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Up Front: Grizzly bear debate comes with broad implications Scope: Pop dance devotee Steve Teran struts his stuff Books: BONG HiTS 4 JESUS lights up freedom of speech issues


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


Up Front: Grizzly bear debate comes with broad implications Scope: Pop dance devotee Steve Teran struts his stuff Books: BONG HiTS 4 JESUS lights up freedom of speech issues


Missoula Independent

Page 2 March 24–March 31, 2011


nside Cover Story The Forest Service and Department of Environmental Quality secured $39 million to finally remove the Mike Horse Dam and its toxic mine tailings at the headwaters of the Blackfoot River. But where in the upper Blackfoot watershed should they go? Next month, the agencies will Photo by Chad Harder detail the various options, none of which appear ideal— an understatement as far as some potentially affected neighbors are concerned...14

News Letters Legislators smoking strong stuff and an occasion for coal ..........................4 The Week in Review Lady Griz lose, a pot poll and a fired-up husband.................6 Briefs Montana diversifies, Snowbowl’s lone critic and Tester’s latest swipe...........6 Etc. Japan disaster hits home .....................................................................................7 Up Front Grizzly debate comes with broad implications..........................................8 Up Front Justification for marijuana raids remains hazy...........................................9 Ochenski Obama’s attack on Libya an irrevocable mistake ....................................10 Writers on the Range The West battles botanical barbarians.................................11 Agenda Werner Fornos presents “The Drain on Our World” ..................................12

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan Wining and dining the rooster.....................................................18 Happiest Hour The Iron Horse ...............................................................................19 8 Days a Week Not in my backyard.........................................................................21 Mountain High Don’t put your sticks away quite yet .............................................29 Scope Pop dance devotee Steve Teran struts his stuff .............................................30 Noise Elephant Revival, David Mayfield, Railroad Earth, Massy Ferguson ..............31 Books BONG HiTS lights up freedom of speech issues...........................................32 Film Blue Valentine hurts so good...........................................................................33 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films..................................................34

Exclusives Street Talk ..................................................................................................................4 In Other News..........................................................................................................13 Classifieds ...............................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ..............................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrology ................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle ..................................................................................................C-6 This Modern World..............................................................................................C-11

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson ASSOCIATE EDITOR Matthew Frank PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Ira Sather-Olson STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Skylar Browning COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Chris Melton, Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Rhonda Urbanski, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Teal Kenny FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold EDITORIAL INTERN Jed Nussbaum CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Dave Loos, Ednor Therriault, Ali Gadbow, Azita Osanloo, Cathrine L. Walters, Anne Medley, Jesse Froehling

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

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Missoula Independent

Page 3 March 24–March 31, 2011


STREET TALK

by Chad Harder

Asked Tuesday afternoon outside the University of Montana’s University Center.

Q:

A dozen or more people have filed claims against the City of Missoula for damages their vehicles have sustained from hitting potholes. Should the city be responsible for paying for repairs? Follow-up: Have Missoula’s potholes affected your driving habits?

Jackson Goodell: No, it’s not the city’s responsibility to pay for private property that’s damaged because you drive your car into a pothole. If you just slow down and be more careful you can avoid them. Defensive driver: Yes, I’ve slowed down and become more cautious. I go slow on curves, and on 6th Street I drive on the left side, because there are fewer potholes.

Rob Gannon: I don’t think they should. The potholes are just the result of winter conditions. Detour ahead: Absolutely. I drive erratically, but you have to. There’s a crater in a university parking lot that’s so big it has an island of un-potholed asphalt right in the middle of it. It’s stupendous.

Libby Covelli: That’s a tough one, because a lot depends on the driver, the time of day, the speed that they’re going, that kind of thing. Anybody can get around a pothole if they just go slow enough. Mixin’ it up: Yes, I definitely drive slower, and I’m more conscious. And I won’t take Russell. I just find a way to get around it.

Clay Skeens: I think so, as long as it’s a legitimate claim. I mean, the roads are pretty dangerous. When riding the bus you really get rattled around. All over the road: In a way, yes. I mean, I swerve a lot more because a lot of them are seriously deep, and when you hit the bottom, sometimes you wonder if anything’s broken under there.

Missoula Independent

Page 4 March 24–March 31, 2011

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

To the dome I voted for the Medical Marijuana Act and still support it today along with proposed restrictions that would ensure that only people who really need it would have access to it. Such restrictions could have been passed years ago by the increasingly inept Montana Legislature. So far this session, they have been too busy trying to secede from the union to give the issue much intelligent consideration. In testimony before a legislative committee, Missoula Police Chief Mark Muir compared medical marijuana to the recent massive Gulf of Mexico oil spill. That statement would be laughable if it were not so illogical, inappropriate and offensive. A legislator in Helena, whose name I have thankfully forgotten, compared medical marijuana to the Japanese earthquake and tsunami. The folks in Helena appear to be partaking of some really strong stuff. Muir went on to tell City Council last Wednesday that “The idea of dispensaries in the state of Montana has got to be something we wash out of our minds.” I find this statement to be alarming. The suggestion of mind control and brain washing does not fill me with enthusiasm. This is redolent of the tin pot dictator in a banana republic police state. Jeff Stevens Missoula

Corporate condemnation House Bill 198 would increase the power of eminent domain to a class of people that never had that right before— non-public corporations that are not serving the needs of Montana residents (see “High tension,” March 17, 2011). HB 198 gives foreign and domestic private companies the right to condemn private property without fair and just negotiations with the landowners. This makes a mockery of our right to protect our property. The backers of HB 198 are being very coy, trying to convince us that the bill really makes no change in longstanding law. But HB 198 expands the ability to condemn other people’s property. It uses the same logic that brought about the reviled Kelo decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2007. Our civil and property rights have diminished extensively during the last few years to the point where big-moneyed entities take precedence over our right to operate our farms and ranches

that produce the food and fiber for people in the most efficient manner. This bill is an attack on our existing way of life and our means of making a living as a family farming business. Senators, please stand up for agriculture, Montana’s No. 1 industry, by opposing HB 198. Don Brown Fort Peck

While “ it’s true that coal demand will rise as nuclear becomes less popular, that increased interest in coal will also result in obstructionists becoming even more aggressive in trying to stop coal

production.

An occasion for coal The heartbreaking tragedy in Japan has rightly brought concerns with nuclear energy into the public debate. And with those concerns with nuclear safety, some are predicting that we will see a greater interest in coal-fired energy.

While it’s true that coal demand will rise as nuclear becomes less popular, that increased interest in coal will also result in obstructionists becoming even more aggressive in trying to stop coal production. While coal power plants are safer and new technology has reduced the environmental impact of coal, their opponents never fail to seize on an opportunity to advance their agenda. If coal moves up the list of preferred energy sources, the stakes for the obstructionists get bigger. Montana is incredibly well positioned to be a world leader in coal production. We lag woefully behind Wyoming in the amount of coal we dig, and some estimates indicate Montana has a 600-year supply at our current rate of extraction. So with all that potential in the ground, you can be assured that Montana will also be at the center of the obstructionists’ attempts to stop energy development. One of my proudest accomplishments during my tenure in Congress was securing the Otter Creek coal tracts for Montana. Otter Creek represents a huge potential for new jobs and a tremendous amount of tax revenue for the state. And now we’re on the cusp of finally developing Otter Creek, but we’re also in danger of losing that opportunity if the opposition wins this fight. Attorney General Steve Bullock, who most Democrats predict will be their gubernatorial candidate next year, has sided with those opposing Otter Creek. Montana has an enormous comparative advantage in natural resources, especially energy and particularly coal. Putting those resources to work is a clear path to increasing jobs, raising our per capita income, providing funding for education, and providing tax relief that will further fuel our economy. Our energy industry in Montana already provides thousands of jobs and contributes mightily to our tax base. But to grow means we need to expand our energy sector, through Otter Creek and elsewhere. But there are those who would erect roadblocks on that path. This debate about Montana’s economic future is going to be one of the most important in recent history, and it’s about to heat up even more. Rick Hill Gubernatorial candidate Helena

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via e-mail: editor@missoulanews.com.

L


Missoula Independent

Page 5 March 24–March 31, 2011


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, March 16

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

News Quirks by Chad Harder

On the eve of St. Patrick’s Day, a Butte police officer pulls over Mollie A. Kirk, the organizer of Butte’s St. Patrick’s Day parade, and arrests her on suspicion of felony drunk driving, her fourth such charge, the Montana Standard reports. She’s also cited for reckless driving.

• Thursday, March 17 The Missoula City Fire Department responds to a house fire at 1014 Vine Street. Crews quickly control the fire, but several family pets perish. Firefighters rescue one cat that is resuscitated with the help of emergency medical technicians. One firefighter suffers a minor injury.

• Friday, March 18 The Senate Local Government Committee votes 5-4 in favor of a bill that would overturn Missoula’s antidiscrimination ordinance, which provides legal recourse to individuals denied services, employment or housing based on gender identity or sexual orientation. House Bill 516 easily passed the House last month.

• Saturday, March 19 In the first round of the NCAA Women’s Basketball Championship, a rash of turnovers and poor shooting doom the Lady Griz as they fall to the UCLA Bruins—the ninth ranked team in the nation—55-47 in Spokane, Wash., ending Montana’s season.

• Sunday, March 20 Lee Newspapers releases a poll showing that 57 percent of Montanans back stricter regulation of the medical marijuana industry, while 31 percent prefer repeal of the law and 11 percent favor keeping the current law intact. The remaining 1 percent remain uncertain.

• Monday, March 21 Missoula’s City Council adopts a formal resolution stating its support for the voter-approved Medical Marijuana Act. The council also states its opposition to legislative attempts to repeal it. Dick Haines, Renee Mitchell and Lyn Hellegaard vote against the resolution.

• Tuesday, March 22 A local man appears in Missoula Justice Court one day after allegedly burning down his estranged wife’s business. Law enforcement says Shawn Robyn Gawronski set the Gifted Hand’s Salon in Frenchtown on fire because he was upset about his wife filing for divorce. Gawronski faces felony arson charges.

Missoula Independent

Some 200 Montanans marched to the Missoula County Courthouse Saturday afternoon to protest federal raids on state-sanctioned medical marijuana facilities. The “Out of the Shadows, Into the Streets” protestors chanted “DEA Go Away!” in rejection of federal interference in state policy and called for the return of the more than $4 million worth of growing supplies, marijuana plants and cash federal agents seized from 26 medical marijuana businesses on Monday, March 7.

Finance Tester confronts cheap swipes A bipartisan group of legislators led by Montana Sen. Jon Tester last week stirred up a long-standing dispute between credit card companies and retailers over how much banks should be allowed to charge for processing debit card transactions. Each time a consumer uses a debit card, 44 cents on average goes to the banking industry. In 2009, according to the Federal Reserve, revenue from such transactions totaled $16.2 billion nationwide. For years, retailers, gas station owners and restaurateurs have said such “interchange fees,” or “swipe fees,” are disproportionate to the service provided. “When you boil it down, what gets the ire of the retailers is it’s really a risk-free transaction to the bank,” says Brad Griffin, president of the Montana Retail Association. “Yet, they’re getting paid as if it’s a credit transaction, like a credit card.” Congress last year passed legislation limiting swipe fees as it overhauled financial industry regulation. The move prompted the Federal Reserve to cap

Page 6 March 24–March 31, 2011

fees at 12 cents per transaction, a rule slated to take effect in July. Retailers celebrated the cap. But they grew frustrated last week when Tester and seven other senators introduced legislation aiming to keep it from going into effect for another two years. They argue more time is needed to evaluate how limiting fees will impact consumers and small banks. When news of the legislation came out, Wall Street watchdogs joined retailers and small businesses in crying foul, contending that Congress is bowing to bankers’ interests. “[Bankers] really turned up that lobbying heat,” Griffin says. Tester, however, disputes charges that he’s beholden to the banking industry and cites his congressional record—he voted twice against bank bailouts—when explaining his stance on the swipe fee cap. “I was concerned it would hurt Montana consumers and small businesses that I represent,” he says. But the Fed’s proposed rule excludes banks with less than $10 billion in assets from the 12-cent

limit, which is why Griffin believes few, if any, Montana-based banks would be affected by the cap. However, Tester maintains that a two-tiered system won’t work. “Even though the statute calls for an exemption for community banks and credit unions, both Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke and FDIC Chairwoman Sheila Bair have questioned whether there’s any way to implement it,” Tester says. Jessica Mayrer

Census Montana becomes more colorful According to data released last week by the U.S. Census, Montana’s complexion is changing. “The minority population grew almost three times as fast as the entire state population,” says U.S. Census spokesman Robert Bernstein. Montana is now home to 989,415 people, reflecting a 9.7 percent increase in the population between 2000 and 2010. During the same time period, minority populations grew from 94,312 to more than 120,000, a 28 percent increase since 2000.


Inside

Letters

Briefs

The American Indians and Alaska Natives demographic, which constitutes the state’s largest minority group, grew by 11.6 percent to 62,555 and now comprises 6.3 percent of Montana’s overall population. But Montana’s Hispanic population grew even faster. The state’s Hispanic and Latino population— defined as those with Mexican, Spanish, Cuban, Puerto Rican and Central or South American roots— grew by 10,000, a 58 percent increase. The spike reflects national trends. “In fast growing western and southern states, like Nevada, Arizona, and Virginia, where whites or blacks dominated past growth, Hispanics are now the greatest growth engine,” notes William H. Frey, a senior fellow and demographer with the Brookings Institution Metropolitan Policy Program. Even with the significant population gains, Hispanics and Latinos represent only 2.9 percent of Montana’s ethnic makeup. Similarly, while the state’s AfricanAmerican population now stands at 4,027, black people represent just 0.4 percent of Montana’s population. “The African-American population grew by almost 50 percent,” Bernstein says. “Granted, it started from a really small base.” Montana’s multi-racial population grew by 35 percent. And Asians, too, are increasingly making homes under the Big Sky, with 33 percent more Asians living here now than in 2000, though they only constitute 0.6 percent of the state’s population. In Missoula, meanwhile, minorities make up 9 percent of the county’s 109,299. That’s up from 6.9 percent in 2000. Locally, American Indians, Hispanics and multi-racial individuals each represent 2.6 percent of the countywide population. Jessica Mayrer

Snowbowl Critics? Crickets. The Lolo National Forest released a draft environmental impact statement for Montana Snowbowl’s proposed resort expansion weeks ago, but only one critic has stepped forward so far. Considering the wide array of potential environmental flashpoints, the silence has come as a surprise to the plan’s lone dissident. “If all these different subsets of conservation and preservation groups are going to be impacted, why has there been no response from any of them?” asks Hayden Janssen, a Missoula economic and environmental researcher. “When we’re dealing with endan-

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

gered species, I would hope there would be a number of groups who would choose to voice their concern.” Snowbowl’s expansion plan includes a long list of possible impacts to the local ecosystem. It would draw more water for snowmaking from Butler Creek, home to endangered cutthroat and bull trout; clearcut 39 acres of old growth timber; and intrude onto elk foraging ground and critical habitat for Canada lynx. So why the drought of voices raising the conservation flag?

