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Up Front: Billboard dispute heads to Montana Supreme Court Ochenski: Tester cuts the throats of wolves—and Montana Scope: Taking a wild ride with Blind Your Ponies


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Up Front: Billboard dispute heads to Montana Supreme Court Ochenski: Tester cuts the throats of wolves—and Montana Scope: Taking a wild ride with Blind Your Ponies


Missoula Independent

Page 2 April 14–April 21, 2011


nside Cover Story Forensic investigator Gilbert Grissom and his team are racing against the clock to save one of their own from a criminal bent on revenge. In just one hour, they seamlessly piece together a crime scene; pick up clues at the criminal’s home through sheer chance; analyze a plant bud from the perp’s car, narrowing their search to one point in the expanse of desert west of Las Vegas; and…so much for CBS’s “CSI,” which is preposterously melodramatic when you consider it alongside the reality-based drama of the Montana State Crime Lab, in Missoula.....................................................................................14

News Letters Bad bills, Section 35, and why we should make things.............................. 4 The Week in Review Gray water tape is cut, the iconic wiener visits ......................6 Briefs Market parking, Plum Creek’s power, and the wolves’ bad week ..................6 Etc. Billings started it..................................................................................................7 Up Front The scent of victory for big-load opponents..............................................8 Up Front Billboard case heads for state high court...................................................9 Ochenski Tester is selling out Montanans and gray wolves alike ...........................10 Writers on the Range Wallace Stegner, Jim Hill, and…Mark Zuckerberg .............11 Agenda Diversity Day 2011: Who’s Your Neighbor? ................................................12

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan Carrots and garlic, a love story ....................................................18 Happiest Hour Tamarack Brewing Company..........................................................19 8 Days a Week Quit watching TV! ...........................................................................21 Mountain High Zootown Roundup Slopestyle Competition .................................29 Scope Stanley Gordon West’s little novel that could ...............................................30 Noise Dark Dark Dark, Maserati, The Hood Internet, Kurt Vile ..............................31 Books Craig Lancaster plumbs father-and-son troubles ..........................................32 Film Ed Helms plays it safe in Cedar Rapids ...........................................................33 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films..................................................34

Exclusives Street Talk ..................................................................................................................4 In Other News..........................................................................................................13 Classifieds ...............................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ..............................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrology ................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle ..................................................................................................C-7 This Modern World..............................................................................................C-11 PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Robert Meyerowitz PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson ASSOCIATE EDITOR Matthew Frank PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Ira Sather-Olson STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Skylar Browning COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Chris Melton, Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Rhonda Urbanski, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Teal Kenny FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold EDITORIAL INTERN Jed Nussbaum CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Dave Loos, Ednor Therriault, Ali Gadbow, Azita Osanloo, Cathrine L. Walters, Anne Medley, Jesse Froehling

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

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Page 3 April 14–April 21, 2011


STREET TALK

by Chad Harder

Asked Tuesday afternoon, outside the Missoula County Courthouse.

Q:

Nobody said governing was easy. But from heartfelt pro-DUI speeches on the House floor to a bill that would permit hunting with spears, the 2011 Montana Legislature is being heralded as one of the worst in the state’s history. How would your life change if we just abolished it? Follow-up: What should Montana endorse as our official cut of meat?

Augustina Delaney: It’d change a lot, because we’d have to come up with a new way of governing ourselves, and there’d be a chance that someone would set up a government that would actually give us less of a say in our affairs. It’s always hard to predict what change will bring. Local branding: I’d say New York Strip, but it’s got “New York” in it. So let’s call it a Montana Strip—a grass-fed and hardy Montana Strip.

Amanda Taylor: You mean if all the cuts they’re proposing didn’t happen? If all the public services stayed the same? I think we might be better off. It may be idealistic, but people would find other ways to get the things they needed—without government oversight, or by people who don’t even know what’s going on. Pigg y: I’m not really a big meat person, but bacon. Definitely bacon.

Joanna Yardley: The legislature…abolished?! Well I hadn’t considered it, but it would probably be for the good as I have been fairly disappointed with them this year. I mean, I’m always amazed that legislators feel compelled to have a say in my affairs, affairs that in no way affect them. I just don’t get it. Erector spinae: It would need to be a backstrap, any good backstrap.

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Misguided doggies Montana Senate Bill 112—the bill sponsored by Sen. Greg Hinkle that would have allowed big game hunting with a spear—really wouldn’t have done that much to affect most Montanans. However, if you look at the bill as a metaphor that characterizes our current legislative session—decidedly retrogressive, nonsensical, and arrogant—it takes on new meaning. Certainly House Bill 309, an attempt to privatize some of our waterways currently open to public access, qualifies as retrogressive. Many of our Republican representatives talk a good line about expanding public recreational access for sportsmen, but when it gets down to actually supporting the kind of access they have the power to influence…not so much. Nullifying the Endangered Species Act would lead to the forfeit of millions of dollars in federal funding that supports road construction, maintenance, and many jobs. House Bill 321 had no chance of passing and overriding the governor’s veto, so what was the point? This kind of hubris wastes time and money—taxpayer money. Republican elected officials such as my representative, Pat Ingraham, seem to have adopted quite the cavalier attitude this session regarding laws we voters have enacted through the citizen initiative process, including the use of tobacco settlement monies for prevention programs, the ban on open pit mines that utilize the cyanide heap-leach process, and access to medical marijuana for the gravely ill. It takes an incredibly arrogant attitude to reverse the will of the voters simultaneously on so many fronts. Yes, it is highly likely that we will remember the majority running the show at the state capitol this year as the “spear chucking legislature of 2011.” Gov. Brian Schweitzer has also called this assembly the “Flat Earth Society,” a moniker they richly deserve. He will certainly need his red-hot veto branding iron when he rounds up all these misguided doggies. Paul Clark Trout Creek

Don’t choose Section 35 Patrick Klier: It would change for the worse. We’d just go to hell without any government, or at least it would give way too much power to the governor. Montana’s muscle: Getting zany, aren’t you. In Montana, it has to be a backstrap. No, not a backstrap—a tenderloin.

Missoula Independent

Page 4 April 14–April 21, 2011

At the Lincoln Community Council meeting on March 28, a robust discussion ensued regarding the U.S Forest Ser vice and Department of Environmental Quality’s attempt to identify an alternative site for nearly one million cubic yards of contaminated waste from the Mike Horse Mine (see “Section 35,” March 24, 2011). This marked the first time residents in the upper Blackfoot Valley were able to publicly

confront Lincoln District Ranger Amber Kamps about plans to place the repository in our neighborhood. Everyone at the meeting spoke out against a repository on Section 35, including some council members, with the exception of Kamps. Still, it sounds like the agencies are going to hold a public meeting with no other reasonable alternatives on the table for a repository than Horse Fly Gulch and Section 35. Amber Kamps flat told the audience they were not going to look outside the Blackfoot watershed. She suggested people contact Leslie Weldon, the regional forester based in

takes an “Itincredibly arrogant attitude to reverse the will of the voters simultaneously on so many fronts.

Missoula, if they want to change that decision. So on some yet-to-be-determined date in May, they intend to present a detailed cost analysis of their alternatives with no real effort to find anything outside the Blackfoot watershed. The agencies have said it would be three times as expensive to go over Rogers Pass even though the mine is within two miles of the top of the pass. Kamps could not provide a source for this estimate. Three truckers I know personally say they see little difference in fuel consumption whether hauling east or west over Rogers Pass. For the first time in public Kamps acknowledged they do not have an agreement to buy from John Baucus and U.S. Sen. Max Baucus the development rights they own on Stimson property—which could effectively eliminate all of their alternatives outside of Paymaster and First Gulch. This would mean they have

spent four years and nearly a quarter million dollars investigating Section 35 and Horse Fly Gulch for nothing, not to mention the $700,000 road they constructed last summer which obviously envisions the haul route going further down into the Blackfoot watershed. Even though their only two current alternatives rest on Stimson property, Kamps denies the “Stimson Land Swap” had any bearing on the decision-making process. The Lincoln Community Council is going to host a public meeting in May. I would like to encourage people to write to Regional Forester Leslie Weldon and ask that she expand the search area for a repository to sites outside of the Blackfoot watershed. Mike Grimes Friends of the Blackfoot Lincoln

Make things I read an interesting editorial in the Wall Street Journal written by Stephen Moore, a senior economics writer. Moore states that today in America there are nearly twice as many people working for the government than in all of manufacturing. He says this is an almost exact reversal of the situation in 1960, when there were almost twice the workers in manufacturing than collecting a paycheck from the government. And it gets worse: More Americans work for the government than work in construction, farming, fishing, forestry, manufacturing, mining, and utilities combined. While in no way do I want to disparage government workers, I am convinced that our nation’s move away from creating new wealth from the production of natural resources and the associated value-added manufacturing of things we consume has not been good for our state or nation. Increasing the options for mineral production, forest products, energy, and agriculture are in our best interests and anything the legislature and governor can do to create jobs in those sectors are beneficial. Of course, there are vocal minorities who continue to advocate that the only thing that matters is doing nothing in terms of natural resource production. They have been banging that gong since the 1970s and it’s leading us backwards. Moore closes by saying, “President Obama says we have to retool our economy to ‘win the future.’ The only way to do that is to grow the economy that makes things, not the sector that takes things.” I agree. We should encourage lawmakers to support legislation that will do anything to help create necessary jobs that make things. Katharine E. Wikstrom Missoula


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Missoula Independent

Page 5 April 14–April 21, 2011


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, April 6

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

News Quirks by Chad Harder

Flathead District Court Judge Stewart Stadler sentences Robert Allen Lake, 22, to 110 years in Montana State Prison; Lake helped bludgeon to death 49-yearold Wesley “Bubba” Collins, of Kalispell, with a hammer before absconding with Collins’s medical marijuana and prescription medications.

• Thursday, April 7 Missoula District Judge John Larson rules that it’s illegal under Montana’s Medical Marijuana Act for medical marijuana caregivers to transfer quantities of marijuana among themselves—a common practice, and one that, at least in part, prompted last month’s federal raids.

• Friday, April 8 The Montana Department of Transportation approves a single oversized load permit for Imperial Oil’s 500,000-pound test validation module. Imperial announces the load will leave the Port of Lewiston April 11 en route to Lolo Hot Springs, but Idaho delays the transport Tuesday morning when the module knocks out power in Orofino.

• Saturday, April 9 A pickup driven by Dillon S. Katzenberger, 24, veers off Montana Highway 21 east of Augusta and strikes a power pole. Katzenberger is uninjured in the crash, but is killed instantly when he touches a fence wire electrified by the downed power line, the Great Falls Tribune reports.

• Sunday, April 10 The Oscar Mayer Wienermobile—a striking sight with a yellow bun body topped by a hotdog resembling a fleshy spaceship—wraps up its three-day stay in Missoula with an appearance at the Wal-Mart Supercenter Store on Mullan Road. Curiosity seekers are offered a chance to tour the iconic wiener.

• Monday, April 11 The Missoula City Council removes regulatory barriers that stand in the way of recycling semi-dirty water, or gray water. Locals who aim to reuse water in irrigation that’s been used once in, for instance, showers and washing machines now have fewer hoops to jump through.

• Tuesday, April 12 Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer signs off House Bill 334, aimed at reforming the state’s workers’ compensation system. Supporters tout the new law as a bipartisan effort to reel in bloated compensation premiums. Critics say the bill cuts costs at the expense of workers.

Taking advantage of a fair-weather window early Tuesday morning, construction crews mill winter-damaged asphalt on South Avenue. If the weather holds, the ground material will be recycled as a new layer of asphalt by next week.

River Market Wilma yanks space Clark Fork River Market organizers were thrown a curveball last week when the Wilma Residential Board announced that vendors will no longer be allowed to use parking spaces under the Higgins Avenue Bridge. “I guess we kind of got in the way a little bit,” says Clark Fork River Market Manager Franco Salazar. “They ended up taking them back.” The decision complicates Salazar’s job, as the market has more than doubled in size in just three years, growing from roughly 55 vendors in 2009 to 130 this year. And the announcement came less than a month before the market’s April 30 opening, leaving Salazar scrambling to find space for its many local food purveyors. “That makes it a little more difficult,” he says. For seven years the market has, based on a verbal agreement, used 12 parking spaces under the Higgins Street Bridge and an additional 12 spots east of the Wilma. But, as Wilma Residential

Bat h i n g Beauties

Beads April Special

Board President Jeff Aresty wrote in a letter to market organizers, dated April 6, “this move just did not work for everyone.” At least one Wilma resident has come forward to denounce Aresty’s decision: State representative and Poverello Center Director Ellie Hill says Aresty is acting unilaterally to the detriment of the community. “I was shocked to hear we were hamstringing the market…My own internal polling of Wilma owners found no one single resident who agrees with Mr. Aresty’s decision,” Hill says. “In fact, I have found all Wilma owners, both on the commercial and residential sides, instead wish to share their parking space with the market. We see it as our honor and privilege.” Hill is mobilizing opposition to Aresty’s decision. Meanwhile, Salazar is making do with what he has, creating a waiting list and working to identify additional riverfront spaces for existing and future vendors. “We could grow more,” he says. Jessica Mayrer

City Council The politics of place Missoula Councilwoman Pam Walzer is grappling with how a potential change in the boundary lines that define city wards will affect her constituents—and her reelection prospects. Missoula considers reapportionment of its wards every other year, to ensure that citizens are equally distributed among them. New 2010 census data released last month reflects demographic shifts, which means that this year’s process to ensure equal representation could have political consequences. Reapportionment proposals now on the table, drafted by Missoula’s Office of Planning and Grants (OPG), recommend redefining all six city wards. That could have significant implications in districts such as Walzer’s, which is considered politically schizophrenic, with the upscale and conservativeleaning Grant Creek on one side and the workingclass and liberal Westside on the other. The proposed reapportionment calls for mov-

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Missoula Independent

Page 6 April 14–April 21, 2011

"I hope our wisdom will grow with our power, and teach us, that the less we use our power the greater it will be." -Thomas Jefferson


Inside

Letters

Briefs

ing 332 people from the Westside into the already solidly-progressive Ward 1. Not all of those individuals are voters. Still, the largest Ward 2 victory in the past decade came when the liberal Roy Houseman won by 262 votes. On top of that, 2011 is shaping up to be an unusual election year in Ward 2. The other Ward 2 councilperson, Cynthia Wolken, was appointed by the council in January to replace the outgoing Houseman. So both of Ward 2’s seats, now occupied by distinctly left-leaning representatives, will be up for election this year. Ward 5, which covers the southwest of the city, also could be on the block. There, Dick Haines, one of the council’s minority conservatives, held onto his seat in 2009 by 68 of 2,744 votes. OPG recommends reallocating 446 people from Ward 5 to Ward 6, another progressive district. Meanwhile, the seat of Renee Mitchell, the other Ward 5 councilperson, is also up for election this year. Wards 5 and 2 have “historically some of the closer elections,� says Ward 1 Councilman Jason Wiener, who also chairs the Missoula County Democratic Party’s Executive Board. “Certainly, any changes in the complexion of a ward would change outcomes.� That said, Wiener and Walzer both caution about coloring any neighborhood with one brush. And a lot can happen before Election Day. “We’ll find out Nov. 3,� Walzer says. Council will decide whether to redraw ward boundaries by April 30. Jessica Mayrer

Legislature Plum Creek protests What should carry more weight in matters of land use: the number of landowners or the amount of land owned? That’s the question posed by Missoula and Gallatin counties in lawsuits seeking to have Montana’s “protest provision� declared unconstitutional. The provision gives landowners with 50 percent or more of the private land in a planning area veto power over land-use regulations. A similar case in South Dakota suggests the counties will prevail. Courts rejected that state’s protest provision years ago because the statute allowed for an unconstitutional delegation of legislative power. If that reasoning translates to Montana, no private landowner would be affected more than Plum Creek Timber, the largest private landholder in the

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

state (and the country). That’s why Plum Creek helped draft Senate Bill 379, which is quickly moving through the Montana Legislature. It would only go into effect if the courts take away Plum Creek’s ability to veto zoning. The bill’s language would be constitutional because, unlike South Dakota’s law, in the opinion of Missoula Deputy County Attorney James McCubbin, it includes a provision allowing a supermajority of county commissioners to override the protest. But the bill wouldn’t just preserve the protest, it would make protests easier to invoke by lowering the protest’s land ownership requirement to 40 per-

cent. And its override provision, in the view of Missoula’s commissioners, is much too “onerous.� Missoula is among several counties around the state asking its delegation to oppose the bill. It echoes the Montana Smart Growth Coalition, which says “SB 379 would make the only tool counties have to manage growth almost impossible to use.� The bill passed the Senate last month, and the House amended it before passing it on Monday, sending it back to the Senate. If it becomes law, its effects might first be felt in the community of Seeley Lake. Last fall, Missoula commissioners approved the Seeley Lake Regional Plan, a years-in-the-making growth policy that Plum Creek—which owns 83,000 acres in the area— opposed. “It would be inequitable at best, and irresponsible at worst, if SB 379 were to become law,� says Missoula County Rural Initiatives Director Pat O’Herren. That, he says, could “result in the inabili-

Agenda

News Quirks

BY THE NUMBERS

ty of these landowners to protect their property values� through zoning. Matthew Frank

$3.59

Wolves

Average retail cost of regular gasoline per gallon in Montana, according to MontanaGasPrices.com. The price has risen 32 cents since this time last month, and is at its highest since November 2008.

Back off the list Congress and a federal court hit gray wolf advocates with a double-whammy last weekend. Negotiators in D.C. deliberated until midnight Friday over a must-pass federal budget bill that in the end also took the wolves off the Endangered Species list. The next day, U.S. District Court Judge Donald Molloy rejected a court settlement recently proposed by 10 environmental groups. “It was certainly a dark weekend for wolves and wildlife conservation overall,â€? says Michael Leahy of Defenders of Wildlife, one of the parties in the settlement effort. “Congress has undermined our system of wildlife conservation by saying science doesn’t matter, politics and fear are all that matter.â€? The budget bill rider—officially attached by Sen. Jon Tester and Idaho’s Rep. Mike Simpson on Tuesday—returns Northern Rockies gray wolves to the 2009 management structure. Montana and Idaho will once again control their own populations. Protections for Wyoming wolves remain pending a federally approved state plan. “This is just pulling wolves off [the endangered species list] because they are recovered,â€? Tester says. “They’re at the top of the food chain, and we need to manage them just like we manage elk or deer or bighorn sheep or whatever wildlife’s out there.â€? Rep. Denny Rehberg greeted the rider with mixed emotions this week, calling it a temporary fix. Rehberg launched his own delisting attempt this session targeting gray wolves nationwide. “I still prefer a solution that fully turns management over to the states,â€? Rehberg told the Indy, “but that’s just not going to be possible unless Congress decides to stand up to the radical urban environmentalists who think they know how to manage our land better than we do in Montana.â€? Compared to Rehberg’s proposal—which environmentalists claimed would doom wolf populations in the Southwest—Leahy views the rider as a lesser evil. Still, the settling groups fought hard to ensure management would hinge on the “best available science.â€? Leahy laments that Montana and Idaho are now “stuck with 100 to 150 wolves‌as the minimum thresholdâ€? for a recovered population, while some wolf advocates maintain it should be set as much as 10 times higher. Alex Sakariassen

etc. Dear Yellowstone County Commissioner James Reno: We caught your recent comments regarding Missoula County’s big rigs lawsuit, suggesting Missoula’s gas pumps should be shut down. Let us be the first to say “bravo!� for taking up the fight for energy interests in eastern Montana. For the past year this issue has focused far too much on the so-called “pristine� forests in our backyard. It’s high time the debate shifted to the human-made features in yours. Billings suffers no lack of charm, Jim, the kind you only get in communities nestled on the high plains. Instead of filing injunctions against the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT), perhaps we should celebrate that Imperial Oil didn’t propose shipping these 200-plus oversized loads through your neighborhood. You have more to lose than us, it seems. After all, those big loads might discourage tourists from visiting the Siberian tigers at ZooMontana (sorry to hear about the looming loss of accreditation). They might even delay traffic heading to the shiny new post-tornado MetraPark. Congrats getting Elton John last weekend, by the way. Billings is looking like quite the entertainment hub. Most important—as you pointed out—is the potential impact our county commissioners’ lawsuit might have on the Billings economy. After all, these loads are headed to ExxonMobil’s tar sands mining operation in Alberta. And, with its Exxon refinery, Billings will no doubt be processing some of that black gold. Some people might call that bias on your part, Jim. We call it shrewd economic thinking. Plus, you have to live with the smell. Imperial Oil’s gotten a lot of flack over this proposal, and not just from our county commissioners. A large number of officials don’t seem to share your forward-thinking attitude. Tribal leaders from the region decried the big rigs last year. So did Forest Service supervisors on the Lolo and the Selway-Bitterroot. But since summer 2009, when he cautioned that this proposal would create a permanent high and wide corridor, MDT Director Jim Lynch has had a change of heart. If Lynch saw the light, others will too. Rather than fight this, maybe our county commissioners should take a cue from Billings’ annual Holiday Parade. Imperial could stimulate the economy by hiring a few locals to pass out candy. If you’d let us, we could even borrow Billings homeboy Denny Rehberg to saddle up and ride one of the big rigs. It could be the weightiest cause he’s ever championed. Sincerely, The Indy

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Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Whiff of victory Heavy haul opposition heartened by Alex Sakariassen

Even before Imperial Oil's test module shorted out power to 1,300 residents and excessively delayed traffic in Idaho Tuesday, opponents of the Kearl Module Transportation Project (KMTP) detected a hint of victory in the air. More often than not, opposition groups have faced defeat—most notably last month's release of a Finding of No Significant Impact by the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT). But Imperial began publicly shifting its focus in recent weeks, away from the hotly debated rural highways and toward the Interstate Highway System. According to the corporation’s March presentation to MDT, repeated permit delays caused by review and litigation have led to “escalating cost/schedule implications,” forcing Imperial to implement a

weight such that they could be moved via an interstate route, should that become necessary,” Rolheiser tells the Indy. “But our original plan remains our preferred option.” For Porter and his opposition fellows, the new contingency plan isn’t the only indicator that victory is in the wings. MDT approved a request from Imperial Oil to ship a test module through the state this month. That module—which weighs just under 500,000 pounds—left the port Monday night. It knocked out power to locals and blocked traffic for an hour shortly after departing, prompting Idaho to delay further transportation. Rolheiser says once the load reaches Lolo Hot Springs, it will remain there until turnout modifications are completed along the rest of the route. Unlike Idaho, Montana does not require movement of a test module.

shoot this thing back down the Columbia and the Snake and around to the Gulf of Mexico, or they can sneak it through as a test module.” Porter says Imperial Oil keeps altering its story, which helps the opposition. For example, Imperial never mentioned the interstate system as a potential alternative to the scenic river corridors of highways 12 and 200. Yet Rolheiser told the Indy this week that the decision to manufacture modules that are too big for interstate travel was made from an engineering perspective, and wasn’t the only option. “Yes, theoretically they could have been manufactured in smaller dimensions,” Rolheiser says. “But from an engineering, technical, risk-safety perspective, that simply wasn’t the best alternative.”

Photo courtesy Fighting Goliath

Imperial Oil is trying to ship a 500,000-pound test module up Highway 12 to Lolo Hot Springs this week. Opposition leaders view the module not as a test but as a sign that big oil is growing desperate.

contingency plan. Imperial originally aimed to finish shipment of 207 oversized loads to Alberta by the end of 2011; four months into the year, not a single module has hit highway 12. “There’s no question that it’s an initial victory, when a longstanding proposal to travel these rural river corridors is abandoned,” says All Against the Haul campaign coordinator Zack Porter. “But it’s only an initial victory.” The tides seem to have turned for heavy haul opposition two weeks ago, when Imperial Oil CEO Bruce March announced to Canadian press that the corporation intends to “revisit” its call to purchase modular equipment from a South Korean manufacturer. March’s announcement came less than a month after Imperial said it had reduced 33 loads in Idaho to accommodate interstate travel. Imperial Oil spokesperson Pius Rolheiser confirms the reductions are part of the contingency plan, though he maintains that the corporation hasn’t given up on the original KMTP. “We currently have work underway to disassemble them to reduce the size and

Missoula Independent

Page 8 April 14–April 21, 2011

“We don’t have to move the test validation module through Montana—but that is our intention,” Rolheiser says. Borg Hendrickson, co-founder of the Idaho-based Fighting Goliath, questions the definition of the incoming load as a “test.” The 200-foot-long blue building is one of several loads that cannot be reduced for interstate travel. Rolheiser says the module isn’t a “specific piece of equipment required by the Kearl project.” Hendrickson alleges that, given the load’s non-reducible nature and the presence of three similar modules at the port, this appears to be Imperial’s way of shipping a load through under the guise of a test. “We see signs of perhaps a fracturing of determination on their part,” Hendrickson says. “If they hadn’t thought about alternatives before, they’re thinking about them now.” Says Porter, “I think we’re going to see increasingly desperate attempts by Exxon and their supporters to get these [loads]squeezed through, and that includes the test module. They know they’ve hit a brick wall, a dead end. They can either

As Imperial continues to be hammered with court proceedings and permit delays, however, that might be their only option. The Missoula County Board of Commissioners joined a lawsuit early this month to prevent MDT from issuing the oversized load permits Imperial requires to execute its original plan. Litigation is still pending, but the commissioners intend to stop the heavy haul until Imperial can address a range of concerns, from environmental impacts to disruption of tourism and commercial activity. Hendrickson stops short of calling the latest developments an outright victory, but she agrees with Porter’s sentiments that the fight is looking more promising. “We can’t look at what Imperial Oil has said [and] we can’t look at the county commissioners’ decision to join in this without feeling more hope for this cause than we ever have,” Porter says. “That being said, it ain’t over ’til it’s over—and for all we know, we’re still only at the beginning.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com


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Ad nauseam Billboard dispute heads to Montana Supreme Court by Matthew Frank

About four years ago, Robert Burch, a wealthy businessman, was driving after dark along Interstate 90 toward his 28,000acre ranch in Sweet Grass County. Up ahead, near his property, was, he thought, a brightly lit construction zone. The lights were “shockingly bright,” like klieg lights, he recalls. As he sped closer, he realized there was no roadwork, but rather, right across the interstate from his ranch, two newly built beaming billboards. “It was like looking out at O’Hare Airport at the landing strip,” Burch says. “It was amazing.”

operate C&H Construction on their 270acre property, which includes a gravel mining operation, a qualifying industrial activity. But, according to court documents, the closest billboard is 2,380 feet from the actual pit. However, MDT determined, and the court agreed, that the entire 270 acres constitutes an industrial area, not just the 24acre pit, which the Bues, they told the court, anticipate expanding. “This was a blatant attempt to manipulate the regulations,” Burch says. In his view, “a hole in the ground and a wheelbarrow” would be enough for MDT and Lamar

the ultra-exclusive Yellowstone Club, in Big Sky, before pulling out when it fell into bankruptcy. MDT declined to comment on the case. So did the Bues, although they expressed disbelief that it’s heading to the state Supreme Court. Paul Dennehy, a Lamar manager in Billings, says he’s also surprised that the billboards—two among Lamar’s roughly 1,000 structures in the state—have become so contentious. “I’ve been in the business for 20 years and this is the first time I’ve seen [such a dispute],” he says.

Photo courtesy Hobble Diamond Ranch

Robert Burch sued the Montana Department of Transportation for permitting these two billboards along Interstate 90 across the road from his 28,000-acre ranch.

