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NEWS

FISHING IN THE GENE POOL: UM BIOLOGISTS DISCOVER NEW SPECIES, HELP CONSERVATION

HEALTH OFFICIALS BATTLE URBAN RENEWAL DISTRICTS NAKED’S MUSIC BAD OPINION NEWS ANTI-VACCINE CONTINGENT DESTROY LOCAL CHARACTER ODD LEGACY


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


NEWS

FISHING IN THE GENE POOL: UM BIOLOGISTS DISCOVER NEW SPECIES, HELP CONSERVATION

HEALTH OFFICIALS BATTLE URBAN RENEWAL DISTRICTS NAKED’S MUSIC BAD OPINION NEWS ANTI-VACCINE CONTINGENT DESTROY LOCAL CHARACTER ODD LEGACY


GFS Anniversary Celebration 2014

Another Great Year Deserves Another Great Party Stop by between 11:00 am and 3:00 pm this Saturday, May 3, and help us celebrate nearly 45 years serving Western Montana. ICE CREAM SUNDAES, CAKE, ICE CREAM & MORE

An exciting remodel and expansion is keeping us off the sidewalk this spring, but that won’t stop us from celebrating another year of your support of the Good Food Store. We’ll be setting up a build your - own sundae bar in our cooking school that will include Big Dipper ice cream, homemade rhubarb compote, hot fudge and more. Plus we’ll also treat you to Bernice’s anniversary cake and coffee from Craven’s and Black Coffee.

LIVE MUSIC & PONY RIDES

Russ and Sam Nasset will be rockin’ the deli from 11:30 to 2:30 pm. And our friends from Parsons’ Ponies will be here from noon to 3:00 pm to help your kids into the saddle for pony rides around our east parking lot.

HUGE PRODUCE SIDEWALK SALE

Artichokes, berries, mangos and more. Paul has so many deals on the season’s freshest fruits and vegetables that we’ll be opening the garage door and expanding out onto the sidewalk.

AND SO MANY TERRIFIC PRIZES s6SHFLDOL]HGHU0RXQWDLQ%LNHFRXUWHV\RIWKH0LVVRXOD,QGHSHQGHQW %LJ6N\%LNHV s,QIODWDEOH.D\DN, courtesy of Blue Sky sSamsung Wireless Speaker, courtesy of SunRidge Farms s2VSUH\%DFNSDFN 5(,3HUVRQ7HQW, courtesy of Clif Bar sLe Creuset French Press Coffee Set, courtesy of Annieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Homegrown s'HSRW*LIW&HUWLILFDWHFRXUWHV\RI.<66)05DGLR s7DEOHWRS6WDLQOHVV*DV*ULOOFRXUWHV\RI2UJDQLF9DOOH\s%OXH&DQ\RQ.LWFKHQ*LIW&HUWLILFDWHFRXUWHV\RI.<66)05DGLR s7ZR0DUFKLHpV1XUVHU\*LIW&HUWLILFDWHVcourtesy of Frontier s)XGGUXFNHUpV*LIW&HUWLILFDWHFRXUWHV\RI.<66)05DGLR s3DUDGLVH)DOOV*LIW&HUWLILFDWHFRXUWHV\RI0RXQWDLQ%URDGFDVWLQJs&LWL]HQ)ROGLQJ%LNHFRXUWHV\RI+RQHVW7HD s7ZR)ODWKHDG/DNH%UHZLQJ&R*LIW&HUWLILFDWHVFRXUWHV\RI0RQWDQD5DGLR&RPSDQ\ s7UDLO+HDG*LIW&HUWLILFDWHFRXUWHV\RI0RQWDQD5DGLR&RPSDQ\ s5HG%LUG*LIW&HUWLILFDWHFRXUWHV\RI0RQWDQD5DGLR&RPSDQ\ s%HOOD6DXYDJH*LIW&HUWLILFDWHFRXUWHV\RI0RQWDQD5DGLR&RPSDQ\ s0LVVRXOD%LNH6RXUFH*LIW&HUWLILFDWHFRXUWHV\RI0RQWDQD5DGLR&RPSDQ\ s7ZR2QH<HDU6XEVFULSWLRQVWR=RQH0DJD]LQHFRXUWHV\RI=RQH0DJD]LQH s$<HDURI)UHH&RIIHH, courtesy of Cravenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s s%ODFN&RIIHH*LIW%DVNHWcourtesy of Black Coffee Roasting Co. s/LTXLG3ODQHW*LIW%DVNHWFRXUWHV\RI/LTXLG3ODQHW s&DPSILUH&RRNZDUH +DPPRFNcourtesy of Winegardnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wines s:HEHU.HWWOH%%4*ULOOcourtesy of Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Distributing s*RRG)RRG6WRUH*LIW%DVNHWFRXUWHV\RIWKH0LVVRXOLDQ s1RUGLF1DWXUDOV*LIW%DVNHWcourtesy of Nordic Naturals www.goodfoodstore.com

[2] Missoula Independent â&#x20AC;¢ May 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 8, 2014

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1600 S. 3rd St. West

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7am to 10pm Every Day


cover photo courtesy of Danielle Ford Photography

News Voices/Letters Bullock, logging and county commissioners .........................................4 The Week in Review Barry Beach, MUD and tennis .....................................................6 Briefs Dams, mobile homes and the castle doctrine......................................................6 Etc. Valerie Stamey is still pulling quite the paycheck....................................................7 News UM biologists discover new species—and help conservation ..............................8 News Health professionals work against anti-vaccine rhetoric ......................................9 Opinion Urban renewal districts threaten Missoula’s distinctive character ................10 Opinion This land is our land—until it’s privatized.....................................................11 Feature Modern women take on vintage beauty with pin-ups ....................................14

Arts & Entertainment Arts Bad Naked is back up to no good .........................................................................20 Music Goatwhore, Off! and Drive-By Truckers.............................................................21 Books Sex, drugs and headlines in Gwen Florio’s latest .............................................22 Theater What pie and werewolves have to do with Prison Boxing .............................23 Film Under the Skin resonates long after it’s over .......................................................24 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films ......................................................25 Flash in the Pan The toy ecosystem ............................................................................26 Happiest Hour Garden City BrewFest.........................................................................28 8 Days a Week Next on our reading list: Pink Bow City and Retro Lovely ................29 Mountain High Bear Foods Buffet...............................................................................41 Agenda Mullan Road Conference.................................................................................42

Exclusives

Street Talk ......................................................................................................................4 In Other News..............................................................................................................12 Classifieds...................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ..................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y....................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle ......................................................................................................C-7 Camp Sleepover.........................................................................................................C-9 This Modern World..................................................................................................C-11

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Heidi Starrett CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL PROJECTS Christie Anderson ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Cathrine L. Walters CALENDAR EDITOR Kate Whittle STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen, Ted McDermott COPY EDITOR Kate Whittle ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Pumpernickel Stewart, Jonathan Marquis CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Allen MARKETING, PROMOTION & EVENTS COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, Jason McMackin, Brad Tyer, Nick Davis, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Matthew Frank, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Melissa Mylchreest, Rob Rusignola, Josh Quick, Brooks Johnson

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2014 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • May 1–May 8, 2014 [3]


[voices]

We deserve better

STREET TALK

by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked Tuesday, April 29, near the corner of Higgins and Spruce. What’s your favorite pin-up pose? Show me. Follow-up: If you could live during a different time in history when would that be and why?

Brandon Kieser: The hip thrust with a finger over the lips. It’s sultry. Gangster: During Prohibition. They had such cool fedoras and such.

Skylure Schmidt: The butt pop with a hand on the cheek. Golden age: Elizabethan England. It would have been sweet to be among royalty.

Brian Martens: The Marilyn Monroe over the street grate. Forager: I would choose way, way back to hunter and gatherer days, where I’d be just cruisin’ around and eating berries.

Elliot Bassett: Laying on the ground with your feet in the air with your best “Ohhhh!” face. Modern: I choose now, now is a really good time. There’s no time like the present.

Matt Duguid: Oh, well you have to get on the ground. Neanderthal: I’m thinking prehistoric, brink of evolution, Clan of the Cave Bear time.

[4] Missoula Independent • May 1–May 8, 2014

Thanks to the Indy for letting Montanans know that Gov. Steve Bullock nominated 5 million acres of National Forest land in Montana for “fast track” logging via a cabal of seven hand-picked people that met in secret on the phone five times with absolutely no public notice, no notes taken and zero opportunity for Montanans to provide any input (see “etc.,” April 24). Montanans should also know that when citizens requested basic information about this secret process, the Bullock administration stonewalled the request and even threatened to make people pay. The 5 million acres of National Forests nominated for “fast track” logging fall under a new provision in the Farm Bill that calls for an unlimited number of timber sales up to 3,000 acres (4.7 square miles) in size, each spread across our National Forests. These timber sales are “categorically excluded” from the National Environmental Policy Act, meaning there will be no environmental analysis as to how a timber sale could impact threatened and endangered species such as bull trout, grizzly bear and lynx. Opportunities for meaningful public input have also been severely curtailed, including removal of the citizen appeal and objection process. To help put this 5 million acres in perspective, it’s estimated that 65-80 percent of the forested acres of the Lolo and Kootenai National Forests—outside of Wilderness—are nominated for “fast track” logging, including everything colored green, tan or red on this map: http://bit.ly/1mV4jtP. As a backcountry, public lands hunter I can assure you that many pockets of prime wildlife habitat and beautiful, ecologically diverse National Forests have been nominated for “fast track” logging. Get on the ground and see for yourself. Recent columns by the Montana timber industry and a handful of “collaborators” defending this secret process ignore the fact that the February conference call agenda clearly states: “April 1st deadline to Governor—after broader public review/input.” But as we all know now, that public review and input was never allowed. In a recent column, NWF’s Tom France tried to paint anyone with concerns about the secret “fast track” logging nomination process as part of “fringe groups.” Unfortunately, this is just more deception. Fact is, WildEarth Guardians—a group that’s won awards for working within open and transparent processes, and with 43,000 members in Montana and across the country—wrote Bullock and requested that he withdraw the

L

designation and restart a full process open to the public, not just hand-picked timber lobbyists and a few other people. Unfortunately, this is just the latest evidence of the Montana timber industry working with a few well-funded conservation organizations to greatly increase National Forest logging in Montana by weakening our environmental laws, “categorical excluding” NEPA analysis and limiting opportunities for meaningful citizen input. Montanans and our public lands and wildlife deserve far better. Matthew Koehler Missoula

“Many pockets of prime wildlife habitat and beautiful, ecologically diverse National Forests have been nominated for ‘fast track’ logging.” Same old tricks Why the surprise of Gov. Bullock’s actions? He’s running for reelection. Do recall in early 2007, knowing we voters could be had, and for chump change, Gov. BS and the legislature dusted off one of the oldest political cons in history and said, “Hey, let’s see if we can buy the voters off with $440 million of their own money for the next election.” Presto, bingo, the property tax rebate was passed, nearly two years before the election, and most everyone, including Gov. BS retained office. They bought our votes for roughly $400 per vote, no fools they. Gov. Bullock’s proposed $45 million of our money to the northeast part of the state will buy a lot of votes, no fool he. Ramping up logging on 5.1 million acres will do the same. Meanwhile Ds and Rs keep the clammer up on the airwaves, and in print, to the joys of party bosses, increasing their

status as geniuses, at the expense of the continued collective stupidity of the electorate. Forget about dark money, forget about media bias, forget about all that you’re told is causing the problems in American politics. Just remember, as citizens our own collective apathy has to disappear before The Same Old becomes a thing of the past. John Marshall Hot Springs

Additional time As a candidate for Missoula County Commissioner I appreciate the Missoula Independent publishing the April 24 article about the candidates in the upcoming election, and I would like to take this opportunity to address two subjects highlighted in that article (see “County control”). The first issue I wish to discuss is the gas tax proposed by the city of Missoula for the county to put on the ballot. This gas tax is essentially a sales tax on all county residents. Even though the county would benefit by the tax, the county’s budget is under control and no additional taxes are currently required. Unfortunately, the city’s budget doesn’t seem to be in the same balanced state. At this point, I am not in favor of putting the gas tax on the ballot. In regards to the issue of the county attorney’s lawsuit, the Independent article stated that I was having a “tough time answering either ‘yes’ or ‘no’” when asked if I would support the county attorney’s request for funds to contest whether the U.S. Department of Justice had jurisdiction over his office. The reason for my hesitation is my belief that only the sitting commissioners have heard the whole story, and that undisclosed details may make a very convincing case in favor of the lawsuit. I believe that Montana’s attorney general has jurisdiction over our state’s county attorneys. A chain of command is in place and it doesn’t appear that it was followed appropriately. As disclosed, the attorney general asked to be kept in the loop with anything uncovered by the DOJ. This is not the same as the attorney general relinquishing the control over the county attorneys, and there may be a valid reason that should be contested. I strongly support all efforts to make our county safer for our families and community members, and as a father of two daughters who live in Missoula County, I am highly motivated to work towards a community we can all be proud of. Don Davies Missoula

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via email: editor@missoulanews.com.


missoulanews.com • May 1–May 8, 2014 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Cathrine L. Walters

Wednesday, April 23 Gov. Steve Bullock sends a letter to the Montana Board of Pardons and Parole in support of releasing Barry Beach, who was convicted for a 1979 murder he has long maintained he didn’t commit. Bullock argues “the reasons for maintaining Mr. Beach’s 100-yearswithout-parole sentence at taxpayer expense diminish with each passing year.”

Thursday, April 24 At 1:45 a.m., Missoula County sheriff’s deputies respond to alarms at First Lutheran Church on South Avenue. They discover a broken window, signs of vandalism and a 59-year-old man sitting on a bench, holding a single yellow flower. The man is charged with burglary and criminal mischief.

Friday, April 25 The University of Montana announces a major donation from Suzanne Moore Crocker and her husband Bruce to fund the salary and benefits of future directors at the Montana Museum of Art and Culture. The specific amount of the California couple’s donation is not released.

Saturday, April 26 Store employees, customers and other fashionistas model short skirts, tight shirts and myriad other seasonal attire from downtown boutiques and local designers during the inaugural Spring Must-Have Fashion Show at the Florence Hotel.

Sunday, April 27 The Missoula Urban Demonstration Project hosts its eighth annual Earth Day Celebration in Caras Park. The Hasslers and Black Mountain Moan provide music, while MUD and other groups promote environmental causes and sustainable practices.

Monday, April 28 Paul McCartney announces an Aug. 5 concert at Washington-Grizzly Stadium as part of his Out There summer tour. It’ll be only the third-ever concert in the stadium, following Pearl Jam in 1998 and the Rolling Stones in 2006. Tickets go on sale May 6.

Tuesday, April 29 The University of Montana men’s tennis team draws Oklahoma as its first round opponent in the NCAA tournament. Hot off the team’s first-ever Big Sky Conference championship, the Griz (13-11) will face the Sooners (23-3) in Norman on May 9.

University of Montana student Julian Robinson, right, and Five Valleys Community College student Wayne Armstrong compete in burling during the annual University of Montana Woodsmen Team show at Fort Missoula on April 25. Colleges across the Northwest battled in events like this one, where the object is to stay on the log longer than your opponent.

Bitterroot River

Dam problem not over The Supply Ditch diversion dam that crosses the Bitterroot River near Corvallis doesn’t look like much, but this low strip of concrete has caused a number of serious boating accidents—one of which resulted in the death of a 6-year-old girl in June 2013. While Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks issued strong warnings about the dam’s dangers and posted signs urging boaters to portage around the hazard, a pair of accidents early this spring convinced FWP to take a more drastic measure. On April 11, the agency closed the approximately 5-mile stretch between the Woodside and Tucker Crossing fishing access sites, where the dam is located. Though there’s no dispute over the dam’s danger, recreational boaters and anglers, as well as professional guides and outfitters, have criticized the closure as overregulation that could set a troubling precedent. It’s an inconvenience that’s not going to make or break the local fishing industry, but it does raise questions about further FWP intervention. “Every time there’s an accident, whether the person involved was being negligent or not, does FWP

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[6] Missoula Independent • May 1–May 8, 2014

have the responsibility to step in and create some type of regulation, close a piece of river, limit public and commercial access?” asks Missoula-based fishing guide Evan Phillippe. “That’s a frightening path to go down.” FWP fisheries manager Pat Saffel acknowledges this concern, but he argues the closure is a rare exception rather than a precedent-setting rule. “We don’t want to get in the business of telling people what’s safe or not,” he says. “But this one had proven issues that we tried to address and, still, people were getting into trouble, and we thought it was severe enough that we needed some time to better inform people about what’s going on.” What Saffel, Phillippe and area boaters want is for this section of the river to be made permanently safe. Efforts to find and fund such a solution, however, have been complicated by uncertainty about who owns the dam. FWP and others assumed Supply Ditch Association, a Stevensville-based irrigation company, owns the dam, which diverts water for agricultural use. Supply Ditch Chairman Hans McPherson, however, disputes that notion. “I don’t know that Supply Ditch owns it,” he says. McPherson believes the dam was built in the 1930s by the Civilian Conservation Corps, a federal program

of the 1930s. Therefore, he thinks the dam is property of the U.S. government—but he isn’t certain. “I’ve never established that,” says McPherson. “That’s what we’d like to know, too.” With so much uncertainty about who owns the dam and when it will be made more safe, a permanent solution still appears far off. Ted McDermott

Mobile homes

Gaining ground Recent news of evictions at Missoula’s Third Street mobile home community are leaving other area trailer park residents feeling insecure that they, too, could go homeless. In response to such worries, residents of the Garden City’s River Acres say they have one solution to the problem: purchasing the land under their trailers themselves. “A year from now, I think you’ll find that this court is one of the nicest ones in town,” says Ron Ehman, a 65-year-old Navy veteran who’s lived on the property for 26 years and is serving as president of River Acres’ newly created five-member governing board.


[news] In February, 31 River Acres homeowners paid roughly $25,000 each to cover the property’s $795,000 price tag and collectively purchase the park. The sale marks the emergence of an increasing trend facilitated by community nonprofits, including NeighborWorks Montana and the New Hampshire-based Resident Owned Communities USA, which seeks to combat the effects of spiking property values on mobile home communities. “They’re really at risk of losing their housing and not having an affordable option available to them,” says Kaia Peterson, from NeighborWorks. Prior to closing on River Acres, residents worried they could be priced out of houses many have lived in for decades. That occurred in February when the owner of Missoula’s Third Street mobile home court evicted roughly 44 tenants to make room for a planned commercial development. The River Acres deal marks the second of its kind in Missoula. In December, Buena Vista Mobile Home Court residents purchased their property. Deals are financed and facilitated by NeighborWorks and ROC. River Acres residents will pay on average $320 month to cover the mortgage, which has a 5.8-percent interest rate. Revenue goes directly back into the court’s bank account to cover expenses and improvements. NeighborWorks and ROC also teach property owners how to form a corporation and govern the cooperative communities. Ehman says when NeighborWorks Montana first pitched the deal, he and other River Acres residents were suspicious. Despite facing a few hiccups, most of his neighbors are relieved to no longer fear evictions. “Most of them are happy,” he says. Jessica Mayrer

Recycling

Glass half full In 2010, Martin NoRunner, founder of the Missoula curbside pickup service i.e. Recycling, started hoarding glass in storage units. There was no existing way to reuse the material, but he assumed some outlet would soon emerge. Four years later, NoRunner’s still collecting and storing glass—and he’s still looking for something to do with it. It’s not that NoRunner hasn’t tried to find an application for his customers’ glass. In 2012, he bought a pulverizer and gave the sand-sized shards to a man who hoped to use the material to make retaining wall blocks. That project, however, turned out not to be viable. Then, in October 2013, NoRunner heard about a large-capacity pulverizer in Livingston that was sending its glass to Colorado, for reuse by Coors. NoRunner started amassing a new stockpile of glass in an effort to get 90 tons—enough to fill a train car. When Coors cut back on its demand for

recycled glass in February of this year, the Livingston pulverizer could no longer accept i.e.’s contribution. “When I heard that,” says NoRunner, “I called Republic.” Missoula’s primary waste-management company, Republic Services, had recently taken over the glass recycling program at the Target store on Reserve Street, and NoRunner wanted to find out if he could contribute his cache. As various media outlets reported last month, however, much of the glass Republic is supposed to recycle ends up in the landfill due to contamination. The situation left NoRunner back at square one: holding thousands of pounds of glass, with nowhere to take it. Now he’s making one final push to solve

his—and Missoula’s—inability to find a way to reuse glass. Over the next year, he hopes to add some 450 new customers to his current roster of about 100. If he can do this, NoRunner thinks he’ll have a sufficiently large and consistent source of glass that a viable use for it will emerge. The most practical and likely application would be as an ingredient in asphalt. “I would just like to see it implemented in our alternative pathways in town—for hiking, biking, running ...,” he says. “Green transportation, basically, made out of green materials.” Ted McDermott

Castle doctrine

Hill aims to revise law This week’s Grant Creek shooting that left a 17year-old Big Sky High School German exchange student dead and a local homeowner in jail is shaping up to ignite a political firestorm over a controversial law that, according to at least one state legislator, encourages vigilante justice. On April 28, state Rep. Ellie Hill, D-Missoula, initiated efforts to repeal changes made in 2009 to what’s

BY THE NUMBERS

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Classic and custom vehicles that rolled into Southgate Mall last weekend for the seventh annual Western Montana Car Club Expo.

called the “castle doctrine,” a law that she believes enables homeowners “to shoot first and ask questions later.” Hill expects the move to be met with a fight. “I know that the National Rifle Association will come after me,” she says. Hill’s actions come in response to the April 27 killing of Diren Dede, who, prosecutors say, was shot by Markus Hendrik Kaarma, a 29-year-old U.S. Forest Service firefighter. Court documents indicate Kaarma was home with his common-law wife, Janelle Pflager, when a motion sensor notified them of someone entering their garage. The alert prompted Kaarma to grab a shotgun, approach the structure from the outside and allegedly fire four shots into the garage. Dede died from a bullet wound to the head. On April 28, the Missoula County Attorney’s Office charged Kaarma with deliberate homicide. Court filings by the county portray Kaarma and Pflager as a couple who, frustrated by two recent home burglaries, set a trap to prevent such a thing from happening again. Charging documents note that, despite having been burglarized, Pflager left the garage door open and a purse with catalogued personal items in the structure, so, as she allegedly told law enforcement, “they would take it.” The documents also detail a conversation between Kaarma and a hair stylist during which Kaarma allegedly said he’d been waiting up at night “with his shotgun to shoot some fucking kid.” Paul Ryan, Kaarma’s Missoula attorney, argues the couple was scared and only acted to protect their family, including their 10-month-old son. “They felt there was no other option,” Ryan says. Ryan adds his client’s actions are protected by the castle doctrine, which the Montana Legislature revised five years ago to authorize the use of lethal force if an individual “reasonably believes” the action will “terminate the other’s unlawful entry into or attack upon an occupied structure.” Prior to the revision, individuals could only lawfully use deadly force against an intruder if the intruder acted in a “violent, riotous, or tumultuous manner.” Hill says this week’s shooting illuminates how badly the 2009 legislature erred. Despite the expected fight once lawmakers reconvene in 2015, Hill believes something had to change. “This is the minimum I think we can do,” she says. Jessica Mayrer

ETC. It’s been more than four months since Ravalli County Treasurer Valerie Stamey sat in front of commissioners and rattled off a list of criminal allegations against the very people seeking answers as to why her office was in such disarray. The county has since spent thousands of dollars investigating her claims, none of which were verified in a final report from retired District Court Judge Nels Swandal last month. Meanwhile, Stamey remains on paid administrative leave, barred from her office but still receiving a regular check from Ravalli County. According to human resources director Robert Jenni, Stamey has been paid a total of $14,020.83 in wages and benefits since the commission voted to place her on leave Jan. 23. Public outrage continues to trickle in to the county commission, with several citizens questioning via phone and email in recent weeks why Stamey is being kept on the payroll. It’s a fair question. That infamous Jan. 21 meeting was meant to offer officials and the public an update on how the treasurer’s office was catching up on months of backlogged tax receipts and disbursements. Instead, Stamey went on the offensive with a series of wild and, as Swandal’s report now indicates, unsubstantiated accusations. But Swandal cast a wider net of culpability in April than anyone prior. He acknowledged that Stamey—who eventually declined to be interviewed for his investigation—should have put forth more effort in learning her duties. However, he added that the office was already suffering from dissatisfaction and conflict. “It is my opinion that if the personnel in the treasurer’s office had acted as a team with the goal of serving the tax-paying public and getting the job done,” Swandal wrote, “Ravalli County would not have faced the problems it did after Mrs. Stamey’s selection.” The commission did discuss Stamey’s present status last month but, on the advice of Ravalli County Attorney Bill Fulbright, opted to keep her on paid leave. That expense is just the tip of the iceberg. The county is spending significantly more—upwards of $50,000 so far— on a financial audit of the treasurer’s office. All this adds up to what seems like an obvious electoral defeat in the offing. Stamey is still on the ballot to retain her seat against two challengers in the upcoming Republican primary. After such a contentious and costly clustermess, it’s safe to say name recognition isn’t exactly on her side.

