Page 1

UP FRONT

FOR THAT RUN TO THE SUPERMARKET, HAVE YOU CONSIDERED DOG POWER?

BREW GETS GREENER PEOPLE FED UP WITH JOHNNY RENO & CO., NEWS LOCAL OCHENSKI SCOPE WITH REUSABLE BOTTLES COAL AND ITS TRAINS MANIACAL ROCKERS


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


UP FRONT

FOR THAT RUN TO THE SUPERMARKET, HAVE YOU CONSIDERED DOG POWER?

BREW GETS GREENER PEOPLE FED UP WITH JOHNNY RENO & CO., NEWS LOCAL OCHENSKI SCOPE WITH REUSABLE BOTTLES COAL AND ITS TRAINS MANIACAL ROCKERS


Missoula Independent Page 2 April 19 – April 26, 2012


nside Cover Story

The Green Investment Group bought the former Smurfit-Stone mill site in Frenchtown last year, promising to redevelop it and create jobs. But an examination of the company’s other projects around the U.S. and Canada suggests that that’s not going to happen. A Washington company that sued Cover photo by Chad Harder GIGI last year pulled its case because it believes GIGI is on the brink of insolvency. And it’s not clear if or how the Frenchtown mill, a potential Superfund site, will ever get cleaned up ....................................................14

News Letters The Griz inspire an idea for reality TV............................................................4 The Week in Review Rollergirls, marijuana and sexual assault .................................6 Briefs Beer, Limbaugh, Caballo Blanco and prison policy..........................................6 Etc. Finish your homework, Apostle............................................................................7 Up Front State Supreme Court hears gay rights case .................................................8 Up Front Suzanne Reed has an urban transportation plan ........................................9 Ochenski Can train shipments be derailed by citizens’ concerns?...........................10 Agenda The annual Clark Fork River Cleanup ..........................................................12

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan The tofu houses of Las Vegas.........................................................18 Happiest Hour The Baucus Caucus..........................................................................19 8 Days a Week Up the creek without a paddle ........................................................21 Mountain High A Five Valleys Back Country Ski Patrol fundraiser ..........................29 Scope Johnny Reno and The Vicemachine don’t mince words ................................30 Noise The Skurfs, Abe Coley, Illmaculate and Odd Future.......................................31 Theater End Days brims with personalities ..............................................................32 Film Kevin is way beyond needing a timeout...............................................................33 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films ...................................................34

The Trees WMDQS P.D. Lear Rob Blackman Josh Farmer

The Animal Treehouse Party Nikko Manamikko Base & the Sheets Portless Break My Fall

Fri. 4/20/12 at 9 PM Leif & Willard The Trees Shackwell

Sat. 4/21/12 at 9 PM

Halladay Quist Viv Savage The Deadmans Douglas Collective

Exclusives Street Talk....................................................................................................................4 In Other News...........................................................................................................13 Classifieds ................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrology..................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle....................................................................................................C-7 This Modern World ...............................................................................................C-11

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Robert Meyerowitz PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson ASSOCIATE EDITOR Matthew Frank PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Jason McMackin STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Skylar Browning COPY EDITOR Ted McDermott PHOTO INTERN Michelle Gustafson ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Chris Melton, Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Brad Tyer, Dave Loos, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Azita Osanloo, Jamie Rogers, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2012 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

Missoula Independent Page 3 April 19 – April 26, 2012


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Agenda News Quirks

STREET TALK

by Michelle Gustafson

Asked Monday afternoon, April 16, outside the Missoula County Courthouse. The Indy has a story this week about a dog chariot. What do you think about dog-powered transportation? Follow up: How would you improve transportation in Missoula?

Cody Dehart: I think it’d be pretty funny to see a dog-powered ride around town. I’d definitely take one, especially if the dog was a St. Bernard. I know you, rider: I don’t take it too often, but when I do, it’s good. U-Call-Us [the pay-what-you-can cab company] is just about the best thing in Missoula as far as transportation goes.

Joane Villa: I think it would have to depend on the size of the dog. You would probably want a husky, a sled dog; that would be best. I doubt you’d want to see a poodle pulling a chariot. We’re poodle-free: We just moved here and are actually on the way now to get a bus schedule because we want to learn to take the public transportation around Missoula. John Keele: For dogs, I’m sure it would be okay, but I don’t know about how it would be for the people. Little dogs hauling around fat people wouldn’t work out too well. Darn kids: The buses could go a little farther. For example, I live in Maloney Ranch, by North Reserve. It doesn’t go into those neighborhoods, and they could improve on that. A lot of kids who use the bus during the summer in those neighborhoods would benefit from that. Bill Atkinson: I used to have a dog in Venice Beach and I’d take him while on my cruiser bike or my skateboard. You have to take the time to train them to do that, so they don’t veer off and piss in the bushes. You take them to a parking lot and practice with them, steer them left and right, use a little encouragement. Walkin’ the dog: Make it more expensive for people to drive by punishing them for using fossil fuels and not taking the bus. I walk constantly, and I’m shocked to see only one or two pedestrians on Mullan or Reserve. Cheri Horstman: I’m not for it. I think it’s cruel for dogs to pull trailers for people. People need the exercise more than the dogs do. Beat it: I’d like to see the bike trails be off the major traffic areas. For example, if the bike trails are moved one block off to a side street, then you can still use a parallel bike trail and not be on a major street.

Missoula Independent Page 4 April 19 – April 26, 2012

I miss panty raids Thank you for your excellent coverage on the local football team [“Illegal procedure,” April 12]. It’s nice to know the University of Montana football program’s high jinx have hit the big time. Forget panty raids, bonfires and keggers like the good old days. Bring on the pistol-whipping, home invasion, jaw-fracturing and sex, sex, sex. The latter, of course, only under the conditions of forced, non-consensual and drugged. Which makes one realize that UM is looking in the wrong direction. They don’t need a new athletic director or football coach, they need a producer to promote the latest reality TV hit, “Jizz Nation”! Follow the sexploits of the errant few Jizzlies as they go from one sex crime to another. Watch school officials bob and weave, as if running the gauntlet of an NFL combine, to avoid blame and responsibility for the actions of players. Faster than you can say “felony sexual assault,” watch the new show displace “The Kar-trashians” as the best in reality TV. Go Jizz! In all seriousness, the $2 million collected by the Grizzly Scholarship Association should be divided equally and paid to the men and women who’ve been on the receiving end of the assaults, sexual and otherwise, by the street thugs UM keeps trying to pass off to the paying public as upstanding college football players—thugs who are an embarrassment and disgrace to the students and players of UM whose pursuit in attaining victory in life and on the field is done so by playing by the rules on and off the field. The UM president and provosts should put UM’s status as an institution of higher learning to good use in the form of a halftime program featuring the names and mug shots of all the Grizzly players convicted of crimes up on the big screen. What better way to educate the public, particularly the young Grizzly fans, about the real world of big-time college football programs? Moms and dads in the stands watching with their children can point to the mug on the big screen and remind their kids that that is the type of person they never want to be in life. John Marshall Hot Springs

Trapped in lies Thank you farmers, ranchers and sportsmen of Idaho who elected a governor with some balls: Butch Otter. Butch backed predator management controls to protect diminishing deer and elk herds. Idaho’s wolf control includes hunting, trapping and snaring by licensed, professionally trained trappers. Idaho’s wildlife management can be a model for the state of Montana. Thank you, Otter! And thanks to animal rights activists for getting their way on the wolf recovery fiasco. Not only has wolf recovery cemented the solidarity of farm and ranch communities, but also the sportsmen’s groups that were once fragmented. We are now becoming one voice for managing healthy deer and elk herds.

I used to dislike wolves, but thanks to animal rights activists we will always be able to trap them. We also owe a big thanks to our little local anti-trapping group. Beware of their uncompromising stand on trapping and their unethical misinformation. They are trapped in their own lies, completely undermining their own credibility. This group ignores the fact that wolf recovery (as well as lynx, otter, fisher and swift fox) was accomplished with live-catch foothold traps “with no foot damage.”

“The $2 million collected by the Grizzly Scholarship Association should be divided equally and paid to the men and women

and ranchers and expedite the construction of the Montana Alberta Tie Line. Regardless of any other arguments made for this bill, it simply would not have become law if not for the promise of jobs, jobs and more jobs for Montana workers. Here’s the devil’s deal: Tonbridge (now Enbridge) got eminent domain powers to use against Montana farmers and ranchers, then contracted with out-of-state companies using out-of-state workers to build their power line. There were maybe a couple of Montana plates at construction sites. Bottom line: Out-of-state workers now have the jobs Montana workers should have. This is a sad commentary on how our state too often falls for false job promises, even to the point of sacrificing something as valued, sacrosanct and time honored as private property rights. It’s time we look out first for Montana values, Montana workers, Montana families and Montana businesses. And jobs? Absolutely. Jobs for Montana workers—Montanans building Montana. John Vincent Montana Public Service Commission Gallatin Gateway

the Super PAC who’ve been on the Sack At the Flathead Democrat’s Spring din-

receiving end of the assaults, sexual and otherwise, by the street thugs UM keeps trying to pass off ... as upstanding college football players.” A quote from L. David Mech, author of The Wolf: “If we carefully regulate wolf populations instead of overprotecting them, we can prevent a second wave of wolf hysteria, a backlash that could lead once again to persecution.” It’s a lesson for animal rights activists. Bert Wustner Lolo

False job promises When Gov. Brian Schweitzer allowed the heavy-handed and patently unjust eminent domain bill pushed by Canada’s Tonbridge Ltd. to become law last year, he called it “a deal with the devil.” He got that right! House Bill 198 passed the legislature and became law on the promise of good jobs for Montana workers. It was even touted as the “Montana jobs bill of the session.” To “put Montanans to work,” HB 198 (unconscionably, in my opinion) changed Montana eminent domain law so that Tonbridge could run roughshod over the private property rights of Montana farmers

ner, we were reminded by Attorney General Bullock that Montana is still standing firm in defense of our state’s 100-year-old statute that prohibits corporate spending in nonfederal elections. Unfortunately, there is a serious possibility that the U.S. Supreme Court will not issue a final decision on the Montana appeal or overturn the Citizen’s United case prior to the 2012 general election, and a timely constitutional amendment to change the current ruling seems unlikely as well. This means that the voters of Montana will be subjected to a barrage of unrelenting negative campaign ads designed to influence the outcome of our elections that will be paid for by Super PACS and large, out-of-state corporations that are not required to identify the sources of their funds. In 1912, Montanans recognized the fact that large corporations were having an undue influence on state government, and we passed the Corrupt Practices Act, banning direct corporate contributions in political elections. Over the years this act has served Montana well. 2012 is not the year to allow rich, out-of-state entities to exert unfair influence on who is elected to serve the citizens of Montana. As this election cycle plays out, I sincerely hope and trust that Montana voters will reject the sordid influence of the out-ofstate money and revel in the tried and true electoral process that involves interacting with candidates as they campaign by going door to door, meeting their constituents face to face. Let’s try our best to learn about the most positive aspects of our candidates, and carefully choose the ones who we think will work together to make responsible decisions for our state. We must not let people from out of state tell us how to vote. Edd Blackler Big fork


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Missoula Independent Page 5 April 19 – April 26, 2012


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, April 11

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

News Quirks by Michelle Gustafson

Missoula Mayor John Engen proposes a city budget for the coming year. He says a property tax hike of 3.28 percent will help offset the increasing costs of salaries and benefits. Property owners with homes valued at $225,000 would pay close to $30 more per year under Engen’s proposal, which City Council will tweak.

• Thursday, April 12 A woman calls University of Montana Office of Public Safety to report that there is a “chronic” problem with people smoking marijuana near the entrance to Craig Hall. The woman says she’d like extra patrols because the smoke drifts into the Student Affairs Office and bothers the staff.

• Friday, April 13 The Hellgate Rollergirls host “Slay-Her,” a derby bout at the Adams Center, featuring Missoula’s Dirt Road Dolls against the Tacoma Trampyres. The diminutive Dolls get squished by the significantly beefier Trampyres by a score of 184 to 108.

• Saturday, April 14 Roughly 100 men and women carry signs that say “My clothes are not my consent” and “No=No” as they walk from the University of Montana campus to the county courthouse for Missoula’s first “SlutWalk.” UM’s Women’s Resource Center puts on the event to draw attention to a culture that blames sexual assault victims.

• Sunday, April 15 A woman reports that she is attacked early in the morning near the University of Montana campus by a man who attempts to sexually assault her. UM issues a notification of the alleged attack roughly 13 hours after it occurs, stating, “It can be assumed that conditions continue to exist that may pose a threat to members of the community.”

• Monday, April 16 A local district judge agrees to hold an evidentiary hearing to evaluate whether new evidence in the Cody Marble case justifies a new trial. Marble was convicted in 2002 of raping a 13-year old boy while the two were incarcerated at the Missoula County Detention Center. The alleged victim originally testified that Marble assaulted him and later recanted. Months after recanting, he again changed his story.

• Tuesday, April 17 Three weeks after Lee Enterprises made public that its CEO, Mary Junck, received a $500,000 bonus for leading the company through its bankruptcy, the Missoulian’s parent company reports that it lost $26.6 million during the second quarter of 2012. The number of full-time employees companywide for the same quarter decreased by roughly 7.5 percent.

Skiers donned costumes and flocked to Snowbowl Sunday, April 15 to get in one more day of lift-served skiing on the area’s closing day. Skiers can still hit Silver Mountain, which closes after Saturday, April 21.

Justice Katka case settled Attorneys for Raistlen Katka, who was sent to Montana State Prison just after his 16th birthday, say they’re pleased with a settlement that will reshape how jailers at Montana State Prison treat juvenile inmates and those who are mentally ill. “I feel like we made a huge difference,” says Helena attorney Andree Larose. Larose, along with the ACLU of Montana and other cooperating attorneys, sued the Montana Department of Corrections in 2009 alleging the state violated constitutional protections against cruel and unusual punishment when it placed the 17-year-old Katka alone in a cell for nine months. As the Independent reported in March, the Katka lawsuit is similar to two others filed against the DOC since 2000. Each of them alleges that mentally ill inmates were punished with increasing severity because they didn’t receive proper mental health treatment while incarcerated. Katka was sent to MSP after getting into an altercation with two guards at Pine Hills Youth Correctional facility. When he arrived at the prison, he had a history of mental illness, including post-

traumatic stress disorder, mood disorder and major depressive disorder. The teenager acted out while incarcerated. His behavior earned him nine months inside MSP’s special housing unit. While there, he spent 23 hours a day in a cell alone. His mental state worsened. The prison put him on behavior management plans that included dressing him in a gown and placing him in a padded cell that remained lit through the night. While incarcerated, Katka tried four times to kill himself. The fourth time, he used a shaving razor to slit his wrists in the shower. Emergency personnel had to resuscitate him. The settlement agreement between Katka’s attorneys and the state mandates juvenile offenders cannot be kept in solitary for more than 72 hours, unless the warden or DOC director signs off on a longer stay. The agreement also stipulates that mentally ill prisoners cannot be placed in solitary if medical staff finds it will worsen mental health. Similarly, suicidal inmates cannot be placed on behavior management plans. While Katka’s counsel says the settlement is significant, Max Davis, a private attorney representing the state in the Katka proceedings, said this week in

a written statement that it requires “virtually no change in existing practices at Montana State Prison involving offenders who are under 18.” Jessica Mayrer

Radio Petitioners seek end of Rush Several weeks ago, the national debate over birth control policy was already at the boiling point, and then bombastic right-wing radio host Rush Limbaugh tossed in a heaping measure of vitriol. He called Georgetown University law student Sandra Fluke a “slut” and a “prostitute.” This was after Fluke testified before Congress on the importance of contraceptive coverage for students and employees at religiously affiliated institutions. Advertisers around the country began pulling spots from Limbaugh’s show. A national petition asking radio company Clear Channel to kill the show altogether now has close to 500,000 signatures. Missoulians Dave Chrismon and Nancy Cooper also have a petition, with more than 1,600 signatures, asking NewsTalk KGVO Radio to take Limbaugh’s show off the air locally. The couple was especially offended by his comments because their daughter,

War is a cowardly escape from the problems of peace. ~Thomas Mann

Missoula Independent Page 6 April 19 – April 26, 2012


Inside

Letters

Briefs

Beth, a junior at Georgetown, is so much like Fluke. “We could see a woman there whom we wish our daughter could be in five or six years,� Chrismon says, “having faith in the system and the energy and the bravery to step up and speak so eloquently about a subject that’s a little controversial, for sure, but not something way out of bounds.� He says Limbaugh “has this huge bullhorn, this huge pulpit, that he’s using to bully people.� On April 12, Chrismon and Cooper presented their petition to Shawna Batt, Townsquare Media’s general manager for the Missoula market (Townsquare owns KGVO). They also created a website, www.rushoutofmissoula.com, listing all of KGVO’s advertisers. As of Tuesday, four local advertisers had responded by pulling their ads from KGVO. But Batt says it’s “very unlikely� that the effort will get Limbaugh off the air in Missoula. The petition has close to 1,300 signatures of Montanans, “and I’ve had twice that much in emails in support of Rush,� she says. “The other thing is, contractually, we’re obligated� to air Limbaugh’s show. KGVO’s most recent ratings show that more than 14,000 listeners tune into Limbaugh’s show every week. Now Chrismon and Cooper are the ones being bullied. They’ve received several emails with comments like, “Please take the American flag off your website! You are a communist! Go back to Russia or China where you belong,� and “Get a life and turn off your radio. Rush will go away just by that simple act.� “We are community members who see something we feel passionately about and want to make a stand, and we get attacked personally,� Cooper laments. Matthew Frank

Beer Greener glass Bayern Brewing owner JĂźrgen KnĂśller strolls down the beer aisle at Pattee Creek Market, gesturing to bottled six-packs: Full Sail, Big Sky, Great Northern. “We can take this one, this one, all these,â€? KnĂśller says, singling out a dozen or so brands. “Are your guys able to handle all this?â€? asks market owner Jim Edwards. “You’re going to get swamped.â€? “We want to,â€? KnĂśller answers. “I need 50,000 bottles a week.â€? KnĂśller plans to reuse each one. He just dropped $400,000 on a bottle washing machine

Up Front

Ochenski

Agenda

from Germany, and expects to have it running by early June. KnÜller finishes setting up a display for Bayern’s new ecopack, a collapsable waxed-cardboard box that holds 24 bottles and four cardboard six-pack carriers. Bayern wants to make it easier for people to collect packaging, and easier for the machine to sort bottles so staff don’t have to. Bayern launched its latest sustainability campaign a few weeks ago and KnÜller’s slowly been introducing the ecopack to grocery stores around Missoula. Bayern’s been collecting bottles through taproom word-of-mouth for years and trucking them to Billings for recycling. But KnÜller estimates 2.5 million Bayern bottles still end up in the Missoula landfill each year.

“They could [be reused], theoretically, eight to 10 times,â€? he says, adding that for German breweries, reusing glass has been the norm since the 1980s. KnĂśller says in the long run, the bottle washer will cut down not only on the volume of glass at the landfill but on the carbon footprint of running truckloads to Billings. Bayern hasn’t advertised the ecopack widely yet and it’s already sitting on 12,000 reusable bottles. Bayern’s paying 5 cents per bottle and 10 cents per carrier—a total of $1.60 for each full ecopack. The brewery does have a few stipulations though: bottles have to be clean, they have to match the type Bayern distributes in, and—KnĂśller can’t stress this enough—they have to be returned to Bayern’s taproom. Otherwise, you won’t get paid. Edwards wonders aloud if Missoula will really embrace Bayern’s reuse campaign. “How does the saying go?â€? KnĂśller replies. “Big hat, no cattle?â€? From now on, KnĂśller will be counting cattle in empty six-packs. Alex Sakariassen

News Quirks

BY THE NUMBERS

Running

10.5

Paying tribute to Caballo A couple of weeks ago, Dean McGovern, Kiefer Hahn, Kevin Twidwell and Rick Wishcamper went for a run, which they often do. But this run was dedicated to one of their friends and heros, Micah True, better known as Caballo Blanco. The nomadic ultra-marathoner, made famous by the best-selling book Born to Run, was found dead in New Mexico March 31. The quartet ran from the Wilma Theatre, where True gave a speech to a full house of running enthusiasts in October 2010, and over the North Hills and into the Rattlesnake, one of the routes they ran with True during his visit. They talked about True’s influence on them and his simple message of “running free.� When McGovern learned True had gone missing in the Gila National Forest, in southwestern New Mexico, in late March, he figured True would turn up. “My first thought,� he says, “was, ‘Oh, come on. He’s out for a run. Of course he’s not on a trail you can see. He’s out running.’ I do that all the time in the Rattlesnake—just get lost, lose track of time.� But then a few days went by, and True was found dead, his legs still dangling in a creek, with his water bottle next to him and no obvious signs of trauma. He was 58. Autopsy results haven’t been released. For years, True lived on and off with the Tarahumara Indians in Mexico’s Copper Canyons, one of the most remote wildernesses in North America. The tribe is known for its remarkable health and athletic endurance. They do without modern running shoes, instead running in sandals on the balls of their feet, their legs acting as shock absorbers. In 2006, True started the annual Copper Canyon Ultra Marathon, which author Christopher McDougall participated in and documented in Born to Run. McGovern, Hahn, Twidwell and Wishcamper ran the 51-mile Copper Canyon Ultra Marathon in 2011. McGovern calls it “the most epic adventure I’ve ever been on.� True was “not that mythical, amazing superhero� as Born to Run portrayed him, McGovern says. “He’s just a guy. He had sharp elbows and sharp opinions, and he would throw his barbs just like anyone else. He had imperfections. But his simple message was profound and it moved a lot of people...literally.� Matthew Frank

million

Tourists that visited Montana last year, a significant bump from 9.5 million in 2001, according to the University of Montana’s Institute for Tourism and Recreation Research.

etc.

News broke this week that Missoula County Public Schools Superintendent Alex Apostle won’t be going anywhere. At least not for now. Earlier this month, Apostle announced he was a finalist in the search for a superintendent of Spokane Public Schools. The possible loss of a leader who’d been trumpeted by the school board and the community caused a stir. Trustees assured the public they’d do what they could to keep him here. Meanwhile, during a public forum in Spokane, Apostle couldn’t have sounded more excited about the new opportunity. “Spokane Public Schools is the best superintendency in the state, in the country,� Apostle was quoted saying in the Spokesman-Review. “I believe I can move Spokane schools to a place they’ve never been.� The words can’t sting much. MCPS has 8,750 students; Spokane has 29,275. It would have been an obvious promotion for a man who’s already retired once. But Apostle’s eagerness to relocate after just short of a four-year stint in Missoula gave us pause, long enough to reflect on what he means to the district. Since starting in 2008, Apostle’s changed MCPS so much you’d hardly recognize it. He’s restructured the administration and relocated or replaced almost all of the district’s 17 principals. He’s implemented an International Baccalaureate Program at Hellgate High and a Health Sciences Academy at Big Sky. He’s promised to increase graduation rates and carry the district into the wondrous, tech-centric world of the 21st century—promises that are just starting to bloom. Apostle’s in the middle of a complex project to improve local education, and trustees recognize that to lose him now could seriously set the district back. That song sounds familiar. The school board used Apostle’s apparent value to justify his $15,000 raise in the fall of 2010. Teachers and staff raised Cain, claiming the 10 percent bump was an insult viewed alongside their measly 0.5 percent raises. The debate cost one trustee, Nancy Pickhardt, her position when she told two retired teachers to “go fuck yourselves� for questioning the superintendent’s worth. Spokane turned down Apostle this week in favor of another finalist. According to MCPS, Apostle’s work in the district hasn’t gone unnoticed and Spokane probably won’t be the last district to come courting. And so we wonder what price the trustees will place on Apostle if the next proposal sticks, and whether he’ll finish his homework before he transfers.

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Missoula Independent Page 7 April 19 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; April 26, 2012


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Agenda News Quirks

Arguing equality State Supreme Court hears gay rights case by Jessica Mayrer

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Missoula Independent Page 8 April 19 – April 26, 2012

Still, Goetz told the Montana justices that the Donaldson plaintiffs are not asking justices to enact laws. What they’re requesting is a “declaratory judgment,” or a declaration from the court that says denying partnership benefits to same sex couples violates equal protections. “The order does not have to be complicated,” he said. University of Montana political science professor James Lopach told the Independent after the hearing that such a declaration would guide the legislature but is non-binding. With such an order, “the court declares the rights of the parties,” Lopach said. “They’re building a legal structure and this is the foundation.” Typically, such judgments are complied with voluntarily. However, the Montana Legislature has long resisted gay rights legislation. The state’s Republican Party, a strong presence during the 2011 legislative session, aims to re-criminalize gay sex. The state GOP’s 2010 platform plank on the issue says, “We support the clear will of Photo by Steele Williams the people of Montana expressed The Montana Supreme Courts hears arguments in a suit over gay rights last week, by legislation to keep homosexual at Missoula’s University Theatre. acts illegal.” “If the next legislature is “It would depend on the circum- “This is a statutory smorgasbord.” similar to the recent past, then the legisstances, your honor,” Black answered. “They Black added that Montanans had their lature would ignore a declaratory judgemay or they may not.” say on this issue in 2004, when 67 percent of ment,” Lopach says. Black, on behalf of the state voters approved an amendment to the state Justice Patricia Cotter alluded to that Department of Justice, is defending the state constitution which limits marriage to one history when she asked Goetz during last against a lawsuit by six gay and lesbian man and one woman. “Certainly that consti- week’s hearing if he felt the legislature couples. The suit, Donaldson and tutional amendment is entitled to some would be receptive to judicial prodding. Guggenheim v. the State of Montana, weight here,” he said. “They really are attack- “If we enter the declarations that you ask us to enter, and the legislature does not alleges that Montana legislators are unlaw- ing in substance the marriage act.” Attorneys for both sides agreed, how- act, what then?” fully denying homosexuals domestic partGoetz told her that the legislature nership rights, including those of inheri- ever, that the act does not preclude the tance, equal tax benefits and the power to legislature from granting domestic part- should first be given a chance to respond to nership benefits. a court order for declaratory relief. “This make financial decisions for their partners. Montana ACLU staff attorneys and Jim court has a whole broad range of powers The exchange with Nelson took place during a special hearing of the Montana Goetz of Bozeman are representing the including injunctive powers, if necessary,” Supreme Court at the University Theatre in plaintiffs. In response to judicial overstep Goetz said. “But that’s a long way off. We Missoula. It drew a crowd of local and state concerns, Goetz pointed out that there’s a should not presume the legislature would lawmakers, gay activists, law students and precedent for state courts to order law- not do its duty.” Lopach noted that the justices spent U.S. Supreme Court Clerk William Suter. makers to craft mechanisms like those The case could affect the lives of thousands now sought in the Donaldson case. In much of their time inquiring about how to 1999, the Vermont Supreme Court unani- remedy the alleged constitutional violations of gay couples in Montana. Last year, Helena District Judge Jeffrey mously found that prohibitions against rather than substantiating whether such vioSherlock dismissed the lawsuit. His ration- same-sex partnerships violated that state’s lations exist. His money is on a win for the ale centered largely on what’s called the constitutional protections. Justices plaintiffs, he says. “I would be surprised if Separation of Powers Doctrine, which ordered Vermont’s lawmaking body to the Montana Supreme Court limited itself to holds that judges are legally mandated to provide a mechanism for gays to achieve the declaratory relief.” interpret laws, not make them. Lawmaking partnership rights and responsibilities. In The court is slated to rule this is left to the legislature, Sherlock said. “For 2000, the Vermont Legislature was one of summer. this court to direct the legislature to enact the first in the country to grant rights to a law that would impact an unknown num- gay partnerships. jmayrer@missoulanews.com On April 13, Montana Supreme Court Justice James C. Nelson grilled the state’s assistant attorney general, Michael Black, about Black’s contention that homosexuals in the state should not have access to the same legal protections afforded to married heterosexuals. “Do you believe that committed samesex couples are entitled to equal protections, do you believe that?” Nelson asked.

ber of statutes would launch this court into a roiling maelstrom of policy issues without a constitutional compass.” The plaintiffs appealed. Black echoed Sherlock when arguing on behalf of the state last week. He said the suit is too broad. Plaintiffs aren’t asking that a specific law be overhauled, but rather hundreds of them. “The scope of relief being sought here is unprecedented,” he said.