And not in a good way. Burch doesn’t want his secluded Montana getaway along the Yellowstone River to resemble an airport. So he decided to sue the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT), claiming its billboard permitting process was flawed. MDT had issued two permits to Burch’s neighbor, Herbert Bue, who had been paid by Lamar Advertising, the country’s largest outdoor advertiser, to construct the billboards on his property. Last month, Lewis and Clark County District Court Judge Dorothy McCarter ruled in favor of MDT. Burch’s attorney, Jack Tuholske, of Missoula, last week appealed the ruling, sending the case to the Montana Supreme Court. The outcome could have statewide implications for how, how many, and where billboards are sited. Additionally, Tuholske says, “The case presents very important legal questions about the discretion that state agencies have to conduct their administrative processes.” It centers on whether or not MDT complied with the Montana Outdoor Advertising Act, which states that billboards must be built within 600 feet of unzoned commercial or industrial areas. The Bues

to justify erecting a billboard. Beyond that, Burch expresses frustration that he and his neighbors weren’t consulted about the billboards’ placement. “My issue is two-fold,” he says. “One, the fact that we’re in a rural area like this and these gigantic billboards can go up without any notification, I’m surprised by. And secondarily, I’m offended by the fact that these lights are on all night long… they definitely have an impact on myself and my neighbors…and we have nothing to say about it.” The lights aren’t, in fact, on all night long; they go off at 11:30 p.m. In response to neighbors’ complaints, Lamar installed shields around the lights in early 2008. They’ve helped, Burch says, but not much. Burch, who bought his property, known as the Hobble Diamond Ranch, in 1998, lives most of the year in suburban Philadelphia. He has ties to several companies, including Red Badge, a real estate and venture capital company, where he serves as CEO. Burch also co-founded Everlands, a high-end, conservation-oriented vacation club that went belly-up when the housing market tanked. And he was a member of

Lamar’s 10-year lease with the Bues, which ends in 2017, pays them $1,500 per year for the first five years and $1,750 per year for the second five years, according to court documents. Lamar installed the billboards, near milepost 384, between Greycliff and Reed Point, at a cost of $75,000. Burch says his cost to pursue the case “far exceeds” what the Bues will earn from the billboards, but it will be money well spent if it forces MDT to be more scrupulous in issuing billboard permits. Burch himself has a gravel pit, and he says the court’s recent ruling means that the six-mile stretch of his land that edges the Yellowstone River could be designated an industrial zone if he simply says he intends to mine it in the future. “I think it’s an absurd point of view,” he says. “I think it’s dangerous…There’s a billboard act that these guys are supposed to comply with.” The Montana Supreme Court is expected to take up the case next year. mfrank@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 9 April 14–April 21, 2011


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Page 10 April 14–April 21, 2011

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Tester’s howling error Congressionally delisting wolves could gut the ESA Montana is already a national laughingstock thanks to the Republican legislature’s blatantly unconstitutional efforts to nullify federal laws on everything from guns to currency. Now comes Montana’s two U.S. Senators, Democrats Jon Tester and Max Baucus, who will only exacerbate the problem as they seek to congressionally exempt wolves from the Endangered Species Act—a precedent that may well make the act itself extinct. Early this week, Tester told the Missoulian: “We’re really not changing the Endangered Species Act. We’re taking a recovered species off (the endangered species list) and putting it under state control for management. We’ll manage that wildlife species like we manage all wildlife species, and that’s on the state level.” As the heat from national environmental organizations begins to descend on Tester, his statement is an obvious attempt to deflect criticism from the unprecedented move and assure Montanans that he is not actually doing what he’s doing. The problem is, it’ll take more than talk to convince folks that what he’s doing is harmless— because it isn’t. The exact language of the rider is “Before the end of the 60-day period beginning on the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of the Interior shall reissue the final rule published on April 2, 2009 (74 Fed. Reg. 15123 et seq.) without regard to any other provision of statute or regulation that applies to issuance of such rule. Such reissuance (including this section) shall not be subject to judicial review and shall not abrogate or otherwise have any effect on the order and judgment issued by the United States District Court for the District of Wyoming in Case Numbers 09-CV-118J and 09-CV-138J on November 18, 2010.” For those who haven’t been following Montana’s wolf saga, a brief summary may be useful. Although wolves were naturally migrating down the Rockies from Canada, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service decided to introduce an “experimental population” in Yellowstone National Park to return this key predator to the ecosystem. Since wolves were nearly exterminated through poisoning, trapping, and hunting a century ago, large ungulates such as bison and elk were, except for the bite of the occasional grizzly bear or mountain lion, virtually free from natural predation. As the herds outgrew the capability of their grazing range, it led to the slaughter of thousands of bison that attempted to leave Yellowstone to find

food, and ecological damage to fragile riparian areas from too many elk on too little land. Federal wildlife managers reasoned that the easiest and best way to deal with the problem was to reintroduce the wolf to the ecosystem and restore some balance between predator and prey.

Got a bird or “some insect in the way of progress? De-list ’em. If Tester and Baucus can do it, any senator or representative

can follow suit.

To make a long story short, the experiment worked. The Yellowstone wolf packs drew tens of thousands of visitors from around the globe seeking the rare chance to see a wolf in the wild. And sure enough, the park’s riparian vegetation began to recover and, at least marginally, the wolves provided some reduction in bison numbers. But wolves being wolves, they recognize no particular boundaries. Soon they spread out into Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming, and, as happens so often when a predator is reintroduced to an ecosystem, they found easy pickings on prey that hadn’t dealt with wolves in a century. Moreover, since cattle far outnumber people in Montana, some of the wolves found even easier pickings in domestic livestock. To address the issue, Montana and Idaho developed federally approved wolf management plans that included issuing licenses to hunt wolves. Those hunts functioned as expected; hundreds of wolves were killed in recent years. But here’s the rub: Wyoming’s plan did not meet federal approval because it classi-

fied wolves as predators that could be shot on sight in almost all of the state. Nonetheless, the Fish and Wildlife Service issued a rule saying wolves in Montana and Idaho were recovered and were removed from the protections of the Endangered Species Act. Concerns over the genetic connectivity necessary to fully recover the wolves prompted 14 environmental groups to file a federal lawsuit to put wolves back on the Endangered Species list. Last year, Federal District Judge Donald Molloy ruled that the Endangered Species Act did not allow selective delisting along political boundaries and restored protection for wolves in all three states. It’s no secret that the 2012 elections are likely to be contentious. Political pressure motivated the environmental groups to find a way to settle the lawsuit with the federal government and restore the ability to hunt wolves in Montana and Idaho. The iron fist behind the move was Senator Tester’s threat to congressionally de-list the wolves. Ten of the 14 groups that originally filed the suit bowed to that political pressure and moved to settle with the feds rather than see the precedent of selective congressional delisting of endangered species whenever political pressures grew too hot. Four, however, did not. When the dust settled last Saturday, Molloy ruled that he had no choice under the law except to deny the settlement. By politically delisting a species—and exempting that decision from judicial review, as Tester’s rider does—our Montana senator opens the door for anyone else to do the same. Got a minnow in the way of a dam? De-list it. A bird or some insect in the way of progress? De-list ’em. If Tester and Baucus can do it, any senator or representative can follow suit. But wolves remain symbols of the wild for most of the nation. Montana doesn’t need the backlash Tester’s move will undoubtedly engender. Nor will it enhance Tester’s chances of reelection. Wolf reproduction is slowing while Montana’s elk numbers are healthy and growing. We can and will deal with wolves—but gutting the Endangered Species Act is the wrong way to do it, and will bring infamy to both Tester and Montana. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


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Mythbuster What Wallace Stegner taught us by Michelle Nijhuis

I’ve come to think of the writer Wallace Stegner (1909-1993) as a brilliant, beloved, occasionally exasperating uncle. He said many things first and best, and, though he could get stuffy at times, he’s still mostly right about the West and our penchant for mythmaking. Recently, I ran across Joe Hill, Stegner’s 1950 “fictional biography” of the legendary labor organizer. Most of the Stegner I’ve read is Late Stegner: eloquent, aphoristic about the failings and promise of the West. Joe Hill is Middle Stegner, published when the author was in his early 40s: rougher, more tentative in both style and ideas, but at least as interesting as any Stegner I know. Countless writers and musicians have told, and sung, the legend of Joe Hill. Swedish-born itinerant laborer, songwriter for the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), and, finally, martyr, Hill was killed by state firing squad after a controversial murder conviction in Salt Lake City in 1915. “Don’t waste any time in mourning,” he wrote to IWW leader Bill Haywood. “Organize.” And so the man became an enduring myth. Stegner, who grew up partly in Salt Lake, knew the legend. As a young man, he dated the daughter of the warden of the prison where Hill was held. When he began researching his book, he expected to find that the real Joe Hill was the victim of a frame-up. After reading as many documents as he could find and tracking down people who had met Hill, Stegner concluded that the Utah courts convicted the organizer on flimsy evidence and killed him unjustly. But he also believed that Hill might well have participated in the armed robbery he was accused of, which killed two men, and then turned his case into a rallying cry for the cause he loved. Joe Hill doesn’t convict Joe Hill, but it allows, even encourages, the reader to do so. It portrays Hill as a complex, not always likable man: talented, passionate, sporadically violent, far from the Christ-like image

seen on union posters. Some critics say Hill resembles Stegner’s father, a cold drifter always on the losing end of the Western boom. Stegner knew the West and its people were complicated, and demolishing myths was his business. Fictionalizing a real historical character is tricky, both artistically

Where Joe Hill “used a historical skeleton to build a plausible alternative to a legend, The Social Network deliberately departs from known facts—in effect, constructing a myth about a

living person.

and ethically, but with so few facts at hand, Stegner felt fiction was the only way to examine the legend. “I contented myself with trying to make him a man, such a man as he might have been,” writes Stegner in the book’s introduction, “with his legend at his feet like a lengthening shadow.” Joe Hill received little notice, sold poorly, and put Stegner off novel writing for more than a decade. But it continues to

be read, and it continues to complicate the received wisdom about both Hill and Stegner. In one of his final interviews, Stegner reflected on his decision to fictionalize Hill. “I think probably any living person, any person with living relatives who can be hurt, should be exempt from that kind of invention,” he told professor Robert Keller. Which brings me to a man Joe Hill— mythical, fictional or actual—might have despised: the 26-year-old billionaire Mark Zuckerberg. The Social Network, the tripleOscar-winning movie about Zuckerberg’s founding of Facebook, is, like Joe Hill, a smart, highly entertaining and partly fictional biography. But where Joe Hill used a historical skeleton to build a plausible alternative to a longstanding legend, The Social Network deliberately departs from known facts—in effect, constructing a myth about a living person. Screenwriter Aaron Sorkin, who never met Zuckerberg, created “Mark Zuckerberg,” a character who dresses and sometimes acts like the real Zuckerberg, but “I don’t want my fidelity to be to the truth; I want it to be to storytelling,” Sorkin told an interviewer. “I feel like, had I met Mark, I would have felt a certain obligation to make the character sound like Mark, walk like Mark, all of those things. And frankly, I probably would have had an affection for him that I wouldn’t have wanted to betray.” Maybe we’re savvy enough as a society to assume that all movies, even those about living people, are fiction, but I doubt it. A seductive narrative can stick with us for generations, even when we know the truth. Zuckerberg doesn’t need me or anyone else to shed tears for him. But as we who live in the West know, and as Stegner knew far better than most, myths can be persistent and pernicious. We don’t need to build them. Michelle Nijhuis is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org) in Paonia, Colorado, where she is a contributing editor.

Missoula Independent

Page 11 April 14–April 21, 2011


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Missoula Independent

Page 12 April 14–April 21, 2011

Missoulians come in all stripes and shoe sizes, but sometimes we’re a little too selfinvolved—or glued to our iPads or Facebook pages—to really appreciate the variety of people inhabiting this mountainous college town. This week, you have a chance to celebrate the diverse social and cultural fabric of our city during Missoula’s Diversity Day 2011, with the theme “Who’s Your Neighbor?” The event kicks off Saturday afternoon with a non-motorized parade starting at the XXXXs on North Higgins Avenue, and heads down to the Boone and Crockett Club for a rally with an array of speakers. Some of those slated to talk include members of a queer youth

group; Mayor John Engen; and Bob Oaks, executive director of the North Missoula Community Development Corporation. Their speeches will touch on topics including how to make Missoula more welcoming to others. Oaks also plans to highlight the city’s diversity within a historical context, and will discuss the importance of heterogeneous neighborhoods. –Ira Sather-Olson

THURSDAY APRIL 14

Students Assistance Fund, and begins at 7 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $10.

Row your intellect into The North Fork of the Flathead: Threats, Progress and Importance, a panel discussion on various aspects of the north fork of the river that begins at 7 PM in Room 332 of UM’s University Center. Free.

FRIDAY APRIL 15 Rock out while doing your part to help UM Entertainment Management Program director Scott Douglas recover from a stroke during the Rock N’ Rally for Scott Douglas, which features music by Kung Fu Kongress, Treehouse and Darah Fogarty & Her Band, and begins at 8 PM at the Wilma Theatre. Proceeds go directly to Douglas’ recovery fund. $10/$5 advance at Rockin Rudy’s, Worden’s Market, The Adams Center and The Source.

SATURDAY APRIL 16 Get a handle on those finances during homeWORD’s Financial Fitness workshop, which runs from 9 AM–6 PM at homeWORD, 127 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 303. $10 per person, with vouchers for childcare available. Register online by visiting homeword.org and call 532HOME for more info. Sussex School presents its annual Ecothon community service project and fundraiser, where students from the school collect pledges throughout Missoula all day today to pick up litter and work on other community service projects. The event raises money for educational field trips. Call Robin at 549-8327 to make a donation or for more info. Enjoy some frozen lactose and help raise funds for a nonprofit community garden during the Milltown Garden Patch Ice Cream Social, which also features bluegrass music and runs from 6–8 PM at Bonner School, 9045 Hwy. 200 E. $4. Have a delightfully tasty evening in order to benefit the Missoula Community School during its fourth annual Taste Trifecta: Wine, Chocolate and Coffee Tasting & Silent Auction, which also features music by Ron Dunbar and casey*jo, and runs from 6:30–10 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. Money raised will be used for need-based scholarships and general expenses. $20 per person, with tickets at the school and at the door. Call 542-2833. Witness a slick slice of anime and help others out during a screening of Summer Wars, which is also a benefit for The Red Cross of Japan and the UM Foreign

Missoula’s Diversity Day 2011 begins at 3 PM Sat., April 16, at the XXXXs on North Higgins Avenue. Free. Call 541-6891 or visit ncbimissoula.org for more info and details on participating in the parade.

SUNDAY APRIL 17 Show your love for the mother that sustains us during Missoula’s annual Earth Day Celebration, which features eco-friendly vendors, educational tables, a “Sustainability Olympics,” plus food and live music with Amy Martin and the Coyote Choir, from noon–7 PM at Caras Park. Free. Call 721-7513 or visit mudproject.org. Help bring comfort to troops stationed abroad during Comfort Kits for the Troops, an event where you can donate items including small Kleenex packs, packs of gum, safety pins and other items to troops, starting at 1 PM at the American Legion Hall, 825 Ronan St. All items should be put in a zip-lock bag. E-mail Susan at bluemountain@montana.com.

MONDAY APRIL 18 Just say no to nukes during Skull Valley: Nuclear Waste, Environmental Racism and Tribal Sovereignty, a talk with James Martin-Schramm that begins at 7 PM in Room 123 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building. Free. Call 243-6605.

TUESDAY APRIL 19 The Montana Food Bank Network (MFBN) presents CANstruction 2011, a food fundraiser where participants build large structures using nothing but canned goods, with building from 1–7 PM, and an awards ceremony at 8, at Southgate Mall, 2901 Brooks St. Free. All proceeds and canned food used in the event will be donated to the MFBN. Call 721-3825 and visit mfbn.org.

THURSDAY APRIL 21 Conservationists unite during It’s Your Planet...Pass It On!, a celebration of conservation in western Montana that features talks with Chris Johns of National Geographic magazine and M. Sanjayan of The Nature Conservancy, plus music by Cash for Junkers, starting at 6 PM at the Wilma Theatre. Free. Call 543-6681. Ignite your fire for activism when NARAL ProChoice Montana presents its fourth annual Voices, Power, Politics event with a talk by Courtney E. Martin, an author, freelance journalist and editor in chief of the blog Feministing.com, starting at 6 PM in the University Center Ballroom. Free. E-mail info@prochoicemontana.org to RSVP.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - After Daniel Rahynes, 35, told tellers at a bank in Harrisburg, Pa., that he wanted to open an account, he gave the bank his information, then announced he was there to rob the bank. Police said he drove away with a small amount of cash but left behind the two forms of identification he showed to open the account. He was arrested after he crashed his car during his getaway. (Associated Press) While police were investigating a DUI-related crash in Westminster, Colo., Katherine Morse, 49, stopped to complain about how the officers had parked their patrol cars. When they told her to return to her vehicle, she became “belligerent with them, telling them it was a stupid place” for a traffic stop, a witness said. Officers then realized Morse was also drunk and arrested her for drunk driving. (Denver’s KMGH-TV) HOLIER THAN THOU - When a German doctor praised Pope Benedict XVI for setting an example by having an organ donor card, the Vatican explained the pope wouldn’t be donating any organs. “It’s true that the pope owns an organ donor card,” the pope’s secretary, Monsignor George Gaenswein, said in a letter quoted on Vatican Radio, “but contrary to public opinion, the card issued back in the 1970s became de facto invalid with Cardinal Ratzinger’s election to the papacy.” Vatican officials said that after a pope dies, his body must be buried intact and that any papal organs donated would become holy relics in other bodies if he were eventually made a saint. (Reuters) HOMELAND INSECURITY - A security guard at a federal building in Detroit stored a suspicious package for three weeks before alerting authorities that it might contain a bomb. A police bomb squad promptly collected the package, which had been placed between two dumpsters behind the McNamara Federal Building, determined that it indeed contained a bomb and detonated it. (The Detroit News) SLIGHTEST PROVOCATION - Loniesh Veasey admitted slashing her friend to death with a razor in Tacoma, Wash., during an argument over whether crack cocaine or heroin was the better drug. (Tacoma’s The News Tribune) UNFRIENDLY SKIES - A Continental Airlines flight leaving Pittsburgh for Houston was delayed nearly three hours because of a broken toilet in the first-class lavatory. The two lavatories in coach were fully functional, but first-class passengers would’ve had to walk to the rear of the plane to use them. Continental’s Mary Clark said that after the maintenance crew failed to fix the toilet, the first-class lavatory was closed, and the plane took off. (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette) Passengers trying to avoid checked-baggage fees are costing taxpayers $260 million a year, according to Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, who noted the money covers the extra workload on Transportation Security Administration officers. “When you have to pay to check a bag, it increases carry-on luggage,” Napolitano told a Senate Appropriations subcommittee, “and that means there is more to inspect at the gate and so forth for passengers to get on planes.” She said increasing airport mandatory security fees that passengers pay when they buy tickets would bring her department about $600 million a year. (Associated Press) SEEMED LIKE A GOOD IDEA AT THE TIME - Annoyed by squirrels running around inside the wall of his townhouse in Richton Park, Ill., Robert Hughes decided to smoke them out by lighting a smoke bomb in a gutter near a hole in the wall the squirrels were using to access the home. The bomb went off but ignited and set the house on fire. Firefighters had to rip open the roof and drywall in Hughes’s home and a neighbor’s to extinguish the blaze. (Chicago Sun-Times) WHEN CREMATION ISN’T ENOUGH - A Columbus funeral home filed a lawsuit against the Ohio Department of Health after the agency blocked the home’s use of an alternative to cremation that turns the remains to liquid, which proponents say can be poured down the drain. Any remaining bone pieces can be ground into a powder and kept, similar to cremation. Edwards Funeral Service is the first U.S. funeral business to publicly offer alkaline hydrolysis, which uses lye and heat to dissolve soft tissue. Having already used the process on 19 bodies since January, owner Jeff Edwards said health officials lack the authority to make him stop. (Associated Press) KEY TO CRIME PREVENTION - When Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn borrowed his wife’s bicycle to ride to work, he parked it in a bike rack in the City Hall parking garage. After work, the bike was gone. “I know I’ve been encouraging people to ride bikes more,” McGinn tweeted, “but I didn’t mean u could ‘borrow’ my wife’s bike w/o asking.” Later, he posted a picture of the bike and added his wife’s reaction: “Peg is pissed.” McGinn admitted that he forgot to lock the bike when he parked it because he was preoccupied with city business, according to his communications director, who explained, “He just spaced.” (Seattle Times) WRONG ARM OF THE LAW - The Houston Police Department relieved senior police officer Mike Hamby, 51, of duty after he took part in a barbecue cook-off at a rodeo and reportedly threw a tear gas canister into the booth of an opposing cook-off team. The gas sickened several people and reached a tent occupied by military veterans, including some amputees in wheelchairs. “How stupid can an individual be?” rodeo executive director Mike DeMarco said. “If it was John Q. Public, we would arrest, then press the full charges that the law would allow.” (Houston Chronicle) The Sarasota, Fla., police department fired veteran homicide detective Tom Laughlin, 42, for trying to secede from the United States of America. In a document filed at the city courthouse, Laughlin renounced his U.S. citizenship and declared himself a “sovereign citizen” and included a thumbprint on each page and a photocopy of 21 silver pieces, explaining they’re the price to become a “freeman.” Internal affairs documents showed that Laughlin, a decorated and respected investigator who handled high-profile cases, believed with other freemen that the red numbers of a Social Security card were clues to finding a secret “straw man account,” where the government hides millions of dollars from citizens, and that birth certificates were related to secret ships berthed in a port that held access to millions of straw man dollars. (Sarasota’s Herald-Tribune)

Find Missoula’s finest local flavors in Downtown! Visit our website for quick, easy listings plus maps on how to get here. And remember, there’s always free parking evenings and weekends.

Missoula Independent

Page 13 April 14–April 21, 2011


orensic investigator Gilbert Grissom and his team are racing against the clock to save one of their own from a criminal bent on revenge. In just one hour, they seamlessly piece together a crime scene; pick up clues at the criminal’s home through sheer chance; analyze a plant bud from the perp’s car, narrowing their search to

F

one point in the expanse of desert west of Las Vegas; and, finally, rescue their battered, dehydrated comrade. And so much for CBS’s “CSI”—which is preposterously melodramatic when you consider it alongside the reality-based drama comprised by the Montana State Crime Lab, in Missoula. The Forensic Science Division of the Montana Department of Justice, with its

harsh overhead lighting, industrial desktops, and clustered equipment, resembles a high school science lab more than a Hollywood set. Yet the work done here, off Palmer Street, is just as effective as anything on CBS. When it comes to reallife crime labs, Montana’s is about as cutting-edge as they come: The facility was accredited by the American Society of Crime Lab Directors this January, making it one of only 149 ASCLD-affiliated labs worldwide that have received international accreditation. This entailed rigorous testing in disciplines from toxicology

and trace evidence to latent fingerprints and digital and multimedia evidence. Not bad, considering its humble origins. The crime lab began on the University of Montana campus, where forensic technicians had to shoot down hallways to run ballistics tests, recalls Montana Attorney General Steve Bullock. From there it moved to the basement of the Wilma, then to St. Patrick Hospital before settling in its own facility, by Palmer Street, in 2000. Just past the reinforced, bulletproof glass at the front desk is the office of director Dave McAlpin, a former three-

by Alex Sakariassen photos by Chad Harder

Firearm and toolmark examiner Lynette Crego is one of the few forensic scientists in Montana who fires guns on the job. But unlike TV’s showy take on forensics, Crego says she spends more time in front of a microscope than on the firing range. Once people see her real work close-up, “they realize it’s not as glorified.”

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term Missoula legislator with a disarmingly calm voice, and a slow, studious gaze. Sitting in his office recently, he spoke about the increasing demand for the lab’s services. He said he thinks that’s due to “more people being aware of the kind of results we can provide, either by vindicating someone or by showing that there’s evidence to convict. For us, we don’t bias one way or the other. We just look at the evidence and provide the scientific result.” Since taking the helm of the lab two years ago, McAlpin has learned more and more about the painstaking intricacies of forensic science, and how it diverges from the fantasies proffered by shows such as “CSI.” If the type of moving-computer-screen technology those shows use actually existed, he says, he would have had a requisition in to the state long ago. Instead, when talking to outsiders, he finds himself having to dispel TV-promulgated myths about the work of crime labs. If you took your cues from television, you’d assume that this was work done by bombshell women and brainy men with pistols and badges and six-inch heels; folks in cool shades who can read blood spatters like Green Eggs and Ham. By and large that’s not the people on McAlpin’s staff, who typically wear lab coats over sweaters and have the mien of excited kids at a science fair. Yet they do help catch actual criminals. “In Montana, and in most real criminal justice systems, the forensic scientist is not the investigator or even the crime scene analyst,” McAlpin patiently explains. “In our laboratory, we take the evidence that is submitted and do our best with it. By the same token, we are not prosecutors. Our role in testimony is not to set the stage of the case, but merely to testify only to our small part in the system… the unbiased result of our analysis.”

homemade battleaxe, several fully automatic rifles, and a crude silencer made from a plastic bottle rest on a wall in the firearms and tool marks section of Montana’s forensic division. It’s what the lab calls “the gun wall,” a rack of unusual and sometimes seemingly impractical weapons collected from crime scenes. Some were donated by victims’ families who had no interest in holding onto them. Others come from agencies such as

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Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks that have closed the book on cases like the high-profile poaching investigation in Seeley Lake tied to one of the rifles. There’s a James Bond quality to some of the weapons, like the flashlight-turned-pistol. This is Lynette Crego’s playground. As firearm and tool mark examiner, she’s one of the only forensic experts in Montana who actually uses a gun on the job. She jokes about the flashlight gun as she pulls a Beretta 9-millimeter from a rolling storage locker. She and her

type interaction. But once they get in the job, they realize it’s not as glorified. We don’t have all the cool instrumentation. It takes longer to work a case. Some cases are tedious and painful.” Like all of her fellow forensic scientists at the crime lab, Crego doesn’t do field work. Evidence is sent to her by local and state enforcement agencies. Then she sets to work analyzing what they’ve found. Sometimes that means hitting the lab’s indoor firing range for distance determination. It may require shooting

The Montana State Crime Lab handled 5,377 cases in 2010, an average of about 22 per day, according to McAlpin; and their workload has been increasing lately by 10 percent a year. Managing the inevitable backlog is one of the lab’s greatest challenges. And most technicians shy away from discussing specific cases, because much of what they’re working on is still subject to litigation. While the caseload in firearms and tool marks can be tedious, it’s diminutive

Since the dawn of “CSI,” criminals have gotten wise to forensic investigation methods. Connie Muller, a latent fingerprints expert at the Montana State Crime Lab, sees much more evidence of rubber gloves being used in crimes these days. She finds it hard not to credit that, in part, to television.

coworker Travis Spinder use the lockers to stash firearms for comparison work. Crego isn’t wearing six-inch stilettos. “They don’t work well in the lab,” she says. She also doesn’t have a badge, though she does have a bachelor’s degree in business from the University of Montana. And while Crego’s job may be one of the flashier disciplines at the state crime lab, it’s still a far cry from what she sees when she turns on the television. “CSI” and its ilk glamorize everything, she says. “It kind of shows it in the light of people doing both the science and the investigation part: interviewing suspects, throwing them against the wall, all that. I think a lot of people get that sense, that it’s also a law-enforcement-

into a 500-gallon water tank and retrieving the bullet and cartridge case for comparison work. Crego and Spinder work an average of 200 cases a year. “We get to shoot a lot of guns, but it’s more microscope work, straining your eyes, than actually going around shooting off Tommy Guns and stuff,” she says. “We can get whole bullets in good shape. But sometimes we’ll get bullets from bodies, bullets from houses, cars, where it’s actually just little fragments. So it all depends on the condition of the bullet, of the cartridge case and how good the markings [are]. It can be anywhere from a couple minutes to line it up on the scope… or a couple weeks, going back and forth from the microscope.”

compared to other sections. McAlpin estimates about 4,000 of last year’s cases went straight to their toxicology lab. It’s here that he turns for an example of how ever-changing the jobs of forensic scientists are. “There’s an increasing complexity in each case,” McAlpin says. “Whereas we used to get plant material to analyze for THC, now we’re getting a brownie, and the complexity of measuring that baked good for level or quantity or presence of THC is much greater than just measuring a crumbly plant material.” Some of those changes appear, at least anecdotally, to stem from the increased popularity of forensics in the mainstream. At the crime lab, Latent

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Print Examiner Connie Muller explains that she’s noted increased precautions taken by criminals, based on what she’s received from crime scenes. It’s hard not to attribute the heightened awareness of forensic methods in part to shows like “CSI,” she says. “I see a lot more situations where I see on evidence… the texture of rubber gloves. It becomes obvious that someone was wearing rubber gloves when committing a crime. But at times we’ve actually been able to retrieve those gloves and get prints or DNA from them.” The dramatized idea that criminals can somehow manipulate their fingerprints by, say, burning them off is also fairly ridiculous in Muller’s eyes. Such attempts to mask one’s identity can actually make prints more distinguishable, she says. Muller’s work in latent prints has gone a long way in bolstering criminal proceedings in western Montana. In 2007, Anne Stout allegedly shot and killed her husband, Bill, in their Hamilton home. Investigators retrieved a pistol from a saddlebag on Bill’s motorcycle and pulled a latex glove from a laundry hamper in the couple’s basement. The gun and ammunition had no fingerprints on them, but Muller testified in

district court in 2008 that she’d found Anne Stout’s DNA on the inside of the glove as well as gun powder residue on the outside.

SI” has clearly affected the criminal justice system in the past decade. Attorneys across the country use the term “CSI Effect” to describe misconceptions about the limits of forensic science among potential jurors. Missoula Chief Criminal Deputy County Attorney Kirsten Pabst LaCroix discusses the effect of the program during every jury selection she’s a part of. She asks would-be jurors how often they think she’s seen a usable fingerprint in court in her 17-year career. Guesses come in the hundreds. Then she plays her trump card: She hasn’t seen one. LaCroix says there’s a belief among groups such as the National District Attorneys Association that these jury pool discussions are necessary to dispel myths that jurors might carry into trials. “For a while there we were having to compete with the idea of this magical instrument that if you sprinkled in dust from someone’s shoes, it would print out not only the identification of the perpetrator but his current location and whether there were any warrants out for him,” says

“C

Toxicologist Scott Schlueter handles thousands of criminal cases a year at the crime lab. Much of his work involves analyzing narcotic compounds and identifying the types of drugs being manufactured and peddled in the state. Staying up on what drugs are in vogue is a constant challenge for his lab, Schlueter says.