Photo by Chad Harder

Janssen feels that, beyond the conflicts of interest raised by Snowbowl’s status as a recreation hotspot, the answer lies in the amount of attention a lawsuit against a finalized plan can draw. “It’s a misallocation of resources,” Janssen says. “If you can get away with writing a letter now and it quells it, what’s the point of wasting money on litigation later?” Janssen also questions the seemingly inconsistent arguments coming from local conservation groups. Years ago, critics of the Bitterroot Resort directed the public’s attention to the 2006 Lolo National Forest draft management plan, which panned the need for increased ski area capacity. The information, gleaned from a Forest Service-sponsored industry study from late 2005, backed arguments launched against the resort by groups like Friends of Lolo Peak. Yet those same findings also appear to undermine Janssen’s point. The Forest Service’s 2005 Downhill Skiing Needs Assessment states, “Considerations should be given to Montana Snowbowl’s proposal to provide a more balanced mix of terrain to meet the desires of the skiing public.” Regardless, Janssen plans to voice his complaints against Snowbowl’s proposal during the March 30 open house at the Grant Creek Inn, even if

Agenda

News Quirks

he fails to generate additional opposition in the local environmental community. “Paying $28 to ride to the top of the mountain as the excuse for cutting down old growth forest is pretty ludicrous,” Janssen says. Alex Sakariassen

BY THE NUMBERS

10

Indian Country Regulatory no-man’s land It saddens Lloyd Irvine to watch hard-rock mining operations at the base of Chief Cliff Mountain in his hometown of Elmo, on the Flathead Indian Reservation. “Because of our beliefs, we’re not here to destroy what was given to us,” says the 67-year-old Irvine, who is half Kootenai and half Salish. Tribal members have for years tried to curb the use of dynamite by quarry operator Western Stone LLC to loosen the richly colored rock deep underneath the Chief Cliff rock formation, considered sacred among Kootenai people. The quarry is owned by a non-tribal member but sits within the reservation’s boundaries, so it falls in a regulatory blind spot of sorts. The tribe has attempted to buy out the landowner and lobbied Montana’s congressional delegation for help, according to Irvine, a former Confederated Salish and Kootenai (CSKT) Tribal Council representative who now sits on the Salish Pend d’Oreille Culture Committee. “We can’t get anywhere,” he says. The Montana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) has proposed that it regulate the Chief Cliff quarry and another site on the reservation in the town of Perma. Earlier this month, the cultural committee, comprised of Irvine and more than a dozen other elders, met to discuss the offer. Though frustrated by the impacts of mining on their reservation, members of the cultural committee, including Irvine, bristled at the notion of DEQ intervention. The DEQ’s offer might be the most feasible option, but inviting an outside government agency onto the reservation, Irvine says, contradicts American Indian tribes’ right to self-govern. “It goes against all principles,” he says. Elders will continue debating the proposal as the CSKT Tribal Council also looks for ways to address hard-rock mining concerns, says CSKT spokesman Robert McDonald. “The Tribal Council is in the process of gathering input from our various departments, including our culture committees,” McDonald says. “Our council has not yet determined the best path for our nation.” Jessica Mayrer

Environmental groups that agreed to a settlement with the Department of the Interior last week that would give Montana and Idaho management authority over wolves. At least three other groups—including Alliance for the Wild Rockies—have publicly stated they’ll continue to fight for federal control.

etc.

Missoulians were likely bellied up to a barstool or sitting down to watch Letterman when the 9.0 magnitude earthquake struck Japan two weeks ago. With the closest potential fallout still hundreds of miles away on the West Coast, there seemed little connection between Montana and the tragedy unfolding halfway around the globe. Yet some locals found themselves glued to news coverage early on March 11 for more than curiosity’s sake. For Tom McGrath, 61, the thready information filtering out of Japan provided his only link to his son Brian, a Hellgate High and University of Montana graduate working as an English teacher in the small village of Katashina. Nearly seven hours passed before McGrath received a phone call from Brian confirming that he was alive and well. “It was really stressful,” McGrath says. “We didn’t know exactly what area got hit hardest.” Elsewhere in Missoula, Rick Heilman was “absolutely stunned” by images of the quake-triggered tsunami and explosions at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear plant. Eventually he realized that Missoula native Brandon Palmer, a close friend, was trapped in the middle of it all. Palmer, too, is a Hellgate grad and English teacher, living within 50 miles of the Fukushima contamination zone. “All of a sudden we’re thinking about Brandon, and on Monday morning I woke up and had this vision that I had to get Brandon and his family out,” Heilman says. After obsessing over the safety of Palmer and his young family (Palmer has two sons, a 3-year-old and a 10-monthold), Heilman took action. What started as a simple Facebook group blossomed into a full-blown grassroots fundraising initiative through Missoula Federal Credit Union. So far Heilman says he’s raised $1,100, helping to cover emergency passports and airfare. “We also want to be able to cushion them when they get here, so they can de-stress from this,” Heilman says. “It’s all we can do.” Palmer is expected home late this week, but Heilman says the fundraising isn’t over. Heilman plans to direct money to the relief effort in Japan and hopefully hold a local benefit event. As for Brian McGrath—contacted by the Indy this week— he’d hoped to volunteer over spring break, but says devastated areas are currently off-limits. He plans to lend a hand in his village of 5,000, which recently accepted 1,000 evacuees from Fukushima. “It is really inspirational for me to witness even the smaller communities offering their help,” McGrath says. “My respect for the Japanese people has grown deeply since the disaster.”

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Missoula Independent

Page 7 March 24–March 31, 2011


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Bearing it all Grizzly debate comes with broad implications by Alex Sakariassen

National Park. Servheen says the population there has already reached its benchmark for delisting. DNA analysis of samples collected in the field indicated a total of 765 grizzlies in 2004; based on a population gain of 3 percent per year, officials estimate the NCDE is now home to some 900 bears. Once the conservation strategy is complete—something Servheen says could happen as early as next year—Montana will contain yet another grizzly population poised for delisting. If the legal debate over Yellowstone grizzlies continues, however, Servheen believes it will undermine future attempts to delist other populations and taint agency and public perception of the worth of grizzly conservation. “Getting across the finish line in Yellowstone and getting that population recovered would have direct ramifications on the recovery of the Cabinet-Yaak population and the Selkirks in north Idaho, because those people could then say it’s worth the investment,” Servheen says. “The future of grizzly bears everywhere is dependent on achieving success where success has been achieved.” Opposition to delisting even threatens to erode the decades-long cooperative spirit among the international, federal, state and tribal entities involved in the IGBC. The Yellowstone conservation strategy took 25 years of not just biologPhoto by Chad Harder ical research but of careful political Government agencies, seasoned biologists and environmental groups con- negotiating, says IGBC spokesman and tinue to debate the future of the Yellowstone grizzly bear and its endan- Idaho Fish and Game conservation edugered species status. But many believe litigation could erode interagency cator Gregg Losinski. He hopes people relations and the Endangered Species Act itself. begin to realize “how damaging this litiThe agencies behind the conservation gation has been to this cooperative effort.” “If you can never get across the finish line because of legal interference in strategy counter that the plan actually pro“Very few of those organizations have the recovery process, then our ability to vides more protections for the grizzlies recovery of the bear as their number one recover not only grizzly bears but many than the ESA. It would halt increases in priority,” Losinski says. “They have a totally other species listed under the ESA will road density, grazing allotments and site different line of business, and they’ve been drop off,” says Chris Servheen, a development on thousands of square miles willing over the past 25-plus years to bend Missoula-based wildlife biologist and of prime grizzly habitat. Servheen says the where possible, to commit resources where grizzly bear recovery coordinator for the plan, which he helped draft, will improve possible and to bring back the bear.” U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. If funding for bear conservation and increase Servheen maintains that beyond the [Molloy’s] opinion stands, the ESA is management efficiency by allowing local future of the Yellowstone grizzly, the greatofficials to handle conflicts. unworkable.” est setback a failure in the 9th Circuit will “This is the best post-delisting manage- bring is in undermining the ESA and caterFrom a biological standpoint, t h e r e ’ s n o d i s a g r e e m e n t t h a t ment plan for any species ever created,” ing to its critics. Yellowstone’s grizzlies have bounced Servheen says. “This commits the agencies “The grizzly bear in Yellowstone is one back from the brink. The population has to spend $3.4 million a year managing and of the greatest success stories under the tripled since the bears were first listed in monitoring the bear after recovery and ESA,” Servheen says. “But if these groups the mid-1970s and now totals approxi- delisting. That’s a million dollars more than are successful in obstructing our recovery mately 600, says Yellowstone National when it was listed, so it’s a very gold-plated in Yellowstone, we won’t be able to say the Park bear management biologist Kerry system.” ESA works. All those people that don’t like That plan also serves as a template for the ESA and are only looking for failures Gunther. Their geographic distribution has increased by 50 percent. The statis- an analogous conservation strategy for griz- will have one more thing to point to.” tics were compelling enough to con- zlies in the Northern Continental Divide vince federal officials to delist the bears Ecosystem (NCDE) around Glacier asakariassen@missoulanews.com

The fate of the Yellowstone grizzly bear landed in the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals earlier this month following nearly two years of legal squabbling over the population’s status under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Appellate judges are now considering an appeal of U.S. District Judge Donald Molloy’s September 2009 decision in Missoula to return the bears to the list of endangered species. But while federal officials, state agencies, environmental groups and biologists continue to dispute the answer to a seemingly simple question—whether or not the bears should be delisted—many agree the debate has much broader implications not just for the Yellowstone population but other grizzlies in the northwest, and possibly for the ESA itself.

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Page 8 March 24–March 31, 2011

in 2007, placing management in the hands of state and local governments. Opposition to the delisting came with the release of a long-term conservation strategy for Yellowstone from the Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee (IGBC). Several environmental groups including the Greater Yellowstone Coalition alleged the document failed to, among other things, consider declines in the number of white bark pine— a staple food source for grizzlies—in the Yellowstone ecosystem, and pressed Molloy to relist the bears. “Ultimately, what we’re trying to avoid is the possibility of another population crash similar to what we had in the ’60s and ’70s, when food sources were abruptly eliminated,” says Greater Yellowstone Coalition spokesperson Jeff Welsh.


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Buzz kill Justification for marijuana raids remains hazy by Matthew Frank

Confusion lingers in the wake of last for marijuana patients’ rights. He hoped the not be deterred by such assertions when week’s raids of medical marijuana business- current Legislature would clarify the rules otherwise pursuing the Department’s core enforcement priorities.” es around the state. Affidavits filed by the for wholesale exchanges of marijuana. The language gives federal law U.S. Attorney’s office indicate the federal The feds also cite tax evasion as reason government based the warrants largely on for the raids, but that’s a knotty issue, too. enforcement plenty of leeway. It also suspicions of caregivers purchasing mari- Caregivers are prohibited from declaring appears to protect state-authorized juana from other caregivers. But state law is on federal tax returns expenses associated patients, but doesn’t give the same protecmute on the subject, so the justification with medical marijuana operations, leading tion to people who provide them with doesn’t square with the feds’ claim that the to an artificially high tax bill or charges of medicine. At the nexus of the state and federal raided businesses violated state law in ways tax fraud. “clear and unambiguous.” In fact, little “If compliance with state law is the uncertainties surrounding medical marijuaabout Montana’s Medical Marijuana Act question, only state courts can evaluate na stands Daubert. He helped author seems clear and unambiguous, leaving that, and I don’t see why state law enforce- Montana’s medical marijuana law, and, those targeted in the raids—who saw their ment would have needed this federal intru- because of his connection to Montana plants and growing supplies seized and, in sion in order to effectively do that,” Cannabis, he was named in the warrant to search its facility west of Helena. some cases, bank accounts frozen—baffled Daubert says. “There’s a feeling that our law has funcabout the laws they allegedly broke, and A U.S. Department of Justice memo bracing for federal indictments. may help explain why. The “Ogden tionally been repealed by the federal government,” Daubert said The U.S. attorney’s before a March 19 rally in office in Montana has said Missoula to protest the nothing to clarify the federal raids. During the situation. Assistant U.S. demonstration a couple Attorney Victoria L. of hundred people Francis declined to commarched through downment, except to say that town chanting “DEA Go the federal agents’ focus Away” and waving signs on businesses that supwith messages like, “Fix posedly violated state law it, don’t nix it.” A bill mov“may be an exercise of ing through the Montana prosecutorial discretion.” Legislature would repeal Still, the search warrants the Medical Marijuana and affidavits cite only Act, but it stalled in comfederal laws, and, as mittee on the day of the Francis says, “The thing raids. we would be enforcing is Photo by Chad Harder Daubert says the federal law.” Speaking last Friday “There’s a feeling that our [medical marijuana] law has function- search warrants were exeat a statewide Montana ally been repealed by the federal government,” says Tom Daubert cuted despite repeated of Patients and Families United. attempts by him and othBar Association meeting, ers in the medical mariMontana U.S. Attorney Mike Cotter said the policy of the Memorandum,” issued in October 2009 by juana community to seek clarity from state Department of Justice, which in 2009 Deputy Attorney General David Ogden, officials about the Montana attorney generannounced its intention to stop prosecut- emphasizes that prosecuting marijuana al’s interpretation of the law, and how it ing state-sanctioned medical marijuana, has traffickers continues to be a “core priority,” would be applied. “If the people involved in medical marnot changed. But that policy appears now but pursuing them should not focus resources “on individuals whose actions ijuana can’t get an answer from the governto be open to question. The affidavit filed for the warrant to are in clear and unambiguous compliance ment about how it intends to enforce the search Montana Cannabis, one of the largest with existing state laws providing for the law and interpret it, how can any of them “cannabusinesses” in the state, underscores medical use of marijuana.” In particular, the ever be accused, even, of intending to viothe legal ambiguities. One allegation is that memo singles out individuals with cancer late that law?” he asks. The state attorney general’s office Montana Cannabis, after it was vandalized in and other serious illnesses, and says proseearly 2010, purchased large quantities of cuting them “is unlikely to be an efficient offers no insight, saying only that federal officials made their own determinations. marijuana from Bozeman’s Big Sky Patient use of limited federal resources.” For Chris Lindsey, a Helena-based But the memo goes on to state that the Care. State law doesn’t explicitly permit the transfer of marijuana among caregivers, but “prosecution of commercial enterprises medical marijuana attorney, it boils down it doesn’t preclude it either. Of the law’s that unlawfully market and sell marijuana to a frustrating twist. “While people will accuse those in the many gray areas, “the caregiver-to-caregiver for profit” continues to be a priority. “To be sure,” the memo says, “claims of industry for taking advantage of the gray exchange concept is clearly one of them,” says Tom Daubert, who co-founded compliance with state or local law may areas, it sort of feels like that’s exactly what Montana Cannabis before severing ties last mask operations inconsistent with the the feds did,” he says. fall, and directs Patients and Families United, terms, conditions, or purposes of those a group that lobbies the Montana Legislature laws, and federal law enforcement should mfrank@missoulanews.com