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missoulanews.com • May 1–May 8, 2014 [7]


[news]

Fishing in the gene pool UM biologists discover new sculpin species by Matthew Frank

One day last summer, Michael netics, in which genetics is applied to con- history archives, which offered few speciLeMoine, a doctorate candidate in fish- servation biology, have already shown that mens for comparison. Ultimately, Don Zaroban, the curator eries biology at the University of Montana, there are probably even more new sculpin carried a nondescript cardboard box into species out there—along with who knows of fishes at the College of Idaho’s Museum of Natural History, helped LeMoine unthe Missoula FedEx office. Inside it was a what else. By applying genetic techniques to fish cover a key distinction: The species that jar of ethanol containing a single speciand amphibians, says Michael Young, a co- would eventually be named Cottus schitmen of a new species of sculpin. The woman at the counter asked author of the paper, “it’s quite likely that suumsh has a single, small, skin-covered LeMoine for the value of the contents. He we’d encounter something that’s extraor- protrusion on its preopercular bone, lohesitated, considering. “My trouble, dinarily rare.” In the process, they could cated between the cheek and gill cover, ma’am,” he remembers answering, “is that identify new species that are already on whereas all other sculpin in the region you don’t know this, but this is a new the brink of extinction, thereby joining have two. The difference is visible only through dissection. species in this box, and I really have no discovery and preservation. Young and fellow idea what the value researchers are now of it is.” applying DNA barcodSo LeMoine hazing to other fish, such arded $10,000, an as the westslope cutamount that didn’t throat trout, Moninclude the value of tana’s state fish. the months of field Despite the threat of and lab work it took habitat loss and hyto identify the fish. bridization with rainNor could he begin bow and Yellowstone to answer the unimage courtesy of Emily Harrington cutthroat trout, the spoken philosophical question: What is An illustration of the cedar sculpin, Cottus schitsuumsh, a newly identified U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has declined the value of a species of sculpin. to protect the westsspecies? Young, a fisheries biologist at the U.S. lope cutthroat under the Endangered FedEx charged $5 to insure the package. “Five bucks to insure a new species,” Forest Service’s Rocky Mountain Research Species Act. By collecting specimens from LeMoine says. “If only that would work in Station in Missoula, led the team that discov- across the species’ entire range and analyzered the new sculpin. He describes his re- ing their DNA, Young’s team could very the real world.” In January, Zootaxa, a taxonomy search as “quantifying biodiversity,” well find evidence of a new trout species journal, published LeMoine and his col- mapping all the fish and amphibians in the or at least genetically distinct populations. leagues’ description of the cedar sculpin, Rocky Mountain West’s river basins. Doing Either would bolster the scientific arguor Cottus schitsuumsh,which is found in this, he says, will set a benchmark, a standard ment for listing, since divided populations parts of the upper Columbia River Basin of comparison for monitoring the future ef- result in smaller and more vulnerable ones. Once the trout’s genetics are underin Montana and Idaho. Of the hundreds fects of climate change on species. It’s an of sculpin species around the world, sev- ambitious effort that involves gathering stood, Young says, it may be possible to eral are abundant in the cold freshwaters thousands of samples over vast landscapes. help it cope with climate change. GenetiYoung and his colleagues started with cally unique stocks of the fish would have of the Pacific Northwest, where they are tasty prey for salmon and trout and play a sculpins because they presented a “target different evolutionary histories; some may crucial role in stream ecology. They’re of opportunity”—since they’re hard to dis- have been selected for dealing with strangely colored, odd little bottom-feed- tinguish with the naked eye, distinct warmer climates. “If we want to move ers with unflattering names like “slimy” species have probably been lumped to- some fish,” he says, “those might be really and “spoonhead.” LeMoine describes gether. Between 2008 and 2011, Young’s good ones to move because they’re likely them as “a frog head connected to a slug team collected sculpins from 398 streams to be more resilient to climate change in northern Idaho and western Montana. than other forms that only deal with really with some fins on it.” The problem is that all sculpins look DNA barcoding revealed that as many as cold environments.” Genetic sleuthing offers intriguing posalike, to such a degree that biologists con- eight could be genetically distinct, as-yetsibilities, but also underscores how much sider them one of the most difficult groups unnamed species. The most distinct, it appeared, was a remains to be discovered. As freshwater bioof freshwater fish to identify. LeMoine and his colleagues identified the cedar sculpin sculpin found in Idaho’s Coeur d’Alene diversity continues to decline, we’re losing by scanning a short sequence of its DNA. and St. Joe rivers and a couple of Clark species we’ve never even named. In doing so, they demonstrated how this Fork tributaries west of Missoula. But a This reporting was supported by Scidecade-old taxonomic tool, known as DNA unique gene sequence alone does not esbarcoding, can help biologists discover tablish a new species; it must be com- ence Source, a project of the University of new fish species—or distinct popula- bined with unique morphology. Young Montana School of Journalism. The artitions—within what was thought to be a tasked LeMoine, his student, with finding cle first appeared in High Country News single, undifferentiated species. The re- those physical differences, however slight. (hcn.org ). searchers, among the West’s pioneers in The assignment was made more difficult the fast-growing field of conservation ge- by the sorry state of the region’s natural editor@missoulanews.com

[8] Missoula Independent • May 1–May 8, 2014


[news]

Beer Drinkers’ Profile Eatin’ & Readin’

Margie

Herd mentality Health professionals work against anti-vaccine rhetoric by Mike Gerrity

Ravalli County Public Health Director formed in 2008 and attempted twice to ate the completely disproven link between Judy Griffin has seen what whooping have Montana’s exemption laws for vaccine vaccination and autism, that’s completely regulations changed in the state legislature. fear-based and they’re not up to date on cough can do to a child. “I’ve seen a three-week-old baby with After failing both efforts, Dewey Duffel, one the data and the science on that.” Griffin says anybody disputing the expertussis hospitalized and it’s really in- of the group’s founders, says the group istence of herd immunity will be told differcredible, and it really hits those babies now exists online only. “In 2013 we basically monitored the ent by simply consulting an epidemiologist. hard,” she says. “It’s very ugly to see a “The point I want to put across is that if proposed law changes and found none that baby struggling.” Griffin recalls the major outbreak that were a significant threat to our goals,” Duffel you’re vaccinated and you come in contact hit Ravalli County two years ago when writes in an email. “Since then, MFHF has with pertussis, you’re not going to be as sick as if you have never been vaccidozens became infected and nated before,” she says. “The nearly 100 unvaccinated students anti-immunization people are were pulled from classes for gonna think, ‘Well, yeah, look at three weeks. That was the first all these people that still got it time in Ravalli County history after they’ve been vaccinated,’ that students had to be removed but the point is that you’re not from school to protect the comgoing to be as ill as if you have munity through a process known never been vaccinated before.” as herd immunity. The problem for physi“Basically, when you don’t cians is that to effectively vachave an outbreak, the people cinate, patients must come to who are vaccinated are actually them. Those convinced of a protecting the kids or the people problem with vaccinations who choose not to be vaccimay never have an opportunated,” she says. “And then when nity to discuss the issue. this dips low and you have a photo by Chad Harder “When people come here lower immunization rate, then you’re going to see more cases.” Ravalli County Public Health Director Judy Griffin worries they’ve pretty much decided A growing sentiment against that a growing anti-vaccine contingent will further to get it,” Leahy says, “or they vaccination has officials like Grif- weaken western Montana’s herd immunity. Groups like maybe want to get them on a Shot Free in Montana and Montana Families for Health slower schedule and so we fin working to combat lower im- Freedom make preventative efforts more difficult. talk with them about how to munization rates and avoid a similar problem. The anti-vaccination con- been inactive except for our web site pres- get it on a slower schedule if that makes tingent has been fueled by disinformation ence which allows us to be contacted in case them more comfortable.” Missoula County’s most recent outbreak spread through the Internet—such as the de- individuals want to ask a question about of whooping cough is not officially over, as bunked notion linking vaccines to autism— Montana exemptions or related matters.” Duffel says the group identifies as the incubation period from the last conand drives some families to treat the shots “vaccine-neutral,” although its website di- firmed cases has not passed. This winter ofas suspect or to reject them entirely. Organizations like Shot Free in Mon- rects visitors to articles advocating vaccine ficials counted eight cases, three of which tana and Montana Families for Health Free- “liberation.” One such site claims that were contracted by students at Hellgate High dom present the biggest local challenge to present-day public health is generated School. Leahy says some of those cases may health officials. Shot Free in Montana claims from advances in sanitation and nutrition, suggest that herd immunity in Missoula the state’s religious exemption law is lax and that vaccines, on the other hand, “in- County is weakening. Nationally, cases of measles, mumps and pertussis, long reenough to allow any family who does not troduce filth into a body.” The group’s Facebook page, which garded as bygone illnesses thanks to widebelieve vaccinations are in their child’s best interest eligibility to file for exemptions. Out was recently taken down, also posted links spread vaccination, have seen resurgences in of 14,023 students enrolled in Missoula K- to anti-vaccine articles and memes. Last areas where vaccination rates have dropped. “You actually need really good herd 12 classes, 303 are listed as having religious month, an article was posted claiming that exemptions from certain vaccines, with 89 vaccines can be implicated in the rise of immunity to be protective to the public at autism. Last September, an image file was large,” Leahy says. “We actually have some more having medical exemptions. Jon Ebelt, public information officer posted of a laughing child along with a cap- fully immunized children that have had for the Montana Department of Health and tion implying that herd immunity is a myth. positive tests for pertussis. They have not Ellen Leahy of the Missoula City- been very ill, which is good.” Human Services, says the religious exempMissoula County Public Schools tion statute does not provide information County Health Department says dubious on specific religions or a verification pro- theories behind vaccinations can resonate Health Services Supervisor Linda Simon cedure, but exemption forms clearly doc- deeply in parents simply trying to take says Missoula is lucky to avoid an outbreak on the level of Ravalli County’s two ument the requirements. “We have no care of their children. “When you have a child there are so years ago. Nonetheless, she notes that indication that false religious exemptions are being filed and we do not contact par- many things that you can think about that pertussis infections have increased during can cause fear in a parent, and the parent her 16-year-long career in Montana. ents or guardians to verify,” Ebelt says. Montana Families for Health Freedom, of course wants to do the very best,” she which has a P.O. box listed in Florence, says. “So when they continue to perpetueditor@missoulanews.com

What brings you to the Iron Horse? I wanted to sit in the sun, read a little, and eat a healthy lunch–which was d-lish! Have any plans for nicer weather? You bet: golf. My friends and I laugh; encourage each other. And we saved the UM golf course! Beverage of choice? Clean, cold water with lunch.

Watch the Kentucky Derby, attend our Half-Way-To-Halloween party, and visit after BrewFest. Something New Is Always Happening At The Horse

501 N. Higgins • 728-8866

missoulanews.com • May 1–May 8, 2014 [9]


[opinion]

Blight fight Urban renewal districts threaten Missoula’s distinctive character by Dan Brooks

Regular readers of this column know that I support virtually every crazy scheme you can think of. For example, I am in favor of Mayor John Engen’s plan to purchase the city water supply from the Carlyle Group, even though that global asset management firm surely has the interests of the townspeople at heart. Missoula for Missoulians, I say, and I mean anyone who moved here or works in town or otherwise interacts with the city not through a Telex machine in D.C. I am concerned, however, about the Missoula City Council’s plan to declare urban renewal districts along North Reserve and East Broadway. I live in the second of those districts, and while it is probably blighted, I worry what will happen to me and my fellow reprobates after the city spruces it up. Missoula for Missoulians, I say, even though many of us are weirdos or poor. We should acknowledge that the legal and financial mechanics of an urban renewal district are not a big deal. After the council declares a district blighted, city government can capture revenue from growth in its tax base for the next 15 years and reinvest it in development projects. That’s it, logistically. Ideologically, though, declaring blight signals the council’s attitude toward certain areas and, by extension, its larger vision of the city. By definition, blight is the kind of thing you don’t like. And over the last decade and a half, the council has expressed its displeasure with several parts of town. District II, for example, includes the Clark Fork riverfront from Ogren Park to Catlin Street west of Russell—with “riverfront” covering everything between Toole Avenue and South Fourth Street, plus an unfashionable chunk of the Westside. Then there’s District III, which covers the entire Brooks Street corridor between Mount and Reserve. There’s also blight from Kiwanis Park to the Orange Street bridge along Front Street. If council goes ahead with its plan

for a new district, the entire north bank of the river will have been declared blight from Orange to East Missoula, except for the Doubletree Hotel. Located in the center of Missoula’s riverside blight district, the Doubletree remains a lovely place for you and your family to sleep. I agree that many of these areas are gross. But they also include much of the city’s affordable housing. District II and the riverfront are home to a substantial portion

“I can find an Outback Steakhouse anywhere. But I have never found another town like this one.” of the student population, as well as young people who cannot yet buy in to Missoula’s vertiginously expensive market for houses. From council chambers, it may look like a good idea to aggressively increase property values in these areas. For students and working renters, however, it could make it harder to get by in a town where the cost of living relative to wages is already dauntingly high. According to Jim McGrath of the Missoula Housing Authority, fair-market rent in Missoula increased 14 percent in 2013. That’s an astounding jump. It contradicts national trends, and it reflects the steady reduction in affordable housing that has burdened this city even as the job market stagnates. Clearing out the cheap motels along Broadway and the student apartments on either side of the river will only exacerbate

this problem. Those districts may have shabbier housing than other places in the city, but they are also vibrant neighborhoods that contribute to Missoula’s unique culture. I question whether council appreciates the value of that culture, given some of its past uses of urban renewal district money. In January, for example, the city gave $66,000 in property tax assessments funds to Wadsworth Development Group so it could build a Starbucks on Brooks Street. There is already a Starbucks about one mile from that location, to say nothing of the many local coffee shops nearby. I question whether subsidizing national chains is how Missoula wants to renew itself, much less spend taxpayers’ money. But that seems to be what the Missoula Redevelopment Agency has planned for the proposed blight area on North Reserve. “Whether you like big boxes or not, it’s a planned development,” director Ellen Buchanan told the Missoulian. “And if you look at what’s going on up in this area, it’s anything but a planned development.” I do not like big boxes, even if they do constitute a plan. The massive parking lots and river of shimmering traffic along Reserve Street are a bigger affront to my concept of Missoula than bad apartments and cheap motels. I can find an Outback Steakhouse anywhere. But I have never found another town like this one. Maybe instead of forging a new city, council should try to get more use out of the Missoula it already has. Municipal government hears from real estate agents and developers more often than it hears from students and low-income weirdos, but we are a necessary part of this town, too. Missoula for Missoulians, I say—even if you could get more property taxes by replacing us with a Starbucks. Dan Brooks writes about politics, culture and chain restaurants at combatblog.net. His column appears every other week in the Independent.

photo by Chad Harder

[10] Missoula Independent • May 1–May 8, 2014


[opinion]

Pay to play This land is our land—until it’s privatized by Greg Lewis

It’s 6 a.m. on April 8 as I head out for a hike on Mount Lemmon, in Arizona’s Coronado National Forest. Today, the temperature in Tucson will break 90 degrees, so I’m looking forward to the cooler, higher elevations. Passing Rose Canyon, I notice the campground is still closed. Making a quick decision, I pull into the empty parking area beside the highway. This may be the last opportunity I’ll have for several months to enjoy a free, peaceful and uninterrupted walk in these woods. Back in the 1950s, as a public service, the U.S. Forest Service created Rose Canyon Lake by damming Rose Creek at the place where the canyon narrows into a steep-sided slot. For generations, the lake has provided a tranquil setting for those wishing to spend quiet time enjoying nature, completely free of charge. But the times they are a-changing, and so is the “public service” role of the Forest Service. This morning, a gentle breeze sings softly in the tops of towering ponderosa pines. At 7,000 feet above sea level, the air is clean and sweet. I walk past a sprawling picnic pavilion crowded with concrete tables, festooned with banquet-sized cooking grates and covered by a large metal roof. “Reservations Required to Use This Site,” the sign reads. “Contact Reserve America.” Shortly, I pick up meandering Rose Creek. Though it has been a dry winter, there is still a trickle of water, and I find a few shallow pools. By staying near the creek, I mostly avoid the pavement—lined with 72 developed campsites—that leads for a mile-and-a-half down to the lake. By and by, a curve in the road crosses the creek, and just around the bend I spot a large recreational vehicle. The “campground host” is setting up for the season. An American flag hangs prominently next

to the RV, giving the impression that the inhabitant is a representative of the U.S. Forest Service. He is not, however: The Forest Service outsources management of its most popular campgrounds to private concessionaires. This particular campground host works for a Phoenix-based corporation called Recreation Resource Management. Though the company’s vehicles and uniforms resemble those of the federal agency, these employees are not

“These employees are not the noble forest rangers of days gone by, nor do they own the land they manage.” the noble forest rangers of days gone by, nor do they own the land they manage. American taxpayers have provided the infrastructure, including the recently completed, six-year renovation at Rose Canyon. In exchange for running the site, the concessionaire collects the profits. But national forest concessionaires don’t honor federal agency passes or follow the same rules that govern the Forest Service when it comes to fees. I notice that the fee booth on Mount Lemmon is closed. That is because the law does not allow the Forest Service to charge visitors for simple access—for parking and walking through the national forest. But when RRM opens the campground at Rose

Canyon, all visitors will have to pay $10 just to park and walk around the lake. In fact, even if you park along the highway, as I did, RRM will charge you for walking through “its” campground, built with your tax dollars. It seems shocking to say it, but this privatization of what were once public resources was recently upheld in district court, in a lawsuit in which I was one of six plaintiffs. We challenged the Coronado and four other national forests’ use of concessionaires to evade laws that restrict what fees the agency itself can charge. We lost. I reach the shore and see, out in the lake, a pair of ducks trailing ripples on its glassy surface. No one else is around on this glorious morning. I’m going to use this quiet time to reflect on what to say in a letter to my congressman. The law that governs fees in national forests is up for renewal or replacement this year, and I believe these fees must be fought, and fought hard. Only Congress can end the unhealthy alliance that has developed between the Forest Service and its concessionaires. Concessionaires have introduced a profit motive into the management of our national forests, and, as a result, the job of preserving the natural character of Rose Canyon has suffered. Unfortunately, the Forest Service seems bent on placing its private partners’ profitability above public service. The development that, as taxpayers, we all paid for is plain to see. But this summer, when it’s 100 degrees in Tucson, you’ll only see it if you pay the price of admission. Greg Lewis is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org ). He is an Elder for ecological issues at Southside Presbyterian Church in Tucson, Arizona.

missoulanews.com • May 1–May 8, 2014 [11]


[quirks]

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN – Police investigating the burglary of a restaurant in San Mateo, Calif., arrested Keveen Quintanilla, 31, after he stopped to flirt with bartender Ashleigh Cullen, 22, who was taking out the recycling. “He said he’d seen me around and wanted to hang out, which was strange since it was already 1 a.m. when he approached me,” Cullen said. After she realized the restaurant had been burglarized, she gave police Quintanilla’s name and phone number. Pretending to be Cullen, officers texted the suspect and arranged a date, then arrested him when he showed up. (San Jose’s KNTV-TV) Police investigating the theft of a laptop computer from a home in Dover, N.H., identified Casey Wentworth, 24, as their suspect after he called Apple customer service for help unlocking it. Detectives had already given Apple technical support the computer’s serial number. (Manchester’s WMUR-TV) CAPITALIZING ON DISASTER – Protesting Beijing’s choking air pollution, artist Liang Kegang returned from a business trip to France with a glass jar of clean, mountain air, which he auctioned off for 5,250 yuan ($860). The month before, tourism officials in smog-free Guizhou province announced plans to sell canned air as souvenirs. Tourism authorities in Henan province distributed bags of air from a mountain resort in Zhengzhou, the provincial capital, to attract visitors. Finally, recycling tycoon Chen Guangbiao began selling fresh air in cans online for $3 each. (Associated Press)

Registration for the Riverbank Run on May 10, 2014 is OPEN!

PATIENT, HEAL THYSELF – When Rose Preston experienced symptoms of a stroke at her home in Washington, D.C., she called 911. An ambulance arrived promptly. Once Preston was inside, however, the two D.C. Fire & EMS responders began “constantly bickering back and forth with one another,” she said. “I didn’t feel safe being transported by the vehicle.” Preston got out of the ambulance and returned to her home, noting that the paramedics didn’t seem to care and didn’t ask her to sign a formal patient refusal. Later that day, she took a subway to the hospital, where she was diagnosed with Bell’s palsy, which requires immediate medical care. Chief Kenneth Ellerbe said D.C. Fire & EMS was investigating the “unacceptable” incident, which occurred two months after the death of a 77-year-old man who collapsed across the street from a fire station. When his daughter pleaded with a firefighter to help the man, she was told to call 911 instead. (Washington’s WRC-TV) IS THERE ANYTHING BACON CAN’T DO? – Authorities accused Cameo Adawn Crispi, 31, of trying to set fire to her ex-boyfriend’s home in Naples, Utah, by leaving a pound of bacon burning on a gas stove. A police officer responding to a complaint by the ex-boyfriend discovered the fire in time to stop it from spreading. According to charging documents, Crispi “stated she was attempting to start a fire in the house to get back at (the ex-boyfriend).” (Salt Lake City’s Deseret News) SOUND BARRIERS – Philadelphia schools eager to keep teenagers from loitering during off hours are counting on high-frequency sonic waves emitted by a device known as “The Mosquito.” Adults over 25 generally cannot hear the sound, but teenagers find it “extremely annoying and will leave an area within a couple of minutes,” said Michael Gibson, president of Moving Sound Technologies, which sells the device. (Philadelphia’s KYW-TV) Organizers of the Australian Grand Prix have threatened legal action against Formula One management because the racecars’ new engines aren’t noisy enough. Besides switching from high-pitched 2.4 liter, V8 engines to fuel-efficient, 1.6-liter, turbocharged V-6 hybrid power plants, Formula One management introduced an energy recovery system that transforms exhaust fumes into extra engine power but with less noise. Addressing fan criticism of this year’s race, Andrew Westacott, head of the Australian Grand Prix Corporation, explained that the lack of noise has reduced the spectacle of the event by taking away a visceral element of the fan experience. (Business Insider Australia) SECOND AMENDMENT MEETS THE 21ST – Wilshire Gun, a new state-of-the-art indoor firing range in Oklahoma City, has applied for a liquor license. “We wanted to build a place, the first one in Oklahoma, where you could go in, shoot, enjoy the retail area and then go to the café,” owner Jeff Swanson said, insisting that shooting complexes which offer customers more than just a place for target practice “is where the shooting sport is headed.” Swanson explained that Wilshire Gun’s staff intends to scan the driver’s license of customers who order drinks to assure that none would be allowed to enter any of the shooting facilities as a spectator or shooter for the remainder of the day. (Oklahoma City’s KOKH-TV) ANTI-SOCIAL MEDIA – When British graphic designer Edd Joseph bought a video game console online but the seller failed to deliver it, Joseph copied the entire works of William Shakespeare and texted them to the seller. Although he sent them as one text, without paying extra because his calling plan allows unlimited texting, the seller can receive them only in 160-character chunks, meaning the 37 works arrive successively in 29,305 individual messages. Despite receiving abusive replies from the seller, who still hasn’t refunded his money, Joseph said he’d continue sending the texts. “I’m not a literary student, and I’m not an avid fan of Shakespeare,” he pointed out, “but I’ve got a new appreciation you could say, especially for the long ones.” (Britain’s The Bristol Post) CREATURE OF HABIT – Christopher M. Miller, 40, spent 15 years in state prison for robbing a Stride Rite shoe store in Toms River, N.J. Immediately after his release, Ocean County police said Miller boarded a bus from the prison to Tom’s River, where he robbed the same Stride Rite store. Police located the suspect a few blocks from the store and recovered the stolen money. (Baltimore’s WBFF-TV) FIRST STEP TO GUN CONTROL – Kentucky Rep. Lesley Combs admitted accidentally firing her Ruger semi-automatic handgun in her Capitol office while unloading it. “I’m a gun owner. It happens,” she explained, adding that she intends to replace the weapon. “It’s an automatic. I need to stick with revolvers.” (Louisville’s WHAS-TV) FAMILIARITY BREEDS ARREST – While dining at a high-end restaurant in Kansas City, Mo., a deputy U.S. marshal recognized another patron as Virgil Tillman, 30, a felon who had eluded police in two states since 2011 and whom he’d been hunting for five weeks. “I had been looking at the guy’s picture every day for weeks,” the deputy said after he called city police, who arrested Tillman as he was leaving Fogo de Chao. (Kansas City’s KSHB-TV)

[12] Missoula Independent • May 1–May 8, 2014


missoulanews.com • May 1–May 8, 2014 [13]


I

f you are comfortable, you probably don’t look good.”

Stella Pearl is lying on the floor, back arched, fish-netted legs impossibly straight up in the air. A group of women are standing around her, taking notes and asking questions. At the moment, they are learning about how to do bevels, arches and twists during photo shoots. More generally, at this workshop, they are learning all the secrets of modern-day pin-up girls, from where to find the perfect vintage underwear (estate sales), to where to buy the right shade of red lipstick downtown (Smooch Cosmetics), to how to find a great photographer on a budget (try university students). And of course, they are learning how to pose just like the pin-ups of the 1940s and ’50s.

Alysson King, aka Legs á la Mode, poses for a Valentine’s Day photo shoot. photo courtesy of NP Images at NicholePetersonPhotography.net

[14] Missoula Independent • May 1–May 8, 2014


“I am still wondering what you do with your hands,” asks an audience member who’s wearing sneakers and skinny jeans, but has her hair in a 1950s do, tied with a bandana like Rosie the Riveter, the We-Can-Do-It girl. Stella Pearl considers the question, legs still up. “What do you want to draw focus to? Your face?” Her hands slide behind her head so that both elbows are bent flat against the floor. “Your legs?” Her arms swoop down across her body so that her hands touch her thighs. “Your bottom?” Her arms and hands drop to the floor again, but this time along her body. With each small movement, the tone and focus of the pose changes. Although Stella should be the uncomfortable one, she’s obviously in her element. Her pupils look doubtful of their abilities, shifting their weight from one foot to another, furrowing their brows. While Stella makes vintage modeling look easy, it clearly isn’t. She stands up and takes a moment to reassure them all. “The modern idea of beauty—it’s all Photoshop and fake tan,” Stella says. “Today’s models are made to look like they were born perfect, like they got out of bed with naturally blonde and beachy hair, that they are naturally thin with perfect skin. What I love about pin-up is that the look isn’t going for natural. It is something you create. It’s glamour. It owns up to the fact that it is fake. It owns up to the fact that beauty takes time and effort. Our hair, the makeup, the shapewear—it’s about creating a specific look. It’s about magic and illusion.” And with that, Stella Pearl launches into an explanation of how to best make the range of expressions so common in cheesecake photos (another term for pin-ups). Her bright red hair is piled on top of her head in a mess of curls just like the iconic Betty Grable photo. She wears a simple black skirt and shirt along with bright blue pumps. One by one, she rotates through the classic pinup faces while making vowel sounds. Her big toothy smile first turns into a pursed-lips kiss, then a demure grin. Next, her mouth transforms into a flirty, mischievous “O.” It’s a Saturday afternoon in the back room of Lacy Zee’s tattoo parlor on Missoula’s Westside. The workshop participants are a small, diverse group of women, including one who wants to take pin-up inspired engagement photos, another interested in burlesque and a mother-daughter pair who simply want to learn more about vintage fashion and hair. During the three-hour class, they learn how to apply pin-up makeup, where to buy the right books that explain vintage hairdos and where to shop in Montana (and online) for the appropriate clothing. Why would a person want to know these things? From the curriculum of the class, it seems that very few pin-up enthusiasts do so for money or fame. There are only a handful of paid modeling opportunities for today’s pin-up hopefuls and even fewer opportunities to achieve widespread recognition. In fact, participating in pin-up activities often means investing both time and money in finding a wardrobe, making alterations and paying a photographer. And yet women across the country are competing in pin-up contests, putting curlers in their hair at night and scouring Goodwill racks for vintage cardigans and circle skirts. For Stella, who is admittedly making a little money from running the workshop, the joy seems to be in the act itself: finding a 1950s-era bathing suit in great condition and in her size. Creating a photo shoot storyline and set surrounding the new bathing suit—or entering a vintage bathing suit pageant. Doing her hair and makeup for the shoot. And finally—maybe most importantly—having the resulting pictures to keep, post online and share. Something that takes so much effort for little apparent long-term return: Is that a hobby? A pastime? A way of life?

T

o understand modern pin-up, you first have to learn about traditional pin-up. A good place to start is The Great American Pin-Up by Charles G. Martignette and Louis K. Meisel, a Bible-big tome of cheesecake art history. On each page, paintings of sassy, classic beauties are smiling out at the camera, many suffering from sexy clothing malfunctions or revealing breezes. The portraits begin to appear in the early 20th century and don’t peter out until the 1970s. The women wear high heels, wedges or no shoes at all (though mostly high heels). They wear dresses, bathing suits, lingerie or nothing at all (but mostly dresses). They are all white, blemishless and busty. They all, almost without exception, look like they are having a lot of fun. Born out of the widespread sexual repression of the early 1900s, and with a little help from pulp magazines and detective dime novels, pin-up art gained popularity that boomed when World War II sent millions of soldiers overseas with only a few photographs and their imaginations to keep them company on the front lines. After the war, pin-ups were common subject matter for calendars, magazine ads and movie posters—and, as one might guess, the pictures ended up pinned above men’s workbenches, in locker doors and in garages across the country. Stella Pearl was certainly right when she ge do. her vinta told the workshop y to hold ra sp ir . a Hair h 949 Ford about the magic and Big Sexy custom 1 n applies r classic se e n h a n H o g s e illusion of the pin-up. Top: M King pose Alysson Many of the women Bottom: in the book are wearphoto courtesy of NP Images at NicholePetersonPhotography.net

missoulanews.com • May 1–May 8, 2014 [15]


ing impossibly structured high heels, which Stella had explained were often added on by painters after the shoot. Many are also wearing outfits that defy gravity or sense: bras that just barely cover breasts (but somehow support them magnificently) or sheer robes that don’t have seams or weight, as if they were made of spider web. The art creates a strange yet undeniably pleasing effect: very real women in slightly unreal surroundings and situations. The book’s pages make a strong argument for the resurgence in pin-up’s popularity today: Who wouldn’t want to look like that? But the same pictures also depict some troubling aspects of a bygone era. It’s hard to miss that many of the women are baking pies, applying makeup, vacuuming or engaging in any number of other traditional 1950s female activities. Not to mention the blatant objectification of women. While some of the pictures are inspiring or even funny, others reveal a world that many women are glad is in the past. In one picture by Art Frahm, for example, a woman is carrying a bag of groceries with one arm, her purse and a hatbox in the other. She seems surprised when her yellow dress becomes stuck in a telephone booth, and her lacy pink panties accidentally slip to her ankles. From the left of the picture, a man looks at the scene, unhelpful and leering. While the book answers a lot of questions about the current popularity of pin-up, it also raises a new one: Why are people like Stella Pearl idealizing a time when a woman’s place was in the home, and the only woman you’d see at a garage would be hanging on the wall?

Par t of pin-up culture involves taking the time to choose an outfit, fix hair and apply makeup. “It’s not a waste of my time because it makes me feel good,” says King, top. Hansen, pictured in the lower three photos, agrees. “It is never a matter of, Am I beautiful enough? It’s about hard work to create and market my product. The product is yourself …,” she says.