LaCroix, who occasionally watches “Law and Order” for the sheer novelty of an open-and-shut case playing out in a single hour. “Now the biggest issue is explaining to the jury why there is no forensic evidence, because they do expect something.” One of the biggest misconceptions LaCroix notes is why forensic evidence is introduced. Courts here rarely deal with questions of identity, she says, as perpetrators are usually known to victims. Occasionally the outlandish side of forensic science will offer up new evidence, as in the 2000 case against Martin Reed Swan where food particles from the suspect’s car were matched to food particles found on the body of the victim, Ginny Hann. But more often the question facing Missoula jurors is one of intent rather

expectations when it comes to forensic investigation. The CSI Effect was at one time a strange and difficult obstacle for county attorneys, prosecutors, and public defenders, says Steve Bullock. “When CSI and things first came out, there was an expectation that there would be DNA from any sort of touching of things, that you’d have all this science in every trial.” But, he says, “I think over time jurors have become more sophisticated in recognizing that forensic science plays a role, but it doesn’t have to be the paramount role in every trial.” LaCroix says that she, too, has noticed the trend beginning to fade. She believes shows like “CSI” have outlived their mild credibility with viewers. As plots become more ludicrous, public perception starts

national database, the case would likely still be unsolved. Instead, Trimble pled not guilty in Spokane this January and is heading to trial. “That’s something that’s an ongoing process, for our folks to try and do the DNA matching,” McAlpin says. “When we get a hit like that, it’s important to what we do here at the lab. It helps resolve cases as part of the larger work of the lab and I think it can provide comfort to the families of victims.” As the crime lab’s image has risen, propelled at least in part by television, so have its obligations, while the underlying science advances more slowly, tugged along by new technologies. At the same time, says forensic toxicologist Scott Schlueter, the CSI Effect has also meant that their actual work is better under-

“I don’t go knock on doors; I don’t arrest people; I don’t chase people; I don’t do interviews. I simply go to the crime scene, process the crime scene, and let the evidence speak to me.” —Barb Fortunate, crime scene technician

“We get to shoot a lot of guns, but it’s more microscope work, straining your eyes,” Lynette Crego says of her forensic duties. She adds that comparing imperfections on bullets and bullet casings to get a match can sometimes take days—unlike what she sees on television.

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than identity. “Without forensic evidence, people are worried that perhaps they’re going to wrongly convict someone,” LaCroix says, when in fact, “99.9 percent of our cases don’t involve a question of who the perpetrator was. It’s more a question of what did they do, or what did they mean to do, or was it an intentional act.” Legal researchers have examined the CSI Effect for years. St. Thomas University law professor Tamara Lawson found, in a 2009 study, that “the CSI Infection goes well beyond the application of a lower or higher burden of proof; it delves into the realm of warping, skewing, and manipulating the realities of evidence in a way that threatens the accuracy of the verdict and the legitimacy of the criminal justice system.” Potential jurors in Canada and Australia have exhibited similarly false

to shift towards disbelief or skepticism. “If you asked me how big of a problem it was… 10 years ago, I’d say it was a huge problem. Even five years ago, pretty bad. But I’m starting to see the pendulum swing the other way with jurors getting a little oversaturated with some of those programs they watch on TV.”

ack at the crime lab, McAlpin gets excited talking about real-world successes, such as the case of Lincoln resident Gary Trimble. Last year authorities apprehended Trimble on murder charges related to a Christmas Eve slaying in Spokane from 1986. New evidence in the case had come straight from Montana’s forensic division. If the crime lab hadn’t run a sample of Trimble’s DNA through a

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stood in venues where it counts. “Five or 10 years ago, we were seeing the same [kinds of lab] results, but now we’re being asked better questions in court and people have a better understanding… They expect to see you there, to see that that testing was done.” The mainstreaming of criminal forensics has generated some less expected side effects as well. Select high schools in Montana are offering classes inspired by “CSI.” For McAlpin, that’s an outreach opportunity. The crime lab teamed up with the Office of Public Instruction in February 2010 to conduct video-conferencing presentations for rural students, and student tours are now common at the crime lab. “There’s no question in my mind that the television phenomenon has raised the level of


interest among college kids and high school kids,” McAlpin says. “Forensics intrigues them as a career opportunity.” Missoula Police Department crime scene technician Barb Fortunate has seen the same thing. Since the advent of “CSI” she’s in demand at local high schools, where she draws distinctions between fact and fiction and explains the specialized nature of her work. “I’m not a forensic professional, I’m a crime scene professional,” she says. “I always tell people… that when I was hired, DNA wasn’t even on the horizon as a crime-fighting tool. Now it is, but as far as I’m concerned it’s smoke and mirrors. It’s magic. I have no idea what they do with the swabs I send in to them.” And, she says, “I don’t have to know that stuff.”

Still, if Missoula has one character who could have stepped out of “CSI,” Fortunate seems like a good bet. She’s a petite, soft-spoken woman with the demeanor of a middle-aged mother. She took the job almost 18 years ago, becoming the city’s first civilian crime scene expert. She had no forensic training and no law enforcement background, but she knew her way around a dark room back when crime scene photography hadn’t yet gone digital. Fortunate isn’t a scientist and she isn’t a cop, though she’s taken classes in latent prints and done informal internships at the crime lab over the years. Mostly, she collects things and sends them to the experts. Yet she’s the one on scene for every major crime or vehicular

Crime lab director Dave McAlpin regularly finds himself correcting public misperceptions about the work his forensic science team does. “We just look at the evidence and provide the scientific result,” he says.

wreck in the city, snapping photos and bagging evidence. “I was CSI before ‘CSI’ was cool,” she says. “They were forward-thinking, because there are a lot of civilians now doing crime scene work. It frees up the officers to do the cop work. This is where, in this department and in many departments, it’s way different than ‘CSI.’ I don’t go knock on doors; I don’t arrest people; I don’t chase people; I don’t do interviews. I simply go to the crime scene, process the crime scene, and let the evidence speak to me.” Much of her job actually entails sitting in front of a computer, cataloging databases or filing reports. Even in the field, a seemingly interesting and TV-worthy discovery can end on an anti-climactic note. Take the call she received two weeks ago: “A woman was starting a new garden and found some bones. I have a degree in anthropology, though not forensic anthropology, so we were trying to get a hold of somebody to go look at the bones and determine if they’re human or not. If they’re human then we’ve got to treat it like a crime scene.” Deputy Medical Examiner Willy Kemp eventually arrived and, despite Fortunate’s devotion of much of her day to the potential crime scene, he determined the bones weren’t human. Fortunate says they’ll now be sent to UM for further identification by forensic anthropology students. Still, there have been a number of dramatic points in Fortunate’s career. In

Missoula’s closest parallel to “CSI” is Barb Fortunate, the Missoula Police Department’s civilian crime scene technician. She isn’t a scientist, and she doesn’t carry a gun. But that hasn’t stopped her from contributing to high-profile criminal cases like the Forrest Clayton Salcido murder in 2007.

December 2007, she worked a crime scene at the California Street footbridge where Forrest Clayton Salcido, a homeless veteran from Missoula, had been brutally murdered in a seemingly random act of violence. Two young men were later arrested and linked to the case. One, Anthony St. Dennis, was sentenced to 100 years in prison. For Fortunate, just being involved there felt like a true “CSI” moment. The scene took hours to process, she says. The scattered evidence she collected—

Missoula Independent

shoeprint impressions, blood trail information—contributed greatly to the case. Most important were the photos she took. From there, detectives managed to piece together a jumbled story, one Fortunate feels had as complete an ending as possible. “It started out being a whodunit, and through really good crime scene work, really good detective work, came to a good conclusion,” she says. “Not for Forrest—but he was taken care of in the long run.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com

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Garlic patch friends FLASHINTHEPAN Carrots love garlic, and garlic doesn’t mind carrots. Those are some conclusions I reached last year, when I finally got sick of looking at all the blank space between my garlic plants and decided to do something about it. They’re planted six inches apart, and if it weren’t for the straw mulch between them, most of the patch would be bare dirt. Mulching dissuades weeds, shades soil from sun, and blocks the wind, helping to keep moisture in the soil. Mulch comes in many forms, including “living mulches,” which are sown among crops to provide mulch-like action. Clover planted in corn rows is one example of a living mulch, and with that image in mind my thoughts turned to sowing a mulch between my garlic plants. But I wanted more than just a living mulch. I wanted my mulch to be edible, too. Searching for the best mulch crops to plant in my garlic patch, I developed a technique called “tossing seeds randomly.” I put all the seeds I didn’t get around to planting last year into a jar, shook it up, and tossed them by handfuls into the garlic patch. Last summer’s research identified two general categories of plants good for growing in the garlic patch—what I call “garlic patch friends.” The first includes fastgrowing, quick-to-bolt greens and herbs like spinach, lettuce, endive, cilantro, and escarole. As soon as summer heats up, these plants will go to seed, or “bolt.” The plant will divert all its energy into reproduction, and will often grow surprisingly tall, while the leaves stop growing and turn bitter. You want to harvest and eat these plants before they bolt, when they’re sweet and tender. They can grow fast in the spring when the garlic is small, and their bolting is delayed when the garlic grows big and shades them. You get to gorge on these intra-garlic leafy greens in spring and early summer, and by the time they start to bolt, the second category of garlic patch friends will kick in. Category Two includes crops that will bide their time in the partial shade of the garlic plants early in the season, and will take off in full sun after the garlic has been harvested. So far, carrots are this category’s champion. Their lush foliage functions awesomely as mulch, while below ground, the roots

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Missoula Independent

by ARI LeVAUX

plays well with roses and strawberries. While its pungent mix of aromatic compounds keeps some pest insects away, it attracts the white cabbage moth away from brassica plants like cabbage, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts, and remains unharmed itself by the moths. But be warned: The brassicas I planted in my garlic patch didn’t do so well last summer. It’s possible that while a few garlics in the brassica patch are good, brassicas in the garlic patch may not do much. Diversified agricultural environments are sometimes called polycultures. The more widely accepted name for the practice is “agroecology,” which describes the ecological theory behind agricultural systems that are both productive and resource-conserving. Practitioners consider plant and insect interactions, mineral cycles, and the farm’s own socioeconomic relationships with its community, since the people who work the farm and eat from its produce are considered part of the larger ecosystem. While it’s pooh-poohed as non-scientific by some folks who support industrialstyle farming, agroecology is now being taught at many universities—around 15 currently, including UC-Santa Cruz, Iowa State, and Penn State. A December, 2010 report commissioned by the UN Human Rights Council examined hundreds of peer-reviewed scientific papers and concluded that agroecology has the potential to double food production in marginally productive areas. In the arid interior of Bahia, Brazil, Marsha Hanzi has been using Photo by Ari LeVaux agroecology (she calls it polyculture) to halfway through winter, the chickens got some ama- reclaim land that has been turned into desert by years ranth, and when you count those early-season salads, of chemical-intensive monoculture. I’ve seen with my own eyes how Hanzi’s discoveries have helped peoI grew a pretty good bonus out of my garlic patch. This year I’m taking it a step further: In addition ple rebuild the soil and turn the landscape from redto my custom mix of tossed leafy green seeds, I also brown to green with edible plants. The impact transplanted some escarole, radicchio, and endive they’ve had on the local communities is striking. My garlic and carrot garden might not work in that I’d started indoors. I’m expecting these to get the early jump and grow huge while the garlic plants the Brazilian drylands, or a lot of other places either. But the take-home lesson, wherever you live, is to are still on the small side. To some extent I’ve been reinventing the wheel experiment with your home ground. Mix up your here. Garlic has long been known as a good compan- garden just to see what happens. Whether you ion to other crops. It contains compounds that repel approach it through book learning or the trial-andaphids, so many gardeners intersperse it with their error of randomly hurled seeds, you might be pleaslettuce and other aphid-fearing plants. Garlic also antly surprised by the extra yield. mind their own business, growing straight down and keeping out of the garlic’s way. I tossed a smorgasbord of carrot seeds in the garlic patch and the variety called Hercules performed best, growing as big as beer bottles. Another good late-season living mulch crop is amaranth, a long-cultivated Mesoamerican grain with brilliant red flowers. Once you pull your garlic plants from the ground, the craters left behind invite air and water into the soil. This helps your late season garlic patch friends in their pursuit of greatness and also helps stimulate the microbial environment on the soil surface, which strengthens the garden’s ecosystem. I was very happy with my garlic harvest last year, and suffered no decrease in production due to intragarlic crowding. I didn’t run out of carrots until

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Page 18 April 14–April 21, 2011

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HAPPIESTHOUR Tamarack Brewing Company—Missoula News bulletin: On Monday, Tamarack Brewing Company opened its gorgeous new taproom on Front Street, adding about 10 more taps of Montana-made microbrews to Missoula’s increasingly crowded brewery scene. Actually, “taproom” doesn’t quite do the Lakeside-based brewery’s new digs justice. It’s created a classy, two-story beer drinkers’ emporium. Atmosphere: This place impresses. Upstairs, you’ve got a bar and seating for dining. Downstairs boasts a huge wrap-around bar, tons of seating and flat-screens everywhere; there are 19 TVs total. The vibe will only improve with the weather: both floors have outdoor seating overlooking Caras Park and the Clark Fork. What you’re drinking: No PBR here. Tamarack only serves its microbrews and a few other local beers. Try the Old ’Stache Whiskey Barrel Porter, which brewmaster Craig Koontz ages in Jim Beam barrels for four months. “It has scary drinkability at 8.8 percent,” a belliedup sampler said Monday night. What you’re eating: The head chef describes Tamarack’s fare as “upscale bar food.” The green chili pork burrito we ordered was massive—and tasty. The chef recommends the fish and chips. We’re eyeing “The Boss Hawg BBQ”—

Photo by Matthew Frank

local andouille sausage topped with beer-braised shredded pork—for our next go-round. For dessert, have a stout ice cream float (seriously, try it). Yet another brewery? Yep. Tamarack follows the opening of Flathead Lake Brewing Company’s Missoula taproom earlier this year, in addition to Missoula’s three staple breweries. But Tamarack co-owner Andra Townsley doesn’t call it competition: “You talk to any brewer down here and it’s…far more a brotherhood.” Where to find it: 231 West Front Street in downtown Missoula, next to the entrance to Caras Park. —Matthew Frank Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, e-mail editor@missoulanews.com.

Pita Madness 4-6 PM • 10 PM - MIDNIGHT

$1 PITA OFF ANY

541-PITA(7482) 130 North Higgins Ave • Missoula

Open 7 Days a Week 11:30 am - 9:00 pm 3075 N. Reserve Street Missoula • 327-0731

Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

Vote for us! 1601 South Ave West 542-2060

Mondays & Thursdays - $1 SUSHI (all day) (Not available for To-Go orders)

Daily TEMPURA Special - $1.25 for 2 pieces - 11:30am-2:30pm Tuesdays - LADIES’ NIGHT, $5 Sake Bombs & Special Menu Missoula Independent

Page 19 April 14–April 21, 2011


April

COFFEE SPECIAL

Mocha Java Blend $10.75/lb. Missoula’s Best Coffee

Easter Time At

BUTTERFLY HERBS

BUTTERFLY

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

d o w n t o w n

Sushi Bar & Japanese Bistro On Every Monday and Wednesday in April, we will be donating a percentage of our sales to relief efforts in Japan. Please join us on these nights for $1 Sushi and for a great cause!

When we say Not just Sushi! we mean it.

403 North Higgins Ave • 406.549.7979 www.sushihanamissoula.com

The Mustard Seed Asian Café Southgate Mall • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our all-new bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our non-smoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, microbrews, fine wines & signature drinks. Takeout & delivery available. $$-$$$

Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine 542–1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for Lunch and Dinner, featuring a Sat.-Sun. Brunch 11-2pm. Great Fresh food With Huge Portions. Featuring international & Irish pub fare as well as locally produced specials. FULL BAR, BEER, WINE, MARTINIS. $-$$

Oil & Vinegar Southgate Mall • 549-7800 Mon.-Sat. 10:00 AM-9:00 PM Sun. 11:00 AM6:00 PM. With a visit to Oil & Vinegar, you will discover an international selection of over 40 estate-produced oils & vinegars suspended in glass amphora-shaped containers on a dramatic backlit wall. Guests can sample the varieties and select from various shapes & sizes of bottles to have filled with an “on-tap” product of choice.

The Sunrise Saloon & Casino 1100 block of Strand 728-1559 Every day is a great day at the Sunrise Saloon! Enjoy two happy hours daily, plus daily drink specials. Wednesday is Ladies night. Missoula's only dedicated country bar with live country music Thursday Saturday. Play our liberal machines while enjoying great entertainment and friendly service. 21+ only. Open daily 8 a.m. 2:00 a.m.

Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. • 543-3188 Don’t feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$

NOT JUST SUSHI Sushi Hana Downtown offering a new idea for your dining experience. Meat, poultry, vegetables and grain are a large part of Japanese cuisine. We also love our fried comfort food too. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. Corner of Pine & Higgins. 549-7979. $$–$$$

Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $8.50. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $7.75. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$.

Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you'll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER.

Pearl Café 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French specialties, bison, elk, trout, fresh fish daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Three course bistro menu with wine $30, Tues. Wed. Thurs. nights, November through March. Extensive wine list, 18 wines by the glass, local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the warm and inviting dining areas. Go to our website Pearlcafe.us to check out nightly specials and bistro menus, make reservations or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$

Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Drive • 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$

Pita Pit 130 North Higgins Avenue 541-PITA (7482) • pitapitusa.com Fresh Thinking Healthy Eating. Enjoy a pita rolled just for you. Hot meat and cool fresh veggies topped with your favorite sauce. Try our Chicken Caesar, Gyro, Philly Steak, Breakfast Pita, or Vegetarian Falafel to name just a few. For your convenience we are open until 3am 7 nights a week. Call if you need us to deliver! Red Robin 2901 Brooks Street • 830-3170 www.redrobin.com Half the price, twice the fun! Halfy Hour at the Southgate Mall Red Robin®! Half price bar drinks Monday – Friday, 4-6 p.m. and Monday – Saturday, 9-10 p.m. Enjoy a drink with one of our insanely delicious Gourmet Burgers, Bottomless Steak Fries. Or, snack on one of our shareable starters with friends! $-$$ SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway • 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavorsno MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. • 549-2790 Share a meal within the warm elegance of our location at the historic Wilma Building. Enjoy our seasonal menu of classic Mediterranean and European fare with a contemporary American twist, featuring the freshest local ingredients. Serving lunch Tues-Sat 11:00-2:30, and dinner Tues-Sun 5:00-Close. Beer and Wine available. $$-$$$

$…Under $5

Missoula Independent

Page 20 April 14–April 21, 2011

Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 14 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Sun - Wed 83pm, Thurs - Sat 8-8pm $-$$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

BITTERROOT Spice of Life 163 S. 2nd St., Hamilton 363-4433 Spice of Life welcomes you to the Bitterroot’s best locavore dining experience. Serving up fresh and fun food in a conscientious manner. For lunch try one of our hand made burgers from Lolo Locker or one of our fabulous fresh salads. Dinner selections include natural beef which contains no growth hormones or antibiotics ever, sustainable seafood selections and pasta dishes made from Montana wheat from Pasta Montana. Quench your thirst with beer from right here in Hamilton or try one of our reasonably priced yet fantastic wine selections. Children’s menu available. No reservations. So come as you are to Spice of Life! 163 S 2nd St. Hamilton, MT. Lunch: Mon - Fri 11:00 to 2:00 Dinner: Wed - Sat 5:00 to 9:00. 363-4433.

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over


Arts & Entertainment listings April 14–April 21, 2011

8

days a week

Find out for yourself when UM hosts What Makes Good Political Art?, a seminar with writer and Pulitzer Prize winner Mark Stevens that begins at 3:40 PM in Room 106 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building. Free. Call 243-2311. That spondee tries to be all that it can be when John Holbrook presents a poetry reading and signing for his book A Clear Blue Sky in Royal Oak, at 4 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881.

nightlife Slap on your art appreciation goggles during an opening reception for Scenes from the Origin Project, an exhibit by Jennifer Thompson with the opening from 5–7 PM, with a performance piece at 5:30 and an artist talk at 6, in UM’s University Center Art Gallery, in UC Room 227. Free. Call 243-5564.

Photo courtesy Michael Weintrob

Don’t mess with a sax man’s axe. Saxophonist Ravi Coltrane performs as the Ravi Coltrane Quartet during a Bitterroot Performing Arts Series concert on Sat., April 16, at 8 PM at the Hamilton Performing Arts Center, 127 Fairgrounds Road. $32.50–$27.50 depending on seats. Get tickets online at bartc.org or by calling 363-7946

THURSDAY

14

April

UM’s Natural Resources and Environmental Policy Forum continues with a talk by Mary Sexton titled Who’s in Charge of Montana’s Lands and Water Management?, which begins at noon in the Castles Center of UM’s School of Law. Free. Call 207-9071.

Squeeze out a film in just 72 hours, and perhaps win $500 for your efforts, during Do It In 72!, a three-day film contest presented by MCAT where you’ll make a film from April 29–May 2. To register, visit MCAT in person at 500 N. Higgins Ave. Registration is free and due by 5 PM on Thu., April 28. Call 542-6228. Protect yourself against a slumlord during the talk The Good, the Bad, and the Illegal–Renters’ Rights, which begins at 12:30 PM in Room 327 o f UM’s University Center. Free. Call 243-5527.

Enjoy an art attack from some up and coming artists when UM’s School of Art presents its 2011 Bachelor of Fine Arts Thesis Exhibition opening reception, which features work by 18 students and runs from 5–7 PM in the Gallery of Visual Arts in UM’s Social Science Building. Free. Call 243-2813. UM’s Indian Law Week concludes with “An Evening with NALSA,” a reception that recognizes work done through the past year by Native American Law Student Association members, instructors and leaders in Indian Country, and begins at 5:30 PM in UM’s Payne Family Native American Center. $10. Support the work of local and international young writers during the Aerie International Gala Fundraiser Reading, a benefit for Big Sky High School’s literary arts magazine of the end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., April 15, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

Times Run 4/15- 4/21

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

Jane Eyre (PG-13) Nightly at 7 & 9:10 Sun at 1 & 3:10

The King's Speech Sun-Tues 7 Sun at 1

Cedar Rapids (R) Sun-Tues at 9:10 Sunday matinee at 3:10

www.thewilma.com

FULL BAR AVAILABLE 131 S. Higgins Ave. Downtown Missoula 406-728-2521

thewilma.com

Fussy nesters appreciate our 100% natural handmade futons. H A N D M A D E

F U TO N S

125 S. Higgins 721-2090 Mon – Sat 10:30 – 5:30 smallwondersfutons.com

Missoula Independent

Page 21 April 14–April 21, 2011


Photo courtesy alice-foto.com

The thousand-yard Portlander stare. Portland, Ore.’s Hillstomp plays swampy punk blues at the Top Hat on Fri., April 15, at 10 PM with openers Dodgy Mountain Men and Black Mountain Moan. $7.

Don’t miss MCT’s 40th anniversary show!

same name that runs from 5:30–7:30 PM at the Dana Gallery, 246 N. Higgins Ave. Includes live jazz, appetizers, as well as readings from students, Debra Magpie Earling, David Allan Cates and others. $25 donation requested per family, which can also include friends. Call 728-2401. Give granny a reason to rock out with her frock when Ello plays rock during the Top Hat’s monthly artist-inresidence series every Thu. in April from 6–8 PM. Free, all ages.

A celebration of 40 years of MCT featuring the talents of Missoula teens!

Tickets are on sale now!

April 29–May 1, 4–8, 11–15

SPONSORED BY:

First Security Bank Western States Insurance

MCT CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

(406) 728-PLAY • www.mctinc.org MCT accommodates accessibility needs upon request. Call us at (406) 728-7529 or visit www.mctinc.org/accessibility for more info.

Give me a quarter and I’ll give you a gallon of my special jazz juice when the Discount Quartet plays at 6 PM at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-PINT. Get in the know about permaculture (aka permanent agriculture) when expert Paul Wheaton presents the talk Introduction to Permaculture, which begins at 6:30 PM at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Visit permies.com/missoula. Row your intellect into The North Fork of the Flathead: Threats, Progress and Importance, a panel discussion on various aspects of the north fork of the river that begins at 7 PM in Room 332 of UM’s University Center. Free.

The Creative Self with Ken Silvestro Are you experiencing: A feeling of being lost or stuck in your life? • Affects of traumatic stress from the past? • Low self-esteem? • Affects of persistent trauma from childhood? • Depression resulting from early trauma? • A general feeling of low energy, dullness, and a lack of vitality? Class participants will learn how to enrich their lives by opening the door to one of the most powerful of all natural human phenomena- creativity!

Tuesdays May 17 – June 7 1-2pm For more information or to register, please contact Kathy Mangan at 406-721-0033 or rwlcmt@gmail.com. For a complete listing of our classes, please visit www.redwillowlearning.org. Sliding scale fee available. Red Willow Learning Center, 825 West Kent Street, Missoula

Missoula Independent

Page 22 April 14–April 21, 2011

Go easy on being too touchy-feely when Melissa Kwasny presents a poetry reading and signing for her book The Nine Senses, starting at 7 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881. Witness the effects of a 20-year long war on the children of Northern Uganda when the Peace and Justice Film Series presents a screening of Invisible Children: Rough Cut, starting at 7 PM in the University Center Theater. Free. Visit peaceandjusticefilms.org. Absorb a drama about a political prisoner in Lebanon, and his wife who waits for his return, when Montana Rep Missoula presents a performance of Lee Blessing’s Two Rooms, starting at 7:30 PM at the Crystal

Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10/$5 student rush tickets with sign ups at 7 PM. Visit montanarep.org/missoula.html.

third floor of UM’s University Center. Free. Visit dhc.umt.edu/ugresearch/UMCUR/schedule.cfm for more info.

You’re the star under the intellectual spotlight during The Endless Fifteen Minutes: Fame, Celebrity and Art Today, a talk with writer and Pulitzer Prize winner Mark Stevens that begins at 8 PM at the University Theatre. Free. Call 243-2311.

nightlife

Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip hop, electronic, pop and mashedup tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets booties bumpin’ at 9 PM. $3. Prepare for a beat battle between “America’s Tallest DJ” and perhaps Missoula’s crunkest DJ when RoboTrash presents Dubble Trubble with Aaron Traylor Vs. Kris Moon, which features the two of them battling it out on four turntables starting at 9 PM at the Palace. Free. Don’t let those lima beans leak out of your trousers when The Klassix plays at 9 PM at the Sunrise Saloon & Casino, on the 1100 block of Strand Ave. Free. Call 728-1559. Mix and match your personality on the dancefloor during Dance Remix with DJ MVP, which begins at 9 PM at the Dark Horse Bar, 1805 Regent St. Free. Call 728-1559. Put some beeswax on your soles and prepare to tear the roof off the motha during Electronic MKVR, a night of house music with DJs Coma, Shea Daze, Mikee Sev and Cadence, at 9:30 PM at the Top Hat. Free.

FRIDAY April

15

Learn it up during the UM Conference on Undergraduate Research, which features more than 130 projects for your perusal and occurs from 9 AM–5:30 PM on the

Leave the polar bear suit at home and string out with a family stringband when The Jen Slayden Family Band plays the Top Hat’s Family-Friendly Friday concert series from 6–8 PM. Free, all ages. The Monkey Bar Gym, 725 W. Alder St. #3, hosts a grand opening starting at 6 PM with art by Erin Roberts, along with food and drinks. The gym also hosts free classes on Sat. starting at 9 AM. Free. Visit monkeybargymmissoula.com Run or walk to raise funds for cancer research during UM Relay for Life, which runs from 6 PM today to 6 AM on Sat., at UM’s Oval. Visit umrelayforlife.com for registration information or call 498-2795. Congregation Har Shalom, 3035 Russell St., presents a Scholar-inResidence Weekend with Rabbi Niles Goldstein, which kicks off with a potluck dinner followed by a talk with Goldstein, starting at 6 PM. Free. Visit har-shalom.org for details. Get squeeze happy with your favorite grape juice lover when the one man soul band known as Dan Dubuque plays at 6 PM in the tasting room of the Ten Spoon Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Free. Call 549-8703. You’re a cheap date, not a cheapskate: The Missoula Public Library hosts another installment of its cheap date movie night, which screens The Next Three Days at 7 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Enter from the parking lot side of the building. Call 721-BOOK and visit missoulapubliclibrary.org. Slip into a film that touches on September 11, the Federal Reserve, warmongering and other political issues and includes interviews with Ron Paul, Jesse Ventura and others during a screening of the docu-


mentary Dreams of Liberty: Panacea, which begins at 7 PM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $4. Visit battleforjustice.com. A weekend of American Indian culture, along with skilled dancers and drummers, is yours to enjoy during the annual Kyi-Yo Powwow, which starts with the first grand entry at 7 PM at UM’s Adams Center. $5. Call 243-2039 and visit umt.edu/kyiyo. Hang with an ace stanza master when poet C.S. Giscombe—who’s the author of books including Prairie Style and Two Sections from Practical Geography—reads from his work at 7 PM in the Dell Brown Room of UM’s Turner Hall. Free. Call 243-5267. (See Spotlight in this issue.) The University Center Theater presents its weekend movies program with a screening of How Do You Know at 7 PM, followed by The Dilemma at 9:30 PM. $7 double feature/$5 single feature/$4 double feature for students/$3 single feature for students. Just don’t cry for Argentina when the Flathead Valley Community College Theatre presents a performance of Evita, starting at 7 PM in the college’s theatre, in the Arts and Technology Building at the school, 777 Grandview Drive in Kalispell. $10/$5 seniors/free for students. Call 756-3906. Missoula Catholic Schools present BASH, which features kids’ activities, food and silent/live auctions, starting at 7:30 PM at the Rita Mudd Activity Center, 1040 S. First St. W. Free. Call 728-2367. Love and bad manners collide uproariously when the Whitefish Theatre Co. presents a performance of Noël Coward’s Private Lives, starting at 7:30 PM at Whitefish’s O’Shaughnessy Center, 1 Central Ave. in Whitefish. $15/$12 seniors/$8 students. Call 862-5371 and visit whitefishtheatreco.org. Absorb a drama about a political prisoner in Lebanon, and his wife who waits for his return, when Montana Rep Missoula presents a performance of Lee Blessing’s Two Rooms, starting at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15/$5 student rush tickets with sign ups at 7 PM. Visit montanarep.org/missoula.html. Rock out while doing your part to help UM Entertainment Management Program director Scott Douglas recover from a stroke during the Rock N’ Rally for Scott Douglas, which features music by Kung Fu Kongress, Treehouse and Darah Fogarty & Her Band, and begins at 8 PM at the Wilma Theatre. Proceeds go directly to Douglas’ recovery fund. $10/$5 advance at Rockin Rudy’s, Worden’s Market, The Adams Center and The Source. Rubber stamp the irie vibes all over your friends thighs when Chele Bandulu plays reggae at 8 PM at the Missoula Winery, 5646 W. Harrier. $5. Call 830-3296. Show off your IRS victory dance during a Tax Day Party with music by Off in the Woods, which begins at 8 PM at The Raven, 4.5 miles south of Bigfork in Woods Bay. Free.