275 W. Main St • 728-0343 • www.tanglesmt.com

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Page 9 March 24–March 31, 2011


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Crossing the Rubicon Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attack on Libya an irrevocable mistake

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When President Obama took office, he promised â&#x20AC;&#x153;change and hope.â&#x20AC;? But this week, in his rush to lead the attack on Libya, the only change from his infamous predecessor George W. Bush is that we are now in three wars in the Middle East instead of two. A change all right, but certainly not what we were hoping for. As an outraged Congress mulls the situation, another change might be worthwhileâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;having the president ask the American people before he commits our nation, our tax dollars and our soldiers to prohibitively expensive, incredibly pointless and totally unwinnable wars. President Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision to launch hundreds of cruise missiles and air strikes against Libyan targets came while Congress was recessed. What that means is that although he met with a few select members of the House and Senate, the other 500 elected representatives of the American people were left wholly out of the equation. In other words, President Obama decided to launch a war basically on his ownâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;just like Bush. The travesty here is two-fold. First, Obama is now following the precedent set by Bush that vastly increased the power of the executive branch and significantly diminished both the power and options available to Congress. Second, he is blatantly reversing a very clear statement he made as a senator in 2007: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The president does not have power under the Constitution to unilaterally authorize a military attack in a situation that does not involve stopping an actual or imminent threat to the nation.â&#x20AC;? Does the situation in Libya comport with President Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s words? No, it clearly does not. There is no â&#x20AC;&#x153;actual or imminent threat to the nationâ&#x20AC;? in the Libyan situation. It is, just as clearly, a matter of internal strife, where a faction of the populace seeks the removal of a ruler while other factions remain loyal to that ruler. That sure sounds a lot like civil war, doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t it? Where is the threat, in any conceivable manner, to our nation? There will be those who point to the actions by the United Nations condemning Libyan President Moammar Gadhaffiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attacks on his own people as justification for using American armed forces in acts of war under the rubric of a â&#x20AC;&#x153;humanitarianâ&#x20AC;? effort. But nothing the U.N. does or says trumps the U.S. Constitution, nor can it direct our armed forces, nor can it compel our people to acts of war. Only we can do that. Supposedly, had we not launched the attacks, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re to believe that Gadhaffi

would have decimated his own populace. Thus, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;America to the rescueâ&#x20AC;? with Operation Odyssey Dawn, in which we are already spending $100 million a day that we know of. I say â&#x20AC;&#x153;that we know of â&#x20AC;? because we do not yet know the full

While the â&#x20AC;&#x153; national debate about our deficit centers around such deplorable options as whacking away at Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, our president is opening the treasury to, once again, unleash the American war machine on another hapless

â&#x20AC;?

foreign nation.

extent of our nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s involvement and the White House isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t telling us. Many news sources have already reported that we have â&#x20AC;&#x153;boots on the groundâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;not just in the airâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;in Libya. These would be Special Forces teams that directed the more than 100 laser-guided cruise missiles already launched from ships and the laser-guided bombs being dropped by our jets. So letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s see, while the national debate about our deficit centers around such deplorable options as whacking away at Social Security, Medicare and

Medicaid, our president is opening the treasury to, once again, unleash the American war machine on another hapless foreign nation. Is there something wrong with this picture? You bet there is. For one thing, what do we get out of this new war? Well, the simple answer is that Libya has oil, which is all the excuse weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever needed in the last 50 years to launch wars. But the truth is that Libyaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oil supplies a mere two percent of world output and none of it comes to us. That hardly seems worth committing our nation to a lead role in a new war unless you take a little broader view of who has run Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s foreign policy and, apparently, continues to do so. This quote from John Gibson, the chief executive of Halliburtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Energy Service Group, in a May 2003 interview with International Oil Daily might cast a little light into the darkness. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We hope Iraq will be the first domino and that Libya and Iran will follow. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like being kept out of markets because it gives our competitors an unfair advantage.â&#x20AC;? And remember, Vice President Dick Cheney was Halliburtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s CEO before he moved into the White House with fellow oil man George W. Bush. So weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re protecting not our nation, or its interests, but more likely those of a multinational oil conglomerate. Some would say. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new?â&#x20AC;? Knowing the motivation, however, is not the same as knowing the outcome. Aggressive Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has been very vocal in demanding that Libyaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s current leader must be removed. Like a parrot, Obama now mouths the same demand, that â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gadhaffi must go.â&#x20AC;? Once again, in the parlance of George W. Bush, President Obama is not just calling for â&#x20AC;&#x153;regime changeâ&#x20AC;? in a sovereign nation, he is actively committing American lives and dollars to achieve exactly that. But thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no guarantee Gadhaffi will lose this fightâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;none at all. Many in Congress are outraged over Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rash actions and abuse of executive power. And rightfully so. Some, such as Congressman Dennis Kucinich, say the presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actions amount to an impeachable offense. Certainly, in light of the constitutional requirements for congressional approval prior to waging war, Obama has already crossed his Rubicon. Helenaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


Friday, March 25th

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

PRIME TIME DJ 8pm - 1am

War on weeds

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The West battles botanical barbarians

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by David Stalling

If the phrase “war on weeds” seems over the top, consider this: Noxious weeds infest more than 100 million acres of North America—an area roughly the size of Montana. Like it or not, we’re engaged in a battle to win back the Western landscape. Weeds now conquer more than three million acres each year, invading an estimated six square miles of U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management lands every day. They’ve already claimed seven million acres of our national parks. Aggressive exotics like cheatgrass, leafy spurge, spotted knapweed and Dalmatian toadflax have infested millions of acres of wildlife habitat and ranchlands, undermining plant diversity and leaving the cupboard bare for large herbivores such as deer, elk and pronghorn. Some of these noxious weeds—the legal term that state and federal agencies use to denote plants that pose serious threats to agriculture and wildlife—came to America by accident. They arrived in North America as stowaways, their seeds inadvertently lodged in shipments of grain. Others were deliberately imported and brought over by well-meaning folks—some of them at federal agencies—to enhance gardens or help control streambed erosion. Once they’ve arrived, many plants and their seeds hitch rides across the country aboard magpies, mule deer, wool pants, horses, all-terrain vehicles, trucks and trains. Others simply fly with the wind or ride on river currents. Spotted knapweed came here from central Europe, mixed in with shipments of alfalfa and clover seeds. In Montana alone, it has crowded out native plants on 4.5 million acres, thriving on soil disturbed by logging, grazing, flooding or fire. By sending down stout taproots, knapweed gets the jump on other plants with its early spring growth; then it snatches up most of the available space, sun, water and nutrients. Each knapweed plant produces more than a thousand seeds and can often be found in amazing densities of up to two million plants per acre. Infestations frequently reduce native grasses and forbs by as much as 90 percent; in fact, botanists now believe

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that the plant may release a chemical substance that inhibits the growth of surrounding vegetation. Since the mammals, birds, insects and fungi that prey on these plants in their homeland didn’t follow them to North America, exotics have a distinct competitive edge. In the same way that deer, elk and pronghorn can proliferate in the absence of

the “Throughout West, county, state and federal governments have joined forces with ranchers, farmers and environmental groups to wage an integrated attack against

weeds.

predation, noxious weeds thrive in a land with no enemies. Spotted knapweed now blankets many of the low-elevation, southfacing slopes in Montana, Idaho, Oregon, Washington and British Columbia, the very places that elk and deer prefer to winter in. The aftermath of a weed invasion in these areas is sadly predictable: “It can be expected that knapweed takeover of fall, winter and spring range would result in a significant decline in deer and elk numbers,” says a report from British Columbia’s Knapweed Action Committee. Noxious weeds not only harm elk and deer; they also harm everything up and down the food chain. Simply put, the loss of native grasses equates to a loss to all the

creatures that depend on those grasses for food, cover and nesting—from voles and larkspurs to the coyotes and Cooper’s hawks that eat them. And because weeds fail to hold soil as well as native vegetation does, erosion increases dramatically where weeds like knapweed dominate. So the earth sloughs into streams and fouls spawning and rearing habitat critical for trout and other fish. Deteriorating habitat also threatens ranchers and farmers and the private lands that help sustain cattle and wildlife. “It’s easy to get depressed about noxious weeds,” says Jim Olivarez, a retired weed-program manager for the U. S. Forest Service’s Northern Region. Steve Kilpatrick, a Wyoming biologist, echoes that sentiment, telling Wyoming Wildlife magazine that if he were a habitat biologist in Idaho, where cheatgrass has created a vast desert monoculture, “I think I’d shoot myself.” But we have to keep fighting back, says Olivarez, because “these public lands are national treasures.” But given the scale of the problem, the question is: How do we fight back? One answer is cooperative action. Throughout the West, county, state and federal governments have joined forces with ranchers, farmers and environmental groups to wage an integrated attack against weeds. We’ve already begun to knock back knapweed, thanks to a careful balance of herbicide use, sheep grazing, pulling up plants and introducing beetles and weevils that prey on the weeds in their native lands. It’s also important for people to clean and keep their vehicles, clothing and recreational equipment free of weed seeds to avoid spreading them. And we all need to learn to identify the invaders, so we can report them to wildlife agencies when we see them, and, ideally, stop them before they spread farther. We’re probably never going to win this war on weeds, but at least we can strive for containment. David Stalling is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). He is a writer in Missoula, Montana.

Missoula Independent

Page 11 March 24–March 31, 2011


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

The next time you drink a glass of water or take a shower think about this: By 2025, it’s estimated that 1.8 billion people will be living in places “with absolute water scarcity and two-thirds of the world’s population may experience water-stress conditions,” according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. That fact alone should be reason to conserve this precious resource. You can learn more about this pressing issue this week when the University of Montana presents a talk with global population expert Werner Fornos titled “The Drain on Our World.” His lecture will touch on why the world’s fresh water supply is shrinking, and will offer tips on what action we can take here at home

and abroad in order to mitigate the problem. A spokesman for the organization Global Population Education, Fornos is a leading specialist on overpopulation issues, and is dedicated to population stabilization. He was also formerly the president of the nonprofit organization The Population Institute, and has authored numerous articles in publications including The Christian Science Monitor and New York Times Magazine. In 2003, he received the United Nations Population Award. –Ira Sather-Olson

THURSDAY MARCH 24

City Harvest, from 5–9 PM. Ten Spoon will donate 25 cents per flight, 75 cents per glass and $1 per bottle sold to the organization. Free. Call 549-8703.

Ain’t no party like an enviro education party during the Montana Environmental Education Association Conference, which meets today and tomorrow at the Holiday Inn-Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St., starting at 7:30 AM, with workshops and meetings running throughout the day. Cost varies depending on what you attend. Visit montanaeea.org for complete details, a schedule and to register. UM hosts the talk Epilepsy and Traumatic Brain Injury in Our Soldiers, a discussion with Drs. Christopher Ransom and Thomas Swanson that begins at 6 PM in Room 169 of UM’s Skaggs Building. Free. Dig into an evening about politics on the Emerald Isle when the Global Issues & Foreign Film Series continues with the program Ireland Yesterday & Today, which features a lecture on present and past political/social issues in Ireland with expert Dermot Keogh, followed by a screening of the film The Wind that Shakes the Barley, starting at 7 PM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $5 donation requested. Visit wildlifefilms.org. Keep it cool when UM’s Dr. Steve Running presents the talk Considering Climate Change, which is hosted by Friends of 2 Rivers and begins at 7 PM at Our Savior’s Lutheran Church in Bonner, 8985 Hwy. 200. Free. Call 370-6584.

SATURDAY MARCH 26 Get organized and learn how to work on a campaign or run for office when Democracy for America presents its Missoula Campaign Academy, a twoday training session for Democratic activists and candidates that begins at 9 AM at UM’s Gallagher Business Building. $35/$15 students and low income persons, with scholarships available. Visit democracyforamerica.com/missoula to sign up and for details. Those suffering from illness or loss can find solace during one of Living Art Montana’s Creativity for Life workshops at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., at 10:30 AM. This week features the program “Nature Works” with Hobie Hare. Free, but donations are appreciated but not expected. Register by calling 5495329 or visit livingartofmontana.org. Sip on some vino and support a worthy institution when the Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive, hosts a nonprofit night for Garden

Werner Fornos speaks Tue., March 29, at 7 PM in the University Center North Ballroom. Free. Call 243-2288.

TUESDAY MARCH 29 YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts “YWCA Tuesday Night Support Groups,” which includes “The Living Peace Support Group” for women who want to continue to heal through mindfulness, connection with others and explorations of topics including new tools for living, plus a domestic violence talking circle and a Native American women’s group, which all meet for dinner and fellowship every Tue. from 6:30–8 PM. Free. Call 543-6691.

WEDNESDAY MARCH 30 Express peace through writing by participating in the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center’s Search for Peace Project. The project is open to all students in Missoula in elementary school, middle school, high school, secondary school and college, and entrants are requested to answer the question “What does peace mean to you?” on an 8”x8” square flat piece of paper using any medium. Submissions are due by 5 PM on April 20. Free. Call the Peace Center at 543-3955 or visit jrpc.org. Enjoy a local brew and support a local organization during the Kettlehouse Northside Tap Room’s Community U-NITE Pint Nights, which occur this and every Wed. from 5–8 PM at the tap room, 313 N. First St. W. A portion of the proceeds from each pint sold goes to a different organization each week. Free to attend. Visit kettlehouse.com. The Montana Society for Conservation Biology hosts a presentation titled Climate Change and Biota: Known Knowns, Known Unknowns, Unknown Unknowns, and Unknown Knowns, which features guest speaker Solomon Dobrowski and begins at 7 PM in the private room next to the deck at The Depot Bar & Restaurant, 201 Railroad St. Free.