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Agenda News Quirks

Dog power Suzanne Reed has an urban transportation plan by Chérie Newman

but none of the dogs were pulling a load of groceries on city streets. What, I wondered, will happen when Reed’s dogs see a squirrel, a cat, or a half-eaten cheese burger in a yard across the street? Successful mushing, Reed says, depends on the relationship dogs have with their people. “About a month ago, we took a training run on the bike trail from 14th Street north to McCormick Park, then east to Bark Park at Jacob’s Island and back. We made our way through a family mob of dogs on leashes, toddlers on trikes and yakking, inattentive adults without a single difficulty. An onlooking dog owner commented on how well trained my dogs were to get through that mess without a hitch.” Okay, but I still have questions. Do her dogs want to pull a chariot full of her and her groceries? Evidently, the answer is a big fat yes. Dogs like Leo and Bree were bred to pull and run. In fact, Reed has to let them out of the truck to run for a couple of miles before our dog chariot prototype adventure. “Otherwise,” she says, “they’ll pull me too fast, and I’m still working on the braking system.” With the chariot on the ground and pointing north, Reed snaps Leo and Bree Photo by Steele Williams into nylon harnesses, which Urban innovator Suzanne Reed with Leo, Bree and her dog chariot she then attaches to a tugline attached to the front of the the left wheel slips off the ramp. The right tion ethic, which propelled Reed into kick-scooter. The dogs prance in place, side of the cart juts skyward. “You want earning a bachelor’s degree in Forest eager. Reed grabs the handle bars, puts Resource Management from the one foot on the narrow steel floor of the help?” I yell into a gust of wind. University of Montana in 1990. Following scooter and pushes with her other foot, “No thanks, I’ve got it,” she says. But she doesn’t. I quickly stuff note- graduation, she worked in the Yaak for shouting, “Hike-hike!” Leo and Bree move ahead. Reed and book and pen into a coat pocket, grab five years, where she and a partner lived onto the side strut, and lift it up and over in a one-room cabin. They hauled river her dog chariot roll forward smoothly. to set the wheel back on the ramp. water, heated and cooked with wood and The rope goes a little slack and Reed Together, we ease the cart down and onto used an outhouse. Also there: nine sled calls, “Out front!” The dogs move faster. I jog along for the road. “Well,” Reed says, straightening dogs that provided winter transportaup, panting a little. “This is what experi- tion. Once back in Missoula, Reed a few yards, searching them for any sign looked for ways to transfer some of that of strain. Nope. I stop to watch, rubbing mentation is all about—trial and error.” my frozen hands together. Reed has spent the past two years self-sufficiency to city living. Urban mushing seemed like a logical As they near a place where the road doing research and experimenting with design ideas for this vehicle, which she focus. Also called dry-land mushing and forks, I hear Reed say, “Gee, gee!” Leo calls a dog chariot. Yes, her chariot will dog-scootering, it started to gain and Bree angle to the right, circling until be pulled by her dogs, Leo and Bree. Leo momentum in the U.S. a few years ago. they’re trotting back toward me. I look is a two-year-old chow-husky mix and Before watching Reed’s trial run of her hard, squinting into the wind: Are those Bree is a three-and-a-half-year-old dog chariot, I looked at a few online dogs smiling? Siberian sled dog. When the idea for dog- videos. I saw people harnessing dog editor@missoulanews.com powered transportation first popped power for all kinds of recreational fun, I’m standing on the narrow asphalt road that runs north from Fort Missoula, watching 58-year-old Suzanne Reed drag a shiny metal cart attached to a kick-scooter across the platform bolted to the top of her small red pickup truck. Bursts of cold wind bite into my face. It’s starting to drizzle. I pull the hood of my jacket up over my head as Reed positions herself between two narrow metal ramps running parallel from the platform to the ground. She tugs on the scooter-cart, guiding each rear wheel into the track of a ramp. The scooter floats out in front as she bends her knees and lowers the vehicle toward the ground. Suddenly,

into her head, Reed searched the internet for a vehicle she could purchase. She found people using dogs to pull scooters, two- and three-wheeled bikes and sleds with rubber wheels, but she didn’t find a vehicle she could use for a trip to the grocery store—one with a crate where her dogs could be safe and comfortable while waiting. So, with the help of Dave Donahue, welder and owner of All Things Metal, she created one. Reed’s father was a mechanical engineer who spent part of his career as an efficiency expert and product developer. He also had a strong resource-conserva-

Missoula Independent Page 9 April 19 – April 26, 2012


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Agenda News Quirks

Coal backlash Can train shipments be derailed by citizens’ concerns?

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Missoula Independent Page 10 April 19 – April 26, 2012

It was so hot on the East Coast this week that the organizers of the famed Boston Marathon asked first-time runners to postpone till next year and urged front runners to slow down to avoid heat stroke. As monster storms ripped the nation’s midland with 100 tornados in a single day, global warming skeptics faced a tougher time convincing the populace that humans are not contributing to the problem through atmospheric overloading of carbon dioxide. And coal, the “black gold” so wildly promoted by Gov. Schweitzer and virtually every Republican, is in the crosshairs of a backlash that spans everything from climatic concerns to negative effects of coal trains on the communities they pass through. Mining more coal has been one of Schweitzer’s goals since his first year in office. Dubbed the “Coal Cowboy” by national media, he was living up to the moniker last week by taking Chinese officials of the Guangdong Fuel Material Company on a tour of the Signal Peak and Rosebud mines. If and when the controversial Otter Creek coal deposits are developed, the output will dwarf existing mines. In the early days of his coal campaign, Schweitzer declared that it was our job to show China and India the nascent and perhaps fictional technologies of “clean coal.” Now, however, it seems the governor is content to simply sell the coal for whatever uses the Chinese and others may wish, clean or not. But several developments have changed the game board for coal, and the realities of dealing with mass coal shipments have sparked a citizens’ rebellion that may make future coal use less likely. The development of natural gas reserves by horizontal drilling and fracking have dropped the bottom out of the coal market. Only a few years back, natural gas was predicted to go as high as $14 per million BTUs. Montanans braced for the enormous hit to their wallets not only from home heating costs, but from the massive increases that would accrue to taxpayers from heating schools and government buildings. Last weekend, that price for natural gas was under $2. It’s so low that analysts are predicting the fracking industry may wind down because it’s becoming unprofitable to put more gas into the market. The effect of a glut of natural gas is also evident in energy production,

where more electricity is being produced using natural gas systems as coal falls from favor for environmental and economic reasons. Unlike coal-fired generators, which burn continuously, natural gas generators can be fired as needed, providing significant flexibility and economic benefits for the operators as well as “firming” power for wind and solar’s intermittent generation. There also are very real issues arising from the specter of shipping coal from the nation’s interior to the Pacific coast

Several developments have changed the game board for coal, and the realities of dealing with mass coal shipments have sparked a citizens’ rebellion that may make future coal use less likely.

and thence to Asia’s emerging economies. Being home to the largest coal deposits in America, Montanans are rightfully concerned about the impacts that coal trains will have on their communities. Montanans who live anywhere near rail lines already know the incidence of long coal trains is growing. Given that our main urban centers were established in proximity to rail lines, people now find themselves stuck at railroad crossings where, by law, the trains can and do stop traffic for up to 15 minutes per train. If and when Otter Creek adds its output to the rail lines, it’s estimated that 40 to 60 coal trains a day might pass through our communities. Such rail traffic will cause tremendous problems, not

only for citizens, but also for emergency responders and law enforcement, while substantially increasing local air pollution as thousands of cars and trucks sit idling waiting for coal trains to pass. It’s possible to build railroads over underpasses, but the cost to do so would be staggering, especially to local communities already struggling with budgetary constraints. But even if the traffic problems could be solved, a whole other set of issues has recently been raised that could significantly alter plans for massive coal shipments by rail. As reported in the Missoulian this weekend, a lawsuit has been filed in California that challenges the rail industry’s right to pollute the atmosphere with enormous amounts of diesel exhaust. The basis for the suit is that such exhausts are known human health hazards and thus should be regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. The suit, brought by the Natural Resources Defense Fund and others against the rail companies Burlington-Northern Santa Fe and Union Pacific, specifically charges that “people living near these rail yards...are in imminent and substantial danger of increased cancer risk, asthma, reduced lung function and other cardiovascular ailments, all as a result of the rail yards’ diesel particulate pollution.” According to the Missoulian, Missoula attorney Jack Tuholske, who is researching the rights of local governments to regulate train pollution, said, “There are a lot of people that are concerned with this anticipated explosion in rail traffic to export Montana’s coal to China. This is a regional assault in my view by the railroads on the air we breathe, the water we drink, for the benefit of foreign countries.” The suit and a host of other actions, from protesting new coal shipment ports to buying out coal mines and leaving the coal in the ground, should be a warning to the Chinese investors who visited Schweitzer last week. Climatic effects may still be coal’s main issue, but getting the coal from Montana to the coast is creating a growing backlash by those who must suffer the impacts along the way. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


by Vote 9 May

2012 OFFICIAL BEST OF MISSOULA BALLOT

It gets so tiresome having people tell you what’s best all the time, doesn’t it? Damn elitists.That’s why it’s your time. We’re begging you to tell us which burger is the hands-down juiciest in Missoula, where the best place is to buy shoes and which bar has the best pour.

New Car Dealer

We know you; we take your calls and pore over your letters and comments, and realize some of you are nothing if not opinionated. That Best of Missoula ballot below? It’s one big soapbox and it’s all yours.

Adult Store

(We’re just old-school enough that we still like paper and glitter pen, but if you want to get all high-tech about it, go to www.missoulanews.com to vote, where you’ll also find a slew of åonline-only categories.)

Ranch Supply Store

Best Local Arts & Entertainment Art Gallery Band Musician Photographer Writer Movie Theater

Best Local Fashion & Beauty Cosmetics Day Spa Jewelry Kids' Clothing Women’s Clothing Men’s Clothing Lingerie Place for a Men’s Haircut Place for a Women’s Haircut Shoe Store Tattoo Parlor Thrift Store

Best Local Food & Drink Asian Food Bakery Breakfast Budget Lunch Coffee Delicatessen Burger French Fries Desserts

Used Car Dealer New Retail Store Pet Supplies Plant Nursery Store for Gifts Home Appliances

Ice Cream Milk Shake Mexican Food Pizza Restaurant New Restaurant Family-Friendly Restaurant Restaurant Service Restaurant Wine List Outdoor Dining Romantic Dining Salad Sandwich Shop Seafood Steak Supermarket Fresh Produce Retail Beer Selection Retail Wine Selection Vegetarian Food

Home Electronics

Best Local Goods & Services

Bike Shop

Auto Repair Bank/Credit Union Big Box Store Bookstore CDs and Music Dry Cleaner Furniture Store Hobby/Craft Shop Lodging Motorcycle/ATV Dealer

Bowling Alley

The rules are also pretty straightforward: We require ballots to include your full name, e-mail address and phone number in the spaces provided. Ballots missing any of this information, or ballots with fewer than 40 categories filled in, will be mocked, ridiculed and not counted. Same goes for photocopied ballots and ballots with unclear markings. Hard-copy ballots may be mailed or hand-delivered to the Indy office at 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or dropped at any of the ballot locations listed below. Ballots must be received by no later than 5 p.m. on Wednesday, May 9. Rest assured, your deep thought, diligent answering and exceptional penmanship will pay off in the form of an invite to the Independent’s annual Best of Missoula Party at Caras Park on Thursday, July 12. Now, get to it. Missoula is counting on you.

Store for Musical Instruments Toy Store

Best Local Nightlife Bar Bar for a Stiff Pour Beer Selection Bloody Mary Margarita Martini Casino Happy Hour Karaoke Bar Microbrewery Place to Dance Place to Hear Live Music Pool Table Sports Bar

Best Local Sports & Recreation Fly-fishing Shop Golf Course Health Club Store for Paddle Sports Gear Place to Get a Snowboard Sporting Goods Store for Guns Store for Mountaineering Gear Store for Skis

Name: __________________________________________ Email: __________________________________________ Phone: __________________________________________

Bernice's Bakery, Bridge Pizza, Buttercup Market, Burger Shack, Butterfly Herbs, Draught Works Brewery, Food for Thought, Good Food Store, Iza Asian Restaurant, Kettlehouse, Le Petit Outre, Lucky Strike Sports Bar & Casino, Missoula Food Bank, Orange Street Food Farm, Press Box, Rockin Rudy's, Sushi Hana,Taco del Sol (all 3 locations), UC Center Market,Westside Lanes,Worden's Market,Yo Waffle Missoula Independent Page 11 April 19 – April 26, 2012


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Agenda News Quirks

Most of us have done some arrogant, moronic things in our wild and wooly youth. If you haven’t, we can never be friends and will never understand one another. Since Earth Day is coming up and many good citizens will be taking the opportunity to do altruistic things like picking up homeless PBR cans and pulling knapweed, I’d like to share a particularly egregious example of what not to do on Earth Day. Granted, I am only sharing this possibly made-up tale to make a point about youth and to remind all of you to take part in the various Earth Day activities because there are a few not-so-well intentioned people out there whose messes we all have to contend with. For example, some 19-year-olds might fill the bed of a moss-covered, motor-less pickup with a winter’s worth of garbage, some ex’s clothes and a black garbage bag or two of misappropriated marijuana

The Clark Fork Coalition’s 9th Annual Clark Fork River Cleanup is Sat., April 22, at 10 AM. Meet at Caras Park. There is a barbecue for participants beginning at noon. Contact Liz at liz@clarkfork.org to RSVP or call 542-0539 ext. 213.

FRIDAY APRIL 20

and Jason Smith. UM Law Bldg. Noon. Free.

Celebrate your planet by participating in the Earth Day Celebration on the Oval at UM. Music, games and activities. Noon. Free.

Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 115 S. 3rd St. W. 1-3 PM. For information, call 543-3955.

Take Back the Night Hamilton and show your support for a violence-free world all. The event begins at 6 PM with a potluck at city hall and at 7:30 PM there is a 14block march through the city. For more info. call SAFE at 363-2793.

Bring out yer’ concerned and yer crazies for the MDT’s Maclay Bridge Planning Study Discussion at Big Sky High School Multi-Purpose Rm. Old bridges are cool. 3100 South Ave. 6 PM.

John Fox of the U.S. Army War College and a U.S. State Dept. foreign service officer presents A Chinese Future for Central Asia? as part of the 10th Annual Central Southwest Asia Conference at UM. Opening remarks by Lt. Gov. John Bohlinger. UC Theater. 7–9 PM. Free.

SATURDAY APRIL 21 Do work, son, at the Earth Service Day and Ecopentathlon at UM. Prairie restoration, river cleanup and plenty more earth work to be done. 9–5 PM. umt.edu/earthday.

SUNDAY APRIL 22 Occupy Missoula General Assembly takes place at the Union Hall. 208 E. Main St. 2–4 PM. occupymissoula.org.

MONDAY APRIL 23 Blue Mountain Clinic, along with the Missoula AIDS Council, offers free, anonymous and blood-free HIV testing. 610 N. California. 1–4 PM. Free. Call 721-1646.

TUESDAY APRIL 24 Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsoleck during Compassionate Communication Non-Violent Communication Weekly Practice Group at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. 519 S. Higgins. Noon–1 PM. Free. Visiting State Department officials from Asia give you the low-down at the Mansfield Center Brown Bag Lecture Series talk Reflections on Womens Empowerment Issues in Southeast Asia. Mansfield Conf. Rm. Noon–1 PM. Free. UM Indian Law Week continues with A Closer Look at Montana Tribes, a talk given by Steven Small

plants. After some doing, this pickup may find its way to a stream bed a couple hundred yards down a steep slope, where it could yet rest almost 20 years later, leaking drops of transmission fluid that make rainbow swirls in the water but providing shade for a few fish and a home for snails. In other words, you should come out to the Clark Fork Coalition’s 9th Annual Clark Fork River Cleanup, because you never know what you might find. Or maybe you do. That’s all the more reason to do it. –Jason McMackin

YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts YWCA Support Groups for women every Tue. from 6:30–8 PM. An American Indian-led talking circle is also available, along with age-appropriate children’s groups. Free. Call 543-6691.

WEDNESDAY APRIL 25 ACLU national privacy expert Chris Calabrese explains that NSA knows about you and the baristas at Butterfly Herbs during his talk Privacy in the Digital Age at the UM School of Law, Rm. 101. 7 PM. Free.

THURSDAY APRIL 26 The 27th Annual Mansfield Conference at UM features panels on violence against women, law, development and leadership. This year’s theme is Holding Up Half the Sky: Womens Leadership and Development. UM Turner Hall. 8:30–5 PM. Contact the Mansfield center for more info. at 243-2988. Stephen Edwards of the UM Center for Natural Resources and Environmental Policy talks Central Asia during her lecture Forty Tribes, One Yurt: Ky r g y z s t a n , E t h n i c Vi o l e n c e a n d C i v i c Nationalism. UM Stone Hall, Rm. 303. Noon. Free. The Young Republicans host a Debate of the Lieutenant Governor Candidates at UC Theater. 6:30 PM. The Peace and Justice Film Series brings us Climate Refugees, a film that considers the geo-political impact of climate change. Currently, the UN believes there are more climate refugees than political or religious refugees. Gallagher Business Bldg., Rm. 122. 7 PM. Free. Now this has nothing to do with fun. James K. Galbraith of the University of Texas unleashes this mega-downer of a presentation called The Great Financial Crisis and the Dismal Science as part of the President’s Lecture Series. 8 PM. Free.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent Page 12 April 19 – April 26, 2012


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - When Gloria Davis, 47, left her apartment in Hillsborough County, Fla., her estranged husband, Matthew Wong, 50, was “waiting out there to ambush her,” according to sheriff’s official Larry McKinnon. Wong chased Davis across the lawn, trying to douse her with gasoline. When she escaped by ducking into a neighbor’s apartment, he began setting fire to bushes and grass to try to “smoke her out,” McKinnon said. Unaware he’d splashed gasoline on himself, Wong “was instantly engulfed in flames,” neighbor Jo Akert said. After neighbors doused the blaze, Wong was rushed to the hospital in critical condition. (Tampa Bay Times) Police had no trouble catching Chester Michael Schaffer, 30, who they suspected of robbing a convenience store in Hampton, Va. “He was located immediately,” police Cpl. Mary E. Shackelford said, trying to make his getaway on a moped. (Norfolk’s WVEC-TV) SECOND-AMENDMENT SCIENCE - Holding a gun makes you think others are, too, according to research by University of Notre Dame psychologist James Brockmole and Purdue University perception expert Jessica K. Witt. “Beliefs, expectations and emotions can all influence an observer’s ability to detect and categorize objects as guns,” Brockmole explained. “One reason we supposed that wielding a firearm might influence object categorization stems from previous research in this area, which argues that people perceive the spatial properties of their surrounding environment in terms of their ability to perform an intended action.” Witt added, “We hope that this information will be helpful to anyone who relies on a firearm for self-defense.” (University of Notre Dame’s Notre Dame News and Purdue University’s University News Service.)

SPICY CALAMARI Hefeweizen-marinated calamari, cornmeal dusted and flash fried, served with a sweet Sriracha sauce. $4.95

TAMARACK WINGS Jumbo wings tossed in your choice of Buffalo, Switchback Stout BBQ, or Pacific Rim sauce served on a bed of beer-battered fries with a side of bleu cheese. $7.95

BABY BACK RIBS AND FRIES A half rack of tender pork ribs smothered in our Stout barbeque sauce on a bed of beer-battered fries. $9.95

VEGGIE QUESADILLA Filled with diced tomatoes, olives, bell peppers and green onion. Served with our house-made salsa. $6.95 Add Chicken-$2

CHICKEN STRIPS Beer-battered chicken breast strips on a pile of beer battered fries. Served with a side of our house-made Ranch. $8.95

THE HELLGATE PIZZA Pepperoni, Redneck Italian sausage, red onion, jalapeños, black olives and fresh garlic, with marinara and mozzarella, finished with Sriracha. $13.95 & $20.95

AMBUSH OF THE WEEK - Part of a cell tower disguised as a palm tree broke off and crashed through the windshield of a car in El Paso, Texas. Driver Sergio Gonzales said the steel branch, made to look like a palm frond, impaled the vehicle and cut his face near his right eye. Blaming the accident on high winds, tower owner T-Mobile denied responsibility, pointing out the branch “broke in the middle of the frond, not at the point of attachment to the primary structure,” making it an issue with building techniques. (El Paso’s KVIA-TV) NIGHT OF THE LIVING UNDEAD - Badgers have been desecrating human remains in the English town of Swindon by burrowing under graves and bringing bones to the surface. The Swindon Borough Council explained it is powerless to stop the badgers because of the 1992 Protection of Badgers Act. “Licenses to move badgers,” a council official pointed out, “are only granted in exceptional circumstances.” Following the council’s decision, Frances Bevan, a member of the Friends of the Radnor Street Cemetery, warned, “The badgers are left to breed.” (BBC News) BAD DECISIONS - After a homeless man killed a venomous snake, believed to have been a cottonmouth, in Mobile, Ala., he cut off the head. His 41-year-old friend picked it up and stuck his finger in the snake’s mouth. The mouth bit down on his finger. When the victim began showing signs of poisoning, paramedics were called. He was treated with anti-venom and released. (Mobile’s WALA-TV) British authorities reported that a 34-year-old Lithuanian man suspected of stealing fuel in Wiltshire abandoned his van when police spotted him and took off running. He tried to escape detection by a police helicopter with on-board thermal imaging by hiding in a manure pile at a farm. Officers on the ground noticed him “face-down in the dung” and arrested him. (BBC News) MODUS OPERANDI - Police arrested a 16-year-old boy who took his mother’s car without permission, drove to a nearby bank, pulled up to the drive-through window and “sent a note through the drive-through canister telling the teller to send him money,” police Sgt. Craig Martinez said, noting the boy implied “he had a weapon.” The teller complied, and the boy drove away. Twenty minutes later, he robbed a credit union, again from the drive-through window. Police located the getaway car, which the boy had abandoned in a residential neighborhood, but an officer found him walking nearby, arrested him and recovered an undisclosed amount of cash. “I’ve never seen or heard about a robbery at a drive-up window,” Martinez said, “much less two in the same day.” (Salt Lake City’s KSL-TV) SIDE-EFFECT ISSUES - Federal health officials required new safety warnings on labels of statins, which are widely prescribed to help prevent heart-related problems associated with cholesterol. The drugs include Lipitor, Crestor and Zocor. The Food and Drug Administration stated the drugs carry risks of memory loss and elevated blood sugar. The FDA emphasized that the side effects go away when patients stop taking the drugs. (Associated Press) Illinois prison inmates have sued the state, claiming too much soy in their diets is causing severe health problems, including heart issues and thyroid damage. The conditions began, according to the suit filed on behalf of several inmates by the Weston A. Price Foundation, after then-Gov. Rod R. Blagojevich took office. Corrections officials cut spending on meals by increasing the use of soy to four times the amount recommended for a healthy diet. Besides substituting soy for “very nutrientdense” organ meat in burgers, prisons “started using soy cheese on macaroni and cheese, soy nuggets in spaghetti sauce, soy flour added to all baked goods,” foundation president Sally Fallon Morell said. “The first thing that shows up is digestive disorders. Soy is extremely hard to digest, so you get vomiting, chronic constipation and horrible gas. You can imagine the effects in close quarters after eating this.” (The Washington Times) THERE OUGHTA BE A LAW - State senators in Arizona introduced legislation, SB 1467, that would require all educational institutions in the state, including state universities, to suspend or fire any instructor who “engages in speech or conduct that would violate the standards adopted by the Federal Communications Commission concerning obscenity, indecency and profanity if that speech or conduct were broadcast on television or radio.” (The Huffington Post) PETTY CRIMES OF THE WEEK - Two officers who searched Asheton Killiant Biggerstaff, 24, when he returned to the Gaston, S.C., jail from work release found two bags of wintergreen smokeless tobacco hidden between his butt cheeks. (Gaston Gazette) Authorities reported that a man tried to buy gas at a station in Salisbury, N.C., by giving the clerk counterfeit $1 bills. When the clerk recognized the bills were bogus, the man left them on the counter and drove away. (Salisbury Post)

Missoula Independent Page 13 April 19 – April 26, 2012


N

obody wanted to see the Smurfit-Stone pulp mill fall into the hands of Tim Ralston last year. The Frenchtown mill had been an economic anchor in Missoula County for half a century before it shut down in early 2010. Ralston, a Portland, Ore.-based developer, wanted to gut it, selling the equipment. As Ralston’s company, MLR Investments, negotiated to buy the mill for $12 million, he was vilified. Ralston cared nothing for reviving the mill or creating new jobs to take the place of the 400 that had been lost there; he was just a “scrapper,” folks said. And that was unacceptable. In March 2011, Gov. Brian Schweitzer stood in front of the mill and said he’d make Smurfit conduct an environmental analysis before the deal could be consummated. He said Smurfit would have to clean its wastewater ponds in the Clark Fork River floodplain. The Montana Department of Environmental Quality

threatened a Superfund designation— whatever it took to save the mill from Ralston. “We don’t believe this facility ought to be scrapped,” Schweitzer said. In the end, Schweitzer, Ralston and Missoula community leaders all got what they wanted. Ralston bought the site, but immediately sold it for $17 million to the Illinois-based Green Investment Group, Inc. The company, known as GIGI, had “a proven track record of investing the necessary funds to save the industrial infrastructure” of a site such as Frenchtown’s, Schweitzer said at the time of the sale, “and create good-paying jobs.” But at least in the U.S., where GIGI now owns four former Smurfit mill sites, including Frenchtown’s, that’s just not true. GIGI borrowed the money to buy the mill—$17 million plus $2 million in associated costs—from a Seattle-based real estate developer. This and other details of the transaction, such as Ralston’s $5 million windfall, recently

came to light in a lawsuit filed against GIGI in February by Tom Dauenhauer. When GIGI acquired the mill, they hired Dauenhauer to manage it. Dauenhauer had worked at the mill for 25 years before beginning a second career as a real estate agent, and helped arrange its purchase from Ralston. Dauenhauer’s case, now in federal court, alleges breach of contract, fraud and deceit. He claims GIGI owes him more than $1 million for work he performed between March 2011 and January 2012. And he has an even larger complaint: When it comes to GIGI, he says, Missoula’s been sold a bill of goods. Dauenhauer and Missoula were deceived by GIGI, says Dauenhauer’s attorney, J.R. Casillas of Datsopoulos, MacDonald & Lind. GIGI, he says, “turned out to be pure scrappers—and that’s it.” More than a year after the sale, the only sound at the Frenchtown mill is the squeal of twisting steel. Demolition machinery pulls structures to the ground,

sending up clouds of dust. Railcars haul away the scrap. GIGI’s purchase agreement had a non-compete clause: The papermaking equipment, at least, has to be sold. GIGI owns seven former Smurfit-Stone mills, including three in Canada. It operates them primarily as a scrapper. It’s had little success creating jobs. And another breachof-contract suit filed against GIGI raises doubts about the company’s solvency. All of which points to a larger question: how the company, which took on Smurfit-Stone’s environmental liability, can possibly clean up 50 years of accumulated pollution at the Frenchtown mill site, including 900 acres of toxic wastewater ponds in the Clark Fork River floodplain—or whether it has any intention to.

‘COMPLETELY CLEANED UP’ Papermaking is a dirty industry. A preliminar y EPA assessment released last September estimates that

HAS THE GREEN INVESTMENT GROUP SOLD MISSOULA DOWN THE RIVER? by Matthew Frank

Photo courtesy of Tom Dauenhauer

Gov. Brian Schweitzer, right, said the Green Investment Group, owned by Ray Stillwell, center, and Mark Spizzo, left, had a “proven track record of investing the necessary funds to save the industrial infrastructure” of sites such as the Frenchtown mill “and create good-paying jobs.” But that’s not true.

Missoula Independent Page 14 April 19 – April 26, 2012


every year, the mill generated 20,000 tons of sludge that likely contained dioxins, furans, PCBs, organic halides, chlorinated phenols, petroleum hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), arsenic, cadmium and other metals, all of which was put in ponds and landfills at the mill site. The same chemicals were likely in the mill’s annual production of 5.7 billion gallons of wastewater, the report says, which was disposed of through a combination of direct discharge into the Clark Fork River, “rapid infiltration” through ponds to groundwater, pond seepage to groundwater, and evaporation. The DEQ also has documented 11 petroleum spill sites on the property. “So what happens when the river reclaims its floodplain?” asks Peter Nielsen, Missoula County’s environmental health supervisor. “Does that result in a large-scale release of material from the sludge ponds and landfills? That’s really the big concern.” Having conducted a site inspection, the EPA is now wrapping up a report on the results, due out in coming weeks. That will help determine whether the site will fall under federal Superfund authority. Ray Stillwell, GIGI’s president, certainly doesn’t expect it to: “There’s a reason we buy paper mills, as opposed to steel mills,” he says with a laugh. But a Superfund designation is possible. Nielsen notes that many of the pulp mills in the Pacific Northwest that have closed over the last decade have landed on state or federal Superfund lists. The mills that bleached paper, as the Frenchtown mill did, tend to have the highest cleanup costs—in the tens or even hundreds of millions of dollars. GIGI has absolved Smurfit-Stone of environmental liability. In its contract with Smurfit-Stone for the Frenchtown mill, it agreed to “assume and perform, satisfy, pay and discharge all debts, actions, causes of actions, lawsuits, claims, demands and other liabilities and obligations of every kind and nature, whether past, present or future, known or unknown, fixed or contingent, arising from or relating to the property or the environmental conditions in, on, under or surrounding the property or any of the improvements thereon.” In addition, per the agreement, GIGI holds an environmental liability insurance policy that also covers SmurfitStone. “It’s not just us saying we’re going to take care of it,” Stillwell says. “We actually collateralize that...with insurance.” He says all seven of GIGI’s deals with Smurfit-Stone included environmental indemnity. The Frenchtown mill site is by far the largest and most contaminated of GIGI’s properties. “I’ve always speculated that maybe this is part of the reason that [GIGI] set it up this way—to try to shield Smurfit from liability,” Nielsen says. “It may have worked at other sites, to some extent, but this one is going to be a bigger can of worms.”

Under state and federal Superfund law, the government can sue SmurfitStone and all other prior landowners to pay for the cleanup; the law says that liability can’t be avoided through contract clauses. But the clause would allow Smurfit-Stone to sue GIGI and seek to transfer Smurfit-Stone’s obligation. How GIGI would pay for it is unclear. If its insurer won’t pay, or if the company

is “more familiar with this kind of cleanup work,” Montana DEQ Director Richard Opper told the Indy last year, “so I think we’re probably more comfortable with the ownership as it worked out, but the needs haven’t changed, nor has the state’s commitment to pursue this.” If the EPA doesn’t dictate a certain level of cleanup, Gov. Schweitzer says the state will: “We want to make sure,

Still, such a cleanup could be a task of Herculean proportions, on par with the Milltown dam removal upriver. It’s long overdue.

‘JOBS AND OPPORTUNITY INSIDE’ In 1957, Waldorf Paper Products of St. Paul, Minn., opened a $6 million wood pulp mill on 3,200 acres along the Clark

Photo by Chad Harder

State officials thought they saved the mill from a scrapper that wouldn’t create jobs.

can’t pay—if it goes bankrupt, for example—Smurfit-Stone would be back on the hook. But in early 2011, the paper manufacturer RockTenn purchased SmurfitStone, complicating the situation further. The question of environmental liability gave Montana an excuse to try to stop Smurfit-Stone’s deal with Ralston for the Frenchtown mill site, yet it was a nonissue when GIGI acquired the site. GIGI

whether it’s water quality issues, air quality issues, asbestos—all of those thing— that they’re [addressed] correctly, because the fastest way to assure that a site like this will not be productive in the future is to put ourselves in a position where we have environmental concerns and companies are saying, ‘Whoa, whoa, whoa—I’m not coming in there until…it’s completely cleaned up.’”

