Page 1

INSIDE: HOMESTEADER 2013–YOUR GUIDE TO RENTING, BUYING AND LIVING GREEN

NEWS MUSIC

THE WRONG LEGACY? MASSIVE DEVELOPMENT PROPOSED NEXT TO STEVI WILDLIFE REFUGE

HELMS ALEE HEADLINES ZOO CITY APPAREL FINALE

ARTS

FASHION FINDS ITS FANS AT PROJECT SELVEDGE

NEWS

HOMELESS VETS FORCED TO WAIT


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


INSIDE: HOMESTEADER 2013–YOUR GUIDE TO RENTING, BUYING AND LIVING GREEN

NEWS MUSIC

THE WRONG LEGACY? MASSIVE DEVELOPMENT PROPOSED NEXT TO STEVI WILDLIFE REFUGE

HELMS ALEE HEADLINES ZOO CITY APPAREL FINALE

ARTS

FASHION FINDS ITS FANS AT PROJECT SELVEDGE

NEWS

HOMELESS VETS FORCED TO WAIT


F U N IS SPRING LODGING FOR LESS MOUNTAIN EVENTS + COLD BEERS

END OF SEASON EXTRAVAGANZA Book TWO days/nights & get the THIRD FREE! VALID MARCH 31 - APRIL 7, 2013 *Based on space available & minimum night requirements apply. Not valid in the Hibernation House. Other restrictions may apply. Call 800-858-4152 for additional details. Promo code: PWS.

FUN | 877-SKI-FISH | SKIWHITEFISH.COM

Partially Located on National Forest Lands

DUMMY DERBY & BREWFEST - MARCH 30TH MOONLIGHT DINE & SKI - MARCH 30TH POND SKIM - APRIL 6TH

WWW.MTFIRST.COM | 1.800.731.4385

LOANS FOR THE AUTO - BOAT - RV

MAKE THE SWITCH switchtoMTfirst.com Federally insured by NCUA.

[2] Missoula Independent • March 28 – April 4, 2013


Cover photo by Chad Harder

News Voices/Letters More coal, aid in dying and a correction...................................................4 The Week in Review March Madness, buses and Tester takes a stand .............................6 Briefs Miss Montana, marijuana and ghosts ......................................................................6 Etc. Brewery follies.............................................................................................................7 News Public comment opposes Bitterroot subdivision “100 percent”..............................8 News D.C. politics leave local veterans waiting for housing assistance.............................9 Opinion Legislature misses opportunity to make real difference ...................................10 Opinion What do you do when you meet a predator? ....................................................11 Feature Opportunity’s burden.........................................................................................14

Arts & Entertainment Arts Project Selvedge brings Missoula fashionistas together ...........................................18 Music Orange Goblin, Pile, Langhorne Slim and Pissed Jeans ........................................19 Music Helms Alee harnesses the friction .........................................................................20 DVD Mark spring with a basket of holiday flicks..............................................................21 Film Admission almost makes the grade .........................................................................22 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films..........................................................23 Flash in the Pan Local or sustainable? ............................................................................24 Happiest Hour SMaSH Märzen .......................................................................................26 8 Days a Week Feeling guilty...........................................................................................27 Mountain High Dummy Derby .......................................................................................33 Agenda Balanced View .....................................................................................................34

Exclusives Street Talk..........................................................................................................................4 In Other News .................................................................................................................12 Classifieds ......................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess......................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y .......................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle..........................................................................................................C-5 This Modern World .....................................................................................................C-12

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson INTERIM ARTS EDITOR Kate Whittle PHOTO EDITOR Cathrine L. Walters CALENDAR EDITOR Jason McMackin STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen, Jamie Rogers COPY EDITOR Brooks Johnson ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Pumpernickel Stewart, Jonathan Marquis CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Allen MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, Chris Dombrowski Andy Smetanka, Brad Tyer, Nick Davis, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Matthew Frank, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Melissa Mylchreest

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2013 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • March 28 – April 4, 2013 [3]


[voices]

Analyzing the analysis

STREET TALK Asked on Tuesday, March 26, in front of the University Center. by Cathrine L. Walters This week we write about Project Selvedge, Missoula’s annual design competition. How would you describe Missoula’s fashion sense? Follow-up: What’s the most dressed up you’ve gotten recently, and why?

Nacole Beall: Very eclectic. We have our own trends by far—anything goes in Missoula. Drinking in disguise: I just went to a masquerade party at Monk’s and I wore a ball skirt, a corset and a white feathered mask. My mother hand-sewed it all.

Tyler Myers: Urban lumberjack. Minnesota chic: It was just my birthday, so I wore a nice button-up flannel.

Jessie Knorr: Versatile. There’s a lot of culture here so versatile and also quirky. Jazzed up: I went to Jazz Martini Night because it’s classy and you can get $4 martinis. I wore a dress and heels.

A March 14 piece regarding Dr. Alan Lockwood’s book tour repeats incorrect information Lockwood uses to buttress his claims (see “Black cloud” in Letters). Clearly, a clarification is needed. First, the research in Europe and Japan linking diabetes to the onset of Alzheimer’s disease does not link either condition to coal. Further, Dr. Lockwood completely misstates the findings of a 2009 National Academies Study, which he says estimates “the additional heath care costs because of pollutants from those [coal] plants totaled $62 billion a year.” The analysis uses 2005 emissions data to model a range of potential costs: Health care is not one of them. The same study uses these parameters to estimate the costs from cars and trucks to be $56 billion annually. Coal-based generation as well as cars and trucks have continued to reduce their emissions profile since 2005—thereby reducing the calculated potential costs. Neither the NAS study nor Dr. Lockwood evaluate the positive economic or healthbased contributions of affordable electricity used to power home heating and air conditioning, water treatment facilities or other benefits of modern society. Nancy Gravatt Senior Vice President, Communications National Mining Association Washington, D.C.

Healthy choice As the daughter of an engineer at a coal-fired power plant, I’ve lived most of my life near coal plants and was glad I could attend a lecture last week by Dr. Alan Lockwood, author of the book The Silent Epidemic: Coal and the Hidden Threat to Health.

Like most of us, I’d heard some of the statistics before, though I was especially astounded when Dr. Lockwood stated that approximately one-third of all U.S. citizens live in counties in which the EPA’s National Ambient Air Quality Standards are not met. I wonder where Missoula stands? Air quality isn’t only local, as Lockwood noted. Pollution from East Asia is windswept to the Pacific Northwest, right back to western Montana.

“Approximately one-third of all U.S. citizens live in counties in which the EPA’s National Ambient Air Quality Standards are not met. I wonder where Missoula stands?” Burning coal is not only harmful to the environment and exacerbating climate change, it is also extremely harmful to our health. Lockwood cited studies in which coal combustion has been shown to be positively correlated with increased incidences of cardiovascular, cardiopulmonary, lung and kidney diseases. This is quite frightening and reminded me of conversation I recently had with my father. He has had asthma for most of his life, but during a twoweek shutdown at his plant, he told me that

he didn’t need to use his inhaler once and could breathe much easier than usual. The negative health effects associated with burning coal are enough to bring about a shift in policy, even without bringing the still contentious topic of climate change into the debate. Now is not the time to decrease renewable energy development, which is what happened last week in the Montana Senate with Senate Bill 31 and Senate Bill 45. We desperately need a shift away from our reliance on coal, and I hope that Lockwood’s message, with its focus on human health, could help bring us there. Monica Perez-Watkins Missoula

Letter vs. letter I was upset in reading the letter to the editor concerning House Bill 505 (see “Yes on HB 505” in Letters, March 21). In calling the bill, “the assisted suicide bill,” it totally changes the connotation. It is more truly “aid in dying” for those at the end of life, with the “aid” being their trusted physician rather than a government agency! If people want to commit suicide, believe me, they will—either successfully or thwarted. (I’ve worked as an R.N. in an emergency room for 25 years and “saw plenty.”) I’ve also seen the unnecessary suffering of many terminal patients and feel strongly that aid in dying is a right. Don’t let the doctor/patient relationship we have trusted all of our lives be undermined by any government bill. Vote “no” for HB 505! Robin Eyre Missoula Correction: Due to an editing error, the Hellgate High School graduates who went on to start Silkworm were misidentified in last week’s “Spinning legends” film review. Tim Midgett and Andy Cohen attended the school, but Michael Dahlquist and Joel RL Phelps did not. The Indy regrets the error.

Robin Rose-Rice: A good, healthy, hipster-bohemian combo. I think people in general care about what they look like but it doesn’t seem to be a primary focus. Birthday suit: Probably for my last burlesque show—if you want to call taking off your clothes getting dressed up. I started out with a gold sequined toga that I made and an elaborate feathered headpiece.

Rob Weimer: I see a lot of people driven by a sense of originality. You could call it hipster and such. The best thing is it remains true to people’s hearts. To the nines: I went to a Shpongle concert at the Wilma recently and dressed up pretty snazzy. I wore travel pants that I had when I was overweight so they are real big, and a striped shirt I found on the street with a vest.

[4] Missoula Independent • March 28 – April 4, 2013

L

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via email: editor@missoulanews.com.


missoulanews.com • March 28 – April 4, 2013 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Cathrine L. Walters

Wednesday, March 20 House Bill 247, known as the “Roadkill bill,” passes second reading in the Montana Senate 33-15. The bill, if signed by Gov. Steve Bullock, will allow people to scrape up roadkill for use as food.

Thursday, March 21 The Griz make 20 percent of their shots and miss 27 of 31 three-pointers in a brutal second-round loss to Syracuse in the NCAA tournament. The 81-34 debacle marks the worst NCAA tournament defeat in University of Montana history.

Friday, March 22 Federal officials shut down Billings-based Rimrock Stages, stranding bus passengers throughout the state. The Department of Transportation cites widespread safety concerns. Rimrock has had three accidents in the past year.

Saturday, March 23 The Lady Griz trail the University of Georgia by just two points with 14 minutes left to play in the first round of the women’s NCAA tournament, but the Bulldogs ultimately pull away. The 70-50 loss ends UM’s season.

Sunday, March 24 Thousands of locals descend upon the University of Montana to celebrate the 22nd annual International Culture and Food Festival. For some, it’s tough to make room for all the delicacies, including dolmas, fried bananas and souvlaki.

Monday, March 25 The Crime Victim Advocate Office asks Missoula City Council to spend $54,406 to fund a new “Healthy Relationship Project Coordinator” position that would complement efforts by the city, county and university to curb sexual and domestic violence.

Tuesday, March 26 As the U.S. Supreme Court deliberates whether same-sex couples should marry, Sen. Jon Tester announces on Facebook that he supports equality. “No one should be able to tell a Montanan or any American who they can love and who they can marry,” he says.

A bulldozer removes reinforcing steel rods and concrete from the Clark Fork below Brennan’s Wave Thursday afternoon to help repair the popular water feature. Crews will return this fall after water levels drop to continue improvements at the site.

Legislature

D.U. High A bill making its way through the Montana Legislature seeks to set a criminal threshold for something that’s been long debated by law enforcement and marijuana users: Exactly how high can you be when operating a motor vehicle? House Bill 168, introduced by Missoula Republican Rep. David “Doc” Moore, would revise Montana’s DUI laws to establish a legal limit for Delta-9 Tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the primary psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. The proposed law would set the maximum limit for drivers at five nanograms per milliliter, which can only be tested via blood drawing. Moore says that limit is already in place for medical marijuana cardholders. “There’s an inherent unfairness in that policy, ” Moore says. “We’ve had so many accidents and fatalities involving alcohol and THC, and the present law holds medical marijuana cardholders to a legal limit, but not recreational users.” Rose Habib, a chemist who testified against HB 168 in front of the House of Representatives in February, calls the five nanogram limit arbitrary. “There’s no actual proof there’s a correlation be-

tween the blood levels of Delta 9 THC and being impaired. How the body metabolizes marijuana isn’t done in a way that correlates with an amount of impairment you feel at a certain time,” Habib says. “Law enforcement will admit that this is essentially a tool to incarcerate people better.” Moore says the proposed law would be more of a service to prosecutors in the aftermath of a fatal accident rather than a way to pull impaired drivers off the road. He referenced the death of Judy Wang, a Missoula attorney who was killed in 2009 by a drunk driver who tested positive for THC after the crash. “You can’t make the argument that cannabis does not impair you to some degree, even if you’re a regular user,” Moore says. Habib says that while Moore may single out the detection of marijuana in the blood of David James Bugni, the driver convicted in Wang’s death, as evidence of the drug’s power to impair, marijuana alone did not lead him to the wreck. “(Bugni) was also driving 110 miles an hour,” she says. “At night.” HB 168 passed its third reading in the Senate and is now headed to the governor’s desk to be signed into law. Mike Gerrity

Lar Autio, M.D. - 329.7398 Board Certified • Family Practice [6] Missoula Independent • March 28 – April 4, 2013

Politics

ALEC as equal? The Republican National Committee unveiled a comprehensive 100-page report earlier this week containing detailed strategies it hopes will carry the GOP to victory in 2014. The report—now the template for the RNC’s Growth and Opportunity Project—marks a concerted effort by Republicans to revise the party’s playbook and appeal to voter groups that conservatives have so far failed to win over. Buried on page 67 of the report, under recommendations for reviewing and revising state campaign finance laws, is a measure calling for the development of model legislation that can be replicated in statehouses nationwide. Among the organizations the RNC says “may wish to take a leading role” in the effort is the American Legislative Exchange Council, or ALEC, a group with a lessthan-inclusive track record on minority issues. Watchdog groups have repeatedly decried ALEC as nothing short of a corporate “bill mill” that puts state legislators and corporate lobbyists on equal footing. ALEC’s extensive library of model legislation includes a bill based on Florida’s 2005 “stand your ground” law and a bill inspired by Arizona’s hotly contested anti-il-


[news] legal immigration measure. Montana Rep. David Howard introduced two immigration reform bills in the 2013 Legislature bearing similar or identical language to ALEC’s model (see the Indy’s recent feature story, “Cookie-cutter legislation,” for more examples). “It does seem counterintuitive for the RNC to be relying on a group that played such a substantial role in one of the most discredited pieces of immigration legislation to pass in a state in recent decades,” says Lisa Graves, executive director of the Center for Media and Democracy. The RNC’s press office did not return requests for comment. The RNC’s endorsement of ALEC as a possible leader on state campaign finance reform legislation isn’t all that surprising to ALEC critics. ALEC has in recent years pushed controversial voter ID laws in various statehouses, a move that contributed to numerous corporate members abandoning the nonprofit last year. “ALEC certainly has a track record in this area,” Graves says. “Its track record is one of making it more difficult for Americans to vote, in particular Americans who tend to vote Democratic. I’m sure it’s no coincidence that the RNC is interested in what further role ALEC could play.” Alex Sakariassen

Late in January 2008, Didier reported to Chubb that her friend (and co-defendant) Surayya Mahasin Nasir had secured a rental house for Didier just south of Somers. Didier claimed the home was 6,900-square-feet with five bedrooms and an in-ground pool. Chubb approved and, after paying Nasir a broker’s fee of $10,875, the company paid Didier $15,250 a month for rent. What Didier did not divulge to the insurance company was that her $15,250 a month “rental” property was actually an 890-square-foot cabin with no indoor plumbing that her family already owned. At the Russell Smith Courthouse last week Didier’s attorney, Colin Stephens, argued that Didier’s actions were not a deviant act of fraud. During the initial repairs, he said that a company hired by Chubb

Pageantry

Former Miss Montana busted After the swimsuit, evening gown and interview portions of the 1997 Miss USA pageant in Shreveport, La., Miss Montana Christin Didier’s aggregated score was 8.67 out of 10. It was good enough to place her in the top 15 of competitors, but well behind Hawaii’s Brook Lee, who would go on to win both Miss USA and Miss Universe. Since then, Didier’s life has been like a made-forTV movie. After trying her hand at modeling, she opened Aunt Kissy’s Bed and Breakfast in Lewistown. She also bought a historic mansion in Somers. And last Friday, a jury in federal district court in Missoula found her guilty on nine counts of felony charges. Didier’s troubles began in 2005 when she purchased the Somers Mansion, a 7,982-square-foot home overlooking Flathead Lake. In July 2007, a windstorm ripped through the Flathead Valley and tore sections of roof off Didier’s house. Six months later, the mansion suffered further damage from a fire. After a month of repair, it became clear the 110year-old home needed a major renovation and Didier would have to move out for the remodel. The Chubb Group of Insurance Companies agreed to pay for temporary housing. Then things got tricky.

to repair the fire damage had used diesel-powered generators that gave Didier carbon-monoxide poisoning. An expert witness testified that to this day Didier’s mental faculties are “significantly impaired,” and she wasn’t capable of such an elaborate scheme. The jury, however, was unmoved. It found the former Miss Montana guilty of eight counts of mail fraud and one count of conspiracy, and responsible for duping her insurance company for $133,666.50. Didier faces up to 25 years in prison at her July 11 sentencing hearing. Jamie Rogers

Ghosts

Supernatural search at UM Last Sunday night, a University of Montana Public Safety officer met creative writing professor Debra Magpie Earling and 10 students from her upper division sto-

BY THE NUMBERS Attendees at the 96 annual 1,000 Foresters’ Ball dance March

ETC.

th

23. The number of available tickets was reduced to 1,100 from 1,600 last year, when the event sold out. The event’s first night this year, held March 22, drew only 400 people.

rytelling class outside one of campus’ oldest buildings. The officer pulled out a ring of keys and climbed the granite steps to the front door. “This is totally normal,” he said coyly as Earling and her students entered the 104-year-old foyer. “We always get requests to have Jeannette Rankin Hall unlocked at 9 p.m. on Sunday night.” Though it may seem strange to some, exploring the unlit building is nothing new to Earling. In spring 1996, she was teaching a night class in Jeannette Rankin Hall room 202, when her class was interrupted by a commotion in room 203. “We could hear moving chairs, a professor’s voice booming and people laughing,” Earling remembers. “My whole class [68 students] heard it, and we stopped class.” She says the sound continued until one of her students went to open the door to 203. The room was empty and suddenly quiet. Since that day Earling has returned to Jeannette Rankin Hall, which today houses the UM School of Social Work. Over the years, she has heard unexplained footsteps and knocking, and spoke with a custodian who also heard a lecture come from an empty room 203. Sometimes Earling brings her students to help investigate. Last weekend, she asked her pupils to sit with their palms flat on the table, fingers outstretched, pinkies overlapping with their neighbors (so no one would play tricks). She lit a candle, plugged in a tape recorder and addressed the dark room. “Is anyone here with us?” she asked. Her students followed with more questions: “Were you a university employee? How did you die?” After the questions conjured no audible response, Earling spoke louder. “If there are any spirits in this building, please come closer. Walk up the stairs to this room,” she said. “Step-by-step, come up the stairs. You are almost here. Keep coming.” In the end, the night produced no definitive encounters with the dead, but given the nervous smiles, awkward laughter and one graduate student gasping and asking urgently, “Did anyone feel that?” it was clear how the experience might benefit a young writer. “Ghost stories are the original stories,” Earling said. “They are the spark. They make us want to tell stories.” Jamie Rogers

In the span of 24 hours this week, nearly 200 people signed an online petition to boycott Big Sky Brewing Company. Commenters took to Facebook to call out Big Sky as a “traitor” and a “Judas” in Montana’s craft beer industry. There’s even an internet meme: The word “shame” stamped across the Big Sky logo. All that vitriol began within minutes of Big Sky co-founder Neal Leathers’ testimony March 26 in favor of House Bill 616, the socalled brewery killer bill. The measure would revise laws affecting brewery taprooms, requiring brewers to either purchase a potentially back-breakingly expensive state license or agree to sell no more than 40 percent of their product on-premise. Leathers’ testimony was direct: He just wants to be able to sell pints like the other 40 breweries in Montana, rather than be limited to offering free samples. “We’re being painted with a brush that I don’t think really fits us,” Leathers told the Indy shortly after his return from Helena. “We were simply saying if this bill passed and we were under the rules and regulations as all the other breweries in Montana, that’d be a good thing for Big Sky.” Problem is, what’s good for Big Sky isn’t necessarily good for every other craft brewer in the state. Leathers contends HB 616 will ultimately benefit most breweries by lifting the current limitations on business, even if it forces those breweries to buy into the state’s licensing system. That doesn’t come cheap, though, especially for brewers in markets where beer retailer and all-beverage license quotas are already met. Of the 40 small breweries statewide, 29 would have to pay the full $100,000 licensing fee—benefitting the state’s general fund to the tune of $2.9 million by 2015. Leathers says that if HB 616 were a true “brewery killer,” Big Sky wouldn’t be supporting it. But Big Sky is the only brewery standing alongside the Montana Tavern Association as a proponent, which alone says plenty. Big Sky is Montana’s greatest success story when it comes to craft brewing, and while breaching the 10,000-barrel production limit has already made them an outcast of sorts, the brewery and its beer still occupy a special place in this state. That’s exactly why Big Sky’s stance, and the backlash it’s prompted, are such bitter mouthfuls to swallow.

Amy Capolupo Win a 50% OFF Merchandise Coupon Sign Up for our Weekly Drawing

Leather Goods – Great Footwear Downtown – 543-1128 www.hideandsole.com

missoulanews.com • March 28 – April 4, 2013 [7]


[news]

SPRING INTO A WORKSHOP

The wrong legacy? Public comment opposes Bitterroot subdivision “100 percent”

:RUNVKRSVEHJLQLQ$SULO 7KH1RYHOZ'DYLG&DWHV 1RQ)LFWLRQZ5XVV9DQ3DHSHJKHP 3RHWU\Z0DUN*LEERQV 6KRUW)LFWLRQZ%ULDQ%XFNEHH

7KH:ULWHUV:RUNVKRS 7KH:ULWHUV:RUNVKRS 9LVLWXV DWZZZZULWH UVZRUNV KRSFRP

[8] Missoula Independent • March 28 – April 4, 2013

by Alex Sakariassen

Former Ravalli County Commissioner time spurred the creation of both an in- sion has a very clear path and we’ll make it Jim Rokosh stands just off the concrete out- terim zoning regulation and a countywide clear … that indeed, there are potentially side the Lee Metcalf National Wildlife growth policy. An anti-zoning faction led significant adverse impacts that have not Refuge visitor’s center, fuming. Several cars by 2012 U.S. Senate candidate Dan Cox been mitigated or sufficiently mitigated.” Rokosh doesn’t just measure those imroll slowly down the nearby road as pas- defeated the latter in 2008. Morton’s Legacy Ranch application pacts in traffic figures and new textbooks. sengers and drivers watch ducks and geese paddle across a pond. The refuge and its stalled when the economy tanked, before For him, the impacts are also measured in inhabitants draw roughly 150,000 visitors it could get county approval. Now it’s feet—specifically the 406 feet that separate a year, Rokosh says, and bring millions in back in the form of an application so large Legacy Ranch from the Lee Metcalf refuge. The subdivision would rely on septic tourism dollars to the Bitterroot. Even on it takes up three binders. The county says a cruddy Friday afternoon, with snow flur- it can’t even load the full document to its systems and a community wastewater facility to treat wastewater. A letter ries limiting visibility, the from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife refuge is pulling people in. Service’s Ecological Services Rokosh is fuming beDivision dated July 2006 esticause just a few miles north, mates Legacy Ranch’s wastenear the Lone Rock commuwater systems would release nity between Stevensville 32 million gallons of effluence and Florence, a landowner into the groundwater every from Victor and a developyear. Nearby residents fear the ment firm from Missoula subsequent release of pharhave revived a controversial maceuticals and other pollusubdivision that could irrevtants into their wells. Rokosh ocably alter the scene here. applies those same concerns Donald Morton and Territoto the refuge’s wetlands and rial Landworks LLC are seekPhoto by Cathrine L. Walters the Bitterroot River itself. ing to build more than 600 Back in 2006, Montana residential units on a 368- The proposed Legacy Ranch subdivision would be larger than Corvallis and sit just 406 feet from the Lee Metcalf Fish, Wildlife and Parks came acre agricultural lot along National Wildlife Refuge at its northwest corner. forward with a host of conthe Eastside Highway, a website, and has instead made it available cerns over Morton’s proposal. Most were mere 406 feet from the refuge in places. exclusive to the subdivision’s immediate “I characterize it as a town falling out to the public via CD or zip drive. According to Ravalli County Planner impact on the surrounding environment. of the sky, ’cause that’s exactly what this is,” Rokosh says. “What they want to do Kevin Waller, the planning office has re- But one complaint spoke to the ramificanow is to suspend the town for some 40 ceived 119 letters of comment on Morton’s tions Legacy Ranch could have outside the years over the heads of the Lone Rock proposal in addition to the nearly 11 hours Bitterroot. “FWP has reviewed many subdivisions community and wait for it to fall when the of testimony offered during the three planhousing market pendulum swings again.” ning board meetings. The board is ex- this large and larger close to towns about Morton’s proposal calls for 15 phases pected to issue a recommendation April 17. which we have not made such extensive comof development over 30 years, with con- The Ravalli County Commission then must ments,” the agency wrote in a letter dated April 11, 2006. “Legacy Ranch is different bestruction beginning in 2019. In the end, make a final decision by May 31. Waller adds that public comment has cause it proposes to develop what is basically the Legacy Ranch would be larger than been “100 percent” against the proposal, a a small town in a rural area abutting a Nathe town of Corvallis. The short- and long-term concerns fact he says the planning board will consider tional Wildlife Refuge. It would set a preceover Legacy Ranch dominated more than in its “quest for a recommendation.” Some dent for future development, and FWP is seven hours of public comment before the critics have decried the addition of an esti- vitally concerned about the total cumulative Ravalli County planning board March 13. mated 9,271 vehicle trips per day on an al- impacts of this and future developments.” Joe Elliott, the environmental conHundreds of locals showed up at the Lone ready crowded and dangerous stretch of the Rock School gymnasium for that meeting— Eastside Highway—the only road from which sultant brought on to the project, waved the second on the Legacy Ranch this year— Legacy Ranch would be accessible. Others fear off FWP’s concern at the time, calling to unanimously sound off against the the incredible tax strain Legacy Ranch will Legacy Ranch “one of the most carefully subdivision. Pressure from the public place on agricultural communities, nearby planned developments to date” and “a prompted the board to open a third meet- towns and even Missoula for emergency serv- positive precedent.” Asked why he thinks someone would ing up to public comment two weeks later. ices and road maintenance. Officials from This isn’t the first time individuals like Lone Rock Elementary have testified that the revive a subdivision that’s garnered so Rokosh and groups like Bitterrooters for school district is currently near capacity with much public backlash and has such a Planning have mounted opposition to almost 300 students. Legacy Ranch could strong potential to impact the community and environment alike, Rokosh pulls out Legacy Ranch. Morton first proposed the double the student population. Phone messages left with Territorial his wallet and removes a $20 bill. “This development in 2005. He immediately met widespread criticism from environ- Landworks CEO Jason Rice and Morton right here,” he says, crinkling the cash between his fingertips. mentalists, government employees and were not returned. “There are a number of significant legal nearby residents. The proposal and others like it throughout the Bitterroot at the issues here,” Rokosh says, “and the commisasakariassen@missoulanews.com