Tip the green metallic scales in your favor when Salt Lake City’s A Balance of Power plays metal during its 2011 MetalJuana Tour, which begins at 8 PM at the Dark Horse, 1805 Regent St. Undun, ENDever and Mageddon open. Cost TBA. Slip into a drama that tells the true story of C.S. Lewis and his relationship with his wife Joy when the Hamilton Players present a performance of William Nicholson’s Shadowlands, starting at 8 PM at the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road. $14/$8 children ages 12 and under. Visit hamiltonplayers.com for tickets or call 375-9050. The UF Okies want to try your pickle down theory of economics when it plays at 8 PM at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W. Free. Celebrate the artistic talents of all XX chromosome holders when The Badlander hosts This Night of Mayhem!, which features sets of rock, country punk and other styles from Seattle’s Eighteen Individual Eyes, and locals Bird’s Mile Home, Pony Canon, 10yoGF and DJ Mermaid, at 9 PM. Proceeds benefit the UM Women’s Resource Center. $5/$10 for those aged 18–20. Go easy on the rooster sauce so you can get ill with some melodic dubstep and downtempo when Vancouver, British Columbia’s illesha plays the Palace at 9 PM. Denver’s Rumblejunkie, Portland, Ore’s Enzymes and Kris Moon opens. $8/$13 for those ages 18–20. Sho Down gives you a hands-on lesson in honky tonk lovin’ when it plays country at 9 PM at Florence’s High Spirits Club and Casino, 5341 Hwy. 93 N. Free. Get your degree in drunken engineering when the Whiskey Rebellion plays outlaw country at 9 PM at the Sunrise Saloon & Casino, on the 1100 block of Strand Ave. Free. Call 728-1559. Surrender your body to the nougat gods when The Workers play a mix of Americana, rock and country at the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. The Bad Neighbor will totally let you borrow that rusty fish hook when it plays rock and country at Harry Davids, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, at 9:30 PM. $2. Portland, Ore.’s Hillstomp measures your sex appeal in terms of a good meal when it plays swampy punk blues at 10 PM at the Top Hat. Dodgy Mountain Men and Black Mountain Moan open. $7.

SATURDAY April

16

Get a handle on those finances duri n g h o m e WO R D ’ s F i n a n c i a l Fitness workshop, which runs from 9 AM–6 PM at homeWORD, 127 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 303. $10 per person, with vouchers for childcare avail-

able. Register online by visiting homeword.org and call 532-HOME for more info. Sussex School presents its annual Ecothon community service project and fundraiser, where students from the school collect pledges throughout Missoula all day today to pick up litter and work on other community service projects. The event raises money for educational field trips. Call Robin at 549-8327 to make a donation or for more info. Pray to the sun goddess during the Pray for Sunshine Par ty at Montana Harley-Davidson, 5106 E. Harrier, which kicks off at 9 AM with a Cornhole Corn Toss, and features activities throughout the day until 10 PM including demo rides at noon, music by MudSlide Charley at 6 PM, and tunes from the Mike Bader Blues Band at 8 PM. Free. Visit mtharley.com for details. Learn some smooth moves from a world renowned hip-hop/jazz choreographer when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. hosts a full day of workshops with Bosco, starting at 10 AM and running through the day. Visit ddcmontana.com for pricing, registration and a complete list of workshops, or call 541-7240 to RSVP. Congregation Har Shalom, 3035 S. Russell St., continues its Scholarin-Residence weekend with Rabbi Niles Goldstein starting with services at 10 AM, and also featuring a talk at 4 PM with Goldstein. Free. Visit harshalom.org for details. Show me your best bear mask when the International Wildlife Film Festival (IWFF) presents free public art workshops for the IWFF’s annual WildWalk Parade, which offers the chance to make puppets and masks with local performance artist Craig Menteer, this and every Sat. until May 7 from 11 AM–3 PM at 801 Ronan St. #5. Free. Call 728-9380.

New exhibit opens on Sunday, April 17; free reception from 1:00 to 4:00.

Where Art & Army Met: Uniforms of the U.S. Army consists of 52 prints by artist H. A. Ogden, and lithographer Thomas Hunter. These prints represent the most detailed and accurate record of Army dress and accoutrement from the Civil War through World War I; accompanying the prints are period Army uniforms and accoutrements, weaponry, and original artwork. For more information, call 728-3476 or visit fortmissoulamuseum.org HISTORICAL MUSEUM AT FORT MISSOULA BUILDING 322 - FORT MISSOULA

Kids move to a smooth groove during the Kids’ Vibrations Music and Rhythm Program, which is open to children of all ages, and occurs from 11 AM–noon at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. This week features guest artist T.J. Dupras. $5-$20 suggested donation. Call 396-3352. Stuff your ear sockets with something blue when the Montana Rockies Bluegrass Association presents its Oldtime Bluegrass Festival & Fundraiser, which features 18 bands including Pinegrass and Oregon’s JD Webb and the Down State Ramblers, and runs from noon–10 PM at Lone Rock School, located on 1112 Three Mile Creek Road northeast of Stevensville. $5/$3 members/free children under age 12. Call 821-3777. UM hosts the second day of the annual Kyi-Yo Powwow, which begins with grand entries at noon, and again at 7 PM, at the Adams Center. $5/$3 with a Griz Card. Visit umt.edu/kyiyo. Show your support for diversity during Diversity Day 2011, which features the theme “Who’s Your

1804 North Ave W, Suite F 406-214-3112 Book online @ www.ShearArtSalon.com Missoula Independent

Page 23 April 14–April 21, 2011


www.spectrum.umt.edu • 243-4828

Public Hours: Thurs. 3:30-7 pm • Sat. 11 am-4:30 pm

SCIENCE SATURDAY • 4/16 • Fly Fishing Explore the fundamentals of fly fishing. 11am-2 pm • Grades 3-4 $20/nonmembers, $15/members. PUBLIC HOURS • 4/14 Strawberry DNA extractions with Griz for UNICEF! PUBLIC HOURS • 4/16 Explore the physics of sound!

SPOTLIGHT green warrior If we didn’t give a tinker’s cuss about the natural beauty that surrounds us, our favorite hiking spots could very well be dotted with McMansions. Fortunately, that isn’t the case. And we can thank the late conservationist Aldo Leopold for helping to make that happen. The forester, philosopher, scholar, ecologist, writer and avid outdoors lover is perhaps best known as one of the forefathers of the modern conservation movement, and his impact has been as gigantic as a sequoia. Consider this fact: In the 1920s, Leopold spearheaded an effort to get the Gila National Forest in New Mexico designated as a wilderness area. It was officially designated as such in 1924. But perhaps his greatest contribution to the conservation movement was the book A Sand County Almanac. It’s a collection of observational and philosophical essays that makes the case for why we should show respect for “the land”—which includes animals, soils, WHAT: Screening of Green Fire: Aldo Leopold and a Land Ethic For Our Time WHEN: Wed., April 20, at 6 PM WHERE: Wilma Theatre

waters and plants. To date, the book has sold over 2 million copies, and many consider it to be the bible of conservationists. Leopold’s legacy hits the big screen this week when the Wilma Theatre hosts a screening of the documentary Green Fire: Aldo Leopold and a Land Ethic For Our Time. The film includes striking footage of places Leopold lived and was inspired by, and explores his impact on conservation and environmentalism through interviews with scholars, politicians and family members—including his daughter Nina Leopold, pictured. It’s an intimate look at an original activist, an important reminder of the conservation roots that have been a major part of our own little valley for decades past, and will be for decades to come.

HOW MUCH: Free

Neighbor” and begins at noon with a non-motorized parade at 3 PM at the XXXXs on North Higgins Avenue, and then heads to the Boone and Crockett Club for talks with a number of speakers. Free. Call 541-6891. (See Agenda in this issue.) Missoula Catholic Schools presents its BASH Dinner & Auction, which begins with cocktails and a silent auction at 4 PM, followed by a live auction at 7 PM, at the Rita Mudd Activity Center, 1040 S. First St. W. $100 per person. Reservations required by calling 728-2367.

nightlife Honor those who have worked for the good of animals in Missoula during the Humane Society of Western Montana’s annual Ken Shughart Humanitarian Award and Auction, which starts at 5 PM at the Doubletree Hotel, 100 Madison St. $40, with tickets available at the Humane Society, 5930 Hwy. 93 S., or online at myhswm.org. Call 549-HSWM. Get into an operatic groove when the nonprofit Alliance Française of Missoula presents Night at the Met!, a gala soiree that features The Met: Live at the Roxy’s screening of Le Comte Ory, plus a reception beforehand featuring wine, cheese and a presentation by UM music faculty member Anne Basinkski, starting

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—Ira Sather-Olson

at 6 PM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. This serves as a fundraiser for the organization. $25, with tickets at the door. Watch some ivory tickling in action during a piano recital featuring classical and baroque tunes, which begins at 6 PM at First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. $5/free for children ages 12 and under. Cash For Junkers wants to know who dropped that neutron bomb on your lawn when it plays Americana with a swing at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT. Enjoy some frozen lactose and help raise funds for a nonprofit community garden during the Milltown Garden Patch Ice Cream Social, which also features bluegrass music and runs from 6–8 PM at Bonner School, 9045 Hwy. 200 E. $4. Have a delightfully tasty evening in order to benefit the Missoula Community School during its fourth annual Taste Trifecta: Wine, Chocolate and Coffee Tasting & Silent Auction, which also features music by Ron Dunbar and casey*jo, and runs from 6:30–10 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. Money raised will be used for needbased scholarships and general

expenses. $20 per person, with tickets at the school and at the door. Call 542-2833. Just don’t cry for Argentina when the Flathead Valley Community College Theatre presents a performance of Evita, starting at 7 PM in the college’s theatre, in the Arts and Technology Building at the school, 777 Grandview Drive in Kalispell. $10/$5 seniors/free for students. Call 756-3906. Witness a slick slice of anime and help others out during screening of Summer Wars, which is also a benefit for The Red Cross of Japan and the UM Foreign Students Assistance Fund, and begins at 7 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $10. Love and wit hit the screen in HD when Morris Productions presents another installment of The Met: Live at The Roxy with an encore screening of Rossini’s Le Comte Ory, starting at 7 PM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $19/$17 students and seniors. Get tickets at morrisproductions.org or at Rockin Rudy’s. Love and bad manners collide uproariously when the Whitefish Theatre Co. presents a performance of Noël Coward’s Private Lives, starting at 7:30 PM at Whitefish’s O’Shaughnessy Center, 1 Central Ave. in Whitefish. $15/$12 sen-


iors/$8 students. Call 862-5371 and visit whitefishtheatreco.org. Absorb a drama about a political prisoner in Lebanon, and his wife who waits for his return, when Montana Rep Missoula presents a performance of Lee Blessing’s Two Rooms, starting at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15/$5 student rush tickets with sign ups at 7 PM. Visit montanarep.org/missoula.html. Pianist Whitney Kliewer and saxophonist Jordan Koppen tease and please your cochlea when they perform a student recital at 7:30 PM in the UM Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880. Freak the folk out of your system when the Missoula Folklore Society hosts a contra dance, starting with a beginners workshop at 7:30 PM, followed by the dance from 8–11 with music by Out of the Wood and calling by Janet Grove, at the Union Hall, upstairs at 208 E. Main St. $8/$6 members. Visit missoulafolk.org. Slip into a drama that tells the true story of C.S. Lewis and his relationship with his wife Joy when the Hamilton Players present a performance of William Nicholson’s Shadowlands, starting at 8 PM at the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road. $14/$8 children ages 12 and under. Visit hamiltonplayers.com for tickets or call 375-9050. The UF Okies want to try your pickle down theory of economics when it plays at 8 PM at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W. Free. Jazz junkies unite for a hit of the good stuff when saxophonist Ravi Coltrane performs as the Ravi Coltrane Quartet, at 8 PM at the Hamilton Performing Arts Center, 327 Fairgrounds Road. $32.50– $27.50 depending on seats. Get tickets online at bartc.org or by calling 363-7946.

Atlanta’s Let the Night Roar, Great Falls’ Kadmin, and locals Judgment Hammer, Tidal Horn and Shramana, starting at 9 PM at the Palace. $5. Break free from the weight of your mind when Texas’ Anchored plays southern hard rock at 9 PM at The Dark Horse, 1805 Regent St. Universal Choke Sign and The Fail Safe Project open. $8. The Bad Neighbor will totally let you borrow that rusty fish hook when it plays rock and country at Harry Davids, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, at 9:30 PM. $2. Show everyone your secret pineapple handshake when Beyond the Pale plays pop and rock covers at the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. Grapple with that peach pit when the Top Hat presents a DJ set with Nate Donmoyer of Passion Pit, starting at 10 PM. $25/$21 advance at Ear Candy Music. Feel the smooth acoustic vibrations when UM’s Entertainment Management Program continues the Saturday Night Music Shuffle with a concert by California folk musician Chase McBride and locals ThreeEared Dog, at 10 PM at Sean Kelly’s. Proceeds will be donated to the program. $3, with non-perishable food items accepted at the door to support the Missoula Food Bank.

SUNDAY April

17

Enjoy a morning of timely and spiritual music when the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 102 McLeod Ave., presents music by Beth Youngblood, starting at 10 AM. Free.

Show your love for the mother that sustains us during Missoula’s annual Earth Day Celebration, which features eco-friendly vendors, educational tables, a “Sustainability Olympics,” plus food and live music with Amy Martin and the Coyote Choir, from noon–7 PM at Caras Park. Free. Call 721-7513 or visit mudproject.org. Soldier on over to the Historical Museum at Fort Missoula, Building 322, to check out Where Art & Army Met: Uniforms of the U.S. Army, a collection of 52 framed pieces from the museum’s collection of prints by artist Henry Alexander Ogden and lithographer Thomas Hunter, with an opening reception from 1–4 PM. Free. Call 728-3476 or visit fortmissoulamuseum.org. Slip into a drama that tells the true story of C.S. Lewis and his relationship with his wife Joy when the Hamilton Players present a performance of William Nicholson’s Shadowlands, starting at 2 PM at the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road. $14/$8 children. Visit hamiltonplayers.com for tickets or call 375-9050. Love and bad manners collide uproariously when the Whitefish Theatre Co. presents a performance of Noël Coward’s Private Lives, starting at 4 PM at Whitefish’s O’Shaughnessy Center, 1 Central Ave. in Whitefish. $15/$12 seniors/$8 students. Call 862-5371 and visit whitefishtheatreco.org.

nightlife Enjoy a flick about an Italian housewife who escapes her controlling husband when The UM Italian Club presents a screening of Bread and Tulips, at 5 PM, and again at 8 PM, in the University Center Theater. Free. E-mail umcircoloitaliano@ hotmail.com.

Keep those singular nouns in your trousers when Lansing, Mich.’s The Plurals plays pop punk with TBA openers at 8 PM at the Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W. $5, all ages. Show me your USB stick and I’ll show you my cellar during Saturday Night Jazz with the Basement Boyz, which begins at 8 PM at the Missoula Winery, 5646 W. Harrier. $5. Call 830-3296. DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are guaranteed to keep you dancing to an assortment of hip hop, electronic and other bass-heavy beats ‘til the bar closes during Absolutely at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free, with visuals by V3R. Swig drinks while listening to old school rock hits, ‘80s tunes or modern indie rock songs when Dead Hipster presents Takeover!, which features “drinkin’ music” DJ’d by the Dead Hipster DJs starting at 9 PM at the Central Bar & Grill, 143 W. Broadway St. Includes drink specials and photos with Abi Halland. Free. Raise your horns and enjoy the metallic taste in your mouth during a night of metal and punk with

Photo courtesy Katharine E. Wright

It’s always good to practice safe sightseeing. UM’s Creative Writing program presents a reading from visiting poet C.S. Giscombe in the Dell Brown Room of UM’s Turner Hall on Fri., April 15, at 7 PM. Free. Call 243-5267.

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Put on your preservation shades during the second annual Preserve Historic Missoula Night, which runs from 5:30-8:30 PM at Fort Missoula’s Heritage Hall, and features appetizers, beverages and music by Two Cats and a Fiddle with Ellie Nuno, exhibits/informational tables from regional groups, and finishes off with presentations at 7 PM. Free. E-mail Suzanne at sjulin@earthlink.net.

Catch a literary gust during UM’s Second Wind Reading Series, which features readings from poet and creative writing prof Karen Volkman, plus fiction writer and MFA student Kate Rutledge Jaffe, starting at 6:30 PM at the Top Hat. Free. It always smells like something classical when the String Orchestra of the Rockies presents the concert Mozart in the Spring, which features guest pianist Roger Wright and

begins at 7:30 PM in the UM Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. $20/$10 students. Get tickets at the door, Rockin Rudy’s, Fact & Fiction and online at sormt.org. Twiddle your toes to the sounds of a top notch Irish fiddler when Eileen Ivers & Immigrant Soul plays Celtic and world music at 7:30 PM at the University Theatre. $20, with advance tickets at all GrizTix locations and online at griztix.com.

Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with $4 martinis, plus jazz DJs and jazz bands starting at 8 PM. Free. This week: jazz from Josh Farmer, The Front Street Jazz Group and DJ Mermaid.

UM’s School of Music continues its Composer’s Showcase with performances of student compositions, plus a performance of Melissa Hui’s And Blue Sparks Burn, starting at 7:30 PM in the UM Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880.

Enjoy a brew and a moving picture when the Palace hosts a movie night, which features screenings of Pink Flamingos and Up! starting at 9 PM. Free.

See if you can become a star under the spotlight at Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery every Mon. at 9 PM. Free. Call 5421471 after 10 AM on Monday to sign-up.

MONDAY

Take the cat litter out of your pockets and meow it up when Milkcrate Monday presents Random Music for Random Kitties, featuring sets of electronic music by Fatty Acid, Logisticalone, DJ Hauli and the Milkcrate Mechanic, at 9 PM at the Palace. Free.

April

18

UM’s School of Music kicks off its Composer���s Showcase with a lecture by Canadian composer Melissa Hui at 10 AM in Room 105 of UM’s Music Building. A concert in the Music Recital Hall follows at 2:10 PM and features student compositions and a performance of Hui’s Inner Voices. Free. Call 243-6880. Keep it green and just during Climate Justice and U.S. Energy Policy, a talk with author James Martin-Schramm that begins at 3 PM in the Pope Room of UM’s School of Law. Free. Call 243-5153.

nightlife Just say no to nukes during Skull Valley: Nuclear Waste, Environmental Racism and Tribal Sovereignty, a talk with James Martin-Schramm that begins at 7 PM in Room 123 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building. Free. Call 243-6605. The Discount Quartet hooks your tentacles up to a jazz juice machine when it plays from 7–10 PM at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 100. Free. Dig for details when the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., hosts a talk with Helen Keremedjiev titled Archeology and Battlefields in Montana, starting at 7 PM. Free.

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TUESDAY April

19

It’s good to be green during the Sustainable Business Council’s Strive Towards Sustainability Workshop, which presents the business case for sustainability and an intro to the concept, among other objectives, and runs from 8:30 AM–noon in the basement of Office Solutions and Services, 1020 North Ave. W. $50/free SBC memebrs. Call 824-7336 or visit sustainablebusinesscouncil.org to RSVP and for details. Bring your intellectual appetite to the UM Mansfield Center’s Brown Bag Lecture Series, which continues this week with the talk PRC Domestic Influence Shaping China’s Bilateral Tensions with the U.S., and begins at noon in the Mansfield Center Conference Room, on the fourth floor of the Mansfield Library. Free. Visit umt.edu/mansfield. The Montana Food Bank Network (MFBN) presents CANstruction 2011, a food fundraiser where participants build large structures using


Downtime at the shoe gum party. Detroit’s Koffin Kats play psychobilly during the Hellgate Rollergirls Zombie Fundraiser at the Badlander on Tue., April 19, at 9 PM with openers Reptile Dysfunction and Bird’s Mile Home. $10.

nothing but canned goods, with building from 1–7 PM, and an awards ceremony at 8, at Southgate Mall, 2901 Brooks St. Free. All proceeds and canned food used in the event will be donated to the MFBN. Call 721-3825 and visit mfbn.org. The UM School of Music’s Composer’s Showcase continues with a concert of student compositions, starting at 2:10 PM in the UM Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880.

nightlife Slide into a narrative about an estranged father and son who try to make nice when author Craig Lancaster reads and signs copies of his book The Summer Son, at 7 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881. Tap into the aesthetic process when the Rocky Mountain School of Photography presents the lecture

Artistic Perspectives on Process Part II with Elizabeth Stone, which begins at 7 PM in the quarry of the school, 216 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-0171. The UM School of Music’s Composer’s Showcase finishes off with a concert of student compositions, plus a performance of composer Melissa Hui’s work titled Lacrymosa, starting at 7:30 PM in the UM Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880. Absorb a drama about a political prisoner in Lebanon, and his wife who waits for his return, when Montana Rep Missoula presents a performance of Lee Blessing’s Two Rooms, starting at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10/$5 student rush tickets with sign ups at 7 PM. Visit montanarep.org/ missoula.html. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes

place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? What’s the world’s largest island? (Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.) Bask in the glow of chamber folk music when Minnapolis’ Dark Dark Dark plays with Why Are We Building Such a Big Ship? at 8 PM at Zoo City Apparel, 139 E. Main St. Locals Buffler, Fiancee and The Keys Knees open. $7, with advance tickets at Ear Candy Music and Zoo City Apparel. (See Noise in this issue.) All royalty gets irie during Royal Reggae Night, which features free pool plus reggae, dancehall and hiphop remixes spun by an array of DJs starting at 9 PM at the Palace. Free. Smell that beautiful undead smell during a Hellgate Rollergirls

Missoula Independent

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Zombie Fundraiser featuring psychobilly from Detroit’s Koffin Kats, at 9 PM at the Badlander. Reptile Dysfunction and Bird’s Mile Home opens, and the show includes a “zombie contest” and photo booth. $10. Butter up that slice of rye and get ready to rock in your frock when Javier Ryan plays acoustic guitar along with guest musicians, at 10 PM at the Top Hat. Free.

WEDNESDAY April

Be part of the green brigade during the UM Sustainability Summit, which features a number of panel discussions, film screenings and even a “Trash Bash Recycled Fashion Show,” from 9 AM–8 PM in the University Center and James E. Todd Building. Free. Visit umt.edu/greeningum/earthweek for a complete schedule of events.

APRIL 14 • 9 TO 6 1221 HELEN AVENUE ONE BLOCK EAST OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA BETWEEN McLEOD AND UNIVERSITY AVENUE

• SERVING BREAKFAST AND LUNCH EVERY DAY • EAT IN OR TAKE OUT • ESPRESSO AND PASTRIES • GROCERIES • FRESH, LOCAL, AND FRIENDLY

20

Munchies are a must during a 420 Potluck, which features DJs at 4 PM, plus music by Sockeye Sawtooth, Voodoo Horseshoes and Traffic Jam at 6:30 PM, all at the Stensrud Building, 314 N. First St. W. A $5 donation is requested but not required, and you should bring a dish to share. All ages, with beer available with ID.

nightlife

541-1221

Enjoy a local brew and support a local organization during the Kettlehouse Northside Tap Room’s Community U-NITE Pint Nights, which occur this and every Wed. from 5–8 PM at the tap room, 313 N. First St. W. A portion of the proceeds from each pint sold goes to a different organization each week. This week’s beneficiary is the Milltown Garden Patch. Free to attend. Visit kettlehouse.com. Witness the legacy of an old-school conservationist when the Wilma Theatre hosts a screening of the Green Fire: Aldo Leopold and A Land Ethic For Our Time, a documentary on Leopold that begins at 6 PM. Free. Visit greenfiredoc.eventbrite.com to register for a ticket. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Break through the intellectual iron curtain during Law, Order, and Judicial Reform in Russia and the Former Republics of Soviet Union, a talk with Karen Aguilar that runs from 7–9 PM in the University Center Theater. Free. Call 243-2299. Wear your patented magic pants during Hump Night Theatre, an evening featuring music, performances by hypnotist Mark King, magic by Evan Disney, plus appetizers and drink specials, this and every Wed. from 7–9 PM at Deano’s Casino, 5318 W. Harrier. $7. Absorb a drama about a political prisoner in Lebanon, and his wife who waits for his return, when Montana Rep Missoula presents a performance of Lee Blessing’s Two Rooms, starting at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10/$5 student rush tickets with sign ups at 7 PM. Visit montanarep.org/missoula.html. You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. Greenland is the world’s largest island, clocking in at 839,999 square miles.

275 W. Main St • 728-0343 • www.tanglesmt.com Missoula Independent

Page 28 April 14–April 21, 2011

Just shut up and enjoy the trip when Athens, Ga.’s Maserati plays post-rock with a heavy psych influence at 9 PM at the Palace. Treehouse and The Lion The Tamer open. $8. (See Noise in this issue.)

Mix up something heady in your aural pipe when the Top Hat presents “Medical Mashups” with a set of mashed up tunes by Chicago’s The Hood Internet starting at 10 PM. Chicago’s Shapers and locals Sick Kids XOXO open. $12/$10 advance online at seafarerentertainment.com.

THURSDAY April

21

Return for the green stuff when the UM Sustainability Summit continues at 9 AM in Room 210 of the James E. Todd Building, and features a host of discussions on the issue throughout the day. Free. Visit umt.edu/greeningum/earthweek/ for a complete schedule of events.

nightlife Shoot something aesthetically pleasing into your system when the Dana Gallery, 246 N. Higgins Ave., hosts a Third Thursday opening reception from 5–8 PM for The Art of Chris Robitaille, a collection of landscapes and wildlife oil paintings by Robitaille, who was picked as the featured artist for the 2011 International Wildlife Film Festival. Free. Call 721-3154. Be a print party animal when the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St., hosts Artini: Northwest Narratives, an event that celebrates the museum’s Northwest Narratives exhibit and runs from 5:30–9 PM, and features a gallery talk with printmaker Elizabeth Dove at 6 PM, plus etching demos with James Bailey, and dance performances by Tricia Opstad. Free. Call 728-0447. Give granny a reason to rock out with her frock when Ello plays rock during the Top Hat’s monthly artist-in-residence series every Thu. in April from 6–8 PM. Free, all ages. Conservationists unite during It’s Your Planet...Pass It On!, a celebration of conservation in western Montana that features talks with Chris Johns of National Geographic magazine and M. Sanjayan of The Nature Conservancy, plus music by Cash for Junkers, starting at 6 PM at the Wilma Theatre. Free. Call 543-6681. Absorb a drama about a political prisoner in Lebanon, and his wife who waits for his return, when Montana Rep Missoula presents a performance of Lee Blessing’s Two Rooms, starting at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10/$5 student rush tickets with sign ups at 7 P M. Visit montanarep.org/missoula.html. Tickle your earlobes with a night of bass-heavy electronic music when the Palace hosts BassFace The Bounce Edition, which features sets of electronic music by KidTraxiom, Cadence, and Buckaroo Blastar, at 9 PM. Free. Laugh off your gingko hangover when Star Anna & The Laughing Dogs plays folk and bluegrass at 10 PM at the Top Hat. $5. Don’t be a space case and send your event info by 5 PM on Fri., April 15 to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff to me online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”


VOTE SAS!!

MOUNTAIN HIGH F orget riding the pony, this week is all about riding on the pow pow for one last time this season. Here’s the dealio: Beginning on Fri., April 15, Montana Snowbowl announces that it’s open for one final weekend of powdery fun for the season, and it welcomes anyand-all shredders and carvers to get down on its slopes through Sun., April 17. And if recent snow reports are any indication, it ought to be prime conditions up in those there hills. Snowbowl’s online ski report for April 12 indicates a snow depth of 62” on its base and 120” at its summit. If you’re in the mood to bust out stylish tricks this weekend, you can

...providing you the true Salon Experience!

also participate in the Zootown Roundup Slopestyle Competition, which occurs at Snowbowl’s High Roller terrain park on Sat., April 16. It’s open to all snowboarders and skiers, and features some sick prizes including “Powder Passes” for the 2011-2012 season. So get out there and shred! Montana Snowbowl is open from 10 AM–4:30 PM Fri., April 15–Sun., April 17. $40 for a full-day pass/$35 for a half-day pass. The Zootown Roundup Slopestyle Competition is Sat., April 16, starting around 11 AM or noon. Registration is $10. Call 5499777 or visit montanasnowbowl.com.

Healthy Hair. Healthy Skin. Healthy, Beautiful You.

Shear Art Salon 1804 North Ave W, Suite F

406-214-3112 Shearartsalon.com

Hair • Nails • Skin

Photo by Chad Harder

FRIDAY APRIL 15 Kids in Missoula can hike, bike, raft, canoe and swim to their heart’s content, and learn skills in leadership, self-confidence and teamwork, during Missoula Outdoor Learning Adventures’ Outdoor Adventure Summer Camp, which is currently open for registration. Camps run each week from June 6–Aug. 26. $150 per one-week session, with a $50 deposit check per week. Get details at missoulaoutdoors.com.

