room where she's surrounded by them! This sweet lady longs for a family to love and prefers to be the only cat in it.

BO

O S WA L D

Bo is a 4-year-old lab mix. He enjoys long walks and playing fetch. Bo is housetrained and knows basic obedience. This charming canine loves car rides and is updated on all of his vaccines. Bo would do best in a home with an experienced dog owner.

Oswald is a quirky, but sweet, 3-year-old Maine Coon mix. This lovely buffcolored kitty gets along well with cats and dogs. Oswald is playful, sweet and loves to be brushed. He is looking for a person who can truly appreciate his beauty and intelligence.

Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

Flowers for every bride.

www.missoulafoodbank.org

In Trouble or in Love? The Flower Bed has

For more info, please call 549-0543

affordable flowers for all your needs.

Improving Lives One Pet at a Time

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

The Flower Bed

Missoula’s Unique Alternative for pet Supplies

CHUKKA

Chukka is a Manx, and many would say that his lack of a tail is his most interesting characteristic. However, we think that the freckles on his nose are quite endearing too. He's attractive no matter how you look at him!

www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275

2405 McDonald Ave. 721-9233

627 Woody • 3275 N. Reserve Street Corner of 39th and Russell in Russell Square

KEISHA

ZEUS

Keisha the lab mix may be a senior, but she still has the energy of a young pup! Keisha loves daily walks and swimming. She walks well on leash and gets along with some dogs. Keisha would do best in an active home without cats.

Zeus is a 6-year-old mix that was found as a stray. This pooch loves people and is looking for someone to be his full-time companion. Zeus is friendly, kennel-trained, intelligent and playful. He is a wonderful dog who is waiting patiently at the shelter for a wonderful person to come and adopt him.

MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

These pets may be adopted at AniMeals 721-4710 SMOKETTE

Smokette is what they call me/I’m sweeter than buttercup candy/My fur resembles a smoky haze/Coming from a chimney in the December days/I have white as bright as fresh fallen snow/And eyes that resemble the harvest moon glow/I’m anything but plain/Mesmerizing as the first spring rain

A Nice Little Bead Store In A Nice Little Town 105 Ravalli St Suite G, Stevensville, MT 59870 406.777.2141

DOLLY

Dolly’s story is no fairy tale, but the ending could be. This beautiful little girl came from a hoarding situation where she had to fight for her food. Every day was a struggle to survive. She was found bedraggled and extremely underweight. OPEN HOUSE MAY 14TH Equine Sports & Canine Massage Traveling Practitioner Grooming Boutique and Spa

2825 Stockyard Rd www.equusandpaws.com • 406.552.2157

CALLIE

I'm Callie, you can think of me as the big man on campus. I am twenty pounds of pure man. I grew up outdoors but am now finding out how great it is to live inside! Instead of chasing after food and battling the weather, I now spend my days sprawled out on my ottoman.

HENRY

Have you ever seen a cat give you two thumbs up or two thumbs down? Were they black or white or brown? Never seen a cat with opposable appendages? Don’t feel bad; on your side are percentages. These feisty felines are rare to see and trust me even harder to be!

715 Kensington Ste 8

406-240-1113 Find me on FACEBOOK jessicagoulding.zenfolio.com specializing in weddings, pets, families, babies, senior J. Willis Photography pictures, fine art, and more!

Missoula Independent

Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

Page 35 May 12–May 19, 2011


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

May 12 - May 19, 2011

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Have sexual health questions? The Montana Access Project (MAP) Receive answers to your sexual health questions via text from sexual health experts. Text 666746 Type ASKMAP (space) enter your question. Free & Confidential. askmap.info New Montessori Program offered in Missoula for infants, toddlers and 3 – 6 year olds onsite at the Missoula Fire, Science and Technology Campus, next to the Missoula airport. For more information visit our website at www.northernrockiesmontessori.com Please call 406-8296899 or email elizabeth.maliska @gmail.com for questions.

“Education is a natural process carried out by the child and is not acquired by listening to words but by experiences in the environment.” Red Willow Learning Center now available to rent. 1000’ space for classes or meetings. Video conferencing, AV, beverage service. 825 West Kent. Call Kathy 880-2639. Support groups for survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault each Tuesday at YWCA Missoula. Orientation Group, Living in Peace, and Domestic Violence Native Women’s Talking Circle. Groups also available for children/teens. Dinner at 5:30,

groups start at 6:30. Please arrive by 6:15 if you have children. 1130 W. Broadway. 543-6691 for more information. WHO’S YOUR REMODELER? 5434423 www.buildmissoula.com

LOST & FOUND FOUND: Ring on sidewalk at 340 East Central. Call to identify. 5496718 Lost Engagement Ring 3/4ct diamond in white gold setting, Missoula Club, sat 4/9 $REWARD$ 541-222-0729

FREE

Estimates

406-880-0688

bladesofglorylawncarellc.com

I BUY

Hondas, Subarus, Toyotas Japanese/German Cars & Trucks

INSTRUCTION ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com

ADOPTION

Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 Missy is a confident 4-year-old feline. She is adventurous, yet has an affectionate side. Missy loves to be the center of attention; she can be very playful and entertaining. This kitty comes with all of her vaccines updated and her adoption fee is sponsored. HSWM 5943934

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching

127 N. Higgins, Suite 307 532-4663 www.homeword.org

Table of contents Advice Goddess . . . Free Will Astrology Sustainafieds . . . . . Public Notices . . . . Crossword . . . . . . . This Modern World

. . . . . .

. .C2 . .C4 . .C5 . .C5 . .C7 .C11

P L A C E YOU R AD: Deadline: Monday at Noon

Walk it. 317 S. Orange

NOT ARTISTIC?

FAST CASH 24 HOURS

Come have some fun painting. Instruction & art supplies furnished. Complimentary wine or tea. Book now, 327-8757 or 207-7839

327-0300

Art Hang up 839 S. Higgins

Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not.

LOST Manx female orange and white with stripes, not spayed, 1 to 2 inch tail, med hair (Lolo area) 239-2002

Got Hurt? Get Help! Worker's Compensation Disputes



Talk it.



Send it. Post it.

543-6609 x121 or x115

classified@missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

No set up fees in May!

Fletch Law, PLLC Steve M. Fletcher Attorney at Law

Accidents & Personal Injury

Call Thomas at Bulman Law Today!

Over 20 years experience. Call immediately for a FREE consultation.

721-7744 • Bulmanlaw.com 416 E. Pine Missoula MT

541-7307 www.fletchlaw.net

406-546-6574 www.copperstoneproperty.com

THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE Hot Stone, Deep Tissue & Swedish

Rosemary Polichio 239-0474

Graduation + Cold Stone Ice Cream Cakes = Success!


COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

ADVICE GODDESS By Amy Alkon

Piano Lessons WILL YOU STILL SHOVE ME TOMORROW? I’m in a relationship that feels like it could last, but I’m afraid of ending up like my parents: constantly bickering over minutiae, snarling at each other from other rooms, and slamming doors. The thing is, my boyfriend and I are already starting to fight over the stupidest stuff! —Worried Before you know it, you’re thinking, “What was it, a year ago, he was promising me the moon, and now he can’t even bring home the right freaking pepper?!” Being annoying is the human condition. But, the partner who will be most annoying is one you only find halfway hot—somebody you have the hots for physically but whose character flaws and incompatibilities you ignore. You basically need to have a crush on a partner as a human being (have deep respect and even admiration for who he is and how he goes about life). Being human, he’ll do things that would annoy a Buddhist monk who could relax for an afternoon in a tank of fire ants. If you have the hots for him all around, it’s far less likely that the things you dream of doing to him in bed will involve strangling or blunt force trauma. You should also make sure your partner isn’t your second greatest love, after your love of being right. Approaching problems as “ours” rather than “mine vs. yours” takes what researcher John Gottman calls “deep friendship,” where overwhelming positive feelings about each other and the relationship really suck the life out of any negative ones. The more relationship research I read, the more essential an overall positive sentiment seems. For example, researcher Shelly Gable found that the happiest relationships involve partners who make sacrifices for each other— because they love and want to support their partner, and not as some sort of investment to avoid conflict or keep from losing them. So, in a good relationship, a guy goes to his girlfriend’s poetry reading because it means a lot to her to have him there, and not because it means a lot to him to keep her from running off with some spoken-word slacker who doesn’t wash between his toes. Each time you snap at each other, you hack a little chunk out of your relationship. Before long, snapping becomes the culture of your relationship, and you become your snarly parents. It helps to make a pact that you won’t act like you’ve forgotten you love each other. Of course, there will probably be times you slip and get nasty.

What’s important is not letting yourselves stay nasty. Not for a minute. Not even for 30 seconds. If you do have “deep friendship,” there’s a good chance you’ll vault yourselves out of the feel-bad situation with what Gottman calls “the secret weapon of emotionally intelligent couples”—“the repair attempt.” This is something you say or do, maybe even something silly like making a face you know will crack your partner up, that defuses the tension and keeps the argument from getting out of hand. This is essential, since Gottman has found that a couple’s success in preventing negativity from escalating when they argue is one of the primary factors in whether a marriage lasts—and not in the sense that your parents’ has: “Please help us celebrate our 30 years—of nonstop screaming, door slamming, and vicious putdowns. Dinner and character assassination, followed by dancing.”

At YOUR Home All Ages, All Levels

Bruce- 546-5541 Peace happens... One heart at a time. 546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Missoula 3:16

REGRESSION TOWARD THE MEANIE

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

Fine Arts Emphasis Whole Organic Meals

Tues - Sat/10am - 6pm • 728-5538 HUGE store-wide sale Saturday, May 14th, 10am to 6pm. We carry furniture, antiques, jewelry, shoes, artwork, household items, and clothing for women, men, & children. Come check us out!

My girlfriend of three months seems to relish treating me like her narcissistic psycho ex-boyfriend treated her—constantly pulling away and basically putting her on an emotional rollercoaster. She brings up her ex in almost every conversation, although I’ve asked her not to. I keep telling her mature love is about putting out what you wish to receive, and she agrees. Should I stay with her while she struggles to overcome her past? —Mistreated “Mature love”? At best, that sounds like a porn mag put out by the AARP or some old man’s pickup line: “Something tells me you aren’t wearing any Depends.” The last person who should be pontificating about “mature love” is a guy who thinks he can lecture somebody into providing it. Even better, your student is a woman who treats your relationship like the revenge phase of her last one. (Her narcissistic psycho ex is gone, but you’ll do.) If you want a project, buy macaroni and glue. If you’re really after “mature love,” you need a woman who’s capable of sharing it with you. This starts with recognizing that “mature love” doesn’t only involve “putting out what you wish to receive” but putting out what you don’t—and then running inside and bolting the door so it can’t get back in.