THURSDAY MARCH 31 Have a green lunch when the UM Natural Resources and Environmental Policy Forum presents Collapse, Collective Action, Conundrum: Pursuing Sustainable Communities in the Age of Ideology, a talk with William Shutkin that begins at noon in the Castles Center of UM’s School of Law. Free. Call 207-9071.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent

Page 12 March 24–March 31, 2011


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - Robert Michelson, 21, called 911 wanting to know how much trouble he could get into for growing one marijuana plant. When the dispatcher told him he could be arrested, Michelson said thank you and hung up. The dispatcher promptly notified police, who went to Michelson’s house in Farmington, Conn., and arrested him for marijuana possession. (Associated Press) Authorities arrested Jerrie Perkins, 30, for shoplifting after she tried to leave a store in Rochester Hills, Mich., with $600 worth of stolen electronics merchandise. According to the Oakland County Sheriff’s Office, the 400-pound woman’s getaway was thwarted when her mobility scooter got stuck at the door. (Michigan’s The Macomb Daily) WHEN CHINA RULES THE WORLD - China’s Civil Affairs Ministry wants the government to make it mandatory for adult children to visit their elderly parents. The ministry’s proposal would allow parents to sue no-shows. “Younger generations are moving away from their parents and quickly developing different values,” said Ninie Wang, international director of the Gerontological Society of China, which endorsed the measure. “Filial piety is a myth.” (The New York Times) SECOND-AMENDMENT FOLLIES - A New York City police officer tried to switch on a pistol-mounted flashlight but pulled the trigger instead, shooting Jose Colon, 76, in the stomach. Colon survived. The incident followed the shooting death of an unarmed man in Plano, Texas, that occurred when an undercover police sergeant drew his pistol in a dark parking lot and tried to turn on the flashlight mounted on it but accidentally fired the gun. Both incidents involved the Surefire X300 flashlight, whose manufacturer insisted it “prevents misidentification and saves police lives.” Firearms expert Kenneth Cooper disagreed, warning that pistol-mounted flashlights complicate what is already a stressful situation for police officers pointing guns. (New York Post) Two men were injured in an accidental shooting at a gun show in Bloomington, Ill., when an attendee handling a mini-14 semiautomatic rifle was setting the rifle back on a vendor table, and it fired a .223caliber bullet. “The round went through a post, through a person and then into another person,” McLean County Sheriff Mike Emery said. (Central Illinois’s The Pantagraph) Allen Jones told authorities in Baldwin County, Ala., that he was bringing his loaded Glock .40 handgun from the glove compartment of his truck into the house when he tripped and fell and accidentally shot himself in the leg. Aleisha Jones was bathing their young son when she heard her husband’s call for help. Both she and the boy arrived at the same time, and the boy grabbed the gun. Aleisha Jones said that when she tried to take the gun away, it accidentally fired, hitting her in the neck. Neighbors who heard the gunshots alerted the sheriff’s office, which reported that husband and wife were hospitalized in stable condition. (Mobile’s WPMI-TV) SMELL AWAY UNWANTED POUNDS - A device that lets food be inhaled rather than eaten will go on sale this fall in France, promised its inventor, Harvard University professor and aerosol scientist David Edwards, 49. The machine, named Le Whaf, will cost $130. It uses rapidly vibrating crystals to create ultrasound waves that transform liquefied food into tiny droplets. Then Le Whaf pumps the flavored mist into a goldfish-like bowl, from which each breath (or “whaff”) takes in the taste with hardly any calories. Edwards predicted that “whaffing” will catch on as a way of eating in the future. “Imagine a restaurant where, instead of sitting at a table, you walk around,” he explained. “Instead of eating food, you’re breathing it in as you walk from room to room, each with a different flavor.” (Britain’s Daily Mail) MORE STRIKES THAN A BOWLING ALLEY - After a minivan struck a man crossing a street in Hawthorne, Calif., the driver sped off. Moments later, a second vehicle ran over the man and continued without stopping. As several pedestrians who witnessed the incidents rushed to help the pedestrian and block other cars from running over him, a third vehicle struck one of them. This time, the driver stopped to help the woman, but the crowd attacked him anyway. “These criminal bystanders assaulted the victim and ultimately stole his cell phone,” a police statement said. Police arrested Tran Lewis, 32, on suspicion of beating and robbing the motorist and located the driver of the second vehicle. The pedestrian died, and the woman hurrying to help him suffered moderate injuries. (The Los Angeles Times) TOO BIG-BOX TO FAIL - Wal-Mart, Kmart and Best Buy are setting up financial services for store customers without bank accounts, hoping for a share of the $320 billion a year alternative financing services industry, now populated by payday-loan and check-cashing stores that charge 2 to 4 percent of the check’s amount. Wal-Mart charges a flat-rate $3 to cash a check. Besides check-cashing, the bigbox retailers sell money transfers and prepaid cash cards. Best Buy also started providing kiosks where customers can pay utility, cable and phone bills A government survey found that 30 million households either don’t have a bank account or use one sparingly. Two-thirds of America’s “unbanked” population earn less than $30,000 a year; others might earn more but don’t trust banks or come from cash-based cultures. (The Washington Post) WAY TO GO - Moments after high school junior Wes Leonard, 16, scored the winning basket in an overtime game in Fennville, Mich., to clinch his team’s undefeated season, he collapsed on the court in the middle of the victory celebration and died of a heart attack. (Michigan’s The Holland Sentinel) Blair River, the 575-pound spokesperson for the Heart Attack Grill, a restaurant in Chandler, Ariz., that specializes in huge burgers, milkshakes and fries cooked in lard, dropped dead at age 29. “Cynical people might think this is funny,” restaurant founder Jon Basso said, “but people who knew him are crying their eyes out.” Having a big man promoting it was part of the restaurant’s tongue in cheek “glorification of obesity,” but Basso said the 6-foot-8 River was more than a caricature, pointing out, “Even if he was skinny, we would have given him the job. We would have just put a fat suit on him.” (The Arizona Republic) LEAST SURPRISING FINDING OF THE WEEK - A University of Texas poll of 718 students found that half of the boyfriends would forgive their girlfriend’s infidelity, so long as it was with another woman. Only 22 percent of the boyfriends surveyed said they could forgive betrayal with another man. (Reuters)

Missoula Independent

Page 13 March 24–March 31, 2011


A

t the headwaters of the Big Blackfoot River, it’s difficult to imagine that the waters become, just a little ways downstream, one of the most revered and iconic rivers in the West. The river effectively originates from a 4-inch pipe, above which stands a humming wastewater treatment plant. Above that, hundreds of thousands of yards of toxic mine tailings lie ensconced, tenuously, in an earthen dam. Today, snow cover conceals the extent of the pollution, but signs of it emerge in exposed ground, reddened by acid mine drainage. Even below the pipe, where the Blackfoot begins in earnest a 132-mile meander to its confluence with the Clark Fork River, the streambed is scarred and discolored. Here, the mystique of the river, so steeped in fly-fishing lore and notions of purity, becomes myth. Since the early 1940s, the Mike Horse Dam has loomed over the Blackfoot, holding back contaminates from the Mike Horse Mine, part of a mountainous mining district called the

Upper Blackfoot Mining Complex (UBMC) some 15 miles upstream of Lincoln. In June 1975, at the peak of the spring runoff, the Mike Horse Dam, itself partly constructed of tailings, blew out, washing 100,000 tons of fine-grain tailings—laced with silver, gold, zinc, lead, cadmium, iron, copper and nickel—into Beartrap Creek and the upper Blackfoot River, devastating fish and other aquatic life for miles. Shortly thereafter, the mine’s owner, American Smelting and Refining Company, LLC (ASARCO), shoddily fortified the dam with more earth and tailings. Ever since, despite the Montana Legislature designating the UBMC a state Superfund site in 1991, the potential for the dam to fail again has weighed heavily over the river, and on the minds of those who love it. This spring—36 years after the blowout—brings the beginning of the end of the Mike Horse Dam. A $39 million settlement with ASARCO and the Atlantic Richfield Co., which assumed a lease of the property in the ’60s, is allowing the state and federal government to finally begin the process of removing the dam and the contaminated tailings

behind it, and restoring the historic headwaters of the Blackfoot River. That the dam will be removed at all—as opposed to permanently entombed in place, as ASARCO, as it sank into bankruptcy, had argued for—counts as a major victory for the U.S. Forest Service and Montana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), the two agencies leading the restoration effort. But that victory created a quandary: If the toxic tailings are going to be removed, where should they be moved to? The agencies and Lincoln-area residents have been grappling with the question for more than three years. In the coming weeks, the DEQ and Forest Service will release their analysis of the various options, none of which appear ideal—an understatement as far as some potentially affected neighbors are concerned. Those neighbors charge that the agencies have already chosen a site for the repository, absent public input and corrupted by backroom dealings. It’s not only residents, though, who find themselves watching the restoration of the upper Blackfoot unfold. The river’s reach spreads well beyond its

banks, to communities all over the state and, thanks to Norman Maclean, across the country. “This particular project, and its impact, is very far reaching,” says Shellie Haaland, a DEQ reclamation specialist who works solely on the UBMC. “It’s Great Falls, it’s Helena, it’s Missoula. It’s three large populations of people who have lived and played here for decades, and it is very, very important to a lot of people.” “And it’s A River Runs Through It, so there are national implications,” adds Amber Kamps, the Lincoln district ranger. “We’re hearing from those folks as well.”

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aaland and Beth Ihle, a geologist with the Helena National Forest, drive single-lane highways and snowpacked forest roads between Lincoln and Rogers Pass pointing out potential locations for a tailings repository. As the truck passes marshy creek bottoms and winds around mountainsides, it becomes abundantly clear that there are no obvious places for a 30-acre landfill.

THE GOVERNMENT THINKS IT’S FOUND THE BEST SPOT TO BURY TOXIC TAILINGS THAT LOOM ABOVE THE BLACKFOOT RIVER. SUSPICIOUS NEIGHBORS SAY THE LOGIC DOESN’T HOLD WATER. by Matthew Frank • photos by Chad Harder

The Forest Service and Department of Environmental Quality say this piece of ground, known as Section 35, off Highway 279 east of Lincoln, may be the best place to bury the metals-laced tailings contained behind the Mike Horse Dam at the headwaters of the Blackfoot River.

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Photo courtesy of DEQ

In 1975, the spring runoff breached the Mike Horse Dam, washing 100,000 tons of fine-grain tailings—laced with silver, gold, zinc, lead, cadmium, iron, copper and nickel—into Beartrap Creek and the upper Blackfoot River, devastating fish and other aquatic life for miles. This aerial photo was taken shortly after the blowout.

“We’re in a mountainous environment, let’s face it,” Ihle says. “Where do cities put their landfills? They don’t put them up on slopes like this,” her hand at a sharp angle. “Well, this is the environment we have. That’s our dilemma, in the end.” What they’re looking for, ideally, is flat ground above about 15 feet of clay or limestone. “That’s not going to happen,” Haaland says. “It’s just not. But what we’re looking for up here is benched topography, something that will give us something to work with that’s not a 35 percent slope.” Even that’s hard to find here in these rolling forestlands, where the tailings will likely have to end up. Siting the repository within the Superfund area is advantageous largely because it precludes the need for a landfill permit. As Haaland says, “The whole point of Superfund is to streamline the process.” But more practical reasons are at play, namely cost. Costs increase exponentially the farther the tailings are moved. Haaland estimates that the mining complex currently holds between 600,000 and one million cubic yards of toxic waste (about 420,000 cubic yards are impounded in the dam itself ). Assuming a single dump truck can carry about 20 cubic yards, that’s 40,000 roundtrips from the Mike Horse Dam to a repository, give or take 10,000. “That’s a lot of trucks,” Haaland and Ihle say in near unison. And it’s the sin-

gle greatest cost of the project. They say $39 million sounds like a lot of money, but it hardly is for a project that will take a decade to complete. The closer the repository is to the dam, the further that money can be stretched. Back in 2007, when the Forest Service released its Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis, they laid out a simple solution: depositing the tailings in an existing repository created years ago by ASARCO. It’s adjacent to Paymaster Creek, just off the forest road that connects the mining complex to Highway 200. “Paymaster was chosen because of its proximity to the waste, where it’s at right now,” Haaland says. “It’s the closest, therefore, with the information that we had at the time, it was the most economically viable, feasible solution.” Not anymore. For starters, estimates of the volume of waste within the impoundment have nearly doubled. “And that changes the game,” Haaland says. “What would have been a 20-foot impoundment is more like a 50-foot impoundment, just because of [Paymaster’s] landform.” Haaland and Ihle pull up to the Paymaster site. It sits up-mountain in a clearing surrounded by dense pine, with an average slope of about 24 percent. But Haaland and Ihle point not to the repository itself, but what sits downhill on the other side of the road—the stillnascent Blackfoot River. The 50- to 80foot retaining berm Paymaster would require to accommodate the Mike Horse

tailings would be built about 50 feet from the river. Beyond that, the Paymaster site presents geotechnical problems. Among them, soils here naturally contain high levels of metals, so they can’t truck “borrow material” from Paymaster to the headwaters—as would be the plan—to rebuild the floodplain. Plus, the seismic safety factor here barely meets minimum requirements. “We’re living in a fault zone,” Haalands says. “What happens when you have a 50- to 80-foot berm and the quake comes? What happens then? You open up a fissure and that stuff gets resaturated…The thing that will be most protective in the long run is where you want to be.” (It’s been over four decades since the last destructive earthquake in Montana, but small quakes are common; on Thursday, March 17, a 1.0-magnitude quake struck about 30 miles north of Lincoln. The Continental Divide here runs along the Intermountain Seismic Belt.) Paymaster is one among several sites the Forest Service and DEQ have explored since 2007. Haaland and Ihle describe a few others that have been considered, but each has its own drawbacks. First Gulch, on the north side of Highway 200 about four miles from the road to the Mike Horse Dam, looked promising, but design estimates showed that multiple repositories would be needed, and those locations are all on steep slopes above tributaries to the Blackfoot. And, as Haaland says, “it just doesn’t have much for dirt [for rebuilding the headwaters’ floodplain].” “So you’re looking at needing yet another place to get borrow material and you’re branching out more and more,” she says. “Each time you branch out to another site, you have more cost, and you have more environmental impact.”

The Horsefly Creek area’s topography and soil types made it a candidate for the repository, but its problem is access. Trucks could reach it via dirt road, which adds a few miles, or they could go onto private property and build a bridge over the Blackfoot. Neither option pencils out. “Horsefly Creek is a hell of a haul, is what it ends up being,” Haaland says. And there are a few other options, too, like Shave Gulch, but they’ve effectively been nixed. Like real estate agents showing properties to new homebuyers, Haaland and Ihle save the best for last—a 365acre piece of ground off Highway 279 known as “Section 35.” It popped up on their radar early last year, and it now stands out as the preferred location for laying to rest the Mike Horse tailings. It wasn’t initially considered, they explain, because they didn’t zoom their GIS mapping system in close enough to reveal the land’s benched topography, an appealing feature for landfilling. It also contains low-permeability soils with low metals content. The depth to groundwater ranges from about five to 80 feet. One test well didn’t reach groundwater at all. Haaland and Ihle pull over onto the shoulder and look northeast of the highway, past willows and the foot-wide Nora Creek, completely hidden under snow, to a series of benches dotted with trees. Says Haaland: “It has a lot of potential to be able to encapsulate that material and keep it separated from surface water, ground water; be able to keep it away from those things, not just under normal circumstances, but in catastrophic circumstances. “There’s enough distance and space,” she adds, “that even in the absolute worst case scenario—the absolute worst, which is you have a quake, it opens that thing up

and then you have a massive rain event— it’s still not going to get it to the surface water.” Ihle says the site also offers a good visual buffer for area residents, since the benches rise hundreds of yards from the road. Not everyone’s as enthusiastic, and that partly has to do with the landowner: Stimson Lumber Company. Stimson owes the state $300,000 for cleanup work at its Bonner mill, at the other end of the Blackfoot River, and, conveniently, it’s offered to give the state Section 35 to use as a repository in lieu of payment. But the land wouldn’t necessarily cost just $300,000. Just down the road is the Sieben Ranch, owned by John Baucus, brother of U.S. Sen. Max Baucus. The family holds Section 35’s development rights, as well as some of its mineral rights. The DEQ is currently in negotiations with John Baucus to buy out the ranch’s claims. Critics contend that the DEQ arbitrarily favors Section 35, and they express misgivings about the Baucuses standing to profit. But more than that, a handful of neighbors say they’ve been kept in the dark about the potential for one million yards of toxic tailings to be dumped in their backyards.