Fork River, three miles south of Frenchtown. It began with 78 employees, producing 250 tons of pulp a day, which was used to make liners for cardboard boxes. Wastewater was sent downriver, until the next year, when complaints of fish kills, foam and discoloration forced the company to build wastewater storage ponds. In 1960, a $6 million expansion upped production at the mill to 450 tons

Missoula Independent Page 15 April 19 – April 26, 2012


of pulp and 150 tons of bleached pulp a day. Capacity more than doubled again in 1966. By then, Waldorf Paper Products had merged with Hoemer Boxes. Hoemer Waldorf dug more ponds for the increasing wastewater. More than five million gallons of it was discharged into the Clark Fork every day from the 700 acres of ponds. In 1977, Champion International bought the Frenchtown mill and invested about $170 million over three years to boost capacity to 1,850 tons per day. Stone Container Corp. bought it in 1986. By 1993, production reached 1,900 tons per day. Stone Container merged with Jefferson Smurfit in 1998, creating SmurfitStone Container, which became one of the world’s largest paper-based packaging makers, though the merger saddled the company with billions of dollars of debt. In the early 2000s, demand for cardboard boxes began to decline. Manufacturing was heading overseas. Smurfit-Stone shut down one of the Frenchtown mill’s three paper machines. “The manufacturing sector of our economy produces goods which need to be packaged and transported,” the mill’s general manager, Bob Boschee, told the Missoulian in 2003. “If those goods are not produced in the United States, then they are not being packaged in the United States.” Smurfit-Stone began closing mills and purging workers around the country. In 2008, the Frenchtown mill laid of 52 workers. In early 2009, with a debt load of more than $5 billion, SmurfitStone filed for bankruptcy protection. In late 2009, the company said it would close the Frenchtown mill. In January 2010, 417 workers, with an average salary of about $70,000 a year, worked their final shifts. The jobs represented about four percent of Missoula County’s economy. The mill had been the county’s second-largest taxpayer.

Photo courtesy of Tom Dauenhauer

Tom Dauenhauer, center, the Green Investment Group’s first employee in Montana, alleges in a lawsuit that the company owes him more than $1 million.

Smurfit-Stone emerged from bankruptcy in mid-2010. In early 2011, RockTenn announced it would purchase SmurfitStone for $3.5 billion. Before the deal closed, Smurfit sold the Frenchtown mill. On May 4, 2011, Gov. Schweitzer again stood in front of the mill, this time with Missoula Mayor John Engen and Missoula County commissioners, to announce that the Green Investment Group, through its subsidiary M2Green Redevelopment, had bought it—not Ralston. “We’re here to announce that scrapper will not tear down this plant,” Schweitzer said. “That gate will open, and there’ll be jobs and opportunity inside.” Ray Stillwell, GIGI’s president, said at the time, “As with all of our projects, our main goal is to work with the community

and local officials to develop a site that complements the other industries in the area and meets the economic needs and interests of its people by creating jobs in sustainable growth industries.” Yet in examining GIGI’s projects, the same theme keeps emerging: Not much is happening. As in Missoula and Frenchtown, people seem guardedly optimistic that jobs will return to the former industrial sites. They’re puzzled, yet hopeful. Is the hope misplaced?

‘WE’RE READY FOR SOME NICE, NEW REDEVELOPMENT’ Ray Stillwell is a lawyer and entrepreneur. In 2001, he incorporated Alton Steel, which acquired a shuttered steel

Photo courtesy of Peter Nielsen

The EPA is determining whether to designate the 3,200-acre Frenchtown mill property a Superfund site. Every year for 50 years, the mill generated an average of 20,000 tons of sludge containing a medley of papermaking chemicals that was put in onsite ponds and landfills next to the Clark Fork River.

Missoula Independent Page 16 April 19 – April 26, 2012

mill in Alton, Ill., a city of about 28,000 on the Mississippi River, about 15 miles north of St. Louis. Alton Steel restarted production at the mill in 2003. Stillwell sold his stake in the company in 2005 and used the proceeds to launch the Green Investment Group with Mark Spizzo, the company’s executive vice president, who had worked in economic development in Illinois for two decades. In 2006, GIGI acquired its first property, a 235-acre former Smurfit-Stone mill in Alton. Six years later, there’s “nothing happening” at the site, says Monica Bristow, director of the RiverBend Growth Association, an economic development organization in southwest Illinois. “Why? We’re not sure.” Bristow says no jobs have been created other than for scrapping contractors. The mill was completely razed. All that remains is an empty service garage. Stillwell says GIGI had hoped to transform the site, which it named America’s Center Industrial Park, into an ethanol plant to work in conjunction with a nearby Conoco-Phillips refinery, but that project has been shelved. GIGI acquired its second former Smurfit-Stone mill, in Circleville, Ohio, in 2006. Through its subsidiary CircleGreen, the company received a $750,000 grant from the Ohio EPA to remediate a 26-acre section of the 300-acre property. The mill on those 26 acres, which sat at the entrance to the town, was demolished. “For the most part, we have a level, cleaned, new green space and we’re ready for some nice, new redevelopment,” says Ryan Scribner, director of the Pickaway Progress Partnership, the economic development agency for Pickaway County, where Circleville is located. As for jobs, there have been none, Scribner says—“unless you count the folks working for the demo company and the folks who did all the environmental remediation.” Stillwell says he expects the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency to approve the environmental cleanup soon, which he hopes will spur more interest in the site. For now, the ag giant Cargill is leasing some of the land for corn storage, he says. GIGI bought its third Smurfit-Stone mill, in Carthage, Ind., in 2009. “We haven’t progressed very far there yet,” says Jim Finan, director of the economic development organization in Rush County, where Carthage is located. “The feedback we’ve gotten is that [redevelopment] is the plan but they’re working in other arenas first before they focus their attention on this particular site.” Finan says no jobs have been created there. He calls the 180-acre site a “dinosaur”: it’s about 10 miles from the interstate, and he thinks its age, the condition of the facilities and the required environmental cleanup will deter prospective businesses. He’s wondering why GIGI bought it. Stillwell says progress has been delayed in Carthage due to a fire allegedly started by a demolition company GIGI hired. The fire burned down buildings


GIGI hoped to preserve, which led to litigation that’s ongoing. GIGI’s success stories are in Canada. The company bought two former Smurfit-Stone mills in Quebec in January 2010. At one, in Portage-du-Fort, Trebio, a company that makes wood pellets, has leased part of the 2,200-acre site, making up the majority of the 175 new jobs there. Stillwell and Spizzo reportedly own part of Trebio. GIGI’s other Quebec mill site is in New Richmond. Part of its 225 acres are now occupied by Fabrication Delta, which uses the space to make masts for wind turbines, employing about 150 people, according to Elie Arsenault, a Fabrication Delta manager. He says the arrangement is “going perfect.” GIGI also acquired a mill in Bathurst, New Brunswick. That site, too, is vacant. Stillwell says GIGI only owns former Smurfit-Stone mills because he and Spizzo “have always enjoyed a good working relationship with the Smurfit folks.”

never signed a contract. Dauenhauer’s argument in the lawsuit is that the oral contract is enforceable because it was partly performed by both parties: Dauenhauer was paid at least $360,000 plus a separate $75,000 commission. “It’s our view,” says Casillas, Dauenhauer’s attorney, “that these defendants brought him in to broker this deal and then preyed on the knowledge and experience that he had out there to their benefit without wanting to compensate him accordingly.”

VanGreen, incorporated in Colorado. VanTek claims it spent 18 months working to acquire the Frenchtown mill through VanGreen only to have GIGI pull out of their agreement at the last minute and acquire it separately. VanTek says GIGI exploited its expertise. A judge dismissed that case on April 11, 2012, at VanTek’s request. After reviewing GIGI’s financial disclosures, VanTek opted to pull the case because “it appears that they will never be able to pay back the Wakefield Kennedy loan,”

performed demolishing, scrapping and salvaging GIGI’s mill sites in Canada.

‘IT ALL TAKES TIME’

Mark Spizzo, GIGI’s executive vice president, was in Missoula a few weeks ago. He declined a request for an interview while he was here, but according to County Commissioner Jean Curtiss, Spizzo gave representatives of the Northwest Advanced Renewables Alliance a tour of the mill site. NARA is a Washington State University-led consortium of researchers working to convert wood waste into jet fuel. It recently landed a $40 million USDA grant. “I just keep crossing my fingers that somebody’s going to come in and do something,” Curtiss says. “It all takes time.” A more immediate use of the site would be wood chipping, since the mill has a chipper. “We see that as a very viable business activity that we’re aggressively working on preserving,” Stillwell says. In GIGI’s counterclaim against Dauenhauer, the company blames him for failing to secure a woodchipping deal with Boise Inc., which, earlier in the year, wound ‘HEADED FOR INSOLVENCY’ up leasing the chipper at the forTom Dauenhauer worked at mer Stimson mill site in Bonner, the Frenchtown mill from 1981 to now owned by Western Montana 2006. He served as a purchasing Development. agent, storeroom supervisor, shipThe chipper is one of the ping supervisor and paper Frenchtown mill site’s many machine supervisor. After leaving assets, some of which GIGI is trythe mill, he became a real estate ing to sell. A year ago, Dauenhauer agent. His familiarity with the mill estimated that the site contained made him well suited to broker a more than $50 million in assets, deal when Smurfit sought to sell between the papermaking equipthe property. He worked with sevment, heavy equipment like the eral prospective buyers. According wood chipper, scrap metal, tools, to the lawsuit Dauenhauer filed land, and water rights. earlier this year, Stillwell and “We obviously look for the Spizzo approached him in best return on our investment that February 2011. Photo by Chad Harder we can get,” Stillwell says. “But Meanwhile, Smurfit-Stone was nearing a deal to sell the mill for Dauenhauer estimated the Frenchtown mill contained more than $50 million in there is nothing being scrapped $12 million to Tim Ralston’s com- assets, between the papermaking equipment, heavy equipment, scrap metal, that has infrastructure value for pany. Dauenhauer wasn’t involved tools, land and water rights. “There is nothing being scrapped that has infrastruc- ongoing use.” GIGI disputes the $50 million because Ralston “was a known ture value for ongoing use,” GIGI president Ray Stillwell says. estimate in court documents. ‘scrapper,’ interested only in Stillwell declined to discuss those Vantek’s attorney, Donald Grant, wrote Stillwell declines to say what he thinks the demolishing the site,” the lawsuit says. In March 2011, Dauenhauer met allegations. In a prepared statement, he in an email to GIGI’s attorney on April sellable scrap and equipment is worth. There are other potential uses for with Stillwell and Spizzo, who were said Dauenhauer “was paid his commis- 10. “Although Gordon believes that GIGI interested in purchasing Ralston’s con- sions before he terminated his activities breached the partnership agreement, it the site—recycling, biomass electricity tract. During that meeting, Dauenhauer in January as a result of business irregu- also appears that GIGI is headed for generation, wood pellet production. The insolvency and will likely never be able to BitterRoot Economic Development says, he presented Stillwell and Spizzo larities occurring during his work.” GIGI filed its answer to Dauenhauer’s pay back any judgment.” District has been working to explore with an agreement: He was to be paid Stillwell insists that VanTek’s decision such possibilities through a feasibility three percent of the $12 million pur- lawsuit on April 9, denying the allegations chase price of Ralston’s agreement— and filing counter claims against him, not to go forward with the suit had “noth- study. It worked with GIGI to get a $20,000 Big Sky Economic Development $360,000. He’d also get five percent of alleging a breach of his real estate agent ing to do with financial information.” There have been at least two other suits Trust Fund grant through the state the roughly $19 million in non-tradition- duties, among other things. That’s not the only legal dispute sur- claiming that GIGI failed to pay contractors. Department of Commerce. GIGI had al financing GIGI secured from Wakefield Kennedy, LLC to buy the mill. rounding GIGI’s acquisition of the Worthing, S.D.-based IntegroEnergy Group agreed to chip in another $30,000 for the sued GIGI subsidiary SWI Energy in study, but it hasn’t followed through. Frenchtown mill. That’s another $950,000. In June 2011, Washington-based December 2011 over an agreement it Spizzo says in an email that the study is Stillwell confirms that GIGI obtained financing from Wakefield Kennedy, which VanTek, Inc., a supplier of used paper signed with GIGI to provide consulting “on hold for the time being.” It’s a matter is a subsidiary of Wakefield, a large mill equipment, also sued GIGI for services for the ethanol project in Alton, Ill. of “prioritizing” the work at all of GIGI’s properties. Bellevue, Wash.-based residential and com- breach of contract. About two years earli- The case remains open. In a case that was dismissed in June BREDD is asking the program for an mercial real estate development company er, VanTek, owned by Gordon Cassie, signed an agreement with GIGI to part- 2011, John Brutz, of Ohio, and Michael extension. owned by Steve Malsam and Len Evans. Dauenhauer, Stillwell and Spizzo ner in buying former paper mills. The Cohl, of Michigan, claimed GIGI owed apparently agreed to the deal, though they two companies created a company called them about $30 million for work they mfrank@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent Page 17 April 19 – April 26, 2012


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The tofu houses of Las Vegas FLASHINTHEPAN Las Vegas has a world-renowned dining scene. The glitter, celebrity chefs, and high tabs are mostly clustered around the Strip, but when I’m in town I try to eat as far from that as possible—usually in Chinatown. Lately I’ve become infatuated with a Korean tofu stew called soon tofu, or soondubu jjigae. It can be found in the many “tofu houses” popping up in cities with big Korean populations. In Vegas these establishments include Mr. Tofu, Tofu Hut, Tofu & BBQ, and others. It’s a common reflex to associate tofu with vegetarianism, but while excellent vegetarian versions of soondubu are made, most recipes include meat and tofu both. The Vegas Chinatown is a fascinating place. It exists almost entirely in strip malls, which are creeping westward along Spring Mountain Road like expanding coral reefs, each storefront blinking neon, often in symbols or mysterious Asian characters. So enticing are the options that it’s tough to make it past the first block or two. In addition to the Korean tofu houses, there’s a mix of Filipino, Malayan, Laotian, Taiwanese, and Singaporean restaurants, as well as regional cuisines like Szechuan and niche players like noodle houses, Vietnamese sandwich shops, and even “Hot N Juicy Crawfish.” While attending a conference in Sin City recently, I stole off to Chinatown whenever possible. This was the trip, I had promised myself, that I’d explore the Vegas tofu houses. And Mr. Tofu—my first stop— did not disappoint, and my explorations continued. There’s something thrilling about a tofu dish that includes meat. It’s a validation of tofu as an ingredient in its own right, rather than a mere substitute for meat, and the contrasts between proteins can be stunning. With soondubu, a red chile broth with chunks of meat is loaded with delicate, broken pieces of extra-soft tofu. The tofu floats on top like curdles of cream, crowding the surface. It arrives bubbling at your table in a clay pot, often with a just-cracked egg lurking inside. The tofu flesh is chalky white when the spoon cuts through it, so soft you can slurp it. It’s a custardy island of nonflavor in an otherwise busy stew that’s further complicated by an assortment of banchan, Korean for “little dishes of vegetables and whatnot.” Banchan can include pickled daikon, seasoned soybean

Best Breakfast in Town! www.thinkfft.com Mon-Thurs 7am - 8pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

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“But not seafood and beef together,” the store owner warned, though others might disagree. She offered to sell me a soup flavor packet, but I wanted to do the whole thing from scratch. I started by making the stock. For two servings of stew, heat five cups water in a pot, add a fist-full of six-inch dried kelp pieces, four whole cloves of garlic, half an onion in one piece, a teaspoon of anchovy paste or a few squirts of fish sauce, and four shiitake mushrooms (or morels or porcini), dried or fresh. Simmer for 20 minutes. This is your stock. Meanwhile, cut meat into domino-sized pieces or smaller and sauté them in oil in the bottom of the pot in which you will cook and serve your soondubu. This would ideally be a clay pot, but a cast iron pan or Dutch oven works. Fish the mushrooms out of the stock pot, chop, and add them to the meat frying in the soup pot. Then add vegetables. Summer squash like zucchini are favored in most restaurant soondubu I’ve eaten, so at the Korean grocery I bought a blue-gray oval summer squash that came carefully wrapped in paper. Other options are julienned carrots, minced garlic or onion, and kimchi. Photo by Ari LeVaux Let your meat and veggies cook together Having returned home from that trip with (but don’t add the kimchi yet). Then add the stock. deep appreciation and craving for soondubu, I vis- As it comes to a boil, add red chile powder, a little at ited a Korean store for ingredients. To my great a time, until it’s the right heat. Add a splash of joy, I discovered a little café in the back where sesame oil, and soy sauce to taste. Cut your tofu, a they serve soondubu jjigae. After slurping down a 14-ounce package or two, depending on how much bowl, I asked the store’s owner to help me find room there is. You want the broth packed. I use a butter knife to cut an elongated # sign the ingredients. Most crucial is the tofu itself. It must be extra- into the rectangular piece of tofu, and then dump soft (or “extra-silken”). The brand I got, named only the nine pieces into the pot, stirring gently. I let in Korean, has a picture of soondubu on the pack- these big chunks break into smaller pieces on their age. The package does say the English words: “extra- own. Add your kimchi now, if you like. When the stew reaches a rolling boil, crack an soft” and “contains soy.” I guess that’s all I needed egg per person into the pot (or one egg into each to know. Based on what I was told at the store, and from single-serving clay pot). Don’t let the stew boil for poking around online, I’ve put together a recipe longer than 30 seconds after adding the eggs, and for venison and wild mushroom soondubu that then turn off the heat. Garnish with chopped green could hold its own on Spring Mountain Road. It’s onions and a sliced jalapeno. Serve with rice and any adapted from a beef and shiitake mushroom banchan you can get your hands on. You may soon recipe, so you could use those ingredients instead. find yourself working on your banchan recipes, You could also follow the recipe more loosely with because after your first bowl of soondubu, odds are you’ll soon come back for more. clams, or mixed seafood. sprouts, kimchi, dried radish, or seaweed salad. At Vegas’ Greenland Market food court, which has the best soondubu I sampled, the stall in the corner includes a six-inch, pan-fried fish as a banchan. The most common meats used in soondubu are beef, pork, and shellfish. Vegetarian versions include kimchi and mushroom/onion. Eaters typically adjust their soup by adding banchan to it, or alternatively combine the soup and banchan in the accompanying bowl of rice. Unless you get to the egg right away, it will be at least soft-boiled by the time you find it.

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Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 When the sun shines, the trail along the Clark Fork beckons me for a stroll. As I pass Boone & Crockett I realize one quick side step up the hillside and I can stop at Bernice’s. Mmmm. Iced Coffee to help me kick into the last leg of my cruise and a chocolate chip cookie. Or an herb cream cheese hard roll and a loaf of Sourdough for tomorrows lunch. Tradition. While you kick into April remember Bernice’s can accent your spring adventure any time, any day. Open 6a – 8p seven days a week.

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Missoula Independent Page 18 April 19 – April 26, 2012

Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-

ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Big Sky Drive In 1016 W. Broadway 549-5431 Big Sky Drive In opened June 2nd 1962. We feature soft serve ice cream, shakes, malts, spins, burger, hot dogs, pork chop sandwiches and breaded mushrooms all made to order. Enjoy our 23 shake and malt flavors or the orange twist ice cream. Drive thru or stay and enjoy your food in our outdoor seating area. Lunch and dinner, seven days a week. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Monday – Friday, 7:30 – 2. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty.


dish

the The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to late. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 39 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am-2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm Sun-Wed and 11am10pm Thurs-Sat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. We deliver and we cater! The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. 926-2038 The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St 9262038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and gluten-free options. Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a

rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. 11am-9pm Tuesday-Sunday. Downtown Missoula. $ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. 721-6033 Missoula's Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. M-TH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am-4pm, Sat 8am-4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West 41-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula's best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. 532-2056 Brooks and Browns Trivia Night is back. $7 Bayern Pitchers plus appetizer specials. Every Thursday from 7-10pm. $50 Bar Tab to winning team. Warm up your chilly nights with our Hot Jalapeno Artichoke Dip. We have Classic French Onion Soup and hearty Bison chili made in house daily. Fall in love with our Bacon Cheeseburger Meatloaf-stuffed with crispy Daily’s bacon and cheddar cheese, served with cheddar mashed potatoes and corn. And finish the best meal in town with our New Orleans style Bread Pudding with warm caramel sauce and Big Dipper vanilla bean Ice cream. We still have Happy Hour from 4-7 every day and on game days we offer wings specials and all your favorite local micro-brews. Everyone loves our SUNDAY BINGO NIGHT! Sundays 6-9 pm at Brooks and Browns. Same happy Hour specials ($5 pulled pork sliders, ? order wings, ? nachos; $6 Bud Lite pitchers) Have you

HAPPIESTHOUR Beers with Baucus on brewery laws. The answer The skinny: It’s is no. Baucus is up to date on Thursday evening and we’re an effort to decrease the at the Westside’s Draught excise tax on craft beer in the Works Brewery with Sen. Max country. He’s a booster. Not Baucus. As co-chair of the so much with the CARE Act, U.S. Senate’s Small Brewers which would inhibit the ability Caucus, he has to keep up of small breweries and winerwith issues facing microbrewies to ship directly to cuseries nationwide. Today he’s tomers. “Sen. Baucus’s knowlmeeting up with a few heavy edge on our issues was far hitters, including Brewers and away greater than any of Association COO Bob Pease the other senators I’ve met and Montana Brewers Photo by Alex Sakariassen with,” Pease says. Association Executive Director Tony Herbert. And, of course, sipping some fine What’s next: There’s a boom in Montana Missoula brew. brewing. The state now has 34 registered brewWhat Baucus is drinking: Turns out the eries, with two more set to open this year. The Montana senator is a fan of Draught Works’s Quill industry employs 240 people statewide. At this Pig Czech style pilsner. So are we. It’s a crisp little rate, Montana could soon topple Vermont for number. Baucus can’t set his glass down. We ask most breweries per capita. The thought excites if he prefers any particular beer style. “I’ll experi- Baucus almost as much as the beer. “We’re going ment a little bit,” he says. “I’m not a fan of the to go for it,” he says. “We’re going to be number jalapeño, though.” He means the Jalapeño Dry one.” With that, Baucus tries the Scepter Head IPA. —Alex Sakariassen Hopped Pale Ale, one of the brewery’s limitedtime-only cask beers. It’s an acquired taste. Happiest Hour celebrates western What Baucus is saying: Herbert and Pease Montana watering holes. To recommend a spend most of the evening asking Baucus if there’s bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, any intel he needs to help steer congressional talk e-mail editor@missoulanews.com.

Great Food No Attitude. Mon-Fri

7am - 4pm (Breakfast ‘til Noon)

Sat & Sun

8am - 4pm (Breakfast all day)

531 S. Higgins

541-4622 Montana Musicians and Artists Presents:

Showcase Sampler Vol. 1 CD Release Party

SATURDAYS $1 SUSHI 4pm-9pm Mondays & Thursdays - $1 SUSHI

(all day)

Tuesdays - LADIES' NIGHT 4pm-9pm

Featuring: Darting Through Traffic Leif and Willard Kristi Neumann Michael Avery Kevin Van Dort and the KVD Band Joshua Farmer Shake Well The Dodgy Mountain Men Off In The Woods Tom Catmull John Floridis Three Eared Dog

Saturday, April 21st Noon-9 PM Draught Works Brewery 915 Toole Ave, Missoula

Free CD with $5 Donation - No Cover 50¢ of every pint sold goes to the Montana Musicians and Artists Coalition for the advancement of Montana music and art. www.mmacoalition.org

Not available for To-Go orders

Missoula Independent Page 19 April 19 – April 26, 2012


discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com All our menu items are made from scratch, featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive tea menu. Missoula's Original Bubble Teas. Beer, Wine and Sake available. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Rotating music and DJs. Lunch 11:30-3:00, Happy Hour 3-6, Dinner 5-10. $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$

April

COFFEE SPECIAL

Colombian Excelso Dark Roast $10.95/lb.

COFFEE FOR FREE THINKERS

Missoula’s Best Coffee

BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

BUTTERFLY HERBS COFFEE, TEAS AND THE UNUSUAL 232 N. HIGGINS •

DOWNTOWN

Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West • 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ The Mercantile Deli 119 S. Higgins Ave. • 721-6372 themercantiledeli.com Located next to the historic Wilma Theater, the Merc features a relaxed atmosphere, handcrafted Paninis, Sandwiches, and wholesome Soups and Salads. Try a Monte Cristo for breakfast, a Pork Love Panini for lunch, or have us cater your next company event. Open Monday – Saturday for breakfast and lunch. Downtown delivery available. $-$$ The Mustard Seed Asian Café Southgate Mall • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our allnew bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our non-smoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, microbrews, fine wines & signature drinks. Takeout & delivery available. $$-$$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. • 543-3188 Don’t feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $8.50. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $7.75. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$. Pearl Café 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French specialties, bison, elk, and fresh fish daily. Delicious salads and appetizers, as well as breads and desserts baked in-house. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Philly West 134 W. Broadway • 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday - Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. Pita Pit 130 N. Higgins 541-PITA (7482) • pitapitusa.com Fresh Thinking Healthy Eating. Enjoy a pita rolled just for you. Hot meat and cool fresh veggies topped with your favorite sauce. Try our Chicken Caesar, Gyro, Philly Steak, Breakfast Pita, or Vegetarian Falafel to name just a few. For your convenience we are open until 3am 7 nights a week. Call if you need us to deliver! Sapore 424 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-6695 Voted best new restaurant in the Missoula Independent's Best of Missoula, 2011. Located on Higgins Ave., across the street from Wordens.

Missoula Independent Page 20 April 19 – April 26, 2012

Serving progressive American food consisting of fresh housemade pastas every day, pizza, local beef, and fresh fish delivered from Taste of Alaska. New specials: burger & beer Sundays, 5-7 $9 ~ pizza & beer Tuesdays, 5-7 $10 ~ draft beers, Tuesday -Thursday, 5-6:30 $3. Business hours: Tues.- Sat. 5-10:30 pm., Sat. 10-3 pm., Sun. 5-10 pm. Authentic Thai Restaurant 221 W. Broadway • 543-9966 sawaddeedowntown.com Sa Wa Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors- no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisine. Now serving beer and wine! $-$$ Sean Kelly’s Empire Grill 130 W. Pine St. • 542-1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for lunch & dinner. Featuring brunch Saturday & Sunday from 11-2pm. Serving international & Irish pub fare. Full bar, beer, wine, martinis. $-$$ Silvertip Casino 680 SW Higgins • 728-5643 The Silvertip Casino is Missoula’s premiere casino offering 20 Video gaming machines, best live poker in Missoula, full beverage liquor, 11 flat screen tv’s and great food at great prices. Breakfast Specials starting at $2.99 (7-11am) For a complete menu, go to www.silvertipcasino.com. Open 24/7. $-$$ Sparkle Laundry 812 S. Higgins Ave. • 721-5146 The big pizza joints have been hating on our $6, made-to-order, 12” pepperoni pizzas for a reason. They’re affordable and they’re good. Well, the cat’s out of the bag, boyee! We also have dogs, pretzels, muffins, bagels, ice cream and more. We do your laundry too. Since 1960. NOT JUST SUSHI Sushi Hana Downtown. We have quick and delicious lunch specials 6 days a week starting at $7, and are open for dinner 7 nights a week. Try our comfort food items like Pork Katsu and Chicken Teriyaki. We also offer party platters to go and catering for all culinary styles. Lunch 11:30-3 Mon-Sat. Dinner 5-9:30 Every Night. Corner of Pine and Higgins. Very Family Friendly. 549-7979. $$-$$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins • 327-8929 Stop in when you're in the neighborhood. We'll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula's best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 11-10 Sun 12-9. Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you'll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. Tamarack Brewing Company 231 W. Front Street 830-3113 facebook.com/tamarackmissoula Tamarack Brewing Company opened its first Taphouse in Missoula in 2011. Overlooking Caras Park, Tamarack Missoula has two floors -a sports pub downstairs, and casual dining upstairs. Patrons can find Tamarack’s handcrafted ales and great pub fare on both levels. Enjoy beer-inspired menu items like brew bread wraps, Hat Trick Hop IPA Fish and Chips, and Dock Days Hefeweizen Caesar Salads. Try one of our staple ales like Hat Trick Hop IPA or Yard Sale Amber Ale, or one of our rotating seasonal beers, like, Old 'Stache Whiskey Barrel Porter, Headwall Double IPA, Stoner Kriek and more. Don’t miss $8 growler fills on Wednesday and Sunday, Community Tap Night every Tuesday, Kids Eat Free Mondays, and more. See you at The ‘Rack! $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Drive 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming • 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$ YoWaffle Yogurt 216 W. Main St. • 543-6072 (Between Thai Spicy and The Shack) www.yowaffle.com YoWaffle is a self-serve frozen yogurt and Belgian waffle eatery offering 10 continuously changing flavors of yogurt, over 60 toppings, gluten free cones and waffles available, hot and cold beverages, and 2 soups daily. Indoor and outdoor seating. Meetings welcome. Open 7 days a week. Sun-Thurs 11 AM to 11 PM, Fri 11 AM to 12 AM, Sat. 10 AM to 12 AM. Free WiFi. Loyalty punch cards, gift cards and t-shirts available. UMONEY. Like us on facebook. Let YoWaffle host your next birthday party! $


Arts & Entertainment listings April 19 – April 26, 2012

8

days a week

Photo courtesy of Sarah Cass

Tuck and buzz. Olympia all-stars The Hive Dwellers perform at Zoo City Apparel, 139 E. Main St., on Tue., April 24, at 8 PM, with Shahs and The Sandman. $6.