[news]

Pinned down D.C. politics leave local veterans waiting for housing help by Jessica Mayrer

These days, Steven Sutton sleeps on a wooden bunk bed inside the crowded Poverello Center homeless shelter. The 36-year-old veteran has crooked teeth and a five o’clock shadow, and he wears battered black work boots that he can’t afford to replace. Despite the fact that he has nowhere else to go but the Pov, Sutton tries to stay positive. Maintaining some level of optimism is a lesson he learned in the Navy. “If I go completely negative, it’s just going to make it harder for me to get back up,” Sutton says. “You just try to keep your head above the situation and work things through.” Between 1996 and 1999, Sutton served at Virginia’s Norfolk Naval Amphibious Base as a “boatswain’s mate,” operating cranes, boats and bulldozers to help, he says, keep ships up to snuff. Sutton’s skills haven’t translated well in the private sector, where certifications that he doesn’t have are often required to operate heavy machinery. Unable to secure work and on the heels of a divorce, Sutton found himself last year with no place to live and only $400 in his pocket. Seeing no other option, he came to the Pov. Sutton represents part of a troubling issue that local, state and federal policymakers have grappled with for years. In 2011, 67,495 veterans were homeless, according the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. In Missoula, Pov staffers estimate that roughly 25 percent of the people who sleep at the Ryman Street shelter on any given night have served in the armed forces. That number could rise in the near future. The federal budget sequestration, which includes $85 billion in funding cuts that began March 1, is threatening to exacerbate what are already challenging circumstances for people like Sutton. Lori Davidson from Missoula Housing Authority, which administers federal housing subsidies, says that because of the sequester, low-income veterans and civilians waiting to access federal housing vouchers will likely have an even tougher time doing so this year than they have in the past. “We won’t be able to issue new vouchers to families that have (already) been on our waiting list for two to three years,” Davidson says. In 2012, Congress and the president cut federal Section 8 funding to the lowest levels in the program’s history, Davidson says. According to the nonprofit Center

on Budget and Policy Priorities, Congress pared back housing assistance programs between 2010 and 2012 by $2.5 billion, or 5.9 percent. This month’s sequester compounded the problem. HUD estimates that the budget cuts nationally will cause 125,000 individuals and families, including veterans, to lose Section 8 housing assistance. Davidson says her office has already done what it can to weather budget cuts,

1975 he followed family tradition and joined the Army. He was just 17 and served in Vietnam as the war was ending. His airborne unit was charged with constructing plane runways and securing airport perimeters. Decades after his service, Maldonado came to Montana looking for an economic stability that he hadn’t found on the East Coast. The former chef and oil field worker says it was his elderly mother

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Army vet John Maldonado and his wife have been at the Poverello Center for six months waiting for a federal VASH housing voucher.

but is unable to maintain certain services with the sequester. Last year, MHA tapped $300,000 in reserve funds to help keep the housing program—and its clients— afloat. The same can’t be done this year. That means MHA will have to eliminate 50 of its 774 Section 8 vouchers. “We will be serving 50 less families on an ongoing basis,” Davidson says. There are other housing subsidies for former service members like Sutton that are not subject to the sequester, such as “HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing vouchers.” But, as with Section 8, there aren’t enough to go around. According to Montana’s Department of Veterans Affairs, 283 veterans in Montana are now waiting for VASH vouchers. The waiting list typically runs between three and six months. Vietnam veteran John Maldonado is on the VASH list. For the past six months, he’s waited at the Pov to secure a voucher that will enable him and his wife Iris to leave the shelter. Maldonado says his father, brother and sister all served in the military, so in

who suggested that he land in the Treasure State. “I said, ‘We’re going to go west,’” he recalls. “She says, ‘You need to go to God’s country.’ I said, ‘There’s such a thing as God’s country?’ She goes, ‘Yeah.’ I said, ‘Well, where’s that at?’ She said, ‘Montana.’” Maldonado laughs as he recites this story from inside the Pov. Despite his humor, he is fully cognizant of the gravity of his situation. His felony theft conviction has made it even harder for him to find work in Missoula. He would work in the oil fields again, he says, but he worries about leaving his wife alone at the shelter, where tensions sometimes run high. “I want to get my wife out of here,” he says. “I can’t leave her here.” As for Sutton, he may have fewer responsibilities but it’s still tough to keep his spirits high. “It’s kind of like you’re looking at people and going, ‘Wow, this is getting harder,’” he says. Based on the current backlog, Sutton could be waiting at the Pov for several more months. jmayrer@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • March 28 – April 4, 2013 [9]


[opinion]

Tough to swallow Legislature misses opportunity to make real difference by Dan Brooks

*$5'(1)(9(5 

+RPH5H6RXUFHKDVHYHU\WKLQJIRUVSULQJSURMHFWV      









[10] Missoula Independent • March 28 – April 4, 2013

Last week, the Montana Senate burnished our image at home and abroad by approving House Bill 247, to “create permit for salvage of game killed by vehicles.” Informally known as the Make Your Uncle Send You Humorous Emails Act of 2013, HB 247 will allow Montanans to harvest meat from roadkill at the discretion of highway patrol officers. Clearly, our legislature is getting down to the fine strokes. It’s easy to make fun of a statewide law declaring it okay to eat roadkill, but the fact is a lot of good meat is being wasted. I would say that wasting wasted deer is among Montana’s biggest problems, provided you do not spend even one second thinking about other problems facing the state. Consider, for example, the federal budget sequestration that took effect March 1. Those across-the-board cuts to domestic and military spending arrived with a conspicuous absence of disaster. After months of dire warnings from the national press, the post-sequester landscape looks much as it did on February 28. But the bill is in the mail. Montana ranks 41st among the states in its ratio of federal taxes rendered to federal funding received. For every dollar we send to Washington, we get nearly two dollars back. That means sequestration will hit us hard, economically and socially. The state’s Indian reservations are already feeling the pinch. Last week, the Washington Post ran a story on the Poplar School District, located on the Fort Peck Reservation about 50 miles west of the North Dakota border. As a result of sequestration, Poplar schools are facing a 5 percent reduction in federal funding. It doesn’t sound like much, until you consider that reservation schools do not receive property tax funding from private landowners and therefore rely heavily on federal dollars. You might remember Poplar from 2009, when five students at the town’s middle school committed suicide and 20 more attempted, prompting outcry in the national media. Like many reservation towns in Montana, Poplar is a small community struggling with a depressed economy and high crime rates. Its schools provide not

just education but valuable social services to students and their families. In this environment, a 5 percent reduction in funding can change lives, and not for the better. Meanwhile, Helena continues to argue over what to do with Montana’s $427 million budget surplus, now projected to reach $480 million by 2015. Democrats and Republicans are at loggerheads over whether to return some of that money to property owners now or a lot of it over the next four decades.

“I would say that wasting wasted deer is among Montana’s biggest problems, provided you do not spend even one second thinking about other problems facing the state.” Both plans enjoy broad taxpayer support, and both ignore an opportunity to help the Montanans who need it most. As our elected representatives argue over how best to return property taxes, they might consider the thousands of Montana children at risk of receiving sub-par educations this year because their schools get no property tax money at all. In Poplar, the district is looking for ways to cut $1.2 million from its budget. Elementary schools will no longer provide students with paper workbooks to take home. The same middle school where 25 out of 200 students attempted suicide in 2009 has scrapped plans to hire a second guidance counselor.

That’s 12 percent of the children in fifth, sixth and seventh grade—12 percent of pre-adolescents in Poplar—who thought killing themselves was a better option than the life that Fort Peck had to offer. And now their school is scrambling to make up for budget cuts that amount to 0.25 percent of Montana’s state budget surplus. At this moment, I’m not sure roadside venison is the most valuable resource Montana is wasting. The kids in Poplar and at reservation schools across the state are Montanans, even if their education is underwritten by federal money. They will grow up to run this state, to work Montana jobs and vote for Montana legislators, even if they are not the constituency our representatives in Helena are most concerned with pleasing. The state already provides about 70 percent of the funding for Montana’s reservation schools. In this time of sequestration, when our federal representatives have failed us so disappointingly, our state representatives have an opportunity to pick up the slack. Helena should provide emergency funding for reservation school districts to make up for lost federal dollars. We have the surplus to do it, and kids need an education more than homeowners need a few hundred bucks. As political ideas go, helping reservation schools would be less popular than free money from the government. Probably, it would be less popular than HB 247. A lot of state legislators might have to confront the fact that their constituents would rather eat roadkill than help Indians. But using some of our surplus to cover the loss of federal funding to reservation schools would be the right thing to do. So far, the 2013 legislature has proven itself reluctant to tackle big issues. The sequestration crisis offers an opportunity for our representatives to do something serious and good for the state—something a generation of young Montanans will remember. Dan Brooks writes about politics, consumer culture and lying at combatblog.net.


[opinion]

Quantum Consciousness

Close encounters

and the Art of Being Human with Amit Goswami, Ph.D.

What do you do when you meet a predator? by Christina Nealson

her cubs gathered around her.” opened up to throngs of hikers. I would have missed it all had it not been for Teak’s keen nose and our good luck in being downwind. To witness the wild is to step into an extraordinary space. I wonder why that mother didn’t feel threatened by either the dog or me, and act on her fear by charging us. My response to our encounter was just as surprising: Avid photographer that I am, I never thought to reach for my camera. I simply watched in fascination as my body received information that lay far beyond the reach of my conscious brain. That is why I didn’t flee; I stood my ground and sent out whatever

Tickets $15.00/$10.00 for students Available at Water Lilies - 401 W. Broadway Ste. C Missoula, MT or by calling Kathy at 406-880-2636

www.redwillowcenter.org

k e e w this at spectr UM

PUBLIC HOURS - NO ENROLLMENT REQUIRED

Thurs 3/28 Sat 3/30

Dry Ice

Explore dry ice & see how it mysteriously changes from a solid to a gas! 3:30-7pm

Electricity and Magnetism

Experiment with different types of circuits, make an electromagnet & see how it interferes with a compass. 11am-4:30pm

Homeschool Astronomer’s Club

ages 8-11 Wednesdays for ages 5-7 Fridays for ls! bsite for full detai Check out our we

Check out our website for our exciting

STEM to scie

STEAM nce

scie

nce

art

math

as if by magic,

Urey Underground Lecture Hall • UM Campus

math

into the air and,

Friday, April 5, 7:00-9:00pm

engineering

stuck her nose

Public Lecture

engineering

“She looked at me,

nonthreatening and nonverbal vibes take over at a time like that. I had a similar experience once above timberline in the Canadian Rockies when I met a mother grizzly and her three cubs. I rounded a corner and there they were, moseying across the mountainside, turning over huge rocks in search of insects. I grabbed the dog and stood still, watching, until the mother noticed me. She could have been on me in a nano-second. Above timberline, there was no place to run, no trees to climb. I directed every drop of energy I had toward her presence, trying to communicate the fact that I meant no harm. She looked at me, stuck her nose into the air and, as if by magic, her cubs gathered around her. They all stood still for a moment, then turned on a dime and headed down the mountain, the three cubs following like the tail on a kite. A few moments later, they reappeared on a mountainside farther away. I want to find meaning in these encounters that left me breathless and yet unharmed. Even though lions and bears are fierce predators, when they noticed me watching them, they suddenly seemed vulnerable and alone. I was privileged to see those two mothers make the wiser choice, protecting their young not by confrontation but by their decision to move on. I, too, was able to walk away, deeply humbled by the experience. I knew that I was the intruder, forcing wild animals on their own wild turf to react to me. The imperative of wilderness weighs heavily on us all.

technology

at me, let loose with a tremendous snarl revealing razor-sharp canines and sprang to the other side as if propelled by the thickness of her powerful tail. My body, frozen in awe, eventually relaxed, as my breath returned. I moved up a few yards and looked back on the spot where the family had been. It was a dry, south-facing slope, hidden under a slight rock overhang. I imagine that they were lazing in the spring sun, relaxing in these quiet weeks before the backcountry

technology

The March day in western Colorado was crystalline clear. North-facing mountain slopes held up to a foot of snow; the south faces, however, were bare. I made my way up a favorite isolated mountain valley along a stream of beaver ponds. I saw no beaver, but I did see a small mountain lion track. It’s a common experience: My cougar sightings have all occurred close to beaver activity. I stopped to rest on a log in the sun as a raven checked me out from on high, and a flock of chirpy cedar waxwings worked the aspen catkins. The air brimmed with the exhilaration of spring. When I decided to go higher, the wind was in my favor; perhaps I’d see an elk. I rounded the high overlook and continued a few steps when I suddenly noticed that the hair on the back of my dog’s neck stood on end. I peered into the valley below and saw nothing. Then I followed Teak’s eyes. Thirty yards directly below us was a mountain lion. I watched as the lion, intent on putting distance between the dog and me, leapt a small stream and disappeared into the thick forest, tangled with downed debris. Then, another lion appeared. It, too, walked the bank of the stream, jumped over it and disappeared. I couldn’t believe my eyes. I stood spellbound when danged if a third lion didn’t come into view. Within a few seconds, after this one disappeared, the mother finally appeared, dwarfing her yearlings, which, until that moment, had seemed huge. She was magnificent. Having assured the triplets’ safety, the lion strode upstream about 10 yards and climbed onto a trunk snag that bridged the stream. She was halfway across when she looked back

Spring Break Camp line-up!

more information? spectrum.umt.edu 243-4828

spectrUM

Christina Nealson is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org ). She is on the road promoting her latest book, Drive Me Wild: A Western Odyssey.

missoulanews.com • March 28 – April 4, 2013 [11]


[quirks]

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN – After agreeing to give a stranger a ride to a convenience store in Spotsylvania County, Va., a 29-year-old man bought some items at the store and returned to his pickup truck. The stranger assaulted and robbed him, then hopped into a waiting car, which drove off. The victim called 911 and followed in his truck but lost sight of the getaway car. Sheriff’s Deputy Chad Polliard kept searching and found the vehicle 10 miles from the robbery scene with its blinkers flashing after it ran out of gas. He arrested suspects Johnny Ray Brooks, 28, and Jon Dean Kimmel, 37, who were standing beside the vehicle. (Fredericksburg’s The Free Lance-Star) Police investigating a drive-by shooting that wounded 13 people in the District of Columbia identified Craig Steven Wilson, 19, as a suspect after surveillance videos showed shots fired from a vehicle registered to him at the scene. Wilson was also wearing a court-ordered electronic ankle bracelet with a GPS tracking device, which indicated his movements coincided with those of one of the shooters. (The Washington Post) FUTURE IN THE PAST – Outbox, a new startup, charges people $4.99 a month to digitize their mail. A driver, known as an “unpostman,” stops at subscribers’ homes three times a week to collect letters, bills, magazines and advertisements delivered by official letter carriers, and then takes them to a warehouse. There, they’re opened and photographed to create digital files, which are sent electronically to recipients. Outbox co-founder said the company already has more than 600 customers in Austin, Texas, and just began service in San Francisco. (CNN) Polaroid Fotobar opened its first store in Delray Beach, Fla., where it offers customers the opportunity to turn pictures on cell phones and other digital devices into prints that replicate traditional Polaroid instant photos. Prices begin at $1. “Digital is not permanent,” Warren Struhl, Fotobar’s founder and CEO, said. “Physical is permanent.” (Associated Press) SECOND-AMENDMENT FOLLIES – After an explosion at an ammunition factory in Bend, Ore., the sprinkler system ran for 90 minutes, contaminating the water and requiring a year’s clean-up effort. Much of the contamination was in underground shooting areas, where Nosler Inc. tests its bullets. “It was mainly lead-related, as you might imagine from a bullet manufacturer,” Cliff Walkey, a hydrogeologist for the Department of Environmental Quality, said. (Bend’s The Bulletin) Tracer rounds fired at a Dallas shooting range apparently triggered a four-alarm fire that engulfed the one-story building. About 50 people inside the range when the fire broke out managed to escape safely, according to Dallas Fire-Rescue official Jason Evans, who said a shooter at the range admitted firing unauthorized tracer ammunition, which produces a small flare that makes following a round’s path easier but can ignite the target backing at the range. After the blaze was doused, security personnel were dispatched to the wreckage to prevent looters from taking at least 100 handguns, assault rifles and ammunition amid the debris. (Houston’s KHOU-TV) DRONE ON – The University of North Dakota became the first to offer a degree program in unmanned aviation, although it’s just one of many academic settings, along with companies and individuals, preparing for the day when cheap, remote-controlled aircraft will occupy civilian airspace. “The sky’s going to be dark with these things,” predicted Chris Anderson, who runs 3D Robotics, which sells unmanned aerial vehicles. (The New York Times) The Defense Department is creating a medal for drone pilots and cyber-warfare specialists that recognizes “extraordinary achievements that directly impact on combat operations, but do not involve acts of valor or physical risks that combat entails.” The new Distinguished Warfare Medal ranks just above the Bronze Star with Valor device, which is awarded for specific heroic acts performed under fire in combat. (Marine Corps Times) Celebrity news and gossip media outlet TMZ has applied for a permit to use drones to follow the activities of its targets, according to reports, which TMZ and the Federal Aviation Administration have denied. By 2015, TMZ and virtually anyone else will be able to use drones for private and commercial purposes, such as taking photos, shooting videos, conducting research, providing security surveillance and advertising. (The Washington Times) Numerous media outlets, citing U.S. Customs and Border Protection documents obtained via the Freedom of Information Act, reported that the federal government possesses unmanned aerial vehicles capable of detecting guns and tracking citizens via their cell-phone signals. The agency explained it merely wants its 10 border-patrolling drones to be equipped with cameras capable of zooming in close enough to see whether people crossing the border from Mexico are holding a gun in their hands, but Amie Stepanovich, an attorney with the Electronic Privacy Information Center, pointed out that the technology “is only going to get cheaper and easier to implement,” and will soon expand to other government departments and agencies. (The Washington Times) Although at least 19 states are considering limits on how the unmanned craft — some now as small as a housefly — can be used, about 30 states, including some of the 19, are urging the FAA to choose them for its six proposed drone test sites. A study by the Government Accountability Office cited a survey by the drone industry that puts the combined public- and private-sector spending on drones over the next decade at $89 billion, including spin-off spending for research and development. “We would encourage officials in all states, and especially those seeking test sites, to work collaboratively to ensure that state legislation doesn’t undermine the job-creation potential of unmanned aircraft or a particular state’s ability to compete for a test site,” said Melanie Hinton of the Association of Unmanned Vehicle Systems International. (The Washington Times) MOVING LIPS – After police charged Robert Smith, 32, with disorderly conduct for his loud whistling in downtown Portland, Maine, Smith pleaded guilty but reached an agreement with the city that lets him continue to whistle so long as he doesn’t remain in one spot. Businesses complained that Smith drives away their customers, but he insists that his whistling, which is audible a block away, is protected free speech. (The Portland Press Herald) EASY TO FIND, HARD TO STOP – Of the 1,351 criminal defendants ordered to wear GPS ankle bracelets after being released on bail in Washington, D.C., officials said 110 were arrested and charged with new crimes, 11 of them involving violence, while they were being tracked. (The Washington Post)

[12] Missoula Independent • March 28 – April 4, 2013


missoulanews.com • March 28 – April 4, 2013 [13]


Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

On November 8, 2011, Connie Ternes-Daniels totaled her Buick Rendezvous on a bull moose. That’s how she knows that things in Opportunity, slowly but surely, are getting better. She tells me about it over lunch at Donivan’s Family Dining in Anaconda. Connie orders a salad. I have the Miner Burger–a cheeseburger with a slice of ham on top. Donivan’s also features an “Opportunity Omelet” on its all-day breakfast menu, filled with sausage and drenched in cream gravy. Connie says she’s never tried it. Connie, the Anaconda-Deer Lodge County planning director, was driving east on Montana Scenic Highway 1, headed from a commissioners’ meeting in Anaconda to the 30-acre homestead she shares with her husband in Opportunity. The meeting had ended at 7 p.m. and the road had already grown dark. She had just passed the turnoff to Mill Creek Road, but not yet reached the railroad tracks, when the moose materialized out of nowhere. She was traveling about 65 miles per hour in the 70 mph zone and yanked the steering wheel trying to avoid the animal. The Buick’s passenger side plowed into it, knocking it dead into the ditch between the eastbound and westbound lanes. The impact shattered her windshield, but Connie wasn’t hurt. The son of Anaconda’s sole auto dealer and his girlfriend were driving behind her, thinking about passing, when they saw Connie swerve. They let her wait with them in their truck, out of the cold, while her husband came to pick her up.

At the turn of the 19th century, Montana exploited the richest copper deposits in the world, fueling the electric growth of 20th century America and building some of the nation’s most outlandish fortunes. The toxic by-product of those fortunes—what didn’t spill into the Clark Fork—was dumped in a town named Opportunity. In the 21st century, Montana’s draw is no longer metal but landscape. To match reality to myth, affluent exurbanites and wellmeaning environmentalists are trying to restore the Clark Fork to its “natural state.” In the process, millions of tons of toxic soils are being removed and dumped—once again—in Opportunity. In his new book, Opportunity, Montana: Big Copper, Bad Water, and the Burial of an American Landscape, former Independent editor Brad Tyer investigates the town’s history and wrestles with questions of environmental injustice and the ethics of burdening one community with an entire region’s waste. The following excerpt, published with permission from Beacon Press, looks at Opportunity today, and how some residents feel about their downstream neighbors in Missoula. A week later, another local resident ran into an elk on the road, and several weeks after that a pilot flying into nearby Bowman Field radioed in a moose browsing in the middle of his runway.

[14] Missoula Independent • March 28 – April 4, 2013

Connie felt terrible about killing the moose. “It’s sort of interesting that all of the remediation has really enhanced wildlife,” she tells me. “I just don’t want to run into them.” Connie was born in the Deer Lodge Valley, and left to attend Montana State University in Bozeman and then Montana Tech in Butte before going to graduate school at the University of Montana in Missoula. She’s lived in Opportunity since 1982, when her husband–an Opportunity native and an electrical engineer on smelter hill when it closed down in 1980–inherited property from his grandfather, who had purchased one of the community’s original 10-acre tracts from the Anaconda Company’s Deer Lodge Valley Farms development arm. Now they operate a small hobby farm, some cows and horses and hay, and Connie raises miniature horses. “There’s always been agricultural use in Opportunity,” she tells me. “That was the whole purpose of it from the beginning. It was to show that you could have little agricultural operations under the plume of the big stack.” You could and you couldn’t. The local rumor is that the Anaconda Company raised livestock on the upwind side of Smelter Hill, importing healthy animals to Opportunity fairs for show. Now that the stack produces no plume, Connie hasn’t noticed any problem. Gold, her palomino Tennessee Walking Horse, is 34 years old. “He eats the grass and drinks the water. My vet says he’s one of the oldest


horses he’s ever seen, and the horse has lived in Opportunity since he interstate, across from Opportunity, but there’s not much soil left there. Nine months after EPA’s initial deadline, EPA and ARCO finally anwas nine years old”–that was seven years after the smelter shut down. Which is not to say that Connie thinks everything is peaches and nounced a plan to cap the Milltown section of the Opportunity Ponds. cream in Opportunity. She knows better. She served two terms on the The compromise calls for 12 inches of new “vegetative growth medium” county commission before going to work for U.S. Sen. Jon Tester as his topsoil, that is on top of the Milltown sediments. The county had wanted Butte field director. She left that job to come work for Becky Guay as the 18 inches. The modern national standard for reclaimed mining sites is three to four feet. If forced to find more dirt, ARCO publicly threatened, county’s planning director. “Jon’s state director offered me more money to stay. I took a pay cut from what I was making to come over here. I like projects, and I like being able to say, ‘Yeah, see what you can do when you work together?’” She knows what it’s like when you don’t. Connie was on the county commission on May 5, 2003, when Butte’s Montana Standard announced that Sen. Max Baucus wanted to send Milltown’s toxic lakebed to Op“Do you think for one second that portunity. Connie read about Baucus’ proposal in the newspaper like everyone else. Missoula would take one drop of “There wasn’t a discussion here about that. It was announced in the newspaper and there was no discuscontaminated soil from this area sion with any public official at the time. We read about it. I was irate about it. I have no proof, but I have to down there? Absolutely not.” believe that Dennis Washington had a discussion with Sen. Baucus and said, ‘This means jobs.’” Jobs, that is, for Washington’s Montana Rail Link, which would ship —Connie Ternes-Daniels, the wastes to Opportunity. Anaconda-Deer Lodge County planning director “I firmly believe that that decision was a political decision that influenced the EPA,” Connie says. To add insult to injury, two years later Baucus announced that he had secured a $5 million congressional appropriation to help redevelop the Superfund-affected communities with parks and trail systems. This time, Connie got the news directly from Baucus’ state director, Jim Foley. “I’ll never forget that call,” Connie told me. “He said, ‘Max has got the company would dig up the grassy, tree-crowded strip of buffer that $5 million for redevelopment. Four point eight million is going to go to partially obscures the treeless ponds from Opportunity’s view. It’s comMissoula and 200,000 is going to go to you.’ I think my statement was, pany property, after all. In short, ARCO, with EPA approval, is digging up dirty dirt, diluting ‘Over my dead body.’ I was incensed. We have had to scrap and fight for every little pittance. What the hell are we going to do with that? I mean seriously?” Ultimately Connie fought and scrapped and got the appropriation halved between Missoula and Anaconda-Deer Lodge County; $1.3 million went to remediation and redevelopment of Opportunity’s Beaver Dam Park. Beaver Dam Park is named for the fenced-off Beaver Dam School. The Beaver Dam School itself is named for the valley’s once prodigious beavers. The water-slowing dams they built meant that more mine tailings settled out here, on the valley floor, than anywhere else in the watershed. Connie is happy about the park. She fought for years to get it. It’s something. If nothing else, it cleaned up a contaminated and blighted block. “The fact remains, if it wasn’t used as a school or park ground, it would have reverted back to Atlantic Richfield. There are lots of reversionary clauses on a lot of company ground. If it wasn’t used for its original intention, then it would revert back.” Even once she secured the money for the park, she had to fight to get the property’s soil tested before construction began. EPA and ARCO were willing to presume the ground was nontoxic enough for Opportunity’s children. It wasn’t. Contractors conducted a removal action stripping contaminated soil and replacing it with clean donor soil before work could begin. Some of the donor soil came from the StewWorkers haul waste in Opportunity. art Street “borrow area” on the other side of the

it, calling it clean dirt, and mixing it into more dirty dirt to dilute that. Require anything more thorough and the company stands ready to cannibalize this “garden community” of a company town for dump cover. It boggles Connie’s mind. “Anyway– ” Connie says “anyway” a lot, usually as a way to trail a thought off, sometimes apologetically, as if she’s gone on too long. It’s an enormously confusing patchwork of projects to keep track of, and she has developed pet peeves, but she doesn’t want to dwell on her frustrations. “I don’t think running around screaming about ‘it’s contaminated’ and blah blah, and going on about every negative thing under the sun is ever going to get you out of it,” she says. “I would rather focus my personal energies, and my professional energies, on trying to do something constructive and positive to make some sort of an impact to change things to some degree, to the best of our abilities.” What she wants to change is what Opportunity has already become: a ghost town whose ghosts haven’t left yet. She is encouraged by the new START–Sanction, Treatment, Assessment, Revocation and Transition adult–correctional facility recently constructed just across Highway 48 from the ponds, and the Anaconda credit union’s new office in the old company train yard, and the newish $200 million NorthWestern Energy power plant and transfer station just up the Mill Creek Road, each of which required pre-construction soil remediation. But she knows that’s not enough. Neither is the park. “The park is wonderful, it’s a great little thing, but really, for this community to recover, it needs a lot more. I think you need to put something back here. People still live here, there’s still businesses here, so what can we do to help them? I’ve lived here my entire life and I can do things every single season of the year. I was out cross-country skiing yesterday, I horseback ride in the