M

eg Hansen answers her front door wearing a vintage printed cotton housedress. Her red hair is now pulled back in a simple curled ponytail, her bangs curled under themselves and bobby pinned. As she sits down at her kitchen table, the sun catches a sheen of silk stockings and a flash of white slip. She isn’t on her way to teach another pin-up workshop, or to a costume party, or to a pageant. And today she isn’t calling herself Stella Pearl, her pin-up persona and stage name. In fact, she’s just returned home from the mall, where she’d picked up a few extra shifts at her job at LensCrafters (she also works at Swoon Beauty Boutique). While she doesn’t dress in full pin-up gear every day, due to issues of practicality and Montana weather, she always tries to display a vintage style—a coat of bright red lipstick, a cardigan, a pair of highwaisted jeans. The only other thing that stands in the way of a complete pin-up lifestyle? She doesn’t always appreciate the attention. Walking through the mall on her lunch break means stopping multiple times to talk to someone who wants to know about her hair or stockings, or a senior citizen who wants to reminisce about bygone days. “This goes beyond a hobby. It’s a lifestyle,” she says, sitting at her modern dining room table in her 1940s bungalow. “Something about it feels more natural to me. Although I have appreciation for modern fashion, it has never felt right or natural on me. When I put a vintage dress on, something about it on my body feels right.” Hansen’s love affair with the 1950s and ’60s started as she was growing up, watching reruns of “I Love Lucy” and “The Dick Van Dyke Show” on Nick@Nite and going to classic car and motorcycle shows with her father and brothers. Later, when she attended beauty school, she learned all the basics of vintage hairstyling, from victory rolls to finger waves. Her interest in tattoos

photos by Cathrine L. Walters

[16] Missoula Independent • May 1–May 8, 2014

(not to mention romantic interest in tattoo artists) and rockabilly culture (not to mention romantic interest in rockabilly artists) further influenced her lifestyle as a modern pin-up. But while she can point to these important events as stops along her road to creating her current lifestyle, she admits she simply loves most everything about the time period. “It isn’t just the clothes and hair,” she says. “People had better manners. It is everything. The penmanship from that era, the décor. The cars were so sleek and beautiful.” As for the issue of idealizing an imperfect past— like the confining gender roles of the 1950s—Hansen returns to the idea of her persona, Stella. “Stella is from a wealthy family and has a ditzy personality. It’s fun to have that character, to be able to exaggerate, to have that release,” she says. “When I’m Stella, I like to play up the idea of those old stereotypes. Stella thinks chivalry is dead, that we don’t have values anymore. I enjoy poking fun at those ideas.” Alysson King (pin-up name: Legs á la Mode) has similar thoughts on the juxtaposition between traditional and modern pin-up. Sitting at her Formica and chrome 1950s dining room table, she explains that what could seem like idealization is really innovation. “This is the 1950s reinvented,” she says. “I feel like the modern pin-up girl is strong. She has tattoos. She can fend for herself. But remember that even back then, a lot of pin-up wasn’t mainstream. There was Bettie Page. There were whips and chains. It’s rebellious now, and it was also rebellious back then.” King also lives the pin-up lifestyle, to the extent she can, though she seems to have a few more modern and rockabilly influences than Hansen. While her hair is curled and pinned, her platinum blonde hair has a bright blue streak. And while she sports red lips and cat eyes, she’s also wearing a comparably modern blouse and jeans. Parked on the street outside her apartment window is a classic custom 1949 Ford, sporting the vanity license plate PINND UP. Her boyfriend, who also loves all things vintage, restores classic cars and builds hot rods. “When I think of a pin-up girl, I think of the utmost example of what a girl should be: hair done up, too much makeup, form-flattering clothing, heels,” King says. “It’s a classic art, with a super modern edge. Our grandmothers used to get their hair done once a week, with rollers, and sleep on a satin pillow. They used to sew their own dresses. The art is dying, and I’d like to see it go on.” King, like Hansen, has a history that includes beauty school, tattoo parlors and car shows. She now works as a stylist and makeup artist during the day while spending free time on her pin-up passions. Unlike Hansen, she has sewed since high school and has made outfits from both modern and vintage patterns. Her spare room is completely devoted to pin-up, from her antique waterfall vanity to her sewing table, to her closet, which spills out into the main space in a jumble of shoes, purses and fabrics. She pulls one stunning dress from her closet— wine-red velvet—that is in almost perfect condition. As she smooths down the fabric, she explains that it belonged to her friend’s mother, who sewed it herself from a Vogue pattern and wore it to a New Year’s Eve party in the early 1960s. “So many of these pieces have history behind them,” she says, showing off the stitching along the seams. “And it is so cool to own something that is one-off. Everything back then was made this way. The cars were made of steel. I think it is so special to preserve it.”


Best Local Arts & Entertainment Art Gallery Band Museum Musician Photographer Writer Movie Theater

Best Local Fashion & Beauty Cosmetics Day Spa Jewelry Kids' Clothing Women's Clothing Men's Clothing Lingerie Place for a Man's Haircut Place for a Woman's Haircut Shoe Store Tattoo Parlor Thrift Store

Best Local Food & Drink Appetizers Asian Food Bakery Barbecue Breakfast Brunch Budget Lunch Coffee Tea Delicatessen Doughnuts Burger French Fries Fresh Produce Desserts Ice Cream/Frozen Yogurt Milk Shake Mexican Food Pizza Restaurant New Restaurant (Since Jan. 2013) Family-Friendly Restaurant Restaurant Service Restaurant Wine List Outdoor Dining Romantic Dining Salad

For the last 20 years, the Independent’s dedicated readers have taken a few minutes out of their day, put aside their Happy Hour beer or lunchtime burrito, and filled in a few answers to help us celebrate this place we call home.We’re talking about Best of Missoula, and while the times have certainly changed—no more Best Video Rental category, the addition of online-only categories at missoulanews.com—the spirit of our reader poll has remained the same. It’s about you, our community, and the people, places, events and businesses that get you excited about living, working and learning here. Best of Missoula is our biggest issue of the year, and we can’t do it without you. In return for your vote, we’re inviting you to the summer’s biggest bash:The Independent’s annual Best of Missoula Party at Caras Park on Thursday, July 10.There’ll be live music from local bands, food, drinks, special activities for the whole family and, of course, plenty of toasts to this year’s winners. But first things first: Fill out your ballot and do your part to make the 2014 Best of Missoula poll our best in two decades. Or go online (missoulanews.com) to vote for even more categories.

Best Local Nightlife Bar Bar Food Bar for a Stiff Pour Beer Selection Cocktail Selection Bloody Mary Margarita Casino Happy Hour Karaoke Bar Late-Night Munchies Microbrewery Place to Dance Place to Hear Live Music Pool Table Sports Bar

Best Local Sports & Recreation

Sandwich Shop Seafood Steak Supermarket Retail Beer Selection Retail Wine Selection Vegetarian Food Wings

Bike Shop Bowling Alley Fly-Fishing Shop Golf Course Health Club Place for Paddle Sports Gear Place to get a Snowboard Sporting Goods Store Store for Guns Store for Mountaineering Gear Store for Skis

Best Local Goods & Services Adult Store Auto Repair

Consider this the fine print: We require ballots to include your full name, email address and phone number in the spaces provided. Ballots missing any of this information, or ballots with fewer than 30 categories filled in, will be mocked, ridiculed and not counted. Same goes for photocopied ballots and ballots with unclear markings. Hard-copy ballots may be mailed or hand-delivered to the Indy office at 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or dropped at any of the ballot locations listed below.

Bank/Credit Union Big Box Store Bookstore CDs and Music Dry Cleaner Furniture Store Garden Center Hobby/Craft Shop Lodging Motorcycle/ATV Dealer New-Car Dealer Used-Car Dealer New Retail Store (Since Jan. 2013) Pet Supplies Ranch Supply Store Store for Gifts Home Appliances Home Electronics Store for Musical Instruments Toy Store

Vote by May 7

R

Name: Email: Phone:

Ballot Box Locations: Bagels on Broadway, Bernice's Bakery, Bridge Pizza, Buttercup Market, Butterfly Herbs, Doc's Sandwich Shop, Draught Works Brewery, Five on Black, Flathead Lake Brewing, Go Fetch, Good Food Store, Iza Asian Restaurant, Kettlehouse, Market on Front, Orange Street Food Farm, Piece of Mind, Press Box, Rockin Rudy's, Skin Chic, Taco del Sol (all four locations), Taco Sano, The Trail Head, UC Center Market, Westside Lanes, Worden's Market

missoulanews.com • May 1–May 8, 2014 [17]


M

eg Hansen is going through her underwear drawer. Lingerie is piling up on her bed as she digs deeper, making the tiniest puffs of sound when pieces land on top of one another. She pulls out a few bullet bras, plus an amazing example of vintage shapeware: white high-waisted underwear with a corset tie in the front. They don’t conceal quite as well as modern-day Spanx, she explains, but that’s not really the point. She digs deeper. “And these are just so comfortable. They just feel so good,” she says, holding a handful of delicate slips like a bouquet. “I know they don’t serve much of a function, but I would wear a slip under my jeans if I could.” Going through her lingerie, it becomes clear what’s at the center of the allure of modern pin-up, at least for Hansen. For her, it’s more than a yearning for a different time, or an attempt to stand out and be different, or a hipster trend. It’s not about vanity or even about beauty. It’s about personality and identity. Hansen doesn’t like the slip just because it is pretty, or just because it is vintage. She doesn’t like it because her friends like it. She likes the way it feels on her legs. King expresses the same love for the style and time while talking about her sometimes extensive hair and makeup routine. She also addresses the potential perception that being into modern pin-up and self-photography means being vain. “This is the way I like to present myself. It’s not a waste of my time because it makes me feel good. It makes me feel good and that’s all that matters,” she says. “The pictures are for me. There’s nothing better than getting all dolled up, getting your picture taken and thinking, I look good. I do it for me.” Or as Hansen says, “Women back then didn’t have less on their plates, but their plates were very different looking. Doing your hair and makeup wasn’t considered extra, it was standard hygiene. I think that’s how a women’s world was designed. The modern idea of beauty is so narrow. [Modern pin-up] is all-inclusive—we get that comment a lot. It is never a matter of, Am I beautiful enough? It’s about hard work to create and market my product. The product is yourself: classic vintage, rockabilly, suicide girl, fetish. It’s getting to create what makes you feel happy and beautiful.” But perhaps Stella Pearl put it best during the pin-up girl workshop: “Traditional pin-up art used to be for the men. Modern pin-up is for women.”

T

raditional pin-up was for men, modern pin-up is for women. This is the key to understanding what pin-up means to the new generation of enthusiasts. To see what Hansen really means by this is as easy as surfing the Internet or flipping through one of the many modern pin-up magazines. These are the places where women who work hard to create pin-up photos of themselves submit their art and also where they go for inspiration. At first glance, many of the photos look similar to the originals of the ’40s and ’50s: the makeup is the same, the facial expressions are the same, their beveled legs are angled just so. But differences appear in quick succession. Many of the models are tattooed and many have brightly dyed hair. Although the photo themes and sets are similar, modern pin-ups are, much like Stella Pearl suggested, knowingly playing off the old, traditional and sometimes even offensive ideas of the past. In one picture, a woman in an apron, holding an iron, poses on the set of a hilariously filthy kitchen. Another website displays a collection of Art Frahm pictures, including the one featuring grocery bags and ankle panties, but each image is recreated with goth- and fetish-inspired models sporting combat boots, mohawks and face piercings. The biggest difference, though, may be that while the most iconic pin-ups of the past were painted—and mostly painted by men—the new pin-ups showcase real people with real bodies and faces, even if they are still trying to create magic and illusion. Today’s pin-up comes in all shapes and sizes, not to mention races. They are well aware of the art they are creating, and in fact many have designed their own hair, makeup, wardrobe, set and concept. And they don’t expect to be pinned above an oily tool bench in a dusty garage. They don’t even expect a paycheck. They take the photos for themselves and each other. They are all, without exception, having fun. Ready to make your pin-up debut (or just celebrate the pin-up resurgence)? Cigarette Girls Burlesque hosts a pin-up pageant emceed by Stella Pearl and Legs á la Mode Sunday, June 15, at 5 p.m. at Rock Creek Lodge. Entry fee is $15. Visit the Cigarette Girls Burlesque on Facebook for more information. Also, Stella Pearl runs her next pin-up workshop July 12, from 2-4 p.m. $30. Visit Stella Pearl’s Facebook page for more information.

Get some red lipstick. Stella Pearl recommends heading to Smooch Cosmetics (125 E. Main St.) and asking for a blue-red shade. Be precise and patient when applying it; you can’t smear it on like a lip gloss. Add a piece of nostalgia to your wardrobe. Stella says even adding a few vintage (or vintage-inspired) pieces to your wardrobe can help you give a nod to pin-up in your everyday dress. Head to Carlo’s One-Night Stand (109 S. Third St. W) to dig for treasures. If you’re feeling adventurous, ask to look in the basement. Paint on some cat eyes. All you need is some black liquid eyeliner and access to YouTube—the best place to find vintage hair and makeup how-to videos. Tell a fella that you’re busy doing your hair. These days, when women turn down a date because they’re washing their hair, it’s an accepted lie. But in the 1950s, women did have to spend about one night a week with curlers, bobby pins and round brushes. Take a night off to dedicate to self-care or attempt a new style (or just tell someone you did.)

editor@missoulanews.com King models at Sparkle Laundry during a photo shoot.

[18] Missoula Independent • May 1–May 8, 2014

photo courtesy of NP Images at NicholePetersonPhotography.net


missoulanews.com • May 1–May 8, 2014 [19]


[arts]

Games without rules Dane Hansen, aka Bad Naked, is up to more mischief with Bad Bad Super Saver Show by Erika Fredrickson

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

F

rench Renaissance writer Michel de Montaigne is credited with reminding humanity of its limitations. In one instance he writes, “No man is exempt from saying silly things; the mischief is to say them deliberately,” and in another, “Even on the most exalted throne in the world we are only sitting on our own bottom.” Missoula artist Dane Hansen embraces those sentiments in his photography, collage work and performance art. (He is a big fan of Montaigne.) As his alter-ego, Bad Naked, Hansen is deliberately silly and also literally aware of himself as a mere animal. “We’re all these stupid primates with these sloppy, dumb bodies that we have for 70-some years and then we keel over and die,” he says. “There’s not much to it. You’re not going to become something better. At your base you’re just that.” Bad Naked strums his hollowed-out bass guitar, “Big Betsy,” wearing nothing but a mask over his eyes and a pair of tight black underwear. He sings songs like “I Know What Dogs Like/Hot Dogs (For Everybody)” and “Spokane Arena/Dog Breeds” (he loves dogs), and even does a cover of “Come on-a My House,” which he renders in a much more belligerent fashion than Rosemary Clooney ever did. Many of the Bad Naked shows are guerrilla-style, springing up seemingly impromptu for 10 minutes in a parking lot or at the backdoor of a venue in between sets by other bands. His fans and friends gather around him and yell out the songs with him, clap along and heckle. Bad Naked encourages onlookers to throw padded “fail-

ure” balls and sometimes there are food fights featuring hot dogs or, classically, tomatoes. “Every Bad Naked song is a hook and a riff,” Hansen says. “It’s got to be so simple that I can find my way back to it if a tomato goes in my face.” Bad Naked is arguably the most controversial act in the Missoula music scene. His detractors see a guy who hardly knows how to play an instrument and who breaks convention, but in a lazy way that doesn’t offer something valuable in its place. His supporters see him as an embodiment of true punk rockness, an artist who delivers a vibrant performance for pure fun. If you ask Hansen, he kind of admits both sides are right. “With Bad Naked it’s like if you went out for a hamburger and instead somebody gave you a pile of dirt on a bun,” he says. “But people eat dirt. It’s nutritious.” He also admits that the origin of Bad Naked came when he got sick of being just a music promoter and wanted to get the spotlight for himself. “I wanted some of that attention,” he says. “I didn’t want to be the guy on the sidelines. For me, [performing] is like being kissed by the gods for a second. It’s like someone opened up my brain and is rubbing sand or glass in there. It just makes me feel good.” Suffice it to say he’s a strange cat. Hansen says he has tested positive for Asperger’s, and if you talk with him long enough you can see that the way he experiences the world is genuinely unusual. His live Bad Naked album, Shaq Show, for instance, was recorded at the now-defunct Lab, a house that hosted some of Missoula’s more mem-

[20] Missoula Independent • May 1–May 8, 2014

orable performances. You can hear the audience participation in the recording, but when Hansen talks about it he doesn’t differentiate between the things you can and can’t hear. “The audience pretty much just takes over the whole recording banging on things and shouting,” he says. “There’s a chiweenie that shows up. There are naked people. Penises show up in that recording. There’s somebody who sleeps through the entire recording in the corner. It’s a historical recording. They’ll dig it up someday and say, ‘Ah, this is how people used to be!’” Initially, long before Bad Naked existed, Hansen focused on photography. He would set up his large-format camera to face some beautiful outdoor scene and he’d attempt to capture it just right. But as he started going to more rock shows, he began to experiment with pointand-shoots and late-night flash photos. Instead of landscape or cool band photos, he started looking for the less romanticized aspects of a rock show or a party. Hansen’s upcoming First Friday show at Butterfly Herbs is called Bad Bad Super Saver Show No. 2 (the first Super Saver show was last August) and includes photographs and collage. Hansen describes the photographs as things you might see out of the corner of your eye but would probably disregard. Some might say for good reason. “Things like dog butts,” he says, “or cats doing weird things around your house at night. Pieces of people’s bodies, things happening at parties, fragmentary pictures of human desire, strange rituals and games.” Games are important to Hansen. He likes watching

sports and he likes incorporating sports objects into his performances and art. (For instance, his collage at Butterfly will include some balls.) But he doesn’t care for rules. “Games are all about deception and mischief,” he says. “Sports are a lot of fun to go watch if you don’t focus on the rules or specific [details of the game] but just watch the athleticism of people being dumb and throwing their bodies at each other and throwing things at each other. I like that part.” Hansen isn’t just dawdling in chaos, he kind of has a yin and yang approach to life. He takes an orderly approach to curating his photographs and collage. As the director of music at KBGA college radio, he loves putting the music collection in order. He was recently accepted for a full-ride scholarship to the University of New Orleans to get his master’s in art and will leave Missoula in late June for that adventure. Bad Naked will go with him, of course, to provide his ordered world with just the right amount of off-kilter messiness. Sometime soon, a house party in the Big Easy will be in for a big surprise. “People come to a party pretending that they wanted to see music but they are actually after pot, cute girls or boys, for the loose hookups and alcohol and sex—not the music,” he says. “Bad Naked is here to remind you of what you really came for.” Dane Hansen’s Bad Bad Super Saver Show No. 2 opens Fri., May 2, with a reception at Butterfly Herbs from 4 to 8 PM. efredrickson@missoulanews.com


[music]

More umlaut! Goatwhore keeps its black metal classic If you’re looking for a classic black metal sound to rev up your day (or midnight shenanigans), look no further than Goatwhore. This New Orleans metal band, founded in the late ’90s, rocks all of the skull imagery and Satanic references and randomly placed umlauts in its album artwork you could ever want. I

I don’t so much dig Goatwhore’s tracks where lead singer Ben Falgoust does cookie monster vocals. (Hey, band dudes: just ’cause Assück made cookie monster vocals sound cool the one time, doesn’t mean they shouldn’t be used sparingly.) Endlessly pummeling riffs and über-macho metal posturing

Goatwhore

was pleasantly surprised to find that a lot of Goatwhore’s catalog, including tracks on 2012’s Blood for the Master, is excellently thrashy and energetic, with speed-metal riffs galore. Most of the lyrics remind me of scenes in “Game of Thrones” where the priestess Melisandre is casting spells, with such cheery topics as “mortal despair” and “this age of oblivion” and “falling deeper into this trance of flame” and such.

tend to wear out their welcome with me, but I can totally recommend this to fans of older school, thrashier metal who want to get their headbang on. (Kate Whittle) Goatwhore plays the Palace Mon., May 5, along with Black Crown Initiate and Arctodus. 9 PM. $15/$12 advance at Rockin Rudy’s and 1111presents.com. All ages.

Off!, Wasted Years The video for “Red White and Black,” from Off!’s new Wasted Years album, depicts a bar full of neo-Nazis getting beaten up by black nationalists. That’s what Off! is going for: a righteous display of power. That’s also the story of hardcore. You fall in love with the aggressive sound, and you reach for the ethic to justify it. Composed of former members of Black Flag, Burning Brides, Redd Kross and Rocket From the Crypt, Off! is in many ways the ur-hardcore band. They sound it on Wasted Years, for better and for worse. They are better than almost everyone at as-

sembling muscular, spasmodic songs less than two minutes long, and this album distills the form to its essence. And yet it does not feel essential. The worst part about being the ur-hardcore band is that hardcore is in danger of not meaning anything anymore. Loud and fast have ceased to be artistic positions. If there is a flaw in Wasted Years, it’s that it is done masterfully without being done desperately. There is little sense of danger in its 16 tracks, but maybe that’s the listener’s fault. Hardcore was a way of living once, but now it is a form. (Dan Brooks)

EVERY MOTHER’S

HAPPY PLACE CELEBRATE MOM ON MAY 11

Drive-By Truckers, English Oceans Early in their career, Drive-By Truckers made southern rock mean. Fifteen years of road-wear and numerous lineup changes have distilled some of that piss and vinegar a little bit, but these buzzards still craft some of the loudest, toughest hard-luck anthems and boozers’ ballads around. English Oceans, the Georgia band’s 10th release, proves DBT is still drinking ’shine straight from the source. Dual frontmen Mike Cooley and Patterson Hood split the songwriting and singing down the middle on this release, a welcome change from the last two Hood-heavy releases. Not that Hood can’t hold his

own as a captivating presence—check out the eightminute album closer “Grand Canyon,” a swelling tribute to the band’s recently-deceased merch manager. But Cooley’s sardonic wit and old-boy grit on songs like the snarling “Shit Shots Count” and the shuffling serenade “Natural Light” balance things nicely. Nothing strikes as exceptional on this record compared to some earlier releases, and certain songs like “Hanging On” simply sound uninspired. Still, Truckers fans new and old will find plenty of believable tunes here to get them through those long hauls. (Jed Nussbaum)

Treat your mom to a pedicure in our new nail lounge, a relaxing massage or let her select her own path to happiness with a Sorella’s gift card.

207 East Main • Downtown Missoula • 721.3639 • Gift Cards Available

missoulanews.com • May 1–May 8, 2014 [21]


[books]

Dakota SVU Sex, drugs and headlines in Gwen Florio’s latest by Kate Whittle

Our society makes it dangerous for women to be meat, sniffing out their need and vulnerability.” Lola’s investigation takes her to the Bakken oiladventurous, to go out of bounds of home and family. It’s a theme that crops up throughout Dakota, fields of North Dakota. Here, Florio clearly relishes former reporter Gwen Florio’s page-turning follow- using real-life stories of lawlessness and debauchery as inspiration for the fictional town of Burnt Creek. up murder mystery to her debut, Montana. The series’ protagonist, reporter Lola Wicks, con- (I wonder if the name was inspired by the Burnt tinually gets in trouble for going where people think Creek Bar and Grill in Bismarck.) As anyone who women—especially reporter women—don’t belong. reads a news headline these days knows, real North In Montana, we learned that she navigated a hard- Dakota boomtowns like Williston are downright “Deadwood”-esque, bitten world of innerwith the proportions city crime reporting of roughneck male and then went on to workers, rampant foreign bureaus in drug use, crime synAfghanistan, maintaindicates and exploitaing a steely determition of female sex nation throughout. workers. Lola is a no-nonsense, With little idea of gun-toting dame, unthe scale of all this, comfortable with traLola heads off to ditional trappings of Burnt Creek. As you femininity but refreshmight expect, she ingly practical about finds a lot more trouhopping into bed ble than she barwith various dudes. As gained for while far as her detective purportedly working work, she calls to on a story about mind not so much the Blackfeet men who calm composure of a commute to the Miss Marple, but the Bakken for work. reckless enthusiasm Lola uncovers seedy (and disregard for plots, staying in town head injuries) of a even after getting atmore grownup Nancy tacked by a stranger Drew. in the street, that Montana opened lead her to find out with the murder of about young women Lola’s friend, Mary getting abused and Alice—a reporter who Dakota used for sex and stuck her neck out Gwen Florio money. too far while investihardcover, The Permanent Press While Dakota is gating political cor272 pages, $28 just as satisfying as ruption. In Dakota, Montana when it Lola has taken a gig with the local newspaper in the small fictional town comes to likable characters and pitch-perfect summaof Magpie, Montana, and is shacking up with the en- tions of small-town rural life, I found the mystery itdearing town sheriff. That doesn’t mean her life gets self to be disappointingly obvious. Maybe it’s because any quieter. Like Montana, Dakota opens with a I was actively looking for clues this time around, but woman’s death. This time it’s a young Blackfeet I do wish the foreshadowing had been a tad subtler. woman found frozen to death by the side of the road, I’m mostly nit-picking, though. The fun of Dakota a few miles from her home, on a bitter winter morn- isn’t so much the mystery itself but following along ing. “In Montana, the wind slammed snow against as Lola extricates herself from trouble, with plenty of earth frozen hard as iron,” Florio writes. The Hi-Line’s help from other strong, self-actualized women. Withbrutal weather is a fittingly cruel backdrop for the out giving too much away, I found a moral in the story’s denouement: In a patriarchal world, women human cruelty in the story. The tribal community mourns the girl, and the can either work against each other for perceived gain, death reminds Lola of how many other Blackfeet girls or band together to lend a sister a hand. I’m especially glad that Florio didn’t go for a tidy, have disappeared from the reservation in recent years. The rest of the community dismisses the miss- happy ending to all the intrigue. The trouble and ing girls as drug addicts and runaways. Lola has other strife in the fictional world she’s created continues— suspicions. “In her experience, men who went walk- just like it does in the real one. about tended to show up eventually, sometimes Gwen Florio reads from Dakota at Fact and Ficworse for the wear, but not infrequently better. It was tion Fri., May 2, at 5:30 PM. different for women, especially young ones. Predators homed in on them like wild dogs to scraps of raw kwhittle@missoulanews.com

[22] Missoula Independent • May 1–May 8, 2014


[theater]

Gut punch Prison Boxing brings the inside out by Erika Fredrickson

ater. They’re going to be so impressed with you guys that for the first time they’re totally going to forget that.’ And they really kind of became rock stars.” After she self-published the book, she started hearing that a former inmate named Michael Singleton was trying to find her. She was, admittedly, unsettled. “He contacted Carmen Winslow of the Montana Standard … and he called my mother,” she says. “And then through Amazon I was getting messages that an agent was looking for me and a manager. I wasn’t quite sure what was going on.” It turns out Singleton had been a student of Joki’s and his experience in the theater program had made an impression. A decade before the book came out, Singleton had befriended a down-and-out actor named Joe Manganiello. Manganiello would later go on to play Alcide the werewolf in “True Blood” and star in Magic Mike, but at the time he was dealing with alcoholism. Singleton, having battled his own demons, told Manganiello about how Joki had been an inspiration. When Juilliard to Jail came out, Singleton showed it to Manganiello, who, according to Joki, bought the film options. It’s unclear yet what will come of it, but it’s an exciting photo by Cathrine L. Walters development for Joki. Prison Boxing was Leah Joli performs as 14 characters in Prison Boxing. staged in October last year in-Corrections program, which she helped establish in under the direction of Joshua Kelly, who has since left the early 1980s. She taught screenwriting to inmates the state to pursue a master’s in directing. This time, and helped them put on plays, and through it all she Linda Grinde is working with Joki. Grinde’s worked on came to know the complex subculture of 25-to-lifers. several one-woman shows including Julie Cajune’s BeJoki’s new one-woman show, Prison Boxing, brings a lief, which was performed last year at the Bigfork Center few odd, funny details (like pie truces) and weaves them for Performing Arts. “I still think theater is mainly a flashlight and an in with more tragic and heavy topics. In the piece she plays 14 characters, including a juvenile delinquent, an actor, when it comes down to really good storytelling,” abused woman who kills her husband, a drug addict, a Grinde says. After its two nights in Missoula, Joki and Grinde murder victim and a prison guard. It’s a window into her time working behind bars—she addresses the effect will take Prison Boxing to LA, where it will be staged at the Polly Klaas case and mandatory minimums had on the Skylight Theatre by the Actors’ Gang, Tim Robbins’ the prison system, for instance—but the show is mostly company. Grinde has helped Joki reorganize the piece, partly a visceral exploration, through monologues, of the gray by helping her focus on one big question: What drew areas that develop in the system. This isn’t the first time Joki has written about her her to work in the prisons? It’s not an easy answer. Joki prison experience. Her book, Juilliard to Jail, which still has dreams from the intense experience—ones was published late last year, chronicles her jump from where she’s attacked or where she has accidentally mura theater student at Juilliard to pioneer of the prison dered someone. But she knows why she’d do it all over arts program. The book shows some of the ways theater again. “It’s about redemption,” Joki says. “It’s my feeling upended the status quo inside prison. For instance, the that people can be redeemed. My question for the instage was one of the few times you’d ever see races mix. mates was, ‘Can you do something with your life even In her chapter “Black Irish,” she talks about directing if you never get out?’ And I think you can.” Indian in the Bronx for which she cast a black man and Prison Boxing shows at the Crystal Theatre Fri., white man as friends. “When we went to bring in an au- May 2, at 8:30 PM and Sat., May 3, at 6:30 and 9:30 dience they were afraid that they were going to get the PM. $10/$5 student rush. crap beat out of them because they were on the stage being buddy-buddy,” she says. “I told them, ‘No, it’s theefredrickson@missoulanews.com One rule Leah Joki learned while working in prisons is that no one gets stabbed during a pie sale. You might knife someone or brawl any other time, but when the church folks show up with freshly baked fruit pies (or chain-store pizza) for an afternoon fundraiser, everyone’s on their best behavior. “It’s a huge thing to get a real pizza from Dominoes or to get a big apple pie,” Joki says. “If something’s going to go down in the yard, it’s not then. You’re not going to interfere with someone getting their pie.” Joki recently earned her master’s in theater at the University of Montana, but before that she spent almost 20 years teaching in California prisons through the Arts-

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missoulanews.com • May 1–May 8, 2014 [23]


[film]

Mullan Reserve combines the best of regional design and environmental sensitivity with amenities that promote an exceptional lifestyle. The result is Missoula's most innovative and comfortable apartment community.