THURSDAY

19

April

In a city saturated with nonprofits, you best check out the Missoula Nonprofit Network’s class Making the Pie Bigger: What Nonprofits Need to Know about Planned Giving & Bequests presented by Meredith Printz. Mountain Home Montana, 2606 South Ave. W. Park in back. 11:30 AM–1 PM. $10/Free for MNN members. Put the tall cans down and join UM Botanist Marilyn Marler for her Transplanting Perennials hands-on class at Ft. Missoula’s Native Plant Gardens. 5:30–7:30 PM. $5 suggested donation.

Three-Eared Dog warms it up and shuts it down for Dierks Bentley, sorta-kinda, by performing for your pleasure before and after Dierks’ show. Pulse inside the Press Box. 835 E. Broadway. 6 PM. Free. Get to the truthiness of the matter at Jack Metcalf’s and Brett Hargesheimer’s Artini exhibition Semantic Ascent, a crowd-participatory and multi-disciplinary event. Food, beers and music, too. 335 N. Pattee. 6–9 PM. Free. Hey folksy friends and lovers of alliteration (or is it assonance?), Baby and Bukowski are making you fall in love all over again at Draught Works Brewery. 915 Toole. 6–8 PM. Free.

end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., April 20, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to The Calemander c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

MASSAGE THERAPY

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

Salmon Fishing in the Yemen Nightly at 7 & 9 7 ONLY Fri (4/20) Sat matinee at 1 & 3

www.thewilma.com

nightlife

Aspiring badasses, leave your parents at home for Thomas Nybo’s Dean Stone Lecture Danger Lessons: How Embracing Risk Can Lead to Job Security and Personal Fulfillment. Nybo is a photog who has worked for everything that rips. Gallagher Business Bldg,, Rm. 106. 7 PM. Free. The 10th Annual Central and Southwest Asia Conf. at UM presents Central Asia in Transition: Will Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan Go Through Their Own ‘Central Asia Spring’? UC Theate. 7–9 PM. Free. Samuel Becket’s tragicomedy Waiting for Godot is back, with a vengeance, at the Crystal

MITCHELL

Times Run 4/20- 4/26

We Need to Talk About Kevin (R) Nightly at 7 & 9 9 ONLY on Fri (4/20) Sat matinee at 1 & 3

Get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at the weekly meeting of the Treasure State Toastmasters. Community Medical Center meeting rooms. 2827 Ft. Missoula Rd. 6–7 PM. Free.

ERIC

MITCHELL, LMT Massage Therapist/Owner Beer & Wine AVAILABLE 131 S. Higgins Ave. Downtown Missoula

406-207-9480

406-728-2521

MitchellMassage.abmp.com

PACIFIC IS RECYCLING FOR PETS IN APRIL! All month long, we will donate current market price on aluminum cans PLUS 10¢ a pound to AniMeals. Simply drop your cans into the AniMeals recycling cottages and/or at the specially marked drive-up drop boxes at our 2600 Latimer headquarters. 2600 Latimer • One Block Behind Target 543-7280 • 100% Employee Owned Open Monday-Friday, 8am-5pm Saturday, 8am-1pm

Missoula Independent Page 21 April 19 – April 26, 2012


Theatre. 515 S. Higgins. 7:30 PM. $12/$10 (See Theater.) Have a rapturous time at the Montana Rep Missoula’s production of the end times comedy End Days. UM Masquer Theatre. 7:30 PM. $11. montanarep.org. The UM School of Theatre & Dance presents 16 all-original dance jams with wide-ranging styles and a grip of moves during Dance New Works. The Open Space, UM PARTV Center. 7:30 PM. $9/$6 students. Dierks Bentley is a good lookin’ son of a buck and one fine country singer, but he has a weak spot: little white tank tops. Check him out with openers Will Hoge and The Eli Young Band at the Adams Center. 8 PM. $29.50-39.50. griztix.com. Three-Eared Dog continues their tour of Missoula with a show at Pulse inside the Press Box. 9 PM. Free. It’s beat street all over again when Modality brings a herd of donkeys to their knees during week two of their VFW Residency, with A Common Pigeon, Darshan Pulse and The Magpies. 245 W. Main. 9 PM. Free. Get sweaty with all the beautiful people at the Dead Hipster Dance Party, where love and funk is in the air. Badlander. 208 Ryman St. $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM–midnight. The battle continues, as some of MSO’s finest musical talents battle it out in the Top o’ the Mic Trilogy competition to crown the champion of music at Sean Kelly’s. 130 W. Pine. 9 PM. Free. Party Trained is playing music at the Sunrise Saloon. 1101 Strand. 9 PM. Free. Meet your old psych. prof. for a drink and possibly some role-playing while Blue and the Vagus Nerve play the soundtrack to your life. Union Club. 9 PM. Free. Fans of grammar, logic and rhetoric, grab your liberal arts degrees and head down to the Central Bar and Grill’s trivia night, hosted by local gallant and possible Swede Thomas Helgerson. 143 W. Broadway. 9 PM. Free. Bring that old painting of the deer in the wintery forest down to the Union Club for IconoClashes and let some local art guildsters give it an upgrade. 9–10:30 PM. Free. He’ll cure your tremors with a sweet shot of country: Russ Nasset hits up the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., for a solo set this and every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free. Tea Leaf Green is the sweet goo in a p.b and jam band sandwich, with Silent Comedy. The Top Hat. 9 PM. $16/$14 adv.

FRIDAY April

20

For builders interested in strutting their stuff for a good cause, get onboard (ha!) and sign-up for the 10th Annual Boys and Girls Club Playhouse and Pet Palace Auction Fundraiser. Build something rad. Show it off at Southgate Mall. Auction it off in June. Contact Anne for specifics at 239-6505. Celebrate your planet by participating in the Earth Day Celebration on the Oval at UM. Music, games and activities. Noon. Free. The UM FLAT Earth Day BBQ sounds more confusing then it needs to. The folks at Forum for Living with Appropriate Technology want to feed you, have you bid on silent auction items and learn more better ways to live on the planet. 633 S. 5th St. E. 3–6 PM. $3-$5 suggested donation. Take a walk and help kick cancer in the patoot during the American Cancer Society Relay for Life at the UM Oval. 6 PM to 6 AM. relayfor life.org. Poet and U of O prof. Garret Hongo is no Beaver Believer but he is undoubtedly going to read some fine work in the Dell Brown Room of UM’s Turner Hall. 7 PM. Free. Listen and see some of the finest Native American drum and dance groups at the Annual Ki-Yo Celebration at the Adams Center. 7 PM. $5-$12. John Fox of the U.S. Army War College and a U.S. State Dept. foreign service officer presents A Chinese Future for Central Asia? as part of the 10th Annual Central Southwest Asia Conference at UM. Opening remarks by Lt. Gov. John Bohlinger. UC Theater. 7–9 PM. Free. The Holistic Weight Loss Support Group is facilitated by Tereece Panique and takes place at the Unity Church of Missoula at 7:30 PM. 546 South. $2 suggested donation. Call 493-1210 for more info.

nightlife El 3-Oh! plays gypsy jazz while you look at the deer up at the Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery. 4175 Rattlesnake. 5–9 PM. Free. Kid wranglers La Pachanga play the Top Hat’s Family Friendly Friday from 6–8 PM. Free. Take Back the Night Hamilton and show your support for a violence-free world all. The

Smooch

Cosmetic Boutique featuring...

bareMinerals

DuWop, theBalm, Lola, RGB and more!

406.541.1600

125 East Main Street, Downtown Missoula Missoula Independent Page 22 April 19 – April 26, 2012


event begins at 6 PM with a potluck at city hall and at 7:30 PM there is a 14-block march through the city. For more info. call SAFE at 363-2793. Samuel Becket’s tragicomedy Waiting for Godot is back, with a vengeance, at the Crystal Theatre. 515 S. Higgins. 7:30 PM. $12/$10 adv. at Butterfly Herbs and Shakespeare & Co. (See Theater.) Have a rapturous time at the Montana Rep Missoula’s production of the end times comedy End Days. UM Masquer Theatre. 7:30 PM. $16. montanarep.org. The UM School of Theatre & Dance presents 16 all-original dance jams with wide-ranging styles and a grip of moves during Dance New Works. The Open Space, UM PARTV Center. 7:30 PM. $9/$6 students. For some reason the Top Hat is having a 4/20 Party with a bunch of local bands including possible weed smokers The Dodgy Mountain Men, Grit, Black Mountain Moan, Tahjbo and Voodoo Horseshoes. 8 PM. $4. Good gravy it’s The Gourds, but if you’re a fan, you already knew that. Wilma Theatre. 8 PM. $22. (See Spotlight in this issue) Laugh your buns off while keen observers of the world share observations at the Palace’s Comedy Show. Anyway, white guys drive like this, bee-boopy-doop. 9 PM. $5 with $5 surcharge for those 18-20. Spliff-a-riffic, it’s Chele Bandulu and Muzikata performing tuneage that’s down with the doobage at Monk’s Bar. 225 Ryman. 9 PM. $4. If there’s grass on the field you best smoke that shizzle when big-time dubsteppers Hulk bring the beef and the cheese to the Badlander, with locals Zombie Dodger, laummusi Shan and ir8prim8. $12/$10 adv. with a $5 surcharge for those 18-20 available at Ear Candy. Joan Zen is at it again when the music begins at the Union Club. 9 PM. Free. The Copper Mountain Band plays the Sunrise Saloon with gumption and style, something Uncle Hank lost when he was a rodeo clown. 1101 Strand. 9 PM. Free. This is not a threat: I’ll House You with DJs Kris Moon, Mike Stolin and Hotpantz does happen at The Jolly Cork’s. 112 N. Pattee St. (Front St. entrance). 10 PM. Free. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

SATURDAY April

21

Take a break from the hub-bub by joining the Simple Yoga Studio for a One-Day Meditation Retreat. 220 W. Main, Hamilton. $25-$50 donation. tibetanlanguage.org. Strap on the frog suit and help out elementaryaged girls by taking part in the L.E.A.P. Hop, Run or Walk 5K and 1-Mile Run fundraiser. The after-school running program keeps the youngins off the streets. 8 AM. $20/$15 preregistration. racemontana.com. Do work, son, at the Earth Service Day and Ecopentathlon at UM. Prairie restoration, river cleanup and plenty more earth work to be done. 9–5 PM. umt.edu/earthday.

The Heirloom Winter Market still has plenty of local num-nums for you and yours, including farm-fresh eggs, butter, sausage, lavender, honey and more, more, more! Ceretana Gallery and Studios, 801 Sherwood. 10 AM–1 PM. Kids Vibration Music and Rhythm Program at the Downtown Dance Collective gets the childrens groovin’ and sangin’. 121 W. Main. 11–11:45 AM. $5-$20 donation. Listen and see some of the finest Native American drum and dance groups at the Annual Ki-Yo Celebration at the Adams Center. Noon. $5-$12.

Saturday Kids’ Activity: Super Cool Snakes! 120 Hickory. 2–3 PM. $3/$1 members. The Top Hat hosts the Zoograss Festival which features all the usual suspects and then some. The fest begins at 2 PM and is family-friendly until 9 PM. Check out tophat missoula.com for a full line-up. The UM School of Theatre & Dance presents 16 all-original dance jams during Dance New Works. The Open Space, UM PARTV Center. 2 PM and 7:30 PM. $9/$6 students. This Student Recital Series concert features pianists Janell Zerbe and Whitney Kliewer

The Montana Musicians and Artists Coalition host a fundraiser at Draught Works with music from 12 bands all darn day long. 915 Toole. Noon–9 PM. 50 cents a pint goes to MMAC. Bring that special pal to the ZACC for BOGO Pottery Saturday, where you can paint mugs and the like and get a discount on that second one and maybe a smooch from that special barista. 235 N. 1st St. Noon–6 PM. Prices vary. See how art inspired the Greatest Generation to victory during the Historical Museum at Fort Missoula’s exhibit, United We Will Win: World War II Posters That Mobilized a Nation. The exhibit has 50 original posters that showcase the various types of poster campaigns. 1–4 PM. Free. They’ve got snakes, snakes, snakes as big as garden rakes at the Montana Natural History Center’s

and has no ranch dressing on it. Music Recital Hall. 3 PM. Free. Listen and see some of the finest Native American drum and dance groups at the Annual Ki-Yo Celebration at the Adams Center. 7 PM. $5-$12. Great Falls author and all-round rad dude Pete Fromm reads at the Grizzly Claw Trading Co. in Seeley Lake. Fromm’s book Indian Creek Chronicles is really sweet. 7 PM. Free.

nightlife Ahoy there, sailors. George Carlton sets sail on the S.S. Delight when he performs at the Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery. 4175 Rattlesnake. 5–9 PM. Free. The Workers complete the project when they perform at Blacksmith Brewing Co. in Stevi. 5:30–8 PM. Free.

Join them pot throwing dynamos from the Clay Studio for Potsketch 2012, a fun fundraising auction that intends to raise money for studio expansion. Music by the Discount Quartet. UC Ballroom. 6–10 PM. $50. Bid on local creations and support the future leaders of this great nation during the Missoula Community School 5th Annual Taste Trifecta and Silent Auction, plus there is wine beer and coffee. Tunes by Ron Dunbar, Grace Decker and Casey Massey. MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams. 6:30–10 PM. $20. missoulacommunity.org. Have a rapturous time at the Montana Rep Missoula’s production of the end times comedy End Days. UM Masquer Theatre. 7:30 PM. $16. montanarep.org. Samuel Becket’s tragicomedy Waiting for Godot is back, with a vengeance, at the Crystal Theatre. 515 S. Higgins. 1:30 PM and 7:30 PM. $12/$10 adv. at Butterfly Herbs and Shakespeare & Co. Cellist Robert deMaine joins the Missoula Symphony Orchestra for The Spirit of Spring. University Theatre. 7:30 PM. $10-$40. missoulasymphony.org. After a hard day of servicing the earth, head on down to the Union Hall for the Earth Service Day Dance sponsored by the Missoula Folklore Society. Easy-to-learn and more fun than a bottle rocket fight. 7:30 PM–11 PM. $9/$6 for MFS members/$4.50 for service day participants/free for those 15 and under. Reggae is back in the hizzy when Chele Bandulu hit it on the three at the Union Club. 9 PM. Free. DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo pretend that you’re dead at Absolutely, a dance party featuring every style of rump-shaking tuneage. The Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2 for 1 Absolut drinks until 11 PM. Free. Hey my furry friends, this is your night, Animal Nite 2012, that is. Dress as your fave critter and shake your tails to electronical tunes at the Western Montana Fairgrounds, Commercial Barn. 9–1:30 AM. 18 plus, $9-$12. The Copper Mountain Band plays the Sunrise Saloon with gumption and style, something Uncle Hank lost when he was a rodeo clown. 1101 Strand. 9 PM. Free. Fraggle Fest is a drug and dubstep free fete dedicated to the memory of Fraggle Joel Grey. Featuring heavy and hardcore tuneage by Throne of Lies, Shramarama, Gretchen and Zebulon Kosted. 139 E. Main. 9 PM. $3 donation with proceeds going to the Pov. Things are gettin’ downright rural at Monk’s Bar when Black Mountain Moan and The Best Westerns hit the stage and play some hill country blues and fine ol’ country music. 225 Ryman. 9 PM. $3. Cream the corn but not your panties when I Hate Your Girlfriend is joined by Bozeman’s The Mustache Bandits and Shotgun the Avalanche. Palace. 9 PM. $5. DJ Dubwise supplies dance tracks all night long so you can take advantage of Sexy Saturday and rub up against the gender of your choice at Feruqi’s. 10 PM. Free. Call 728-8799.

SUNDAY April

22

The Worldwide Vegan Bake Sale would upset my grandma until she heard that its pro-

Missoula Independent Page 23 April 19 – April 26, 2012


SPOTLIGHT lights, camera, gourds The Gourds don’t limit themselves to the classic subjects of roots rock; they’ve written about everything from preachers to Sufis to the National Football League. The Austin, Texas, band’s most recent album, 2011’s Old Mad Joy, features a highly catchy tune called “Peppermint City,” that begins with “You wonder out loud how it came to this/ threadbare and broke at The Hotel Abyss...My heart is black but in my sack I got a taco and half a pack of vitriol and self abuse.” It has the faintest echo of “Suffragette City” for obvious word choice reasons, but this one employs the classic Gourds Southern-rock groove. Those lyrics show frontman Kevin Russell’s imagination at work. The Gourds have developed a solid following in Missoula ever since über-fan JR Roof brought them here in 2001. You might have seen that first show at the Blue Heron, or any at The Other Side or the Wilma or The Top Hat or downtown at the River City Roots Festival. Another longtime fan of the band is filmmaker Doug Hawes-Davis of High Plains Films who’s renowned for the documentary WHO: The Gourds with Shinyribs WHAT: Concert and final shoot of All The Labor documentary WHEN: Fri., April 20, at 8 PM WHERE: Wilma Theatre HOW MUCH: $22 Facing the Storm: The Story of the American Bison, among other films. He attended the first Missoula Gourds show and every one thereafter, and when he heard a rough mix of Old Mad Joy he got to talking with the band about a documentary. Hawes-

Davis started filming All The Labor in August 2011. He and a large crew toured with the band to make the film, collecting commentary by band members, concert footage, archival images and completely candid and entertaining behind-the-scenes footage that captures the quintet wonderfully. The band’s upcoming shows in Missoula, Bozeman and Billings will be part of the final footage shot for the film, which means Montana Gourds fans can go see the show and be a part of the doc. Check out the film’s kickstarter campaign (kickstarter.com/projects/225802176/all-thelabor). It includes an awesome teaser. One of the songs that has plagued the Gourds for so long, because it’s a cover and has been so overrequested, is their country rendition of Snoop Dog’s “Gin and Juice.” That issue is comically addressed in the teaser when Russell and Big Rich, the club owner at Courville’s in Beaumont, Tex., talking about their next big concert. The friend says, “First person that says ‘Gin and Juice,’ I’m gonna knock ’em out,” and Russell laughs a big belly laugh saying, “Oh man!” and gives him a highfive. The sense of humor and musical talent is palpable here. —Erika Fredrickson

invites you to the 2012 Dean Stone Lecture

Thomas Nybo, photographer, filmmaker and J-School graduate

“Danger Lessons: How Embracing Risk Can Lead to Job Security and Personal Fulfillment”

Thursday, April 19 • 7 p.m. • Free Gallagher Business Building Room 106 Missoula Independent Page 24 April 19 – April 26, 2012

ceeds aid New Dawn MT Farm Sanctuary in Stevi. Caras Park Pavillion. Noon–5 PM. Free. You know it’s Earth Day every day and the good eggs are attending MUD’s Earth Day Event anyway. The event features vendors, educational tables and the Sustainability Olympics (now with the 400-meter compost relay and crushed can discus). Caras Park Pavilion. Noon-5 PM. Free. Occupy Missoula General Assembly takes place at the Union Hall. 208 E. Main St. 2–4 PM. occupymissoula.org. Go with the jam when The Rocky Mountain Grange Hall, 1436 S. First St. south of Hamilton, hosts a weekly acoustic jam session for guitarists, mandolin players and others from 2–4 PM. Free. Call Clem at 961-4949. Cellist Robert deMaine joins the Missoula Symphony Orchestra for The Spirit of Spring. University Theatre. 3 PM. $10-$40. missoulasymphony.org.


Get your jazz on up at Seeley Swan High School (Go Black Eagles) during An Afternoon of Jazz with pianist David Morgenroth and vocalist Eden Atwood. 3 PM. $14/$12 seniors/18 under free.

nightlife Assorbire qualche vita Italiana during the Italian Film Festival at the UC Theatre. This week’s film is 18 Dopo Anni (18 Years Later). 5 PM. Free. Montana Tales & Other Bad Ass Business with actor Troy Evans sounds like a hoot and holler. Evans covers his many lives in a performance he calls “autobiography told by ghosts.” UM Masquer Theatre. 7 PM. $15/$12 adv. $25 tickets include post-perforamce reception. facebook.com/TroyEvansTales. Close out the weekend in style with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz & DJs, during the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with Josh Farmer, The Vanguard Combo and Front Street Jazz. Free. Man, Sunday is usually a real puker, not tonight, though. Merchandise, The Magpies and Boys do music at the VFW and make Sunday a fun day once again. 245 W. Main. 9 PM. $3. Grab the hot sauce from your fanny pack and splash some on your palm when underground hip-hoppers The Chicharones, featuring MCs Sleep and Josh Martinez, hit and quit it with LMNO, Bullhead and Enzymes. Palace. 9 PM. $8/$5 surcharge for those 18-20. UM graduate student Cameron Fehring wants to share his ears with you in Songs I’ve Written/Songs I’ve Heard at the Crystal Theatre. 515 S. Higgins. 9 PM. $5 suggested donation.

MONDAY April

23

UM Indian Law Week kicks off with a talk called Tribal Institutions for Economic Development given by Gavin Clarkson and Gyasi Ross. Noon. UM Law Bldg. Free. Blue Mountain Clinic, along with the Missoula AIDS Council, offers free, anonymous and blood-free HIV testing. 610 N. California. 1–4 PM. Free. Call 721-1646.

nightlife Larry Hirshberg only has time to perform for you at the Red Bird Wine Bar. He has no time for lies about D.B. Cooper. 111 N. Higgins. 7–10 PM. Free. Easiest way to make rent since keno: Bingo at the VFW. 245 W. Main. 6:45 PM. $10 buy-in. The UM Women’s Chorus makes angels cry. Music Recital Hall. 7:30 PM. Free.

Don’t just express yourself, be expressive at the ZACC’s weekly, one-hour poetry workshop. 235 N. 1st St. 8 PM. Free. Slap it up, flip it, shwompitdown at Monday Night Shwompdown with DJs asyn9, M-AD, Special K and the Milkcrate Mechanic. Palace. 9 PM. Free, with free pool and $6 pitchers of PBR. Open Mic at the VFW seems like a fine idea, especially with 2 for 1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. Call Skye on Sunday at 531–4312 to reserve your spot in the line-up, or I bet you could roll in and be all, “Dude, I do a perfect Sublime.”

TUESDAY April

24

Make it happen, for Fun with Yoga at the Families First Children’s Museum might work for you and the kids. 11 AM. 225 W. Front. $4.25. Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room and work on your elk camp locution at the Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters. All are invited. 12–1. 5205 Grant Creek Dr. Free. Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication Non-Violent Communication Weekly Practice Group at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. 519 S. Higgins. Noon–1 PM. Free. Visiting State Department officials from Asia give you the low-down at the Mansfield Center Brown Bag Lecture Series talk Reflections on Womens Empowerment Issues in Southeast Asia. Mansfield Conf. Rm. Noon–1 PM. Free.

UM Indian Law Week continues with A Closer Look at Montana Tribes, a talk given by Steven Small and Jason Smith. UM Law Bldg. Noon. Free. Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 115 S. 3rd St. W. 1-3 PM. For information, call 5433955. WECAN Job Networking Night is for folks looking to for work and those looking to help those folks out. Liaisons Cafe, 111 N. 2nd St., Hamilton. 5 PM. Free. Start making sense at the weekly Taking Pounds Off Sensibly Meeting (TOPS) at First Baptist Church in Whitefish. Weigh-in at 5 PM. Meeting at 5:30 PM. For more info., call 862-5214. You saw House Party, but you still can’t do the Kid ‘N Play. Do something about it by taking the Downtown Dance Collective’s Beg./Int. Hip Hop dance class with Heidi Michaelson. 1221 W. Main St. 6–7 PM. ddcmontana.com. Bring out yer’ concerned and yer crazies for the MDT’s Maclay Bridge Planning Study Discussion at Big Sky High School Multi-Purpose Rm. Old bridges are cool. 3100 South Ave. 6 PM. YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts YWCA Support Groups for women every Tue. from 6:30–8 PM. An American Indian-led talking circle is also available, along with ageappropriate children’s groups. Free. Call 543-6691.

nightlife The VFW hosts my kind of three-way during a night of Singers, Songwriters and Spaghetti, with food provided by the Blue Bison Grill. 245 W. Main St. 6 PM. Free. Take a load off while you get a load of some of the area’s better musi-

Tuesday, April 24, 4:30-5:30 PM "Achieve Optimal Health with Ancient Chinese Diet and Lifestyle knowledge." $20 fee for text and materials (book, recipes handout, and expanded info.)

Wednesday, May 2, 7-8 PM "Self-diagnosis utilizing Chinese Medical Tongue Analysis." Let us teach you to assess your health by examining the variations to the tongue: size, coat and color. You'll leave with your own basic personal diagnosis, as well as diet and lifestyle changes you can use to help improve your health. Please bring a mirror to see your own tongue!

See If Acupuncture Can Help You.

Missoula Independent Page 25 April 19 – April 26, 2012


cians during the Musician Showcase at Brooks and Browns in the Holiday Inn Downtown. $7 Big Sky pitchers and $2 pints. 200 S. Pattee St. Free. Toot-toot ba-doot, the University Concert Band performs tonight and it will honk your hooter, Clem. University Theatre. 7:30 PM. $11/$6 seniors/$5 students. Satire and song and the Roaring ‘20s? Get on the trolly, bub, it must be Chicago, as performed by the UM School of Theatre and Dance. 7:30 PM. $20/ $16 seniors and students/$10 kids 12 and under. umtheatredance.org. Oh my, The Hive Dwellers (featuring that legend Calvin Johnson) are en rte. to musically pleasure your candy asses tonight, with Shahs and Chris Sandman Sands. Zoo City Apparel, 139 E. Main. 8 PM. $6. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. In the original L. Frank Baum story The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, what color were Dorothy’s slippers? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.) Now this is comedy, Frenchy! Get your chuckle on during Comedy Night at Lucky Strike Casino. 151 Dearborn Ave. 8 PM. $5. Bow down to the sounds at Royal Reggae, featuring dancehall jams by DJs Supa, Smiley Banton and Oneness at the Palace at 9 PM. Free. Fight for your right to make a jerk of yourself and win money doing it at Karaoke with DJ LRock at the Press Box. First place wins a $25 bar tab. On the last Tues. of the month,

the winners battle for supremacy. 835 E. Broadway. 9 PM. Free. Helen, I think I hear an owl at the Badlander’s Live and Local Night with acoustic folksters History of Owls, local folk dude Larry Hirshberg and bonus dude Josh Clinger. 9 PM. Free.

WEDNESDAY April

25

Let them dance, or at least give it a try, during Kids’ Hip Hop (7–10 years old) at the Downtown Dance Collective. No dance experience is necessary and drop-ins are welcome. Just wear good clothes for dancing. 121 W. Main St. 5–6 PM. ddcmontana.com Join clinical herbalist Britta Bloedorn for Herbal Medicine and Womens Health: Botanical Support for Peri-/Menopausal Challenges. 210 N. Higgins, Ste. 318. $30. Go to brittabloedorn.com to register. Artists of all levels are invited to the MAM’s non-instructed Open Figure Drawing Class. This class gives artists the opportunity to draw from a for-real person. Ages 18 plus (you and the model). 335 N. Pattee St. 6–8 PM. $7/$5 members. Find out how to keep well-behaved chickens at the Backyard Chicken Workshop, facilitated by MSU Extension nutrition educator Virginia Chaffin. North Valley Public Library, 208 Main St. Stevi. 6:30–8:30 PM. Free. ACLU national privacy expert Chris Calabrese explains that NSA knows about you and the baristas at Butterfly Herbs during his talk Privacy in the Digital Age at the UM School of Law, Rm. 101. 7 PM. Free.

WESt SiDE StORy

Book by Arthur Laurents

Spatial dynamics will not be damned at Helen Keremedjiev’s Archeology Talk: The Spatial Relationship of Anniversary Programs at Historic Battlefields of Montana. Missoula Public Library, Lg. Meeting Rm. 7 PM. Free. Having learned to speak bear, author Jeff Gailus reads from his book The Grizzly Manifesto and discusses how them bears is doing up in the Crown of the Continent. Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory. 7 PM. $4 suggested donation.

nightlife The Kettlehouse Community UNite Pint Night supports RAMP (Regional Access Mobility Program). Give ‘em some money by buying a pint, possibly feel good about the whole deal. 313 N. 1st. 5–8 PM. Continuing our blue collar band name theme at Blacksmith Brewing Co. in Stevi, gBots & the Journeyman perform tunes for your beer-drinking pleasure. 5:30–8 PM. Free. (Trivia answer: Dorothy’s slippers were silver.) Satire and song and the Roaring ‘20s? Get on the trolly, bub, it must be Chicago, as performed by the UM School of Theatre and Dance. 7:30 PM. $20/ $16 seniors and students/$10 kids 12 and under. umtheatredance.org. Huff some nugs and check the reggae influenced hip-hop stylings of The Humboldt Fire Tour with Myka9 and Winstrong as well as JtheSarge, Zoo Effort and DJ Ichie Fingaz. 9 PM. $5, surcharge for those 18-20. The Skurfs do the nazty Bugaloo Shrimp style with Johnny Reno and the Vice Machine. Top Hat. 9 PM. $3. (See Noise and Scope in this issue) Black Eyed Peas fanatics are welcome to belt out their fave jamz at the Badlander during Kraptastic Karaoke, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $5 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free.

Music by Leonard Bernstein Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim Based on conception of Jerome Robbins Based on Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet Produced by special arrangement with  Music Theatre International

A timeless retelling of the world’s greatest love story

April 27 – May 13

MCT CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS TICKETS ON SALE APRIL 9 AT 9:00 AM

• 728-7529 • www.mctinc.org

Sponsored by: Western States Insurance • NorthWestern Energy • First Security Bank MCT accommodates accessibility upon request. Some accommodations require advance notice.