SATURDAY APRIL 16 LOL all the way to the finish line at the fifth annual Bust-A-Gut 5k, a race that begins with day-of registration the University of Montana Oval at 7:30 AM, and is followed by the race at 9 AM, which takes you down the Kim Williams Trail to Orange Street, and then back to UM. A pancake feed at Christ the King Church coincides with the race, and proceeds from the event are used for scholarships for UM Phyiscal Therapy grad students. $10 to race. Visit runmt.com/cal1.html for more details. Swap your boat, but not your partner, during The Trail Head’s annual Canoe, Kayak and Raft Swap, which begins with gear drop-off from 9 AM–noon, and a swap sale from noon–3 PM, all at the Trail Head, 221 E. Front St. Gear pickup occurs from 3–5 PM. Those who are selling can get 80 percent of the selling price in cash, or 110 percent of selling price in store credit. Call 543-6966. Get away from the toxins and let your soles pound the pavement during the annual Superfun(d) Run, a race that features a 1-mile run/walk at 9 AM, followed by a 5k and 10k walk/run at 9:30, starting at Our Savior’s Lutheran Church in Bonner, 8985 Hwy. 200 E. $25/$23 Run Wild Missoula members/$20 advance/$18 advance Run Wild Missoula members/free for children through the eighth grade. Visit active.com by April 14 to register online. Earn the nickname “Stewie the Super Steward” during the Clark Fork River Cleanup, which begins with a meet-up at 10 AM at Caras Park, and is followed by pickups of trash and recyclables. A free barbecue occurs after the cleanup at noon. Free. Call 542-0539 or e-mail liz@clarkfork.org to volunteer. Get up to snuff on your bird ogling when The Five Valleys and Bitterroot Audubon Societies present a Beginning Bird Walk that covers avian ID, plus use of field guides and binoculars, at 10 AM at the headquarters of Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge, 4567 Wildfowl Lane, outside of Stevensville. Families and children are welcome. Free. Call Larry at 549-5632.

Get rid of some of your old-but-still-good sleeping bags, backpacks and other outdoors gear in order to help out the Mountain Shepherds—a community run, eco-tourism organization located in the Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve in India—during the Nature-Link Institute’s Gear for the Garhwal drive, which runs through April 30 with drop off locations at Pipestone Mountaineering, The Trail Head, Aerie Wilderness Medicine, UM’s Outdoor Program and REI Missoula. Call 370-2294 and visit nature-link.org for details. Get waterwise with your child when the Missoula Children and Nature and the Watershed Education Network present an aquatic insect hike, which runs from 1–4 PM starting with a meet-up at the Greenough Park entrance, on Monroe Street between Locust and Elm Streets. Free. Call 396-9562. Get fishy with your kid when the Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St., presents its Saturday Kids’ Activity: The Dish on Fish, which begins at 2 PM. $3/$1 MNHC members. Call 327-0405.

SUNDAY APRIL 17 Pedal for the meat’s sake when Missoulians on Bicycles host the 36th annual Cheese Burger Boogie ride, a 55-mile cycling jaunt that departs at 9 AM from Lucky Lil’s, on the corner of Brooks and Reserve Streets. The ride features paved roads and includes a stop in Stevensville for lunch. Free. Visit missoulabike.org.

TUESDAY APRIL 19 Have a nice stroll with your fam when the Montana Natural History Center (MNHC), 120 Hickory St., celebrates 2011 Unplug and Play Week with a Family Hike Night, which includes a stroll along the River Trail and runs from 7:30–8:30 PM. An Early Bird Naturalist Walk also occurs at the MNHC from 8–9 AM on Wed., April 20. Both events are free. Call 327-0405.

THURSDAY APRIL 21 Leave your bear suit at home during Swan Valley Bear Resources’ Spring Bear Wake Up Social, an evening featuring guest speakers discussing info related to bears in the Swan Valley, which runs from 5–8 PM at the Swan Valley Community Hall, near milemarker 42 off Hwy. 83. Free, but RSVPs are requested. Call 754-3137. calendar@missoulanews.com

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scope

Horse sense Stanley Gordon West takes Blind Your Ponies on a wild ride by Erika Fredrickson

Stanley Gordon West spent 12 years writing Blind Your Ponies before self-publishing the novel a decade ago. When medium-sized publishing company Algonquin picked it up for print last year, West had already sold 40,000 copies via word-of-mouth—making the book an unusual success story in the flooded selfpublishing market. West, 78, grew up in Minnesota, but he spent 40some years in Montana since 1964, living on a ranch near Livingston. He’s authored six other novels, including Amos, which was made into a TV movie and Until They Bring the Streetcars Back, about St. Paul in the 1950s. Blind Your Ponies, however, has garnered the most praise. The story of two broken people and a small-town basketball team just won 2011’s One Book Montana—a program that promotes selected titles for statewide reading—and it’s received rave reviews across Montana, the Dakotas, and beyond. In the wake of the buzz, we talk with West about his influences—from Crow Indian legends to Steinbeck—and how he keeps Montana on his mind. Indy: You self-published Blind Your Ponies in 2001. What was your strategy for getting it into readers’ hands? West: I actually drove around with a bunch of books in my car trunk. I realized that my job was just to get the book to people and bookstores who might read it, and they would give it to their family and friends. And people were really loving it. There’s a little store on the main street of Ennis and it’s got everything: souvenirs, all kinds of stuff, but it has just one row of books. I was down there

Stanley Gordon West, 78, wrote Blind Your Ponies, a novel about love, loss and a small-town Montana basketball team. The book was picked for 2011’s One Book Montana, a program of Humanities Montana that selects a title each year to promote for statewide reading.

for one of their summer gatherings of painters and writers and the owner of this little store came up to me and he said [he’d] sold 300 or 400 copies of it. It’s been kind of like a grass fire. Indy: The Crow Indian legend behind the title, Blind Your Ponies, is startling. (After losing their loved ones to smallpox, the Crow warriors blindfolded their horses out of grief and rode off a cliff.) How did you first hear about it? West: I was in Billings and found this story somewhere where the tourists were; a brochure or something. It told briefly of the Crow Indians who had gone over suicide cliffs. I was haunted by it. I guess I tucked it away somewhere in my mind. When I was writing the novel, why, it just naturally came into the story. I was going to have the cover say “Blindfold Your Ponies” so that people didn’t get the idea that it sounds like you’re poking the eye out of a pony. But to counteract that, I told the story of the Indians in the first 10 pages so that it eliminated that misunderstanding. Indy: What experiences planted the seed for this novel? West: I was living in Bozeman and I was single. Somebody told me, “Well, if you want to meet a really nice gal you oughta take the country western dancing class up at [Montana State University].” So I went up there and I met a gal. The first time I was going to take her out she told me where she lived, and it was Willow Creek, Mont., about 40 miles west of Bozeman. She had a boy who played on the basketball team there and so I started going

to basketball games with her. The team hadn’t won a game in five years and when they lost, you know, it would be like 95–12 or 87–15. Yet these kids—and there was only about six of them to make up the team—played like it was life or death. That’s how I got to Willow Creek and where the story came from. Indy: I love how the basketball story parallels the lives of the main characters, Sam and Diana. West: It’s really a love story and not a sports story. What does Sam do when he comes home to a dark empty house after he’s seen his wife’s face splattered on the wall of a Burger King? He’s tempted to, like the Indians, blind his pony and jump. Sam and Diana are both struggling…And, of course, they’re not going to jump off a cliff, but they’re gonna give up on love. It’s the ragtag, bowlegged basketball team that shows them to love again. Indy: What inspired you to start writing? West: East of Eden by Steinbeck was a book that in a way got me started. I wasn’t a real reader at that time, back in my 30s. I went to the film East of Eden, with James Dean. When I came out of that movie I remember thinking, “Someday I’m going to write a novel and the main character’s name is going to be Cal.” I forgot about it until just about five years ago, and some little electrical charge in the file of my brain brought it to mind. I had just written a novel with a main character named Cal. Boy. It was like a lightning bolt after 30 or 40 years—not only inspiring, but scary. Indy: Did you start writing in Livingston? West: Yes. Livingston at that time was a small Hollywood. There was a whole pile of movie stars and directors and screenwriters and novelists. Some of them are still around there. I thought, “Jeez, I oughta take a crack at this.” For me to say that with my background and experience was crazy. I was getting close to 50 by then. I dusted off an old typewriter and started writing. And that’s where Amos came from, which was made into a TV movie with Kirk Douglas. It was based on a place right in Livingston called the Poor Farm. Indy: What did you think of that adaptation? West: It kind of missed the point of the book. But I was flabbergasted that it happened. I was naïve to think I could sit down and write a novel—and it ended up being made into a movie. I was the most surprised and dumbfounded of anybody. Indy: What’s next? West: I’m working on a novel set in Montana back in the early days before it’s even a state. It’s a story of a guy in Ohio who, ever since he was a little boy, dreamed about going west and building a ranch. The book follows three generations of that family. I have to laugh at myself: I had decided to make sure the next [book] I did would keep me immersed in researching and traveling in Montana. I think about Montana every day. And when I write, I can visualize being back there. efredrickson@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 30 April 14–April 21, 2011


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Dark Dark Dark Wild Go Melodic Records

Thanks to the ubiquitous presence of master pan flautist Zamfir in my youth, I have never felt comfortable using the word “haunting” to describe music—until now. But Dark Dark Dark’s Nona Marie Invie’s haunting voice is only part of the musical puzzle that shares that propinquity with Zamfir. Beginning with “In Your Dreams,” everything old is new again, but not just new, more like a message from the almost future. Squishing squeezebox and pattering drums combine with monastic doo-wop backing vocals, which sound as Gregorian as they do Philly street corner circa 1957. This is as much unabashed fun as you will have listening to Wild Go. “Daydreams” is more demonstrative of this delightfully moody album (yes, delightfully). Invie’s piano playing and her aching-yet-euphonious vocal

Maserati Pyramid of the Sun Temporary Residence Limited

I can’t shake the thought that Maserati’s monumental tune “Oaxaca” would fit perfectly within a scene from some 1970s dystopian sci-fi film. The minor-key moodiness and sense of urgency on this synth-heavy tune evoke a protagonist who’s desperately searching for some place to hide while on the run from the iron fist of an autocratic government. It’s cinematic, psychedelic post-rock with touches of Krautrock and dance-y electronic music dabbled throughout. And

The Hood Internet Mixtape #5 self-released

With a mash-up DJ’s mixtape, so much depends upon a perfect blend of songs colored with allusion, and bumping at the club. Especially bumping at the club. It’s a fool’s errand to strap on the headphones and quizzically dissect why the genre blenders and benders made the decision to mash-up one track with another (unless you’re being paid a kingly sum to do so). Obviously, mixtapes are for boogieing down. Shaking your moneymaker. Dancing. So how did blenderistas STV SLV and ABX do in the all-important funkengrooven department on Mixtape #5? Not bad considering they don’t cherrypick the most overplayed/well-known tracks in popular music from the past 30 years: I’m looking at you

Kurt Vile Smoke Ring For My Halo Matador Records

Smoke Ring For My Halo sounds familiar the first time you hear it, as if Kurt Vile was a traveler from an alternate 1970s in which Neil Diamond was never born and Lou Reed had to do everything. Except that’s not really what Smoke Ring sounds like. It sounds like the Rolling Stones if they had done quaaludes instead of coke after Let It Bleed, or like

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laments—reminiscent of Fiona Apple and Regina Spektor—are backed by the swirling scuff of percussive brushes. The somber power of DDD flags when banjo player/clarinetist Marshall LaCount helms the vocal on “Heavy Heart.” While a serviceable vocalist and an excellent musician, he is no match for the powerfully morose and impassioned Invie. Fair warning guys: female leads end up on Top 40 hip-hop tracks, then go solo, then you’re out of a job. Just sayin’. ( Jason McMackin) Dark Dark Dark plays Zoo City Apparel Tuesday, April 19, at 8 PM with Why Are We Building Such a Big Ship?, The Keys Knees, Fiancée and Buffler. $7 with tickets available at the door and at Ear Candy Music. like any good flick, it ping pongs inside your head for days. “They’ll No More Suffer From Thirst” is another keeper on the Athens, Ga.-based band’s instrumental arsenal. Shimmery guitar takes center stage, and then lifts off into trails of delay effect. It’s akin to a spaceship breezing past clusters of asteroids. Pastoral guitar motifs also slip in the mix, while a funky bassline coalesces with a disco drumbeat. Other tracks, like “Pyramid of the Sun,” highlight wailing, mournful guitar work and a tightly honed sense of dynamics. The final track, “Bye M’friend, Goodbye”—which is also the last song the band recorded with drummer Jerry Fuchs before he died in 2009—shows the band at its best with rocking riffs and enlivening melodies. It totally seals the epic post-rock deal. (Ira Sather-Olson) Maserati plays the Palace Wednesday, April 20, at 9 PM with Treehouse and The Lion The Tamer. $8. Girl Talk. That said I muffed up and sat in a room puzzling away with Monster Beats® by Dr. Dre ensconcing my ears. Sure, I bit my bottom lip and got my Molly Ringwald on now and again, but I never heard one of those “Eureka!” moments that mash-ups can offer when two or more seemingly incongruous numbers meld into a joyous, revelatory musical marriage replete with “zoomazoom-zoom-zooms and a boom-booms” and Fugazi bass-lines. Mixtape #5 could use more revelations, more unveilings. (Jason McMackin) The Hood Internet plays the Top Hat Wednesday, April 20, at 10 PM with Shapers and Sick Kids XOXO. $12/$10 advance. “Gimme Danger” as arranged by Elliott Smith. So basically we’re talking about the last 40 years of American pop music distilled by one surly dude with a guitar. And, Jesus, it is good. You could play the influence game for all 45 minutes of Smoke Ring, but you’d miss the words. Any question that Vile is merely being clever is answered by the odd, moving specificity of his lyrics. Lines like, “I get sick of just about everyone / and I hide in my baby’s arms / because except for her, you know, as I’ve implied” live on the border between resentment and fatigue—a place the album makes viscerally real. It’s a honky tonk somewhere during the off hours, and there’s a man hung-over and mumbling to the jukebox. He is telling the truth. (Dan Brooks)

Missoula Independent

Page 31 April 14–April 21, 2011


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Seeds • Potatoes Onion Sets & Walla Wallas Berries • Asparagus Bulbs • Fruit Trees

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Rising son Lancaster’s big world offers authentic character by Michael Peck

After finishing The Summer Son, I began wander- Jerry flees for the Marines, Mitch’s stepmother leaves ing my balcony (it’s actually the roof, but I prefer to call Jim, Jim sinks into alcoholism, punches some people it a balcony), wracked by two contradictory reactions at and takes on a drifter who will go on to give the book once, which, for a book reviewer, is not a good sign. My its final revelation. But unless one is stimulated by the ins and outs of drilling for natural gas or needlessly thoughts were: 1.) This is an unusually probing, terrifically paced obfuscating conversations between father and son, there is nothing here of substance. The “twists” that are character study; supposed to propel the action forward are not so much 2.) This is a hyperbolic, badly conceived novel. I kept reminding myself that I would not begin a classic shifts of fate as theatrical upheavals. Instead of review on such a vague note. A few days and much bal- getting a pie in the face, we are hit on the back of the cony-wandering later, however, my analysis remained head with a bakery. Dramatic? Yes. Convincing? No. unchanged. Let me explain. Likewise, halfway through you have a pretty In his second published novel (his first was the acclaimed 600 Hours of Edward), Billings resident strong inkling that the author has planned some massively redeeming episode to Craig Lancaster has written an explain Jim’s degeneracy, but uneasy saga of secrets, frustraby the time he gets around to tion, sudden violence and forgiving Jim on behalf of generational angst; in other Mitch, it’s too late: For the words, he’s written a book reader, he’s already unforgivabout family. Once again able. Except as Lancaster’s Lancaster shows himself an attempt to pile on Jim’s vile astute psychologist of people attributes in order to make coping with elusive problems, his eventual vindication in a book that proves memory reverberate, several dozen is just as insurmountable as intervening pages could have any mental illness. been scissored away and left The summer son and a far more powerful work. narrator of the title is Mitch Still, Lancaster is superb Quillen, a man struggling at characterization, writing in with his existence as a father, a practical idiom that is pera husband and, especially as a fect for capturing the intricason. After some cryptic cies of parental cruelty and phone calls from his irascible love. Although Mitch comes father, Jim, Mitch travels to off as a somewhat grating Billings to confront his past wreck, Jim is intimately craftand uncover a mystery that ed, an all-too-human working has been plaguing him since The Summer Son Craig Lancaster class guy in the throes of a boyhood. Paperback, AmazonEncore dirty history that he cannot “Now I was going away,” 304 pages, $13.95 escape; entirely unlikeable, Mitch confides, “because I hadn’t tried enough or succeeded enough. Because but almost cathartically satisfying. Lancaster’s great feat my father had wrenched an opening in our lives big in The Summer Son though, is how straightforwardly enough for my wife to push me through.” So com- he presents a story with all the elements of an ultramences Mitch Quillen’s descent into bad recollec- depressed indie tragedy—existential brooding, brutalitions, during which an 11-year-old Mitch joins his ty, anger, heartbreak, etc.—and somehow makes it father’s drilling crew, connects with older brother entertaining. Like Jim Quillen, it is unpolished, not Jerry, meets some new friends and survives a series of without its irreconcilable flaws and, occasionally, unwholesome situations that would turn anyone into enlightening. Whatever its faults (over-ambitious plotting at the a frazzled neurotic. Bouncing between Mitch’s discontented adult- expense of naturalistic storytelling comes to mind), hood (marital strife, unsavory job, aloof father) and this book is a fitfully insightful prompt that dormant part of the summer of 1979 (spent mainly watching his secrets are always an inch away, ready to destroy or to father enraged), Lancaster’s tale follows the double tra- transform. Someone once remarked that you can get jectory of past and present, as Mitch pieces together over anything except childhood, and Lancaster illuswhy Jim was/is a terrible father, while backtracking to trates this point with an abundance of stark honesty in show just how terrible a father Jim really was/is. the tormented form of Jim Quillen. All in all, The Altogether, it’s a fine balancing act, supported by the Summer Son is a story about extraordinarily authentic author’s taut structure. As Jim’s combustible, blue-col- individuals somehow maneuvering in a painfully cinelar rage threatens to engulf everyone in his vicinity, matic world. Craig Lancaster reads from The Summer Son at Mitch unearths much more than he intended. And Fact & Fiction Tuesday, April 19, at 7 PM. Free. none of it is pleasant. The major problems of the novel seem to reside in the middle chapters, adding superficial layers to Jim: arts@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 32 April 14–April 21, 2011


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Innocence floats Helms dives only so deep in Cedar Rapids by Dave Loos

depth to Lippe and his colleagues and then it flounders in sitcom territory in the movie’s final act. It’s as if the filmmakers took a hard look at some uncomfortable themes involving the escapism and alternate realities fostered by working life and business travel and decided not to dive headfirst into that pool. So, instead, Cedar Rapids just tests those waters, aided by a wonderful cast that includes John C. Reilly, Anne Heche and Sigourney Weaver—a cast that probably would have been up to the challenge of exploring a side to Midwestern angst that is almost non-existent on screen today. And Helms is very good as Lippe, a sadsack bachelor with some serious emotional neediness. He’s sleeping with his recently divorced seventh grade teacher ( Weaver), and explains their relationship to colleagues as “almost pre-engaged.” Not only does the last-minute business trip to the Iowa conference provide Lippe’s first airplane experience, but it might also very well be the first time he’s left the state of Wisconsin. In Cedar Rapids he meets colleagues to whom this conference is a yearly high point, a place to booze it up and stay in a nice hotel (with an indoor pool!) without having to Welcome to corporate, can I take your life savings please? worry about familial obligations. But no amount of But the eventual end of “The Office” is still no karaoke and conference scavenger hunts can mask the guarantee that Helms will ever be able to shed his fact that there are some very sad people in attendance. small screen persona to any substantial degree. Some work too hard, others are in the midst of failing There’s even a great example of the perils of former marriages, and in the middle of it all is Lippe. He’s television brilliance within Cedar Rapids, as Isiah ostensibly in Cedar Rapids to lobby the association’s Whitlock Jr.—who played the wonderfully evil state president for a coveted two-diamond award, but is senator Clay Davis in “The Wire”—is cast against type almost immediately overwhelmed by his environment. here as an honest, hardworking and friendly insur- While his innocence has its cute and endearing ance agent. And although Whitlock does a fine- moments, it also occasionally falls into unbelievable enough job as one of Lippe’s cohorts, I could never Forrest Gump territory, like when Lippe fails to grasp shake the image of the smug, arrogant, corrupt guy I’d the obvious flirtations of a prostitute. But it’s still hard not to like the guy, or his oftengrown to love and hate, constantly punctuating his obnoxious group of peers. Even as Cedar Rapids slowdialog with, “Sheeeeeeet.” Cedar Rapids is a decent enough comedy that ly devolves into predictable territory—fueled by a crisis mixes elements of slapstick and dark humor to varying of conscience as the conference reaches its endpoint— levels of success as we follow Lippe and his newfound there are still wry and subversive moments to be friends at an annual insurance industry conference in enjoyed. Of note are the subtle jabs at Bible Belt the eponymous Iowan city. But director Miguel Arteta hypocrisy throughout the film. Reilly is especially funny fails to effectively convey a much heavier undercurrent as he complains about his hangover during the breakof middle-class angst and frustration, one that occa- fast prayer. Helms has taken a giant leap in proving he can sionally floats to the surface but eventually just gets bogged down by the film’s own sappiness. And it all carry a pretty good film as the lead. But how high a ceilends up playing out like a moderately entertaining ing he has may very well depend on how well he untanthree-episode arch of—there’s really no way to escape gles himself from Andy Bernard when “The Office” finally closes its doors. Cedar Rapids does not reprethis—“The Office.” That’s not a terrible thing, but Cedar Rapids had sent much of a stretch. Cedar Rapids continues at the Wilma Theatre. the potential to be as introspective and moving as last year’s Up In The Air. Instead it follows a wonderful series of middle scenes in which we begin to see some arts@missoulanews.com

Ed Helms is an affable and charming fellow who appears to have the charisma and skill required to handle leading-man roles on the big screen. But that time is not now. At the moment Helms is in many ways a victim of his own success on NBC’s “The Office,” where he’s been playing for the past six years the a cappellaloving, insecure nerd, Andy Bernard. Until “The Office” goes off the air—and it appears there’s at least a season or two to go—Helms is going to have a tough time escaping Bernard as he makes the leap to movies, especially if he keeps getting roles like the insecure belittled boyfriend in The Hangover and the insecure naïve insurance salesman Tim Lippe in Cedar Rapids.

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Saturday, April 16 • 9am-6pm @ homeWORD • 127 N Higgins, Ste 303

“Get Ready for Home Ownership” April 18, 20, 25, 27 • 6-9pm @ Lambros Real Estate ERA, 3011 American Way (behind Barnes and Noble)

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Call to sign up for a free aromatherapy class! 180 S. 3rd W. next to Bernice’s M-F 10-6 • Sat 11-5 • 728.0543

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Have you been wondering how YOU can be involved in building The GARDEN of ONE THOUSAND BUDDHAS to create an International Peace Center in Arlee, MT?

JOIN US FOR THE VOLUNTEER FAIR AT THE NEW EWAM TIBETAN BUDDHIST CENTER UPSTAIRS AT 180 S. 3RD ST. WEST, MISSOULA, MT Wednesday, April 20, 2011 From 6-8pm

VOLUNTEER FAIR Contact www.ewam.org or 406-726-0555 for information. Visit www.ewambuddhagarden.org. Ewam is a federally-registered 501c(3).

Missoula Independent

Page 33 April 14–April 21, 2011


Scope OPENING THIS WEEK THE CONSPIRATOR Confederate sympathizer Robin Wright is in the doghouse after she’s charged as a co-conspirator in the slaying of Abe Lincoln, and her only hope lies in the hands of defense lawyer James McAvoy. Robert Redford directs this flick, which is based on the story of Mary Surratt, the first woman executed by the U.S. government. Village 6: 4 and 7, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at 9:50, and Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:45, 3:50, 6:40 and 9:30, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 3:50, 6:40 and 9:30. JANE EYRE Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender hit the screen in this film that’s based on Charlotte Brontë’s famous 19th century romantic novel. Cary Joji Fukunaga, whose film Sin Nombre won awards at the 2009 Sundance Film Fest, directs. Wilma Theatre: nightly at 7 and 9:10, with Sun. matinees at 1 and 3:10.

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new lady friend Greta Gerwig, and childhood buddy Helen Mirren. Carmike 10: 4:10, 7:15 and 9:50, with an additional Fri. show at 12:15 AM, and Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:05. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:10, 4:05, 6, 6:55, 8:30 and 9:35, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:15, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4, 7 and 9:10. CEDAR RAPIDS Insurance agent Ed Helms cures his small town squareness by getting blotto with weirdo funnyman John C. Reilly, Isiah Whitlock Jr. (Sen. Clay Davis from “The Wire”) and others during a routine business trip to a convention in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Wilma Theatre: nightly at 9:10, with a Sun. matinee at 3:10.

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1:05, 2:05, 3:30, 4:20, 7:05 and 9:20. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:15. INSIDIOUS When a family’s young son falls into a comatoselike state, an evil spirit starts to screw things up around their abode. Patrick Wilson and Rose Byrne co-star. Village 6: 4 and 7, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at 10, an additional Fri. show at 12:10 AM, and Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:45, 3:45, 6:45 and 9:35, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:25, 3:45, 6:45 and 9:35. THE KING’S SPEECH After English aristocrat Colin Firth gets crowned King George VI of England, he tries to rid himself of a nasty stammer so he can give good speeches to his fellow Brits, who are on the brink of World War II. Oh, and in case you didn’t know, the film received “Best Picture” at the Oscars, among

RIO A rare macaw who never learned how to fly high in the sky has to tackle the task after he escapes some smugglers during a trip to Rio de Janeiro. Tracy Morgan, Jamie Foxx, George Lopez and others lend their voices to this 3-D animated flick. Carmike 10: 4, 7, and 9:15, with an additional Fri. show at midnight, and Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1. Carmike 10 in 2-D: 4:20, 7:20 and 9:35, with an additional Fri. show at midnight, and Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:20. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at noon, 2:20, 4:40, 7 and 9:30, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 3:30, 7 and 9:30. Stadium 14 in Kalispell in 2-D: Fri.–Sun. at 12:30, 2:40, 5:10, 7:30 and 9:45, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 and 9:45. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:15, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. “Yes ma’am, the emo party is that way.” Scream 4 opens Friday at the Carmike 10. Entertainer in Ronan: 4, 7 and 9. SCREAM 4 That masked, pale face killer named Ghostface is back in the latest installment of Wes Craven’s seemingly unending slasher series. This time around, Ghostface is taking bloody cues from horror movie remakes. Neve Campbell, Courteney Cox-Arquette, David Arquette and others co-star. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:30, with an additional Fri. show at midnight and Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1. Village 6: 4:20 and 7:30, with additional Fri.–Sat. shows at 10, an additional Fri. show at 12:10 AM, and Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:20. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3, and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:50, 3:55, 7:05 and 9:45, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:10, 3:55, 7:05 and 9:45.