Alien seduction Under the Skin resonates long after it’s over by Molly Laich

Energy-Efficient Features: LED Site Lighting Energy Star Appliances • High-Grade Insulation Exterior features include an extraordinary clubhouse, private gardens, open spaces and a pool and fitness center. Residences include oversized storage and balconies, bike hangers, shaker cabinetry, plank-style floors and custom finishes.

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[24] Missoula Independent • May 1–May 8, 2014

Not sponsored by PETA.

Under the Skin starts you out feeling absorbed but disoriented, and basically never relieves you of that feeling. Imagine if David Lynch made a movie with Stanley Kubrick’s disciplined aesthetic but didn’t care as much about entertaining his audience, and you’re close to approaching Under the Skin’s odd, languid greatness. Some films beg to be enhanced by mind-altering substances. With this one, the movie is the drug. Jonathan Glazer directs the screenplay written by Walter Campbell, adapted from a novel by Michel Faber. Glazer’s other films include Sexy Beast (2000) and Birth (2014). He’s also the man behind the Radiohead music videos for “Street Spirit” and “Karma Police.” Think back to “Karma Police” and that haunted stretch of highway, where mysterious figures emerge out of the darkness into color and then get set on fire. That’s the caliber of mood and imagery you can expect here, but featurelength and with talking. Scarlett Johansson stars as an alien named Laura who’s fallen to earth in Glasgow, Scotland, in the skintight suit of a perfect human female. She’s on a mission to seduce and ensnare men she encounters while cruising around in her car, and there’s the plot for you in its entirety. There’s hardly any dialogue, but the disjointed visuals combined with Mica Levi’s devastating score fills these scenes with an unmistakable dread, and it’s a feeling that persists long after you leave the theater. I can’t level enough praise for Johansson’s performance. Many filmmakers have lingered on Johansson’s curves—and not just men. Remember the opening shot of Sofia Coppola’s Lost in Translation? But this is the first time she’s been so naked on camera. Big surprise, it’s thrilling, and maybe not what you think. She’s got some unexpected plump in her belly and thighs and her clothes and makeup are just slightly trashy. She’s beautiful in a real-life way that makes her sexuality a thousand times more palpable and dangerous. Beyond the physical, Johansson’s subtle performance manages to make sense of what is an otherwise inexplicable character. She’s a new-

born adult who starts out confident and persistent in her mission and then becomes increasingly unhinged by the humanity burgeoning inside of her. I don’t mean to gush, but that’s sort of the point. If you’re not seduced and enamored by Laura then the film hasn’t done its job. Her game is simple enough. She approaches men on the street and asks them for directions, then tries to lure them into her car and eventually back to her place for sex, murder, robbery? It’s unclear. The moment they step into her apartment, the film dispenses with narrative and turns into a visual poem. I’ve talked to some people who interpret the black, gooey abyss the men march slowly into as a literal event, which is certainly possible within the science fiction confines of the story, but it had not occurred to me. At the time I thought it was a metaphor for their death and now I have no idea. Many of the scenes of men approaching the car to give Laura directions feature non-actors caught on hidden camera who didn’t find out they were in a movie until after the encounter. The effect is seamless and you’d never know it if I didn’t tell you. Laura encounters one man in particular with a hideous, elephant-man like face. She invites him to caress her cheek and then her neck. He’s a shy, guarded person who probably knows the situation is too good to be true and elects to dive in anyway. His fate is unclear, but I suspect whatever happened to him might have been worth it. Under the Skin is the most exhilarating and thoughtprovoking film to come out so far this year and I wholeheartedly recommend it, even though the mysteries bug me. I don’t understand what’s driving her to victimize these men, and I suspect avoiding the question is more a shallow convenience than an artistic choice. Still, I’m eager to be proven wrong with repeated viewings, or else just forgive the transgression and dive into the black pool. Under the Skin continues at the Wilma.

arts@missoulanews.com


[film]

OPENING THIS WEEK THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2 Peter Parker, Oscorp, supervillains, weird adolescent metaphor for shooting sticky substances, crappy reboot, blah blah blah. Starring Andrew Garfield, Emma Stone and Jamie Foxx. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex, Entertainer. LABYRINTH “Hey I just met you, and this is crazy, but here’s my labyrinth. I stole your baby.” Starring David Bowie, Jennifer Connelly and Toby Froud. Rated PG. Screening at the Roxy Thu., May 1 at 7 PM. Don’t forget to drink every time you see David Bowie’s crotch. NOW: IN THE WINGS ON A WORLD STAGE Go behind the scenes in this doc about the international stage production of Richard III that starred Kevin “Congressman Underwood” Spacey. (Calapatra is going through a “House of Cards” phase.) Also featuring Maureen Anderman and Stephen Lee Anderson. Not rated. Screening at the Roxy May 2-4 at 7 and 9 PM. SEEDS OF TIME Sustainable agriculture advocate Cary Fowler goes ‘round the world to find people working to preserve biodiversity. Worth paying attention to if you like to eat food. Screening at the Roxy May 2-4 at 7:15 and 9:15 PM.

“Pro tip: cover up your receding hairline by putting underwear on your head.” The Amazing Spider-Man 2 opens Friday at Carmike 12 and Pharaohplex.

NOW PLAYING BEARS Alaskan bear cubs run, play and grow up in the backdrop of majestic and dangerous wilderness. Narrated by John C. Reilly. Rated G. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex. BRICK MANSIONS An undercover cop must bring down a crime lord with the help of an ex-con. Starring Paul Walker (RIP), David Belle and RZA. Rated PG13. Carmike 12. CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER Steve Rogers and his jawline are just trying to keep on the down-low in modern-day Washington, D.C., but must team up with the Black Widow to fight off assorted villainous mischief. Starring Chris Evans, Frank Grillo and Sebastian Stan. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex.

DIVERGENT A teen living in a weirdo dystopia discovers she’s “divergent” and must save her own kind. Starring Shailene Woodley, Theo James and Kate Winslet. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex. DRAFT DAY Kevin Costner is an NFL general manager trying to decide which talented young men to select for a career that inflicts irreversible head injuries. (Maybe they’ll save that part for the sequel.) Also starring Chadwick Boseman and Jennifer Garner. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12. THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL Quirk-lovers rejoice, Wes Anderson brings us the lighthearted adventures of a mid-1930s concierge and a lobby boy. Starring Ralph Fiennes, F. Murray Abraham and Mathieu Amalric. Rated R. Wilma. HEAVEN IS FOR REAL A family is astonished to hear that their son believes he visited heaven after a near-death ex-

perience. Based on the 2010 best-selling book. Starring Greg Kinnear, Kelly Reilly and Connor Corum. Rated PG. Carmike 12. THE OTHER WOMAN Gals team up to get revenge on the cheatin’ dude who’s been, er, three-timing them. IMDB Plot keywords include “woman in bikini,” so this sounds pretty intellectual. Cameron Diaz, Leslie Mann and Kate Upton. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex, Showboat. THE QUIET ONES A university research team uncovers some weirdo supernatural poltergeist phenomena while studying a young woman. Starring Jared Harris, Sam Claflin and Olivia Cooke. Rated PG13. Carmike 12. RIO 2 The goofy family of macaws returns for an Amazon adventure and more bird-brained antics. Starring the voices of Jesse Eisenberg, Anne Hathaway and Jemaine Clement. Rated G. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex.

TRANSCENDENCE A terminally ill scientist gets his mind uploaded into a giant computer, promptly becomes allpowerful and potentially evil. Starring Johnny Depp, Rebecca Hall and Morgan Freeman. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Showboat. UNDER THE SKIN A sexy alien lady preys upon Scottish hitchhikers, in the adaptation of Michel Faber’s freaky 2000 novel. Starring Scarlett Johansson, Jeremy McWilliams and Lynsey Taylor Mackay. Rated R. Wilma. (See Film.)

Capsule reviews by Kate Whittle. Planning your outing to the cinema? Visit the arts section of missoulanews.com to find up-to-date movie times for theaters in the area. You can also contact theaters to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 and Village 6 at 541-7469; Wilma at 728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603.

missoulanews.com • May 1–May 8, 2014 [25]


[dish]

photo by Ari LeVaux

The toy ecosystem by Ari LeVaux I used to garden as if I had something to prove, as if my garden was a measure of my worth. I had clear production goals and took it as my duty to put food not only on the table, but in the freezer for a winter. Those days are over. Now my garden is like a cross between a yard ornament and the lab of a mad scientist, as much a half-baked expression of my artistic vision as a reflection of the gardener, the way pets come to resemble their owners. But I’m at peace with my hobby garden. I still want to harvest the maximum amount of produce, but just as much, I want to enjoy the garden. It has a lot to offer beyond pounds of food, perhaps none greater than the satisfaction of using the garden as a tool to interact with the forces of nature. It’s like the connection an angler feels with a fish on the line. But gardening adds the element of creation. The gardens I’ve been creating in recent years are dense and diverse, like edible toy ecosystems. The practice of growing lots of plants in the same spot, often called polyculture, has yielded a different-looking garden each summer. But they’ve all been interesting, fun and productive. Here are the general laws for the creation of my edible ecosystems. Law No. 1: Bare dirt is the enemy A photon that hits the ground is a wasted photon. What’s more, it’s a wasted photon hitting wasted ground, where something could be growing. In spring and early summer, bare dirt is inevitable as the garden fills in. But in a mature garden, every photon that falls within your garden should hit something green, not brown. Covering the bare soil prevents it from drying out and blowing away, while allowing it to hold onto its valuable moisture. I plant primarily by seed, aiming for a groundcovering blanket. I fill bald spots with starts from the farmers market. Law No. 2: Minimize labor If you follow the first law, much of the garden work will take care of itself. By filling every inch of garden space, especially on the soil surface, you aren’t leaving any room for potential weeds to grow. This leaves more time for sipping iced tea. Another labor saving technique I call “throwing seeds at garden” (pronounced with a cadence normally reserved for tai chi moves). Simply mix together the seeds for what you want to grow, and toss handfuls at your prepared dirt. This technique has helped me find, among many other discoveries, the place in my garden where parsley grows best. When mixing and matching plants in your garden, it helps to know how the various players might get along. Members of the cabbage family, for exam-

[26] Missoula Independent • May 1–May 8, 2014

FLASH IN THE PAN

ple, such as broccoli and kale, do poorly when crowded with a bunch of other random plants. Onions and garlic are notoriously bad companions to beans, and don’t do well in partial shade. After throwing your seeds, rake them in and sprinkle shovelfuls of compost over them. In order to keep your garden a garden, and not a bird feeder, cover the bed with shade cloth or floating row cover, available at most gardening stores, until the seeds sprout. Keep the bed well watered. This isn’t the most efficient way of sowing one’s seeds. Some will grow too close together and get shaded out. If you’re going to toss seeds at your garden you have to be comfortable yanking redundant or poorly placed seedlings. That’s how you make room for the tomato and pepper starts. Remember, this haphazard planting style should only be tried in smaller plots. Harvesting from a large garden that was planted by throwing would be a nightmare. But in a small-scale garden on which realistic expectations are placed, tossing some seeds is a fun way to get the action started. Law No. 3: Garden in three dimensions A garden doesn’t just exist on the surface of the earth. It also operates above and below ground. Gardening in 3D ensures that the ground will be covered, and will enhance your harvest of other intangibles by making your garden more diverse, colorful, interesting and fun. Corn is particularly well-suited for taking advantage of airspace. Planting peas, or some other climbing plant, at the base of the corn plants allows them to crawl up the stalks. You won’t have to set up a trellis, much less find a spot in the garden for a dedicated pea patch, because the corn stalks are essentially free real estate. Peas, being legumes, have roots that convert nitrogen from the atmosphere into a form useable by plants, which helps the entire garden. With corn and peas towering above the garden floor, there are still ground-level and below-ground spaces to fill. A mix of spinach and carrots would do the trick. Both are shade tolerant, ground-covering plants. Altogether, the plants share not just space, but interlocking ecological niches as well. The individual players are interchangeable, as long as specific needs of the game are filled. Spinach could be replaced by squash, melons, lettuce or endive. Beets or radishes could substitute for carrots; sunflowers for corn stalks. Or you could do like me and grow corn, sunflowers, beans, peas, spinach, lettuce, squash, melons and cucumbers, all in the same spot. Then, brew some iced tea, and enjoy the drama of your toy ecosystem as it unfolds.


[dish] Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway 728-8900 (across from courthouse) Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 When the sun shines, the trail along the Clark Fork beckons me for a stroll. As I pass Boone & Crockett I realize one quick side step up the hillside and I can stop at Bernice's. Mmmmm. Iced coffee to help me kick into the last leg of my cruise and a chocolate chip cookie. Or an herb cream cheese croissant and a deli container of Bernice's Signature Curried Chicken Salad. Tradition. While you embrace the sunshine remember Bernice's. Open 6a 8p seven days a week. xoxo bernice. bernicesbakerymt.com $-$$ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Mon.–Fri., 7:30–4, Sat. 8-4. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. $ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$ Brooks & Browns Inside Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. 532-2056 Thursday 5/1 Big Brains Trivia 7-10pm. Friday 5/2 Captain Wilson Conspiracy 6-9pm. Sunday Funday (Happy Hour all day). Martini MONDAY ($4 select martinis). Tuesday Burger & Beer $8. Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 41 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$

$…Under $5

El Cazador 101 S. Higgins Ave. 728-3657 Missoula Independent readers’ choice for Best Mexican Restaurant. Come taste Alfredo's original recipes for authentic Mexican food where we cook with love. From seafood to carne asada, enjoy dinner or stop by for our daily lunch specials. We are a locally owned Mexican family restaurant, and we want to make your visit with us one to remember. Open daily for lunch and dinner. $-$$ The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and gluten-free options. Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. Mon-Sat 11am5pm. Downtown Missoula. $ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West 541-FOOD The GFS Deli features made-to-order sandwiches, a rotating selection of six soups, an award-winning salad bar, an olive & antipasto bar and a self-serve hot bar offering a variety of housemade breakfast, lunch and dinner entrées. A seasonally changing selection of deli salads and rotisserie-roasted chickens are also available. Locally-roasted coffee/espresso drinks and an extensive smoothie menu complement bakery goodies from the GFS ovens and from Missoula’s favorite bakeries. Indoor and patio seating. Open every day, 7am – 10pm. $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St. 549-7723 www.grizzlyliquor.com Voted Missoula's Best Liquor Store! Largest selection of spirits in the Northwest, including all Montana micro-distilleries. Your headquarters for unique spirits and wines! Free customer parking. Open Monday-Saturday 9-7:30 www.grizzlyliquor.com. $-$$$ Heraldo's Mexican Food 116 Glacier Dr. Lolo, MT 59847 406-203-4060 HeraldosMexicanRestaurant.com Lunch and Dinner. Open 7 Days • Eat-in or Carry-out • Handmade Tamales • Burritos • Chimichangas • Flautas • Fajitas • Combo plates and MORE. See our menu at www.heraldosmexicanrestaurant.com. Order Your Holiday Tamales Now! Also sold year-round. Call for details. $-$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$

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Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We’re the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we’ll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Iza 529 S. Higgins • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Contemporary Asian cuisine featuring local, vegan, gluten free and organic options as well as wild caught seafood, Idaho trout and buffalo. Join us for lunch and dinner. Happy Hour 3-6 weekdays with specials on food and drink. Extensive sake, wine and tea menu. Closed Sundays. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm, Dinner 5pm-close. Sat: Dinner 5pm-close. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over

missoulanews.com • May 1–May 8, 2014 [27]


[dish]

Garden City Brewfest HAPPIEST HOUR It’s the time of year for the 22nd annual Garden City BrewFest, when our cups can’t runneth over enough. Breweries from across the state and country will be setting up shop in Caras Park with nearly 70 beers, so we’ve pulled together a few suggestions to help make the day a little easier to navigate. Heart of Darkness: Draught Works cooked up a black IPA that comes in at a fairly tame 5.7 percent alcohol by volume. The beer is a fusion of chocolate and black malts with some serious bitterness from 13 separate hops additions. It’s a porter-ish brew with a nice hoppy bite. Montana Lager: Bayern brewer Justin Lee gave us some backstory on this helles lager a while back. The recipe was originally an exclusive brewed for a bar in Seattle, but it got such a great reception at competitions last year (including a silver medal at the North American Beer Awards) that the brewery decided to try it on a wider audience. Perfect timing. Quilter’s Irish Death: This year marks the first appearance of the Washington-based Iron Horse Brewery at BrewFest, and already they’ve piqued our curiosity. We’re particularly looking forward to this hefty dark ale (7.8 percent), which the brewery refers to as “beer candy.”

photo by Alex Sakariassen

Gambler American Amber: BrewFest can be a point of frustration for the gluten intolerant, which is why we’re glad to see at least one beer on this year’s list billed as “gluten friendly.” Belgrade’s Outlaw Brewery says the Gambler is less sweet and more hoppy than your run-of-the-mill amber ale, and is brewed with an enzyme that makes it a nice gluten-reduced option. Where to go: Garden City BrewFest starts at noon on Saturday, May 3, in Caras Park. —Alex Sakariassen Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

MOTHER'S

DAY

BRUNCH Sunday May 11th 10am- 2pm

Our patio is now open for the season! Join us in the Atrium or Brooks & Browns

• Roasted Turkey & Roast Beef Carving Station • Omelet Station, Quiche, Montana Hash Brown Potatoes • Cocktail Shrimp, Chicken Cordon Bleu, Cold Smoked Salmon • French Toast, Bacon, Pastries, Fresh Fruit • Salad Station, Antipasto Station, Pasta Primavera • Chef's Harvest Vegetables, Cheddar Mashed Potatoes • Dessert Station

LARGE PARTIES WELCOME $29.99 per person $13.99 per child 12 & under

• LIVE HARPIST - 11am 2pm • Children 4 and under eat free • Limit 2 children per 1 adult • 20% Gratuity added to tables of 6 or more.

+ Kids Station: Chicken Fingers, Vegetables, Mac-n-Cheese

200 South Pattee, Missoula

Make Reservations Today

532-2040

Jimmy John’s 420 N. Higgins 542-1100 jimmyjohns.com Jimmy John’s - America’s Favorite Sandwich Delivery Guys! Unlike any other sub shop, Jimmy John’s is all about the freshest ingredients and fastest service. Freaky Fast, Freaky Good - that’s Jimmy John’s. Order online, call for delivery or visit us on Higgins. $-$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ Lucky Strike Sports Bar. Casino. Restaurant 1515 Dearborn Ave. 406-549-4152 Our restaurant offers breakfast, lunch and dinner. Are you looking for Delivery without all the extra charges? Call 549-4152 and talk to Jacquie or Judy for more details. You can also get lunch and Coffee from Bold Coffee in the parking lot. Come into the casino for your chance to play Plinko, Spin the Wheel, or Roll the Dice for machine play. Open Mon-Sun 7am-2am. $-$$ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. 543-7154 (on the hip strip) Did you know that the Missoula Senior Center serves delicious hearty lunches every week day for only $6? Anyone is welcome to join us for a delicious meal from 11:30-12:30 Monday- Friday for delicious food, great conversation and take some time to find a treasured item or garment in our thrift shop. For a full menu and other activities, visit our website at www.missoulaseniorcenter.org. The Mustard Seed Asian Cafe Southgate Mall 542-7333 Contemporary Asian fusion cuisine. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combine the best of Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences. Full menu available at the bar. Award winning desserts made fresh daily , local and regional micro brews, fine wines & signature cocktails. Vegetarian and Gluten free menu available. Takeout & delivery. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Parkers’ Restaurant 32 East Front Street Exit 153, Drummond 406-288-2333 Find us on Facebook, Yelp or Foursquare. Offering over 125 different Burgers. Parker’s burgers are ground fresh daily. We patty them 1/4 pound at a time. We also have 1/2 pound and pound burgers! Most burgers are available all the time too, except for seasonal items. We’re open Tuesday thru Saturday 11am to 8 pm. We’ve also got Steaks, Pastas, Salads, Daily Specials and NOT the usual variety of home made desserts. Private parties and catering available. $-$$ Pearl Cafe 231 East Front St. 541-0231 pearlcafe.us Country French meets the Northwest. Idaho Trout with Dungeness Crab, Rabbit with Wild Mushroom Ragout, Snake River Farms Beef, Fresh Seafood Specials Daily. House Made Charcuterie, Sourdough Bread & Delectable Desserts. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers

$…Under $5

[28] Missoula Independent • May 1–May 8, 2014

on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Philly West 134 W. Broadwa • 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday - Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. $-$$ Plonk 322 N Higgins • 926-1791 www.plonkwine.com Plonk is an excursion into the world of fine wine, food, cocktails, service and atmosphere. With an environment designed to engage the senses, the downtown establishment blends quality and creativity in an allencompassing dining experience. Described as an urban hot spot dropped into the heart of the Missoula Valley and lifestyle, Plonk embodies metropolitan personalities driven by Montana passions. Romaines 3075 N. Reserve Suite N 406-317-1829 www.romainessalads.com We provide you with the convenience of delicious salads, sandwiches and soups. Our salads include over 30 wholesome ingredients. Our homemade soups change with the season as different ingredients become available. If hearty sandwiches are your favorite, then visit Romaines for one of our braised meat sandwiches. We also have a Montana Hummus sandwich made from Montana grown garbanzo beans. Now serving omelettes and mimosas on Sunday, 11-4. At last, local, fresh, and healthy! $-$$ Roxiberry Gourmet Frozen Yogurt Southgate Mall Across from Noodle Express 317.1814 • roxiberry.com Bringing Missoula gourmet, frozen yogurt, using the finest ingredients (no frozen mixes), to satisfy your intense cravings with our intense flavors. Our home-made blends offer healthy, nutritional profiles. We also offer smoothies, fresh-made waffle cones, and select baked goods (gluten-free choices available). Join Club Roxi for special offers. See us in-store or visit our website for information. $-$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins 327-8929 Stop in when you’re in the neighborhood. We’ll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula’s best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 11-10 Sun 12-9. $$$ Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you’ll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over


THURSDAYMAY01 Get into the May Day spirit when the Grand Industrial Band, a new performance collective, presents an evening celebrating free speech and local historic labor activists with music and speeches. Crystal Theatre. 7 PM. $2.

May 1–May 8, 2014

The Inaugural Craft Beer Cup: A Mini Golf Tourney & Pub Crawl challenges you to nine holes of mini golf and brewskies at various downtown watering holes. Tee-off’s at 6 PM, with award ceremony later at the Top Hat. Teams of 4-6 can compete. $20 per player. Visit missoulabeerweek.com for registration and location info. Release some stress during t’ai chi classes every Thursday at 10 AM at The Open Way Center, 702 Brooks St. $10 drop-in class. Visit openway.org. Undo that keyboard hunchback with Lunch Re-Boot Yoga, a gentle practice with Mary Hanson. Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent Ave. Thursdays, noon-1 PM. $40 for six classes/$9 drop-in. The International Worker’s Day Protest meets on the UM Oval at 2 PM to march to the Missoula County Courthouse for a rally and speeches in support of living wages, immigration reform and abolishing government corruption. The Thursday Young Artists After School Program gets the chilluns involved with all manner of art history and media. ZACC. 2:15-5 PM. $12/$10 for members. Ages 6-11. Call 549-7555 to learn more. Soon-to-be mommas can feel empowered, relaxed and nurtured during a prenatal yoga class, this and every Thu. at the Open Way Center, 702 Brooks Ave., at 4 PM. $11/$10 with card. Drop-ins welcome. Call 360-1521. Brush up on the Konami code before the Big Sky System Check! a gamer’s club for all ages with Wii, Super Mario 3D World, Nintendo Land and New Super Mario Bros. Meets at the Big Sky High School branch of the Missoula Public Library, Thursdays from 4-6 PM.

Rocky mountain high. “Suspension of Belief” is on display as part of Altered State at the Monte Dolack Gallery. Reception Fri., May 2 from 5-8 PM.

Conservation biologist Seth Wilson won’t tolerate any malarkey with his talk, “Damn Proud to be a Grizzly Bear Conservationist in a Time of Ideological Idiocy.” Part of the spring seminar series on conservation social science. Forestry Building, room 301. 4:10-5 PM.

missoulanews.com • May 1–May 8, 2014 [29]


[calendar]

nightlife Taste la dolce vita when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs Thu-Sat from 4–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 549-8703. Visit tenspoon.com. The traveling exhibit This is Not A Silent Movie: Four Contemporary Alaska Native Artists showcases works by Sonya Kelliher-Combs, Susie Silook, Da-ka-xeen Mehner and Nicholas Galanin. Meloy and Paxson galleries in the PARTV center. Reception from 5-7 PM, with remarks from Anchorage Museum’s Julie Farnham at 5:45. The UM Climate Action Now Meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM FLAT, 633 Fifth St. E. Now meeting at 6 PM. Djebe Bara Community Dance and Drum presents a community dance class as part of the West African Drum and Dance Conference at the Barn Movement Studio, 2926 S. Third St. W. 6-7:30 PM. $5. Overcome your fears and take a stand when Treasure State Toastmasters mentors folks in leadership and public speaking. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free. Knock on wood, it oughta be a good time when Hardwood Heart plays the Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 6-8 PM.

[30] Missoula Independent • May 1–May 8, 2014

Country Swing. Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave. Due to popularity, there are now two levels: beginning twostep from 6:45 to 7:30, intermediate two-step from 7:45 to 8:30. Live band starting at 9.

Slide on a blazer (don’t forget to roll up the sleeves) and drop some “In Soviet Russia” jokes at Missoula’s Homegrown Stand-Up Comedy at the Union Club. Sign up by 9:30 PM to perform. Free.

Hark, the UM School of Theatre and Dance doth present A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the Montana Theatre. April 29-May 3 and May 610 at 7:30 PM. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 kids 12 and under. Visit umtheatredance.org.

Get up the mojo to take our junior copy editor out for a twirl when JD and Montana Standard Time play tunes at the Sunrise Saloon. 9:30 PM. No cover.

Bring a tissue for the Missoula Community Theatre’s rendition of Les Misérables. MCT Center for the Performing Arts April 25-27, April 30May 4 and May 7-11. Wed-Sat shows at 7:30 PM, Sundays at 6:30 PM, plus Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2 PM. $15-$21. Visit MCTinc.org. The semester’s almost plumb over, so better catch the UM Concert Band while you can with the Spring Concert at the Dennison Theatre. 7:30 PM. $11/$6 seniors/$5 students. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place, plus specials on beer. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM. During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, local talented folks may titillate your eardrums. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up.

The Beans ‘n Joe Show, featuring Curtis Rathburn and Teri Llovet, plays sweet ol’ tunes at the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6-8:30 PM. No cover.

Hone your performance skills at the Broadway Inn’s open mic night, with Big Sky Pool Party in the Cabana starting at 5 PM, singing and prizes at 9 PM. Includes $3 Big Sky beer special. 1609 W. Broadway St. No cover.

It ain’t the wallflower who gets to take home the cutie, so get out there on the floor for the Country Two-Step dance class with Cathy Clark of NW

Fiddle dee-dee, that may require a tetanus shot when Ted Ness and the Rusty Nails play the Palace. 9 PM. Free.

It’s going down, I’m yelling timber when the Badlander hosts the Drop Culture Dance Party, featuring hot trax and a rotating cast of DJs. $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight; women get in free before 10. “Finisher” isn’t just the nickname for Elise the Forty Drinkin’ Beast, it is also a band residency-ing things up at the VFW this month, plus guests Slow Glass and Abe Coley. 10 PM.

FRIDAYMAY02 A hockey session might break out during the drinking game when Glacier Ice Rink hosts Brews and Blades, which includes games, figure skating exhibitions and Draught Works beer. 7-11 PM. $5, includes the first brew. Additional beers and slices of pizza are $3 each. Proceeds will help replace Glacier Rink’s aging inventory of rental skates.

Art aficionados and downtown revelers alike can enjoy First Friday, wherein shops, cafes, bars and galleries host free art viewings for all to enjoy. Sometimes there’s totally excellent free wine and snax, too. Runs about 5-8 PM every first Friday of the month. Check out firstfridaysmissoula.blogspot.com and our special listings.


[calendar]

FIRST FRIDAY Adventurous sculptor Lilly Zuckerman shows off the fruits of a two-year residency with the Closer To Fine show. Clay Studio of Missoula, 1106 Hawthorne St. Unit A. 5 PM. Start your own Northside/ Westside debate when painter Laura Blaker presents Missoula Neighborhoods at A&E Architects, 222 N. Higgins Ave. 5 PM.

Illustrator Adrienne Langer displays her pieces celebrating Missoula with a show at Noteworthy Paper & Press, 101 S. Higgins Ave. 5-8 PM. Alison Reintjes’s nifty, site-specific large-scale installation DoubleColumn is the focus of this edition of First Friday at Missoula Art Museum, with music and tunes from 5-8 PM, plus artist’s talk at 7 PM. Get wired when the Tides Gallery at Bathing Beauties Beads presents Valerie Laboski’s Restrung, an exhibit of recycled jewelry crafted out of old string instrument bits. Reception from 5-8 PM.