Missoula Independent Page 26 April 19 – April 26, 2012

THURSDAY April

26

The 27th Annual Mansfield Conference at UM features panels on violence against women, law, development and leadership. This year’s theme is Holding Up Half the Sky: Womens Leadership and Development. UM Turner Hall. 8:30–5 PM. Contact the Mansfield center for more info. at 243-2988. A timely topic this time around at UM’s Indian Law Week: Emerging Issues for Energy Development in Indian Country. UM Law Bldg. Noon. Stephen Edwards of the UM Center for Natural Resources and


SPOTLIGHT

sweet and sour A vote for Tangles is a smooth move 275 W. Main St •

Sweet Honey In The Rock, a venerable, allfemale a cappella sextet with gospel and African roots, are a feel-good multicultural experience. If that’s what you crave, they’ve got your hookup, WHO: Sweet Honey In the Rock WHAT: Bitterroot Performing Arts series WHERE: Hamilton Performing Arts Center, 327 Fairgrounds Road WHEN:Sun., April 22, at 7:30 PM HOW MUCH: $27.50–$32.50 MORE INFO: hamiltonpac.org although one also can’t help thinking of Gertrude Stein’s description of Ernest Hemingway: “He was a village explainer, excellent if you were a village, but if you were not, not.” Sweet Honey apparently come to teach as much as to sing these days, so: this show is probably for you if you think you can always stand to be reminded that we’re all the same beneath our skins, enjoy anything in the never-ending Putumayo series of “world music” CDs and possibly have a Guatemalan indigenous rug as a wall hanging. It’s perhaps less suitable if you crave the rawness of ’50s gospel groups, the

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otherworldliness of Fela Kuti, or just really like seeing Jimi Hendrix light his guitar on fire on YouTube. Sweet Honey was started in 1973 by Bernice Johnson Reagon, the formidable daughter of a Georgia Baptist minister. Johnson Reagon was a freedom singer in the civil rights movement and a fine gospel singer who, maturing at the tail-end of the golden age of black gospel in America, put her talents to excellent use as an educator who could handily demonstrate highlights of the history of the music. It was in part her voice, for example, that thrilled listeners on Sweet Honey’s 1990s version of “I’m Going To Get My Baby Out Of Jail,” which seemed to connect the civil rights movement in its themes to the sound of South African vocal ensembles such as the Mahotella Queens. Johnson Reagon left Sweet Honey in 2004. These days, according to a message from her on their website, the group still aspires to be “a communal voice for justice and truth in the world.” One must suppose that’s noble. Anodyne lyrics such as “This law of immigration/Race hatred, separation/Can we find a way to come together/Right now,” from their 2010 song “Are We A Nation?” seem less persuasive, however, and make one miss Johnson Reagon’s growl. —Robert Meyerowitz

Music that stays with you.

The program, featuring Robert deMaine, cello soloist Un Sourire – Messiaen Cello Concerto No.1 – Saint-Saens Symphony No. 5 – Prokofiev

SAT., APRIL 21, 7:30 P.M. SUN., APRIL 22, 3:00 P.M. The University Theatre Tickets: $10 to $40 Online at missoulasymphony.org Call 721-3194 or visit 320 E. Main St. Sponsored by

Darko’s Pre-Concert Talk: One hour before showtime in the Gallagher Building next door.

Missoula Independent Page 27 April 19 – April 26, 2012


A vote for us is a vote for your hair. 275 W. Main St •

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Photo by Michelle Gustafson

1925 or 6 to 4. The UM School of Theatre and Dance performs the musical Chicago Tue., through Sat., Apr. 24-28 and May 2-5 at 7:30 PM, with 2 PM matinees on Sat., Apr. 28 and Sat., May 5. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 kids 12 and under.

Beer Drinkers’ Profile

THROWBACK TO THE WAYBACK

Outside Chance You know it's coming: T-shirts, sunglasses, shorts, vitamin D, and...beer.

Warmer weather is on its way. We’re opening up our decks for outside seating! Missoula Independent Page 28 April 19 – April 26, 2012

Environmental Policy talks Central Asia during her lecture Forty Tribes, One Yurt: Kyrgyzstan, Ethnic Violence and Civic Nationalism. UM Stone Hall, Rm. 303. Noon. Free. Bring the kids and the rest of the fam to the 37th Annual Head Start Pow-Wow in Ronan, which celebrates kids from 0 to 5 years old. Each child will receive a new pair of mocassins and learn to make a dance outfit. 26 Round Butte Rd. 4 PM. Free. Get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at the weekly meeting of the Treasure State Toastmasters. Community Medical Center meeting rooms. 2827 Ft. Missoula Rd. 6–7 PM. Free. The Young Republicans host a Debate of the Lieutenant Governor Candidates at UC Theater. 6:30 PM. The Peace and Justice Film Series brings us Climate Refugees, a film

that considers the geo-political impact of climate change. Currently, the UN believes there are more climate refugees than political or religious refugees. Gallagher Business Bldg., Rm. 122. 7 PM. Free. Now this has nothing to do with fun. James K. Galbraith of the University of Texas unleashes this mega-downer of a presentation called The Great Financial Crisis and the Dismal Science as part of the President’s Lecture Series. 8 PM. Free.

nightlife Satire and song and the Roaring ‘20s? Get on the trolly, bub, it must be Chicago, as performed by the UM School of Theatre and Dance. 7:30 PM. $20/ $16 seniors and students/$10 kids 12 and under. umtheatredance.org. Hear the UM music profs do it like you know they can do at the Faculty Chamber Recital. Music Recital Hall. 7:30 PM. Free.

Pulse inside the Press Box hosts the guys who agree that today’s music ain’t got the same soul, Wild Coyote and Louie Bond. 835 E. Broadway. 8 PM. Free. Meet the girl or boy of your dreams and shave each others’ heads after dream popster Frankie Rose (formerly of the Crystal Stilts) performs at the Palace. Openers TBA. 9 PM. $10. Mad Anthony throws a musical tantrum at the Union Club. 9 PM. Free. Get sweaty with all the beautiful people at the Dead Hipster Dance Party, where love and funk is in the air. Badlander. 208 Ryman St. $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM–midnight. The battle continues, as some of MSO’s finest musical talents battle it out each Thursday in the Top o’ the Mic Trilogy competition to crown the champion of music at Sean Kelly’s. 130 W. Pine. 9 PM. Free. Fans of grammar, logic and rhetoric, grab your liberal arts degrees and head down to the Central Bar and Grill’s trivia night, hosted by local gallant and possible Swede Thomas Helgerson. 143 W. Broadway. 9 PM. Free. Party Trained is playing music at the Sunrise Saloon. 1101 Strand. 9 PM. Free. The kitten’s are out tonight for the Blue and the Vagus Nerve show at the Union Hall. How ya doin’ kittens? 9 PM. Free. Happy Earth Day hippies and to the rest of you, try enjoying the trails and rivers guilt-free after the hippies clean up your refuse and fix up the things you love about your town. Send your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Apr. 20 to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to The Calemandar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online at missoulanews.com.


MOUNTAIN HIGH T he final day of the 2011-2012 season at da Bowl was off the chain as the kids used to say. Fresh pow and even a brief trip to Gnarkansas™ up around the Nutcracker run are going to make it tough to give up riding. However, many of us will not. We’ll be hiking into the backcountry in June, scouting for snow-filled glades protected from the sun and keeping an eye on the elk while we’re at it. Fall and winter, please, you can keep your summers. But I digress. As we saw this past winter, the backcountry can be dangerous even for seasoned folks. That’s why a volunteer group like the Five Valley Backcountry Ski Patrol (FVBSP) is a welcome addition. The group is trained to respond to backcountry winter

emergencies, particularly in the Missoula County area. As you might imagine, the training and gear ain’t cheap so they’re having a fundraiser at the Crystal Theatre. Besides getting to watch an inspirational film undoubtedly filled with scenery and lines that’ll make your thighs scream and your heart squeal, you may just be helping out the folks that save your bacon one day. The Five Valleys Back Country Ski Patrol is holding a fundraiser on Wed., April 25, at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave., with a screening of a film about the Glacier Park ski traverse. Doors open at 6:30 PM, show at 7 PM. $5 suggested donation.

Photo by Chad Harder

THURSDAY APRIL 19 Drop the controller and check out this month’s theme at the Montana Natural History Center’s miniNaturalists Pre-K Program. This month’s theme is Osprey. Pliny the Elder would approve. 120 Hickory St. 10–11 AM. $3/$1 for members. montananaturalist.org.

FRIDAY APRIL 20 Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s (formerly the Flathead Valley Over the Hill Gang) weekly meeting to talk about being awesome, past glories and upcoming activities. Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free. Get back in shape and learn something new at Freestone Climbing Gym’s Intro. to Bouldering course, which introduces basic techniques, safety stuff, ethics and more. Class includes 1.5 hours of instruction and two weeks of unlimited climbing. 935 Toole. 7–8:30 PM. $40.

SATURDAY APRIL 21 Clark Fork Coalition’s Clark Fork River Cleanup 2012 begins at Caras Park next to the Clark Fork River and the Clark Fork Market area. Clean up the river, head back to Caras for bbq. Sounds good, yeah? 10 AM. Contact Liz at liz@clarkfork.org with questions. Head to Warm Springs Pond with Five Valleys Audubon for a trip to see shore birds and waterfowl, but leave the loon jokes at home. Meet in the middle of the UM field house parking lot. 7 AM. Call Larry for more info. at 549-5632. Strap on the frog suit and help out elementary-aged girls by taking part in the L.E.A.P. Hop, Run or Walk 5K and 1-Mile Run fundraiser. The after-school running program keeps the youngins off the streets. 8 AM. $20/$15 pre-registration. racemontana.com. Welcome Earth Day by running or walking at the 4th Annual Superfun(d) Run. Meet at Our Savior’s Lutheran Church at 8 AM for registration and breakfast. One-mile fun run and 5K starts at 9 AM, while the 10 K starts at 9:30 AM. $20/8th graders and younger free. runwildmissoula.org. The ‘M’ is for maintenance at the Mount Sentinel M Trail Restoration. Put on some gloves and get ‘er done. 9–2 PM. Lunch provided. RSVP at hannah.riedl@umconnect.umt.edu. I’m going to type a couple of things and see what you

think: blackpowder rifles, throwing knives and tomahawks. You guessed right, it’s the Sapphire Mountain Men Public Days at Hellgate Civilian Shooters Association Range. Re-enactments and demonstrations galore. Bring the kids! 7350 Zaugg Dr., West Riverside. 11–4 PM. They’ve got snakes, snakes, snakes as big as garden rakes at the Montana Natural History Center’s Saturday Kids’ Activity: Super Cool Snakes! 120 Hickory. 2–3 PM. $3/$1 members.

SUNDAY APRIL 22 Get back in shape and learn something new at Freestone Climbing Gym’s Intro. to Bouldering course, which introduces basic techniques, safety stuff, ethics and more. Class includes 1.5 hours of instruction and two weeks of unlimited climbing. 935 Toole. 12–1:30 PM. $40.

MONDAY APRIL 23 At Slacker Mondays, from 6 PM until close, slackline fans can come to Freestone Climbing Center at 935 Toole Ave. to test their balance. $13/$10 for students. Visit freestoneclimbing.com.

TUESDAY APRIL 24 Find out how Missoulians aid the Mountain Shepherds organization in the Himalayas of northern India at Gear for the Garhwal: Stories from the Nanda Devi. I’ll give you a hint, much-needed gear is transported from here to there. REI, 3275 N. Reserve. 6:30–8 PM. Free.

WEDNESDAY APRIL 25 I wish I could stuff this job and only do the stuff the Flathead Audubon Society does, like their Bird Identification: By Song, Sight and Silhouette courses. This week’s class is A Closer Look at Bird Songs and Calls with Bruce Tannehill. 6–8 PM. Contact Debbie at Flathead High School at 751-3461 to register. Raise some funds for the Five Valleys Backcountry Ski Patrol during the screening of The Glacier Park Ski Traverse, a film about people that have huge lungs, bigger thighs and incredible balance. Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins. 7 PM. $5. calendar@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent Page 29 April 19 – April 26, 2012


scope

From the bowels Johnny Reno and The Vicemachine don’t mince words by Erika Fredrickson

Stage pageantry and band lore are key components for a good dirty rock band—and Johnny Reno & the Vicemachine are no exception. Behold their bandcamp description: “From the bowels of Butte, Montana arose a beastman to bang the skins alongside a giant-man from the rundown Reno slums slaying the strings of a red machine. They’ve put a million in the ground and a million in the sac [sic]. It’s ten o’clock, do you know where your children are? They’re drinking cheap whiskey with Johnny Reno and Trickshot Johnson! Welcome the shovel, and welcome the Vicemachine...” At this point, you can just imagine the smoke machine coming alive on stage in some dive bar near a railroad track. Aaron Johnson, aka Trickshot Johnson, mounts the seat of his drum set in a button up shirt, buttoned down. Johnny Brooke, aka Johnny Reno, with his long dark mane already covering his face, strums the first chord on his red Flying V. Or something like that. This is the kind of sweaty, debauched rock and roll that actually feels less like a moment and more like a lifestyle, which is why the band’s live show shouldn’t be one to miss. The Vicemachine isn’t an easy musical endeavor. Johnson, the “beast-man” from Butte, lives in Missoula, and Brooke, the “giant-man” from Reno, lives in Portland, so there are no convenient band practices to be had. “We get together and play in short bursts,” says Johnson. The band has played a couple of shows in Missoula, and last summer they went on tour with the Missoula band The Skurfs, for whom Johnson also plays drums. Their upcoming show in Missoula is for a Skurfs CD release party, but Vicemachine also just released an album, American Barricade—a scuzzy, blues-punk garage collection that has whispers of

everything from Johnny Thunders to The Stones to 1990s Northwest underground darlings The Makers, with creeping guitar riffs exploding into hazy reverb. This album includes a few tracks from their previous album, Trouble in Old Town, like the song “Bobbing for Bullshit.” Brooke, a 22-yearold who delivers his vocals like he’s been on the rock circuit for decades, starts out singing sweetly, “You can have my pants/but you’ll never get in my heart, woman/ Your key don’t make this cigarette engine turn over and start.” By now you know there’s nothing sweet happening here, just as the song erupts into a bouncing rock ballad with scathing one-liners sung with romantic intonation: “Goddamit that beer was cheap. So are you, to me.” On “Welcome the Shovel,” he imagines his girlfriend asleep in the stove and he says, “wake you up when it gets cold.” Here you have, as you might be able to tell, the timeless themes of relationships gone bad. “He’s like the ultimate frontman,” Johnson says of Brooke. “He looks like a rock star anyways, but he goes absolutely nuts on stage and he’s a good singer, too.” Johnson, 24, says he found his musical calling when his Butte middle school friends started getting into punk rock. “I was still at that age where I was figuring out my personality,” he says. “I still wanted to be popular and my friends were like, ‘Why?’ And I realized, ‘Yeah! Why do I want to be like them? These kids make fun of us.’ And so that was my outlet in Butte. It’s not a nice town. It’s not a place of beauty and understanding and open mindedness. If you’re an open kind of person or different, and if you’re trying to be creative, you’re constantly stifled by

the general population. ” He got into the classics—Operation Ivy, Minor Threat, early Green Day—and also started listening to The White Stripes, who were just making young rockers swoon with their two-piece guitar sound. Johnson and his friends started a band called The Low Rollers and the first song they learned was “Fell in Love with a Girl” off The White Stripes’s 2002 album White Blood Cells. Johnson and Brooke met in Portland when both of them were living there and they ended up playing a show together. “I thought his stuff was pretty cool,” says Johnson. “It was just him on a Flying V electric kind of just screaming over it, but there was something there.” The two musicians are both influenced by Jack White and early blues, as well as the ambience of their hometowns. One song on American Barricade, for instance, is called “Berkeley Pit Stain.” “He’s from Reno and I’m from Butte,” says Johnson, “so we’re both from these dirty-ass cities and we connected because of that, too.” Johnson recorded their album in his Portland studio little chunks at a time. “The whole first album is about Johnny’s trials and tribulations, women and living in Portland, living in the city,” he says. Now that he’s moved back to Missoula to go to school, Johnson says it’s a little challenging to have the Vicemachine be more of a fling than a full-on musical relationship. There have been some little victories: their song “Be Gorgeous and Be Gone” was picked for the most recent Portland band compilation PDX Pop Now, along with bands such as Viva Voce, Red Fang and the Ascetic Junkies. Despite the obstacles, the caliber of the Vicemachine sound seems promising, especially with Brooke at the guitar helm. “Johnny is an amazing songwriter,” says Johnson. “The lyrics he writes are poetic and thoughtful and he flips things around and makes slant rhymes in cool ways.” He laughs. “‘Welcome the Shovel’ is all about cooking your girlfriend, but the lyrics are so good. I don’t want to paint him to be a maniac. He’s more just a tortured genius.” Johnny Reno and the Vicemachine play The Top Hat Wed., April 25, at 10 PM for The Skurfs album release party. $3. efredrickson@missoulanews.com

Photo courtesy of Nicholas Kakavas

Missoula Independent Page 30 April 19 – April 26, 2012


A FUNDRAISER FOR LIVING ART ARTISTS CREATE LAMPS & UNIQUE PIECES FEATURING LIGHT FOR AUCTION

THE LIGHT SHOW

Scope Noise Theater Film Movie Shorts The Skurfs Mountain Surf self-released

In the summer of 1996, I moved into a house in Palo Alto with a surf band called the Aquamen. We watched Endless Summer often and called in sick to work, packed up the Galaxy 500, turned on Laika and the Cosmonauts and hit the beach for some surf action. Missoula’s The Skurfs capture that same kind of carefree attitude, but with a driving, stormier edge. The re-mastered instrumental album Mountain Surf is undoubtedly surf, but it shifts in tone, each song infused with something different: classic garage or angular guitar à la Urge Overkill or psychedelic stoner rock that evokes Wolfmother. “Daffy” could score a scene in a James Bond flick: the 007 spy traversing the side of a cliff shadowed above by some Russian villain. The soundscape creates a dynamic narrative that could do well with visual art

Abe Coley Cabin Recordings self-released

Whatever Abe Coley does—painting, re-purposing or making music—it always seems fun and subversive. The local artist’s new Americana instrumental album, Cabin Re c o rd i n g s 2 0 1 1 (recently on KBGA radio’s top 30), is easy to listen to but not coddling. Zealous finger-picking on homemade guitars and unbridled beating on homemade drums provide a wild, ramshackle texture. Coley recorded the songs in

Illmaculate Skrill Talk Wapikiya Records

Ever since the Smashing Pumpkins released Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness in 1995, hour-long albums have haunted me. Illmaculate’s latest runs 60 minutes, borderline lengthy here in 2012. But the rapper has much to say about gentrification, seeking fame and, of course, boasting (a rapper who doesn’t boast is as useless as a high-school boy). The highlights of the PDX rapper’s resume include winning one of the biggest freestyle battle rap competitions in the country, Scribble Jam, at age 17; also, he and partner The Saurus were twice victorious at the dubiously titled World Rap Championships. The YouTube vids of Illmac’s battles are fun and energetic and filled with spiff-a-riffic riffing on pop culture references.

Odd Future The OF Tape Vol. 2 Columbia

The same generalized hostility that characterizes Tyler the Creator’s solo work thoroughly informs The OF Tape Vol. 2, which spends as much time insulting other rappers as it does developing its own atmosphere of isolated superiority. The good news is that it’s mostly excellent, and when it sucks, it sucks on purpose. The bad news is that it does enough to matter.

(an Andy Smetanka silhouette short would be perfect here). “First Run” is frenetic with intermittent false endings that fade like a record player being powered down. The breakdown almost sounds like a Cars song—the beginning of “You’re Just What I Needed”—before it hits the gas down a rugged highway of rock. This is a stellar take on the surf style. The final track, “Jaws/Misirlou,” a combo of the two classic songs, illustrates the vibe: This might be a beach party, but something dangerous lurks. (Erika Fredrickson) The Skurfs play a re-mastered CD re-release party at The Top Hat Wed., April 25, at 10 PM with Johnny Reno and the Vicemachine. $3. his cabin up Pattee Canyon between May and December 2011, and each song is named after its recording date. One, from September 14, is ambient and pensive, like it’s made for a Hal Hartley film, but with less cerebral intentions. Songs fall apart at the seams and then are deftly sewn back together. A September 24 track mixes swampy blues with a bass-line reminiscent of a Johnny Cash song. Was the song from September 26 recorded in a deep dark well? The air (or is it feedback?) and guitar taps and rustlings are amplified with a lo-fi lusciousness that would make a Dolby apprentice drool with delight. One song incorporates electronic blips and glitches. One you could rhumba to. Another reminds me of bagpipes, despite their absence. You could listen to this like it’s high art. Or you could listen on the porch of a Forest Service cabin drinking an ice cold beer. Either way will do. (Erika Fredrickson) But Skrill Talk ain’t a battle, it’s a studio album, so the energy is more laconic and practiced. That said, “Territorial” is an aggro track. It stands out for its melancholy vocals that make you want to call your homies and tell ’em you miss ’em. The combo of finger snaps, plucked violins and hand drums on “Under Their Radar, Over Their Heads” seems like a happy accident and points to an artist on his way to finding a stamp and putting it on the kids. (Jason McMackin) Illmaculate performs with Only One, Goldini Bagwell and DJ Spark, along with local acts at the Lucky Strike Bar and Casino Sat., April 21, at 8 PM. $5. Consider “We Got Bitches,” Tyler’s brutally accurate send-up of Gucci Mane and Waka Flocka. The production is spot-on, and the rapping is exactly as good as Gucci’s, which makes the track both impressive and kind of terrible. With “We Got Bitches,” Odd Future proves that a) Gucci is a toy and b) they do not give a fudge. They do the same thing on “Real Bitch” and at least three other tracks—total burns on how bad contemporary hip-hop is. Unfortunately, almost 25 percent of OF Vol. 2 winds up devoted to non fudge-giving. The rest of the album is prime dark alterna-rap. When they’re serious, Odd Future is as strong a crew as exists in contemporary hip-hop. Approximately 45 minutes of OF Vol. 2 proves that. The rest is pure, skippable fronting. (Dan Brooks)

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Missoula Independent Page 31 April 19 – April 26, 2012


Scope Noise Theater Film Movie Shorts

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Final countdown End Days brims with character by Mack Perry

What do Jesus Christ, Stephen Hawking, 9/11 and Elvis’s iconic white jumpsuit all have in common? Well, nothing, except that they each have a pivotal role in End Days, an original play by Deborah Zoe Laufer first read in 2007 at the Missoula Colony and which has garnered national recognition since. The sharp, thoughtprovoking and heartwarming account of a New York family reeling from the events of September 11 even as they prepare for an impending apocalypse is filled with so much uninhibited imagination and surprising levity that it threatens to overwhelm any theatergoer lucky enough to come across it.

MRM’s End Days

Frequenters of local theater productions often complain about the lack of originality in venues that tend toward safe, well-established material or contemporary creations that feature forced edginess and relevance. It’s rare to come across something that is equal parts fresh and honest. Montana Rep Missoula’s Days is just such a production. At times it’s a profound rumination on the personal truths gleaned from the conflict between science and religion, at others it’s a hokey yet uproariously funny character study that takes several cues from old-school television sitcoms like “Family Ties” and “Growing Pains.” Days is refreshingly difficult to categorize. The true genius of Laufer’s inventive tale lies with the way both of these narrative extremes are informed by the production’s characters. Laufer boldly includes Jesus and Stephen Hawking as symbolic extensions of the spiritual and scientific struggle central to the story. The play’s scenes humorously play up the way their surreal interactions with the production’s lead characters resemble all-too-familiar relationships. Actor William Updyke pulls double duty here as both of the story’s larger-than-life personas and does an excellent job of making their individual contributions to the narrative memorable. His Jesus is appropriately understated, representing a quiet, comforting presence for the family’s sweet but fiery matriarch, Sylvia. His Hawking has plenty to say to Goth girl Rachel, until, of course, she decides to “see other astrophysicists.” Extended metaphysical cameos aside, however, the true stars of Days are the philosophically fractured Stein family and the boy that they all, in their own way,

Missoula Independent Page 32 April 19 – April 26, 2012

let into their steely hearts. That boy is Nelson Steinberg, a jovial, lovestruck student perpetually clad in Elvis’s aforementioned duds—which he clings to as a sort-of garish, bedazzled security blanket in the wake of his parents’s recent deaths. Nelson is frequently the target of bullying because of his bizarre wardrobe choice. Erik Montague plays him with an earnest, unflinching optimism that comes across as a tad annoying at first, but you soon realize that his unwavering positivity is entirely the point. Nelson repeatedly recommends Hawking’s A Brief History of Time to Rachel. At the same time, he balances studying for his fast approaching bar mitzvah with spreading the word about the impending Rapture alongside Rachel’s fanatical, born-again Christian mother. He sees the value in each opposing worldview, no matter how divisive or contradictory. Adopting Nelson’s complex, life-affirming perspective nearly right out of the gate is Rachel’s father, Arthur Stein, an ex-World Trade Center office employee haunted by the events that left him Photo by Michelle Gustafson the lone survivor of his department. Rick Martino’s performance conveys the delicate transformation of Arthur from lost, disconnected couch potato to supportive, sandwich-crafting superdad with the appropriate blend of subtlety, humor and poise. Leah Joki’s standout turn as Sylvia Stein is a sight to behold. She’s a character that could have easily come across as insufferably preachy, but Joki portrays her as loving, achingly committed and funny. You can’t help but root for her even when her family can’t understand her quest to save their reluctant souls. And Sylvia’s explosive exchanges with her boisterous, questioning daughter, portrayed by a sniping Kate Robischon, feel more than a little true to life. Jason J. McDaniel’s bare-bones set makes creative use of a projector that covers the entire back wall of the stage during sequences where the Stein family checks in with the rest of the world. Seeing exactly what the curious bunch is witnessing on television as they await the end helps further immerse the audience in the world of the play. The authenticity in the way director Eric D. Hersh choreographs the heated family scuffles is in keeping with Laufer’s eccentric, cleverly-written personalities. Those worried that the creative potential of local theater productions is nearing its own portentous Day of Judgment can rest easy. End Days just might be the salvation you’re looking for. End Days continues at UM’s Masquer Theatre in the PARTV Center Thu., April 19–Sat., April 21, at 7:30 PM nightly. $11 Thu./$16 Fri.–Sat./$6 student rush. arts@missoulanews.com


Scope Noise Theater Film Movie Shorts

Parental control Kevin is way beyond needing a timeout

Look mom, same haircut.

Anyone striving to raise normal offspring thinks about these things often, and prays they’re making the best choices. It’s impossible to know how you’re doing because there’s never some giant billboard warning, “THIS IS ONE OF THOSE IMPORTANT MOMENTS. DON’T SCREW IT UP.” Parents make a million tiny decisions and hope that, at certain milestones, they come to find their kid is one of the good ones. The boy in We Need to Talk About Kevin is not one of the good ones. Not by a long shot. The only questions are why, and what will come of his vicious behavior. Neither answer is comforting. Lynne Ramsay has written and directed a film that will scare any parent into wearing Huggies and prompt those thinking about starting a family to use birth control. We Need to Talk About Kevin is like torture porn for grownups, a sadistic mix of Saw and Parenthood. For nearly two hours, we watch as a relatively normal couple tries to raise and nurture a troubled boy. They’re not perfect—believably far from it—but it’s unclear whether that even matters. We see them make those tiny decisions that every parent makes, mostly with good intentions, and see them backfire one tantrum at a time. The fact that this pattern continues into Kevin’s teenage years doesn’t bode well for Mom and Dad. I can’t fathom why anyone would voluntarily sit through this sort of excruciating drama, except for the fact that the storytelling and acting are done incredibly well. Tilda Swinton (Orlando, Adaptation) plays Kevin’s mother, a woman who

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by Skylar Browning

There are times I watch my children play and wonder if they possess the most vivid imaginations in the world, or if maybe they need professional help. The Star Wars fort made of beach towels and lawn furniture that commands half my back yard gives me great pride. Looking on as my three-year-old repeatedly spins himself dizzy and crashes into the fort does not. I wonder a lot about when it’s appropriate to explain to him that purposefully disorienting yourself and collapsing into a useless heap is weird and dangerous—at least until he gets to college.

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lived wild and loose while traveling the world until she fell madly in love with a man played by John C. Reilly. Swinton displays an apprehension about being pregnant that’s not at all unusual; she knows this will blunt her wanderlust and dump some serious responsibility into her previously carefree life. As she becomes the exclusive target of Kevin’s torment and rage, and remains his primary caregiver (there are no babysitters or doting grandparents here), the regret and second-guessing are apparent. Swinton’s steely gaze has a way of capturing such emotions. Ramsay tells the story from opposite ends, flashing back and forth between Swinton’s vibrant early years with Reilly, and a bleak present day in which she’s strungout and alone. It’s a confusing way to tell the story, and requires patience during the first 30 minutes, but it also provides some powerful imagery. We see Swinton, pregnant and unsure, walking down a hallway as a swarm of ballerinas scamper past on their way to class; she hardly notices them. There’s also the scene when she tries to mask the never-ending cries of her newborn by standing directly next to a jackhammer. As I said, she’s not perfect. The memories hint at some sense of blame, especially when juxtaposed with her current lot in life. Her house and car are inexplicably covered in red paint. She sleeps on a couch next to a coffee table filled with plates of old food and pill bottles. She applies for a clerical job in a dreary travel agency where everyone chews gum too loudly and looks jaundiced. Something went horribly wrong between the two ends of the story, and it’s no secret that the something involves Kevin. Family dynamics are complex, and Ramsay lets the events of the film play out in a way that’s open to interpretation. Does it matter that Swinton was an awkward, reluctant mother? Would things be different if Reilly didn’t pass off each episode as typical boy behavior? When exactly do potty training problems turn into giant, flickering warning signs? How could all of this been avoided? These are the questions that haunt Swinton. To Ramsay’s credit, they remain unanswered. Kevin might be a nightmare, but what if … It’s that last part that sticks with you. As a parent, you have to believe you can influence a different outcome. You have to believe you can do something better. The nagging problem, once something goes awry, is figuring out which of the million tiny decisions you got wrong. We Need To Talk About Kevin continues at the Wilma Theatre.