NOW PLAYING ARTHUR Russel Brand’s a richboy with no direction in life— except towards all things hedonistic—who’s going to get his scrilla supply cut off, unless he marries corporate executive Susan Johnson. Brand isn’t too keen on her though, and decides to put on his big-boy britches with the encouragement of his

Missoula Independent

HANNA Trained by her father Eric Bana to be a stealthy assassin, teenager Saoirse Ronan embarks across Europe on a deadly family mission, and uses her wicked survival skills in order to elude Cate Blanchett and her crew of intelligence agents. Village 6: 4 and 7, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at 9:30, an additional Fri. show at midnight, and Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:20, 4:10, 7:15 and 9:40, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. HOP After a botched attempt at trying to “make it” as a drummer in Hollywood, the teenage son of the Easter Bunny, voiced by Russel Brand, must try to save Easter from an evil chick in this live action/CGI flick. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:35, with an additional Fri. show at midnight, and Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1. Village 6: 4:30 and 7:25, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at 9:55, an additional Fri. show at midnight, and Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:05, 1:05, 2:25, 3:30, 4:45, 7:05 and 9:20, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at

Page 34 April 14–April 21, 2011

other accolades. Wilma Theatre: Sun.–Tue. at 7 nightly, with a Sun. matinee at 1. LIMITLESS Bradley Cooper’s a writer with a case of creative blockage who finds his muse after he takes an experimental pharmaceutical called NZT—which seems like a cross between meth and coffee. Of course, Cooper soon realizes he’s gotta keep dipping into his stash in order to do things like help Robert De Niro run a company. Carmike 10: 4:30, 7:30 and 9:55, with an additional Fri. show at 12:15 AM, and Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 7:20 and 9:45, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. THE LINCOLN LAWYER Defense attorney Matthew McConaughey makes a living off of defending slimy dudes, but his workload takes a killer turn when he takes an offer to defend shady richboy Ryan Phillippe, who’s accused of rape and attempted murder. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:50, with an additional Fri. show at midnight, and Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 4 and 6:50. PAUL Seth Rogen aims for guffaws by lending his talents

as the voice of a hitchhiking alien picked up by Simon Pegg and Nick Frost—two buddies heading to Area 51 for sci-fi kicks. From that point, the duo tries to help Rogan get back to his clan of extra terrestrials. Sigourney Weaver and Jason Bateman co-star. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:30 and 9:30, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. RANGO Johnny Depp lends his voice as an animated pet chameleon who decides he’s going to be the sheriff of an old western town populated by various hardened critters. Some might call this a spaghetti Western for kids. Carmike 10: 4:30, 7:30 and 9:55, with an additional Fri. show at 12:10 AM, and Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:15 and 4:05. SOUL SURFER A teen surfer with high hopes on the waves has to relearn the sport after a shark gnaws off her arm. Helen Hunt and Dennis Quaid co-star. Carmike 10: 4:20, 7 and 9:40, with an additional Fri. show at midnight, and Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:15. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:25, 4:15, 7:10 and 9:45, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45. SOURCE CODE Jake Gyllenhaal wakes up in the body of another man, and finds out the government assigned him the loathsome task of re-living the last minutes of the man’s life in order to get to the bottom of a gruesome train bombing in Chicago. Carmike 10: 4:20, 7:15 and 9:40, with an additional Fri. show at midnight, and Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45. Pharoahplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:10, 2:35, 4:50, 7:25 and 9:40, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:20, 3:50, 7:25 and 9:40. YOUR HIGHNESS Danny McBride is a stoner/boozehound slacker prince who is asked to prove his family worth by joining his brother James Franco, along with warrioress Natalie Portman, on a quest to save Franco’s lady Zooey Deschanel–who was snagged by evil wizard Justin Theroux. Village 6: 4:30 and 7:15, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at 9:45, an additional Fri. show at 12:10 AM, and Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:10, 2:40, 5, 7:30 and 9:50, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:15, 4, 7:30 and 9:40. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45. Capsule reviews by Ira Sather-Olson. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., April 15. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-F I LM; S t a d i u m 14 i n K a l i s p e l l – 752 - 78 0 0 . Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.


by Vote 1 1 May

2011 OFFICIAL BALLOT

Arts & Entertainment Best Art Gallery _____________________________________ Best Local Band _____________________________________ Best Local Photographer _____________________________ Best Local Writer ___________________________________ Best Movie Theater __________________________________

Fashion & Beauty Best Cosmetics _____________________________________ Best Day Spa ________________________________________ Best Jewelry ________________________________________ Best Kids' Clothing __________________________________ Best Lingerie ________________________________________ Best Men’s Clothing __________________________________ Best Place for a Hair Cut _____________________________ Best Shoe Store _____________________________________ Best Tattoo Parlor ___________________________________ Best Thrift Store _____________________________________ Best Women’s Clothing _______________________________

Food & Drink Best Asian Food _____________________________________ Best Bakery _________________________________________ Best Bar Food _______________________________________ Best Breakfast _______________________________________ Best Budget Lunch ___________________________________ Best Coffee _________________________________________ Best Convenience Store ______________________________ Best Delicatessen ____________________________________ Best Desserts _______________________________________ Best Family-Friendly Restaurant _______________________ Best French Fries ____________________________________ Best Fresh Produce __________________________________ Best Hamburger _____________________________________ Best Ice Cream ______________________________________ Best Liquor Store ____________________________________ Best Mexican Food __________________________________ Best Milk Shake _____________________________________ Best New Restaurant ________________________________ Best Outdoor Dining ________________________________ Best Pizza ___________________________________________ Best Pizza Delivery __________________________________ Best Place to Eat Alone ______________________________ Best Restaurant _____________________________________ Best Restaurant Service ______________________________ Best Restaurant Wine List ____________________________ Best Retail Beer Selection ____________________________ Best Retail Wine Selection ____________________________ Best Romantic Dining ________________________________ Best Salad __________________________________________ Best Sandwich Shop _________________________________ Best Seafood ________________________________________ Best Steak __________________________________________ Best Supermarket ___________________________________ Best Vegetarian Food _________________________________

Goods & Services Best Auto Repair ____________________________________ Best Big Box Store __________________________________ Best Bookstore _____________________________________ Best Car Wash ______________________________________ Best CDs and Music _________________________________

20

Best of Missoula

11

It’s that time again, dear reader. Take a deep breath because you are about to embark on a critical couple of minutes. You’re looking at an official Best of Missoula ballot, the starting point to the Independent’s annual celebration of everything and everyone that make Missoula so special. By answering the following vital questions—Best Local Band, Best Vegetarian Food, Best Happy Hour, and nearly 100 others—you’ll help anoint our next great discovery or re-crown one of the city’s established stalwarts. It’s all up to you. Your part in this process is pretty important, but, luckily, it doesn’t require much work.You can vote in hard copy by using this ballot, or visit www.missoulanews.com and vote online, where you’ll find more than 50 onlineonly categories. The rules are also pretty straightforward: We require ballots to include your full name, e-mail address and phone number in the spaces provided. Ballots missing any of this information, or ballots with fewer than 30 categories filled in, will be mocked, ridiculed and not counted. Same goes for photocopied ballots and ballots with unclear markings. Hard-copy ballots may be mailed or hand-delivered to the Indy office at 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or dropped at any of the ballot locations listed below. Ballots must be received by no later than 5 p.m. on Wednesday, May 11. Rest assured, your deep thought, diligent answering and exceptional penmanship will pay off in the form of an invite to the Independent’s annual Best of Missoula Party at Caras Park on Thursday, July 7. Now, get to it. Missoula is counting on you.

Name: Email:

Best Computer Repair Shop _________________________ Best Dry Cleaner ___________________________________ Best Financial Institution _____________________________ Best Furniture Store ________________________________ Best Green/ Eco-friendly Business ____________________ Best Hardware Store ________________________________ Best Hobby/Craft Shop ______________________________ Best Laundromat ___________________________________ Best Lodging _______________________________________ Best Motorcycle/ATV Dealer _________________________ Best New Car Dealer _______________________________ Best Pawn Shop ____________________________________ Best Pet Supplies ___________________________________ Best Plant Nursery _________________________________ Best Ranch Supply Store _____________________________ Best New Retail Store ______________________________ Best Store for Gifts _________________________________ Best Store for Home Appliances ______________________ Best Store for Home Electronics _____________________ Best Store for Musical Instruments ___________________ Best Toy Store ______________________________________ Best Used Car Dealer _______________________________

Nightlife Best Best Best Best Best Best Best Best Best Best Best Best Best

Bar ___________________________________________ Bar for a Stiff Pour _____________________________ Beer Selection _________________________________ Bloody Mary __________________________________ Casino ________________________________________ Happy Hour ___________________________________ Karaoke Bar ___________________________________ Martini ________________________________________ Microbrewery _________________________________ Place to Dance ________________________________ Place to Hear Live Music ________________________ Pool Table _____________________________________ Sports Bar ____________________________________

People & Media Best Activist ________________________________________ Best Journalist ______________________________________ Best Local Politician _________________________________ Best Local Sports Figure _____________________________ Best Meteorologist _________________________________ Best Radio Personality ______________________________ Best Radio Station __________________________________ Best TV Newscast __________________________________ Best TV Personality _________________________________

Sports & Recreation Best Best Best Best Best Best Best Best Best Best Best

Bike Shop _____________________________________ Bowling Alley __________________________________ Flyfishing Shop _________________________________ Golf Course ___________________________________ Health Club ___________________________________ Place for Paddle Sports Gear ____________________ Place to Get a Snowboard ______________________ Sporting Goods ________________________________ Store for Guns ________________________________ Store for Mountaineering Gear __________________ Store for Skis __________________________________

Phone:

Bernice's Bakery, Break Espresso, Bridge Pizza, Butterfly Herbs, Caffè Dolce (Brooks & Beckwith), El Diablo, Food for Thought, Good Food Store, Grizzly Grocery, Hastings, Hob Nob, Iron Horse, Iza Asian Restaurant, Kettlehouse, Missoula Public Library, Orange Street Food Farm, Press Box, Rockin Rudy's, Rosauers Reserve Street Bistro, Sushi Hana, Taco del Sol (all 4 locations), UC Center Market, Uptown Diner ,Westside Lanes,Wheat Montana,Worden's Market Missoula Independent

Page 35 April 14–April 21, 2011


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

April 14 - April 21, 2011

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Have sexual health questions? The Montana Access Project (MAP) Receive answers to your sexual health questions via text from sexual health experts. Text 666746 Type ASKMAP (space) enter your question. Free & Confidential. askmap.info

Red Willow Learning Center now available to rent. 1000’ space for classes or meetings. Video conferencing, AV, beverage service. 825 West Kent. Call Kathy 880-2639. Support groups for survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault each Tuesday at YWCA

Missoula. Orientation Group, Living in Peace, and Domestic Violence Native Women’s Talking Circle. Groups also available for children/teens. Dinner at 5:30, groups start at 6:30. Please arrive by 6:15 if you have children. 1130 W. Broadway. 543-6691 for more information.

LOST & FOUND LOST: Zune Device Saturday April 9th at Pirate Cabaret at the Crystal Theatre. Happy little reward if found. Please call 728-2090

TO GIVE AWAY

5pm. If you would like to be a vendor please call 396-8140

Female Black Lab Cross. Leave message at 240-0402

Table of contents Advice Goddess . . . Sustainafieds . . . . . Free Will Astrology Public Notices . . . . Crossword . . . . . . . This Modern World

ANNOUNCEMENTS CRAFT BAZAAR A Craft Bazaar is being held at the Orchard Homes Country Life Club on 3rd street. There will be something for everyone. Need last minute Easter gift ideas? You wont want to miss this! SATURDAY APRIL 23rd from 9am-

. . . . . .

. .C2 . .C3 . .C4 . .C5 . .C7 .C11

THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE Hot Stone, Deep Tissue & Swedish

Piano Lessons At YOUR Home All Ages, All Levels

Bruce- 546-5541 CHEATING SPOUSE? Let Shadow Investigating obtain the video evidence so you know the truth. Low Rates/Free Consultation

830-0498 shadowinvestigating.com

Peace happens... One heart at a time. 546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

Rosemary Polichio 239-0474

I BUY

Hondas, Subarus, Toyotas Japanese/German Cars & Trucks

ENROLLING AGES 2-6

Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not.

Fine Arts Emphasis Whole Organic Meals

FAST CASH 24 HOURS

830-3268

327-0300

1703 S. 5th West

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION DISPUTES Call

721-7744 Today!

Bulmanlaw.com 416 E. Pine Street Missoula MT

FREE

P L A C E YOU R AD:

Estimates

Deadline: Monday at Noon

406-880-0688

Walk it.

bladesofglorylawncarellc.com

317 S. Orange

Missoula 3:16

Thrift Boutique • Downtown Corner of Orange & Front Tues - Sat/10am - 6pm 728-5538

Still need an Easter outfit?

Check us out. We have great prices! We also carry furniture, antiques, jewelry, shoes, artwork, household, and clothing for women, men, & children.

Fletch Law,

PLLC

Steve M. Fletcher Attorney at Law

Worker's Compensation Over 20 years experience. Call immediately for a FREE consultation.

541-7307 www.fletchlaw.net



Talk it.



Send it. Post it.

543-6609 x121 or x115

classified@missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

PET OF THE WEEK Cleo is a stunning adult Bengal cat who has been awaiting her forever family for quite some time. She is spayed, current on all vaccinations and her adoption fee has been sponsored. Cleo is a declawed indoor cat that enjoys being brushed and playing with sparkly cat toys. She is a selfproclaimed couch potato that loves affection and has a quiet purr. Cleo rewards people with little kitty kisses if they do a good job scratching her behind the ears. Western MT Humane Society 549-3934


COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

ADVICE GODDESS By Amy Alkon

MIFFED CONNECTION Two years ago, “Beth,” this attractive woman I see around, gave me her number and mentioned three times that she hadn’t been asked out in a long time. I called to ask her out and…silence. She then said, “I can’t...as I think I may have something else to do.” Well, that was that, as I rarely ask a lady a second time when a lady “may have something else to do.” I saw her around occasionally, and we were polite. Fast-forward to last week: I saw her and about 10 of her girlfriends swilling pitchers of beer and doing shots. I said hello to Beth, nodded to her friends, then rejoined my group. One by one, Beth’s friends wandered over and gushed, “I hear you asked Beth out!” I said that yes, I had— two years ago. And once! Do you think Beth painted me as a stalker or some stain that wouldn’t go away, or was I a victim of some rare chick moment? —Mystified People say things for a reason. Sometimes, the reason is that they are nervous and socially awkward and burp out the first thing they can that’s made of words. “I think I may have something else to do” could’ve meant “anything but go out with you,” or maybe she just couldn’t think of a good excuse for the real deal: “The lady at the clinic told me to avoid all sexual contact until the burning and itching goes away.” It’s unlikely Beth gave you her number just so she could prank you two years later. Chances are, she liked you and then felt insulted that you never called again despite the strong signals she gave you: stony silence, followed two years later by a gauntlet of her drunk friends. You didn’t help matters with your little policy of never asking for a date more than once. This can be a workable strategy—if you’re Jake Gyllenhaal and you have women tossing their panties with their phone number over the booth divider whenever you go out to eat. When a woman you’ve asked out turns you down in some nebulous way, asking her out again will either get you a date or confirm that she’s a lost cause. It helps if you can divorce rejection from how you feel about yourself. Remember, it’s called “self-worth,” not “what girls think of me-worth.” Try to see asking someone out as a procedural thing you have to go through—ask once, then repeat—kind of like “rinse, lather, repeat” directions on the back of a

VOLUNTEERS

shampoo bottle. (Surely, you don’t see “repeat” as a message from your shampoo manufacturer that you’re a worthless human being who can’t be trusted to clean his disgusting greasehead the first time around.) Why not just walk away? Because, well, sometimes the guy who looks like a giant Martian baby gets the girl. I’m talking about a guy who writes at the coffeehouse I do—a guy the color of fresh Wite-Out, with no eyebrows, eyelashes, or hair, who has a stunningly beautiful wife. Loads of men always ogled her, he told me—and then just stood there with their mouths open, never getting to the point where their lips moved and “Wanna go out with me?” came out. Maybe some of those guys now realize that good things come to those who wait—good things like a fleeting glance at the hot wife of the weird-looking guy who gets that far better things come to those who ask.

GLACIER NATIONAL PARK is recruiting volunteersto help answer phones & visitor questions and assist in a variety of administrative tasks. If you want to learn more about Glacier and its operations, are upbeat, and enjoy helping others, this would be a great opportunity for you! Training will be provided. A commitment from midApril through Labor Day of two or more days per week, 4-8 hours per day, is requested. If you are interested please contact David Restivo at (406) 888-7933 or david_restivo@nps.gov. For other volunteer opportunities please contact Volunteer Program Coordinator Brooke Linford at (406) 888-7851 or brooke_linford@nps.gov. VOLUNTEER INFORMATIONAL MEETING The Flathead County Animal Shelter is hosting an informational meeting for all new and existing volunteers on Friday April 16th at 4:00 PM in

the Earl Bennett Building (Flathead City/County Health Department) in the 2nd floor conference room. All who are interested are encouraged to attend. For further information, please contact the Shelter at 752-1310.

Of course, in the heat of love, you say, “We’ll always be friends,” and not, “If we ever break up, I’ll go around my house and cut your head out of all the pictures, burn the sheets, and put everything you ever gave me in a plastic shopping bag and drop it off at Goodwill.” After the relationship ends, however, the silliest things get in the way of a beautiful friendship, like the unbearable pain one person feels at the mere sight of the other. So, try to excuse your girlfriend if she isn’t up for regular get-togethers to learn how great your life is without her, how easy it was for you to move on, and how you spend hours every day not giving her a moment’s thought. What’s a girl to say but, “That was emotionally draining! Can’t wait till next week!”

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

Friday April 15th • 4-9pm Red Willow Learning Center 825 W. Kent • redwillowlearning.org

INSTRUCTION ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com

ADOPTION PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

EASTER SPECIAL

1/2 Hour Sitting & 8 Images $50 Live Bunnies & Baby Chic's for Easter

LEAVE ACTUALLY My girlfriend and I promised that if we ever broke up, we’d remain friends. Well, we broke up a year ago, and she doesn’t want me in her life at all. She won’t answer my calls, email, nothing. I finally emailed her, saying I’d wait patiently but I need her in my life. She sent back a curt “Please be kind enough to respect my wishes.” —Ouch

Gem & Crystal & Jewelry Sale

CD with full copyrights.

715 Kensington Ave Suite 8 • Missoula • 406-529-4466

www.jamielynnphotographymt.net

NOT ARTISTIC? Come have some fun painting. Instruction & art supplies furnished. Complimentary wine or tea. Book now, 327-8757 or 207-7839

Art Hang up 839 S. Higgins

EMPLOYMENT GENERAL A well-established childcare center seeking a Responsible, Caring, Fun, Nurturing, Hardworking, Enthusiastic person dedicated to the development of children. The Missoula Family Y cares for children 6 wks - 5 yrs. Must be certified in CPR & First Aid. A background in childcare, early or elementary education preferred. Applications available at 3000 S. Russell. EOE ADVENTUROUS YOUNG WOMEN AND YOUNG MEN (15-17) wanted for Montana Conservation Corps Expedition program. 4 weeks camping, working, learning in wilderness. $200 service award. June 12-July 9 or July 17-August 13. Call today! 18 6 6 - J O I N - M C C . www.mtcorps.org BARBER WANTED. Montana Barber’s License Required. Call 728-3957 ! BARTENDING ! $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training provided. 1800-965-6520 ext. 278 FACILITIES ASSISTANT. Upkeep and maintenance of The UM University Center. Night shift (10:00 p.m. to 6:30 a.m.) including weekends and holidays. Duties include sweeping, mopping, vacuuming, scrubbing, trash removal, and sanitizing; performing general maintenance such as changing light bulbs as well as supplying paper products and soap; snow

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2 April 14 – April 21, 2011

removal. Progression to Facilities Associate; advancement expected within 18-24 months. Criminal Background Investigation is required. #2979397 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 HOUSEKEEPER. Holiday Inn Downtown at the Park is seeking a detail oriented individual. Responsible for cleaning every area of the guest room, changing linens, dusting, vacuuming, emptying trash, refreshing amenities, and performing all other duties as assigned.Benefits and incentive programs available. #9951922 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 Job hunting is stressful. You deserve a break. Get started at www.MissoulaEvents.net LINE COOK. Holiday Inn’s bar and grill, Brooks & Browns is currently seeking a full time line cook. Have previous culinary experience and be able to demonstrate ingenuity, efficiency, and accuracy with food orders. Must have a flexible schedule and willingness to work weekends and holidays. Excellent company benefits. #9951923 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 SALVAGE YARD WORKER. Laborer for Axmen Recycling yard. Job will include sorting, loading and unloading metal among other tasks. Must be able to lift 150 pounds on a regular basis and work in a safe and efficient manner. Position is part time with the possibility of full time with benefits in the future. #9951885 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

PROFESSIONAL FINANCIAL REPRESENTATIVE. Financial representatives with the Northwestern Mutual Financial Network provide expert guidance and innovative solutions to help meet a client’s financial goals and objectives. For more information, visit our Web site at www.nmfn.com/castronovogroup #9951927 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 GROUP HOME ATTACHMENT COUNSELOR. Requires B.A/B.S. or equal combination of experience/education; experience working with troubled children; sound moral character; ability to provide consistent care and control; be emotionally accessible; positively resolve conflicts; knowledge of child development; knowledge of nurturing interventions. Requires valid driver’s license. Will manage group living: assist with meals, transportation, housekeeping, cleaning. meet client needs: provide institutional care, assess needs, carry out interventions, run house meetings. Environment is highly emotional. Full background check will be conducted. 40 hours per week, varying shifts, includes weekends and holidays. Pay starts at $10.35/hr plus generous benefits. #2979400 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

SKILLED LABOR AUTOMOTIVE MECHANIC for general repairs to all makes of

vehicles. Duties would include brakes, mufflers, tire changes, transmissions, and engines. Must have own tools and valid driver’s license. Position is in Seeley Lake. Full or part-time. Pay is DOE. Company can help provide housing. #2979401 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 FARM MECHANIC-MSU-Ft. Keogh LARRL, Miles City, MT. $11.727/hr. full-time. Details at www.montana.edu/jobs, or call 406-8748201. MSU-Bozeman is an ADA/EEO/AA/Vet Pref employer SAWMILL/PLANER. Must have knowledge of setup, repair, service and operation of planer machines. Must be able to work day and night shift. Pays $12.89 to $13.12/hour. Pre employment drug screening required. Benefits include family medical/dental, paid vacations & holidays, 401 (k), and monthly bonus program. #2979398 MIssoula Job Service 728-7060 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-5454546

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION Wildland Fire Training; Basic and Refresher. 406-543-0013 www.blackbull-wildfire.com


SUSTAINAFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT Seeking a full time PA/NP. Blue Mountain Clinic is seeking a full time Physician Assistant/ Nurse Practitioner! Experience in primary care and reproductive health in an outpatient setting a plus. Salary DOE, great benefits! E-mail resume and cover letter to annie@bluemountainclinic.org, fax to 406-5439890, or mail to Blue Mountain Clinic, 610 N California Street, Missoula, MT 59802. Seeking a full time PA/NP. Blue Mountain Clinic is seeking a full time Physician Assistant/ Nurse Practitioner! Experience in primary care and reproductive health in an outpatient setting a plus. Salary DOE, great benefits! E-mail resume and cover letter to annie@bluemountainclinic.org, fax to 406-5439890, or mail to Blue Mountain Clinic, 610 N California Street, Missoula, MT 59802.

Seeking a full time PA/NP. Blue Mountain Clinic is seeking a full time Physician Assistant/ Nurse Practitioner! Experience in primary care and reproductive health in an outpatient setting a plus. Salary DOE, great benefits! E-mail resume and cover letter to annie@bluemountainclinic.org, fax to 406-5439890, or mail to Blue Mountain Clinic, 610 N California Street, Missoula, MT 59802.

GREEN HANGER

HEALTH CAREERS

OPPORTUNITIES ATTN: COMPUTER WORK. Work from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1,500 Part-time to $7,500/month. Full-time. Training provided. www.KTPGlobal.com or call 1-888-304-2847

Eco-Friendly Dry Cleaners Laundromats • WI-FI Alterations • Free Laundry Soap Clean & Comfortable

2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS!!

146 Woodford St. 728-1948

960 E. Broadway 728-1919

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-4057619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com

IND

SERVICES GENERAL CONTRACTORS Natural Housebuilders, Inc. • Passivhaus Designs • Smaller Homes • Additions/Remodels • 369-0940 OR 642-6863 • www.naturalhousebuilder.net

ELECTRICAL Electric Work. Master Electrician. Jobs large & small. Affordable, reliable & qualified. Senior Discount 880-0981

HANDYMAN Squires for Hire. Carpentry, Drywall, Painting, Plumbing,

General Handyman. I actually show up on time! Bret 544-4671

GARDEN/ LANDSCAPING Lawns of Montana: Fertilization & Weed Control, Lawn Mowing, Sprinkler Service, Hedge Trimming, Landscaping, Lot Sweeping. Call 728-9517 or visit lawnsofmontana.com.

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

HOME IMPROVEMENT Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator, testimonials available. Hoythomes.com or 7285642

PETCARE Dog and Cat Sitting. When staying home is the best option for your pet, I’ll come to your home for visits. Nelson Dog and Cat Care, Denise 529-5631, nelsondmarie@aol.com

Highlighting businesses dedicated to creating a more sustainable world

You’ll find plenty of classes and seminars to finish that project at MissoulaEvents.net

DUST BUNNIES CLEANING Come home to a clean house!

Let us make your home pretty & fresh. Free Estimates 459-5546 Dependable • Flexible

Drive a little, save a lot! Blue Mountain Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x20 $65 Bitterroot Mini Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x10 $45 • 10x15 $55 10x20 $65 • 10x30 $85 • 542-2060

Landscaping & Gardening Services 406-381-8444 meredith@npsservicesllc.com

Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

"Let us tend your den"

SEAMAN’S

Home Improvement & Construction Repairs to Remodels Additions to New Construction

880-6211

Commercial or Residential ImprovingYourOutlook.com

Time for Spring Cleaning!! Windows•Carpets•Rain Gutters

We do it all

GREEN BUILDING Licensed • Insured

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Curtis Cleaners, Inc. 370-4248

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3 April 14 – April 21, 2011


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): In her blog, Jane at janebook.tumblr.com answers questions from readers. A recent query went like this: “Who would win in a steel cage match, Santa Claus or the Easter Bunny?” Jane said, “Easter Bunny, no question; he has those big-ass teeth.” But I’m not so sure. My sources say that Santa has more raw wizardry at his disposal than the Bunny. His magical prowess would most likely neutralize the Bunny’s superior physical assets. Likewise, Aries, I’m guessing you will have a similar edge in upcoming steel cage matches—or any other competitions in which you’re involved. These days you’ve simply got too much mojo to be defeated. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “Dear Rob: Last January you predicted that 2011 might be the best year ever for us Bulls to commune with the invisible realms and get closer to the Source of All Life. And I have been enjoying the most amazing dreams ever. I’ve had several strong telepathic experiences and have even had conversations with the spirit of my dead grandmother. But that God character remains achingly elusive. Can’t I just have a face-to-face chat with his/her Royal Highness? —Impatient Taurus.” Dear Taurus: The coming weeks will be one of the potentially best times in your life to get up close and personal with the Divine Wow. For best results, empty your mind of what that would be like. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I was reading about how fantasy writer Terry Pratchett made his own sword using “thunderbolt iron” from a meteorite. It made me think how that would be an excellent thing for you to do. Not that you will need it to fight off dragons or literal bad guys. Rather, I suspect that creating your own sword from a meteorite would strengthen and tone your mental toughness. It would inspire you to cut away trivial wishes and soul-sucking influences that may seem interesting but aren’t really. It might even lead you to rouse in yourself the zeal of a knight on a noble quest— just in time for the arrival of an invitation to go on a noble quest.



CANCER (June 21-July 22): Over the years I have on several occasions stood at a highway exit ramp with a handmade cardboard sign that reads, “I love to help; I need to give; please take some money.” I flash a wad of bills, and offer a few dollars to drivers whose curiosity impels them to stop and engage me. I’ve always been surprised at how many people hesitate to accept my gift. Some assume I have a hidden agenda; others think I’m crazy. Some are even angry, and shout things like “Go home, you freak!” If a comparable experience comes your way anytime soon, Cancerian, I urge you to lower your suspicions. Consider the possibility that a blessing is being offered to you with no strings attached.



LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Nearly all men can stand adversity,” said Abraham Lincoln, “but if you want to test a man’s character, give him power.” According to my analysis of the astrological omens, that thought will have extra meaning for you in the coming weeks. So far in 2011, you have gotten passing grades on the tests that adversity has brought you. But now come the trickier trials and tribulations. Will your integrity and impeccability stand up strong in the face of your waxing clout and influence?



BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist Susan Clarion RNC CA MATS 552-7919 Classes at Meadowsweet Herbs: Basic Soap Making Learn the art of making your own homemade soap. Saturday April 16 OR Saturday May 21, 11am-4pm. Cost: $50, Materials fee $25. Making your own Natural Body Care Learn how to use natural bath and body products to promote healthy hair and skin. Wednesday April 20, 7-9pm. Cost: $20, Materials fee $5. Making Your Own Lip Balms and Salves Spring is a great time to stock up on your salves and lip balms so you can use them throughout the summer. Heal those sun-cracked lips, soothe bee stings, cuts, burns and scrapes without the use of any petroleum or artificial preservatives. Tuesday April 26, 7-9 pm. Cost: $20. Take home a salve and lip balms for an additional $10. Homeopathy for Infants and Children Homeopathic medicines are safe for all ages. Ease of use and quick results, makes homeopathy a welcome alternative for treating babies and children. Thursday April 28, 79pm. Cost: Free. A New Approach to Headaches Dr. Jeffrey Friess of the Golgi Clinic provides a perspective that looks beyond the headache and addresses the underlying cause of the disharmony. Tuesday May 17, 7-9pm. Cost: Free. Environmental Effects on

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): It would be a good week for you to assemble a big pile of old TVs you bought for $5 apiece at a thrift store and run over them with a bulldozer. It would also be a favorable time to start a blazing fire in a fireplace and throw in the photos of all the supposedly attractive people you used to be infatuated with even though you now realize that they were unworthy of your smart love. In other words, Virgo, it is a perfect moment to destroy symbols of things that have drained your energy and held you back. There’s an excellent chance this will provide a jolt of deliverance that will prime further liberations in the coming weeks.



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The style of dance known as the samba seems to have its origins in the semba, an old Angolan dance in which partners rub their navels together. In the African Kimbundu language, semba also means “pleasing, enchanting,” and in the Kikongo tongue it denotes “honoring, revering.” In accordance with the astrological omens, I invite you Libras to bring the spirit of semba to your life. Use your imagination as you dream up ways to infuse your intimate exchanges with belly-to-belly reverence and enchantment. Be serpentine and worshipful. Be wild and sublime. Bestow your respectful care with all your slinky wiles unfurled.



SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In the Philippines, there is a geographic anomaly I want to call your attention to: a volcanic island in a lake that’s on a volcanic island in a lake that’s on an island. Can you picture that? Vulcan Point is an island in Crater Lake, and Crater Lake is on Volcano Island, and Volcano Island is in Lake Taal, and Lake Taal is on the island of Luzon. It’s confusing— just as your currently convoluted state is perplexing, both to you and those around you. You could be aptly described as fiery earth within cool water within fiery earth within cool water within fiery earth. Whether that’ll be a problem, I don’t know yet. Are you OK with containing so much paradox?

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): For the Navajo, the quality of your life isn’t measured by your wealth or status, but by whether you “walk in beauty.” It’s an excellent time, astrologically speaking, for you to evaluate yourself from that perspective. Do you stop to admire a flock of sparrows swirling toward a tangerine cloud at dusk? Are you skilled at giving gifts that surprise and delight others? When your heart isn’t sure what it feels, do you sing songs that help you transcend the need for certainty? Have you learned what your body needs to feel healthy? Do you know any jokes you could tell to ease the passing of a dying elder? Have you ever kissed a holy animal or crazy wise person or magic stone?



CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “He who wants to do good knocks at the gate,” says Bengali poet Rabindranath Tagore in one of his “Stray Bird” poems, while “he who loves finds the gate open.” I agree completely. That’s why I advise you, as you get ready to head off to your next assignment, not to be burning with a no-nonsense intention to fix things. Rather, be flowing with the desire to offer whatever gifts and blessings are most needed.



AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Once bread becomes toast, it can never become bread again.” Today I saw that piece of wisdom scrawled on the wall of a cafe’s restroom. I immediately thought of you. Metaphorically speaking, you’re thinking about dropping some slices in the toaster, even though you’re not actually ready to eat yet. If it were up to me, you would wait a while before transforming the bread into toast—until your hunger got ratcheted up to a higher level. The problem is, if you make the toast now, it’ll be unappetizing by the time your appetite reaches its optimum levels. That’s why I suggest: Put the bread back in the bag. For the moment, refrain from toasting.

Preconception and Pregnancy From preconception through delivery, an expecting couple may modify every nutritional, behavioral and lifestyle factor possible to ensure a healthy child. Dr. Teresita Martinez of the Golgi Clinic discusses the impact the environment has on our health and what we can do about it. Tuesday May 24, 79pm. Cost: Free. Advanced Soap Making Did you like the Basic Soap Making class or do you already make you own soaps? This is the class for you! In this class you will also do hands on soap making including developing your own recipe with an in depth discussions of additives, colorants, and natural preservatives. Saturday May 28 11am-4pm. Cost: $50, Materials fee $35. Meadowsweet Herbs, 180 S. 3rd St. W., Missoula, MT 59801 728-0543 www.meadowsweet-herbs.com

Wilson’s temperature syndrome, herbal medicine, and HCG diet. Call DR. Nesbit at 541-7672. 2016 Strand Avenue in Missoula. www.DrNesbit.com

Deborah Gregory, Nurse Practitioner Providing women’s healthcare ... one female at a time. •Birth control to young & older. •Annual exams. •Hormonal issues •Prenatal care. Accepting all insurance types. Debbie Gregory, Nurse Practitioner, 7219999 Community Medical Center #3, 2835 Fort Missoula Road, Suite 305.

Kaimu Mystical Poet looking for Muse.

DR Naturopathic Take the Natural Path to Health with DR. NATUROPATHIC. Specializing in: Primary care & midwifery, Pain management, naturopathic manipulation, metabolic disorders,

Escape with Massage$50. Swedish & Deep Tissue. Gift Certificates Available. Janit Bishop, CMT. 207-7358 127 N. Higgins Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie Clarion 406-552-7919 MASCULINE, EXPERIENCED FULL BODY MASSAGE FOR MEN IN MISSOULA. Mark(406)728-2629 Rosie Smith Moondance Healing Therapies, Massage & BodyTalk. New client discounts. 240-9103

808-443-1786 Hypnosis & Imager y * Smoking * Weight * Negative self-talk * Str e s s * D e p r e s s i o n * E m p o w e r y o u r s e l f

728-5693 • Mar y Place MSW, CHT, GIS

Psychic Readings ($1/min) & Psychic Classes/Training with Adrienne Elise. psychicreadingsmt.com, psychicreadingsmt@gmail.com, 406-5437055 Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 241-3405 With over 500 events per month, you’re sure to find something for Body, Mind and Spirit at www.MissoulaEvents.net The Lotus Project Events

Meet the Doula Night April 19 @ 7PM Discover what a doula is and meet several local doulas My Doula Integrative Nutrition Ali Kelly, CD (DONA) Learn the kinds of nutrition needed in pregnancy & post-partum. www.MyDoulaMT.com Call Ali for Info

251.4821 Find us on Facebook The Lotus Project MT

Aurora Family Therapeutic Massage Virginia Bazo, LMT

Swedish, Deep Tissue & Reiki 370-4175 Located in Shear Perfection at UC Center

Need a great counselor? Check out the profile for Lois Doubleday, LCPC on Psychology Today!

721-1646 www.bluemountainclinic.org

Christine Brasmer LPN / Nationally Certified Massage Therapist Specializing in chronic pain management, stress reduction & health maintenance 406.239.9189 christinebrasmer.com Is what you are doing not working?

We c a n h e l p w i t h t h a t .



PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Don’t try so hard, Pisces. Give up the struggle. As soon as you really relax, your subconscious mind will provide you with simple, graceful suggestions about how to outwit the riddle. Notice I just said you will be able to “outwit the riddle.” I didn’t say you will “solve the riddle.” Big difference. Outwitting the riddle means you won’t have to solve it, because you will no longer allow it to define the questions you’re asking or the answers you’re seeking.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4 April 14 – April 21, 2011

542-2147 • 2204 Dixon


PUBLIC NOTICES

MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS 1st Interstate Pawn. 3110 South Reserve, is now open! Buying gold and silver. Buying, selling, and pawning items large and small. We pay more and sell for less. 406-721(PAWN)7296. Firewood for sale! Save money on your heating bill. We have cords of lodgepole that are dry and ready to burn. This wood lights easily and burns hot. Will deliver anywhere in Missoula or the greater Missoula area (i.e., Potomac, Blackfoot, Seely, Bitterroot, Arlee, Alberton). Cords can be rounds or split, or a combination. Ask us about our multi-cord discount. Single cords: rounds are $100/cord and split is $125/cord. Stacking fee negotiable. Call Greg at 406-2444255 or 406-546-0587 to order yours today. Wood available all winter long. FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation non-denominational 1-800-475-0876 SAWMILLS-Band/Chainsaw SPRING SALE - Cut lumber any dimension, anytime. Make Money and Save Money in stock ready to ship. Starting at $995.00. www.NorwoodSawmills.com/3 00N 1-800-661-7747, Ext.300N STEEL BUILDINGS: Inventory clearance up to 40% savings! Must move now! 40x50, 50x80, 80x120, 120x200. Immediate Delivery! Choice of Colors. 1800-411-5869 ask for Steve

COMPUTERS Even Macs are computers! Need help with yours? CLARKE CONSULTING @ 5496214

Outlaw Music

541-7533

Missoula's Stringed Instrument Pro Shop!

Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

724 Burlington Ave. outlawmusicguitarshop.com

RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway 5438287

CLOTHING DESIGNER JEANS ~ 50% OFF Authentic designer jeans in your home at up to 50% off retail prices! 406.207.7366

MUSIC GUITAR LESSONS. Learn to play at the next level. Rock, Blues, Country. Dave Stang 721-1652 Outlaw Music Specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, TuesdayFriday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am-6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533. Outlawmusicguitarshop.com WWW.GREGBOYD.COM One of the world’s premier music stores. (406) 327-9925.

PETS & ANIMALS AKC Pembroke Welsh Corgis Two sable females, dew claws removed, tails docked and first vaccinations. Come from working line, make great family pets, well socialized. Ready 4/9.(509)5214577 CATS: #9414 British short Hair X, Blk/Tan Tabby, SF; #0330 Black/brown tabby, SF, Am Long Hair, Adult; #0358 Brown Tabby, Main Coon X, Diabetic, SF, 2yrs; #0588 Grey Tabby, Am Short Hair, SF; #0624 Black, Am Short Hair, NM, 4 yr; #0644 Black/white, SF, Manx X, 9 mo; #1061 Torti, ASH, SF, 7mo; #1065 Orange

Tabby, ASH, NM, 2 yrs; #1162 Black/white, DMH, SF, 1 yr; #1230 White/Grey Tabby, ALH, SF, 9 yrs; #1255 Tuxedo, DLH, SF, 2 yrs; #1259 Orange/Buff, ALH, NM, 5 yrs;; #1275 Grey/Tan Tick, ASH, NM, 4yrs; #1283 Seal Point, Burmese X, SF, 5.5 yrs; #1298 Grey, Tabby, ASH, SF; #1330 Black/white, ASH, SF; #1333 Black, Maine Coon X, NM, 7yrs; #1339 Silver Tabby, DSH, SF, 2yrs; #1364 Tan/Black, DSH, SF, 1 yr; #1367 Grey w/white, ASH, NM; #1369 Orange/white, DSH, NM, 3yrs; #1372 Grey Tabby, DSH, NM; #1373 Grey/white, DLH, NM; #1390 Grey/brown, DSH, NM, 3yrs; #1391 Grey, DSH, SF, 5yrs; #1403 Grey Tabby, Siamese X, SF, 3yrs; #1412 White, DLH, SF, 3yrs; #1413 Grey/white Tux, ASH, SF, 3yr; #1425 Tan/black, Siamese, NM; #1440 Orange/creme, DLH, NM, 6yr: #1441 Tan/grey, DSH, NM; #1447 Orange/white, DMH, NM, 3yr; #1448 Calico, DMH, SF, 3yrs; #1466 Black, DMH, SF, 2yr; #1478 Black, DLH, SF, 6yrs; #1481 Orange Tabby, DMH, NM; #1485 Black, DLH, SF, 5yrs. For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

SF, 1yr; #1501 Tri, Aussie/Border Collie X, SF, 3yrs; #1504 Black/white, Schnauzer, NM, 4yr. For photo listings see our web page at w w w. m o n t a n a p e t s . o r g Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

DOGS: #1219 Black, McNabb Blue Heeler X, NM, 2yrs; #1312 Mastiff/Hound X, SF; #1313 Red/white, Heeler X, SF; #1315 Brown/Black, Shepherd X, SF, 4 yrs; #1317 Lab/Hound X, Black, SF, 4yr; #1332 Black, Lab/Pit X, NM, 1yr; #1363 Black/tan, German Shepherd/Dobie X, NM, 1.5 yrs; #1410 Black/white, Lab/Pointer X, SF, 7yr; #1429 Red/white, Mini Aussie, NM, 2yr; #1480 Black/white, Rat Terrier X, SF, 3yr; #1488 Tri, Airdale, SF, 1yr; #1490 Brown/white, Pit Bull, SF, 2yr; #1500 White/w Red, Heeler,

Timeshare Week to trade! One week/year at Stoneridge Resort in Northern ID (or exchanged) to trade for a HOT TUB that’s been gently used.

THINK BIKES! WE GOT ‘EM! EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

549-6214

111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

NEW OWNER, NEW LOOK

The Mommy Shoppee Maternity • Nursing • Consignment & Sales • Shower Gifts & More • Call for hours 401 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT •406.728.2208 www.themommyshoppee.com Griz card discounts Visit our sister company Pananche Hair Design

TWO DOGS FOR SALE. Purebred Golden Retriever & Mastiff Boxer-Mix. Males. $300/each. Leave message 240-0402

GARAGE SALES After you scour the sales, plan your savvy weekend at MissoulaEvents.net GIANT RUMMAGE SALE! FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 201 South 5th West. 4/15: 9:00am5:30pm. 4/16: 9:00 am-Noon. Bag Sale: 4/16 1:00-3:00. $3.00/bag. Sporting goods, tools, toys, collectibles, boutique, household, books, clothing & lots more!

WANTED TO BUY

OUTDOOR GEAR Savage Model 110 .30-06 $300 Excellent condition, bolt, 5 rd. magazine,iron sights, scope rings. Reliable, accurate, great first hunting rifle! Brian 406-531-5608

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AUTO SCOOTERS 2008 Buddy Scooter Light blue 125cc Buddy scooter. Only has 1851.6 miles on it. Comes with luggage box and cover. Excellent condition. Asking $2700. Located in Whitefish, am willing to deliver! Serious inquries may call 406862-0423

ADULT SWEET & DISCRETE Escort Referral Service

829-6394

NOW HIRING

CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON STREET VACATION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Missoula, Montana, passed Resolution Number 7603 at their regular meeting held on April 4, 2011. A resolution declaring it to be the intention of the City Council of the City of Missoula, Montana, to close and vacate portions of Regent Street, North Avenue at the intersection of Brooks and Stephens, and the alley in Block 40 of the Union Addition, all generally located in the Brooks Street Corridor (located in Section 28, Township 13 North, Range 19 West, PMM) The City Council will hear all matters pertaining to the proposed street vacation at its regular meeting on April 25, 2011, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine St. The full resolution is on file and open for inspection in the City Clerk’s Office from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday at City Hall, 435 Ryman, Second Floor. For more information, contact Jessica Miller, Public Works at 552-6347. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC, City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on April 25, 2011, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider if the Sentinel Village low-income housing apartments located at 1111 McDonald Avenue meet a community housing need. For further information, contact Martha Rehbein, City Clerk, at 552-6078. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. Martha L. Rehbein CMC, City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on April 25, 2011, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to determine whether adjustments to ward boundaries are necessary and to consider an emergency and a regular ordinance amending MMC 1.16 entitled “Election Wards” amending section 1.16.010 revising and updating ward boundaries based on new population statistics and repealing section 1.16.020 entitled “Precinct Boundaries” which contains outdated provisions relating to precinct boundaries enacted as an emergency in order to have new ward boundaries in place before the opening of filing for city offices. For further information, contact Laval Means, Office of Planning & Grants at 258-3797. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA Vehicle Maintenance Division Public Works Department 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana 59802 COMPETITIVE SEALED PROPOSALS (CSP) TO PROVIDE (HVAC) HEATING VENTILATIONS AND AIR CONDITIONING SERVICE TO THE CITY OF MISSOULA The City of Missoula (City) is requesting competitive sealed proposals (CSP) to provide heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) services to the City of Missoula. This CSP will result in a contractual agreement to provide HVAC services to the City of Missoula for a five (5) year period of time beginning

July 1st, 2011, and extending to June 30th, 2016. Copies of the detailed Competitive Sealed Proposals including a description of the services to be provided by respondents, the minimum content of responses, and the factors to be used to evaluate the responses, may be obtained on the city’s website: http://www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bi ds or at the Vehicle Maintenance Division during normal business hours at 1305 B Scott Street, Missoula MT, 59804, starting March 25th, 2011. For more information, contact: Jack Stucky, Vehicle Maintenance Superintendent at (406)5526387, or email jstucky@ci.missoula.mt.us. Sealed proposals must be submitted to Missoula City Clerk’s Office by 2:30 p.m. MST, May 3rd, 2011, at 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT 59802-4297. An HVAC service provider-vendor will be selected and an HVAC contract will be made shortly thereafter. Martha L. Rehbein, City Clerk MISSOULA COUNTY PUBLIC NOTICE The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Tuesday, May 3, 2011, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. 1. Revisions to the Southside Riverfront Neighborhood Character Overlay A city initiated map and text amendment request to revise Section 20.25.060 Overlay Districts of Title 20 City Zoning Ordinance to include 31 additional parcels and amend several use and design standards. 2. Missoula Active Transportation Plan A MPO initiated update to the 2001 Non-Motorized Transportation Plan to be considered for adoption as an amendment to the Missoula County Growth Policy. The City Council and/or Board of County Commissioners will conduct a public hearing on these items at a time to be determined. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request is available for public inspection at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants, City Hall, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana. Telephone 258-4657. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 258-4657. The City of Missoula or will provide auxiliary aids and services. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-11-45 Dept. No. 1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF PATRICIA L. SOLUM, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Co-Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Richard Solum and Cathleen Aldrich, Personal Representatives, return receipt requested, at c/o Sullivan, Tabaracci & Rhoades, P.C., 1821 South Avenue West, Third Floor, Missoula, MT 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 24th day of February, 2011. /s/ Richard Solum, Personal Representative /s/ Cathleen Aldrich, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-11-55 Dept. No. 1 Judge Ed McLean NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF KATHERINE LOUISE BURTON, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Sharon K. Batt has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims

against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Sharon K. Batt, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Dan G. Cederberg, PO Box 8234, Missoula, Montana 59807-8234, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 21st day of March, 2011. CEDERBERG LAW OFFICES, P.C., 269 West Front Street, PO Box 8234, Missoula, MT 59807-8234 /s/ Dan G. Cederberg, Attorneys for Personal Representative Montana Fourth Judicial District Court, Missoula County Cause No. DV-11-400 Dept. No. 1 Ed McLean Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Melissa Propp. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Melissa Lynn Propp to Leia Elizabeth Propp. The hearing will be on 5/18/11 at 1:15 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: 3/30/11. /s/ Shirley E. Faust Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Richard Goodwin, Deputy Clerk of Court NOTICE OF SALE UNDER DEED OF TRUST Deed of Trust: Dated June 11, 2008 Grantor: Jeffrey S. Malek 10510 O’Brien Creek Road Missoula, Montana 59804 Original Trustee: Title Services, Inc. P.O. Box 8223 Missoula, Montana 59807 Beneficiary: First Security Bank of Missoula Great Northern Branch 3220 Great Northern Way Missoula, Montana 59808 Successor Trustee: Christopher B. Swartley Attorney at Law Christopher B. Swartley, PLLC P.O. Box 8957 Missoula, Montana 59807-8957 Date and Place of Recordation: June 16, 2008 in Book 820, Page 873, as Document No. 200813295, Micro Records of Missoula County, Montana The undersigned hereby gives notice that on the 2nd day of August, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. at the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, West Broadway side, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, Christopher B. Swartley, as Successor Trustee under the above-described instrument, in order to satisfy the obligation set forth below, has elected to and will sell at public auction to the highest bidder, for cash, lawful money of the United States of America, payable at the time of sale to the Successor Trustee, the interest of the above-named Trustee, Successor Trustee, and Grantor, and all of its successors and assigns, without warranty or covenant, express or implied, as to title or possession, in the following described real property: Tract B of Certificate of Survey No. 4367 located in the Northeast OneQuarter of Section 29, Township 13 North, Range 20 West and West OneHalf of the Northwest One-Quarter of the Northwest One-Quarter of Section 28, Township 13 North, Range 20 West, Principal Meridian, Montana, Missoula County, Montana. (10510 O’Brien Creek Road, Missoula, Montana) Subject to a Deed of Trust to American Home Mortgage, Inc. and Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., dated August 14, 2003, and recorded August 19, 2003, in Book 715 of Micro Records at Page 419, records of Missoula County, Montana. Subject to easements of record. Together with improvements and appurtenances. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are the failure of the above-named Grantor, and all of his successors and assigns, to pay when due the monthly payments provided for in the HELOC Credit Agreement and Modifications thereto, and the Deed of Trust, of Six Hundred Thirty-three and 04/100ths Dollars ($633.04) for the months of November 2010 through February 2011; together with late charges in the amount of One Hundred Eighty-two and 66/100ths Dollars ($182.66). The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is One Hundred Fifty Thousand Dollars ($150,000.00), plus interest thereon at the rate of 6 .85% from and after September 22, 2010 to February 17, 2011, in the amount of Four Thousand One Hundred Sixty-seven and 73/100ths Dollars ($4,167.73), plus per diem interest thereafter at the rate of Twenty-eight and 23/100ths Dollars ($28.23), plus late fees and all costs, expenses, attorney’s and trustee’s fees as provided by law. DATED this 10th day of March, 2011. /s/ Christopher B. Swartley Christopher B. Swartley, Successor Trustee Christopher B. Swartley, PLLC P.O. Box 8957 Missoula, Montana 59807-8957 STATE OF MONTANA :ss. County of Missoula

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5 April 14 – April 21, 2011


PUBLIC NOTICES This instrument was acknowledged before me on the 10th day of March, 2011, by Christopher B. Swartley, Trustee. /s/ Roxie Hausauer N o t a r y Public for the State of Montana. (NOTARIAL SEAL) Residing at: Lolo, Montana My commission expires: 1/6/2013 NOTICE OF SALE UNDER DEEDS OF TRUST Deed of Trust: Dated November 15, 2007 Grantor: Jeffrey S. Malek 10510 O’Brien Creek Road Missoula, Montana 59804 Original Trustee: Title Services, Inc. P.O. Box 8223 Missoula, Montana 59807 Beneficiary: First Security Bank of Missoula Great Northern Branch 3220 Great Northern Way Missoula, Montana 59808 Successor Trustee: Christopher B. Swartley Attorney at Law Christopher B. Swartley, PLLC P.O. Box 8957 Missoula, Montana 59807-8957 Date and Place of Recordation: November 15, 2007, in Book 808, Page 1633, as Document No. 200729996, Micro Records of Missoula County, Montana November 15, 2007, in Book 808, Page 1635, as Document No. 200729998, Micro Records of Missoula County, Montana, These two Deeds of Trust secure a single Promissory Note dated November 15, 2007 in the original principal amount of $210,000.00 under Loan No. **2722. The undersigned hereby gives notice that on the 2nd day of August, 2011, at the hour of 10:05 a.m. at the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, West Broadway side, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, Christopher B. Swartley, as Successor Trustee under the abovedescribed instrument, in order to satisfy the obligation set forth below, has elected to and will sell at public auction to the highest bidder, for cash, lawful money of the United States of America, payable at the time of sale to the Successor Trustee, the interest of the above-named Trustee, Successor Trustee, and Grantor, and all of its successors and assigns, without warranty or covenant, express or implied, as to title or possession, in the following described real property: Tract 1 of Certificate of Survey No. 4358, a tract of land located in the Southeast one-quarter of Section 34, and the Southwest one-quarter of Section 35, Township 12 North, Range 17 West, P.M.M., Missoula, Montana. (12867 Hawk Lane, Clinton, Montana) AND Lots 9 and 10 in Block 81 of School Addition, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. (1637 Howell Street, Missoula, Montana) Subject to easements of record. Together with improvements and appurtenances. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are the failure of the above-named Grantor, and all of his successors and assigns, to pay when due the principal and interest at maturity on December 15, 2010 as provided for in the Promissory Note, Modifications, and two Deeds of Trust in the amount of Two Hundred Ten Thousand Dollars ($210,000.00) in principal, and accrued interest of Twenty-three Thousand Five Hundred Eight and 55/100ths Dollars ($23,508.55) from August 21, 2009 to February 17, 2011; together with late fees accrued in the amount of Six Hundred Eighty-five and 72/100ths Dollars ($685.72); and the failure to pay real property taxes and assessments for the years 2008, 2009, and 2010. This Promissory Note matured on December 15, 2010. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deeds of Trust Two Hundred Ten Thousand Dollars ($210,000.00), plus interest thereon at the rate of 7 .50% from and after the 21st day of August, 2009 to February 17, 2011, in the amount of Twenty-three Thousand Five Hundred Eight and 55/100ths Dollars ($23,508.55), plus per diem interest thereafter at the rate of Fortythree and 16/100ths Dollars ($43.16), plus accrued late charges and all costs, expenses, attorney’s and trustee’s fees as provided by law. DATED this 10th day of March, 2011. /s/ Christopher B. Swartley Christopher B. Swartley, Successor Trustee Christopher B. Swartley, PLLC P.O. Box 8957 Missoula, Montana 59807-8957 STATE OF MONTANA :ss. County of Missoula This instrument was acknowledged before me on the 10th day of March, 2011, by Christopher B. Swartley, Trustee. /s/ Roxie Hausauer Notary Public for the State of Montana. (NOTARIAL SEAL) Residing at: Lolo, Montana My commission expires: 1/6/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust

(“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/04/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200807549, Bk 816, Pg 0725, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Betsy T. Hawkins, a married person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 126 of Grantland-Rankin, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 11/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 10, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $382,356.40. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $373,404.33, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 22, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults

are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.92443) 1002.186207-FEI

NOTICE TO INACTIVE VOTERS OR NON-RESIDENT PROPERTY OWNERS WITHIN THE FRENCHTOWN RURAL FIRE DISTRICT

NOTICE TO INACTIVE VOTERS OR NON-RESIDENT PROPERT Y OWNERS WITHIN THE CLINTON RURAL FIRE DISTRICT

NOTICE TO INACTIVE VOTERS OR NON-RESIDENT PROPERT Y OWNERS WITHIN THE SEELEY LAKE RURAL FIRE DISTRICT

A trustee election for the Frenchtown Rural Fire District will be held on May 3, 2011. This election will be held by mail ballot with the ballots being mailed to all active, registered voters within the district on April 18th. According to M.C.A. 7-332106 (2) “An elector, who resides in the district who presents a proof of payment of taxes on the lands at the polling place is eligible to vote in the election.”

A trustee election for the Clinton Rural Fire District will be held on May 3, 2011. This election will be held by mail ballot with the ballots being mailed to all active, registered voters within the district on April 18th. According to M.C.A. 7-33-2106 (2) “An elector, who resides in the district who presents a proof of payment of taxes on the lands at the polling place is eligible to vote in the election.”

A trustee election for the Seeley Lake Rural Fire District will be held on May 3, 2011. This election will be held by mail ballot with the ballots being mailed to all active, registered voters within the district on April 18th. According to M.C.A. 7-332106 (2) “An elector, who resides in the district who presents a proof of payment of taxes on the lands at the polling place is eligible to vote in the election.”

Since this election is being held by mail ballot, any inactive voters or property owners who do not live in the district will need to request a ballot from the Missoula County Election Administrator. The request should include voter name, address, date of birth, signature and either a copy of a tax bill or a tax ID number.

Since this election is being held by mail ballot, any inactive voters or property owners who do not live in the district will need to request a ballot from the Missoula County Election Administrator. The request should include voter name, address, date of birth, signature and either a copy of a tax bill or a tax ID number.

Since this election is being held by mail ballot, any inactive voters or property owners who do not live in the district will need to request a ballot from the Missoula County Election Administrator. The request should include voter name, address, date of birth, signature and either a copy of a tax bill or a tax ID number.

The request may be mailed to: Missoula County Election Administrator 200 W Broadway Missoula MT 59802

The request may be mailed to: Missoula County Election Administrator 200 W Broadway Missoula MT 59802

The request may be mailed to: Missoula County Election Administrator 200 W Broadway Missoula MT 59802

Or faxed to: 406-258-3913 If you have questions, please call the Election Office at 258-4751.

Or faxed to: 406-258-3913 If you have questions, please call the Election Office at 258-4751.

Or faxed to: 406-258-3913 If you have questions, please call the Election Office at 258-4751.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 03/27/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200607077, Bk 771, Pg 326, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Patrick T. Beers was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Financial Inc. d/b/a Mann Mortgage was Beneficiary and Title Services, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: The South one-half of Lots 16, 17, 18 and 19 in Block 20 of Car Line Addition a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200911125 Bk 866, Pg 471, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to US Bank National Association, as Trustee for CSMC 2006-6. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 03/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 11, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $165,157.05. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $148,683.65, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 23, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only

Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7777.13715) 1002.172506-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/17/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200628950, Book 786, Page 1143, modified by Instrument 200827802, Book 830, page 1390, recorded 1223-08, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Thomas W. McAnally, married and Larinda R. McAnally, married was Grantor, JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and American Title & Escrow was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded American Title & Escrow as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 2 in Block 3 of Seeley Lake Estates according to the Official Plat thereof, recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula, Montana. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. Book 835, Page 1277, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C6 April 14 – April 21, 2011

As of February 11, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $427,555.17. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $358,999.47, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 27, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.17458) 1002.115144-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 07/15/05,

PUBLIC NOTICE The Missoula City Council will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Monday, April 25, 2011, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana: 139 E. Main Street – Microbrewery Conditional Use Request from Ryan Montgomery for a Conditional Use approval at 139 E. Main Street (see Map P), zoned CBD-4 (Central Business District). The applicant requests the Conditional Use in order to place a microdistillery at the site.

Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request and case file are available for public inspection at the Office of Planning and Grants, 435 Ryman Street. Call 258-4657 for further assistance. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 2584657. The Office of Planning and Grants will provide auxiliary aids and services.

recorded as Instrument No. 200517625, Book 756, Page 146, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Thomas B. English, a single person was Grantor, Union Federal Bank of Indianapolis was Beneficiary and Chicago Title Insurance Co. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Chicago Title Insurance Co. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: The East 6 feet of Lot 3 and all of Lots 4 and 5 in Block 1 of Mount Sentinel Addition No. 4, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201014437 Bk 863, Pg 728, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to The Bank of New York Mellon, FKA The Bank of New York, as Successor in Interest to JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as Trustee for Structured Asset Mortgage Investments II Inc. Bear Stearns ALTA Trust 2005-8, Mortgage PassThrough Certificates, Series 2005-8. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 11/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 22, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $204,948.69. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $182,665.17, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING THE MISSOULA CITY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT will be conducting a public hearing at 7:30 p.m., Wednesday, April 27, 2011, Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine, Missoula, MT, on the following items: 1. A request by Community Medical Center, represent by Epcon Sign Co., for a sign variance to allow a dynamic display sign to be located 2827 Fort Missoula in the OP3 zoning district. SEE MAP D.

If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling the Missoula Office of Planning & Grants at 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. For additional information regarding the variance request you may contact Hilary Schoendorf at the same number or email hschoendorf@co.missoula.mt.us.

Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 5, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7777.13265) 1002.165852-FEI

CLARK FORK STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 90, 113, 33, and O5. Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting April 18-21, 2011 by appt only by calling 541-7919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to April 21, 2011, 4:00 P.M. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

EAGLE SELF STORAGE

will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 218, 226, 288, 301, 305, 313, 495, 509, and 633. Units contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday, April 25, 2011. All auction units will only be shown each day at 3 P.M. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage office at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59804 prior to Thursday, April 28, 2011, 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.