Bernice’s Bakery hosts a First Friday shindig with artist Suzette Dussault. 5 PM. Proceeds from art sales go to Habitat for Humanity. Get a preview of area high school students’ work for the Windows of Youth exhibit in the Missoula Mercantile building. 5 PM. Troy-based wildlife photographer Donald M. Jones presents a collection of his most eye-catching images with Wild Reflections. Reception at the Artists’ Shop, 127 N. Higgins, from 5-8 PM. Inga Guzyte’s “SK8 Buddy” (See Arts.) Photographer Bea Hufman endeavors to capture essences of Americana with her ongoing project, Mapping the United States, on display at Betty’s Divine. Reception from 5-8 PM. See how sisters are painting it for themselves when Lara and Sarah Taubner display their collective exhibit, Mountain Reflections, at Prudential Montana Real Estate. 5-8 PM. Perhaps you wood like to stop in to see Janet Crandall’s repurposed timber scraps made into geometric collage pieces at Upcycled, 417 S. Higgins Ave. 5 PM. The Monte Dolack Gallery celebrates the Altered State exhibit with a First Friday shindig with all the usual trimmings. 139 W. Front St. 5-8 PM. Singer-songwriter Chris Pumphrey plays acoustic, roots-y tunes at Bhavana, 101 E. Broadway. 5-8 PM.

Stay focused when Ivette Kjelsrud presents My Artistic ADHD, a collection of works both abstract and realistic. E3 Convergence Gallery, 229 W. Main St. Reception from 5-9 PM, with tunes from Meiosis and the Maze.

The Thursday Artists Working Group presents Atelier II, a series of paintings and drawings themed on the color red, at Montana Art and Framing, 709 Ronan St. Reception from 5-9 PM. Tres amigos strut their stuff with First Friday at the Brunswick Gallery, 223 Railroad St., featuring Matt Duguid, Matt Hamon and Tim T. Thornton. 5-9 PM.

Celebrate! Have a Mimosa! with Banana Bread French toast, or Hash Browns topped with ham, one egg, cheddar and jack cheeses, and gravy over the top (we call it Buffalo Pie), or perhaps a delectable Omelette (there are 18 to choose from) Come in for your favorite!

Monday–Thursday 7 am to 3 pm

S i n c e

Friday–Sunday 7 am to 9:30 pm

   

2 2 2 We s t M a i n , M i s s o u l a 4 0 6 . 5 4 9 - 9 9 0 3

see our complete menu at www.theshackcafe.com seasonal sidewalk dining ◆ fine wine & beer selection

Roll on down to the Brink Gallery for the annual On Deck exhibit and art auction, which features 54 custom skateboard decks by local and international artists. 5-10 PM. Proceeds benefit the Montana Skatepark Association. Mark Vander Meer and company present “an eclectic mix of woodcraft, art and music” at the brand-new Mill Gallery, 1301 Scott St., under the Scott St. Bridge. 5 PMmidnight.

Expert weaver Bonnie Tarses displays her colorful pieces at the 4 Ravens Gallery, 248 N. Higgins Ave., with a reception from 5-8 PM.

Let your imagination take flight when the Rocky Mountain Map Gallery showcases avian photographers by raptor expert Kate Davis. 1710 Brooks St. Reception and signing from 5:30-8 PM.

Bad Naked says farewell to ‘Zootown in style with a photo and art show at Butterfly Herbs, accompanied by artisanal vegan jello molds by Mikki Lunda. 4-8 PM. (See Arts.)

Stevensville photographer Mariane Maynard helps kick off the grand opening and reception at the new Frame of Mind gallery and framing studio, which includes a kid’s corner. 1706 Brooks St. 5:30-9 PM.

Lo, garage sale season is nearly upon us. Gear up with the Spring Rummage Sale, which includes clothes, furniture and books, at Holy Spirit Episcopal, 130 S. Sixth St. E. 9 AM-3 PM on Friday and 9 AM-1 PM on Saturday. Find your very spiffiest argyle for the 22nd annual Red Ripper Golf Tournament, which kicks off at 10 AM at the Missoula Country Club. Registration’s full, but you can still sponsor a hole or get on the waiting list by contacting April at 543-6623 or april@missoulachamber.com. The little ones can get a dose of global learnin’ with Cultural Friday at the Children’s Museum. 11:30 AMnoon. May 2 features Costa Rica.

missoulanews.com • May 1–May 8, 2014 [31]


[calendar]

defying norms A Mexican immigrant campaigns for domestic worker’s rights. A kid with Tourette’s imagines escaping the tics with flight. A high school wrestler prepares for a first co-ed match. The common thread for these documentaries and films is that they happen to be by and about women, and they’re showing as part of the traveling Lunafest short film festival, gracing the Wilma on May 4.

WHAT: Lunafest WHEN: Sun., May 4 at 6 PM

Maria of Many

WHERE: Wilma Theatre HOW MUCH: $15/$12 in advance MORE INFO: lunafest.org

CAMPUS

RECREATION YOU T H CAMPS

JUNE 16 AUGUST 22 Open to Grades K-5 Each week, campers have the opportunity to take part in swim instruction, wtness activities, and outdoor adventures to go along with an activity theme. www.umt.edu/youthcamps | 406.243.5295 campusrec.youthcamps@umontana.edu

If you’re skeptical about why we need to encourage women to make films, consider this: Only 30 percent of speaking roles in films are given to women, according to a 2010 USC Annenberg study, and only one woman has ever won an Oscar for Best Director. And who we see on screen, and how they are portrayed, has a ton of impact on how men view women, and how women view women. Actress Geena Davis, whose foundation studies gender bias in media, put it pretty well in a recent Hollywood Reporter article: “We are in effect enculturating

My hope for Lunafest, and things like it, is that dudes show up. Women’s stories are not “special interest” or “niche,” even though they are treated as such in the media. I advocate for things that cater specifically to women because they’re certainly better than nothing for bringing women’s stories to the fore. Women’s stories are people’s stories. —Kate Whittle

The Women in Black stand in mourning of international violence every Friday on the Higgins Bridge from 12:15-12:45 PM. Visit jrpc.org/calendar to learn more.

ZACC. Ages 6-11 on Mondays and Wednesdays, from 3:15-5:30 PM. Ages 12-16 on Fridays from 3:455:30 PM. $12/$10 for members. Call 549-7555 to learn more.

One woman’s unwanted leopard skin coat is another gal’s treasure, so check out the Women’s Resource Center’s spring clothing swap, where you can bring at least two things to throw on the pile and trade for other nifty, new-to-you duds. Bonner Park, 2 PM. Refreshments and sunscreen included. Free.

nightlife

The Women’s Circle Group Acupuncture at Mountain Sage Acupuncture Clinic, 725 W. Alder St. Ste. 1, focuses on women’s health issues and sounds comfy and nice. 2– 5 PM, last appointment at 4 PM. Sliding scale treatments $20-40 with a first time administration fee of $10. Call (503) 593-7073. Teens go toward the literary light during the Missoula Public Library’s Teen Writers Group, which meets every Fri. at 3:30 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Spark some creativity after the bell rings with the Young Artists After School Program, where kids can learn art fundamentals, history and techniques while using several media.

[32] Missoula Independent • May 1–May 8, 2014

kids from the very beginning to see women and girls as not taking up half of the space. Couldn’t it be that the percentage of women in leadership positions in many areas of society—Congress, law partners, Fortune 500 board members, military officers, tenured professors and many more—stall out at around 17 percent because that's the ratio we've come to see as the norm?”

Taste la dolce vita when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs Thu-Sat from 4–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 549-8703. Visit tenspoon.com. Hang out and have a pic-a-nic with the Great Bear Foundation’s Bear Foods Buffet, in which you’ll sample the kinds of foods bruins eat and learn about sharing habitat with them. (The bears, not the foods.) Greenough Park Picnic Shelter. 5-8 PM. Donations welcomed. The dream of the 1860s is alive at the three-day Mullan Road Conference 2014, with presentations and tours about the “road that built Montana.” Ruby’s Inn, 4825 N. Reserve. $75. Visit tworivershistory.net. (See Agenda.) Careful, a book reading might break out during the party when Gwen Florio presents her latest crime novel, Dakota, at Fact and Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. 5:30 PM. (See Books.)

All the cool kiddos should check out Mismo Gymnastics’s Friday Night Children’s Party, where ages 5-plus play games and explore obstacle courses with guidance. 1900 W. Broadway St. 5:30-9:30 PM. $25/$20 for members, plus $10 for additional siblings. Limited to 80 kids, so zoom over to mismogym.com or call 7280908 to sign up ahead of time. Chilluns can play while Mom and Pop get their whiskey on with Family Friendly Friday at the Top Hat, 6-8 PM. No cover. May 2 features Djebe Bara. Leah Joki performs her onewoman play Prison Boxing, based on her experience in California prision theater programs, at the crystal on May 2 at 8:30 PM and May 3 at 6:30 PM. $10. Fabulous finalists Joanna Smetanka and Jazmine Penelope face off for the culmination of the Project Selvedge fashion design contest at Selvedge Studio, plus the year’s previous contestants appear to showcase their works. 6:309 PM. $1. Martha from Red Bird Yoga demonstrates the basics of this ancient healing practice at the North Valley Public Library, 208 Main St. in Stevensville. 6-7 PM. Free.


[calendar] Legendary singer/songwriter Carole King performs at the LA Design Gallery, 337 E. Broadway, from 6-8 PM as a fundraiser for Senate candidate Dirk Adams. $100-$2600. RSVP to 646-707-2240 or kris@adamsformontana.com. Captain Wilson Conspiracy gets jazzy while colorful characters discuss covert machinations at Brooks and Browns, inside the Holiday Inn at 200 S. Pattee St. 6-9 PM. No cover. The Ty’s Bucket List Neon Dance Party is a shindig in honor of a Stevensville teen who’s battling bone cancer. The Hub Family Entertainment Center, 5505 Expressway, 6-9 PM. Don’t yell out your ex-girlfriend’s name during Hump Day Bingo

May 4 and May 7-11. Wed-Sat shows at 7:30 PM, Sundays at 6:30 PM, plus Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2 PM. $15-$21. Visit MCTinc.org. Cut a rug when the Golden Age Club hosts dancing and live music in an alcohol-free environment. 727 S. Fifth St. in Hamilton. 7:30-10 PM. $3. Call 240-9617 to learn more. It’s hip to be rectangular at the Old Time Square Dance, where you and your buddies are invited to the Downtown Dance Collective’s First Friday shindig. Old-time stringband tunes provided by the Parallellograms. 8 PM. $5. You’ll just havta to check out Zootown Improv to find out what’s in store for this sketch comedy and im-

Proceeds benefit the 11:45 PM. $7. UM Artists’ Collective. Soak it up and sing it down to some 67,000 tunes when The Outpost Restaurant & Saloon, 38500 W. Hwy. 12 at Lolo Hot Springs, presents karaoke with KJ Mark, starting at 9 PM. Free. Call 273-4733. Sing a happy tune at the Evaro Bar’s Friday night karaoke and you just might win a prize. Starts at 9 PM, free to sing. 17025 US Highway 93 North. DJ Dubwise spins hot old-school and new dance party traxx at Feruqis, 318 N. Higgins Ave., starting at 10 PM. Free. The BassFace Krew dives on into the weekend with Fishbowl Friday, featuring tunes from DJs Deadline,

Soul City Cowboys get the boots on the floor and the hands in the air at the Union Club. 9:30 PM. No cover.

or self-publishing. Granite County Museum in Philipsburg. $100. Register and learn more at valerieharms.com.

Chill Missoula tunemeister Jordan Lane plays Sean Kelly’s, with surprise guests, at 9:30 PM. No cover.

Get a hit of cardiovascular exercise during Nia: The Joy of Movement, from 9-10 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $12/$10 members. Call 5417240.

You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours when The Tomcats play the Dark Horse, 1805 Regent Ave. 9:30 PM. No cover. If you’ve got the money, I’ve got the time for Paydirt at the Sunrise Saloon. Tunes and general revelry from 9:30 PM-bar time. No cover.

The Hamilton Farmers Market kicks off the season with dancing and a kid’s festival on Bedford, Second and Third Streets in, you guessed it, Hamilton. 9 AM.

Slick back that pompadour and hop in the Way Back Machine for the Cold Hard Cash Show at the Top Hat, featuring the Velvet Elvis ‘56. 10 PM. $5.

Lo, garage sale season is nearly upon us. Gear up with the Spring Rummage Sale, which includes clothes, furniture and books, at Holy Spirit Episcopal, 130 S. Sixth St. E. 9

Pretty in pink. The Velvet Elvis ’56 plays the Top Hat Fri., May 2, along with Cold Hard Cash Show, at 10 PM. $5.

with Bob at the Lucky Strike Casino. Prizes for winners. Beware: $5 minifishbowls served all day. Bingo starts at 6:30 PM. Two-step all the way up Highway 93 for the country dance with Western Union Swing Band and the Bitterroot Dancers, at the Bedford Building, 223 S. Second St. in Hamilton. 7-11 PM. $2, dance lesson included. Hark, the UM School of Theatre and Dance doth present A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the Montana Theatre. April 29-May 3 and May 610 at 7:30 PM. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 kids 12 and under. Visit umtheatredance.org. Bring a tissue for the Missoula Community Theatre’s rendition of Les Misérables. MCT Center for the Performing Arts April 25-27, April 30-

prov evening at the Stensrud Playhouse, 314 N. First St. W. 8 PM and 10 PM, doors open half an hour prior to each show. Beer and wine bar available. $15/$22 for two, if bought in advance at stensrudplayhouse.com. Blue Smoke gets grassy, never gassy, at the Symes Hot Springs Hotel and Mineral Baths. 8-10 PM. Pass-the-hat donation. Unleash your inner elf, fairy, hobbit or wizard at the Annual Beaux Art Ball, a celebration of the 2014 UM graduating class with costume contest, fortune telling, food and live music from luminaries such as the Codependents, Logisticalalone, Copilot Eyedrops, The Black Heron, Julie & The Five Dollar FootLongs, Anthony Yazzie, Siligo Days and special guests. Stage 112. 8-

Benefit, Alto and newbie Exhouse. Badlander. 9 PM. No cover, plus $5 fishbowl drank special. Missoula rock outfit Confidence Man plays the Palace with, presumably, panache, along with special guests. 9 PM. No cover. John “Poncho” Dobson hosts open mic at Fergie’s Pub every Fri., where you’re bound to mingle with a mix of resort celebs, odd locals and dizzy soakers. You never know who’ll show up and play. It could be you. Starts at 3 PM. 213 Main Street in Hot Springs. Sign up ahead at 406721-2416 or just show up. Lolo Hot Springs Resort hosts the weekly TomBourine Show, plus you can get your soak on and rent a cabin. 9:30 PM. No cover.

The grooves and the moves will be smooth at the Oh My Soul! after party for On Deck 9, featuring classic and deep-cut R&B and soul tracks. Monk’s Bar. 10 PM. No cover.

SATURDAYMAY03 Early rising produce-seekers, occasional walk-of-shamers and waffle sandwich lovers rejoice, the Clark Fork Market is back in action under the Higgins Bridge. Saturdays through October from 8 AM-1 PM. Valerie Harms, author and Distinctly Montana magazine editor, offers a “Publishing Clinic for Today’s Scene,” about how writers can go about finding an agent and publisher

AM-3 PM on Friday and 9 AM-1 PM on Saturday. Get musical while finding your flow when Brian Baty leads a live music Vinyasa yoga class, which features music by Nathan Zavalney, every Sat. from 9:30–10:45 AM at Inner Harmony Yoga, 214 E. Main St. Ste. B. $10/$8 students drop-in. Visit yogainmissoula.com. If Spontaneous Music By Children doesn’t sound like a punishment to you, then check out University Village Community Center’s 14th season of monthly sessions for parents and kids to dance and see professional performances. Instruments and snack provided. 10:30 AM. $3.50 per child, $2 for additional kiddos. Free for parents. Call Jen at 370-0300.

missoulanews.com • May 1–May 8, 2014 [33]


[calendar] Your bedtime tales of college-age debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like storytelling, finger plays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM on Sat. and 2 PM on Sun. at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. The whole fambly can get totally modular with the Saturday Family Art Workshop: Mod, Moving, Mini Sculptures with Alison Reintjes, at Missoula Art Museum, 11 AM-12:30 PM. Free. Call 728-0447 or visit missoulaartmuseum.org to learn more. Learn about maintaining healthy relationships at Co-Dependents Anonymous, at 11:30 AM on Saturdays at the Fourth D Alano Club, 1500 W. Broadway. Contact Koryn for more information at 493-4431. The West African Drum and Dance Conference hosts master dance and drum classes from 11:30 AM-1 PM, 1:30-3 PM and 3:30-5 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective. $15 per class or $75 for unlimited. Email djebecommunity@gmail.com to learn more. Grab your favorite fräulein and head to the Top Hat for Mozartiana, a classical ballet performance by the Rocky Mountain Ballet Theatre, accompanied by a German-style lunch. Noon. $35, includes lunch. Proceeds benefit the RMBT’s tour to the Festspiele in Salzburg, Austria. It’ll be a literal walk in the park when clinical herbalist Britta Bloedorn hosts a spring herb class, where you’ll learn about identifying and using common medicinal plants right in Greenough Park. Noon-2:15 PM. $25. Register required at 406830-0949 or britta.bloedorn@gmail.com. The whole fambly is invited to the Know Your Farmer Children’s Festival, celebrating sustainable food systems with activities like planting, mask-making, goat-milking and critters to pet. Spirit At Play Preschool, 621 Stephens Ave. Noon-4 PM. Lemonade stand and bake-sale refreshments. $10 adults/free for kids.

[34] Missoula Independent • May 1–May 8, 2014

The guild that sews together, stays together, so join Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., at Craft Vigilantes, its monthly Modern Quilt Guild for beginners and pros alike. 12–5 PM. $20 (first few sign-ups are free). Dunno about you, but I’m feeling 22, what with all the schnazzy brewskies on tap for the 22nd annual Garden City Brewfest in Caras Park. Noon-8 PM. $12 gets you a sevenounce taster glass and two beers, additional tokens are $1. Lake Missoula Tea Company presents chilled and hot teas, plus snacks with its grand opening. 136 E. Broadway. 3-6 PM. (See Agenda.)

nightlife The dream of the 1860s is alive at the three-day Mullan Road Conference 2014, with presentations and tours about the “road that built Montana.” Ruby’s Inn, 4825 N. Reserve. $75. Visit tworivershistory.net/mullanroad-conference-2014.html. Leah Joki performs her onewoman play Prison Boxing, based on her experience in California prision theater programs, at the crystal on May 2 at 8:30 PM and May 3 at 6:30 PM. $10. Some dames will be cruising for a bruising when the Hellgate Rollergirls team up against Pocatello’s Portneuf Valley Bruisers. The night kicks off with Hellgate Hellions junior roller derby league vs. Spokane’s Lilac City Pixies. Western Montana Fairgrounds. 5-9 PM. $10/$8 students/free for kids under 12. Call up Hanz and Franz and get pumped up before the NPC Big Sky Championships, which present categories in bodybuilding, figure, bikini and physique. Dennison Theatre. Prejudging from 9 AM-noon, $22 for general admission seats. Evening show at 6 PM, $37. Visit npcmontana.com. The always mischievous Hasslers play tunes at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 6-8 PM. White shirts are not advised when Gil and the Spills play soul-folk dancin’


[calendar] The Montana A Cappella Society performs tunes from the 1600s all the way to today’s favorites at the Ronan Performing Arts Center. 7:30 PM. $14/$12 in advance/free for kids under 18. Contact Brittany at 6762427 or email brit_gardner@hotmail.com. Proceeds benefit the Cantlon Family Youth Home.

tunes at Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6-8 PM. No cover. The Stensrud Dinner Theatre presents Bullets for Broadway, a musical murder mystery. 314 N. First St. Performances on Saturday at 7 PM and Sunday at 5:30 PM, with booze and dinner catered by Silk Road. $50/$80 for two, advance. Tickets at stensrudplayhouse.com.

Latin Dance Nights gets into the Cinco de Mayo spirit with a dance honoring Mexican heritage and dance lessons in salsa, bachata, merengue, cumbia and more. Monk’s Bar. Dance lesson at 8 PM, followed by DJed dance party until 2 AM. $7/$5 for Downtown Dance Collective students. 18-plus.

Bust out the creased blue jeans and trucker caps, ‘cause Eli Young Band plays country-fried rock at the Wilma. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $30/$25 in advance. Tickets at Rockin Rudys and knittingfactory.com. Everybody’s a queen (or king) for the night when VonCommon celebrates its new space opening with PromCommon, featuring work by several artists. 1909 Wyoming, No. 7 (two blocks west of Home Resource.) A bike parade departs Caras Park at 6:30 PM to start the party at 7 PM. Bring a dish for the potluck and dress up in snazzy duds, if you like. Check out facebook.com/voncommon. A bunch of ragtag musicians with who-knows-what kind of instruments get together from 7 to 9:30 PM on the first Sat. of every month for the Bitterroot Valley Good-Time Jamboree at the Grange Hall, 1436 South First St. in Hamilton. $3 donation encouraged. Call Clem at 961-4949.

The one and only Larry Hirshberg plays acoustic tunes at the Symes Hot Springs Hotel and Mineral Baths. 8-10 PM. Pass-the-hat donation.

Big tree. Stephen “Ragga” Marley plays the Top Hat Sun., May 4 at 9 PM. $31/$27 in advance at Rockin Rudy’s and the Top Hat. Visit tophatlounge.com.

Hark, the UM School of Theatre and Dance doth present A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the Montana Theatre. April 29-May 3 and May 610 at 7:30 PM. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 kids 12 and under. Visit umtheatredance.org.

Bring a tissue for the Missoula Community Theatre’s rendition of Les Misérables. May 3 and 4 and May 7-11. Wed-Sat shows at 7:30 PM, Sundays at 6:30 PM, plus Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2 PM. $15$21. Visit MCTinc.org.

The Missoula Folklore Society presents a contra dance with tunes by Out of the Wood, upstairs at the Union Hall. Roy CUret has the call. Beginner workshop from 7:30-8, dancing from 8-11 PM. $9/$6 for members and students.

Captain Wilson Conspiracy plays jazz tunes with covert flair at Finn and Porter, 100 Madison St. 8-10 PM. No cover. Soak it up and sing it down to some 67,000 tunes when The Outpost Restaurant & Saloon, 38500 W. Hwy. 12 at Lolo Hot Springs, presents karaoke with KJ Mark, starting at 9 PM. Free. Call 273-4733. You can be positively sure that Absolutely DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo will juice up the joint at the Bad-

missoulanews.com • May 1–May 8, 2014 [35]


[calendar]

Puppy love. Molly Caro May reads from her memoir, The Map of Enough: One Woman's Search for Place, Tue., May 6 at Shakespeare & Co., 103 S. Third St. W. 7 PM.

lander. Doors at 9 PM. 2-for-1 Absolut drinks until midnight. Now free.

$15 per class or $75 for unlimited. Email djebecommunity@gmail.com to learn more.

DJ Dubwise spins hot old-school and new dance party traxx at Feruqis, 318 N. Higgins Ave., starting at 10 PM. Free.

Like to move it, move it with Let’s Move! Missoula’s kickoff for Unplug and Play! day, which includes fun stuff for kids like basketball, fencing, pickleball, folf and much more at McCormick Park, as part of an effort to get kids away from the screen and outside. (Grownups and calendar editors could benefit from this too, perhaps.) 1-4 PM. Visit unplugmissoula.org.

The Jack Saloon and Grill (formerly the venerated Lumberjack) presents live music on Saturdays. 7000 Graves Creek Road. 9 PM. Thank goodness for the Halfway to Halloween party at the Iron Horse, ‘cause Calapatra thought she was gonna have to wait months to wear this Sexy Kleenex Box costume. Dancing starts at 9 PM. No cover. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours when The Tomcats play the Dark Horse, 1805 Regent Ave. 9:30 PM. No cover. If you’ve got the money, I’ve got the time for Paydirt at the Sunrise Saloon. Tunes and general revelry from 9:30 PM-bar time. No cover. Commune with your inner party animal when Joan Zen plays tunes at the Union Club, starting at 9:30 PM. No cover. Missoula’s own Locksaw Cartel brings forth the blues at the Top Hat. 10 PM. $5.

SUNDAYMAY04 Assorted scruffy characters and lovable ruffians might be getting their Sunday Funday on when Filthy Still plays the VFW, along with Slaughter Daughters and Whiskey Hooves. 9 PM. $6.

Catch new thoughts with the Science of Mind Community during a Sunday service via the internet when Rev. Kathianne Lewis spreads a spiritual message at the Carriage House in Hamilton, 310 N. Fourth St., at 10 AM every Sun. Free. Call Barb at 375-9996. The West African Drum and Dance Conference closes out the weekend with a story and song class from 10-11 AM, master drum class from 11:30 AM-1 PM and master dance class from 1:30-3 PM at the Barn Movement Studio.

[36] Missoula Independent • May 1–May 8, 2014

Your bedtime tales of college-age debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like storytelling, finger plays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM on Sat. and 2 PM on Sun. at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Kick out the jams down the ‘Root at the dining room of the Sapphire Lutheran Homes, corner of 10th and River streets. Players of all levels are invited to bring their acoustic instrument, or just sit a spell and listen. Call John at 381-2483. Free. It’ll be a beautiful day in the ‘hood when the ASUM Neighborhood Ambassadors host a U-district block party on the 400 block of University Avenue from 3-6 PM, with games, music and the Big Dipper ice cream truck. Free.

nightlife The dream of the 1860s is alive at the threeday Mullan Road Conference 2014, with presentations and tours about the “road that built Montana.” Ruby’s Inn, 4825 N. Reserve. $75. Visit tworivershistory.net/mullan-road-conference-2014.html. The Stensrud Dinner Theatre presents Bullets for Broadway, a musical murder mystery. 314 N. First St. Performances on Saturday at 7 PM and Sunday at 5:30 PM, with booze and dinner catered by Silk Road. $50/$80 for two, if purchased in advance. Tickets at stensrudplayhouse.com. Knock back some ethanol alcohol for a scientific buzz with the The Missoula Area Secular Society’s viewing party of “Cosmos” with Neil deGrasse Tyson. 501 Lounge in the upstairs of


[calendar] the Iron Horse. Get there and order your dranks at 6 PM or so. Honor rad ladies while kickin’ back at Lunafest, the touring show of short films by and about women. Wilma. 6 PM. Proceeds go toward the YWCA GUTS program for girls and the national Breast Cancer Research Fund. $15/$12 in advance. Call 406-728-2521 to learn more. Explore the idea of open intelligence and the peace, happiness and skillfulness that exists within you during the Balanced View open meeting, which runs every Sun. from 6-7 PM in the meeting room of the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free, but donations accepted. Enter from the back entrance. Visit greatfreedom.org for more info. The Mike Bader Bear Jam plays tunes at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave., from 5-7 PM. No cover.

the bell tolls If you spend any time in the vicinity of the University of Montana campus, you’ll have heard one of the more obscure musical instruments without even realizing it. The Main Hall clock tower is home to a carillon, a 47-bell instrument with keys, similar to an organ, played with one’s fists. (Carillon players are called carilloneurs.) UM’s carillon chimes on the hour and half hour automatically, but every weekday at noon, you can hear a short song resonating from the tower—and that song is played by an actual person up there, typically UM music professor Nancy Cooper. WHAT: Carillon Recital

Bring a tissue for the Missoula Community Theatre’s rendition of Les Misérables. MCT Center for the Performing Arts April 25-27, April 30-May 4 and May 7-11. Wed-Sat shows at 7:30 PM, Sundays at 6:30 PM, plus Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2 PM. $15-$21. Visit MCTinc.org. The Red Road Foundation hosts a fundraiser to fight against sex trafficking, with silent auction, sushi dinner, live jazz and documentary premiere. The Loft of Missoula, 119 W. Main St. 7 PM. $100. Tickets at theredroadfoundation.brownpapertickets.com.

Sip a fancy soda for a cause at this edition of Moscow Monday at the Montgomery Distillery, 129 W. Front St. A dollar from every drink sold is donated to a cause each week. Family friendly, from noon–8 PM.

WHO: Carilloneur Tin-Shi Tam WHEN: Mon., May 5 at noon WHERE: UM Oval HOW MUCH: Free

Organ players and carilloneurs don’t get a lot of recognition, since they’re often hidden from view up in clock towers or in the corners of churches. So take note on Monday, May 5, when the noon carillon song will be a bit special. Organist and carilloneur

The String Orchestra of the Rockies sends out the season with special guest violinist Adele Anthony. UM Music Recital Hall. 7:30 PM. $10-$23. Tickets available at GrizTix outlets and griztix.com. Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Starts at 8 PM with Front Street Jazz. Free. Bellow out your favorite pop tune so you can impress your friends and perhaps win a prize during a karaoke contest this and every Sun. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. $3 Fireball specials. Call 7211798. Stephen “Ragga” Marley plays top-notch reggae at the Top Hat, along with Jo Mersa and

Wayne Marshall. 9 PM. $31/$27 in advance at Rockin Rudy’s and the Top Hat.