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Missoula Independent Page 33 April 19 – April 26, 2012


Scope Noise Theater Film Movie Shorts OPENING THIS WEEK CHIMPANZEE Holy cuteness, a young chimpanzee is separated from his crew and a full-grown male adopts him. Man, this is gonna be cute. Directed by BBC nature documentarian Mark Linfield. Rated G. Carmike 12: 1:30, 4, 6:30 an 8:30 pm. THE LUCKY ONE A Marine believes a photo of a mystery lady saved his life while he was in Iraq. Now he must find that lady and make her love him. Starring Zac Efron and Blythe Danner. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 and 10 pm. Pharaohplex: 7 and

unleashes Navy SEALs on kidnappers and terrorists. You done messed up again, terrorists. Starring Alex Veadov and dozens of uncredited SEALs. Rated R. Carmike 12: Big D: Thu., Apr. 26, at 1, 4, 7 and 10 pm. AMERICAN REUNION See what happens when a bunch of people in their almost-40s attend their 13th high school reunion. Sex is my guess. Plus getting embarrassed. Starring Alyson Hannigan and Eugene Levy. Rated R. Carmike 12: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 and 10 pm. Village 6: 4:30 and 7:30 pm, with shows at 10 pm of Fri. and Sat. and 1:30 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Pharaohplex: 6:50 and 9:10 pm, with 3 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun

in the future? Heinous. Starring Jennifer Lawrence and Stanley Tucci. PG-13. Carmike 12: 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 9:30 and 10 pm. Village 6: 4:10 and 7:20 pm, with matinees at 10:30 pm on Fri. and Sat. and 1 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Pharaohplex: 6:45 and 9:15 pm, with 3 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Entertainer: 4, 6:45 and 9:30 pm. LOCKOUT A question: What if the only way you could get out of some espionage charges was to rescue the president’s daughter from an outer space prison that the inmates control? Starring Guy Pierce and Maggie Grace. Rated PG-13. Village 6: 4:15 and 7:15 pm, with matinees at 9:45 pm on Fri. and Sat. and 1:15 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun.

and intrigue. Sounds like Verdi to me. Carmike 12: Tue., Apr. 24, at 7 pm. SALMON FISHING IN YEMEN A sheikh dreams of fly-fishing in that dry old Yemen, and British fisheries expert Ewan McGregor is brought in to help make it happen and most likely trawl for love with government aid Kristin Scott Thomas. Rated PG-13. Nightly at 7 and 9 pm, with Sat. matinees at 1 and 3 pm. 7 pm show only on Fri., Apr. 20. SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF SHADOWS Perhaps Mr. Holmes and Dr. Watson will match wits with Professor Moriarty once again. Indubitably. Starring Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law. Carmike 12: Big D: Tue., Apr. 24, at 1, 4, 7 and 10 pm. THE THREE STOOGES At one point Sean Penn and Benicio del Toro were attached to this tale about modern-day stooges run-amok on reality TV. If only. Starring Sean Hayes and Chris Diamantopoulos. Rated PG. Village 6: 4 and 7 pm, with matinees at 9:20 pm on Fri. and Sat. and 1 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Showboat: 4:15, 7 and 9 pm, with 1:45 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. TITANIC IN 3D Fall in love with Kate and Leo all over again...in 3D. Starring Kate Winslet and Leonardo DiCaprio. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12: 3D: 1, 5, and 9 pm. Village 6: 3D: 5:15 pm nightly, 1 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. and 9:30 pm shows Fri. and Sat. Pharaohplex: 7 pm nightly, with 3 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON Michael Bay throws a bunch of money and machinery at the screen in this third installment of the popular series. Shia LaBeouf, Frances McDormand, Patrick Dempsey, John Malkovich and Leonard Nimoy star. Carmike 12: Big D: Sun., Apr. 22 at 1, 5 and 9 pm. THE VOW Hello V-Day! Rachel McAdams wakes up from a coma with severe memory loss and finds her hunky husband romancing her once again. Starring Channing Tatum. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12: Big D: 1, 4, 7 and 10 pm. WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN Nobody says you have to love your kid, but this kid is particularly wicked, and mom doesn't know what to do about him. Starring Tilda Swinton and John C. Reilly. Rated R. Nightly at 7 and 9 pm, with Sat., matinees at 1 and 3 pm. 9 pm show only on Sat., Apr. 20.

Verboaten love. The Lucky One opens Friday at the Carmike 12, Pharaohplex and Entertainer.

9 pm, with Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 pm. Showboat: 4, 7:15 and 9:15 pm. THINK LIKE A MAN It’s about time someone made one of “comedian” Steve Harvey’s books into a movie. Look here now, men are horny boys and women are always trying to control them. And men don’t like being tricked by their wives. Comeuppance time, y’all. Starring Gabrielle Union and Kevin Hart. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 and 9:45 pm.

NOW PLAYING 21 JUMP STREET Let’s jump into the story of a couple of dopey cops who go back to high school to foil an undercover drug ring. Starring Jonah Hill, Channing Tatum and Peter Deluise (jokes). Rated R. Carmike 12: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 and 9:45 pm. Mountain: 4:30, 6:50 and 9 pm, with 2 pm matinees Fri.-Sun. ACT OF VALOR The world’s finest navy, the United States Navy,

THE ARTIST Will talking pictures end silent film star George Valentin’s career? Will he find love with a young dancer? It seems black-and-white to me. Starring Jean Dujardin and Bérénice Bejo. Rated PG-13. Entertainer: 1:30 pm matinees on Sat., Apr. 21 and Sun., Apr. 22.

DR. SEUSS’ THE LORAX Make Fox News angry and take your kids to this story of young boy’s love of a girl and the grumpy fella that protects the environment. Starring the voices of Taylor Swift and Danny Devito. Rated PG. Carmike 12: Big D: Sat., Apr. 21, at 1, 4, 7 and 10 pm.

CABIN IN THE WOODS Man, there is no doubt that this is more than some cruddy old cabin. There are secrets. And the friends who go there have secrets. And secrets mean power and weakness. Nuts. Starring Richard Jenkins and Bradley Whitford. Rated R. Carmike 12: 1, 1:30, 4, 4:30, 7. 7:30, 9:30 and 10 pm.

MIRROR MIRROR No way I’m buying Julia Roberts as the evil stepmother in this “update” of Snow White she’s so darn cute. Starring Lily Collins and Armie Hammer. Rated PG. Carmike 12: 1:15 and 7 pm. Village 6: 4:30 pm nightly, with 1:30 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Pharaohplex: 6:50 and 9:10 pm, with 3 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun.

THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO (US) Based on Stieg Larsson’s book, a journalist gets some help finding a person from a spooky lady. Stars Daniel Craig and Rooney Mara. Carmike 12: Big D: Wed., Apr. 25, at 1, 5 and 9 pm. THE HUNGER GAMES Oh lordy, in the future children are chosen by The Man to fight to the death on live TV. Wait, there’s TV

Missoula Independent Page 34 April 19 – April 26, 2012

MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE - GHOST PROTOCOL Ethan Hunt and his crew are forced to go rogue, y’all. Told you not to bomb the Kremlin. Starring Tom Cruise and Paula Patton. Carmike 12: Big D: Fri., Apr. 20, at 1, 4, 7 and 10 pm. OPERA IN CINEMA RIGOLETTA Assassins, hunchbacks, cuckolds, dukes, ladies

WRATH OF THE TITANS If you think Zeus is a jerk, you need to meet his extra-jerky Titan parents, Kronos and Rhea, who ruled the Golden Age. Anyway Perseus has to rescue Zeus from Hades, who unleashes the Titans on humanity. Starring Sam Worthington and Liam Neeson. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12: 3D: 4:15 and 9:30 pm. Village 6: 7:30 pm nightly, with 10 pm shows on Fri. and Sat. Entertainer: 4, 7 and 9 pm. Capsule reviews by Jason McMackin. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., April 20. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan.


INFORMATIONAL MEETING Discuss Maclay Bridge Planning Study • Missoula County Tuesday, April 24, 2012 6:00 p.m. • Big Sky High School Multi-purpose Room • 3100 South Avenue W., Missoula, MT Missoula County, in partnership with the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) and Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), have initiated the development of the Maclay Bridge Planning Study to determine potential needs of the Maclay Bridge and connecting roadways within the area. The Maclay Bridge crosses the Bitterroot River approximately 2.75 miles west of Reserve Street via North Avenue. North Avenue connects to the existing bridge as the eastern approach, and River Pines Road serves as its western approach. The planning study will determine the needs of the Maclay Bridge and connecting roadways, and will identify feasible improvement options, if any, to address safety, geometric and environmental concerns based on needs presented by the community, study partners, resource agencies, and other interested parties. The purpose of the meeting is to present the study scope and solicit comments.

The meeting is open to the public and the public is encouraged to attend. Local governments attempt to provide accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person's participation in this meeting. For reasonable accommodations to participate in this meeting, please contact Jeff Key, Robert Peccia & Assocs. Inc., at (406) 447-5000 at least two days before the meeting. For the hearing impaired, the TTY number is (406) 444-7696 or (800) 335-7592, or Montana Relay at 711. Alternative accessible formats of this information will be provided upon request.

Comments may be submitted in writing at the meeting, by mail to Sheila Ludlow, Project Manager, MDT, P.O. Box 201001, Helena, MT 59620-1001

or online at www.mdt.mt.gov/mdt/comment_form.shtml Please indicate comments are for the Maclay Bridge Planning Study.

by Vote 9 May

Vote Online at Missoulanews.com

Complete your Best of Missoula ballot online to vote for all categories, including these WEB EXCLUSIVES:

VOTE NOW! Best Local Arts & Entertainment Album New Band Actor/Actress Artist Dancer

Best Local Fashion & Beauty Eyewear Hairstylist Tanning Salon

Best Local Food & Drink Coffee Hut Convenience Store Dish Liquor Store Pizza Delivery Place to Eat Alone Barista Caterer Chef Waiter/Waitress

Best Local Goods & Services Antiques Camera/Photo Store Car Wash Computer Repair Shop Florist Home Accessories Laundromat Lawyer Pawn Shop Property Management Company Real Estate Agent Pet Care/Boarding Veterinary Clinic/Hospital

Best Local Sports & Recreation

Optometrist Health Clinic Massage Therapist Physical Therapist Personal Trainer Yoga Instructor

Best Local Nightlife Bar DJ Bar to Hook Up Bartender Brew Poker Game

Best Local People & Media Athlete Journalist Meteorologist Politician Radio Personality Radio Station TV Newscast TV Personality UM Professor Blog Website

Best Uniquely Missoula Church Choir Festival Leader of the Revolution Nonprofit Organization Park Place for Kids' Fun Place for People Watching Place to Take Out-of-Towners Place to Walk Dogs View Way to Spend Your 21st B-Day Category We Forgot

Best Fishing Guide

Best Local Health & Wellness Doctor/Health Care Provider Alternative Health Care Provider Gynecologist Chiropractor Dentist Or you can still vote the old-fashioned way by completing the paper ballot on page 11

Missoula Independent Page 35 April 19 – April 26, 2012


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

April 19 - April 26, 2012

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD INHERIT THE EARTH www.wethepeople3d.com Llama poo/manure needed call MUD 721-7513 or e-mail info@mudproject.org May 6, 2012—Spokane, Washington—The Lilac Bloomsday

Run is one of America’s classic road races. In its 35-year history over a million runners, joggers and walkers have crossed the finish line. Olympic athletes and thousands of citizen runners navigate a 7.5-mile course that weaves back and forth across the Spokane River gorge, facing the

Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

infamous “Doomsday Hill” at five miles and, spurred on by nearly 30 performers along the route, enjoying a dramatic finish above Spokane Falls. www.bloomsdayrun.org

Piano Lessons At YOUR Home All Ages, All Levels

Bruce- 546-5541 YODEL FOR YOGURT!

Bennett’s Music Studio

(OR JUST ASK)

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available. bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

Peace happens... One heart at a time.

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Table of contents

416 E. Pine Street Missoula MT

"Like an ability or a muscle, hearing your inner wisdom is strengthened by doing it." -Robbie Gass

Walk it. 317 S. Orange

( :

Talk it. 543-6609 x121 or x115

Send it. Post it. classified@missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

PET OF THE WEEK Toes Playful Toes has a contagious grin! She loves everyone she meets and enjoys romping with other dogs. She adores kids and cats as well. Unfortunately, she tore her ACL while playing. Now Toes needs surgery so that she can romp again! Please help Toes by donating to the Humane Society’s Emily Kantor Medical Fund. Visit www.myhswm.org or call (406)549-3934 for more information. If you are interested in potentially fostering or adopting Toes following her surgery come meet her or give us a call.


ADVICE GODDESS

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

By Amy Alkon

NOTICE. The Orchard Homes Ditch Company will be holding a meeting on Wednesday, April 25th, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. at Orchard Homes Community Life Club, 2537 3rd Street West, Missoula, MT. This meeting is held to discuss canal intake improvements. Public comment will be accepted on this item and incorporated into a grant application for this project.

YOU LITE UP MY LIFE This man I’ve been dating didn’t want anything serious. I don’t either. I explained that I just wanted to hang out and have fun. We were going out several times a week, sleeping together at least once a week. Suddenly, he freaked, worrying I’d get attached. I reinforced that I absolutely don’t want anything serious, but he seemed unconvinced. He went away on business and called the day he returned, and we hung out and slept together. The next day, he said we needed to slow things down because he wasn’t feeling we were getting closer. (Isn’t that the point of not getting serious?!) The whole thing started making me feel bad. I blew him off, and now crazily enough he’s calling, texting, asking to see me again. Where do we go from here? –Baffled File you under “too good to be true.” When you tell a man “I just wanna hang out and have fun sometimes naked,” you actually mean that. It is not secret womancode for “Love me, or I’ll cut up your shirts, set your lawn on fire, and stand under your window at 3 a.m. screaming, ‘MY UTERUS IS BAAAARE!’” He must’ve been pretty bewildered: “Come on...shouldn’t you at least be trying to key my car?” Because so many women seem unable to keep things casual even when they’re sure casual’s all they want men tend to assume that’s how all women are. But, there are outliers, and you’re one of them. The problem was convincing him of that. Sure, you kept saying “no strings attached,” but he figured you just had your hands full weaving them all into a big net. He, on the other hand, is a man who knows exactly what he wants: “None of that mushbucket stuff!” Until he doesn’t know: “Hey! Where’s my mushbucket?!” It seems the main thing he wants is to be in control. So, when it became clear you wanted things casual, he kind of blew you off probably your cue to throw yourself at him but you yanked him off his game yet again by blowing him off right back. (Men, especially, are compelled to ditch what’s chasing them and chase what’s trying to ditch them.) The guy essentially set up a hamster wheel and then complained that the hamster wasn’t getting anywhere. Unfortunately, people are messy. Part of what’s messing him up may be the romantic mythology that says “fireworks or nuthin!” that a relationship isn’t legit unless it’s “going somewhere.” (You can’t just plan something for Tuesday and, if

that goes okay, maybe see a movie on Thursday.) As for where you go from here, a frank talk is in order: Can he handle the casual thing he thinks he wants or is he a closet committer? If he can live without the promise of a future, you can probably have some good carefree fun in the present: “I love the way you hold me; I love the way you make love to me; I love the way that, afterward, you get out of bed, get in your car and go to your own house.”

Scholarships for former residents of Watson Children’s Shelter. The Watson Children’s Shelter Alumni Educational Support Fund now has a new funding source for any students pursuing higher education, trade school or specialized training. Eligibility and application is available at www.watsonchildrensshelter.org. There is no deadline for submission.

STARE WAY TO HEAVEN

TO GIVE AWAY FREE miscellaneous household goods and cloths, stuffed toys, baskets, decorations, etc. 7280889

ANNOUNCEMENTS John Maxwell Team Youth Leadership Event. YOUTHMAX, May 612, 2012!! jmtyouthmax.com. These are the four areas of content: Fail Forward • Personal Character • Positive Self-Image • Stand-Up Be-Counted (bullying) MUD’s Earth Day Celebration Join the Missoula Urban Demonstration Project (MUD) at Montana’s largest Earth Day Celebration from 12-5 pm on Sunday, April 22 at Caras Park. Learn about all

A guy wrote you about a girl he sees at a coffee shop a girl he suspects is out of his league. You said the way to know for sure is by asking her out. Bad Advice Goddess! This suggests that he should regard all women with whatever she’s got like if she’s “too beautiful” as out of his league. That just isn’t right. There’s probably a “too beautiful” woman out there who’d go for him. – Irked “Sky’s the limit!” “You can do anything you set your mind to!” These are fantastically inspiring things to tell a person when he’s about to enter preschool and you’re trying to teach him to use the potty. As an adult, you realize that the sky is not the limit. In fact, you sometimes realize that your life is taking place in the crawl space between the third- and fourth-floor apartments or that you’ll never get a date, because you are Joe Ordinary but refuse to consider any girl who’s less than a 9.95. As for this guy, I didn’t advise him to avoid all beautiful women; I told him to stop slobbering into his latte and ask his crushgirl out. A guy who endlessly pines away either hasn’t worked through his social awkwardness or is after somebody out of his league and knows that and pining allows him to pretend he’s in the game without risking rejection. Rejection can be a good thing; it tells you where you fall on the “What kind of woman can I get?” scale allowing you to either try to improve your mate value or make the required trade-offs to have dates with women you don’t have to inflate with a bicycle pump.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2 April 19 – April 26, 2012

Toes Playful Toes has a contagious grin! She loves everyone she meets and enjoys romping with other dogs. She adores kids and cats as well. Unfortunately, she tore her ACL while playing. Now Toes needs surgery so that she can romp again! Please help Toes by donating to the Humane Society’s Emily Kantor Medical Fund. Visit www.myhswm.org or call (406)549-3934 for more information. If you are interested in potentially fostering or adopting Toes following her surgery come meet her or give us a call (406)549-3934.

VOLUNTEERS Work and live in rural Buddhist center, California. Help make Buddhist books to donate in Asia. Includes housing, vegetarian meals, classes on Buddhism, living allowance. Must have sincere Buddhist interest, physical strength. Minimum age 22. For details, application call 510981-1987 Email contact@nyingma.org

INSTRUCTION ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads TV Film Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week Lower Tuition for 2012 AwardMakeupSchool.com

Ken's Barber Shop Children & Walk-ins Welcome Haircuts-$8.50 • Beard Trims-$4 8:30am - 5:30pm • Tuesday-Saturday 1114 Cedar St, Missoula, MT • 728-3957

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18+ Other Cities: 1.800.300.0300 www.tangobyphone.com

Sign up NOT ARTISTIC?

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

the ways that you can make Earth Day EVERY day by browsing eco-friendly vendors, exploring educational tables featuring a wide range of activities, and competing in the Sustainability Olympics! This event is free and open to all ages, and features food and live music.

Come have some fun painting. Instruction & art supplies furnished. Complimentary wine or tea. 327-8757

Art Hang up • 839 S. Higgins


EMPLOYMENT GENERAL BADLANDER CATERING NOW HIRING A CATERING MANAGER FOR BADLANDER CATERING. EXPERIENCE AND EXCELLENT REFERENCES A MUST. VISIT badlandercatering.com AND CLICK ON EMPLOYMENT, TO APPLY. BARTENDING $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training available. 1-800-965-6520 ext. 278 Big Sky Bikes employment oppurtunities: Skilled/Experienced Bike Mechanic: possibly 2 positions. Sales/Technician: 2 positions. Bike Builder: 1 position. Please respond in person with a resume to: Big Sky Bikes 809 East Front Street GREAT CAREER OPPORTUNITY in Montana’s service of first choice. Earn more with the skills you have. Learn more of the skills you need. In the Montana Army National Guard, you will build the skills you need for a civilian career, while developing the leadership skills you need to take

your career to the next level. Benefits: $50,000 Loan Repayment Program. Montgomery GI Bill. Up to 100% tuition assistance for college. Medical & dental benefits. Starting at $13.00/hr. Paid job skill training. Call 1-800GO-GUARD. NATIONAL GUARD Part-time job...Full-time benefits Missoula Downtown Association seeking full-time Administrative Assistant. Position description posted at www.missouladowntown.com. Send cover letter, resume and references to 218 E. Main St., #C; Missoula, MT 59802 by April 27. Own a car? Earn $7k per year renting out your car. RelayRides provides insurance and support. You set the price and who rents your car. www.RelayRides.com/list-yourcar Questions? (415)729-4227

SKILLED LABOR JOURNEYMAN AND APPRENTICE ELECTRICIANS NEEDED IMMEDIATELY near Salt Lake City, UT! Per Diem and Overtime Available!! Do you want to work on a

job that will protect the future of the United States? We have that job for you! We are building a data center just south of Salt Lake City, UT and are looking for great Journeyman and Apprentice Electricians! Rates range from $28/hour to $15.40/hour. Plus Per Diem at $5/hour for a full days work in lieu of benefits for a maximum of $300/week possible. Overtime 6-10s possible. -Must be

FLATBED DRIVERS

a US Citizen per the job requirement. -Must be able to pass a Federal background check and drug test. -Must possess a Utah Journeyman/Apprentice license OR must reciprocate. Please go to www.ludvik.com and click on the Careers tab to fill out our application. TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-545-4546

1-800-700-6305

Wildland Fire Training; Basic and Refresher. 406-543-0013 www.blackbull-wildfire.com

SALES FT/PT Sales Exec Msla and Bitt. Sales exp. preferred. Send resume to MTN Broadcasting, PO

Box 309, Msla, MT 59806 EEO Employer

OPPORTUNITIES $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www.easyworkgreatpay.com

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

STRONG COMMUNITY SPIRIT. TOP-NOTCH BENEFITS. SPECTACULAR COMMUTE.

NEEDED FROM THE MISSOULA AREA

• Home weekly to Bi-weekly • Top pay • Full benefits • New equipment • 2 years exp. required • Clean driving record

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION

At Community Medical Center in Missoula, we offer employees the same opportunities and benefits you'd find at all the big-city hospitals in other states. That's why we fill full- and part-time positions with hard-working professionals like you, with a great salary range and manageable shifts. For a full listing of positions, visit www.communitymed.org. EEO employer.

Apply online: www.communitymed.org 2827 Fort Missoula Road, Missoula, MT 59804 406-327-4244

From day one.

MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS

COMPUTERS

MUSIC

1st Interstate Pawn. 3110 South Reserve, is now open! Buying gold and silver. Buying, selling, and pawning items large and small. We pay more and sell for less. 406721-(PAWN)7296.

Even Macs are computers! Need help with yours? CLARKE CONSULTING @ 5496214

MUSIC LESSONS In-house lessons on guitar, ukelele and piano. Sign up now! MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds entrance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 5490013. www.montanamusic.com

FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation non-denominational 1-800-475-0876

RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway 543-8287

AUCTIONS

FURNITURE

ROGER GUTHRIE ESTATE AUCTION. Fri. & Sat., April 27th & 28th. Best Western KwaTakNuk Resort, Polson, MT. Antiques, Guns, Watches, Clocks, Coins. www.ShobeAuction.com Brochure @ 406-538-5125. United Country - Shobe Auction & Realty, Lewistown, MT

Donate good used furniture & appliances to help prevent child abuse. Free Pickup available. Donation Warehouse 240-4042.

Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

PETS & ANIMALS CATS:

EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

549-6214

#1230 White/Grey,

Tabby, ALH, SF, 9yrs; #1623 Orange Tabby, DSH, SF, 2yr;#1948 Grey, DSH, SF, 10yrs; #2061 White/red, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #2147 Grey, Maine Coon, NM, 2yrs; #2162 Grey Torbi, British Shorthair, SF, 7yrs; #2171 Black Torti, DSH, SF, 1yr; #2190 Grey/white, DSH, NM, 14yrs; #2209 Dilute Calico, DSH, SF, 7yrs; #2242 Grey Tabby, DSH, SF, 5yrs; #2248 Grey Tabby, DSH, SF, 1yr; #2264 Cali/Rust/Grey, DLH, SF, 5yrs; #2287 Grey Tabby, ASH, NM, 7yrs; #2304 Orange/white, DMH, NM. 2yrs; #2305 Torti, DSH, SF, 4yrs; #2307 Blk/grey, Maine Coon X, SF, 3yrs; #2312 Blk/white, DLH, NM, 2yrs. For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc.

in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/ hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840 DOGS: #2169 White/grey, Border/Heeler X, SF, 3 1/2yrs; Aussie, NM, 9yrs; #2214 White/tan, Lab/Pit X, SF, 1.5yrs; #2233 Blk/white, Heeler/Aussie X, NM, 3yrs; #2234 Blk/white, Border Collie X, NM, 2yrs; #2245A Blk/tan, Dobie X, SF, 5yrs; #2245 Blk/white, Husky X, NM, 2yrs; #2278 Corgi/Terrier, Tri Color, NM, 10yrs; #2280 Grey/white, Pit Bull, NM, 7yrs; #2282 Tan/blk, Shep/Rhodi X, NM, 5yrs; #2285 Red/Tan, Boxer X, SF, 6yrs; #2286 Blue, Heeler/MinPin, SF, 1yr; #2290

Hypnosis & Imagery * Smoking * Weight * Negative self-talk * Stress * Depression * Empower yourself

1136 W. Broadway 930 Kensington

Great Gear Great Prices 111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

Outlaw Music

541-7533

Black, Lab, NM, 2yrs; #2303 Brown, Pug/Lab, SF, 5mo; #2306 Red/white/Blue, Aussie/Heeler X, SF, 6mo; ; #2308 Brown/white, Sheltie, SF, 5yrs; #2310 Blue, Heeler X, NM, 1yr; #2311 Yellow, Lab, SF, 2yrs; #2314 Blue Merle, Aussie, NM, 9yrsBitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840

GARAGE SALES HELLGATE HIGH SCHOOL ANNUAL BOOK SALE! Saturday, April 21st. 7:00a.m.-1:00p.m. Hellgate High Cafeteria, 900 South Higgins

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT

Thift Stores

CLARK FORK STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 11, 33, 90, 94, 118, 134, 170, 216, 224, + OS45. Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting April 23rd, 2012 by appt only by calling 541-7919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to April 26th, 2012, 4:00 P.M. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

Outlaw Music Got Gear? We Do! Missoula’s Pro Guitar Shop specializing in stringed instruments.

Open Monday 12pm-5pm, Tuesday-Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am-6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533. Outlawmusicguitarshop.com

728-5693 • Mary Place MSW, CHT, GIS

Awaken your Spirit

Shamanic counseling Soul retrieval • Power retrieval Releasing attachments Marge Hulburt • 241-7260 www.BlueEagleWoman.com

Missoula's Stringed Instrument Pro Shop!

Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

724 Burlington Ave. outlawmusicguitarshop.com

ESCAPE with Massage and healing energy work. By Janet 207-7358 montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3 April 19 – April 26, 2012


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): You had to take the test before you got a chance to study more than a couple of the lessons. Does that seem fair? Hell, no. That’s the bad news. The good news is that this test was merely a rehearsal for a more important and inclusive exam, which is still some weeks in the future. Here’s even better news: The teachings that you will need to master before then are flowing your way, and will continue to do so in abundance. Apply yourself with diligence, Aries. You have a lot to learn, but luckily, you have enough time to get fully prepared. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Let’s see if you know what these exquisitely individuated luminaries have in common: Salvador Dali, Martha Graham, Stephen Colbert, David Byrne, Maya Deren, Malcolm X, Willie Nelson, Bono, Dennis Hopper, Cate Blanchett, George Carlin, Tina Fey, Sigmund Freud. Give up? They are or were all Tauruses. Would you characterize any of them as sensible, materialistic slowpokes obsessed with comfort and security, as many traditional astrology texts describe Tauruses? Nope. They were or are distinctive innovators with unique style and creative flair. They are your role models as you cruise through the current phase of maximum self-expression. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In December 1946, three Bedouin shepherds were tending their flock near the Dead Sea. They found a cave with a small entrance. Hoping it might contain treasure hidden there long ago, they wanted to explore it. The smallest of the three managed to climb through the narrow opening. He brought out a few dusty old scrolls in ceramic jars. The shepherds were disappointed. But eventually the scrolls were revealed to be one of the most important finds in archaeological history: the first batch of what has come to be known as the Dead Sea Scrolls. Keep this story in mind, Gemini. I suspect a metaphorically similar tale may unfold for you soon. A valuable discovery may initially appear to you in a form you’re not that excited about.

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist Susan Clarion RNC CA MATS 552-7919 Energy Balancing and Acupressure Meridians. Hand and foot reflexology. 493-6824 or 399-4363

MARSHA KIRCHNER 406-728-8458

Garden Mother Herbs General Store NOW OPEN! Teas, Tinctures, Balms, Books and more! 529-3834. 345 W. Front Suite C. LINDA BLAIR is offering computerized homeopathy and testing via the BodyScan 2010 for you and your pets, as well as

Louise Harvey Scents of Wellness Master Touch Reflexology foot treatments with Young Living essential oils.

colonics. 28 years in holistic medicine. 406-471-9035

ering? Call 552-5494 for meeting information.

Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie Clarion 406-552-7919

Past life regression. Find out what your soul has experienced in other lifetimes. It helps you understand your strengths, talents, fears and relationships. 406-961-4449. Serving Western Montana.

National Alliance on Mental Illness, Missoula Affiliate. WEEKLY SUPPORT GROUPS Family & Friends: Tues. 6:30 p.m.,Thurs. 10:00 a.m. Providence.Ctr., 902 N. Orange St., Rm. 109. Recov-

Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 241-3405

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a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): The devil called together a committee meeting of his top assistants. He was displeased. Recruitments of people born under the sign of Cancer had fallen far below projected totals. “It’s unacceptable,” the dark lord fumed. “Those insufferable Crabs have been too mentally healthy lately to be tantalized by our lies. Frankly, I’m at wit’s end. Any suggestions?” His marketing expert said, “Let’s redouble our efforts to make them buy into the hoax about the world ending on December 21, 2012.” The executive vice-president chimed in: “How about if we play on their fears about running out of what they need?” The chef of intelligence had an idea, too: “I say we offer them irrelevant goodies that tempt them away from their real goals.”