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ucked among 140 wooded acres along Highway 279 stands Mike Grimes’ home. Inside, the 66-year-old sits at the kitchen table, beneath a mount of a bull elk he shot on the ridge outside his backdoor, and rolls out maps and shuffles through papers as he tries to show that the DEQ and Forest Service have bungled the repository selection process. Grimes’ biggest beef is that the agencies haven’t been more forthcoming about their consideration of Section 35,

Beth Ihle, a geologist with the Helena National Forest, stands above the Mike Horse Dam. “You don’t want to do it twice, I tell you what,” Ihle says of the Upper Blackfoot Mining Complex restoration. “This is our one shot in history.”

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located across the road from his property. And he argues that when they do finally seek public comment next month, their minds will already be made up. “What good does that do?” he asks about irrelevant public comments. “Are you going to go up there and tell them how to build [the repository]?” The DEQ and the Forest Service insist they’ve diligently involved the public. They’ve given monthly project updates to the Lincoln Community Council, and taken local residents and organizations like the Blackfoot Challenge on field trips to Section 35 to demonstrate its relative appeal. But, as Grimes points out, the arrangement with Stimson was first made public last April in a document relating to Stimson’s cleanup in Bonner, not the upper Blackfoot, serving to fuel critics’ claims of surreptitiousness. And then, last September, a DEQ update on the Stimson Cooling Pond PCB Cleanup project plainly stated that “Stimson will also compensate DEQ for past and current costs incurred for this project by transferring certain property Stimson owns near Lincoln, Montana, to DEQ for use as a source of clean soils and as a

“It’s going to hurt the hell out of me and my family and my neighbors from a lot of different aspects,” he says. “But besides that, it’s a stupid place to be putting a repository when they’re trying to protect the Blackfoot River.” Grimes isn’t the only one voicing disapproval. Jack McInnis, who lives at the confluence of Willow Creek and the Blackfoot, says arguments in favor of Section 35 don’t hold water. He proceeds to tick off the names of about a dozen other neighbors who agree. McInnis makes the case for hauling the waste over Rogers Pass to dry ground, where it wouldn’t pose a threat to the Blackfoot watershed. The Forest Service and DEQ say doing so, beyond costing an estimated three times more, raises safety risks. Says McInnis: “They’re going to take rigs that are 200-feet-long and 500,000 pounds”—referring to ExxonMobil’s oil sands modules slated to travel Highway 200 on their way to Alberta—“over Rogers Pass, and those are adequately safe, but a gravel dump truck going over the pass is a prohibitive risk? Why that’s such a specious argument that they, I think, have finally

“perceptually improper that the Baucus family is involved in this.” “I don’t know anybody up there that isn’t against it,” he says. “But we’re fighting with the Forest Service, DEQ, Stimson Lumber and last, but not least, by any means, the Baucus family.” Jim Paris, chairman of the Lincoln Community Council, says he can understand neighbors’ concerns, but he doesn’t agree with the assertion that the DEQ and Forest Service have worked in secrecy. He feels the agencies gave the community “adequate” notice about Section 35. “I kind of get the feeling sometimes that we receive so many different notices and things from the Forest Service that sometimes it becomes overload and people don’t pay quite as close attention to what they’re receiving as they should,” he says. Chris Brick, science director of the Missoula-based Clark Fork Coalition, is paying close attention. She doesn’t subscribe to Grimes’ theories of corruption, but she does caution that decision makers don’t know enough about Section 35 to decide. She’s suspending judgment until the state makes more data available.

“This particular project, and its impact, is very far reaching. It’s Great Falls, it’s Helena, it’s Missoula. It’s three large populations of people who have lived and played here for decades, and it is very, very important to a lot of people.” —Shellie Haaland, DEQ reclamation specialist

waste repository for the cleanup of the Upper Blackfoot Mining Complex-Mike Horse Mine Site.” It’s enough for Grimes to think Paymaster and the other less desirable repository locations amount to “a bunch of strawmen.” More than the sting of feeling that he and his neighbors aren’t a part of the decision-making process, Grimes is facing the prospect of his peace and quiet being disrupted by an incessant hum of dusty dump trucks—for the next 10 years. “It’s not just property values,” he says. “It’s dust and pollution…and what about a seismic event? Even if they get a thing that doesn’t leak initially, we’re talking about perpetuity here. Who can even comprehend that? If you’re within the watershed and near tributaries, it’s just a crazy decision.” Section 35 does include tributaries. Nora Creek snakes through it, then winds down onto Grimes’ property before mingling with Willow Creek and finally the Blackfoot. Haaland and staffers at Trout Unlimited and the Clark Fork Coalition say Grimes has very little to worry about in terms of groundwater contamination, but he maintains that the tailings ought to be trucked out of the watershed altogether.

Missoula Independent

realized that that doesn’t carry much credibility.” McInnis doubts it would cost significantly more to take the tailings over the pass, saying, only partly in jest, that since it’s all downhill “they’d spend more on brake linings than they would on gas.” He’s convinced the real reason the agencies aren’t considering sites outside the Superfund boundary is that doing so would require more environmental review—which would draw out the process even longer and cost more. (The boundaries of the Superfund site are still being defined, but they certainly wouldn’t extend east over the pass; the Mike Horse Dam blew out to the west.) “At this point in time, after 20 years or more of fighting with that material, what’s another year or so in developing an appropriate repository?” McInnis says. “But they won’t listen to that.” John Baucus has the “veto power,” as McInnis calls it, to force the agencies to look in another direction. And Baucus’ influence extends beyond just Section 35; the Sieben Ranch owns mineral and development rights all around the area, allowing Baucus to “keep anything unsavory out of his own backyard.” While he acknowledges that Baucus’ involvement could help his cause, McInnis says it’s

Page 16 March 24–March 31, 2011

“I’d like to see how high groundwater gets there in the spring,” Brick says. “Certainly there are some environmental concerns on that site with respect to high groundwater in the lower elevations, and so what I’d want to know before I would say, ‘Sure, this is a reasonable site,’ is exactly where they would put the repository, and exactly how they would construct it. “I am not sure I see fatal flaws that immediately disqualify it,” she adds, “but I definitely have some concerns.” Grimes has gone so far as to build a website to rally support for his cause— www.helpsavetheblackfoot.net. It aims to shed light on the “potentially devastating plans to create a mining waste dump in the watershed of the Blackfoot River” and attempts to “keep this information quiet.” Grimes also penned a letter to Attorney General Steve Bullock, dated March 11, calling the repository selection process “underhanded and unethical.” He said unless Bullock can assure him that Section 35 is off the table, “my neighbors and I will have no alternative but to fight this terrible decision in the public arena and, unfortunately, in court.” Grimes agrees with McInnis that the waste should be taken over Rogers Pass.

Top: Thirty-six years after the blowout of the Mike Horse Dam, the headwaters of the Blackfoot River have yet to recover. “You can sample fish in the Blackfoot that still have high levels of cadmium in them,” says Bruce Farling of Montana Trout Unlimited. Bottom: Mike Grimes staunchly opposes entombing the tailings on Section 35, which sits across the road from his property. “It’s a stupid place to be putting a repository when they’re trying to protect the Blackfoot River,” he says.


The Blackfoot River, one of the most revered and iconic rivers in the West, effectively originates from a 4-inch pipe, and then flows 132 miles to its confluence with the Clark Fork River. The river’s banks near the headwaters still show signs of acid mine drainage.

But if it has to stay in the watershed, where would he put it? “If I was forced to choose—and this is like choosing one of your children to shoot—if I was forced to make a decision on these sites, that’s the only one that’s dry,” he says, placing his finger on Section 36 of the map. “It’s a whole mile away from the Blackfoot.” Section 36 is east of Section 35, toward the Sieben Ranch, and it happens to be home to a popular sledding hill. As Haaland would later say when driving by the hill, “This would have been a really bad idea. You only thought people were mad,” suggesting the outcry over Section 36 would be even louder. Grimes and McInnis suspect that the reason for precluding Section 36 from consideration has more to do with its proximity to the Sieben Ranch than the sledding hill. As for John Baucus, he says he’s still negotiating with the state and has been for several months. The talks are focused on process more than money, he says. He declines to estimate what he believes the property’s mineral and development rights are worth, and notes that putting a price tag on it is part of the complication. “We obviously intend to be up in this area for a long time,” Baucus says. “We don’t want to put ourselves at risk, but there’s risk in anything you do, so where’s the line at? That’s what we’re trying to figure out.”

A

mber Kamps, the Lincoln district ranger, takes issue with the suggestion that the Stimson arrangement has in any way influenced the agencies’ apparent preference for Section 35. “Despite what you may hear from other people outside of our two agen-

cies, it wasn’t a driver,” she says. “It still isn’t a driver…The focus is completely on, Where is the best site? And how well is that site going to be able to handle waste for the long term? We’re talking infinity here.” Even if it is a driver, Section 35 appears to be the best site currently under consideration. No one says it’s not, except those for whom Section 35 sits within eyeshot (or earshot of a parade of dump trucks). Unfortunately for the agencies, the perception of disingenuousness can be as damaging as the real thing. The next step is for the Forest Service and DEQ to release the technical analysis outlining all of the options. It’s expected by late April, and a comment period will follow. “Everyone recognizes that where this repository goes is a huge decision, and it’s something that’s going to impact all of us who like and care about and want to play in the Blackfoot,” says Ihle. “So we have to make sure that we do a good job of displaying all the information we’ve collected thus far—the pros and cons of each one of these repositories— and do that well so the public can really be part of that process, and we’re trying to follow through with that.” Regional Forester Leslie Weldon and DEQ Director Richard Opper will make the final decision. The removal of the Mike Horse Dam will begin following a year or two of design and prep work at both the dam and repository site. After more than three decades since the dam blew out, after seven decades since the Mike Horse Dam was built, and after more than a century since the Mike Horse Mine was first established, it’s been a long time coming. Count Bruce Farling, director of Montana Trout Unlimited, among those who have grown impatient.

“That mess up there has kept the fishery of the upper Blackfoot suppressed for a long time,” he says. “You can sample fish in the Blackfoot that still have high levels of cadmium in them, and this is cadmium that was mobilized when that dam blew out in ’75 and got into bed sediments and is constantly rolling downstream…The dam itself is a Milltown type of situation. That thing has the potential to come out again in a catastrophic kind of release.” Milltown, of course, is the federal Superfund site at the confluence of the Blackfoot and Clark Fork rivers. It was officially removed in 2008, and restora-

tion efforts are ongoing. Some say that if the Mike Horse Dam blew again, the years of work and millions of dollars spent on the Milltown Dam removal would be for naught. Farling says removing the Mike Horse Dam will be the easy part; it’s just excavation. The hard part will be limiting and treating seepage from the mine’s underground works, finding and removing other discrete waste piles, and treating the contaminated wetlands downstream. And then there’s the long-term restoration and monitoring. “There’s stuff that we flat out aren’t going to be able to take care of permanently, that we’re going to have to deal with in perpetuity,” he says. Which is why the wastewater treatment, and the pipe running from it that essentially serves as the Blackfoot’s headwaters, will remain long after the dam is gone. “That stuff has to be collected and treated forever,” he says. “It’s a genie out of the bottle situation not unlike Butte, where we have all those underground workings. Of course, all that stuff ends up in the [Berkeley Pit]. We don’t have a pit up at the Mike Horse. What we got is drainages and it’s ending up in the creek.” Farling, like Brick, says he’s concerned about groundwater issues at Section 35, and he encouraged the DEQ to explore other options, including McDonald Meadows and hauling the material over Rogers Pass. But he acknowledges that science—and “agency prejudices”—both point to Section 35. He says he’s told Grimes and McInnis that if it’s ultimately selected he’d push the state to “mitigate the hell out of that for those guys.” Once the dam is trucked away, the restoration will begin. It’s years off, but the DEQ last month began soliciting public comment on a draft conceptual restoration plan for the Upper Blackfoot

Mining Complex. It proposes general approaches to integrating restoration and remediation activities. Grimes, incidentally, says seeking comment on the restoration before seeking comment on the repository puts the cart before the horse, and he cites it as another example of the agencies’ deceitfulness. But the document itself makes clear that the purpose of defining the restoration vision is so the dam’s removal can support the best long-term outcome. The Montana Department of Justice’s Natural Resource Damage Program will accept comments through April 15. In the end, the dilemma centers on the struggle between the urgency to remove the dam as soon as possible, mounted up over decades, and the patience required to find the safest possible site. Every spring Farling gets nervous about the potential for a replay of 1975. And with the current snowpack deeper than it’s been in years, this spring will probably keep him on edge more than most. Those leading the upper Blackfoot’s restoration stress the need to do it right the first time. The trick is striking the appropriate balance between prudence and promptness—and staying within budget. “You don’t want to do it twice, I tell you what,” Ihle says. “This is our one shot in history. You have to think about that. If you just want to make it go away, you make decisions that work for now, and you basically say, ‘We’re not going to worry about the long term operations and maintenance and the risk. We just want to get it done.’ We cannot work that way. When’s the next time we’re going to get [$39 million]? When is the next time we’re going to see this kind of money? We don’t have the money to do this twice.” mfrank@missoulanews.com

Shellie Haaland, a reclamation specialist with the Department of Environmental Quality, stands inside the wastewater treatment plant that cleans water flowing from the Upper Blackfoot Mining Complex. The treatment plant was built by ASARCO, and it will remain long after the restoration is complete.