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

missoulanews.com • March 28 – April 4, 2013 [15]


summer, you can go to Georgetown Lake. There talisms. East European sex slavery and Mexican drug needs to be some investment back in it to help these violence. China rises and America flails. The oil is running out. The sun will explode. areas recover. I think it’s So what if Opportunity got only fair.” thrown under the bus. BeConnie is one of the sides, big good did come of it. few people I’ve talked to Industry, wealth and convenwho seems comfortable ience, lives extended and imtalking about Opportunity proved by mineral-aided in terms of bald fairness. It comfort, communication and is conceivably logical to speed. There are harsher fates dump an entire river afoot in the world than a quiet restoration’s waste at an allife in Opportunity, worrying, ready dumped-upon site, or not, about the dust in your but is it fair? lungs and the dirt in your yard Is it fair that the EPA’s and the water in your well. national safety standard for Where’s the crime, right? arsenic in soil is 150 ppm, As crimes go, the cleanup while the standard applied of the Clark Fork, the failure to in Anaconda and OpportuPhoto by Chad Harder fix Anaconda, and the sacrifice nity is 250 ppm? Is it fair that ARCO’s thousands of The return of wildlife, evidenced by the of Opportunity belong firmly acres of dumpsite are taxed tracks, is a positive sign for Opportunity. in the category of First World Problems. I remember describas agricultural land, the state’s lowest tax bracket? Is it fair that in calculating ing the story to a fellow journalist, an opposition rethe resources lost to the state through a century’s porter in Russia, a woman whose closest colleagues worth of mining and mining waste, the state Natural Resource Damage Program discounted Anaconda-Deer Lodge County and the Opportunity Ponds entirely, never to be compensated for? The place was too fucked-up to make amends. Connie has tried to find out who made that decision, but no one will say. Is it fair that Missoula gets it river cleaned up at Opportunity’s expense? “Do you think for one second that Missoula would take one drop of contaminated soil from this area down there?” Connie asks me. “Absolutely not.” She’s finished her salad, and periodically checks her watch. Her mother has been ill, and she’s expecting an update from her brother. I’ve told her that I’ve felt almost guilty, as a Missoulian, at the way Opportunity has been steamrolled, the way it’s been taken out of the equation. “Don’t think we haven’t noticed,” she says. “It’s really hard for a little town like this with pretty limited resources to fight this. It is a community. It’s a great little community. It has survived the smelter closure. It has survived all these things. I don’t have any regrets. I don’t want the legacy of this community to be the waste repository of the Clark Fork, and that’s it. I live here. I don’t have any plans on moving. Maybe that’s part of our generational attachment here. Our son is fourth generation on his [father’s] side of the family, and I’m second. I like Missoula, but I’m not moving down there.” ••• There’s a voice that says: So what? Who cares? A little out-of-the-way town got shat upon. Opportunity’s fate is logical, politically convenient and advantageous to several generations of billionaires. The world has bigger problems. Massacres, genocides and epidemics. Collapsing economies and murderous fundamen-

[16] Missoula Independent • March 28 – April 4, 2013

had been murdered for speaking truth to power. She looked at me for a long time, trying to gauge if I was serious. When she realized I was, she said, of my country, “You are so far ahead of us.” Is it really an injustice? Does an injustice require someone to blame? Who do we blame for Opportunity? The mining company that industrialized a nation and collaterally despoiled a landscape, or the state of Montana that rolled over for it? Blame ARCO, which has done almost nothing to the site but spend money, however variably effective? Do we acknowledge that the residents of Opportunity are fully accessory to the crime? Men who raised families in Opportunity worked on the smelter in Anaconda. They produced the copper and they produced the poison. They drove company trucks to tailings dumps and poached the stuff to fill low spots in their yards and muddy driveways. Theirs was no paradise lost. Maybe Opportunity is just a cost of doing business. Something we had to do. Something we chose to do and wouldn’t, on balance, choose to undo. The concept of necessary sacrifice strikes at the core of the deal that modern America–and the increasingly modern world–has struck with itself: we’ll

write this one off, and we’ll move along, not looking back. It’s the deal that meat-eaters make with themselves even after they’ve toured the abattoir. It’s the deal that dedicated smokers make even after the cancer has been diagnosed. It’s the deal that love-it-orleave-it patriots make to embrace American exceptionalism without regard to the global sweatshop that supports it. It’s the deal copper king William A. Clark struck when he conflated personal profit with American dominion and left future generations to fend for themselves. It’s self-imposed blindness, failure to recognize, the discomfort of acknowledgment, that’s erasing Opportunity. EPA, the state Department of Environmental Quality and the Clark Fork Coalition have all published maps of the Superfund stretch from Butte to Missoula. Not one of them marks Opportunity. The country’s largest Superfund site proffers no shortage of hooks upon which to hang complaints. Industry has too little motivation to do the right thing, and too much power to be forced to. Cleanup of the watershed has been enacted out of any logical order, downstream first, exhibiting political favoritism toward the already relatively powerful. It’s taking entirely too long: Three decades in, Butte doesn’t even have an encompassing Record of Decision governing the work still to be done. And if you believe cleanup consultant Jim Kiupers and others, even the revised remedies in Anaconda are inadequate. Nothing has been done to prepare for the day when the Opportunity Ponds turn acid and start pumping heavy metals into the river, potentially undoing hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of restoration already accomplished. Opportunity is a sacrificial landscape that allowed America to become what it is, and that is now enabling the restoration of a river and the betterment of Missoula. The Clark Fork’s total restoration bill will come in around $1.3 billion–a dollar for every man, woman and child in China. Opportunity got 0.01 percent of that–$1.3 million– for a mothballed schoolhouse in a token park. Residential Opportunity will never not be next door to 4,000 acres of tailings piles. Waste doesn’t just disappear. Excepting an eruption of the Yellowstone caldera that would vaporize much of the Rocky Mountain West, it cannot be made to go away. We carry our disappointments, the failures we’ve inherited, with us. We are uneasy with those we owe, so we look away. Better to just bury the debt under four feet of clean, fenced-off soil and walk away. You can’t save everything. Yet we owe Opportunity something. You could argue we owe Opportunity everything. The least a beneficiary can do, and more than we’ve done, is say thanks.

Photo by Chad Harder

Brad Tyer will read from Opportunity, Montana: Big Copper, Bad Water, and the Burial of an American Landscape at Shakespeare & Co., 103 S. Third Street W., Tuesday, April 2, at 7 p.m.


missoulanews.com • March 28 – April 4, 2013 [17]


[arts]

Fabric of our lives Project Selvedge brings Missoula fashionistas together by Kate Whittle

I

f Missoula has a definable fashion sense, it would have to be the style displayed by the audience at Project Selvedge, the annual design competition hosted by Selvedge Studio. It’s mostly practical and classic: Women and men wear flats or low-heeled boots, sweaters, jeans or Aline skirts, topped with ski caps or locally made Jax newsboy caps. But sometimes things get a little funky: The occasional wide-brimmed hat or pair of suspenders or green velvet leggings sneak in. For seven years now, Selvedge has hosted the amateur design competition, which narrows down about 10 local contestants over the course of a few months to one winner. On Friday evenings, dozens of fashion fans crowd the small fabric and notions store on Higgins Avenue, lined up shoulder-to-shoulder around the taped lines on the floor that denotes the runway. Models then exhibit the results of the designer’s weekly challenge. The March 15 challenge, for example, called for an outfit based on a particular decade. The winner,

Project Selvedge contestant Abby McGill works on her design for the March 30 challenge on her Kenmore sewing machine, which she says she's had since fifth grade. Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Abby McGill, was assigned to create something for the ’70s. She dressed her model, a statuesque woman with an afro, in an elegantly draped dove-gray caftan with kimono sleeves and slits up to the thighs. At the end of the months-long competition, the winner receives prizes and the opportunity to showcase her designs at nearby clothing boutique Betty’s Divine. But Project Selvedge is less about competition and more about local fashionistas coming together to stretch their skills and get gussied up. At McGill’s house on a recent afternoon, the designer works with her model for the next challenge, Leila del Luca. McGill shows her a few panels of floral fabric stitched together. “This doesn’t look like anything, but it’s going to be shorts,” she says. McGill says she got into fashion through her work at Boom Swagger salon. She thinks Missoulians could afford to be a little more daring and dressy with their style, and she doesn’t accept common excuses like Montana’s cold weather. She wore a motorcycle jacket

[18] Missoula Independent • March 28 – April 4, 2013

over a high-waisted skirt to the last Selvedge challenge. “It gets cold in San Francisco and people dress up,” she says. “It’s that Missoula mentality.” “It’s economics, partly, isn’t it?” del Luca asks with a laugh. “We’re poor, aren’t we?” “I don’t think it takes that much money to look good,” McGill says. “I pride myself on being thrifty.” Another Selvedge contestant, Katie Oly, doesn’t argue that Missoula can seem drab, but says it’s about finding the right community. “I surround myself with fashion risk-takers,” she says. “My friends don’t care what the rules are or if it matches.” Oly, who grew up mostly in Olympia, Wash., studies theater at the University of Montana. She sports a curly pixie cut, dyed pink and blue on top. She says her creativity sometimes gets a negative reaction, but somebody has to be different. The same mentality carries over to fashion. “I look around and I see Walmart, Walmart, Target, Walmart, Griz wear, Griz wear, Griz wear,” she says.

Neither Oly nor McGill say they have plans to launch design careers if they win Project Selvedge, though prizes like a new sewing machine would be nice. Oly says she wanted to join Project Selvedge after watching a friend compete a few seasons ago, and to test her creativity. So far, she’s proud of trying things she’d never done before, like sew a full dress. “Everyone’s doing it for themselves, and to learn,” she says. “And everyone’s really supportive of each other.” In some ways, Project Selvedge’s informal vibe echoes Missoula’s relaxed sartorial attitude. The competition is about men and women coming together to have fun, be creative and dress up: Just like the point of fashion itself. Project Selvedge continues at Selvedge Studio Fri., March 29, at 6:30 PM. $1. arts@missoulanews.com


[music]

Rev up Cruise the metal highway with Orange Goblin The motorcycle equivalent of modern metal is like some stretched-out, shiny, tribal-tattooed contraption that looks like something from an Alien movie. That isn’t Orange Goblin. These Brits are an oil-covered old hardtail Panhead that growls and smokes and leaves your tailbone feeling utterly crushed by the ass-thumping a simple ride across town will deliver. It’s loud, unflinching biker metal. It’s metal for people who ride their bikes cross-country to festivals like Sturgis, not the kind for people who haul them in trailers. Orange Goblin debuted in 1997 with thick, grooveheavy rock that had more in common with the Kyussinfluenced stoner rock of the day. A Eulogy for the Fans: Orange Goblin Live 2012, the band’s eighth record and first live collection, displays how the Goblins have migrated since 2002 when they started swapping swing for speed and aggression. Most of this set, recorded at the UK 2012 Bloodstock Festival, draws from the band’s most recent studio efforts, but does include some gems from the early years. It consists of a live CD and DVD of

the Bloodstock set, as well as a live show from Hellfest 2012 in France, a documentary and a few short extras. If you lean more toward Motörhead for your metal fix, this package is essential. (Chris La Tray) Orange Goblin, Lionize and Kyng open for Clutch at the Wilma Mon., April 1, at 7 PM. $24. Advance tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s and ticketweb.com.

Pile Like many ex-punks in their 30s, I would like to go to an Avail show, but I have this thing with my knee. I therefore welcome post-hardcore, which takes the sonic elements of hardcore and arranges them in a structure that does not require me to jump over a 19-year-old who has just fallen on a pint glass. Pile is an exemplar of the form. All the familiar sounds are there: heavy guitar, flat vocals and a dry, trebly production that makes it sound like all the instruments were recorded within four feet of one another. It’s just not so damned fast. The transition to “post” requires some sacrifices, as it always does. The whole point of post-hardcore is

to escape the rigid chorus-verse-chorus-breakdownchorus structure of the original genre, and Pile sometimes unpacks this formula to formlessness. Certain tracks can only be described as lumbering. When these Bostonians discipline themselves, however, they remind us that the only two real components of hardcore are loud and louder. Pile is painting in black and white, with the appropriate sense of nostalgia for scenes that are no more, at least for the elderly among us. (Dan Brooks) Pile, Fat History Month, St. Elias and Missoula’s Boys play the VFW Sun., March 31, at 10 PM. $5.

Langhorne Slim One morning a couple summers ago, I found myself hungover, soaking wet and driving a borrowed Subaru back to Missoula, wearing only a Woolrich flannel coat and boxer briefs. I remember cranking the Black Keys’ fantastic EP, Chulahoma. I could’ve substituted that disc for a collection of Langhorne Slim songs. They provide a salve to the haggard mornings we’ve all had—music you play, say, after an all-night funny hat party in the Mission Mountains where you drank an entire bottle of Wild Turkey and fell into a creek trying to find your tent. Slim croons with a high wail reminiscent of The Rural Alberta Advantage or the Tallest Man on Earth. In his fingerpicking ode to traveler’s love, “Coffee Cups,”

off last year’s The Way We Move, Slim sings, “It’s early in the morning / what are we doing up still / drinking wine out of coffee cups / that’s fine by me / as long as I’m lying by you.” Most of his discography toes the line between these kind of quiet folk ballads and a raucous brand of back porch, blue-eyed soul. When you’ve got to play an hour-long acoustic show for kids at 9 a.m. on a Sunday, songs like these are Vitamin Water for your ears. (Nate Hegyi) Langhorne Slim and the Law and Missoula’s The Hasslers play the Palace Thu., April 4, at 9 PM. $8. Advance tickets available at Ear Candy or stonefly-productions.com.

Pissed Jeans, Honeys Do you remember the first time you did white drugs and shirtlessly ran around a backyard party telling anyone who would listen how much Fleetwood Mac’s Tusk changed how you heard the world? Honeys produces that same reaction—dilated pupils, prickly skin, anxiety, catharsis—sans hard drugs and the shameover. From the moment “Bathroom Laughter’s” fuzzed-out bass drives panzer-like into your temples, it is on. Vocalist Matt Korvette barks, growls, grumbles and groans. Guitars squawk and stomp. This is rawk and roll at its filthiest and it’s merely the opener to an album filled with so much thunderous ass-kickery that it’s a difficult proposition to

choose a favorite track. Speed is traded in favor of sweaty, slow swampass grind on “Chain Worker.” Overdriven bass and swirls of grunting doom-filled feedback are matched with Korvette’s belching hollers in a satisfactory sonic display of how monotony can rule our lives. The band does its best Rollins-era Black Flag impersonation on “Male Gaze.” Korvette admits that he stares at women although he knows it’s inappropriate and creepy: “It’s when a smile becomes a stare/ And it starts to burn,” he sings, before lamenting, “I’m not innocent, but I’m sorry.” Grown-up reflections and youthful energy rate this the most besotted pair of jeans yet. (Jason McMackin)

missoulanews.com • March 28 – April 4, 2013 [19]


[music]

Opposites attract Helms Alee harnesses the friction by Jason McMackin

The HobbyZone® Glasair® Sportsman® airplane is a 4-channel model that anyone can learn to fly. Smooth control and assistance provided by its sophisticated electronics make RC flight simple and fun. It's extra tough so that you can keep flying longer, and loaded with other great features that make it an outstanding first plane.

[20] Missoula Independent • March 28 – April 4, 2013

We all love opposites. We love the crunch of Oreo gullis explains how the Capitol Theater in Olympia, cookies’ dark outsides and we love their white, creamy Wash., shaped her musical path. “It was the all-ages venue that showed me most of centers. We love it when Steven Tyler sings, “Livin’ it up when I’m goin’ down” on “Love in an Elevator.” And in my favorite music when I was a bun,” she writes. “I was rom-coms like Sleepless in Seattle, we love Tom Hanks 15 years old when I got my drum kit and just months later I saw both Unwound and Karp.” and disdain Meg Ryan (like, a lot). Those early influences helped inform Helms Alee’s Opposites create tension and friction, and tension and friction create heat and energy. Helms Alee has har- sound. When Matheson-Margullis is asked to describe the band, she refernessed that hot heat to ences a friend who create energetic tunes calls it “raw, powerful that are as ballsy as and fun.” It’s an apt they are beautiful, description, and part tunes that crush of the reason Total eardrums with crusty Fest founder Josh sub-sonic bass growls, Vanek says the event’s brutal screams and planning committee warlike drums. But the invited Helms Alee to trio can also cause one headline the Zoo City to ruminate about blowout. “They’re a what life would be like thoroughly awesome inside a well-decorated and kind of jaw-droptreehouse through pingly inspiring band arpeggios dripping that has to be seen with the echo of reverb live to be fully appreand somber female ciated, and it’s been harmonies. The band too long since anycan shift the mood in body’s gotten a mere seconds or over chance to do that the course of an entire around here,” Vanek album. It does this Ben Verellen of Helms Alee says. without a trace of gimshreds at Total Fest XI. mickry. In other Helms Alee has words, Helms Alee doesn’t veer tonally just to show us a lot of new material, but no current record label as it can, but because it sounds as if it always should. Hydra Head Records ceased releasing new albums. Helms Alee is a six-year-old trio based out of Seattle No matter, though. The band launched a Kickstarter made up of drummer Hozoji Matheson-Margullis, campaign to help record and release a third fullbassist Dana James and guitarist Ben Verellen. Total Fest length, Sleepwalking Sailors. The fundraiser surfans are likely aware that Verellen was in the influential passed its goal of $5,000 just this week. People can post-hardcore outfit Harkonen while Matheson-Mar- still donate to receive a copy of the release. gullis also performs in the duo Lozen. The local familMatheson-Margullis describes the new tracks as iarity goes both ways, as the band members say they’re “more adventurous” in terms of melody. “But none of down with Missoula, as well. us can resist distorted power chord riffs,” she adds. “So “Total Fest is definitely held dear by Helms Alee,” there’s still plenty of that.” Matheson-Margullis writes in an email interview. “We As the band gets in its van to race across the eastern have close friends in town. Getting to ice our nuts in Washington scablands for its current tour, Mathesonthe river with them and all the awesome bands that Margullis describes how it will all go down: “Dana and travel to the Fest is something we look forward to all I sing Campfire Girls songs for the boys [Verellen and a year long.” roadie] for the first few hours. Then we argue about It’s a shame that Helms Alee’s latest visit is for the things we agree on for a while. Then we usually break show that’s closing down the area’s only viable all-ages out some ’90s R&B to heat up the mood before we roll rock ’n’ roll venue. The March 30 Zoo City Apparel into town.” blowout is a fundraiser for Total Fest and a goodbye to It’s not hard to imagine one last white Ford Econothe space. The shuttering of Zoo City means all-ages line van rolling into the Zoo City Apparel parking lot, shows will likely return to the basements of college-aged blaring Boyz II Men’s “Motownphilly” and Helms Alee kids’ rentals, where things can get pretty drunk and singing along. “Motownphilly’s back again / Doin’ a little high. Sure, plenty of folks got their toot on at Zoo City, east coast swing / Boyz II Men going off / Not too hard, and maybe that girl I once saw splayed out in the corner not too soft.” vomiting in her purse probably had a tough time in her Helms Alee, Crys, Vacation Club, Total Comeconomics class the next day, but overall the space was bined Weight and Monster W/ 21 Faces play the a safe, cuckoo fun place to see amazing touring and Zoo City Apparel farewell blowout Sat., March 30, local acts. at 6 PM. $9/$7 advance at Ear Candy and online All-ages venues like Zoo City Apparel also serve as at totalfest.org. incubators for youngsters seeking inspiration and direction, and that’s not lost on Helms Alee. Matheson-Mararts@missoulanews.com


[dvd] Times Run 3/29/13 - 4/4/13

Easter vigils

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater Happy People: A Year in the Taiga (NR)

Mark spring with a basket of holiday flicks

Nightly at 7 • Sat at 1

Fri 3/29, Mon 4/1 & Thur 4/4 at 7 & 9

by Molly Laich

56 Up There’s no cultural precedent for how to celebrate Easter once you’re a grown-up. This is the day Jesus came back to life, so the bar scene is pretty dead. It’s a bit gauche to go out and get trashed with bunny ears on, after all. What can you do but stay home and watch a few good films about Christ? Here are five of our best recommendations.

The Gospel According to St. Matthew (1964) Pier Paolo Pasolini’s film is a stark, blackand-white biographical drama of Christ’s life in the Italian neo-realist tradition. This is the stoic, sometimes arrogant Jesus we’re all familiar with. The dialogue is sparse and comes directly from the Gospels. Picture it: “Two sparrows are sold for a farthing, and one shall not fall on the ground without your father’s leave. The very hairs of your head are all numbered. Fear not, ye are more valuable than many sparrows.” Best of all are the scenes with ordinary people getting baptized while Odetta’s Negro spiritual “Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child” wails in the background. Knowing that Pasolini was a homosexual Marxist atheist only adds to the intrigue.

Constantine (2005) And now for something completely different: What if there was a battle over earth between heaven and hell, and hell won? Jesus doesn’t make much of an appearance in Francis Lawrence’s adaptation of the comic book (originally titled Hellblazer) but his weird fallen angels sure do! Constantine is not a great movie, per se, but it celebrates Christian cosmology like no other. Look out for Tilda Swinton, androgynous as ever, as Gabriel, Gavin Rossdale as a sharp-dressed Balthazar and Keanu Reeves smoking so many cigarettes.

The Rapture (1991) In the beginning there is Sharon (Mimi Rogers), a lost telephone operator who spends her nights swinging with a furniture salesman while struggling against the emptiness inside her. She finds Christ, some other stuff happens and her story comes full circle. Don’t overthink the

Nightly at 9• Sat at 3

title: The movie indeed ends with the Rapture, but how it arrives there and what it means for Sharon is subject to endless interpretation. Writer/director Michael Tolkin’s film didn’t exactly make waves when it was released, and it might not even be considered a cult classic now, but you’d be hard-pressed to find a more uncomfortable film to inspire a sincere conversation about Christ with your traditional relatives.

No show Fri 3/29, Mon 4/1 or Thur 4/4

Quartet

Nightly at 7 & 9• Sat at 1 & 3

No show Fri 3/29, Mon 4/1 or Thur 4/4

www.thewilma.com

131 S. Higgins Ave. Downtown Missoula 406-728-2521

ms-of a e r d m o r F e’ve w . . . f o y a to d vered! o c u o y t o g

Jesus Christ Superstar (1973) You’d have to be utterly joyless to not let Norman Jewison’s film adaptation of Andrew Lloyd Weber’s rock opera into your heart. The songs are catchy and brilliant, obviously, but it’s the depth behind the exuberance that elevates this work to something greater than a good soundtrack. A party bus drives up and a bunch of hippies get out ready for a rowdy passion play. They’ve got one foot in the past and the other rooted deeply in the present. During the Last Supper, the apostles sing, “Then when we retire we can write the gospels so they’ll still talk about us when we die.” Or consider Simon Zealotes singing: “Christ, you know I love you. Did you see I waved? I believe in you and God, so tell me that I’m saved.” It’s the straight-talk that really stings. You get a sense of what Jesus was up against.

Beer & Wine AVAILABLE

101 higgins

541-6683

near the wilma

noteworthystore.com

The Last Temptation of Christ (1988) Take care not to get Martin Scorsese’s masterpiece confused with Mel Gibson’s passion play/snuff film of a similar name. Christ, Judas, Mary and the Apostles are all fully human characters, and their revolution plays out with a lot of doubt, misunderstandings, discussion and argument. Is Christ being called upon by God or the Devil? The story’s central relationship, much like Jesus Christ Superstar, is between Jesus and Judas (played by Willem Dafoe and Harvey Keitel, respectively). Judas represents the physical; he wants to overthrow the Roman government with violence, but Jesus is still the harbinger of good news, isn’t he? He’d rather change the hearts of men. No other film will get you thinking more seriously about faith and religion. The Catholic Church and Christian fundamentalists were upset about a scene where Christ and Mary Magdalene make love and have a child, but they had the wrong idea. It’s not what you think. arts@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • March 28 – April 4, 2013 [21]


[film]

Waitlisted Admission almost makes the grade by Nick Davis

There’s a great scene early on in Admission, the new movie from director Paul Weitz (American Pie, Little Fockers), wherein Princeton admissions officer Portia Nathan addresses a group of pre-college kids at an alternative school run by John Pressman, a freewheeling former college classmate of hers. Nathan (Tina Fey) had been lured into the presentation by a chance call from Pressman (Paul Rudd), on the heels of an edict from her boss to re-establish Princeton at the top of the admissions ranks by sniffing out future worldchangers.

highly effective technique of placing the applicants in the room with Nathan as she reviews their qualifications, her internal narration of the words in front of her blending with, and then taken over by, the apparitions of the kids who are so desperately reaching for the Ivy ring. Rudd’s easy, quirky charm is a nice fit for the role of Pressman, a highly recognizable character as a classic rich-white-kid-turned-social-work-activist. The chemistry between Rudd and Fey is a genuine one, uneasy from start to finish and punctuated by the awkward

Lily Tomlin wears the bossy pants in this family.

As Nathan launches into her rote routine, she immediately gets cut off by a barrage of questions and accusations from the group of free thinkers, who hammer Princeton as a staid institution built to perpetuate the dominant white-male paradigm. To this point in the movie, Nathan has been portrayed as a draw-inside-the-lines type, a ladder-climber trying to keep her personal life and career on a smooth upward arc despite major fault lines appearing under both worlds. After a stunned silence, Nathan gathers herself and delivers an impassioned, blistering retort to the effect that even counter-cultural hipster geniuses will need formal education and training to save the world. It’s a fantastic and unexpected moment, built on the unconventional thinking of screenwriter Karen Croner and the budding dramatic acting chops of Fey. Admission is chock-full of such moments, and while those moments are not enough to overcome the movie’s overall narrative flaws and vault it into must-see territory, they are refreshing enough—especially given the formulaic hell that consumes most dramatic romantic comedies—to make it a worthwhile way to spend a couple hours at the theater. Based on a novel by Jean Hanff Korelitz, a good chunk of Admission’s appeal comes from the intimate look at the admissions process of an elite school—an insular and cloistered environment for which a prospective student’s status as a brilliant overachiever earns only the right to be considered. Weitz shows a deft touch in illuminating the process, employing a

[22] Missoula Independent • March 28 – April 4, 2013

and surprising moments that define this story. And Lily Tomlin, who very nearly steals the movie as Nathan’s tattooed, cancer-surviving, hard-nosed beatnik mother, leads a generally fine and diverse supporting cast. Wallace Shawn also stands out as Nathan’s boss, Clarence. Shawn is a fine character actor who will forever live in my mind as the rogue mercenary Vizzini in The Princess Bride—you know, the guy who gets outfoxed by Westley in the poison-drinking scene. So given the smart and unpredictable writing, sharp dialogue and solid performances, why is it that Admission doesn’t work the way it should? That’s a hard question to answer, really. A few of the supporting characters are shallow, obtrusive plot-drivers, conventional in a way that the movie rejects for its main characters, and perhaps the ingenuity of that juxtaposition is all the more jarring, given the context. A few of the plot twists sound highly discordant notes, and again, the impact of those shortcomings may well be exaggerated by the overall quality of the writing. Whatever it is, Admission is a curious, and frustrating, case of the whole not reaching the sum of its parts. Still, this film has the courage to break conventional dram-rom-com conventions, and earns high marks for doing so. But, like the kids it portrays who don’t quite have the “it” Princeton is looking for, Admission falls just short of hitting it big. Admission continues at Carmike 12. arts@missoulanews.com


[film]

OPENING THIS WEEK G.I. JOE: RETALIATION Great American heroes, the G.I Joes are at battle on two fronts: one involving mortal enemy Cobra, the other involving their own government. Somebody best watch out for that Stormshadow. Starring Channing Tatum, Dwayne Johnson and Bruce Willis. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex and Showboat. THE HOST Can Melanie save her friends and family and humanity from mysterious beings taking over human bodies and erasing precious memories? Well, yes, most likely. Starring Saoirse Ronan, Max Irons and Jake Abel. Rated PG-13. Pharaohplex.

NOW PLAYING 56 UP Acclaimed director Michael Apted (Coal Miner’s Daughter, Gorky Park) is at the helm once again in this long-running series which revisits a few British-born blokes every seven years to see how life is treating them. NR. Wilma. ADMISSION A straight-laced Princeton University admissions officer thinks she may have discovered the son she gave up for adoption when she visits an alternative high school on a recruiting visit. What are the chances this gal will fall in love with the kid’s teacher and get everything she ever wanted out of life? 100 percent. Starring Tina Fey, Paul Rudd and Nat Wolff. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12. THE CALL A longtime 911 operator must confront a killer from her past while trying to save an abducted girl, because that’s what 911 operators due in real life. Starring Halle Berry, Evie Thompson and Abigail Breslin. Rated R. Carmike 12. THE CROODS Join the first prehistoric family for the very first family road trip and laugh for the very first time at Ryan Reynolds’ jokes. Starring the voices of Nicolas Cage and Emma Stone. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex and Entertainer. DEAD MAN DOWN A lovelorn and bereft woman unites with a crime boss’s right hand man behind the sword of revenge with nothing but the shield of love to protect her. Directed by Niels Arden Oplev (The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo). Starring Colin Farrell, Noomi Rapace and Dominic Cooper. Rated R. Village 6. IDENTITY THIEF This is a revenge comedy gone awry and back and awry again, wherein a mild-mannered fella tries to

Project Runway: COBRA Edition. GI Joe: Retaliation opens Friday at Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex and Showboat.

recover his stolen ID from the woman (gasp!) who is ruining his credit score with lavish spending sprees. Perhaps we shall learn the true meaning of “identity.” Starring Jason Bateman, Melissa McCarthy, John Cho. Rated R. Pharaohplex. INAPPROPRIATE COMEDY In this purported sketch comedy movie film about comedy being funny, a computer unleashes the most offensive apps ever into the our world and stirs up what is sure to be some vaguely humorous fart jokes. The most offensive thing about it? It stars Rob Schneider and Lindsay Lohan and Adrien Brody. Rated R. Village 6. THE INCREDIBLE BURT WONDERSTONE This is a tale pitting the old against the new, the hep versus the hip, the stale agin to the fresh (but mostly it’s about the stale jokes, nyuk, nyuk) as magicians compete against one another in a cutthroat magic competition. Bring on the tiger sex gags. Starring Steve Carell, Steve Buscemi, Luke Vanek and Jim Carrey. Rated PG-13. Village 6 and Pharaohplex. JACK THE GIANT SLAYER This is what it’s like when worlds collide. Giants and humans do battle and a boy becomes a man and a woman is loved properly and the indefatigable spirit of humanity is undoubtedly celebrated with shiny medals and a wedding. Rated PG-13.

Starring Nicholas Hoult, Stanley Tucci and Ewan McGregor. Village 6.

Starring Julianne Hough, Josh Duhamel and Cobie Smulders. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12.

OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN A disgraced Secret Service agent is the only one who can rescue the president. Redemption, y’all, it’s the best. Starring Gerard Butler, Aaron Eckhart and Morgan Freeman. Rated R. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex and Showboat.

SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK Based on the novel by Matthew Quick, this is the story of a former teacher returning home to his wife and parents after a stint in a mental institution. But things aren’t all turkey and stuffing cuz there is a mysterious woman in the picture, too. Starring Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence and Robert De Niro. Rated R. Carmike 12.

OZ THE GREAT AND POWERFUL How exactly did homeboy become the Wizard of Oz? Learn how in this Disney creation story involving a small-time circus magician of dubious community standing who makes his way to the magic land of Oz. Starring James Franco, Michelle Williams and Rachel Weisz. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Village 6 and Pharaohplex. QUARTET Things are just plain old hunky-dory at the home for retired musicians until an old firebrand who is also an old flame shows up with her diva panties set to stun. Directed by Dustin Hoffman. Starring Maggie Smith, Michael Gambon and Billy Connolly. Rated PG-13. Wilma. SAFE HAVEN In this adaptation of Nicholas Sparks’ (The Notebook) novel, a woman moves to a small, tight-knit community and falls for a local hunk. Guess what? Dark secrets bubble to the surface, that’s what.

SPRING BREAKERS Four well-gammed gals are bailed out of jail by a drug dealing weirdo (played by actual weirdo James Franco), so of course they decide to help him go on a crime spree. Starring Vanessa Hudgens, Selena Gomez and Ashley Benson. Rated R. Carmike 12.

Capsule reviews by Jason McMackin. Moviegoers be warned! For show times please visit missoulanews.com or contact the theaters in order to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 and Village 6 at 5417469; Wilma at 728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603.

missoulanews.com • March 28 – April 4, 2013 [23]


[dish]

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Local or sustainable? by Ari LeVaux

SATURDAYS 4PM-9PM

MONDAYS & THURSDAYS ALL DAY

$1

SUSHI Not available for To-Go orders

[24] Missoula Independent • March 28 – April 4, 2013

Locavore fundamentalists might call it blasphemy, but there’s no reason a meal made with local foods can’t contain ingredients from the other side of the world. What’s wrong with imported oyster sauce on homegrown broccoli? Why not use curry powder on your homegrown lamb? Much less defensible are lamb from New Zealand (since we grow tasty sheep here at home) and strawberries flown in from Chile (because we can’t wait for summer) and carrots from anywhere else (because they grow everywhere). One of the main reasons to source your foods as close to home as possible is it cuts down on carbon costs associated with shipping. Eating local is a good rule of thumb, but with rules come exceptions. I call mine the Slow Boat Exception. It states that if a food could be transported on an unrefrigerated sailboat, it can be included in a locally oriented meal without a side of guilt. “Slow Boat” is a nod to the wind-powered, unrefrigerated cargo boats upon which global trade once depended. On those vessels, the only things that could be shipped were nonperishables like spice and canned or dry goods. Marco Polo used a slow boat to introduce noodles to Italy from China. Slow boats likewise spread peppers, tomatoes and potatoes from the new world to the old. In other words, global transport played a crucial role in the evolution of many cuisines around the world. And to this day, shipping food long-distance can be a very good thing with little downside. If unrefrigerated sailboats were still the norm, many of the carbon-related problems associated with long-distance transport of food would be eliminated. In 2008, French shipper Compagnie de Transport Maritime delivered 30,000 bottles of wine to Dublin on the century-old tall ship Kathleen & May. And while that turned out to be an isolated case, the same principle applies to the gargantuan, slow-moving cargo ships currently plying the seas. Sure, these vessels burn fuel, but they carry such massive payloads that the carbon burned per unit of food is negligible compared to other forms of transport, especially if the cargo isn’t refrigerated. A ship dubbed “Triple-E,” launched recently from a South Korean dock, is currently the largest cargo ship in history, capable of carrying 18,000 shipping containers—2,500 more than the previous record

FLASH IN THE PAN

holder. The company that commissioned the TripleE, Danish shipper Maersk, just ordered 20 more. The Triple-E, or any other boat, won’t be making deliveries to Nebraska anytime soon, but that doesn’t mean inland dwellers can’t employ the Slow Boat Exception in their purchasing decisions. The inland equivalent of a slow boat is a train, which is roughly 10 times more fuel efficient than trucks and 100 times more efficient than planes. Consumers usually don’t have any idea whether their food arrives by train, Triple-E or magic carpet. Still, if you limit your imports to foods that could have been transported efficiently, that edges you closer to the solution side of the carbon-burning spectrum, and away from the problem of consuming things that must be transported quickly and cold. At its core, the Slow Boat Exception isn’t about boats, or even transport. It’s about getting into the habit of considering food choices case by case, guided by principles but grounded in nuance. The carbon costs of transport represent only a small fraction of the carbon costs associated with food, while food production and processing burn the lion’s share—the exact carbon cost varies from food to food. The production of olive oil, for example, involves significantly less fossil fuel than the production of highly processed seed oils like canola or soy. Just as production practices and distances traveled burn varying amounts of carbon, so does the timing of when a product is consumed. While most of the country can’t eat citrus locally, we can all eat it seasonally. And since citrus is in season during winter, refrigeration isn’t needed for its transport. Southernhemisphere citrus, shipped farther and during our summer, has a higher cost of transport, refrigeration and, in some cases, storage. Without being overly obsessive, I lean locally in my food choices. But I have no qualms about supplementing my local foods with exotic ingredients like coconut milk, curry paste, black pepper, Brazil nuts, coffee, tea, chocolate and many more of the culinary treasures the world has to offer. Blanket rules can be useful guidelines when making food purchases, but don’t set that ship on autopilot. Putting actual thought into your choices is a much more sustainable way of putting food on the table. And that’s a rule that has no exception.


[dish] Alcan Bar and Grill 16780 Beckwith St. Frenchtown • 626-9930 Tantalize your taste buds with Angus beef burgers, chicken strips, shrimp, and biscuits and gravy from Alcan Bar & Grill. With more than 20 years of experience and 10 years in the business, we have been offering fresh meals and beverages at the area's most competitive prices. Our friendly professionals offer personalized service and make sure you leave our restaurant as one of our friends. We offer have a variety of specials for ladies night and sports events featuring drink specials and free food. Contact us today and enjoy our incredible menu selection. 9 am – 2 am Mon-Sun. $ Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway • 728-8900 (across from courthouse) Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 Have you checked out Bernice's web-site: bernicesbakerymt.com: Are you a fan of Bernice's on Facebook? Did you catch that silly Christmas video on YouTube? Viewed the Montana Home Shopping Showcase? Bernice's not only has awesome breakfast pastries, elegant cakes, signature wedding cakes, fresh bread, cookies & treat galore, lunch, and excellent coffee. Bernice's has great employees who rock the social media! 34 years of solid goodness! Check out our social media and then stop by to celebrate a job well done! xoxo bernice. bernicesbakerymt.com. $-$$ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Mon.–Fri., 7:30–4, Sat. 84. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. $ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 40 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Cafe Zydeco 2101 Brooks • 406-926-2578 Authentic cajun cuisine, with an upbeat zydeco atmosphere in the heart of Missoula. Accomodates indoor and outdoor seating. Breakfast served all day. Featuring Crawfish omlettes, beignets, and cafe au lait. Open Monday-Wednesday 11am-3pm, Thursday-Saturday 11am8pm, and Sunday 9am-3pm (Beignets available Saturday 11am-2pm, and All Day Sunday) $-$$ Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 • ciaomambo.com The vibrant energy at Ciao Mambo is fantastically accompanied by steaming hot pizzas, delicious assortments of pastas and of course authentic Italian wine. We focus on making sure that whether it be date night, family night, or business dinners we accommodate whatever the need! And do not forget there are always leftovers! Open 5 to close every day, come make us your go to dinner destination! $-$$

$…Under $5

Educate you taste buds!

Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am-2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm Sun-Wed and 11am-10pm Thurs-Sat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. 542-7414 Doc's is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you're heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc's is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$

www.thinkfft.com Mon-Thurs 7am - 8pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 *When school is not in session, we often close at 3pm Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and glutenfree options. NOW SERVING BREAKFAST Empanadas! Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! (Happy Hour 3-6 PM Mon-Sat. 2 Empanadas for $7) Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. 9am-5pm Monday-Saturday. Downtown Missoula. $-$$ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. 721-6033 Missoula's Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. M-TH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am-4pm, Sat 8am-4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$ GoodieVille Paxson Plaza by Southgate Mall 406-728-0010 www.goodieville.com Missoula’s only Gluten-Free Bakery and Restaurant offers a full line of savories and sweets. We serve breakfast, lunch and dinner including Pancakes, Pizza, American and Indian fare. We also have extensive vegetarian and vegan options. Open Wed-Sat 7am-9pm and Sun 7am2pm. $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St • 549-7723 www.grizzlyliquor.com Missoula's Tailgate Headquarters! We carry all of the spirits & accessories to make your tailgate party a success! Largest selection of spirits in Montana, including locally made whiskey, vodka, gin, rum and wine. We're located downtown with free customer parking. Grizzly Liquor was voted Missoula's #1 Liquor Store! Open M-F 9-6:30, Sat 9-6. $-$$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula's best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. • 532-2056 This week at Brooks and Browns... Martini MONDAY ($4 select martinis). TUESDAY (Burger + any draught beer $8). THURSDAY is Trivia Night. FRIDAY night features Live Music! SUNDAY: Easter Brunch from 9-2. + Sunday Funday (Happy Hour all day). Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over

missoulanews.com • March 28 – April 4, 2013 [25]


[dish]

SMaSH Märzen HAPPIEST HOUR The Brew: Märzen is a traditional Bavarian-style lager that translated from German literally means “March beer.” The Tamarack Brewing Company’s SMaSH Marzen is a single malt, single hop (hence the capitalization) version of the old-world classic.

Iza 529 S. Higgins 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Contemporary Asian cuisine featuring local, vegan, gluten free and organic options as well as wild caught seafood, Idaho trout and buffalo. Join us for lunch and dinner. Happy Hour 3-6 weekdays with specials on food and drink. Extensive sake, wine and tea menu. Closed Sundays. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm, Dinner 5pm-close. Sat: Dinner 5pm-close. $-$$

The softer side of microbrews: In the world of aggressively hoppy and alcoholic microbrews, SMaSH Märzen is a pacifist. Made from Vienna malt and Perle hops, it’s sweet but not cloying, earthy but not dull, and coming in at a 5.6 percent ABV, it’s mellow without being watery. Like the month it was brewed for, SMaSH Märzen is a sort of inbetweener that tastes like a reprise from the doldrums of a Missoula winter. March is for beer drinkers: If you didn’t fill out a March Madness bracket, you know someone who did, and no doubt watched them tear their hair out as the whiz kids from Harvard took down the Lobos of New Mexico last week. And that’s what March Madness is all about: upsets. But it’s also about finding a seat in a dimly lit sports bar, simultaneously watching 12 televisions and drinking beer. Tamarack Brewing Company’s Front Street digs has you covered on all bases. SMaSH Märzen, which pairs nicely

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$

Jakers 3515 Brooks St. 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Photo by Jamie Rogers

with TBC’s buffalo burger with caramelized onions, makes for a slam dunk. Go there: Tamarack Brewing Company— Missoula is at 231 W. Front Street. Open 11 a.m. - 1 a.m., Monday-Sunday. —Jamie Rogers Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

Jimmy John’s 420 N. Higgins 542-1100 jimmyjohns.com Jimmy John’s - America’s Favorite Sandwich Delivery Guys! Unlike any other sub shop, Jimmy John’s is all about the freshest ingredients and fastest service. Freaky Fast, Freaky Good - that’s Jimmy John’s. Order online, call for delivery or visit us on Higgins. $-$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. 543-7154 (on the hip strip) UoM School of Pharmacy Health Fair March 28 11-3 All ages welcome. FREE. April 4 – Sweet Adelines perform for Lunch – 11:45-12:15 FREEFor a full menu and other activities, visit our website at www.missoulaseniorcenter.org. Pearl Cafe 231 East Front St. 541-0231 pearlcafe.us Serving country French specialties, Montana elk, Berkshire Pork, and delicious seafood dishes. Delectable salads and appetizers, as well as breads and desserts baked in-house. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Philly West 134 W. Broadway 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday - Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. $-$$

$…Under $5

[26] Missoula Independent • March 28 – April 4, 2013

Romaines 3075 N. Reserve Suite N 406-214-2659 www.romainessalads.com We provide you with the convenience of delicious salads, sandwiches and soups. Our salads include over 30 wholesome ingredients. Our homemade soups change with the season as different ingredients become available. If hearty sandwiches are your favorite, then visit Romaines for one of our braised meat sandwiches. We also have a Montana Hummus sandwich made from Montana grown garbanzo beans. At last, local, fresh, and healthy! $-$$ Silvertip Casino 680 SW Higgins 728-5643 The Silvertip Casino is Missoula’s premiere casino offering 20 Video gaming machines, best live poker in Missoula, full beverage liquor, 11 flat screen tv’s and great food at great prices. Breakfast Specials starting at $2.99 (7-11am) For a complete menu, go to www.silvertipcasino.com. Open 24/7. $-$$ Sis’s Kitchen 531-5034 sisskitchen.com Wheat, Gluten & Allergen Free Foods. Frozen & Dry Mix Products. Sis's Kitchen plays a part in Best of Missoula "Best Pizza" Winner's for 2008-2012. Find our products at: The Good Food Store • Biga Pizza • Bridge Pizza • Pizza Cafe in Ronan (12"crust). $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI We have quick and delicious lunch specials 6 days a week starting at $7, and are open for dinner 7 nights a week. Try our comfort food items like Pork Katsu and Chicken Teriyaki. We also offer party platters to go and catering for all culinary styles. Lunch 11:30-3 Mon-Sat. Dinner 5-9:30 Every Night. Corner of Pine and Higgins. Very Family Friendly. 549-7979. $-$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins 327-8929 Stop in when you're in the neighborhood. We'll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula's best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 1110 Sun 12-9. $-$$ Taco John’s 623 W Broadway 2600 S Reserve West-Mex® is about fresh taste and BOLD flavors. Taco John’s recipes make you smile and yell “OLÉ”. We combine hearty helpings of seasoned meats, crispy Potato Olés®, and flavorful cheeses with fresh-made Mexican specialties like burritos, tacos, and quesadillas. All topped off with bold sauces, spices and salsas. You’ll find West-Mex® cooking makes for an unbeatably satisfying meal. See you soon ... Amigo :) $-$$ Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you'll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over


March 28 – April 4, 2013

nightlife

End your afternoon with a fine glass of fermented grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 830-3296 and visit missoulawinery.com. The UM American Indian Student Services hosts an eight-week Insider/Outsider Film Series, at the Payne Family Native American Center on the UM campus, with strict “B.Y.O.F. (bring your own frybread)” policy, according to the group’s press release. This week’s film is Dead Man. 5–7 PM. Free. Sip on some well-fermented spirits when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at the winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 549-8703. Dan Dubuque can do it all. Don’t believe me? Check him out when he performs at Hamilton’s Bitter Root Brewery where he’s rumored to play guitar and weld up a coffin simultaneously. 6–8:30 PM. Free. Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free.

Three dudes, two cats, a dog and a deer’s head walk into a bar ... Nashville rock ’n’ rollers Natural Child perform at the Palace Wed., April 3, at 9 PM, with Chains of Love and locals J. Sherri. $7/$5 advance at Ear Candy and ticketfly.com.

THURSDAYMARCH28 Listen up fans of “30 Rock” and Cop Out: Funny man Tracy Morgan visits the Dennison Theatre on the UM campus with a 7 PM show full of jokes. $49.50. Tickets from griztix.com.

Release some stress during T’ai Chi classes every Thu. at 10 AM at The Open Way Center, 702 Brooks. $10 drop-in class. Call Chris at 728-0918. Tom Catmull might perform Heart’s “All I Wanna Do Is Make Love to You” if you are real nice to him when he takes the stage at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 5–8 PM. Free. If it worked for Brad Pitt, it's bound to work for you. Today is the registration deadline for the Fundamentals of Fly Fishing course brought to you by the UM Outdoor

Program. Learn the skills and techniques of fly fishing through the experts from Missoulian Angler. Course begins April 11. $52 includes four classroom sessions and two field days on the river. Transportation and equipment also are included. Call 243-5172 or crecop@mso.umt.edu. The subject of Michael Hansen’s Philip L. Wright Lecture is a slippery one: “The Mysterious Atlantic Eel: Swimming 3,000 Miles to Have Sex.” ‘Nuff said. UM North Underground Lecture Hall. 4:10 PM. Free.

Join the Mike Bader Bearjam for a celebration of their new release Worldwide Blues: 11 all-original blues, funk and R&B songs with themes ranging from global peril, desolation, hopefulness and redemption. This is the first Mike Bader release in six years. Stensrud Building, 314 N. First St. 7 PM. Free. Win $50 by using your giant egg to answer questions at Brains on Broadway Trivia Night at the Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway Ave. 7 PM. Plus, all-you-can-eat wings, $10 two-topping pizzas, $6 domestic pitchers and $7 Blue Moon pitchers. What does a pente cost? No matter, the UM School of Theatre & Dance’s production of the political thriller Pentecost uncovers how art is more than just a pretty picture and instead informs our ideologies and notions of

missoulanews.com • March 28 – April 4, 2013 [27]


[calendar] self and nationality. UM PARTV Center. 7:30 PM. $10-$20. Visit umtheatredance.org. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM.

as having a job during Trivial Beersuit at the Lucky Strike Casino. Prizes for podium finishers. Karaoke follows. 1515 Dearborn. 8–10 PM. Surfin’ n’ singin’, Donavon Frankenreiter performs for you all at the Wilma Theatre, with Eric Tollefson and Rayland Baxter. 8 PM. $18.

Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St. 8:30 PM. Free. Run the gamut from relaxed to riled-up at the Palace tonight with country-rockers Viv Savage, Sophi’s Tea and State of Rage. 9 PM. $5.

Dance your way to a free mind at Turning the Wheel Missoula’s Ecstatic Dance. Headwaters Dance Studio, 1042 Monroe St. 8 PM. $8. Visit turningthewheel.org.

An artistic bout of sorts ought to tickle your musical fun glands during another installment of Top of the Mic, an open mic competition, starting at 8:30 PM at Sean Kelly’s. Free.

The Dead Hipster Dance Party is all kinds of sweaty, but ‘tis the droplets of the beautiful people. Get a taste in the place where love and funk is in the air (sometimes they are the same scent). Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight.

Show ‘em that pop culture knowledge is just as important

Them hard working, music making Soul City Cowboys kick it at the

Number 5 is alive and at the Short Circuit Tour which features

hip-hopperinos Toki Wright, Carnage and Kristoff Krane. Top Hat, 134 W. Front St. 10 PM. $8. After whipping ass at Boise’s Treefort Music Fest, Boys returns to Missoula for the final night of the group’s VFW residency, with King Elephant, Boise’s Ditch Tiger and The Trees. 10 PM. $2.

FRIDAYMARCH29 Load up the kin and zip on down to the Top Hat, 134 W. Front St., for Family Friendly Friday with acoustic duo Britchy. 6–8 PM. Free. Send them kids down the rabbit hole that is life in the theatre at the Missoula Children’s Theatre’s Alice in Wonderland Spring Day Camp. The deadline to sign up is today and the camp runs April 1-5, from 9 AM to 4 PM. The camp culminates with performances on April 6 and 7. Call 728-1911. The Women’s Circle Group Acupuncture at Mountain Sage Acupuncture Clinic, 725 W. Alder St. Ste. 1, focuses on women’s health issues and sounds comfy and nice. 2–5 PM, last appointment at 4 PM. Sliding scale treatments $20-40 with a first time administration fee of $10. Call (503) 593-7073. Teens go toward the literary light during the Missoula Public Library’s Teen Writers Group, which meets every Fri. at 3:30 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Practice being peaceful in a world of differences during the Intercultural Dialogue Group at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, where people from various back-

[28] Missoula Independent • March 28 – April 4, 2013

grounds meet on the last Fri. of each month at 4:30 PM for an afternoon of conversation and peacemaking. Library of the Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call Betsy at 543-3955 or email peace@jrpc.org for more info.

nightlife End your afternoon with a fine glass of wine when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 8303296 and visit missoulawinery.com. Sip on some well-fermented spirits when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at the winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 549-8703. Zumba is like partying without having the horrible feelings in the morning. Most importantly, you get into shape. Head down to the Lolo School lower gym, 11395 U.S. 93, every Mon., Wed. and Fri. to practice the exhilarating, effective, easy-to-follow, Latin-inspired, calorie-burning, dance, fitness party. 6 PM. $2 per class. Don’t yell out your ex-girlfriend’s name during Hump Day Bingo with Bob at the Lucky Strike Casino where you’ll win prizes. Beware: $5 mini-fishbowls served all day. Bingo starts at 6:30 PM. Speak the language of fashion and say stuff like “hot mess” and “cloying” at the 7th annual Project Selvedge fashion show. Contestants spend eight weeks battling for supremacy and only one can be called the victor. Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave. 6:30 PM. $1. (See Arts.) Slip into them leather pleasure pants and drink two fifths of Jack


[calendar] Daniels cuz rocking rocketeers Hellyeah and All That Remains are doing work at the Wilma, with Nonpoint. 7:30 PM. $32.50. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s and ticketweb.com. Hear junior sopranos Quinn Vaira and Maria Miller make beautiful music during the Student Recital Series at the Music Recital Hall on the UM campus. 7:30 PM. Free. What does a pente cost? No matter, the UM School of Theatre & Dance’s production of the political thriller Pentecost uncovers how art is more than just a pretty picture and instead informs our ideologies and notions of self and nationality. UM PARTV Center. 7:30 PM. $10$20. Visit umtheatredance.org. Scratch them fleas and howl at the street light people when the Wild Coyote Band does dancing tunes for you and Maude at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. 8 PM. Free. Bass-ically it’s time to have yourself some EDM, go on and get some during “A Night of Bass” featuring Big Chocolate and J. Rabbit on the American Hustle Tour at Stage 112 in the Elk’s Lodge, 112 Pattee St. Locals Aaron Briggs and Lecture open. 8 PM. $12. Soak it up and sing it down to some 67,000 tunes when The Outpost Restaurant & Saloon, 38500 W. Hwy. 12 at Lolo Hot Springs, presents karaoke with KJ Mark, starting at 9 PM. Free. Call 273-4733. Highjack, “Missoula’s source for Psychedelic Rebel Rock,” performs with tripped-out special guest Modality at Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St. 9 PM. Free, with $5 drink-till-it’sgone keg of Big Sky beer. Shane Clouse & Stomping Ground bring years of experience and country tuneage to the Union Club. Now all we ask is that you bring your foxy self on down and do some two-steppin’ with us. 9 PM. Free. Charlie Parr is feeling Minnesota and looking it, too, but who gives a toot? He’s gonna play some bluesy folk tunes for y’all at the Badlander, with local tonkers Aran Buzzas and John Smith. 9 PM. $12/$10 advance plus fees at Ear Candy, Rockin Rudy’s and stonefly-productions.com. (See Spotlight.) Mr. Everything’s Good and allround music maker Javier Ryan performs at the Palace. 9 PM. Free. Blow the party horn and strap on your scootin’ boots for an evening of all three kinds of grass: blue, stomp and...you know, with the Lil’ Smokies and Dodgy Mountain Men, at the Top Hat, 134 W. Front St. 9:30 PM. Free. Paydirt is gonna make you swing to them country sounds and

some of which are filled with crazy cool prizes like a coupon for a free bicycle. When the Main Hall bell tolls at 1 PM it is on. Eggciting! Free.

below, parr

Get arty and party at the MAM’s Open Printmaking Orientation and Studio. Take a onetime printing press orientation and then, for a small fee, you can register to come in and use the MAM printing press 1-3 PM. $10 with own supplies or $20 with MAM supplies. Orientation: Sat., Jan. 26, for a $10 fee. Those who have already taken a printing class at MAM do not need to take the orientation.

Charlie Parr looks the part of a man who plays traditional American folk and blues. He is balding and bespectacled, with a dark bird’s nest of a beard that has trails of gray hair throughout. His clothing tends toward the utilitarian: flannel, cotton long johns, suspenders, dungarees, sturdy shoes. Certainly Parr could hop a train from his native Minnesota and travel to Missoula with nothing but a guitar and a bed roll (maybe even a cooking pot for a hat). When he performs, he often sits hunched over his guitar, knees nearly tucked into his chest. Parr wraps his body around the instrument like a snake on a tree branch. His left foot bounces and taps. His eyes stray downward past his hands and onto the floor, but he is not in the room with the audience. He is elsewhere, a distant, doleful place inside his heart and mind. I’m

nightlife

Photo courtesy Richard Narum

“1922 Blues” from the album 1922, Parr’s protagonist complains of taxes, lost loves never had and The Man in general. But his protagonist isn’t blaming the Universe for his ordeals, admitting that he drank so much

WHO: Folk and bluesman Charlie Parr, with locals Aran Buzzas and John Smith WHERE: Badlander, 208 Ryman St. WHEN: Fri., March 29, at 9 PM HOW MUCH: $12/$10 advance at Ear Candy, Rockin Rudy’s and stonefly-productions.com

not being disparaging here. The man lives in his music and the only thing more authentic than his look is his sound. Although Parr’s music is typically stripped down to its bare essentials–vocals, guitar, a bit of harmonica– his sound often takes up a lot of sonic space, particularly when he is joined on vocals by his wife Emily. His music is bluesy and often story-driven. On a track like there ain’t a darned thing the local constabulary cam do about it. Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St. 9:30 PM. Free.

SATURDAYMARCH30 Scratch them fleas and howl at the street light people when the Wild Coyote Band does dancing tunes for you and Maude at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. 8 PM. Free.

Get a hit of cardiovascular exercise during Nia: The Joy of Movement, from 9 AM to 10 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $12/$10 members. Call 541-7240. Get musical while finding your flow when Brian Baty leads a live music Vinyasa yoga class, which features music by Nathan Zavalney, this and every Sat. from 9:30–

that “I slept all night on the barroom floor / and woke up this morning my head was sore / Pockets empty but I want some more / The bar man’s got my car though.” While Parr’s people might not be able to deliver a lecture on responsibility, they do tell us something about reality. —Jason McMackin

10:45 AM at Inner Harmony Yoga, 214 E. Main St. Ste. B. $10 drop-in/$8 students drop-in, with various prices for punch-card holders. Call 581-4093 or visit yogainmissoula.com.

engaging experiences like storytelling, finger plays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM on Sat. and 2 PM on Sun. at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721BOOK.

Meditate on this: Dharma teacher Rowan Conrad hosts a Day of Mindfulness in the Zen Tradition of the Order of Interbeing at the Open Way Sangha, 702 Brooks Ave. Perfect for newcomers or folks looking to tune-up their meditation skills. 9:30 AM–4:30 PM. Free, but donations are accepted. To register email openwaysangha@aol.com or call 549-9005.

Learn more about the Salish, Kootenai, Pend d’Oreille and other tribes at Travelers’ Rest State Park’s Winter Storytelling Series. This week Tony Incashola, director of the Salish-Pend d’Oreille Culture Committee, speaks of his people and their culture. 11 AM–12:30 PM. Free.

The Missoula Winter Market is a family-friendly market much like the Saturday markets, but indoors and during wintertime! Come and enjoy local crafts, artisans, food and entertainment every weekend at 10 AM. 2036 Mullan Rd. Visit missoulawintermarket.com. Your bedtime tales of collegeage debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers

Never fear lovers of fresh, local vittles, the Heirloom Winter Market at the Missoula County Fairgrounds in the Floriculture Building offers you remedies of local produce, meat, baked goods, jam, honey and so much more. 11 AM–2 PM. No eggstistential crises are eggspected at the Easter Eggstravaganza at the UM Oval. Kids from 2 to 9 years of age are divided up in age groups and sent asearching for thousands of eggs,

End your afternoon with a fine glass of wine when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 8303296 and visit missoulawinery.com. The Workers play with vigor and verve and only ask that you do the same when the group performs at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 5–8 PM. Free. Sip on some well-fermented spirits when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at the winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 549-8703. We’re gonna do the village, the whole fruitin’ village when Seattle melodic bombardiers Helms Alee headline the Zoo City Apparel Blowout at 139 E. Main St. This is the final show at the much ballyhooed venue and it starts bright and early with doors at 6 PM. Other music outfits include locals Monster with 21 Faces and Total Combined Weight, as well as midwesterners Vacation Club and Crys. $9/$7 adv. All ages. Tickets available at Ear Candy, zoocityapparel.com and totalfest.org. (See Arts.) Slip on that felt hat, tie that silk neckerchief on and get ready for some good clean fun at the country dances sponsored by the Bitterroot Dancers at the Eagles Lodge in Hamilton, 125 N. Second St. This week the Jim Snow Band performs for y’all dancees. 7–11 PM. $5-$7. What does a pente cost? No matter, the UM School of Theatre & Dance’s production of the political thriller Pentecost uncovers how art is more than just a pretty picture and instead informs our ideologies and notions of self and nationality. UM PARTV Center. 7:30 PM. $10$20. Visit umtheatredance.org. Absolutely with DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are like ShabbaDoo and Boogaloo Shrimp, saving rec centers one beat at at time. Get hip to their jamz, hippies. Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2-for-1 Absolut drinks until midnight. $2.

missoulanews.com • March 28 – April 4, 2013 [29]


[calendar]

It’s gonna be rainbow bright at the Queer Party, a dance party in honor of equality and in support of Missoula’s LGBTIQQA community, with tunes from local DJs Tygerlily, Mr. Reid and Owlie at the Palace. 9 PM. Free. Includes an interactive visual art installation by ir8prim8, plus drink specials. Aran Buzzas brings some of that yonder homegrown Montana “folky tonk” to the Alcan Bar and Grill in Frenchtown, 16780 Beckwith St., from 9–11:30 PM. Free. Join the Noah-approved music outfit The Flood Band down at the yonder Lumberjack Saloon outside of Lolo for an evening of dancing, swinging and warm respites by the firelight. 9 PM. Free. Prick up your ears and take a listen to some up-and-coming musicians at round three of the semi-finals for the Top of the Mic competition at Sean Kelly’s, 130 W. Pine St. 9 PM. Free. It’s Joan Zen again down at the Union Club ready to play and aurally pleasure your ears with wideranging tunes and big ol’ smiles. 9 PM. Free. It’s time for some metal up your, uh, you know what when Walking Corpse Syndrome, War Cry

and Stupid Human Suit roll into Polson for some skull-crushing buttkickery. Wolf Den Bar, 218 Main St. 9 PM. Free. Paydirt is gonna make you swing to them country sounds and there ain’t a darned thing the local constabulary cam do about it. Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St. 9:30 PM. Free. Take in some of that good stuff when locals Broken Valley Roadshow and Tom Catmull & the Clerics make beautiful music together at the newly shiny Top Hat, 134 W. Front St. 9:30 PM. Free.

SUNDAYMARCH31 Dogpile on the rabbit and rock till your slacks are stacked when KBGA and the VFW present Pile, Fat History Month, St. Elias & Boys. 245 W. Main St. 10 PM. $5. (See Music.) Catch new thoughts with the Science of Mind Community during a Sunday service via the Internet when Rev. Kathianne Lewis spreads a spiritual message for your viewing pleasure at the Carriage House in Hamilton, 310 N. Fourth St., at 10

AM. this and every Sun. Free. Call Barb at 375-9996. The Missoula Winter Market is a family-friendly market much like the Saturday markets, but indoors and during wintertime! Come and enjoy local crafts, artisans, food and entertainment every weekend at 10 AM. 2036 Mullan Rd. Visit missoulawintermarket.com. Have yourself a rockin’ good Easter at the Fresh Life Church’s Easter celebration, with music by The City Harmonic and homily by Pastor Levi Lusko at 3535 W. Broadway. 10 AM. Free. A hunting you will go at the Easter Celebration and Egg Hunt sponsored by the River City Church and held at the Mismo Gymnsatics gymnasium, 1900 W. Broadway, from 10–11:30 AM. Kids 2 through 10 are welcome to learn the Easter story, play in the gym and find some eggs. Free. Your bedtime tales of collegeage debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like storytelling, finger plays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM on Sat. and 2 PM on Sun. at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

Mustache bandit. EDM makers Big Chocolate and J. Rabbit perform at Stage 112 in the Elk’s Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St., Fri., March 29, at 8 PM, with locals Aaron Briggs and Lecture. $12.

Kick out the jams down the ‘Root at the dining room of the Sapphire Lutheran Homes on the corner of 10th and River streets. Folks who want to play or just listen are encouraged to come. For more information, call John at 381-2483. Free. Avast you putrid souls, the fine musicians of the Captain Wilson Conspiracy bring skill and panache to the Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 4–6 PM. Free.

nightlife End your afternoon with a fine glass of wine when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 8303296 and visit missoulawinery.com.

[30] Missoula Independent • March 28 – April 4, 2013

Bellow out your favorite pop tune so you can impress your friends and perhaps win a prize during a karaoke contest this and every Sun. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. $3 Fireball specials. Call 721-1798. Irie eyes be smiling when Sister Carol and Mykal Rose bring them tasty reggae tunes to the Top Hat, 134 W. Front St. 9:30 PM. $20. Tickets available at tophatlounge.com.

MONDAYAPRIL01 Check out a couple of April fools (jokes) when Love is a Dog from Nebraska featuring Mr. Travis Yost and Mr. Ron Dunbar perform at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. 7–10 PM. Free.

Explore the idea of open intelligence and the peace, happiness and skillfulness that exists within you during the Balanced View open meeting, which runs every Sun. from 6-7 PM in the meeting room of the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free, but donations accepted. Enter from the back entrance. Visit greatfreedom.org for more info.

Music makers, get your gig on by signing up to perform at the Missoula Farmers Market. Applications accepted through April 1. A $40 stipend is provided. For more information and an application, see the Market website missoulafarmersmarket.com.

Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with Josh Farmer, The Vanguard Combo and Front Street Jazz. Free.

Those looking for mother-tomother breast feeding support can find it when the La Leche League meets every first Mon. of the month at 10 AM and every third Monday of the month at 6 PM at the First Presbyterian Church, 201


[calendar] S. Fifth St. W. Free. Children and babies are always welcome.

belly dance class at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. This class is great for beginners and experienced dancers alike. 6– 7 PM. Visit madronadance. wordpress.com.

Come on down for Moscow Monday at the Montgomery Distillery, 129 W. Front St., where the distillery redistributes the wealth (It ain’t called Wall Street Wednesday, amiright?). $1 from every drink sold is donated to a different non-profit each Monday. Family friendly, from noon–8 PM.

Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room for Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters, at 5205 Grant Creek Dr., and work on your elk-camp locution with the best. All are invited. Noon– 1 PM. Free.

Anyone affected by epilepsy can come to the Epilepsy Support Group at Summit Independent Living Center, 700 SW Higgins Ave. 2– 3:30 PM. Free. Call 721-0707.

Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. Third St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1–3 PM. For information, call 543-3955.

The Rough Cut Science Seminar Series shows off the brainiacs of Montana’s scientific community, with presentations on current research each week at 4 PM in the University Center Theater. Visit montanaioe.org/rough-cut-series for the schedule.

nightlife It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Boys Bluegrass from 5:30 to 8 PM. Free. Call 327-0900.

nightlife Zumba is like partying without having the horrible feelings in the morning. Most importantly, you get into shape. Head down to the Lolo School lower gym, 11395 U.S. 93, every Mon., Wed. and Fri. to practice the exhilarating, effective, easy-to-follow, Latin-inspired, calorie-burning, dance, fitness party. 6 PM. $2 per class. Bingo at the VFW: the easiest way to make rent since keno. 245 W. Main. 6:45 PM. $12 buy-in. Baby boomers rejoice! Relive your formerly glorious selves and do some reminiscing at the Top Hat’s Monday Night Movies: Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas and Easy Rider. Start times are 7 and 10 PM. Free. Go on and domo arigato if you’ve got to when rawk veterans

XXX-mas comes early. Metal demi-gods Hellyeah co-headline with All That Remains at the Wilma Theatre, Fri., March 29, at 7:30 PM, with Nonpoint. $32.50. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s and ticketweb.com.

Clutch do work at the Wilma with Orange Goblin, Lionize and Kyng. 7:30 PM. $24. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s and ticketweb.com. (See Music.) Open Mic with Joey Running Crane at the VFW, 245 W. Main, seems like a fine idea, especially with 2-for-1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. 10 PM. Free. Call him up and get yourself a slot at 229-0488. You know it’s gotta be a real party when DJ Super Steve rocks the karaoke with the hottest Kamikaze tuneage this side of the

hemisphere at the Dark Horse. Are you brave enough to let the computer pick your songs? 9 PM. Free. Womp, wobble and woot your way to success at the Missoula Area Dubstep Monday: Zookeeper Takeover!, a night of dubstep with local DJs the Milkcrate Mechanic, Mankiisi, Enzymes, Lui and Jackrabbit, at the Palace, starting at 9 PM. Free. Includes $5 pitchers of PBR on tap. John Mayer and Katy Perry make a stop in Missoula as part of their “Will They or Won’t They Tour,” at Washington-Grizzly stadium. Show starts 10 PM. VIPs can enter

the Cotton Candy Pit at 8 PM. Ticket prices start at $500. Visit jokes.com.

TUESDAYAPRIL02 “So much depends upon a red wheelbarrow...” Learn to mine great lines from that fabulous mind of yours just like William Carlos Williams when you join other seasoned and novice poets for Poetry Club every Tuesday at 8 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First. St. W. Dance cuz everybody’s watching at the American Cabaret Style

Former Indy editor Brad Tyer returns to our fair burg to read from his book Opportunity, Montana: Big Copper, Bad Water, and the Burial of an American Landscape, at Shakespeare & Co., 103 S. Third St. W. After the reading, a discussion and book signing take place. 7 PM. Free. Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication, a non-violent communication weekly practice group, at the Jeanette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Noon. Free. The Montana Musicians and Artists Coalition hosts the Musician Showcase at Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St., an evening of tuneful live tuneage made by locals for locals. 8–11 PM. Free. 18 plus.

missoulanews.com • March 28 – April 4, 2013 [31]


[calendar] Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free pub trivia, which takes place every Tuesday at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with: Of the 90 million chocolate bunnies eaten by Americans each year, what percentage of people eat the ears first? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.)

nightlife

Relax to the max and take in some hiphop from the Stress Free Tour 2013, with San Francisco’s Equipto, the Bay Area’s First Light (aka Pep Love and Opio of the Heiroglyphics), plus hip hoppers Z Man, L*Ro-

Take a sniff of them tapas and do some nibblin’ at the Top Hat’s dinner series show with local legend Russ Nasset. 6–8 PM. Free. (Pub trivia answer: 76 percent of people start with the ears.)

Zumba is like partying without having the horrible feelings in the morning. Most importantly, you get into shape. Head down to the Lolo School lower gym, 11395 U.S. 93, every Mon., Wed. and Fri. to practice the exhilarating, effective, easy-to-follow, Latin-inspired, calorie-burning, dance, fitness party. 6 PM. $2 per class.

The ZACC’s Printshop Orientation Class teaches peeps everything you need to know to use the print shop. Once you get the tour, you can work there during business hours. Limited to six people per month. To register call 549-7555. Release some stress during T’ai Chi classes every Thu. at 10 AM at The Open Way Center, 702 Brooks. $10 drop-in class. Call Chris at 728-0918.

nightlife KVD is no RVD, but who is? There’s only room in this world for one moonsault expert. Kevin Van Dort performs for you beer enthu-

Stoll O’Neill and directed by Howard Kingston, at the Crystal Theater, 515 S. Higgins Ave. 7:30 PM. $15/$13 advance at eventbrite.com. Welcome to the machine that is Pinky and the Floyd, a Floyd tribute outfit that is on a Pink Floyd Retrospective Tour and who are joined by Missoula’s Dolce Canto Choir for the full meal deal. Wilma Theatre. 8 PM. $22/$20 advance at at Rockin Rudy’s or by calling 542-0077. Show ‘em that pop culture knowledge is just as important as having a job during Trivial Beersuit at the Lucky Strike Casino. Prizes for podium finishers. Karaoke follows. 1515 Dearborn. 8–10 PM. During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, amazing musicians could play some great jams. Just don’t tell your cousin Rapping Timmy about it. That guy’s version of “Santeria” is terrible. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up. Them hard working, music making Soul City Cowboys kick it at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St. 8:30 PM. Free. Show up the rest of the room with your version of “Ninja Survive” when you hit the Dark Horse for Combat Karaoke hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free. The grass is blue and the party is on when bluegrassers Toubab Krewe take the Top Hat stage, 134 W. Front St. 9:30 PM. $7. Advance tickets available at tophatlounge.com. Comb out your sister’s hair and don your down-home party cape, Langhorne Slim and The Law come to town and they are going to take you there, with locals The Hasslers and Ryan Bundy. Palace 9 PM. $8. Advance tickets at Ear Candy or stonefly-productions.com. (See Music.)

Black and white and reading all over. Former Indy editor Brad Tyer reads from his new book, Opportunity, Montana: Big Copper, Bad Water, and the Burial of an American Landscape, at Shakespeare & Co., Tue., April 2, at 7 PM. Free. (See cover story.)

neous, Otayo Dubb, Zyme & DJ True Justice, along with locals Abuv Limitz, The Orators, and Fluorescent Thoughts with Dame of Fame. Palace. 9 PM. $10. Perhaps some local talent intends to rip off your face with Steve Vai-like precision when the Badlander presents Live and Local Night, with TBA acts. 10 PM. Free.

WEDNESDAYAPRIL03 Do you wanna get rocked? Then check out Nashville’s Natural Child at the Palace, with garagerinos Chains of Love and J. Sherri. 9 PM. $7/$5 advance plus fees at Ear Candy Music and ticketfly.com Rocky Mountain Ballet Theatre now offers daytime children’s dance classes. Creative Movement for ages 2.5 - 3 and preballet for ages 4 -5. Visit www.rmbt.org or call 549-5155 for more information.

Show the Man how big your gray matter can get at Super Trivia Freakout. Badlander. 6:30 PM. Free. Cathy Clark’s West Coast Swing Class is at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent Ave. 7 PM. $5. Kraptastic Karaoke welcomes Black Eyed Peas fanatics to belt out their fave jamz at the Badlander, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $5 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free.

THURSDAYAPRIL04 Things are about to get more erotic than George Hamilton sunning himself at the Beverly Hilton Hotel circa ‘77, cuz Vera begins its month-long residency at the VFW, 245 W. Main St., with helper monkeys Monster with 21 Faces and creepers Forrest Friends out of the Jet City. 10 PM. $2.

[32] Missoula Independent • March 28 – April 4, 2013

siasts at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 5:30–8 PM. Free. After the revolution, we’ll need a new Betsy Ross, which is why you should pick up some tips every Thu. at Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., where its Sewing Lounge goes from 6–8 PM. $9–10/hour. Call 541-7171. Win $50 by using your giant egg to answer trivia questions at Brains on Broadway Trivia Night at the Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway Ave. 7 PM. Plus, all-youcan-eat wings, $10 two-topping pizzas, $6 domestic pitchers and $7 Blue Moon pitchers. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM. Check in for some Hospitality, a Montana dramedy about love, land and loyalty. Featuring Margaret Johnson, Ann Peacock and Justin Fatz. Written by Leslie

The Dead Hipster Dance Party is all kinds of sweaty, but ‘tis the droplets of the beautiful people. Get a taste in the place where love and funk is in the air (sometimes they are the same scent). Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight. Slide on a blazer (don’t forget to roll up the sleeves) and drop some “In Soviet Russia” jokes at Missoula’s Homegrown Stand-Up Comedy at the Union Club. Sign-up by 9:30 PM to perform or just sit back and take in the funny. Free. Country peoples, it’s time to get driven nuts by Wrangler butts when country tunesmithers the Casey Donahew Band perform at Stage 112 in the Elk’s Lodge, 112 Pattee St. 10 PM. $15. Don’t eat too much candy this Easter. Instead, focus on ham, delicious and salty ham. Send your event info to me by 5 PM on Fri., Mar. 29 to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to The Calemandar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 5434367. You can also submit stuff online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”


[outdoors]

MOUNTAIN HIGH

L

ike some of you, I am not willing to let winter slip away just yet. There is still plenty of good snow to slide upon and the bluebird days on the mountain are pretty good for the soul. That said, even I have to admit that good-time winter fun is on the wane and the waxing of bikini areas is in full effect for spring breakers and Adonises alike. However, let us embrace the silliness of springtime ski hill rituals with a trip to Whitefish Mountain Resort for its annual Dummy Derby. The derby is a pretty self-explanatory: build a dummy out of the junk in your garage, attach it to skis or a snowboard, send it down the mountain, launch it off a jump,

crash it. Sounds pretty dumb, right? Wrong. Embrace your inner 13-year-old, people. Besides, the Winter Brewfest takes place the same day at the same location. That’s what we in the business call serendipity. —Jason McMackin Whitefish Mountain Resort’s Dummy Derby takes place Sat., March 30, with registration from noon to 1:30 PM at the events office in the upper village. Free to attend, $50 to enter. For a schedule of events visit skiwhitefish.com.

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

FRIDAY MARCH 29 If it worked for Brad Pitt, it’s bound to work for you. Today is the registration deadline for the Fundamentals of Fly Fishing course brought to you by the UM Outdoor Program. Learn the skills and techniques of fly fishing through the experts from Missoulian Angler. Course begins April 11. $52 includes four classroom sessions and two field days on the river. Transportation and equipment also are included. Call 243-5172 or crecop@mso.umt.edu. Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s weekly meeting to talk about past glories and upcoming activities at Bigfork’s Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free. Make sure your first time is special by attending First Timer Friday at the Freestone Climbing Center, 935 Toole Ave. in Missoula, at 7 PM. Free if it’s your first visit. At Seasons of the Salish, Tim Ryan of the Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St., focuses on the seasonal rounds or cycles of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. 7 PM. $4 suggested donation/members free. Visit montananaturalist.org.

SATURDAY MARCH 30 Don’t run on a full stomach during Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which occur at 8 AM every Saturday at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. in Missoula. It’s after the run/walk that you can grab breakfast with other participants. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org. View yourself a plethora of feathered friends including most of the species of ducks, grebes and geese at the Five Valleys Audubon Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge Day Trip led by Terry McEneaney. This trip lasts all day so bring binos and a lunch. Meet at the UM Field House parking lot at 8 AM or

the refuge’s parking lot near the visitor’s center at 9 AM. Free. For more info call Terry at 214-1194. Get down with the fam and get them home fires burning at Seasons of the Salish Family Program, where the crew can learn how to make cordage from local dog bane and practice using a bow drill while learning about local native technology from Tim Ryan. Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St. 1 PM. $10/$5 members free. Visit montananaturalist.org.

MONDAY APRIL 1 Take it from someone who has done it, Cycle Only Days in Yellowstone National Park is a darned toot. From now to April 20, the park allows only non-motorized traffic inside its boundary. This is usually the time of year critters galore emerge from a long winter, so carry bear and/or buffalo spray. Check out “Spring Riding” at cycleyellowstone.com for more info. Be a fool and throw caution to the wind in the name of bird watching at the Five Valleys Audubon April Fool’s Day Trip. The viewing destination is known only to the group leader and lasts until noon. Meet in the northwest corner of the UM Field House parking lot at 8 AM. Free. Call 214-1194 for more info.

WEDNESDAY APRIL 3 Find some direction in your life at the GPS Navigation Basics. Learn how to pinpoint your location, mark waypoints and navigate to distant points. If you own a GPS unit, please bring it to class. REI, 3275 N. Reserve St. 6 PM. $50/$30 members. Visit rei.com/missoula. calendar@missoulanews.com

549-6106 • 422 Madison • Missoula

www.gcpm-mt.com missoulanews.com • March 28 – April 4, 2013 [33]


[community]

Sometimes the world seems so vast. For example, there are reports of children freezing and starving during the Syrian civil war. One can’t help but feel empathy for them and their families and a desire to do something to abate the suffering, yet the distance is so great one merely feels helpless. However, because of technology, the world seems to have shrunk recently. We can read live tweets from people involved in the distant war while enjoying a sandwich at our desks here in Montana. On Twitter you can see their faces and follow their daily lives as if they merely lived across town. Perhaps, though, it’s a fallacy to assume that this is a new thing. Perhaps we’ve shared a collective consciousness since the birth of humanity, one that is as effective as any modern technology when put to use. The Balanced View organization seeks to organize the “global human community into a potent, in-

telligent force that acts in its shared self-interest to cultivate a powerful, peaceful, beneficial, prosperous, generous society for all,” according to its website. While such esoteric language might scare some off, the opportunity to use a different method to solve age-old problems, such as the Syrian crisis, might be worth investigating. —Jason McMackin Balanced View hosts a leadership training and grassroots global organizing course called Empower Open Intelligence on Wed., April 3, from 6–8 PM, at the atrium room above Hothouse Yoga, 127 N. Higgins Ave. Register by Tue., April 2. Suggested contribution is $25–$125. For more information visit balancedview.org.

[AGENDA LISTINGS] FRIDAY MARCH 29 Practice being peaceful in a world of differences during the Intercultural Dialogue Group at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, where people from various backgrounds meet on the last Fri. of each month at 4:30 PM for an afternoon of conversation and peacemaking. Library of the Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call Betsy at 543-3955 or email peace@jrpc.org for more info.

MONDAY APRIL 1 Come on down for Moscow Monday at the Montgomery Distillery, 129 W. Front St., where the distillery redistributes the wealth (It ain’t called Wall Street Wednesday, amiright?). $1 from every drink sold is donated to a different non-profit each Monday. Family friendly, from noon–8 PM. Occupy Missoula General Assembly meets at the Union Hall above the Union Club at 6 PM. Visit occupymissoula.org.

The UM Climate Action Now Meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM FLAT, 633 Fifth St. E. 6:30 PM.

TUESDAY APRIL 2 Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. Third St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1–3 PM. For information, call 543-3955. Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication, a non-violent communication weekly practice group, at the Jeanette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Noon. Free.

THURSDAY APRIL 4 Children of the Earth Tribe Song and Chant Circle at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center is for all those ready to sing in honor of our connection to one another and the earth. 519 S. Higgins (Enter through back alley door.). 7:30 PM. Free will offering.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

[34] Missoula Independent • March 28 – April 4, 2013


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control 541-7387 ROLAND• Roland is a big, muscular dog that we think is mostly Redbone Hound. The color is certainly right, and he has a very melodious Hound voice, but we've noticed that his head is broader than usually seen in Hounds. We've also noticed that he's friendly, lively, and well-behaved in his kennel. MARIE•Marie is most likely a Plott Hound, as well as being quite a pretty young lady. She's a nice medium size, and she's also very tidy in her kennel. We'd like to adopt her separately from her older companion to give her a chance to develop her own personality and become more bonded with people.

SYD•Syd is small in size, but large in perSouthgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MTSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

DONNIE•Naming this handsome fellow after a singer made perfect sense because he often serenades the whole kennel with his baritone Hound voice. He's a lively fellow who 2330 South Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59801 probably knows all about hunting, but who Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) could use some training to make him a bit 3708 North Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59808 more manageable around people. Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri)

sonality. He has a very sweet nature and is warming up from being very shy to being curious and friendly. We know that in a real home it would take no time at all for him to become an interesting, playful companion.

GRAMERCY•Gramercy is a big cat, and

Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

we do mean BIG! There's no fat on him, but he has a large frame and is quite solid. He's also a big shy, although he does love to be handled and petted. He's also been declawed, so he'll need and inside-only home to keep him safe.

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

CANDICE•We've seen lots of calico cats in the shelter, but seldom one with the dense, vivid coloring that Candice has. This petite lady may not be wearing a coat of many colors, but it's certainly one of very beautiful ones! Her personality is just the opposite -very quiet and sedate.

Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 9:00am-12:00pm (Sat)

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana 549-3934 BEAU•What a Beau!

PAVI•Pavi

This sweet 6-ye-old Hound/Pointer mix is a must-meet. Good with kids, dogs and cats, he loves to play and creates his own sense of fun. Housetrained and intelligent, he’s a true family dog who enjoys playing fetch, and joining you for a daily jog! Warning (!), you’ll lose your heart to Beau when you meet him.

DITTO•Hey, I’m Ditto.

My name implies I might copy you, but I’m really quite independent. Three years old, I’m a reddish-tan-colored Corgi mix from California. Often called outgoing, I enjoy time with other dogs but prefer the alpha role if I’m being honest. I’m a smart boy who’ll listen to you, but I could benefit from a basic manners class.

currently enjoys meandering around the cat room, getting his 20 minutes (+) of play time from the Humane Society’s dedicated cat socializing volunteers. But he is ready to assume his new post as official lapwarmer. Visit the shelter on Highway 93 South to meet Pavi or to learn more about our life-saving volunteer program.

Flowers for every bride. In Trouble or in Love? The Flower Bed has affordable flowers for all your needs.

The Flower Bed

2405 McDonald Ave. 721-9233

BABY• Hoping to bring an easy-going kitty

home who’s independent, and loves to nap the day away? Meet Baby. She’s a long-haired, black & white 9-year- old sweetheart who has experience living with other dogs and cats. Baby beams when you brush her, and enjoys using a scratching post. A 6-month resident already, she’d really love to find her forever home.

SOPHIE•Sophie is a sweet and outgoing cat. She has lived comfortably in a home with other cats, and really loves to cuddle with dogs. She can be quite the curious one and is able to open closet doors in order to find a comfortable and dark place to cuddle, but her favorite spot is on her person’s lap.

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

Improving Lives One Pet at a Time Missoula’s Unique Alternative for pet Supplies

www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275 627 Woody • 3275 N. Reserve Street Corner of 39th and Russell in Russell Square

STUBBY•Stubby is a confident senior cat MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

who knows what she wants. At the age of 16, we believe she deserves to get her way! She is a great communicator, and will let you know exactly when is the perfect time to pet her, feed her, brush her and the like. If you can relate to this confident gal and would like more information on her, call us or just come for a visit.

These pets may be adopted at AniMeals 721-4701 SHOE•She moved and left him just as he was approaching his golden years. He never dreamed he would ever be without her. Now here he is being shuffled from one place to another because no one wants him. She named him “Shoe” because as a tiny kitten he had the most endearing habit of curling up and napping inside of one of her shoes.

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

NESSA• I didn’t see a “No cats allowed”

sign anywhere so I marched right up to the open door and went in….the place was named for a cat after all. The Red Lion. I was hoping for a meal and a nice warm bed out of the rain. But the management wasn’t having any of that and they brought me to AniMeals.

Rockin Rudy’s World Headquarters 237 Blaine • 542-0077

ANGEL•My name is Angel and I have been here since I was a 3-month-old kitten. I have lived in the shelter my whole life. Sometimes my roommates tell me stories about when they had homes and I always try to imagine it. They say it’s a place where you get one or more people that will love you and be there for you for the rest of your life.

715 Kensington Ste 8

406-240-1113

J. Willis Photography

Find me on FACEBOOK jessicagoulding.zenfolio.com specializing in weddings, pets, families, babies, senior pictures, fine art, and more!

MIKEY•My name is Mikey and I have been with AniMeals since February of 2012. I have no problem making myself visible for adopters to see, so I am not entirely sure as to why I haven’t gotten a new home yet. I hope it’s not because I am a black cat. Did you know black cats tend to be the last cats adopted from shelters? I wouldn’t say that I am bad luck either.

missoulanews.com • March 28 – April 4, 2013 [35]


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

March 28 - April 4, 2013

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Big Sky Bouncers Your biggest and best bouncer house rental company this side of the divide. Half and full day rental (free delivery within 15 miles of Lolo). (406) 273-9001 www.bigskybouncers.com

celebration of Montana’s cherries draws many thousands of visitors each year. Three booth sizes are available, making this affordable for anyone. Local Montana-made and cherry-themed products are

preferred. Food vendors welcome. To view and fill out an application, please visit www.flatheadcherryfestival.com. Booth spaces are limited and our deadline is May 24, 2013. This is

a two-day event and we reserve the right to refuse duplicate products. You can direct questions to vendors@flatheadcherryfestival.c om, or 406-686-1155.

Grout Rite Your tile & grout specialists. Free Estimates. Over 31 yrs exp. 406-273-9938. www.groutrite.com

Table of contents Advice Goddess . . . . . .C2

CHERRY FESTIVAL SEEKING VENDORS Wanted: Seeking vendors for Polson’s Main Street Flathead Cherry Festival. This is a very well-attended event, held on the main streets of Polson July 20th and 21st. This unique

FREE

Estimates

406-880-0688

bladesofglorylawncarellc.com Most of us quit going to church for the same reasons you did. Then we found...

Free Will Astrology . . .C4 Public Notices . . . . . . . .C4 Crossword . . . . . . . . . .C5 Sustainafieds . . . . . . . .C9 This Modern World . .C12

546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

P L AC E YOUR AD:

Walk it. 317 S. Orange

( : I BUY

Honda • Subaru • VW Toyota • Nissan Japanese/German Cars Trucks SUVs

Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not

327-0300 ANY TIME

543-6609 x121 or x115

Send it. Post it. classified@missoulanews.com

PET OF THE WEEK Doogie Bowser Energetic and fun-loving Doogie will help you see the silver lining of every cloud. This one year old Boxer cross enjoys hiking, playing with dogs, and learning new things. He’s super smart and already knows the basics. Doogie hopes his new family will bring him to basic manners classes at the Humane Society once he’s adopted so that he can continue his education. Training classes are only $75 for shelter dogs and are open to anyone. Humane Society of Western Montana 549-9864 www.myHSWM.org

"Be a first rate version of yourself, not a second rate version of someone else." - Judy Garland

Talk it.


COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

ADVICE GODDESS By Amy Alkon EX-RATED MOVIE I've been with my boyfriend for a year. We were best friends and talked about everything—what our kids would be like, projects we'd do together, magical worlds, and even other people we found attractive. Then, on his computer, I accidentally clicked on what I thought was just some porn video, but I recognized his blanket and realized it was he and his ex-girlfriend having sex (when they were dating). I had a very hard time seeing him with someone else and have become very sensitive and jealous, and this has set our relationship on edge. We don't talk as we used to. So many areas have become off-limits (even just whom he had lunch with) because he's so afraid that anything he says will upset or hurt me. I want to communicate as we used to when I was his "cool girlfriend." —Shut Out Katharine Hepburn could have made a sex tape without anyone ever knowing, because after the 8 mm film got transferred to video, her image would have been hard to discern from that of Ernest Borgnine, Sasquatch, or Yogi Bear. Thanks to technological advances, whenever some dermatologist in Idaho clicks up Kim Kardashian's sex tape, her agent probably gets a call telling him she's got some 2 mm birthmark that needs looking at. As distressing as it is that you could probably pick your boyfriend's ex out of a lineup—one from the waist down—it's not like you found footage of him clubbing squirrels. You just got unfortunate visual confirmation of what you already knew: He had a girlfriend before you. They did more than spoon. Jealousy is a good thing when it rears its little green head to warn of an actual threat to the relationship: "Eeek! He's having sex with another woman..." But jealousy needs a slap in the mouth from reason when there is no real threat: "...and it happened a year before we'd even met." To help yourself think rationally, don't be nebulously hysterical ("I'm afraaaaid!"). Verbalize exactly what you're actually afraid of—probably that he'd leave you, maybe for his ex. Next, consider what would happen if he actually did. The world would not end. Your head would not fall off, roll under the bed, and become a cat toy. You'd probably sob into your pillow for a few months, but you'd eventually get over him and get on with your life. To get back the relationship you had, start acting as if you'd never lost it—mean-

ing, when your boyfriend asks you the time, you just tell him; you don't shriek that all you can see is that clock on the nightstand in his sex video. There's a good deal of research, laid out by psychologist Dr. Richard Wiseman in "The As If Principle," that suggests that changing how you behave is actually the fastest, most effective way to change how you feel. Let your boyfriend know that you know your fears aren't rational, that you're going to stop acting like they are, and that he, in turn, needs to stop treating you like a bomb that could be triggered by "pass the salt." Before long, you should be his cool girlfriend again— faster, probably, if that blanket from the video finds its way to some homeless man. Ideally, he should be one who isn't in your neighborhood, lest your response to "Spare change?" be "You whore!"

JEST NOT THAT INTO YOU Women always say they like a man with a good sense of humor. What exactly does that mean? I think I'm funny. Do I have to bust right out with a bunch of hilarity on the first date? —A Guy If a woman agrees to go out with you, it isn't so she can finally find out why the chicken crossed the road. She either wants a free dinner or wants to figure out whether you're worth seeing again. You're unlikely to score a second date by pelting her with jokes and one-liners, which suggests you prepared for the evening by memorizing the joke book on the back of the toilet. What impresses a woman are shows of wit—spontaneous expressions of humor in response to something she says or something around you. Wit reflects intelligence while communicating your worldview— telling her who you are far more interestingly than droning on about your major and your dream to someday get your boss to assign you a better parking space. That said, don't get so caught up in making her laugh that you forget that connecting with her is the point. Make her feel like a onewoman audience for your "act" and she'll figure out for herself why the chicken crossed the road. (Because it would rather be hit by a car than listen to another one of your jokes.)

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

[C2] Missoula Independent • March 28 – April 4, 2013

Missoula FRIENDS OF NRA Banquet, Friday, April 5, Double Tree Inn Edgewater. Doors Open at 6 PM, Dinner Served at 7:15. Earlybird Drawing For A Rifle With Tickets Purchased Before March 20th. Please Contact Todd Harrison 406.214.1343 Or Tim McCool 406.241.9946 For More Information On Attending This Banquet. Tickets Are Available At Both Missoula Les Schwab Tire Locations. NEED CLEANING? Students Bachelors - Builders - Move-in Move-out. Call Tasha @ RC Services 888-441-3323 ext 101. Locally Owed & Operated. Licensed & Insured. Visit our website www.rcservices.info. SOCIAL SECURITY DENIED? Call Bulman Law Associates 7217744 www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com

LOST & FOUND LOST: pink walking cane. Lost around March 7th between Community Hospital, Missoula Public Library and the Equinox located at 1515 Liberty Lane. Lydia 239-7443

TO GIVE AWAY WE MOVED!! Pass It On Missoula is now located at 2426 W Central Ave. We are a community supported service offering FREE infant, toddler and maternity clothing to ALL Missoula area families! There are NO eligibility guidelines, simply reduce, reuse, and Pass It On locally! Community donations are accepted on location. PIOM offers FREE clothing to those in need, and affordable for all at 3/$5! Located at 2426 W Central Ave and open Monday-Saturday 10AM-5:30PM. 274-6430. www.passitonmissoula.com

ANNOUNCEMENTS 100 SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY ????’s & ANSWERS www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com 721-7744 Doogie Bowser Energetic and fun-loving Doogie will help you see the silver lining of every cloud. This one year old Boxer cross enjoys hiking, playing with dogs, and learning new things.

Ken's Barber Shop Children and Walk-in Welcome Haircuts-$8.50 • Beard trims-$4 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m Tuesday-Saturday 1114 Cedar St, Missoula, MT• 728-3957

He’s super smart and already knows the basics. Doogie hopes his new family will bring him to basic manners classes at the Humane Society once he’s adopted so that he can continue his education. Training classes are only $75 for shelter dogs and are open to anyone. Humane Society of Western Montana 5499864 www.myHSWM.org Sabar African Dance Class Mondays 6pm.$5. Live Drumming. The Barn Movement Studio, 2926 S. 3rd ST. W. Missoula call 529-2322. WORN OUT BY YOUR JOB? NO HEALTH INSURANCE? Call Bulman Law Associates 7217744

VOLUNTEERS Seeking Host Families Host a foreign high school student with Aspect Foundation! Call 1-800-US-Youth Volunteer Tutors Needed. Women’s Opportunity & Resource Development (WORD) is seeking college students and community members

Piano Lessons At YOUR Home All Ages, All Levels

Bruce- 546-5541

to work with children in transition in the Missoula public schools. • give just 1 to 2 hours per week • provide academic support • provide mentoring. Tutoring is offered during the school day. Placements are available in both the Middle and Elementary Schools depending on your preference. Ben Brewster, Volunteer C o o r d i n a t o r , bbrewster@wordinc.org, 406543-3550 x 218. Changing the World, One Child at a Time

INSTRUCTION ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com Montana School of Massage & Massage Clinic- Professional Massage Therapy Training MontanaMassage.com 549-9244

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com


EMPLOYMENT

MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS

PETS & ANIMALS

19% PROTEIN, nice, green 2011 alfalfa, $185 ton, free delivery within 50 mile radius of Lewistown, MT. Some 2012 Grass/Alfalfa also available. 25 to 30 ton loads. 406-823-0442. sknowles@trailanimalnutrition.co m

Basset Rescue of Montana www.bassetrescueofmontana.or g 406-207-0765

MUSIC MUSIC LESSONS Inhouse lessons on guitar, ukelele and piano. Sign up now! MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds entrance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 549-0013. www.montanamusic.com Outlaw Music Got Gear? We Do! Missoula’s Pro Guitar Shop specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, Tuesday-Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533. Outlawmusicguitarshop.com Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

Accepting Spring Consignments 111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments Outlaw Music

541-7533

Missoula's Stringed Instrument Pro Shop!

Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

724 Burlington Ave. outlawmusicguitarshop.com Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

CATS: #2162 Grey Torbi, British Shorthair, SF, 7yrs; #2305 Torti, DSH, SF, 4yrs; #2312 Grey/white, DMH, SF, 10yrs; #2334 Blk/wht, DMH, NM, 15yrs; #2391 Wht/Orange, DSH, SF, 9mo; #2445 Grey/white, DSH, NM, 3yrs; #2455 Black, ASH/Bombay X, SF, 6yrs; #2499 Black, DSH, SF, 1.5yrs;#2508-2509 Black, KITTENS 9wks; #2510 Black, DMH, SF, 9wks;#2520 Grey Torti, DMH, SF, 2yrs; #2521 Orange, DSH, NM, 8wks; #2523 Orange/Buff, DSH, NM, 9wks; #2534 Grey Tabby, DSH, NM, 7rs; #2535 White/Blk Calico, DSH, SF, 6yr; #2561 Black, DSH, NM, 7 1/2yrs; #2569 Black, Siamese/DSH, NM, 10yrs; #2573 Blk/white, DSH, SF, 2.5yrs; #2587 Black, DSH, SF 9 mo; #2599 Grey Torti, DMH, F, 2yrs; #2602 Brn Torti, DSH, F, 8wks; #2615 Grey/Blk, Maine Coon X, F, 9wks; #2663 Blk, DSH, NM, 12wks; #2666 Blk/tan Tabby, ASH, SF, 9wks; #2668 Orange/wht, DSH, NM, 3yrs; $2670 Dilute Torti, Persian, SF, 9yrs; #2676 Blk, DSH, NM, 1yr; #2683 Blk/white, ASH, SF 9wks; #2695 Grey/brown, Russian Blue, NM, 3yrs; #2697 Buff, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #2698 Black, ASH, NM, 1yr; #2706 Buff, ASH, SF, 2yrs; #2708 Flame Point, Siamese X, NM, 12wks; #2722 Grey, Russian Blue, SF, 10yrs; #2723 Grey, Russian Blue, SF, 5yrs; #2724 Buff, ASH, SF, 10yrs; #2726 Tan/Blk Tips, Maine Coon X, NM, 3yrs; #2727 Blk/white, Maine Coon X, SF, 8mo; #2728 Creme/Blk, Siamese, NM, 6yrs For photo listings see our web page at w w w. m o n t a n a p e t s . o r g

Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840. DOGS: #2169 White/grey, Border/Heeler X, SF, 3 1/2yrs; #2285 Red/Tan, Boxer X, SF, 6yr; #2396 Yellow, Chow/Lab x, SF, 1yr; #2467 Brown, German Shep X, NM, 2yrs; #2564 Brindle, Catahoula, NM, 2yrs; #2575 Brn/white, Husky X, NM, 1yr; #2595 Blk/white, Heeler X, SF, 1yr; #2702 White/brindle, Boxer, NM, 1yr; #2705 Tan, Pit X, NM, 5yrs; #2712 Yellow, Lab/Retriever, NM, 4yrs; #2716 Blk/rust, Dobie/Hound X, NM, 2yrs; #2717 Fawn/white, Pit/Terrier, SF, 3yrs; #2736 Blk/white, Boxer/Lab/BC, SF, 1yr; #2737 Blk/white, F, Boxer/Lab/BC, 2wks; #2738 Brown/white, Boxer/Lab/BC, M, 2wks; #2740 Heeler X, F, 1yr; #2741-2746 BOXER/Lab/BC PUPPIES; For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

GENERAL New company in Lolo. Now Hiring! Days and Nights. Call John or Mike 273-2266

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION

GIVE BACK. GET MORE.

Annual Wildland Fire Refresher Training 406-543-0013 www.blackbull-wildfire.com

SKILLED LABOR

Donate life-saving plasma.

TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-545-4546

RECEIVE RECEI EC IV VE UP U TO $ $250 25 YOUR 1st MONTH! ª'REATª.ORTHERNª!VEªsª-ISSOULA ª-4ª 406.721.2584 SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT AT BIOLIFEPLASMA.COM

$50 Seasonal Positions:

NEW DONORS OR DONORS WHO HAVEN’T DONATED IN SIX MONTHS OR MORE, PRESENT THIS COUPON AND RECEIVE A $50 BONUS ON YOUR FOURTH DONATION.

Must present this coupon prior to the initial donation to receive a $50 bonus on your fourth successful donation. Initial donation must be completed by 4.30.13 and subsequent donations within 30 days. Coupon redeemable only upon completing successful donations. May not be combined with any other offer. Only at participating locations.

Aquatics, Recreation. Applications, descriptions, deadlines at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/jobs or Currents Aquatics Center, McCormick Park. Lifeguarding classes start 4/8 & 5/6.

missoulaparks.org

SERVICES CHILDCARE Diaper Service averages 18 cents per change, so why are you throwing your money away? Local cloth diaper sales & service. Missoula peeps order online and get your goods delivered during diaper route Wednesdays. 406.728.1408 or natureboymontana.com

CLEANING NEED CLEANING? Students Bachelors - Builders - Move-in Move-out. Call Tasha @ RC Services 888-441-3323 ext 101. Locally Owed & Operated. Licensed & Insured. Visit our website www.rcservices.info.

GARDEN/ LANDSCAPING

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Able Garden Design & Services LLC Professional and Affordable Lawn & Garden Maintenance. *Spring Cleaning Specials* Call Rik 406-549-3667

Natural Housebuilders, Inc., *ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes* Additions/Remodels* HIGHERCOMFORT crafted building* Solar Heating* 369-0940 or 642-6863* www.naturalhousebuilder.net

HANDYMAN

Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator. Ttestimonials Available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642

Squires for Hire. Carpentry, Drywall, Painting, Plumbing, General Handyman. I actually show up on time! Bret 544-4671

SBS Solar offers design and installation services for Solar Systems:

residential, commercial, on- and off-grid. We also specialize in Energy Audits for home or business. www.SBSlink.com

MASSAGE $45/hour Deep Tissue Massage. Zoo City Massage located at 1526 S. Reserve St., Missoula. Call (406) 370-3131 to schedule an appointment. zoocitymassage.com.

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

THOMAS CLEANING Residential/Commercial. 8+ years experience. Licensed/Insured. Free estimates. Fast, friendly, and professional. References. (406) 396-4847

Spring Clean

Full House Up To 1500 Sq.Ft. $80

RC SERVICES Call For Details 241-0101

www.rcservices.info montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • March 28 – April 4, 2013 [C3]


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): I was too lazy to write your horoscope this week, so I went to a website that hawks bumper stickers and copied a few of their slogans to use as your "advice." Here you go. 1. Never follow a rule off a cliff. 2. Have the courage to honor your peculiarities. 3. It's never too late to have a rebellious adolescence. 4. Criticize by creating. 5. Never make anything simple and efficient when it can be elaborate and wonderful. 6. Complex problems have simple, easy-to-understand, morally clear, wrong answers. APRIL FOOL! I lied. I wasn't lazy at all. I worked hard to ensure that all the suggestions I just provided are in strict accordance with the astrological gestalt.

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Escape with MassageSwedish, Deep Tissue and Reiki. Open days, evenings and weekends. In my office or your home. Janit Bishop, LMT • 207-7358

Hypnosis & Imagery

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You know what would be a really cool prank to pull off this April Fool's Day? Arrange to have rubber tires airlifted into a dormant volcano, then set them on fire. Smoke will pour out the top. Everyone who lives nearby will think the volcano is getting ready to explode. Don't forget to videotape the event for Youtube. Later, when you reveal the hoax, your video will go viral and you'll become a celebrity. APRIL FOOL! I don't really think you should try this prank. It's old hat. Back in 1974, a guy named Porky Bickar did it to Alaska's Mt. Edgecumbe. Here's my real oracle for you: It is a good time to boost your visibility by doing something funny. Or to build your brand by being mischievous. Or to demonstrate your power by showing off your sense of humor.

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In the animated TV show The Simpsons, ten-year-old Bart is constantly getting into trouble because of the monkey business he loves to perpetrate. His teachers punish him by compelling him to write corrective declarations on the classroom blackboard. It so happens that some of those apologetic statements should be coming out of your mouth in the coming week, Leo. They include the following: "I will not strut around like I own the place. I will not claim that I am deliciously saucy. I will not instigate revolution. I will not trade pants with others. I will not carve gods. I will not Xerox my butt. I will not scream for ice cream." APRIL FOOL! I lied. The truth is, you SHOULD consider doing things like that. And don't apologize!

MASSAGE THERAPY

* Stress * Depression * Empower yourself

Nurture Lactation Breast Feeding Support Home Visits. 531.6684

728-5693 • Mary Place MSW, CHT, GIS

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): It's a perfect time to watch the cult classic film Night of the Day of the Dawn of the Son of the Bride of the Return of the Revenge of the Terror of the Attack of the Evil, Mutant, Alien, Flesh Eating, Hellbound, Zombified Living Dead. It will provide you with just the right inspiration as you deal with your own problems. APRIL FOOL! I lied. Don't you dare watch any horror movies. You're in a phase when you can make dramatic progress in transforming long-standing dilemmas—but only if you surround yourself with positive, uplifting influences. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The coming week will be an excellent time to wash dishes, clean bathrooms, scrub floors, vacuum carpets, wash windows, do laundry, and clean the refrigerator. The more drudge work you do, the better you'll feel. APRIL FOOL! I lied. The truth is, you now have astrological license to minimize your participation in boring tasks like the ones I named. It's high time for you to seek out the most interesting work and play possible.

MITCHELL

* Smoking * Weight * Negative self-talk

People's Trust Foreclosed on Major Corporations www.oppt-in.com www.peoplestrust1776.org

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

ERIC MITCHELL, LMT Massage Therapist/Owner

2601 S 3rd St. W

Find me on Facebook MitchellMassage.abmp.com

406-207-9480

Confused about coming out? Call our Mental Health Counselor Bernie Kneefe, MSW, LCSW today!

721-1646 www.bluemountainclinic.org

c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The sport of ferret legging is an endurance contest. Participants vie to determine who can last longest as a live ferret runs loose inside their pants. The current record is five hours and 26 minutes, held by a retired British miner. But I predict that a Virgo will soon break that mark. Could it be you? APRIL FOOL! I misled you. I don't really think you should put a ferret in your pants, not even to win a contest. It is possible, however, that there will soon be a pleasurable commotion happening in the area below your waist. And I suspect that you will handle it pretty well.

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Risk being a crazed fool for love, Libra. Get as wild and extreme as you've ever been if it helps you rustle up the closeness you're hungry for. Get down on your knees and beg, or climb a tree with a megaphone and profess your passion. APRIL FOOL! I was exaggerating a little. It's true that now is an excellent time to be aggressive about going after the intimate connection you want. But I suggest you accomplish that by being ingenious and imaginative rather than crazy and extreme.

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): British comedy team Monty Python did a sketch in which a policeman apprehends a criminal. The bad guy says, "Yes, I did it, but society is to blame." And the cop says, "Right! We'll arrest them instead." You should adopt this attitude, Scorpio. Blame everyone else but yourself for your problems and flaws. APRIL FOOL! I lied. In fact, the truth is the opposite of what I said. It's time to take more responsibility for your actions. Bravely accept the consequences of what you've done—with your sense of humor fully engaged and a lot of compassion for yourself.

f

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Banzai skydiving is a step beyond ordinary skydiving. To do it, you hurl your folded-up parachute out of the airplane, wait a while, and then leap into mid-air yourself. If all goes well, you free-fall in the direction of your parachute and catch up to it. Once you grab it, you strap it on and open the chute, ideally before you hit the earth. This is the kind of beyondballsy activity that would be perfect for you right now. APRIL FOOL! In truth, I don't recommend banzai skydiving now or ever. Plain old skydiving is fine, though. The same principle applies in relation to any adventurousness you're considering: Push yourself, yes, but not to an absurd degree.

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Should you relocate to Kazakhstan and grow sunflowers? Is it time to think about getting a job in Uruguay and living there for the next ten years? Can you see yourself building your dream home in Morocco on a bluff overlooking the Atlantic Ocean? I suggest you spend some quality time thinking way, way outside the box about where you belong on this earth. APRIL FOOL! I went a bit overboard in my recommendations. It is true that you should brainstorm about the kind of home you want to create and enjoy in the future. But that probably means revising and refining your current situation rather than leaving it all behind and starting over.

h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Your brain has a bigger capacity than you realize. According to professor of psychology Paul Reber, it can hold the equivalent of three million hours' worth of television shows. As I'm sure you know, your brain is not even close to being full of that much data. And in accordance with the current astrological omens, I suggest you cram in as much new material as possible. APRIL FOOL! I told you a half-truth. While it's correct that now is an excellent time to pour more stuff into your brain, you should be highly discerning about what you allow in there. Seek out the richest ideas, the most stimulating information, the best stories. Avoid trivial crap.

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): July 2012 was a sad time in the history of mythic creatures. The National Ocean Service, a U.S. government agency, made a formal proclamation that there are no such things as mermaids. But I predict those stuffy know-it-alls will soon get a big shock, when a Piscean scientist presents evidence that mermaids are indeed real. APRIL FOOL! I was exaggerating. I don't really foresee the discovery of a flesh-and-blood mermaid—by a Pisces or anyone else. I do, however, suspect that your tribe is now highly adept at extracting useful revelations and inspirations from dreams, visions, and fantasies—including at least one that involves a coven of Buddhist Ninja clown mermaids. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

[C4] Missoula Independent • March 28 – April 4, 2013

BLACK BEAR NATUROPATHIC Family Care • Nutritional Consultation & IV Therapy • Herbal Medicine • Homeopathy • Massage Christine White N.D. & Elizabeth Axelrod N.D. Monday-Thursday 9:00-4:00 Friday & Saturday appointments available

2204 Dixon, Msla • 542-2147 • MontanaNaturalMedicine.com

Did you know? Posting a classified ad ONLINE is FREE!

www.missoulanews.com


PUBLIC NOTICES

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s

Cassie R. Dellwo MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM 38 Second Ave E Dickinson ND 58601 Phone: 701-227-1841 Fax: 701225-6878 Attorney for the Plaintiff Cdellwo@Mackoff.com MT Bar #11880 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-11-965 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION PHH Mortgage Corporation, Plaintiff, -vs- F. Duke Hermann; First Security Bank of Missoula; and all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the complaint adverse to plaintiff’s ownership or any cloud upon plaintiff’s title thereto, whether such claim or possible claim be present or contingent, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT, F. DUKE HERMANN: You are hereby summoned to answer the Complaint in this action, which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your Answer and serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff’s attorney within twenty-one (21) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or Answer, Judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action relates to an equitable lien, foreclosure and quiet title action of a Deed of Trust upon the following described real property in the County of Missoula, State of Montana: LOT 27 AND 28 IN BLOCK 54 OF CAR LINE ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH PORTIONS “C” AND “D” OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5681, BEING A PORTION OF THE NORTHWEST ONEQUARTER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 13 NORTH, RANGE 19 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court, this 1st day of March, 2013. (SEAL OF THE COURT) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of the District Court By: /s/ Andy Brunkhart Deputy. Dated this 20th day of February, 2013. MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM Attorneys for Plaintiff 38 Second Ave E Dickinson ND 58601 Tel: (701) 227-1841 By: /s/ Cassie R. Dellwo, Attorney #11880 Attorney for the Plaintiff THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION RECEIVED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. NOTICE Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that unless you dispute the validity of the foregoing debt or any portion thereof within thirty days after receipt of this letter, we will assume the debt to be valid. On the other hand, if the debt or any portion thereof is disputed, we will obtain verification of the debt and will mail you a copy of such

"Classical Remix"–recomposing composers. by Matt Jones

AUTO GENERAL CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car.com

verification. You are also advised that upon your request within the thirty day period, we will provide you with the name and address of your original creditor, if different from the creditor referred to in this Notice. We are attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. CITY OF MISSOULA FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT PERMIT APPLICATION The City of Missoula Development Services Department has received a floodplain application from Datsopoulos, MacDonald & Lind, P.C. to work with the Clark Fork Creek floodplain. The proposed project is located Section 22, Township 13N, Range 19W, otherwise know as Brennan’s Wave. The proposed project will include removal of portions of the substructure that have become dislodged and pose a danger to users of the recreational site. The full application is available for review at the Development Services Department located on the second floor of City Hall. Written comments from anyone interested in the City floodplain permit application 13-03 may be submitted prior to 5:00 pm, April 5th 2013. Address comments to the City Floodplain Administrator, Development Services Department, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802 or call 552-6637 for more information. CITY OF MISSOULA FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT PERMIT APPLICATION The City of Missoula Development Services Department has received a floodplain application from the City of Missoula to work with the Grant Creek floodplain. The proposed project is located Section 7, Township 13N, Range 19W and includes the removal of material in the creek at the bridges located at Expressway and International Way. The full application is available for review at the Development Services Department located on the second floor of City Hall. Written comments from anyone interested in the City floodplain permit application 13-04 may be submitted prior to 5:00 pm, April 5th 2013. Address comments to the City Floodplain Administrator, Development Services Department, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802 or call 5526637 for more information. CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON STREET VACATION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Missoula, Montana, passed Resolution Number 7764 at their regular meeting held on March 25, 2013: A resolution declaring it to be the intention of the City Council of the City of Missoula, Montana, to close and vacate portions of Eaton Street between South 3rd Street and South 4th Street (located in Section 20, Township 13 North, Range 19 West, P.M.M.) The City Council will hear all matters pertaining to the proposed street vacation at its regular meeting on April 8, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine St. The full resolution is on file and open for inspection in the City Clerk’s Office from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday at City Hall, 435 Ryman, Second Floor. For more information, contact Jessica Miller, Public Works at 552-6347. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC, City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, until 2:00 p.m., on

803A Pattee Creek • $129,900

Pat McCormick

• Second floor 2 bed, 1.5 bath condo with Real Estate Broker Real Estate With Real Experience single garage in 55+ community. pat@properties2000.com • Stair-master lift 406-240-SOLD (7653) • Gorgeous sunset & mountain views. Properties2000.com Tuesday, April 9, 2013, and will then be opened and publicly read in the Jack Reidy Conference Room, 140 W. Pine, Missoula, MT for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for construction of the following: City of Missoula Crosswalk Epoxy Painting – 2013 Improvements Project 13-005 This project consists of epoxy painting crosswalks at 19 locations throughout the City of Missoula. Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project Manual addressed to the City Clerk, City of Missoula, enclosed in sealed envelopes plainly marked on the outside “Proposal for City of Missoula Project 013-005 “Crosswalk Epoxy Painting - 2013”. The envelopes shall also be marked with the Bidder’s Name, Address and Montana Contractor’s Registration Number. Proposals must be accompanied by cash, cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of the City of Missoula against liability. A complete set of the Contract Documents and Project Manual will be furnished the Contractors making application therefore from the Office of the City Engineer, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana, upon payment of $50.00 by company check, cashier’s check, or bank money order (cash can not be accepted). Full amount of payment will be refunded upon return of the plans and specifications in good condition within ten (10) days after bid opening. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1-406-444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. All laborers

and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. The contractor performing work on a “Public works contract” shall not pay less than the latest Montana Labor Standard Provisions minimum wage as determined by the U.S. Secretary of Labor. A copy of said wage rate is attached as part of the contract documents. The provisions of this part do not apply in those instances in which the standard prevailing rate of wages is determined by federal law. “Public works contract” means a contract for construction services let by the state, county, municipality, school district, or political subdivision or for non-construction services let by the state, county, municipality, or political subdivision in which the total cost of the contract is in excess of $25,000. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against on the basis race, ancestry, color, physical or mental disability, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital or familial status, creed, ex-offender status, physical condition, political belief, public assistance status or sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, except where these criteria are reasonable bona fide occupational qualifications. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula Business Licensing requirements. The City of Missoula reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids, and, if all bids are rejected, to readvertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to the bid opening at 2:00 p.m. on April 9, 2013. The City of Missoula provides accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the City. To request accommodation, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (406)552-6079. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the city’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk INVITATION FOR BID CALL FOR BIDS Sealed, lump sum bid entitled: “BID for Anaconda Deer Lodge County NSP Project” will be received by Anaconda-Deer Lodge County until 12:00 P.M.

local time, April 5, 2013, and then publicly opened and read thereafter. Each Bid shall be submitted in a sealed opaque envelope bearing on the outside the name of Bidder and address. Bids may be mailed or hand delivered to: Mail Delivery: Hand Delivery: Anaconda-Deer Lodge County, Planning Department Attention: Paula Arneson, 800 South Main Street, Anaconda, Montana 59711. If forwarded by mail, the Bid and sealed envelope marked as described above shall be enclosed in another envelope with the notation “SEALED BID ENCLOSED- 716 EAST 3rd STREET” on the face of the outer envelope and addressed as indicated above. Rehabilitation on both structures is advertised together, the bids will be considered for each individual structure on the parcel. PROJECT LOCATION: The Project is located in Anaconda, Montana at 716 East 3rd Street. PROJECT WORK DESCRIPTION: 716 East 3rd St. is a residential lot with two structures. There are two rehabilitation projects within this bid: 1) repair/rehabilitation on the North/main house, 2) repair/rehabilitation of the South/smaller house. The contract

PUBLIC NOTICE The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Tuesday, April 16, 2013, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. 1. Zoning Request – Decker Zoning

A request from Decker Investments, Inc., represented by Paul Forsting of Territorial Landworks, Inc. to zone an unzoned property near the Wye to CI1(Light Industry). The property is legally described as Tract 1 of COS # 6341 in Section 21, Township 14N, Range 20W, PMM. See Map B.

ACROSS

1 Insult hurled at 30-across 6 Mediterranean island nation 11 Two for Juan? 14 Block, as an Arctic ship 15 Message sender SETI hopes to detect 16 Hose problem 17 Photography size, based on Elgar? 19 Lance with a gavel 20 Driver around Hollywood 21 Spectator 23 "The Price Is Right" game 25 Ernie's special friend 26 Reverberate 29 "Wowzers!" 30 "South Park" protagonist 32 Understand fully 34 Dropped a line 36 Longtime Harry Belafonte label 39 Polite 41 Shakespeare nickname 43 Bizarre 44 Tahrir Square's country 46 Disturbed 47 "If it feels right, do it" 49 Public regard 51 Caustic substances 52 Scotch mixer 54 Chew out 56 Game where you tug on your ear 59 Smokin' 63 Rand of "Atlas Shrugged" 64 2013 dance all over YouTube, based on Mahler? 66 Was winning 67 Went on the radio 68 Toss option 69 "Gangnam Style" rapper 70 Times to eat cake, casually 71 Dark-skinned wine grape

DOWN

1 Get on tape 2 Berry in juices 3 Sea bird 4 Stake out by the road, perhaps 5 Reporter April, friend of the Ninja Turtles 6 Great Leap Forward name 7 Jovial weatherman 8 Pole dance? 9 Loose-leaf selections 10 Stud fee? 11 Seriously irritate, based on Verdi? 12 Like a rind 13 Make pig noises 18 "Bridesmaids" director Paul 22 Diamond stat 24 Word before created or elected 26 Breakfast brand 27 Street ___ 28 Useful, based on Haydn? 30 Numerical suffix 31 Diver's place 33 Banana shell 35 Weasel's cousin 37 Plains language 38 Contributes 40 Driving force 42 Did some farm work 45 "The Pelvis" 48 Rowboat mover 50 Chicken ___ (dish on "The Sopranos") 52 Make some money off those tickets 53 "I just remembered..." 54 Quotable Yogi 55 Tries out 57 "Moby Dick" captain 58 "Pore Jud Is ___" (Rodgers and Hammerstein song) 60 It'll grow on you 61 Tulsa's st. 62 New age musician/former TV host John 65 Alt-weekly workers, briefly

Last week’s solution

©2013 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • March 28 – April 4, 2013 [C5]


PUBLIC NOTICES will be funded in whole by the Neighborhood Stabilization Program, administered by the Montana Department of Commerce, and is subject to all federal laws and regulations. All contractors and subcontractors must adhere to current wage rates as defined by the Davis Bacon Wage Rates. The Contract Documents may be examined at the Anaconda-Deer Lodge County Planning offices, 800 South Main Street, Anaconda, MT 59711. A Pre-bid meeting will be held on Thursday, March 14th, at the project site at 10:30am, 716 East 3rd Street, Anaconda, Montana. No contractor may submit a bid unless already properly registered in Montana at the time of bid submission with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry. Anaconda-Deer Lodge County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Minorities and women are encouraged to apply. Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968 also applies. Anaconda-Deer Lodge County reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids, to waive irregularities, to evaluate the bids submitted and to accept the proposal which best serves the interest of the owner. MISSOULA COUNTY Attention Residents of Lewis & Clark RSID 8918 and Sunset West RSID 8925 The Annual Drinking Water Quality Report, also known

as the Consumer Confidence Report for the monitoring period of January 1st through December 31, 2012 is available upon request by calling Tami Quinn at 406-3701838. MISSOULA COUNTY Missoula County Central Services Public Auction - Miscellaneous Office Accessories. See items at Publicsurplus.com./Montana Missoula County MISSOULA COUNTY Notice of Close of Regular Voter Registration and Option for Late Registration Notice is hereby given that regular* registration for the Special District Elections to be held on May 7th, 2013 will close at 5:00 p.m., on April 8th, 2013. *NOTE: If you miss this regular registration deadline, you may still register for the election by showing up at the county fairground’s Election Center, up to and including on Election Day. Between noon and the close of business on the day before Election Day, you can complete and submit a voter registration card, but you will need to return to the local election office on Election Day to pick up and vote a ballot. All active and inactive electors of the Seeley Lake Rural Fire District are entitled to vote at said election. All electors, as defined in Title 13, who resides in the Missoula Irrigation District or any holder of title to lands

within the district who present a proof of payment of taxes on the lands at the Election Center is eligible to vote in the election. Ballots will be automatically mailed to Active Electors only. If you are a registered voter and do not receive a ballot, contact the county election office to update your information as necessary and receive a ballot. Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the County Election Administrator. If you have moved, please update your registration information by filling out a new voter registration card and submitting it to the county election office. DATED this 8th day of March 2013. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Missoula County Election Administrator MISSOULA COUNTY Notice of Election: Missoula Irrigation District Notice is hereby given that on May 7th, 2013, a mail ballot election for the election of two commissioners for the Missoula Irrigation District will be held. Drop off locations will open at 7:00 a.m. and will continue to be open until 8:00 p.m. on Election Day. All electors, as defined in Title 13, who resides in the Missoula Irrigation District or any holder of title to lands within the district who present a proof of payment of taxes on the lands at the Election Center is eligible to vote

[C6] Missoula Independent • March 28 – April 4, 2013

in the election. Dated this 8th of March, 2013. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator, Missoula County MISSOULA COUNTY Notice of Election: Seeley Lake Rural Fire District Notice is hereby given that on May 7th, 2013, a mail ballot election for the election of one trustee for the Seeley Lake Rural Fire District will be held. Drop off locations will open at 7:00 a.m. and will continue to be open until 8:00 p.m. on Election Day. Dated this 8th of March, 2013. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator, Missoula County MISSOULA COUNTY Notice of Public Hearing The Missoula County Parks and Trails Advisory Board will conduct public hearings on the following items on Thursday, April 11, 2013 at 1:30 p.m. in Room B14 located at 199 West Spruce St in Missoula. The Parks and Trails Advisory Board will forward their recommendation to the Board of County Commissioners. Transfer of Ownership of Alvina and Hellgate Parks from Missoula County to the City of Missoula for continued use as a parkland. The Alvina Park property is legally described as a 23,382 square foor public park dedicated with the Greendale Addition, a subdivision located in the SW of Section 14 and the SE of Section 15, T13N, R19W, P.M.M. Hellgate

Park is legally described as a 3.85 acre public park dedicated with the Gateway Gardens #2 subdivision, a subdivision located in the N 1/2 of Section 26 and the of the SE of Section 23, T13N, R19W, P.M.M. Request from Missoula Horseman’s Council to renew the lease of approximately sixty (60) acres of Missoula County land located within the Big Sky Park, near Tower and Spurgin Roads. The land is described as portions of Tract 1 and Tract 5 of COS 3323, located in the E1/4 of Section 24, T13N, R20W. The purpose of the lease is to operate and maintain an existing equestrian cross-country jump course, riding trails and exercise track and to manage the site for bird and small mammals in accordance with the Big Sky Park Plan. Request from American Legion Swan Valley Post 63 to renew a lease from Missoula County on property legally described as a five (5) acre area located directly north of the Condon Airfield and immediately east of Montana State Highway #83 in an existing cleared area in the SE , SW , Section 25, T21N, R17W. The property is owned by the United States Forest Service and under Special Use Permit by Missoula County for the purposes of operating and maintaining a public park/playground known as the Condon ball field that is located on National Forest System lands. Your attendance and your comments are welcomed and

encouraged. The request is available for public inspection at the Missoula County Parks Office, 317 Woody, Missoula, Montana. If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling 258 4716. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. MISSOULA COUNTY PUBLIC NOTICE The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Tuesday, April 2, 2013, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. 1. Garden City Harvest River Road Farm Conservation Easement A proposal from Garden City Harvest to grant the City of Missoula a conservation easement on an approximately 3.25 acre parcel located adjacent to River Road about 1/5 mile west of Russell St in Missoula, legally described as Lot 12 of Cobban and Dinsmore’s Orchard Homes No. 2, a tract of land located in S.20, T13N, R19W, P.M.M. Information about this project is available from the City Open Space Program Manager, Jackie Corday, at 552-6267. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. Comments may be directed to Missoula Parks & Recreation, 600 Cregg Ln, Missoula, MT, 59801, or via email to jcorday@ci.missoula.mt.us If anyone attending these meetings

needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 258-3432. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services MISSOULA COUNTY Request for Qualifications for Architectural Services - Missoula County Detention Facility The Missoula County Detention Facility (MCDF), an entity of Missoula County, is seeking statements of qualifications for lead architectural services for the remodel of recreation space within the MCDF building located at 2340 Mullan Rd, Missoula, MT. The selected firm will work with the Owner’s staff to develop the designs for the remodel. Statements of qualifications will be accepted until 5:00 PM, Friday, April 5, 2013. Interested firms may obtain a complete project description on Missoula County’s website at http://www.co.missoula.mt.us/bidsandproposals or by contacting Barbara Berens, 406-258-3227 or bberens@co.missoula.mt.us. MISSOULA COUNTY SECTION 00100 INVITATION TO BID Missoula County seeks bids for grading and drainage improvements and reconstruction of the Momont Road, chip sealing Expressway and improvements to the Butler Creek-Expressway intersection. Sealed bids will be accepted by: Missoula County


PUBLIC NOTICES Public Works Office, Attn: Greg Robertson, P.E., 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808 until 10:00 AM local time on April 12, 2013 , and then publicly opened and read aloud in the Conference Room at the offices of the Missoula County Public Works. The project consists of the construction of the following: Reconstruction of portions of Momont Road, Industrial Road and Alloy South. Recycling existing asphalt and base gravels Installing 12” HDPE drainage pipe across Expressway Installing chip seal and asphalt epoxy paint along Expressway. Installing paint striping and signage. The contract documents consisting of drawings, specifications, and bidding documents may be examined or obtained at the office of Professional Consultants, Inc., 3115 Russell, Missoula, MT 59801. The required deposit is $ 50.00 per set, which is nonrefundable. In addition, the drawings and project manual may also be examined at the Missoula Plans Exchange, 201 N. Russell, Missoula, MT (406) 549-5002. There will be a Pre-Bid Conference at 10:00 AM, April 8, 2013 in the Missoula County Public Works conference room, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808. Interested CONTRACTORS are encouraged to attend. CONTRACTOR and any of the CONTRACTOR’S subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI). Forms for registration are available from the Department of Labor and Industry, P.O. Box 8011, 1805 Prospect, Helena, Montana 596048011. Information on registration can be obtained by calling 1-406444-7734. CONTRACTOR is not required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project, but must have registered prior to execution of the Construction Agreement. All laborers and mechanics employed by CONTRACTOR or subcontractors in performance of the construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by Missoula County and the State of Montana. The CONTRACTOR must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their race, color, religion, sex or national origin. Each bid or proposal must be accompanied by a Certified Check, Cashier’s Check, or Bid Bond payable to Missoula County, in an amount not less than ten percent (10%) of the total amount of the bid. Successful BIDDER(s) shall furnish an approved Performance Bond and a Labor and Materials Payment Bond, each in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Insurance as required shall be provided by the successful BIDDER(s) and a certificate(s) of that insurance shall be provided. Sealed bids shall be marked. Upper Miller Creek Road Reconstruction. No bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled time for the public opening of bids, which is 10:00 AM local time on April 12, 2013. Missoula County reserves the right to reject any or all proposals received, to waive informalities, to postpone the award of the contract for a period of not to exceed sixty (60) days, and to accept the lowest responsive and responsible bid which is in the best interest of the OWNER. The Contractor is required to be an Equal Opportunity Employer. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-13-57 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF BETTY C. MELTON, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representa-

tive of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to LANCE L. MELTON, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Reely Law Firm, P.C., 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 11th day of March, 2013 /s/ Lance L. Melton, Personal Representative. REELY LAW FIRM P.C. 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801 Attorneys for the Personal Representative. By: /s/ Shane N. Reely Esq. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-10-179 Dept. 3 No. Hon. John W. Larson NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of MICHAEL DURAN COURCHENE, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF MICHAEL DURAN COURCHENE: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Wesley G. Redden has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Wesley G. Redden, 35858 Detwiler Road, Arlee, Montana 59821, return receipt requested, c/o Law Office of Patrick G. Sandefur, 100 Ryman, Ste. 700, Missoula, Montana 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 7th day of March, 2013. /s/ Patrick G. Sandefur, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-13-45 Dept. No. 2 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF BRUCE W. ZEMAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that David H. Straus has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to David H. Straus, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Dan Cederberg, PO Box 8234, Missoula, Montana 59807-8234, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 27th day of February, 2013. CEDERBERG LAW OFFICES, P.C., 269 West Front Street, PO Box 8234, Missoula, MT 59807-8234 /s/ Anne Blanche Adams Attorneys for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-13-227 Dept. No. 2 Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Paul Anthony Gaebel, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Paul Anthony Gaebel to Paul Anthony Emrich. The hearing will be on April 9th, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: 02/26/2013. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Andrew Brunkhart, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP-13-47 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF EDWIN BRESTER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Cheryl A. Jemison-Nelson and Alona J. DeVoe have been appointed Co- Personal Representatives of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the Deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or their claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Christian, Samson & Jones, PLLC, Attorneys for the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 310 West Spruce, Missoula, MT 59802 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of Montana the foregoing is true and correct. Dated this 28th day of February, 2013 /s/ Cheryl A. Jemison-Nelson, Co-Personal /s/ Alona J. DeVoe, Co-Personal Representative. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DP-13-50 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF:

ELIZABETH HALL, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Robert Buckner, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at c/o Sullivan, Tabaracci & Rhoades, P.C., 1821 South Avenue West, Third Floor, Missoula, MT 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 13th day of March, 2013. /s/ Robert Buckner, Personal Representative

JAY AZZARA, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to CHRISTINE RUTH GINGERELLI, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of Douglas Harris, Attorney at Law, PO Box 7937, Missoula, Montana 59807-7937 or filed with the Clerk of the above-named Court. DATED this 7th day of March, 2013. /s/ Christine Ruth Gingerelli, Personal Representative

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DP-2013-48 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: MAE LOUISE MURPHY, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Joseph Murphy or Catherine Hazenberg, the CoPersonal Representatives return receipt requested, at c/o Sullivan, Tabaracci & Rhoades, P.C., 1821 South Avenue West, Third Floor, Missoula, MT 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 14th day of March, 2013. /s/ Joseph Murphy, Personal Representative

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY. Dept. No. 3 Probate No. DP-13-64 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF BENJAMIN F. FLAIG, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Bryan J. Flaig, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Boone Karlberg, P.C., PO Box 9199, Missoula, Montana 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. I declare, under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the state of Montana, that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 19th day of March, 2013, at Missoula, Montana. /s/ Bryan J. Flaig, BOONE KARLBERG, P.C. By: /s/ Thomas H. Boone, Esq., PO Box 9199, Missoula, Montana 59807 Attorneys for Bryan J. Flaig, Personal Representative

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-13-51 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ALVIRA K. WALLACE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Richard K. Wallace, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane PC, PO Box 4747, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 6th day of March, 2013. /s/ Richard K. Wallace, Personal Representative. I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. /s/ Richard K. Wallace WORDEN THANE, P.C. Attorneys for Personal Representative /s/ Patrick Dougherty MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-13-60 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF WILLIAM C. FISCHER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Joseph Louis Fischer, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane PC, PO Box 4747, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 14th day of March, 2013. /s/ Joseph Louis Fischer, Personal Representative. I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. /s/ Joseph Louis Fischer WORDEN THANE, P.C. Attorneys for Personal Representative /s/ Jane E. Crowley MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-2013-32 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of Leland E. Graves, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Mary Ellen Osowski, return receipt requested, at 401 River Drive, Lolo, MT 59847 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 8th day of March 2013. /s/ Mary Ellen Osowski MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-13-54 Dept. No. 1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF THOMAS

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 30, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A tract of land located in the Northwest one-quarter of the Northeast one-quarter of Section 34, Township 12 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana and more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Northeast corner of said Section 34; thence S. 89° 56’ W., a distance of 2558.60 feet; thence N. 89° 21’ 45” W., a distance of 81.40 feet; thence South a distance of 383.40 feet to the true point of beginning; thence along the boundary of West View No. 2, a proposed subdivision of Missoula County, Montana for the next seven (7) courses, East a distance of 423.02 feet to a nontangent curve having a radius of 50.0 feet and a chord of 99.70 feet which bears N. 45° 34’ E., ; thence easterly, northeasterly and northwesterly along said curve a distance of 149.31 feet; thence N. 13° 09’ E., a distance of 117.60 feet; thence East a distance of 231.25 feet; thence South a distance of 140.0 feet; thence S. 36°04’ W., a distance of 134.57 feet; thence South a distance of 860.0 feet; thence leaving said proposed subdivision boundary and running West a distance of 673.0 feet; thence North a distance of 924.46 feet to the point of beginning. Recording Reference: Book 137 Page 1405 Micro Records Brady G Nelson and Cindy R Nelson, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title of Missoula County, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Community Bank - Missoula, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 15, 2007 and recorded June 15, 2007 in Bk-799, Pg-716, under document No. 200715183. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust company as Trustee for Starm Mortgage Loan Trust 2007-4, Mortgage PassThrough Certificates, Series 2007-4. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,990.00, beginning September 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 10, 2012 is $624,000.00 principal, interest at the rate of 5.75000% now totaling $40,429.29, late charges in the amount of $1,820.00, escrow advances of $5,177.49, and other fees and expenses advanced of $143.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $98.30 per diem,

late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 27, 2012 /s/ Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham) On this 27th day of December, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Suntrust V Nelson 41531.654 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 05/23/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200612770, Bk-775 Pg-733, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Torbjorn I. Joreteg and Anita R. Joreteg, husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for GreenPoint Mortgage Funding, Inc., its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and First American Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 25 of Mission-Swan Estates, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201224933 B: 905 P: 610, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 22, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $239,322.43. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $229,489.35, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if

any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 5, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.100248) 1002.240878-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/24/93, recorded as Instrument No. 9328618 Book 398 Page 2032 and modified by Agreement recorded 1/31/2006, Instrument No. 200602265 Bk-768 Pg-264, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which James W. Royan, a married man as his sole and separate property was Grantor, Montana Mortgage Company was Beneficiary and Insured Titles, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 11 and the North 10 feet of Lot 12 in Block 1 of Mosby’s Leisure Highlands Addition No. 5, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Recording reference in Book 225 at Page 475 Micro Records. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 199908142 Book 577 Page 274, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Manhattan Bank F/K/A Chemical Bank. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 25, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $60,618.30. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $57,680.61, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 5, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at

any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.100553) 1002.241297-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 07/23/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200719267 Bk 802 Pg 669, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Apryl Lange was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage, LLC, its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Stewart Title of Missoula County was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title of Missoula County as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 3 in Block 2 of El Mar Estates Phase 1, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201013933 B: 863 P: 224, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP, fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 07/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 13, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $197,851.58. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $187,435.02, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 21, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7021.14860) 1002.242605-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 07/15/09, recorded as Instrument No. 200917604, Bk 843, Pg 1246, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Jhawn D. Thompson and Misty J. Thompson, as joint tenants was

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • March 28 – April 4, 2013 [C7]


PUBLIC NOTICES Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage, LLC was Beneficiary and Western Title and Escrow was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Western Title and Escrow as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lots 12, 13, 14 and 15 in Block 14 of the Townsite of Frenchtown, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat of record in Book 1 of Plats at Page 57, together with the Northerly half of vacated Bedard Street adjoining said Lots 12, 13, 14 and 15 in Block 14 of the Townsite of Frenchtown as vacated by Resolution recorded April 7, 1966 in Book 2 of Micro Records at Page 533. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201119250, Bk 885, Pg 877, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 07/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 28, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $177,965.15. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $159,856.94, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any).

Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 10, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.97589) 1002.207163-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Refer-

ence is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/23/10, recorded as Instrument No. 201008049 B: 858 P: 1335, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Bruce N. McGlashan was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Mann Mortgage, LLC, its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and First American Title Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 19 in Block 8 of West View, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201224171 B: 904 P: 1248, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 08/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 30, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $230,530.17. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $220,192.86, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of

[C8] Missoula Independent • March 28 – April 4, 2013

beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 11, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.100067) 1002.241839-File No.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/31/10, recorded as Instrument No. 201017175, Bk. 865, Pg. 668, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Casey James Shelden, unmarried was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: The West one-half of Lot 10, all of Lot 11 in Tract 12 of School Five Acre, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 8, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $88,424.58. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $84,862.87, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed

Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 20, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.104666) 1002.242571-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 29, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the

First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A tract of land located in the Northeast one-quarter (NE 1/4) of Section 17, Township 14 North, Range 20 West, Principal Meridian, Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as Tract A of Certificate of Survey No. 5798. Together with a 30 foot private access and utility easement as shown on Certificates if Survey Nos. 5622 and 5798. Jeffery S. McBroom, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Bank Of America, N.A., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on September 11, 2006 and recorded on September 15, 2006 in Book 783, Page 328 under Document NO. 200623676. The beneficial interest is currently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,134.83, beginning February 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan The total amount due on this obligation as of January 17, 2013 is $382,383.00 principal, interest at the rate of 6.00% now totaling $78,834.91, late charges in the amount of $3,491.64, escrow ad-


PUBLIC NOTICES vances of $26,212.00, and other fees and expenses advanced of $4,455.82, plus accruing interest at the rate of $62.86 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 21, 2012 Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 21st day of December, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to

be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa J. Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 11/6/2018 BAC Vs. McBroom 42019.412 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 20, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: LOT 3 OF MART ADDITION NO. 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF MICHAEL ANNE LEPOLE, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Home123 Corporation, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated January 13, 2006 and recorded January 18, 2006 in Book 767, Page 1149, under Document No. 200601319. The beneficial interest is currently held by U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for J.P. Morgan Mortgage Acquisition Trust 2006-NC1, Asset Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-NC1. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,213.27, beginning August 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 2, 2013 is $164,744.47 principal, interest at the rate of 7.65% now totaling $44,179.56, escrow advances of $14,375.25, and other fees and expenses advanced of $7,145.82, plus accruing interest at the rate of $34.53 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be

SUSTAINAFIEDS charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 9, 2013 /s/ Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 9th day of January, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 Chase Vs. Lepole 41954.440 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEES SALE on May 20, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First

American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 5 of D & E HOMESITES, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. ALAN W FUSSELL AND TONYA M FUSSELL, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to American Pioneer Title Insurance, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Beneficial Montana Inc d/b/a Beneficial Mortgage Co, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated August 27, 2007 and Recorded November 14, 2007 in Book 808, Page 1500 under Document No. 200729863. The beneficial interest is currently held by BENEFICIAL FINANCIAL I INC. successor by merger to Beneficial Montana Inc d/b/a Beneficial Mortgage Co. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,378.26, beginning April 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 31, 2012 is $129,889.83 principal, interest at the rate of 12.240% now totaling $54,386.72, late charges in the amount of $620.19, escrow advances of $14,003.87, and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,043.98, plus accruing interest at the rate of $43.56 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any represen-

tation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shad be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at feast every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 11, 2013 /s/ Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 11th day of January, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 Hsbc Vs. Fussell 41472.441

LEGAL SERVICES GOT HURT? GET HELP! www.bulmanlaw.com Montana’s Best Health & Safety Lawyers FREE CONSULTATION. 721-7744 IF YOU USED THE MIRENA IUD between 2001-present and suffered perforation or embedment in the uterus requiring surgical removal, or had a child born with birth defects you may be entitled to compensation. Call Johnson Law and speak with female staff members 1800-535-5727

Natural Housebuilders, Inc., *ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes* Additions/Remodels* HIGHER-COMFORT crafted

building* Solar Heating* 3690940 or 642-6863* www.naturalhousebuilder.net

Natural Housebuilders, Inc. ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes Additions/Remodels • Solar Heating HIGHER-COMFORT crafted building

369-0940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net

Big Dipper Ice Cream's dishes are purchased from Treecycle and are made from 100% biodegradable, 100% plastic & tree-free sugar cane fiber. The ice cream mix is made in Great Falls and with Montana milk. Big Dipper makes an effort to buy all their ingredients locally whenever possible. Necessities like root beer & bananas are bought right down the street at Orange Street Food Farm.

631 S. Higgins • bigdippericecream.com

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • March 28 – April 4, 2013 [C9]


RENTAL APARTMENTS 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom $500. W/D hookups, off-street parking, storage, heat (hot water), W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom $515 across from Public Library, coinop laundry, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom $675 off South Reserve. Garage, DW, microwave, deck W/D in unit, W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

yard, pet okay. RENT INCENTIVE $725. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 2 bedroom, 1 bath $795 W/S/G paid, newly renovated, Southside location, DW, W/D hookups, carport. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom $595 coin-op laundry, off street parking, storage, H/W/S/G paid, No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom $600 across from Public Library, coinop laundry, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

1 bedroom, 1 bathroom. (2 Weeks Free to Qualified Applicant) $675 (62+ Complex) elevator, microwave, deck, coin-op laundry, off street parking, H/W/S/G paid, No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 1024 Stephens #2. 2bed/1bath ground level apartment, shared yard, coin-ops, cat? $675. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 1335 BYRON: HUGE 1 BEDROOM, 2-STORY, LAUNDRY, DW, STRG, HEAT & CABLE PAID, $725; GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106, 1YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP! 1409 S. 3RD ST. W: 1 BDRM, STORAGE, LAUNDRY, PRIVATE DECK, HEAT & CABLE PAID, $625; GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106, 1YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP! 1502 Ernest #4. 1bed/1bath, W/D hookups, central location. $575. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1801 Howell #3. 2 bed/1 bath, W/D hookups, storage, shared

2 bedroom, 1 bathroom $695 quiet cul-de-sac, DW, coin-op laundry, off street parking, H/W/S/G paid, No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2306 Hillview Court #3 . 2bed/1bath in South Hills. W/D hookups, near Chief Charlo Elementary. $600. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 446 Washington Street. RENT INCENTIVE. 1bed/1bath, downtown location, coin-ops onsite, cat? $700 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 509 S. 10TH ST. W.: 1 BDRM, DINING, DECK-AREA, CENTRAL, LAUNDRY, HEAT & CABLE PAID, $675. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106, 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!

731 W. Sussex #4. 2bed/1bath HEAT PAID, carport, coin-ops. $650. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 825 SW Higgins Ave. B3. 2 bed/1 bath HEAT PAID, patio, single garage, gas fireplace. $800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 923 Helen: 1 BDRM, CLOSE TO THE U, 2ND FLOOR, FREE CABLE, LAUNDRY, NICE, $725; GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106, 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP! Equinox Apartments. 2 bedrooms: $620. W/S/G paid. Comes with Mountain Line EZ Pass. Missoula Housing Authority Contact Colin 5494113 ext. 112

Gold Dust Apartments. 2 bed: $691 all utilities paid. Application fees waived through March. Comes with Mountain LIne E-Z Pass. Missoula Housing Authority. Contact Jordan 549-4113 ext. 127.

Studio $495. Near St. Patrick’s Hospital, separate room for bedroom, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

New Complex, 1 & 2 bedroom units, $625-$795 DW, A/C, deck, storage, coin-op laundry, limited off-street parking, W/S/G paid, 2 bedroom units have W/D hookups or 2nd bath. No pets. No smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

MOBILE HOMES

Solstice Apartments. 2 bed: $751. W/S/G & recycling paid. Comes with Mountain Line E-Z Pass. Missoula Housing Authority. Contact Colin 549-4113 ext. 112

Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent w/s/g/elec included $425/month 406-273-6034

DUPLEXES 524 South 5th Street East “B”. 2bed/1bath near University. All utilities included. $900. Grizzly Property Management 5422060

1&2

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

549-7711 Check our website!

ROOMMATES ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

OUT OF TOWN 11270 Napton Way 1C. 3bed/1bath, shared yard, coinops, central location in Lolo. $800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 514 ROLLINS: 1 BEDROOM, SLANT STREET, 2ND FLOOR, STORAGE, ALL + CABLE PAID, CAT OK, $665; GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106, 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP! 9850 Anderson Road. 4bed/1bath house in Bonner. Spacious yard, basement, W/D hookups. $1050. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

www.alpharealestate.com

MHA Management manages 10 properties throughout Missoula.

GardenCity

Property Management

All properties are part of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program.

422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

The Missoula Housing Authority complies with the Fair Housing Act and offers Reasonable Accommodations to persons with Disabilities.

1235 34th St. • Missoula (406) 549-4113 missoulahousing.org

30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

www.gatewestrentals.com

251-4707 Rent Incentive

107 Johnson 1 Bed Apt. + Storage $485/month

"Let us tend your den" Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

520 Hickory 1 Bed Apt. $510/month

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing

FIDELITY

Finalist

Uncle Robert Lane 2 Bed Apt. $595/month

Finalist

fidelityproperty.com

Visit our website at

Did you know? Posting a classified ad ONLINE is FREE!

www.missoulanews.com [C10] Missoula Independent • March 28 – April 4, 2013


REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 11689 Stolen Rock Court. 5 bed, 3 bath, 2 car garage on 3.15 acres. $319,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net 141 Burlilngton. Charming 4 bed, 1 bath with 2 car garage in Rose Park neighborhood. Wood floors under carpet, original hardware. $230,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com 2 Bdr, 1 Bath single-level Windsor Park home. $168,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 2 Bdr, 2 Bath Northside home. $160,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 210 Burlington. 4 bed, 2 bath well-maintained home with wood floors, fenced yard & single garage. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com

253 Strand. 2 bed, 1.5 bath with hardwood floors, coved ceilings, updated bath. Charming house close to UM. $250,000. Go to MoveMontana.com for more information. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath Pleasant View home. $205,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr. 2 Bath Windsor Park home. $215,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Grant Creek / Prospect Meadows home. $469,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4315 Melrose. 3 bed, 2 bath with vaulted ceilings, covered front porch and 2 car garage. $247,500. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties, 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com

4433A Bordeaux. 2 bed, 2 bath with 2 car garage, fenced yard with pergola. Many upgrades including new flooring. $177,900. Rochelle Glasgow, Missoula Prudential, 728, 8270. glasgow@montana.com 4705 Potter Park Loop. 2 bed, 1 bath partially finished basement & 2 car garage. $169,900. 4705 PotterParkMoveMoontana.com for more details. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 5209 Dutton Court. 5 bed, 3 bath with fantastic kitchen, laundry room and 3 car garage. Near city park. $339,900. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816 annierealtor@gmail.com 6544 McArthur. 3 bed, 2.5 bath with gas fireplace and 2 car garage. $240,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net Adorable Tree House Feeling Rattlesnake 2 bedroom 1.5 bath home for $195,000. Water-wise garden, seasonal ditch, awesome views of Jumbo, close to parks and town! 1907 Missoula Ave.

KD. porticorealestate.com 240-5227 Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free comparative market analysis. 360-8234 Fantastic Home With View 6305 St. Thomas. 4 bed, 3 bath, updated and gorgeous setting with large private lot, double garage, landscaped and ready to move into! $310,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Linda Vista Home to be built at top of Linda Vista with amazing views! One level living, 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on corner lot on Jeff Drive. $279,900. KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com Lot 16B MacArthur. 3 bed, 2 bath to be built with fantastic views. $189,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net Remarkably Cute 2039 South 10th West. 2 bedroom home on large lot very centrally located near Good Food Store, bike trails and schools. Full base-

ment and single garage. $185,000. KD, Portico Real Estate, 240-5227 www.porticorealestate.com

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES 2025 Mullan Road. Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos. Large secure units with affordable HOA dues. Starting at $144,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 8804749. montpref@bigsky.net 526 Minnesota #B. 2 bed, 1.5 bath energy-efficient condo with large front yard. $130,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com

Cormick, Properties 2000, 2407653. pat@properties2000.com 839 Discovery. 2 bed, 1.5 bath at base of Mt. Jumbo. Patio, balcony, fenced yard & single garage. $170,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmailcom Open & Light & Green & Clean Efficiency abounds in this 3 bed, 2.5 bath stand-alone super-insulated condo with heated floors and so much more. $250,000. 1530 S 12th W. Near Good Food Store and bike trails. 240-5227. porticorealestate.com State of the Art GreenBuilt Innovative stand-alone 3 bedroom condo with radiant

6614 MacArthur. 2 bed, 2.5 bath townhome with amazing views. $194,500. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properites. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net

www.canyonviewmissoula.com 3 bed 2 bath on large fenced lot with mature trees 2 bonus room in basement & 2 car garage

Townhome On The River Land Stewardship Program buyers must qualify. Call KD to find out more about this 2 bedroom 1.5 bath condo with the balcony facing the river and right next to the river trail and close to downtown. $135,000. 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Uptown Flats #306. 1 bed, 1 bath top floor unit with lots of light. W/D, carport, storage & access to exercise room. $162,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com

RICE TEAM

803A Pattee Creek. 2. bed, 1.5 bath condo with garage in 55+ community. $129,900. Pat Mc-

2 Canyon View Dr. $192,500

floor heat, superior insulation, concrete countertops, yard and garage and more! $265,000 KD porticorealestate.com 2405227

Robin Rice 240-6503

riceteam@bigsky.net missoularealestate4sale.com

New Listing 102 Boardwalk $285,000 Great Stevensville property with beautifully landscaped yard. Lot is zoned commercial with heated 48'x30' shop with three 10’ x 9' doors and benches and shelves. Wired for 220 50 amp for welder and a 30 amp 220 for air compressor.

13475 Crystal Creek $249,900 Well-maintained with mature trees and landscaping. Two wood stoves, large deck for entertaining. Nice bonus room downstairs for crafts or small shop. Turah fishing access down the road.

Two Great Building Sites $55,000 each 531 Minnesota Lots 8 & 9

Seller Motivated! Must Sell! 15305 Spring Hill $485,000

Will Go RD Financing 210 Burlington $272,000 MLS #20131400

,SQIPSERW[MXL WXVIIXWQEVXW 'LYGO7GLQEYX^6IEP)WXEXI0SER3JJMGIV

21079-

4 bed 2 bath well-maintained home with basement, garage and fenced yard. New energy-efficient furnace and wood floors. For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Rochelle

6IEP)WXEXI0IRHMRK'IRXIV`+EVJMIPH` GWGLQEYX^$JWFQWPEGSQ

Missoula Properties Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com

Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos $144,900 - $249,900 Under new ownership! 1 and 2 bedrooms. Large units, nice finishes, secure entry, secure U/G parking, riverfront, affordable HOA dues and much more. Owner financing comparable to FHA terms available with as little as 3.5% down! Units, pricing and info available at www.mullanheights.com

missoulanews.com • March 28 – April 4, 2013 [C11]


REAL ESTATE Uptown Flats. From $149,900. Upscale gated community near downtown. All SS appliances, car port, storage and access to community room and exercise room plus more. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5465816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com

each. Robin Rice Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net Rattlesnake Acreage Rattlesnake 1/4 acre lot at the base of Mt. Jumbo with all utilities stubbed to the site and ready to build on. $160,000. KD 2405227. porticorealestate.com

MANUFACTURED HOMES

COMMERCIAL

1825 Burlington. Two central Missoula lots with 3 bed, 2 bath mobile. Great investment or first time buy. $89,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com

514 West Spruce. Great office space in vintage building near St. Pat’s. Upgrades to wiring, plumbing, roof & more. $244,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com

715 Clements. 3 bed, 2 bath mobile & 1 bedroom house on 1/4 acre. $120,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties, 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com

LAND FOR SALE 23645 Mullan. Beautiful 14 acre treed meadow west of Huson. Modulars on permanent foundation allowed. $169,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net 3.2 Acres in the Wye area. Gorgeous mountain and valley views. $65,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3010 West Central. Nearly 5 acres in Target Range with 3 bed, 1 bath home. Rural living in town. $499,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com 531 Minnesota. Two great East Missoula building lots. $55,000

Commercial Lease Space Fantastic opportunity to be neighbors with the award-winning Homeword Organization. New, LEED registered, high quality, sustainably-built office space close to river and downtown. $11-$15 per sq.ft. KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com Gorgeous Victorian home zoned for commercial use in a great location $395,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

15305 Spring Hill Road, Frenchtown. Beautiful cedar 4 bed, 2.5 bath with 3 car garage & deck on acreage bordering Forest Service. $485,000. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. 2 Canyon View Drive, East Missoula. 3 bed, 2 bath on large fenced lot. Basement with 2 bonus rooms and double garage. $192,500. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula, 7 2 8 - 8 2 7 0 . glasgow@montana.com

OUT OF TOWN

3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Stevensville area home on 6+ acres. $325,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

102 Boardwalk, Stevensville. 3 bed, 2 bath on almost 3 acres with large 48’x30’ heated shop. $285,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties, 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

4 Bdr, 3 Bath Stevensville area home on 13 acres. $575,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

13475 Crystal Creek, Clinton. 3 bed, 2 bath with large deck, 2 wood stoves & 2 car garage. $249,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

5 Bdr, 3 Bath, Florence area home on 3.2 acres. $575,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

Homes: 203 N. Curtis . . . . . . . .Farmhouse On Large Lot . . . . . .$217,000 1907 Missoula Ave. . . . .Rattlesnake Tree House . . . . . . .$187,500 217 Arlee . . . . . . . . . .Hot Springs Bungalow . . . . . . . .$69,000 418 Church . . . . . . . . .Stevensville Charmer . . . . . . . .$174,500 506 Central . . . . . . . . .Sweet Stevi Home . . . . . . . . .$174,900 2039 S 10th W . . . . . .Adorable On Large Lot . . . . . . .$185,000 1520 S 6th W . . . . . . .Sweet & Charming . . . . . . . . .$185,000 Jeff Drive . . . . . . . . . .One Level Living . . . . . . . . . .$279,900 6305 St. Thomas . . . . . .Quiet, Views, Immaculate . . . . . .$310,000 4705 Potter Park Lp . . .Adorable & Affordable . . . . . . .$169,900 253 Strand . . . . . . . . .Solid & Sweet . . . . . . . . . . . .$250,000 Homes w/land: 20525 Schwartz Creek . .Clinton Near River . . . . . . . . .$247,000 2348 River Road . . . . . .Home & Land to Build . . . . . .$535,000 4100 Stevi River Rd. . . .Riverfront Home On 1.87 Acres! . $340,000 Land: Rattlesnake Lot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$160,000 East Missoula Building Lot With Trees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$55,000 Townhomes/Condos: 839 Discovery Way . . . . .Comfy 2-Story Townhome . . . . .$170,000 1405 Phillips . . . . . . . .Innovative Green-Built . . . . . . .$265,000 1400 Burns . . . . . . . . .Cheaper Than Rent . . . . . .From $79,000 Uptown Flats . . . . . . . .Upscale Downtown . . . . . .From $149,900 1530 S 12th W . . . . . .Green Construction . . . . . . . . .$250,000 1401 Cedar . . . . . . . . .River Views-Income Qualified . . . .$135,000 Commercial: 1535 Liberty Lane . . . . .New Lease Space . . . . . . . . . . .$11-$15

[C12] Missoula Independent • March 28 – April 4, 2013

Home On the River Stevensville River Road home on 1.87 acres. 4 bedrooms, views of the Bitterroot Mountains and right on the Bitterroot River. This is awesome! Attached garage plus detached RV garage. $340,000. KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL QUICK CASH FOR REAL ESTATE NOTES and Land Installment Contracts. We also lend on Real Estate with strong equity. 406721-1444 www.Creative-Finance.com

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

THE UPTOWN FLATS 1 and 2 bedroom condos available Units starting at

$149,900 Call Anne for more details

546-5816 Anne Jablonski annierealtor@gmail.com movemontana.com

PORTICO REAL ESTATE theuptownflatsmissoula.com


Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weeky journal of people, politics and culture

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you