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THE DISH ON MISSOULA’S RECENT RUSH OF NEW RESTAURANTS PLUS: • Why the customer is always right • How to be a better regular • What question to avoid around a chef • Missoula dining etiquette

NEWCOMERS FLOOD THE HELL JUST BURLESQUE ASSASSINS NEWS NEWS WHAT FILM MCPS BOARD BALLOT HAPPENED IN HELENA? RAMPS UP THE CAMP

GARDEN CITY BREWFEST GUIDE


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


THE DISH ON MISSOULA’S RECENT RUSH OF NEW RESTAURANTS PLUS: • Why the customer is always right • How to be a better regular • What question to avoid around a chef • Missoula dining etiquette

NEWCOMERS FLOOD THE HELL JUST BURLESQUE ASSASSINS NEWS NEWS WHAT FILM MCPS BOARD BALLOT HAPPENED IN HELENA? RAMPS UP THE CAMP

GARDEN CITY BREWFEST GUIDE


[2] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013


Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

News Voices/Letters Aid in dying and an unlikely reader...........................................................4 The Week in Review Griz troubles, fireworks and guns...................................................6 Briefs Disabilities, solar energy and development ............................................................6 Etc. ADUs and the future of democracy .............................................................................7 News Three newcomers vie for school board seats...........................................................8 News A look back at the 63rd Montana Legislature ............................................................9 Opinion Baucus’ public-land legacy is beyond reproach ................................................10 Feature The dish on Missoula’s recent rush of new restaurants .....................................14

Arts & Entertainment Arts Burlesque Assassins and the fun of camp ................................................................18 Arts Blackfeet artist creates modern art with classic motifs.............................................19 Music Redbush, The Vignettes, Charles Bradley and Iron Lung......................................20 Film Dude, it’s all connected in “Waterworlds”...............................................................21 Film Stars can’t carry The Company You Keep .................................................................22 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films .........................................................23 Flash in the Pan Nitrogen fixation ..................................................................................24 Happiest Hour Trip 15 ....................................................................................................26 8 Days a Week Order up, hon.........................................................................................27 Mountain High Montana Wilderness Association ...........................................................37 Agenda Montana Innocence Project ................................................................................38

Exclusives Street Talk..........................................................................................................................4 In Other News .................................................................................................................12 Classifieds ......................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess......................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y .......................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle..........................................................................................................C-5 This Modern World .....................................................................................................C-12

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson INTERIM ARTS EDITOR Kate Whittle PHOTO EDITOR Cathrine L. Walters CALENDAR EDITOR Jason McMackin STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen, Jamie Rogers COPY EDITOR Brooks Johnson ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Pumpernickel Stewart, Jonathan Marquis CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Allen MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, Chris Dombrowski Andy Smetanka, Brad Tyer, Nick Davis, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Matthew Frank, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Melissa Mylchreest

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2013 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • May 2 – May 9, 2013 [3]


[voices]

Oregon’s mistake

STREET TALK

by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked Tuesday, April 30, at various downtown locations.

What’s your favorite new Missoula restaurant? Follow-up: What’s your best/worst customer service experience?

McCoy Conner: I like Dickey’s. It’s at a great location and it’s the only barbecue place downtown. Plus, it’s open late. Mind if I smoke?: There was an old pizza place in town where the manager there was really rude. He stood outside and finished his cigarette before he’d go inside and hand me my carry-out. It took like 10 minutes

Alec Short: Five on Black. There are so many different combinations that you could go there a few times a week and have a different dish every time. Don’t judge me: As a person who has worked in the customer service industry, I wish people wouldn’t equate knowledge and wisdom with profession.

Jessie Grossman: I like the new downstairs at Flathead Brewery. Everything on the menu is kind of pricey, but I had a $10 burger that’s rubbed in espresso. It was great. Fine dining: The service at the Pearl is pretty good.

Jake Booher: The Nine Mile Roadhouse. It’s the old Nine Mile Steakhouse. I like the personal service and fresh seafood on Thursday nights. Mano a mano: The best is at the Dino; you get what you want and you can talk to the chef. There’s no in-between guy.

Jenny Mueller: I would have to say Five on Black. Everything tastes so fresh and everything I’ve had there is good. Keep your tips up: People that don’t know how to tip. Coming from working in the customer service industry, even if you have bad customer service, you should tip 10 percent.

[4] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013

I was disturbed by Alex Sakariassen’s article about the Montana doctor who claims to have assisted three patient suicides, euphemistically termed “aid in dying” (see “Cowardice to courage,” April 11). I am a cancer doctor with more than 40 years experience in Oregon, where physician-assisted suicide is legal. I am also a professor emeritus and former chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology at Oregon Health and Science University. I was first exposed to the assisted-suicide issue in 1982 shortly before my first wife died of cancer. We had just visited her doctor. As we were leaving, he had suggested that she overdose herself on medication. I still remember the look of horror on her face. She said, “Ken, he wants me to kill myself.” In Oregon, the combination of assisted suicide legalization and prioritized medical care based on prognosis has created a danger for my patients on the Oregon Health Plan (Medicaid). First, there is a financial incentive for patients to commit suicide: The plan will cover the cost. Second, the plan will not necessarily cover the cost of treatment. This is based on statistical standards. For example, cancer patients are denied treatment if they have “less than 24 months median survival with treatment” and fit other criteria. Some of these patients, if treated, however, would have many years to live, as much as five, 10 or 20 years depending on the type of cancer. The plan will cover their suicides. In Oregon, the mere presence of legal assisted-suicide steers patients to suicide even when there is no coverage issue. One of my patients was adamant she would use the law. I convinced her to be treated instead. Twelve years later she is thrilled to be alive. Don’t make Oregon’s mistake. Kenneth Stevens Sherwood, Ore.

Ensure safety I take great umbrage at the characterization of the doctor from Missoula as “courageous” for opening the door to overt assisted suicide and euthanasia (“aid in dying”) in our great state. I am the widow of a respected Great Falls surgeon, James E. Mungas. Against his expressed wishes and despite his pleas for intervention for the “palliative” overdose he was given, he was ignored and euthanized at a hospice. As a physician he understood the great respon-

L

sibility and power over life the profession conferred; he also understood and witnessed the hubris that led to abuses of that power. He opposed physician-assisted suicide, worried about the potential for abuse in palliative care and understood the seduction of “ending one’s suffering.” There is a body of law, a code of ethics and ever-evolving standards of care developed for medical practitioners to ensure the safety of patients and the public. Doctors have been sued and in some cases indicted for negligence, impairment (alcohol and drugs), depraved indifference and poor judgment. We hold them accountable as “captains of the ship” for the errors of others involved in a case. These are all good and necessary measures to protect the public and the profession.

“I normally gather and smokily burn every piece of your rag, but the Colstrip headline got my attention.” Physician-assisted suicide is a serious threat to the public safety. There is such incredible potential for abuse of the elderly, the handicapped, the mentally impaired, the chronically ill or catastrophically injured. Consent is not protection enough—it can easily be coerced, co-opted, contrived or added after the fact. It becomes a perfect cover for negligence and/or malpractice. Most people do not have the financial nor emotional resources to seek re-dress in these situations. Humans make mistakes. Doctors are human. Sometimes they are wrong about the outcomes. The bombing at the Boston Marathon wrought devastating and horrific life-changing injuries to healthy, able-bodied people. In the aftermath, many will be severely depressed and probably want to commit suicide. Do we just kill them because they might “consent”? The statement by the doctor from Missoula that he is “proud” after assisting three of his patients’ suicides is disturbing. His certitude is alarming. The first jump off the diving board and the first incision are the

hardest, but all things repeated become easier. Said doctor’s conduct would suggest that assisting suicide is a pretty easy thing to which one could become accustomed. I urge the governor, the attorney general and all public officials to do whatever they can to protect the public from physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia. This is not about compassion and choice. Carol E. Mungas Great Falls

It’s not legal I am the President of Montanans Against Assisted Suicide. I disagree with the quote of Emily Bentley that assisted suicide is legal under the Montana Supreme Court case, Baxter v. Montana. That case merely gives assisting doctors a potential defense to prosecution for homicide. The case offers no protection to non-doctors. The case gives no protection to anyone from being sued by angry family members who suddenly find their loved one dead from a lethal prescription. One reason we oppose legalization is due to the abuse that is already occurring in Montana in which patients are pressured to give up on treatment and/or are given morphine to cause their deaths without their consent. A prominent example is Dr. James Mungas, who was effectively euthanized against his will. If the abuse cannot be controlled now, when assisted suicide and euthanasia are not legal, how will it be controlled if these practices are made legal? Please contact us to join in the fight against assisted suicide. For more information, go to www.montanansagainstassistedsuicide.org. Bradley Williams President Montanans Against Assisted Suicide Hamilton

Unlikely reader Seeing as how Duane Ankney has a lesbian daughter and progressives shunned gays how does he get the label “unlikely”? (see “Unlikely ally,” April 18) He was never quoted as thinking that way. It seems to me that the “unlikely” adjective is a reflection of the bias that both your publication and you seem to share toward Republicans and Colstrip. That being said I normally gather and smokily burn every piece of your rag but the Colstrip headline got my attention. No respect intended, in any way, ever. Carl Farnsworth Jr. Colstrip

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via email: editor@missoulanews.com.


missoulanews.com • May 2 – May 9, 2013 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Cathrine L. Walters

Wednesday, April 24 The Missoula City Council considers a new fireworks ordinance. If approved, the city would lift an all-out fireworks ban and make Independence Day explosives legal for a brief window during the holiday week.

Thursday, April 25 Gov. Steve Bullock vetoes House Bill 239 after it passed through both legislative chambers along party-line votes. The bill would have required school districts to obtain written consent from parents before “instructing students in human sexuality education.”

Friday, April 26 The Montana Chapter of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America starts an online petition asking outgoing Democratic Sen. Max Baucus to donate the remainder of his campaign war chest to victims and survivors of gun violence.

Saturday, April 27 Police arrest University of Montana basketball players Will Cherry, 22, and Keron DeShields, 20, after a fight outside Stockman’s Bar. Both are charged with disorderly conduct, and Cherry is also charged with resisting arrest.

Sunday, April 28 An Amber Alert is issued across western Montana for Brayden Blasius, a 1-year-old Kalispell boy who was reportedly abducted by his non-custodial parents. Beau Blasius and Bryndi Gibson are later apprehended in Fife, Wash., and Brayden is placed in the care of Child Protective Services.

Monday, April 29 The Montana Public Service Commission announces that it opposes proposed federal rules to restrict greenhouse gas emissions for new power plants. The commission notes that because of Montana’s vast coal reserves, limiting emissions “would be a bane for the state.”

Tuesday, April 30 The University of Montana unveils its new brand and logo during a gathering of faculty and staff in the University Center. The university’s new slogan is a single word: “Thrive.”

A herd of bighorn sheep race across Highway 200 near Thompson Falls Friday and nearly collide with a cyclist.

Disability

Long way still to go In 1990, President George H. W. Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act, which protected people with “physical or mental impairments” from discrimination in the workplace, in schools and in the public sphere in general. In 2008, President George W. Bush signed an amendment to the law, further broadening the protections of the original legislation. But a recent survey conducted by the Summit Independent Living Center, a Missoula-based nonprofit that advocates for people with disabilities, shows the laws do not always go far enough. The survey, which was taken by representatives from 29 area disability service providers like Missoula County Public Schools, Missoula Aging Services and Opportunity Resources, shows disabled Missoulians are often lacking the access and opportunities of their peers. Seventy percent of those who took the survey said local businesses and other public facilities “lack wheelchair ramps or have other barriers,” while 78 percent reported it was “difficult” for their clients to participate in community events. The study also showed that 86 percent of service providers feel more support is needed for

[6] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013

young people with disabilities to transition from high school to higher education or the workforce. While Summit Media and Communications Specialist Justice Ender admits the survey draws from a relatively small sample size, he says the results still indicate local needs. He points to accessible pedestrian signals at crosswalks, which help the visually impaired safely cross the street, and accessible public transportation as two areas in need of improvement. He adds that the problems are not unique to the Garden City. “This is a national issue,” he says. “It’s a matter of civil rights.” Imagine if you are in a wheelchair and you need to get to work, Ender says, but the bus you take to work doesn’t have a functional wheelchair lift. “If you are black or a woman and someone told you you couldn’t get on a bus, you’d know that was wrong,” he says. “But this is sometimes the reality for people with disabilities.” Enders adds that while the ADA was undoubtedly a step toward equality, society has not yet seen its full implementation. It’s something that will take time. “People with disabilities represent the largest minority group in the country,” he says. “But we’ve only had civil rights for 20 years.” Jamie Rogers

Energy

Solar flares On a recent Friday morning, Bryan von Lossberg stands atop Missoula’s new downtown parking structure, called “Park Place,” and admires the rows of solar panels absorbing the morning sun. “I actually find it pretty aesthetically pleasing, but that’s my engineering nerd side,” says von Lossberg, who’s the executive director of Montana’s nonprofit Alternative Energy Resources Organization, or AERO. Park Place’s solar installation—the largest of its kind in the state—will satisfy roughly 80 percent of the structure’s electricity needs and feed surplus energy generated at peak sun times back into the grid. That method, called net metering, enables the city, which owns the parking garage, to bank energy credits and use them to offset future utility costs. The massive installation gives Missoula bragging rights. But there’s an aspect to the project that von Lossberg and other renewable energy advocates find troubling. State laws governing net metering haven’t been updated since 1999, and von Lossberg says that slow adaptation is hindering the burgeoning solar industry. The problem is on display at Park Place, where a state law


[news] that limits net-meter installations to 50 kilowatts in size forced Missoula to install two meters—one at 50 kW and another at 35—rather than simply using one for the whole system. “It is more costly to install, more complicated to install, for no good reason,” von Lossberg says. The additional $3,000 expense of purchasing another meter and connecting it to the project may seem insignificant in light of the structure’s $10 million construction costs. But several renewable energy advocates, including AERO, the Montana Renewable Energy Association and the Montana Public Interest Research Group, in addition to the Montana Department of Environmental Quality, testified in February at the Montana Legislature that the limit is stifling solar innovation. NorthWestern Energy argued against the bill, stating that because solar producers aren’t required to pay the full costs of transmitting and distributing power, utility consumers are being forced to subsidize net metering. “It’s not really workable under the current constraints to make it a larger program,” says NorthWestern Energy’s Claudia Rapkoch. AERO and other renewable advocates dispute NorthWestern’s assertion. However, they didn’t persuade the legislature to support the cause. Lawmakers let the legislation, Senate Bill 247, die and left the 50 kW cap in place. Jessica Mayrer

Bitterroot

Legacy Ranch moves forward The Ravalli County Planning Board gave a thumbsup to the Legacy Ranch subdivision April 18, recommending that the county commission approve the proposal despite overwhelmingly critical public comment. Now opponents are redoubling efforts to quash a development larger than Corvallis on the fringes of the Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge. “It’s hard for me to imagine that the issues were not raised strongly enough to be given meaningful consideration by the planning board, but for whatever reason, meaningful consideration was not given,” says former Ravalli County Commissioner Jim Rokosch. “We’ll have to do a better job.” The Legacy Ranch proposal now falls to the Ravalli County Commission, which will hold a public hearing June 3. Ravalli County Planner Kevin Waller says the planning board had to weigh nine hours of testimony and 150 written comments in issuing its recommendation, on top of a list of proposed mitigations from Jason Rice of Territorial Landworks LLC, who represented developer Donald Morton.

“They found that the mitigation proposed was sufficient to make a recommendation to the commissioners for approval,” Waller says. “They had met the legal requirements from our end and submitted evidence of adequate, or at least conditionally adequate, provisions for water and sanitation.” Rokosch and others believe otherwise. Numerous mitigations for impacts to neighbors and the environment are contained in lot-buyer notifications and subdi-

vision covenants. While those may seem appropriate now, Rokosch says, the surrounding community might not have a say in future attempts to revise or overturn those covenants. Waller admits nearly 100 percent of the comments received were opposed to the subdivision. Howard Eldridge, one of the two planning board members to deny the proposal, cited that level of opposition in his decision to vote no. But many of those comments simply voiced general disapproval. As the issue moves to the county commission, Bitterrooters for Planning and others are working to ensure that new public comment includes more substantive complaints. “Raising these issues, providing as much facts and figures as you can to support those issues and the lack of mitigation—frankly, this shouldn’t be on the public’s head,” Rokosch says. Rice successfully requested a 30-day extension of the commission’s review to give planning staff more time to draft a final report. Opponents intend to use every day to strengthen their case. Alex Sakariassen

UM

Diversifying financial aid Times are tight at the University of Montana, but that hasn’t stopped a group of American Indian students from

BY THE NUMBERS

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Beers expected to be on tap for the annual Garden City BrewFest at Caras Park Saturday, May 4.

pushing for a new position in the Financial Aid Office tailored specifically to the needs of their peers. Proponents believe the investment could improve poor retention rates and actually benefit UM in the long run. “I really believe that with the Native American center, the University of Montana could become the leading destination for Native American students in the nation,” says Amanda Stovall, a UM senior, enrolled member of the Crow tribe and former vice president of the Associated Students of the University of Montana. “But the reality is we’re not retaining students, so we have to change some things.” Stovall adds that 86 percent of Native undergrads between 2004 and 2011 did not graduate. The financial aid process can be confusing to begin with, but each tribal government has its own scholarship process and deadlines for need assessments, creating additional hurdles for Native students on tuition waivers or higher education scholarships. “Native students rely on this money when it comes in … and it takes time to navigate this process,” says Zaneta Dale, a UM senior from Montana’s Rocky Boy Indian Reservation. “On top of that, we’re expected to communicate with several entities.” Stovall began rallying Native students earlier this year and took the issue before ASUM, which approved a resolution April 24 urging the UM administration to create a specialized financial aid position. ASUM President Zach Brown understands that people are “feeling the squeeze” across campus and that “the timing is not ideal for this.” But he adds budget concerns aren’t going to discourage ASUM from approaching Main Hall and “starting the conversation.” “We had over an hour of public comment, mostly about this issue,” Brown says. “So the Native students came out in force. It’s my third year interacting with ASUM, second year of being a part of it, and it is by far the longest public comment period I’ve ever seen.” Stovall understands UM is facing a crunch. But, she says, the position could pay for itself if the university retains as few as a dozen additional Native undergrads. “It costs less to retain a student than it does to recruit a student, and we already know we have retention issues around the Native American population,” Stovall says. “I just feel like it’s the best business decision they could make right now.” Alex Sakariassen

ETC. Missoula citizens are agonizing over the future of our little burg. It’s a heavy burden and, as such, some feel compelled to share it. For example, local resident Bob Luceno waxed poetic about his burden in an email sent to the Missoula City Council just after 4 a.m. on April 23. “I cannot sleep, I grieve for the city of Missoula which will groan under the terrible and heavy weight of the most unwise, radical council leadership in the history of the city,” he wrote. The author’s anxiety stems from the likelihood that Missoula lawmakers will soon allow accessory dwelling units, also called “granny flats,” in single-family residential neighborhoods. Luceno told the council that he watched in dismay hours before as six council members—a majority that night— voted to legalize ADUs. That vote constituted one of two needed to make the proposal law. The next vote is scheduled for May 6. With (A)D(U)-Day creeping closer, writers are using increasingly colorful language to make their points. One local even bestowed “a big raspberry,” or what some may call a “zerbert,” to council members supporting ADUs “against the will of the people.” While the idea of giving pro-ADU council members raspberries isn’t necessarily displeasing, we can’t help thinking that granny flats are getting a bad rap. First of all, since the city legalized ADUs in multifamily districts in 2009, only a handful have been constructed. That’s probably because the ADU ordinances are so restrictive. If the new law passes, history suggests an alley-house explosion is unlikely. Second, ADU proponents have steadily painted Missoula as a longtime haven for idyllic single-family residential neighborhoods, but that’s simply not the case. Missoula didn’t create its first zoning law until 1932, when the council passed an ordinance limiting development to two units per parcel even in the Garden City’s lowest-density district. Since then, the city has created numerous laws to govern growth, many of them contentious. Despite the high drama and colorful language used by current naysayers, our city has survived. Hopefully Luceno and other critics take comfort in that—and get some sleep.

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missoulanews.com • May 2 – May 9, 2013 [7]


[news]

The challengers Three newcomers vie for school board seats by Jamie Rogers

feels some things should be done differently. He says the current board too often votes unanimously. “I want to know someone on the board is raising the issues I want raised,” he says. “And not just falling in line.” Tompkins feels her point of view would also add a new dimension to the trustees. Tompkins was born in Michigan, where her father worked for more than 20 years at General Motors. She says that her “strong working class background” would inform her service, and she would give voice to the “under-represented demographic … of lower-to-middle income families.” “There’s this perception that because a school is located in a specific neighborhood, it doesn’t require programs that serve low-income students,” she says. “But there are pockets of working poor and college students with kids throughout the district who can’t afford to pay for extracurricular sports or art, music and science programs. I’d like to see those activities once again be a feature of the school day.” Though Lorenzen, Beers and Tompkins come from different backgrounds, there is no doubt that all of their candidacies originated when the current board voted to give Apostle a raise. Tompphoto by Cathrine L. Walters Newcomers Michael Beers, Julie Tompkins and Diane Lorenzen are seeking kins calls it “a horrible decision on to unseat incumbents Scott Bixler and Joe Toth on the Missoula County school so many levels,” while Lorenzen says Apostle’s salary should be board. more in line with the national aver“I think we need to be very careful age, which in Missoula, she says, should be meetings to express their dissatisfaction. And on March 21, Missoula businessman about starting new things with grant roughly $140,000, or twice as much as the John Suprock ran an advertisement in the money,” she says. “They’re new, it’s excit- highest-paid teacher. Beers is not as vocal about the board’s Missoulian offering $10,000 to anyone who ing, but they’re difficult to maintain. What decision; he admits he doesn’t have all of sought to unseat MCPS trustees in the up- happens when the grant runs out?” Like Lorenzen, Beers is a Hellgate alum the information the trustees had when they coming election. Specifically, it stated, “Alex Must Go,” and “Let’s get some common who graduated in 2001. He says he is eager voted. But he did find himself confounded to give back to the system he credits with during a recent conversation with a comsense back on the School Board.” Now, with school board election bal- getting him to graduation. Beers was born munity member regarding something else lots due May 7, only four of the nine candi- with VACTERL association, a condition that that is on the school election ballot: roughly dates running for seats on the board are can cause limb defects and cardiovascular $800,000 in annual district technology incumbents. And in the most visible race anomalies. He says if not for the guidance levies. The community member asked Beers representing both the elementary and sec- and support of his teachers he’s not sure why the people of Missoula should have to pay for the increased funding while the suondary portions of the district, three of the where he would be. “On paper, I should not have suc- perintendent is about to make twice as five candidates—Diane Lorenzen, Michael Beers and Julie Tompkins—may represent ceeded. Whether because of disability, fam- much as the state’s governor. It made Beers the change Suprock and others have been ily income, being adopted—all these things wonder. are red flags,” he says. “But my teachers crying for. “If we needed more money to buy new Lorenzen graduated from Hellgate in went above and beyond. It took a village to broadband, why did we give Apostle a new 1979. She went to Stanford University be- get me to graduation.” salary?” he asks. “I think it’s a good question.” Beers does not portend to have anfore serving two years with the Peace Corps It’s one he soon hopes to answer. in Nepal. After living outside of Helena and swers—he admits to having little experiserving on the Jefferson County school ence in managing a school district—but he jrogers@missoulanews.com Since the Missoula County Public School board voted in January to award Superintendent Alex Apostle a 13 percent raise—eventually boosting his pay to $200,000 a year—members of the Missoula community have been finding ways to decry the decision. In late January, a Hellgate High School student started an online petition calling for Apostle to reject the money and for the entire board to be “re-evaluated” before the May election. To date, more than 2,000 people have signed. Then, in February and March, hundreds attended the public comment portions of school board

[8] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013

board, she and her family moved back to Missoula, where she has a daughter at Washington Middle School. Of all the problems facing MCPS today, she feels most stem from the fact that the district only “has a fixed amount of money, and if you put it in a program it has to come out of one.” But she says the current administration’s efforts to obtain grants from groups like the Dennis and Phyllis Washington Foundation to start new programs like Big Sky’s International Baccalaureate are short-term solutions with dubious longterm implications.


[news]

Pass/fail A look back at the 63rd Montana Legislature by Jessica Mayrer and Alex Sakariassen

The 2013 Montana Legislature officially adjourned April 24 after 87 days of lawmaking. And while the gavel fell on schedule, the past few months didn't always go smoothly. There was banging on desks and a senator gone missing. The session even came close to going into overtime on April 24, when the budget debate temporarily caused gridlock. Gov. Steve Bullock has hinted at calling everyone back into a special session to hash out Medicaid expansion. But for now, work in Helena has wrapped up. Here’s a closer look at some of the most notable debates of the past session. Abortion

HB 391, which requires “notarized written consent” from a parent if a minor seeks an abortion, passed both legislative chambers. But this fight ain’t over. Bullock, who is staunchly pro-choice, let the bill become law, setting the stage for an imminent legal challenge. Dark money

Bullock responded to unprecedented amounts of dark money in Montana’s 2012 electoral cycle by proposing a crackdown on its influence in state races. Sen. Jim Peterson, R-Buffalo, carried the measure, and while critics questioned increases in campaign contribution limits, the bill does restrict anonymity in electoral advertising and requires more transparency from campaigns and third-party groups. In the end, the House Judiciary Committee—chaired by Rep. Krayton Kerns, RLaurel—tabled SB 375, killing the bill. Aid in dying

End of life care again became a hotbutton issue in Helena as Kerns proposed imprisoning physicians for up to 10 years for prescribing life-ending medication to terminally ill patients. HB 505 passed the House in February. Missoula physician Eric Kress stepped up in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee as the first Montana doctor to admit he’d written such prescriptions, but the bill stalled. It was blasted to the Senate floor in mid-April, then failed to pass second reading. Voter suppression

Republicans launched another attack on same-day voter registration with a measure from Rep. Ted Washburn, R-Bozeman, seeking to eliminate the practice. Opponents of the bill testified that an estimated

28,000 Montana voters have registered on Election Day since 2005. Yet the GOP’s majority forced HB 30 past both the House and the Senate by early April. Bullock vetoed the bill April 22, but a separate referendum to close registration early passed both chambers. The issue now heads to voters on the 2014 ballot. Taprooms v. taverns

Rep. Roger Hagan, R-Great Falls, worried craft beer fanatics statewide with a proposal to require brewers to either purchase a new state license or restrict taproom sales to less than 40 percent of total production. The Montana Tavern Association lobbied for the bill. Hagan himself claimed taprooms have become de facto bars. An online petition to stop HB 616 attracted 1,943 signatures, and when Big Sky Brewing testified in favor of the measure, scores called for a boycott of the brewery. HB 616 eventually died without ever leaving committee. A separate resolution to study the state’s alcohol laws over the next two years also died on the House floor. Roadkill

HB 247, sponsored by Highway Patrol Sgt. and Rep. Steve Lavin, R-Kalispell, allowed law enforcement to issue permits for state residents to salvage dead deer, elk, moose or antelope from the side of the road. Proponents said the bill would save the state money in roadkill cleanup costs and generate food for the hungry. Opponents worried about foodborne illness. Everyone delivered at least one punch line before Bullock signed HB 247 into law April 3. Medicaid

Efforts to expand Medicaid to roughly 70,000 impoverished, uninsured Montanans failed—and failed in a spectacular fashion. SB 395, carried by Sen. David Wanzenried, D-Missoula, narrowly passed the Senate, but failed in the House. A similar measure, HB 623, stalled in the House, even after lawmakers scrambled to amend it by utilizing state funds to help low-income Montanans purchase private health insurance. House Speaker Mark Blasdel motioned to send HB 623 back to committee and Rep. Tom Jacobson, DGreat Falls, accidentally voted in favor of the motion. Jacobson’s vote afforded four Republicans time to change their minds and retract their support.

Youth homes

Rep. Ellie Hill, D-Missoula, sponsored HB 236, which would require private religious youth homes to obtain state licensure. Supporters included former Pinehaven Christian Children’s Ranch residents, who allege that they were physically abused at the St. Ignatius ranch and that state oversight is necessary to ensure resident safety. Ranch Director Bob Larsson opposed the bill, as did the Montana Family Foundation, which argued that HB 236 treads on religious freedoms. Republican lawmakers killed the bill. “I would not be surprised to see a class-action lawsuit,” Hill said.

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Beer Drinkers’ Profile Marteen, Jamin, Joey

Water wars

The Flathead Reservation’s Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes advocated on behalf of HB 636, which called for legislative support for a final agreement that would forever quantify how much water the tribes are entitled to under 158-yearold treaty promises. Opponents, including reservation irrigators, worried the agreement, called a water rights compact, would leave them with insufficient water. The legislature tabled the bill. CSKT has threatened to take the issue to court. Equality

Sen. Tom Facey, D-Missoula, introduced SB 107 to remove the portion of the state’s deviate sexual conduct code that classified homosexual sex as akin to bestiality. Social conservatives argued the bill would open the door to teaching gay sex in public schools. Proponents said the antiquated language fueled homophobia. Bullock signed the bill April 18 in front of a large crowd of LGBT supporters in the Capitol Rotunda, marking one of the session’s high points. editor@missoulanews.com

What brings you to the Iron Horse? We wanted to work on our long-term school project outside but it’s raining. I’m curious about the homework/beer connection. We’re convinced there’s a positive correlation between beer, creative ideas, and good grades. It looks like this: project stale; beer fresh. Beers of choice? Bud Light, Cold Smoke times two.