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dish

the

Wining and dining the rooster FLASHINTHEPAN After a recent wave of raccoon attacks, the last of our egg-laying chickens are dead. Two roosters and a four-year-old post-menopausal hen are all that remain. The desert might be the toughest place on earth to raise chickens. The landscape is dry and open, but the law of the jungle presides just the same. Virtually every weakness in my chicken security apparatus has been exploited. Since moving here with Annabelle and five others, I’ve purchased eight full-grown chickens, mostly roosters, and about 30 chicks from the feed store, in several batches. That’s 38 chickens added to the original flock of six. And now there are three, thanks to the owls, bobcats, raccoons, neighbor dogs and coyotes. And they’ve had close calls with ravens, rattlesnakes and golf-ball sized hail. Old age and the dinner table are pretty much the only threats my hens don’t face. After a lifetime of eggs, kitchen scrap disposal and friendship, there’s no way I’d kill one of my hens—especially when you can buy a nice local organic bird, pre-killed, for about $15. Even after they stop laying, my girls are free to frolic and scratch until they die. But alas, despite the attractive retirement package, none of my hens have managed to live long enough to enjoy their golden years. But if anyone is likely to die of old age it will be the goldcolored Buff Orpington hen named Annabelle 2.0. Buff Orpington is a breed whose members, in my experience, have the sharpest survival instincts of any chicken. My very first flock, back in Montana, included eight hens, all of which we named Annabelle, and two of which were Buff Orpingtons. When a dog got into the yard and killed six of the Annabelles, the only two that escaped were the Orpingtons, who had the presence of mind to run for the coop. Those two ended up raising the next flock of chicks, which included a single Buff Orpington chick who came to be known as Annabelle 2.0. Thanks to her Buff Orpington genetics and perhaps the advice of her stepmoms, Annabelle 2.0 has become the Fidel Castro of chickens, surviving each and every attempt on her life since we’ve moved to New Mexico. Sometimes I think that after so many lessons learned the hard way, I might finally be getting the hang of desert chicken farming. I’ve put up a second fence, I make sure to lock the coop as soon as they

go in for the night, and I got a dog to chase away the critters. And then, just when I’m feeling like I’ve made progress, the girls get hit again. Lately I’ve been investing heavily in roosters, because they’re aggressive enough to run at whatever’s coming, and usually big enough to satisfy its hunger. Every time I lose a rooster, I figure, that could have been a hen. And roosters are easier and cheaper to replace. But eventually we ended up with a rooster named Rusty who began surviving attacks that the

Photo by Ari LeVaux

hens didn’t. Thanks to Rusty’s survival instinct, the chicken population dropped to just Rusty, Annabelle 2.0 and Marco Pollo. That’s when we realized that Marco—the only survivor of 30 feed store chicks— was a rooster too. Needless to say, the eggs are not exactly flowing. A few weeks ago, Annabelle 2.0 began spending all day in the coop, and I wondered if she might finally be dying. Losing her would be sad, but I would also have been proud to finally have a chicken die of old age. Then it occurred to me that she was broody—a phase hens go through when all they want to do is incubate eggs.

by ARI LeVAUX

Annabelle 2.0 has been broody in the past, and I’ve given her fertilized eggs to sit on. She gets flat as a rug, and has managed to incubate as many as 15 eggs, rotating them constantly to regulate their temperature. She was an attentive mom, but all her chicks died. When I thought she was broody again, I pictured the old girl raising one last brood, and this time, with my help, some of them might survive. I gave her some fertilized eggs, but she showed zero interest, nesting elsewhere in the coop and completely ignoring them. I gave up on her being broody, collected the eggs, and made an omelet. Later that day I had to kick Annabelle 2.0 out of the coop so I could change the straw bedding. As soon as she hit the ground, she began running around the yard frantically, as both roosters pursued her like heat-seeking missiles. When they finally pinned her down, it was a most unsavory spectacle. Spending her days being raped by a pair of young roosters wasn’t what I had in mind for Annabelle 2.0’s golden years. And while I guarantee my hens a full retirement plan, without the threat of ever becoming dinner, I’ve made no such promise to the roosters. My thoughts turned to coq au vin, the French dish of rooster braised in wine. Coq au vin can be complicated to make—Julia Child’s version requires about a month of prep time—but it can also be very simple: Brown the bird in the oven and simmer it in red wine until the meat falls off the bone. Rusty is the obvious choice. He was purchased full-grown, so killing him will involve less emotional baggage. As a chick, Marco Pollo was always exploring and blazing trails for the other chicks, hence his name. I always liked Marco, and was bummed when he turned out to be a rooster. Marco Pollo is smaller than Rusty. And he doesn’t attack your legs like Rusty does. In fact, Rusty bullies Marco quite a bit, and I have a feeling that without Rusty around, Marco Pollo will be a lot nicer to Annabelle 2.0. The feed store sells chicks in springtime. Once Rusty has been wined and dined, as it were, I’m going to get more chicks and give Marco Pollo and Annabelle 2.0 a chance to raise a family. One of the perks of old age is plenty of second chances, and Annabelle 2.0 has earned her share.

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www.justinshobnobcafe.com

Missoula Independent

hardroll snack at Bernice’s? Man does your dough stretch at Bernice’s. See you soon. Love Bernice. www.bernicesbakerymt.com open M – F 6a – 8p 190 S. 3rd St. W. 728-1358

Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway (across from courthouse) • 728-8900 Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wifi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$

Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced beega) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$

Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 Did you know $5 can get you a cup of coffee to go and a croissant for breakfast at Bernice’s? Did you know $5 can get you a half of a vegetarian sandwich and a coffee at Bernice’s? Did you know $5 can get you two cupcakes for dessert after dinner at Bernice’s? Did you know $5 can get you a loaf of sliced sourdough and a

Blue Canyon Kitchen 3720 N. Reserve 541-BLUE (adjacent to the Hilton Garden Inn) www.bluecanyonrestaurant.com We offer creatively-prepared American cooking served in the comfortable elegance of their lodge restaurant featuring unique dining rooms. Kick back in the Tavern; relish the cowboy chic and

Page 18 March 24–March 31, 2011

culinary creations in the great room; visit with the chefs and dine in the kitchen or enjoy the fresh air on the Outdoor Patio. Parties and special events can be enjoyed in the Bison Room. Winter Hours: 4pm - 9 pm Seven Days a Week. $$-$$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to late. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 38 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $


the Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 Cold Stone Creamery offers the Ultimate Ice Cream Experience. Ice Cream, Ice Cream Cakes, Shakes, and Smoothies the Way You Want It. Come in for our weekday specials. Get Gift Cards any time. Remember, it's a great day for ice cream at Cold Stone Creamery. $-$$

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Spring weather brings patio seating! Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$

Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery service within a 3 mile radius.

Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins Ave. • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com All our menu items are made from scratch, featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive tea menu. Missoula's Original Bubble Teas. Beer, Wine and Sake available. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Jazz Wednesdays starting at 7pm. Lunch 11:30-3:00, Happy Hour 3-6, Dinner 5 - close. $-$$

Family Dental Group Southgate Mall • 541-2886 Many people think because they don’t have dental insurance they can’t afford to go to a dentist. Preventative dental services (2 cleanings, an annual exam and 4 x-rays) cost about what a guy spends on haircuts in a year. Your first exam and x-rays with a new dentist will usually cost more but it will save you money over time.

Jakers 3515 Brooks St. www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$

Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and an espresso bar till close. WE DELIVER On Campus & to the area between Beckwith, Higgins & 5th Street. Delivery hours: M-F 11-2. $-$$

Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$

Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$

Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West • 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ Oil & Vinegar Southgate Mall • 549-7800 Mon.-Sat. 10:00 AM-9:00 PM Sun. 11:00 AM6:00 PM. With a visit to Oil & Vinegar, you will discover an international selection of over 40 estate-produced oils & vinegars suspended in glass amphora-shaped containers on a dramatic backlit wall. Guests can sample the varieties and select from various shapes & sizes of bottles to have filled with an “on-tap” product of choice.

dish

HAPPIESTHOUR The Iron Horse Brew Pub What you’re drinking: In honor of Missoula’s impending spring fever, the Tulip seemed like a solid choice this week. Billed as “an Iron Horse favorite,” this refreshing little number blends Absolut Vodka with Bols Black Raspberry Schnapps and a decent helping of lemonade. The Tulip balances out some of the Iron Horse’s hotter menu items without losing its springtime flavor. It hits the spot when the sun starts its annual teasing routine. Atmosphere: While the hurricane mentioned in the Tulip’s menu slug may reference the glass your drink comes in, it could just as easily apply to the scene around you. We found the joint packed with throngs of noontime March Madness spectators last Friday afternoon. But don’t let the lunch crowd fool you; the families and local business types quickly give way to a glut of college-age drinkers as the evening wears on. Sure the Iron Horse starts to smell a bit like a magazine cologne ad around 11 p.m., but stake your claim early at the 501 Lounge upstairs and you can avoid the sea of elbows below. Claim to fame: A tight-lipped bartender declined to chat so we’ll have to fill in the blanks ourselves. The most obvious point of interest is that the Iron Horse used to reside in the old railroad depot at the end of Higgins Avenue in the early 1990s. The place was

Photo by Alex Sakariassen

attached to Bayern Brewing back then. Also, Iron Horse fries have made our Best of Missoula list several years running. Happy hour: Monday Madness features a bucket of five beers for $7. Fat Tuesdays bring half-price well drinks 9–11 p.m., as well as $5 pitchers of domestic beer. Wicked Wednesday is a true drinker’s paradise, though, with $4 deals on a Jager shot with a bottle of Pabst and “strawberry sex drinks.” Sounds like a definite hump day happy-ending. Where to find it: At 501 N. Higgins Ave. —Alex Sakariassen Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, e-mail editor@missoulanews.com.

March

COFFEE SPECIAL

Organic Earth & Sky Blend $10.75/lb. Missoula’s Best Coffee

BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

BUTTERFLY HERBS 232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE Open 7 Days a Week 11:30 am - 9:00 pm 3075 N. Reserve Street Missoula • 327-0731

Mondays & Thursdays - $1 SUSHI (all day) (Not available for To-Go orders)

Daily TEMPURA Special - $1.25 for 2 pieces - 11:30am-2:30pm Tuesdays - LADIES’ NIGHT, $5 Sake Bombs & Special Menu Missoula Independent

Page 19 March 24–March 31, 2011


Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. • 543-3188 Don’t feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$

Pita Madness 4-6 PM • 10 PM - MIDNIGHT

$4.99 PITAS 541-PITA(7482) 130 North Higgins Ave • Missoula

Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $8.50. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $7.75. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$. Pearl Café 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French specialties, bison, elk, trout, fresh fish daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Three course bistro menu with wine $30, Tues. Wed. Thurs. nights, November through March. Extensive wine list, 18 wines by the glass, local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the warm and inviting dining areas. Go to our website Pearlcafe.us to check out nightly specials and bistro menus, make reservations or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Pita Pit 130 North Higgins Avenue 541-PITA (7482) • pitapitusa.com Fresh Thinking Healthy Eating. Enjoy a pita rolled just for you. Hot meat and cool fresh veggies topped with your favorite sauce. Try our Chicken Caesar, Gyro, Philly Steak, Breakfast Pita, or Vegetarian Falafel to name just a few. For your convenience we are open until 3am 7 nights a week. Call if you need us to deliver!

d o w n t o w n

Sushi Bar & Japanese Bistro

Spring is upon us! Enjoy our Refreshing Lunch Specials Daily from $7! When we say Not just Sushi! we mean it.

403 North Higgins Ave • 406.549.7979 www.sushihanamissoula.com

Red Robin 2901 Brooks Street 830-3170 www.redrobin.com Half the price, twice the fun! Halfy Hour at the Southgate Mall Red Robin®! Half price bar drinks Monday – Friday, 4-6 p.m. and Monday – Saturday, 9-10 p.m. Enjoy a drink with one of our insanely delicious Gourmet Burgers, Bottomless Steak Fries. Or, snack on one of our shareable starters with friends! $-$$ SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. 549-2790 Share a meal within the warm elegance of our location at the historic Wilma Building. Enjoy our seasonal menu of classic Mediterranean and European fare with a contemporary American twist, featuring the freshest local ingredients. Serving lunch Tues-Sat 11:00-2:30, and dinner Tues-Sun 5:00-Close. Beer and Wine available. $$-$$$ Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine 542–1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for Lunch and Dinner, featuring a Sat.-Sun. Brunch 11-2pm. Great Fresh food With Huge Portions. Featuring international & Irish pub fare as well as locally produced specials. FULL BAR, BEER, WINE, MARTINIS. $-$$ The Sunrise Saloon & Casino 1100 block of Strand 728-1559 Every day is a great day at the Sunrise Saloon! Enjoy two happy hours daily, plus daily drink

$…Under $5

World Starts With A Perfect Breakfast!

www.thinkfft.com Mon-Thurs 7am - 8pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

Page 20 March 24–March 31, 2011

NOT JUST SUSHI Sushi Hana Downtown offering a new idea for your dining experience. Meat, poultry, vegetables and grain are a large part of Japanese cuisine. We also love our fried comfort food too. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. Corner of Pine & Higgins. 549-7979. $$–$$$ Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you'll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Drive • 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 14 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Sun - Wed 83pm, Thurs - Sat 8-8pm $-$$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming • 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

BITTERROOT Burger Shack 205 Main St., Stevensville • 777-2370 Come take a bite out of our 1/2 pound big & beefy burgers. The only burger joint in Missoula and the Bitterroot serving 100% Certified Angus Beef, hand pattied, charbroiled and made to order. We have over a dozen mouth watering specialty burgers to choose from, like the Inside Out, stuffed with creamy gorgonzola cheese and fresh chopped bacon. Or the Philly Cheesesteak made with 100% Certified Angus top sirloin - touted to be the best outside of Philly! It's not just a burger, it's a destination. The Burger Shack is open Monday - Saturday, 11:00am to 8:00pm. Also serving beer & wine. Orders to go 777-2370. $-$$ Spice of Life 163 S. 2nd St., Hamilton 363-4433 Spice of Life welcomes you to the Bitterroot’s best locavore dining experience. Serving up fresh and fun food in a conscientious manner. For lunch try one of our hand made burgers from Lolo Locker or one of our fabulous fresh salads. Dinner selections include natural beef which contains no growth hormones or antibiotics ever, sustainable seafood selections and pasta dishes made from Montana wheat from Pasta Montana. Quench your thirst with beer from right here in Hamilton or try one of our reasonably priced yet fantastic wine selections. Children’s menu available. No reservations. So come as you are to Spice of Life! 163 S 2nd St. Hamilton, MT. Lunch: Mon - Fri 11:00 to 2:00 Dinner: Wed - Sat 5:00 to 9:00. 363-4433.