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “If you don’t run your own life, someone else will,” said psychologist John Atkinson. Make that your motto in the coming weeks, Leo. Write it on a big piece of cardboard and hold it up in front of your eyes as you wake up each morning. Use it as a prod that motivates you to shed any laziness you might have about living the life you really want. Periodically ask yourself these three questions: Are you dependent on the approval, permission, or recognition of others? Have you set up a person, ideology, or image of success that’s more authoritative than your own intuition? Is there any area of your life where you have ceded control to an external source?

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c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Here are the last words that computer pioneer Steve Jobs spoke before he died: “OH WOW. OH WOW. OH WOW.” I’d propose that we bring that mantra into as wide a usage as Jobs’ other creations, like the iPhone and iPad. I’d love to hear random strangers exclaiming it every time they realize how amazing their lives are. I’d enjoy it if TV newscasters spoke those words to begin each show, acknowledging how mysterious our world really is. I’d be pleased if lovers everywhere uttered it at the height of making love. I nominate you to start the trend, Virgo. You’re the best choice, since your tribe, of all the signs of the zodiac, will most likely have the wildest rides and most intriguing adventures in the coming weeks.

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d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A starfish that loses an arm can grow back a new one. It’s an expert regenerator. According to my understanding of the astrological omens, you are entering a starfishlike phase of your cycle. Far more than usual, you’ll be able to recover parts of you that got lost and reanimate parts of you that fell dormant. For the foreseeable future, your words of power are “rejuvenate,” “restore,” “reawaken,” and “revive.“ If you concentrate really hard and fill yourself with the light of the spiritual sun, you might even be able to perform a kind of resurrection.

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Too much of a good thing isn’t necessarily good. (Have you ever hyperventilated?) Too little of a good thing can be bad. (Have you ever gotten dehydrated?) Some things are good in measured doses but bad if done to excess. (Wine and chocolate.) A very little of a very bad thing may still be a bad thing. (It’s hard to smoke crack in moderation.) The coming week is prime time to be thinking along these lines, Scorpio. You will generate a lot of the exact insights you need if you weigh and measure everything in your life and judge what is too much and what is too little.

f

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sculptor Constantin Brancusi had a clear strategy as he produced his art: “Create like God, command like a king, work like a slave.” I suggest you adopt a similar approach for your own purposes in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. With that as your formula, you could make rapid progress on a project that’s dear to you. So make sure you have an inspiring vision of the dream you want to bring into being. Map out a bold, definitive plan for how to accomplish it. And then summon enormous stamina, fierce concentration, and unfailing attention to detail as you translate your heart’s desire into a concrete form.

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “If there is one door in the castle you have been told not to go through,” writes novelist Ann Lamott, “you must. Otherwise, you’ll just be rearranging furniture in rooms you’ve already been in.” I think the coming weeks will be your time to slip through that forbidden door, Capricorn. The experiences that await you on the other side may not be everything you have always needed, but I think they are at least everything you need next. Besides, it’s not like the taboo against penetrating into the unknown place makes much sense any more. The biggest risk you take by breaking the spell is the possibility of losing a fear you’ve grown addicted to. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): When rain falls on dry land, it activates certain compounds in the soil that release a distinctive aroma. “Petrichor” is the word for that smell. If you ever catch a whiff of it when there’s no rain, it’s because a downpour has begun somewhere nearby, and the wind is bringing you news of it. I suspect that you will soon be awash in a metaphorical version of petrichor, Aquarius. A parched area of your life is about to receive much-needed moisture.

h i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Forty percent of Americans do not know that the dinosaurs died out long before human beings ever existed. When these folks see an old cartoon of caveman Fred Flintstone riding on a Diplodocus, they think it’s depicting a historical fact. In the coming weeks, Pisces, you need to steer clear of people who harbor gross delusions like that. It’s more important than usual that you hang out with educated, cultured types who possess a modicum of well-informed ideas about the history of humanity and the nature of reality. Surround yourself with intelligent influences, please.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4 April 19 – April 26, 2012

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CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, until 4:00 p.m., on Friday, April 27, 2012, and will then be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for construction of the following: Curb and Sidewalk Improvements S. 6th St. & Schilling St. – Kemp St. to S. 7th St. City of Missoula Project 10-035 This project consists of a base bid including approximately 2000 lineal feet of curb/gutter, 10,000 square feet of 4 & 6 inch sidewalk and topsoil with a bid alternate to complete street improvements including sumps, cut/fill, road sub-base &base, asphalt milling and installation of 3 inch asphalt. Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project Manual addressed to the City Clerk, City of Missoula, enclosed in sealed envelopes plainly marked on the outside “Proposal for City of Missoula Project 10-035 S. 6th St. & Schilling St. – Kemp St. to S. 7th St. curb and sidewalk improvements” The envelopes shall also be marked with the Bidder’s Name, Address and Montana Contractor’s Registration Number. Proposals must be accompanied by cash, cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of the City of Missoula against liability. A complete set of the Contract Documents and Project Manual will be furnished the Contractors making application therefore from the Office of the City Engineer, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana, upon payment of $50.00 by company check, cashier’s check, or bank money order (cash can not be accepted). Full amount of payment will be refunded upon return of the plans and specifications in good condition within ten (10) days after bid opening. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1-406-444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. The contractor performing work on a “Public works contract” shall not pay less than the latest Montana Labor Standard Provisions minimum wage as determined by the U.S. Secretary of Labor. A copy of said wage rate is attached as part of the contract documents. The provisions of this part do not apply in those instances in which the standard prevailing rate of wages is determined by federal law. “Public works contract” means a contract for construction services let by the state, county, municipality, school district, or political subdivision or for nonconstruction services let by the state, county, municipality, or political subdivision in which the total cost of the contract is in excess of $25,000. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against

on the basis race, ancestry, color, physical or mental disability, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital or familial status, creed, ex-offender status, physical condition, political belief, public assistance status or sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, except where these criteria are reasonable bona fide occupational qualifications. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula Business Licensing requirements. The City of Missoula reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids, and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to the bid opening at 4:00 p.m. on April 27, 2012. The City of Missoula provides accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the City. To request accommodation, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (406) 552-6079. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the city’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON MODIFICATION OF MISSOULA URBAN RENEWAL PLAN TO APPROVE A CERTAIN PROJECT AS AN URBAN RENEWAL PROJECT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council (the “Council”) of the City of Missoula, Montana (the “City”), will hold a public hearing on the modification of the City’s Urban Renewal District II Plan (the “Urban Renewal Plan”) to approve the Project as an urban renewal project on April 23, 2012 at 7:00 p.m., at the Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana. The Missoula Housing Authority (the “MHA”) owns the nearly 11-acre former Intermountain Lumber Site located in the District on Russell Street, generally between Wyoming Street and South 2nd Street (the “Intermountain Site”). The Farran Group, LLC, a Montana limited liability company (the “Developer”), has entered into an agreement with the MHA to purchase approximately 9.29 acres of the Intermountain Site (the “Project Site”), for private mixed-use development. As a first phase of development at the Project Site, the Developer proposes the construction of 196 market-rate apartments within seven, three-story, gardenstyle buildings, including a clubhouse, swimming pools and landscaped lawn areas (the “Project”). The estimated cost of the Project is $17.9 million. The City proposes to issue up to $1,370,000 of Tax Increment Urban Renewal Bonds (the “Bonds”), to be used to pay the costs of eligible Project activities, including: construction of Milwaukee Way, including new curb, gutter and sidewalks; demolition and removal of concrete foundations and asphalt from the Project Site; improvements to Russell Street, including pedestrian lighting and other public improvements; extension of basic utilities to the Project Site, including water, storm water and wastewater main lines; the design, engineering, testing and survey work necessary to accomplish the foregoing; and amounts necessary to establish necessary reserves and to pay costs of the sale and issuance of the Bonds. The Bonds would be payable from the tax increment generated by the Project Site. Any interested persons may appear and will be heard or may file written comments with the City Clerk prior to such hearing. Dated: April 9, 2012 /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5 April 19 – April 26, 2012


PUBLIC NOTICES The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on April 23, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider a resolution to amend the annual appropriations for the City of Missoula, as set forth in the Fiscal Year 2012 Budget and Capital Improvement Program that increases the total City budget by $1,938,479. A copy of the resolution is on file in the City Clerk office. For further information, contact Brentt Ramharter, Finance Director at 552-6108. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING WITH RESPECT TO PLEDGE OF REVOLVING FUND OF THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MONTANA TO POOLED SPECIAL SIDEWALK, CURB, GUTTER AND ALLEY APPROACH BONDS, SERIES 2009A CITY OF MISSOULA, MONTANA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on April 9, 2012, the City Council of the City of Missoula, Montana (the “City”), adopted a Resolution Relating to Pooled Special Sidewalk, Curb, Gutter and Alley Approach Bonds, Series 2012A; Authorizing the Issuance of the Series 2012A Bonds and Making Certain Findings with Respect to the Pledge of the Revolving Fund of the City of Missoula to the Security Therefor (the “Resolution”). The City will issue its Pooled Special Sidewalk, Curb, Gutter and Alley Approach Bonds, Series 2012A (the “Series 2012A Bonds”), in an original aggregate principal amount estimated not to exceed $825,000, in order to (i) finance a portion of the costs of certain sidewalk, curb, gutter, and alley approach improvements throughout the City (the “Improvements”), (ii) fund a deposit to the Special Improvement District Revolving Fund of the City (the “Revolving Fund”), and (iii) pay certain costs associated with the issuance of the Series 2012A Bonds. Principal of and interest on the Series 2012A Bonds will be paid primarily from special assessments levied against the property located adjacent to the Improvements, as identified in the Resolution. Subject to the limitations of Montana Code Annotated, Section 7-12-4222, the general fund of the City may be used to provide loans to the Revolving Fund or a general tax levy may be imposed on all taxable property in the City to meet the financial requirements of the Revolving Fund. Pursuant to the Resolution, the City Council found it to be in the public interest, and in the best interests of the City and the Improvements, to secure payment of principal of and interest on the Series 2012A Bonds by the Revolving Fund, and authorized the City to enter into undertakings and agreements therefor with respect to the Revolving Fund and the Series 2012A Bonds. On Monday, April 23, 2012, at or after 7:00 p.m., in the City Council Chambers at Missoula City Hall, located at 140 West Pine Street, Missoula, Montana, the City Council will conduct a public hearing on the pledge of the Revolving Fund to the above-referenced Series 2012A Bonds. Further information regarding the Improvements, the Revolving Fund, the Series 2012A Bonds or other matters in respect thereof may be obtained from the City Clerk at City Hall, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, or by telephone at (406) 552-6078. Dated: April 9, 2012. BY ORDER OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MONTANA /s/ Marty Rehbein City Clerk MISSOULA COUNTY FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT PERMIT APPLICATION The Office of Planning & Grants has received a floodplain application from the City of Missoula to work within the Rattlesnake Creek floodplain. The proposed project is located par-

allel to Pine St in Section 22, Township 13N, Range 19W and includes the construction of a new pedestrian bridge over Rattlesnake Creek. The full application is available for review in the Office of Planning and Grants in City Hall. Written comments from anyone interested in City floodplain permit application #12 05 may be submitted prior to 5:00 p.m., May 11, 2012. Address comments to the Floodplain Administrator, Office of Planning & Grants, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802 or call 258-4841 for more information. MISSOULA COUNTY Missoula County Request for Qualifications Engineering & Planning Services Missoula County is seeking statements of qualifications to prequalify firms offering engineering & planning services to determine the feasibility of a non-motorized connection between the present terminus of the Bitterroot Branch Trail in Missoula and the northern terminus of the US Highway 93 South pathway in Lolo using existing public right-of-way. Responses to the RFQ will be accepted until 4:00 PM, MDT on Monday, May 14, 2012 as addressed in the RFQ. Submittals should be addressed to: Jeff Seaton, Missoula County Public Works, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808, Re: RFQ Lolo-Missoula Feasibility Study. The Request for Qualifications – Engineering & Planning Services for Missoula County – Lolo-Missoula Feasibility Study may be obtained at the offices of Missoula County Public Works, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808, by calling 406 258-4816, or by email from jseaton@co.missoula.mt.us Pre-submittal questions regarding the RFQ will be accepted until 5 p.m. on April 30, 2012 in either writing or via email. Missoula County will issue a response to all questions received on May 4, 2012. Missoula County reserves the right to reject any or all submissions, to waive any and all irregularities or informalities, and to determine what constitutes any and all irregularities and informalities. MISSOULA COUNTY INVITATION FOR BIDS FOR IMPROVEMENTS TO MISSOULA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT MISSOULA COUNTY AIRPORT AUTHORITY MISSOULA, MONTANA Sealed bids for the improvements to Missoula International Airport, 5225 Highway 10 West, Missoula, Montana, will be received at the Office of the Missoula County Airport Authority in the Conference Room until 1:00 p.m. local time on May 22, 2012 and then opened and read aloud, and canvassed. The work includes the following: Schedule I Rental Car Parking Lot Overlay Including Grading, Drainage, Paving, Marking, Schedule II Frontage road overlay by car wash bay exit A complete set of Plans, Specifications and Contract Documents may be obtained on or after April 19, 2012 at the Airport Administration Office, located on the second floor of the Terminal Building, Missoula International Airport, Missoula, Montana. Each bid must be accompanied by a Certified Check or Cashiers Check in the amount of not less than five percent of the total bid, made payable to Missoula County Airport Authority, or by a bid bond in like amount executed by a Surety Company. The Bidder must supply all the information required by the proposal forms and specifications, and must bid on all items. The Missoula County Airport Authority reserves the right to waive any informality or to reject any or all portions of the various bid items. No proposal may be withdrawn for a period of 60 days form the opening thereof. All bidders are advised to examine the site to become familiar with all site conditions. The project will be shown to interested bidders at 1:00 pm local time, on April 25, 2012 at the conference room, Missoula International Airport, 5225 Hwy 10 West, Missoula, MT 59808. Minimum wage

rates, as established by the State of Montana, are applicable to this project. Any questions regarding bids are to be directed to Dennis Chudy 406728-4381. MISSOULA COUNTY Missoula County Request for Qualifications General Contractor Missoula County is seeking statements of qualifications to pre-qualify General Contractors for bidding on the $13 million phased renovation of the historic Courthouse and Courthouse Annex (the Project) at 200 W. Broadway, Missoula. Responses to the RFQ will be accepted until close of business (5:00 PM, MDT) on Tuesday, May 15, 2012 as addressed in the RFQ. Submittals should be addressed to: Barbara Berens, Procurement Officer and Missoula County Auditor, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, Re: RFQ Courthouse Renovation. As described in the RFQ, 100% performance and 100% payment bonds in the amount of $8 million will be required for the Phase 2 portion of the Project, as will compliance with Montana prevailing wage rates. The Request for Qualifications - General Contractor for Missoula County Missoula County Historic Courthouse and Courthouse Annex Renovation Project” may be obtained at the offices of Barbara Berens, Procurement Office and Missoula County Auditor, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 , by calling 406-258-3227, online at http://www.co.missoula.mt.us/bidsandproposals/bidandproposals.htm, or by email from bberens@co.missoula.mt.us. A mandatory facility walk-through will be conducted on May 1, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. starting from the rotunda of the historic Courthouse. Missoula County reserves the right to reject any or all submissions, to waive any and all irregularities or informalities, and to determine what constitutes any and all irregularities and informalities. MISSOULA COUNTY Notice is hereby given that regular* registration for the Federal Primary Election to be held on June 5, 2012, will close at 5:00 p.m., on May 7, 2012. NOTE: If you miss this regular registration deadline, you may still register for the election by showing up at the county fairground’s election center up to and including on Election Day. Between noon and the close of business on the day before Election Day, you can complete and submit a voter registration card, but you will need to return to the local election center on Election Day to pick up and vote a ballot. All active and inactive electors of Missoula County are entitled to vote at said election. Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the County Election Administrator. If you have moved, please have your registration transferred to your present address. DATED this 19th day of March 2012. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Missoula County Election Administrator MISSOULA COUNTY Notice of Public Hearing Enact Revised Land Use Fees for Services Rendered by the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants. The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a public hearing on the above item at their regularly scheduled public meeting on Wednesday, May 9, 2012 at 1:30 p.m. in Admin B14 Public Meeting Room, Lower Level of the Missoula County Administration Building, 199 W Pine, Missoula. The Missoula Office of Planning and Grants receives requests from individuals, businesses and government agencies for landuse related services including subdivision review. MCA 76-3-602 provides for the establishment of fees for reviewing subdivisions. The proposed changes to land use fees would lower some fees for minor subdivisions for lease or rent. A copy of the Resolution to Enact Re-

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C6 April 19 – April 26, 2012

vised Land Use Fees is on file at the Office of Planning and Grants and on the websites for OPG (http://www.co.missoula.mt.us/opgweb/) and Rural Initiatives (http://www.co.missoula.mt.us/rural/ ). For more information on the proposed revised land use fees contact Karen Hughes, Senior Planner, Missoula County Rural Initiatives, at (406) 258-3425 or via email at khughes@co.missoula.mt.us. Your attendance and your comments are welcomed and encouraged. Any person wishing to be heard on the matter may submit written or other materials to the Commissioners and/or speak at the public hearing. Comments may also be submitted any time prior to the hearing by phone, mail, fax, email or personal delivery to the Commissioners at their offices. The Commissioners’ Office is physically located on the second floor of the Missoula County Administration Building, 199 W Pine, Missoula. The Commissioners’ mailing address is 200 W Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. Fax: (406)721-4043. Phone (406) 2584877. Email: bcc@co.missoula.mt.us. If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling (406) 258-4763, Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. By Order of the Missoula County Board of County Commissioners MISSOULA COUNTY REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION SERVICES AT THE HISTORIC LALONDE RANCH SITE 5404 WEST HARRIER MISSOULA DEVELOPMENT PARK NOTICE TO BUILDERS: Notice is hereby given by Missoula County that it will receive written statements of qualifications for construction services for the Historic LaLonde Ranch located at 5404 West Harrier within the Missoula Development Park, Missoula, Montana. Six copies of written statements of qualifications not to exceed five (5) pages shall be mailed to Barbara Martens, Missoula County Development Park Manager, at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 or submitted to the Special Projects office at 317 Woody Street, Missoula, MT 59802 on or before 5:00 PM, local time Wednesday, May 9, 2012. Full details of the RFQ can be found at the following link: http://www.co.missoula.mt.us/bidsandproposals/bidan dproposals.htm MISSOULA COUNTY The Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) of 2701 Prospect Ave in Helena has requested a variance from the Missoula City-County Health Code, Regulation 1, which prohibits the use of holding tanks for wastewater disposal. MDT wants to use holding tanks to handle wastewater, primarily snow melt, from two shops at the Evaro Maintenance facility, located at 17185 HWY 93 N. The Missoula City-County Health Board has scheduled a hearing on this request for Thursday, April 19 in the second floor conference room at the Health Department at 301 West Alder in Missoula. The hearing will start at 1:00 p.m. or soon thereafter. Interested persons may present relevant information at the hearing. The application and other materials may be viewed online at www.co.missoula.mt.us/EnvHealth or at the Health Department at 301 West Alder. For more information, please call 258-4755. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Robert L. Deschamps, III Cause No. DV-11-1509 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION. NORMAN E. TAYLOR Plaintiff, v. MAGDALENE L. WOLVERTON, EARL CHARLTON, WAVA CHARLTON AND RALPH F. GREEN, WALLACE PAULSON, J. VIOLA HERAK TRUST, their heirs and devisees and all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate, or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the Complaint, adverse to Plaintiff’s ownership or any cloud upon Plaintiff’s title thereto,

whether such claim or possible claim be present or contingent, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA to all persons claiming any interest in or lien upon the real property described in this summons or any part of the real property, defendants: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint for Quiet Title in this action, which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, within sixty (60) days after the first publication of this Summons, and set forth what interest or lien, if any, you have in or upon that certain real property or any part of the real property situated in the county of Missoula, state of Montana as described as follows: That portion of Lot Twenty-five (25) of Cobban and Dinsmore’s Orchard Homes, Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Starting at the Southeast corner of said Lot Twenty-five (25), and thence running North along the East line of said Lot Twenty-five (25) a distance of 300 feet, thence at right angles and in a westerly direction a distance of 150 feet, thence at right angles and in a southerly direction 300 feet to the South line of said Lot Twenty-five (25), and thence in an Easterly direction and along the South line of said Lot Twenty-five (25) a distance of 150 feet to the point of beginning. Recording Reference: Book 598, Page 582 You are further notified that, unless you appear and answer, the Plaintiff will apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the complaint as follows: 1. That the Court make a complete adjudication of the title to the above-described real property and that by Decree of the Court it be declared and adjudged that no Defendant has any estate or interest whatsoever in and to said land or lien or encumbrance thereon and that the title to the above-described real property is quieted in Plaintiff; 2.That Defendants, Magdalena L. Wolverton, Earl Charlton, Wava Charlton and Ralph F. Green, their heirs and devisees and all other persons, known and unknown, be forever enjoined and barred from asserting any claim whatever in and to the within described real property, or any part thereof, adverse to Plaintiff; and 3. That Plaintiff have such other or further relief as the Court may deem proper. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court, the 29th day of February, 2012. /s/ Shirley E. Faust CLERK OF DISTRICT COURT Attorneys for Plaintiffs: GARLINGTON, LOHN & ROBINSON, PLLP 350 Ryman Street P. O. Box 7909 Missoula, MT 59807-7909 Telephone (406) 523-2500 Telefax (406) 523-2595 By: /s/ Jenny M. Jourdonnais March 22, March 29, April 5, April 12, April 19, 2012 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-12-61 Department No. 4 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT D. O’CONNER, DECEASED. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Kathleen D. O’Conner, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 3110 Flynn Lane, Missoula, MT 59808, or filed with the Clerk of the District Court at the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. Dated this 27th day of March, 2012. /s/ Kathleen D. O’Conner, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DP-12-69 Dept. No.: 1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: DONALD JACK GALAHAN Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Walter Galahan and Sean Galahan, the Co-Personal Representatives, return receipt requested, at c/o Sullivan, Tabaracci & Rhoades, P.C., 1821 South Avenue West, Third Floor, Missoula, MT 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 3rd day of April, 2012. /s/ Walter Galahan, Personal Representative /s/ Sean Galahan, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-12-327 Dept. No. 3 Judge John W. Larson Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Linda Michele Keener. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Linda Michele Keener to Michele Linda Keener. The hearing will be on 05/10/2012 at 9:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Dated: March 21, 2012 /s/ Shirley E. Faust Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Nicole Borchers, Deputy Clerk of Court

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 2 Cause No. DP-11-219 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF CHRISTINE L. SHULL, Decedent. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed as Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Von A. Dailey at St. Peter Law Offices, P.C., 2820 Radio Way, PO Box 17255, Missoula, MT 59808 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 5th day of December, 2011. /s/ Von A. Dailey, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP-12-67 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF DAVID ALLEN JENKINS, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Valerie Kay Jenkins, Personal Representative, certified mail, return receipt requested in care of Molly K. Howard, Datsopoulos, MacDonald & Lind, P.C., 201 West Main Street, Suite 201, Missoula, MT 59802 or filed with the Clerk of the above court. DATED this 3rd day of April, 2012. /s/ Molly K. Howard, Attorney for Valerie Kay Jenkins, Personal Representative of the Estate of David Allen Jenkins MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DP-12-63 Karen S. Townsend, Presiding. NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF RONALD G. DESCHAMPS, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said Deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Katherine D. Bush, the Personal Representative, Return Receipt Requested, c/o Skjelset & Geer, PLLP, PO Box 4102, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 30th day of March, 2012. /s/ Katherine D. Bush, Personal Representative. /s/ Douglas G. Skjelset, Attorney for the Estate NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR PRIOR APPROVAL OF MERGER OF BANKS AND TO ESTABLISH BRANCH OFFICES Notice is hereby given by Community Bank, Inc., 63239 US Highway 93, Ronan, MT that it intends to apply to the Federal Reserve Board and the Montana Division of Banking and Financial Institutions for permission to merge with Community Bank- Missoula, Inc., 3010 American Way, Missoula, MT 59808. The Federal Reserve System considers a number of factors in deciding whether to approve the application, including the record of performance of the banks we own in helping to meet local credit needs. You are invited to submit comments in writing on this application, to (1) the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, P.O. Box 291, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55480-0291, or (2) Commissioner of Banking and Financial Institutions, P.O. Box 200546, Helena, MT 59620. The comment period will not end before May 16, 2012, and may be somewhat longer. With respect to the Montana Division of Banking and Financial Institutions, processing of the application will be completed no earlier than the 15th day, nor generally later than the 45th day following the date of the last required publication. The Federal Reserve Board’s Policy Statement regarding notice of applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. 262. Procedures for processing protested applications may be found at 12 C.F.R 262.25. To obtain a copy of the Federal Reserve Board’s procedures, or if you need more information about how to submit your comments on the application, contact Jacqueline G. King, Community Affairs Officer, at (612) 204-5470. The Federal Reserve will consider your comments and any request for a public meeting or formal hearing on the application if they are received by the Reserve Bank on or before the last day of the comment period. The nonconfidential portion of the application file is available for inspection within one day following the request for such file. It may be inspected in the Montana Division of Banking and Financial Institutions office during regular business hours. Photocopies of information in the nonconfidential portion of the application file will be made available upon request. A schedule of charges for such copies can be obtained from the Montana Division of Banking and Financial Institutions. Community Bank, Inc. By: /s/ Gordon Zimmerman Its: President

NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER DEED OF TRUST TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 1. Notice is hereby given to the public and to the following: Nancy K. Coleman 16460 Hashknife Way Missoula MT 59808 Nancy K. Coleman P.O. Box 280541 Northridge CA 91328 Nancy K. Coleman 1821 South Ave. W. #408 Missoula MT 59801 Travis Coleman 1821 South Ave. W. #408 Missoula MT 59801 Travis Coleman 16460 Hashknife Way Missoula MT 59808 Pinnacle Holdings Montana, LLC 16460 Hashknife Way Missoula MT 59808 Pinnacle Holdings Montana, LLC 1821 South Ave. W. #408 Missoula MT 59801 2. Real Property. This Notice concerns the following described Real Property: Tract 2 of Certificate of Survey No. 6227, located in the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 26, Township 15 North, Range 20 West, Principal Meridian, Montana. 3. Loan Secured by the Real Property. First Interstate Bank made a loan to Nancy K. Coleman (“Coleman”). Coleman and Travis Colemen executed a Deed of Trust encumbering the Real Property to secure payment and satisfaction of a Promissory Note in the original principal amount of $65,000.00. 4. Deed of Trust Securing the Loan Obligation. Grantors Coleman and Travis Coleman, executed and delivered to First Interstate Bank a Deed of Trust described as follows: Date: April 7, 2011 Grantor: Nancy K. Coleman and Travis Coleman Original Trustee: Stewart Title of Missoula County Lender/Beneficiary: First Interstate Bank Recorded in the records of Missoula County, Montana, as follows: Date: April 7, 2011 Recording reference: Document No.201105918, Book: 876, Page: 133 Substitute Trustee. The following was substituted as Trustee: Dean A. Stensland Boone Karlberg PC 201 West Main, Suite 300 P. O. Box 9199 Missoula, MT 59807-9199 Telephone: (406) 5436646 Facsimile: (406) 549-6804 by a written document recorded in the records of Missoula County, Montana as follows: Dated: January 10, 2012 Recorded: January 11, 2012 Recording reference: Document No. 201200710, Book: 888, Page: 187 5. Default. Coleman , is in default of the terms and obligations contained in the Promissory Note and Deed of Trust. Coleman is in default due to the failure to timely pay First Interstate Bank. 6. Amount Owing. The amounts owing are as follows: Principal: $63,591.20 Interest through 1/24/12: $2,639.47 Late charge balance: $75.00 Trustee’s Sale Guarantee: $340.00 TOTAL $66,645.67 Interest continues to accrue on this Promissory Note and loan at the daily rate of $13.0666 from January 25, 2012, until paid. The total balance due on this obligation secured by the Deed of Trust, is the sum of the above items, plus attorney fees and costs allowed by law. The exact amount owing as of the date of sale will be provided upon request made to the undersigned prior to the date of said sale. 7. Acceleration. Notice is hereby given that the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust previously elected to consider all principal and interest immediately due and payable as a consequence of the default under the Deed of Trust. 8. Notice of Sale. Notice is hereby given that the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust and the Trustee hereby elect to sell or cause to be sold the Real Property described above to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. The sale will be held at the following date, time and place: Date: Wednesday, June 13, 2012 Time: 10:00 a.m. Place: Missoula County Courthouse 200 West Broadway Missoula MT 59802 The Trustee will sell the Property at public auction to the highest bidder, in cash, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of the sale. DATED this 25th day of January, 2012. By: /s/ Dean A. Stensland Successor Trustee STATE OF MONTANA) : COUNTY OF MISSOULA) This instrument was acknowledged before me on the 25th day of January, 2012, by Dean A. Stensland, Successor Trustee. /s/ Nancy Randazzo Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at Missoula, Montana My Commission Expires: March 1st, 2013 NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER TRUST INDENTURE. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that on Tuesday the 8th day of August, 2012, at the hour of 10:00 o’clock a.m., on the steps at the South door of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, 59801, MATTHEW J. CUFFE, Attorney at Law, PO Box 4747, Missoula, MT, Successor Trustee, in order to satisfy the obligation set out below, has elected to sell and will sell at public auction to the highest bidder, for cash, payable at the time of sale to said Successor Trustee without warranty or covenant, expressed or implied as to title, possession or encumbrances, the interest of MATTHEW J. CUFFE, Successor Trustee, and of the Grantor, SONDRA LEE POWERS, in and to the following described real property, situated in Missoula County, Montana, to wit: Tract 10A of Certificate of Survey No. 5974, located in the NE 1/4 of Section 30, Township 15 North, Range 21 West, P.M.M., Missoula County Montana. Said sale will be made in accordance with the statutes of the State of Mon-