MONDAYMAY05 I got a story about peanut butter that’ll knock your socks off at the Tell Us Something: Story Jam celebratory tale-telling at the Top Hat. 6 PM. Free, all ages. Storytellers must sign up by 5:30 PM.

Registration is now open for the Volunteer Vacation at the Bob Marshall Wilderness, with several trips throughout the summer where you can pitch in with trail maintenance, weeding and

Rasa O’Neill presents Therapeutic Yoga for Wellness and Healing, with gentle stretches, breath work and guided meditation. Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent St. Mondays from noon to 1 PM. $40 for six weeks/$9 drop-in. Ongoing class. Call 721-0033 to learn more.

Tin-Shi Tam, an Iowa State University professor, visits Missoula and plays a carillon recital. If you stop to listen, you might recognize pieces by Johann Christian Bach and Scott Joplin, plus some lesser known works by composers like Wang Hui-Ran and Federico Mompou. Tam plays the bells in Iowa State’s clock tower, like Cooper does for UM. You can also find a video on YouTube of a more 21st century kind of tune emanating from the Iowa State clock tower; in 2010, an ISU student launched a Facebook campaign to get Tam to play Lady Gaga’s “Bad Romance.” Whatever preconceived notions you might have (or not have) about organ players, it sounds like they have a sense of humor, too. —Kate Whittle campground restoration. Trip leader, pack support and food provided. First trip is May 27. Check out bmwf.org.

In the sky! It’s a bird! It’s a plane! No, it’s a free carillon recital! But seriously, carillon and organ player TinShi Tam plays a special carillon recital in the UM Main Hall’s clock tower at noon. (Y’know, the thing that chimes every hour.)(See Spotlight.) Therapeutic Yoga for Wellness meets for a dose of gentle yoga to ease your anxiety, chronic fatigue or other maladies. Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent Ave. Noon1 PM. $40 for six classes/$9 drop-in. Call 721-0033. Brush up on your skillz with the Bridge Group for beginners/those in need of a refresher course. Missoula Senior Center, Mondays at 1 PM. $1.25.

Anyone affected by epilepsy can come to the Epilepsy Support Group at Summit Independent Living Center, 700 SW Higgins Ave. 2–3:30 PM. Free. Call 721-0707.

Aspiring reiki practitioners are invited to Reiki 1, a class with Neil Chaput de Saintonge that will go over the basics of this non-invasive healing practice. Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent Ave. 9 AM-7 PM. $95. Registration required by calling 721-0033 or emailing info@redwillowlearning.org.

Spark some creativity after the bell rings with the Young Artists After School Program, where kids can learn art fundamentals, history and techniques while using several media. ZACC. Ages 6-11 on Mondays and Wednesdays, from 3:15-5:30 PM. Ages 12-16 on Fridays from 3:45-5:30 PM. $12/$10 for members. Call 5497555 to learn more.

Those looking for mother-to-mother breastfeeding support can find it when the La Leche League now meets just once a month on every first Monday from 10-11:30 AM. First Presbyterian Church, 201 S. Fifth St. W. Free. Children and babies are always welcome.

Former military members are invited to the Veterans For Peace Western Montana Chapter meeting, which will work to inform and advocate about peace issues. Meets at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave., on the first Monday of every month at 4 PM. Visit veteransforpeace.org to learn more.

missoulanews.com • May 1–May 8, 2014 [37]


[calendar]

nightlife Let’s get physical, physical, at the Zumba Fitness Classes at Lolo School cafeteria. Mondays and Wednesdays from 6-7 PM. $2/free for Lolo residents. Register by calling Kathy at 2730451. The Xi Xi Hu: Walking Qigong with Libby McIntyre class explores this breath-based healing practice at the Learning Center at Red Willow. Mondays from 6-7:30 PM until May 19. $40. Dr. Joe Knapp, of the International Heart Institute of Montana, presents “Heart Disease and the Children of Ethiopia: Nurture and Nature,” as part of UM’s spring lecture series on global health. Gallagher Business Building Room 106, 6:307:30 PM. Bingo at the VFW: the easiest way to make rent since keno. 245 W. Main. 6:45 PM. $12 buy-in. Find out how the Garden City grows at the weekly Missoula City Council meeting, where you can no doubt expect ranting public commenters, PowerPoint presentaBeacon of light. Aaron McDonnell plays the Badlander Tue., May 6, at 9 PM. Free. tions and subtle wit from Mayor Engen. Missoula council chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Meetings are the first four Mon- Dan Dubuque plays the Red Bird Wine Bar, 7:30 to 8:45 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Open to all religions and days of every month at 7 PM, except for holi- 111 N. Higgins Ave. 7-10 PM. No cover. days. Get mindful at Be Here Now, a mindfulness levels of practice. Free, but donations apprecimeditation group that meets Mondays from ated. Visit openway.org.

[38] Missoula Independent • May 1–May 8, 2014

Young love and old-school outfits are on tap for the Met Live’s screening of Puccini’s classic La Bohème. Encore presentation at the Roxy Theater Mon., May 5 at 7:30 PM. $18/$16 seniors/$13 students and kids. Visit mtlive.org. Black metal outfit Goatwhore is here to scour the earth (or possibly just make loud noises) along with Black Crown Initiate and Arctodus. Palace. 8 PM. $15/$12 in advance at Rockin Rudy’s and 1111presents.com. All ages. (See Noise.) The Lolo Square and Round Dance Center hosts an amateur caller night for Cinco de Mayo from 89:30 PM. Call 251-2173 or check out lolocampndance.com for directions. Rock the mic when DJ Super Steve rocks the karaoke with the hottest Kamikaze tuneage this side of the hemisphere at the Dark Horse. Are you brave enough to let the computer pick your songs? 9 PM. Free. Open mic at the VFW, 245 W. Main St., seems like a fine idea, especially with 2-for-1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. 10 PM. Free. Maintain dignity for best results at Super Trivia Freakout. Winners get cash prizes and shots after the five rounds of trivia at the Badlander. 9 PM. Free.


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TUESDAYMAY06 Poet Robert Lee presents his poetry collection, Black Bear Holds a Hole in His Paws, with a reading at Fact and Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. 7 PM. Dance cuz everybody’s watching at the American Cabaret Style bellydance class at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. This class is great for beginners and experienced dancers alike. 6–7 PM. Visit madronadance.wordpress.com. You’ll be seeing stars at Bingo on Broadway, with cash prizes, $3 Sam Adams pints and food specials. Broadway Inn, 1609 W. Broadway St. 8 PM. $6 buy-in. Discover different approaches to raising kiddos at Empowered Parenting With Balanced View, which meets at Break Espresso from 7:158:15 AM Tuesdays. Watch your little ones master tree pose in no time during yoga at the Children’s Museum of Missoula. 11 AM. 225 W. Front. $4.25. Come into a deeper awareness of your body with instructor Elaine Conder’s Rosen Movement class, which uses music and gentle exercises. Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent Ave. Meets Tuesdays from 11 AM-noon until May 20. $30. Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. Third St. W. 1–3 PM. Info, call 543-3955.

Survivors in any stage are welcome to Yoga Beyond Cancer with Dena Saedi, a gentle practice which includes breath work, meditation and body scanning. Students must have a doctor’s okay. Learning Center at Red Willow, Tuesdays from 4-5 PM. $40 for six classes.

Hark, the UM School of Theatre and Dance doth present A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the Montana Theatre. April 29-May 3 and May 6-10 at 7:30 PM. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 kids 12 and under. Visit umtheatredance.org.

As part of International Big Data Week, the brown bag lunch discussion “Big Data for Dummies” is led by web experts Eric Franzon and Russ Fletcher. MonTEC, 1121 E. Broadway. Noon-1 PM. Visit bigdataweek.com/missoula to learn more.

The Met Live presents Mozart’s romantic opera Cosi Fan Tutte. Live broadcast at the Roxy on April 26 from 11 AM-3 PM, with encores on April 29 and May 6 at 6:30 PM. $20/$18 seniors/$15 students and kids. Visit mtlive.org.

Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free pub trivia, which takes place every Tuesday at 8 PM. Here’s a question to tickle your brainwaves: What is Dita Von Teese’s real name? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.)

Spark some creativity after the bell rings with the Young Artists After School Program, where kids can learn art fundamentals, history and techniques while using several media. ZACC. Ages 6-11 on Mondays and Wednesdays, from 3:15-5:30 PM. Ages 12-16 on Fridays from 3:45-5:30 PM. $12/$10 for members. Call 5497555 to learn more.

nightlife The 1,000 Hands For Peace meditation group uses ancient mudras for cleansing the heart at Ewam Buddhist Center, S. Third Ave W. 5:30-6:30 PM. Call Clare at 721-8224. Foster a lifetime of closeness with your kiddo at Glenyss Carney’s The Circle of Security Parenting Program course. Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent Ave. Meets the first Tuesday of the month until July 8. $250 for couples or caregivers/$180 individuals. Call 7210033 to learn more. Dust off that banjolin and join in the Top Hat’s picking circle, from 6 to 8 PM. All ages. The UM Guitar Ensemble displays finger dexterity with a concert at the UM Music Building, room 218. 7 PM. Free. Multitalented author Molly Caro May reads from her memoir, The Map of Enough: One Woman’s Search for Place at Shakespeare and Co., 103 S. Third St. W. 7 PM.

Declare who is Lord Smartypants of Them All and get a $20 bar tab at KBGA’s Tuesday Trivia night, which includes music and picture rounds, plus drank specials. VFW, 245 W. Main St. 8-10 PM. Solo acoustic country fella Eric Barrera plays down-home tunes at the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave, this and every Tuesday at at 9 PM. No cover. Seattle country fella Aaron McDonnell tickles your fancy with tunes at the Badlander. 9 PM. No cover, plus $3 Montgomery drink special.

WEDNESDAYMAY07 Cori Di Biase reads from his debut novel, These Can’t Be Choices, about a man reckoning with his conscience, at Fact and Fiction. 7 PM.

nightlife Offer a penny or two for your thoughts at the community workshop for Missoula’s new urban sculpture park. Missoula Art Museum, 5:30-8:30 PM. Free, but RSVP by May 5 to alison@missoulaartmuseum.org or 728.0447, ext. 221. Sip a giggle water and get zozzled, baby, with the Top Hat’s weekly Jazz Night. 6 PM. Free, all ages. May 7 features Trio Noir. Calapatra hereby bequeaths all of her LPs to her housemate and her cat to her sister. Now the rest of y’all should check out Estate Planning for Young Families and the Young at Heart, a panel discussion cover the essentials. Holy Spirit Episcopal, 130 S. Sixth St. 6:30-8 PM. Free. Hark, the UM School of Theatre and Dance doth present A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the Montana Theatre. April 29-May 3 and May 6-10 at 7:30 PM. $20/$16 seniors and stu-

Every Monday  $1 Game & $2 Shoe Rental 10am-close 

Single or taken, come mingle.

GREAT DRINK SPECIALS $4.95 Taco & Tot Basket 4pm-9pm

KARAOKE CONTEST EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT

missoulanews.com • May 1–May 8, 2014 [39]


[calendar]

“I feel pretty and witty and gay...” The Met Live presents Mozart’s Cosi Fan Tutte at the Roxy on Tue., May 6 at 6:30 PM. $15-$20. Visit mtlive.org.

Complete your ballot online to vote for all categories, including these WEB EXCLUSIVES: Best Local Arts & Entertainment Actor/Actress Artist Dancer Filmmaker New Band

Best Local Fashion & Beauty Eyewear Facials Hairstylist Tanning Salon Waxing

Best Local Food & Drink Coffee Hut Convenience Store Liquor Store Pizza Delivery Place to Eat Alone Barista Caterer Chef Waiter/Waitress

Best Local Goods & Services Antiques Camera/Photo Store Car Wash Computer Repair Shop Florist Head Shop Home Accessories Laundromat Lawyer Pawn Shop Property Management Company Real Estate Agent Pet Care/Boarding Veterinary Clinic/Hospital

Best Local Sports & Rec Fishing Guide

Best Local Nightlife Bar DJ Bar to Hook Up Bartender Brew

Best Local Health & Wellness Doctor/Health Care Provider Alternative Health Care Provider Gynecologist Chiropractor Dentist Optometrist Health Clinic Massage Therapist Physical Therapist Personal Trainer Yoga Instructor

Best Local People & Media Athlete Journalist Meteorologist Politician Radio Personality Radio Station TV Newscast TV Personality UM Professor Website

Best Uniquely Missoula Church Choir Festival Leader of the Revolution Nonprofit Organization Place for Kids' Fun Place for People Watching Place to Take Out-of-Towners Place to Walk Dogs Category We Forgot

Vote by May 7

[40] Missoula Independent • May 1–May 8, 2014

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dents/$10 kids 12 and under. Visit umtheatredance.org. The UM Symphony Orchestra and 2013 Concerto/Aria Competition winners play the Honors Convocation at the Music Recital Hall. 7:30 PM. Free. Bring a tissue for the Missoula Community Theatre’s rendition of Les Misérables. MCT Center for the Performing Arts May 7-11. WedSat shows at 7:30 PM, Sundays at 6:30 PM, plus Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2 PM. $15-$21. Visit MCTinc.org. Let somebody else do the hump-day lifting with Milkcrate Wednesdays at the Palace. 9 PM. No cover, plus free pool and pitcher specials. (Trivia answer: Heather Sweet.)

THURSDAYMAY08 Hard-working, harder-partying string band Pert Near Sandstone plays fast-past tunes at the Top Hat. 10 PM. $10. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s and the Top Hat. Release some stress during t’ai chi classes every Thursday at 10 AM at The Open Way Center, 702 Brooks St. $10 drop-in class. Visit openway.org. The Thursday Young Artists After School Program gets the chilluns involved with all manner of art history and media. ZACC. 2:15-5 PM. $12/$10 for members. Ages 6-11. Call 549-7555 to learn more.

nightlife MudSlide Charley unleashes a bucket of blues at the Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 6-8 PM. The bluegrassy Acousticals get plugged into the scene at Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. Tunes from 6-8:30 PM. No cover.

It’ll be like “American Idol: Carrot Edition” during Farm Fresh Pitchfest, in which farmers, ranchers and business owner have five-minutes to give a pitch on what their work offers to the community. Le Petit Outre. 6-9 PM. Free, plus there’s refreshments. Ole, the Singles of Missoula are raging it up for a special Ocho de Mayo dinner at Fiesta en Jalisco, 3701 Brooks St. 6:30 PM. Call John at 251-2616 with any questions. Hark, the UM School of Theatre and Dance doth present A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the Montana Theatre. April 29-May 3 and May 6-10 at 7:30 PM. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 kids 12 and under. Visit umtheatredance.org. Bring a tissue for the Missoula Community Theatre’s rendition of Les Misérables. MCT Center for the Performing Arts April 25-27, April 30-May 4 and May 7-11. Wed-Sat shows at 7:30 PM, Sundays at 6:30 PM, plus Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2 PM. $15-$21. Visit MCTinc.org. New York-based blues musician and ramblin’ man Johnny Azari plays tunes at the Palace. 9 PM. No cover. Watch our calendar sub-editor tie a cherry with her tongue when Julie Bug and Northern Exposure play tunes at the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave., from 9 PM to bar time. No cover. Submit events to Calapatra the Calendar Mistress at calendar@missoulanews.com at least two weeks in advance of the event. Don’t forget to include the date, time and cost. If you must, snail mail to Calapatra c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801. You can also submit online. Just find the “submit an event” link under the Spotlight on the right corner at missoulanews.com.


[outdoors]

MOUNTAIN HIGH

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s much as grizzlies are an iconic symbol in our town, I’d wager that not everybody who walks past the griz statue on the University of Montana campus or sports Grizwear knows a whole lot about mammals of the family Ursidae. The Missoula-based Great Bear Foundation advocates for the eight species of bears, some of which call Montana home. To mark springtime and bears’ wakening from hibernation, the foundation hosts the annual Multicultural Bear Honoring, with events in Missoula, Pablo and Glacier Park. We’re not all that likely to see a grizzly wander down into the Garden City—my sister spent a summer internship tracking grizzlies in the Cabinet Wilderness and never saw a damn one of them— but black bears are easy enough to spot. At the Bear Honoring in Greenough Park, you’ll snack on things that bears also eat, like glacier lilies, spring

beauty, nettles and elk (though presumably not freshly killed or raw elk.) The Great Bear Foundation also runs the Bears and Apples project, which reminds folks that backyard fruit trees often lure hungry animals, particularly black bears up in the Rattlesnake. The project sends volunteers to help residents harvest the fruit, and whatever residents don’t want is distributed to the Missoula Food Bank and Poverello. Fewer conflicts between bears and humans means bears get to live (and eat) another day. —Kate Whittle The Great Bear Foundation’s Bear Foods Buffet, with food and educational walk hosted by scientist Charles Jonkel, is Fri., May 2 at the Greenough Park Picnic Shelter. 5-8 PM. Suggested donation $10-$20. Visit greatbear.org.

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

THURSDAY MAY 1

SUNDAY MAY 4

The Alberton-based Zoo Town Surfers invite you to join them for the unofficial start of Lochsa Season, as the group rafts and kayaks on Class III and Class IV whitewater rapids. Peak flows run through June. Visit zootownsurfers.com.

The views will be totes worth it after the 87mile Missoulians on Bicycles trip to Painted Rock Reservoir. Meet at McCormick Park at 7 AM for carpool to the 8 AM start point of Hamilton’s Coffee Cup Cafe; or shorten the ride by starting at Darby’s Lightfoot Cycles at 9:15. Email David at david.e.barth@gmail.com to learn more.

FRIDAY MAY 2 Make sure your first time is special by attending First Timer Friday at the Freestone Climbing Center, 935 Toole Ave. in Missoula, at 7 PM. Free if it’s your first visit.

SATURDAY MAY 3 See what waterfowl, raptors, sandhill cranes and long-billed curlews are in store when Five Valleys Audubon hosts an all-day trip to Brown’s Lake and the upper Blackfoot Valley. Meet at the Adams Center parking lot at 8 AM for departure. Bring a lunch. Call Terry at 214-1194 to learn more. You’ll be bright eyed and bushy tailed after Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which start at 8 AM every Saturday at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. Grab breakfast with other participants afterward. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org. You’ll be sweating rainbows after the Color Me Rad! 5K run/walk in downtown Missoula. 8 AMnoon. $35-$45. Register or sign up to volunteer at zootownarts.org/color. Proceeds benefit the ZACC. Go loco for the Lolo Lulu, a 100-mile trip with the Missoulians on Bicycles over Lolo Pass. 10 AM. Call Diana at 327-9697 to learn more.

MONDAY MAY 5 Registration is now open for the Volunteer Vacation at the Bob Marshall Wilderness, with several trips throughout the summer where you can pitch in with trail maintenance, weeding and campground restoration. Trip leader, pack support and food provided. First trip is May 27. Check out bmwf.org.

TUESDAY MAY 6 The always down-to-earth Montana Dirt Girls host a hike or bike ride every Tuesday at 6 PM. Check out the Montana Dirt Girls page on Facebook for ride info.

WEDNESDAY MAY 7 See classic beauties like Missoula phlox and blooming bitterroots with the Waterworks Hill Wildflower Loop hike with the Montana Native Plant Society. Meet at the Waterworks trailhead on Greenough Drive at 6:30 PM. Call Clare at 7280189 with questions. calendar@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • May 1–May 8, 2014 [41]


[community] PRESENTS A LECTURE BY

Stanley Katz Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; and Princeton University Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies

"The Global Century: Not Your Mother’s World" Katz will discuss the inherent differences between international and global education: tomorrow’s citizens must deal with an interconnected world that extends beyond borders.

Monday •

May 5 • 7 PM

University Center South Ballroom

To misquote Field of Dreams, “if you build it, they will come.” That certainly holds true for the settlement of the West. After French Canadian fur trappers, Lewis and Clark and other early 1800s expeditions helped map and claim North America for white people, America’s westward expansion required railroads and wagon trails to make it happen. (For better or for worse.) In 1859-1860, Army Lt. John Mullan built a wagon road from Fort Benton, in what was then Dakota Territory, to Fort Walla Walla, then in Washington Territory. An estimated 20,000 people followed the road in its first year to found towns in what later became the states of Montana, Idaho and Washington. Today the route is called Mullan Road, and I-15 and I-90 follow sections of the original path. All sorts of passes and landmarks are still named after it, from the town of Mullan, Idaho to the Mullan Road in Missoula. (I’m reminded of ol’ John Mullan and the legacy of Manifest Destiny every time I drive by WalMart and Carmike 12.) The three-day Mullan Road

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

conference at Ruby’s Inn honors the history of the settlement era with historic presentations from folks like Eastern Washington University history professor Bill Youngs, history writer/reporter Kim Briggeman and Salish actor Julie Cajune. Maybe you’ll drive on part of the Mullan Road to get there. —Kate Whittle The 2014 Mullan Road Conference runs May 2-4, with presentations and tours about the “road that built Montana.” Ruby’s Inn, 4825 N. Reserve. $75. Visit tworivershistory.net.

[AGENDA LISTINGS] THURSDAY MAY 1

SUNDAY MAY 4

The International Worker’s Day Protest meets on the UM Oval at 2 PM to march to the Missoula County Courthouse for a rally and speeches in support of living wages, immigration reform and abolishing government corruption.

The Missoula Area Secular Society presents the M.A.S.S. Lunch, where atheists, secular humanists, agnostics and other freethinkers meet the first Sunday of every month for lunch at 11:30 AM at the Walking Moustache, corner of Main and Ryman. Free to attend, but the food costs you. Visit secularmissoula.org.

Conservation biologist Seth Wilson won’t tolerate any malarkey with his talk, “Damn Proud to be a Grizzly Bear Conservationist in a Time of Ideological Idiocy.” Part of the spring seminar series on conservation social science. Forestry Building, room 301. 4:10-5 PM.

FRIDAY MAY 2 Lo, garage sale season is nearly upon us. Gear up with the Spring Rummage Sale, which includes clothes, furniture and books, at Holy Spirit Episcopal, 130 S. Sixth St. E. 9 AM-3 PM on Friday and 9 AM-1 PM on Saturday. Martha from Red Bird Yoga demonstrates the basics of this ancient healing practice at the North Valley Public Library, 208 Main St. in Stevensville. 6-7 PM. Free. Legendary singer/songwriter Carole King performs at the LA Design Gallery, 337 E. Broadway, from 6-8 PM as a fundraiser for Senate candidate Dirk Adams. $100-$2600. RSVP to 646-707-2240 or kris@adamsformontana.com.

SATURDAY MAY 3 Lo, garage sale season is nearly upon us. Gear up with the Spring Rummage Sale, which includes clothes, furniture and books, at Holy Spirit Episcopal, 130 S. Sixth St. E. 9 AM-3 PM on Friday and 9 AM-1 PM on Saturday.

The Red Road Foundation hosts a fundraiser to fight against sex trafficking, with silent auction, sushi dinner, live jazz and documentary premiere. The Loft of Missoula, 119 W. Main St. 7 PM. $100. Tickets at theredroadfoundation.brownpapertickets.com.

MONDAY MAY 5 Former military members are invited to the Veterans For Peace Western Montana Chapter meeting, which will work to inform and advocate about peace issues. Meets at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave., on the first Monday of every month at 4 PM. Visit veteransforpeace.org to learn more. Dr. Joe Knapp, of the International Heart Institute of Montana, presents “Heart Disease and the Children of Ethiopia: Nurture and Nature,” as part of UM’s spring lecture series on global health. Gallagher Business Building Room 106, 6:30-7:30 PM.

WEDNESDAY MAY 7 Calapatra hereby bequeaths all of her LPs to her housemate and her cat to her sister. Now the rest of y’all should check out Estate Planning for Young Families and the Young at Heart, a panel discussion cover the essentials. Holy Spirit Episcopal, 130 S. Sixth St. 6:30-8 PM. Free.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

[42] Missoula Independent • May 1–May 8, 2014


missoulanews.com • May 1–May 8, 2014 [43]


www.missoulanews.com

May 1 - May 8, 2014

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD ADD/ADHD relief ... Naturally! Reiki • CranioSacral Therapy • Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT). Your Energy Fix. James V. Fix, RMT, EFT, CST 360840-3492, 415 N. Higgins Ave #19 • Missoula, MT 59802. yourenergyfix.com CHERRY FESTIVAL SEEKING VENDORS Wanted: Seeking vendors for Polson’s Main Street Flathead Cherry Festival. This is a very well-attended event, held on the main streets of Polson July 19th and 20th. This unique celebration of Montana’s cherries draws

many thousands of visitors each year. Three booth sizes are available, making this affordable for anyone. Local Montana-made and cherry-themed products are preferred. Food vendors welcome. To view and fill out an application, please visit www.flatheadcherryfestival.com. Booth spaces are limited and our deadline is June 20, 2014. This is a two-day event and we reserve the right to refuse duplicate products. You can direct questions to vendors@flatheadcherryfestival.com, or 406-686-1155.

Donate used building materials to Home Resource, a non-profit that sells building materials and deconstructs buildings for reuse. Keeping stuff that ain’t garbage outta the dump! Open everyday. 541.8300. homeresource.org FREE ZUMBA DANCE CLASS! Every Monday & Wednesday 6-7 PM. Lolo School. 406-544-5859. Come join the fun and bring your friends!! GARDEN PLOTS AVAILABLE. Through May 10th. 11.6x6.6.

Call 274-1518 or info@milltowngardenpatch.org www.milltowngardenpatch.org Missoula Medical Aid: Working for Health in Honduras. In 1998 we responded after a devastating hurricane. The need still continues, and so do we. Will you help? Volunteer or donate today! missoulamedicalaid.org Missoula Medical Aid: Working for Health in Honduras. Please donate now at missoulamedicalaid.org!

LOST & FOUND Found: Cat approximately 6 month old calico female cat, extremely friendly, found on West Central on 4/21. AniMeals Seniors for Seniors program waives the adoption fee for anyone 65 and older adopting a cat 9 years old and older. All cats are spayed or neutered, vaccinated, and microchipped free of cost before they’re adopted. For more information call AniMeals at 721-4710. FOUND: Dog near Wyoming and north Johnson intersection. Pit/lab mix. Dark brown. Male. Give a shout out for him. 406.544.5070

Table of contents Advice Goddess . . . . . .C2 Free Will Astrology . . .C4 Public Notices . . . . . . . .C6 Crossword . . . . . . . . . .C7 Camp Sleepover . . . . .C9 This Modern World . .C11

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PET OF THE WEEK Little Bit is loving, mellow, goofy, smart, and just can’t wait to find a family to join in time for summer adventures. Outdoor adventures are her favorite, and she loves to swim! The fact that she’s thirteen hasn’t slowed this lady down, and she still has lots of spunk. She encourages you to check out HSWM’s Seniors for Seniors program: adoptions are free for animals seven years and older, if they’re adopted by someone over the age of 60! Come and get a “Little Bit” of love today! 549-3934 myHSWM.org


ADVICE GODDESS

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

By Amy Alkon

TO GIVE AWAY

WATCHING PAINT DIE I've been dating a girl I really like for six weeks. She pays her rent with a 9-to-5 job but studied painting at art school and wants to make it her career. Unfortunately, I don't like her paintings at all. They are abstract and don't look like they take much craft, and they just don't aesthetically appeal to me. (Maybe I'm missing something...who knows.) I haven't told her my real feelings. But as we get more serious and as she talks about her aspirations, I'm finding it more and more uncomfortable to keep playing along. I worry that we won't have a future because of this. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Philistine There are questions you long to ask her about her work, such as, "What did you do in art school, spend four years playing Angry Birds on your phone?" Abstract art is an easy target for ridicule. The thing is, somebody who went to art school most likely had to learn formal principles and show they could draw figuratively before they could venture into abstraction. But to the untrained eye, an abstract work can look like somebody made a big mess with some paint and then stuck a mythical title on itâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;"Androcles And The Lion, No. 4." You can't help but wonder, "Sorry, but is that the lion's paw on the left, or did somebody at the gallery opening trip and let their appetizer go flying?" Because your girlfriend's artwork is more than a weekend hobby, your disliking it probably is a big deal. A painting is basically a striptease of the artist's self on a piece of canvas, reflecting who they are, what they see and feel, and what they want to say. Also, it's hard enough to try to earn a living as an artist without sharing a bed with one of your detractors. (Imagine Edvard Munch's girlfriend seeing "The Scream" and nagging him, "Come on, Eddie, 'The Smile' would be so much nicer.") And even if you can hide your true feelings for a while, there's a good chance they'll poke their little heads out during an argument, a la "Wanna vastly improve your work? Incorporate gasoline and a lit match." For a relationship to work, it isn't enough to have the hotsies for somebody. You need to have a crush on them as a human being. Fortunately, you may be able to get to this, even if her paintings don't speak to you (save for saying "I'm ugly"). Admit that you don't know much

about art, and ask her to tell you about her work: the thinking behind it, her painting process (color, form, why she includes certain elements), and what she's trying to say or evoke. You might find that you respect where she's coming from and believe in her on that level, which could mean that the two of you can make a go of it. If so, keep in mind all the ways she's just like any other girlfriend, and be prepared to fake a seizure when she asks the artist's version of that classic lose-lose question: "Do I look untalented while painting in this dress that makes me look fat?"