$–$$…$5–$15

A Perfect

Missoula Independent

specials. Wednesday is Ladies night. Missoula's only dedicated country bar with live country music Thursday - Saturday. Play our liberal machines while enjoying great entertainment and friendly service. 21+ only. Open daily 8 a.m. - 2:00 a.m.

$$–$$$…$15 and over


Arts & Entertainment listings March 24–March 31, 2011

8

days a week

Photo courtesy Nancy Nutile-McMenemy

Pickin’ party. The Infamous Stringdusters play bluegrass during an installment of the Bitterroot Performing Arts series at the Hamilton Performing Arts Center, 327 Fairgrounds Road in Hamilton, Fri., March 25 at 8 PM. $27.50–$22.50 depending on seats, all ages. Visit bartc.org for tickets or call 363-7946.

THURSDAY March

24

Peruse the slick works of a contemporary painter and drawer when the Montana Museum of Art and Culture (MMAC) presents the exhibit Sense and Sensation: Laurie Fendrich, Paintings and Drawings 1990–2010, which opens at noon in the Paxson Gallery, in UM’s PARTV Center. Another MMAC exhibit titled Flow by Barry Hood—a collection of sculptural glassworks—opens at the same time in the Meloy Gallery, also in the

PARTV Center. $5 suggested donation. Call 243-2019.

nightlife Get craft-astic during the MOPS Spring Fling Craftacular, an open house featuring products from vendors around Missoula occurring from 5:30–8:30 PM in the back parking lot of the Christian Life Center Church, 3801 Russell St. Free. Hang with some expert string pluckers when Him & Her (a duo featuring Travis Yost and Caroline Keys) plays tunes featuring upright bass, acoustic guitar and banjo during the Top Hat’s monthly artist-in-residence series every Thu. in March from 6–8 PM. Free, all ages. Stop at the intersection of beer and opera when

the Montana Lyric Opera presents another installment of its Opera on Draft performance series, starting at 6 PM at the Badlander. $5. Slap your Adam’s apple with a flyswatter when Dan Dubuque plays slap blues/soul guitar at 6 PM at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-PINT. Escape your coop and head to Raising Chickens 2.0: No More Coop and Run, a talk with permaculture expert Paul Wheaton that begins at 6:30 PM in the large conference end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., March 25, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

Seed-Starting Supplies Seeds Potatoes Onion Sets Berries Asparagus Bulbs Meadowsweet Herbs 180 S. 3rd W. 728.0543 meadowsweet-herbs.com

Missoula Independent

Page 21 March 24–March 31, 2011


room of the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Visit permies.com/permaculture/missoula. by Meridian Ltd.

Spring Jeans & Jewels Sale Friday, March 24 & Saturday, March 25 Select Denim & Jewelry up to 75% Off! 124 N Higgins Ave | Downtown Missoula Open: mon-Sat 10am - 6pm | 406-829-3501

Spit out some scorching spondees or stanzas when UM’s The Oval and Big Sky High School’s Aerie International present the 2011 Citywide Poetry Slam, which features sign ups at 6:30 PM and music by The Ones From There, followed by the slam at 7, all at the Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St. All work must be original and under three minutes. $5. Call 721-2401. Get your fix of Harry, Ron and Hermione with a student-run musical featuring characters from Harry Potter during Potterwatch: A Harry Potter Musical, which begins at 6:30 PM at Hellgate High School’s auditorium, 900 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Get edgy with a theater performance told in an unexpected format about the demise of a marriage when the Alpine Theatre Project presents its “ATB Winter Lab” performance of Jason Robert Brown’s The Last Five Years, starting at 7 PM at Whitefish’s O’Shaughnessy Center, 1 Central Ave. $25/$18 students. Call 862SHOW for tickets. Cast your vote for a better electoral system when the Peace and Justice Film Series continues with a screening of Hacking Democracy, at 7 PM in the University Center Theater. Free. Visit peaceandjusticefilms.org. Take an intellectual toke when author James Foster presents a discussion and signing for his book Bong Hits 4 Jesus: A Perfect Constitutional Storm in Alaska’s Capital, which starts at 7 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881. (See Books in this issue.) Dig into an evening about politics on the Emerald Isle when the Global Issues & Foreign Film Series continues with the program Ireland Yesterday & Today, which features a lecture on present and past political/social issues in Ireland with expert Dermot Keogh, followed by a screening of the film The Wind that Shakes the Barley, starting at 7 PM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $5 donation requested. Visit wildlifefilms.org. Watch green words spill off the page when the Wild Mercy Environmental Reading Series continues with readings from Jeff Gailus and Josh Slotnick, starting at 7 PM at The Missoulian Angler, 401 S. Orange St. Free. Check out a story about a playboy who just wants to dance when the UM School of Theatre and Dance presents a performance of the musical Crazy for You, starting at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 children age 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets. Cure your jittery mind with something mellow when The Flathead Lake Brewing Company of Missoula, 424 N. Higgins Ave., presents Reggae with Supa J, starting at 7:30 PM. Free. Call 542-3847.

Missoula Independent

Page 22 March 24–March 31, 2011

Relax with an evening of Baroque music when Trio Sonnerie performs at 7:30 PM at the University Congregational Church, 401 University Ave. $25 suggested donation. Enjoy a high class comedy that touches on themes of kindness and affection when the Sentinel High School Drama Department presents a performance of John Patrick’s The Curious Savage, at 7:30 PM in the Margaret Johnson Theatre at the school, 901 South Ave. W. $6/$5 students. Call 728-2400 Ext. 7065. Walk into a wicked satire about a man who sets out on a road trip to persuade people to join an underground coalition that will indelibly change America during a performance of Pitch, which begins at 7:30 PM in a basement in downtown Missoula. The location of the play will be e-mailed after purchasing a ticket. $10/$5 students. Visit pitchmt.blogspot.com. Pop and lock yourself over to UM to catch The Main Attraction: A Pop Dance Spectacular, a night of pop choreography by UM student Steve Teran that begins at 8 PM in The Open Space, in UM’s PARTV Building. Free. Call 243-4481. (See Scope in this issue.) Hip shake the night away with some Canadians when Missoula ex-pat band Two Year Touqe plays indie pop during a reunion show from 8–11 PM at the Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W. Vera, Tyson Ballew, The Scribblers and Miles Standish Proud open. $5, all ages. Call 549-7555. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Heat up the night with some Middle Eastern music during a Middle East Concert with the Georges Lammam Ensemble and Oud player Naser Musa, which begins at 8 PM at the University Center Ballroom. $14/$8 students. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptopfueled hip hop, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets booties bumpin’ at 9 PM. This week features special guest DJ Likes Girls. $3. It’s all about your dance-tastic rhythm method when Whiskey Rebellion plays outlaw country at 9 PM at The Sunrise Saloon & Casino, on the 1100 block of Strand Ave. Free. Call 728-1559. Kung Fu Kongress overrides your veto on the funk when it plays funk at 9 PM at the Palace. $5/$10 for those ages 18-20. Spark your spark plugs when DJ MVP makes the dancefloor sizzle when he plays at 9 PM at The Dark Horse Bar, 1805 Regent St. Free. Call 728-1559. Check your megabytes at the door and get ready for a blazing night of punk and pop punk when Kalispell’s The Graveyard Girl Scouts plays with Seattle’s Smoke Jumper and

Ol’ Doris, plus a secret TBA band, starting at 9:30 PM at the Kalispell Eagles Lodge, 37 S. First St. W. $5. Pay a visit to your favorite folk doctor when David Boone & The Controls play folk and rock at 10 PM at the Top Hat. Darah Fogarty opens. $5.

FRIDAY March

25

Slap the asphalt because it’s someone else’s fault when Seattle’s Massy Ferguson rocks you with a set of rock and Americana at noon in the University Center atrium. Free. (See Noise in this issue.) Expect nothing but the creative truth during “Telling True Stories,” a nonfiction craft lecture with author and New Yorker staff writer Susan Orlean that begins at 12:10 PM in Room 210 of UM’s McGill Hall. Free. Call 243-5267.

nightlife Break out the funk protector when Freetown Turnaround plays funk during the Top Hat’s FamilyFriendly Friday concert series, from 6–8 PM. Free, all ages. Emancipate yourself from mental grape juice slavery when El3-OH! plays Gypsy jazz at 6 PM at the tasting room of the Ten Spoon Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Free. Call 549-8703. Bang your internal drum to some army band music when America’s Corps and Joint Base Lewis McChord present a performance by The Fightin’ 56th Army Band with “A Night of Music,” which features guest musicians from Missoula County Public Schools, and begins at 6 PM at the University Theatre. Free. Get your fix of Harry, Ron and Hermione with a student run musical featuring characters from Harry Potter during Potterwatch: A Harry Potter Musical, which begins at 6:30 PM at Hellgate High School’s Auditorium, 900 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Get edgy with a theater performance told in an unexpected format about the demise of a marriage when the Alpine Theatre Project presents its “ATB Winter Lab” performance of Jason Robert Brown’s The Last Five Years, starting at 7 PM at Whitefish’s O’Shaughnessy Center, 1 Central Ave. $25/$18 students. Call 862S H OW o r v i s i t a l p i n e t h e a t r e project.org for tickets. Hear true stories from the author of such books as The Orchid Thief and The Bullfighter Checks Her Makeup when New Yorker staff writer Susan Orlean presents a nonfiction reading at 7 PM in the Dell Brown Room of UM’s Turner Hall. Free. Call 243-5267. (See Spotlight in this issue.)


SPOTLIGHT touqe party To reference David Bowie’s popular lyric, some bands go through “Ch-ch-ch-ch-Changes.” Two Year Touque, the indie pop band that used to call Missoula its home, is no exception. Here’s the skinny about them, if you don’t know: Back in 2008, the band’s two core members, husband and wife Paul and Sarah Copoc, set off for Canadian pastures by moving to Paul’s hometown of Brantford, Ontario. According to Paul, Two Year Touqe’s first show in Brantford went off well, but then things dissipated. The band called it quits in 2009 after playing for six years. The Copocs say they decided to put the band to rest due to scheduling problems, and the lack of a tight knit community of musicians in their new town, among other reasons. “It just ran its course,” Paul says. Since then, they’ve kept busy with work, parenting and playing music. At present, they front an unnamed band that’s more garage rock oriented than the whimsical, twee pop style of Two Year Toque, Paul says. Recently, though, the duo revived WHAT: Two Year Touqe reunion show with openers Miles Standish Proud, Vera, Tyson Ballew and The Scribblers WHEN: Thu., March 24, at 8 PM WHERE: Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W.

photo by Sarah Daisy Lindmark

their old band for a one-off house show in Brantford, and it was a smashing success. They’ll now play out when the mood strikes. Lucky for us, the Copocs are in town this week, and they’re resurrecting Two Year Touqe for a special reunion gig. It will feature members from the band’s previous Missoula incarnation, including Missoulian arts reporter Joe Nickell on drums, bassist Bryan Hickey, and percussionist Craig Domes. As for their tunes, Paul says they’ll be playing songs from the band’s last two records, In The Elephant Garden and The Midi West. Rounding out the night is a set by Miles Standish Proud, an REM cover band featuring members of Volumen, Ex-Cocaine and Secret Powers. Local rock duo Vera also plays, along with one-man folk punk from Tyson Ballew, and up-and-coming 10-year-old indie folk duo The Scribblers. —Ira Sather-Olson

HOW MUCH: $5

See some badasses lace up and kick ass when the Hellgate Rollergirls present the kickoff to its spring season with a bout between the Brawlin’ Mollies and Dirt Road Dolls, at 7 PM at the Adams Center. $20 for VIP track-level seating/$14 general admission/free children age 5 and under. Get tickets at all GrizTix outlets, griztix.com, or by calling 243-4051. Check out a story about a playboy who just wants to dance when the UM School of Theatre and Dance presents a performance of the musical Crazy for You, starting at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 children age 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit umtheatredance.org. Enjoy a high class comedy that touches on themes of kindness and affection when the Sentinel High School Drama Department presents a performance of John Patrick’s The Curious Savage, at 7:30 PM in the Margaret Johnson Theatre at the school, 901 South Ave. W. $6/$5 students. Call 728-2400 Ext. 7065. Walk into a wicked satire about a man who sets out on a road trip to persuade people to join an under-

ground coalition that will indelibly change America during a performance of Pitch, which begins at 7:30 PM in a basement in downtown Missoula. The location of the play will be e-mailed after purchasing a ticket. $10/$5 students. Visit pitchmt.blogspot.com. You might as well give a pluck when the UM Symphony Orchestra performs at 7:30 PM in the University Theatre. $10/$5 students and seniors. Call 243-6880. Hand your ticket to the conductor and climb on board when Railroad Earth plays progressive bluegrass at 7:30 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $26, with tickets available at Rockin Rudys and online at vootie.com. Laugh it up while watching a story about a drama critic and his killhappy family when the Montana Actors’ Theatre presents a performance of Joseph Kesselring’s Arsenic & Old Lace, at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15/$7.50 for student rush tickets at the box office only. Visit mtactors.com. Pop and lock yourself over to UM to catch The Main Attraction: A Pop

Dance Spectacular, a night of choreography by UM student Steve Teran that begins at 8 PM in The Open Space, in UM’s PARTV Building. Free. Call 243-4481. (See Scope in this issue.) Clear the cobwebs from your ears when The Infamous Stringdusters plays bluegrass during another installment of the Bitterroot Performing Arts Council’s concert series, at 8 PM at the Hamilton Performing Arts Center, 327 Fairgrounds Road. $27.50–$22.50 depending on seats, all ages. Visit bartc.org for tickets or call 363-7946. You should be more than willing to folk out when Kathy Colton & The Reluctants play folk and blues at 8 PM at the Symes Hot Springs Hotel, 209 Wall St. in Hot Springs. No cover, but pass-the-hat donations welcome. Go ahead and chug the sage-laced Kool-Aid when Strange Brew plays classic rock and soul at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Break out of tap into the Hollywood’s music with

the nursing home and industrial bone when 26z plays industrial Kalispell metal band

Missoula Independent

Page 23 March 24–March 31, 2011


photo by Chad Harder

The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents performances of Arsenic & Old Lace at the Crystal Theatre Fri., March 25–Sat., March 26 and Wed., March 30–Sat., April 2, at 7:30 PM nightly, with 2 PM matinees Sun., March 27, and Sun., April 3. $15/$7.50 student rush tickets for Fri.–Sat. shows and $12/$6 student rush tickets for Sun., Wed.–Thu. shows. Visit mtactors.com.