PUBLIC NOTICES tana, and the terms and provisions of a certain Trust Indenture dated the 11th day of January, 2011 and recorded the 13th day of January, 2011, at 3:25 p.m., in Book 872 at Page 713 Micro Records, records of Missoula County, Montana, wherein KAREN V. ADAMS, is the named beneficiary. The Grantor, SONDRA LEE POWERS has defaulted in the terms of said Trust Indenture in that she has failed to make the payment due under the January 11, 2011 note of Seventy-one Thousand Four Hundred Seventy-four and 94/100 Dollars ($71,474.94) due February 15, 2012 plus interest of Nine Hundred Twenty-eight and 20/100 Dollars ($928.20) through March 31, 2012 and there is now due, owing and unpaid payment in the total sum of Seventy-two Thousand Four Hundred Three and 14/100 Dollars ($72,403.14), plus an escrow close out fee in the amount of Seventy-five and 00/100 Dollars ($75.00). That the principal sum now owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Indenture is the sum of Seventy-one Thousand Four Hundred Seventy-four and 94/100 Dollars ($71,474.94), together with interest at the rate of Six percent (6.0%) per annum from and after the 12th day of January, 2012 until the date of sale. That on the date of sale there will be due and owing the sum of Seventy-one Thousand Four Hundred Seventy-four and 94/100 Dollars ($71,474.94) in principal; and Two Thousand Four Hundred Fiftyfive and 61/100 Dollars ($2,455.61) in interest; and Seventy-five and No/100 Dollars ($75.00) in an escrow closing out fee, equaling the total sum of Seventy-four Thousand Five and 55/100 Dollars ($74,005.55), together with costs and expenses of foreclosure, including attorney fees, appraisal fees, costs of title insurance and other costs and expenses. DATED this 29th day of March, 2012. /s/ Matthew J. Cuffe STATE OF MONTANA) : ss. County of Missoula). On this 29th day of March, 2012 before me, the undersigned a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Matthew J. Cuffe, Attorney at Law, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within Notice of Sale of Real Property under Trust Indenture as Successor Trustee, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same as such Successor Trustee. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and notarial seal the day and year first above written. /s/ Barbara R. Hartzell Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at Stevensville, MT My commission expires: 7/3/2015 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 11, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 22 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS TRACT 2 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5236 Amber Armitage and Erik Armitage, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Co. of MT, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Montana First Credit Union, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated May 22, 2007 and Recorded May 29, 2007 in Book 798, Page 184 under Document Number 200713098. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage Corporation. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,387.87, beginning November 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 14, 2012 is $195,645.80 principal, interest at the rate of 7.125% now totaling $3,981.43, late charges in the amount of $138.76, escrow advances of $491.56, and other fees and expenses advanced of $42.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $38.19 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash

equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 2, 2012 /s/ Dalia Martinez First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 2nd day of February, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shannon Gavin Notary Public Blackfoot, ID Commission expires: 1/19/18 Phh V. Armitage 41392.532 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 29, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOTS 7 AND 8 IN BLOCK 5 OF WEST RIVERSIDE, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF William D Ailport, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to New Century Mortgage Corporation, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated February 18, 2005 and recorded on February 22, 2005 in Bk 748, Page 480 under Document No. 200504234. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Indenture Trustee, for New Century Home Equity Loan Trust 2005-2. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $725.19, beginning December 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 16, 2011 is $100,675.69 principal, interest at the rate of 7.10% now totaling $8,029.23, late charges in the amount of $471.25, escrow advances of $1,156.45, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,072.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $19.58 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 16, 2012 /s/ Marti A Ottley First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339, Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho)) ss. County of Bingham) On this 16th day of January, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Marti A Ottley, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Blackfoot, ID Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Fmc V. Ailport 41722.165 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 29, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: LOT 42 OF HILLVIEW HEIGHTS NO. ONE, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Dawn Marie Harrell, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on May 18, 2009 and recorded on May 22, 2009 in Book 839 pg. 1265 as Document No. 200912027. The beneficial interest is currently held by EverBank. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1049.42, beginning October 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 20, 2011 is $191356.95 principal, interest at the rate of 4.87500% now totaling $2,817.77, late charges in the amount of $157.41, escrow advances of $117.32, and other fees and expenses advanced of $92.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $25.56 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred

and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 23, 2012 /s/ Dalia Martinez First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho)) ss. County of Bingham) On this 23rd day of January, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Marti A Ottley Notary Public Inkom, ID Commission expires: 8/15/2012 Everhome V Harrel 41470.254 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 29, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 74 OF MALONEY RANCH, PHASE VI, A PLATTED SUBDIVISON IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Josh Rohde and Erin Rohde, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to PHH Mortgage Services, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 27, 2005 and Recorded on July 1, 2005 under Document # 200516377, in BK-755 Pg425. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage Corporation. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,723.05, beginning August 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 4, 2012 is $295,767.22 principal, interest at the rate of 4.75000% now totaling $7,139.97, late charges in the amount of $172.28, escrow advances of $2,676.88, and other fees and expenses advanced of $653.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $38.49 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors.

EAGLE SELF STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 35, 306, 512, 538. Units contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday April 23, 2012. All auction units will only be shown each day at 3 P.M. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage office at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59804 prior to Thursday, April 26, 2012, 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 23, 2012 /s/ Marti A Ottley First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 23rd day of January, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Marti A Ottley, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana,

LEGAL ADVERTISEMENT The City of Missoula Design Review Board will conduct a public hearing on Wednesday, May 9, 2012 in the City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine Street, Missoula, at 7:30 p.m. to consider the following applications: A request from Lucas Dupuis for Special Signs; Building Graphics for Montana Natural History Center located at 120 Hickory St. (SEE MAP G).

Your attendance and your comments are welcome and encouraged. E-mails can be sent to hkinnear@co.missoula.mt.us. Project files may be viewed at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants at 435 Ryman St., Missoula, Montana. If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services.

"Who's in Charge Here?"–four who should be.

by Matt Jones

ACROSS

1 Plenty of 6 Coffeehouse drink 10 Post your thoughts online 14 Hit the town 15 "Get ___" 16 Hawaiian island where much of "Lost" was filmed 17 Room under a roof 18 WWI spy ___ Hari 19 Mufasa, for one 20 Big shot overseeing metamorphoses? 23 Brother of Michael and Jermaine 24 Buenos Aires' loc. 25 Dunking Ming 27 Big shot in the flexible straw industry? 34 ___ Domani wine 36 Big berry 37 "La Traviata" composer 38 Fend (off) 40 Cuba or Curacao: abbr. 41 Bartender on "The Love Boat" 42 Stuck in the microwave 43 Title role for Jodie Foster 45 Plus-size model born Melissa Aronson 46 Big shot in charge of locksmiths? 49 Nincompoop 50 Genetic messenger material 51 Five, in France 53 Big shot in the salad factory? 59 Guilty or not guilty 61 Furniture giant 62 Spotted laugher 63 Brazen 64 D.C. team 65 Fencing swords 66 Hot month 67 Watches closely 68 Income, in Paris

DOWN

1 "Jumpin' Jack Flash, it's ___..." 2 Women's rights activist Lucretia 3 Arby's side item 4 He wears green and eats mushrooms 5 "I could go on and on" 6 Actress Gertz of "Twister" 7 Cracked open a smidge 8 Take to the polls 9 Genesis album that looks like a rhyme scheme 10 Meat sauce 11 Grizzly hideaway 12 "I'm onto your scheme!" 13 "Bop ___" (Parliament song) 21 Qatar's capital 22 Roman fountain 25 Kind of question with a 50/50 answer 26 Go on the fritz 28 Cupcake topper 29 Prop for Bob Ross 30 Girl, in Grenoble 31 Everything's always about her 32 Dutch cheeses 33 Jasmine and basmati 35 Heat 'n' eat 39 Patsy's "Absolutely Fabulous" friend 44 Shoe string 47 Nobel Prize-winning novelist ___ Gordimer 48 Be indecisive 52 Semiconductor variety 53 "___ no, we won't go" 54 Just fine 55 Party 56 Scottish miss 57 Technology website now owned by CBS Interactive 58 Effortlessness 59 Sandwich with the crusts cut off 60 Reed or Rawls

Last week’s solution

©2012 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 April 19 – April 26, 2012


PUBLIC NOTICES Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Blackfoot, ID Commission expires: 2/18/2014 PHHV Rohde 41392.587 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 07/11/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which TIMOTHY S. SULLIVAN AND KATHLEEN A. SULLIVAN, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to TITLE SOURCE, INC. as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 05/16/2006 and recorded 05/25/2006, in document No. 200612039 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 775 at Page Number 2 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LAND SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF MISSOULA IN THE STATE OF MT LOT 9 IN BLOCK 4, OF SPRING HILLS ADDITION NO. 6, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 2306 HIGHWOOD DR, MISSOULA, MT 59803. Property Address: 2306 HIGHWOOD DR, Missoula, MT 59803. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 10/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $156,950.48 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.625% per annum from 10/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 03/02/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0016000 FEI NO. 1006.154923 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 07/16/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the fol-

lowing place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which MARK C. MODERIE, ANTONIA B. MODERIE as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to STEWART TITLE OF MISSOULA COUNTY, INC. as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to COMMUNITY BANK-MISSOULA, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 09/08/2006 and recorded 09/13/2006, in document No. 200623422 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 783 at Page Number 74 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 274 OF PLEASANT VIEW HOMES NO. 3, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 4018 YORKSHIRE PLACE, Missoula, MT 59808. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 12/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $168,759.08 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.75% per annum from 12/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 03/05/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0017817 FEI NO. 1006.155033 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 07/20/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which JOHN P KELLY as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 01/19/2006 and recorded 01/24/2006, in document No. 200601754 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 767 at Page Number 1584 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 1 IN BLOCK 57 OF SOUTH MISSOULA ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 700 CLEVELAND STREET, Missoula, MT 59801. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE

SUSTAINAFIEDS STRUCTURED ASSET INVESTMENT LOAN TRUST 2006-3. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 09/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $144,276.14 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 2.50% per annum from 09/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 03/07/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0018601 FEI NO. 1006.155146 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 07/30/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which GEORGE R BAILEY as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to INSURED TITLES, LLC., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 06/16/2008 and recorded 06/17/2008, in document No. 200813512 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 820 at Page Number 1090 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: TRACT 5 OF GRANT CREEK TRACTS, AS AMENDED ON AMENDED PLAT OF TRACTS FIVE AND SIX, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT RECORDED IN BOOK 12 OF PLATS AT PAGE 32, INCLUDING PORTION B AND EXCLUDING PORTION A. Property Address: 10840 GRANT CREEK ROAD, Missoula, MT 59808. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 11/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $304,000.00 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.25% per annum from 11/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C8 April 19 – April 26, 2012

required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 03/16/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-9840407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 120023601 FEI NO. 1006.155463 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 07/30/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which KENNETH K. CRAWFORD as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to STEWART TITLE OF MISSOULA COUNTY, INC. as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to COMMUNITY BANKMISSOULA, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 06/08/2007 and recorded 06/13/2007, in document No. 200714811 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 799 at Page Number 344 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 1 OF CRAWFORD ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 23850 MULLAN ROAD, Huson, MT 59846. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 12/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $219,162.85 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.375% per annum from 12/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 03/16/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-9840407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 120023523 FEI NO. 1006.155462

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The Spring Bustle Has Hit Housing in Missoula By Jennifer Taylor, 2012 MOR President Even during the recession, housing has had ups and downs throughout the year – often slowing down in the winter and picking back up in the spring and summer months. For 2012, it seems the early spring has brought early interest into the market place. Missoula families are getting out and enjoying the sun while looking for a new home. Although the insanely low interest rates are most likely a contributing factor to the market’s energy, a recent National Housing Survey conducted by Fannie Mae shines some light on how American consumers view owning a home. Most importantly 84% of the population believes that owning a home makes more sense than renting, but I found it interesting that financial gain is low on the list of reasons why. The top four: 1. It means having a good place to raise children and provide them with a good education 2. You have a physical structure where you and your family feel safe 3. It allows you to have more space for your family 4. It gives you control of what you do with your living space (renovations and updates) For those of you who want to ensure that you’re buying at the right time, several things should be discussed. First is the cost versus the price. With interest rates so low, it makes a big difference in how much you can afford for the same monthly payment. The second thing you

should know is how the market is performing in the areas that you would like to live. The Missoula Organization of REALTORS® releases a report each year to look at the local market place in a credible and neutral way. The 2012 Housing Report was just released and is available on our website, www.MissoulaRealEstate.com, under market trends. Additionally, we update market numbers and graphs each month to ensure you have the most accurate information available.

The most important factor to consider if you’re thinking now is a good time to buy is your own personal situation. Can you afford the home, down payments, taxes, repairs? Are you looking toward a longerterm investment? Do you want to offer the stability and benefits associated with home ownership to your family? If you’ve answered yes to these questions, than get out and enjoy the sunshine and check out a few properties while you’re at it!

Northside Energy-efficient Bungalow

FEATURED LISTING • Historic AJ Gibson • 5 bed 2 bath • Basement & garage • Leaded windows, oak floors • Energy-efficient updates

$499,900 MLS#10006516

• 1 bed, 1 bath, basement • Wood floors, gas range, W/D • Upgraded furnace & electical • Fenced yard with native plants

$182,500

431ePine.com

835 Rollins

MLS#20121623

Shannon Hilliard

Anne Jablonski

shannon@prudentialmissoula.com www.ShannonHilliard.com

www.MoveMontana.com

406-239-8350

546-5816

RENTAL APARTMENTS 102 CAMELOT: 2 BEDROOM, CARPORT & BIG STORAGE, SECOND FLOOR, ONSITE COIN-OP LAUNDRY, BY COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY & SPLASH MONTANA, NO SMOKING/DOGS, CAT OK $590 * 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP * Garden City Property Management 549-6106 1213 S. 6TH ST. W.: 1 BEDROOM, GARDEN LEVEL W/ EGRESS, JUST OFF ORANGE STREET, STORAGE, GOOD SIZE, SHARE BACK YARD, PARKING, NO SMOKING OR DOGS, CAT CONSIDERED ! $550 * 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP & $100.00 GIFT CARD * Garden

City Property 549-6106

Management

1301 MONTANA: NEWER STUDIOS, 2ND FLOOR WITH PRIVATE DECK OR SUNROOM, PERGO FLOORS!, FREE CABLE , LAUNDRY, FULL KITCHEN W/ DISHWASHER, STORAGE, NO SMOKING OR PETS $625 & $675. * 1-YEAR COSTCO MEM-

BERSHIP & $100.00 GIFT CARD! Garden City Property Management 549-6106 1304 S. 1ST ST. W.: 1 BEDROOM, SMALL PET OK !!, 2ND FLR, BREAKFAST BAR, NEW LINOLEUM!, STORAGE, PARKING, * FREE CABLE*, CENTRAL, SHARED YARD, NO SMOKING, $595 * 1-YEAR COSTCO MEM-

"Let us tend your den"

1323 Grant St. “B” newer studio, semi-secluded, W/D in unit, A/C. $575 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

1547 S. Higgins Ave. #5 1bed/1bath HEAT PAID! Centrally located near schools & shopping, features coin-ops on site, off-street parking, & A/C. $675 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

MHA Management An affiliation of the Missoula Housing Authority

FIDELITY Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

251-4707

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

1315 East Broadway #1. 1bed/1bath near University & on bus line. Carport, storage and coinops on site. $600. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

1409 S. 3RD ST. W.: 1 BEDROOM, NEWER, MAIN FLOOR W/ PATIO, STORAGE, CENTRAL LOCATION – JUST OFF RUSSELL, * FREE CABLE *, ON-SITE LAUNDRY, ASSIGNED PARKING, NO SMOKING /PETS $595 *1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP & $100.00 GIFT CARD * Garden City Property Management 549-6106

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

BERSHIP * Garden City Property Management 549-6106

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

Finalist

Finalist

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing 30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

www.gatewestrentals.com

Rent Incentive

1 Bed Apt. 528 Hickory $490/month 2135 Carol Ann Ct. 2 Bed Duplex w/Garage $850/month 2 Bed Apt Uncle Robert Ln. $645/month

Garden District Apts. 1-2 bedroom apts. Rent: $474 Deposit: $550 Rent: $703 Deposit: $650 W/S/G paid. W/D included in unit 2 bedroom fully accessible unit 1155 34th Street Rent: $625 Deposit: $650 Dishwasher, W/D hookups 2 bedroom unit 1443 South 1st West Rent: $325 Deposit $650 Very low income limits apply Dishwasher, W/D in unit 149 West Broadway 1 bedroom apartments Rent: $475-$500 Deposit: $550 Convenient downtown location

Visit our website at

Some restrictions apply. For more information contact MHA Management at

www.fidelityproperty.com

549-4113

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 April 19 – April 26, 2012


RENTAL 1561 S. 12TH ST. W.: STUDIO, BIG WALK-IN CLOSET + ANOTHER! 2ND FLOOR, CENTRAL LOCATION, PARKING, FULL KITCHEN & BATHROOM, NO SMOKING OR DOGS CAT OK ! $425 * 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP * Garden City Property Management 5496106

1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP & $100.00 GIFT CARD. Garden City Property Management 549-6106

COSTCO MEMBERSHIP * Garden City Property Management 5496106

1914 S. 14th St. Brand new studios, central location, W/D, A/C, shared yard, garage space available. $575. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

1805 PHILLIPS: 1 BEDROOM, SECOND FOOLR, DINING AREA, DECK-AREA, ON-SITE LAUNDRY FACILITIES, * SOME QUALIFICATIONS *, OFF STREET PARKING, NO SMOKING OR PETS $595 *

1925 S. 14TH ST. W.: 1 BEDROOM, * FREE CABLE *, CENTRAL LOCATION, STORAGE, OFF STREET PARKING, GARDEN LEVEL WITH BIG WINDOWS, NO SMOKING OR DOGS, CAT CONSIDERED ! $525 * 1-YEAR

2339 Mary #3 2bed/1bath. HEAT PAID! New carpet & linoleum, shared yard, coin-ops, off-street parking, close to Reserve St. $600 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

GardenCity

Property Management

422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

444 Washington 1bed/1bath, HEAT PAID, downtown, coin-ops on site. $675Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 528 DALY #2: 1 BEDROOM, MAIN FLOOR UNIT _ BLOCK FROM THE U!, WOOD FLOORS, SHARED PORCH, OPEN LAYOUT, NEAT OLD BUILDING, NO SMOKING/DOGS, CAT OK ! $625 * 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP * Garden City Property Management 549-6106

807 SW HIGGINS: 1 BEDROOM, BASE OF SOUTHHILLS, BIG CLOSETS, 2ND FLOOR, NEAR PATTEE ST. MARKET, SHARE BACK YARD, * FREE CABLE *, NO SMOKING OR DOGS, CAT WELCOME ! $510 * 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP * Garden City Property Management 549-6106

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

1016 Charlo #1 2bed/1bath, new carpet, freshly painted, off-street parking, W/D hookups. $675 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

825 SW Higgins #B2. 2bed/1bath. HEAT PAID. Single car garage. $800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

218 Barclay “A” 2 bed, 1.5 bath, central Lolo location, all utilities paid. Shared yard, carport, DW & shared W/D. $800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

MOBILE HOMES

HOUSES

Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent w/s/g/elec included $400/month406-273-6034

1800 S. 4th W. #8 : Two bedroom, 2nd floor, Dining area, Big closets, Large unit, New Carpet, Near Good Food Store, Off street parking, On site laundry, No smok-

1&2

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

DUPLEXES

ing or dogs allowed, Cat considered $100.00 COSTCO GIFT CERTIFICATE GCPM , $750, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com

Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

3901 O’Leary: Two bedroom, 2 story unit, Newer, Carport, Storage, Free cable, Private deck, #219 has washer and dryer, 1 1/2 bath, Dishwasher, No smoking or pets allowed $100.00 COSTCO GIFT CERTIFICATE GCPM , $825, 5496106, gcpm-mt.com

roomate to share house 475 per month inc. util. Dog/Horses/Garden ok. Close walk and views of river. Satelite tv included, firepit, scenic location. Located in Clinton easy commute 15 minutes to Orange st. Call 493 2856

824 Stoddard St. 4 bed/2.5 bath Northside home, recent remodeling, shared fenced yard, W/D hookups. $1400. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

ROOMMATES

OUT OF TOWN ALBERTON Petty Creek Exit. Older 2 bedroom 1.5 bath single wide on 1/2 acre. 1010 Lucinda Lane. $650/month, $650 deposit. Call Rob 602-499-4640

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM.

Find your new home with

Professional Property Management

Office/retail space in Stephens Center. 950-2,170 sq. ft. $895-$1,990 + merchant fees.

1 Bedroom Walk to the U $525 W/G/S pd. Gas heat, coin-op laundry, off street parking, no smoking, no pets.

2 Bedroom North Russell $595 H/W/S/G/ paid, coin-op laundry, off street parking & storage.

2100 Stephens • 728-7333

2100 Stephens • 728-7333

2100 Stephens • 728-7333

Five bedroom, 4 bath townhome with 2 car garage on The Ranch Club golf course. Amazing views. Golf everyday! 2640B Tanbark Way MLS #20120690 $399,000. Call Anne for details. 546-5816 www.movemontana.com

sac, 10 acres. Rodeo Rd. 2405227 porticorealestate.com

Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com

Historic Preservation Award-winning Marshall House Beautiful professional building with great design for offices or home and awesome exposure for business. 436 S 3rd W. $395,000 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

Immaculate Rose Park Area Home This light filled home offers a fantastic floorplan, 2 family rooms, large deck and nice backyard for entertaining. 300 Central, 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

1511 S Russell • 721-8990

549-7711 Check our website!

professionalproperty.com

www.alpharealestate.com

REAL ESTATE HOMES 15000 Neil Drive. Enjoy country living close to town, 3 bed, 2.5 bath. Covered deck front and back. Carport and large double detached garage with additional living quarters. Nice views and close to Forest Service land and Lolo Cree. Park on the North boundary. Fence between Lot 1 and 2 not on property line. Will sell with adjacent 1.71 acre lot. $299,900. MLS#20115937. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. 2 Bdr, 2 Bath Central Missoula home close to the Good Food Store. $189,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

4 Bdr, 3 Bath Grant Creek/Prospect Meadows home next to open space. $314,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4 Bdr, 3 Bath Stevensville area home on 13 acres with spectacular Bitterroot Mountain views. $629,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 541-547 South 2nd West. Wonderful 4-plex in great neighborhood. Suitable for condo conversion. Newer rubber membrane roof. $275,000. MLS #20120840 Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula

Properties. 544-7507. www.541-547s2ndst.com

1400 Burns, porticorealestate.com

6107 Brusett. 4 bed, 3 bath Martz home with 2 car garage & basement. Lower Miller Creek. MLS #20121397. $300,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 880-4749

Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free comparative market analysis. 3608234

736 South 3rd West. Beautifully renovated 1920’s home. 5 bed, 1.5 bath. Currently used as office building. MLS #2116938. $429,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749 Affordable Townhomes Didn’t think you could afford to buy your own place? This sweet new, green-built development may be your ticket. NEW PRICES!

240-5227

Character + and Ready to Move Into! Corner lot, close to schools, great trees, lots of upgrades, 3 bedroom, 1 bath, full basement, so much house for this price of $227,500. 240-5227 2107 Park St. porticorealestate.com Energy-Efficient Sweet Bungalow in Slant Street ‘hood with double lot and raised beds ready to plant! 835 Rollins. 2405227 porticorealestate.com

2441 Macintosh: 55+ COMMUNITY 2 bed, 2 bath, large family room. Homeowners fee of $370/month includes clubhouse, sewer, garbage, land lease, snow removal & lawn care. $129,900. MLS#10006023. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net.

Four bed, 1-1/2 bath, 3 car garage home at 345 Brooks. Close to downtown, neighborhood coffee shop/restaurant, and university. Long time family home has potential to also have downstairs rental. Just $265,000 MLS 20117301 Call Anne 546-5816 for details. www.movemontana.com Handsome, Spacious Home on Prime Upper Miller Creek Acreage, 5+ bedrooms, with out of town living on quiet cul-de-

Huge Lot Bungalow Style Home Middle of Missoula, close to Good Food Store, 1/2 acre + lot, enormous shop, great home. 203 Curtis, 240-5227 porticorealestate.com I can help you sell your home! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential

Looking for a place to call home? Call me! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 5447507. www.rochelleglasgow.com Looking for homebuyer education? Call me! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 5447507. www.rochelleglasgow.com

RICE TEAM

Robin Rice • 240-6503

3 Bdr, 1 Bath Central Missoula home with a two car garage. Close to the Good Food Store. $189,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 6785 Prairie Schooner • 3 bed • 3 bath tri-level on quiet 1/2 acre • Oak & tile flooring • Large, bright family room • Fenced yard • Many updates $259,900 MLS #20122287

Rochelle Glasgow

544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

Missoula Properties

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10 April 19 – April 26, 2012

736 South 3rd West Beautiful 1920 home currently used as office space • Reception and conference areas • 4 private offices • Full kitchen & basement • Wood floors, doors & trim • Arched doorways & Tiffany lighting $300,000 MLS #21021397 8169 Lower Miller Creek • PRICE REDUCED! • 3 bed, 2 bath well-kept manufactured home on 5 acres • 2 storage sheds, detached double garage & separate shop • Only 5 minutes to town $244,000 • MLS #20113133

Please call me with any questions Astrid Oliver Senior Loan Originator Guild Mortgage Company 1001 S. Higgins Ave 2A Missoula, MT 59801

Phone: 406-258-7522 Cell: 406-550-3587 NMLS # 395211, Guild License #3274, Branch 206 NMLS # 398152


REAL ESTATE Open & Light & Green & Clean Efficiency abounds in this 3 BR, 2.5 ba stand alone super insulated condo with heated floors and so much more. 1530 S 12th W. Near Good Food Store and bike trails. 240-5227. porticorealestate.com PRICE REDUCED 4 bed 2 bath house on one full landscaped acre near Wye. Great Well at 30 gpm. 2 gas fireplaces, updated kitchen and bathrooms. $280,000. MLS #20120012. 9869 Leeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lane, Missoula. Call Anne 546-5816 for details. www.movemontana.com

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES 2 Bdr, 1.5 Downtown Missoula condo. Zoned for Residential or Commercial use. $299,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com For a limited time a purchase of a condo at the Uptown Flats will include a large flat screen TV and assistance with up to $5000 Buyers closing costs!The Uptown Flats have two one bed one bath units at $149,900. Call Anne 546-5816 for showing. www.movemontana.com Treehouse Feel in this fairly new condo with single garage. Great location close to school, bike trail, Good Food Store and town. 935B Garfield. $117,500. 2405227 porticorealestate.com

MANUFACTURED HOMES 1641 Stoddard Great single wide 2 bed, 2 bath mobile on large lot with double car garage. Fenced yard, lots of trees and curbing around the landscaping. Covered deck. $99,500. MLS#20116883. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

LAND FOR SALE 2951 Expo Parkway. 1.24 acres off I-90 between Motel 6 & Cracker Barrel. MLS #20120951, $399,000. Additional 1.57 acres at $499,000. MLS #201200952. Jeremy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 552-2410 3.5 Acres on Petty Creek. Well in place, septic approved. $125,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4,500 square foot lot on the Northside. Power & utilities in place, sewer available in alley. Zoned for single or multi-family use. $59,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 601 West Broadway. .58 acre along Clark Fork River. MLS #20120935, $1,700,000. Jeremy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 552-2419

NHN Peregrine Court. Almost 1/2 acre building site with great views. Close to Ranch Club Golf course and fishing access. City sewer stubbed to the property line. NOW ONLY $65,000. MLS# 10007449. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties

COMMERCIAL 1510/1520/1530 Cooley. 54 unit 1, 2 and 3 bed apartment complex. MLS #20120934. $4,259,000. Jeremy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 552-2419 321 N. Higgins Commercial building on coveted downtown location with lots of foot traffic. Building only for sale. Call Anne 546-5816 for showing. www.movemontana.com

East Missoula Building Lot with great trees and a sweet â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;hood. $65,000. 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

OUT OF TOWN 3 Bdr, 2 Bath single level Stevensville area home on 6.3 cross-fenced acres with a large shop. $339,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

4 Bdr, 3 Bath Florence area home on 10 acres with Bitterroot River frontage. Horse Barn, cross-fenced. $449,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com Lolo End of Cul-de-sac Beauty Open, light, private, quiet and in immaculate condition. Huge yard, 3 bedroom, 2 bath home with hardwood, tile and

beautiful warm colors. 5697 Explorer Court. $225,000. 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL

Mountain views, cute 3 bed, 2 bath, Philipsburg. ~2,000 sf., full basement. New carport, siding, windows. Large fenced yard. Walk to town, 20 minutes from Georgetown Lake, Discovery Basin. $135,000. 406-859-1282. 406-529-5529.

QUICK CASH FOR REAL ESTATE NOTES and Land Installment Contracts. We also lend on Real Estate with strong equity. 406-721-1444 www.Creative-Finance.com

3 Bdr, 2.5 Bath home on 3.3 acres on Petty Creek. $425,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 32499 Bible Lane, Alberton 3 Bed, 2 Bath, 2 Car Garage. Seller motivated. Nice home close to Clark Fork River. $159,900. MLS# 20121030. Robin Rice @ 2406503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

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OPEN HOUSE â&#x20AC;˘ SUNDAY 4/22 12-2 P.M. UPSCALE DOWNTOWN LIFESTYLE THE UPTOWN FLATS 1 and 2 bedroom condos available One unit priced lower than ever before at

$139,900. Limited time Call Anne for more details

546-5816

PORTICO REAL ESTATE

annierealtor@gmail.com Anne Jablonski ePRO, ABR, CRS MoveMontana.com Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 April 19 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; April 26, 2012


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701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 7 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188 | orangestreetfoodfarm.com


Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture