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NEWS

STILL WAITING: WHAT’S THE DEAL WITH CONTINUED DELAYS AT DOWNTOWN MISSOULA’S HOTEL FOX SITE?

MOCKING SMALL-TOWN MEDICAID EXPANSION BILL MEASURES GOES FILM MONTANA ON BIG SCREEN BOOKSEPIC OPINION SHOWS COST OF IDEOLOGY BEYOND THE NUMBERS


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


NEWS

STILL WAITING: WHAT’S THE DEAL WITH CONTINUED DELAYS AT DOWNTOWN MISSOULA’S HOTEL FOX SITE?

MOCKING SMALL-TOWN MEDICAID EXPANSION BILL MEASURES GOES FILM MONTANA ON BIG SCREEN BOOKSEPIC OPINION SHOWS COST OF IDEOLOGY BEYOND THE NUMBERS


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[2] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015

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cover illustration by Kou Moua

News

Voices/Letters Public lands, Early Edge and Steve Daines .............................................4 The Week in Review Skiing, Kaarma and Lance Armstrong ..........................................6 Briefs Rattlesnake logging, Mountain Water and roller boys..........................................6 Etc. Evel Knievel’s cane goes up for sale.........................................................................7 News What’s the deal with continued Fox site delays? ...................................................8 Opinion Medicaid expansion shows the cost of ideology ............................................10 Opinion A recent study shows the perseverance of nature..........................................11 Feature Who’s behind the push to transfer Montana’s public lands?...........................14

Arts & Entertainment

Arts The relationship between a curious photographer and Butte ..............................20 Music Wand, Pile and Butch Walker ..............................................................................21 Music A close look at Action Bronson’s weird evolution..............................................22 Books Epic Measures takes on a health story of global proportions............................23 Film Cut Bank almost imagines murder in a small town .............................................24 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films.......................................................25 Flash in the Pan Sugar, the new tobacco .....................................................................26 Happiest Hour Bodega.................................................................................................28 8 Days a Week Playing connect the dots ......................................................................29 Mountain High The Sapphire Mountain Men’s Sixth Annual Public Day....................37 Agenda Dark Side of the Full Moon..............................................................................38

Exclusives

Street Talk .......................................................................................................................4 In Other News ..............................................................................................................12 Classifieds....................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess...................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y ....................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle .......................................................................................................C-6 This Modern World...................................................................................................C-12 PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Heidi Starrett CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL PROJECTS Christie Anderson ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Cathrine L. Walters CALENDAR EDITOR Kate Whittle STAFF REPORTERS Kate Whittle, Alex Sakariassen, Ted McDermott COPY EDITOR Kate Whittle EDITORIAL INTERNS Courtney Anderson, Kellen Beck ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Steven Kirst, Tracy Lopez, Will Peterson ADMIN, PROMO & EVENTS COORDINATOR Leif Christian CLASSIFIED SALES REPRESENTATIVE Tami Allen FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, Scott Renshaw, Nick Davis, Ednor Therriault, Jule Banville, Matthew Frank, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Melissa Mylchreest, Rob Rusignola, Migizi Pensoneau, Brooks Johnson, Sarah Aswell

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2015 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [3]


[voices]

STREET TALK

by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked Tuesday, April 7, near the corner of Higgins and Spruce. This week the Indy reports on yet another delay with the development proposal for the Fox site. What would you like to see replace the current parking lot? Follow-up: What do you think is the best new addition to downtown Missoula?

Tyler Kissler: I would like to see a park and garden area where the community is involved, where “problem people” could work at the garden and clean the park. And maybe an acoustic stage. Beer me: I like Imagine Nation Brewing.

Joel Baird: A fish hatchery would be nice with fish that are native to the Clark Fork. People could come see what species of fish are in the river, then when they’re ready to go it’s just a hop, skip and a jump into the river. Don’t call it a comeback: I think Nick and Robin’s purchase of the Wilma Theatre. It’s such an asset to downtown and it’s hopefully about to have a revival.

Elise Holbrook: A river access site and a dog park. I scream, you scream: Probably Sweet Peaks. Ice cream is always a good thing.

Melissa Cook: The most exciting thing I heard about was an entertainment venue to see music and live entertainment. Feeding frenzy: The food and drink scene in general is blowing up. I want to check out the Thomas Meagher Bar but every time I go in there it’s too busy with some sports event on all the TVs.

Cameron Best: The first thing that comes to mind is a park, but an aquatic center would be cool, where you can teach people about riparian environments and aquatic species. Free rider: The Mountain Line’s free fare is a pretty nice addition to downtown. It’s nice to walk onto the bus and not pay for anything.

[4] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015

Stuck in the past Why was I not surprised after reading the article by Marshall Swearingen? (See “Locked out,” April 2.) Why should the big baron landowners have to obey the same rules as us 99-percenters? It’s not enough they don’t want you crossing public land, they don’t even want you wading in public water thru their land. Change? Nothing changes in Montana. Big-time ranchers still act like the bad guys in all the old Westerns. Trappers still set dangerous traps in public rivers and on public land near trails when people and pets go walking. Our chickenhearted senators and congressmen refuse to support the land access granted to us by the taxes and the federal government because doing so might get them “unelected.” Change? If you’re looking for change in Montana and wanna get “locked in,” try locking in to this century. Alan Gelman Florence

Daines doesn’t listen We think Steve Daines, as one of Montana’s senators, has the responsibility to listen to and represent all Montana citizens, not just Republicans. We were part of a large group of people who visited his office last month and were surprised that his staff refused to even listen to our concerns. The matter that most concerns us is Sen. Daines’ refusal to recognize the reality of climate change, caused by human burning of carbon fuels. Letters from his office continue to repeat the fiction that there is “considerable scientific debate” around whether human activities significantly contribute to climate change. They urge caution (read: inaction) around any legislation addressing it and even point to China as “unlikely to implement” policies that control carbon emissions (read: shift attention from responsible problem solving ourselves to blame elsewhere). If ever there were an issue that supersedes partisan politics or narrow nationalism, it is climate change. Despite warnings from scientists (97 percentof whom agree)around the world, climate change is already causing massive destruction, from Montana’s forests to all animal and plant life on earth and in the oceans. It is going to continue to get worse until we do something about it. Does Sen. Daines care or want to know? His denial and silence is an abandonment of his responsibilities as a senator. We want to

L

hear from him. And we want Congress to get down to business and seriously consider solutions in the little time that is left us to do so. Nancy Q. Cochran and Carol Marsh Missoula

The right plan As director of The Community School in Missoula and as a mother, I value the vast importance of early childhood education. I see firsthand every day the necessity of early intervention for pre-kindergarten students. I know public early childhood education will give all children a better chance to succeed in kindergarten, preventing them from struggling during their first year of formal schooling. Quality childcare providers know that safe, structured, play-based learning that emphasizes language and social development is key to increasing a student’s future success, from the day they start kindergarten to when they don their caps and gowns at high school

“Change? Nothing changes in Montana.” commencement. My own daughter at age 3 and 4 had high-risk anxiety and high-risk OCD. Thanks to early intervention provided by her preschool, she entered kindergarten with full confidence instead of anxiety, and I’m proud to say she is now excelling socially and academically. After parents and family members, caregivers like us are often the earliest influencers on the development of Montana’s kids. We take this responsibility seriously by offering the highest quality early education possible. For example, consider the life-changing services offered by the Young Families Early Head Start program in Billings. Last month, this center for infants to toddlers was the first center to earn five stars under Montana’s voluntary rating program of early childhood care. Imagine if we could extend quality early education like this to 4-year-olds all across the state? If passed by the Montana Senate, Early Edge would do just that: offer statewide support to bolster existing high quality preschool providers to improve and expand upon their quality programs. Early Edge, part of the state’s budget bill, would allow a $37 million investment of ex-

isting revenue into existing pre-K programs, public and private, and allow the creation of new pre-kindergarten centers where communities want them. The flexible funding would allow local districts, teachers and providers with options so that every school, childcare center and town has an easy and affordable transition to public pre-K. Teachers would have a three-year grace period to receive their Early Grade Endorsement. For childcare providers not currently licensed by the state, online options would be available through Montana’s university system to earn an endorsement within the three-year period. Gov. Bullock is making sure Early Edge matches the needs of existing childcare providers so we can offer the services needed for quality programming and a strong workforce. This includes changing the policies of the Best Beginnings Scholarship, which currently provides a federal child care subsidy, to make it more business and family friendly. The Early Edge initiative empowers parents to decide whether or not they want to enroll their child in pre-K. If they choose to enroll their son or daughter, they do so without the added financial burden of paying for a high quality program, because pre-K would be free for all kids in Montana regardless of where they live, their parent’s income bracket or where they will enter kindergarten. Voluntary, free and tailored to the schools and childcare centers available in your community, Early Edge is the right plan for a big, diverse and independent state like Montana Please, contact your legislators at (406) 444-4800 in support of public, voluntary preK for all Montana children today. Kristal Burns The Community School in Missoula Missoula Caroline McDonald Best Beginnings Children’s Partnership Flathead Reservation and Lake County Jeanne Christopher CSKT Early Childhood Services Pablo and Ronan counties Correction: Last week’s story on trapping, “Initiative will test new law,” incorrectly attributed a 2010 citizens’ initiative to Trap Free Montana Public Lands. The 2010 effort was spearheaded by Footloose Montana. The Indy regrets the error.

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via email: editor@missoulanews.com.


THE STARS HAVE ALIGNED. Check out what 2015 has in store. HANK WILLIAMS, JR. JULY 10

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LYNYRD SKYNYRD WITH THE MARSHALL TUCKER BAND AUG 7 ON SALE APRIL 18

STAY TUNED FOR FULL LINEUP. Buy tickets online or call the Northern Quest box office: 509.481.6700. Lineup is subject to change.

missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Cathrine L. Walters

Wednesday, April 1 Lance Armstrong, the seven-time Tour de France winner who was stripped of his titles after being implicated in a doping scandal, joins Montana Trail Crew for a run in Missoula’s North Hills.

Thursday, April 2 Attorneys for Markus Kaarma file a notice of appeal with the Montana Supreme Court, indicating their intention to seek a review of Kaarma’s February conviction for the deliberate homicide of German exchange student Diren Dede.

Friday, April 3 The Montana Highway Patrol settles a 2013 racial-profiling lawsuit alleging officers improperly detained Hispanic drivers for the purpose of checking into their immigration status.

Saturday, April 4 After receiving a report of a man waving a handgun and yelling profanities at a family during a road-rage incident on Highway 93 near Lolo, Missoula County Sheriff’s deputies arrest Brian Parini and find a loaded .45 in his vehicle.

Sunday, April 5 While some celebrate Easter, skiers take to the slopes for the final time at Discovery Ski Area and at Lost Trail Ski Area, where the lift tickets are free as part of the hill’s annual customer appreciation day.

Monday, April 6 By a 10-1 vote, the Missoula City Council votes to reimburse the Missoula Redevelopment Agency $5 million for the estimated cost of a new pedestrian bridge planned to span Reserve Street, connecting the Missoula to Lolo Trail.

Tuesday, April 7 Cole Francisco, a 22-year-old University of Montana student accused of exposing himself to four young girls in Missoula and Lolo, pleads not guilty in Missoula County District Court to all six charges against him.

Derek Moree practices flow art with a bow staff on a sunny April 7 afternoon at Caras Park.

Mountain Water

Trial ends, decision begins As lawyers delivered their closing arguments in the Mountain Water condemnation trial on Monday afternoon and evening, interested observers crowded the courtroom. In the back sat a large contingent of the utility’s employees, clad in orange sweatshirts and concerned about the future of their jobs. Near the front sat Missoula Mayor John Engen, who signed a letter endorsing the system’s sale to the Carlyle Group in 2011 and who has been leading the effort to wrest it into public ownership. In between were city councillors, government officials, media members and others. Ultimately, however, the opinion of only one person in the courtroom will really matter: that of Missoula County District Judge Karen Townsend. It will be up to her to decide whether Missoula’s water, its pipes and its pumps will remain in the hands of private owners or become property of the city. To make her determination, Townsend will apply Title 70 of Montana Code Annotated, which allows the

[6] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015

water system to be condemned and to change hands only if the city can prove it is “more necessary” for the city than for Carlyle or another private entity to own it. Harry Schneider, the city’s lead counsel, argued for that necessity by pointing to the future and claiming a litany of benefits will derive from public control of the city’s water. While private owners aim to benefit their shareholders, Schneider argued the city will manage the system in the best interest of residents. “In effect,” Schneider said, “the city is willing to bear the short-term costs for long-term benefits for the future citizens of the city.” If Townsend rules against Missoula, the water that flows—and, to a significant degree, leaks—beneath city streets will become property of Liberty Utilities, the Canadian company that purchased Mountain Water’s parent company, Park Water, for $327 million last year. At stake, Schneider said, is “local accountability, local accessibility, local decision making.” Joe Conner, Bill Mercer and Gary Zadick—counsel for Mountain Water, Carlyle Infrastructure Partners and

Mountain Water’s employees, respectively—sought to counter Schneider’s argument by extolling the economic and service advantages of private ownership. They also worked to undermine the legal argument that city ownership is “more necessary” by pointing to the last time the city tried—and failed—to condemn and acquire the water system in 1984. In addition, defense attorneys attempted to counter the city’s claim that Carlyle tricked Engen into supporting the company’s purchase of Mountain Water in 2011 by promising to consider purchase offers from the city in “good faith” and then failing to do so. Mercer presented evidence that Carlyle not only considered the city’s offers but also offered Engen a “significant amount of context … as to why those offers were rejected.” The reason Carlyle turned the city down, Mercer argued, had to do with its desire to sell all three companies contained under the Park Water umbrella at once—not just Mountain Water alone, as Missoula wanted. “It’s clear that, since the 1980s, the city has coveted these [water] assets,” Mercer said. But that


[news] desire, he argued, doesn’t make city ownership a necessity. When arguments were complete, Townsend gave the parties two weeks to submit their final briefs, which she will use to make her decision. After the courtroom emptied, Schneider paused in a hallway to answer a quick question. How does he feel about the city’s chances? “I think the evidence is there,” Schneider said, indicating his optimism. “And we certainly feel comfortable that we had the opportunity to present the evidence that we feel is determinative.” A few moments later, a Mountain Water employee walked past, talking to his companions. “A lot’s at stake,” he said. “A lot is at stake.”

Ted McDermott

Roller derby

Men get a turn Skater boys, take note: Missoula’s Hellgate Rollergirls roller derby is recruiting for a new, yet-to-be-named men’s expansion team, and it’s about halfway toward a minimum membership goal. The nonprofit Hellgate Rollergirls league was founded around 2009, following a nationwide wave of interest in the full-contact, fast-paced sport that’s associated with a punkrock aesthetic. As a nonprofit league, the Rollergirls are responsible for every facet of putting on a bout, including training their own group of mostly male referees. Recently, some referees decided they wanted to play the game, too, says Rollergirls public relations director Jannette McDonald, who plays under the name “Loch Net Monster.” Currently, a handful of men are skating with the Rollergirls at their current practice space, the Play Gr8 Golf indoor course off Stephens Avenue. “So you come to beginner practice, and you test up to your levels, and once you test up to level 2, you practice with the team,” McDonald says. “We have two guys at that level, and we have about six or seven males overall that come to practices.” Ideally, a team needs about 12 to 14 members to play a bout.

McDonald says the men’s expansion is part of a big year for the league, which lost its practice space at a Northside warehouse due to a renovation and now makes do at Play Gr8 Golf. The team is also anticipating its upcoming third annual fundraiser, the Sip It Speakeasy, and busy training men as well as new female recruits from a recent skater boot camp. “Things are going really well,” McDonald says. “This is a rebuilding year for us.” Once the men’s team gets up and rolling, it will face the additional challenge of finding opponents on the road, since men’s derby is popular in Canada but still somewhat unusual in the U.S. The Men’s Roller Derby Association lists just a handful of leagues in the Northwest, like the Puget Sound Outcasts in Tacoma and Portland’s Bridgetown Menace. Hellgate trainee Forrest Norby says his wife, a derby player and referee, encouraged him to join as a ref about four years ago. He had never so much as ice skated before, but he “got addicted” to derby. “I understand the rules pretty well, and I think I’m a decent referee, but playing the game is a whole new challenge,” he says. “It’s thinking about the game from the inside rather than looking at it from the outside.”

Kate Whittle

Rattlesnake

Logging plan stalled In response to mounting public pressure, the Lolo National Forest announced last week it was extending the public comment period for its proposed Marshall Woods Restoration Project through April 30. The 13,000-acre project is intended to address a variety of management issues in the Rattlesnake and Marshall creek drainages, from ecological health to the potential for high intensity wildfires. But the inclusion of roughly 225 acres of commercial timber harvest in the main corridor of the Rattlesnake National Recreation Area has turned a number of longtime collaborators on the project into vocal critics. Jake Kreilick, chair of the Lolo Restoration Committee, says the subject of commercial logging has been a point of contention in the Marshall Woods

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sity of Montana Oval for last Saturday’s Easter Eggstravaganza. It took less than five minutes for hundreds of kids—and parents—to collect the items and end the hunt. discussion for years. The committee first brought the project to the Lolo National Forest in 2008 and became a key collaborator. But given the historic sense that the Rattlesnake NRA is “wilderness-lite,” Kreilick says, those involved in the project could never reach a consensus on timber harvest. “This element of logging the Rattlesnake was controversial in 2010, and it’s controversial now,” Kreilick says. Rattlesnake resident Cass Chinske is particularly perturbed by the issue. Chinske authored the draft of the Rattlesnake National Recreation Area and Wilderness Act back in 1980 and lobbied heavily for its passage in Congress. He also helped write the committee report for the U.S. House outlining the intent of the bill—a document that specifically states the Rattlesnake is “unsuited for … timber harvest.” When he first heard about the logging proposals included in the Marshall Woods Environmental Assessment released in February, he says he was “stunned.” “It’s like somebody going into the Sistine Chapel with a high-pressure tank on their back with hydrochloric acid and spraying all those Michelangelo paintings,” Chinske says. “You just don’t do things like that in the Rattlesnake.” The portion of the Marshall Woods EA that has sparked backlash calls for the harvesting of 80 log-trucks worth of timber from two units in the Poe Meadows area, about three miles up from the main Rattlesnake trailhead. That work would require use of mechanized equipment and result in the U.S. Forest Service closing the main trail to public use for as much as 30 to 40 days. In the April 2 release announcing the comment period extension, Missoula District Ranger Jennifer Hensiek stressed that the Lolo has “never had a ‘preferred alternative’ and no decision has been made.” Along with the extension, forest officials will host public field trips on April 14 and 18 to explain the details of the Marshall Woods project. Several concerned groups including Sierra Club and Friends of the Rattlesnake will hold an April 22 wine tasting and comment writing party at Ten Spoon Winery. “The most important issue is what the Rattlesnake is,” Chinske says of the debate. “What is up there? All the animals, the different species of plants and trees, the incredible waters … and the type of experience that people go up there to enjoy. It’s a sacred area.”

Alex Sakariassen

ETC. The classified ad included just a nine-word description: “Cane from famous daredevil for sale for best offer.” A bold-type title made it clear the cane belonged to Butte legend Evel Knievel (although his name was misspelled), and it included a phone number. But like any good ad, it left the rest to imagination. Was it Knievel’s famous diamond-encrusted cane that included a secret compartment to hide booze? Was it garish, like so many of the daredevil’s outfits from the late ’60s and 1970s? Was it similar to the standard mahogany cane that accompanies the official Evel Knievel action figure? Questions like these are exactly why 81year-old Harold LaTray of Deer Lodge has been fielding a lot of calls of late—at least a dozen, he says, since placing the ad. Each caller has asked the same three things: Which cane is it? (It’s a less garish, more sensible walking cane with Knievel’s name and a patriotic red, white and blue design.) Where’d LaTray get it? (At a garage sale held by Knievel’s first wife, Linda, about 20 years ago.) And how much had he been offered so far? “Depends,” he says. “How much are you willing to offer me right now?” Turns out, LaTray isn’t much of a Knievel fan. He purchased the cane at the garage sale because he figured it’d be worth something someday, not because he wanted a piece of history from an American cult icon. Now, he’s simply looking to cash in. Any perceived romance in LaTray’s enticingly efficient description can probably be chalked up to saving a few bucks not going to a fourth line in the ad. Nevertheless, the availability of the Knievel cane prompted us to check out other local outlets for hidden treasures and valuable oddities with similarly tantalizing “For Sale” signs. The Indy pages featured a show pig. Craigslist had a vintage University of Montana marching band uniform, circa the copper-and-gold era. As for Knievel memorabilia, someone in Helena is selling an Evel Knievel business card, autographed by the daredevil with a gold paint pen. Asking price: $165. How’s that stack up to LaTray’s cane? “Someone offered me $200 for it,” LaTray eventually divulges. “But I’m holding out for a little more.”

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missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [7]


[news]

Still waiting What’s the deal with continued Fox site delays? by Ted McDermott

Back in January, Jim McLeod, senior managing director of Farran Realty Partners, expressed optimism about his group’s ability to move forward with a long-awaited plan to convert what is now a parking lot just west of the Orange Street bridge into an ambitious mixed-use development. At the same time, Missoula Redevelopment Agency Assistant Director Chris Behan said he expected Farran to present indications of progress to the Missoula City Council within a “couple of weeks.” That never happened, and now McLeod says his group won’t “have information to share with the public” until at least the end of May. With the project years behind schedule and the developers’ most recent deadline for progress three months overdue, some on city council are ready to reconsider the group’s exclusive right to develop the prime riverfront parcel located within steps of downtown. “If it comes back to council and it’s not with a plan for doing something, I expect there to be some pressure to open it back up,” says Councilman Jason Wiener. “That doesn’t mean everybody has to start from square one, but I would like to have a real idea of what are the possibilities that we are foreclosing on if we stay the course, if what we’ve been doing hasn’t yet yielded a project.” City council granted Farran and its two primary partners—the Averill family of Whitefish and Dieter Huckestein, formerly of Hilton Hotels—exclusive one-year rights in January 2012 to develop the land, upon the MRA’s recommendation. The developers, known collectively as Hotel Fox Partners, proposed spending $37.6 million to build a 200-250 room hotel with a conference center, health club, indoor-outdoor swimming pool, two-story parking garage and space for retail and restaurant uses. While the vision Hotel Fox Partners presented was somewhat vague, Behan says that was by design. The Fox site, as it’s known, has sat undeveloped since the city acquired it in 1984. In the 31 years since, MRA has issued seven requests for development proposals. With the seventh, in 2011, Behan says the agency sought to attempt something different and open things up. “None of the other ones worked,” Behan says. “So what we tried to do with this one was to say, ‘Okay, we’re going to back off a little bit. We’re not going to tell you every-

[8] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015

thing that we want. We’re not going to force unreasonable deadlines, because we’re the city, we don’t develop property.’” More than three years later, though, Hotel Fox Partners have yet to present a concrete development plan—much less begin implementing it. Meanwhile, council has repeatedly granted the group extensions, furthering the partners’ exclusive rights to the land. The most recent deadline passed in January, and now Behan says he will have to go before council to seek yet another extension. When he does, Behan hopes he has something to show them, something to demonstrate “that there’s progress being made.”

“We’re asking for [developers] to meet a lot of the community’s goals, in terms of the pattern of development and how it informs that side of downtown, to provide facilities that can be hard to get to pay for themselves—in terms of the convention space and the conference space and things like that—as well as to provide some of the most high-intensity mixed use that we would probably see in our community in order to make the best of this piece of land that’s right central to the city,” Wiener says. “There are a lot of needs to be met, and whatever goes there is going to be precedent-setting for that part of downtown.”

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

The Fox site has been idle since 1984, the year the city of Missoula acquired it, despite numerous proposals for development. With the latest plan stalled, some officials wonder if it’s time to again consider other possibilities.

“The first question [council members] are going to ask is, ‘What’s going on? What progress is being made?’” Behan says. “And one thing I hate to say is, ‘I don’t know.’” But absent any solid information from Hotel Fox Partners, Behan is left to guess. He believes the group is “fairly close” to completing a feasibility study of a conference center on the site, which the city requested in 2013. Once that’s done, Behan says a decision can be made about whether—and if so, how—to include such a space. With that keystone in place, Behan believes the developers will finally be able to begin making plans for the rest of the site. As with the conference-center study, those plans must adhere to a number of requirements and guidelines provided by the city. Behan and Wiener say those requirements have helped delay the site’s development now and over the past several decades.

With so much at stake, Behan, Wiener and others are willing to be patient. But Wiener says the “opportunity cost” of waiting is beginning to mount. “Because we’ve granted exclusivity, what kind of offers aren’t we getting?” Wiener wonders. “If we open a window for [other] people to present an offer, then we can fairly evaluate staying the course or switching to something else. Whatever it’s going to be, it’s going to have to be something compelling, whether it comes from Farran or another developer.” Behan hopes council will stick it out, even as his confidence has begun to waver. “This could be the real deal,” Behan says. “That’s what I’m telling myself. Even though, after all these years, I’m a little cynical.” tmcdermott@missoulanews.com


missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [9]


[opinion]

Back to reality Medicaid expansion compromise reveals the cost of ideology by Dan Brooks

Last week, the Montana Senate approved a bill from Sen. Ed Buttrey, R– Great Falls, to accept federal funding to expand Medicaid in Montana under the Affordable Care Act. In Helena, Medicaid expansion has gone from federal law to controversy to saga over the last five years, and Buttrey’s compromise is by no means the end of it. But it is a heartening step forward. It also illustrates the cost of ideology. By requiring recipients to pay a small monthly premium—2 percent of their annual incomes—Buttrey’s compromise gets around conservative Republicans’ objection that expanding Medicaid will hook Montanans on free health care from the government. It also introduces an extra $11 million in administrative costs. That’s how much the fiscal analysis of Senate Bill 405 estimates a third-party program manager will get for processing payments from 45,000 Montanans between now and 2019. In order to make sure nobody gets anything for free, Buttrey’s compromise gives an insurance company millions to administer a program the federal government already runs gratis. The senator from Great Falls has done Montana a favor with SB 405, because it placates the Tea Party wing of his caucus while still finding a way to help uninsured Montanans. His compromise is not perfect, but it’s a lot better than nothing—and nothing is the only alternative hard-right conservatives have offered. But it’s worth considering how much ideology has cost us. Since the U.S. Congress passed Medicaid expansion in 2010, conservatives in the state legislature have been hard-put to find practical reasons to refuse it. In addition to helping poor people who get sick, expanding Medicaid would do a lot of good for the rest of us. The 70,000 uninsured Montanans who should have gotten coverage under expanded Medicaid but haven’t yet are costing hospitals—and therefore premium-paying, insured Montanans—millions of dollars a year in emergency room visits. Investment banker Mark Semmens

[10] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015

estimates that refusing Medicaid expansion has left a $5 billion hole in the Montana economy. And our federal taxes are paying for expanded Medicaid in 29 states other than our own. I’m not sure it’s worth all that to make sure lazy people don’t get penicillin for free. I understand conservatives in Helena have a principled objection to the expansion of the welfare state and to the increasing size of the federal debt. But

“This compromise bill might just keep the ideologues in Helena from denying blood transfusions to the working poor over a theory they read about in a chain email.” these are not central tenets of conservatism. A central tenet of conservatism is to govern practically, not ideologically— to think in terms of how things can work instead of getting distracted by how they should. Withholding billions from the state economy and letting the uninsured jack up health care costs on the principle that welfare is bad is conservatism for dummies. It’s an idea for people who have absorbed the sound of conservatism without understanding how it actually works. Buttrey is to be commended for leading the more impressionable members of his caucus away from talk-radio conservatism and toward the kind of pragmatic

conservatism that has a history of responsibly governing this state. His compromise bill might just keep the ideologues in Helena from denying blood transfusions to the working poor over a theory they read about in a chain email. But we should remember that we had to give $11 million to an insurance company to assuage the Tea Party’s principles. We should not let those people pretend that they are governing for the good of Montana, when they are merely playacting an ideology they dimly understand. I’m writing this on Monday afternoon. By Tuesday, SB 405 will be discussed in the Health and Human Services Committee, six hours before the House officially returns from its five-day Easter recess. It’s possible that committee chair and staunch defender of theoretical conservatism Art Wittich scheduled it that way so he could do something weird. By the time you read this, we’ll know. Either Buttrey and the rest of Montana’s Republicans can remember 2015 as the session when they found a way to govern for both the working poor and the conservative wing of their party, or the Tea Party can remember a defiant gesture that maybe killed a few people and drove up premiums for the rest of us. Those are the options at hand. In the same way that there is no choice to simply accept Medicaid expansion without spending millions to charge people for it, there is nothing conservatives in the House can do to end the welfare state or thwart the dread Obama. We did not send them to Helena to save America. We didn’t even elect them to make federal Medicaid policy. We sent them to Helena to run the state of Montana. So far, they have proven about as useful as that blowhard at the bar who is right about everything because he never has to do anything. But there’s still time. If $11 million gets the Tea Party to actually govern, I’ll consider that a bargain ticket back to reality. Dan Brooks writes about politics, culture and barflies at combatblog.net.


[opinion]

The land came back A recent streambed study shows the perseverance of nature by Rebecca Deatsman

Cattle are hard on streams. There’s no getting around it. They’re large creatures, they travel in big herds unlike native ungulates such as mule deer and pronghorn, and they love to hang out in streambeds where the living is easy, with plentiful water to drink and delicate plants to munch on. The damage they do to riparian vegetation can speed up erosion, harm fish by increasing water temperature, decrease bird populations through the elimination of shrub habitat and cause a long list of other ecological problems. Conventional wisdom holds that in order to repair this damage, it’s necessary to actively restore a streambed by replanting vegetation, reshaping eroded banks and filling gullies. If you’ve ever worked trying to restore habitat, you know that it is both time-consuming and expensive. I discovered this myself when I worked for a watershed council in eastern Oregon, spending hours planting willow stakes and spreading grass seed along streams that had been degraded by cattle. Happily, though, there is some good news for underfunded and understaffed restoration efforts throughout the West. A new study carried out at Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge by Oregon State University researchers suggests that in some cases, overgrazed riparian areas can recover on their own in the decades after cattle are removed—no assistance from us needed. Hart Mountain is a wildlife refuge in sparsely populated southeastern Oregon, established in 1936 to protect remnant herds of pronghorn in the area. Originally, land managers believed that allowing cattle to graze in the refuge would actually improve the quality of the habitat; a 1970 document described grazing as the “primary means by which vegetation would be managed.” Over time, it became clear that this assumption was dead wrong; by the 1990s 73 percent of Hart Mountain’s streams were listed as being in poor or very poor condition. The radical solu-

tion? Removing all cattle from refuge lands, accomplished in 1991. To see how things had changed in the decades since, Oregon State University ecology professor Bill Ripple, his student Jonathan Batchelor and their colleagues tracked down the sites of 110 historical photos of the refuge’s degraded riparian areas. Then they re-photographed each site to see how it looks today. The images were dramatic (see for

“Restoring every foot of overgrazed streambed across the vast American West by hand is clearly not going to happen, and it’s a relief to learn that maybe it doesn’t need to.” yourself at www.cof.orst.edu/hart). Previously eroded channels had been filled with lush grass and willows, bare soil has disappeared and aspen stands have regenerated. In a few areas, some active restoration had been done in the form of controlled burns and willow plantings, but amazingly, today you can see little difference between managed and unmanaged sites. Ripple called his paper “rare,” because it showed what happened to the land before and after cattle were removed and can serve as an example to all Westerners. “It’s not practical to do

active restoration for huge areas, where people are planting willows and other species,” he said. “What makes this potentially a very powerful management tool is that it is a passive restoration approach, where the government took action to remove the cattle and over two decades later we’re seeing a major resurgence of stream-side plants. It’s an indicator of the resiliency of nature.” He was quick to caution that these results may not be universal; nature is temperamental as well as adaptable, and what works in one place may not work in another. In a degraded streambed that has been overtaken by invasive weeds, for example, native plants will probably have trouble reestablishing without a helping hand. That Hart Mountain’s streams are now healthy again doesn’t mean it’s time to reintroduce cattle to the refuge, either, Ripple adds. If the grazing were managed intensively, using a low stocking rate and frequently moving cattle between pastures, cattle could be compatible with healthy riparian areas, but he adds, it would be challenging. I wouldn’t trade the time I spent on the banks of Fox Creek planting willow stakes along with a group of teenage volunteers. It got me out of the office on a sunny day and deepened my understanding of the land whose stewardship I was supposed to be overseeing. But restoring every foot of overgrazed streambed across the vast American West by hand is clearly not going to happen, and it’s a relief to learn that maybe it doesn’t need to. Thanks to the experiment at Hart Mountain, we finally have data to back up what ranchers and others who live close to the range have long maintained: Given time, on the scale of decades or more, tired, beat-up, overgrazed land has an amazing capacity to heal itself. Rebecca Deatsman is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a column service of High Country News (hcn.org ). She is a writer in Walla Walla, Wash..

missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [11]


[quirks]

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN – A burglar used the homeowner’s devices to log on to porn, YouTube and his Facebook account, but authorities in Monroe County, Fla., quickly identified him because he forgot to log off Facebook. Sheriff’s official Becky Herrin said the 16-year-old suspect also ate a Pop Tart and drank a soda. (Miami Herald) Burglary suspect Christopher Wallace, 24, eluded sheriff’s deputies in Somerset County, Maine, for several weeks but then unwittingly alerted them to his whereabouts by revealing on Snapchat that he had just returned home. A second post followed that deputies were at his home and coming inside, but he was hiding in a cabinet. Social media-monitoring deputies then headed for the cabinet and found “a pair of feet,” the sheriff’s department’s Facebook page reported. “The feet just so happened to be attached to a person, and that person was Christopher Wallace.” (Kennebec Morning Sentinel)

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE – Shortly after Will Swenson was named to receive the Medal of Honor for heroism in Afghanistan, the Army placed the outspoken critic of Army leadership under surveillance because his name appeared, along with others, in a one-paragraph book review on Amazon.com. Swenson, whom the book itself didn’t mention, said agents questioned him, pawed through his trash and rattled his girlfriend. Then-Secretary of the Army John McHugh agreed the Amazon review triggered the surveillance, which, he suggested, “was really about his award, his criticism of the Army and the hope that agents would find something to shut him up.” (The Daily Beast) DOUBLE TROUBLE – Arthur Mondella, 57, spent five hours with investigators answering complaints that his New York City factory, which makes Maraschino cherries, was dumping syrup and “cherry-related waste” in the waters around the warehouse. When agents noticed a flimsy shelving system attached to an office wall and asked Mondella about it, they said he excused himself, went into the bathroom and shot himself in the head. After the shooting, agents were surprised to uncover “a huge marijuana-growing operation” underneath the warehouse, including 80 pounds of pot, hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash and several high-end vehicles. (New York Daily News) PAPER TIGER – The developer of Tiger Woods’s new restaurant in Jupiter, Fla., said it couldn’t be named after the golfer because Tiger Woods doesn’t own commercial rights to his name. Nike does. (CNN) WHEN GUNS ARE OUTLAWED – Authorities accused Travis Lanning, 34, of beating a woman in her 50s with a weapon described as “a club with a spiked ball on the end”—known in medieval times as a mace. The Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department reported the woman wasn’t robbed but said her attacker threatened to kill her. (The Sacramento Bee) NO BELIEVING ALLOWED – After a group called the Satanic Temple asked the Orange County (Fla.) School Board for permission to distribute a Satanic coloring book to students, the board voted to ban not only Satanic materials, but also outside Bibles. The World Changers of Florida had previously been allowed to hand out Bibles. (Orlando Sentinel)

SLIGHTEST PROVOCATION – Eldridge Dukes, 58, told police that he shot his 18-year-old son in the buttocks after the two argued because they were out of orange juice. (Baton Rouge’s The Advocate) Police who responded to reports of a disturbance involving 20 to 30 teenagers in Burbank, Ill., found that one 17-year-old girl had been stabbed several times in the back. Investigator Mike Dudio said the victim had gone to the “house of her adversary,” another 17-year-old girl, to confront her about “issues” the two were having on Twitter. (Chicago Tribune)

MADE IN THE SHADE – A London-based architectural firm announced it has developed a skyscraper that doesn’t cast a shadow. NBBJ explained the design involves a pair of precisely aligned towers with curved and angled facades that reflect sunlight to the street below and onto each other. “The ‘No-Shadow Tower’ redirects sunlight to visibly reduce shadows at the base of the towers by 60 percent over typical buildings,” a company official said. (Britain’s The Telegraph)

SCHOOL DAZE – The University of Iowa allowed “a very small number of students” who said they were offended by a 7-foot-tall statue of a Ku Klux Klan-like robed figure to be exempted from class assignments because it affected their “state of mind.” (Cedar Rapids’s The Gazette) ANTHONY WIENER OF THE WEEK – Jeff Landfield, 30, had his name withdrawn as an appointee to the board that oversees judicial ethics after Alaska Gov. Bill Walker discovered “disrespectful images” on Facebook showing Landfield wearing a Speedo and bathing with women. One showed his hands on a woman’s breast. Landfield said the images are “not something I hide. I think everybody knows that about me. I’m kind of an open book.” (Anchorage Daily News) NOUS SOMMES CHARLIE HEBDO – Surviving staffers of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo are feuding over how to split the surge in revenue since the deadly shootings at its Paris office. Sales rose from 30,000 copies a week to hundreds of thousands, and revenue jumped to $32 million. Eleven members of the staff asked lawyers to turn the magazine into a cooperative so everyone can share the profits. Others oppose the move, saying it’s an attempt to get their hands on the 40 percent of shares owned by murdered editor Stephane Charbonnier that now belong to his parents. (New York Daily News)

[12] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015


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missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [13]


O

n a recent Thursday afternoon, Jennifer Fielder sits in a hallway outside her office on the fourth floor of the Montana Capitol in Helena, leafing through a four-inch-thick binder crammed with bill drafts, leaflets, policy statements and news clippings. Every scrap of paper relates in some way to the public lands issues this Republican state senator from Thompson Falls is pushing in the 2015 legislature, and she pauses occasionally to look over an article or a resolution. Over the past few years, Fielder has become her caucus’ de facto expert on a controversial movement to see federal lands managed by the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management transferred to state control. It’s a topic that has taken her from small town-hall meetings in rural Montana counties to conferences and workshops in Salt Lake City, home of Utah state representative and lands transfer kingpin Ken Ivory. Even the protective case on Fielder’s smartphone is emblazoned with an image of the United States shaded red to mark federal lands and fractured where East meets West—the adopted logo of Ivory’s nonprofit American Lands Council. Fielder paints a bleak picture of the

current state of national forest management in Montana. She and her husband, Paul, moved to northwestern Montana from central Washington in 2007, about six years after Paul bought property in the area. Hunters and trappers both, the Fielders have since become prominent characters on the conservative side of public lands debates in the Flathead. To hear Jennifer tell it, the federal government has dropped the ball when it comes to maintaining a healthy, accessible and productive landscape. Hence her increasingly fervent interest in the transfer of public lands issue, and the litany of bills she’s introduced in the past few months to explore such a path. “We’re seeing so many closures, so many restrictions,” she says. “The fire hazards are so bad. Trails are in bad shape, in disrepair. The maintenance backlog on the trails is really horrendous. We’re seeing money—federal money—spent to actually take out and obliterate the old logging roads, which are great trails to walk and ride bikes on. But they’re actually spending money to remove those trails, and that really concerns me.” Fielder hardly stands alone in pushing the transfer agenda, which she is quick to note does not include national parks or designated wilderness areas. Since Ivory’s Transfer of Public Lands Act passed into law in Utah in 2012, conservative activists and policy makers at all levels of government in the West have flocked to the issue like gun enthusiasts to a shooting range. The National Association of Counties officially adopted a resolution advocating for

[14] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015

“the full and immediate implementation of the transfer of public lands” on July 22, 2013. Less than six months later, the Republican National Committee ratified an even lengthier statement of support. The Wyoming Legislature last month approved a bill commissioning a study on the transfer of federal lands to state control. Other legislative proposals have popped up in Arizona, Nevada, Washington and New Mexico. “We’ve been seeing this idea catch on across the country,” Fielder says. “We’ve been seeing states all over the West getting engaged in it.” Yet for many on both sides of the aisle, no issue seems as wasteful, ill-conceived or dead on arrival as the transfer of public lands. Hundreds of conservationists, sportsmen and citizens flooded the Capitol rotunda in February for a rally sponsored by the Montana Wilderness Association, Montana Wildlife Federation, Backcountry Hunters and Anglers and The Nature Conservancy. Gov. Steve Bullock spoke out against the very measures Fielder and Rep. Kerry White, her lands transfer counterpart in the state House, were pushing with such gusto. The following month, the Montana Bowhunters Association made a firm stand against one of White’s transfer proposals, urging the House Natural Resources Committee to “kill this bill.” Despite transfer proponents’ arguments that such action would help revitalize Montana’s stagnated timber industry, the Montana Wood Products Association clearly stated this year that “we do not— at this time—support the movement to transfer federal lands to the state of Montana for either ownership or management responsibilities.”

In fact, it appears that a majority of Montanans view the transfer of public lands issue with either annoyance or disdain. And yet the conversation continues to be debated in the media, at the Capitol and in communities throughout the state, leaving many wondering where the support and drive on this issue lies. Deeper analysis shows Fielder and White—whose Gallatin Valley-based nonprofit Citizens for Balanced Use has advocated for studying the issue—are propelling a discussion that has attracted the attention and admiration of a particular subset of the right wing, one primarily incubated in the northwest reaches of Montana. Revelations regarding these associations have sparked a whole new level of concern, from out-of-state influence powered by taxpayer money to grassroots support from former militia movement activists dead-set against the federal government. “This sort of stuff in Sanders County is happening across the West,” says Rachel Carroll-Rivas, co-director of the Montana Human Rights Network, “and that’s not coincidental.”

REGIONAL ORIGINS The proliferation of the lands transfer movement throughout the western United States is part of a specific strategy. Utah’s legislature served as an early control group for Ivory’s transfer of public lands experiment in 2012, and after it passed, Ivory began peddling his idea to other regions. Before long, county governments in several states were paying thousands of dollars for memberships in his newly founded American Lands Council. Critics branded the effort as an updated version

of the famed Sagebrush Rebellion of the 1970s. Undeterred by such comments, Ivory established a pyramidal plan for facilitating lands transfers, with education as the foundation on which to build negotiation, legislation and, if needed, litigation. He crafted his message around three key promises: better access, better health and better productivity. “We look at this as the only solution big enough to better fund education, better care for the lands and the forests, protect access ... and grow state and local economies,” Ivory told the Independent in a phone interview in November 2013, just prior to an ALC tour in Montana. Ivory traveled to western Montana in late 2013 to present his ideas before county commissions and town-hall meetings. Former commissioner Suzy Foss hosted him in Ravalli County; the nonprofit Sanders Natural Resource Council did likewise in Sanders County. Fielder accompanied him throughout the Flathead, her faith in both him and the ALC already established through her sponsorship of several lands transfer bills in the 2013 legislature and research into the transfer issue conducted by both her and her husband. Ivory and Fielder delivered speeches to commissioners in both Mineral and Lincoln counties. According to minutes from the Lincoln County meeting, dated Dec. 13, 2013, Ivory talked about wildfire hazards, about difficulties adequately funding education, and about dues paid by


other counties for membership in the ALC, explaining most donate $5,000. “Representative Ivory preached ‘Knowledge and Courage’ of taking back the land for the State’s control and not federal,” the minutes read. “He cited history of the land becoming federal lands and why the states should have control.” The history and legal defenses for public land transfers touted by the ALC hinge heavily on a debatable reading of the western enabling acts granting statehood. Ivory argues those enabling acts included a promise that the federal government would “forever disclaim all rights and title” to public lands in western states. As evidence, he points to Congress’ divestment of most of its public lands holdings in the eastern U.S. back in the mid-19th century. Transfer proponents continue to invoke this argument in furthering the ALC’s regional agenda. To bolster this Enabling Act theory, Ivory and others make repeated reference to historic political statements and news articles from the times they were ratified. “From the inception of this Nation and through much of its history, it was the policy of the federal government to dispose of the public lands both to pay off federal debt and to encourage the settlement of western lands for the benefit of the states and the nation,” wrote Utah’s Constitutional Defense Council in defending Ivory’s transfer bill in November 2012. “Indeed, most of the states east of the Colorado-Kansas state line have very little federal public lands within their borders as a result of the historical implementation of this policy.” However, many critics maintain the Enabling Act argument is inherently based on flawed interpretation. As Yale fellow Raph Graybill wrote on the American Constitution Society blog this March, “the plain text of most Western state enabling acts expressly renounces state

Sen. Jennifer Fielder, R-Thompson Falls, has become her caucus’ resident expert on the transfer of federal lands to state control. In addition to pushing the issue in Montana, she’s grown increasingly involved with the Utahbased American Lands Council. Below, her Twitter feed includes pictures with ALC founder Ken Ivory, as well as presidential hopeful Ted Cruz.

claims to federal land.” Graybill goes on to explain that in requesting statehood, Montana and others explicitly agreed to disclaim all title to unappropriated lands within their borders. His teardown of the historic and legal claims made by the ALC also stresses that a transfer of public lands is patently unconstitutional given the prohibitions laid out by both the Property Clause, which gives Congress sole authority to dispose of its lands, and the Supremacy Clause, which makes the constitution and all federal statutes supreme over state ones. “I didn’t read anywhere in the Enabling Act where it says the feds would give us the land,” says Montana state Rep. Rob Cook, a Republican from Conrad and staunch opponent of the transfer move-

ment. “You’d have to get pretty fancy with some missing punctuation.” In addition to the Enabling Act, transfer proponents lean heavily on cost and revenue comparisons between state-managed and federally managed public lands. As the Bozeman-based Property and Environment Research Center stated in a 2015 report on state versus federal management in the West, “Federal land expenditures are more than six times higher per acre than state expenditures. Moreover, state trust lands generate ten times more revenue per full-time employee than federal land agencies.” However, critics insist the financial burden for states in taking over management of federal lands is insurmountable and would ultimately result in selling off large swaths of public lands to

the private sector. Fielder dismisses these assertions, citing proposals like her Senate Bill 274—to prevent the federal government from selling off lands in Montana— as evidence of her dedication to keeping the lands public. She remains resolute in her belief that opposition rallies like the one held in the Capitol this February are just “ginning up this fear and disseminating this bad information” and that what Democrats and conservation groups say is “simply not true.” But even at a regional level, questionable arguments haven’t stopped the ALC from finding dedicated allies on the right. In January 2013, not long after Ivory’s bill became law in Utah, the nonprofit American Legislative Exchange Council inserted a resolution into its model policy

playbook demanding that Congress “convey title of federal public lands to the states.” ALEC, which has been abandoned by scores of corporate members in recent years due to increasing public and media scrutiny, named Ivory its Legislator of the Year in 2014 based on his “dedication to the ALEC principles of limited government, free markets and federalism.” At the time, Ivory was an active member on ALEC’s International Relations and Federalism task force. In fact, Ivory’s message meshes neatly with the rest of ALEC policy primarily due to its invocation of state sovereignty and demand that lawmakers, not Congress, be the ones to assert their authority. The American Lands Council has also attracted the support of Sen. Ted Cruz, the Texas Republican and Tea Party maven who declared his 2016 presidential candidacy at Liberty University last month. But not all of the nonprofit’s connections are so contemporary. Current ALC board chairman Demar Dahl was once a prominent figure in the Sagebrush Rebellion, the very anti-government movement many critics have compared to the ALC itself. The Elko County cattle rancher has claimed publicly to be a friend of Cliven Bundy, and used Bundy’s armed standoff against federal agents over unpaid grazing fees to promote the need for more local control of federal land in Nevada. Montana Rep. Kerry White, a sponsor of lands transfer proposals this session, was also tied to the Bundy conflict last year, publicly stating his intent to visit the ranch to help diffuse tensions. According to the Bozeman Chronicle, White canceled his plans after the Bureau of Land Management stood down. Ivory has also attracted growing media attention for, as an article in the Salt Lake Tribune suggested last May, blurring the line between legislator and lobbyist. According to ALC’s tax records, the nonprofit pulled in $228,043 in

missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [15]


2013, the bulk of it from grants and contributions. Membership donations alone accounted for $157,378 of that revenue, with dozens of counties in Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington and Wyoming paying between $1,000 and $25,000 into the group’s coffers. Ivory is not registered as a lobbyist in Utah, raising complaints from critics that he’s netting a huge payday from the very issue on which he advocates, drafts policy and

management issues. The concept was decried as costly and borderline unconstitutional by Democrats. Instead of returning to Helena, Hinkle set his sights on a non-partisan race for the Sanders County Board of Commissioners. He lost by a wide margin to Carol Brooker, the Democratic incumbent who has held a seat on the commission since 1995. Fielder prevailed in her Senate campaign, however, winning just over 55 per-

shortly after the wave of Republican electoral victories in 2010 that swept Tea Partyminded politicians into office at various levels of government. Constructed in part around fears of federal mismanagement and the purported destructive nature of the United Nations’ Agenda 21, coordination advocates call on state and local governments to invoke supposed rights granted by laws like the National Environmental Policy Act to force federal agencies to incorporate local concerns when craft-

unanimously approved a natural resource policy invoking its rights to coordination and outlining how the county would deal with public land managers like the Forest Service in the future. Hinkle also attracted national attention for his sponsorship of the so-called “Sheriffs First” bill in 2011, which sought to declare sheriffs the supreme authority in their counties and require that federal employees obtain permission from those sheriffs prior to entering said counties.

Trochmann as its chairman. According to records with the Montana Secretary of State, he’s also a registered partner in the organization. Indeed, Trochmann represented SNRC throughout the public meetings on the forest plan, at times accusing county officials of not adequately participating in the process. Trochmann cited Executive Order 13575—signed by President Barack Obama in 2011 to establish the White House Rural Council—in arguing that SNRC had “a seat at the table for

image courtesy of YouTube

Utah state Rep. Ken Ivory succeeded in passing a controversial lands transfer bill in 2012 and founded the nonprofit American Lands Council. His message has since spread throughout the western U.S.

votes. Tax filings show the ALC paid Ivory $95,000 in 2013. Ravalli, Lincoln and Mineral counties all confirmed they did not pursue a membership with the ALC following Ivory’s visit. Neither did Sanders, though Fielder wouldn’t mind her home county allocating tax dollars to the cause. “I wish my county would join,” she says. “I think it would be a very good use of taxpayer money to have my county join. I’d be glad to pay taxes towards it.”

TOUCHDOWN IN MONTANA Fielder’s path to the Montana Senate began when her predecessor, Republican Greg Hinkle, announced in early 2012 that he wouldn’t be running for reelection. Hinkle’s last legislative session in 2011 had been dominated by widespread mockery and ridicule, much of it associated with his sponsorship of Senate Bill 112, the now-infamous “legalized spearhunting” proposal. But his political beliefs and actions also raised red flags for watchdog groups and nonprofits like the Montana Human Rights Network, namely his sponsoring of a measure requiring local governments to demand coordination from the federal government on certain

cent of the vote for Senate District 7. She’d campaigned fairly hard, and many of her core supporters hailed not just from Hinkle’s camp but from the nonprofit he’d become involved with: the Sanders Natural Resource Council. Fielder’s website claimed, for a time, that she was a board member of SNRC. It’s this particular tie that prompted cautionary letters to the editor throughout western Montana

Rep. Kerry White, R-Bozeman, sponsored several lands transfer measures in the state House during the 2015 legislative session.

ing management plans. The Montana Human Rights Network claims the basic idea is “that county governments can adopt plans that contradict federal policy,” adding that coordination proponents “frequently claim their version of ‘coordination’ is mandated by federal law.” Hinkle’s unsuccessful Montana Coordination Act of 2011 is one of the most high-profile debates over the matter to

That bill, supported by testimony from, among others, Montana Shooting Sports Association President Gary Marbut, failed as well, but did provide the Montana Human Rights Network with what it considered another smoking gun. The group says it tied Hinkle and, by extension, the SNRC to the same anti-government, county supremacy beliefs espoused by militia organizations in the 1990s.

“A lot of great ideas don’t start out as popular. What great idea has ever started out as popular?” —Sen. Jennifer Fielder, R-Thompson Falls claiming “far-right wing political agendas and philosophies” at the root of both Hinkle and Fielder’s campaigns, and landed Fielder a name-drop in a November 2012 report from the Montana Human Rights Network titled “Coordination: New name for the anti-government doctrine of county supremacy.” The concept of coordination started gaining popularity in western Montana

[16] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015

date, and drew opposition from scores of groups including the Montana League of Cities and Towns, the Montana County Attorneys Association and the entire Cascade County Commission. But that January, four commissioners in Ravalli County attended a coordination training in Hamilton hosted by the conservative American Stewards for Liberty. Nearly two years later, the Ravalli County Commission

The most commonly cited connection between SNRC and anti-government mentality by state bloggers, citizen critics and the Human Rights Network is the nonprofit’s relationship to former Militia of Montana founder John Trochmann. SNRC became embroiled in the recent debate over the Forest Service’s Kootenai National Forest plan and the group’s documented objection to the revised plan lists

coordination.” Paul Fielder and thenRavalli County Commissioner Suzy Foss also referenced “coordination” and the need to include local communities during their testimony at the April 30, 2014, meeting. “Do I believe it’s all about local control? Absolutely not,” Montana Human Rights Network co-director Rachel CarrollRivas says of the coordination movement. “Quite frankly, the Human Rights Network has a multi-faceted agenda and we work on local issues of non-discrimination ordinances. Guess what? They’re not supportive. So at the end of the day, is the message that this is about local engagement and things coming from the local level? Absolutely not. It’s about a larger ideology.” In late 2011, Trochmann appeared on the conservative “Global Freedom Report” radio show hosted by Brent Johnson to discuss problems with federal land management in northwestern Montana. He mentioned “a little organization” called the Sanders Natural Resource Council and claimed they were “going after the Forest Service, bringing a lawsuit against them right now.” Trochmann went on to assert, on the subject of grizzly bears, that “if you plug one of them and the heart stops, there


will be a satellite over the top of you instantly to take your pictures and call out the game warden instantly.” Asked by Johnson if the Militia of Montana was still active and supported, Trochmann answered, “absolutely. We are growing by leaps and bounds. It’s nice and quiet.” The interview eventually came to the subject of federal road closures, at which point Trochmann defended a county sheriff ’s right to arrest a federal employee and stated that several Sanders County residents would have the sheriff ’s back in such a scenario. Fielder became heavily involved in the Kootenai National Forest plan debate as well, testifying in her capacity as a state senator that the federal government “did not adequately contact affected citizens and land owners.” In speaking with the Indy, she stresses that the plan’s revision was advertised in Missoula, Kalispell and Sandpoint. “It wasn’t advertised in the communities where the national forest actually exists.” Her objections to the plan, as well as its proposed amendment addressing the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem Grizzly Bear Conservation Strategy, revolved around concerns for adverse impacts to local livelihoods, the economy, private property, public lands and “ultimately the survival of rural America.” These points are reflective of the same leanings that drew her to the transfer of public lands issue and the American Lands Council. They’re also why she believes many have cited coordination between various levels of government as critical to the development of land management decisions. “I think coordination is one of those tools that some people are trying to use, a lawful tool to increase the dialogue and the responsiveness between the federal agencies and the local agencies,” she says. “I don’t believe it’s a supremacy issue at all. It’s a matter of people working with their government to try to get some better decisions that are more responsive I think to the people’s interests in the area.” During a May 7, 2012, town hall meeting in Trout Creek hosted by SNRC, Fielder presented her case regarding the grizzly bear amendment alongside Hinkle and her husband. Video of the event shows her talking about permanent closures and moratoriums on new campgrounds and trails resulting from the

Forest Service’s plan. Local Forest Service officials responded to the event by drafting flyers beforehand disputing the allegations that the draft forest plan would close areas or restrict recreation on public lands. SNRC also hosted the public presentation made by Fielder and Ken Ivory regarding transfer of public lands in late

2013. Despite these connections, Fielder insists she has no formal relationship or status with the group. When she included the board member position on her campaign website in 2012, she says, she was still considering joining in an official capacity. In the end, she decided against it and removed the position from her online resume.

“I don’t want to join any organization, especially as an elected official,” she says. “I want to make it clear that I represent my constituency, not any particular organization.” Fielder puts distance between herself and Trochmann too. She had “no idea” about his Militia of Montana background when she first met him, she says, and to

this day only communicates with him “pretty infrequently.” He’s “a constituent in my district,” she adds, one who despite his past has “a right to be involved in things.” “I think it’s kind of unfortunate because his background creates a focus on him and his background rather than on the issue that I think he’s trying to advocate for

This chart shows how Rep. Ken Ivory and his American Lands Council connect to various players on the right wing, from U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz to former Militia of Montana founder John Trochmann.

missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [17]


now,” Fielder says. “The discussion gets off track on him. I don’t necessarily think that’s a great thing for that organization, but there’s not that many people in our rural communities that are willing to step up and do work and help on volunteerism, so I guess they felt like they needed to have the help of anyone that was willing to help them.” With her Kootenai National Forest plan objections on record, Fielder has since devoted much of her time to the transfer of public lands. Last year alone, she traveled to Utah at least twice for workshops and convention appearances on the issue, carpooling there in April with Sen. Mark Blasdel (then speaker of the House), Sen. Debby Barrett (now speaker of the Senate) and Rep. Art Wit-

Even so, Fielder’s association with Ivory has grown increasingly close over the years. The two have appeared in radio spots together discussing transfer of public lands. Fielder’s Twitter feed is full of photos of her dining at restaurants with Ivory and his wife, hanging out in the couple’s Utah kitchen and rubbing shoulder with Ivory and Ted Cruz at events. The ALC has also been a source of mild scandal for her this legislative session; in mid February, her Senate aide, William Macon Richardson, was forced to step down from his position after Democratic lawmakers became aware he’d filed as a lobbyist for the ALC—a blatant violation of legislative rules. Richardson had made the filing just weeks before the anti-transfer rally in the rotunda.

“I don’t think she’s dumb,” Elliot says. “I think she’s a demagogue. And she’s good at it.”

DEBATABLE SUPPORT Nestled in the corner of Fielder’s Helena office is a translucent plaque etched with the words “Keeper of the Tenth.” Fielder received the award in late March from the nonprofit Montana Agri-Women in recognition of her legislative efforts to uphold the Tenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which reserves to the states those powers not delegated to the federal government nor prohibited by it to the states. Karen Yost, vice president of communications for Montana Agri-Women and immediate past president of its national

Rachel Carroll-Rivas, co-director of the Montana Human Rights Network, believes the transfer of public lands has serious appeal in portions of Montana because it fits neatly into the broader coordination movement.

tich for a joint summit of Utah, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming legislators. About one week later, she was back in Salt Lake City for the Western Republican Leadership Conference as a panelist presenting the findings thus far from the Montana Legislature’s Environmental Quality Council—an assignment she used to bring Ivory before her legislative colleagues and keep the transfer of public lands issue alive throughout the 20132014 interim. “I’m not a formal member, I’m not formally engaged with the ALC,” she says of her relationship with Ivory’s nonprofit. “It’s one of those organizations that is working on an issue that I think is a really important issue, so I try to stay up to date with what they’re doing, provide input and direction and just guidance when I can as far as what I think the movement should be about, what I think the issues and the priorities should be just from the Montana viewpoint.”

Jim Elliot, chairman of the Montana Democratic Party and a former state legislator, is especially perplexed by Fielder’s involvement with the transfer issue and her association with individuals boasting a more anti-government lean. He recalls his last race for reelection to the state Senate in 2008, and the unwavering support Fielder and her husband offered his campaign both financially and personally. The couple helped him make campaign signs in his yard one afternoon, Elliot says. He spoke to them about trapping issues and abortion—he’s pro-choice—and the Fielders appeared to agree with his stance on both issues. After his electoral defeat that year, the relationship tapered off. He began noting their increasing support for Hinkle, though they gave him no initial indication that they had political beliefs in line with SNRC. When Fielder started pushing the transfer issue, Elliot says he was “disappointed.”

[18] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015

believe in less federal management and ownership and more states and private ownership.” Yet even within the ranks of the Montana Republican Party, support for the transfer of public lands seems spotty at best. Most agree that federal lands management should be a topic of serious discussion, given widespread concerns within the GOP over timber harvest, beetle-killed forests, wildfires and environmental regulation. As Rep. Rob Cook puts it, there has to be a better mechanism to address the plight of western lands. But transferring ownership of those lands to the states is not one of them. “I can guarantee you that 95 percent of Republicans wish it would just go away,” Cook says of the issue.

there with no results and nowhere to go other than issue statements.” The question then remains: How did transfer of public lands make it into the Montana Republican Party platform? At last June’s GOP platform convention in Billings, delegates voted in favor of adopting a new plank requesting that state and federal officials and citizens of Montana “fully exert their efforts and powers to support granting federally managed public lands to the states.” The resolution was “passed, approved and adopted unanimously by the Montana Republican Party” on June 21, 2014. Cook attributes the plank’s passage to the “successful infiltration of [county] central committees by ideologues and single-issue individuals.” Connell contests the GOP’s claim that the vote was unanimous.

In addition to criticism from elected Democrats and conservationists, the lands transfer debate has been met with derision by many within the Montana Republican Party. Rep. Rob Cook, R-Conrad, believes a bulk of the GOP wishes the issue “would just go away.”

counterpart, says Fielder was a prime choice for the distinction during the nomination process last summer. “We just believe that she’s very ethical in what she does,” Yost says. “She’s very hardworking, and when she believes in something she’s—I’m not going to say undaunted, but if you’re familiar with the American Lands Council you know there’s just a lot of negativity, and she’s continuing on with it because she believes it’s right. So we’re in support of that.” Montana Agri-Women has no official policy stance yet on the transfer of public lands. According to Yost, the issue will be taken up by the national American AgriWomen during a symposium in Washington, D.C., this June. However, Fielder’s efforts on the issue do echo the broader position of the organization that recognized her this spring. “We do believe in being able to manage our lands,” Yost says, “and as an affiliate of American Agri-Women … we

Sen. Pat Connell, R-Hamilton, agrees. He speaks far more highly of measures like the one he co-sponsored last session with Sen. Bradley Hamlett, D-Cascade, to allow Montana to engage in activities on federal lands deemed critical watersheds in the interests of protecting water quality. He points to the state’s inclusion in a timber harvest project around Chessman Reservoir—a key water source for the city of Helena—as proof that common-sense, cooperative efforts can achieve real results. “The state has engaged in a way that is accomplishing the fundamental goal that we were looking for, and that’s to strive to get back to good management,” Connell says. “To try to take over the federal lands has turned into a political hot potato that other states have promulgated, but take a look. Utah passed a law that said this has got to be done by last December, and basically the fed ignored them. Last word I had, Utah just wound up spending a batch of money and is sitting

“I was at that party platform convention, and Steve Gibson, who at that time was a representative out of Helena, and myself were sitting together and our votes in opposition to that were not recognized by the chair,” he says. “But we damn well did vote against it.” Fielder, who had given a presentation on the transfer issue for the convention delegates alongside Ken Ivory the day before the vote, acknowledges that members of her own party don’t support the movement. But regardless of the characters it has attracted in Montana and regardless of the stated lack of support for a transfer from the entire left and the bulk of her own party, Fielder continues to push for the state to consider the option. “A lot of great ideas don’t start out as popular,” she says. “What great idea has ever started out as popular?” asakariassen@missoulanews.com


Green Business

Best Local Arts & Entertainment

Hardware Store

Art Gallery Band Museum Musician Photographer Writer Movie Theater

Hobby/Craft Shop Lodging Motorcycle/ATV Dealer New-Car Dealer Used-Car Dealer New Retail Store (Opened in 2014 or 2015)

Best Local Fashion & Beauty Cosmetics Day Spa Jewelry Kids' Clothing Women's Clothing Men's Clothing Lingerie Place for a Man's Haircut Place for a Woman's Haircut Shoe Store Tattoo Parlor Thrift Store

Best Local Food & Drink Appetizers Asian Food Bakery Barbecue Breakfast Brunch Budget Lunch Coffee Tea Delicatessen Burger French Fries Food Cart/Truck Fresh Produce Desserts Ice Cream/Frozen Yogurt Milk Shake Mexican Food Pizza Restaurant New Restaurant (Opened in 2014 or 2015) Family-Friendly Restaurant Restaurant Service Restaurant Wine List Outdoor Dining Romantic Dining Salad Sandwich Shop Seafood Steak Supermarket Retail Beer Selection

Pet Supplies Ranch Supply Store

Psst. Hey you. Yes, you. We need your help. It’s time for the Indy’s annual Best of Missoula reader poll and, if the past is any indication, your vote could determine who wins and who loses. No, really. Not to put any pressure on you or anything, but every year we ask readers to fill out a ballot and every year at least a handful of categories come down to the wire. Are you really going to let your favorite pizza joint down? Or your favorite local news anchor? Or your hair stylist? (Lookin’ good, by the way. Like what you did with the ’do.) Don’t be that person. Now is your moment to make a difference. It’s cool, there’s something in it for you, too. If you fill this out, we’ll pass along an invitation to the Independent’s Best of Missoula Party at Caras Park on Thursday, July 9. There’ll be live music from local bands, food, drinks and special activities for the whole family. It’s pretty much the biggest thing happening this summer, or so we’ve heard. But first things first: Fill out your ballot and let your opinions be known. It just might be the most important thing you do in the next five minutes. (Vote online at missoulanews.com for even more categories.)

Store for Gifts Home Appliances Home Electronics Store for Musical Instruments Toy Store

Best Local Nightlife Bar Bar Food Bar for a Stiff Pour Beer Selection Cocktail Selection Bloody Mary Margarita Casino Happy Hour Karaoke Bar Late-Night Munchies Microbrewery Place to Dance

Retail Wine Selection Vegetarian Food Wings Coffee Hut Convenience Store Liquor Store Pizza Delivery Place to Eat Alone

Place to Hear Live Music

Best Local Goods & Services

Fly-Fishing Shop

Pool Table Sports Bar

Best Local Sports & Recreation Bike Shop Bowling Alley Golf Course

Adult Store Auto Repair Bank/Credit Union Big Box Store Bookstore CDs and Music Dry Cleaner Furniture Store Garden Center

Consider this the fine print: We require ballots to include your full name, email address and phone number in the spaces provided. Ballots missing any of this information, or ballots with fewer than 30 categories filled in, will be mocked, ridiculed and not counted. Same goes for photocopied ballots and ballots with unclear markings. Hard-copy ballots may be mailed or hand-delivered to the Indy office at 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or dropped at any of the ballot locations listed below.

Health Club Place for Paddle Sports Gear Place to get a Snowboard Sporting Goods Store Store for Guns Store for Mountaineering Gear Store for Skis

Vote by May 13

R

Name: Email: Phone:

Ballot Box Locations: Bagels on Broadway, Bernice's Bakery, Bridge Pizza, Butterfly Herbs, Doc's Sandwich Shop, Draught Works Brewery, Good Food Store, Iza Asian Restaurant, Kettlehouse, Market on Front, Orange Street Food Farm, Piece of Mind, Press Box, Rockin Rudy's, Taco del Sol (all four locations), Taco Sano, The Trail Head, UC Center Market, Westside Lanes, Worden's Market

missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [19]


[arts]

On the inside A Timeless Town in Time documents the long relationship between a curious photographer and Butte, America by Erika Fredrickson

T

he first time David Spear came to Montana, he and a friend rolled straight to Missoula’s downtown and in through the back door of Eddie’s Club. Inside the bar they saw the wall of Lee Nye’s black-and-white photographs—now housed at Charlie B’s—depicting intimate portraits of local characters. Their raw and personal nature took Spear’s breath away. “I thought to myself, ‘Wow. Here are all these people who are part of this particular place,’” he says. “It was about 1972, and back then many of those characters still frequented the bar. The photos gave me a real sense of what this town is about.” Spear, who grew up in Connecticut, had just graduated from Brooks College in Santa Barbara with a photography degree, and he was ready for a new adventure. His instant love affair with Missoula, through the lens of Nye, wasn’t enough to keep him there. Jobs were scarce and commercial photographers couldn’t afford to hire assistants, so Spear ended up back east working as a photographer. Each spring or summer, however, he would take time off to travel back to Montana to explore. (He even moved to Missoula for a short time and worked as a photographer for The Borrowed Times newspaper before heading back east again to look for work.) In 1977, on a whim, he ended up in Butte—on St. Patrick’s Day, no less—and just like that day at Eddie’s Club, he was enamored with the people and the town. With Nye as inspiration, he decided he wanted to capture the raw, everyday moments of Butte: the people born from a tough history, the lively festivals, the old buildings full of history. He took photographs that day and then returned to the mining town a decade later on assignment from The New York Times for a story about copper. And he kept coming back. “On that first day this place and its people simply mesmerized me,” Spear wrote in an essay about his photography. “I knew I needed to return. I started making trips to Butte to photograph, generally for a couple weeks at a time. My interest in the details and the remnants of Butte occupied me until a point at which people I met started allowing me to make their picture.” Spear’s current exhibit, A Timeless Town in Time: Butte, Montana, showcases 50 photographs at the Zootown Arts Community Center spanning his years spent on “The Richest Hill on Earth.” Young girls dance an Irish jig at a community center. A shoeshiner named Stevie grins at the camera. An older and younger woman share cocktails at a lounge. A little boy holds a bottle of Listerine that’s been re-

filled with water so he can stay hydrated out on the hot summer streets. Some of Spear’s subjects show up first as young kids and in later pictures as adults. Buildings he shot in the 1970s have been worn down or replaced by new buildings. In that way, his initial intention to explore the aesthetics of a town has turned into a documentary of people growing up and a place that changes, however slowly. Besides Nye, one of Spear’s greatest influences for his Butte images came from working as a photography coordinator at the International Center of Photography in New York. The ICP was founded by Cornell Capa, the young brother of war photographer Robert Capa, who was killed on assignment in Vietnam. “The collection to Cornell was really personal,” Spear says. “His brother’s work was there and he was building a collection documenting war. He believed that pictures of war and famine … were very important. He sort of believed that if they could establish a strong enough collection at ICP that the next time someone wanted to start a war, maybe they could come look at the pictures and realize what war really was.” Being a part of that documentation process led Spear to his own project photographing communities around New York, especially the street that separates the wealthy Upper Eastside from the impoverished East Harlem. He collaborated with schools in the area to get students out photographing their surroundings. When Spear and his wife, Jill, moved to Montana in 2000, he continued to pursue the same kind of projects. He works with Two Eagle River School in Pablo helping students document their community. The Butte project stems from the same idea, but it’s a different animal. Spear is one in a long line of photojournalists, including Carlton Watkins, Robert Frank and even Nye, who have been enticed by the mining town and added to its story. Spear’s work is distinctive, however, in his relationship with the town as a transitory character. “In many cases, with documentary photography you are an outsider,” he says. “You make pictures and you leave. I was an outsider. But over the years, each time I returned, I came to understand it more.” David Spear presents A Timeless Town in Time: Butte, Montana with a reception at the ZACC Fri., April 10, from 5 to 8 PM. The exhibit is open now and runs through May 2. efredrickson@missoulanews.com

[20] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015


[music]

Like magic Wand’s Golem taps the weird and heavy Just when I feel like I’ve thrown in the towel on ever hearing a heavier band that does anything more than drag a yawn out of me, a record like Golem from Los Angeles’ Wand crosses my radar. It’s not like they are doing anything any of us haven’t heard before, or even that they are doing it better, they’re just doing it well. My favorite track, “Melted Rope,” sounds kind of Pink Floyd-ish mellow, with acoustic guitar, some synth and a nice Wand lead vocal swimming in reverb (a recurring theme throughout, actually). I also like the lead guitar breaks in this one: no shredding, just toothsome melodic riffage that enhances the song rather than runs away from it. Other than that, Golem is a fuzzy collection of head-nodding walls of guitar and synth. It’s a fun experience to hear it in earbuds, since there is plenty

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of bizarre stuff going on in the mix. I don’t know what any of the songs are about, but I don’t really care either. I mean, it’s an LA band recording their album in Sacramento. It better be weird. (Chris La Tray) Wand plays Stage 112 Thu., April 9, at 9 PM along with FUULS, Holy Lands and Razor Whip. $8/$6 advance at ticketfly.com.

Pile Pile’s singer/guitarist Rick Maguire tells illuminating stories and, with the help of the band, comes undone while doing it. The way in which he comes undone is fascinating, going from even-keeled singer-songwriter to post-punk yelling. Meanwhile, the band jumps from brightly purring guitar riffs and mathy rock drums to a maniacal lullaby to outright headbanging rock. If you’re into heavy music and disappointed that one track begins like a sleepy Beatles song, as in “Uncle Jill,” you’ll be thrilled to find that it slips into hardcore seizures in no time. The Boston band’s strong suit is the way it musically travels through mountains and valleys, and the way

it indulges in contrasts. In “Pets,” from 2010’s Magic Isn’t Real, for instance, mellow guitar picking is housed like a nesting doll inside beefier rock backdrops. This album in particular is a study in tension build-up and release. The forthcoming You’re Better Than This, which you can stream on Bandcamp, captures a whole new series of angsty images and sounds. With Maguire’s smart lyrics, songs seem to oscillate between combative, reasonable and reflective—sometimes they are all of those things at once. It’s an uncomfortable album, but satisfying nonetheless. (Erika Fredrickson)

Butch Walker, Afraid of Ghosts Butch Walker is one of those guys who has his songs covered by rock stars, has been the subject of a couple documentaries and yet has never really ascended beyond the fringes of notoriety. Listening to his latest, the Ryan Adams-produced Afraid of Ghosts, it is hard to imagine he actually got his start in the early ’90s via hair metal act SouthGang, a unit that released two albums on Virgin Records before obliteration by grunge. Walker is an accomplished songwriter and has one of those beautiful voices that can effortlessly slide out of emotive near-whispers and into falsetto, then

back. Afraid of Ghosts is a lot of acoustic guitar and piano; sad songs and quiet moments with pop influence. Its strength is found right in the middle, specifically with “Bed On Fire,” which shows a little fire, and “21,” a morose little number that for whatever reason really gets to me. Sometimes it’s just the way a song hits the ears, and this is one of those. Walker is accomplished enough not to be overwhelmed by the touch at the controls of a guy like Adams, but this really does sound like an early Adams record. Which to my ears isn’t a bad thing. (Chris La Tray)

Saturday, April 11 11:00am – 4:00pm Missoula Fairgrounds

$7.00 admission • Kids 12 and under free. For $1.00, first 1000 attendees 21 and over will receive a commemorative mug from Firefly and one beer.

Live music by

www.z100missoula.com or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/baconandbrewfest missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [21]


[music]

Mr. Wonderful A close look at Action Bronson’s weird evolution by Dan Brooks

Approximately 15 months after he said it was about to blow our minds, Action Bronson has finally released Mr. Wonderful, his major-label debut LP. You should listen to it, because it is very strange. In a genre that badly needs weirdness, Bronson may be the weirdest man working. He is also among the most prolific. Contrary to what you might expect from the tedious hype cycle for Mr. Wonderful, Bronson releases new material at a craftsman’s pace. Since 2011’s Bon Appetit…Bitch, he has dropped four mixtapes, three studio albums and two EPs. Any other rapper who put up nine releases in four years might become calcified in his style, but the most satisfying thing about listening to Action Bronson has been hearing him evolve. Consider 2011’s Dr. Lecter, which establishes the themes of Bronson’s early career. Born Arian Arslani in Brooklyn, Bronson worked in gourmet kitchens until a broken leg forced him to spend six months just rapping. His early lyrics suggest this work was still very much on his mind, along with the material ambitions and macho sexuality that characterize contemporary hip-hop. On “Brunch” he raps: “Just let me sharpen my knives, throwin’ on the apron,/ X’s mark the steak and the salad crumbled with bacon/ and bleu cheese, caramel complexions on two knees/ or two skis, carving up the Alps is what this dude needs.” In addition to the internally rhymed spondees of “bleu cheese,” “two knees,” “two skis” and “dude needs”—which would become the signature metric feature of his mature style—this kitchen imagery provided the thematic anchor for Bronson’s first releases. It was his gimmick; it gave him credible access to the iconography of luxury that contemporary rap fans demand without casting himself, implausibly, as a drug dealer or a star. For the early Action Bronson, chef identity provided valuable thematic and narrative constraints to channel his surreal imagination. But he faced two significant barriers. One, rap fans were not exactly clamoring for music about food. Two, he sounded like Ghostface Killah. This similarity and the identity crisis it provoked led Bronson to a stylistic breakthrough on Blue Chips. In addition to con-

[22] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015

taining the couplet “while you catch me out in Spain on the coast, dick,/ don’t ever say my fucking music sounds like Ghost’s shit,” that mixtape has Bronson shifting away from story raps—Ghostface’s preferred structure—toward raps organized around surreal image systems. Released in 2013, Saaab Stories finds him “about to buy an alligator for my birthday” on “Alligator,” the same track that has him “on the balcony, stoned and naked playing Sega.” These surreal lyrics parody the assertion of wealth and success in contemporary rap. Bronson is participating in that status race, but he’s doing it in an ironic way, making himself a comic figure. He seems to be mocking tropes of rap as much as he participates in them. Bronson’s unexpected slant rhymes and inexplicably evocative images make Mr. Wonderful a kind of overdose dream where the narrative exists between allusions. From “Terry”: “Twisted off the Jenkem, watching ‘Iron Chef,’/ the secret ingredient was lion’s neck./ Royal blue Cybertek—I ride solo like a fighter jet./ Hurt me again.” Jenkem is a probably fictional inhalant made from fermenting human urine; Cybertek was a turn-of-the-millennium urban clothing company responsible for the shiny jumpsuits in the “Mo’ Money, Mo’ Problems” video. This lyric captures the way Bronson has repurposed contemporary hip-hop’s tired obsession with luxury. Instead of smoking indo and drinking Cristal, Bronson is dabbing wax and fermenting his own urine. Rather than a rose gold Jesus piece, he wears obscure Nikes from the 1980s. He is a chef instead of a dealer, a john instead of a pimp. He represents a hip-hop culture that has become aware and even tired of itself, but that still doggedly pursues the thrill of hearing something new in a familiar form. Action Bronson has spent the last four years compulsively reinventing his style, and he has arrived at something satisfying and strange. Probably, he is the most interesting rapper alive. His insistence on remaining so—through nine releases, 300 pounds and a herculean quantity of drugs—suggests that hip-hop might survive, too. arts@missoulanews.com


[books]

Beyond numbers Epic Measures takes on global health care by Kate Whittle

Statistics might seem straightforward on the sur- mated worldwide child deaths in 1980 at 30 million, face, but in reality they are often maddening, slippery and the World Health Organization estimated it at less things. Take the infamous Nationwide Insurance Super than 20 million. These numbers have highly political Bowl commercial that claimed preventable accidents implications, since these organizations allocate funding are the chief cause of childhood deaths in America. Fact- based on what is perceived to be the biggest problem. Murray and his colleagues also pioneered a new checkers at PolitiFact.com determined things weren’t quite so simple: From ages 1 to 14, the most common formula that doesn’t just account for how long somecause is accidents, but from infancy to age 14, the most one lives, but also how well. As Smith puts it, “That common cause of death is birth defects. The key is there are no pink ribbons for lower back pain doesn’t mean it doesn’t hurt and cost days whether you define babies under 1 at work.” year as children or not. Smith explains that as Murray As Missoula-based journalist Jefound the endless drive, energy remy N. Smith explores in his new and similarly passionate colleagues book, Epic Measures: One Doctor. to help him in his goal to gather Seven Billion Patients, we owe a global health data, he stood against growing understanding of human major forces holding him back. It’s health to a handful of pioneering renot a new story that the medical essearchers and statisticians willing to tablishment is resistant to change, look beyond the numbers the way but Smith illuminates appalling buPolitiFact did after the Super Bowl. reaucracy and pettiness at enorSmith focuses on the career of mously powerful entities like the Dr. Chris Murray, an abrasive but WHO, down to details like which brilliant man who led the Global staffers are allowed to use Post-Its. Burden of Disease study, which In the end, the WHO and similar aimed to take a comprehensive look organizations have proven resistat what diseases and causes of death ant to Murray’s goals; that 2000 repeople suffer around the world— Epic Measures: One Doctor. port that ranked the U.S. 37th something that had never been atSeven Billion Patients tempted before. Murray’s work is sparked a serious backlash from Jeremy N. Smith responsible for the 2000 World countries who protested how they hardcover, Harper Collins Health Report that ranked the were ranked, and diplomats tried 352 pages, $26.99 United States 37th for quality of to get Murray fired for it. The latter half of Epic Measures details how Murray health care, between Costa Rica and Slovenia. The U.S. placed so poorly in large part because the study took ac- finally found funding to complete his Global Burden of count not just of what health care services were available, Disease study, in part thanks to a certain dude named Bill Gates. Smith ends on a somewhat optimistic chapbut whether low-income citizens could afford them. The gathering of statistics might sound as exciting ter listing conclusions from the study that explain ways as watching paint dry, but in Smith’s retelling, the people individuals can live long, healthy lives. (First rule on the and real-life drama behind the numbers come alive. Dr. list is, unsurprisingly, to never start smoking.) But for a Murray, for instance, grew up in an adventurous family book with so much scope, Epic Measures somehow and spent his formative years volunteering at desperately skims over any mention of access to birth control, which is a vitally important way of averting a host of problems poor health clinics in sub-Saharan Africa in the 1970s. Inspired by his stimulating upbringing, Murray like unintended pregnancies, unsafe abortions and inwent on to become a Harvard-educated doctor and fant deaths. Given that contraception is such a cheap Oxford-educated economist, and endeavored to ask and useful way to ensure maternal and child health, I’m disappointed that it’s not addressed. questions that no one else had. I’d still highly recommend Epic Measures as an Beginning in his college days, Murray started to take on the enormous task of compiling data about illuminating look at global health and for engaging what people die of around the world. His work exposed anecdotes of striving, passionate people—but with a lot of problems with commonly reported statistics; the caveat that, of course, no single book can encapmany countries that self-report their data often under- sulate the entire story. Jeremy N. Smith reads from Epic Measures play the severity of some problems. North Korea, for inat Shakespeare & Co. Thu., April 16, at 7 PM. stance, claimed that none of its citizens ever got sick. Even altruistic organizations report vastly different numbers: the United Nations Population Division estikwhittle@missoulanews.com

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FEDERALLYY INSURED BY FEDERALL BY NCUA. missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [23]


[film]

Dream bigger Cut Bank almost imagines murder in a small town by Molly Laich

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[24] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015

“Are we in a metaphor?”

Cut Bank is a pretty terrible film that I’ve developed a misplaced affection for anyway. It’s an indie thriller set in the Montana town nestled on the border between Glacier National Park and Canada. The film has big names attached, including John Malkovich, Billy Bob Thornton, Bruce Dern and Oliver Platt. At the center of the story rests a young, attractive couple who accidentally film the murder of their beloved postmaster, thus sending the town on an irreversible path of subterfuge, betrayal and murder. Cassandra (Teresa Palmer) looks a little like Kristen Stewart except she’s blonde and smiling. She’s a bad actor in the silly Montana promotional video her character is shooting, but also in this movie, so the contrast isn’t as great as I fear the filmmakers would have liked. Her boyfriend, Dwayne (Liam Hemsworth), pensively squints into the sun like a low-rent, still living Paul Walker. The couple set the scene of their lives for us in a field of yellow flowers with exposition-heavy dialogue: They are a few years out of high school and were probably the shining stars of their graduating class, but it’s not quite enough. She’s a waitress at the steak house, gearing up to compete in this year’s Cut Bank pageant. He’s got a sick dad and no money, but by golly, they’re working on it. At one point she’s like, “We can move to Butte!” and he hilariously corrects her: “Dream bigger. California.” Then they catch the shooting on tape and it starts to look like the reward money might be their ticket out. Right out of the gates I came to all the wrong conclusions about what I was watching. If this were a product of Hollywood, it would clearly be embarrassingly derivative of other, better films (Fargo, Pulp Fiction, etc.). I decided this had to be an earnest homegrown effort instead, brought to life by a passionate Montanan, featuring mostly local actors, and somehow, through the romantic lure of the West, they’d managed to get several distinguished actors on board. Anyway, I was completely wrong. They shot the film in Alberta, Canada, for starters. The director, Matt Shakman, comes from the world of television (“It’s Always

Sunny in Philadelphia” and “House M.D.”) Roberto Patino (“Sons of Anarchy” and “Prime Suspect”) wrote the screenplay. The couple that I imagined were local are in fact hot, young Hollywood actors (He’s in The Hunger Games franchise, she starred in 2013’s Warm Bodies.) For god’s sake, both of them are from Australia. Malkovich shows up as the “aw shucks,” in-overhis-head Sheriff Vogel. He watches what is really a very tame murder caught on tape (just a couple of bullets to beloved character actor Dern’s chest, far off in the distance), but it’s enough to send him puking in the bathroom. “This is the first murder this town has ever seen,” he says, which can’t possibly be true, right? Even if we’re not counting the reservation. Later, Vogel pukes again as bodies start piling up, which makes the original puke kind of funny, but I don’t know if this film has earned the right to retroactive humor like that. Platt shows up as a big city rep of the U.S. Postal Service to authenticate the evidence. His character is just like Special Agent Dale Cooper of “Twin Peaks,” if he were updated with a Bluetooth and cared about his work a little less. Never mind the absurdity of this plot: if crime scene videos were worth the kind of money this film posits, every gas station attendant who surrenders surveillance videos to the Detroit PD would be rich. Forget it, doesn’t matter. Despite its many foibles, my affection for Cut Bank only grows stronger. At 93 minutes, the script has some genuinely sharp turns and every scene contains a revelation. Some of the performances and characters are really good, and the bad stuff is delightfully so, like when the aging beauty who works alongside Cassandra tells her she was Miss Cut Bank once, and then— bam!—immediately produces a photo of herself wearing the crown. I think this is what the filmmakers think Montanans trapped in small towns are really like. Cut Bank screens at the Roxy Fri, April 10, through Mon., April 13, at 7 PM nightly. arts@missoulanews.com


[film]

OPENING THIS WEEK ATANARJUAT: THE FAST RUNNER Canadian drama inspired by an old-school Inuit legend about an evil spirit, a warrior and winning the hand of a dame. Starring Natar Ungalaaq, Sylvia Ivalu and Peter-Henry Arnatsiaq. Rated R. Screening at the Roxy Wed., April 15, at 6 PM. CUT BANK Liam Hemsworth stars as a young man who opens a can of worms after witnessing a murder in the quiet li’l town of Cut Bank, Montana. Also starring Teresa Palmer and John Malkovich. Rated R. Screening at the Roxy Fri., April 10–Mon., April 13, at 7 PM. (See Film.) DARK SIDE OF THE FULL MOON Maureen Fura’s documentary investigates women who deal with postpartum depression and a host of other untreated issues. Screening at the Roxy Thu., April 9, at 7 PM. (See Agenda.) GIMME SHELTER (1970) Documentary revisiting the infamous 1969 Rolling Stones concert where they had the brilliant idea to let the Hell’s Angels work as their security team. Screening at the Roxy Thu., April 9, at 7:30 PM. KING JOHN (STRATFORD FESTIVAL) Tom McCamus stars in this 2013 stage production of personal turmoil and royal tugs-of-war. Screening at the Roxy Tue., April 14, at 6:30 PM. Visit mtlive.org. KUMIKO, THE TREASURE HUNTER A Japanese woman embarks on a quest to the midwest after discovering a VHS of Fargo and taking it too seriously. Starring Rinko Kikuchi, Nobuyuki Katsube and Shirley Venard. Not rated. Screening at the Roxy Fri., April 10–Thu., April 16, at 8 PM. THE LONGEST RIDE In case your DVD of The Notebook is starting to get scratched, a bull rider and an artsy college girl fall in love in this adaptation of a Nicholas Sparks novel. Starring Britt Robertson, Alan Alda and Scott Eastwood’s chiseled jaw. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex, Entertainer. THE TWILIGHT ANGEL Short film starring James Koskinas as a successful artist who stumbles into a roadblock while trying

“Hey Easter Bunny, where’s my candy?” Kumiko, The Treasure Hunter opens Friday at the Roxy. to finish his masterpiece. Screening at the Roxy Sat., April 11, at 7 PM. WOMAN IN GOLD A Jewish refugee campaigns to recover artwork stolen by Nazis and some small measure of justice for their war crimes. Starring Helen Mirren, Ryan Reynolds and Daniel Brühl. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12. ZERO MOTIVATION Female Israeli soldiers kill time and goof around while stationed in the HR office of a remote desert outpost. Starring Dana Ivgy, Nelly Tagar and Shani Klein. Not rated. Screening at the Roxy Sun., April 12, at 5 PM.

NOW PLAYING BELLA VISTA The Missoula-made drama follows an English teacher searching for connection and hope, along with her group of international students. Screening at the Roxy Sat., April 11 at 7 PM and Sun., April 12 at 5 PM. CINDERELLA I don’t care how boring or silly this particular adaptation of the fairytale is, because if it has poufy ballgowns, prancing horses and Robb Stark being

handsome, take my money. Update: I totally cried when Cinderella’s dad died. Starring Lily James, Cate Blanchett and Richard Madden. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex, Showboat.

a Biggie reference that will make you feel delighted/old. Featuring the voices of Jim Parsons, Rihanna and Steve Martin. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex, Entertainer.

THE DIVERGENT SERIES: INSURGENT Shailene Woodley is back as the heroine who must get her group of rebels to band together to fight the Man, or something. Also starring Ansel Elgort and Theo James. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex.

IT FOLLOWS After a teenage girl has a sexual encounter, she’s haunted by the sense that something is following her. (And it’s not supposed to be a giant pregnancy test, I think.) Starring Maika Monroe, Keir Gilchrist and Olivia Luccardi. Rated R. Carmike 12.

FURIOUS 7 Let us all commemorate Paul Walker (RIP) in this, the seventh film about cars that are fast and men who are furious. Also starring Vin Diesel and Dwayne Johnson. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex.

NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE Arthur Miller’s classic play exploring the American dream is brought to life by Ivo van Hove. Screening at the Roxy Tue., April 15, at 7 PM. Visit mtlive.org.

GET HARD A millionaire who’s convicted of fraud turns to a black friend to prepare him for life behind bars. Sensitive contemplation of American racial attitudes no doubt ensues. Starring Will Ferrell, Kevin Hart and Alison Brie. Rated R. Carmike 12, Pharaophlex.

Capsule reviews by Kate Whittle.

HOME A clumsy alien lands on earth and befriends a cheerful young girl. Be advised, the trailer features

Planning your outing to the cinema? Visit the arts section of missoulanews.com to find upto-date movie times for theaters in the area. You can also contact theaters to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 at 541-7469; The Roxy at 728-9380; Wilma at 728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603.

missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [25]


[dish]

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Sugar, the new tobacco by Ari LeVaux We know foods like doughnuts and soda can make you fat, but the effects of sugar on the liver and brain are less well-known. Dietary sugar can fry your liver in much the same way that alcohol can. This in turn can hurt your brain, leaving you with dementialike symptoms decades too soon. Most people associate liver disease with alcohol abuse or hepatitis. But another type, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, or NAFLD, that barely existed three decades ago has quickly become the most common liver disease in America. It isn’t caused by booze or a nasty virus, but dietary sugar, which causes a buildup of fat in your liver. Overweight people are likely candidates for NAFLD. Memory loss and diminished cognitive function are often the first symptoms, as the liver loses its ability to filter toxins that compromise the brain. According to the American Liver Foundation, at least a quarter of the U.S. population now suffers from NAFLD, and that number is expected to swell to 40 percent by 2030. A study published on March 25 further solidified the connection between sugar and NAFLD. It found even moderate amounts of sugary drinks will stimulate the production of enzymes that deposit fat in the liver. These are sour times at the Sugar Association, a DC-based trade group with a mission that appears increasingly impossible: “... to promote the consumption of sugar through sound scientific principles ...” Alas for Big Sugar, it’s becoming ever more difficult to use even the most convoluted scientific principles to promote sugar consumption, much less defend it. The Sugar Association once touted sugar as “a sensible approach to weight control,” something we now know is roughly the opposite of the truth. In addition to NAFLD, sugar promotes a variety of other ailments, including heart disease, tooth decay and diabetes. Meanwhile, new research is mounting that suggests sugar is behind Alzheimer’s disease. The case against sugar has grown steadily but quietly in the last four decades, in the shadow of dietary fat, which has widely been blamed for these ailments. The Sugar Association has engaged in tactics reminiscent of those of the tobacco industry during the height of its denial, including the funding of sugarfriendly research, the installation of sugar-friendly (and sugar-funded) scientists on government advisory panels, and even threats to scientists and politicians

[26] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015

FLASH IN THE PAN

who question the place of sugar in a healthy diet. The Sugar Association’s general response to the anti-sugar contingent has been to claim a lack of consensus and inconclusive results. But despite these efforts, as with tobacco, the cat is proving too big for the bag. In February, the recommendations of the USDA’s Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee featured several significant sugar-related proposals, including a sugar tax. The recommendations take specific aim at added sugars, suggesting they be labeled as such, and kept below 10 percent of total caloric intake. Identifying added sugar would distinguish it from sugar that’s naturally in a food product. For example, a six-ounce container of plain yogurt has 7 grams of the sugar lactose, while a pomegranate yogurt has 19 grams of sugar, including 12 grams of added sugar, explains Robert Lustig, a specialist in pediatric obesity, in a March 20 op-ed in the LA Times. Added sugar is another way of saying “Big Sugar’s bottom line,” and on March 24 the Sugar Association requested that the added sugar recommendations be removed. In a bitter irony, its letter to the committee complained that it used, “... selected science to support its predetermined conclusions.” In his op-ed, Lustig compared Big Sugar to a wild animal that has been cornered, and will fight with everything it has. But as with tobacco, the evidence against it is just too damning. We have a choice between limiting sugar consumption or dealing with its consequences. While the dust settles and sugar consumption and labeling guidelines are inevitably restructured, you don’t have to wait for any final word from government agencies. You can use your common sense, though willpower might be more of an issue. Sugar craving is widely considered an addiction. It’s an addiction that’s complicated by the fact that eating sugar is entangled with the healthy, necessary act of eating. But research at MIT, published in January, suggests that compulsive sugar consumption follows a different neural pathway than healthy eating. These findings open the door to more research into dealing with sugar addiction. Meanwhile, it’s encouraging that your brain’s sweet tooth can be retrained, before your memory deteriorates to the point where you forget where you even stashed the gummy bears.


[dish] Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 On Monday, April 20th BERNICE'S WILL BEGIN SERVING ESPRESSO!! Yep, you heard us right. And, we have heard you. Bernice's espresso was created by the talented staff at Hunter Bay (and approved by the staff at Bernice's )to represent the full bodied flavor character of the infamous Bernice's Cup o' Joe. Our espresso is a rich Mocha Java blend of sweet berry African coffees united with Indonesian and Brazilian coffees for an espresso that compliments Bernice's palate of fresh baked treats. Serving 7 days a week 6am - 8pm. Now you can enjoy your morning croissant, muffin or scone with espresso! Wheee! Or, stop by after dinner and have a dessert with a demitasse. Bernice's: from scratch for your pleasure...always. xoxo bernice. Bernicesbakerymt.com $-$$ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 525 E. Spruce 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Mon.–Fri., 7:30–4, Sat. 84. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. $ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$

Cafe Zydeco 2101 Brooks 406-926-2578 cafezydeco.com GIT’ SOME SOUTH IN YOUR MOUTH! Authentic cajun cuisine, with an upbeat zydeco atmosphere in the heart of Missoula. Indoor and outdoor seating. Breakfast served all day. Featuring Jambalaya, Gumbo, Étouffée, Po-boys and more. Beignets served ALL DAY! Open Monday 9am-3pm, Tuesday-Saturday 11am-8pm, Closed Sundays. Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$ Eagles Lodge #32 Missoula 2420 South Avenue 543-6346 Tailgate with us before each Griz home game, and get a FREE ride to the game on our shuttle. Soup, salad and burgers served for lunch Monday thru Friday 11:00am to 2:30pm. Don’t forget to stop in for our Thursday Night Matadors & Friday Night Burgers, 6:00 to 8:00pm both nights. Live music EVERY Friday and Saturday night and admission is always FREE! El Cazador 101 S. Higgins Ave. 728-3657 Missoula Independent readers’ choice for Best Mexican Restaurant. Come taste Alfredo’s original recipes for authentic Mexican food where we cook with love. From seafood to carne asada, enjoy dinner or stop by for our daily lunch specials. We are a locally owned Mexican family restaurant, and we want to make your visit with us one to remember. Open daily for lunch and dinner. $-$$

Brooks & Browns Inside Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. 532-2056 Martini Mania with $4 martinis every Monday. The Griz Coaches Radio Show LIVE every Tuesday at 6pm, Burger & Beer special $8 every Tuesday. $2 well drinks & $2 PBR tall boys every Wednesday. Big Brains Trivia every Thursday at 8pm. Have you discovered Brooks & Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula $-$$

The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. 926-2038 FREE DELIVERY DOWNTOWN. Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and gluten-free options. NOW SERVING BREAKFAST Empanadas! Ask us about our Take and Bake Service! Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. Mon-Thurs 11 am - 6 pm. Friday and Sat 118 pm Downtown Missoula. $

Burns Street Bistro 1500 Burns St. 543-0719 burnsstbistro.com We cook the freshest local ingredients as a matter of pride. Our relationship with local farmers, ranchers and other businesses allows us to bring quality, scratch cooking and fresh-brewed Black Coffee Roasting Co. coffee and espresso to Missoula’s historic westside neighborhood. Handmade breads & pastries, soups, salads & sandwiches change with the seasons, but our commitment to delicious, affordable food and over-the-top fun and friendly service does not. Mon-Fri 7 AM – 2 PM. Sat and Sun Brunch 9 AM – 2 PM. Reservations for Prix Fixe dinners on Fri and Sat nights. $-$$

Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West 541-FOOD The GFS Deli features made-to-order sandwiches, Fire Deck pizza & calzones, rice & noodle wok bowls, an award-winning salad bar, an olive & antipasto bar and a self-serve hot bar offering a variety of housemade breakfast, lunch and dinner entrées. A seasonally-changing selection of deli salads and rotisserie-roasted chickens are also available. Locally-roasted coffee/espresso drinks and an extensive fresh juice and smoothie menu complement bakery goods from the GFS ovens and Missoula’s favorite bakeries. Indoor and patio seating. Open every day 7am10pm $-$$

Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 42 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $

Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St. 549-7723 www.grizzlyliquor.com Voted Missoula’s Best Liquor Store! Largest selection of spirits in the Northwest, including all Montana micro-distilleries. Your headquarters for unique spirits and wines! Free customer parking. Open Monday-Saturday 9-7:30 www.grizzlyliquor.com. $-$$$

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missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [27]


[dish]

Bodega HAPPIEST HOUR Why you’re here: Fresh off the NCAA men’s and women’s tournaments and on the cusp of the NBA playoffs, you’re jonesing for a little basketball—and Bodega is the only local bar with a regulation hoop and hardwood floor just a few steps from the taps. Yes, you can shoot free throws or challenge a buddy to a game of HORSE, with the loser buying next round. Just don’t expect to play any two-on-two. “That’s when the ball tends to get taken away,” says bartender Dave Sandau. What you’re drinking: Cold beer, Jack Daniels or shots, with a menu of the latter helpfully posted on a large whiteboard above the bar. Sandau says the Swayze (orange-flavored vodka and Red Bull; $6) is among the most popular “shooters.” What your friend is drinking: If it’s their birthday, one of Bodega’s signature “tapeworm” shots (it includes a squeeze of mayonnaise that looks like a worm). If your friend has a sweet tooth, Sandau suggests the Gummy Bear, made with raspberry vodka, peach schnapps, Rose’s lime and Sprite. “It tastes exactly like a gummy bear,” he says. What your friend should be drinking: Every day, from 5 to 9 p.m., Bodega offers Jack Daniels drinks for $2.50. That’s tough to beat.

Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We’re the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we’ll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

What you’re eating: The Samburger— topped with ham, bacon and cheese—is, by far, the most popular thing on the menu. It’s $7.50. Runner-up? The bacon-wrapped hot dog for $4.50. Where to find it: Bodega is located at 221 Ryman St., about a three-pointer away from Red’s and above Monk’s. —Skylar Browning Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

Iza 529 S. Higgins 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Local Asian cuisine feature SE Asian, Japanese, Korean and Indian dishes. Gluten Free and Vegetarian no problem. Full Beer, Wine, Sake and Tea menu. We have scratch made bubble teas. Come in for lunch, dinner, drinks or just a pot of awesome tea. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm, Dinner M-Sat 3pm-close. $-$$ Jimmy John’s 420 N. Higgins • 542-1100 jimmyjohns.com Jimmy John’s - America’s Favorite Sandwich Delivery Guys! Unlike any other sub shop, Jimmy John’s is all about the freshest ingredients and fastest service. Freaky Fast, Freaky Good - that’s Jimmy John’s. Order online, call for delivery or visit us on Higgins. $-$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, MondayFriday 7-6. $ Market on Front 201 E. Front St. marketonfront.com The Market on Front is more than a market with a restaurant. It is an energetic marketplace which offers an epicurean experience to excite the senses. It is also an energetic, vibrant marketplace creating an opportunity to taste and take home the products of artisans who create excellent products at awesome prices. This community centered specialty food destination features gourmet yet traditional prepared foods, sandwiches, salads, specialty cheeses, charcuterie, local brews, wines, espresso and so much more! $-$$

Bring in this coupon for

$5 off any purchase of $12.50 or more. Expires 4/18/15

2101 Brooks • 926-2578 • www.cafezydeco.com Mon 9am - 3pm • Tues-Sat 11am - 8 pm • Closed Sundays [28] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015

Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. (on the hip strip) 543-7154 themissoulaseniorcenter.org Did you know that the Missoula Senior Center serves delicious hearty lunches every weekday for only $3? (Missoula County residents over 60: $3, only $6 if younger and just stopping by) Anyone is welcome to join us from 11:3012:30 Monday- Friday for delicious food and great conversation. For a full menu, visit our website. $ The Mustard Seed Asian Cafe Southgate Mall 542-7333 Contemporary Asian fusion cuisine. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combine the best of Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences. Full menu available at the bar. Award winning desserts made fresh daily , local and regional micro brews, fine wines & signature cocktails. Vegetarian and Gluten free menu available. Takeout & delivery. $$-$$$

Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. 543-3188 www.orangestreetfoodfarm.com Experience The Farm today!!! Voted number one Supermarket & Retail Beer Selection. Fried chicken, fresh meat, great produce, vegan, gluten free, all natural, a HUGE beer and wine selection, and ROCKIN’ music. What deal will you find today? $-$$$ Pearl Cafe 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 pearlcafe.us Country French meets the Northwest. Idaho Trout with Dungeness Crab, Rabbit with Wild Mushroom Ragout, Snake River Farms Beef, Fresh Seafood Specials Daily. House Made Charcuterie, Sourdough Bread & Delectable Desserts. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Pita Pit 130 N Higgins 541-PITA (7482) pitapitusa.com Fresh Thinking Healthy Eating. Enjoy a pita rolled just for you. Hot meat and cool fresh veggies topped with your favorite sauce. Try our Chicken Caesar, Gyro, Philly Steak, Breakfast Pita, or Vegetarian Falafel to name just a few. For your convenience we are open until 3am 7 nights a week. Call if you need us to deliver! $-$$ Plonk 322 N Higgins • 926-1791 www.plonkwine.com Plonk is an excursion into the world of fine wine, food, cocktails, service and atmosphere. With an environment designed to engage the senses, the downtown establishment blends quality and creativity in an all-encompassing dining experience. Described as an urban hot spot dropped into the heart of the Missoula Valley and lifestyle, Plonk embodies metropolitan personalities driven by Montana passions. Ruby’s Cafe 2101 Regent St. at Brooks 728-9890 True American Diner! Come join us at the counter, grab a booth or find a table. Breakfast all day, Lunch & Dinner. Homemade Pies. Homemade Soups. Mon-Sat 6am - 9pm and Sun 8am - 3pm. “You keep us cookin!” $-$$ Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West 1515 Fairview Ave inside City Life 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you’ll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 549-8703 • www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming • 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over


April 9–April 16, 2015

photo by courtesy Anthony Norkus

Double trouble. Alejandro Escovedo and Susan Voelz play the Top Hat Thu., April 16, at 8 PM. $22/$18 in advance.

THURSDAYAPR09 KBGA College Radio and The Rainbow Road Radio Show take you up the yellow brick road with tunes from Lushush, Peanut Butter, Sean Rudolf and Bustello. VFW. 8 PM. $2/$5 for ages 18-20.

Shut up ‘n make something with the Planter Box workshop at Home ReSource, a basic woodworking class just in time for spring green thumbs. 1515 Wyoming St., 2-7 PM. $15-$75 sliding scale; check out homeresource.org/ classes to learn more and sign up.

nightlife Ceramicist Crista Ann Ames counts her sheep in her pastoral-inspired MFA exhibit, along with minimalist sculptor Tyler Nansen. Reception at the Gallery of Visual Arts in the Social Sciences Building, 5-6:30 PM.

Mary Place and Blue Moon heat up the afternoon with jazz at the Union Club every Thursday from 5:30-8 PM. Free. The Djebe Community Drum and Dance class offers interactive instruction in performance traditions

from nations including Guinea, Senegal, Mali, Zimbabwe and South Africa. Barn Movement Studio, 2926 S. Third St. Meets on the second and fourth Thursday of each month from 6-7:30 PM. $5 donation requested.

missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [29]


from late to class to time to spare from late to class

[calendar]

to time to spare

Getting there is half the fun. #RideTheLine.

New foor 20115

15 minute ser vice on Routes 1 and 2 . Evening ser vice until 10pm on Routes 1 , 2 , 6 and 7 . Mount ain Line is no Mountain now w ZERO-F ZERO-FARE ARE ffor or all.

(406) 721-3333

Visit our website and download our mobile app for Googlepowered trip planning, real time bus tracker and rider alerts.

WWW.MOUNTAINLINE.COM

Free Wi-Fi on Board

Have a pint and let your branches down while Hardwood Heart plays homey tunes at Draught Works, 6-8 PM. No cover.

Mr. Tom Catmull says howdy at Ten Spoon Vineyard, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Tasting starts at 4 PM, tunes from 6-8:30. No cover.

You’ll be a pro in no time after the Country Two-Step classes with Cathy Clark on Thursdays at the Sunrise Saloon. Beginners at 7 PM, intermediate at 7:30. $5, payable in cash, with live country bands to follow where you can show what a quick learner you are.

nightlife

Jazzy dude Ryan Keberle, “One of 5 Trombonists You Need to Know” according to Jazz Times, and member of the SNL house band, among other accomplishments, brings his quartet to this installment of DalyJazz. Doors at 7 PM. RSVP to dalyjazz@gmail.com.

You’ll be enthralled when exhibiting artist LeAnn Boyd presents “A Brief, Fascinating Look at the History and Technique of Frescos.” Radius Gallery, 114 E. Main St. 5:30 PM.

The Whitefish Theatre Company presents the Tony-winning sultry drama, Venus in Fur, about an actress’ audition turned strange and intriguing, at the O’Shaughnessy Center. Performances April 8–11 and 16–18 at 7:30 PM. $20. Call 862-5371. Just don’t call it metal when LA heavy psych-rock outfit Wand plays Stage 112, along with local radsters FUULS, Holy Lands and Razor Whip. 9 PM. $6-$8. Bust out a little geetar, tunesmiths, at the Open Mic with Cheree at the Eagles Lodge Missoula, 2420 South Ave. W. Runs 8:30-10:30 PM. Impress ‘em enough and you could get paid $50 as a showcased performer. Text 406-3965934 to sign up early. Small town girls, city boys and anyone that leaves out can share the night on and on and on at the Dead Hipster Dance Party of lore, at the Badlander on Thursdays. No cover, plus $1 wells from 9 PM to midnight. The bluegrassy Old Salt Union gets to work at the Top Hat, with tunes starting at 9:30 PM. No cover. Copper Mountain Band delivers the pure country gold at the Sunrise Saloon for your boot-scootin’ pleasure, starting at 9:30 PM, on Fri-

FRIDAYAPR10 The Missoula Writing Collaborative hosts a family-friendly Poetry Jam, featuring open mic and silent auction, writing activities and live tunes from Caroline Keys and co. Roxy Theater, 5 PM. $15/$7 for students, with an array of mac ‘n cheese-related refreshments included in ticket price. day and Saturday. No cover. The Western Montana Shrine Circus brings the Big Top to the the Adams Center, with performances on Fri., April 10 at 3 and 7 PM and Sat., April 11 at 11 AM, 3 PM and 7. $12. Visit griztix.com.

[30] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015

Sandpiper Art Gallery puts the “R” in art with a non-juried show featuring rodeos, ranching, railroads, raptors and ‘rithmetic, maybe. 306 Main Street in Polson. Reception from 5-7 PM.

Photographer David J. Spear presents his original photos of errbody’s fav mining town in A Timeless Town in Time: Butte, Montana, in the ZACC’s main gallery. Plus, check out Monica Wilson’s Galt Market in the hallway. Opening reception from 5-8 PM. (See Arts.) Sip a Guinness and be whisked away to the Emerald Isle with the Irish Music Session, every Friday at the Union Club from 6-9 PM. No cover. Family Friendly Friday invites little ones to boogie while parental units kick back at the Top Hat, starting at 6 PM, with a rotating lineup of local musicians providing all-ages tunes. No cover. Enjoy zee cinema at Missoula Public Library’s World Wide Cinema night, the second Friday of every month. The series showcases indie and foreign films. Doors open at 6:45, show at 7 PM. Check missoulapublibrary.org for info. Free. The First Friday Free Fencing Class is just that, so get en guarde with the Missoula Fencing Association at 1200 Shakespeare St., Ste. A, from 6:30-7:30 PM. Ages 9 to adult; just wear gym clothes and bring a water bottle. Kittredge Distinguished Visiting Writer William deBuys reads from selected pieces of his environmental writing at the Dell Brown Room of Turner Hall at 7 PM. Free. The public is invited to kick back and enjoy when Captain Wilson Conspiracy jazzes up proceedings with an evening of original compositions, featuring the full quartet. Loft of Missoula, 121 W. Main St. upstairs. 7 PM. Suggested donation $5; bring your own beverages and snacks. The Whitefish Theatre Company presents the Tony-winning sultry drama, Venus in Fur, about an actress’ audition turned strange and intriguing, at the O’Shaughnessy Center. Performances April 8–11 and 16–18 at 7:30 PM. $20. Call 862-5371. The UM Symphony Orchestra kicks it with the Tramp when it accompanies a screening of Charlie


[calendar] Chaplin’s ‘29 film The Adventurer with silent film musical selections from the dawn of cinema. Music Recital Hall, 7:30 PM. $5/$3 for students/$10 per family. Look no further than the Eagles Lodge to find Nashville 406 playing all the right country-fied dance numbers, starting at 8 PM on Friday and Saturday. 2420 South Ave. No cover. Check out the third round of the annual Comedy Competition qualifiers, with local lol-ers duking it out at the Crystal Theater, 8-10 PM. $8. Call John Howard for info at 240-2395. Copper Mountain Band delivers the pure country gold at the Sunrise Saloon for your boot-scootin’ pleasure, starting at 9:30 PM, on Friday and Saturday. No cover.

April

getlitfestival.org

The Zeppo rhythm ‘n blues revue lights up the Union Club, starting at 9:30 PM. No cover.

Spokane, WA

The gutbucket bluesy fellas of Hillstomp are back in town, and tearin’ up Friday nite with PD Lear and Local Yokel. Palace. 9:30 PM. $8. Hot damn, guys, Denver-based jammin’ electro dudes Yamn play the Top Hat for your undulating delight, starting at 10 PM. $5. Loosen up when Bozeman’s The Bent Bones plays the Badlander, along with our own groovemeisters Locksaw Cartel. 10 PM. Cover TBA.

SATURDAYAPR11 Dust off your fedora and make like Dr. Henry Walton Jones at the Archaeology Day with demos, activities and flintknapping hosted by UM anthropology students. Historical Museum at Fort Missoula. 10 AM-noon. Healthy Kids Day hosts all sortsa activities at the YMCA, including swimming and rock climbing, and it all goes down from 9 AM-noon. Free; no membership required. Call 721-YMCA to learn more.

20-26, 2015

Sittin’ on the dock of the bay. Hillstomp plays the Palace Fri., April 10, along with PD Lear and Local Yokel. 9:30 PM. $8. Kick back in your jammies at the Saturday Morning Funhouse, featuring cartoons, wildlife films and popcorn for breakfast at the Roxy Theater, starting at 10 AM. $5. The new Missoula Winter Public Market features all manner of produce, meats, eggs, honey and treats, plus coffee and craft vendors. 800 S. Third St. W. Now open every Saturday, Jan. 10-April 25. 10 AM-2 PM. Visit facebook.com/mslawinterpublicmarket. The Saturday Family Art Workshop features book sculpture today, and you’ll use old textbooks to create a 3-D sculpture. Missoula Art Museum, 11 AM-12:30 PM. Free, but come early to get a seat. The Western Montana Shrine Circus brings the Big Top to the the Adams Center, with performances on

Fri., April 10 at 3 and 7 PM and Sat., April 11 at 11 AM, 3 PM and 7. $12. Visit griztix.com. Fidgeters beware, the Montana Museum of Art and Culture hosts a local event as part of the international Slow Art Day. A docent-led tour will go through the Paxson and Melow Galleries, looking at five pieces of artwork for 10 minutes each and discussing it. 12:30 PM. Free, but call to reserve a spot at 406-243-2019. Ages 8-12 should brush up on their skillz with the Drawing and Painting Exploration with Bayla

Laks, which uses techniques like blind contour drawing and creating texture with substances like salt and rubbing alcohol. Missoula Art Museum, Saturdays from 1-3 PM through May 2. $45/$40.50 for members. Irish eyes will be smiling when Malarkey plays tunes at Ten Spoon Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Tasting room opens at 4, tunes from 68:30 PM. No cover. The brand-spanking-new Astro Loki Labs, featuring Zombie Tools’ Maxon McCarter, presents a grand

Readings, poetry slams, workshops and more!

Featuring Sherman Alexie Cami Bradley Walter Kirn Tod Marshall Benjamin Percy Sharma Shields Shawn Vestal Jess Walter

Tickets /more info visit

getlitfestival.org

Help for chronic and acute disease. Revealing what will get you well. Try the Sound Table! Mention Get Lit! for a festival rate starting at $89 at the Red Lion River Inn, Spokane!

missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [31]


[calendar]

insta-famous

SPRING SPRIN N G 20 2015 15

If art legend and filmmaker Andy Warhol was alive today, he would probably totally slay at Instagram. We might first think of his Campbell’s Soup or Marilyn Monroe paintings, but Warhol also left behind a treasure trove of Polaroids of the artists, celebrities and musicians he partied with between the ‘60s and the ‘80s. Most of the snapshots were meant to be used as memorabilia or as reference for other artworks, but they also stand alone as fascinating and often beautiful moments in time. The shot of Debbie Harry, with her bleach-blonde hair feathered just so and impeccable lipstick gleaming, is probably my favorite.

HANDCR HANDCRAFTED AFTED GOODS B BY Y LOC LOCAL AL & REGION REGIONAL AL AR ARTISTS TIS T S

APRIL 1 6-18, 20 15 16-18, 2015

THU. THU.

9AM-6PM

FRI.

S SAT. AT.

9AM-6PM 10AM-4PM 10AM-4PM

UNIVERSIT UNIVERSITY Y CENTER A ATRIUM TRIUM | LIVE MUSIC | PRIZES | N NO O ENTR ENTRY Y FEE

WHAT: “Portraits That You Can’t Mess Up: Andy Warhol’s Big Shot Photo graphs,” a presentation by Valerie Hedquist WHERE: Missoula Art Museum “Joanie D. Nasher, 1979.”

WHEN: Thu., April 16, at 7 PM W WWW.UMT.EDU/UC WW.UMT..EDU/UC

HOW MUCH: Free MORE INFO: missoulaartmuseum.org

as result of a trade where MAM lent its Chris Larson “Pause” sculpture to WSU in 2010.

Dozens of Warhol’s Polaroids and silver gelatin prints of random subjects are on display at this spring’s special Andy Warhol Collection exhibition at Missoula Art Museum. The exhibit is on loan from the Museum of Art at Washington State University,

MAM hosts several events to celebrate the Andy Warhol collection, including a screening of Warhol films at the Roxy on April 29 and a lecture on April 16 from UM art professor Valerie Hedquist, where she’ll present insights and illuminating backstory about the exhibit. —Kate Whittle

FOR INFORMA INFORMATION MA ATTION OR TO TO REQUEST AN ACCESSIBILITY ACCESSIBILIT Y ACCOMMODATION ACCOMMODA ATION TTIO CALL CALL 243-5776

opening and art exhibit with swords, action figures, live music from Rooster Sauce and Flock of Bagels, booze, snacks ‘n frolicking. 3015 Railroad St., No. 15. Kid-friendly from 3-7 PM, grown-up shenanigans from 7-11:30.

Brewery in Hamilton. 6-8:30 PM. No cover.

nightlife

Ornery comedian Christopher Titus delivers the lols at the Wilma, along with Rachel Bradley. Doors at 7 PM. $25. Tickets at thewilma.com.

The Community Ties shindig celebrates the anniversary of notable Missoula organizations including A Carousel for Missoula, Missoula Children’s Theatre, Missoula Symphony Orchestra, Garden City Ballet and String Orchestra of the Rockies. Missoula Art Museum, 5-7 PM. Visit missoulaartmuseum.org for tickets and more information. Raise a glass to The Humane Society of Western Montana at the annual Ken Shughart Humanitarian Award Dinner, which honors veterinarian David Bostwick this year. Doubletree, 6 PM. $75/$600 for a table of eight. Tickets at the shelter and myhswm.org. Andrea Harsell does her singersongwriter thang while you yell-talk over pints at Bitter Root

[32] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015

Bluesy fella Andre Floyd sings for his supper while you drink yours at Draught Works, 915 Toole Ave., from 6-8 PM. No cover.

The Whitefish Theatre Company presents the Tony-winning sultry drama, Venus in Fur, about an actress’ audition turned strange and intriguing, at the O’Shaughnessy Center. Performances April 8–11 and 16–18 at 7:30 PM. $20. Call 862-5371. No doubt about it, country star Neal McCoy brings the real deal to the Dennison Theatre, along with comedian Brad Upton. 7:30 PM. $36, available in advance at Rockin Rudy’s. Joan Zen Jazz Quintet brings the posi vibes to the Stevensville Playhouse, 7:30-10 PM. $15/$12 in advance, tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s, Chapter One Bookstore and

the playhouse. Call 240-0216 for info. Look no further than the Eagles Lodge to find Nashville 406 playing all the right country-fied dance numbers, starting at 8 PM on Friday and Saturday. 2420 South Ave. No cover. Step into spring at the April tango night at the Downtown Dance Collective’s Brick Room, where there’s a beginner lesson at 8 PM and social dancing to follow, plus potluck refreshments. Partner not required. $10/$16 for two. Absolutely DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo deliver the primo Saturday nite party at the Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. Two-fer-one Absolut vodka drinks until midnight. No cover. We’ll all be pretty in pink at the ‘80s Prom Night, featuring Montgomery Distillery drink specials, doing the worm, pining for hotties and general swag. Red’s Bar, 217 Ryman St. Cocktail hour from 9-10 PM, dancing afterward. New Reb and Satsang serve up an evening of reggae with a side of hiphop funk at Monk’s Bar. 9 PM. $5.


[calendar] Cash for Junkers delivers the western swing and hillbilly jazz to make hearts go pitter-patter at the Union Club, with tunes starting at 9:30 PM. No cover. Swim together with other lost souls when Pinky and the Floyd plays all your favorite jamz at the Top Hat, starting at 10 PM. $10 in advance at Rockin Rudy’s, the Top Hat and tophatlounge.com.

SUNDAYAPR12 Go beyond Banksy with the Contemporary Art History class for adults at the ZACC, 2-4 PM. $20/free for members. Check out zoo townarts.org. What better way to spend a Sunday afternoon than sipping cold ones and crushing the competition at the Cribbage Tournament hosted by the Eagles of Missoula, 2420 South Ave. 1 PM. $6 to enter; blind draw for partner. Get all keyed up with the Five Valley Accordion Association, which presents its dance jam every second and fourth Sunday of the month. April 12 meets at the Hamilton Eagles, and April 26 meets at the Rustic Hut; 1-5 PM. $4/$3 for members. Email helenj4318@hotmail.com for info. The creativity—and the drinks— flow at Art on Tap, a guided, social painting class where you’ll leave with a finished piece of work. Montgomery Distillery, 2-5 PM. $32. Visit artontapmissoula.com for registration and info. Esteemed pianist Stephen Beus tickles the ivories with classical and contemporary works as part of the Celebrate Piano Series at the Music Recital Hall. 3 PM. $20/$15 seniors/$10 students. Visit griztix.com or call 243-4581.

nightlife Kick it with hometown heroes when Local Yokel plays bluegrass at Great Burn Brewing, 2230 McDonald Ave. 5 PM. No cover. Grab a beer and debate the merits of the upcoming “X-files” reboot while Captain Wilson Conspiracy plays jazzy tunes at Draught Works, 5-7 PM. No cover. The 18-piece Ed Norton Big Band puts some swing in the month’s second Sunday when it plays the Missoula Winery, 5646 Harrier Way, from 6–8 PM. $7. Polish your steps with $5 swing lessons prior at 4:45 PM. Visit missoulawinery.com. Italian Club and the UM Department of Modern and Classical Languages host a screening of the Slow Food Story documentary,

Right on. Yamn plays the Top Hat Fri., April 10, at 10 PM. $5. about how the movement originated. University Center Theater, 6:30 PM. Free. Feel the love when Georgia’s Passafire spreads the reggae at Stage 112, along with Yo Momma’s Big Fat Booty Band. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $15; tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s. Sundays are shaken, not stirred, at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $5 martinis all evening, live jazz and local DJs keepin’ it classy. Music starts at 8 PM. Free.

MONDAYAPR13 The University of Montana Chamber Chorale hosts As Waves Seek the Shore, a grand celebration of all things aquatic with composers like Whitacre, Monteverdi, and Elgar, juxtaposed with the poetry of Sara Teasdale. UM Music Recital Hall, 7:30-9 PM. $11/$6 seniors/$5 students. City Club Missoula meets to chat about plans to bring the Special Olympics Summer Games to the UM campus in late May. Doubletree Hotel, 11:30 AM-1 PM. MAM Registrar Ted Hughes leads a discussion about Andy Warhol’s impact on current art at Missoula Art Museum, 3-4 PM. Free. The Young Artist After-School Program imparts art fundamentals,

missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [33]


[calendar] history and techniques while playing with a variety of mediums. Meets at the ZACC on Mondays, 3:30-5:30 PM, through June 8. $12/$10 for members a day. Visit zootownarts.org/youngartists. The Shuffles Dance Studio hosts tap classes for all ages and levels, Mondays through Thursdays from 4-7 PM. 500 N. Higgins Ave. Call 2108792 to set up a time and routine that’s best for you, or just drop in any day to observe a class. $60 for four classes. Meditation newbies can discover techniques like compassionate meditation and loving-kindness with the Meditation for Beginners series at Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent Ave. Meets Mondays from April 6– 27 at 4:30 PM and May 25–June 10 at 4:30 PM. $40 for four-week series. Visit redwillowlearning.org.

nightlife Dancer-types and anyone seeking to get into touch with their body can check out the Authentic Movement Group, where a facilitator will help you find and follow your own movement. The Barn Movement Studio, 2926 S. Third St. Mondays from 6-8 PM through May. $30. Call 529-2322 to register. Whisper sweet nothings, my dear, while Captain Wilson Conspiracy gets into a syncopated rhythm at Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. 7-10 PM. No cover. Shake, rattle ‘n roll at the Beginner/Intermediate Jazz Dance class, led by Jennifer MeyerVaughan on Mondays at Downtown Dance Collective, 7:30-8:55 PM. Regular rates apply. Maintain dignity for best results at Super Trivia Freakout. Winners get cash prizes or shots after the five rounds of trivia at the Badlander, including picture and music rounds. 9 PM. Free. To get those neurons sparking, here’s a question: Abraham Lincoln was shot by John Wilkes Booth on April 14, 1865, at Ford’s Theater. What play was he watching at the time? Find answer in tomorrow’s nightlife. Live in SIN at the Service Industry Night at Plonk, with DJ Amory spinning and a special menu. 322 N. Higgins Ave. 10 PM to close. Just ask a server for the SIN menu. No cover.

TUESDAYAPR14 Raise a pint to the totalest of festivests when Total Fest XIV (slated for August 20-22 in downtown Missoula) hosts a Cheers for Charity at Draught Works, 5-8 PM. Fifty cents from each pint go toward supporting this year’s festival; cuz enticing a buncha rad metal and rock bands into our fair burg does not come cheap. Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters takes the “eek out of public speaking” with weekly meetings at the Florence Building, noon-1 PM, on the second floor. Free to attend. Check out shootinthebull.info to learn more.

nightlife The 10th annual Missoula Labor Film Festival celebrates civil action and advocacy with films including Cesar Chavez, Together We Win: The Fight to Organize Starbucks and Pride. Missoula Public Library, on Tue., April 14 and Tue., April 21, at 6 PM.

[34] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015

The Unity Dance and Drum African Dance Class is sure to teach you some moves you didn’t learn in junior high when it meets Tuesdays from 7 to 8:30 PM at the Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins Ave. All ages and skill levels welcome. $10, $35 for four classes. Email tarn.ream@umontana.edu or call 549-7933 for more information. Esteemed international organist Keith Reas presents a recital at Holy Spirit Episcopal, 130 S. Sixth St., at 7:30 PM. Free. (Trivia answer: Our American Cousin.) Illinois rockers The Giving Tree Band make a joyful noise at the Top Hat, along with The Cerny Brothers. 8 PM. $10/$8 in advance at the Top Hat, Rockin Rudy’s and tophatlounge.com. 18-plus. Mike Avery hosts the Singer-Songwriter Showcase, now on Tuesdays at the Badlander at 9 PM. No cover. Email michael. avery@live.com ahead of time to sign up.

WEDNESDAYAPR15 Portland feelings-y indie rock outfit Kind of Like Spitting plays Stage 112, along with Lee Corey Oswald and The City On Film. Doors at 8 PM. $12/$10 in advance at Rockin Rudy’s. 18-plus. This month’s edition of the Art Associates of Missoula meeting invites Kathi Olson from the city’s public art committee to chat about the array of decorated traffic boxes around town. Missoula Art Museum’s Education Center, 10 AM. Free. Call Susie for info at 544-0891. Dr. Liz Rantz leads the four-week course Live Like There is no Tomorrow: an exploration of how to live without knowing the future, particularly as one gets older. Meets Wednesdays at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center from 34:30 PM. Free. The UM Rural Institute for Inclusive Communities continues celebrating the anniversary of the ADA with film screening of Sins Invalid, a performance project on disability and sexuality, and the local short documentary For All, about Missoula’s first all-abilities playground. University Center Theater, 3-4:30 PM. #Teens take note: artist Michael Workman hosts the young artist workshop at Missoula Art Museum, where he’ll chat about stop-motion animation and digital projection, and participants will make their own movies out of found objects. I am tempted to pretend to be a teen just to check this out; would a One Direction shirt be a good disguise? Missoula Art Museum, 4-6 PM. Free.

nightlife The weekly Dinner and a Movie series brings top-notch indie flix and good eats under one roof. Screening at the Crystal Theater at 7 PM, $7. Dinner menu from Silk Road available (not included in admission price). Sarah Gerard reads from Binary Star, her portrayal of a woman struggling with an eating disorder, at Fact and Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. 7 PM. Ah yeah gurl, you climb that stairway when Zoso brings “The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Experience” to the Wilma. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $25. Check out thewilma.com.


[calendar]

photo courtesy of Jeff Schad

Dazed and confused. Zoso’s Ultimate Led Zeppelin Experience plays the Wilma Wed., April 15. 7 PM. $25. Tango Connections I will impart to you the essentials of the “embrace, connection, musicality” of this dynamic dance style, led by Patrick Marsolek and Lori Mitchell. Downtown Dance Collective, Wednesdays at 7:15 PM through May 13. Come alone or bring a friend, guy or gal. $60/$48 for members. Visit ddcmontana.com. Local DJs do the heavy lifting while you kick back at Milkcrate Wednesday down in the Palace. 9 PM. No cover, plus $6 PBR pitcher special. I’ll bring the peanut butter, y’all bring that sweet jaaaaam to the Soul Kitch’n Blues Boogie sesh at the Dark Horse, starting at 9 PM. $50 prize for best act each week. No cover. DJs BoomBox and Mikey Thunder wanna hear your hips swing at the Top Hat, with show starting at 9 PM. $18/$15 in advance at the Top Hat, Rockin Rudy’s and online. 18-plus.

THURSDAYAPR16 Exhibiting artist Pamela Caughey chats about “The Dragon in my Studio: The Importance of Risk Taking” at Radius Gallery, 114 E. Main St. 5:30 PM. Beginner fencing lessons for kids start today at the Missoula Fencing Association, 1200 Sherwood St., with divisions for ages 6-8 meeting on

Thursdays from 3:15-4 PM and ages 9-11 from 6:30-8 PM for six weeks. Register at missoulafencing.net, call 406-251-4623 or email missoulafencing@hotmail.com. The spring art fair in the UC includes all manner of handmade jewelry, clothing, ceramics and local art, plus plenty of enjoyable people-watching as you spot the stressed-out students hurtling toward finals. University Center Atrium, April 16-17 from 9 AM-6 PM and April 18 from 10 AM-4 PM. Businessy types might be intrigued by Home ReSource’s 10 Tips to Zero Waste Your Business Seminar, with an interactive presentation about reducing cost and waste. 1515 Wyoming St. 4:30-6 PM, with refreshments included. Free.

nightlife The Soroptimist of Missoula presents the Spirit of Excellence: A Celebration of Achievement awards banquet and benefit, with live tunes, emcee Heidi Meili, guest speaker Shawn Gray from Youth Homes and dinner catered by Café Firenze. Ruby’s Inn, 5-9 PM. $35/$300 for a table of eight. Proceeds benefit the Susan Talbot Home for Girls and Missoula’s Girl Scouts. Mary Place and Blue Moon heat up the afternoon with jazz at the Union Club every Thursday from 5:30-8 PM. Free. Muslide Charley pours a bucket of bluesy stuff all over Draught Works, 6-8 PM. No cover.

missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [35]


[calendar] Feel the wind in your hair when Carter Freeman cuts loose with tunes at Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton, 68:30 PM. No cover.

Bust out a little geetar, tunesmiths, at the Open Mic with Cheree at the Eagles Lodge Missoula, 2420 South Ave. W. Runs 8:30-10:30 PM. Impress ‘em enough and you could get paid $50 as a showcased performer. Text 406-3965934 to sign up early.

Hone your chops at the Slow Jam, where musicians will play celtic, old time and contra dance tunes at relaxed tempos so beginners can easily join in. Starving Artist Cafe, 3020 S. Reserve St., off the corner of Reserve and Harve. Every third Thursday of the month from 6-7:30 PM. Visit missoulastarvingartist.com or email rocu@rocketmail.com for more info. You’ll be a pro in no time after the Country Two-Step classes with Cathy Clark on Thursdays at the Sunrise Saloon. Beginners at 7 PM, intermediate at 7:30. $5, payable in cash, with live country bands to follow where you can show what a quick learner you are.

Small town girls, city boys and anyone that leaves out can share the night on and on and on at the Dead Hipster Dance Party of lore, at the Badlander on Thursdays. No cover, plus $1 wells from 9 PM to midnight. Bring an extra face, ‘cuz yours just might be melted off when Great Falls sludge outfit Piranha Dog plays this installment of the KBGA residency show, along with Swamp Ritual and Windhelm. VFW. 9 PM. $2/$5 for ages 18-20. Don’t look so board. Passafire plays Stage 112 Sun., April 12, along with Yo Momma’s Big Fat Booty Band

Billings-based lawyer, private pilot and Rhodes scholar Carrie La Seur somehow found the time to write a novel (and what have YOU done lately?) and it is called The Home Place and it is about a Montana woman drawn back to her hometown after a mysterious death. Reading at Fact and Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave., at 7 PM. Journalist Jeremy Smith reads from his strangely engrossing tale of global health statistics, Epic Measures: One Doctor. Seven Billion Patients. Shakespeare and Co., 103 S. Third St. W. 7 PM.

None other than Dean Baquet, executive director at The New York Times, presents this year’s Dean Stone lecture, titled, “Quality Journalism in the Digital Age – Challenges & Opportunities.” (Cue a lot of reporters nervously tugging their collars.) University Center Ballroom, 7 PM. Free. Art history professor Valerie Hedquist presents “Portraits That You Can’t Mess Up—Andy Warhol’s Big Shot Photographs,” part of the Andy Warhol exhibit at Missoula Art Museum. 7 PM. Free. (See Spotlight.)

The Whitefish Theatre Company presents the Tony-winning sultry drama, Venus in Fur, about an actress’ audition, at the O’Shaughnessy Center. Performances April 8–11 and 16–18 at 7:30 PM. $20. Call 862-5371. Don’t worry, Alejandro Escovedo lovahs, he wouldn’t let you down, and so the legendary singer-songwriter hath arrived to play the Top Hat at 8 PM, along with violinist Susan Voelz. $22/$18 in advance at the Top Hat, Rockin Rudy’s and online. 18-plus.

Denver country outfit Whiskey Wednesday takes over the Sunrise Thursday through Saturday, starting at 9 PM. No cover.

My goodness, summer is just around the corner. Submit events at calendar@missoulanews.com at least two weeks in advance of the event to guarantee publication. Don’t forget to include the date, time and cost. If you must, snail mail to Calapatra c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801. You can also submit online. Just find the “submit an event” link under the Spotlight on the right corner at missoulanews.com.

FEATURING

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SATURDAY, SA ATTURDAY, APRIL APR 11TH [36] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015

SPONSORED BY BY::

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[outdoors]

MOUNTAIN HIGH

D

on your fur trader best in coonskin caps and Pendleton jackets if you don’t want to stand out in a crowd when the Sapphire Mountain Men host their Sixth Annual Public Day. The Sapphire Mountain Men’s organization stands on the principles of the safe usage of muzzle-loading firearms, developing accurate pre-1840s period representations for historical interest, good sportsmanship and patriotism. Because 'Merica! Join the Mountain Men for a day of fun at the Hellgate Civilian Shooting Range, where you can try your hand at shooting a black-powder rifle and impress your buds with your tomahawk throwing abilities while wandering among period-dressed reenactors and historical displays of the days of fur trading. Further your

mountain man skills by learning to start a fire with flint and steel, and test your stomach by trying a piece of hardtack. Hardtack, the scourge of Civil War soldiers, is a very hard cracker made from flour, water and salt. It may not seem like a delicious snack option, but it lasts indefinitely, which makes it a good option to have in a mountain survival pack, I suppose. I'll probably just stick with granola bars. —Kellen Beck The Sapphire Mountain Men’s Sixth Annual Public Day will be hosted Sun., April 12. Noon-4 PM. Hellgate Civilian Shooting Range. 7350 Zaugg Drive in Bonner.

n esso L e Lif #01

Life is a journey live it!

fsbmsla.com

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

SATURDAY APRIL 11

MONDAY APRIL 13

Join MOBI for the Lolo Lulu group ride, enjoying all the scenery that Highway 12 has to offer. Meet at Fort Fizzle for the 60-mile ride at 11 AM, plan for a large lunch at the Lolo Pass visitor center. You also have the option of meeting at Lolo Conoco at 10 AM or continuing on through Lolo Pass for lunch at Lochsa Lodge. Contact Diana Bjorgen at 327-9697 for more information.

Five Valleys Audubon goes down unda with a program highlighting the wildlife and scenery of the Antarctic Peninsula and Falkland Islands. Gallagher Business Building, room L14. 7:30-9 PM. In addition, two recipients of last year’s Philip L. Wright Student Research awards will briefly present their research results.

Hellgate Hunters and Anglers host the ninth annual Wild Night for Wildlife, with drinks, guest speakers, raffles, wild game appetizers and more. Buying admission gets you a membership and entry into the shindig. Call 546-8406 or email royalwolf@gmail.com to learn more.

SUNDAY APRIL 12 Earth Day isn’t the only one set aside for planting trees when Missoula Parks and Rec and Run Wild Missoula host the 23rd annual Run for the Trees, kicking off with Mayor Engen planting a tree before the 5K and 10K races, plus a 1-mile fun run, outdoor fair and family activities at Silver Park all morning. $25 to join the 5K and 10K, participants receive a sapling and a commemorative T-shirt. 9:45 AM. Visit runwildmissoula.org. Cheeseburger in Stevensville would have been a better song, Mr. Buffet. Hum your way down the Bitterroot for MOBI’s Stevi Cheeseburger Boogie group ride. Meet at Montana Lil’s at 10 AM and bike 55 miles up and down the paved bike path, refueling with lunch at Frontier Cafe. You can also start from the Lolo Conoco at 10:30 too. For info, contact Ray Johnson at 239-1448 or rwj1448@yahoo.com.

TUESDAY APRIL 14 This month’s edition of Rocky Mountaineers presents buddies Julie, Kate and Laurie chatting about their touring bike adventures in the Little Belt Range. Trail Head, 221 E. Front St. 7 PM. Free.

WEDNESDAY APRIL 15 Ride the tidal wave of Coldsmoke when the Community Pint Night benefits the Max Wave surfing installation on the Clark Fork. Kettlehouse Northside, 5-8 PM, with premier of the film about the Max Wave at 7 pm. When it is time to Pardee, we will Pardee hard when the Glacial Lake Missoula group hangs out with archivist Anne Millbrooke, who will illustrate the life and times of J.T. Pardee, the geologist who discovered evidence of the ancient floods. Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St., 7 PM. $4 suggested donation/free for MNHC and GLM members.

THURSDAY APRIL 16 Adventure Life hosts a screening of the BBC TV series “Wild China,” all about that country’s flora and fauna, at the Roxy. Doors open at 6:30 PM, showing starts at 7:00 PM. Appetizers provided by China Buffet. calendar@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [37]


[community]

Having a baby seems dauntingly tough enough even when all goes well, with the prospect of pregnancy, labor, medical bills and then taking the dang thing home and figuring out how to keep it alive for 18 years or so. Pregnancy and childbirth are associated with all sorts of hormonal disruptions, which in 10–20 percent of women manifests as a mood disorder during the perinatal period. According to the Mayo Clinic, many more women experience a brief period of mood swings and depression that’s informally called the “baby blues.” Adding to the problem, a lot of new moms don’t feel comfortable expressing their darker thoughts or moods during a time when they’re supposed to be thrilled with their baby, for fear of

sounding like a “bad mom.” But the tide is turning, and some states have enacted laws requiring doctors to screen new mothers for perinatal mood disorders. You can find a supportive community and resources when St. Patrick’s Hospital and the Western Montana Clinic host a screening of and panel discussion about Dark Side of the Full Moon, an Indiegogo-funded documentary made by two mothers that addresses perinatal depression and anxiety. —Kate Whittle Dark Side of the Full Moon screens at the Roxy Thu., April 4, at 7 PM. $5.

[AGENDA LISTINGS] THURSDAY APRIL 9 Find out all about the upcoming construction for the $36 million Fort Missoula Regional Park approved by last year’s voters at an open house at Missoula Children’s Theatre at 6:30 PM. The new Minimalist Meet-Up Group gets together to chat about a clutter-free lifestyle as inspired by the Minimalist author dudes. Break Espresso, second Thursday of the month at 7 PM. Email Cindy for more info at cindyart5@yahoo.com.

FRIDAY APRIL 10 Folks with disabilities can get creative at Art Group, every second and fourth Friday of the month at Summit Independent from 2-4 PM. Call 728-1630. Local animal activists host educational presentations outside the Shrine Circus’s performances at the Adams Center to raise awareness of animal cruelty allegations. Fri., April 10, before the 3 and 7 PM shows, and Sat., April 11 before the 11 AM, 3 and 7 PM shows.

SATURDAY APRIL 11 The sixth annual NCBI Missoula Diversity Day parties down at the Missoula Senior Center, with local youth performing song, dance, spoken word and multimedia art on the theme “Diverse City.” 6 PM.

MONDAY APRIL 13 Grab a cup of good coffee and sit down to chat about end-of-life issues at Hospice of Missoula’s Death Cafe, ‘cuz nobody’s getting out of here alive. Meets at Caffe Dolce from 10 AM-noon on the second Wednesday of each month to learn from community members and care providers alike.

WEDNESDAY APRIL 15 Get in touch with healing arts at the Creative Connections for Cancer Survivors workshop, every third

Wednesday of the month at Living Art Studio, 725 W. Alder St. Unit 17. Noon-1:30 PM. Free. Call 549-5329 for info. Practice empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication, a peaceful communication weekly practice group, where you’ll role-play stressful situations and practice responding calmly. Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Wednesdays at noon. Free. Arabic instructor Abdelilah Bouasria presents “Peaceful Islam, or, Much Ado about ISIS,” part of the Mansfield spring brown-bag lecture series. University Center room 333. 12:10-1 PM. The interactive Grief Institute Community Workshop offers tips on talking about suicide and seeking help, as part of Tamarack Grief Resource Center’s conference on grief. St. Patrick Hospital, 4:30-6 PM. Free. Visit tamarackgriefresourcecenter.org or call 5418472. Find help with food issues at the Overeaters Anonymous meetings on the third floor of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church on Brooks St., Wednesdays. Newbies can come at 6:30 PM, and the regular meeting begins at 7 PM. Free. Call 543-5509 for info.

THURSDAY APRIL 16 There’s no such thing as too many books, so check out the AAUW-PDK Used Book Sale for deals at the Orchard Homes Country Life Club, 2537 South Third St. W., Thu., 10 AM-8 PM, Fri., 10 AM-5 PM, Sat., 10 AM-5 PM and Sun., 10 AM-2 PM. Call 543-5975 for info. Meet your potential MCPS trustees at the Missoula School District Trustee Candidate Forum, with everyone who’s filed in the elementary and high school positions. City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St., from 7-8 PM.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

[38] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015


missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [39]


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

April 9-April 16, 2015

COMMUNITY BOARD ADD/ADHD relief ... Naturally! Reiki • CranioSacral Therapy • Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT). Your Energy Fix. James V. Fix, RMT, EFT, CST 406210-9805, 415 N. Higgins Ave #19 • Missoula, MT 59802. yourenergyfix.com Build skills! Build community! Build a compost bin for MUD at the MAKE SOMETHING: Compost Bin Building Party at Home ReSource - Saturday April 25 2-

5 p.m. FREE! Missoula Medical Aid: Working for Health in Honduras. In 1998 we responded after a devastating hurricane. The need still continues, and so do we. Will you help? Volunteer or donate today! missoulamedicalaid.org Missoula Medical Aid: Working for Health in Honduras. Please donate now at missoulamedicalaid.org!

Save money and green your business by reducing waste with 10 TIPS TO ZERO WASTE YOUR BUSINESS a FREE Home ReSource event! - Thursday April 16 4:30-6 p.m. RSVP: katie@homeresource.org.

LOST & FOUND Lost Pit bull. Seeley lake. Smokey was last seen in

Seeley Lake. He is a very friendly boy so it’s possible someone may have picked him up. Please help find him! Contact Molly 2076521. Thank you

Table of contents Advice Goddess . . . . . .C2

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Tom is one very determined puppy. Tom and his littermates have a neurological condition that limits their ability to move. But, his mobility changed when two wonderful volunteers made a four-wheeled cart for him, giving him the independence to get around on his own on smooth surfaces. Another generous individual saw the difference mobility made to Tom and donated an “off-road” cart. Now Tom can go pretty much

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anywhere. Please contact adoptions@myhswm.org or visit the shelter to learn more about Tom or call 549-3934


ADVICE GODDESS By Amy Alkon

EYES THE LIGHT UP A WOMB I'm a 35-year-old guy who's doing online dating and who's against having kids for moral reasons. Don't get me wrong; I love kids. I just don't think we need any more people on this crowded, violent planet. I'm wondering whether I should make the "no kids" thing clear in my profile. I know this can be a major deal-breaker for many women. —Nobody's Daddy Saying you won't have kids for "moral reasons" sounds better than my reasons: I find them loud, sticky, and expensive. There's also the problem of how long they take to, uh, ripen, which used to be 18 years—before kids started living at home until 30. (Many murder sentences are shorter.) And now, bear with me as I put a buzz saw through your reasons. As for this “violent planet” business, it used to be that somebody was always cracking somebody over the head with a cudgel. But today, as psychologist Steven Pinker reports in “The Better Angels of Our Nature,” the planet is less violent than ever, and violence continues to decline. As for the “crowded” argument, in 2011, National Geographic’s Robert Kunzig reported that all seven billion earthlings could fit comfortably in Texas—”if Texas were settled as densely as New York City.” And it turns out that women in the U.S. aren’t having enough children to replace the population dying off. According to World Bank data, American mommies are only having 1.9 children, while demographers put the replacement rate at 2.1 of the screeching, airplane seat-kicking little darlings. The good news is that if you truly like kids, you don't have to bring them into the world to bring them into your life. There's adoption, of course (though most women who can give birth to children will want to instead of importing one “made in China”). But there are also countless kids already in existence whose divorced, widowed, or otherwise single moms have a harder time finding boyfriends—even if they’re uber-hot and so sweet they make your teeth hurt. Do profile searches for moms, and say in your profile that you don’t want to create new earthlings but love kids and are open to a woman who already has some. To describe the likely spike in your popularity after hanging the “Welcome, Single Moms!” sign, well, ever watch a pack of wild din-

COMMUNITY BOARD LOST: FERRET! Small gray female with white feet in neighborhood of 1000 South 6th West. 5491274

goes descend on a downed cow? Then again, say you like your life childfree but went all eco-pacifist so you wouldn’t seem like a big meanie. Definitely put the “nobody's daddy” thing in your profile. You might also want to consider a vasectomy (with a surgeon who does loads of them, which lessens the risks). Unfortunately, getting snipped is not the deterrent to aspiring mommies you might think it would be. Women pining to spawn are prone to chirp, “Vasectomies can be reversed!”—forgetting that it’s a little harder to reverse a man's aversion to, say, tapping into a quarter-million-plus dollars of his earnings to fund orthodontia, grad school and rehab. More bad news: For some women, not wanting kids at the moment seems to be no guarantee of not eventually wanting them. Badly. Desperately. And by the way, I've always found the “Come on, you’ll want kids someday!” remark insulting, as if some random stranger at a cocktail party could know my mind better than I do. But a study in the Journal of Evolutionary Psychology by Finnish researcher Anna Rotkirch found that women—like me—who were sure they didn’t want children sometimes found themselves suddenly experiencing “baby fever,” which goes way beyond the wish to have a child. It’s a painful physical longing to have a baby (often experienced in a woman’s early 20s and between 28 and 35). One of Rotkirch’s subjects, a woman in her 30s who knew it wasn’t the right time for a child, described feeling an “agonizing” and “all-encompassing desire” to have one, to the point where she was ”practically ready to rob a sperm bank.” In other words, yes: Disclose! Disclose! Disclose! State your preference in your profile. But don't think that this will be any sort of mandate for women to care about what you want. Some will—even some of those with a uterus howling, “I WANT A BAYBEEE!” They’ll be the ones who default to their ethics instead of their biology. So until there's highly reliable male birth control that doesn’t require a scalpel, make it your priority to find out whether a woman is ethical before having sex with her. It’s really your best—and maybe only—defense against the joy of bringing something into the world that spends half its time hating you and the other half begging you for money.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com.

[C2] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015

TO GIVE AWAY FREE SAMPLES of Emu Oil. Learn more about the many health benefits that Emu offer

from oil and skin care products to eggs, steaks, filets and ground meat. Wild Rose Emu Ranch. (406) 363-1710. wildroseemuranch.com

with simple things like grocery shopping, & socializing. Earn a small stipend if 55+ & meet income guidelines. Call Missoula Aging Services, 728-7682.

VOLUNTEERS Senior Companions needed for older adults. Help

STORAGE UNITS EAST OF MSLA

Close to University 10x10 $50 10x20 $70 Rainbow Mini Storage 880-8228

EMPLOYMENT GENERAL

Job Service. employ missoula.com Job # 10118580

Assistant Manager This is a place where great people are in great company. This is much more than a job, it is a career. We have fun, and we offer personal challenges and growth. $32k/year. Full job listing online at . Job ID# 24063

Housekeeping Temp To FullTime. Busy local hotel seeking experienced housekeepers. Ideal candidate will be able to work both Saturday and Sunday. Full time $8.50 hr. Full job listing online at lcstaffing.com. Job ID# 24172

Bookkeeper Seeking a parttime/long term Bookkeeper to collect and classify financial information according to GAAP for an accountant. $12.00$15.00/DOE. Full job listing online at www.lcstaffing.com Job ID #24758 Delivery Driver For linen service in Missoula and surrounding area. Two overnights required. Delivery experience and extensive knowledge of the Missoula area. Able to lift #75 pounds on a regular basis. Clean driving record required. Wage DOE $13-15. Full job listing online at lcstaffing.com Job ID #24715 General Office Help/Labor This is a beginning position for general office help/labor with the opportunity to advance into accounting, bookkeeping and payroll. Duties include filing, data entry, parts delivery, cleaning, inventory, reception, general secretarial and miscellaneous office/shop task. Full job description at Missoula

Office Assistant Real Estate office seeking a candidate with the following skills: Outlook , Microsoft Word, Excel, online analytical understanding and organizational skills. Full job listing online at lcstaffing.com Job ID #24730 Production and Facilities Manager Temp To FullTime. $18.00/hour. Exciting opportunity to lead a team in a well established production manufacturing firm. Arlee, MT. Full job listing online at lcstaffing.com. Job ID# 23839

Receptionist/Dispatch Looking for friendly

person to anwser phones, schedule and dispatch service department. Must have computer skills and Quickbooks backgroud is preferred. Full time position is open immediately. Wage based on experience. Full job description at Missoula Job Service. employmissoula.com Job # 10118640

DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONAL Supporting Persons with Disabilities in Enhancing their Quality of Life. Evenings, Overnights & Weekend hours available.  $9.20-$10.40/hr. Excellent Benefits!!

Must Have: Valid Mt driver license, No history of neglect, abuse or exploitation

NO RESUMES. EEO/AA-M/F/disability/protected veteran status. Applications available at

OPPORTUNITY RESOURCES, INC., 2821 S. Russell, Missoula, MT. 59801 or online at www.orimt.org. Extensive background checks will be completed.

Sewing Machine Operator Manufacturing company seeking employee to sew for pool accessory line. Lifting requirement of 75+. Previous knowledge preferred but employer is willing to train. Monday- Friday 3: 30pm- 2am. Generous benefits package. $11.50-12.50 DOE. Full job listing online at lcstaffing.com Job ID #24682 Start your humanitarian career! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 1, 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! 269-5910518 info@oneworldcenter.org Travel Agent This is an immediate part-time opportunity for a sales-minded individual to join an exclusive team of Travel Agents in our booming Missoula branch office. Full job listing online at lcstaffing.com Job ID #24662

ploymissoula.com 10118625

Job

#

CHIP TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED from the Missoula area. • Local hauls • Home daily • Good pay • Benefits • 2 years exp. required Call 406493-7876 9am-5pm M-F. Downtown Ambassador Seeking reliable Ambassador. Concierge meets safety patrol. Must know DT well. missouladown town.com/employment or 543-4238 FLATBED DRIVERS NEEDED • Home weekly to Biweekly • Top pay • Full benefits • New equipment • 2 years exp. required • Clean driving record 1-800-700-6305

PROFESSIONAL

Human Resource Generalist Perform a broad range of professional HR tasks. BA, 3-5 years experience. Arlee, MT. $50K/yr. Full job listing online at lcstaffing.com. Job ID# 24118

CDL Flatbed Truck Driver Jones Brothers Trucking is currently seeking drivers of all levels of experience to make runs throughout all of the United States and Canada. Whether you’re an experienced OTR driver or new to the industry and still in need of training, we’re here to help! Full job description at Missoula Job Service. em-

Property Management Admin. Assistant Approximately 1-3 years of previous administrative experience preferred. Real estate / Property Management experience. High school diploma required, some college preferred. SKILLS MUST INCLUDE: proficiency with Microsoft Word and Excel, ability to organize and prioritize workload, exhibit strong written and

NOW RECRUITING FOR Laundry Production Shipping Receiving Carpenter Ophthalmic Assistant Maintenance Receptionist Assistant Manager Bookkeeper Administrative Assistant Visit our website for more jobs! www.lctsaffing.com

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Seeking part-time 6th-8th grade Social Studies Instructor for a one year contract. Visit sussexschool.org for job description & application instructions


EMPLOYMENT verbal communication, and strong attention to detail and accuracy. Full job description at Missoula Job Service. employmissoula.com Job # 10118602 Systems Engineer Consumer Direct Management Solutions has a full-time Systems Engineer position available. College degree and 5 years relevant experience in a Microsoft or Cisco environment required. For full job description and to apply please visit our Careers webpage at: http://careers.consumerdirectcare.com/jobs/view/systems-engineer-2/

SKILLED LABOR

ners. Listing available at MissoulaDowntown.com or call 5434238. TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-545-4546

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION Annual Wildland Fire Refresher Training 406-543-0013 www.blackbull-wildfire.com

Home ReSource seeks a dynamic, mission-motivated Operations Manager to manage the administrative and accounting systems of our growing nonprofit business. For more information and how to apply, see www.homeresource.org. Summer DT Facilities Staff Hiring energetic staff for Downtown Missoula, inc. Caras Park Events, Flowers, and Ban-

HEALCAREERS

MARKETPLACE ND! $15,000 student loan repayment, relocation assistance, and $2,000 sign-on bonus. New grads welcome! rgolke@ jmhcc.org or 701-584-7247 Ophthalmic Assistant Primary duties include performing automated and non-automated ophthalmic testing, assisting with minor surgery or laser treatments in the office, educating patients on medications, and pre-and post-operative instructions. Additional office duties as assigned. Full job listing online at lcstaffing.com Job ID #24733 SCHOOL-BASED MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN Missoula employer is seeking a fulltime licensed mental health professional (LCPC, LCSW, or license-eligible) to provide schoolbased (CSCT) services in a Structured Learning Program classroom. Full job description at

Liberty Medical Center (Chester, MT) has openings for a Clinic Administrator and Director of Ancillary/Lab Manager. Contact Bev Halter, HR at 406-759-5181 for information.

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SALES Outside Sales in Missoula Seeking an outside sales candidate for a full time, permanent position M-F 8-5pm, **This position is intended to be fulltime year-round*Full job description at Missoula Job Service. employmissoula.com Job # 10118502

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PETS & ANIMALS AniMeals Seniors for Seniors program waives the adoption fee for anyone 65 and older adopting a cat 9 years old and older. All cats are spayed or neutered, vaccinated, and microchipped free of cost before they’re adopted. For more information call AniMeals at 721-4710.

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missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [C3]


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT 2831 Fort Missoula Road, Ste. 105, Bldg. 2

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): "Everything we do in life is based on fear, especially love," said Cancerian comedian Mel Brooks. Although he was joking, he was also quite serious. More often than we like to admit, desperation infects our quest to be cared for. Our decisions about love may be motivated by a dread of loneliness. We worry about whether we are worthy of getting the help and support we need. It's a fundamental human problem, so there's no reason to be ashamed if you have this tendency yourself. Having said that, I'm happy to report that you now have the necessary power to overcome this tendency. You will be able to summon tremendous courage as you revise and refine your relationship with love. It's time to disappear the fear.

Christine White N.D.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): When he was in his fifties, French painter Claude Monet finally achieved financial success. He used his new riches to buy a house and land, then hired gardeners to help him make a pond full of water lilies. For the first time in his life, he began to paint water lilies. During the next 30 years, they were his obsession and his specialty. He made them a central feature of 250 canvases, which now serve as one of his signature contributions to art history. "I planted my water lilies for pleasure," he said. "I cultivated them without thinking of painting them. And then suddenly, I had the revelation of the magic of my pond." I regard the imminent future as a good time for you to do something similar, Gemini: Create or find a source of beauty that will stimulate your sense of wonder and fuel your passion to express yourself for a long time.

Family Care • IV Therapy • Women’s Health

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Your nasty, nagging little demon isn't nasty or nagging any more. It's not doing what demons are supposed to do. It's confused, haggard, and ineffective. I almost feel sorry for the thing. It is barely even keeping you awake at night, and its ability to motivate you through fear is at an all-time low. Here's what I suggest: Now, when the demon's strength is waning and its hold on you is weak, you should break up with it for good. Perform an ultimate, non-reversible exorcism. Buy it a one-way bus ticket to the wasteland and say goodbye forever.

BLACK BEAR NATUROPATHIC

By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): Uitwaaien is a Dutch word that means to go out for a stroll in windy weather simply because it's exhilarating. I don't know any language that has parallel terms for running in the rain for the dizzy joy of it, or dancing through a meadow in the dark because it's such nonsensical fun, or singing at full volume while riding alone in an elevator in the mad-happy quest to purge your tension. But in the coming weeks, you don't need to describe or explain experiences like this; you just need to do them. Experiment with giving your instinctive need for exuberance lots of room to play.

b

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A lot has happened since you were . . . uh . . . indisposed. You've missed out on several plot twists. The circle has been broken, repaired, broken again, and partially repaired. Rumors have been flying, allegiances have been shifting, and riddles have been deepening. So are you ready yet to return to the heated action? Have you learned as much as you can from the commotion that provoked your retreat? Don't try to return too early. Make sure you are at least 70 percent healed.

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Rent, but don't buy yet. That's my $250-per-hour advice. Keep rehearsing, but don't start performing the actual show. OK? Flirt, but don't fall in love. Can you handle that much impulse control? Are you strong enough to explore the deeper mysteries of patience? I swear to you that your burning questions will ultimately be answered if you don't try to force the answers to arrive according to a set timetable. I guarantee that you will make the necessary connections as long as you don't insist that they satisfy every single one of your criteria.

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The Guerrilla Girls are a group of prankster activists who use humor to expose sexism and racism in the art world. Every so often they take a "weenie count" at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art. During their first survey in 1989, they found that five percent of the artists who had work hanging in the galleries were women, while 85 percent of the nudes depicted in the paintings were women. More recently, in 2012, their weenie count revealed that four percent of the artists were female, but 76 percent of the naked people in the paintings were female. The coming week would be a good time for you to take a weenie count in your own sphere, Scorpio. Conditions are more favorable than usual to call attention to gender disparities, and to initiate corrective action.

f

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The English term "engine" refers primarily to a machine that transforms energy into mechanical power. But its roots are in the Old French word engin, which meant skill or wit, and in the Latin word ingenium, defined as "inborn talent." I'd like to borrow the original meanings to devise your horoscope this week. According to my reading of the astrological omens, your "engine" is unusually strong right now, which means that your cultivated skills and innate talents are functioning at peak levels. I suggest you make intensive use of them to produce maximum amounts of energy and gather more of the clout you'd love to wield.

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): What I'm about to say is not a hard scientific fact, but it is a rigorous poetic fable. You don't need to go to the mountain, because the mountain is willing and able to come to you. But will it actually come to you? Yes, but only if you meet two conditions. The mountain will pick itself up and move all the way to where you are if you make a lot of room for it and if you are prepared to work with the changes its arrival will bring.

h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): If you were a four-year-old, cookies might be a valuable treasure to you. Given a choice between a bowl of stir-fried organic vegetables and a plate full of chocolate coconut macaroons, you'd probably choose the macaroons. For that matter, if you were four years old and were asked to decide between getting a pile of macaroons and a free vacation to Bali or an original painting by Matisse or a personal horoscope reading from the world's greatest astrologer, you'd also opt for the cookies. But since you're a grownup, your list of priorities is screwed on straight, right? You would never get distracted by a sugary, transitory treat that would cause you to ignore a more nourishing and long-lasting pleasure. Right?

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): On June 23, 1917, Babe Ruth was the starting pitcher for the Boston Red Sox in a Major League Baseball game against the Washington Senators. After the first batter drew a walk, Ruth got upset with the home plate umpire and punched him in the head. Ejected! Banished! The Babe had to be dragged off the field by the cops. The new pitcher was Ernie Shore. He proceeded to pitch a perfect game, allowing no further Washington player to reach base in all nine innings. In the coming weeks, Pisces, I see you as having the potential to duplicate Ernie Shore's performance in your own sphere. Coming in as a replacement, you will excel. Chosen as a substitute, you will outdo the original. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES.

[C4] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015

ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com

BODY MIND SPIRIT Affordable, quality addiction counseling in a confidential, comfortable atmosphere. Stepping Stones Counseling, PLLC. Shari Rigg, LAC • 406926-1453 • shari@steppingstonesmissoula.com. Skype sessions available. BioMat FREE First Session Far Infrared Therapy Restoration, Detox, Balance Call 541-8444

Got Speedy Recovery?

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Do you ever feel reverence and awe, Leo? Are there times when you spontaneously yearn to engage in acts of worship? Is there anyone or anything that evokes your admiration, humility, and gratitude? The coming weeks will be a good time to seek out experiences like these. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you will get tender jolts of transformational inspiration if you blend yourself with a sublime force that you trust and respect.

c

INSTRUCTION

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experience in physical therapy. Shana’s Heart of Healing, Shana Dieterle, LPT 396-5788 Now accepting new Mental Health patients. Blue Mountain Clinic, 610 N California, 721-1646, www.bluemountain clinic.org


PUBLIC NOTICES MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP-15-51 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DENNIS LEE LALKO, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above! named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever

barred. Claims must either be mailed to DIANE WELTY, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Thomas C. Orr Law Offices, P.C., 523 South Orange Street, P.O. Box 8096, Missoula, Montana 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 27th day of March, 2015. /s/ Diane Welty, Personal Representative THOMAS C. ORR LAW OFFICE, P.C. 523 South Orange Street Missoula, Montana 59807 Attorneys for Personal RepresentativeBy: /s/ Thomas C. Orr, Esq.

MNAXLP MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP15-46 Dept. No. 4 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF ELVA M. GREIL, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Robert S. Greil has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be

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mailed to Robert S. Greil, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Dan G. Cederberg, PO Box 8234, Missoula, Montana 598078234, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 17th day of March, 2015. CEDERBERG LAW OFFICES, P.C., 269 West Front Street, PO Box 8234, Missoula, MT 59807-8234 /s/ Dan G. Cederberg, Attorneys for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP15-48 Dept. No. 3 NOTICE TO CREDITOR IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DONALD RAYMOND PARRETTE, DECEASED. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Mary J. Adams Riggs, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 2620 Connery Way, Missoula, Montana 59808, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 17th day of March, 2015. /s/ Mary J. Adams Riggs, Personal Representative DARTY LAW OFFICE, PLLC /s/ Steve Darty, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP15-49 Dept. No. 4 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF LOUIS A. TECCA, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the above-named estate. All person having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Lisa Tecca and Tandra J. Tecca Plympton, CoPersonal Representatives, return receipt requested, c/o GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 4110 Weeping Willow Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803, or filed with the Clerk of the above-named Court. DATED this 27th day of February, 2015. /s/ Lisa Tecca, Co-Personal Representative /s/ Tandra J. Plympton, CoPersonal Representative. /s/ Nancy Gibson, Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DR15-206 Department No. 1 Summons for Publication IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF Renata Barros deSilva, Petitioner, and Stephen Emerson Eckhold, Respondent. THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED RESPONDENT: You, the Respondent, are hereby summoned to answer the Petition in this action, which is filed with the Clerk of Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer and serve a cop thereof upon the Petitioner within twenty days after service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the Petition. This action is brought to obtain a dissolution. Title to and interest in the following real property will be involved in this action: None. DATED this 31st day of March, 2015. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: /s/ Gayle Johnston, Deputy Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DV15-190 Dept. No.: 2 Robert L. Deschamps, III Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Jamie McGarvey, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Jamie Sue McGarvey to Jamie Henkel Kearra. The hearing will be on 04/21/2015 at 11:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: March 10, 2015. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Molly Reynolds, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 2 Cause No. DG-14-78 NOTICE OF HEARING In the Matter of the Guardianship of Baby S., A minor. COME NOW, the Petitioners, Jordan Rae Kaufman and Zachery W. Bingham, by and through their counsel of record, St. Peter Law Offices, and hereby give notice that Petitioners have requested this court be appointed as full and permanent guardians and conservators or the minor child Baby S. A hearing on this matter will be held on the 28th day of April, 2015, at 11:00 a.m. at the Missoula County Courthouse in Missoula, Montana. DATED this 20th day of March, 2015. ST. PETER LAW OFFICES, P.C. By: /s/ Linda Osorio St. Peter

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-15-52 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DONNA J. SUTTON, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be certified mail, return receipt requested, to Mary Ellen O’Donnell, c/o Worden Thane P.C., PO Box 4747, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 20th day of March, 2015. /s/ Mary Ellen O’Donnell, Personal Representative WORDEN THANE PC Attorneys for Personal Representative By: /s/ Patrick Dougherty

several variations listed in the case caption above, to her one true legal name, JULIE ANNE GOEBEL. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is further hereby given to all persons interested in the matter that a Hearing on the Petition will be held at the Missoula County Courthouse in Missoula, Montana on the 23rd day of April, 2015, at 9:00 a.m., at which time any objections to the Petition will be heard. Any person desiring to object to the granting of the Petition may do so by filing a proper objection in writing with the clerk of said court with any such filing completed no later than the time set for hearing. DATED this 10th day of March, 2015. /s/ Michelle Vipperman, Deputy Clerk IT IS, THEREFORE, ORDERED ADJUDGED, AND DECREED that Petitioner’s former aliases of her one time name of Julie Anne Goebel, be forever changed for all purposes under the law to JULIE ANNE GOEBEL. DATED this 10th day of March, 2015. /s/ John W. Larson, District Court Judge

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Probate No. DP-15-47 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF KELLY K. BULLOCK, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Ronald D. Bullock has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the Deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Christian, Samson & Jones, PLLC, Attorneys for the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 310 West Spruce, Missoula, Montana 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 9th day of March, 2015. /s/ Ronald D. Bullock, Personal Representative of the Estate of Kelly K. Bullock /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Attorney for Personal Representative

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate No. DP-15-50 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF RONALD L. ANDERSON, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to JUDITH ESTA ANDERSON and KENT K. ANDERSON, the Co-Personal Representatives, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane P.C., PO Box 4747, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DV-15-193 NOTICE OF HEARING ON PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF JULIA ANN GOEBEL, a/k/a JULIA ANNE GOEBEL, a/k/a JULIE A. GOEBEL, and a/k/a JULIA A. GOEBEL TO CHANGE HER NAME TO JULIE ANNE GOEBEL Notice is hereby given that Petitioner, Julie Anne Goebel, has filed a Petition with this Court for permission to change her name from the

CLARK FORK STORAGE

will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 83, 241. Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting 4/22/2015 by appt only by calling 541-7919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to 4/23/2015 at 4:00 P.M. Buyer’s bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [C5]


JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s “Presidential Pets”-they’re a bunch of animals.

by Matt Jones

ACROSS

1 Word before out or put 5 It precedes theta 8 Make a difference 14 Phone connection 15 3-D med. scan 16 "Java" trumpeter 17 Rob Ford, by residence 19 With 20-Across, the first cat president? 20 See 19-Across 22 Luau staple 23 Two-player card game 24 Twice-serving dog president? 32 Affix, as a button 33 "As I see it," in a text 34 "Night" author Wiesel 35 "Mod Squad" member 36 Flower part made up of sepals 38 Up and quit 39 ___ Day multivitamins 40 Ending for spat 41 Directed (toward) 42 Recent small, furry president in a cage? 46 Resort type 47 Victorian or Edwardian, e.g. 48 Leading pot-bellied pig president? 55 Underwater naval habitat 57 Picture of pandemonium 58 Actress Hemingway 59 Brian who released "Ambient 4: On Land" 60 ___ Romeo (Italian car company) 61 Elastic 62 WSJ rival 63 Each

Last week’s solution

DOWN 1 Like molasses 2 Turner of note 3 Formicary dwellers 4 "Hell ___!" 5 Key of Brahms's Symphony No. 4 6 Dire 7 Grammar class faux pas 8 Zenith competitor, once 9 Porto ___, Brazil 10 You, long ago 11 Radial, e.g. 12 Rowing machine unit 13 Delivery path, for short 18 Decide not to go green? 21 "I ___ soul to the company store" ("Sixteen Tons" lyric) 24 Queen, in Quebec 25 "For Sale by ___" 26 Words from the teacher? 27 Pale purple 28 Aboveboard, slangily 29 Texas Revolution site 30 "Separate Tables" Oscar winner David 31 Monopoly holding 32 Go through mud 36 Deserving of blame 37 Koran focus 41 "Delta of Venus" author Nin 43 Jordan's neighbor 44 Like some furniture polishes 45 1950 sci-fi short story collection by Isaac Asimov 48 Modern Maturity publisher 49 Radar reading 50 "I totally agree!" 51 Elite Eight org. 52 Iodine-rich seaweed 53 Lowdown 54 Certain tide 55 Texting protocol initials 56 Evian or Perrier ©2015 Jonesin’ Crosswords

PUBLIC NOTICES the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the State o Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 18th day of March, 2015. /s/ Judith Esta Anderson, CoPersonal Representative /s/ Kent K. Anderson, Co-Personal Representative WORDEN THANE PC Attorneys for Co-Personal Representatives By: /s/ William E. McCarthy Montana Fourth Judicial District Court, Missoula County Probate No DP 15-58 District Judge John W. Larson Dept. No. 3 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of MURRAY F. EHLERS Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above estate. All persons having claims against the Decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or their claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to JAMES M. EHLERS, the personal representative, return receipt requested, in care of his attorney, Robert G. Michelotti, Jr., of Crowley Fleck PLLP, 500 Transwestern Plaza II, 490 North 31st Street, Billings, Montana 59101, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 31st day of March, 2015. /s/ JAMES M. EHLERS, Personal Representative ADDRESS: 3925 208th PL SE Bothell, Washington 98021 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/26/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200702634, Bk. 791, Pg. 655, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Mark W. Knight and Laura A. Knight, husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Home123 Corporation was Beneficiary and First American Title Insurance Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Insurance Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 55-B of Snider Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200807848, Bk. 816, Pg. 1024, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to HSBC Bank USA, National Association as Trustee for Deutsche Alt-A Securities

[C6] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015

Mortgage Loan Trust, Series 2007-AR3. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 6, 2015, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $1,067,353.15. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $599,322.54, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 15, 2015 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7777.26264) 1002.97599-File No.

MNAXLP NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/31/09, recorded as Instrument No. 200928024 Bk: 851 Pg: 474, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Paul E. Morrison, a married man as his sole and separate property was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 17 of Lakewood Estates Phase I, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because Section 9(a)(ii) The Property ceases to be the principal residence of a Borrower for reasons other than death and the property is not the principal residence of at least one other Borrower. Interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/11/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 3, 2015, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $320,989.34. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $278,925.84, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 15, 2015 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is,

where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.108632) 1002.267338File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 09/04/92, recorded as Instrument No. 9219519 Bk: 361 Pg: 15021509, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which James J Lewis, a single person was Grantor, Norwest Mortgage Inc. was Beneficiary and First American Title Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 15 in Pattee Canyon Addition to Farviews Homesites, a Platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official Recorded Plat Thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 9600394 BK: 461 Pg:721, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chevy Chase Bank, FSB. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 08/01/14 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 18, 2015, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $31,235.27. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $27,945.98, plus accrued

interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 2, 2015 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 8520.20231) 1002.278433-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 1, 2015, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 13 AND THE EAST ONE-HALF OF LOT 14 IN BLOCK 6 OF GLENWOOD PARK ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. RECORDING REFERENCE: BOOK 793 MICRO RECORDS AT


PUBLIC NOTICES PAGE 306 Leslie A Largay and John F Largay, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated March 8, 2007 and recorded March 8, 2007 in Book 793, Page 307 under Document No. 200705492. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. successor in interest to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc.. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,591.03, beginning January 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 25, 2014 is $209,707.47 principal, interest at the rate of 6.250% totaling $53,288.85, late charges in the amount of $261.90, escrow advances of $16,870.57, and other fees and expenses advanced of $7,973.28, plus accruing interest at the rate of $35.91 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environ-

mental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 21, 2015 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho )) ss. County of Bingham) On this 21st day of January, 2015, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, known to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that she executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 02/18/2020 Citimortgage V Largay 42011.428 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 1, 2015, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 13 OF SPRING MEADOWS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Josh Chesnut and Tanya Chesnut, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., a Montana Corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed

MNAXLP of Trust dated September 12, 2008 and recorded September 19, 2008 in book 826, page 932 under Document No. 200821748. The beneficial interest is currently held by Guild Mortgage Company, a California Corporation. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,045.04, beginning September 1, 2014, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 31, 2015 is $190,387.06 principal, interest at the rate of 4.0% totaling $3,891.60, late charges in the amount of $687.82, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,384.96, plus accruing interest at the rate of $21.15 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, whereis basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under

the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 21, 2015 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho )) ss. County of Bingham) On this 21st day of January, 2015, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, known to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that she executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 02/18/2020 Guild Vs. Chesnut 41291.874 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S

SALE on June 9, 2015, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 54 of Grantland Nine, A platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana according to the official recorded plat thereof Loubelle Lewis Blaich-Wissler Trustee of the Loubelle Lewis Blaich Wissler Trust Dated April 12, 1991, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, Inc, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on January 25, 2008 and recorded on January 30, 2008 in Book 812, Page 830 under Document no. 200802171. The beneficial interest is currently held by Quicken Loans Inc. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,571.54, beginning May 1, 2014, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 23, 2014 is $247,255.10 principal, interest at the rate of 5.625% totaling $10,110.38, late charges in the amount of $707.22, and other fees and

expenses advanced of $248.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $38.10 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an inter-

est in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 30, 2015 /s/ Lisa J. Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF IDAHO )) ss. County of Bingham) On this 30th day of January, 2015, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, known to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that she executed the same. /s/ Shannon Gavin Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 01/19/2018 Quicken V Blaich-wissler 42010.035

missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [C7]


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control 541-7387 DUDE• Dude is a 7-year-old male Pit

Bull mix. Dude needs a very special home where he can be the main focus and concern with no other dogs or small children. He recently had to have a leg amputated due to a dog fight and is learning to adjust to life as a tripod. He is a very sweet older boy and would make an amazing therapy dog. He is good with cats, but not all dogs.

A.K.•A.K. is a 4-6 year-old female Tortie.

Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MontanaSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

BARLEY•Barley is a 1-year-old male Pit

She needs a home that understands cats with sassy personalities. A.K. loves affection, but will let you know when she's done. Most of the time, her vocal habits are all just a front. She's sassy, but not mean. A.K. doesn't mind other cats, will probably put most dogs in their place, and is definitely not a cat for little kids.

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

BUTLER•Butler is a 3-5-year old male

Bull. This young and rambunctious guy loves all other dogs and wants to play from sun up to sun down. Barley is always wearing an excited smile, and his tail never stops wagging. The perfect family for Barley would be willing to put some time in teaching him manners and boundaries, as well as lots of time playing outdoors.

2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd 3510 S Reserve

Tuxedo DSH. Butler can be cranky from time to time, but when he finds a person he likes, he willingly gives head-butts and kisses. He gets along fairly well with most cats, but is not interested in cuddling with them. Butler likes his space, especially in your arms or on you lap. He could easily be a cat who only has eyes for his owner.

Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

BENNETT• Bennett is a 3-5 year-old

BLUE•Blue is a 7-year-old female Australian Shepherd/Queensland Heeler mix. She is a very loving lady. Blue is good with 2330 South Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59801 cats and older kids. She needs to be in an Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) only dog home as she has decided in her 3708 North Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59808 older age that she needs to be the focus. Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri) Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 9:00am-12:00pm (Sat)

male Orange Tabby patch cat. He is a very loving kitty. Bennett loves to be held, and will rub his head underneath your chin. He can be a tad bashful, but would likely come out of his shell in a home environment. For a young male cat, Bennett is actually very loving and would prefer to run away from other cats than get in a scuffle.

www.dolack.com Original Paintings, Prints and Posters 139 W. Front St., Missoula (406) 549-3248

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana 549-3934 LACY• Lacy can't wait to meet her knew family. She is an active, friendly and smart gal who would love to enjoy a Montana Spring going on hikes and car rides, swimming, playing fetch and playing with other dogs. Visit the Humane Society to learn more about Lacy and the 18th Annual Ken Shughart Humanitarian Award Dinner honoring Dr. David Bostwick!

Serving the community’s framing needs since 1993 using environmentally sustainable practices.

139 West Front St. inside the Monte Dolack Gallery, Downtown Missoula, MT

(406) 549-3248 • dolack.com

MOMMA• Momma would like to invite you to the 18th Annual Ken Shughart Humanitarian Award Dinner honoring Dr. Bostwick, DVM on Saturday April 11th. She would also like to invite you to come and meet her! Momma has been declawed and is looking for a family who will keep her inside and help her to slowly adjust to her new home.

REX• Rex

JUNIOR•Junior is friendly fellow who love car rides and playing with his brother, Tucker, with whom he hopes to be adopted. These 7-year-old Doxie mixes get along great with other dogs, are crate-trained and know words like "sit," "kennel," and "off." Come meet this sweet pair today!

is a friendly kitty cat who likes to chat it up with meows and purrs. He really enjoys being held and he likes giving and receiving rubs. He is a sweetheart looking for his forever home. Come meet this playful, comedic and loving snuggle bug today.

TWILA•Twila is a spunky lady looking

MAJOR• Meet

for her furrever home. She loves human attention and going on walks and car rides. Active, friendly and responsive, Twila makes great a jogging partner. She has nice leash manners and stays right by your side when on a walk. Visit myhswm.org to learn more about the life-saving work done at the Humane Society of Western Montana.

[C8] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

Major! This handsome, laid-back boy would love to meet you. He enjoys lounging on tall scratching posts and soaking up the sun in front of a window. Recently diagnosed with diabetes, Major is spending time in a temporary foster home while he adjusts to his very treatable condition. Call 406-549-3934 if you would like to learn more about adopting Major.

Missoula’s Locally Owned Neighborhood Pet Supply Store

www.gofetchdog.com - 728-2275 South Russell • North Reserve


RENTALS APARTMENTS

W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

1 bedroom, 1 bath, $625, New Complex, DW, A/C, coin-op laundry, storage, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

1-2 bedroom, 1 bath, $525$705. Downtown, coin-op laundry, carport, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

1 bedroom, 1 bath, $675, newer complex, near Broadway & Russell, DW, A/C, coin-op laundry, storage, off-street parking,

1-2 bedroom, 1 bath, $575$625, N. Russell, coin-op laundry, storage, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-8777353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

1-2 bedroom, 1 bath, $600$705, quiet cul-de-sac, near Good Food Store, DW, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 1024 Stephens #5. 2 bed/1 bath, central location, DW, coinops, cat? $725. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 106 Camelot Court: 2 Bedroom, Free DirecTV, Laundry, Heat paid $725. Garden City Property Management 549-6106 1 year Costco membership. 119 Turner Ct. #4, 2 bed/1 bath, Northside, W/D hookups, storage, pets? $650. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 1213 Cleveland St. “E”. 1 bed/1 bath, HEAT PAID, central location, shared W/D, pet? $600. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1301 Montana: Open studio, Wood floors, Private deck, Dish-

washer, On-site laundry, Heat paid $640. Garden City Property Management 549-6106 1 year Costco membership & $100 gift card. 1315 E. Broadway #4. 2 bed/1.5 bath, close to U, coinops, pet? $800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1335 Byron: 2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath, Storage, Laundry, All Paid, $825.Garden City Property Management 549-6106 1 year Costco membership 2 bed, 1 bath upstairs. 1100 sq.ft. Lots of closets. Nice view of city off deck plus carport. W/S/G paid. On bus line & within biking distance to UM. $750/month. Call 728-9372 or 728-3344 2 bedroom, 1 bath, $750, 62 and older community, third floor unit, elevator, coin-op laundry, free basic cable, H/W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bath, $795, Southside location, remodeled, w/d hookup, storage, carport, W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bath, $875-$895, 2 Weeks FREE w/6 Month Lease,

Brand New 6-Plex, DW, A/C, large closets, patio/balcony, storage, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2101 Dearborn: 1 Bedroom condo, Private patio, 2 Carports, Heat paid $795. Garden City Property Management 5496106 1 year Costco membership. 2306 Hillview Ct. #1. 2 bed/1 bath, South Hills, W/D hookups, shared yard, storage. $600. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown Check our website!

www.alpharealestate.com

MHA Management manages 7 properties throughout Missoula.

7000

All properties are part of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program.

251-4707

fidelityproperty.com

River Ridge is a lovely, active community dedicated for seniors only (residents must be 55+ to qualify). This apartment complex has a mix of 1 & 2 bedrooms apartments over 3 floors. Thoughtful floor plans, radiant heat flooring and all utilities paid help make this is comfortable and welcoming place to call home. There is a large commu-

www.gatewestrentals.com

MANAGEMENT SERVICES, INC.

549-7711

Are you a first time renter and not sure how to pick the right property choose a NARPM professional property manager. Our members have a code of ethics that require managers to educate our tenants on fair housing laws. westernmontana.narpm.org

Looking for the right property and not sure which one to choose? Choose a NARPM professional property manager. NARPM members have a duty to protect the public against fraud, misrepresentation, unethical practices in property management. You can feel safe knowing you are protected by a NARPM member. westernmontana.narpm.org

NOW LEASING! Mullan Reserve Apartments Rugged yet refined. Secluded yet convenient. Luxurious yet sustainable. Call for a free tour. 543-0060. 4000 Mullan Road. mullanreserveapartments.com

30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

FIDELITY

Uncle Robert Lane 2 Bed Apt. $725/month

720 Turner St. “B” 3 bed/1.5 bath Northside, pet? $900 Grizzly Property Management 5422060

Got vacancy? Contact a NARPM member and see how you can put their expertise, education and commitment to work for you. westernmontana.narpm.org

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing

Uncle Robert Ln #7 1&2

2329 Fairview #1. 2 bed/1 bath, shared yard, close to shopping. $650. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

The Missoula Housing Authority complies with the Fair Housing Act and offers Reasonable Accommodations to persons with Disabilities.

1235 34th St. • Missoula (406) 549-4113 missoulahousing.org

Our members specialize in the management of single family homes, condominiums and apartment complexes. Our members are: Licensed professionals Educated regularly on current laws, regulations & fair housing Have a duty to provide you with the best possible service Promote a high standard of professionalism Bound by a code of ethics for property managers

missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [C9]


RENTALS nity room with a fireplace, a library, card/puzzle room, and a billiards room. 2 elevators serve the building, there is a laundry room on each floor and garages are available for an additional fee. 1 bedrooms $625, security deposit $550 and 2 bedrooms $725, security deposit $650. Please contact Property Manager Colin Woodrow at 406-549-4113 x131 cwoodrow@missoulahousing.org to schedule a tour.” Tenants from hell? Contact a NARPM member and see how we can restore your sanity. westernmontana.narpm.org

MOBILE Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent. W/S/G/Electric included. $425/month 406-273-6034

DUPLEXES

REAL ESTATE $900. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 2608 O’ Shaughnessy. 3 bed/2 bath, N. Reserve, pet? $1350. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 Is your Property Manager a NARPM Member? Our members are: licensed, educated, professional, bound by a code of ethics, and have a duty to provide the best possible service. www.westernmontana.narpm.org Professional Property Management. Find Yourself at Home in the Missoula Rental Market with PPM. 1511 S Russell • (406) 721-8990 • www.professionalproperty.com WHO CARES? We do, in good times & bad... Auto; SR-22; Renters; Homeowners. JT Zinn Insurance. 406-549-8201. 321 SW Higgins. Find us on Facebook.

2414 Gilbert. 2 bed/1 bath, Rattlesnake, single garage, pet? $875. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

HOUSES 103 Cove Ct. 2 bed/1.5 bath, patio, city views, single garage.

ROOMMATES

HOMES 10955 Cedar Ridge. Loft bedroom, 1 bath on 20+ acres with guest house & sauna near Blue Mountain Recreation Area. $289,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 11864 O’Keefe Creek. 5 bed, 3 bath on 20 acres. Daylight walkout lower level, decks & double garage. $389,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula. 239-8350 shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 1307 Phillips. Lovely 3 bed, 2 bath Craftman with great front porch, back deck & double garage. Lots of recent upgrades. $300,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270 glasgow@montana.com 1511 Van Buren. 3 bed, 1 bath in lower Rattlesnake. Hardwood

floors, coved ceilings & basement. Mt. Jumbo views. $229,900. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-581. annierealtor@gmail.com 2 Bdr, 2 Bath, Rose Park Home with commercial space. $265,000. BHHS Montana Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 2101 South 14th West. 4 bed, 2 bath with mother-in-law apartment & double garage. $239,900. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 2101 South 14th West. Remodeled 4 bed, 2 bath on corner lot. Lower level has separate entrance, kitchen & bath. $239,900. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605 vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

ALL AREAS ROOM MATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com!

GardenCity

Property Management

422 Madison • 549-6106

1307 Phillips $300,000

For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com Finalist

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. "Let us tend your den" Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

Finalist

Finalist

Westside Craftsman 3 bed, 2 bath with original woodwork & wood floors. Open living & dining areas with lots of natural light & wonderful master bedroom suite. Classic front porch, back deck & patio. Double garage. New roof, furnace & water heater. MLS #20151637 For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Rochelle

Missoula Properties Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com

[C10] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015


REAL ESTATE 2227 West Kent. 2 bed, 1 bath ranch home with unfinished basement. Priced to sell! $135,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270 glasgow@montana.com 2304 River Road. Fully remodeled 2 bed, 2 bath 1940’s bungalow with large fenced yard, patio & deck. $209,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270 glasgow@montana.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Central Missoula home. $265,000. BHHS Montana Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath, East Missoula home. $225,000. BHHS Montana Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3010 West Central. 5 acres in Target Range with 3 bed, 1 bath home. Borders DNRC land. $325,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com 3010 West Central. Five acres bordering DNRC in Target Range

with 3 bed, 1 bath home. $325,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com 3924 Chelsea Drive. 3 bed, 2 bath Pleasant View home. Central heating & A/C, covered front porch & 2 car garage. $235,500. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambroserarealestate.com 4 Bdr, 2 Bath, University District home. $410,000. BHHS Montana Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4 Plex By The River 319/321 1st St. Dream location! 3-plex and alley house (2 efficiencies and 2 one bed units) behind Bernices ‘hood, River views and end of the street. Reduced $365,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com 4114 Melrose. 3 bed, 2 bath Pleasantview home with fenced yard, UG sprinklers & 2 car garage. $238,500. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

4221 Bordeaux. 3 bed, 2 bath on Windsor Park. Full unfinished basement & double garage. $219,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com 5802 Longview Drive. South Hills Split Level. 4 bedroom, 2 bath, double car garage on 9,338 sf fenced lot. $225,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real E s t a e 5 4 6 - 5 8 1 6 annierealtor@gmail.com 601 Montana Avenue. 4 bed, 1 bath on 3 lots in East Missoula. Fenced yard, double garage & shop. $260,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350 shannon@prudentialmissoula.com Affordable & Adorable Northside 217 N 2nd St. W. $189,500. Home with some upgrades including kitchen floor, some newer windows, roof in 2003, water heater in 2008. Private back yard with a wonderful shed, and lovely front yard with a picket fence KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Are your housing needs changing? We can help you explore your options. Clark Fork Realty. 512 E. Broadway. (406)

www.clarkforkre-

TIES 406-241-3221 LOEWENWARTER.COM

Buying or selling homes? Let me help you Find Your Way Home. Please contact me, David Loewenwarter, Realtor, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOME SERVICES MONTANA PROPERTIES 406-241-3221 LOEWENWARTER.COM

Natural Housebuilders and Terry Davenport Design, Inc. Building net zero energy custom homes using solar thermal and solar PV. 3690940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net

728-2621. alty.com

Farviews Home 404 Westview. Three bedroom, 2 bath home in the desirable Farviews neighborhood for $265,000! Solar panels, views, great home. KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com If you’ve been thinking of selling your home now is the time. The local inventory is relatively low and good houses are selling quickly. Let me help you Find Your Way Home. Please contact me David Loewenwarter, Realtor, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOME SERVICES MONTANA PROPERTIES 406-241-3221 LOEWENWARTER.COM Interested in real estate? Successfully helping buyers and sellers. Please contact me, David Loewenwarter, Realtor, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOME SERVICES MONTANA PROPER-

Bank NMLS #472212

Orange Street Triplex 201 S Orange Street Triplex. $275,000. Location is awesome, near the river and downtown and river trails and bike trails and all sorts of conveniences. Two main floor units, one upper. Some hardwood floors and some upgrades and tons of character! KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Put my experience and dedication to work for you. JAY GETZ, Prudential Montana Real Estate. (406) 214-4016 • jay.getz@prumt.com • www.JayGetzMissoula.com South Hills Ranch Style 2615 Arcadia - $250,000. 3 bed/1 bath. Open floor plan, gorgeous updates including kitchen abd bath, backs to open space, large backyard. KD 2405227 porticorealestate.com

Sweet & Modern 949 Discovery. $225,000. 3 bed/2 bath energy-efficient home with a trail up Mt. Jumbo right out your door! No maintenance siding; low maintenance yard; super floor plan and kitchen, and lots of light. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com “There once was an agent named Dave/Whose clients they all would rave. He’ll show you a house/loved by both you and your spouse. Both your time and money he’ll save.” Tony and Marcia Bacino. Please contact me David Loewenwarter, Realtor, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOME SERVICES MONTANA PROPERTIES 406-241-3221 LOEWENWARTER.COM We’re not only here to sell real estate, we’re your full service senior home specialists. Clark Fork Realty. 512 E. Broadway. (406) 7282621. www.clarkforkrealty.com When considering a move please call Missoula native JAY GETZ, Prudential Montana Real Ese. (406) 214-4016 • j a y. g e t z @ p r u m t . c o m • www.JayGetzMissoula.com WHO CARES? We do, in good

HOME E

times & bad... Auto; SR-22; Renters; Homeowners. JT Zinn Insurance. 406-549-8201. 321 SW Higgins. Find us on Facebook.

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES Uptown Flats #303. Top floor unit looks out to the “M” and includes all the wonderful amenities that The Uptown Flats offers. $159,710. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546.5816. annierealtor@gmail.com Uptown Flats #306. 1 bed, 1 bath top floor unit with lots of light. W/D, carport, storage & access to exercise room. $162,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com Uptown Flats #312. 1 bed, 1 bath modern condo on Missoula’s Northside. $151, 900. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com Uptown Flats. Upscale gated community near downtown. All

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6IEP)WXEXI0SER3J½GIV 6IEP)WXEXI0SER3J½GIV NKEFIPLEYWIR$JWFQWPEGSQ NKEFIPLEYWIR$JWFQWPEGSQ 543.1643

missoulanews.com • April 9–April 16, 2015 [C11]


REAL ESTATE

SS appliances, carport, s torage and access to community room and exercise room plus more. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com

MANUFACTURED NEW HOME SPRING BLOWOUT!! Single Wides, Double Wides & Modular Homes at Clearance Prices!! Modular Homes starting at $79,500 Tape & Texture Throughout, Oak Cabinets, Glamour Bath & Much More. 16 x 80 Singlewides Tape & Texture Throughout & Oak Cabinets starting at $45,900. Elite Homes - Call Troy at 406-696-6282 OR Jason at 406-855-2279

LAND 1 acre building lot with incredible views. Mullan Road West. $115,000. BHHS Montana Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

1625 Lot 12A Cote Lane. Level 1 acre with fantastic views. Mary Louise Zapp-Knapp, Lambros ERA Real Estate 532-9296. mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com 2 acre building lot with incredible views. Mullan Road West. $125,000. BHHS Montana Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com Lot 33 Old Mill Loop, St. Regis. 1.02 acre with 150’ of Clark Fork River Frontage. Mary Louise Zapp-Knapp, Lambros ERA Real Estate 532-9296. mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com

NHN Rock Creek Road. 20 acres bordered on north by Five Valleys Land Trust. Direct access to Clark Fork River. $189,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

COMMERCIAL Rose Park commercial building with attached rental. $265,000. BHHS Montana Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

OUT OF TOWN

LOWER RATTLESNAKE LAND FOR SALE- NHN RAYMOND.62 ACRES. Please contact me David Loewenwarter, Realtor, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOME SERVICES MONTANA PROPERTIES 406-241-3221 LOEWENWARTER.COM

1476 Eastside Highway, Corvallis. 3 bed, 2 bath Victorian on over 7 fenced acres with barn & outbuildings. $389,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

NHN Arnica. Pattee Canyon acreage with great view of Missoula. Mary Louise Zapp-Knapp, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 5329296 mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com

17430 Six Mile Road Wow. Stunning setting - picture perfect with a wooded hillside behind and open meadows in front. 12.5 acres with wonderful farm house $250,000. KD 2405227 porticorealestate.com

THE UPTOWN FLATS #303 • $159,710 & #312 • $151,900 Top floor units include all the wonderful amenities that The Uptown Flats offer. Ask Anne about ALL the opportunities for Ownership in The Uptown Flats or visit www.movemontana.com

17730 Wild Goose, Frenchtown. 4 bed, 2 bath on 1/2 acre by King Ranch Golf Course. Fireplace, jetted tub & 2 car garage. $310,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 2 Bdr, 2 Bath, Stevensville home. $178,000. BHHS Montana Prop-

2014 Best Real Estate Agent

Anne Jablonski

Broker

546-5816

PORTICO REAL ESTATE

www.movemontana.com

[C12] Missoula Independent • April 9–April 16, 2015

erties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4 Bdr, 2 Bath, Nine Mile Valley home on 12.3 acres. $350,000. BHHS Montana Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

5 Bdr, 3 Bath, Florence area home on 3.2 acres. $479,000. BHHS Montana Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 5615 Nightingale, Lolo. 3 bed, 2 bath on quiet cul-de-sac. A/C, UG sprinklers, deck, fenced yard

4221 Bordeaux $219,000 Beautiful home on Windsor Park. Built in 2009, 3 bed, 2 bath, home with 2 car garage. McCormick Unfinished basement Pat Real Estate Broker is plumbed for bath Real Estate With Real Experience and has egress pat@properties2000.com 406-240-SOLD (7653) windows. Properties2000.com

& 2 car garage. $227,500. 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 6850 Faithful Way, Lolo. New 3 bed, 2 bath on 1+ acre in Sapphire Acres. $349,900. 531-3605 vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

3917 PAXSON OPEN HOUSE 4/12 1-4 PM 4 bed 2 bath completely updated home. Nearly 2000 finished sqft. $269,000 . Contact Matt for more information 406-360-9023

MORTGAGE EQUITY LOANS ON NONOWNER OCCUPIED MONTANA REAL ESTATE. We also buy Notes & Mortgages. Call Creative Finance & Investments @ 406-721-1444 or visit www.creative-finance.com


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Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture

Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture

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