ENROLLING AGES 2-6

Thrift Boutique • Downtown Corner of Orange & Front

830-3268

1703 S. 5th West

Baby's First Year Package

10% off ONLY $495 with this ad Normally $550

Belly shots, new born 3,6,9, and 12 month sittings announcements & invitations 715 Kensington Ave Suite 8 • Missoula • 406-529-4466

www.jamielynnphotographymt.net

EMPLOYMENT GENERAL SUMMER WORK $14.25 base/appt Flexible schedules Apply now, start after finals Call 406-8303387 today! FARM/RANCH WORK AVAILABLE. Cattle, wheat, basic riding experience required. Alcohol, drug, tobacco-free workplace. Resume, references to: Blind Box #418, Box 900, Lewistown, MT 59457 FULL-TIME FOOD SERVICE SUPERVISOR for the Mental Health Nursing Care Center in Lewistown, MT. $28,533 to $35,666 annually DOE, plus benefits. For information call (406)538-7451. Closes 05/25/11 EOE

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2 May 12 – May 19, 2011

Graphic Designer Adventure Cycling Association seeks an energetic, detail-oriented, junior-level graphic designer who enjoys working with people to join our creative team and help design a variety of publications, printed materials, and web graphics. This is a full-time position with excellent benefits. The position is based at Adventure Cycling’s headquarters in Missoula, Montana. Submit cover letter, resume, and portfolio samples to Adventure Cycling, c/o Sheila Snyder, P.O. Box 8308, Missoula, MT 59807 or ssnyder@adventurecycling.org. Application review starts mid June. Head Housekeeper, Seasonal Position: (June 10th through September 24th) Salary: $2500 to $3500 mo. (DOE) Plus Tips, Travel, Room & Board. Long established

remote Alaskan Fishing & Adventure Lodge seeking qualified applicants for a Head Housekeeper. Must be able to lift 30 to 40 lbs. Requires strong oral communication and organizational skills. This job requires hands on work and overseeing a staff of 1 to 4 people. Long hours are sometimes required based on number of guests. Will be responsible for cleaning and laundry service for 30 rooms and bathrooms. Travel to and from Montana is included in Package. Position requires full term commitment (June 10th through September 24th). Job requires good customer & employee service skills. For application, go to http://www.whalerscove lodge.com/Employment_Opportun ities. Applications and Resumes can be faxed to (907) 788-3104 or emailed to: info@whalerscovelodge.com

Whaler’s Cove, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Permit Holder of the Tongass National Forest Job hunting is stressful. You deserve a break. Get started at www.MissoulaEvents.net PAINTING & PRODUCTION WORKERS for a multitude of duties. Painting, assembly work, manufacturing, shipping, receiving and machine operation. #9952561 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 PIZZA COOK. PT. Must have saute and fryer experience. Experience making pizzas from scratch a plus! Minimum of 3 years experience. Wages start at $8/hour DOE. #2979606 Missoula Job Service 728-7060


EMPLOYMENT RECEPTIONIST. Medical office experience helpful, but employer is willing to train. $10.00-$10.50 per hour with health benefits. #2979608 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 TREASURER CLERK. PT for Missoula County. Requires high school graduation/GED; two years customer service experience that included face-to-face contact; one year handling payment transactions; computer data entry experience and basic keyboarding speed (35 WPM). #2979593 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

VISITOR CENTER. Destination Missoula is seeking a Travel Counselor. Requires 2 to 3 years experience in providing information and administrative support functions. PAY: $9.50/hr plus health insurance stipend. #2979590 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

PROFESSIONAL

15.74 with benefits. #2979598 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

SKILLED LABOR

Radio News Director Townsquare Media has an opening for a news director. Apply in person at 3250 S. Reserve St. Broadcasting experience preferred, but not required. If you have a demo, please submit with resume.

AIRPLANE LINE TECHNICIAN. Prior aviation experience a plus but not required. Able to work outside in all weather. Full time, shifts will vary to include weekdays, Saturday, Sunday with possibility of graveyards. #2979607 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-5454546

TRAINING

HEALTH CAREERS

Wildland Fire Training; Basic and Refresher. 406-543-0013 www.blackbull-wildfire.com

MEDICAL MANAGEMENT CAREERS START HERE - Get connected online. Attend college on your own time. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. 800-4819409. www.CenturaOnline.com

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

COMPUTER SPECIALIST. UM Institute for Tourism and Recreation Research. For a complete duty description go to umjobs. silkroad.com. Full time. $13.11 to

Case Worker/Treatment Manager Would you like to provide direct services to children and families in Missoula and the surrounding areas? Are you able to work closely with service agencies and community professionals? Do you have the ability to relate to children and families of varied cultural and socio-economic backgrounds? We need you to fill the Case Worker/Treatment Manager position in our Dan Fox Family Care Program Office in Missoula. Requirements include a B.A. in a human service field. Prefer 2 years of experience related to foster care, adoption, family care services or juvenile probation & parole. Online application must be submitted at www.youthhomes.com. Please attach resume and personal references in the Resume/References area on app. Position closes May 27, 2011.

Jobs for the Environment Montana Conservation Voters is offering part-time employment supporting clean energy this summer. 30+Hrs/wk in Missoula and Helena, May - July. $8.50/hour+ possible bonus.

SALES SALES. Part or Full-time. No investments. Advertising and Leads available. Steel Buildings. Big profits. Ag, Utility, Commercial. Support provided. Close-by factories. 406545-4580. cwirth@sunwardsteel. com www.sunwardsteel.com

OPPORTUNITIES ATTN: COMPUTER WORK. Work from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1,500 part-time to $7,500/month full-time. Training provided. www.KTPGlobal.com or call 1-888304-2847 NOW HIRING: companies desperately need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Info. 1-985-646-1700 Dept. MT-4186

EXPANDING SERVICES – MORE STAFF NEEDED ALL SHIFTS AVAILABLE!

Send resume to summerjob@mtvoters.org.

DIRECT CARE

Habilitation Assistants

P/T, F/T positions providing services to adults w/disabilities in a res/com setting. Exp working w/persons with disabilities preferred. Varied hrs. $9.00/hr.

MDSC, a non-profit serving adult clients with severe disabilities is gaining new clients. More staff needed for all shifts! You’ll find rewarding challenges and opportunities for learning to help our clients live healthy and well-meaning lives in their group home settings. Assist them with activities of daily living, outings and events in the community, fun projects, as well as provide personal needs such as meal preparation, household duties, and personal hygiene.

Valid MT drivers license • No History of Abuse, Neglect/Exploitation

Applications available at OPPORTUNITY RESOURCES, INC., 2821 S. Russell, Missoula, MT 59801. Extensive background checks will be completed. NO RESUMES. EOE.

Day, evening, and night shifts available; including part-time and full-time! All these positions include our excellent paid time off and health benefit package! Also seeking relief staff which offers more flexibility, but requires ability to work any shift to fill in for other staff. You will receive extensive new hire orientation and training throughout your employment to make you successful in your role of providing the best care possible for our special clients.

IND

Must have minimum of high school diploma or GED, pass background check and drug screen, and ability to obtain valid MT Driver’s License. If interested, apply at 1005 Marshall St., Missoula. Questions? Call Misty at 728-5484, ext. 130. EOE.

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist Susan Clarion RNC CA MATS 552-7919 Classes at Meadowsweet Herbs: A lunch time herb stroll happening every Thursday at noon to discover the herbs growing in our own downtown neighborhood. Walks will be different each week as we see both native plants and introduced herbs through their life cycles: leafing out, in bloom and berrying. Walks will be in various areas including, but not limited to, the natural prairie, the waterwise garden and the Clark Fork River. Plants discussed will include poplar, raspberry, tansey, dandelion, yarrow, balsamroot, flax, burdock, lavender, choke cherry, service berry, uva ursi and more!

Happening every Thursday through the summer! Starting June 2 at 12 noon. Cost is $5. Environmental Effects on Preconception and Pregnancy From preconception through delivery, an expecting couple may modify every nutritional, behavioral and lifestyle factor possible to ensure a healthy child. Dr. Teresita Martinez of the Golgi Clinic discusses the impact the environment has on our health and what we can do about it. Tuesday May 24, 7-9pm. Cost: Free. Advanced Soap Making Did you like the Basic Soap Making class or do you already make you own soaps? This is the class for you! In this class you will also do hands on soap making including developing your own recipe with an in depth discussions of additives, colorants, and natural preservatives. Saturday May 28 11am-4pm. Cost: $50, Materials fee $35. Meadowsweet Herbs, 180 S.

3rd St. W., Missoula, MT 59801 728-0543 www.meadowsweetherbs.com

Call DR. Nesbit at 541-7672. 2016 Strand Avenue in Missoula. www.DrNesbit.com

Rosie Smith Moondance Healing Therapies, Massage & BodyTalk. New client discounts. 240-9103

Deborah Gregory, Nurse Practitioner Providing women’s healthcare ... one female at a time. •Birth control to young & older. •Annual exams. •Hormonal issues •Prenatal care. Accepting all insurance types. Debbie Gregory, Nurse Practitioner, 7219999 Community Medical Center #3, 2835 Fort Missoula Road, Suite 305.

Escape with Massage$50. Swedish & Deep Tissue. Gift Certificates Available. Janit Bishop, CMT. 207-7358 127 N. Higgins

Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 241-3405

Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie Clarion 406-552-7919

With over 500 events per month, you’re sure to find something for Body, Mind and Spirit at www.MissoulaEvents.net

Kaimu Mystical Poet looking for Muse.

808-443-1786

DR Naturopathic Take the Natural Path to Health with DR. NATUROPATHIC. Specializing in: Primary care & midwifery, Pain management, naturopathic manipulation, metabolic disorders, Wilson’s temperature syndrome, herbal medicine, and HCG diet.

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3 May 12 – May 19, 2011


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT

By Rob Brezsny

Need a boost? Forget the energy drink!

ARIES (March 21-April 19): The 16th-century English writer John Heywood was a prolific creator of epigrams. I know of at least 20 of his proverbs that are still invoked, including “Haste makes waste,” “Out of sight, out of mind,” “Look before you leap,” “Beggars shouldn’t be choosers,” “Rome wasn’t built in a day,” and “Do you want to both eat your cake and have it, too?” I bring this up, Aries, because I suspect you’re in a Heywoodian phase of your long-term cycle. In the coming weeks, you’re likely to unearth a wealth of pithy insights and guiding principles that will serve you well into the future.

Call our Mental Health Counselor Lois Doubleday, LCPC today.

721-1646 www.bluemountainclinic.org Is what you are doing not working?

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “If you wish to bake an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe,” said astronomer Carl Sagan in his book Cosmos. In other words, the pie can’t exist until there’s a star orbited by a habitable planet that has spawned intelligent creatures and apples. A lot of preliminaries have to be in place. Keep that in mind, Taurus, as you start out down the long and winding path toward manifesting your own personal equivalent of the iconic apple pie. In a sense, you will have to create an entire world to serve as the womb for your brainchild. To aid you in your intricate quest, make sure to keep a glowing vision of the prize always burning in the sacred temple of your imagination.

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GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I’ll quote Wikipedia: “Dawn should not be confused with sunrise, which is the moment when the leading edge of the sun itself appears above the horizon.” In other words, dawn comes before the sun has actually showed itself. It’s a ghostly foreshadowing—a pale light appearing out of nowhere to tinge the blackness. Where you are right now, Gemini, is comparable to the last hour before the sunrise. When the pale light first appears, don’t mistake it for the sun and take premature action. Wait until you can actually see the golden rim rising.

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CANCER (June 21-July 22): When some readers write to me, they address me as “Mr. Brezsny.” It reminds me of what happens when a check-out clerk at Whole Foods calls me “sir”: I feel as if I’ve been hit in the face with a cream pie—like someone is bashing my breezy, casual self-image with an unwelcome blast of dignity and decorum. So let’s get this straight, people: I am not a mister and I am not a sir. Never was, never will be. Now as for your challenges in the coming week, Cancerian: I expect that you, too, may feel pressure to be overly respectable, uncomfortably formal, excessively polite, and in too much control. That would be pushing you in a direction opposite to the one I think you should go.

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): At one point in the story “Alice in Wonderland,” a large talking bird known as the Dodo organizes a race with unusual rules. There is no single course that all the runners must follow. Rather, everybody scampers around wherever he or she wants, and decides when to begin and when to end. When the “race” is all over, of course, it’s impossible to sort out who has performed best, so the Dodo declares everyone to be the winner. I encourage you to organize and participate in activities like that in the coming weeks, Leo. It’s an excellent time to drum up playful victories and easy successes not only for yourself, but for everyone else, too.



VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In his book The Rough Guide to Climate Change, Bob Henson talks about the “five places to go before global warming messes them up.” One such beautiful spot is Colorado’s Rocky Mountain National Park. Vast swatches of its trees are being ravaged by hordes of pine beetles, whose populations used to be kept under control by frigid winters before the climate began to change. Australia’s Great Barrier Reef and Switzerland’s Alpine glaciers are among the other natural beauties that are rapidly changing form. I suggest that you apply this line of thought to icons with a more personal meaning, Virgo. Nothing stays the same forever, and it’s an apt time in your astrological cycle to get all you can out of useful and wonderful resources that are in the midst of transformation.



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): There’s not a whole lot of funny stuff reported in the Bible, but one notable case occurred when God told Abraham that he and his wife Sarah would finally be able to conceive their first child. This made Abraham laugh out loud, since he was 99 years old at the time and Sarah was 90. It may have been a while since God has delivered any humorous messages to you, Libra, but my sense is that She’s gearing up for such a transmission even as we speak. To receive this cosmic jest in the right spirit, make sure you’re not taking yourself too damn seriously.



SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): No one in history has ever drunk the entire contents of a regulation-size ketchup bottle in less than 39 seconds. So says the Guinness Book of World Records. However, I believe it’s possible that a Scorpio daredevil will soon break this record. Right now your tribe has an almost supernaturally enormous power to rapidly extract the essence of anything you set your mind to extracting. You’ve got the instincts of a vacuum cleaner. You’re an expert at tapping into the source and siphoning off exactly what you need. You know how to suck—in the best sense of that word— and you’re not shy about sucking.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “I’m not superstitious,” said Michael Scott, the former boss in the TV show “The Office.” “I’m just a little stitious.” From my perspective, Sagittarius, you shouldn’t indulge yourself in being even a little stitious in the coming weeks. You have a prime opportunity to free yourself from the grip of at least some of your irrational fears, unfounded theories, and compulsive fetishes. I’m not saying that you suffer from more of these delusions than any of the rest of us. It’s just that you now have more power than the rest of us to break away from their spell.



CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In Plato’s Republic, Socrates speaks derisively about people who are eu a-mousoi, an ancient Greek term that literally means “happily without muses.” These are the plodding materialists who have no hunger for inspiration and no need of spiritual intelligence. According to my reading of the astrological omens, Capricorn, you can’t afford to be eu a-mousoi in the coming weeks. Mundane satisfactions won’t be nearly enough to feed your head and heart. To even wake up and get out of bed each morning, you’ve got to be on fire with a shimmering dream or a beautiful prospect.



AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In his Book of Imaginary Beings, Argentinian writer Jorge Luis Borges reports the following: “Chang Tzu tells us of a persevering man who after three laborious years mastered the art of dragon-slaying. For the rest of his days, he had not a single opportunity to test his skills.” I bring this to your attention, Aquarius, because my reading of the astrological omens suggests that you, too, may be in training to fight a beast that does not exist. Luckily, you’re also in an excellent position to realize that fact, quit the unnecessary quest, and redirect your martial energy into a more worthy endeavor.



PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Want to see a rabbit chase a snake up a tree? Go watch this video on YouTube: tinyurl.com/BunnyWhipsSnake. If for some reason you don’t have access to Youtube, then please close your eyes and visualize a cute bunny harassing a six-foot-long snake until it slithers madly away and escapes up a tree. Once you have this sequence imprinted on your mind’s eye you will, I hope, be energized to try a similar reversal in your own sphere. Don’t do anything stupid, like spitting at a Hell’s Angels dude in a biker bar. Rather, try a metaphorical or psychological version.

MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS 1st CUTTING ALFALFA & GRASS. Round bales. Very good quality. (406)350-2180, leave message 1st Interstate Pawn. 3110 South Reserve, is now open! Buying gold and silver. Buying, selling, and pawning items large and small. We pay more and sell for less. 406-721-(PAWN)7296. ESTATE SALE. May 12/13/14 10am 2770 Cooper #431. Montana art collection. Over 60 pieces of original & limited edition art. Montana artists: Walter Hook, Rudy Autio, Russell Chatham, Stan Lynde, Janet Sullivan & many more. Also complete household & personal liquidation. 2009 Hyundai Sonata 4800 miles. 1989 Saab 300 ZX. Segway X2. Quantum 610 motorized wheel chair. Leather recliner & ottoman. Leather loveseat hide-a-bed. Schwinn Airdyne. 42” Mitsubishi flat screen TV. Kindle. Bookcases, end & coffee tables. Men’s wardrobe cabinet. Oreck vacuum. Gourmet cooking items. Small kitchen appliances. Two antique Winchester rifles. Luger 9 mm pistol. Antique violin. Antique mandolin. Lots of household miscellaneous. See photos at www.AbleEstates.Sales.com

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4 May 12 – May 19, 2011

Firewood for sale! Save money on your heating bill. We have cords of lodgepole that are dry and ready to burn. This wood lights easily and burns hot. Will deliver anywhere in Missoula or the greater Missoula area (i.e., Potomac, Blackfoot, Seely, Bitterroot, Arlee, Alberton). Cords can be rounds or split, or a combination. Ask us about our multi-cord discount. Single cords: rounds are $100/cord and split is $125/cord. Stacking fee negotiable. Call Greg at 406-244-4255 or 406-5460587 to order yours today. Wood available all winter long. FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation non-denominational 1-800-475-0876 Steel Buildings. Factory Discounted. 24x36 Reg $13,700 Now $9600. 38x50 Reg $25,300 Now $18,800. 48x96 Reg $53,400 Now $38,800. 60x150 Reg $112,800 Now $76,800. www.sunwardsteel.com Source# 12F. 406-545-4580

COMPUTERS Even Macs are computers! Need help with yours? CLARKE CONSULTING @ 5496214

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RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway 543-8287

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MUSIC Outlaw Music Specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, Tues-Fri 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am-6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533. Outlawmusicguitarshop.com WWW.GREGBOYD.COM One of the world’s premier music stores. (406) 327-9925.

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PUBLIC NOTICES CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council and the Missoula County Commissioners will hold a joint public hearing on Monday, May 23, 2011, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider resolutions to authorize City action for two open space proposals: 1) Thompson-Huff Project- a.) Accept a conservation easement on a 20.57 acre parcel located on the west side of Mount Jumbo; b.) Accept an adjacent 6.28 acre parcel in fee simple; and c.) Authorize the expenditure of $9,810 in open space bond funds to

cover the costs of survey and other professional fees incurred to complete the transfers. 2) Jacobs Project- Authorize the expenditure of $80,000 in open space bond funds towards the purchase of 35 acres located off Deer Creek Road between East Missoula and Bonner. A copy of the resolutions are available in the City Clerk Office, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. For further information, contact Jackie Corday, Parks & Recreation at 552-6267. If you have comments, please mail them to the City Clerk at the address listed above. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk

CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on May 23, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider a resolution to increase fees for services related to the review and processing of land use applications pursuant to city adopted regulations pertaining to zoning, subdivision and floodplain services based on the 2010 cost of services study. For further information, contact Brentt Ramharter, Finance Director at 552-6108. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk,

435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein CMC, City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on May 23, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider an ordinance amending Title 5, Missoula Municipal Code, entitled “Business Licenses and Regulations” Chapter 5.04 entitled “Definitions”, Chapter 5.08 entitled “Licensing Provisions Generally,” Chapter 5.20 entitled “Junk Dealers”,

Chapter 5.24 entitled “Pawnbrokers,” Chapter 5.28 entitled “Secondhand Dealers,” Chapter 5.40 entitled “Boilerroom Operations,” Chapter 5.52 entitled “Liquor,” and Chapter 5.90 entitled “Devices Depicting Sexual Activity” adjusting and/or increasing the fee provisions in each chapter’s fee section in accordance with the results of an official 2010 fee study commissioned by the City of Missoula. For further information, contact Brentt Ramharter, Finance Director at 5526108. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L.

Rehbein CMC, City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on May 23, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider an ordinance amending portions of Missoula Municipal Code Chapter 8.40 entitled “Hazardous Vegetation and Nuisance Weeds”, Chapter 12.04 entitled “Street Vacation”, Chapter 12.12 entitled “Curbs, Sidewalks, and Paving”, Chapter 12.14 entitled “Right-of-Way Occupancy

Permit”, Chapter 12.24 entitled “Excavations”, Chapter 12.30 entitled “Fences”, Chapter 13.06 entitled “Industrial Wastewater”, Chapter 15.38 entitled “Accessibility”, Chapter 15.65 entitled “Grading, Drainage, Erosion Control and Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP)”, pertaining to fees. For further information, contact Brentt Ramharter, Finance Director at 5526108. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein CMC, City Clerk

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5 May 12 – May 19, 2011


PUBLIC NOTICES CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on May 23, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider an ordinance amending Title 8, Missoula Municipal Code, entitled “Fire Inspection Fees” section 8.50.010 entitled “Establishment of Fees” and section 8.52.020 entitled “Manufacture in City Prohibited—Permit for Sale or Discharge” increasing the inspections fees and establishing fees for pyrotechnic/fire performance permits in accordance with the results of an official 2010 fee study commissioned by the City of Missoula. For further information, contact Brentt Ramharter, Finance Director at 552-6108. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein CMC, City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on May 23, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider an ordinance amending Title 12, Chapter 12.58 entitled “Special Event Permits” establishing section 12.58.035 to establish a fee for holding special events in accordance with the results of an official 2010 fee study commissioned by the City of Missoula. For further information, contact Brentt Ramharter, Finance Director at 5526108. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein CMC, City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on June 6, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider an ordinance amending Missoula Municipal Code (MMC) 10.22 Stopping, Standing and Parking; 10.33 Vehicle Removal; 10.50 Street Cleaning Regulations; and 10.54 Violations—Penalties. For further information, contact Anne Guest, Parking Commission Director at 552-6244. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. Martha L. Rehbein CMC, City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on May 23, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider a resolution to approve the annual appropriations and the Capital Improvement Program for the City of Missoula as set forth in the fiscal year 2012 budget. In conjunction with the public hearings concerning the budget, the City Council will also hear public comments and objections to the fiscal year 2012 work plans and budgets for the following districts prior to considering resolutions affirming the method of assessment for each district and levying assessments to defray the costs of the work plan and budget: 1. Business Improvement District 2. Tourism Business Improvement District 3. Road District #1 4. Park District #1 For further information, contact Brentt Ramharter, Finance Director at 552-6108. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802 or email them to the City Council at council@ci.missoula.mt.us. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein CMC, City Clerk MISSOULA COUNTY FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT PERMIT APPLICATIONS The Office of Planning and Grants has received the following applications for Floodplain Development Permits: 1. City Floodplain Permit Application #11-04 from Richard Goldsmith to work within the Clark Fork River floodplain. The project is located at 803 E. Front St. in Missoula and includes the construction of a commercial addition. 2. County Floodplain Permit Application #11-13 from Michael Darling to work within the Clark Fork River floodplain. The project is located at 11200 Kona Ranch Rd. and includes the excavation of existing ponds and minor landscaping. The full applications are available for review in the Office of Planning and Grants in City Hall. Written comments from anyone interested in these applications may be submitted prior to 5:00 p.m., May 27, 2011. Address comments to the Floodplain Administrator, Office of Planning & Grants, 435 Ryman, Missoula MT 59802 or call 258-4841 for more information. MISSOULA COUNTY INVITATION FOR BIDS MISSOULA COUNTY T-1 Courtroom REMODEL Missoula County seeks bids for the remod-

el of the historic courtroom on the second floor of Building T-1, Fort Missoula. Sealed bids will be accepted by the Missoula County Auditor’s Office, Attn: Barbara Berens, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 until 3:00 PM local time on May 18, 2011, at which time bids will be opened and read aloud. Late bids will not be accepted. Bidding contractors shall clearly mark the outside of their envelope “MISSOULA COUNTY T-1 COURTROOM REMODEL – SEALED BID ENCLOSED.” The Scope of Work, in brief, consists of renovations to the 2nd floor of Building T-1 to restore the historic courtroom to its original configuration and appearance. The project includes all demolition and construction required for new mechanical and electrical systems, plumbing, finishes, and other work as outlined in the Bid Documents. Work must be completed by June 30, 2011. Bid proposals shall be submitted on the forms provided with the Contract documents. Contract documents and plan drawings are available and may be obtained from the office of Adler Architects, Inc located at 210 N. Higgins Ave. Missoula, MT 59802 (406549-4861). A refundable deposit of $100.00 is required for each plan set. Plan sets returned to the office of Adler Architects in good condition within ten (10) days of the bid opening shall receive a deposit refund. Members of the Missoula Plans Exchange may view plan and contract documents on line at http://www.mpe.us/. All questions about project plans and specifications should be directed to Adler Architects at 210 N Higgins Ave Missoula, MT, or 406-5494861. A site inspection can be arranged by calling Larry Farnes at 406-258-4756. Bids shall be accompanied by bid security in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the amount bid and must be in a form specified in the Montana Code Annotated 18-1-201 thru 206. The security is subject to forfeit if the successful bidder does not enter into a contract with Missoula County within 30 days of bid acceptance. The successful bidder will also be required to furnish an approved performance bond in the amount of 100% of the contract value. The contractor shall comply with all fair labor practices and state statutes including the Montana prevailing wage rates. No bidder may withdraw a bid for at least thirty (30) days after the due date and time for receipt of bids. Missoula County reserves the right to reject any or all bids. By: Missoula County Board of County Commissioners 200 W Broadway Missoula, MT 59802 MISSOULA COUNTY SECTION 00100 INVITATION TO BID Missoula County seeks bids for construction of the Missoula Development Park Airway-Expressway Roundabout. Sealed bids will be accepted by the Missoula County Auditor’s Office, Attn: Barbara Berens, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 until 1:30 PM local time on May 25, 2011 and then publicly opened and read aloud in Room 374 of the Missoula County Courthouse. Note to bidders: the due dte for sealed bids on this project has been extended from Thursday, May 19, 2011 to Wednesday, May 25, 2011. The project consists of the construction of roundabout at the intersection of Airway and Expressway, and landscaping the medians along Airway Blvd and Expressway. The contract documents consisting of drawings, specifications, and bidding documents may be examined or obtained at the office of Professional Consultants, Inc., 3115 Russell, Missoula, MT 59801. The required deposit is $100.00 per set, which is nonrefundable. In addition, the drawings and project manual may also be examined at the Missoula Plans Exchange, 201 N. Russell, Missoula, MT (406) 549-5002. There will be a PreBid Conference in Room 374 of t he Missoula County Courthouse, at 3:30 PM on May 12, 2011. Interested CONTRACTORS are encouraged to attend. CONTRACTOR and any of the CONTRACTOR’S subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI). Forms for registration are available from the Department of Labor and Industry, P.O. Box 8011, 1805 Prospect, Helena, Montana 596048011. Information on registration can be obtained by calling 1-406-444-7734. CONTRACTOR is not required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project, but must have registered prior to execution of the Construction Agreement. All laborers and mechanics employed by CONTRACTOR or subcontractors in performance of the construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by Missoula County and the State of Montana. The CONTRACTOR must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their race, color, religion, sex or national origin. Each bid or proposal must

be accompanied by a Certified Check, Cashier’s Check, or Bid Bond payable to Missoula County, in an amount not less than ten percent (10%) of the total amount of the bid. Successful BIDDER(s) shall furnish an approved Performance Bond and a Labor and Materials Payment Bond, each in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Insurance as required shall be provided by the successful BIDDER(s) and a certificate(s) of that insurance shall be provided. Sealed bids shall be marked Missoula Development Park Airway-Expressway Roundabout. No bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled time for the public opening of bids, which is 1:30 PM., local time, May 25, 2011. Note to bidders: the due date for sealed bids on this project has been extended from Thursday, May 19, 2011 to Wednesday, May 25, 2011. Missoula County reserves the right to reject any or all proposals received, to waive informalities, to postpone the award of the contract for a period of not to exceed sixty (60) days, and to accept the lowest responsive and responsible bid which is in the best interest of the OWNER. The Contractor is required to be an Equal Opportunity Employer. MISSOULA COUNTY The Missoula City-County Health Board will hold a second public hearing on proposed changes to the Missoula Health Code on Thursday, May 19, 2011 at 12:30 p.m. or soon thereafter in the second floor conference room at the Health Department at 301 West Alder in Missoula. The Department has proposed additional changes to Regulation 1 regarding Wastewater Treatment and Disposal Systems and to the graywater irrigation section of the Alternative Systems Manual. The Board will take public comments at the hearing. Written comments may be submitted by 5 p.m. on May 17th by mailing them to Health Code Comments, MCCHD, 301 W Alder St., Missoula, MT 59802; faxing them to (406) 258-4781 or emailing them to envhealth@co.missoula.mt.us. For more information, a copy of the proposed regulations or to sign up for the Interested Parties mailing list, visit www.co.missoula.mt.us/EnvHealth or call 258-4755. INVITATION TO BID AIRPORT IMPROVEMENTS MISSOULA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT MISSOULA, MONTANA Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received and publicly opened at 2:00 p.m. local time on Thursday, May 26, 2011 by the Missoula County Airport Authority at the Airport Terminal Conference Room for the construction of “Airport Improvements” to include the following: Interactive Training Office Expansion and Remodel This work is to include all tools, equipment, materials and labor to complete this project. Bids must be sealed and delivered: Missoula County Airport Authority 5225 Highway 10 West Missoula, MT 59808 at or before 2:00 p.m., local time on Thursday, May 26, 2011, and marked “Bid for Airport Improvements at the Missoula International Airport.” The bidder’s name, address and state Contractor’s Registration Number shall appear in the lower left hand corner of the envelope. All bids must be accompanied by lawful monies of the United States or a Cashier’s Check, a Certified Check, Bid Bond, Bank Money Order or Bank Draft, drawn and issued by a National Banking Association located in the State of Montana, or by any Banking Corporation incorporated under the Laws of the State of Montana, in an amount equal to not less than ten (10) percent of the total bid, payable to the order of the Missoula County Airport Authority as liquidated damages in the event said successful bidder shall fail or refuse to execute the contract in accordance with the terms of his bid. After a contract is awarded, the successful bidder will be required to furnish a separate Performance and Payment Bond, each in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the contract. Plans, specifications, bidding and contract forms may be inspected at the Airport Director’s Office – Missoula International Airport, or at offices of the consulting engineer, Morrison-Maierle, Inc., at 1 Engineering Place, Helena, Montana; 315 N. 25th Street, Suite 102, Billings, Montana; 2880 Technology Blvd West., Bozeman, Montana; 1321 8th Avenue North, Suite 104, Great Falls, Montana; or 3011 Palmer Street, Missoula, Montana. Copies of these documents may be obtained from the office of MorrisonMaierle, Inc., 3011 Palmer Street, Missoula, Montana 59803 – Phone: (406) 542-8880, on the payment of Seventy-Five Dollars ($75.00) non-refundable, for each complete set. The Owner reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to waive irregularities. The Contractor will be required to comply with the wage and labor requirements and to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedule of wage rates established by the United States Department of Labor as referenced in the Contract. Contractors and any subcontractors doing work on this project will require registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry. Forms for registration are available from the Department of Labor and Industry, P.O. Box 8011, 1805 Prospect Avenue, Helena, Montana 596048011. Information on registration can be obtained by calling 1-800-556-6694. Contractors are required to have been registered with the Department of Labor and Industry prior to bidding on this project. The Bidder must supply all the information required by the bid docu-

ments and specifications. The Bidder is required to submit a Certification of Nonsegregated Facilities (included in the Proposal form). A Contractor having 50 or more employees and his subcontractors having 50 or more employees and who may be awarded a subcontract of $50,000 or more will be required to maintain an affirmative action program, the standards for which are contained in the specifications. To be eligible for award each bidder must comply with the affirmative action requirements which are contained in these specifications. The proposed contract is under subject to Executive Order 11246 of September 24, 1965, and to the Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) and Federal Labor Provisions. This contract will be funded by revenue generated through the Airport’s PFC program. Bidders may not withdraw Proposals for a period of sixty (60) days after the bid opening date. The pre-bid conference is hereby established at 2:00 p.m. (local time) Tuesday, May 17, 2011, at the Airport Terminal Conference Room, Missoula International Airport. A tour of the work site at the Missoula International Airport will be conducted following the pre-bid conference. /s/ Cris Jensen Airport Director Missoula County Airport Authority MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT Probate Case No. DP-11-66 Judge Townsend Dept. No. 4 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of DONALD W. HANSON, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Carolyn L. Hanson, Personal Representative to the estate of Donald W. Hanson, return receipt requested, at c/o Katherine Holliday, Esq., Carmody Holliday Legal Services, PLLC, PO Box 8124, Missoula, MT 59807 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED May 2, 2011. /s/ Carolyn L. Hanson, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-11-53 Dept. No. 1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF TERRY G. HANSEL, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Barbara Thompson, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at c/o Sullivan, Tabaracci & Rhoades, P.C., 1821 South Avenue West, Third Floor, Missoula, MT 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 25th day of February, 2011. /s/ Barbara Thompson, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-11-77 Dept. No. 1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MICHELLE K. CHARLES, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Robert Charles, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at c/o Sullivan, Tabaracci & Rhoades, P.C., 1821 South Avenue West, Third Floor, Missoula, MT 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 15th day of April, 2011. /s/ Robert Charles, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-11-79 Dept. No. 2 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF ERIC R. BRAUN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Virginia V. Braun, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of her attorneys, Crowley Fleck PLLP, 305 South 4th Street East, Suite 100, PO Box 7099, Missoula, Montana 59807-7099, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 27th day of April, 2011. /s/ Virginia V. Braun, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-11-405 Dept. No. 1 Ed McLean Notice of Hearing on Name Change of Minor Child In the Matter of the Name Change of Izayah Samuel Powell, Jessica Hunter, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court to change a child’s name from Izayah Samuel Powell to Izayah Samuel Smith. The hearing will be on 5/25/11 at 1:15 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Dated 3/31/11 /s/ Shirley E. Faust Clerk of District Court By: Molli Zodo Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-11-489 Dept. No. 3 Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Julia Camille Leuthold, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Julia Camille Leuthold to Julia Camille Lake. The hearing will be on May 26, 2011 at 9:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. DATED this 18th day of April, 2011. /s/ John W. Larson, Judge of the District Court

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C6 May 12 – May 19, 2011

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 1 Cause Probate No. DP-08-123 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF WILLIAM F. MUHLHAUSER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Shahara Muhlhauser, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested at GEORGE LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 210 North Higgins Avenue, Suite 234, Missoula, Montana 59802 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED: July 28th, 2008. /s/ Shahara Muhlhauser, Personal Representative for the Estate of William F. Muhlhauser MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 John W. Larson Probate No. DP-11-90 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF HARRY RICHARD SMITH, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the Personal Representative, Steve Richard Smith, return receipt requested, at Tipp & Buley, P.C., PO Box 3778, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 6th day of May, 2011. /s/ Steve Richard Smith, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate No. DP-11-82 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF BESSIE HOELL, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to S. Melanie Hoell, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane PC, PO Box 4747, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 21st day of April, 2011. /s/ S. Melanie Hoell, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DV-11-453 NOTICE OF HEARING ON PETITION FOR NAME CHANGE IN RE THE NAME CHANGE OF AUBREY SHARON SANDERS, A minor child to AUBREY ROSE SANDERS-McKAY. NOTICE is hereby given that Petitioner Clare McKay has filed a petition with the Clerk of Court for an Order to change her daughter’s name from Aubrey Sharon Sanders to Aubrey Rose Sanders-McKay. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given to all persons interested in the matter that a hearing will be held at the Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Missoula County, Montana on Tuesday, May 24, 2011, at 1:30 p.m. at which time objections to said petition will be heard. Any person desiring to object to the granting of the petition may do so by filing said objections in writing with the Clerk of said Court no later than the time set for hearing. DATED this 13th day of April, 2011. ANDERSON & ANDERSON, P.L.L.P. /s/ Nicholas P. Anderson, Attorney for Petitioner Auction storage contents 16-J. 10 am, 5/18/11, 2122 South Ave. W., Missoula. Cash. 240-9371 Notice of Public Hearing- Notice is hereby given that a County Commissioners will hold a public hearing to consider a tax reduction for commercial or industrial personal property pursuant to MCA 15-24-102. The personal property is taxed under taxpayer id #600407. For a list contact Vickie Zeier, Missoula County Treasurer. Apublic hearing on the above will be held before the Board of County Commissioners at their regular weekly public meeting on Wednesday, May 25, 2011 at 1:30 p.m., Written comments will be accepted by the Commissioners’ Office, Room 210, Missoula County Courthouse, prior to the hearing date. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier, Clerk & Recorder /Treasurer 200 W. Broadway St. Missoula, MT 59802 (406) 258-3234 Date 5/09/11 NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER DEED OF TRUST TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 1. Notice is hereby given to the public and to the following: Scott G. Cooney P.O. Box 7694 Missoula, MT 59807- 7694 Scott G. Cooney P.O. Box 8851 Missoula, MT 59802 Scott G. Cooney 2249 Rodgers Missoula, Mt 59802 Scott G. Cooney 2992 Woodland Ave. Missoula, MT 59802 Rainglow Services, Inc. d/b/a Rocky Rail Services 4685 Expressway P.O. Box 17767 Missoula, MT 59802 Kimberly J. Strawbridge f/k/a Kimberly J. Cooney 1000 Greenough Drive Missoula, MT 59802 Kimberly J. Cooney c/o Gail H. Goheen 345 West Main St. Hamilton, MT 59840 -0997 2. Property. This Notice concerns the following described real property (the “Property”) located at 4685 Expressway, Montana 59802, and more particularly described as follows: Tract B of Certificate of Survey No. 5689, located in the East one-half of Section 1, Township 13 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., and in the Southwest one-quarter of Section 6, Township 13 North, Range 19 West, P.M.M., all in Missoula County, Montana. EXCEPTING THEREFROM Tracts A-1, C-1, Portion “A” and Portion “B” of Certificate of Survey No. 5891, located in the East one-half of Section 1, Township 13 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. The

remaining property is more fully described as Tract B-1 of Certificate of Survey No. 5891 located in the East one-half of Section 1, Township 13 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., and in the Southwest one-quarter of Section 6, Township 13 North, Range 19 West, P.M.M., all in Missoula County, Montana. 3. Loan Secured by the Property. Missoula Federal Credit Union made a loan to Scott G. Cooney. Scott G. Cooney also executed a Deed of Trust (described below) to secure payment and satisfaction of the loan obligation as follows: i. Deed of Trust. Grantor Scott G. Cooney executed and delivered to Missoula Federal Credit Union (beneficiary) a Deed of Trust described as follows: Date: March 16, 2007 Grantor: Scott G. Cooney Original Trustee: Stewart Title of Missoula Lender/Beneficiary: Missoula Federal Credit Union Recorded in the records of Missoula County, Montana, as follows: Date: March 16, 2007 Book/Page: Book 793, page 1088, Document No. 200706273 ii. Substitute Trustee. The following was substituted as Trustee: Robert J. Sullivan Boone Karlberg PC 201 West Main, Suite 300 P. O. Box 9199 Missoula, MT 59807-9199 Telephone: (406) 543-6646 Facsimile: (406) 549-6804 by a written document recorded in the records of Missoula County, Montana as follows: Dated: January 31, 2011 Recorded: January 31, 2011 Document No.: 201101962 Book/Page: Book 873 of Micro Records at Page 377. iii. Promissory Note. The Deed of Trust was given to secure payment of a Promissory Note in the original principal amount of One Million Two Hundred Fifteen Thousand Dollars ($1 ,215 ,000 .00) from Scott G. Cooney to Missoula Federal Credit Union. iv .Default. Scott G. Cooney has defaulted under the Promissory Note and Deed of Trust. Scott G. Cooney is in default due to the failure to pay all monthly interest payments due from August 28, 2010, failure to pay real property taxes and to pay the accelerated balance due on the Promissory Note. v. Amount Owing. The amount owing on the Promissory Note is as follows: Principal: $1 ,214 ,982 .49 Interest through 2/28/2011: $39 ,041 .33 Late Charges: $1 ,238 .28 Fee: $47 .00 Trustee’s Sale Guarantee $2 ,901 .50 Interest continues to accrue on the Promissory Note and Deed of Trust at the daily rate of $199 .7231 from February 28, 2011 until paid. The total balance due on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is the sum of the above items, plus attorney fees and costs allowed by law. The exact amount owing as of the date of sale will be provided upon request made to the under-signed prior to the date of said sale. vi. Acceleration. Notice is hereby given that the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust has previously elected to consider all principal and interest immediately due and payable in consequence of the default of Scott G. Cooney under the Promissory Note and Deed of Trust. 4. Notice of Sale. Notice is hereby given that the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust and the Trustee hereby elect to sell or cause to be sold the Property described above to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. The sale will be held at the following date, time and place: Date: July 13, 2011 Time: 10:00 a.m. Place: Missoula County Courthouse 200 West Broadway Missoula, MT The Trustee will sell the Property at public auction to the highest bidder, in cash, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of the sale. DATED this 1st day of March, 2011. By /s/ Robert J. Sullivan Successor Trustee STATE OF MONTANA: COUNTY OF MISSOULA This instrument was acknowledged before me on the 1st day of March, 2011, by Robert J. Sullivan. /s/ A. Melissa Otis Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at Missoula, Montana My Commission Expires: August 15, 2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/18/04, recorded as Instrument No. 200432701, Bk. 743, Pg. 1230, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Jim Rentfro was Grantor, Wells Fargo Financial Montana, Inc. was Beneficiary and First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lots 13 and 14 in Block 38 of Daly’s Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/23/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 10, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $141,852.35. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $136,117.63, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 20, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made

by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7777.15250) 1002.188509-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/30/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200703700, Bk 791, Pg 1721, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which David S. Zrowka and Jeanne A Zrowka, husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Quicken Loans Inc. was Beneficiary and Title Source, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Source, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract 9-B-2 of Certificate of Survey No. 1813, located in the NE1/4 of Section 35 and the NW1/4 of Section 36, Township 14 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. Bk. 866, Pg. 409, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for J.P. Morgan Alternative Loan Trust 2007-A2. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 06/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 9, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $407,519.15. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $383,846.53, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 22, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.09748) 1002.171712-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/21/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200809215, Bk 817, Pg 0993, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which David A. Zink and Tammy M. Zink, husband and wife and Georgena R. Compton, all as joint tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage LLC was Beneficiary and Title Services, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: The East half of Lot Twenty-eight (28) and all of Lot Twenty-nine (29), in Block Fortyeight (48) of East Missoula Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat thereof. Recording Reference: Book 800 Micro Records, Page 702. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. Bk. 863, Pg. 978, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the


PUBLIC NOTICES Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 03/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 22, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $242,688.83. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $212,901.30, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 2, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.08349) 1002.165986-FEI Notice of Trustee’s Sale T.S. No. 10-0039159 Title Order No. NWT002615 THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 09/14/2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: On the front steps to the County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT.. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which LAURA E PETERSON AND MICHAEL J. PETERSON, AS JOINT TENANTS as Grantors, conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON, ATTORNEY AT LAW as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 07/18/2005 and recorded 07/19/2005, in document No. 200517944 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 756 at Page Number 465 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: A TRACT OF LAND BEING A PORTION OF U.S.GLO LOTS NO. 7, SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 762. TOGETHER WITH A 60 FOOT WIDE ACCESS EASEMENT AS SHOWN ON CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO(S). 2 AND 437. Property Address: 17825 BEARGRASS MOUNTAIN ROAD, MISSOULA, MT 59808 The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 200535CB, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-35CB There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 12/01/2009, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $171,996.71 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.00% per annum from 11/01/2009 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale

include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. Dated: 04/29/2011 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. Successor Trustee Amanda Green, Authorized Signer 2380 Performance Dr, TX2-984-0407 Richardson, TX 75082 ASAP# 3983498 05/12/2011, 05/19/2011, 05/26/2011 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 5, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 3A OF DAWN ACRES NO. 3, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Dawn E. Lorash and Stephen W. Lorash, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Community Bank- Missoula, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on May 4, 2004 and recorded on May 10, 2004 in Book 731, Page 1396 as Document No. 200412535. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. successor by merger to Principal Residential Mortgage, Inc. Jason J. Henderson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,185.89, beginning September 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 10, 2011 is $143,658.94 principal, interest at the rate of 5.8750% now totaling $4,428.09, late charges in the amount of $2,487.10, escrow advances of $252.68, plus accruing interest at the rate of $23.12 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 23, 2011 /s/ Jason J. Henderson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On February 23, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Jason J. Henderson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Citimortgage Vs. Lorash 41926.901 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 5, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot A52 of Canyon Creek Village, Phase 3 and 4, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official recorded Plat thereof RANDALL E SHIELDS, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services Inc, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 19, 2007 and recorded July 23, 2007 in Book 802, Page 40 under Document No. 200718638. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc.. Jason J. Henderson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the month-

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r ly payments due in the amount of $1,195.36, beginning August 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 14, 2011 is $131,427.06 principal, interest at the rate of 7.8750% now totaling $5,543.57, late charges in the amount of $244.95, escrow advances of $17.05, and other fees and expenses advanced of $139.88, plus accruing interest at the rate of $28.36 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 23, 2011 /s/ Jason J. Henderson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On February 23, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Jason J. Henderson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Citimortgage V Shields 42011.319 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 5, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN THE STATE OF MONTANA, COUNTY OF MISSOULA, WITH A STREET LOCATION ADDRESS OF 342 SPEEDWAY AVE; MISSOULA, MT 59802-5469 CURRENTLY OWNED BY JUSTIN A HAIT AND DESIREAH M HAIT HAVING A TAX IDENTIFICATION NUMBER OF 04-2200-24-1-20-18-0000 AND FURTHER DESCRIBED AS LOT 25 IN BLK 25 OF EAST MISSOULA ADDITION 24-13-19 Justin A. Hait and Desireah M. Hait AKA Nikki M Hait, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to U.S. Bank Trust Company, National Association, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to U.S. Bank, National Association N.D., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on June 13, 2006 and recorded on July 14, 2006 under Document No. 200617256 in Book 778 on Page 1316. The beneficial interest is currently held by US Bank, National Association N.D.. Jason J. Henderson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $246.68, beginning August 25, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 18, 2011 is $25,093.76 principal, interest at the rate of 7.74% now totaling $963.87, late charges in the amount of $399.36, and other fees and expenses advanced of $443.40, plus accruing interest at the rate of $7.02 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The

sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 23, 2011 /s/ Jason J. Henderson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On February 23, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Jason J. Henderson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Us Bank Vs. Hait 41810.441 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 27, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THE WEST 60 FEET OF THE EAST 187 1/2 FEET OF THE NORTH ONE-HALF OF BLOCK 10 IN HOMEVALE ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFI-

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING THE MISSOULA CITY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT will be conducting a public hearing at 7:30 p.m., Wednesday, May 25, 2011, Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine, Missoula, MT, on the following items: 1. A request by Eric and Diana Jensen, represented by Tom Orr of P. Mars Scott, P.C Law Offices, for setback variances for a shed and carport located at 4002 Lancaster in the RT10 zoning district. SEE MAP T.

CIAL PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN BOOK 1 OF PLATS AT PAGE 35. RECORDING REFERENCE: BOOK 228 OF MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 1805. Mona L Munson, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title and Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to American Home Mortgage Acceptance, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated April 6, 2005 and recorded on April 11, 2005 under Document No. 200508158, in Bk-750, Pg-791. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company as Indenture Trustee for American Home Mortgage Investment Trust 2005-2. Jason J. Henderson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,610.30, beginning October 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 1, 2011 is $251,650.00 principal, interest at the rate of 6.125% now totaling $20,593.59, late charges in the amount of $128.44, escrow advances of $4,607.38, and other fees and expenses advanced of $436.40, plus accruing interest at the rate of $42.23 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding

CLARK FORK STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 40 and Outside O6. Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting May 16-19, 2011 by appt only by calling 541-7919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to May 19, 2011, 4:00 P.M. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

EAGLE SELF STORAGE

2. A request by Harriet Spurlock, represented by Terre Meinershagen of Rocking M. Design, for a rear yard setback variance to have a second dwelling unit for a property located at 628 Edith in the RT2.7 zoning district. SEE MAP U. If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling the Missoula Office of Planning & Grants at 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. For additional information regarding the variance request you may contact Hilary Schoendorf at the same number or email hschoendorf@ co.missoula.mt.us.

will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 27, 137, 152, 218, 329, 367, 440, 568, and 633. Units contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday, May 23, 2011. All auction units will only be shown each day at 3 P.M. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage office at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59804 prior to Thursday, May 26, 2011, 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

d s

"Dance Party"–busting a few moves.

by Matt Jones

ACROSS

DOWN

1 Fireplace grate leftovers 6 "___ Head" (Freud work about mythology) 13 '60s adjective 14 They make Chevys shine 16 Brings out a smile in 17 More hardened 18 Getting to home plate while listening to Ravel? 20 Like some tacos 21 Request, as a cigarette 22 Dropped watermelon sounds 23 Female precursor to vampires 24 Part of QED 26 Transgress 27 Spurts of energy 28 Do a new format on a paragraph 30 La Quebrada's home 32 Take down 34 Excuses 37 Skip a walk through the rain, perhaps 39 "Tiny Bubbles" crooner 41 Hit the town 44 Yoga practice need 46 Word after greater or lesser 47 For two, to the French 48 Stern milieu 50 Where: Lat. 51 Remove one's hat 52 The gray area between getting a fashion magazine or not? 54 The writing on the wall 56 Stick around 57 Pens in 58 English soccer great Wayne 59 Ignore, as faults 60 Ed of "Up"

1 Protected, like a Round Table knight 2 Kindred spirit 3 It may have its kinks 4 Tinker-Chance link 5 Some admins 6 Ian who's Blackbeard in a 2011 movie 7 Bother persistently 8 Bit of coffee sediment 9 Lambasted director Boll 10 Automated servant for dispensing dip? 11 Self-evident logical statements 12 Deem appropriate 13 Talkative sort 15 Madrid misses, for short 19 Oscar the Grouch's pet worm 23 Crystal clear 25 Switching around faucets in a restroom? 27 "The Family Circus" cartoonist Keane 29 Injectable firmer 31 Olivia Newton-John film with a few Top 40 hits 33 Sucker 35 Not nice to animals 36 More in need of a makeover 38 Amy Lowell or James Joyce 40 Like some potato salad 41 Cop's credential 42 Decks out 43 Do some cabinet work 45 ___ del Fuego 48 Learning methods 49 Spread options 52 Discover alternative 53 "___ my lunch break" 55 Dandified dude

Last week’s solution

©2011 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com)

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 May 12 – May 19, 2011


PUBLIC NOTICES in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 17, 2011 /s/ Jason J. Henderson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On February 17, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Jason J. Henderson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Ahm V Munson 41537.451 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 27, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: THE EAST ONE-HALF OF THE SOUTH ONEHALF OF LOT 1 IN BLOCK 74 OF SUPPLEMENTAL PLAT TO R.M. COBBAN ORCHARD HOMES, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF, AS FILED IN THE CLERK AND RECORDER’S OFFICE, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA Denise M. Sherman, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on February 15, 2006 and recorded on February 15, 2006 in Book 768, Page 1510 under Document No. 200603511. The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage, LLC. Jason J. Henderson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1281.05, beginning September 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 1, 2011 is $198,397.26 principal, interest at the rate of 6.125% now totaling $7,088.55, late charges in the amount of $1,138.35, escrow advances of $2,974.56, suspense balance of $-198.60 and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,053.75, plus accruing interest at the rate of $33.29 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 17, 2011 /s/ Jason J. Henderson Successor Trustee MACKOFF

KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On February 17, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Jason J. Henderson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/0214 GMAC V. Sherman 41965.453 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 27, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 36A OF COUNTY CREST NO. 3A , LOTS 36 A AND 36B, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Craig E Diettert and Beth A Diettert, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to ABN Amro Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated December 18, 2006 and recorded on December 22, 2006 under Document# 200632709, Book 789, Page 590. The beneficial interest is currently held by Citimortgage Inc successor by merger to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc. Jason J. Henderson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,693.36, beginning May 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 22, 2011 is $221,486.26 principal, interest at the rate of 5.7500% now totaling $10284.34, late charges in the amount of $1068.04, escrow advances of $1804.41, and other fees and expenses advanced of $996.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $34.89 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 17, 2011 /s/ Jason J. Henderson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On February 17, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Jason J. Henderson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Citimortgage Vs. Diettert 42011.076 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 27, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 18 IN BLOCK 3 OF WEST VIEW ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Corey A. Thormahlen and Stephanie T. Thormahlen, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated November 09, 2006 and recorded November 09, 2006 in

Book 786, Page 1377 under Document No. 200629184. The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage, LLC. Jason J. Henderson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,420.94, beginning September 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 29, 2011 is $225,420.37 principal, interest at the rate of 6.00000% now totaling $6,673.05, late charges in the amount of $340.98, escrow advances of $604.47, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,802.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $41.99 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 17, 2011 /s/ Jason J. Henderson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On February 17, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Jason J. Henderson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Gmac V Thormahlen 41965.461 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 28, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: The South 60 feet of Lots 9 and 10 in Block 22 of LOW’S ADDITION, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof Travis R. Jakeway, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated August 31, 2005 and recorded September 9, 2005 at 4:12 o’clock P.M. in Book 759, Page 1334, as Document No. 200523727. The beneficial interest is currently held by Aurora Loan Services, LLC. Jason J. Henderson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $644.58, beginning July 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 13, 2011 is $119,000.00 principal, interest at the rate of 6.50% now totaling $5,063.05, late charges in the amount of $322.30, escrow advances of $656.52, suspense balance of $-368.16 and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,407.66, plus accruing interest at the rate of $21.19 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C8 May 12 – May 19, 2011

elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 18, 2011 /s/ Jason J. Henderson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On February 18, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Jason J. Henderson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Brandi Harrington Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 10/21/2016 Aurora Vs. Jakeway 40990.244 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 08/15/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which THOMAS D. ERVING AND MIKELL K POTTER, AS JOINT TENANTS WITH RIGHT OF SURVIVORSHIP as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 11/14/2007 and recorded 11/20/2007, in document No. 200730276 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 809 at Page Number 177 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 21 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS TRACT 11A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 1872. Property Address: 16600 TOUCHETTE LANE, Frenchtown, MT 59834. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 01/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $397,581.09 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.375% per annum from 01/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 03/29/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor

Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0026415 FEI NO. 1006.131552 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 08/15/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which PHILIP J. O’CONNELL AND JULIE E. GIBSON, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to INSURED TITLES, LLC as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 01/28/2005 and recorded 01/31/2005, in document No. 200502537 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 747 at Page Number 585 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOTS 10 AND 11 IN BLOCK 1 OF MOUNT SENTINEL ADDITION NO. 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 440 EAST KENT AVENUE, Missoula, MT 59801. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 01/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $218,276.68 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 7.625% per annum from 01/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 03/29/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0027249 FEI NO. 1006.131548 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 08/10/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which CLINTON J ADCOCK AND AMBER K ADCOCK, AS JOINT TENANTS as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to TITLE SERVICES as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 01/16/2009 and recorded 01/22/2009, in document No. 200901326 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 832 at Page Number 357 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: TRACT 9A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 4379, LOCATED IN THE SOUTHWEST ONEQUARTER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 14 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Property Address: 6003 AIRWAY BLVD, Missoula, MT 59808. The beneficial interest

under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 05/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $313,492.39 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.00% per annum from 04/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 03/28/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 10-0139822 FEI NO. 1006.117071 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 08/10/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which RICK L. KALLIS, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 01/05/2006 and recorded 01/10/2006, in document No. 200600684 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 767 at Page Number 514 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 3 OF SHADOWRIDGE ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT OF RECORD IN BOOK 28 OF PLATS AT PAGE 97. Property Address: 9294 TUCKER LANE, Missoula, MT 59808. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 03/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $322,500.00 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.50% per annum from 02/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obliga-

tion Dated: 03/25/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 10-0139145 FEI NO. 1006.116826 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 08/10/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which WENDY MARTIN as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 06/25/2008 and recorded 06/26/2008, in document No. 200815054 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 821 at Page Number 1233 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: FRACTIONAL LOT 18 IN BLOCK 65 OF AMENDED PLAT OF A PORTION OF CAR LINE ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH THAT PART OF THE VACATED ALLEY LYING SOUTH OF SAID LOT 18 WHICH IS ATTACHED TO SAID LOT BY OPERATION OF LAW PURSUANT TO COMMISSIONERS JOURNAL 446, FEBRUARY 9, 1935, AND TOGETHER WITH THE SOUTH ONE-HALF OF VACATED DIXON STREET LYING NORTH OF LOT 18 WHICH IS ATTACHED TO SAID LOT BY OPERATION OF LAW PURSUANT TO RESOLUTION NO. 77-86, FILED MAY 11, 1997. EXCEPT THAT PART OF SAID LOT 18 DEEDED TO THE MONTANA POWER COMPANY ON SEPTEMBER 16, 1954, IN BOOK 184, PAGE 521 DEED RECORDS. RECORDING REFERENCE: BOOK 776 MICRO RECORDS, PAGE 949. Property Address: 2345 DIXON AVE, Missoula, MT 59801-8221. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 08/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $160,075.00 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.125% per annum from 07/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 03/25/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 10-0145220 FEI NO. 1006.118349 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 08/10/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appoint-


PUBLIC NOTICES ed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which MAVIS H VAILLANCOURT, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to INSURED TITLES LLC. as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 11/21/2005 and recorded 11/22/2005, in document No. 200531141 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 764 at Page Number 1125 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 1 OF TRUMAN MEADOWS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 5880 SUN VALLEY RD, Florence, MT 59833. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, LLC. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 08/01/2010 and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $159,882.87 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.375% per annum from 08/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and

late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 03/28/2011 ReconTrust Company, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0006768 FEI NO. 1006.131554 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 08/17/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which KENNETH M. FIESTER, J. DOLLENE FIESTER, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to INSURED TITLES as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 11/23/2004 and recorded 11/29/2004, in document No. 200433268 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 744 at Page Number 87 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: TRACT C OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 05635, LOCATED IN THE NORTHWEST ONEQUARTER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 12 NORTH, RANGE 19 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Property Address: 10246C BEAR RUN CREEK ROAD, Missoula, MT 59803. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is

made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 01/01/2011 and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $191,505.66 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.875% per annum from 01/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 04/01/2011 ReconTrust Company, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0027857 FEI NO. 1006.131835 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 08/22/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which HEATHER L. CHENEY,

A SINGLE PERSON as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY OF MONTANA, INC. as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 03/05/2008 and recorded 03/10/2008, in document No. 200805103 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 814 at Page Number 0668 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 11 OF 44 RANCH, PHASES 1 AND 2, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 2543 LATIGO DRIVE, Missoula, MT 59808. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 01/01/2011 and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $265,934.37 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.875% per annum from 01/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attor-

ney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 04/04/2011 ReconTrust Company, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0029577 FEI NO. 1006.131938 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 08/22/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which RONNY L. STRAIGHT AND VICKI L. STRAIGHT HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 07/25/2003 and recorded 07/31/2003, in document No. 200327979 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 713 at Page Number 573 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 14 IN BLOCK 2 OF EL MAR ESTATES PHASE 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 8440 PHEASANT DRIVE, Missoula, MT 59808. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is

made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 11/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $110,421.58 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.25% per annum from 11/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 04/06/2011, ReconTrust Company, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0029886 FEI NO. 1006.132267

Clerk and Recorder. The default of the obligation, the performance of which is secured by the aforementioned Trust Indenture, and for which default of this foreclosure is made, is for failure to pay the monthly payments as and when due. Pursuant to the provision of the Trust Indenture, the Beneficiary has exercised, and hereby exercises its option to declare the full amount secured by such Trust Indenture immediately due and payable. There presently is due on said obligation the principal sum of $282,806.92, plus interest at a rate of 5.6% totaling $25,134.79, for a total amount due of $307,941.71, as of February 24, 2011, plus he costs of foreclosure, attorney’s fees, Trustee’s fees, escrow closing fees, and other accruing costs. The Beneficiary has elected, and does hereby elect, to sell the above-described property to satisfy the obligation referenced above. The Beneficiary declares that the Grantor is in default as described above and demands that the Trustee sell the property described above in accordance with terms and provisions of this Notice. DATED 25th day of February, 2011. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Trustee. STATE OF MONTANA)) ss. County of Missoula). On this 25th day of February, 2011, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Kevin S. Jones, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. (SEAL) /s/ Christy Shipp, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at: Missoula, Montana. My Commission Expires: 5/7/2013

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE. To be sold for cash at Trustee’s sale on July 11,2011, at 10:00 a.m., on the front (south) steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, all of Trustee’s right, title and interest to the followingdescribed property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 3 of Park Addition, Block 6, Lots 13 through 17, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Todd A. Berg and Leslie O. Berg, as Grantors, conveyed the real property to Insured Titles, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Whitefish Credit Union, as Beneficiary, by Trust Indenture recorded May 16, 2008, in Book 819 of Micro at Page 91, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. A Substitution of Trustee designating Kevin S. Jones as Successor Trustee was recorded February 23, 2011, in Book 874, Page 442, records of the Missoula County

PUBLIC NOTICE Notice of Intent to Transfer Air Quality Permit pursuant to the Missoula City-County Air Pollution Control Program. Mickelson Rock Products LLC, 7005 Butler Creek Road, Missoula, MT 59808 has filed on or about 5/3/11 an intent to transfer an air quality permit with the Environmental Health Division of the Missoula City-County Health Department. The applicant seeks approval for operation of gravel crushing at 9639 Boy Scout Road, Seely Lake, MT T17N R15W Section 20. The transferred permit is valid only for the calendar year in which transfer is granted. Any member of the public who wishes to review the application, obtain a copy of the permit that is transferred, or who wishes to submit comments, should contact the Health Department at 301 W. Alder, Missoula, MT 59802-4123 or phone 258-4755 prior to 5/27/11.

RENTAL APARTMENTS APARTMENTS FOR RENT 1 & 2 Bedroom FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished apartments. UTILITIES PAID. Close to U & downtown. 549-7711. Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com 121 Ridgeway: Lolo 2-bedroom, on-site coin-op laundry, off-street parking, fenced yard, $525, GCPM, 549-6106 gcpm-mt.com

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montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 May 12 – May 19, 2011


RENTAL REAL ESTATE 2008 Wyoming-$1200/$1200 dep. 3B/2bath House G/S pd; gas forced air heat. W/D hookups, D/W, 2-car garage, fenced yard. NO PETS. GATEWEST 7287333 2160 Fairview #C-$575/$575 dep. E/W/S/G paid-tenant pays gas heat. Balcony & shared yard. NO PETS GATEWEST 728-7333 218 Barclay “A” — upper level duplex in Lolo, dw, shared w/d, large shared yard $600/month. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 951 Ronald #407 - $725/$350 deposit. **2 WEEKS FREE RENT**Condo AGE 62 & OVER. H/W/S/G & expanded basic cable paid. Coin op laundry. NO PETS. GATEWEST 728-7333 Corvallis, 4,500 sqft warehouse space, 7 bay doors, 40 Cents SqFt offered by Greener MT Prop Mgmt, 370-7009 North Russell apartments-Studio ($465), 1 Bed ($525) & 2 bedrooms ($595). Off street parking & storage. GATEWEST 728-7333

DUPLEXES 2400 Leo : 2-story 2-bedroom, 1 baths, garage, dishwasher, hookups, *free cable*, $775, GCPM, 549-6106 gcpm-mt.com

HOUSES 1303 Linnea Lane — 4 bed/2.5 bath, w/d hkups, single gar., central location, pet? $1250. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 PRIMITIVE CABIN. Off power grid. Missoula County. Seasonal unless own snowplow. Available May. $275/month/deposit. 544-9040

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HOMES

Call Anne 546-5816 for showings. Windermere Real Estate

3 bed, 2 bath home on gorgeous acre just west of Frenchtown. Some updating has been done with newer siding, newer roof and the main bathroom has been totally remodeled with new cabinets, paint, and tile. The gorgeous yard has mature pines, tons of flowers, a playhouse, and even a small pond. $234,900 • MLS # 20111782 Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com

Classic North Side Beauty, fantastic updates, hardwood floors, beautiful decor, lots of room on double lot to garden, outbuildings and rented studio shares bath and kitchen, 622 N. 4th 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

3 bed, 2 bath Potomac area home. Covered deck, fenced acreage and great views. The 28 x32 garage has double doors, attached storage in the back and small car port. RV hookups behind garage. 40x49 Quoncet shop with 200 amp service, air compressor, snap on car lift, crane, water. $259,900. MLS#10002960. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. 4 bed, 2.5 bath manufactured home w/ attached storage & 2 covered porches, Has horse set up. Home has central air. $170,000 • MLS # 20111781. Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com 5 bed, 3 bath home in South Hills. House has central air, vaulted ceilings, big family room with gas fireplace. Yard w/ underground sprinklers and privacy fence. 2 car garage. Great home for entertaining! MLS # 10007275. $240,000. Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com 55+ COMMUNITY 2 Bed, 2 Bath, large family room. Homeowners fee includes clubhouse, sewer, garbage, land lease, snow removal & lawn care. $129,900 • MLS#10006023. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. 642 S 5th St W 3-4 Bd, 3 ba Beautiful Historic Home, walk to heart of Missoula.. Call 529-0022 or email drsamdo@excite.com

Deck Overlooks Clarkfork River for income qualified first time homeowners, great 2bdr condo, attached 2 car garages, like new, pets allowed, 1401 Cedar St #22 & #2. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Did you find the perfect place? Now plan your perfect weekend at MissoulaEvents.net Farm Houses w/land in Missoula, these funky farm houses boast lots of land to spread out and do your thing, Development potential. 3278787 porticorealestate.com Five bedroom 4+ bath townhome on golfcourse with excellent views and gracious space. $445,000. MLS 10007754. Call Anne 5465816 for showings. Windermere Real Estate GORGEOUS CRAFTSMAN STYLE TARGET RANGE HOME ON 0.94 ACRES. 5 Bdr/3.5 Bath, double garage, hardwood & tile floors, gourmet kitchen, breakfast nook, main floor master, 2 family rooms. Close to schools, shopping, and the Bitterroot River. $469,000. Prudential Montana. For more info callMindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

modern kitchen with slate floors and stainless appliances, and more. Prudential Montana. $449,000. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Great 3 Bed 2 Bath home on the hill in Lolo. This home features a spacious living room, large backyard and nice deck, great views of the mountains, and huge family room in the basement. Perfect home for RD financing. $189,900. MLS # 20110854. Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com GREAT NORTHSIDE LOCATION. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, fenced yard, hardwood floors, fireplace, lots of natural light, washer/dryer, off-street parking, walk to community gardens, parks, brew pub and downtown . Prudential Montana. $169,900. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Handsome, Spacious Home on Prime Upper Miller Creek Acreage, 5+ bedrooms, with out of town living on quiet cul-de-sac, and acres. Rodeo Rd. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com IMMACULATE HOME ON A 20,000+ SQ FT LOT. Beautifully updated and maintained 4 Bdr/3 Bath Linda Vista area home. Great yard and deck, spacious living room, 2 family rooms, two full kitchens, master bedroom and more. $265,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy

GORGEOUS HANDCRAFTED HOME IN 3.3 ACRES ON PETTY CREEK. 3 Bdr/2.5 Baths, Main floor master suite, great room, gorgeous kitchen, hardwood floors, heated double garage, with guest quarters, and great views. $595,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

717 Cooper 1 bed, 1 bath bungalow with stainless steel appliances, built in breakfast bar, wood floor, privacy fence & storage shed. $157,500 MLS # 20111199. Call Shannon Hilliard at 239-8350 today!

GORGEOUS LOWER RATTLESNAKE HOME. 4 Bdr, 2 Baths, separate heated studio, wide-plank fir floors, 10’ high ceilings, great kitchen, lots of light, all just steps from Greenough Park and trails. $310,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

Affordable Condo, Didn’t think you could afford to buy your own place? This sweet, new, green-built development may be cheaper than rent. 1400 Burns, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

GORGEOUS UNIVERSITY DISTRICT HOME. Classic Craftsman Bungalow in a prime location. 3 Bdr/2 Baths, large corner lot, iron fence, double garage, beautiful woodwork, fireplace, built-ins,

Beautiful River home on Bitterroot just minutes from Missoula. 3 bed 2 bath with a deck that could hold the whole party. $979,000 or Equity Shares available. MLS 10006007.

Jake has moved to

Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com LOG SIDED HOMES. Panel kit, 32x38, half loft, hand peeled siding, purlins, stained, chinked, windows. $27,500. JR (406)7452110 Open House May 15th 13pm 15510 Kendall Creek Rd Cozy log home only 15 minutes from U of M / downtown/ cultural center Large deck overlooking creek that flows across the property year round. A peaceful mountain retreat on over 15 acres. mls # 20112749 • $319,900 Jon Freeland • 360-8234 jfreeland@missoulahomes.com OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY MAY 15 12-2 1940 S 5th W 3 Bed, 1 bath newly refinished interior. Mid town location, near bus line. Vacate and ready to move in! MLS # 20111520 *$$149,900 Jeannette Williams 239-2049 jeannette@montana.com Price Reduced 3 bed, 1.5 bath centrally located condo w/ 1 car garage. 1 bedroom has deck, gas fireplace, tall ceilings in living room. New trim, interior paint and vinyl. $135,000 • MLS # 20110908 Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com Rare Wilma Building Condo – unique loft style condo offers a carefree, fun lifestyle with an amazing view on top of the historic Wilma, $219,900 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

Rattlesnake Home on Large Lot, nice 3br home sits on very rare lot, mature landscaping, tennis court, home has lots of upgrades, 506 Redwood 327-8787 porticorealestate.com SINGLE LEVEL LIVING CLOSE TO THE BITTERROOT RIVER. 4 Bdr/3 Bath single-level Stevensville home. Great, open floor plan, incredible mountain views, next to public park, walk to Downtown Stevi or Bitterroot River. $219,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com SPECTACULAR HORSE PROPERTY ON THE BITTERROOT RIVER. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, 10.4 acres, crossfenced, 4 stall custom barn with hay loft, hardwood & tile floors, gourmet kitchen, arched doorways, 2 decks, spectacular moun-

tain views, 400 feet of river frontage. $475,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Sweet Slant Street Home, Three bedroom home on quiet street in heart of Missoula, hardwood, great yard, solid home, lots of potential! 632 Cleveland 3278787 porticorealestate.com TWO BLOCKS FROM UM CAMPUS. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, hardwood floors, lots of light, remodeled and updated bath, living room plus dining room, gas fireplace, off-street parking and much more. $229,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

RICE TEAM

riceteam@bigsky.net Robin Rice Janet Rice missoularealestate4sale.com 240-6503 240-3932 • 3 bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage • 32435 Bible Lane, Alberton • Deck in private backyard • Close to river & outdoor recreation • $172,400 • MLS#10004303

• 3 bed, 3 bath, 2 car garage • 2 main floor masters • Heated tile floor & jacuzzi in master bath • Large shed for extra storage • $359,900 • MLS # 20110410

• 4 Bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage • Large deck over looks yard • Lots of room & basement • New furnace & water heater • $239,900 • MLS# 20110384

• Enjoy country living close to town • 3 bed, 2.5 bath, 2 car garage • 4 stall barn, tack room & hay storage • Bring your horses!! • $384,900 • MLS# 20111486

1433 Sherwood $179,000 MLS#20112785 Westside bungalow, corner lot, fenced back yard, some gardens, fruit trees, and detached garage w/extra storage. Many updates include laminate flooring, new paint, newer roof, some updated electrical & nice kitchen. High ceilings, front porch, great character, small bonus room off of kitchen. Check out: www.1433sherwood.com

1729 Ethel Lane $158,900 MLS#20111473 Pride of ownership w/ many updates, end unit! Brand new carpet, newer paint throughout w/ very attractive colors, new bath and kitchen fixtures, upgraded light fixtures. Lower level features large living room, with pergo flooring through out. Single attached garage and small backyard. www.1729ethel.com. May have downpayment/closing cost Asst for those who qualify.

For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

Jake Booher GRI, ABR, e-Pro 406.544.611 • jake.booher@prumt.com

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10 May 12 – May 19, 2011

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Rochelle

Missoula Properties Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com


REAL ESTATE

Unique Lower Rattlesnake home near Bugbee Nature Area, 3Brm, 4Ba, Tree-top views, Lots of upgrades like granite countertops and lots of gorgeous wood throughout, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com View or list properties for sale By Owner at www.byownermissoula. com OR call 550-3077

LAND FOR SALE

Palmer @239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

3.5 ACRES BARE LAND ON PETTY CREEK. Gorgeous bare land parcel straddling Petty Creek. Septic, well, and utilities in place. Gorgeous building spot with mountain, creek, and valley views. Custom builder available. $149,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy

Beautiful 14 acre parcel just west of Huson. Meadow with trees & pasture. Modulars or double wides on foundation ok. $169,900. MLS#906774. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES 3344B Connery Way. Modern three level townhome. Easy maintenance yard, 2 bed 3 bath double car garage. $192,000. MLS 10006082. Call Anne 5465816 for showings. Windermere Real Estate Uptown Flats Unit #213 1 bed 1 bath and all the amenities included in this Quality Downtown Condo. $149,900. MLS 20110263. Call Anne 546-5816 for showings. Windermere Real Estate

3 Bed, 1 bath newly re-finished interior. Mid town location, near bus line. Vacant and ready to move-in!

1940 S 5th W MLS# 20111520 $149,900

BIG BEAUTIFUL AZ LAND $99/mo. $0 down, $0 interest, Golf Course, Nat’l. Parks. 1 Hour from Tucson Int’l. Airport. Guaranteed financing, no credit checks. Pre-recorded msg. (800) 631-8164 Code 4057 www.sunsiteslandrush.com Great building site, with electricity right at the property line. 13.46 Acres with small stream on property. $$170,900. MLS#20111016. 10882 Crystal Creek Road, Clinton. Janet 240-3932 or Robin

• • • •

$165,900 Broker/Owner

jeannette@montana.com

easy commute. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

Nice 1 acre lot, beautiful country setting west of Missoula. City Sewer available. Great view. Now $95,000. MLS#908159. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

COMMERCIAL

Secluded 20 Acres 15 Minutes to Missoula, property boasts nice choices for building site, a healthy and beautiful forest setting, and

321 N. Higgins for sale. Many updates to this grand ole downtown building. $875,000. MLS 10003350. Call Anne 546-5816 for showings. Windermere Real Estate

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL QUICK CASH PAID FOR YOUR REAL ESTATE NOTE! Local Investor buys private mortgages, trust indentures & Land Installment Contracts. Call Today for a FREE Bid on buying a portion or all of your note. We also lend on Real Estate, must have at least 40% equity. (800)999-4809 www.CreativeFinance.com

Featured Listing

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY MAY 15 12-2

406.239.2049

240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

MLS# 20112226

3 Bed, 2 Bath, Storage shed Brand new home Great central location Close to mall, bike/hiking trail

2013 W Sussex, Missoula

KEN ALLEN REAL ESTATE 800 Kensington Suite 205 406-239-6909 • kenallenre@bresnan.net

THE UPTOWN FLATS UPSCALE DOWNTOWN LIFESTYLE 1 bedroom • ADA Accessible • Custom Kitchen and Bathroom • Ground level patio

Unit #103 • $154,710

Jeff Ellis

Anne Jablonski

529-5087

546-5816

www.theuptownflatsmissoula.com Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 May 12 – May 19, 2011


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z z a J y l a D May 12 – 15

May 23 – 24

Pianist Joey Calderazzo with Orlando Le Fleming (bass) and Donald Edwards (drums). Out of a universe of possibilities including the Village Vanguard and other storied jazz venues, pianist Joey Calderazzo decided to bring his trio to record a live album over four nights at DalyJazz.

Blue Note recording artist Ambrose Akinmusire and his Quintet Ambrose (trumpet), Walter Smith III (tenor sax), Sam Harris (piano), Burnniss Travis (bass), Justin Brown (drums).

June 2 – 3

Azar Lawrence Quartet with Benito Gonzalez (piano), Essiet Essiet (bass), and Brandon Lewis (drums). . ired u q re SVP .com R ; z 7 pm lyjaz t a rt w.Da sta s w how fo: w s l Al re in

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Garden City LocalFest Celebrating the Soul of Missoula May 14, 12:30 – 8:00, Caras Park Featuring: 12th annual Best in the West Freestyle Kayak Competition Local food vendors & beer garden featuring local brews and wines Children’s activities featuring SpectrUM Demonstrations by Home ReSource and MUD Retail, arts, crafts, and local & sustainable vendors Quality handmade wares from talented local artists Live music featuring Keegan Smith and the Fam And much more!

Image from calendar available at Rudy’s


Missoula Independent