This Saturday make us your party HQ before and after BrewFest. AND visit our Halfway to Halloween Party 9 PM, with a DJ. Don’t forget your costume! Something New Is Always Happening At The Horse

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missoulanews.com • May 2 – May 9, 2013 [9]


[opinion]

Lasting impression Sen. Max Baucus’ public-land legacy is beyond reproach by Gabriel Furshong

When Montana Sen. Max Baucus announced last week that he would not seek a seventh term in 2014, Montanans instantly began debating his legacy. After nearly 35 years in the Senate and four in the House, Baucus’ reputation as a conservative Democrat who straddled party lines is well established, and his mediocre lifetime score of 68 percent from the League of Conservation Voters reflects his political history. Yet when Baucus released his priority list for his final 18 months in office, he promised to back legislation “to keep the Rocky Mountain Front the way it is for future generations.” Environmental critics shouldn’t be surprised, however, because when it comes to protecting Montana’s public lands, the senator has always been there. “Having worked with him closely in Montana, he really does love the land,” says Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society. “He really has made his mark in land conservation. That has been a consistent theme over his career.” In 1974, Baucus was elected to the U.S. House, representing Montana’s Western District. He won by walking 600 miles across the district from Yellowstone National Park to the Yaak River Valley. His first conservation victory came quickly, with the passage of a bill in 1975 that designated all three forks (219 river miles) of the Flathead River as part of the Wild and Scenic River System. After only four years in the House, Baucus was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1978. He was a steadfast supporter of wilderness in those early years, passing bills to create the Rattlesnake Wilderness and Recreation Area (32,976 acres) in 1980, and the Lee Metcalf Wilderness Area (259,000 acres) in 1983. He also helped pass a bill in 1988 that would have protected 1.43 million acres of wilderness if it hadn’t been pocket-vetoed by President Ronald Reagan. The political fallout from the failure of that bill was severe, and Montana’s congressional delegation failed to find consensus on

[10] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013

wilderness bills in the ’90s. The ensuing years were the most politically challenging of Baucus’ long career. In 1996, he narrowly avoided defeat at the hands of future Montana Congressman Dennis Rehberg, and from 1997 to 2006, he was the only Democrat elected to federal office in Montana. These years were a long, cold winter for conservation in Montana, with Baucus offering the only hope for a thaw. That thaw began with the election of Democratic newcomer Jon Tester over incumbent Republi-

“Maybe he’d like to retire before he, too, ends up voting from a wheelchair with the help of an aide.” can Sen. Conrad Burns in November 2006. During the lame duck session that year, Baucus managed to attach a rider to a large tax and finance bill, which withdrew over 400,000 acres of federal mineral leases along the Rocky Mountain Front. Two years later, he passed a bill securing $250 million in federal bonds to advance the Montana Legacy Project, a historic purchase of 310,000 acres of Plum Creek Timber lands in the Swan and Blackfoot river valleys. Baucus continued to make conservation a top priority after winning re-election easily in 2008. In January of 2011, he introduced the North Fork Protection Act to withdraw federal minerals leases from the North Fork Flathead River Watershed. In October, he introduced the Rocky Mountain Front Heritage Act, which would create 67,000 acres of new wilderness areas and include 208,000 acres

in a conservation management area. With $5 million dollars in the bank for the 2014 cycle, Baucus appeared ready to take on all comers. Then, on April 17, he made a controversial vote against the expansion of background checks for gun sales. The vote sparked heavy criticism, which some say triggered Baucus’ decision to resign days later. But there is another theory that might explain his decision, one that a senior Baucus staffer shared with me last week. On that April day, Baucus watched as Frank Lautenberg, the 89-year-old senator from New Jersey, cast his vote from a wheelchair. An aide had to lift Lautenberg’s hand to help him press the appropriate button. Baucus is now 71 and has spent over half his life in Congress. He’s cast nearly 12,000 votes. Maybe he’d like to retire before he, too, ends up voting from a wheelchair with the help of an aide. As he announced his resignation, Baucus declared that he wanted to continue serving Montana for the next year and half “unconstrained by the demands of a campaign.” “Then,” he said, “I want to come home and spend time with Mel, my son, Zeno, and our family, enjoying the Montana public lands we’ve fought hard to keep open and untarnished.” It will be many years before Montanans finally agree on the nature of Baucus’ legacy. But one thing is indisputable: He worked to protect well over a million acres of public land in Montana—all of it land that faced a very uncertain future when he first took office in 1973. When he and his family return home in the winter of 2014, I hope we can all agree to say, “Thanks, Max,” should we see him out on the trail. Gabriel Furshong is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). He lives in Missoula and works for the Montana Wilderness Association.


Vote by May 8

R

2013 OFFICIAL BEST OF MISSOULA BALLOT

Life consists of millions of tiny choices that determine who you are, how you live and for what you will be remembered. Some of these decisions are easy, others sorta hard and daunting and the type that leave you paralyzed at the thought of what could happen if you make one choice over another. Let’s keep this on the easy side of things. What if we told you that you could answer a bunch of questions that you already know the answers to—and your answers could help fuel Missoula’s biggest celebration of the year? Sound good? Well, luck would have it that we have a Best of Missoula ballot right here. All we’re looking for is your opinion about what makes our city so great. Easy, right? And if you get on a roll and figure you’d like to answer a few more questions, we have even more categories listed on our online ballot at missoulanews.com. All of your focus and dedication comes with a reward, of course. The Independent’s annual Best of Missoula Party at Caras Park takes place Thursday, July 11, and we’d like you to join us. There’ll be live music, food and drinks as we toast your votes and honor this year’s winners. Okay, now get to the ballot. Filling it out will be the best decision you make all day.

Best Local Arts & Entertainment Art Gallery Band Musician Photographer Writer Movie Theater

Best Local Fashion & Beauty Cosmetics Day Spa Jewelry Kids' Clothing Women’s Clothing Men’s Clothing Lingerie Place for a Men’s Haircut Place for a Women’s Haircut Shoe Store Tattoo Parlor Thrift Store

Ice Cream Milk Shake Mexican Food Pizza Restaurant New Restaurant Family-Friendly Restaurant Restaurant Service Restaurant Wine List Outdoor Dining Romantic Dining Salad Sandwich Shop Seafood Steak Supermarket Retail Beer Selection Retail Wine Selection Vegetarian Food Wings

Appetizers Asian Food Bakery Breakfast Budget Lunch Coffee Delicatessen Burger French Fries Desserts

Auto Repair Bank/Credit Union Big Box Store Bookstore CDs and Music Dry Cleaner Furniture Store Hobby/Craft Shop Lodging Motorcycle/ATV Dealer New Car Dealer

Consider this the fine print: We require ballots to include your full name, e-mail address and phone number in the spaces provided. Ballots missing any of this information, or ballots with fewer than 40 categories filled in, will be mocked, ridiculed and not counted. Same goes for photocopied ballots and ballots with unclear markings. Hard-copy ballots may be mailed or hand-delivered to the Indy office at 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or dropped at any of the ballot locations listed below. Ballots must be received by Wednesday, May 8, by 5 p.m.

New Retail Store Adult Store Pet Supplies Plant Nursery Ranch Supply Store Store for Gifts Home Appliances Home Electronics Store for Musical Instruments Toy Store

Best Local Nightlife Bar Bar Food Bar for a Stiff Pour Beer Selection Bloody Mary Margarita Martini Casino Happy Hour Karaoke Bar Microbrewery Place to Dance Place to Hear Live Music Pool Table Sports Bar

Best Local Goods & Services Best Local Food & Drink

Used Car Dealer

Best Local Sports & Recreation Bike Shop Bowling Alley Fly-fishing Shop Golf Course Health Club Store for Paddle Sports Gear Place to Get a Snowboard Sporting Goods Store for Guns Store for Mountaineering Gear Store for Skis

Name:________________________________________ Email: ________________________________________ Phone: ______________________________________

Ballot Box Locations: Bagels on Broadway, Bernice's Bakery, Bridge Pizza, Brooks & Browns Downtown, Buttercup Market, Butterfly Herbs, Doc’s Sandwich Shop, Draught Works Brewery, Flathead Lake Brewing, Go Fetch! (all locations), Food for Thought, Good Food Store, Iza Asian Restaurant, Kettlehouse, Orange Street Food Farm, Press Box, Rockin Rudy's, Sushi Hana, Taco del Sol (all 3 locations), Taco Sano, The Trail Head, UC Center Market, Westside Lanes, Worden's Market missoulanews.com • May 2 – May 9, 2013 [11]


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CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - After someone broke into a church in St. Charles, Mo., and stole an undetermined amount of ice cream from a freezer, police spotted Andrew Steven Jung, 24, three blocks away, with ice cream all over his face and clothing. Jung told officers he was an “ice cream junkie.” (St. Louis Post-Dispatch) A mother and daughter with a baby in a stroller tried to avoid paying full fare on the Philadelphia subway by sharing a day pass intended for only one person. They went to the 60th Street Station, where the cashier punched the pass and allowed the daughter to enter. The mother then went to the 56 th Street Station and used the pass. When the two women met up at the next station, neither had the baby. According to transit official Heather Redfern, both women assumed when they split up that the other one had taken the child. The women notified transit police, who reunited them with the child and declined to cite the pair for violating the day-pass rule. (Philadelphia Daily News)

THE THRILL IS GONE - Inspired by a YouTube video of thrill-seekers swinging through arch and canyon openings, Kyle Lee Stocking, 22, tried to swing from the top of Utah’s 140-foot-high Corona Arch. Stocking died, Grand County sheriff’s Lt. Kim Neal reported, because he made the rope too long, and when he “swung under the arch, he struck the ground.” (The Salt Lake Tribune) LAW MAKERS - Montreal police arrested some 300 people protesting a city law against demonstrating without first providing police an itinerary of the protest route. The police charged the demonstrators with violating the law they were protesting by failing to notify authorities of their route. (Canada’s QMI Agency) Prodded by the meat and poultry industries, state legislators nationwide are introducing laws making it harder for animal-welfare advocates to investigate cruelty and food-safety cases. Measures in Indiana, Arkansas and Pennsylvania, for example, would outlaw videotaping agricultural operations. Iowa already made it illegal to deny belonging to an animal-welfare organization when applying for a farm job. Other bills are pending in California, Nebraska and Tennessee. The force behind this legislative agenda, whose purpose, Paul Shapiro, vice president of farm animal protection for the Humane Society of the United States, insisted, “is to prevent any pattern of abuse from being documented,” is the American Legislative Exchange Council. It labels those who interfere with animal operations “terrorists” and titled the California bill the “Animal and Ecological Terrorist Act,” although an ALEC official admitted “Freedom to Farm Act” would’ve sounded better. (Associated Press) Lawmakers in Mississippi, the most obese state in the nation, overwhelmingly approved an “antiBloomberg bill,” which bans communities from requiring restaurants to post calorie counts on menus or limit portion sizes. State Sen. Tony Smith, who owns a chain of barbecue joints, said he introduced the measure because government has no business telling people what they cannot eat. “If I want fried fish,” he declared, “that’s my right.” (New York’s Daily News)

LITIGATION NATION - Richard and Melinda Armstrong sued the U.S. Forest Service for more than $1 million after a large dead tree at a remote campsite in the Boise National Forest fell and injured their 6year-old son. The Idaho couple accused the Forest Service of negligence for not removing the tree. (Associated Press) Larry Shandola, 62, a Canadian man serving a 31-year sentence in a Washington state prison for a 1995 murder, sued the victim’s widow, blaming her for persuading corrections officials to deny his transfer to a Canadian prison by placing him “in a false light.” Shandola is seeking $100,000 in damages from Paula Henry. Calling the suit a ploy to harass and torment Henry, her lawyer, John Ladenburg, said he doesn’t expect it to get very far in court but lamented, “He wins by costing her money.” (Canada’s The National Post)

HELP A BROBOT OUT - A new web-based informational database for robots by robots provides advice that helps robots simplify complex tasks. Designed by European researchers who created RoboEarth, “a World Wide Web for robots,” the open-source robotics platform Rapyuta lets robots move their heavy computations into the cloud. It catalogs situations and objects that robots have encountered so other robots can access the information instead of having to build up their databases from scratch. Project leader Mohanarajah Gajamohan said that by decreasing the power needed for on-board computation, Rapyuta could make robots cheaper, longer running and more mobile. (BBC News) MORE EQUAL THAN OTHERS - Rich Russians hoping to avoid Moscow’s notorious traffic jams are paying upwards of $200 an hour to ride in emergency vehicles that use their sirens to scatter traffic in their path. The newspaper Izvestiya reported that when police stopped one of these “ambulance taxis” for violating traffic rules, they discovered “that the interior was fitted out like a high-class limousine with comfortable seats for transporting VIP passengers.” (Britain’s The Daily Telegraph) MOTHER OF THE YEAR - After Leticia Silva, 31, was jailed in Florida for drug possession and lost custody of her daughters, authorities said she mailed the girls, ages 7 and 9, a knife from jail with instructions to murder their paternal grandparents, with whom they live in Greenville, N.C. The grandmother found the knife under one of the girl’s pillows and took the girls to the Pitt County Sheriff’s Office, where they told investigators of their mother’s instructions. A friend, Mary Snell, said regaining custody of her daughters was Silva’s “one goal in life.” (Tampa Bay’s WFLA-TV)

BADDER BUSINESS BUREAU - Authorities charged David Kitzki with setting fire to his house in Mequon, Wis. Kitzki, who owns his own fire-inspection business, told investigators he put a lit cigarette in a garbage can to see how long it would take to start a fire and then for the smoke detectors to go off, but it started burning out of control and he was unable to put it out himself. (Milwaukee’s WISN-TV)

DRINKING-CLASS HEROES - After police charged a 27-year-old man with impaired driving in Innisfil, Ontario, he called his mother to take him home. When the 53-year-old woman showed up a couple of hours later, the officer who arrested her son smelled alcohol on her and gave her a Breathalyzer test. She failed and was charged with impaired driving. (The Canadian Press)

[12] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013


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Y

ou can’t swing a bushel of nettles in this town without hitting the front stoop of some newly opened restaurant. We count 12 since last fall, with five setting up shop within a few downtown blocks in the span of three weeks. That’s a lot of fresh grub to wrap your head around—or mouth, as the case may be—and it could lead to a few worthy establishments slipping through the cracks, like that dropped french fry you find under the car seat four months after your cross-state road trip. We’re here to make sure you don’t lose any one of those delicious fries, so to speak. What we mean is, we’re here to fill you in on all of the new eateries so that you can fill up. Consider this your culinary cheat-sheet, a savory scouting report, a fully vetted, Indy-style rundown of restaurants that have opened since last fall. ( Yes, last fall. We had to create some sort of cutoff or else we’d still be eating.) The whole experience not only made us hungry, but also appreciative of Missoula’s ever-expanding edible offerings. With great opportunities to dine out come

great responsibilities, so we’ve added some helpful hints on dining etiquette, as well as cautionary tales from members of our newsroom lucky enough to work in the local food service industry. So, dig in. Find a new place. Experiment with different types of cuisine. Support a new business. Just make sure the first thing you say when you stroll up to the counter is not, “So, what’s good here?” You’ll learn why on the opposite page.

Cafe Rio Opened: November 2012 Where it’s at: 2230 N. Reserve St., Ste. 100 What it’s about: This Mexican chain restaurant touts the fact that there are no freezers or microwaves in its kitchens, and that everything—from the guacamole to the corn tortillas—is handmade. Signature dish: Cafe Rio offers the usual array of Mexican food, from tacos to burritos to quesadillas. It’s hard to go wrong with a pork barbacoa burrito slathered in enchilada sauce ($8.75).

Recommendation: If you feel like tormenting employees, order the nachos. That’s all it takes to hear the staff break out into “Nacho Man” to the tune of “Macho Man.” Dickey’s Barbecue Pit Opened: April Where it’s at: 143 W. Broadway What it’s about: This Texas-based chain, which started in Dallas in 1941, smokes its meats overnight. The Missoula location becomes downtown’s first official barbecue joint. Signature dish: The chopped brisket sandwich with sides comes in at $7.99. Recommendation: Dickey’s includes a full bar and stays open way past last call on weekends—3 a.m., to be exact—making it one of downtown’s few late-night sit-

down options. If you’re anything like us, the whole menu tastes good at this point. Five On Black Opened: April Where it’s at: 325 N. Higgins Ave. What it’s about: Tom Snider, a 24year-old University of Montana finance graduate, opened this Brazilian-inspired “fast casual” joint based on a business proposal he put together in school. The cuisine focuses on stews and sides in a “build your own bowl” format. Signature dish: Feijoada, a Brazilian stew with black beans, bacon, sausage and beef chunks ($5-$8, depending on bowl size). Recommendation: With bases like rotisserie-cooked beef, chicken, roasted vegetables and several toppings to choose from, you have no reason to not get a little

Q: Do you tip for carry-out—and if so, what’s the proper amount? A: Yes, no matter what, according to everyone we spoke with. The answer of what to tip ranges from 10 to 20 percent. “Ten percent for to-go, even at Subway,” says Tao Rohitsathain at Sa Wad Dee. “That’s what I do.”

THE DISH ON MISSOULA’S RECENT RUSH OF NEW RESTAURANTS by Independent staff • photos by Cathrine L. Walters

Romaines

[14] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013


Q: There’s a problem. What’s the safest way to send back your food? A: All that talk of the kitchen taking out its frustrations on your sentback burger is a bunch of bologna. “You just talk about it. You never do it,” says one chef. The key is to politely communicate with your server. Lauren Ramundo at The Shack Cafe says there’s often an easy remedy and the restaurant would always prefer not to send you home grumbling. “Things happen— toast isn’t toasted enough, you miss the butter … and eggs are eggs,” she says, referencing that people are particular about the latter. adventurous with your flavors. The coconut-milk-roasted sweet potatoes are toothsome. Try pairing your bowl with an imported Brazilian soda, like Guarana Antartica, that you won’t likely find anywhere else in town. Einstein’s Bagel Bros Opened: January Where it’s at: 150 W. Broadway What it’s about: Mainly East Coast-style bagels. They also serve sandwiches, salads and bagel dogs, plus coffee and espresso. Part of a national chain, but locally owned by the same family that ran Mullan Station. Signature dish: Toasted everything bagel with a healthy schmear and a cup of Neighborhood Blend coffee ($4.50). Recommendation: Grab a baker’s dozen of bagels with two containers of cream cheese and a coffee carrier to go— they call it “Joe to go”—and become the hero of the office or your apartment (about $31).

Five On Black

GoodieVille Opened: December 2012 Where it’s at: 2700 Paxson St., Ste. M, next to Southgate Mall What it’s about: GoodieVille bills itself as Missoula’s only entirely gluten-free bakery, but also offers a full breakfast, lunch and dinner menu full of both standard and vegan options. Signature dish: A front counter stocked with baked goods—doughnuts, cupcakes, loaves of sorghum and brown rice sandwich bread, etc.—attracts the most attention. From the breakfast menu, look for the biscuits and sausage gravy ($6) or vegan biscuits and mushroom gravy (also $6). Recommendation: You know that friend or coworker who always reminds you of their gluten intolerance and/or vegan lifestyle? Now you’ve got somewhere to take them for lunch where they can dig into a 12-inch vegan pizza ($12) while you enjoy a heaping roast beef sandwich with lettuce, tomato, mayo and gouda ($6.50 cold, $7.50 hot).

What’s good here? A tale about more than just Costco pretzel rolls by Jason McMackin I’m going to tell you something you already know: You and I do not share a mouth. Each of us has our own tongue, cheeks and teeth. And that’s part of what makes us special, makes us individuals. Regardless of that obvious fact, when customers come into the restaurant I work at and own, people regularly step up to the counter, briefly scan the menu, smile and ask, “What’s good here?” Indeed, what is good here? At the point the question is asked, my mood is not part of the answer. I can’t tell you what you would like to eat. Maybe your tongue is a limp, pallid thing because you smoke cheap cigars all day and eat sardines in mustard sauce for breakfast. Or maybe I’m the one who does those things. Or maybe you’re too lazy to read a menu with 12 items on it. I’m unsure if it’s pride or arrogance that makes me get upset when I’m confronted by this query. At our bistro, we get up early. We scratch-make all of our food. We buy as many local and fresh supplies as we can. We take pride in what we do. What really steams me is that when I give the customer the look that says, “C’mon, dude, don’t ask me that,” and the customer inevitably says, “I know, all of it.” The contentiousness usually ends once the customer answers his own question. My blood pressure dips 10 points and we end up sharing a nice conversation about how you can’t get a good fried bologna sandwich these days. We start to trust one another. Hell, we may even come to call each other acquaintances, if not friends. Sometimes, though, things don’t turn out so nicely.

Like many other local restaurants, my bistro vends food at Downtown ToNight. The event takes place on Thursday evenings throughout the summer. There are bands playing a lot of reggae, a lot of Creedence and way too much “Devil with a Blue Dress On.” For the food vendors, the weekly grind of hauling cooking and serving gear to Caras Park can make even the most positive people a bit cantankerous. Factor in the sun, the wind blowing your sporks onto the concrete and a crowd that might have had a few too many and you’ve got the makings for a hullaballoo. By trade I am a baker, but at Downtown ToNight I work mainly as a cashier. I’ll chitchat with the tourists who stop by our spot and ask where the ATM is. I’ll make change for people even if they’re not buying anything. I’ll send folks to our competition because we won’t sell bottled water. On one particular day a woman in her 60s stood a few feet from our menu board. Her nose scrunched and her lips moved as she read. Her husband stood nearby, wearing a Panama hat. I knew they were trouble before they even stepped in front of me. “Is this all you have?” he asked. “Yes.” I began to chew on my tongue. “Do you have bottled water?” he asked. I told him we have what was on the menu but that the vendors across from us had bottled water. He seemed satisfied. I was relieved. Certainly we could both go on with our day without incident. Then his wife appeared by his side, hand held to her forehead, possibly in salute to me. “What’s a pretzel roll?” she asked.

I described the pretzel bread we use on our pulled-pork sandwiches. I get up at 4 a.m. to make that bread. I hand-roll each ball of dough, sometimes 200 of them in a morning. The bread is gorgeous and it’s delicious. “Oh, you got those at Costco,” she said. My partner and I laughed. I explained to her that we bake all our own bread. “No, no, I saw them there, these are from Costco.” She reached for a roll to pick it up as if waving one in my face would prove her case. Using my eyes, I convinced her that picking up a roll would be a huge mistake. The air got hotter. The breeze quit. This was her chance to agree with me and order some food. Instead, she said, “These are definitely from Costco.” My partner sensed the tension and busied himself nearby. “I make every goddamned one of these, okay,” I said. The woman moved off.

There were other customers in line, some laughing, some mortified. Admittedly, I could have gone a different direction with the exchange, but I felt like making a stand for all of us who work in the service industry, for all of us who’ve ever been disrespected (or at least thought they were). The husband stood in front of me looking anxious, like this wasn’t the first time he’d been in this situation. He pulled out his wallet and held it in front of his belly. He ordered something. I stared right over his head. He waved the money a bit to get my attention. I folded my arms. I deliberately blinked my eyes slowly, exuding the bored indifference of a good bouncer. He finally walked away. The next guy in line walked up, shook his head and with a keen wit said, “Where do you get your bread, Costco?”

missoulanews.com • May 2 – May 9, 2013 [15]


Wiener war

Q: Is it true that you shouldn’t order a restaurant’s special on a Monday, because that’s when they’re clearing out leftovers?

The customer is always right, even when they’re not

A: False. Most restaurants we spoke with denied this is an issue. “I think that’s kind of a myth,” says Caitlin Cast, a cook at Sushi Hana.

by Jamie Rogers “The customer is always right” is a meaningless adage that not only damages the psyches of service industry workers worldwide, but is utterly irrelevant in the realm of hotdog vending. A well-chopped onion, a softly steamed bun, an all-beef wiener that has been cooked just until the ends split—these are essential components, but what really makes a meh hotdog a pow hotdog has more to do with the attitudinal thrust with which the dog was served than the culinary precision with which it was prepared. Think about the best wiener towns in the world: In New York, vendors talk on their Bluetooths as they fish another Sabrett from a vat of greasy water. In Chicago, they refuse you service if you order a dog with ketchup. In other words, the crux of successful hotdog vending is forcing the customer to realize the product is so quality that it doesn’t matter how he or she is treated during the transaction. When I used to sling

wieners, I believed deeply that my meat was the best meat and that by making it available to the public I was doing the community a solid of unthinkable altruism. This is to say that in hotdog vending the customer is rarely, if ever, right. Of course, this service philosophy has its dangers. Three summers ago I was manning the hotdog stand on the corner of Main St. and Higgins Ave., when one of our regulars, a 9-year-old boy whose mom owned a nearby retail business—call him Sam—came to get a jumbo doused with ketchup. This was his typical order. (In my opinion, there are two ways to avoid ridicule for ordering ketchup on a hotdog: 1) You are prepubescent or 2) You ask for such an unreasonable amount of ketchup that your preference goes from being sacrilegious to plain shocking. This kid had both going for him.) After we chitchatted for a moment about the things 23year-old hotdog vendors and 9-year-old boys chitchat about, he scampered back down the block to his mom’s shop. Less than three minutes later Sam’s mom returned his hotdog. She asked if he could get another one. “Like you want to return that one?” I asked, pointing at the foil-wrapped jumbo she clutched in her hands. She explained that it was different than usual. “It’s soggy,” she said. I agreed with her. The hotdog was soggy. You could even say it was very soggy. Sogginess is unavoidable when you put the equivalent of 35 packets of ketchup on a tube of steamed meat and then wrap it in tin foil. As I explained this to her, the conversation ran away from me. I could see in her eyes that this was no longer about the wiener. She paused, and I remember this vividly: She turned her head and stared into the middle of the street and the pass-

ing traffic and seemed to consider her options. Certainly, this conversation was unnecessary—you might call it a shamefully First World confrontation. But then she placed the hotdog on the top of my stand and said, “You know what, I have enough going on in my life. I don’t need this.” She stomped away, before returning immediately, towing her son in hand. She marched right past my stand again and crossed the street to buy Sam a sandwich. Until that day Sam’s mom bought at least one soda from our stand every day. Sam had at least two hotdogs a week. After that day, and for nearly two years following, she did not make a single transaction with me or my partner, Casey. No dogs, no soda, not even eye contact or nods of acknowledgment. As someone who at the beginning of this story extolled the importance of swagger in wiener slinging, it is only fair I note I also

have an at-times paralyzing phobia of confrontation. I didn’t think she was right—she was definitely wrong—but I came away feeling like the whole scene was needlessly dramatic, maybe even a little hurtful, especially to Sam. I wonder if he’s had a hotdog since. In preparation for writing this article, I went to see Sam’s mom at her shop, which she still runs downtown. I parked my bike outside and felt a bit anxious. The incident was a long time ago, and clearly we have both moved on, but I had pissed her off so much she refused to acknowledge me every day for nearly two hotdog vending seasons. I walked into the store, which was empty save for her. The shop was clean, well-stocked and smelled like cooked onions. “What can I do for you?” she asked. She didn’t seem to recognize me. I explained I used to sell hotdogs down the street. Her eyes widened and said, “Oh yeah!” I told her I now work as a writer, and I was doing a story about the service industry. She just nodded, and I felt stupid enough to keep talking. “Well, I guess I’m just writing about how little things can become big things for no reason. Like buying hotdogs …” She nodded. I told her about the day she returned the hotdog and about how she never patronized the stand again. She kept nodding, laughed a little, and walked behind the counter. She told me she didn’t remember the incident, but that Sam was 12 now and could I believe that? Then she picked something up off the counter that smelled like onions. She folded back the wrapper and took a bite as she seemed to consider the conversation I was trying to have with her. It looked like a gyro.

[16] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013

Masala Indian Food Cart Opened: Fall 2012 Where it’s at: Depends, because it’s a cart, but track it via Facebook or by calling 406-370-9407 What it’s about: This seasonal cart sets up at events, markets and brewery sidewalks to offer Indian dishes like red lentil curry and grilled lamb with masala rub. The cart’s chef and owner, Theodore Smith, is spending this spring traveling in India and blogging about it at theodoressmith.wordpress.com. Signature dish: It’s hard to go wrong with dishes you won’t find on many other menus in town, like chickpea curry or pork vindaloo ($5-$8). Recommendation: In late summer, the grilled corn on the cob with Flathead cherry chutney offers a new take on a familiar Montana treat ($1-$2). Plonk Missoula Opened: April Where it’s at: 322 N. Higgins Ave. What it’s about: After successfully opening a Bozeman version of this upscale wine bar and restaurant, owner Brett Evje brought the concept to Missoula. Signature dish: The menu includes vegetarian options, but carnivores will find the most to love here. The seared scallops appetizer ($16) balances a tender inside with a perfectly seared outside, and is topped with buttery foie gras and wisps of crispy shallots. For an entree, the adobo-rubbed chicken ($18) with black bean cake, corn salsa and bacon lardons offers a similar contrast of textures, with a perfect hit of spice. Recommendation: It’s more difficult to accommodate groups, but Plonk’s twoseat tables make for a intimate dining ex-

perience. Plan to dress up (in Missoula, that means jeans without holes and your best hoodie) and enjoy a romantic evening. Romaines Opened: January Where it’s at: 3075 N. Reserve, Ste. N, in the Grant Creek Town Center What it’s about: Craving greens? Romaines offers soups, sandwiches and an extensive salad bar, with an emphasis on local ingredients. Signature dish: With more than 30 toppings available for salads, let your imagination run wild. Or order one of the signature salads ($5.50-$7), like the basic Caesar, Greek, Asian or Popeye’s Delight (with spinach, bacon bits, hard boiled egg, mushrooms and candied walnuts). Recommendation: Where else are you going to get some fresh—maybe even healthy—fare while running errands on Reserve? Forego the Costco hot dog for once and get some greens. Craving man food? Try a braised beef sandwich with a side salad ($8.50). Riverside Cafe Opened: September 2012 Where it’s at: 247 W. Front St. What it’s about: This cafe offers artisanal twists on familiar classics. Hardcore foodies might even come across something new, like the carrot root sformato sandwich with roasted apples, caramelized onions and parmesan. (Sformato is a vegetable-based Italian dish similar to a soufflé.) Signature dish: Riverside really puts an emphasis on seasonal ingredients, doing most of its shopping at the farmers’

Q: Is there anything more awkward than the tipping situation with those flip-over iPad checkout thingies? A: If you’ve ever been to El Diablo or a few other local restaurants, you know what we’re talking about: At checkout, the cashier flips over an iPad that asks if you want to tip 10, 15 or 20 percent, customize your tip or skip the tip altogether. We’re in favor of generous tips, but for some this system triggers an uncomfortable moment of pressure and fear of under- or over-tipping. El Diablo counterperson Jenna Beck says not to worry. The new technology initially surprised some customers—“everyone’s was definitely amazed by it”—but they eventually get used to it. Tip a buck for a burrito and you’ll be just fine.


markets and constantly rotating its menu. In early spring, the menu includes a lentilwalnut burger ($9) topped with beet relish, grilled frisee, radish and roasted garlic mayonnaise. Recommendation: The Chef ’s Lunch ($15-$17) includes a microbrew or wine, sandwich and side, with a selection that rotates every week. Top Hat Opened: March (although technically it’s a re-open) Where it’s at: 137 W. Front St. What it’s about: The venerated downtown music venue and bar reopened in March with a slick remodel and full kitchen that offers small plates, or tapas, during low-key dinner shows, which usually feature a local acoustic singer/songwriter. Think salads, manchego-cheese-filled cro-

quettes, red-pepper hummus and calamari. Signature dish: The stone-fired flatbreads ($7-$8), which arrive on a wooden paddle branded with the Top Hat logo, include accoutrements like roasted wild mushrooms, serrano ham and goat cheese or roasted garlic, spinach, manchego and tomato. Recommendation: Long may the bleu-cheese-stuffed, bacon-wrapped dates reign on the menu ($5). Treasure State Donuts Opened: April Where it’s at: 400 E. Broadway What it’s about: Handmade doughnuts with creative twists, like huckleberry glazes. You may have read about it in our 3,000-word ode to doughnuts when they opened. Signature dish: Glazed yeast doughnut (about $1.25)

Recommendation: Get there early. Doughnut-hungry masses stood in line at 6 a.m. on its opening day, and after a few days, Treasure State shut down to install more equipment and hire another shift. The shop is still plenty popular today. Flathead Lake Brewing Company of Missoula Opened: February (although technically it’s a re-open) Where it’s at: 424 N. Higgins Ave. What it’s about: The Woods Baybased brewery closed its Missoula location last fall after a plumbing leak damaged part of the second floor and most of the first floor, which was formerly the separately owned Sapore restaurant. It reopened early this spring as a three-floor complex, with the Imperial Lounge offering fine dining on the first floor, the Pub

Q: Is substituting items a jerk move? What about ordering off the menu? A: James Bar server Kelly Fullerton says it’s okay to ask for menu substitutions—or even order something that’s not listed—as long as you accept the fact that the restaurant can’t always make the desired changes. “As long as you have realistic expectations,” she says. Others were less forgiving, especially about ordering off the menu. “Trust the people cooking your food,” says one local chef. “You’re eating out for a reason.” House focusing on beers and burgers on the second, and the Galaxy Lounge providing killer views on the third. Signature dish: All the signature Flathead Lake beers, like the Two Rivers Pale Ale and Dirty Ginger, are still here. The revamped brewpub menu focuses on sandwiches and burgers, like the Imperial Burger ($11) with soppressata, pickled peppers and provolone.

Recommendation: Order some beer battered pickles ($4) and pork belly bites ($7) to share with the team during Wednesday trivia night, and wash it all down with the new $2.50 pint special. If you’re looking to class it up downstairs, try the Imperial Lounge’s pan-roasted dates topped with pancetta and almonds ($8) and the Oliver’s Twist pizza with merlot-soaked grapes ($14).

Being a better regular Bartenders serve up advice on how to properly belly up by Alex Sakariassen Just another slow Monday night at the Golden Rose in downtown Missoula, and famed bartender Claude Alick busies himself cracking cans of beer and mixing vodka Red Bulls. The jukebox blasts a mix of ’70s-era funk. Heads bob, feet tap. The handful of patrons bellied up to the bar may as well be listening to tunes at home. “What you having, Alex?” Claude asks, flashing a pearly grin. I ask for a beer. Claude reaches into the cooler for a PBR tallboy. He doesn’t bother to ask if I want him to run my card or keep a tab open. Normally I’d be here for an escape, or, on a late summer Sunday, to catch the next episode of AMC’s hit series “Breaking Bad,” which Claude gladly screened for a few of us Rose veterans every week last season. But tonight I’m here with a very specific question: How can I, as a patron, make a bartender’s night better? Claude doesn’t hesitate with his initial answer. “Tip heavily,” he says. I’m looking for something more, something that can inform Missoula as a whole on what really sets off the guys and gals pouring our favorite drinks. “Not acting like a child is a big thing,” says the guy on my right, a bartender from another popular local establishment who agreed to talk candidly with me on the condition of anonymity. For my purposes here, I’ll call him Tyrion. “When people get drunk, they’re like children,” Tyrion continues. “And bartending is basically a practice in babysitting adults.” I can’t help feeling embarrassed by the comment. Over the years, I’ve certainly acted like a child while cutting loose. I’ve danced on bars, had friends 86’d from various establishments, forgotten to tip. But the wild stories have become fewer and further between since college. It’s occurred to me that, while I might have fun acting like an idiot now and then, someone else is paying for that idiocy. “Missoula likes to get fucked up,” Tyrion says, adding that people here tend to party even harder than the Midwest metropolitan area where he grew up. “Honestly, I think Missoula has a problem with that.” Tyrion recalls one particularly irritating incident. A young, drunk woman began dancing on chairs—something that, for her safety more than anyone else’s, Tyrion needed to put a stop to. When she refused the first few polite requests to sit down, Tyrion had to gently coax her off the chair. She complied, but it really put a crimp in Tyrion’s night. “Bartenders can tell when you’re on drugs,” he says, adding that alcohol was clearly not the only factor in this woman’s behavior. “And they will stop serving you when you’re messed up.” I turn to Claude and ask about buying shots for bartenders. It happens a lot around Missoula, and patrons seem to think it’s a hip thing to do by way of a “thank you.” “I always say, buying a bartender a shot is a bit like buying a whore a piece of ass,” Claude says, laughing. Tyrion adds that, while it may feel cool, getting a bartender a drink really isn’t. It can actually be kind

of annoying, he says. Depending on the bar, it can even get someone in trouble. So what makes a bartender happy? Lots of stuff. Clearing glasses off your table can ease the night, particularly at bars that don’t have a bar-back. Calming down angry or emotional friends is a big plus—stepping in early can prevent a fight from breaking out, and keeps the bartender from having to get involved. “There are people who get drunk and get into fights,” Claude says. “Why? That’s ridiculous. Drink and laugh. You paid for it.” It’s no easy job standing behind the bar. Bartenders have to learn when to stop serving folks who are visibly intoxicated. And the job gets extremely emotional too. Patrons—particularly regulars—tend to share really tough stories, Tyrion says. In that sense, bartenders are almost like psychologists. And if there’s one thing Claude hates more than anything, it’s inhospitable people working in the hospitality industry. He goes so far as to equate the relationship between a bartender and a patron to that of a doctor and a patient. “It’s all about confidentiality,” he says. In other words, there’s a trust that goes both ways.

So why do it? Why subject oneself to the name calling, the broken glasses, the fights and the drama? “When it’s a good job, it’s fun,” Tyrion says. “When it’s a pain in the ass, you’re a babysitter. But as a bartender, you feel like the life of the party. You’re the host.” It doesn’t hurt that the pay plus tips is good enough to work three and a half days a week and still make rent, he adds. For Claude, the motivation to sling beers extends to all aspects of life. He enjoys getting to know people on a first-name basis, for one, he says while sliding another PBR in my direction. And working nights enables him to spend his days writing, golfing and hanging out with his son. “I feel like this is my purpose.” I couldn’t agree more. Not many bartenders would host a “Breaking Bad” viewing party for eight straight Sundays and spend every hour talking plot points. “Everything in a bar is constant,” Claude says. “The chairs, the bottles, the jukebox … The personality of the bartender, that’s the variable.” I close out my tab, making sure to take Claude’s advice. I tip heavily.

missoulanews.com • May 2 – May 9, 2013 [17]


[arts]

Just hanging out. Canadian dancer Roxi Dlite stars in Burlesque Assassins as Bourbon Sue.

All the right moves Burlesque Assassins and the fun of camp by Kate Whittle

I

n the beginning of Burlesque Assassins, a tattooed dancer wearing gold pasties and a lit candelabra on her head undulates in a theater, practicing her act. But backstage is where the real action is: A man gets killed via knife through the eyeball, and a Russian woman is in the middle of interrogating a Nazi (while having sex with him on a chair) when he is shot in the head. And that’s just the first five minutes. “Seduce and destroy” is the motto of Burlesque Assassins, the distinctly campy independent film that’s showing at the Crystal Theatre May 3 and 4. In the post-World War II setting, sultry resistance fighters are trying to track down a “Nazi Atomic Death Ray” before their Cold War enemies do. Our heroine, Bourbon Sue (played by real-life award-winning dancer Roxi DLite), a fiesty rockabilly chick who beats up men outside bars for money, is recruited to join the Burlesque Assassins and prove herself. It’s not historically accurate by any means: Benito Mussolini Jr.

and a clone of Hitler hang out together in a dance hall and argue about drinks. Burlesque Assassins nods to a long-standing tradition of films that tease audiences by being so bad they’re good. It’s the first feature-length film from Calgary-based director Jonathan Joffe, who’s proud to reference Ed Wood, Rocky Horror Picture Show and Russ Meyer with his work. “Film can be a wonderful means of expressing very deep things, and that’s great,” he says in a recent phone interview. “But first and foremost, when I go to a movie, I want to have fun.” Campy films, like watching an exotic dance performance, are an escape from life’s seriousness. They transport us to places where anything can happen, no matter how outlandish. Joffe says in real life, subcultures like burlesque, cosplay and roller derby let people explore other realities. “Wouldn’t it be great if life was an adventure just like it is in a movie?” he says. The actors in Burlesque Assassins chew the scenery—sometimes literally, as with the continually cigar-

[18] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013

chomping assassin leader Johnny Valentine (played by cabaret legend Armitage Shanks). The film’s pacing suffers a bit, with punchlines lingering just a beat too long, and the fight scenes don’t land many visual punches. But the several dances in the film are captivating examples of what a fine art burlesque can be. From raunchy to funny to flat-out smoking hot, the performances celebrate sensuality, the agility of the human body and the fun of playing dress-up. Meg Hansen, who performs as Stella Pearl with Missoula’s Cigarette Girls, says when the filmmaker invited the troupe to host a Burlesque Assassins screening, it seemed like a way to celebrate the diversity of burlesque. “For a lot of people in Missoula, we kind of defined burlesque for them,” she says. “And there’s this whole big giant world out there, there’s so many avenues and interpretations of the art form.” In her own act, Hansen likes to play a goofy, clumsy persona. “You get the opportunity to become

a character,” she says. She thinks burlesque’s appeal lies in being inclusive and accessible. The Cigarette Girls include women of many sizes, and they perform styles ranging from classic ’50s-pin-up to neo-gothic. “It’s all body types and all women, all different kinds of sexuality,” she says. It’s that accessibility that’s at the heart of camp’s appeal. The idea of becoming a sexy resistance fighter who can knock a man out with a stiletto kick is, well, ludicrous. But we can sit back and envision ourselves becoming a bombshell babe or dashing fellow, and enjoy the dance. The Cigarette Girls hosts screenings of Burlesque Assassins, with live performances during intermission, at the Crystal Theatre Fri., May 3, and Sat., May 4, at 7 PM. $13/$10 in advance at Rockin Rudy’s. kwhittle@missoulanews.com


[art]

Prairie dreams Blackfeet artist paints contemporary visions by Erika Fredrickson

Driving north to Browning, the mountains of East Glacier are a startling sight. Even if you’ve taken the road dozens of times, even if you’ve lived in Montana your whole life, you can still be shocked by them when they come into sudden view. But it’s the stunning contrast of the vast prairie stretching for miles beneath the peaks that inspires artist Lauren Monroe Jr. The 27-year-old Blackfeet tribal member grew up just outside of Browning on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation. His family didn’t have internet access or satellite television, so Monroe spent his youth strolling across the prairie daydreaming. “Some people think the plains are completely empty,” he says. “But I spend a lot of time walking

ancestor, Old Lady Heavy Runner, a holy woman who participated heavily in the Sun Dance. My grandfather would often tell me stories of her and other history lessons while working on his art. I remember growing up watching all these different faces and figures he made, some based on real people, some not. But nonetheless all representing a different period of Blackfeet history from the buffalo days to the early reservation period. I could feel the age my grandfather lived in, from his days on Moccasin Flat and Cut Bank Creek and from the stories that went with the art pieces.” In his early years, Monroe felt like he didn’t quite fit in, and he dreamed of leaving the reservation.

Lauren Monroe Jr.’s “Medicine”

through them. There’s always something to see no matter where you are. For me, it’s also about what could be there. What ran through here at one point in history—who was here or what animal.” In his exhibit, Something Dreamt or Found, at Betty’s Divine, Monroe is showing acrylic paintings populated with those imagined prairie creatures from the plains: bison, ravens and horses. It’s a collection that, for a 20-something painter in the age of digital art and ever-evolving experimentation, seems surprisingly rooted in tradition. Monroe uses classic Native American primary colors like bright reds and yellows. He depicts war bonnets and tepees. But little things make the pieces feel contemporary—more like skateboard art than something you’d find in a Native American art history catalog. For instance, the men wearing war bonnets are faceless. A bison grows blood-red roots from its hooves. In one, called “Rebirth,” a skeleton in a headdress is being born from a tentacled stump. “That was my very first painting,” he says of “Rebirth.” “It was over a relationship. I was torn up like anyone would be and the roots were there to help me regrow. I still have that one. I don’t know if I’ll ever sell it.” Monroe started taking art seriously just a few years ago, but he’s been around it his whole life. Besides dreaming about the prairie, he also spent time as a youth with his grandfather, Gordon Monroe, a sculptor who taught art at the Blackfeet Community Free School in the 1970s and who worked for the renowned late sculptor Bob Scriver. “I watched my grandfather work on a sculpture and soften the balls of clay while he added them piece by piece,” Monroe says. “There was [a sculpture] of my

“I was a pretty typical teenager,” he says. “I didn’t want to be where I was at. That’s how it is when you’re young. I was basically a nerd. I was interested in making things—in making a sword or making a short film or looking for stuff in the forest. There was a curiosity. Even now it’s never quite left me.” He moved to Missoula to get an English degree from the University of Montana, and found the contrast to his home in Browning revelatory. He realized that to do the art he loved meant returning to his home. Monroe recently started a silk-screen T-shirt business in Browning called Blackfeet Threads for which he uses many of his art pieces as designs. The traditional aspects of his work—the swaths of primary reds and yellows and the simple animal renderings— are perfect for the silk-screen style. With the business and his art, he hopes to inspire, like his grandfather did for him, young artists to be creative while still honoring their history. “I am grateful for the many hours I spent listening and asking questions because it gave me something no school could teach,” he says. “And that’s the ability to know where I came from. With that knowledge in hand it gives me the confidence to continue to work on my own art and make my own statements.” Betty’s Divine hosts the opening reception for Lauren Monroe Jr.’s Something Dreamt or Found Fri., May 3, from 5 to 8 PM. Free. efredrickson@missoulanews.com

549-6106 • 422 Madison • Missoula

www.gcpm-mt.com missoulanews.com • May 2 – May 9, 2013 [19]


[music]

Jackalope rock Wyoming’s Redbush keeps it simple, stupid Sitting in the sunshine and piling up beer cans on a creaky porch—does it get any better than that? No matter what’s on the radio or still sitting on the record player, the vibe is lazy, lucky and free. Listening to the simple heavy rock of Redbush works the same way: I didn’t have to try to like it. The Laramie, Wyo., band doesn’t add any discernible flourish to its three-piece rock, and that’s as welcome these days as those six hours of sunshine we get per week. Milkmaid sounds like any number of straightforward modern rock records, but it still packs a few surprises. “Industrial Morale,” with its palm-muted power chords, could be a leftover track from Sub Pop’s earliest days or some lost recording of Green Day’s just before it decided to go pop instead of punk. Songs like “Polar Creep” have something fast and missing from most popular rock these days: a repetitive yet original-sounding riff as a guide. Those songs pull on a Foo Fighters reference, but Redbush singer J.D. Korpitz is no Dave Grohl—he’s just a

hoarse, hollerin’ Westerner with his radio stuck in the ’90s. (Brooks Johnson) Redbush, King Elephant, and Frederick Kruger and the Sweet Dream play the VFW Fri., May 3, at 9 PM. $3.

Charles Bradley, Victim of Love I forget how I ended up watching Charles Bradley’s set at Sasquatch last year. What I do remember is, after a day of watching pretty musicians strumming for seas of mostly white hipster kids drinking $14 beers, I was thrilled to see someone stride out on the stage with some real soul. Here was a man in his 60s, decked out in a low-cut shirt and trousers, moaning and hip-thrusting. I ended up staying for Bradley’s entire set of throwback funk and R&B. Bradley, nicknamed “The Screaming Eagle of Soul,” comes with the type of colorful backstory that

his passionate delivery would suggest. Bradley ran away from home as a teen, spent a few years living on the streets and worked odd jobs and moved around the country for most of his life. Around 1996, he began performing in Brooklyn clubs as a James Brown impersonator under the name “Black Velvet.” He was discovered by Daptone Records, which released Bradley’s second album of original music, Victim of Love, this April. It’s another great piece of revival soul from the label that specializes in it, and from a man who’s got the cred to back it up. (Kate Whittle)

The Vignettes The Vignettes’ “This is a Song About Rock and Roll” is pretty meta. Coming in at under two minutes, the recording is a mash-up of all of rock’s greatest assets: a loud guitar, a nonstop drumset and winding, indiscernible lyrics about the genre itself. When it’s over, you haven’t learned anything, but isn’t that the whole point? Just to experience someone else’s energy? You’ve read about dozens of two-piece noise outfits in these pages. It might be that more people make it than are enjoying it these days. So putting that sound on the road (also, in this case, on the internet) is getting pretty hard to sell. It often takes

more than two loud instruments to get my attention. In The Vignettes’ case, the brief attempts at melodic punk breeze right past and don’t leave a mark. Another of the Memphis lady-duo’s tracks found on their ReverbNation site, “The Zoo,” focuses on a rhythm-shifting instrumental section, but doesn’t give it enough time to properly close out. “Comic Book Heroes” takes a minor key cue from the Dead Kennedys, but doesn’t break out of a yearning for pop. Still, it’s clear this is music meant to be listened to with ear plugs, not headphones—a mighty goal on a crowded court of other loud rockers. (Brooks Johnson)

Iron Lung, White Glove Test If anyone has ever taken a sledgehammer to the idea that minimalist music needs to all be Phillip Glass-style violins and high art, it is the beautifully brutal Iron Lung. On its latest album, White Glove Test, the Seattle duo unleashes fury that is as stimulating as it is strangely soothing, like taking a shot of whiskey. In 18 tracks, most between 50 seconds to a minute long, Iron Lung creates a careening, stop-start

[20] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013

symphony out of pounding drums, growling vocals and razor-sharp blasts of guitar. White Glove Test, like an attractive gentleman caller, knows to leave early and keep you wanting more. God help the state of heavy music if Iron Lung ever stops being awe-inspiring. But so far, it manages to keep creating interesting, fierce sonic landscapes out of the most basic of ingredients. (Kate Whittle)


[film]

Strange trip Dude, it’s all connected in “Waterworlds” by Skylar Browning

At some point in most of our lives, we either personally engage in or are unwittingly subjected to a “deep” conversation about the interconnectivity of the universe. Usually, this conversation begins with someone ingesting a handful of mushrooms slathered in Cheez Whiz or involves the band Phish. It goes something like, “Dude, it’s all connected, man. Like, all of it! Don’t you see?” What’s neat about the BBC series “Secrets of Our Living Planet,” and its episode titled “Waterworlds,” is that it takes this rather basic psychedelic revelation and backs it up with mesmerizing wildlife footage. Your burnout friends from college—or you, as the

another opening. It’s the type of trippy visual that would blow your stoner friend’s mind. Much of this series, however, relies on Parkham to provide the heavy lifting of explaining how everything works, and that’s not exactly a plus. He’s the type of middling presence that makes one appreciate the gravitas of Sir David Attenborough, the cheesy charisma of Jack Hanna or even—and I can’t believe I’m saying this—the goofy energy of the late Steve “Crocodile Hunter” Irwin. Parkham is, for lack of a better description, boring. Not annoying or offputting, just vanilla. In a way, he’s similar to the animals he eventually focuses on—more apple snail than

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case may have been—would’ve been infinitely more entertaining mid-trip had they used images of freakishly large river otters, innocuous apple snails and regular old dirt to demonstrate how every aspect of an ecosystem, large and small, is, in fact, connected. “Waterworlds,” which won the International Wildlife Film Festival’s Best Ecosystem category, travels to the Brazilian Pantanal, the Sundarbans swamp of Bangladesh and the Maldives in the Indian Ocean. In each locale, host Chris Packham starts big, by showing the kings of the food chain, and drills down into the soil or water to explain what is the most vital element of the area. In the Pantanal, we see anacondas, jaguars, otters bigger than your average seal, rodbreaking fish and even oversized water lilies. Packham explains how the river bottom’s sediment is nutrient rich, and that’s why the wildlife thrives. But he also focuses on a nondescript mollusk that helps keep everything in balance. The diminutive apple snail makes for a healthy, crunchy snack for many river residents and, more importantly, feeds off the dead vegetation and recycles it into rich fertilizer. That’s right—according to “Waterworlds,” this vast tropical wetland ultimately relies on a small snail’s poop. Parkham goes on to draw similar connections between the survival of towering mangroves and lurking tigers in Bangladesh to a crab that burrows holes through the mud. In the Maldives, a sponge is the key to the coral reef. One of the cooler scenes shows how a sponge extracts the nutrients from salt water. Parkham holds up a tube of colored water that the sponge sucks in, filters and then spits out through

impressive jaguar lurking along the shoreline. That sounds meaner than I intended, but you get the point. While “Waterworlds” has its moments—mostly in the wildlife footage, as most IWFF selections should— it ultimately left me asking more questions than necessary. Is that apple snail really the be-all, end-all? Is Parkham the best choice to host? On a more basic level, who is the show’s target audience? Some of the foundational lessons make me think it’s geared toward a younger crowd, like elementary school kids. But Parkham’s presentation doesn’t have the pizzazz and the production lacks the hooks necessary to hold their attention spans. (Exhibit A: My 7-year-old daughter did her homework rather than watch it; this doesn’t happen often, regardless of what’s on the television.) If the show is intended for a more general crowd, why spend so much time on the basics? Learning about plankton isn’t exactly epic. Perhaps the goal, for better or worse, is only to connect the dots between disparate elements of a shared ecosystem. In that case, it’s perfect for your buddy with the extra tab looking to get his mind off Bob Weir’s recent health troubles. Your friend will be totally stoked to simply follow the line from one pretty picture to the next.

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“Waterworlds” screens at the Roxy Theater Sat., May 4, at 5 PM, as part of the International Wildlife Film Festival. Individual screenings are $7/$6 for seniors/$5 students/$3 children 12 and under. arts@missoulanews.com

Or if paper is your practice, you can complete the ballot on page 11.

missoulanews.com • May 2 – May 9, 2013 [21]


[film]

Paint by numbers presents

2013 DO IT IN 72 FILM CONTEST

SCREENING AND RECEPTION Friday May 10th at 7pm at the Roxy Theatre 718 South Higgins

Stars can’t carry The Company You Keep by Molly Laich

There’s nothing too terribly thrilling going on in Robert Redford’s latest political thriller, The Company You Keep, but at least it has a lot of good actors in it. The film is about what idealism and radical extremism look like with age, and it asks questions about retribution and responsibility. Redford directs the film as well as stars. He looks exactly the same as he did 20 years ago, which is suspicious and spooky. He’s 76 in real life, but it’s unclear how old his character is supposed to be. Susan Sarandon plays former Weather Underground member Sharon Solarz, who has been in hiding for 30 years because of her involvement in an

a hotel lobby and some subway cars, makes up about half of the film’s total action. Nick’s not guilty, of course. He travels from Albany to Chicago and finally Michigan’s Upper Peninsula in an attempt to find the one person from his past capable of clearing his name, you know, for his daughter’s sake. When it comes to the state of newspaper journalism in America today, the movie has it right: Ben asks his editor (Stanley Tucci) for money to follow Nick Sloan to Michigan, and the editor basically laughs him out of the office. “I just cut the sports section,” he says. But Ben is a man on a mission and he follows Nick on his own dime.

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In this scene, Robert Redford schedules his next jowl rejuvenation.

armed robbery that resulted in the death of a guard. The Weather Underground people were either political activists or domestic terrorists, depending on whom you ask, responsible for a series of bombings in protest of the Vietnam War and other Americansponsored atrocities in the late ’60s and ’70s. (The film is a little light on the details. For a more serious and in-depth look at the movement, you might want to check out Sam Green’s excellent 2002 documentary The Weather Underground.) It’s time for Sharon to give up the ghost, and she’s dramatically arrested at a gas station on her way to turn herself in. Ben Shepard (Shia LaBeouf ) is the plucky young reporter at the Albany Sun Times assigned to the story. Her arrest leads Ben to Jim Grant (Redford), a mild mannered lawyer whom Ben discovers through hard-hitting journalism is actually Nick Sloan, the Weather Underground member wanted for the same armed robbery incident that Sharon’s in the clink for. Nick’s a recent widower and the father of an 11-year-old daughter who talks and acts like no preteen ever would in real life, but never mind. Nick drops his kid off with his brother (Chris Cooper) and swiftly gives the FBI (spearheaded by Terrence Howard) the slip. This sequence, involving

[22] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013

It’s fun to see Nick meet up with old members of the movement, especially because all of them are played by aging superstar actors. There’s Nick Nolte as the haggard old man in the lumber yard, Richard Jenkins as the college professor who just wants to put the whole thing behind him, Julie Christie as the dogmatic, stubborn liberal, and so on. A lot of these scenes have the feel of a David Mamet stage play more than anything. There’s a lot of stunted exposition going on, like in this phone conversation between Robert Redford and Chris Cooper: “You are my brother. We haven’t seen each other in 20 years.” The film is at its best when the characters talk frankly with one another about the politics of the situation, which doubtless you’re aware of by now: The U.S. government killed millions in a pointless war and some young people went to increasingly violent means to try to stop it. If the movie had been more about that, it would have been onto something. But as a thriller, The Company You Keep is pretty by-thenumbers. The Company You Keep continues at the Wilma. arts@missoulanews.com


[film]

OPENING THIS WEEK IRON MAN 3 Iron Man proves that he doesn’t have an iron heart as he struggles to deliver retribution after his enemy, Mandarin, destroys Peter Stark’s world. Heads are gonna roll, y’all. Starring Robert Downey Jr., Gwyneth Paltrow and Don Cheadle. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex and Showboat.

NOW PLAYING 42 Fans of clever baseballists should find this biographical film about the life of Jackie Robinson and his history-making time with the Brooklyn Dodgers to be a figurative home run. Starring Chadwick Boseman, T.R. Knight and Harrison Ford. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex and Entertainer. THE BIG WEDDING A long-divorced couple have to pretend to be married in order to satisfy their adopted son’s ultra-conservative birth mother, a woman who flies halfway around the world to attend his wedding. Quick question: Why? Starring Robert De Niro, Katherine Heigl and Diane Keaton. Rated R. Carmike 12.

I am a patient boy. I wait, I wait, I wait, I wait. Iron Man 3 opens Friday at Carmike 12, Pharaohplex and Showboat.

at Ryan Reynolds’ jokes. Starring the voices of Nicolas Cage and Emma Stone. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Village 6 and Pharaohplex.

THE CALL A longtime 911 operator must confront a killer from her past while trying to save an abducted girl, because that’s what 911 operators do in real life. Starring Halle Berry, Evie Thompson and Abigail Breslin. Rated R. Pharaohplex.

JURASSIC PARK 3D Universal Pictures calls this 1993 Steven Spielberg film “a groundbreaking masterpiece.” I call it a movie about our future! Cloning! Dinosaurs running amok! Me and Laura Dern! You and Jeff Goldblum! Me and Jeff Goldblum! Whatever, it’s rated PG-13. Carmike 12.

THE COMPANY YOU KEEP A nosy ol’ journalist outs a former member of the Weather Underground (look it up), forcing the former activist to go on the run at his advanced age. In other words, Boomers vs. Millenials. Perhaps the young man learns a thing or two about Creedence. Based on Neil Gordon’s novel. Starring Robert Redford, Shia LaBeouf and Susan Sarandon. Rated R. Wilma.

OBLIVION In 2077, Tom Cruise is one of the last humans left on Earth. With only two weeks to go until he can leave the war-ravaged planet and join other humans on a lunar colony, a mysterious woman arrives and everything he thinks he knows comes into question. Also starring Morgan Freeman and Olga Kurylenko. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex and Showboat.

THE CROODS Join the first prehistoric family for the very first family road trip and laugh for the very first time

OZ THE GREAT AND POWERFUL How exactly did homeboy become the Wizard of Oz? Learn how in this Disney creation

story involving a small-time circus magician of dubious community standing who makes his way to the magic land of Oz. Starring James Franco, Michelle Williams and Rachel Weisz. Rated PG. Carmike 12.

the good jokes about nefarious babies and diaper changes were used up in Three Men and a Baby. Starring Simon Rex, Ashley Tisdale and Charlie Sheen. Rated PG-13. Village 6.

PAIN & GAIN I have three words for you: Zubaz, fanny-pack and misogyny. If those things sound good to you, then check out a trio of bodybuilders who get caught up in a criminal caper. Directed by the Michael Bay. Starring Rebel Wilson, Mark Wahlberg, Dwayne Johnson and Kurt Angle. Rated R. Carmike 12, Village 6 and Pharaohplex.

Capsule reviews by Jason McMackin.

THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES A gorgeous motorcycle stuntman starts robbing banks to support his lady and their baby; unfortunately, a less handsome rookie cop looks to take the handsome one down. Starring Ryan “Gos” Gosling, Eva Mendes and Ray Liotta. Rated R. Wilma.

Moviegoers be warned! For show times please visit missoulanews.com or contact the theaters in order to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 and Village 6 at 5417469; Wilma at 728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603.

SCARY MOVIE V Are you ready to laugh? Too bad, cuz this is the fifth installment of the franchise and all

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HUGE INVENTORY Don’t forget to vote for Blue Mountain Clinic, Dr. Ravitz or Dr. Banks in the Best of Missoula Poll 2130 N 1st St - Hwy 93 Hamilton, MT 406-363-3215 missoulanews.com • May 2 – May 9, 2013 [23]


[dish] Times Run 5/3/13 - 5/9/13

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

The Place Beyond the Pines (R) Nightly at 7 & 9:20 7 ONLY on Sat 5/4 The Company You Keep (R) Nightly at 7 & 9:10 9:20 ONLY on Sat 5/4 www.thewilma.com

4PM-9PM

ALL DAY

131 S. Higgins Ave. Downtown Missoula 406-728-2521

$1

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Beer & Wine AVAILABLE

SUSHI Not available for To-Go orders

[24] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013

Nitrogen fixation by Ari LeVaux The massive fertilizer explosion in West, Texas, made less of an impression than the relatively small Boston blasts two days earlier. But if terrorists are scary, the dangers presented by stockpiles of ammonium nitrate, aka nitrate fertilizer, should be even scarier. This material can be used with bad intentions, such as the gasoline-soaked fertilizer used in the Oklahoma City bombings, and perhaps the pressure cookers of Boston. Or it blows up on its own, accidentally triggered by fire or some other disturbance. Ammonium nitrate is also an environmental contaminant, even when used for its intended purpose of feeding plants. If it is spread on the land in greater amounts than the crops can absorb, it’s a problem. Nitrogen fixation in a lab was first demonstrated in 1909. Under intense heat and pressure, atmospheric nitrogen was converted to ammonium nitrate, which was known to be good for plants as well as explosives. The Haber-Bosch process, as it became known, was developed with agriculture in mind. But when the U.S. entered World War II, it was put to work producing ammonium nitrate for blowing stuff up. When the war ended, factories that had been built to manufacture bombs switched to fertilizer. The sudden abundance of cheap nitrate fertilizer opened the door to modern factory farming. There is much in modern agriculture to be wary of. There are plenty of scary pesticides, synthetic hormones and other sketchy additives. But while nitrate fertilizer is, in essence, a retooled war chemical, which is yucky, there are times when it appears to have much more upside than downside. A paper published last April in Nature presented evidence that many organic farms are nitrogen-deficient, and suggested they would see improved yields with application of nitrogen fertilizer. The paper also found that conventional farms typically apply more nitrogen than their crops can absorb. Organic sources of nitrogen include the growing and rotation of cover crops, the spraying of fish emulsion and other biologically based liquids and covering the ground with compost, manure or some other mulch. The process of getting these materials into place is usually labor-intensive, but worth it for reasons beyond the nitrogen, as it can improve soil structure, increase microbial diversity and help the soil retain moisture. The Nature paper notes that organic crops tend to have an advantage in drought situations. Sometimes—quite often, according to the Nature data—organic practices don’t supply as much nitrogen as crops can consume. If a farmer isn’t in the position to truck in some solution, like composted llama manure, nitrate fertilizer might be the best option. Unfortunately, while using nitrates in moderation isn’t a mortal sin, today’s typical use is hardly moderate. With the stuff so cheap and abundant, farmers often spread considerably more than they need, and

FLASH IN THE PAN

not as efficiently as they should. Every molecule of ammonium nitrate that isn’t absorbed by the crop plant is a pollutant. Fertilizer runoff in rivers can lead to unrestrained growth of algae and weeds that can choke a river to death. Further downstream, in the ocean, nitrogen fertilizers can cause ecological dead zones. As long as energy is cheap, nitrate fertilizer will be widely available. In its relatively brief period of existence thus far, fertilizer has fueled the growth of industrial agricultural commodities like corn and grains. I don’t consider all of these advances to be desirable, but it’s possible to be against corn syrup, ethanol, grain-fattened cattle and other products of modern agriculture, yet still accept an appropriate use of nitrate on farms that are doing their best but are still nitrogen deficient. Agriculture is a complicated, contentious topic, and too often the debates are framed in binary terms like “organic” and “conventional,” as if food were a twoparty political system. Many studies have been done to see which one is better, with the results being applied to arguments on both sides of the divide. The Nature study was a meta-analysis of 66 studies comparing organic and conventional agriculture, and compared the respective yields of 344 crops. In this sample, conventional techniques outperformed organic methods in terms of overall yield, but differences varied greatly from crop to crop. It found organic crops to be generally nitrogen deficient and conventional crop systems generally oversaturated with nitrates. The paper suggests hybrid farming could be useful in some contexts. Hybrid farming borrows heavily from organic practices but also is open to certain nonorganic practices, such as targeted nitrate application. One of the paper’s authors, Dr. Navin Ramankutty of McGill University, told me by phone he’s intrigued at the possibilities of hybrid farming, and thinks it could offer as-yet unquantified promise in subsistence situations, as well as more demonstrated potential for improving yield in commercial organic applications. “I may not buy food if somebody was applying pesticides,” Ramankutty said, “but I would certainly not mind if my farmer applied a little bit of chemical fertilizer on his farm. It’s when we use 200 kilograms per hectare that the problem arises.” Two hundred kilograms is a little more than the 400-pound minimum amount of ammonium nitrate that the Department of Homeland Security requires must be reported for tracking and added security oversight. The plant in West, Texas, had an unreported 270 tons. DHS didn’t even know this stockpile existed until it blew up, which leads to to my next question: How many other undocumented storehouses of explosives are there? Our blasé attitude toward nitrogen is putting us in all sorts of danger. We need to take it more seriously, make less of it, and make the most of what we use. Otherwise we run the risk of having it blow up in our faces all over again.


[dish] Alcan Bar and Grill 16780 Beckwith St. Frenchtown 626-9930 Tantalize your taste buds with Angus beef burgers, chicken strips, shrimp, and biscuits and gravy from Alcan Bar & Grill. With more than 20 years of experience and 10 years in the business, we have been offering fresh meals and beverages at the area's most competitive prices. Our friendly professionals offer personalized service and make sure you leave our restaurant as one of our friends. We offer have a variety of specials for ladies night and sports events featuring drink specials and free food. Contact us today and enjoy our incredible menu selection. 9 am – 2 am Mon-Sun. $ Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway 728-8900 (across from courthouse) Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 It is the 5th year for Bernice's Cupcake Maynia! We are celebrating by bringing back the last four years favorite cupcakes! That's right....Pancakes and Bacon, Peanut Butter Cup, Caramel Popcorn, Whisky Sour, Cookie Monster, What The Bear's Eat, Spaghetti and Meatballs, Breakfast, Banana Split, White Russian, Just For Kids, Strawberry Shortcake and more!!!. 15 flavors to choose from and a Baker's Choice every day! Cupcakes are great for Mother's Day, Graduation, other special occasions and a quick sugar fix. Follow Bernice's Facebook in May as we participate in Bike Walk Bus Week, kick out awesome cupcakes and continue to provide Missoula with a solid cup of joe & pastries for breakfast. We are having so much fun and bringing it directly to you. See you soon. xoxo bernice. $-$$ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Mon.–Fri., 7:30–4, Sat. 8-4. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. $ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$ Brooks & Browns Inside Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. 532-2056 This week at Brooks and Browns... Martini MONDAY ($4 select martinis). TUESDAY (Burger + any draught beer $8). THURSDAY is Trivia Night. (7:30-10 pm) FRIDAY Andrea Harsell 6-9 pm SUNDAY: Sunday Funday (Happy Hour all day). Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 41 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $

$…Under $5

Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 ciaomambo.com The vibrant energy at Ciao Mambo is fantastically accompanied by steaming hot pizzas, delicious assortments of pastas and of course authentic Italian wine. We focus on making sure that whether it be date night, family night, or business dinners we accommodate whatever the need! And do not forget there are always leftovers! Open 5 to close every day, come make us your go to dinner destination! $-$$ Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am-2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm Sun-Wed and 11am-10pm Thurs-Sat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. 542-7414 Doc's is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you're heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc's is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$ The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and gluten-free options. NOW SERVING BREAKFAST Empanadas! Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. 10am-6pm Mon-Thurs/10am-7pm Fri+Sat. Downtown Missoula. $ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. • 721-6033 Missoula's Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. M-TH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am4pm, Sat 8am-4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$ GoodieVille Paxson Plaza by Southgate Mall 406-728-0010 www.goodieville.com Missoula’s only Gluten-Free Bakery and Restaurant offers a full line of savories and sweets. We serve breakfast, lunch and dinner including Pancakes, Pizza, American and Indian fare. We also have extensive vegetarian and vegan options. Open Wed-Sat 7am-9pm and Sun 7am2pm. $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St • 549-7723 www.grizzlyliquor.com Missoula's Tailgate Headquarters! We carry all of the spirits & accessories to make your tailgate party a success! Largest selection of spirits in Montana, including locally made whiskey, vodka, gin, rum and wine. We're located downtown with free customer parking. Grizzly Liquor was voted Missoula's #1 Liquor Store! Open M-F 9-6:30, Sat 9-6. $-$$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula's best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over

missoulanews.com • May 2 – May 9, 2013 [25]


[dish]

Trip 15 HAPPIEST HOUR What it is: A Belgian style ale brewed with dates, dandelion and buckwheat. This small-batch brew comes from “an artisanal collaboration” between New Belgium Brewing in Fort Collins, Colo., and Seattle’s Elysian Brewing. It’s the 15th brew to come from what the breweries refer to as The Trip Series. No, hold on. It’s a “collabeeration”: You probably already know New Belgium, brewer of such favorites as Fat Tire, Sunshine Wheat and Ranger IPA, and host of the traveling Tour de Fat and annual Clips Beer & Film Tour. (The latter returns to Missoula July 19.) Elysian opened its first Seattle brewpub in 1996, began bottling in 2001 and commenced, as the company puts it, “collabeerating” with New Belgium in 2008. New Belgium explains that, by joining forces with Elysian, “we have the ability to increase efficiency, encourage creative experimentation, and take a trip into the future of American craft brewing.” How Trip 15 tastes: Dangerously smooth and lacking, for better or worse, the overpowering flavor of most specialty brews. The dates and dandelion give it a sweetness with a

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Iza 529 S. Higgins 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Contemporary Asian cuisine featuring local, vegan, gluten free and organic options as well as wild caught seafood, Idaho trout and buffalo. Join us for lunch and dinner. Happy Hour 3-6 weekdays with specials on food and drink. Extensive sake, wine and tea menu. Closed Sundays. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm, Dinner 5pm-close. Sat: Dinner 5pm-close. $-$$

photo by Skylar Browning

creamy Belgian stout-like finish. In other words, even at 7.5 percent ABV, you can easily have more than one. Where to find it: It’s only available in 22ounce bottles in select Northwest states. I scored mine at the Good Food Store. —Skylar Browning Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

Jakers 3515 Brooks St. 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Jimmy John’s 420 N. Higgins 542-1100 jimmyjohns.com Jimmy John’s - America’s Favorite Sandwich Delivery Guys! Unlike any other sub shop, Jimmy John’s is all about the freshest ingredients and fastest service. Freaky Fast, Freaky Good - that’s Jimmy John’s. Order online, call for delivery or visit us on Higgins. $-$$

Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West • 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, MondayFriday 7-6. $ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. • 543-7154 (on the hip strip) Did you know that the Missoula Senior Center serves delicious hearty lunches every week day for only $6? Anyone is welcome to join us for a delicious meal from 11:3012:30 Monday- Friday for delicious food, great conversation and take some time to find a treasured item or garment in our thrift shop. For a full menu and other activities, visit our website at www.missoulaseniorcenter.org. Pearl Cafe 231 East Front St. 541-0231 pearlcafe.us Serving country French specialties, Montana elk, Berkshire Pork, and delicious seafood dishes. Delectable salads and appetizers, as well as breads and desserts baked inhouse. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Philly West 134 W. Broadway 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday - Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. $-$$

$…Under $5

[26] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013

Romaines 3075 N. Reserve Suite N 406-214-2659 www.romainessalads.com We provide you with the convenience of delicious salads, sandwiches and soups. Our salads include over 30 wholesome ingredients. Our homemade soups change with the season as different ingredients become available. If hearty sandwiches are your favorite, then visit Romaines for one of our braised meat sandwiches. We also have a Montana Hummus sandwich made from Montana grown garbanzo beans. At last, local, fresh, and healthy! $-$$ Silvertip Casino 680 SW Higgins 728-5643 The Silvertip Casino is Missoula’s premiere casino offering 20 Video gaming machines, best live poker in Missoula, full beverage liquor, 11 flat screen tv’s and great food at great prices. Breakfast Specials starting at $2.99 (7-11am) For a complete menu, go to www.silvertipcasino.com. Open 24/7. $-$$ Sis’s Kitchen 531-5034 sisskitchen.com Wheat, Gluten & Allergen Free Foods. Frozen & Dry Mix Products. Sis's Kitchen plays a part in Best of Missoula "Best Pizza" Winner's for 2008-2012. Find our products at: The Good Food Store • Biga Pizza • Bridge Pizza • Pizza Cafe in Ronan (12"crust). $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI We have quick and delicious lunch specials 6 days a week starting at $7, and are open for dinner 7 nights a week. Try our comfort food items like Pork Katsu and Chicken Teriyaki. We also offer party platters to go and catering for all culinary styles. Lunch 11:30-3 Mon-Sat. Dinner 5-9:30 Every Night. Corner of Pine and Higgins. Very Family Friendly. 549-7979. $-$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins 327-8929 Stop in when you're in the neighborhood. We'll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula's best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 1110 Sun 12-9. $-$$ Taco John’s 623 W Broadway 2600 S Reserve West-Mex® is about fresh taste and BOLD flavors. Taco John’s recipes make you smile and yell “OLÉ”. We combine hearty helpings of seasoned meats, crispy Potato Olés®, and flavorful cheeses with fresh-made Mexican specialties like burritos, tacos, and quesadillas. All topped off with bold sauces, spices and salsas. You’ll find West-Mex® cooking makes for an unbeatably satisfying meal. See you soon ... Amigo :) $-$$ Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you'll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over


Take a trip to old Montana at the opening reception for A Hundred Years Later: Julius Seyler Among the Blackfeet. Seyler’s paintings elucidate the lives of the Blackfeet. This exhibition commemorates the German painter’s centennial visit to Glacier National Park. Montana Museum of Art & Culture, Meloy and Paxson Galleries. 5–7 PM. Free.

May 2 – May 9, 2013

History peeps check out the opening reception and book signing with UM Professor of History Emeritus William E. Farr and Richard S. Buswell, M.D., at the UM PARTV Center lobby. Buswell’s photographs cover old settlement sights and ghost towns. Tunes by Tom Catmull. 5–7 PM. Free. You know you wanna get off your duff and help out your community, so learn how during the Imagine Missoula Q&A where Program Director Nina Alviar, volunteers and those older folks who’ve received services speak about the group’s mission to help older adults feel like part of the community. UM Skaggs Bldg., Rm. 169. 5:30 PM. Take the kids and teach ‘em to howl at the moon when Amy Martin and the Missoula Coyote Choir play Family Friendly Friday at the Top Hat. 6–8 PM. Free. The Kimberlee Carlson Jazz Trio performs for you suds suckers down at Hamilton’s Bitter Root Brewery, 6–8:30 PM. Free. Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free. Try some roasted grouse when Shane Clouse plays the Top Hat dinner show at 6:30 PM. Free. See future filmmakers now during the MCAT 8th Annual High School Film Festival. Students show off their films of eight minutes or less and someone will be awarded $500. Crystal Theatre, 518 S. Higgins Ave. 7 PM. Free.

Dropping science like Galileo dropped the orange. Masoki Batoh, formerly of weirdo experimental outfit Ghost, performs at the Palace, 147 W. Broadway, Tue., May 7, at 9 PM, with openers Modality and Atrocity Singers. $8.

THURSDAYMAY02 The John Floridis Trio plays music at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 5–8 PM. Free.

UM School of Art Bachelor’s in Fine Arts Senior Thesis Exhibition opening reception takes place at the UC Gallery from 4–6 PM and at the Gallery of Visual Arts from 5–7 PM. Free. Ribosome fans stand up and shout, cuz 2009 Nobel Prize Winner for Chemistry, Ada Yonath, delivers a seminar titled “The Fruits of Curiosity: The Ribosome and Its Tiny Enemies.” UM Interdisciplinary Science Bldg., Rm. 110. 4:10 PM. Free.

nightlife The UM American Indian Student Services hosts an eight-week Insider/Outsider Film Series, which takes place at the Payne Family Native American Center on the UM campus, and has a strict “B.Y.O.F. (bring your own frybread)” policy, according to the group’s press release. This week’s film is Miss Navajo. 5–7 PM. Free.

Children of the Earth Tribe Song and Chant Circle at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center is for all those ready to sing in honor of our connection to one another and the earth. 519 S. Higgins (Enter through back alley door.). 7:30 PM. Free will offering. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM. Get your farce on, Shakespeare fans at the UM School of Theatre & Dance’s production of

missoulanews.com • May 2 – May 9, 2013 [27]


[28] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013


[calendar]

STARTING MAY 1ST

LADIES NITE

EVERY WED. 8PM TIL 11PM, ALL LADIES BOWL FREE!!

MENS NIGHT

EVERY THURS. 8PM TIL 11 PM ALL MEN BOWL FREE (shoe rental not included & depending upon lane availability) KARAOKE BY SOLID SOUND!!

DRINK SPECIALS

Huckleberry is good. Rapper and iconoclast Tyler, the Creator performs at the Top Hat, 134 W. Front St., Tues., May 7, at 8 PM. $28/$25 advance at Rockin Rudy’s.

Comedy of Errors at the Masquer Theatre. 7:30 PM. $16/$14 seniors/$10 for those 12 and under. Carl Kassel and co. do the news with a wink and a nudge and some pithy commentary during the broadcast of NPR’s Sunday staple “Wait, Wait…Don’t Tell Me,” at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. Guests include Steve Martin and Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings. 7:30 PM. Tickets are $14-$18 and available at Rockin Rudy’s and morrisproductions.org. If you’re like me, you are stoked that the Pentatonix, season 3 winners of “The Sing-Off,” are in MSO to perform a cappella versions of your fave pop tracks (Do “Gangnam Style,” purty please!). Wilma. 8 PM. $25. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s and tickets300.com. Everybody cut, everybody cut down to the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St., for the Missoula Community Theatre’s production of the song and dance classic, Footloose. 8 PM. For cost and more info visit mctinc.org. During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, amazing musicians could play some great jams. Just don’t tell your cousin Rapping Timmy about it. That guy’s version of “Santeria” is terrible. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up. Julie Bug and the Northern Lights play that good time tuneage for all the sweet people. Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand. 9 PM. Free. Join local MCs Rude, Gatsby, Mac Marler, J.J. Jones, The Orators and

J.Dub for a night of hip-hoppery sure to stoke the b-boy flames in anyone’s heart. Hosted by Traff the Wiz, spins by DJ MPire. VFW, 245 W. Main St. 9 PM. Free. The Dead Hipster Dance Party is all kinds of sweaty, but ‘tis the droplets of the beautiful people. Get a taste in the place where love and funk is in the air (sometimes they are the same scent). Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight. Hear bands battle blissfully with bandoleers of bass, booming guitar and beautiful voices at Top of the Mic 4, a yearly music contest for area musicians. Sean Kelly’s, 130 W. Pine St. 9 PM. Free. Show up the rest of the room with your version of “Ninja Survive” when you hit the Dark Horse for Combat Karaoke hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free. Burst your ear holes and bust an old time groove in your robot walkers at Archaic Revival, an evening of electronic music with Lil Sassy and DJs Rockstocki, HAuLi and Nic Jaymes, at the Palace. 9 PM. Free. Also includes a 2-for-1 well drink special. Mark Sexton Band is here all the way from Reno, and it is going to love y’all up with some funky soul-pop along with our local Zeppo, at the Palace. 9 PM. $5. Slide on a blazer (don’t forget to roll up the sleeves) and drop some “In Soviet Russia” jokes at Missoula’s Homegrown Stand-Up Comedy at

the Union Club. Sign-up by 9:30 PM to perform or just sit back and take in the funny. Free. Montana country-fied fella Tyler Barham, back from a recent recording session in Nashville, plays the Top Hat with guest Jessica Mullikin. 9:30 PM. $7/$5 in advance at the Source, Ear Candy, Rockin Rudy’s and ticketing.com. Once the kids are tucked into bed, party with a bunch of parents when Magpies, VTO and Secret Powers play the Top Hat at 10 PM. Free.

FRIDAYMAY03 Join the jailer man and Sailor Sam in searching for Karen Buley during her reading and signing of Nanny on the Run at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. 5–7 PM. Free.

nightlife Missoula’s most baddestassest gals are back. The Hellgate Rollergirls are throwing a mixer bout at the Glacier Rink on the Missoula Fairgrounds, beginning at 5:30 PM with the Hellgate Hellions junior league. $12. Visit hellgaterollergirls.com. The Mark Sexton Trio brings screaming jazz guitar sounds to Hamilton’s Bitter Root Brewery, and you bring your phone for sexting the cashier at the Pamida in Sidney. 6– 8:30 PM. Free. En guarde, Frenchy, and check out the 45-minute Olympic fencing class

missoulanews.com • May 2 – May 9, 2013 [29]


[calendar]

FIRST FRIDAY Downtown Dance Collective hosts exhibits by several Sentinel High School Art students for the month of May. Sponsored by art instructor Tim Nielson. 121 W. Main St. Reception from 5–7 PM. Free. The children are the future and the future is now, so check out the works of Hellgate High’s senior class art students at the Senior Showcase. Food by the Culinary III kids and silent auction to benefit the Sunshine Fund. Hellgate High. 5–7 PM. Free.

can artwork during Art in the Bar, at the Union Club. 5–9 PM. Free. Caleb Meyer’s exhibit Light and Shadow casts little doubt that the homeboy is headed to the dance. Also showing work is Michael Blessing. Dana Gallery, 246 N. Higgins Ave. 5–8 PM. Free.

play are to be auctioned off and the kids can explain why those dolphins in the photo have feet. Studio D, 420 N. Higgins Ave,. 5– 8 PM. Free. Lean what permanence means at the Clay Studio of Missoula exhibit, Works from the Permanent Collection, which features gads and gads of artists. 1106 Hawthorne St. Unit A. 5–8 PM. Free. See art and politics collide at Forward Montana’s student-made exhibit iLevy iEducate iVote. The exhibit illustrates (ha!) how students deal with the current state (poor) of technology in Missoula schools. 500 N. Higgins Ave. Suite 103. 5– 8 PM. Free.

Don’t be rude, check out the abstract drawings of Kyrie Campbell at Your Energy Fix, 415 N. Higgins Ave., Rm. 19, from 5–7 PM. Free.

For reals, get ethereal like MSO’s Imperial with The personal collec- “Superman, goof boy” by Jane Deschner is on painter Marvie Redmond whose exhibition Abstract tions of the VonCom- display at the MAM, 335 N. Pattee St. Paintings is on display at moners are on display, at VonCommon Studios, 127 E M Mary Beth Percival exhibits her Montana Art and Framing, 709 ain Street, Ste. 316, from 5–8 PM. watercolors on paper, drawings Ronan St., from 5–9 PM. Free. Perhaps the vault holds only and mixed media assemblages at On Deck 8 hosts a bevy of the finest silk screenings of a the Monte Dolack Gallery, 139 W. super-talented hunks and nude Elvis Presley circa ‘77. Front St. Music by Mike Swanson. honeys showing off their art5–8 PM. Free. Free. works on 45 custom skateLolita, light of my life, fire of It’s that time of year again, board decks. The decks are my loins. My sin, my soul. when Sentinel High School auctioned off and the moola benDamn, that’s so good. You know wastes no time making art out of efits the Montana Skatepark Assowhat else is good? The Nabokov- recycled clocks. Isn’t it about time ciation and serves as an annual inspired Butterfly Collections by you swung by Upcycled, 517 S. fundraiser for the organization, Alicia Gignoux and the great in- Higgins Ave., and had swell time whose mission is to fund and facilitate the construction of free, sects from the Butterfly House, at from 5–8 PM? Free. The Naturalist’s Mercantile, 131 E. Picture this: an evening of public, concrete skateparks across photography, dance and Montana. The Brink Gallery, 111 Main St. 5–8 PM. Free. music at The Artists’ Shop, 127 W. Front St. 5–10 PM. Free. (See Lauren Monroe Jr. shares his N. Higgins Ave., featuring Ex- Spotlight.) spiff-a-riffic works in his exhibit, Something Dreamt or Found, at posed: An Exploration of Poten- Swell gals and spiffy artists Betty’s Divine, 521 S. Higgins tials, photography by William Maia Domitrovich and Andrea Ave., from 5–8 PM. Free. (See Munoz of Hamilton and Meghan Cross Guns exhibit their artwork at Nolt of Missoula, as well music by the VFW, 245 W. Main St., and Arts.) Aaron Minnick and choreography you best check out that stuff or I’ll ¡Que bueno, muchachos! Prim- by Katie McEwen. 5–8 PM. Free. get cut. 5:30–9:30 PM. Free. rose Montessori School presents Inspired by Latin American Ah, yes, The Humble Pencil exthe art exhibit Niños Near and Far, which has kooky self-portraits folklore, Laura Blaker’s latest ex- hibit shows the world how varied of the kids and Callie Monroe’s hibit speaks la verdad and tells sto- pencil can really be at the River’s photos from her Nicaraguan ad- ries via colors, patterns, clothing, Mist Gallery of Fine Art, 317 Main venture, plus tunes by Happy animals, people and architecture St., Stevi. The exhibit has works by Endings. Mercantile Deli, 119 S. from that particular region. Pruden- Rich Adams, Carol Hoffnagle, Kris tial Montana Real Estate, 1020 Prather, Michael Rees, Greg Siple, Higgins Ave. 5–8 PM. Free. South Ave. W. 5–8 PM. Free. and Kyle Stevens. The budding So much depends upon peoartist for May is Rachel Agosto. 6– Totally groovy and ultimately ple doing what they do, like John Bohman and Scot Herries’ awesome art makers Jennifer 9 PM. Free. woodwork exhibit Surface: Furni- Combe and Patricia Thornton do Be a sky pilot and tune into ture, or Darin Wicks’ iron work or work and bring new works of the trippin’ balls radio for the artCourtney Blazon’s A Seedy Affair. drawn and painted variety to the works of Wesly Delano are on disAll of which goes down at 4 Brunswick Gallery, 223 W. Rail- play at Le Petit Outre, 129 S. Fourth St. W., along with re-aniRavens Gallery, 248 N. Higgins road St. 5–8 PM. Free. Ave. 5–8 PM. Free. Ted Boushie of the White Clay tribe from Fort Belknap exhibits his contemporary Native Ameri-

[30] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013

Take a peek inside the artistic minds of area youths at the Windows of Youth Art Fundraiser for Youth Homes. All items on dis-

mated tuenage by the loud and proud Modality. Bring earplugs, kids. 6–10 PM. Free.


[calendar] at the Missoula Fencing Association, 1200 Shakespeare St. Ste. A. Free for the first 15 people who arrive by 6 PM. Class is open to participants ages 9 and above and families are welcome. Visit missoulafencing.net. Dig out your fiddlin’ sticks and party down in the Old Post Pub’s parking lot with the Lil’ Smokies, who performs bluegrass Racer X style. 6:30 PM. Free. Swap stories and hear tuneage with Trade, vocals by Amber Dawn and electric bass and guitar by Trae McCabe, at the North Valley Public Library, 208 Main St., Stevi. 6:30–7:30 PM. Free. Get a chance to warm up your dance engines and maybe win a ticket to Mord Fustang at the Wilma at Fishbowl Friday: Mord Fustang Preparty, with DJs Big Man Japan, Tim Carrey, ChumHauer and more. Badlander. Free, with $5 fishbowls. Get seduced and perhaps assassinated by the Burlesque Assassins, a movie of titillating proportions. With special performance by local lasses The Cigarette Girls Burlesque. Crysal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. 7 PM. $13/$10 advance at Rockin Rudy’s. (See Arts.)

of The Wizard of Oz. 7:30 PM. $10/$8 for children 12 and under. Visit stevensvilleplayhouse.org. Northern Lights unleash la luz del bueno tiempo dance tuneage for you and yours at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. ¡Baila, baila, baila! 8 PM. Free. Everybody cut, everybody cut down to the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St., for the Missoula Community Theatre’s production of the song and dance classic, Footloose. 8 PM. For cost and more info visit mctinc.org. Sauce that hot dog and grab a Gary Glitter, cuz Redbush makes big dirt at the VFW, 245 W. Main St., with King Elephant and Fredrick Kruger and the Sweet Dreamers. 10 PM. $3. (See Music.)

Who’s your favorite hairstylist?

Vote online at missoulanews.com

Join the Montana chapter of the New Leaders Council for a rockin’ good time for a progressive cause. Featuring local groups The Hasslers and the Mountain Breathers, the presentation of the 2013 Local Leader of the Year Award recognizing Amanda Curtis and fantastic raffle prizes. Burns St. Events Center, 1500 Burns St. 7 PM. $10 suggested donation, proceeds help to provide training and networking programming to up-andcoming progressive leaders in Montana. Please visit www.newleaders council.org to learn more.

Bring your American thighs and knock someone out when Hell’s Belles, the AC/DC tribute band from Seattle, rocks the Palace at 9 PM, with Bozeman’s The Salamanders opening. $15, tickets available at Ear Candy Music.

Adrian Kien shares his words with Missoula when he reads from his new poetry collection, The Caress is a Letter of Instruction at Shakespeare & Co., 103 S. Third St. W., at 7 PM. Free.

The Mighty Flick comes to town and plays all those songs that your Uncle Steve listens to whenever he drinks too much Budweiser and starts talking about the Gulf War. Dark Horse, 1805 Regent St. 9 PM. Free.

Watch them get down when the Elenita Brown Dancers perform Dance into Spring! a dance performance featuring a myriad of dancing styles. Stevi’s Senior Center, 100 Mission St. 7 PM. Donations welcome.

Oh lordy, I’ve got the vapors again, Curly Sue, cuz Sister Soul & The Medicine Company are playing the Union Club. Bring me a strawberry tea. 9 PM. Free.

Ready. Set. Oboe! Mr. Clint Whittle plies his trade during his oboe/organ senior recital at the University Congregational Church, 405 University Ave. How rad is the oboe? The rest of the concert band tunes to it. 7:30 PM. Free. Get your farce on, Shakespeare fans at the UM School of Theatre & Dance’s production of Comedy of Errors at the Masquer Theatre. 7:30 PM. $16/$14 seniors/$10 for those 12 and under. Go off and see the wizard at the Stevensville Playhouse’s performance

Shoot out the lights, the Wild Coyote Band is playing the Hideout Bar south of Hamilton, 942 Hub Ln. 9 PM. Free.

Celebrate youth and you at the Beaux Arts Ball Fundraiser, which honors graduating art students and has music by CoPilot and J. Sherri. Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St. 9 PM. $5. Countrify yourself and take in the fine dance music of County Line at the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave. 9:30 PM. Free. John “Poncho” Dobson hosts open mic at Fergie’s Pub every Fri., where you’re bound to mingle with a mix of resort celebs, odd locals and dizzy soakers. You never know who’ll show up and play. It could be you. Starts at 3 PM. 213 Main Street

in Hot Springs. Sign up ahead at 406721-2416 or just show up.

SATURDAYMAY04 Go off and see the wizard at the Stevensville Playhouse’s performance of The Wizard of Oz. 2 PM and 7:30 PM. $10/$8 for children 12 and under. Visit stevensvilleplayhouse.org. Support the young and clever baseballists at the Rummage Sale to Benefit Missoula Mud Dawgs Travel Baseball Club. The sale takes place at 2620 Willow Wood Ct., Apt. A. 8 AM– 1 PM.

RIDEG LAW OFFICE Missoula • 626-1500 Serving all of Western Montana Family Law | Contracts | Employment Real Estate Transactions

Check out the wood and maybe get some ideas of your own at the Missoula Woodcarver’s annual Montana State Woodcarving Show at the Fairgrounds Co-Arts Building. The event features vendors, judging, raffles and a fundraiser for The Carousel. 9 AM. $3, ages 12 and younger free. Veg out with your carrot out during the Hamilton Farmers Market, where folks can purchase all sorts of dee-lish local goodies from area farmers. Third and Bedford streets. 9 AM– 12:30 PM. Make that Rock Creek a more better place and attend the Rock Creek Confluence work day where volunteers can remove barbed wire and silt fencing, clean up trash, and maybe pull some invasive plants, too. Snacks and water provided as well as a kids’ activity. 9:30–2 PM. RSVP at tracy.wendt@umontana.edu. Russ and Sam Nasset play that wang dang sweet country twang at the Good Food Store anniversary party at 11:30 AM. Free. Missoula, grab your coats, shorts, Tevas, boots or umbrellas and head to Caras Park for the 21st Annual Garden City BrewFest, with 65 beers and 12 wines, along with tunes by The Hasslers and The Boxcutters. Noon–8 PM. Free, but peeps can get a 7-ounce commemorative glass, a wristband and two beer tokens for $12. Additional tokens are $1 each. The guild that sews together, stays together, so join Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., at Craft Vigilantes, its monthly Modern Quilt Guild for beginners and pros alike. 12–5 PM. $20 (first few sign-ups are free). The Know Your Farmer Family Festival is a family-friendly farming festival. Learn about bees, cows, chickens, gardening, grains and lambswool through activities and games. Most importantly, there is a petting zoo. As a benefit for the Spirit At Play preschool, a raffle and silent auction also takes place. 621 Stephens Ave. Noon. $20 suggested donation. Everybody cut, everybody cut down to the MCT Center for the Per-

missoulanews.com • May 2 – May 9, 2013 [31]


[calendar] forming Arts, 200 N. Adams St., for the Missoula Community Theatre’s production of the song and dance classic, Footloose. 2 PM. For cost and more info visit mctinc.org. Go off and see the wizard at the Stevensville Playhouse’s performance of The Wizard of Oz. 2 PM and 7:30 PM. $10/$8 for children 12 and under. Visit stevensvilleplayhouse.org.

nightlife Grandma’s Little Darlings make you swoon like a loon on the moon when the group plays Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 5–8 PM. Free. Russ Nasset and the Revelators head down the ‘Root and make more country-tonk music than you can shake a gopher at. Bitter Root Brewery. 6–8:30 PM. Free. Get seduced and perhaps assassinated by the Burlesque Assassins, a movie of titillating proportions. With a special performance by local lasses The Cigarette Girls Burlesque. Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. 7 PM. $13/$10 advance at Rockin Rudy’s. (See Arts.) A bunch of ragtag musicians with who-knows-what kind of instruments get together from 7 to 9:30 PM on the first Sat. of every month for the Bitterroot Valley Good-Time Jamboree

Walk on. Caleb Meyer’s exhibit Light and Shadow is on display at the Dana Gallery, 246 N. Higgins Ave., Fri., May 3, from 5 to 8 PM. Free.

at the Grange Hall, 1436 South First St. in Hamilton. This month there’s Irish tunes, cowboy poetry, jazz and western swing. $3 donations are encouraged. Call Clem at 961-4949. Get your farce on, Shakespeare fans at the UM School of Theatre &

Dance’s production of Comedy of Errors at the Masquer Theatre. 7:30 PM. $16/$14 seniors/$10 for those 12 and under. Park the ponies and head to the Wilma for some EDM action with Mord Fustang. 7 PM. VIP/Backstage

Package $56.50/$17.50. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s and ticketfly.com. Dance like Uncle Cooter is watching during the Missoula Folklore Society Contra Dance, which features Out Of The Woods playing and Morna Leonard calling. Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins Ave. Lessons at 7:30 PM, dance from 8–11 PM. $9/$6 members. Northern Lights unleash la luz del bueno tiempo dance tuneage for you and yours at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. ¡Baila, baila, baila! 8 PM. Free. Back Adit is, uhh, back at it, this time playing swing and jazz music at the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs. 8 PM. Pass the hat. Everybody cut, everybody cut down to the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St., for the Missoula Community Theatre’s production of the song and dance classic, Footloose. 8 PM. For cost and more info visit mctinc.org. The Brick Room presents Latin Dance Night, with DJ Heart, who promises that the cha-cha is more than you can handle. No-host bar catered by The Badlander. A portion of the proceeds benefit Espiritu Flamenco. No experience necessary, but for those who would like a little boost in their Salsa steps, there are lessons available starting at 8:30 PM. $10/$16 per couple. Have mercy, as Uncle Jesse used to say. Brother Mercy plays the Alcan Bar in Frenchtown. 9 PM. Free. Hear bands battle blissfully with bandoleers of bass, booming guitar and beautiful voices at Top of the Mic

[32] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013

4, a yearly music contest for area musicians. Tonight is the semi-finals. Rock and roll hootchie-coo! Sean Kelly’s, 130 W. Pine St. 9 PM. Free. Establish your territory before lighting a fire when Stomping Ground opens for Blackberry Smoke at the Top Hat at 10 PM. $17/$15 in advance at Rockin Rudy’s and online at tophatlounge.com. Say goodbye to Aunt Rhoda and hello to the new lifestyle when All Night Alibi plays the Union Club. 9 PM. Free. Electronical triptycals and rock and roll heartaches imbue the VFW with the light of an Egyptian tomb cat when Stacian and Samantha Glass are joined by Skin Flowers and J. Sherri. 245 W. Main St. 9 PM. Cost TBA. The weird beard olympics trip out and get real when fusion freaks Compassion Gorilla play psychedelicious tunes for you and Cousin Steve at Stage 112 inside the Elk’s Lodge, 112 S. Pattee St. 9 PM. $7/$5 adv. Absolutely with DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are like ShabbaDoo and Boogaloo Shrimp, saving rec centers one beat at at time. Get hip to their jamz, hippies. Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2-for-1 Absolut drinks until midnight. $2. Put all that Vitamin B to good use and move your body at the Unofficial Brewfest Afterparty at the Palace, with bluesy dance folks Shakewell and Three Eared Dog. 9 PM. $5. The Mighty Flick comes to town and plays all those songs that your Uncle Steve listens to whenever he drinks too much Budweiser and starts talking about the Gulf War.


[calendar] Dark Horse, 1805 Regent St. 9 PM. Free. See what a good-looking pile of copper pennies looks like when The Copper Mountain Band plays the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave. 9:30 PM. Free. Keep the party rolling at the Mord Fustang Official After Party presented by BFK & One Eleven & Royale, with performances by Keishie, Christian Jackson, Tak 45 and Kapture. Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St. 10 PM. $5. 18 plus.

SUNDAYMAY05 Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with Josh Farmer, The Vanguard Combo and Front Street Jazz. Free.

This is the kind of mass I can really get behind. The Missoula Area Secular Society presents its Sunday M.A.S.S. Lunch, where atheists, secular humanists, agnostics and other freethinkers meet the first “Sun. of every month for lunch at 11:30 AM in the Elbow Room. 1855 Stephens Ave. Free to attend, but the food costs you. Visit secularmissoula.org. Check out the wood and maybe get some ideas of your own at the Missoula Woodcarver’s annual Montana State Woodcarving Show at the Fairgrounds Co-Arts Building. The event features vendors, judging, raffles and a fundraiser for The Carousel. 9 AM. $3, ages 12 and younger free. Everybody cut, everybody cut down to the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St., for the Missoula Community Theatre’s production of the song and dance classic, Footloose. 2 PM and 6:30 PM. For cost and more info visit mctinc.org. Go off and see the wizard at the Stevensville Playhouse’s performance of The Wizard of Oz. 2 PM. $10/$8 for children 12 and under. Visit stevensvilleplayhouse.org. Larry Hirshberg and his breakdance crew pop and lock on a cardboard box or he performs with his guitar and voice at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. It’s definitely one of those things. 4–6 PM. Free.

nightlife Nosh on croquettes and enjoy opera with Neila Getz at the Top Hat dinner show from 5 to 7 PM. A fundraiser is helping send Getz to Italy to study opera. Free.

MONDAYMAY06

        

         

The delightful ditties of Whippletree pair quite nicely with the Chicago-style roast beef sandwich at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. All requests for Hole songs are appreciated. 7–10 PM. Free. Come on down for Moscow Monday at the Montgomery Distillery, 129 W. Front St., where the distillery redistributes the wealth. (It ain’t called Wall Street Wednesday, amiright?) $1 from every drink sold is donated to a different non-profit each Monday. Family friendly, from noon–8 PM. Anyone affected by epilepsy can come to the Epilepsy Support Group at Summit Independent Living Center, 700 SW Higgins Ave. 2–3:30 PM. Free. Call 721-0707. The Rough Cut Science Seminar Series shows off the brainiacs of Montana’s scientific community, with presentations on current research each week at 4 PM in the University Center Theater. Visit montanaioe.org/ rough-cut-series for the schedule.



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nightlife Occupy Missoula General Assembly meets at the Union Hall above the Union Club at 6 PM. Visit occupymissoula.org.

       

The UM Climate Action Now Meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM FLAT, 633 Fifth St. E. 6:30 PM. Bingo at the VFW: the easiest way to make rent since keno. 245 W. Main. 6:45 PM. $12 buy-in. The kids are all right and their choir is too, so grab a listen to the UM Choir at the Dennison Theatre. 7:30 PM. $5-$11. Show the Man how big your gray matter can get at Super Trivia Freakout. Win a bar tab, shots, and other mystery prizes during the five rounds of trivia. Badlander. 8:30 PM. Free. Birthday, we’re gonna party like it’s your birthday but it’s really Logisticalone’s Birthday Bash at MAD Monday in the Palace. With dubstep tunes from the Milkcrate Mechanic, Primecutz, Sounsiva and the birthday kid, Logisticalone. 9 PM. Free, with $6 pitchers of PBR. Watch out for fathers who smell of elderberries at the Top Hat’s movie night showing of Monty Python and the Holy Grail, starting at 9 PM. Free, all ages. Open Mic with Joey Running Crane at the VFW, 245 W. Main, seems like a fine idea, especially with 2-for-1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. 10 PM. Free. Call him up and get yourself a slot at 229-0488.

missoulanews.com • May 2 – May 9, 2013 [33]


[34] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013


[calendar] You know it’s gotta be a real party when DJ Super Steve rocks the karaoke with the hottest Kamikaze tuneage this side of the hemisphere at the Dark Horse. Are you brave enough to let the computer pick your songs? 9 PM. Free.

TUESDAYMAY07 Carl Kassel and co. do the news with a wink and a nudge and some pithy commentary during the broadcast of NPR’s Sunday staple “Wait, Wait…Don’t Tell Me,” at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. Guests include Steve Martin and Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings. 7:30 PM. Tickets are $14-$18 and are available at Rockin Rudy’s and morrisproductions.org. Fun with Yoga at the Families First Children’s Museum might work for you and the kids. It might make you cry, too. 11 AM. 225 W. Front. $4.25. Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room for Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters, at 5205 Grant Creek Dr., and work on your elk-camp locution with the best. All are invited. Noon–1 PM. Free. Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. Third St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1–3 PM. For information, call 543-3955. Do you like counting stuff? Bikes? Pedestrians? Word up, then sign up to count humans for the Missoula Metropolitan Planning Organization’s Bicycle & Pedestrian Traffic Count Program. Training sessions take place in the Development Services Conference room (the basement floor of City Hall). 4–6 PM. Please contact Lewis at 552-6671 or e-mail LKelley@ci.missoula.mt.us.

nightlife It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Boys Bluegrass from 5:30 to 8 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication, a non-violent communication weekly practice group, at the Jeanette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Noon. Free. Get your farce on, Shakespeare fans at the UM School of Theatre & Dance’s production of Comedy of Errors at the Masquer Theatre. 7:30 PM. $16/$14 seniors/$10 for those 12 and under. Find your dance and yourself at Turning the Wheel’s Tapestry class, which is a self-expression-filled improv-

Missoula Ultimate Frisbee Spring League. No prior experience necessary. Fee includes disc, shirt, beer (21+) and fun times every Wed. evening at 6 PM through May 29. Playfair Park, 1600 Bancroft St. $45. Visit missoulaultimate.com.

skate or buy Good gravy, it’s been pert-near seven years since the Montana Skatepark Association opened the Mobash Skatepark in Missoula. And now we’ve arrived at the eighth installment of On Deck. The fundraiser helps MSA raise funds to build more skateparks throughout the state, as well as maintain and expand the ones already built, and it gives artists a chance to use a different sort of medium to create their projects: a skateboard deck. While one could purchase a deck at the auction and throw some trucks and wheels on it, it’d be a doggone shame to grind away the work of so many talented artists. The style of decks for this year’s fundraiser range in style from the titillating work of Troy Evans’ “Toxic Flamethrower,” to Courtney Blazon’s spritely colored “Scandinavian Yulegoat,” to a couple horse-themed pieces. This year Japanese artist Haroshi has donated a deck to the auction and shared “Skull,” a piece from his Virtual Reality exhibition. Haroshi is himself a skater and he regularly uses recycled skateboard

Order the pearled barley when Mudslide Charley plays the Top Hat dinner show from 6-8 PM. Free, all ages. The Women’s Club hosts Missoula’s women police detectives for one night of self-defense awareness and attack prevention training. Learn techniques for creating safe situations and minimizing risk. 2105 Bow St. 6:30 PM. Call 728-4410. Peter Neufeld, co-founder and codirector of the Innocence Project, speaks at the Missoula Winery, 5646 Harrier Way, from 6:30–8:30 PM. Suggested donation $40 for attorneys/$25 for general public/$10 for students. (See Agenda.)

Haroshi’s “Skull”

What: On Deck 8 WHO: Japan-based artist Haroshi, with local artists Andrea Leggitt, Emily Fitterman and many more. WHERE: The Brink Gallery, 111 W. Front St. WHEN: Fri., May 3, from 5 PM to 10 PM HOW MUCH: Free More Info: Visit montanaskatepark.org isational dance bonanza. Headwaters Dance Company studio, 1042 Monroe St. 7:30-9 PM. $10. Proceeds benefit Turning the Wheel’s school programs. Hey jerks, pay attention, cuz the Edge of the World-curated VFW Residency is all over the place this month. Week one includes Bacon & Egg with Vera. 245 W. Main St. 8 PM. $2. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free pub trivia, which takes place every Tuesday at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with: April showers bring May flowers; what do May flowers bring? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.) The Montana Musicians and Artists Coalition hosts the Musician Showcase at Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St., an evening of tuneful live tuneage made by locals for locals. 8–11 PM. Free. 18 plus. Take a peek into your odd future when rap impresario Tyler, the Creator does work on the Top Hat stage. With Earl Sweatshirt. 8 PM. All ages. $28/$25 advance at Rockin Rudy’s or jadepresents.com.

decks to create new, three-dimensional artworks. He stacks the decks and creates large laminated pieces that he shaves down into smaller works. In all, there are 45 decks up for auction. Potential bidders have until Thur., May 2, at 5 p.m. to bid on a deck online. Decks are then bid on in person or via a proxy at the gallery, where things get animated, like any good auction involving art lovers, skateboarders and wine drinkers. —Jason McMackin

Fans of pop punk, jars of peanut butter, The Kinks’ first three albums and the way the moonlight looks on Taylor Swift’s skin in that one video about how her boyfriend is totally lame should head to the Badlander for an evening of top-notch tuneage from Friends of Cesar Romero, Buddy Jackson and King Elephant. 9 PM. Free.

Who makes your favorite pizza?

WEDNESDAYMAY08 The UM School of Theatre & Dance presents another edition of Dance in Concert, an evening of varying styles of choreography and dance at the Montana Theatre, in the UM PARTV Center. 7:30 PM. $10-$20. Visit umtheatredance.org. The Carousel Sunday Market is providing 10 free spaces to agricultural vendors who donate $20 worth of produce each week to Mountain Home Montana and the Watson Children’s Shelter. For more info call 549-8382.

nightlife

Vote with the ballot

on Page 11 Take the red pill or the blue pill, either way it’ll be a freaky ride when Masaki Batoh, formerly of Japanese experimental rockists Ghost, blasts you with his “brain pulse music” after trippy locals Modality and Atrocity Singers open at the Palace. $8. 9 PM.

Help complete the nation’s longest trail, the Continental Divide Trail, and join CDT Montana for Kettlehouse Community Unite Pint Night for CDT Montana at the Northside taproom. Sign up to volunteer or donate to the cause by hoisting a pint. 5–8 PM. Visit wildmontana.org. (See Mountain High.) Looking for the ultimate athletic experience? Need something fun to do this spring? Then register for the

Get your farce on, Shakespeare fans at the UM School of Theatre & Dance’s production of Comedy of Errors at the Masquer Theatre. 7:30 PM. $16/$14 seniors/$10 for those 12 and under. Everybody cut, everybody cut down to the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St., for the Missoula Community Theatre’s production of the song and dance classic, Footloose. 8 PM. For cost and more info visit mctinc.org. It’s a total eclipse of the heart and there’s nothing left to say, so you may as well shut up and dance at the Manhattan Project’s Broken Heart Ball in the Palace, with tunes by DJs Nic Jaymes, Asyn9, Beatloaf and Spacebag. 9 PM. Free. (Pub trivia answer: Pilgrims.) Kraptastic Karaoke welcomes Black Eyed Peas fanatics to belt out their fave jamz at the Badlander, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $5 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free. Mudslide Charley kicks it off and Down North pass it down the field at the Top Hat, starting at 9:30 PM. Free, 21 plus.

THURSDAYMAY09 Call Alex Jones, cuz the Captain Wilson Conspiracy is performing at Hamilton’s Bitter Root Brewery. Something tells me there’s more to these guys than their name implies. 6–8:30 PM. Free.

nightlife The UM American Indian Student Services hosts an eight-week Insider/Outsider Film Series at the Payne Family Native American Center on the UM campus. It has a strict

missoulanews.com • May 2 – May 9, 2013 [35]


[calendar] the same scent). Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight.

“B.Y.O.F. (bring your own frybread)” policy, according to the group’s press release. This week’s film is The Exiles. 5–7 PM. Free.

Show up the rest of the room with your version of “Ninja Survive” when you hit the Dark Horse for Combat Karaoke hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free.

Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free. Come on ride the train and join, choo-choo, the Mountain Breathers, choo-choo, at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave., choo-choo, from 6–8 PM. Free.

Burst your ear holes and bust an old time groove in your robot walkers at Archaic Revival, an evening of electronic music with Lil Sassy and DJs Rockstocki, HAuLi and Nic Jaymes, at the Palace. 9 PM. Free. Also includes a 2-for-1 well drink special.

Get learned at the Bitterroot Public Library’s Fellowship Club which discusses The Shift by Dr. Wayne W. Dyer. Check your ego’s advancement. 6–7:30 PM. Free. Wind down your week when the Kimberlee Carlson Jazz Trio plays the Top Hat from 6-8 PM. Free. Get your farce on, Shakespeare fans at the UM School of Theatre & Dance’s production of Comedy of Errors. Masquer Theatre. 7:30 PM. $16/$14 seniors/$10 for those 12 and under. The UM School of Theatre & Dance presents another edition of Dance in Concert, an evening of varying styles of choreography and dance at the Montana Theatre, in the UM PARTV Center. 7:30 PM. $10-$20. Visit umtheatredance.org.

After a tough day of stretching them wires tight, join The Idle Ranch Hands at the VFW, 245 W. Main St., with Cash for Junkers and The Hasslers. 9 PM. $5. Pointed comment inserted here. The UM School of Theatre & Dance performs Shakespeare’s Comedy of Errors at the Masquer Theatre, Tue. through Sat. evenings at 7:30 PM until Sat., May 11. Tickets are $10$16. Visit umtheatredance.org.

Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM. Everybody cut, everybody cut down to the MCT Center for the Per-

[36] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013

forming Arts, 200 N. Adams St., for the Missoula Community Theatre’s production of the classic, Footloose. 8 PM. For more info visit mctinc.org. During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, amazing musicians could play some great jams. Just don’t tell your cousin Rapping Timmy about it.

That guy’s version of “Santeria” is terrible. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up. The Dead Hipster Dance Party is all kinds of sweaty, but ‘tis the droplets of the beautiful people. Get a taste in the place where love and funk is in the air (sometimes they are

The farmers markets are about to start and Sammy Hagar is playing at a casino in Spokane this summer. Things are beginning to look up, people. Also, send your event info to me by 5 PM on Fri., May 3, at calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to The Calemandar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online at missoulanews.com.


[outdoors]

MOUNTAIN HIGH

F

riends, I am here to tell you what you have always desired to hear: You can have it all. At least according to the Montana Wilderness Association, which is sponsoring a fundraiser for the maintenance and development of the Montana and Idaho sections of the Continental Divide Trail. By purchasing a Kettlehouse beer, and perhaps signing up to volunteer some time later this summer to do a pip of trail maintenance, you get to go outside and see some amazing country, plus partake in refreshing beverages. MWA staff are traveling to breweries throughout the state to collect enough volunteers to help maintain 1,000 miles or so of trail. Though it’s a bit reminiscent

of drunks being pressed into service during WWII for firefighting, it is a worthy cause nonetheless. In preparation, I encourage you to pull out your Pulaski and dig a trench in your backyard, beer in hand. —Jason McMackin The Kettlehouse Community Unite Pint Night for the Montana Wilderness Association takes place Wed., May 8, from 5 to 8 PM at the Northside Kettlehouse taproom, 235 N. First St. The first 25 people to buy a beer and membership receive a free CDT pint glass. For more information visit wildmontana.org.

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

THURSDAY MAY 2 Hey bro-daddies, check the Mt. Sentinel Budburst with the Native Plant Society guide, botanist Michael Krebs. See 130 plants and stretch them legs. 6:30 PM. Meet on the south side of the UM campus, at the corner of Beckwith and Madeline avenues at the picnic table east of the Forest Service research lab. Call Clare 728-0189 for details.

FRIDAY MAY 3 Check out this Calemander-approved event, y’all: The Great Bear Foundation (GBF) 14th annual International Multicultural Bear Honoring. This three-day bear fest includes a Bear Foods Buffet at Greenough Park, an exploration of the Mission Mountains and a trip to Glacier Park. For a full schedule visit greatbear.org. Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s weekly meeting to talk about past glories and upcoming activities at Bigfork’s Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free. Make sure your first time is special by attending First Timer Friday at the Freestone Climbing Center, 935 Toole Ave. in Missoula, at 7 PM. Free.

SATURDAY MAY 4 Bird and binocular lovers view waterfowl, raptors, Sandhill cranes, longbilled curlews and other migrants, during the Five Valleys Audubon Brown’s Lake Trip. Meet in the middle of the UM Field House parking lot for carpooling. The group leaves at 8 AM and returns around 4 PM. Dress appropriately and bring a lunch. For more info call Terry at 214-1194. Don’t run on a full stomach during Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which occur at 8 AM every Saturday at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. in Missoula. It’s after the run/walk that you can grab breakfast with other participants. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org. Color me bad for not signing up for the Color Me Rad 5K, where runners are doused with hyper-coloresque powdered hues along the course for some reason. Flying H Stables, 13699 Mullan Rd. 9 AM. Visit colormerad.com.

Load up the pemmican and dust off the tomahawk for the Fort Connah Restoration Society Open House Rendezvous up in St. Ignatius. The rendezvous site is a recreation of Montana’s 1846 Hudson’s Bay Trading Post. Games, crafts, knife throwing and more old-timey activities. The fun starts at 9 AM. The site entrance is located about 4 miles north of St. Ignatius on the east side of Hwy. 93. For more info or to participate call Preston or Carolyn at 745-4336.

SUNDAY MAY 5 Head west to the heart of the inland northwest and take part in Spokane’s Bloomsday Run, a 12K race that hosts 50,000 runners and features one big hill near the finish. Visit bloomsdayrun.org. Think you’re escaping and run into yourself. Or run in and around Spokane this Bloomsday. Join Run Wild Missoula and Ride the Bloomsday Bus with Us, which hauls runners to the longtime Spokane race. The bus leaves from the Main St. parking garage at 5:15 AM. Cost is $50-$75. Visit runwildmissoula.org. The Fort Connah Restoration Society Open House Rendezvous up in St. Ignatius continues. The rendezvous site is a recreation of Montana’s 1846 Hudson’s Bay Trading Post. Games, crafts, knife throwing and more old-timey activities. The fun starts at 9 AM. The site entrance is located about 4 miles north of St. Ignatius on the east side of Hwy. 93. For more info or to participate call Preston or Carolyn at 745-4336.

WEDNESDAY MAY 8 Looking for the ultimate athletic experience? Need something fun to do this spring? Then register for the Missoula Ultimate Frisbee Spring League. No prior experience necessary. Fee includes disc, shirt, beer (21+) and fun times every Wed. evening at 6 PM through May 29. Playfair Park, 1600 Bancroft St. $45. Visit missoulaultimate.com. calendar@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • May 2 – May 9, 2013 [37]


[community]

According to the Innocence Project’s latest figures, the organization has exonerated 306 wrongfully convicted people. The average amount of time the exonerees spent in prison is 13 years, while one spent 35 years of his life behind bars. The Innocence Project uses DNA evidence to help people get released. The group’s website claims that as many as “5 percent of all prisoners in the U.S. are innocent.” Even lowballing that figure and assuming that 1 percent of prisoners are innocent, that would mean that 20,000 people are wrongfully imprisoned in this country. To quote my Grandpa, “What is this, Russia?” So far, in this state, the Montana Innocence Project has exonerated three men: Chester Bauer, Paul Kordonowy and Jimmy Ray Bromgard. Currently, the Montana Innocence Project is working on the behalf of Richard Raugust,

who is accused of killing his best friend 15 years ago. One of the founders of the national Innocence Project, civil rights attorney Peter Neufeld, comes to Missoula to speak about the latest in forensic technologies and their impact on the legal world. Things in the lab may not be as quick and easy as television makes it look, but it would seem that with the help of modern technology, justice for some is in the making. —Jason McMackin The Montana Innocence Project hosts Peter Neufeld, co-founder and co-director of the Innocence Project, at the M i s s o u l a Wi n e r y, 56 4 6 H a r r i e r Wa y, from 6:30 PM to 8:30 PM. $40 for attorneys/$25 general/$10 students. Visit mtinnocenceproject.org.

[AGENDA LISTINGS] THURSDAY MAY 2 You know you wanna get off your duff and help out your community, so learn how during the Imagine Missoula Q&A where Program Director Nina Alviar, volunteers and those older folks who’ve received services speak about the group’s mission to help older adults feel like part of the community. UM Skaggs Bldg., Rm. 169. 5:30 PM.

Montgomery Distillery, 129 W. Front St., where the distillery redistributes the wealth. (It ain’t called Wall Street Wednesday, amiright?) $1 from every drink sold is donated to a different non-profit each Monday. Family friendly, from noon–8 PM. Occupy Missoula General Assembly meets at the Union Hall above the Union Club at 6 PM. Visit occupymissoula.org.

Children of the Earth Tribe Song and Chant Circle at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center is for all those ready to sing in honor of our connection to one another and the earth. 519 S. Higgins (Enter through back alley door.). 7:30 PM. Free will offering.

The UM Climate Action Now Meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM FLAT, 633 Fifth St. E. 6:30 PM.

FRIDAY MAY 3

Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. Third St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1–3 PM. For information, call 543-3955.

Join the Montana chapter of the New Leaders Council for a rockin’ good time for a progressive cause. Featuring local groups The Hasslers and the Mountain Breathers and the presentation of the 2013 Local Leader of the Year Award. Burns St. Events Center, 1500 Burns St. 7 PM. $10 suggested donation. Please visit www.new leaderscouncil.org to learn more.

SATURDAY MAY 4 Support the young and clever baseballists at the Rummage Sale to Benefit Missoula Mud Dawgs Travel Baseball Club. The sale takes place at 2620 Willow Wood Ct., Apt. A. 8 AM–1 PM. Do you like counting stuff? Bikes? Pedestrians? Word up, then sign-up to count humans for the Missoula Metropolitan Planning Organization’s Bicycle & Pedestrian Traffic Count Program. In the basement floor of City Hall. Noon–2 PM. Please contact Lewis at 552-6671.

TUESDAY MAY 7

Do you like counting stuff? Bikes? Pedestrians? Word up, then signup to count humans for the Missoula Metropolitan Planning Organization’s Bicycle & Pedestrian Traffic Count Program. Training sessions take place in the basement floor of City Hall). 4–6 PM. Please contact Lewis at 552-6671 or e-mail LKelley@ci.missoula.mt.us. Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication, at the Jeanette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Noon. Free.

WEDNESDAY MAY 8 The Carousel Sunday Market is providing 10 free spaces to agricultural vendors who donate $20 worth of produce each week to Mountain Home Montana and the Watson Children’s Shelter. For more info call 549-8382.

SUNDAY MAY 5

THURSDAY MAY 9

This is the kind of mass I can really get behind. The Missoula Area Secular Society presents its Sunday M.A.S.S. Lunch, where atheists, secular humanists, agnostics and other freethinkers meet the first Sun. of every month for lunch at 11:30 AM in the Elbow Room. 1855 Stephens Ave. Free to attend, but the food costs you. Visit secularmissoula.org.

Party on, excellent, it’s the Soroptimist Spirit of Excellence Award’s Banquet & Benefit takes place at Ruby’s Inn & Convention Center 4825 N. Reserve St. Awards are received, trips are given away and it all benefits the auctioned–off Missoula Youth Homes’ Susan Talbot Home for Girls and The Girls Way. $25 per ticket for banquet, $10 per ticket for vacation drawing. 5–9 PM. For tickets call Michelle at 240-5991 or doterralove12@gmail.com.

MONDAY MAY 6 Come on down for Moscow Monday at the

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

[38] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control 541-7387 COCO• Coco looks rather like a grumpy old man in his picture, and he is an older dog, but he's definitely not grumpy and he doesn't even act old. He's a handsome, mellow dog who likes other dogs and really loves people.

QUINCY•Yes, in case you are wondering, Quincy is just as cute in real life as he is in his picture. This sweet little fellow is lively, but not hyper like some small dogs can be. He'd love to be your companion and best friend.

Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MTSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

RED•Red was named for the color of his

coat, but if he had been named for his personality we would be calling him "Friendly" or "Happy". He's a great dog who gets along with 2330 South Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59801 everyone and would love to have his own spe- Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) cial person. 3708 North Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59808

CRICKET•Cricket is a shy, sweet cat with a beautiful diluted calico coat. She gets along very well with other cats and is actually rather lonely since her cage-mate was adopted. She'd make a wonderful pet.

FIREFLY•Firefly is shy and a bit skittish

Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

with new people, but we know that with some patience and gentle handling on the part of a new family, she would settle into a new home very well and be a joy to have around.

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

RAPA•Rapa is something of a wild woman

in our cat room, but that's because she doesn't like other cats. She loves people and is friendly, happy, and entertaining when she interacts with them without other cats around. Just give her a chance!

Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri) Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 9:00am-12:00pm (Sat)

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana 549-3934 SPRUCE•Just call me Mr. Adorable. I'm

ARLO•Wisdom is the name of the game

Spruce, a scruffy black terrier kissed with white markings on my chin and my toe. I hail from California, but you can tell by my outgoing personality & tail-wagging that I’m thrilled to be in Montana. Have another dog? Awesome! I’m friendly and outgoing with people and pups alike! Let’s meet.

BASIL•A sweet little Chihuahua cross who’s enjoyed a good amount of life, Basil is 8years-young and looking for her forever family. Bashful at first, she warms to people rather quickly, and enjoys hanging out with other dogs. Looking for a delightful senior pup to complement your life? You really should come meet Basil. DALLAS• Looking for some playfulness in your life? You need to meet Dallas, a 1 ½-yearold Terrier/Cattle Dog mix who will make you laugh all day long with her silly antics. Super smart with a go-to attitude, Dallas loves to play and would make a great running partner. She’s also housetrained and has the basics down. Come say hello!

with this happy boy. At 10-years-young, he’s figured out how to coax a good rub from you while snuggling in your lap. A grey, shorthaired kitty, Arlo delights in being your personal assistant, and enjoys the companionship of other cats and dogs. Looking for some wisdom in your life?

Flowers for every bride. In Trouble or in Love? The Flower Bed has affordable flowers for all your needs.

The Flower Bed

2405 McDonald Ave. 721-9233

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

JAMES•Howdy, I’m the ginger-red rabbit

called James. Only 1 year old, I enjoy the comfort / safety of my cage; however, I find exploring my surrounds most appealing. I’m called a cuddle bug by experienced bunny folks and those with a gentle hand. Yes, I’m a bit shy, but am also delightfully sweet & affectionate. Are you a bunny person? Let’s see if we’re a match.

Improving Lives One Pet at a Time Missoula’s Unique Alternative for pet Supplies

www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275 627 Woody • 3275 N. Reserve Street Corner of 39th and Russell in Russell Square

ASHER•Handsome MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

is this boy’s middle name. Coupled with his friendly, easygoing and social personality, he’s a keeper on all fronts. Asher, a senior kitty with many years of love and devotion ahead of him, exudes confidence. Offer him your lap and he’ll climb on it like it’s his throne. Looking for a calm, easygoing fellow? Come meet Asher.

These pets may be adopted at AniMeals 721-4701 TABITHA•Tabitha is a 4-year-old female

orange tabby who has been with AniMeals for two years. She is a very sweet girl; however, she will need a single cat home and a patient owner. She is shy upon first introduction, but once she gets to know you, she is very loving.

ROCKY• Rocky is a large 5-year-old male tabby. He is declawed on the front, extremely loving and prefers to live with other female cats. He is tentative and cautious around men, but instantly cuddles with women.

GALENA•Galena

is a 3-year-old female, long-haired tabby. She is playful and full of energy. She is looking for an indoor/outdoor environment and would do well in a multiple-pet home, as long as she has her own space.

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

715 Kensington Ste 8

406-240-1113

J. Willis Photography

Find me on FACEBOOK jessicagoulding.zenfolio.com specializing in weddings, pets, families, babies, senior pictures, fine art, and more!

LEONA•Leona is a 6-year-old female lilac

Rockin Rudy’s World Headquarters 237 Blaine • 542-0077

tortoiseshell who has been at the shelter since January of 2012. She gets along well with children and other cats but is often overlooked because of her quiet, calm disposition.

missoulanews.com • May 2 – May 9, 2013 [39]


COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Big Sky Bouncers Your biggest and best bouncer house rental company this side of the divide. Half and full day rental (free delivery within 15 miles of Lolo). (406) 273-9001 www.bigskybouncers.com CHERRY FESTIVAL SEEKING VENDORS Wanted: Seeking vendors for Polson’s Main Street Flathead Cherry Festival. This is a very well-attended event, held on the main streets of Polson July 20th and 21st. This unique celebration of Montana’s cherries draws many thousands of visitors each year. Three booth sizes are available, making this affordable for anyone. Local Montana-made and cherrythemed products are preferred. Food vendors welcome. To view and fill out an application, please visit www.flatheadcherryfestival.com. Booth spaces are limited and our deadline is May

24, 2013. This is a two-day event and we reserve the right to refuse duplicate products. You can direct questions to vendors@flatheadcherryfestival.c om, or 406-686-1155. Curious about Acupuncture? Experience a MiniAcupuncture Treatment for Stress Relief & Relaxation. Rejuvenate your Mind, Body & Spirit. 30 Minutes only $20. Ask how acupuncture may help you! Gentle Acupuncture by Karen Hayberg L.AC. (406) 396-0815

Time for Spring Cleaning. Call for an estimate. RC Services 241-0101 www.rcservices.info

LOST & FOUND Ring Found at Mustard Seed Sunday 4/14. Call 721-7444 to identify

May 2 - May 9, 2013

Stolen Bike 4th st Red Women’s Trek Multitrack 700, Skull and crossbone sticker under handlebars. My only way to work, school 406-320-0637

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Piano Lessons

“I found a brighter world, I found Unity”

At YOUR Home All Ages, All Levels

Bruce- 546-5541

Table of contents Advice Goddess . . . . . .C2 Free Will Astrology . . .C4 Public Notices . . . . . . . .C5

546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

Crossword . . . . . . . . . .C5 Sustainafieds . . . . . . . .C8

Grout Rite Your tile & grout specialists. Free Estimates. Over 31 yrs exp. 406-273-9938. www.groutrite.com

FREE

Estimates

SOCIAL SECURITY DENIED? Call Bulman Law Associates 7217744 www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com

406-880-0688

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This Modern World . .C12

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Fletch Law, Steve M. Fletcher Attorney at Law

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Send it. Post it. classified@missoulanews.com

PET OF THE WEEK MR MYSTERY Intrigued by my name? I’ll clue you in. . . you see, I’m pretty certain I was a dog in my previous life. I love hanging out with dogs, going on walks with them and cuddling with my canine friends. You’d also never guess I’m 11-years young – clearly a mystery. A grey & black Maine Coon cross, I can be chatty when you come home or when meeting new people. Oh, and my mystery? Kids, but I’ve learned to play with them. Western Montana Humane Society 549-9864. www.myHSWM.org

"I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel" - Maya Angelou


ADVICE GODDESS

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

By Amy Alkon

TO GIVE AWAY

I work 9 to 5, and my girlfriend of two years is retired and pretty much free all day. I've asked that we treat dinner as our special time to reconnect and ignore incoming phone calls. Sadly, instead of embracing this request, she has resisted me with full force. Whenever the phone rings during dinner, she answers and stays on as long as the call takes. We don't get urgent calls. She counters that if the phone rings, you answer it, and that it could be some problem she can just address and be done with. She deems my request "controlling," yet I've never made a demand or thrown a tantrum. I've just explained that I'd appreciate it if we could carve out 30 minutes of together-time. I've also asked her to ignore the phone when we're in bed, but her tendency is to answer it—even if we're having sex. I've explained how unwanted this phone thing makes me feel, but she doesn't seem to get it. —Ignored What will happen if one of these calls goes to voicemail? Kim Jong Un will unleash an electromagnetic pulse bomb on the U.S., and the power grid will be fried for 40 years—or the neighbor will have to call back to tell your girlfriend the ingenious thing she did to perk up her banana cake? Two years into your relationship, the point when so many partners are just getting good at taking each other for granted, you're telling your girlfriend you want to carve out special time to focus on each other—just 30 minutes out of her unbusy, retired woman day. She, in turn, responds like you just demanded she cut off her three favorite fingers and feed them to the pigeons. It's possible that she isn't entirely conscious of why she's treating you this way. She may fear getting closer and then getting dumped or think you'll value her more if she makes you feel like less and less. It's possible she is punishing you for something or is trying to abuse you into leaving. What is clear is who's the controlling one here—the self-appointed dowager countess of the relationship, making the unilateral decision that the phone will be answered no matter what. As for you, her significant serf, keep quiet and eat your gruel while milady has a nice chat with Rachel from Cardmember Services. It must get hard to parse whether you're in a relationship or a call center. Perhaps you, like many people, assume that being in a relationship means having a

partner who loves you and cares about your happiness. Your girlfriend does seem to—as long as it doesn't mean having to call somebody back after dinner. Even if she doesn't fully understand what's motivating her behavior, if she does love you, she can behave lovingly while she figures it out and stop answering the phone like she's one of the town's two sober volunteer firemen. Telling her how unwanted you feel obviously isn't enough; you also have to have standards for how you'll be treated and be willing to walk if they aren't met—ideally, into the arms of a woman whose screams of passion in bed don't include "Who's calling, please?"

SWAT ABOUT A FRIDAY NIGHT? I met this very attractive woman who works at my local bank. She has twice called me regarding the bank's offerings, and I've gotten a vibe that her interest isn't wholly professional. Do I drop by on a pretext and blindside her with "Let's go out sometime"? Is there another way to get her attention? —Stuck Many men have had success getting the attention of a woman who works in a bank by coming in wearing pantyhose over their head and handing her a note. Unfortunately, this approach also tends to draw the attention of the woman's co-workers (unimaginative sorts who, at the first sign of creative headgear, are quick to summon the SWAT team). Even if you forgo the pantyhat, asking her out in person is a problem, as nothing turns the workplace into a junior high school cafeteria faster than having your co-workers looking on as somebody hits on you. (Unless your "local bank" is Citibank's world headquarters, she probably sits at a desk in the middle of the place.) So, do go in on some pretext—so she can attach a face to your name— and then phone her to ask her out. If she turns you down, just act like you're cool with it and you shouldn't have a problem showing your face in the bank—tempting as it might be to go in wearing a Richard Nixon mask and try again: "No dye packs or marked money, and can I interest you in dinner and a slow-speed police chase?"

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

[C2] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013

ANNOUNCEMENTS 100 SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY ????’s & ANSWERS www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com 721-7744 WORN OUT BY YOUR JOB? NO HEALTH INSURANCE? Call Bulman Law Associates 721-7744

INSTRUCTION ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com MASSAGE TRAINING INSTITUTE MONTANA “Weekend Classes - Online Curriculum” 500 Hr Certification for MT License. (406) 250-9616 www.mtimontana.com

HEY GUYS

VOLUNTEERS

Come in and pick up some natural male

Volunteer Tutors Needed. Women’s Opportunity & Resource Development (WORD) is seeking

performance enhancers

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

ADULT AVE.

Home of the Stay-In-Bed Weekend! OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Couples-Friendly Shopping 137 E MAIN • 543-3423

ADULT-AVE.COM

Framed by an artist.

ART

THE

DARK CLOUDS ON THE VERIZON

Pass It On Missoula is now located at 2426 W Central Ave. We are a community supported service offering FREE infant, toddler and maternity clothing to ALL Missoula area families! There are NO eligibility guidelines, simply reduce, reuse, and Pass It On locally! Community donations are accepted on location. PIOM offers FREE clothing to those in need, and affordable for all at 3/$5! Located at 2426 W Central Ave and open Monday-Saturday 10AM-5:30PM. 274-6430. www.passitonmissoula.com

college students and community members to work with children in transition in the Missoula public schools. • give just 1 to 2 hours per week • provide academic support • provide mentoring. Tutoring is offered during the school day. Placements are available in both the Middle and Elementary Schools depending on your preference. Ben Brewster, Volunteer Coordinator, bbrewster@wordinc.org, 406-5433550 x 218. Changing the World, One Child at a Time

HANG-UP

Artistic Custom Framing & Design Gallery 839 S Higgins | Missoula | 327-8757

Montana School of Massage & Massage Clinic- Professional Massage Therapy Training MontanaMassage.com 549-9244

ADOPTION PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

MONTANA WOODCARVERS' SHOW May 4th and 5th 2013

WESTERN MONTANA FAIRGROUNDS Saturday 9AM to 5PM Sunday 11:30 AM to 4 PM

Admission: $3 per person, under 12 free with an adult


EMPLOYMENT GENERAL

PROFESSIONAL

AUTO DETAILER / 2984143 Employer needs a FULL TIME AUTO DETAILER immediately! Applicants may need to pass drug screening. $7.85 Hourly. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

ATTORNEY PUBLIC DEFENDER / 9816227 The minimum requirements include a JD from an ABA accredited law school. $43,392.00 - $58,762.00 Yearly. Missoula Job Service 7287060

Deli Cook / 9974895 Our business is a large grocery retail with an natural deli. If you enjoy working for a local business with strong roots in the community and a friendly staff, we invite you to apply as a Deli Cook. $9.55 Hourly. Missoula Job Service 7287060 Fort Courage Child Care is seeking Infant & Toddler Teacher Aides. Pay DOE. Inquire at 2120 31st Avenue. Front Desk Position at Quality Inn & Suites, experience preferred. Apply in person at 4545 N. Reserve St. Now Hiring Call Today! 273-2266 PRESCHOOL TEACHER / 2984142 Missoula non-profit is seeking a dynamic, outgoing, reliable preschool teacher to add to their team. Monday-Friday, day shift, for 37 hours per week; will attend 1 meeting a month in evening hours and annual training conducted in evening hours. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 SURVEY TECHNICIAN / 2984146 Seeking a regular, full-time SURVEY TECHNICIAN. $15.82 Hourly. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

CLINICAL DOCUMENT COORDINATOR / #2984087 $40,560.00 $46,800.00 Yearly. Associate degree in Nursing or Medical Coding. Full time; M-F; day shift. Full benefit package provided. /lat. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 EXECUTIVE HOUSEKEEPER / 9974929 Seeking a new addition to established housekeeping team!! Great workplace! Hours are typically daytime. Experience with hotel housekeeping (all aspects)! Managerial experience is a plus! $10.00 - $14.00/hr D.O.E. This is a temp to hire position. SERIOUS inquiries only!! Missoula Job Service 728-7060 MSU’s WESTERN TRIANGLE AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER, Conrad, MT, has an available position for a Research Assistant III, Agronomy, Phone: 278-7707. Application available at: http://www.montana.edu/jobs/cl assified/13-279 RECEPTIONIST / VET ASSISTANT / 2984147 Veterinary clinic is seeking a personable, long term Receptionist/Vet Assistant with a mature work attitude. $9.00 - $13.00 Hourly. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

EMPLOYMENT TECH FT position determining and providing job coaching support to individuals w/disabilities in a community environment. Effective problem solving, communication and organizational abilities are essential. Varied hours and days. $10.00/hr. Closes: 5/6/13, 5p.

SPECIAL SERVICES COORDINATOR FT position providing coordination and support to adult’s w/disabilities in a residential/community setting. Supervisory experience and knowledge of community resources preferred. BA in Human Services or 2 years related experience preferred. M-F: 10a-6p. $13.25/hr. Closes: 5/7/13, 5p.

HAB AIDE FT position providing services to adult’s w/disabilities in a residential setting. Monday-Friday: 6:30a- 2:30p. $9.25/hr. Closes: 5/7/2013, 5pm.

MUST HAVE: Valid MT Driver License, Supervisory experience, Experience working w/adults w/disabilities, No History of abuse, neglect or exploitation Applications available at: OPPORTUNITY RESOURCES, INC., 2821 S. Russell, Missoula, MT 59801 or ONLINE at orimt.org Extensive background checks will be completed. NO RESUMES. EOE

RECORDING & ELECTIONS CLERK / 2984145 Seeking a regular, full-time RECORDING & ELECTIONS CLERK. $12.99 Hourly. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 REGISTERED SANITARIAN/LAND USE PLANNER. Review applications and administer regulation for subdivisions, trailer courts/RV parks, water and wastewater systems. Must have RS license or Bachelors in environmental health or equivalent. Contact Stephanie Ler sler@richland.org

SKILLED LABOR

Some forklift experience is preferred, but not required. $9.00 $11.00 Hourly. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-5454546

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION

IMMEDIATE OPPORTUNITY: EntryLevel Oil & Gas Industry Workers needed. No experience necessary. $64,000-$145,000 per year starting salary. Call 24hr free recorded message for details. 1-800-9859770.

Annual Wildland Fire Refresher Training 406-543-0013 www.blackbull-wildfire.com

Production Laborer / 9974916 Looking for skilled Production Laborers for busy Missoula area company. Ideal candidates will have a positive and outgoing personality and attitude, the ability to work well with others and at times with little supervision.

COMMUNITY HEALTH SPECIALIST-PCMH / 2984144 Seeking a tempo-

Missoula's premier hotel is seeking qualified candidates for

Front Desk & Housekeeping. We offer sick pay, paid vacations, holiday pay, health insurance, bonus plan and discounted hotel rooms in a drug free environment. Apply in person at 120 Expressway (next to Dairy Queen on N. Reserve)

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN LEVEL 1

HEALTH CAREERS

rary, part-time (32 hrs/week) COMMUNITY HEALTH SPECIALISTPCMH. $14.08 Hourly. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

SALES INTERACTIVE / ONLINE ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE / #2984085 A minimum of 3 years successful sales experience, preferably in media sales. Solution based selling background. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 Summer at the Lake! Fulltime benefited sales position open at The Lake County Leader in Polson. We train. Generous compensation plan. Interested applicants please call Dan 406-827-2432. Telemarketing Experience? Hiring at $8 plus commission and benefits. Long Standing Missoula Company. Start now with paid training. Call 532-5599

Inside Sales/Customer Service Rep Independent Publishing is seeking an enthusiastic, personable part-timer to assist in our classified advertising department. Must have ability to handle heavy phone work and provide top-notch customer service. Flexible hours.

To apply, please send resume and compensation expectations to: lfoland@missoulanews.com. EOE

Want to live, work and be able to Fish, Hunt, Ski, Snowmobile, & Boat 5 minutes from Work or Home? Now Hiring Full Time Level 1 Automotive Technician, Must have own tools and VALID DRIVER’S LICENSE. The auto tech works with lube and oil changes, transmission service, alignment, computer systems diagnosis, tune-up, brake systems, steering and suspension, Engine, Transmission replacement. Position is in SEELEY LAKE, approximately 50 miles

from Missoula. Glen’s Automotive Service Inc. 406-677-2141 Glen’sauto@blackfoot.net

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • May 2 – May 9, 2013 [C3]


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): Are you afraid that you lack a crucial skill or aptitude? Do you have a goal that you're worried might be impossible to achieve because of this inadequacy? If so, now is a good time to make plans to fill in the gap. If you formulate such an intention, you will attract a benevolent push from the cosmos. Why spend another minute fretting about the consequences of your ignorance when you have more power than usual to correct that ignorance?

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Escape with MassageSwedish, Deep Tissue and Reiki. Open days, evenings and weekends. In my office at 127 N Higgins or in your home. Janit Bishop, LMT • 207-7358

JIN SHIN JYUTSU. Eliminate pain and stress on all levels with safe, healing touch. Animals like it too! Hot Springs. Lila 406-741-5709

Hypnosis & Imagery

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): I know a devotee of Tibetan Buddhism who got an unexpected message from her teacher. He told her she has made such exemplary progress in her quest for enlightenment that she has earned the ultimate reward. When she dies many years from now, the teacher said, she will enter nirvana! She will have no further karmic obligation to reincarnate into a new body in the future, and will be forever excused from the struggle of living in the material world. Although her teacher meant this to be good news, she was heartbroken. She wants to keep reincarnating. Her joyous passion is to help relieve the suffering of her fellow humans. Can you guess what sign she is? Yes: a Cancerian. Like her, many of you are flirting with an odd and challenging choice between selfishness and selflessness.

728-5693 • Mary Place MSW, CHT, GIS

(406) 250-9616 www.mtimontana.com

Curious about Acupuncture? Experience a Mini-Acupuncture Treatment for stress relief

30 Minutes $20 Ask how acupuncture may help you!

Gentle Acupuncture by Karen Hayberg L.AC. 396-0815

People's Trust Foreclosed on Major Corporations

c

www.oppt-in.com

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): This may be the best week in a long time to practice the art of crazy wisdom. And what is crazy wisdom? Here's how novelist Tom Robbins described it to Shambhala Sun: It's "a philosophical worldview that recommends swimming against the tide, cheerfully seizing the short end of the stick, embracing insecurity, honoring paradox, courting the unexpected, celebrating the unfamiliar, shunning orthodoxy, volunteering for tasks nobody else wants or dares to do, and breaking taboos in order to destroy their power. It’s the wisdom of those who turn the tables on despair by lampooning it, and who neither seek authority nor submit to it." And why should you do any of that weird stuff? Robbins: "To enlarge the soul, light up the brain, and liberate the spirit."

d

BLACK BEAR NATUROPATHIC Family Care • Nutritional Consultation & IV Therapy • Herbal Medicine • Homeopathy • Massage

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): "Why should we honor those that die upon the field of battle?" asked Irish poet William Butler Yeats. "A man may show as reckless a courage in entering into the abyss of himself." A woman may show similar bravery, of course. In my astrological opinion, that's the noble adventure beckoning to you, Libra: a dive into the depths of your inner workings. I hope that's the direction you go; I hope you don't take your stouthearted struggle out into the world around you. All the best action will be happening in that fertile hub known as your "soul."

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Historical records suggest that ancient Greek philosopher Democritus went blind late in his life. There are different stories about why. According to one account, he intentionally did it to himself by gazing too long into the sun. That was his perverse way of solving a vexing problem: It freed him from the torment of having to look upon gorgeous women who were no longer interested in or available to him because of his advanced age. I hope you won't do anything like that, Scorpio. In fact, I suggest you take the opposite approach: Keep your attention focused on things that stir your deep attraction, even if you think you can't have them for your own. Valuable lessons and unexpected rewards will emerge from such efforts.

f

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Search your memory, Sagittarius, and recall a time when you pushed yourself to your limits as you labored over a task you cared about very much. At that time, you worked with extreme focus and intensity. You were rarely bored and never resentful about the enormous effort you had to expend. You loved throwing yourself into this test of willpower, which stretched your resourcefulness and compelled you to grow new capacities. What was that epic breakthrough in your past? Once you know, move on to your next exercise: Imagine a new assignment that fits this description, and make plans to bring it into your life in the near future.

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Nairobi is Kenya's capital and home of over three million urbanites. A few minutes' drive from the city center, there's a 45-square-mile national park teeming with wildlife. Against a backdrop of skyscrapers, rhinos and giraffes graze. Lions and cheetahs pounce. Wildebeests roam and hyenas skulk. I suggest you borrow the spirit of that arrangement and invoke it in your own life. In other words, be highly civilized and smartly sophisticated part of the time; be wild and free the rest of the time. And be ready to go back and forth between the two modes with grace and ease.

Christine White N.D. & Elizabeth Axelrod N.D. Monday-Thursday 9:00-4:00 Friday & Saturday appointments available

2204 Dixon, Missoula • 542-2147 • MontanaNaturalMedicine.com

MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS Damsel in Defense Personal defense products for women. Stun Guns, Pepper Spray, Security Items. Dani Stewart. 406-370-0982. my damselpro.net/PRO1512 Dani’z Designz Montana Inspired Jewelry. 406-370-0982. danizdesignz.com

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In the wild, a tiger's diet consists entirely of meat. The big cat loves to feast on deer and wild boar, and eats a variety of other animals, too. The hunt is always solitary, never done in collaborative groups. That's why the creature's success rate is so low. A tiger snags the prey it's seeking only about five percent of the time. It sometimes has to wait two weeks between meals. Nevertheless, a tiger rarely starves. When it gets what it's after, it can devour 75 pounds of food in one sitting. According to my astrological analysis, Aquarius, you're like a tiger these days. You haven't had a lot of lucky strikes lately, but I suspect you will soon hit the jackpot.

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SAWMILLS from only $3997.00. Make & Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363, Ext.300N

i

STORE SHELVING FOR SALE: 96 4x6 Units; 11 3x6 Units, excellent condition. Great for shop, warehouse, business. Price negotiable. Call for Specs or Info. 406-3906542

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The French word flâneur is a meme that refers to a person who strolls around the city at a leisurely pace, exploring whatever captivates her imagination. To the casual observer, the flâneur may seem to be a lazy time-waster with nothing important to do. But she is in fact motivated by one of the noblest emotions -- pure curiosity -- and is engaged in a quest to attract novel experiences, arouse fresh insights, and seek new meaning. Sound fun? Well, congratulations, Pisces, because you have been selected as the Flaming Flâneur of the Zodiac for the next two weeks. Get out there and meander! Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

[C4] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013

*Online Curriculum *Hands-On Class 1-Weekend/Month 500 Hr Certification for MT License

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): A lawyer named John Keogh filed an application with the Australian Patent Office. It was for a "circular transportation facilitation device." His claim was approved. He thus became the owner of the world's first and only patent for the wheel. So far, he has not tried to collect royalties from anyone who's using wheels. I nominate him to be your role model, Leo. May he inspire you to stamp your personal mark on a universal archetype or put your unique spin on something everyone knows and loves.

TRAINING INSTITUTE MONTANA

* Stress * Depression * Empower yourself

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Imagine you're in a large room full of costumes. It's like a masquerade store at Halloween plus a storage area where a theater troupe keeps the apparel its actors use to stage a wide variety of historical plays. You have free reign here. You can try on different masks and wigs and disguises and get-ups. You can envision yourself living in different eras as various characters. If you like, you can even go out into the world wearing your alternate identities. Try this exercise, Taurus. It'll stimulate good ideas about some new self-images you might want to play with in real life. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Ray LaMontagne sings these lyrics in his tune "Empty": "I looked my demons in the eyes. Laid bare my chest and said, 'Do your best to destroy me. I've been to hell and back so many times, I must admit you kind of bore me.'" I wouldn't be opposed to you delivering a message like that to your own demons, Gemini -- with one caveat: Leave out the "Do your best to destroy me" part. Simply peer into the glazed gaze of those shabby demons and say, "You bore me and I'm done with you. Bye-bye." And then walk away from them for good.

MASSAGE

* Smoking * Weight * Negative self-talk

ANTIQUES Virgelle Merc. Antiques presents

the COLLINS COLLECTIBLE & ANTIQUE SALE Sat. and Sun. May 11th & 12th, 9am-5pm daily. Sale held at the old Collins Community Club in downtown Collins, Montana. 1800-426-2926. www.Virgelle Montana.com

AUCTIONS J. CONTWAY WESTERN AUCTION. Sat., May 11, 11am, Fairgrounds, Lewistown, MT. 20 sculptures, oil paintings, Will James sketches, Win., Colt, Ruger & Remington guns; saddles, spurs, chaps. View @ ShobeAuction.com 1-406-5385125

MUSIC MUSIC LESSONS In-house lessons on guitar, ukelele and piano. Sign up now! MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds en-

trance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 549-0013. www.montanamusic.com Outlaw Music Got Gear? We Do! Missoula’s Pro Guitar Shop specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, Tuesday-Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533. Outlawmusic guitarshop.com Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusic Studio.com

PETS & ANIMALS Basset Rescue of Montana www.bassetrescueofmontana.or g 406-207-0765 CATS: #2455 Black, ASH/Bombay X, SF, 6yrs; #3114 Calico, Maine Coon X, SF, 3yrs; #3142 Orange, DSH, SF, 12yrs; #3139 Calico, Maine

Coon X, SF, 1yr; #3187 Torbie, ASH, SF, 7yrs; #3226 Grey/white, Perisan X, SF, 4yrs; #3238 Blk/white, DLH, NM, 3yrs; #3240 Calico, DSH, SF, 8yrs; #3248 Black, DMH, NM, 2yrs; #3255 Torbie(red/grey), Persian X, SF, 2yrs; #3257 Orange, Maine Coon X, NM, 3yrs; #3265 Orange/white, Manx X, NM, 3yrs; #3271 Black, DSH, NM, 3yrs; #3273 Black, DSH, NM, 16yrs; #3277 Black, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #3282 Orange, DSH, NM, 9yrs; #3307 Tri/Torbi, DSH, SF, 1.5yrs; #3333 Grey, DSH, NM, 4yrs; #3339 Grey/white, DSH, SF, 3yrs; #3340 Blk/tan, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #3355 Grey, Am Bob X, SF, 8yrs; #3356 Grey, Russian Blue, NM, 5yrs. For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840. DOGS: #2564 Brindle, Catahoula, NM, 2yrs; #2851 Brown, Boxer X, NM, 1yr; #3149 White, Malamute, NM,


MARKETPLACE 7yrs; #3152 Choc/blk, Boxer/Lab X, NM, 2yrs; #3166 Blk/white, Border Collie X, SF, 1yr; #3291 Brindle, Pit Bull, NM, 3yrs; #3314 Black, Shepherd X, SF, 10 mo; #3315 Blk/white, Aussie/Lab, NM, 4yrs; #3318 Buff, Lab/Sharpei, NM, 1yr; #3329 Black/brn, Shepherd X, SF, 8mo; #3336 Red/tan/white, Heeler X, SF, 3yrs; #3341 White/Blk, Rat Terrier, NM, 4yrs; #3361 Brindle, Plot Hound, SF, 2.5yrs #3362 Cream/grey, Shitzhu X, NM, 5yrs; #3363 Red, Sharpei, SF, 5yrsFor photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamil-

ton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

AUTOMOTIVE CASH FOR CARS: Any Car or Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

Outlaw Music

Missoula's Stringed Instrument Pro Shop! Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

541-7533

724 Burlington Ave. outlawmusicguitarshop.com

Accepting Spring Consignments 111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

What’s your favorite bar?

Vote with the ballot on Page 11

PUBLIC NOTICES ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that separate sealed BIDS for the Demolition of 1106 W. Broadway Property, Poverello Center, Inc. will be received by the Poverello Center, Inc., c/o MMW Architects, located at 125 West Alder Street, Missoula, MT 59802 until 2:00 PM on May 9, 2013, at which time bids will be opened and read aloud. All work is to be performed in accordance with the plans and specifications prepared by MMW Architects. Copies of the CONTRACT DOCUMENTS may be obtained at the office of MMW Architects, located at 125 West Alder Street, Missoula, MT 59802 upon payment of $100.00 refundable deposit for each set and a non-refundable shipping and handling fee of $35. The documents will be available @ MMW on Friday, April 26, 2013. Any BIDDER, upon returning the CONTRACT DOCUMENTS promptly and in good condition, will be refunded their payment, and any NON-BIDDER upon so returning the CONTRACT DOCUMENTS will be refunded $100.00. Any shipping and handling fee will not be refunded. Each Bid or Proposal must be accompanied by a cashiers check, certified check, or Bid Bond payable Poverello Center, Inc. in the amount of not less than ten percent (10%) of the total amount of the bid and must be in the form specified in MCA 18-1-201 through 206. The bid bond or other security shall protect and indemnify Poverello Center, Inc. against the failure or refusal of the bidder to enter into the contract within 30 days of bid acceptance. Bid security will be returned to the unsuccessful bidders as soon as practicable after the opening of the bids. Late bids will not be accepted and will automatically be disqualified from further consideration. Bid must be signed by an authorized representative of the bidder. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1406-444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their race, color, religion, sex or national origin. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula Business Licensing requirements. The contractor is required to be an equal opportunity employer. Copeland

:Anti-Kickback” Act provisions apply to this project. Federal Davis-Bacon Act Prevailing Wage Rates for Building Construction 2013 apply to this project. Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act provisions apply to this project. Contracts shall not be made to any person debarred or suspended or otherwise excluded from or ineligible for participation in Federal assistance programs. Federal Energy and Environmental Conservation provisions apply to this project. ByrdAnti-Lobbying Amendment provisions apply to this project. Contractors must make positive efforts to use disadvantaged businesses, including small businesses, minority-owned firms, women’s business enterprises, and firms in labor surplus areas, whenever possible. The Owner reserves the right to waive informalities, to accept the lowest responsive and responsible bid, which is in the best interest of the owner, to reject any and all proposals received, and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award, as in the judgment of its officials, best meets the owner’s requirements. Successful bidders shall furnish an approved performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Insurance as required shall be provided by the successful bidder(s) and a certificate(s) of that insurance shall be provided. No bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled time for the public opening of bids, which is 2:00 PM, local time, May 9, 2013. There will be a pre-bid conference at the project site, 1106 West Broadway on May 2, 2013 at 10:00 AM. Attendance is recommended but not mandatory. Please meet at the project site.

CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF JOINT CITY/COUNTY PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council and the Board of County Commissioners will hold a joint public hearing on May 6, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to hear public comment on a resolution to expend up to $200,000 of the 2006 Open Space Bond funds to contribute towards the purchase of a 3.25 acre parcel by Garden City Harvest and to accept a conservation easement granted from Garden City Harvest to the City of Missoula on the parcel for purposes of preserving the parcel’s use as a community garden and neighborhood farm. A copy of the resolution is

PUBLIC NOTICE

2. A request by MMW Architects representing the Poverello Center for a variance to allow for a reduced parking requirement at their future location at 1112 W. Broadway, formerly the site of the Trail’s End tavern. SEE MAP K.

The Missoula City Council will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Monday, May 20, 2013, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana:911 Charlo St – City Subdivision Exemption RequestRequest from Devin Khoury, represented by Hoffman Morgan and Eli & Associates, for approval of the entitlement to a boundary line relocation resulting in a rearrangement/redesign that reduces an existing fee simple access to a public roadway to less than five (5) feet, pursuant to Section 8.040.4E(2)(d) of the Missoula City Subdivision Regulations. (See Map N)

CLARK FORK STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 20, 203, 223, 247, 248 and 261 Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting 5/13/2013 by appt only by calling 541-7919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to 5/16/2013 at 4:00 P.M. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s

Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request and case file are available for public inspection at the Development Services Office, 435 Ryman Street. Call 5526630 for further assistance.If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 5526630. The Development Serices Office will provide auxiliary aids and services.

"Gonna Crack"–but you'll figure it out. by Matt Jones

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 1. A request by Morgan and Rhianna Hirschenberger to allow a second story balcony to encroach 2.5 feet into the required side yard setback of 9.8 feet for a property located at 405 N Grove St in the RT10 zoning district. SEE MAP L.

ACROSS

3. A request by Wade Hoyt for a residential development at 16 dwelling units per acre, a Special Use in the City Special District #2. The project is to be located on Lots 11, 12, 13 & 14 of Bennett Addition block 15, alley vacated, adjacent portion of S. 4th St. vacated and adjacent portion of Eaton St. vacated. SEE MAP M. 4. A request by Gene Mostad for a residential development at 16 dwelling units per acre, a Special Use in the City Special District #2. The project is to be located on Lot B of lots A & B of Bennett Addition block 15. SEE MAP M.

1 They're not as busy in May 5 Planned to rob 10 Jimmy of shoes 14 Square footage, say 15 "I want to play ___" (line from "Saw") 16 Good thing to check Snopes.com for 17 Superman's city 19 Like squid spray 20 Awaiting a court date 22 Slow mover 23 Astley who gets rolled 26 It's north of Afr. 29 They'll come before U 31 "Dexter" actor C.S. ___ 33 It may have a five-point harness 39 Comes up short 40 Subside 41 Sir Topham ___ ("Thomas the Tank Engine" manager) 42 Going way back? 45 Author referenced in "The Following" 46 Brit. reference that added "uplink" in 2013 47 Mining find 48 Nuremberg number 50 Eagle's nest 55 Big trouble 61 Vulcan mind ___ 64 Old pantyhose brand with a famous Joe Namath ad 65 Berry variety 66 Pocahontas' husband John ___ 67 Oaxaca water 68 What the four circled answers "crack" 69 Outdo 70 Bestselling 16-bit console, briefly

Last week’s solution

DOWN

1 Pitches a tent 2 Get grooming 3 Insurer based in Hartford 4 Manhattan restaurateur Vincent 5 Rank on a cereal box 6 Wide-eyed 7 Bad substance for a 22-across 8 Mideastern ruler 9 South Asian 10 It's rated with alarms 11 Pet name 12 Charter ___ (tree on Connecticut's state quarter) 13 Acne-fighting brand 18 Fixed a squeak 21 Bohemian 24 Word used with defibrillators 25 He wrote "Endymion" and "Hyperion" 27 Grammarian's concern 28 Overzealous 29 Nostalgia-evoking 30 Take the helm 32 Suffix after Rock or Raisin 33 Provide freebies 34 Tinseltown, in old headlines 35 "Did ___ tell you about the time..." 36 California-based semiconductor company founded in 1981 (hidden in FALSIFY) 37 Follower 38 That boat 43 Film ___ 44 Immature, like some meat 49 One of the Munsters 51 Watson and Thompson 52 Take to the throne 53 Problem 54 You are, in the Yucatan 56 River through Catalonia 57 "___ Flux" (futuristic MTV cartoon) 58 Carnegie or Chihuly 59 ___ Berry (Jones Soda flavor) 60 Sch. near the US-Mexico border 61 It's un-PC 62 Earth Day prefix 63 Wee boy

©2013 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • May 2 – May 9, 2013 [C5]


PUBLIC NOTICES available in the City Clerk Office, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. For further information, contact Jackie Corday, Parks & Recreation at 552-6267. Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on May 6, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to hear public comment on an ordinance to amend MMC 8.40.040 entitled “Hazardous Vegetation and Nuisance Weeds” to change the way fees are assessed. For further information contact Jessica Miller, Development Services at 552-6347. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF ELECTION EQUIPMENT TESTING A test of the ES&S 650 Ballot Counters that will be used to tabulate ballots on Election Day will be starting at 9:00 a.m. on Thursday, May 2, 2013, at the Fairground’s Marsda Building, 1101 South Ave W, Missoula, Montana. Following this, a test of the ES&S AutoMARK ballotmarking system will be held at the Missoula County Record’s Center at 2147 Ernest Ave, Missoula, Montana. All tests are open to the public. /s/ Vickie Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County By /s/ Rebecca Connors, Chief Deputy Clerk & Recorder MISSOULA COUNTY Notice of Election: School District Election Notice is hereby given that on May 28th, 2013, a poll election for the Potomac Elementary School District will be held. Drop off locations will open at 7:00 a.m. and will continue to be open until 8:00 p.m. on Election Day. All electors, as defined in Title 13, are those who reside in the District and are registered to vote by the close of registration on April 29th, 2013. DROP OFF LOCATIONS: 1. Missoula County Courthouse, 200 W Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 2. Potomac/Greenough Community Center, 29827 Potomac Rd, Potomac, MT ELECTIONS BEING HELD: 1. Potomac Elementary School District Levy Absentee & replacement ballots for the May 28th, Potomac School Election may be acquired at the Missoula County Courthouse Elections office (second floor, annex) weekdays between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Dated this 29th day of April, 2013. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator, Missoula County MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING INCREASE BUILDING PERMIT EXEMPTIONS, ELIMINATE AGRICULTURAL BUILDING EXEMPTION & ESTABLISH NEW BUILDING CATEGORY AND FEE STRUCTURE Notice is hereby given that the Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a public hearing on proposed modifications to the Missoula County Building Code Enforcement Program. Modifications are to increase the building permit exemption for detached storage structures from 120 square feet to 200 square feet; increase fence exemption from 6 feet high to 8 feet high; eliminate agricultural building exemption and create a new building category and fee structure for detached accessory storage and shop buildings. The Commissioners will conduct the hearing at a Public Meeting on Wednesday, May 8, 2013, beginning at 1:30 p.m. in the Missoula County Administration Building, Room B14, 199 W. Pine St., Basement Level, Missoula, MT. Any person wishing to be heard on the matter may submit written comments or other materials to the Commissioners and/or speak at the hearing. Comments may also be submitted any time prior to the hearing by phone, fax, e-mail or personal delivery to the Commissioners at

their offices at the Missoula County Administration Building, 199 W. Pine St., Missoula, MT 59802; Fax: (406) 721-4043, Phone: (406) 258-4877; Email: bcc@co.missoula.mt.us Additional information on the hearing may be obtained from the Missoula County Building Codes office at 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808 or www.co.missoula.mt.us/building MISSOULA COUNTY FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT PERMIT APPLICATION Community and Planning Services has received a floodplain application from Dolly Stewart to work within the LaValle Creek floodplain. The project is located in Section 34 Township 14N Range 20W and includes the installation of a 60’ long 3’ X 6’ box culvert (or equivalent CMP) for crossing LaValle Creek and the restoration of approximately 350’ of LaValle Creek & adjacent floodplain. Approximately 4400 cubic yards of fill will be removed and the area revegetated with native riparian species. The full application is available for review at Community and Planning Services at 317 Woody St in Missoula. Written comments from anyone interested in floodplain permit application #13-14 may be submitted prior to 5:00 p.m., May 24, 2013. Address comments to the Floodplain Administrator, Community and Planning Services, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 or call 2584841 for more information. MISSOULA COUNTY MISSOULA COUNTY PUBLIC HEARING AND COMMENT NOTICE The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a hearing at the Commissioners’ weekly public meeting on Wednesday, May 8, 2013, at 1:30 p.m. in Room B14 at the Missoula County Administration Building, 199 West Spruce, Missoula, Montana for the purpose of obtaining public comments regarding the proposed submission of an application to the Montana Department of Commerce for Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Funds, in the Housing category, to assist Poverello Center, a Missoula non-profit organization, with partial financing to enable them to replace the existing Poverello Center with a code compliant, accessible, new building and soup kitchen to be located at 1106 West Broadway, in Missoula, Montana. Construction of the new accessible building will allow Poverello Center to continue to serve extremely low-income persons who will receive emergency housing, short-stay, and transitional housing for veterans. At the public hearing, the proposed project will be explained, including the purpose and proposed area of the project, activities, budget and funding. Comments may be given orally at the hearing or submitted in writing before May 14, 2013. If you wish to comment, please attend the meeting. If you cannot attend, but would like additional information or prefer to submit written comments, please contact Eran Fowler-Pehan, Executive Director, Poverello Center, Inc. at (406) 7281809, or email efowler@ montana.com, or Jean Harte, Department of Grants and Community Programs, at (406) 258-3712, or email jharte@co.missoula.mt.us. The CDBG application guideline is available at http://comdev.mt.gov/CDBG/cdbghousing.mcpx. If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling the Department of Grants and Community Programs, (406) 2583712. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. MISSOULA COUNTY Notice of Close of Regular Voter Registration Notice is hereby given that regular* registration for the Woodman Elementary School District Elections to be held on June 11th, 2013 will close at 5:00 p.m., on May 13th, 2013. Ballots will be automatically mailed to Active Electors only. If you are a

registered voter and do not receive a ballot, contact the county election office to update your information as necessary and receive a ballot. Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the County Election Administrator. If you have moved, please update your registration information by filling out a new voter registration card and submitting it to the county election office before 5:00 p.m. on May 13th. DATED this 8th day of April 2013. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Missoula County Election Administrator MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY. Cause No. DV-13-138. Dept. No. 3. SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION. THAO MOUA, Plaintiff, v. TOM MOUA, Defendant. TO: TOM MOUA, 10210 Waldo Rd, Missoula, MT 59808. YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to appear and answer the Complaint in this action. which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy herewith served upon you. You are directed to file your answer and serve a copy thereof upon Plaintiffs attorneys within twenty-one (21) days after service of this Summons, exclusive of the date of service. If you fail to appear and answer as above required, judgement will be taken against you by default according to the Complaint filed herein for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court this 18th day of April, 2013. Clerk of District Court /s/ By: Casie Kragh, Deputy Clerk. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY PROBATE NO. DP-1211 DEPT. NO. 3 HON. JOHN W. LARSON NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JOSEPH ANDREW TROTCHIE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Jackie Trotchie, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of Morales Law Office, P.C. at 422 West Spruce S., PO Box 9311, Missoula, MT 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 15th day of April. 2013. /s/ Jackie Trotchie, Personal Representative

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DV-13-372 Dept. No.: 3 Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Karen Iris Bogen, Petitioner. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT Petitioner Karen Iris Bogen has petitioned the District Court for the Fourth Judicial District for a change of name from Karen Iris Bogen to Kari Ann Owen. The hearing will be on the 9th day of May, 2013 at 1:30 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Dated this 8th day of April, 2013. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Jeremy Scott MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DV-13-399 Dept. No.: 1 Ed McLean Notice of Hearing On Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Andrea Montee, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a

be heard by the District Court on Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. in the Missoula County Courthouse, Courtroom located at 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. At any time before the hearing, objections may be filed by any person who can demonstrate good reasons against the change of name. Dated April 22, 2013. Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court. /s/ By: Jeremy Scott, Deputy Clerk of Court. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Probate No. DP-13-77 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF EARL E. MORGENROTH, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to David J. Morgenroth, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Boone Karlberg P.C., P. O. Box 9199, Missoula, Montana 59807-9199, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. I declare, under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the state of Montana, that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 9th day of April, 2013, at Denton, Texas. /s/ David J. Morgenroth PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE’S ATTORNEY: BOONE KARLBERG P.C. By: /s/ Thomas H. Boone, Esq. P. O. Box 9199, Missoula, Montana 59807 Attorneys for David J. Morgenroth, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ALLYSON J. BALDWIN, Deceased. Dept. No. 2 Probate No. DP13-84 NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Jake O. Ziegler, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Boone Karlberg P.C., P. O. Box 9199, Missoula, Montana 598079199, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. I declare, under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the state of Montana, that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 19th day of April, 2013, at Helena, Montana. Jake O. Ziegler APPLICANT’S ATTORNEY: BOONE KARLBERG P.C. By: Cynthia K. Thiel P. O. Box 9199 Missoula, Montana 59807

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MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-13-404 Dept. No. 1 Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of May Riggs Adams, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Mary Adams Riggs to Mary Jean Adams Riggs. The hearing will be on 05/29/2013 at 1:30 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: April 9, 2013. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Cady Sowre, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DR-13-166 Department No.: 3 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION In re the Marriage of: JAMES K. LEWIS, Petitioner, And DANA LEE LEWIS, Respondent. THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED RESPONDENT, DANA LEE LEWIS: YOU, THE RESPONDENT, ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Petition in this action which is filed in the office of the Clerk of the above-named Court, a copy of which is served upon you with this Summons, and to file your answer and serve a copy of your answer upon the Petitioner within twenty-one (21) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service. If you fail to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Petition. This action is brought to obtain a dissolution of marriage. TO PETITIONER §40-4-121(3), the Petitioner and Respondent are hereby restrained from transferring, encumbering, pawning, pledging, hiding, or in any way disposing of any property, real or personal, whether jointly or separately held, without either the consent of the other party or an order of the court, except in the usual course of business or for the necessities of life. Each party must notify the other of any proposed extraordinary expenditures at least five business days before incurring the expenditures and must account to the court for all extraordinary expenditures made after the service of the summons. This restraining order does not prevent either party from using any property to pay reasonable attorney fees

[C6] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013

in order to retain counsel in the proceeding. Petitioner and Respondent are further restrained from cashing, borrowing against, canceling, transferring, disposing of, or changing the beneficiaries of any insurance or other coverage, including life, health, automobile and disability coverage held for the benefit of a party or a child of a party for whom support may be ordered. This temporary restraining order shall continue until another order of the Court is issued either amending or vacating this temporary restraining order. VIOLATION OF THE ORDER IS A CRIMINAL OFFENSE UNDER MCA §45-5-626. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court, the 16th day of April, 2013. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of the District Court By: /s/ Jeremy Scott, Deputy Clerk

change of name from Andrea Christine Montee to Andrea Christine Knight. the hearing will be on 05/29/2013 at 1:30 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: April 9, 2013. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: Cady Sowre, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DV-13-449 Dept. No.: 3 Notice of Hearing on Name Change of Minor Child In the Matter of the Name Change of Nathan Robert Turner, Christa Ritter Bigley, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court to change a child’s name from Nathan Robert Turner to Noah Benjamin Bigley. The hearing will be on 06/04/2013 at 3:00 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: April 22, 2013 /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Jeremy Scott, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DV-13-449 Dept. No.: 4 Karen S. Townsend Notice of Hearing on Name Change of Minor Child In the Matter of the Name Change of Noah Benjamin Turner, Christa Ritter Bigley, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court to change a child’s name from Noah Benjamin Turner to Noah Benjamin Bigley. The hearing will be on 06/04/2013 at 3:00 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: April 22, 2013 /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Jeremy Scott, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DV-13-452 Dept. No.: 3 John W. Larson. NOTICE OF HEARING ON PETITION TO CHANGE NAME OF MINOR CHILD. IN THE MATTER OF THE NAME CHANGE OF: A.R.R.V. Edgar B Morales, PETITIONER, on behalf of, A.R.R.V., MINOR CHILD. PLEASE TAKE NOTE THAT Petitioner Edgar B. Morales has petitioned the District Court for the Fourth Judicial District for a change of name for minor child from Aalyiah Raelynn Ruth VanHaele to Aaliyah Raelynn Ruth Morales, and the Petition to Change Name of Minor Child will

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate Case No. DP-13-90 Dept. No. 1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of Margaret J. Gadbow, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the Personal Representative, DARYL J. GADBOW, return receipt requested, at 618 Brooks Street, Missoula, MT 59801 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 26th day of April, 2013. /s/ Daryl J. Gadbow, Personal Representative, 618 Brooks Street, Missoula, MT 59801 MONTANA PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SERVICE REGULATION BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF MONTANA REGULATORY DIVISION DOCKET NO. D2013.3.18 IN THE MATTER OF JL Real Estate Development, Inc. dba Valley Water System, Application for Initial Rates for Water Service in its Missoula, Montana, Service Area NOTICE OF APPLICATION AND INTERVENTION DEADLINE On March 14, 2013, JL Real Estate Development, Inc. dba Valley Water System (Valley Water) submitted its application to establish initial rates and charges for water service in its Missoula, Montana, service area to the Montana Public Service Commission (Commission). Valley Water is a subdivision located in the Missoula area that serves currently 35 customers with a maximum of 48 total users for the system. The Applicant is requesting flat rates of $65.00 per month for lots 1-27 and 34, $40.00 per month for lots 28-33 and 35, and $30.00 per month/per unit for a separate lot 5, a 13plex. Other fees and charges requested by Valley Water include: a. Company specified hours and days sprinkling will be permitted. b. A disconnect fee of $100 for non-payment. c. A reconnect fee of $100 for re-connection after payment. d. Where there is more than

one water user on a single service line which has only one shut off for the entire unit, the responsibility for payment of the future water charges will be assumed by the property owner, or someone mutually agreed upon in writing with the utility. e. ACH or EFT is the preferred payment method, with the amount to be debited out of the account occurring on or around the 25th of the month. f. Failure to provide payment or satisfactory arrangements for payment may result in total discontinuance of service. In the event that there is more than one water user on the system, the service may be terminated even though one or more users may not be in arrears with their account. g. A returned check fee or non-sufficient EFT/ACH of $30.00 per incident. h. A $30 service charge for any customer that presents a check for payment. i. A late fee of $20.00 for all payments that are 10 or more days late. A copy of Valley Water’s application is available for inspection at the business offices of Valley Water, 2425 West Central, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801; the Commission, 1701 Prospect Avenue, Helena, Montana 59601; and the Montana Consumer Counsel (MCC), 111 North Last Chance Gulch, Suite 1B, P.O. Box 201703, Helena, Montana 59620-1703, telephone (406) 444-2771. The MCC is available and may be contacted to assist and represent the interests of the consuming public in this matter. Any interested person who is directly affected by this application before the Commission and who intends to protest the application as a party must intervene by filing a Petition to Intervene with the Commission at the above address no later than June 1, 2013. Any Petition to Intervene must be electronically submitted on the Commission’s website at http://psc.mt.gov (go to “Electronic Documents” then “Account Login/Registration”). The filing party must also deliver or mail the original Petition to Intervene in paper format to the Commission by the filing deadline. The Commission will upload electronically filed documents to its website after the paper original has been officially received at the Commission office. One copy must be served on Valley Water and the MCC (addresses above). Any interested person who prefers not to formally participate in the matter as an intervenor may submit written comments on the matter to the Commission at the above address. Public comments may also be submitted to the Commission through the Commission’s web-based comment form at http://psc.mt.gov (“Comment on Proceedings”). The Commission’s jurisdiction over this matter is provided at Title 69, MCA. The substantive and procedural law applicable is Title 69, MCA, especially at Ch. 3 (public utilities), ARM Title 38, Ch. 5 (utilities), Title 2, Ch. 4, MCA (MAPA), ARM Title 38, Ch. 2 (Commission procedural rules), and any prior orders of the Commission which may bear on the issues presented. If necessary, a procedural order governing the procedure and schedule in this matter will be issued following the deadline for intervention. The Commission and persons having petitioned for intervention in this proceeding may direct discovery to Valley Water at any time up to and including the procedural schedule final date for discovery on the utility application. Valley Water must respond within fourteen calendar days to all discovery requests directed to it more than fourteen calendar days prior to the deadline. Discovery issued less than fourteen days prior to the deadline must be answered according to direction in the procedural order. If there are no intervenors in this docket the Commission may schedule a hearing on its own motion, or may rule on the application based on the information contained in the Valley Water filing. The Commission initially notices proceedings through use of general service lists. Interested persons not intervening, but wishing to remain on the service list to receive notices and orders must notify the Commission in writing by the date fixed for intervention. Failure to submit notification will result in removal from the service list in this docket. BY THE MONTANA PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION W. A. (BILL) GALLAGHER, Chairman BOB LAKE, Vice Chairman KIRK BUSHMAN, Commissioner TRAVIS KAVULLA, Commissioner ROGER KOOPMAN, Commissioner NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY Gregory G. Schultz, P.C., Attorney at Law, 210 East Pine Street, Suite 200, Missoula, Montana 59802, as Successor Trustee, that the Successor Trustee under the terms of the Deed of Trust described herein, and pursuant to §§ 71-1301, et seq., MCA, will sell the property described in the Deed of Trust by public sale to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. A. PARTIES TO THE DEED OF TRUST: Grantor: Lee E. Burrington Successor Trustee: Gregory G. Schultz, P.C. Beneficiaries: Thomas Nadeau and Patricia Nadeau B. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPERTY COVERED BY THE DEED OF TRUST: Lot 80 of Drew Creek Addition Phase VII to the Double Arrow Ranch, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. C. DEED OF TRUST RECORDING DATA: The Deed of Trust under which this sale is to be conducted was recorded October 23, 2008, as In-

strument No. 200824148, at Book 828 of Micro Records at Page 534, Records of Missoula County, Montana. D. DEFAULT: The Grantor’s default for which this foreclosure is made consists of the failure by Grantor to pay the following amounts on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust: E. SUMS OWING: The following are now due and owing to the Beneficiary on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust: Principal balance: $44,000.00 Accrued Interest to the date of this Notice: $11,440.00 Late fees : $550.00 Interest at the rate of 10% per annum from and after the date of this Notice which will continue to accrue to the date of the Trustee’s Sale at a per diem of $14.46 Beneficiaries are also entitled to the costs and expenses of sale, the cost of a title report, filing and recording fees, reasonable trustee’s and attorney’s fees, and any expenditures for taxes and assessments, all incurred up to and including the date of the Trustee’s Sale, with interest thereon at the obligation rate. F. ELECTION TO SELL: The Beneficiaries have elected and have directed in writing that the Successor Trustee sell the real property above-described for the satisfaction of the aforesaid obligations. G. TIME AND PLACE OF SALE: Time: May 29, 2013, at 12:30 p.m. Place: The sale will be held at the main entrance to the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59801. H.TERMS OF SALE: This sale is a public sale and any person, including the Beneficiaries (excepting only the undersigned Successor Trustee), may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash (except for any credit-bid by the Beneficiaries) and the conveyance shall be by Trustee’s Deed, without warranty or covenant, express or implied, as to title or possession of the subject real property. The real property may be subject to prior liens and bidders are advised to determine the status of same as of the date of sale. By Montana statute, the sale purchaser is entitled to possession of the property on the tenth (10th) day following the sale. Dated this 27th day of December, 2012. /s/ Gregory G. Schultz Gregory G. Schultz, Successor Trustee STATE OF MONTANA) : ss. County of Missoula) On this 27th day of December, 2012, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Gregory G. Schultz, known to me to be the individual that executed the within instrument, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my notarial seal the day and year first above written. /s/ Roxie Hausauer (SEAL) Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at: Lolo, Montana My commission expires: 1/6/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/23/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200621607 *Bk. 781 Pg. 1021 Micro Records, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Lloyd A. Carrell was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage LLC,its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Western Title & Escrow was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Western Title & Escrow as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 4 in Block 5, Bellevue Addition No.2, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official recorded Plat of record in Book 4 of plats at page 26 1/2, on file and of record in the office of the County Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201224932, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 11/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 22, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $178,644.16. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $171,869.98, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 8, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid


PUBLIC NOTICES price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7037.100866) 1002.243735-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 02/03/11, recorded as Instrument No. 201102369 Bk: 873 Pg: 784, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Nancy K. Coleman, a married woman was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Sterling Savings Bank, a Washington Corporation, its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract 1 of Certificate of Survey No. 6227, located in the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 26, Township 15 North, Range 20 West, Principle Meridian, Montana. More accurately described as: Tract 1 of Certificate of Survey No. 6227, located in the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 26, Township 15 North, Range 20 West, Principal Meridian, Montana, Missoula County, Montana. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201118745 Bk: 885 Pg: 372, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 07/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 7, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $324,720.91. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $293,547.41, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 15, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7021.15903) 1002.244289-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust

indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 09/19/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200822003, Bk: 826 Pg: 1187, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which John H. Simon Jr and Candy L. Lundgren was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for WCS Lending, its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Commonwealth Land Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Commonwealth Land Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 4 of Lolo Heights, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. More accurately described as Lot 4 of Lolo View Heights, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Plat recorded in Book 16 of Plats at Page 68. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201112998, Bk: 881 Pg: 213, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 02/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 7, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $187,279.51. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $167,479.60, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 15, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7021.14772) 1002.244011-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 03/16/10, recorded as Instrument No. 201005413 B: 857 P: 98, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Kevin J. Thomas and Danielle T. Thomas, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 68 of 44 Ranch, Phase 5, a Platted Subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 11/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 6, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $310,424.63. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $301,109.90, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances

for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 16, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.104863) 1002.244508-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/24/09, recorded as Instrument No. 200910705, Bk 838, Pg 1342, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Jeffrey McCaffree and Megan McCaffree was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for American Bank was Beneficiary and Madison Settlement Services was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Madison Settlement Services as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 419 of Pleasant View Homes No. 4, Phase 2, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201210741, Bk. 895, Pg. 418, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 13, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $261,668.11. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $245,000.83, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 22, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpo-

rated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.102808) 1002.230120-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/25/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200710841 Bk 796 Pg 883, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which James M. Watt and Barbara J. Watt, husband and wife, as joint tenants and not as tenants in common was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Equity One, Inc. was Beneficiary and First American Title Insurance Company of Montana was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Insurance Company of Montana as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 31 in Block 5 of Elms Addition No. 4, in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 14, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $299,916.48. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $242,389.93, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance

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CORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Don O. Holst, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 8, 2004 and recorded September 13, 2004 in book 739, page 1148, under document number 200426170. The beneficial interest is currently held by Federal National Mortgage Association. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,027.91, beginning September 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 15, 2013 is $194,724.10 principal, interest at the rate of 3.25% now totaling $3,325.87, escrow advances of $1,163.46, suspense balance of $180.37 and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,289.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $17.34 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 7, 2013 Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham) On this 7th day of February, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov. 6, 2018 Seterus Vs. Holst 42008.226 Published on 4/25, 5/2 and 5/9/2013

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on Page 11 and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 25, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7069.25824) 1002.245298-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 17, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 2 IN BLOCK 1 OF GARY HOMESITES, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, AC-

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 21, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main door of the First American Title Company located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 16 and the West OneHalf of lot 17 in block 3 of residence addition, a platted subdivision in the city of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof Rebekah A Dubois, as Grantor(s), conveyed

said real property to First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. A Montana Corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 12, 2012 recorded July 16, 2012 under Document No 201213099, Book 896, Page: 1376. The beneficial interest is currently held by Guild Mortgage Company. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,524.38, beginning September 1, 2012 and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 1, 2013 is $230,648.45 principal, interest at the rate of 3.5% now totaling $4,020.14, late charges in the amount of $182.94, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,616.38, plus accruing interest at the rate of $22.12 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 15, 2013 Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham) On this 15th day of February, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov. 6, 2018 Guild Vs. Dubois 41291.880 Published on 4/25, 5/2 and 5/9/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 24, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 51 of Cornerstone Phase II, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof Susan Catherine Butler, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to American Title & Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 25, 2002 and recorded August 15, 2002 in Book 686, Page 1469 under Document No. 200223098. The beneficial interest is currently held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association S/B/M Chase Home Finance LLC, S/B/M to Chase

Manhattan Mortgage Corporation. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $537.37, beginning September 1, 2012, and each month subsequent which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 06, 2013 is $69,942.08 principal, interest at the rate: of 6.875% now totaling $1,681.88, late charges in the amount of $64.47, escrow advances of $200.65, and other fees and expenses advanced of $63.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $13.17 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 15, 2013 Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 15th day of February, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov. 6, 2018 Chase Vs. Butler 41954.307 Published on 4/25, 5/2 and 5/9/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEES SALE on June 24, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 1 IN BLOCK 38 OF EAST MISSOULA ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. David O. Larson, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated April 8, 2008 and recorded April 9, 2008 under Document No. 200807824 in Book 816, on Page 1000. The beneficial interest is currently held by Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana.

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PUBLIC NOTICES The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,250.79, beginning December 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 22, 2013 is $180,898.85 principal, interest at the rate of 6.87500% now totaling $16,261.72, escrow advances of $2,930.75, and other fees and expenses advanced of $4,130.67, plus accruing interest at the rate of $34.07 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of

SUSTAINAFIEDS the following described real property situated In Missoula County, Montana: LOT A-82 OF CANYON CREEK VILLAGE, PHASES 9 AND 10, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY. MONTANA ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Ja’ton L. Simpson, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to National City Bank, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated December 17, 2008 and recorded December 30, 2008 in book 831, page 328, under document number 200828139. The beneficial interest is currently held by PNC Bank, National Association successor by merger to National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,019.03, beginning August 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 1, 2013 is $179,380.67 principal, interest at the rate of 5.000% now totaling $5,979.36, late charges in the amount of $262.80, escrow advances of $1,358.54 and other fees and expenses advanced of $411.12, plus accruing interest at the rate of $24.57 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the

Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the dose of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to ail existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 15, 2013 Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 15th day of February, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov. 6, 2018 Pnc Vs. Simpson 41230.886 Published on 4/25, 5/2 and 5/9/2013

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the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 14, 2013 Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham) On this 14th day of February, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov. 6, 2018 Bana Vs. Larson 42048.354 Published on 4/25, 5/2 and 5/9/2013 O. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEES SALE on June 24, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801,

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On April 22, 2013, Sheila Callahan & Friends, Inc., filed an application with the Federal Communications Commission to assign the license of FM Translator Station K296FM, serving Missoula, MT, to Western Rockies Radio, Inc.. The license specifies operation on Channel 296 (107.1 MHz) with an effective radiated power of 20 watts from an antenna site at 46-48-30 N, 113-58-38 W. Western Rockies Radio will continue to rebroadcast the signal of Station KDXT (FM), 97.9 MHz, Lolo, MT.

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SERVICES CHILDCARE Diaper Service averages 18 cents per change, so why are you throwing your money away? Local cloth diaper sales & service. Missoula peeps order online and get your goods delivered during diaper route Wednesdays. 406.728.1408 or natureboymontana.com

CLEANING Kitchen Deep Clean $150-$200. Includes cupboards, drawers and appliances. Inside and out, top to bottom. RC Services 241-0101 www.rcservices.info THOMAS CLEANING Residential/Commercial. 8+ years experience. Licensed/Insured. Free estimates. Fast, friendly, and professional. References. (406) 396-4847

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[C8] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013


RENTAL APARTMENTS

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1 bedroom, 1 bathroom. (2 Weeks Free to Qualified Applicant) $675 (62+ Complex) elevator, microwave, deck, coin-op laundry, off street parking, H/W/S/G paid, No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 1024 Stephens #2. 2bed/1bath ground level apartment, shared yard, coin-ops, cat? $675. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 1315 E. Broadway #9. 2bed/1.5 bath, coin-ops, shared yard, pet okay. $800 Grizzly Property Management 5422060 1801 Howell #3. 2 bed/1 bath, W/D hookups, storage, shared yard, pet okay. RENT INCENTIVE $725. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1826 S. 4TH W.: 2 BEDROOM, CARPORT & STORAGE, ONSITE LAUNDRY, CENTRAL, PRIVATE DECK, HEAT & CABLE PAID, $725, GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106. 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP! 2 bedroom, 1 bath $795 W/S/G paid, newly renovated, Southside location, DW, W/D hookups, carport. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom $595 coin-op laundry, off street parking, storage, H/W/S/G paid, No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom $695 quiet cul-de-sac, coin-op laundry, off street parking, H/W/S/G paid, No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 446 Washington Street. RENT INCENTIVE. 1bed/1bath, downtown location, coin-ops onsite, cat? $700 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 509 S. 10TH: ONE BEDROOM, DINING AREA, ON-SITE LAUNDRY, FREE CABLE, CENTRAL, HEAT PAID, $675. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Garden District. 1 bedroom. $369, tenant pays electricity. Washer/dryer in unit. Missoula Housing Authority. Contact Jordan Lyons 549-4113 ext. 112 Gold Dust Apartments. 2 bed: $691 all utilities paid. Application fees are $40. Comes with Mountain LIne E-Z Pass. Missoula Housing Authority. Contact Jordan 549-4113 ext. 127.

Russell Square Family Building. 2 Bedroom; $645 W/S/T & heat paid. Missoula Housing Authority Contact Colin 549-4113 ext. 112 Solstice Apartments. 1 bed: $500. 2 bed: $725. W/S/G & recycling paid. Comes with Mountain Line E-Z Pass. Missoula Housing Authority. Contact Colin 549-4113 ext. 112 Studio $450, true studio layout, coin-op laundry, off-street parking. ALL utilities paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 7287333 Studio $495. Near St. Patrick’s Hospital, separate room for bedroom, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No

pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

hookups, all utilities paid. $625. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

MOBILE HOMES

2423 55th St. “A” 3bed/1bath, shared yard, single garage, South Hills. $900. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent w/s/g/elec included $425/month 406-273-6034

DUPLEXES 1016 Charlo St. #1. 2bed/1bath, W/D hookups, shared yard, cat? $700 Grizzly Property Management 5422060 1708 Scott St. “B” 1 bed/1 bath, shared yard, W/D

New Complex, 1 bedroom unit, $625. DW, A/C, deck, storage, coin-op laundry, limited off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No pets. No smoking. GATEWEST 7287333 Palace Apartments. 2 beds from $527-$799. 1 beds $550-$666. Studio(s) 510. Application fee $30. W/S/G and Heat paid, coin-op laundry. Missoula Housing Authority Contact Matty or Connie 549-4113 ext. 130 or ext. 131.

524 South 5th Street East “B”. 2bed/1bath near University. All utilities included. $900. Grizzly Property Management 5422060

HOUSES 1314 Linnea Lane. 3 bed/1.5 bath, newer home, 2X garage, W/D hookups, pet? $1250. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 138 N. 2ND ST. E.: 2 BEDROOM HOUSE! NEAR DOWNTOWN & UNIVERSITY, WASHER & DRYER HOOK-UPS, PORCH, DOG WELCOME, $795, GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106. 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!

ROOMMATES ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

RENTALS OUT OF TOWN 11270 Napton Way 1C. 3bed/1bath, shared yard, coinops, central location in Lolo. $800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 3901 O’LEARY: 2 BEDROOM, 1 1/2 BATH, 2 STORY, PRIVATE DECK, HOOK-UPS + LAUNDRY, CARPORT & STORAGE, HEAT & CABLE PAID, $810. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106. 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP AND $300 GIFT CARD.

Alberton 3 bedroom, 1 bathroom, 1025 North Runyon Dr. (Petty Creek exit) on 1/2 acre. Pets ok. $625/mo. $625/dep. Photo’s available at realtor.com. 602-499-4640

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

1&2

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

549-7711 Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com

MHA Management manages 10 properties throughout Missoula.

GardenCity

Property Management

All properties are part of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program.

422 Madison • 549-6106 PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

The Missoula Housing Authority complies with the Fair Housing Act and offers Reasonable Accommodations to persons with Disabilities.

1235 34th St. • Missoula (406) 549-4113 missoulahousing.org

FIDELITY

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing 30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

www.gatewestrentals.com

Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

251-4707

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715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

Uncle Robert Lane 2 Bed Apt. $645/month Finalist

Visit our website at Finalist

fidelityproperty.com

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • May 2 – May 9, 2013 [C9]


REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE

MoveMontana.com for more information. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com

11689 Stolen Rock Court. 5 bed, 3 bath, 2 car garage on 3.15 acres. $319,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net

2905 Larch Camp Road. 3 bed, 2.5 bath on 2.5 acres in Pattee Canyon. Fully furnished. $621,900. Vickie & Chris Honzel, Lambros Real Estate 4 0 6 - 5 3 1 - 2 6 0 5 . vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

120 Grandview Way. South Hills 3 bed, 3 bath with deck, double garage and great views. $245,900. Properties 2000. Pat McCormick 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com 1360 Starwood Drive. 4 bed, 3 bath in Grant Creek backing open space. 3 car heated garage, garden shed & deck. $449,900. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com

2961 Mary Jane Boulevard. 3 bed, 2 bath with cathedral ceilings, private backyard, patio & 2 car garage. $205,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com

4433A Bordeaux. 2 bed, 2 bath with 2 car garage, fenced yard with pergola. Many upgrades including new flooring. $177,900. Rochelle Glasgow, Missoula Prudential, 728, 8270. glasgow@montana.com 5209 Dutton Court. 5 bed, 3 bath with fantastic kitchen, laundry room and 3 car garage. Near city park. $339,900. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5 4 6 - 5 8 1 6 annierealtor@gmail.com 5222 Forest Hill. 4 bed, 4 bath on over 3.5 acres near Bitterroot River adjacent to USFS land. $1,095,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estae 5329229. tory@montana.com

Who’s your favorite musician?

141 Burlington. Charming 4 bed, 1 bath with 2 car garage in Rose Park neighborhood. Wood floors under carpet, original hardware. $225,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com

Vote online at missoulanews.com

1480 Cresthaven. 3 bed, 2.5 bath on over one private acre. Open floor plan, dream master bathroom and double garage. $344,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

1930 Mullan Trail. 4 bed, 2 bath tri-level with deck, hot tub & 2 car garage. $245,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 5329229. tory@montana.com 2 Bdr, 1 Bath single-level Windsor Park home. $168,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 2 Bdr, 2 Bath Northside home. $160,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 210 Burlington. 4 bed, 2 bath well-maintained home with wood floors, fenced yard & single garage. $267,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@ montana.com 217 North Avenue E. 3 bed, 2 bath U District home with wood & tile flooring, arched doorways & basement. $239,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com 229 Mansion Heights. 4 bed, 4 bath Prairie Style with deck, patio, floor to ceiling windows and amazing views. $895,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com 2365 Village Square. 2 bed, 1 bath with fenced yard, patio & single garage. $168,999. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. anniere altor@gmail.com 253 Strand. 2 bed, 1.5 bath with hardwood floors, coved ceilings, updated bath. Charming house close to UM. $247,000. Go to

3 Bdr, 2 Bath Pleasant View home. $205,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr. 2 Bath Windsor Park home. $215,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3325 West Central. 4 bed, 2.5 bath with open kitchen, covered patio & 2 car garage. $288,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 3455 Jack Drive. 4 bed, 3 bath Linda Vista home with large kitchen, double garage & parklike landscaping. $285,000. Vickie & Chris Honzel, Lambros Real Estate 406-531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 3655 Jack Drive. 4 bed, 3 bath with day light walkout basement and 3 car garage. $290,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com. 4 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Grant Creek / Prospect Meadows home. $469,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4039 Yorkshire Place. Immaculate 3 bed, 2 bath Pleasantview home on large corner lot with covered front porch, deck & 2 car garage. $235,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com 4315 Melrose. 3 bed, 2 bath with vaulted ceilings, covered front porch and 2 car garage. $247,500. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties, 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com

5501 Prospect. 4 bed, 4 bath adjacent to common area in Grant Creek. Sun room, hot tub and many upgrades. $385,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 5805 Lariat Loop. Two story 4 bed, 3 bath on over one acre. $334,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros Real Estate. 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

6301 Hillview. 5 bed, 3.5 bath with 360 degree South Hills views. Game room, 2 gas fireplaces & 3 car garage. $450,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmailcom 6455 Linda Vista $289,900. Stunning, warm cedar sided home situated on a large (19,000sq/ft.) flat lot. Onelevel living!! 3 bd/3 ba home with a wide variety of amenities. A Must See! Properties 2000. Call Pat Dauenhauer 240-2442. 6544 McArthur. 3 bed, 2.5 bath with gas fireplace and 2 car garage. $240,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free comparative market analysis. 360-8234 Fantastic Home With View 6305 St. Thomas. 4 bed, 3 bath, updated and gorgeous setting with large private lot, double garage, landscaped and ready to move into! $310,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Linda Vista Home to be built at top of Linda Vista with amazing views! One level living, 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on corner lot on Jeff Drive. $279,900. KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com Lot 16B MacArthur. 3 bed, 2 bath to be built with fantastic views. $189,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net Lovely Classic Home. Excellent Condition. 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Hardwood Floors, Fireplace, Central Location. 716 South 6th West. $269,000. 406-542-3860

[C10] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013

Totally Green Remodel 1221 Kemp. 4 bedroom, 2 bath. It’s a must-see. $269,500. A sustainability model, this unique and beautifully upgraded home made the Homeword Sustainable Home Tour twice! KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Very Sweet Hidden Trails 548 Utah. 4 bedroom 2 bath home with 2 car garage, trail up to Mt. Jumbo out the door, newer home with great colors and awesome floor plan. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES 2025 Mullan Road. Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos. Large secure units with affordable HOA dues. Starting at $144,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 8804749. montpref@bigsky.net 5108 Village View #6. 2 bed, 2 bath with private deck, patio and single garage. $165,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 5329229. tory@montana.com 526 Minnesota #B. 2 bed, 1.5 bath energy-efficient condo with large front yard. $130,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com 6614 MacArthur. 2 bed, 2.5 bath townhome with amazing views. $194,500. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properites. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net 6632 MacArthur. 3 bed, 2 bath with gas fireplace, Jacuzzi and wonderful views. $273,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503, riceteam@bigsky.net 803A Pattee Creek. 2. bed, 1.5 bath condo with garage in 55+ community. $129,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000, 2407653. pat@properties2000.com 839 Discovery. 2 bed, 1.5 bath at base of Mt. Jumbo. Patio, balcony, fenced yard & single garage. $164,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmailcom Open & Light & Green & Clean Efficiency abounds in this 3 bed, 2.5 bath stand-alone super-insulated condo with heated floors and so much more. $250,000. 1530 S 12th W. Near Good Food Store and bike trails. 240-5227. porticorealestate.com State of the Art GreenBuilt Innovative stand-alone 3 bedroom condo with radiant floor heat, superior insulation, concrete countertops, yard and garage and more! $265,000 KD porticorealestate.com 2405227 Townhome On The River Land Stewardship Program buyers must qualify. Call KD to find out more about this 2 bedroom 1.5 bath condo with the balcony facing the river and right next to the river trail and close to downtown. $135,000. 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

Uptown Flats #306. 1 bed, 1 bath top floor unit with lots of light. W/D, carport, storage & access to exercise room. $162,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com Uptown Flats. From $149,900. Upscale gated community near downtown. All SS appliances, car port, storage and access to community room and exercise room plus more. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5465816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com

NHN Old Freight Road, St. Ignatius. 11 acre parcel with Mission Mountain views. $215,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com NHN Old Freight Road. Approximately 11 acres with Mission Mountain Views. $86,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

MANUFACTURED HOMES 1825 Burlington $83,000. Buy and Hold. Great land investment or first time home buyer. Sale includes 3bd/ 2ba mobile home on site since 1986. Property is zoned RM2.7 allowing multi-family dwelling buildings. Properties 2000. Call Patrick McCormick for details 240-7653.

COMMERCIAL 514 West Spruce. Great office space in vintage building near St. Pat’s. Upgrades to wiring, plumbing, roof & more. $244,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com Commercial Lease Space Fantastic opportunity to be neighbors with the awardwinning Homeword Organiza-

$439,900

4251 D.J. Drive

• Luxurious Kitchen • 2 Master Bedroom Suites • 3rd Bedroom and Bath • 2200+ sq ft on single level

Rita Gray

1825 Burlington. Two central Missoula lots with 3 bed, 2 bath mobile. Great investment or first time buy. $83,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com

406-544-4226 | www.ritagray.com

715 Clements. 3 bed, 2 bath mobile & 1 bedroom house on 1/4 acre. $120,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties, 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com

LAND FOR SALE 3.2 Acres in the Wye area. Gorgeous mountain and valley views. $65,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3010 West Central. Nearly 5 acres in Target Range with 3 bed, 1 bath home. Rural living in town. $499,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com 38487 Dandelion Lane, Polson, $485,000. 129’ of Flathead Lake Frontage. 2.94 acres w/views across the lake of the Mission Mountains. Property is split into 2 separate parcels. Great spot to build your dream cabin on Flathead Lake. Visit: www.FlatheadLakeLot.uCanBuyMe.com. Properties 2000. Call Kris Hawkins 396-6542. 531 Minnesota. Building Lot 9. $55,000. Robin Rice Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net Near Riverfront Park. 1265 Dakota #B. To-be-built, 3 bed, 2 bath with 2 car garage. Lot: $55,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com NHN Bear Creek Road $225,000. Beautiful views from this desired west side property. 20.53 acre property w great access just off of a paved road. Fenced, septic, and irrigation water rights. Properties 2000. Call Kristin Larson (406)672-7030

22020 Frontage Road, Frenchtown $230, 000 3 bed, 2 bath on beautiful one acre Many recent upgrades

11689 Stolen Rock, Frenchtown $319,000 5 bed, 3 bath on over 3 acres Great valley & mountain views

Mullan Heights Riverside Condos Starting at $144,900 • Large secure units with affordable HOA dues


REAL ESTATE tion. New, LEED registered, high quality, sustainably-built office space close to river and downtown. $11-$15 per sq.ft. KD 240-5227. porticore alestate.com For Lease – 1200 S. Reserve, Ste. G. $11.50/sq. 1,250 sq.ft. open office area with separate storage and break room. Office comes furnished with desks, chairs, filing cabinets etc. Properties 2000. Call Deana Ross for details 239-4726. Gorgeous Victorian home zoned for commercial use in a great location $395,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

Prudential Missoula. 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoulaproperties.com 18715 Felicia Lane, Frenchtown. 4 bed, 2 bath manufactured home on 3.39 acres with 2 car garage. $194,900. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com 1978 Waters Edge, Bonner. 4 bed, 2.5 bath on 2.3 Blackfoot River acres. $419,999. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 22020 Frontage Road, Frenchtown. 3 bed, 2 bath on beautiful 1 acre with playhouse & small

pond. Many recent upgrades. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com

wraparound deck and Bitterroot Mountain views. $289,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 5329229. tory@montana.com

244 7th Street, Clinton. 3 bed, 1 bath well-maintained home only a short walk to the river. $135,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net

4 Bdr, 3 Bath Stevensville area home on 13 acres. $575,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Stevensville area home on 6+ acres. $325,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

5 Bdr, 3 Bath, Florence area home on 3.2 acres. $575,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

3416 Lupine, Stevensville. 3 bed, 2 bath log-sided home with

5000 Schuman, Florence $500,000. Only 30 minutes

from town, a natural paradise, large ranches on 3 sides, very private, cross fenced & large pole barn. 3bd/2ba home on 80 acres. Properties 2000. Call Don Sokoloski 544-7830. 606 Stargazer, Florence. 4 bed, 3.5 bath with 2 bed, 1 bath apartment on 5.75 acres. $495,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com 780 N. Burnt Fork Rd in Stevensville $240,000. Take a

102 Boardwalk, Stevensville. 3 bed, 2 bath on almost 3 acres with large 48’x30’ heated shop. $285,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties, 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

Robin Rice • 240-6503

NMLS UI # 487288

3220 Great Northern Way | 327-1012 lhodge@fsbmsla.com 648 Hidden Valley Rd S, Florence $184,500

13475 Crystal Creek, Clinton. 3 bed, 2 bath with large deck, 2 wood stoves & 2 car garage. $249,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

157 Ridgeway $225,000. Corner Lot with lots of trees, nice backyard, deck and offers lots of natural light. 4bd/2ba home with single garage with additional work area. Upper level of the home is the main living area and a full walkout lower level. Properties 2000. Call Paula Crews for details 360-8655.

RICE TEAM

0SVM,SHKI6IEP)WXEXI0SER3J½GIV

11027 Stella Blue, Lolo. Gorgeous 4 bed, 4 bath two story custom home. Gourmet kitchen, spa-like master bath. $425,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com

15305 Spring Hill Road, Frenchtown. Beautiful cedar 4 bed, 2.5 bath with 3 car garage & deck on acreage bordering Forest Service. $475,000. Robin Rice @ 2406503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

productive land. There are 3 separate water rights that go w/the property. Properties 2000. Call Steve Schultz 240-1075.

Wh it comes to home When loa we know our way loans, around the block.

OUT OF TOWN

11082 Cherokee Lane, Lolo. 3 bed, 3 bath with basement, deck, 2 car garage & fantastic views. $252,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503, riceteam@bigsky.net

look at this very nice home built to take advantage of the incredible views. This multilevel home has 2 bedrooms and a shared bath on the upper floor. This home sits on 3.3 acres of very

4bed/4bath SHORT SALE with tons of potential! 5 acres. Oversized 2 car garage. Daylight lower level.

For Lease 4616 Gharrett MLS#: 20130540

9550 Derby, Msla MLS#: 20130743 $150,000

$3,000 per month Church and SFR on 3.03 Acres. Zoned RLD-4. Outstanding community residential day care or personal care facility. Extra land for development. This property is now also available for lease. $3,000 per month.

Great commercial opportunity. Level 1.127 acres in Missoula Industrial Park. Easy access to utilities. Property features a security fence.

Don Sokoloski 544-7830 Soko@Properties2000.com

Deana Ross 239-4726 Dross@Properties.com

512 W. Artemos, Msla MLS#: 20131676 $390,000

2402 Mount Ave. Msla MLS#: 20131839 $170,000

Professionally remodeled and decorated 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath home with double car garage. Beautifully landscaped ½ acre offers best views around and privacy. A Must See!

Centrally located, this home has some nice features to it. Vaulted ceilings, arched doorways, wood laminate flooring, sliding glass doors off the kitchen and the master bedroom to the back deck. All kitchen appliances included plus the stackable washer and dryer. Fenced back yard with storage shed. Visit www.2402MountAve.uCanBuyMe.com

Kristin Larson 672-7030, Kristin@Properties2000.com

Kris Hawkins 396-6542 of Kris@Properties2000.com

1623 Wild Turkey Lane, Stevensville. Over 200 acre private ranch with creek surrounded by conservation easement land. $949,000. Shannon Hilliard,

Rochelle Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

Missoula Properties 728-8270

missoulanews.com • May 2 – May 9, 2013 [C11]


REAL ESTATE Clark Fork River 20525 Schwartz Creek Road. $250,000 3 bed, 2 bath, 1 acre. Single level, country living only 20 minutes to Missoula. Walk to the fishing access and Clark Fork River. KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Home On the River Stevensville River Road home on 1.87 acres. 4 bedrooms, views of the Bitterroot Mountains and right on the Bitterroot River. This is awesome! Attached garage

plus detached RV garage. $340,000. KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL QUICK CASH FOR REAL ESTATE NOTES and Land Installment Contracts. We also lend on Real Estate with strong equity. 406-721-1444. www.CreativeFinance.com

5805 Lariat Loop $334,000 • Two story 4 bed, 3 bath on over 1 acre • Open floor plan, formal dining & breakfast nook • Jetted tub in master suite www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

$245,900 120 Grandview Way

• 3 Bed, 2 Bath On Main • Full Basement • Double Car Garage • Unencumbered Mountain Views • Open Floor Plan

Pat McCormick Real Estate Broker Real Estate With Real Experience

pat@properties2000.com 406-240-SOLD (7653)

Properties2000.com

[C12] Missoula Independent • May 2 – May 9, 2013



Missoula Independent