DON EMOTICON Last month, I hit it off with a girl on an online dating site. The problem is, my written banter is much better than what I can achieve on a first date. I do poorly when just staring across a table at somebody. I'm worried she'll be disappointed when she sees how bad I am at being witty on the spot, so I've been reluctant to ask her out. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Stalling Maybe as a preliminary step, you could make plans to go to the same Starbucks but hide behind your laptops and email each other. We need to start calling online dating sites "online meeting sites" so people will stop thinking they can get to know somebody while spending a month sitting miles away and staring deep into their computer screen. They typically end up filling in the blanks with who they want the person to be and believe they're getting attached to them when maybe what they're most attached to is how witty they feel while leaning on a thesaurus the size of Rhode Island. Sure, it's tough sitting across a table from a near stranger with "SAY SOMETHING ALREADY!" ringing in your head. So don't sit on the first date. Do something. Go somewhere you can pluck subjects of conversation out of the atmosphere: a street fair, a flea market. Play pool; go bowling. And lighten up on feeling that you need to be funny. You'll ultimately be funnier and more likely to get a second date if you approach the first date as if your goal is getting to know a woman instead of getting her to book you for your own Comedy Central special.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com www.advicegoddess.com

[C2] Missoula Independent â&#x20AC;˘ May 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; May 8, 2014

First Friday Free For All. Haircuts will be donated to the first 20 people in the door & you may receive one free haircut every three months. Noon to 4 pm, 1st come, 1st served. Mighty Aphrodite Salon. 406-7211866. 736A S. 1st W. Missoula (next to Free Cycles). Find us on Facebook.

ANNOUNCEMENTS Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Vine Palette - PAINT . SIP . LEARN. *Pick painting *Tell friends to come *Drink & paint. 4 LOCATIONS! MISSOULAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FIRST PAINT & SIP STUDIO. WWW.DVINEPALETTE.CO M. 406.239.6856 Little Bit is loving, mellow, goofy, smart, and just canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait to find a family to join in time for summer adventures. Outdoor adventures are her favorite, and she loves to swim! The fact that sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thirteen hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t slowed this lady down, and she still has lots of spunk. She encourages you to check out HSWMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Seniors for Seniors program: adoptions are

free for animals seven years and older, if theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re adopted by someone over the age of 60! Come and get a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Little Bitâ&#x20AC;? of love today! 549-3934 myHSWM.org Low Cost Vaccination Clinic sponsored by the Bitter Root Humane Association - Saturday 5/31/14 at the Bitter Root Humane Association Animal Shelter, 262 Fairgrounds Rd., Hamilton. Clinic kicks off at 10:00am and runs until 2:00pm. Vaccinations, nail trims, microchips, and name tags available. $15 dog booster, rabies, or kennel cough; $25 cat booster with leukemia. All proceeds benefit the Bitter Root Humane Association. For more information, please contact the Shelter at 363-5311. Pet Food Drive The Bitter Root Humane Association is proud to partner with First Security Bank in sponsoring an adoption event and community pet

food drive. Friday, 5/16/14 3:30pm to 5:30pm in the parking lot at First Security Bank 100 West Main St., Hamilton (look for the white tent). Volunteers will be showing off available shelter dogs as well as collecting donations of pet food for those in the community that might need a little help with pet food. Come by and say hello! For more information, please contact the shelter at 363-5311.

VOLUNTEERS Basset Rescue of Montana. Looking for a volunteer web master. 406-207-0765 facebook.com/bassethoundrescue

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EMPLOYMENT ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE CLERK DOUBLETREE HOTEL EDGEWATER needs full-time ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE CLERK. Must have experience an knowledge of Accounts Receivable and basic bookkeeping. Responsible for billing of guests and groups, deliver outstanding guest service and financial profitability. Prepare daily receivables, post in system and balance totals to the

general ledger; Respond to all questions and concerns related to the City Ledger; Conduct research, offer solutions and negotiate results to resolve questions and discrepancies in a timely, friendly and efficient manner; Review final statements against sales contracts for accuracy and timely dispatch; Assist the credit department in resolving outstanding balances and gathering

appropriate back-up, as needed. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10046427 Administrative Assistant Local technology company seeking an energetic & friendly full time Administrative Assistant with great customer interfacing skills. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for someone

with strong multitasking and organizational skills, and attention to the particulars is a must. Responsibilities include but are not limited to: Field Service Personnel scheduling, regularly communicating with clients over the phone, via email, and in person at our downtown Missoula offices. Often you will be the first point of contact with new clients, so excellent verbal and written


EMPLOYMENT skills are required for this position. Experience with QuickBooks and MS Office are also required, as is exceptional customer service skills. An interest and/or some experience in technology is a plus. If you like a to keep busy each day with a wide variety of duties, enjoy a fast paced, detail oriented environment, enjoy working with people and with technology, and are comfortable working (at times) with minimal supervision, we would like to talk to you. Paid holidays and vacation, downtown parking space. Salary is DOE. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10046475 Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! HYPERLINK “http://www.oneworldcenter.org” w w w. O n e Wo r l d C e n t e r. o r g (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org

AUTO DETAILER - IN-

TERIOR GRIZZLY DETAIL Missoula employer is seeking an experienced INTERIOR AUTO DETAILER. MUST HAVE A VALID DRIVER’S LICENSE!!! MUST have verifiable previous auto detailer experience. Must also be bondable. It is Very important that applicants also be well groomed and presentable for public contact-clientele sometimes sees detailers as the representative for the company. Will be meeting the public and personally taking care of their vehicles. Will be doing detailed Washing, Cleaning, Vacuuming. Meticulous and Intricate cleaning of both the inside and outside of the vehicle. Mainly interior detailing. $9.25 Hourly. $100 bonus available after 30 days. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10046477 Clean Room Assembly We are seeking a someone who pays attention to detail!! Nonsmoker required because of materials being handled. We are seeking someone with good vision who doesn’t mind working with their hands doing repetitive tasks. This clean room job is for a company that manufactures products. The majority of their projects involve plastic injection molding. They also do fulfillment and shipments. $9/hr to start. Call Work Force Inc. to set up an interview 543-3590. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10046336 CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE Customer service representative are needed to answer telephone calls from customers with questions or concerns about billing or programming. These employees are scheduled on a shift basis, with hours of operation from 5:45 a.m. to 11 p.m. - seven days a week with occasional overtime, some holidays and other shifts as required. The on-line application process takes about an hour and a half. We recommend that you use a high-speed Internet connection and if using a laptop, have a mouse. You are welcome to use our on-site computers to apply. Call 406-327-1315 for

more information. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10046510 OFFICE ASSISTANT A local university seeks an OFFICE ASSISTANT. This position creates and edits correspondence, organizes and maintains files, reconciles bills, runs and formats reports, provides more complex information to internal and external customers, supports social media and web site, supports basic computer needs and financial management,t and performs some personnel functions. Other duties include arranging travel requests and coordinating meetings and conference calls. This position works with people from diverse international and cultural backgrounds, including Native American communities in Montana and Asian communities. It requires high-school graduation and two years of related work experience or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10046379 Part Time Data Entry 34 weeks WORK FORCE INC. Come in for an interview if you have data entry experience! This is temporary for 3-4 weeks. $10/hr. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10046485

PROFESSIONAL ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MEDIA ARTS UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA seeks an ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MEDIA ARTS. This job requires a strong professional background in digital design (still image and motion), as well as digital filmmaking (narrative or experimental). Also necessary is the ability to teach the full range of classes in BFA and MFA programs, including post-production, exceptional skills with applicable software including NLE, Photoshop, Illustrator and After Effects, and demonstrated excellence in online and blended teaching at the college/university level or equivalent experience. An MFA in a related area or equivalent professional experience is required. Specific teaching assignments will be determined by the candidate’s experience and expertise. This is a tenure-track position. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10046421 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, COMPUTER SCIENCE THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA. Backgrounds in algorithms, theoretical computer science and data science are preferred, along with candidates who can collaborate with researchers in a science or applied-science area. The successful candidate will have the ability to effectively teach a variety of courses within the department and to work independently and collaboratively on research with faculty and students, and contribute to his/her specialty, the department and the university. This job requires a

PhD in computer science or a closely related field. All areas of specialization within computer science will be considered. This is a tenure-track position, starting in August. A balance of undergraduate and graduate teaching and research productivity is expected. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10046417 CHIP TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED TO PULL DOUBLES • Local hauls • Home daily • Good pay • Benefits • 2 years exp. required Call 406493-7876 9am-5pm M-F only. EQUIPMENT OPERATOR EKO KOMPOST INC. seeks an equipment operator for weekday job. This employee operates equipment for a compost business. Benefits available after six months.Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10046537 STAFF ATTORNEY A local university seeks a STAFF ATTORNEY. This position supervises third-year law student interns in representing UM students with legal problems and maintains his or her own caseload of cases with minimal day-today oversight. These are typically not complex or difficult cases; however, occasional appellate work, jury trials or highly contests cases raise the complexity to medium approximately 5 percent of the time. This attorney must become proficient with computers, legal software and research; become familiar with Microsoft Office, network drives, and Time Matters software; and have a working knowledge of university procedures and policies. A law degree and license to practice in Montana is required, along with five years of experience in general practice and continuing legal education. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10046346 TECHNICAL CUSTOMER SERVICE REP Technical customer service representatives are needed to take calls from customers who have questions or concerns about technical issues with their equipment or services. Successful candidates will be able to troubleshoot and evaluate the needs of each customer. These employees are scheduled on a shift basis, with hours of operation from 5:45 a.m. to 11 p.m. - seven days a week with occasional overtime, some holidays and other shifts as required. The online application process takes about an hour and a half. We recommend that you use a high-speed Internet connection and if using a laptop, have a mouse. You are welcome to use our on-site computers to apply. Call 406-327-1315 for more information. To see a video portraying this position in the DIRECTV Missoula Customer Contact Center, click on the link below. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10046505

SKILLED LABOR LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE CREW MEMBER NATURES BEST INC A local employer seeks a highly motivated and skilled LANDSCAPE CREW

MEMBER WITH PRUNING EXPERIENCE in lawn maintenance and the snow removal industry. Must have clean driving record and current license. Able to commute reliably to office and shop base. Able to work extended hours on occasion when required. Must accomplish lawn maintenance and pruning projects and other related duties in a timely and professional manner. Will professionally handle residential and business customers including large corporate clients. Benefits available after one year. CLOSE DATE: 05/06/14. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10046438 Landscaper Seeking a Landscaper to work for a local landscape company. Primary duties will be in landscaping maintenance mowing, trimming, caring for landscapes. Irrigation installation experience a plus. Duties will include: lawn care, irrigation installation, full landscaping, planting trees, shrubs, bushes, digging, planting lawn and any other duties as assigned. Must be in good physical condition to apply. Must be a self starter who works well unsupervised, have problem-solving skills, mature and consistent work experience. This is a full time seasonal position. Must have a valid driver’s license to apply as will be driving company vehicle occasionally. Hours: 40 hours/week Wages: $8-12.00/hour depending on level of experience. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10046381 OFFICE ASSISTANT DOUBLE W TRUCK & TRLR SALES INC is seeking a fulltime Office Assistant.( 8:30 - 5:00 M-F ) QUALIFICATIONS: Successful applicant must be computer savvy with working knowledge of posting on Craigslist with digital photos, must have background in customer service and data entry. Candidate must be able to search on the internet. Experienced with Quickbooks is a plus. DUTIES: Ability to be the company’s first impression to walk-in customers and phone-in customers. Will be in charge of ensuring inventory is posted and maintained. Will complete orders in Quickbooks, organize parts on the sales floor, maintain all files, make customer care calls and general office work. This is a fast-paced office at times with a variety of work. This position has the opportunity for advancement. If you’re really interested in a job, come out and see us. Bring your resume to: Double W Truck & Trailer Sales, Inc. at 8523 Roller Coaster Road just 2 miles west of the airport in Missoula. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employ missoula.com. Job# 10046495

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION Annual Wildland Fire Refresher Training 406-543-0013 www.blackbull-wildfire.com TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-545-4546

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

IT’S A CALLING. GoANG.com/MT 800-TO-GO-ANG

CHIP TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED TO PULL DOUBLES

• Local hauls • Home daily • Good pay • Benefits • 2 years exp. required Call 406-493-7876 9am-5pm M-F only.

COMMUNITY INTEGRATION TECH PT Providing services to Adults w/disabilities in a residential/community setting.   M-W: Varied hours. $9.25-$9.50/hr.   Closes: 5/6/14, 5p.

RELIEF FLOAT FT Providing support to adults with disabilities in a Res/Comm setting. Exp. working w/adults w/disabilities preferred.  Varied hours and days.  $9.25- $9.50/hr. Closes:  5/6/14, 5p.

DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONAL Supporting Persons with Disabilities in Enhancing their Quality of Life.  Nite & Wknd hours, $9.00-$9.65/hr. Valid MT Driver’s License, No Record of Abuse, Neglect or Exploitation. Applications available at OPPORTUNITY RESOURCES, INC., 2821 S. Russell, Missoula, MT 59801 or online: orimt.org. Extensive background checks will be completed. NO RESUMES. EOE.

Seeking Heavy Machinery Operator Class A CDL not necessary, but preferred. We are seeking someone who can communicate well. Preferably someone who is currently seeking full time employment. $16$21/hr. Call Work Force Inc. at 543-3590. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10046329

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • May 1 – May 8, 2014 [C3]


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Affordable, quality addiction counseling in a confidential, comfortable atmosphere. Stepping Stone Counseling, PLLC. Shari Rigg, LAC • 406-9261453. Skype sessions available

By Rob Brezsny

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I wish there was a way you could play around with construction equipment for a few hours. I'd love it if you could get behind the wheel of a bulldozer and flatten a small hill. It would be good for you to use an excavator to destroy a decrepit old shed or clear some land of stumps and dead trees. Metaphorically speaking, that's the kind of work you need to do in your inner landscape: move around big, heavy stuff; demolish outworn structures; reshape the real estate to make way for new building projects.

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In the Transformers movies, Optimus Prime is a giant extraterrestrial warrior robot. His body contains an array of weapons that he uses for righteous causes, like protecting Earth's creatures. His character is voiced by actor Peter Cullen. Cullen has also worked extensively for another entertainment franchise, Winnie the Pooh. He does the vocals for Eeyore, a gloomy donkey who writes poetry and has a pink ribbon tied in a bow on his tail. Let's make Cullen your role model for now. I'm hoping this will inspire you to get the Eeyore side of your personality to work together with the Optimus Prime part of you. What's that you say? You don't have an Optimus Prime part of you? Well, that's what Eeyore might say, but I say different.

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Do you finally understand that you don't have to imitate the stress-addled workaholics and self-wounding overachievers in order to be as proficient as they are? Are you coming to see that if you want to fix, heal, and change the world around you, you have to fix, heal, and change yourself? Is it becoming clear that if you hope to gain more power to shape the institutions you're part of, you've got to strengthen your power over yourself? Are you ready to see that if you'd like to reach the next level of success, you must dissolve some of your fears of success?

c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): "Beauty is the purgation of superfluities," said Michelangelo. Do you agree? Could you make your life more marvelous by giving up some of your trivial pursuits? Would you become more attractive if you got rid of one of your unimportant desires? Is it possible you'd experience more lyrical grace if you sloughed off your irrelevant worries? I suggest you meditate on questions like these, Virgo. According to my interpretation of the astrological omens, experiencing beauty is not a luxury right now, but rather a necessity. For the sake of your mental, physical, and spiritual health, you need to be in its presence as much as possible.

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I'm pretty sure God wants you to be rich. Or at least richer. And I know for a fact that I want you to be richer. What about you? Do you want to be wealthier? Or at least a bit more flush? Or would you rather dodge the spiritual tests you'd have to face if you became a money magnet? Would you prefer to go about your daily affairs without having to deal with the increased responsibilities and obligations that would come with a bigger income? I suspect you will soon receive fresh evidence about these matters. How you respond will determine whether or not you'll be able to take advantage of new financial opportunities that are becoming available.

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The U.S. military budget this year is $633 billion. In comparison, the United Nations' peacekeeping budget is $7.8 billion. So my country will spend 81 times more to wage war than the U.N. will spend to make peace. I would prefer it if the ratio were reversed, but my opinion carries no weight. It's possible, though, that I might be able to convince you Scorpios, at least in the short run, to place a greater emphasis on cultivating cooperation and harmony than on being swept up in aggression and conflict. You might be tempted to get riled up over and over again in the coming weeks, but I think that would lead you astray from living the good life.

f

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Actor Matthew McConaughey prides himself on his willingness to learn from his mistakes and failures. A few years ago he collected and read all the negative reviews that critics had ever written about his work in films. It was "an interesting kind of experiment," he told Yahoo News. "There was some really good constructive criticism." According to my reading of the astrological omens, Sagittarius, now would be an excellent time for you to try an experiment comparable to McConaughey's. Be brave!

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): "Dear Oracle: I might be hallucinating, but recently I swear my pet iguana has been getting turned on whenever I disrobe in front of it. My naked body seems to incite it to strut around and make guttural hissing sounds and basically act like it's doing a mating dance. Is it me, or is the planets? I think my iguana is a Capricorn like me. —Captivating Capricorn." Dear Capricorn: Only on rare occasions have I seen you Capricorns exude such high levels of animal magnetism as you are now. Be careful where you point that stuff! I won't be shocked if a wide variety of creatures finds you extra alluring.

h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): "Eat like you love yourself," advises author Tara Stiles. "Move like you love yourself. Speak like you love yourself. Act like you love yourself." Those four prescriptions should be top priorities for you, Aquarius. Right now, you can't afford to treat your beautiful organism with even a hint of carelessness. You need to upgrade the respect and compassion and reverence you give yourself. So please breathe like you love yourself. Sleep and dream like you love yourself. Think like you love yourself. Make love like you love yourself.

Christine White N.D. Elizabeth Axelrod N.D. Family Care • Nutritional Consultation • IV Therapy • Herbal Medicine • Women’s Health • Massage Physician’s Building #2 • Community Medical Center • 2831 Fort Missoula Road, Ste. 105

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): "My personal philosophy is not to undertake a project unless it is manifestly important and nearly impossible." So said Taurus-born Edwin Land, the man who invented the Polaroid camera. I have a feeling these might be useful words for you to live by between your birthday in 2014 and your birthday in 2015. In the coming 12 months, you will have the potential of homing in on a dream that will fuel your passions for years. It may seem to be nearly impossible, but that's exactly what will excite you about it so much—and keep you going for as long as it takes to actually accomplish.

Bioenergetic, CranioSacral & Physical Therapies. 30 years experience. Bodymind-spirit integration. Shana’s Heart of Healing, Shana Dieterle, LPT 396 5788

BLACK BEAR NATUROPATHIC

ARIES (March 21-April 19): "Dear Astrologer: We Aries people have an intense fire burning inside us. It's an honor and a privilege. We're lucky to be animated with such a generous share of the big energy that gives life to all of nature. But sometimes the fire gets too wild and strong for us. We can't manage it. It gets out of our control. That's how I'm feeling lately. These beloved flames that normally move me and excite me are now the very thing that's making me crazy. What to do? —Aries." Dear Aries: Learn from what firefighters do to fight forest fires. They use digging tools to create wide strips of dirt around the fire, removing all the flammable brush and wood debris. When the fire reaches this path, it's deprived of fuel. Close your eyes and visualize that scene.

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): If blindfolded, most people can't tell the difference between Pepsi and Coca-Cola. But I bet you could, at least this week. Odds are good that you will also be adept at distinguishing between genuine promises and fakes ones. And you will always know when people are fooling themselves. No one will be able to trick you into believing in hype, lies, or nonsense. Why? Because these days you are unusually perceptive and sensitive and discerning. This might on occasion be a problem, of course, since you won't be able to enjoy the comfort and consolation that illusions can offer. But mostly it will be an asset, providing you with a huge tactical advantage and lots of good material for jokes. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

[C4] Missoula Independent • May 1 – May 8, 2014

Escape with Massage- Swedish, Deep Tissue and Reiki. Open days, evenings and weekends. Insurance accepted. Janit Bishop, LMT • 207-7358 • 127 N Higgins IF YOU USED THE BLOOD THINNER PRADAXA and suffered internal bleeding, hemorrhaging, required hospitalization or a loved one died while taking Pradaxa between October 2010 and the present. You may be entitled to compensation. Call Attorney Charles H. Johnson 1-800-5355727

Confused about coming out? Call our mental health counselor Bernie Keefe, MSW, LCSW today!

721-1646 www.bluemountainclinic.org

JIN SHIN JYUSTU THERAPY. Eliminate pain & stress on all levels with safe, healing touch. Animals like it too! Hot Springs, MT. Will travel. Lila: 406-741-5709 PEACEFUL HEART YOGA & PRESCHOOL First Friday Kids Art & Music show: May 2nd 4:30 - 6:30 pm. Saturday Morning Yoga Series 11:00 12:15 starts May 3. 406-239-9642, PeacefulHeartYogaMissoula.com; 725 W. Alder #3.

$75/Day Noon- 4 pm Level 1 May 4 Level 2 May 18 at Garden Mother Herbs

(406) 529-3834 Space is limited. Please call to reserve space.

Soft Touch Therapy Readings by Leslie

Psychic/Medium-Reiki/ Spiritual Healer. I provide a psychic/medium reading, a healing with a soft, loving laying on of the hands approach. All I do, I do within The Light Of God. I consider my abilities a gift from God to provide love, healing and blessings for each and every person I am honored to connect with and during all sessions I do.

406.542.2147

406-493-6428

MontanaNaturalMedicine.com

psychiclesliemissoula.com

A natural healing art based on the principle that there are reflex points on the feet, hands & ears that are actually "reflections" of the body systems & organs. Using gentle acupressure, your reflexologist is able to stimulate the body's own natural ability to achieve better overall balance and energy. It's a perfect complement to traditional health care routines... and you get to keep your clothes on!!

Please call or email for appt. 406-830-7276 mountainreflexology@gmail.com 127 N. Higgins, Ste. 308


SUSTAINAFIEDS

MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS Great pyrenean mastiff puppies available now, $150. Hamilton upright piano, great condition, $550. Looking for Free untreated logs, stumps or branches. 7452202

ANTIQUES HELENA ANTIQUES FAIR, Helena Civic Center. May 3rd & 4th starting 10am. 34th year. FRESH new mds. from 1st time dealers & up-to-date choices from old favorites. $5.00 bd VIRGELLE MERC. ANTIQUES presents the COLLINS COLLECTIBLE & ANTIQUE SALE Sat. and Sun. May 10th & 11th, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Daily. Sale held at the old Collin’s Community Club in downtown Collins, Montana. 1-800-426-2926 www.VirgelleMontana.com

AUCTIONS AUCTION, MAY 3, DARBY MT. Cat skidsteer 500 hrs. Several attachments, ATV’s, firearms, Sheep Tub, Kiefer Built 5 Horse, Vertical Mill. See www.kevinhillauctions.com

CLOTHING Kid Crossing offers exceptional value on nearly new chil-

dren’s clothing and equipment. Providing ecofriendly clothing exchange since 2001. Reduce • Reuse • Recycle • Buy Local! 1940 Harve • 406-829-8808 • www.kidcrossingstores.com

MUSIC Banjo lessons not just for guys anymore. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

PETS & ANIMALS AniMeals Seniors for Seniors program waives the adoption fee for anyone 65 and older adopting a cat 9 years old and older. All cats are spayed or neutered, vaccinated, and microchipped free of cost before they’re adopted. For more information call AniMeals at 721-4710. Basset Rescue of Montana. Senior bassets needing homes. 406-207-0765. Please like us on Facebook... facebook.com/bassethoundrescue

OUTDOOR GEAR The Sports Exchange - Great Gear. Great Prices. Buy • Sell • Trade • Consignment. 111 S. 3rd W., Missoula, on the Hip Strip. 406-721-6056

Thrift Stores 1136 W. Broadway 930 Kensington

SPRING SALE! 111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

AUTOMOBILE CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car.com

Kid Crossing offers exceptional value on nearly new children’s clothing and equipment. Providing eco-friendly clothing exchange since 2001. Reduce • Reuse • Recycle • Buy Local! 1940 Harve • 406-829-8808 • www.kidcrossingstores.com Natural Housebuilders, Inc. Energy efficient, small homes, additions/ remodels, higher-comfort crafted buildings, solar heating. 369-0940 or 642-6863. www.naturalhousebuilder.net

Natural Housebuilders & Terry Davenport Design, Inc. Building net zero energy custom homes using solar thermal & solar PV.

369-0940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

FLYING KITES MAKES YOU LOOK AT THE SKY & FEEL THE WIND

Mezcal Margarita Serves 8 1 1/2 cups Oaxacan Mezcal 2 cups Limonada • 1/2 cup Triple Sec 1-2 tsp Orange Bitters Mix and chill then shake with ice and strain into cocktail glass. Garnish with orange zest. Credit: Rick Bayless

829 S. Higgins On the Hip Strip

406.543.1179 Mon-Sat 10:30-6 • Sun 12-4

Makers’ Ball  Repurposed/Recycled  Fashion Competition & Show  May 10  $ Cash Prizes $ 

REGISTER NOW

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • May 1 – May 8, 2014 [C5]


PUBLIC NOTICES BONNIE J. FRANKS v.s. CASSIE MCKNIGHT 915 Ronan, Lot 4, Missoula, MT 59801. I have had Cassie McKnight sought by the sheriff’s department to serve papers in a civil suit. They cannot find her. Call 5430393 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-14-83 Dept. No. 3 Judge John W. Larson NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of Patricia Hochhalter, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the Decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or their claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to SHELLEY HUTCHESON, the personal representative, return receipt requested, in care of her attorney, Jeffrey R. Kuchel, of Crowley Fleck PLLP, 305 South 4th Street East, Suite 100, Missoula, MT 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 24th day of April, 2014. /s/ Shelley Hutcheson Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT  MISSOULA COUNTY In the Matter of the Estate of Betty Martin, Deceased. Probate No. DP 14-75 Dept. 2 Judge Robert L. Deschamps, III  NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above estate.  All persons having claims against the Decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or their  claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Nathan Martin, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of his attorneys, Crowley Fleck PLLP, 305 South 4th Street East, Suite 100, P.O. Box 7099, Missoula, Montana 59807-7099, or filed with the Clerk of the Court. DATED this 17 day of April, 2014. /s/  Nathan Martin Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-14-77 Dept. No. 4 Honorable Karen S. Townsend, Presiding. NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF ROBERT R. SAURER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said Deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Jennifer Hurley, the Personal Representative, Return Receipt Requested, c/o Skjelset & Geer, PLLP, PO Box 4102, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 18th day of April, 2014. /s/ Jennifer Hurley, Personal Representative SKJELSET & GEER, P.L.L.P. /s/ Douglas G. Skjelset, Attorneys for the Estate STATE OF MONTANA):ss. County of Missoula) I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the state of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. Signed this 16th day of April, 2014. /s/ Jennifer Hurley, Applicant Subscribed and sworn to before me this 16th day of April, 2014. /s/ Sharon J. Davis, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at Clinton, Montana My Commission Expires May 14, 2014 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-14-435 Dept. No. 4 Karen S. Townsend Notice of Hearing on Name Change of Minor Child In the Matter of the Name Change of William Riley Johnson: Tandy Trogdon a/k/a Tandy Roush, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court to change a child’s name from William Riley Johnson to Riley Jay Trogdon. The hearing will bee on 06/03/2014 at 3:00 p.m. The hearing

will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Dated: 4/21/2014 /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Darci Lehnerz, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DP-14-60 Dept. No. 3 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: NEAL L. MANDELKO, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Lois A. Mandelko-Steinberg, the Personal Representative, returned receipt requested, at P. Mars Scott Law Offices, P.O. Box 5988, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 28th day of March, 2014. /s/ Lois A. Mandelko-Steinberg, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-14-70 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MELODEE DRAKE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Karinna Solum, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Boone Karlberg P.C., P. O. Box 9199, Missoula, Montana 59807-9199, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. I declare, under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the state of Montana, that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 8th day of April, 2014, at Missoula, Montana. /s/ Karinna Solum BOONE KARLBERG P.C. By: /s/ Julie R. Sirrs, Esq. P. O. Box 9199 Missoula, Montana 59807 Attorneys for Karinna Solum, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-14-72 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF TAMMY DUBOIS, A/K/A TAMMY GORE DUBOIS AND TAMMY L. GORE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Kelsey DuBois and Taylor DuBois, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane P.C., PO Box 4747, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 10th day of April, 2014. /s/ Kelsey DuBois, Co-Personal Representative /s/ Taylor DuBois, Co-Personal Representative WORDEN THANE, P.C. Attorneys for Co-Personal Representatives By: /s/ Amy M. Scott Smith MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-14-81 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF KATHERINE E. PHILLIPS, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be certified mailed to Sharon E. Gallagher, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane P.C., PO Box 4747, Missoula, Montana 59806

MNAXLP or filed with the Clerk of the aboveentitled Court. DATED this 22nd day of April, 2014. /s/ Sharon E. Gallagher, Personal Representative WORDEN THANE, P.C. Attorneys for Personal Representative By: /s/ Patrick Dougherty MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP-14-69 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF: WALLACE H. HERTEL, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Connie O’Conner has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Connie O’Conner, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Timothy D. Geiszler, GEISZLER & FROINES, PC, 619 Southwest Higgins, Suite K, Missoula, Montana 59803 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 4th day of April, 2014. GEISZLER & FROINES, PC. BY: /s/ Timothy D. Geiszler, Attorneys for the Personal Representative. I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the state of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 4th day of April, 2014. /s/ Connie O’Conner, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DV-14-382 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION MITCHELL C. HICKS and KAY R. JOHNSTON, Plaintiffs, v. CARL L. BLANK, KATHLEEN I. BLANK, NORMAN E. THYFAULT, AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS, UNKNOWN HEIRS, OR ANY UNKNOWN DEVISEES OF ANY DECEASED PERSON AND ALL OTHER PERSONS, UNKNOWN, CLAIMING OR WHO MIGHT CLAIM ANY RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE OR INTEREST IN OR LIEN OR ENCUMBRANCE UPON THE REAL PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT ADVERSE TO PLAINTIFFS’ OWNERSHIP OR ANY CLOUD UPON PLAINTIFFS’ TITLE THERETO, WHETHER SUCH CLAIM OR POSSIBLE CLAIM BE PRESENT OR CONTINGENT, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS, GREETINGS: You are hereby SUMMONED to answer the Complaint to Quiet Title in this Action which is filed with the abovenamed Court, a copy of which is served upon you, and to file your written answer with the Court and serve a copy thereof upon Plaintiffs’ attorney within twenty-one (21) days after the service of this SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION, or such other period as may be specified by law, exclusive of the day of service. Your failure to appear or answer will result in judgment against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. A filing fee must accompany the answer. This action is brought for the purpose of quieting title the following-described real property located in Missoula County, Montana: The North one-half of the Southeast one-quarter of the Southwest onequarter of Section 12, Township 13 North, Range 23 West, Missoula County, Montana. Dated this 21st day of April, 2014. /s/ Shirley E. Faust (SEAL) By: /s/ Michael Evjen, Deputy Clerk Kevin S. Jones, Christian, Samson & Jones, PLLC, Attorneys at Law, 310 West Spruce, Missoula, MT 59802 (406) 721-7772 Attorneys for Plaintiffs MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-14-57 NOTICE OF HEARING OF PETITION FOR PROBATE OF WILL, DETERMINATION OF TESTACY AND HEIRS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF LUCILLE COLLETTE SLOMINSKI, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Jennifer A. Ball has filed in the above Court and cause a Petition for the formal probate of the Will of Lucille Collette Slominski,

[C6] Missoula Independent • May 1 – May 8, 2014

deceased, for determination of testacy and heirs, and for the appointment of Jennifer A. Ball as Personal Representative of said Will and estate. For further information, the Petition, as filed, may be examined in the office of the clerk of the above Court. Hearing upon said Petition will be held in said Court at the courtroom in the courthouse at Missoula, Montana, on the 12th day of May, 2014, at the hour of 1:30 o’clock p.m., at which time all interested persons may appear and object. Dated this 28th day of March, 2014. /s/ Jennifer A. Ball c/o Boone Karlberg PC PO Box 9199 Missoula, MT 59807 PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE’S ATTORNEY: BOONE KARLBERG P.C. By: /s/ Julie R. Sirrs, Esq. P. O. Box 9199 Missoula, Montana 59807 Attorneys for Jennifer A. Ball NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 07/07/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200517167 Bk:755 Pg:1215, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which Scott Knight and Billie Anne Knight was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., it successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Charles J Peterson, Attorney at Law was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Charles J Peterson, Attorney at Law as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 5 in Block 4 of Wapikiya Addition No. 3, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201111169 B:879 P:1184, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Bank of America, N.A. successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 21, 2014, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $182,239.58. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $152,879.20, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 7, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of

these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7021.16382) 1002.248685-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 05/16/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200811105 BK 819, PG 82, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Joel Wetzel, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Units C-10 of Toole Avenue Condominiums-Phase 2, a residential Condominium situated on Lot C of McCormick Addition No. 2, Block 6, Lots A, B and C, a Platted subdivision of the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. Together with a 4.16% interest in the common elements and an exclusive right to use the limited common elements appurtenant to each unit as said common and limited elements are defined in the Declaration of Condominium, Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions for Toole Avenue Condominiums-Phase 2. And subject to the Declaration of Condominium, Covenants and Conditions for Toole Avenue Condominiums recorded August 20, 2004 in Book 738 at Page 431 Micro Records and for Toole Avenue Condominiums-Phase 2 as recorded August 2, 2005 in Book 757 at Page 677 Micro Records and the Bylaws for Toole Avenue Condominium Owners Association, Inc. as recorded on August 20, 2004 in Book 738 at Page 434 Micro Records. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 11/01/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 14, 2014, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $115,881.71. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $111,424.23, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 24, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually

incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.109120) 1002.266369-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 2, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: The Southwesterly One-Half of Lot 5 and all of Lots 6 and 7 in Block 5 of South Missoula, in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. APN No: 2345001 Patricia Wagner, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Stream, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Financial Freedom Senior Funding Corporation, A subsidiary of Lehman Brothers Bank FSB, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated October 24, 2003 and recorded November 03, 2003 in Book 721 on Page 555 under Document No. 200341976. The beneficial interest is currently held by OneWest Bank, FSB. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust due to death, beginning September 29, 2013, The total amount due on this obligation as of January 28, 2014 is $95,239.58 principal, interest at the rate of 1.61% now totaling $39,140.07, and other fees and expenses advanced of $13,026.80, plus accruing interest at the rate of $6.34 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to

15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 24, 2014 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham) On this 24th day of January, 2014, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Financial Freedom V. Wagner 41742.506 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 27, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 1, HAPPY HOLLOW, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN BOOK 6 OF PLATS AT PAGE 59 1/2 Michael S. Daher, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to PHH Mortgage Services, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 10, 2003 and recorded on September 11, 2003 in Book 717, page 1029 under Document no. 200334214. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage Corporation fka Cendant Mortgage Corporation. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $785.42, beginning July 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments

On May 7th at 2 p.m. an auction will be held at Hellgate Canyon Storage located at 730 Clyde St., Missoula, MT 59802 to sell furniture, clothing, household items, etc. stored by Michael Keeney and Johnny Walker for nonpayment of rent.

CLARK FORK STORAGE

will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 38, 40 and OS 58. Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting 5/19, 2014 by appt only by calling 541-7919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to 5/22, 2014 at 4:00 P.M. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.


MNAXLP would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 14, 2014 is $110,564.26 principal, interest at the rate of 6.0% now totaling $4,658.83, late charges in the amount of $94.23, escrow advances of $1,659.33, and other fees and expenses advanced of $495.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $18.18 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 21, 2014 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham) On this 21st day of January, 2014, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 PHH V Daher 42067.048 Notice The Missoula Irrigation District will be holding a public meeting on Monday, May 5th, 2014 at 6 PM at the Eagles Lodge located at 2420 South Avenue West, Missoula, MT 59801. This meeting is held to discuss two canal repair projects. The first canal repair site is located at the bottom of the South Hills between Gharrett Street and Country Club Lane. The second canal repair site is located west of Reserve Street near the intersection of 3rd Street and Preston Street. Public comment will be accepted on both sites at this time and will be incorporated into a grant application for this project.

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1 Govt. product-tester 4 "Viva ___!" (1952 Marlon Brando movie) 10 Rather adept at reporting? 13 "How cute!" sounds 14 Demons that prey upon sleepers 15 Air filter acronym 16 Creating a Pitt-shaped cake? 18 Sheltered valley 19 Full of it 20 "Blueberries for ___" 21 One of Xavier Cugat's exes 22 Periods of boredom 24 "Night" author Wiesel 26 Bro, say 27 Temperature meas. 28 Heart readout, for short 30 Mississippi River explorer 32 Breakfast item that's only around for a short time? 35 "Alice" diner owner 37 Apprehension 38 TV series set in the Tanner household 39 1980's Punky as an impediment? 42 Conductor Toscanini 43 Play leapfrog 44 Sault ___ Marie 47 Apparel size: abbr. 48 Blown away 51 Made an "Old MacDonald" sound 53 One of the Carpenters 55 Thread target 57 River by the Louvre 58 Big boats 59 "I'm getting seasick in this jail," e.g.? 61 Bikini Bare competitor 62 Took in too much 63 Georgia's capital, casually 64 Barnyard pen 65 "Go away!" 66 "Cats" inspiration's monogram

DOWN

1 Legendary 2 The Rock's real first name 3 "Who's ___?" 4 More piquant 5 "Life of Pi" director Lee 6 Banned pollutants, briefly 7 Distinctive atmospheres 8 Game for little Little Leaguers 9 Lend a hand 10 "3 Feet High and Rising" hip hop trio 11 Drink before dinner 12 Tiny machine 15 MLB banned substance 17 Shiba ___ (dog breed) 21 Average grades 23 Big name in '80s hair metal 25 "Same here" 29 "Pretty Woman" star 31 Mufasa's malevolent brother 32 French cheese 33 Hardly any 34 Big shindig 35 Oscar-winning role for Meryl 36 ' neighbor 39 Troubled region of Europe, with "The" 40 Word in many cereal names 41 Hulu offering 44 Telluride top 45 Basic doctrines 46 1926 English Channel swimmer Gertrude 49 Spine-tingling 50 Fizzling out 52 Circus precaution 54 Secaucus clock setting 56 Frozen waffle brand 59 Consumer protection org. 60 Affable Affleck

Last week’s solution

©2014 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

%montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • May 1 – May 8, 2014 [C7]


RENTALS APARTMENTS 1 bedroom, 1 bath, $575, Downtown, coin-op laundry, offstreet parking, W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

street parking, Shared yard, Hook-ups, Eating area, $625. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!!

1 bedroom, 1 bath, $685, Russell & Stoddard, W/D hookups, newer complex, open concept, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

2 Bedroom Unit, “Sunset” West Side Location, Available Now, Contract Rent is $707.00, incl. H/W/G/S. On-site Management, Coin Op Laundry, Secure entrance! Premium Downtown Location! Call Matty Reed, Property Manager @ 406.549.4113 x130 for details and showings!

1024 Stephens Ave. #13. 2 bed/1 bath, central location, coin-ops, cat? $675. Grizzly Property Management 5422060

2 bedroom, 1 bath, $695, Quite Cul-De-Sac, DW, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

1213 Cleveland St. “A” 1 bed/1 bath, central location, all utilities paid, pet? $725 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

2 bedroom, 1 bath, remodeled, $795, near Southgate Mall, storage, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

1301 Montana: Studio, Newer, Main floor, Pergo floors, Laundry, Heat paid, $595 GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!!

2 bedroom, 1.5 bath, $800, Condo, DW, Microwave, W/D in unit, carport, S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

1315 E. Broadway #2. 1 bed/1 bath, near U, coin-ops on site, pet? $625. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

2 bedroom+bonus, 1.5 bath, $800, Rattlesnake area, DW, W/D in unit, carport, storage, H/W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

1800 Phillips: 2 Bedroom, New carpet, Fresh paint, Storage, Off

2306 Hillview Ct. #4. 2 bed/1 bath, South Hills, W/D hookups.

1&2

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

549-7711 Check our website!

$600 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 2339 Mary Avenue #3. 2 bed/1 bath, coin-ops, storage, cat? $625. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 (3) 1 Bedroom Units, available Early to Mid-May. Contract rent $554.00, incl. H/W/G/S. Onsite Management, Coin Op Laundry, Secure entrance! Premium Downtown Location! Call Matty Reed, Property Manager @ 406.549.4113 x130 for details and showings! 444 Washington St. 1 bed/1 bath, downtown, heat paid, coin-ops on site, cat? $700. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

720 Turner “A”. 3 bed/1.5 bath, HEAT PAID, W/D hookups, pet? $900. RENT INCENTIVE. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 801 Prince: 1 Bedroom, Single car garage, Laundry, Central, Redone, Heat paid, $695. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP & $200 GIFT CERTIFICATE!!

MOBILE HOMES Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent. W/S/G/Electric included. $425/month 406-273-6034

HOUSES 5850 Blue Root Trail 3 bed/2 bath, bonus rooms, W/D hookups, extra acreage, pet? $1250. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 900 Cleveland: 4 Bedroom, Great back deck, Hook-ups, Dining area, Cat OK, All paid, $1295. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 5496106; 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!! Is your Property Manager a NARPM Member? Our members are: licensed, educated, professional, bound by a code of

ethics, and have a duty to provide the best possible service. www.westernmontana.narpm.org Professional Property Management. Find Yourself at Home in the Missoula Rental Market with PPM. 1511 S Russell • (406) 721-8990 • www.professionalproperty.com

ROOMMATES ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

GardenCity

Property Management

422 Madison • 549-6106

FIDELITY

For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

MANAGEMENT SERVICES, INC. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

251-4707 Uncle Robert Lane 2 Bed Apt. $675/month 2141 Carol Ann Ct. 2 Bed Duplex With Garage. $850/month Visit our website at fidelityproperty.com

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. "Let us tend your den" Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

www.alpharealestate.com

[C8] Missoula Independent • May 1 – May 8, 2014

Finalist

Finalist

MHA Management manages 13 properties throughout Missoula. All properties are part of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program. The Missoula Housing Authority complies with the Fair Housing Act and offers Reasonable Accommodations to persons with Disabilities.

1235 34th St. • Missoula (406) 549-4113 missoulahousing.org

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing 30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

www.gatewestrentals.com


REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE

$995,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com

1807 Missoula Avenue. 3 bed, 2 bath cottage-style near Rattlesnake Creek and park. $309,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com

4600 Monticello. 3 bed, 2 bath on corner lot in Canyon Creek Village with 2 car garage. $172,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate. 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com

1944 South 8th West. Remodeled 2 bed, 1 bath with deck on 2 lots. $158,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com

507 North Avenue East. 4 bed, 2 bath University area bungalow with single garage. $319,900. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 5329229 tory@montana.com

1965 Raymond. 4 bed, 2 bath splitlevel in Upper Rattlesnake. Private lower level for mother-in-law apartment. $339,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816 annierealtor@gmail.com

5454 Canyon River Drive. 6 bed, 4 bath with 3 car garage on Canyon River Golf Course. $550,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 5329229 tory@montana.com

2225 Missoula. 4 bed, 3 bath on Rattlesnake creek with fireplace, outdoor hot tub & Mt. Jumbo Views. $499,000. David Loewenwarter, Prudential Montana 241-3321. loewenwarter.com 2607 View Drive. 3 bed, 2 bath ranch-style home in Target Range. Hardwood floors, fireplace & 2 car garage. $238,500. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate. 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 2609 Old Quarry Road. 4 bed, 3 bath Grant Creek home next to Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation & walk trail. $319,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 53-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 2611 Deer Canyon Court. 4 bed, 3 bath with daylight basement, patio, deck & 2 car garage. $447,500. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate. 532-9229 tory@montana.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath Central Missoula home. $179,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath, remodeled Central Missoula home. $285,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3010 West Central. 3 bed, 1 bath on almost 5 Target Range acres bordering DNRC land. $450,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653, pat@properties2000.com 3024 Elms Park Way. 2 bed, 2 bath with deck & gas fireplace near park. $254,900. Vickie Honzel, Lammbros ERA Real Estate. 531-2605 vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 3501 Paxson.4 bed, 1.5 bath with hardwood floors, basement, fenced yard & garage. $225,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com

5619 Prospect. 5 bed, 4 bath wellmaintained Grant Creek home with 3 car garage. $419,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula. 2398350 shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 716 South 6th West. Classic 3 bed, 2 bath with fireplace, deck, fenced yard & single garage. $259,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com 756 Angler’s Bend. 3 bed, 2 bath with 3 car gargage on East Missoula golf course. $472,600. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate. 5329229 tory@montana.com 909 Longstaff. Remodeled 3 bed, 2 bath on 3 lots with 2 car garage. $389,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 9755 Horseback Ridge. 3 bed, 3 bath with mother-in-law apartment on 5 view acres. $395,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653 pat@properties2000.com Beautiful home on Rattlesnake Creek. 4 bed, 3 bath with gourmet kitchen, fireplace and deck. $865,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7355, milyardhomes@yahoo.com I can help you find your new home! Celia Grohmann @ Banana Belt Realty. 406-550-1014 • celiamontana@gmail.com. Visit my website at www.on93.com Lot 42 Jeff Drive. To be built 2 bed, 2 bath Hoyt home in Linda Vista with 3 car garage. $369,500. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 5329229. tory@montana.com RE/MAX All Stars; combining local ownership, experienced agents, and the power of #1 RE/MAX. Complimentary real estate advice. Call 406-542-8644

Slant Street Charmer 733 Marshall $230,000. Slant Street charmer with lots of light, a wonderful yard with raised beds, and an awesome shop all in a convenient location and ready to move in to. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com University District 102 East Kent $265,000. University 4 bedroom home with character and a 1 bedroom cottage house. KD 2405227 porticorealestate.com Wonderful Westside 1722 Defoe $226,500. 2 bedroom, 1 bonus, 2 bathroom home on the Wonderful Westside with awesome gardens in the fenced yard. A home with character! KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com.

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES 1861 East Broadway. 3 bed, 2.5 condo with deck & single garage. $215,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com 2121B Jasmine Place. 3 bed, 2.5 bath with deck, patio & 2 car garage. $198,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

Uptown Flats #306. 1 bed, 1 bath top floor unit with lots of light. W/D, carport, storage & access to exercise room. $162,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5465816. annierealtor@gmail.com Uptown Flats #307. 1 bed, 1 bath top floor unit. $158,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate. 5465816 annierealtor@gmail.com Uptown Flats. Upscale gated community near downtown. All SS appliances, carport, storage and access to community room and exercise room plus more. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5465816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com Why Rent? Own Your Own 1400 Burns. Designed with energy efficiency, comfort and affordability in mind. Next to Burns Street Bistro and Missoula Community Co-op. Starting at $79,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

NEW HOME SPRING BLOWOUT!! Single Wides, Double Wides & Modular Homes at Clearance Prices!! 16 x 80 Single Wides Tape & Texture Throughout, Oak Cabinets, Glamour Bath, Upgraded Insulation = Starting at $45,900 Modular Homes Loaded with Upgrades = Starting at $89,500 Elite Homes - Call Troy at 406-6966282 or Jason at 406-855-2279

LAND FOR SALE 160 acres in Grant Creek bordered on two sides by Forest Service land. $750,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 1625 Lot 12A Cote Lane. Level 1 acre with fantastic views. Mary Louise Zapp-Knapp, Lambros ERA Real Estate 532-9296. mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com

MANUFACTURED HOMES

53.5 acres overlooking Missoula. Utilities in place, septic approved. $927,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

1790 Dukes. 3 bed, 2 bath in Katoonah Lodges, a 55+ community. $83,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate, 532-9229 tory@montana.com

5402 Canyon River Road. Canyon River Golf Course Lot. 15,901 sq.ft. $150,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

605 Dunkleberg, Drummon. 2 bed, 2 bath on 28 acres with creek. $249,000. Pintlar Territories R.E. 406-859-3522. pintlarterritories.com 910 Bandmann Trail. Over 1 acre on Canyon River Golf Course with 252 Clark Fork River frontage. $275,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com Lot 33 Old Mill Loop, St. Regis. 1.02 acre with 150’ of Clark Fork River Frontage. Mary Louise ZappKnapp, Lambros ERA Real Estate 532-9296. mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com NHN Arnica. Pattee Canyon acreage with great view of Missoula. Mary Louise Zapp-Knapp, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 5329296 mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com NHN Edgewood. 3.35 end-of-road acres on east side of Mount Jumbo. Close to river. $89,900. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

NHN Old Freight Road, St. Ignatius. 11 acre Mission Mountain building site. $86,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 2398350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com NHN Old Freight Road, St. Ignatius. Over 40 acres with 2 creeks near Mission Mountains. $199,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com NHN Raymond. .62 acre in Lower Rattlesnake bordering Missoula Open Space. $154,500. David Loewenwarter, Prudential Montana 241-3321. loewenwarter.com Noxon Reservoir Avista frontage lots near Trout Creek, MT. Red Carpet Realty 728-7262 www.redcarpet-realty.com Rock Creek Acreage. 20 acres adjacent to Forest Service land. $349,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

NHN Frontage Road, Alberton. 2 building sites with Clark Fork River views. $65,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com

324B North Grant. 3 bed, 2 bath condo with fenced yard & 2 car garage. $169,900. Rita Gray, LambrosERA Real Estate 5329283. ritagray@lambrosera.com 505 California. 3 bed, 2.5 bath stand-alone near Riverfront Trail. No HOA fees. $289,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 5505 Creekstone. 2 bed, 1.5 bath in Grant Creek. $130,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com Cooley Street Condo 1545 Cooley St. #C. This upper level 2 bedroom condo provides for easy, sweet living close to downtown and has great North Hills views. $128,500 KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Northside Condo 1400 Burns Unit #15, 3 bedroom 1 bath, with balcony and tons of light. $156,000. KD 240-5227 or Sarah 370-3995 porticorealestate.com Uptown Flats #210. 1 bed, 1 bath modern condo on Missoula’s Northside. $149,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5465816. annierealtor@gmail.com

4 Bdr, 2 Bath Central Missoula home. $190,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4221 Chesapeake Way. 3 bed, 2 bath in Canyon Creek Village with 2 car garage. $176,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 531-2605 vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 4571 Heaven’s Gate. 4 bed, 4 bath Farviews home on 2 acres.

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • May 1 – May 8, 2014 [C9]


REAL ESTATE COMMERCIAL 4 Bdr, 2 Bath Central Missoula home. Zoned commercial. $190,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

OUT OF TOWN 109 Church Street, Stevensville. Historic 3 bed, 1 bath with library, parlor & fantastic front porch. $139,000. Rita Gray, LambrosERA Real Estate, 532-9283. ritagray@lambrosera.com 11901 Lewis & Clark Drive, Lolo. 2 bed, 2 bath with many upgrades including roof & windows. $197,500. Rita Gray, LambrosERA Real Estate 532-9283. ritagray@lambrosera.com

1290 Thunder’s Trail, Potomac. 3 bed, 3 bath on 20 acres. $795,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com

Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

1333 Juniper, Alberton. 5 bed, 3 bath on nearly 20 acres bordered by National Forest. $725,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 5329229 tory@montana.com

3416 Lupine, Stevensville. 3 bed, 2 bath log-sided home with wraparound deck & Bitterroot views. $239,900. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com

210 Red Fox Road, Lolo. 4 bed, 2.5 bath on 2.59 acres along Bitterroot River. $480,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula, 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

5 Bdr, 3 Bath, Florence area home on 3.2 acres. $575,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com 5 Bdr, 4 Bath, Stevensville area home on 10 acres. $649,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

3 Bdr, 1 Bath Alberton home. $125,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com Bitterroot Acreage 994 Pathfinder $599,000. 330 acres with knock-your-sock-off views East Side Stevi/Florence area with a small house. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL EQUITY

LOANS

ON

NON-

OWNER OCCUPIED MONTANA REAL ESTATE. We also buy Notes & Mortgages. Call Creative Finance & Investments @ 406-721-1444 or visit www.creative-finance.com

We are experts in the home lending process. Call Astrid Oliver, Loan Officer at Guild Mortgage Company. 1001 S Higgins Suite A2, Missoula. Office: 406-2587522 or Cell: 406-550-3587

River Access 17430 Six-Mile, $285,000. Historic 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath home in great condition on stunning 12.51 acre setting with views, fruit trees, tons of gardening space and so much more! KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

575 Killdeer, Stevensville. 5 bed, 3 bath on 7.5 fenced acres. Great mountain views. $335,000. Vickie

3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Stevensville area home on 6+ acres. $325,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call

Rochelle Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

Missoula Properties 728-8270

D

SOL

[C10] Missoula Independent • May 1 – May 8, 2014

5505 Creekstone 2 bed, 1.5 bath Grant Creek condo. $130,000 MLS #20140810 5805 Mainview 4 bed, 2 bath South Hills home with great views. $220,000 MLS #20142246 3501 Paxson 4 bed, 1.5 bath with hardwood floors, basement & 2 car garage $225,000 MLS #20140601


REAL ESTATE

Real Estate is not always Black & White Call Rita Gray 406-544-4226

ritagray@lambrosera.com

720 W Sussex Ave, Missoula • $247,500

5 bed/2 bath Nearly new roof. Interior updates. Fenced backyard. Walk to school or ride your bike to the UM.

2121B Jasmine Place • $198,000 Centrally located 3 bed, 2.5 bath townhome. Vinyl siding, deck, patio, covered front porch & 2 car garage. No HOA fee!

9755 Horseback Ridge $395,000

Pat McCormick Missoula Valley, Clark Fork River & Mission Mountain Views! 3 bed, 3 bath on 5 acres with large windows, wraparound deck, mother-in-law apt. & 2 car garage.

Real Estate Broker Real Estate With Real Experience

pat@properties2000.com 406-240-SOLD (7653)

Properties2000.com missoulanews.com • May 1 – May 8, 2014 [C11]


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control 541-7387 ROCKY• Rocky is an Alaskan Husky

that is around 1 1/2 years old. He is very playful and talkative. Rocky needs to go to a home with no cats or chickens. He has a history of being an escape artist so he needs an owner who is familiar with the breed and is willing to be responsible and keep him contained.

NELSON•Nelson came to the shelter Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MontanaSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

MOE•Moe is a beautiful, cuddly black lab. He is very well behaved so we aren't sure why no one has claimed him. He does get along with other dogs and loves to give hugs. Moe hasn't been at the shelter long and we know he won't last. Come visit and get a hug from Moe.

2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

PRINCESS•Princess is a beautiful pit bull mix. She is definitely a people loving type of dog. She is very attentive, loves to play fetch, and LOVES to chew on 2330 South Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59801 rawhides. She will need an owner who will Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) feed her a corn-free diet and provide her 3708 North Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59808 Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri) with plenty of chew toys. Please come to Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 9:00am-12:00pm (Sat) the shelter and play fetch with her.

from the Pleasantview subdivision. He was wearing a pink collar so we know he belonged to someone. We just aren't sure why no one has been looking for him. He is an older cat but still has quite a bit of energy and is very playful.

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

MARY ELIZABETH•Mary Elizabeth

Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

was returned to us because her owner couldn't afford to keep her. She is a gorgeous cat who will definitely catch your eye. Mary Elizabeth is declawed so she will need to be an indoor-only cat. Come meet her and see if you fall in love!

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

LIL MAMA•Lil Mama has lots of personality to share. She has extra toes which we feel makes her very special. She does get along with other cats, but prefers to play by herself. Lil Mama has been at the shelter far too long and deserves to be adopted by a loving family who will never let her go. Is that you??

www.dolack.com Original Paintings, Prints and Posters 139 W. Front St., Missoula (406) 549-3248

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana 549-3934 CINDY• Cindy has the most adorable face! With her perky ears, fluffy cheeks, and endearing under-bite, she is not only unique, she's utterly charming too. This 9-year-old border collie/brittany spaniel mix loves attention and car rides, and qualifies for our Seniors for Seniors program!

Serving the community’s framing needs since 1993 using environmentally sustainable practices.

139 West Front St. inside the Monte Dolack Gallery, Downtown Missoula, MT

(406) 549-3248 • dolack.com

RIGSBY• Rigsby is an independent tiger cat who loves two things: head-rubs and his scratching post. This nine-yearold fellow would also love to find a new home where he can relax and sleep in the sun. Because he's over the age of seven, he qualifies for HSWM's Seniors for Seniors program.

CODY•Cody is a six-year-old lab mix who was rescued along with his "sister" Cindy. Cody is an extra-big lovebug who is ready to make friends with everyone he meets. Like Cindy, he likes car rides and attention. He'd love to find a family that will give him lots of attention, and help him shed a few extra pounds!

ANGELICA• Angelica loves laps! This 8-year-old torti also enjoys feather toys, and being part of the family. She qualifies for the Seniors for Seniors program, but don't tell her that. She says, "Senior? I'm barely middle aged!" Come check out this beauty today.

BEAR•Bear arrived at the shelter when his owner passed away. He's sad, but he's looking forward to finding a new family where he can spend time with people - and maybe some other dogs, too! This 8-year-old chihuahua encourages senior humans to stop by and meet him and maybe fall in love!

SYLVESTER•Sylvester is one hand-

[C12] Missoula Independent • May 1 – May 8, 2014

MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

some fellow, decked out in his finest longhaired tuxedo. This 9-year-old is big and swaggering, and though he can be independent, he also has a softer side (just as any gentleman should), and can be loving and affectionate too. Let Mr. Sylvester sweep you off your feet today!

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

Missoula’s Locally Owned Neighborhood Pet Supply Store

www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275 East Broadway • South Russell • North Reserve



Missoula Independent