PUBLIC NOTICES NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 03/14/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200706260, Bk 793, Pg 1075, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which William L. Waldbillig Jr. and Luciana M. Waldbillig, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and First American Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: A tract of land located in Section 14, Township 11 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana, being more particularly described as Tract B23-A-4 of

Certificate of Survey No. 2576. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 08/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 21, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $313,090.86. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $299,195.86, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of benefi-

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r ciary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 1, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on

Missoula Police Department Sale

ABANDONED VEHICLES TERMS: $85.00 MINIMUM BID

Notice is hereby given to all legal owners of the following vehicles; unless vehicle is reclaimed, the following vehicles will be sold at the Missoula Police Department Sale on THURSDAY the 21st of April, 2011, at 9:00 am at Pro-Towing 1922 S 3rd St W, Missoula, in the county of Missoula, State of Montana, that certain personal property situate in the said County of Missoula, and particularly described as follows, to wit: Agency #: . . . . . .Vehicle Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .VIN # PAV11 083 . . . . . .1982 GMC TK PK White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1GTEC14CXCJ505923 PAV11 084 . . . . . .1991 Honda Civic 4D Blue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .JHMED3548MS016804 PAV11 085 . . . . . .2002 Chevrolet Tk Pk Red . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1GCDT19W528157954 PAV11 087 . . . . . .1991 Ford Aerostar Van White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1FMDA41X5MZB57604 PAV11 090 . . . . . .1994 Honda Paseo SU White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4S6CY58V8R4402196 PAV11 091 . . . . . .1988 Subaru GL SW Lt Blue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .JF2AN53B4JE450966 PAV11 092 . . . . . .1994 Ford Taurus 4D White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1FALP5242RA285870 PAV11 093 . . . . . .1995 Ford Taurus 4D Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1FALP52U0SG150972 PAV11 094 . . . . . .GMC Suburban SU Brown/Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TKL16AF523710 PAV11 095 . . . . . .1987 Nissan Sentra 2D White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1N4PB22S0HC873458 PAV11 097 . . . . . .2007 Genuine Scooter MC Black/Orange . . . . . . . .RFVM2C50861000682 PAV11 098 . . . . . .1999 Ford Escort 4D Red . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1FAFP10P1XW129452 PAV11 099 . . . . . .1998 Subaru Legacy SW Blue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4S3BG6857W6605856 PAV11 100 . . . . . .1993 Ford Aerostar Van Dark Blue . . . . . . . . . . . .1FMDA21X0PZB07993 PAV11 102 . . . . . .1997 Dodge Caravan Van White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2B4GP4434VR207801 PAV11 103 . . . . . .1987 Honda Civic 4D White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1HGEC4635HA004798 PAV11 105 . . . . . .1968 Ford Tk Pk Grey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F11YRD42730 PAV11 106 . . . . . .1984 Volvo GL SW Grey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .YV1DX694XE1034111 PAV11 110 . . . . . .1984 American Jeep SU Gold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1JCUL7826ET110417 PAV11 112 . . . . . .1978 Toyota Tk Pk White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RN23093336 PAV11 113 . . . . . .1989 Ford Escort 3D Red . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1FAPP93J2KT186134 PAV11 118 . . . . . .1991 Ford Escort 2D Red . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1FAPP11J8MW262882 PAV11 120 . . . . . .1988 Audi Quatro 4D Black . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .WAUHC0890JA152589 PAV11 121 . . . . . .1990 Lincoln Continental 4D Tan . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1LNLM9842LY618516 PAV11 123 . . . . . .1976 GMC Tk Pk Yellow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TCD1461524891 PAV11 124 . . . . . .1993 Toyota Tk Pk Blue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4TARN81A7PZ093163 PAV11 125 . . . . . .1996 GMC Safari Van Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1GKEL19W6TB504074 PAV11 130 . . . . . .1996 Toyota Corolla 4D Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1NXBA02E3TZ467274 PAV11 131 . . . . . .1989 Mazda 323 2D Black . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .JM1BF2329K0355798 PAV11 132 . . . . . .1995 Dodge Neon 4D Red . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1P3ES47C2SD334954 PAV11 133 . . . . . .1996 Mercury Villager Van Red/Tan . . . . . . . . . . .4M2DV11W9TDJ32886 PAV11 134 . . . . . .1994 Pontiac Transport Van White . . . . . . . . . . . . .1GMDU06L5RT218868 PAV11 138 . . . . . .1994 Hyundai Elantra GLS 4D Green . . . . . . . . . .KMHJF32M7RU573600 PAV11 140 . . . . . .1993 Nissan Sentra 4D Red . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .JN1EB31P8PU217511 PAV11 143 . . . . . .1983 Chevrolet Caprice 4D Blue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2G1AN69H8D1230650 PAV11 144 . . . . . .1999 Lincoln Navigator SUV Green . . . . . . . . . . . .5LMPU28L4XLJ09625 PAV11 152 . . . . . .1990 Mazda Protégé 4D Black . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .JM1BG2243L0122646 PAV11 153 . . . . . .1989 Honda Accord 4D Lt Blue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .JHMCA5645KC042410 PAV11 154 . . . . . .1985 Audi 400 4D Red . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .WAUFB0852FA144461 PAV11 155 . . . . . .1990 Ford Tempo 4D White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2FAPP39S6LB136044 PAV11 157 . . . . . .1997 Plymouth Voyager Van Teal . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2P4GP44RXVR184849 PAV11 158 . . . . . .1994 Honda Accord 2D Blue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1HGCD7240RA012541 PAV11 160 . . . . . .1976 Dodge Monaco 4D Grey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .DH41K6D129981

Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining. NO WARRANTY is made as to the condition or title of these vehicles. Vehicles are not available for preview prior to April 21st at 8:45 am. Payment by Cash or Check, at time of Sale Dated this the 11th day of April, 2011. Mark Muir, Chief of Police Suzanne Mirabito, Abandoned Vehicles

an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.92632) 1002.187079-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 12/17/04, recorded as Instrument No. 200435054, Bk. 745, Pg. 171, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which David Bryon Rose and Leslie Anne Collins-Rose, husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Century 21 Mortgage was Beneficiary and Charles J. Peterson at Mackkoff, Kellogg, Kirby & Kloster was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Charles J. Peterson at Mackkoff, Kellogg, Kirby & Kloster as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract B of Cobban’s Camp Sites Lot 14A, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201020027, Bk. 867, Pg. 720, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance, LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 17, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $117,798.46. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $104,947.25, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 1, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-

Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7037.70794) 1002.187042-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 13, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: LOT 10A OF CARLINE ADDITION NO. 60, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, ACORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN BOOK 24 OF PLATS AT PAGE 63 TED L. HESS, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title and Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by DEED OF TRUST DATED JANUARY 23, 2004 AND RECORDED JANUARY 28, 2004 IN BOOK #725, PAGE #1211, UNDER DOCUMENT NO 200402382. The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage, LLC. Jason J. Henderson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $636.93, beginning May 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 13, 2011 is $124,533.45 principal, interest at the rate of 3.50% now totaling $3,412.28, late charges in the amount of $318.40, escrow advances of $2,274.93, suspense balance of $-750.67 and other fees and expenses advanced of $998.25, plus accruing interest at the rate of $11.94 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 2, 2011 /s/ Jason J. Henderson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA )) ss. County of Stark) On February 2, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Jason J. Henderson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be

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"Generally Speaking"–time to lawyer up.

by Matt Jones

ACROSS 1 Part of a dashboard display 5 Hill of country 10 E. ___ 14 Dull pain 15 Aquarium cleaner's problem 16 Saudi Arabia neighbor 17 Hairstyles seen in "Pulp Fiction" and "Coming to America" 19 Bell Labs creation 20 Slender 21 Healers in role-playing games, often 23 When doubled, a 1965 Dixie Cups song 26 Bowler's assignment 28 "How ___ supposed to know that?" 29 They may reference Nantucket 34 Substance used as an antioxidant, in some alternative medicines 35 Phineas ___ (lead role on the 1980s sci-fi series "Voyagers!") 36 Nitpicky word for grammarians 38 Peoria resident, it's said 43 ___ Sauer 44 Took a header 45 Pod vegetable 46 Dirk Nowitzki, for one 51 Regatta equipment 52 Mineral water spots 53 Commonest English word 54 Post-apocalyptic CBS series 58 Concerning 60 Heaps 61 Attorney General, or what each of six Across answers in this grid literally is 66 Treasure ___ (Zynga game) Last week’s solution

67 Dried poblano chile 68 Prima donna 69 Creepy glance 70 Group's senior member 71 Ensure kittenlessness

DOWN 1 Trump ___ Mahal 2 "___ du lieber!" 3 Guevara on hipster T-shirts 4 Word on a hand towel 5 Mud treatment, maybe 6 Reunion attendees 7 Airport serving Iguacu Falls, for short (in VINAIGRETTE) 8 Soapy mineral 9 Song in "Popeye" 10 Katie of the news 11 Defunct science magazine 12 Outside of the religious realm 13 "Suicide Blonde" band 18 In a not-so-healthy way 22 Relocated to the U.S., on many family trees: abbr. 23 They may be bounced around 24 Movies for tots 25 Sandinista leader Daniel 27 Prepares a mummy 30 Paving stuff 31 E-mail abbr. 32 Get the music started 33 Dry cleaning substance 37 Serpent 39 Insurance company with a duck mascot 40 Car lover, slangily 41 Pro golfer Ernie 42 Ending for super 47 Stick around 48 Military helicopter 49 ___ Island (Puget Sound locale) 50 ___ perpetua (Idaho's motto) 54 Monopoly board corner 55 "If all ___ fails..." 56 Thespian's task 57 Yes-___ question 59 Alero maker 62 F-f-freezing 63 Quick swim 64 Actress Longoria 65 Sunbeam ©2011 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com)

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 April 14 – April 21, 2011


PUBLIC NOTICES the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 Gmac/hess 41965.08 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 6, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NW1/4 OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 21 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS TRACT 26B OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5269. NW1/4 SECTION 35, T15N, R21N, TRACT 26B, COS 5269, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA A.P.N.:2283602 Nancy L. Miles, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated March 30, 2006 and Recorded March 31, 2006 in Book 771, Page 481, as Document No. 200607232. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the Residential Asset Securitization Trust 2006-A7CB, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-G under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated May 1, 2006. Jason J. Henderson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,271.71, beginning January 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 04, 2011 is $185,310.96 principal, interest at the rate of 4.375% now totaling $9,525.18, late charges in the amount of $1,041.18, escrow advances of $3,179.74, and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,444.74, plus accruing interest at the rate of $22.21 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMA-

TION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 26, 2011 /s/ Jason J. Henderson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On January 26, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Jason J. Henderson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Indymac V. Miles 41482.963 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 7, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 34B of Orchard Home Company’s Addition No. 6, Lots 34A and 34B, Missoula County, Montana, a platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof LLOYD BRUCE AND ROXY BRUCE, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Co. of Missoula, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 27, 2005 and recorded September 27, 2005 in Book 761, Page 165 under Document No. 200525395. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc.. Jason J. Henderson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,613.45, beginning September 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 20, 2010 is $194,078.03 principal, interest at the rate of 5.6250% now totaling $4,207.24, late charges in the amount of $240.60, escrow advances of $1,138.83, and other fees and expenses advanced of $47.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $29.91 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for

up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 28, 2011 /s/ Jason J. Henderson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On January 28, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Jason J. Henderson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Citimortgage V Bruce 42011.284 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 31, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 23 in Tract 19 of North Half School Addition also known as School Five Acre Addition in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat of record in Book 3 of Plats at Page 35 Joseph E Troutman, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title and Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on August 8, 2005 and recorded on August 8, 2005 in Book 757, Page 1213 under Document No. 200520333. The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage, LLC. Jason J. Henderson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,383.46, beginning June 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 15, 2011 is $156,511.35 principal, interest at the rate of 5.625% now totaling $6,940.53, late charges in the amount of $393.90, escrow advances of $1,619.80, suspense balance of $55.93 and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,349.25, plus accruing interest at the rate of $24.12 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The

scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 19, 2011 Jason J. Henderson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On January 19, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Jason J. Henderson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Stephanie L Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Gmac V Troutman 41965.429 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 31, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 6 of Block 1 of the Ben Hughes Addition Subdivision to the County of Missoula, City of Missoula, State of Montana REBA CHLARSON, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title of Missoula, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated November 29, 2007 and recorded December 4, 2007 in Book 809, Page 1193 under Document No. 200731292. The beneficial interest is currently held by Fannie Mae (“Federal National Mortgage Association”). Jason J. Henderson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,735.82, beginning March 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 28, 2011 is $234,236.25 principal, interest at the rate of 7.875% now totaling $18,273.44, escrow advances of $4,590.12, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2426.18, plus accruing interest at the rate of $50.53 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C8 April 14 – April 21, 2011

then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 19, 2011 Jason J. Henderson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On January 19, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Jason J. Henderson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Lbps V Chlarson 42008.068 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 07/15/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which VINCENT C BUSS AND HANNE H. BUSS, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to FIRST AMERICAN as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 12/12/2007 and recorded 12/31/2007, in document No. 200733334 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 811 at Page Number 206 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOTS 30, 31 AND THE WEST 10 FEET OF LOT 32 IN BLOCK 50 OF CARLINE ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 2332 MARY AVE, Missoula, MT 59801-7604. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 08/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $173,352.47 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 4.125% per annum from 08/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the

Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 03/03/2011, ReconTrust Company, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 110012970 FEI NO. 1006.130266 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 07/25/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which BRUCE A TUDAHL AND SHELLY TUDAHL, AS JOINT TENANTS as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 05/25/2007 and recorded 05/31/2007, in document No. 200713498 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 79B at Page Number 584 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: A TRACT OF LAND SITUATED IN THE SW1/4 OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 14 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS TRACT 8B2B-2 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 3368. Property Address: 11560 POLECAT ROAD, Missoula, MT 59808. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 12/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $207,164.14 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 3.75% per annum from 12/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 03/08/2011, ReconTrust Company,

N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 110019167 FEI NO. 1006.130563 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 07/22/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which JAMES R. GONZALES AND HEIDI L GALE GONZALES as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 07/16/2007 and recorded 07/20/2007, in document No. 200718520 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 801 at Page Number 1369 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 5 IN BLOCK 2 OF RIO VISTA ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF; EXCEPTING THE SOUTH 20 FEET OF SAID LOT 5, AND FURTHER EXCEPTING THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PORTION OF SAID LOT 5, TO-WIT; COMMENCING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 5; THENCE SOUTH ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID LOT A DISTANCE OF 62.7 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE WEST AND PARALLEL TO THE NORTH BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID LOT A DISTANCE OF 93.5 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH AND PARALLEL TO THE EAST BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID LOT A DISTANCE OF 62.7 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID LOT 5; THENCE EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID LOT A DISTANCE OF 93.5 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT AND POINT OF BEGINNING. Property Address: 4705 MILLER CREEK ROAD, Missoula, MT 59803. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 04/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $189,965.83 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 7.25% per annum from 04/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations


PUBLIC NOTICES secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 03/09/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-9840407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0018700 FEI NO. 1006.130627 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 07/27/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County

Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which LYNETTE ADAMSON, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 03/02/2007 and recorded 03/16/2007, in document No. 200706250 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 793 at Page Number 1065 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 42 OF HAWTHORN SPRINGS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 13140 BUNCHGRASS LN, Missoula, MT 59808. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said

Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 10/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $238,874.73 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.25% per annum from 10/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the

Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 03/11/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-9840407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0020535 FEI NO. 1006.130790

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Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 07/25/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including rea-

sonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which JONATHAN W BURT, AND CHRISTINE K BURT, AS JOINT TENANTS as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 12/27/2007 and recorded 01/04/2008, in document No. 200800249 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 811 at Page Number 482 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN A PORTION OF LOT 30 OF DINSMORE’S ORCHARD HOMES NO. 4, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, AND MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE SOUTH LINE OF LOT 30, OF SAID DINSMORE’S ORCHARD HOMES NO. 4, WHICH POINT BEARS EAST A DISTANCE OF 182.00 FEET FROM THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 30;

THENCE NORTH A DISTANCE OF 190.00 FEET; THENCE EAST A DISTANCE OF 80 FEET; THENCE SOUTH A DISTANCE OF 190.00 FEET; THENCE WEST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LOT 30, A DISTANCE OF 80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. RECORDING REFERENCE: BOOK 346 OF MICRO AT PAGE 705. Property Address: 3130 S 7TH ST W, Missoula, MT 59804. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 12/01/2009, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the benefi-

ciary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $209,294.97 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.75% per annum from 11/01/2009 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 03/09/2011, ReconTrust Company, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 10-0118136 FEI NO. 1006.130629

329 E. Front #B5 - $510/$510 deposit. W/S/G paid. Coinop laundry, off street parking & close to the U. NO PETS. GATEWEST 728-7333

Ninemile mother-in-law apt: 1bedroom, view of the beautiful Ninemile valley, storage, carport, all paid, $450, GCPM, 549-6106 gcpm-mt.com

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2008 Wyoming-$1200/$1200 dep. 3B/2bath House G/S pd; gas forced air heat. W/D hookups, D/W, 2-car garage, fenced yard. NO PETS. GATEWEST 728-7333

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PUBLISHER’S NOTICE EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800929-2611

1805 Phillips: 1-bedroom, dining-area, on-site laundry, parking, 2nd floor, some qualifications, heat paid, $565, $450, GCPM, 549-6106 gcpmmt.com

430 Washington 1bd/1ba $650 w/ Heat paid! Coin-ops, downtown, off-street parking. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 Corvallis, 4,500 sqft warehouse space, 7 bay doors, 40 Cents SqFt offered by Greener MT Prop Mgmt, 370-7009

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montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 April 14 – April 21, 2011


REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 3 bed, 2 bath home on gorgeous acre just west of Frenchtown. Some updating has been done with newer siding, newer roof and the main bathroom has been totally remodeled with new cabinets, paint, and tile. The gorgeous yard has mature pines, tons of flowers, a playhouse, and even a small pond. $234,900 • MLS # 20111782 Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com 3 bed, 2 bath Potomac area home. Covered deck, fenced acreage and great views. The 28 x32 garage has double doors, attached storage in the back and small car port. RV hookups behind garage. 40x49 Quoncet shop with 200 amp service, air compressor, snap on car lift, crane, water. $259,900. MLS#10002960. Janet 2403932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. 4 bed, 2.5 bath manufactured home w/ attached storage & 2 covered porches, Has horse set up. Home has central air. $170,000 • MLS # 20111781. Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com 5 bed, 3 bath home in South Hills. House has central air, vaulted ceilings, big family room with gas fireplace. Yard w/ underground sprinklers and privacy fence. 2 car garage. Great home for entertaining! MLS # 10007275. $240,000. Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com 717 Cooper 1 bed, 1 bath bungalow with stainless steel appliances, built in breakfast bar, wood floor, privacy fence & storage shed. $162,500 MLS # 20111199. Call Shannon Hilliard at 239-8350 today! Affordable Condo, Didn’t think you could afford to buy your own place? This sweet, new, green-built development may be cheaper than rent. 1400 Burns, 3 2 7 - 8 7 8 7 porticorealestate.com Beautiful River home on Bitterroot just minutes from Missoula. 3 bed 2 bath with a

deck that could hold the whole party. $979,000 or Equity Shares available. MLS 10006007. Call Anne 5465816 for showings. Windermere Real Estate Classic North Side Beauty, fantastic updates, hardwood floors, beautiful decor, lots of room on double lot to garden, outbuildings and rented studio shares bath and kitchen, 622 N. 4th 3 2 7 - 8 7 8 7 porticorealestate.com Condo Along the River -Close to the U, one-of-a-kind 2br Edgewater Condo, highly desirable, hardwood floors, lots of character, fantastic location. 521 Hartman #2, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Deck Overlooks Clarkfork River - for income qualified first time homeowners, great 2bdr condo, attached 2 car garages, like new, pets allowed, 1401 Cedar St #22 & #2. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Did you find the perfect place? Now plan your perfect weekend at MissoulaEvents.net Farm Houses w/land in Missoula, these funky farm houses boast lots of land to spread out and do your thing, Development potential. 3278787 porticorealestate.com Five bedroom 4+ bath townhome on golfcourse with excellent views and gracious space. $445,000. MLS 10007754. Call Anne 546-5816 for showings. Windermere Real Estate

info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com GORGEOUS HANDCRAFTED HOME IN 3.3 ACRES ON PETTY CREEK. 3 Bdr/2.5 Baths, Main floor master suite, great room, gorgeous kitchen, hardwood floors, heated double garage, with guest quarters, and great views. $595,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com GORGEOUS LOWER RATTLESNAKE HOME. 4 Bdr, 2 Baths, separate heated studio, wide-plank fir floors, 10’ high ceilings, great kitchen, lots of light, all just steps from Greenough Park and trails. $310,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Great 3 Bed 2 Bath home on the hill in Lolo. This home features a spacious living room, large backyard and nice deck, great views of the mountains, and huge family room in the basement. Perfect home for RD financing. $189,900. MLS # 20110854. Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com

$169,900. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Handsome, Spacious Home on Prime Upper Miller Creek Acreage, 5+ bedrooms, with out of town living on quiet cul-desac, and acres. Rodeo Rd. 3278787 porticorealestate.com IMMACULATE HOME ON A 20,000 SQ FT LOT. Beautifully updated and maintained 4 Bdr/3 Bath Lolo area home. Great yard and deck, spacious living room and family room, great kitchen with breakfast bar & dining area, master bedroom and more. $269,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Price Reduced 3 bed, 1.5 bath centrally located condo w/ 1 car garage. 1 bedroom has deck, gas fireplace, tall ceilings

GREAT NORTHSIDE LOCATION. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, fenced yard, hardwood floors, fireplace, lots of natural light, washer/dryer, off-street parking, walk to community gardens, parks, brew pub and downtown . Prudential Montana.

GORGEOUS CENTRAL MISSOULA CONDO. 3 Bdr/2.5 Baths, fenced back yard, large single garage, tile floors, stainless appliances, spacious master bedroom, vaulted ceilings, tile flooring, all just a short walk to the Good Food Store. Prudential Montana. $181,500. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com GORGEOUS CRAFTSMAN STYLE TARGET RANGE HOME ON 0.94 ACRES. 5 Bdr/3.5 Bath, double garage, hardwood & tile floors, gourmet kitchen, breakfast nook, main floor master, 2 family rooms. Close to schools, shopping, and the Bitterroot River. $469,000. Prudential Montana. For more

in living room. New trim, interior paint and vinyl. $135,000 • MLS # 20110908 Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com Price Reduced! 5 Bed/2 Bath in Bonner. New wood laminate floor. Large kitchen with island. Fenced yard in front with private deck area in back. New roof. Mature trees. $209,900 MLS#20111375. Janet 2403932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

SINGLE LEVEL LIVING CLOSE TO THE BITTERROOT RIVER. 4 Bdr/3 Bath single-level Stevensville home. Great, open floor plan, incredible mountain views, next to public park, walk to Downtown Stevi or Bitterroot River. $219,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

Unique Lower Rattlesnake home near Bugbee Nature Area, 3Brm, 4Ba, Tree-top views, Lots of upgrades like granite countertops and lots of gorgeous wood throughout, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Rare Wilma Building Condo – unique loft style condo offers a carefree, fun lifestyle with an amazing view on top of the historic Wilma, $219,900 3278787 porticorealestate.com Rattlesnake Home on Large Lot, nice 3br home sits on very rare lot, mature landscaping, tennis court, home has lots of upgrades, 506 Redwood 3278787 porticorealestate.com

RICE TEAM

riceteam@bigsky.net Robin Rice Janet Rice 240-3932 missoularealestate4sale.com 240-6503 • 3 bed, 3 bath, 2 car garage • 2 main floor masters • Heated tile floor & jacuzzi in master bath • Large shed for extra storage • $359,900 • MLS # 20110410

• Bonner area 5 Bed / 2 Bath on 2 acres • Large kitchen w/ island • Chain link fence in front yard • Private deck in back, mature trees • $209,900 • MLS#906641

• 3 bdrm/2 bath/10 Acres • Covered deck / fenced acreage • 28 x32 garage / 40x49 Quonset shop • RV hookups behind garage • $259,900 • MLS#10002960

• 3 Bed/2 Bath, single level living • A/C, concrete patio out back door • Chain link fence (back yard), UG sprinklers • One block to Hellgate Elementary School • $209,000 • MLS#20111250

This 3 bed, 2 bath home is not to be missed! You must get inside! NOT A DRIVE BY ! ! S o u t h w e s t e r n theme abounds. Artistic & fun with wood floors, tile accents throughout. Yard is fully fenced. Studio in back yard is tastefully finished. Greenhouse and back patio are added bonuses! A MUST SEE! www.1616cooperst.com. MLS# 20111943

1616 Cooper • $249,900 Pride of ownership w/ many updates, end unit! Brand new carpet, newer paint throughout w/ very attractive colors, new bath and kitchen fixtures, upgraded light fixtures. Lower level features large living room, with pergo flooring through out. Single attached garage and small backyard. www.1729ethel.com. May have downpayment/closing cost Asst for those who qualify. MLS#20111473

1729 Ethel Lane • $158,900 For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

Foreclosure Home Tour: April 16th

You’re invited to participate in a fun interactive real estate tour of the Missoula area. Ask experienced agents about financing, renovation mortgages, and investment opportunities. Get the inside information, get on the bus! Reserve Your Seat Today - www.OpenHouseOnWheelsMT.com

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10 April 14 – April 21, 2011

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Rochelle

Missoula Properties Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com


REAL ESTATE

Upper Rattlesnake house Great house upper Rattlesnake, close to trailhead. Four bedrooms, two and half bathrooms .4 acre, large fenced in yard. Two car attached garage. Fantastic views. 406728-5372. 4710 Rattlesnake Drive . See links. $289,000. View or list properties for sale By Owner at www.byownermissoula.com OR call 550-3077

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES 3344B Connery Way. Modern three level townhome. Easy maintenance yard, 2 bed 3 bath double car garage. $192,000. MLS 10006082. Call Anne 546-5816 for showings. Windermere Real Estate Uptown Flats Unit #213 1 bed 1 bath and all the amenities included in this Quality Downtown Condo. $149,900. MLS 20110263. Call Anne 546-5816 for showings. Windermere Real Estate

LAND FOR SALE 20 Acres-$0 Down!! $99/mo. ONLY $12,900. Near Growing El Paso, Texas (2nd safest U.S. City). Owner Financing, No Credit Checks. Money Back Guarantee! FREE Color Brochure. 800-755-8953 www.sunsetranches.com 3.5 ACRES BARE LAND ON PETTY CREEK. Gorgeous bare land parcel straddling Petty Creek. Septic, well, and utilities in place. Gorgeous building spot with mountain, creek, and valley views. Custom builder available. $149,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Almost 1/2 acre building site with great views. Close to Ranch Club Golf course and fishing access. City sewer stubbed to the property line. NOW ONLY $75,000. MLS# 10007449. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 2406503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

Need a roommate? Check out our local online classifieds to find the perfect one.

Beautiful 20 acres fenced pasture land. Seasonal stream and pond. Great get away or build your dream home. No power to area. $170 per year road maintenance fee. $149,900. MLS#10007447. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 2406503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

Investor buys private mortgages, trust indentures & Land Installment Contracts. Call Today for a FREE Bid on buying a portion or all of your note. We also lend on Real Estate, must have at least 40% equity. (800)9994809 www.CreativeFinance.com

BIG BEAUTIFUL AZ LAND $99/mo. $0 down, $0 interest, Golf Course, Nat’l. Parks. 1 Hour from Tucson Int’l. Airport. Guaranteed financing, no credit checks. Pre-recorded msg. (800) 631-8164 Code 4057 www.sunsiteslandrush.com

1940 5th St. Missoula $156,900 MLS # 20111520 Newly remodeled 3 bed, 1 bath, move in ready. Why rent? Affordable investment!

Nice 1 acre lot, beautiful country setting west of Missoula. City Sewer available. Great view. Now $95,000. MLS#908159. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 2406503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. Secluded 20 Acres 15 Minutes to Missoula, property boasts nice choices for building site, a healthy and beautiful forest setting, and easy commute. 3278787 porticorealestate.com

406.239.2049

Broker/Owner

Jeannette@montana.com

COMMERCIAL 321 N. Higgins for sale. Many updates to this grand ole downtown building. $875,000. MLS 10003350. Call Anne 5465816 for showings. Windermere Real Estate www.mindypalmer.com

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL QUICK CASH PAID FOR YOUR REAL ESTATE NOTE! Local

THE UPTOWN FLATS UPSCALE DOWNTOWN LIFESTYLE 1 and 2 bedroom condos available

Starting at $149,900 OPEN HOUSE: Sat. 11-2pm & Sun. Noon-4pm or call Jeff or Anne for Appointment

Jeff Ellis

Anne Jablonski

529-5087

546-5816

www.theuptownflatsmissoula.com Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 April 14 – April 21, 2011


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WORLD HEADQUARTERS All Compact Discs, New & Used $2 off All Jewelry 25% off All Cards, Journals & Paper Products 25% off All Toys 25% off • All Clothing 25% off All Body Products 25% off All Chocolates & Candies 25% off All Posters & Art 25% off

RUDY’S II RECORD HEAVEN All Vinyl - New & Used 25% off All Turntables, Cartridges & Stereo Equipment 25% off SALE ENDS 4/17/11

The UM Women's Resource Center presents Their Annual Fundraiser:

This Night of Mayhem, Don't forget RECORD STORE DAY! A nationwide celebration of independent music stores Rockin Rudy's, Saturday, 4/16

A Celebration of Women in Music at the Badlander, Friday 4/15, 9pm Featuring Seattle's Eighteen Individual Eyes, Bird's Mile Home, Pony Canon and DJ Mermaid. Also coming up from the UM Women's Resource Center: Betties on Bikes: Basic Bicycle Maintenance 4/27 @ Free Cycles, 6pm (You don't have to be a "Betty" to attend!) More info: umt.edu/wcenter

NCBI's DIVERSITY DAY! Saturday, 4/16 Parade begins at the XXXXs, 3pm, and ends at the Boone & Crockett Club. Come celebrate our rich diversity! More info: ncbimissoula.org


Missoula Independent