Throne of Malediction, at 9 PM at The Dark Horse Bar, 1805 Regent St. Free. Call 728-1559. Dream another lucid dream because you can’t control yourself when Hamilton’s Dream Addiction plays covers by Stone Temple Pilots, Van Halen and AC/DC, at 9 PM at the Badlander. $5. Ladies rule the soundwaves when Aural Fixation presents Dark Dreams: Extreme Estrogen, a dance night featuring an array of electronic music styles from female artists including DJs Tygerlily, Sara Square and HAuLi, plus Bozeman’s goth/industrial band Damsel in The Dollhouse, at 9 PM at the Palace. The Hypsy Gypsy Bellydancing Troupe also performs. $5/$10 for those ages 18–20, with $5 off for women who get there before 10 PM. Get knee-deep in the twang when Russ Nasset and The Revelators play rockabilly and country at 9 PM at Larry’s Six Mile Tavern in Huson, 23384 Huson Road. Free. Center your chi and catch Joan Zen when she plays a mix of funk, reggae and soul at the Union Club, at 9:30 PM. Free. Inject something shimmery into your soul when Northern Lights plays at Florence’s High Spirits Club & Casino, 5341 Hwy. 93 N., at 9:30 PM. Free. That court order says you should scoot your combat boots over to The Sunrise Saloon & Casino, on the 1100 block of Strand Ave., so you can catch Sho Down when it plays at 9:30 PM. Free. Call 728-1559. Party Trained rocks your spork and plays with some pork when it plays a variety of tunes at Harry Davids, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, at 9:30 PM. $2. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. Leave the vacuum packed bags of your essence at home when Bend,

Missoula Independent

Page 24 March 24–March 31, 2011

Ore.’s Eric Tollefson plays blues and acoustic music with Seattle roots rockers Cody Bebe & The Crooks, at 10 PM at the Top Hat. $7.

“A Night to Remember,” which occurs from 6–9 PM at the The Keep Restaurant, 102 Ben Hogan Drive. $50, with tickets at The Keep, Rockin’ Rudy’s and online at missoulachorus.org.

SATURDAY

Get your fix of Harry, Ron and Hermione with a student run musical featuring characters from Harry Potter during Potterwatch: A Harry Potter Musical, which begins at 6:30 PM at Hellgate High School’s Auditorium, 900 S. Higgins Ave. Free.

March

26

Chillax with some acoustic tunes when Bitter Root Range plays Liaisons Coffee House, 111 N. Second St. in Hamilton, from 10 AM–1 PM. Free. Get delightfully crazy by watching an opera about an innocent woman who goes a little cuckoo when Morris Productions presents another installment of The Met: Live at the Roxy with an encore screening of Donizetti’s Lucia Di Lammermoor, starting at 11 AM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $19/$17 students and seniors, with tickets at Rockin Rudy’s or online at morris productions.org. Witness the story of a playboy who just wants to dance when the UM School of Theatre and Dance presents a performance of the musical Crazy for You, starting at 2 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 children age 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit umtheatredance.org.

nightlife A pint a day keeps the psychotic doctor away when Los Amigos plays Stevensville’s Blacksmith Brewing Co., 114 Main St., at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 777-0680. Beyond the Pale kisses your walleye and slaps your kidney with kidney beans when it plays at 6 PM at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-PINT. Do your part to help the Missoula Community Chorus celebrate its 10th anniversary during its gala wine, beer tasting and auction benefit titled

Your cochlea won’t cry in pain during The Joyful Noise Music Festival, which features local musicians and raises scholarship money for Friends of Valley Christian, and begins at 6:30 PM at the auditorium of Valley Christian School, 2526 Sunset Lane. Free, but donations are accepted. Bring some extra Pomade and get slicker than snot with your dance partner when the Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins Ave., hosts a Saturday Night Dance with The City Slickers, from 7–10 PM. $5, all ages. Call 543-1573. Hang with some stanza slingers when poets Cedar Brant, Roger Dunsmore and Jenni Fellein read work from The Montana Poets Series, at 7 PM at the Grizzly Claw Trading Co., 3187 Hwy. 83 in Seeley Lake. Free. Check out a story about a playboy who just wants to dance when the UM School of Theatre and Dance presents a performance of the musical Crazy for You, starting at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 children age 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit umtheatredance.org. Enjoy a high-class comedy that touches on themes of kindness and affection when the Sentinel High School Drama Department presents a performance of John Patrick’s The Curious Savage, at 7:30 PM in the Margaret Johnson Theatre at the school, 901 South Ave. W. $6/$5 students. Call 728-2400 Ext. 7065.


Walk into a wicked satire about a man who sets out on a road trip to persuade people to join an underground coalition that will indelibly change America during a performance of Pitch, which begins at 7:30 PM in a basement in downtown Missoula. The location of the play will be e-mailed after purchasing a ticket. $10/$5 students. Visit pitchmt.blogspot.com. Laugh it up while watching a story about a drama critic and his kill-happy family when the Montana Actors’ Theatre presents a performance of Joseph Kesselring’s Arsenic & Old Lace, at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15/$7.50 for student rush tickets at the box office only. Visit mtactors.com. It’s woodwinds for the win when flautist Ceri Hofferber and alto saxophonist Addie Frasier perform during a UM student recital at 7:30 PM in UM’s Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880. Pop and lock yourself over to UM to catch The Main Attraction: A Pop Dance Spectacular, a night of choreography by UM student Steve Teran that begins at 8 PM in The Open Space, in UM’s PARTV Building. Free. Call 243-4481. (See Scope in this issue.) Go ahead and chug the sage-laced Kool-Aid when Strange Brew plays classic rock and soul at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Let your pockets overflow with meow mix when Seattle’s TacocaT, Smokejumper and Ol’ Doris play pop punk and punk at The Dark Horse Bar, 1805 Regent St., with doors opening at 8 PM. Locals The Thug Nasties open. $5. Calm your inner hulk with some smooth grooves when Indulge plays jazz at 8 PM at the Missoula Winery, 5646 W. Harrier. $5. Call 830-3296. Living Well recommends two shots of yohimbe bark extract a day to keep the doctor away when it plays classic rock, folk and blues at 8 PM at the Symes Hot Springs Hotel, 209 Wall St. in Hot Springs. No cover, but pass-the-hat donations welcome. Turn off your transistor and head to the Wilma Theatre to catch State Radio’s set of socially conscious alt-rock, starting at 8:30 PM. Golden Dogs open. $20/$18 advance, with tickets available at Rockin’ Rudy’s, Ear Candy Music, The Source in the UC, and online at browpapertickets.com. DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are guaranteed to keep you dancing to an assortment of hip hop, electronic and other bass-heavy beats ‘til the bar closes during Absolutely at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free, with visuals by V3R. Swig drinks while listening to old school rock hits, ‘80s tunes or modern indie rock songs when Dead Hipster presents Takeover!, which features “drinkin’ music” DJ’d by the

Dead Hipster DJs starting at 9 PM at the Central Bar & Grill, 143 W. Broadway St. Includes drink specials and photos with Abi Halland. Free. Celebrate Montana’s gay pageant system when The Imperial Sovereign Court of the State of Montana honors 24 years of Montana’s Gay pageants with a performance featuring the introduction of the new Mr., Miss and Ms. Gay Big Sky Title, plus music by the Dead Hipster DJs, at 9 PM at the Palace. $5/$10 for those ages 18–20. That court order says you should scoot your combat boots over to The Sunrise Saloon & Casino, on the 1100 block of Strand Ave., so you can catch Sho Down when it plays at 9:30 PM. Free. Call 728-1559. Party Trained rocks your spork and plays with some pork when it plays a variety of tunes at Harry Davids, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, at 9:30 PM. $2. Cash for Junkers want to know if you prefer credit or debit when it plays Americana with a swing at the Union Club, at 9:30 PM. Free. Glassy eyed vixens are achin’ for a musical fixin’ when Russ Nasset and The Revelators play rockabilly and country at 9:30 PM at the Full Moon Saloon in Stevensville, 207 Main St. Free. See if the snake eyes are watching you when The Balboas play hard rock at The Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9:30 PM. Cost TBA. Find free love in someone’s pint glass when Whitefish’s Moonshine Mountain plays rock and alt country with Portland, Ore. Americana band The Dust Settlers, at 10 PM at the Top Hat. $5. Catch a reverb-soaked wave when UM’s Entertainment Management Program continues the Saturday Night Music Shuffle with a “Surf Night” featuring tunes from locals The Skurfs plus Portland, Ore.’s Don & The Quixotes (which includes former Missoulian Chris Pickolick) at 10 PM at Sean Kelly’s. Proceeds will be donated to the program. $3, with non-perishable food items accepted at the door to support the Missoula Food Bank.

SUNDAY March

27

Gnaw on some African food, enjoy a Polynesian dance, and take your child to an array of kids’ activities during the International Culture and Food Festival, which runs from noon–5 PM at the University Center. The fest also includes a silent auction on the third floor from noon–4 PM for the Missoula International Friendship Program. Admission is $5/$3 children 12 and under. Call 243-6059. Laugh it up while watching a story about a drama critic and his kill-

happy family when the Montana Actors’ Theatre presents a performance of Joseph Kesselring’s Arsenic & Old Lace, at 2 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $12/$6 for student rush tickets at the box office only. Visit mtactors.com. Sweeten up your Sunday with some shimmering voices when Dolce Canto presents its spring concert titled Northern Lights, which features guest artists Ola Gjeilo, Giselle Wyers and Emily Murdock, and begins at 3 PM at UM’s Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. Suggested donation: $15/$10 children. Visit dolcecanto.info.

nightlife Sip on vino, gnaw on appetizers and hang with the final judges of the International Wildlife Film Festival (IWFF) during the IWFF’s Sneak Peek Preview Party & Meet the Final Judges event, which begins with a reception at 6 PM at Hunting & Gathering, 741 S. Higgins Ave., and is followed by a sneak preview screening of this year’s “Best of Festival” film selection at 7 PM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $25/$20 for 2011 preliminary judges. Call 728-9380. Get moving with a moving picture when the Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W., presents its Winter Cinema Film Series, which continues this week

Beer Drinker’s Profile In The Words Of Peter Tosh

Brett

What brings you to the Iron Horse today? A business lunch. Thoughts on the medical marijuana repeal? Legalize it. Tax the hell out of it. Have very few regulations on it. The focus needs to be on real threats, like synthetic drugs. Beer of choice? Kettlehouse IPA

NCAA Sweet Sixteen Starts Thursday! Something New Is Always Happening At The Horse 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866

Missoula Independent

Page 25 March 24–March 31, 2011


with the program “Free Speech Night” and runs from 6–9 PM. Free. Call 5497555 and visit zootownarts.org. Ride a literary gust during UM’s Second Wind Reading Series, which features readings from fiction writer Michael A. FitzGerald, plus second year MFA nonfiction writer Keema Waterfield, at 6:30 PM at the Top Hat. Free. Squeeze some time in for an evening of song and dance during the Over the Moon & Out of this World Concert, which raises money for the Heifer Ark Project and features music with John Floridis, The Bill Manning Trio and others, and begins at 7 PM at First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. $10/free for children age 12 and under. Get tickets at Rockin Rudy’s or at the church. Email kloos@bresnan.net. Walk into a wicked satire about a man who sets out on a road trip to persuade people to join an underground coalition that will indelibly change America during a performance of Pitch, which begins at 7:30 PM in a basement in downtown Missoula. The location of the play will be e-mailed after purchasing a ticket. $10/$5 students. Visit pitchmt.blogspot.com. Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with $4 martinis, plus jazz DJs and jazz bands starting at 8 PM. Free. This week: jazz from Amur River Jazz.

Missoula Independent

Page 26 March 24–March 31, 2011

Expect a night of adroit rhymes from some West Coast hip hop maestros when Zion I & The Grouch plays the Palace, with doors opening at 8 PM, and the show at 9. Blu, Jazz Mafia’s Shotgun Wedding, Linkletter, E.T. and DJ Brand One open. A portion of proceeds will be donated to the Poverello Center. $15 advance at Ear Candy and online at inticketing.com.

MONDAY March

28

I’m certain you’ll want to check out On the Other Hand: The Ethics of Ambivalence, a lecture with Amelie Oksenberg Rorty that begins at 3:10 PM in Room 123 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building. Free. Call 243-2311.

nightlife Tom Catmull might just show you his patented grape pickling technique when he plays a solo set from 7–10 PM at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins St. Ste. 100. Free. Use your intellect but don’t abuse it when UM hosts another installment of its President’s Lecture Series with The Use and Abuse of Morality, a talk with Amelie Oksenberg Rorty that begins at 8 PM in the University Theatre. Free. Call 243-2311 and visit umt.edu/president/lectures.

Wax it on but not off when Milkcrate Monday presents Vinyl Night, which features DJs Kris Moon, Geeter, JixsheX9 , and The Milkcrate Mechanic spinning a variety of electronic styles on wax, at the Palace at 9 PM. Free.

TUESDAY March

29

Satiate your appetite for something intellectual during another installment of the Mansfield Center Spring 2011 Brown Bag Lecture Series, which this week features the talk “The United States Institute of Peace: An Insider’s Perspective,” and begins at noon in the Mansfield Center Conference Room, on the fourth floor of UM’s Mansfield Library. Free. Call 243-2988.

nightlife Get lost in someone else’s true story, or perhaps tell one of your own, during MissoulaMoth, an open mic storytelling forum in the spirit of New York City’s The Moth, which runs from 6–9 PM at the Badlander. If you’re interested in sharing a story, you can sign-up the day of the event or e-mail missoulamoth@gmail.com. Free. Shoot some watery info into your mind when UM hosts The Drain on


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With the exception of Hunter S. Thompson, most journalists never find themselves depicted as an adulterous, drug-abusing, neurotic whacko by a well known Hollywood star in a critically acclaimed film. Still fewer watch such a negative pseudo-fictional depiction of themselves and rave about it. But Susan Orlean, a nonfiction author, New Yorker staff writer, and Meryl Streep’s character in the 2002 film Adaptation, called the film “brilliant. “ In addition, the film–based on Orlean’s book, The Orchid Thief–probably earns the award for most bizarre book-to-movie-translations ever made.

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Orlean’s narrative makes the transition from page to screen no great leap. The book was based off of her 1995 New Yorker article “Orchid Fever,” and even in its condensed version, Orlean’s unflinching depictions and laborious reportage fill every inch of the page. She describes orchid poacher John Laroche as “skinny as a stick, paleeyed, slouch-shouldered, and sharply handsome, in spite of the fact that he is missing all his front teeth,” wearing “Wraparound Mylar sunglasses, a cotton-blend shirt printed with some sort of scenic design, and trousers that bagged around his rear.” This acute detail fleshes out a character that actor

Our World, a talk with Werner Fornos about why the world’s fresh water supply is shrinking, starting at 7 PM in the University Center Ballroom. Free. Call 243-2288. (See Agenda in this issue.) Sail to a literary land down under when author Mark Tredinnick hosts a reading and signing for his book The Blue Plateau: An Australian Pastoral, which begins at 7 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881. Let guitarist Paul Grove strum out your sorrows when he plays a UM faculty and guest artist series recital at 7:30 PM in the Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. $10/$5 students and seniors. Call 243-6880. Check out a story about a playboy who just wants to dance when the UM School of Theatre and Dance presents a performance of the musical Crazy for You, starting at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 children age 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit umtheatredance.org. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes

Chris Cooper had little trouble capturing in Adaptation. Orlean’s article “The Maui Surfer Girls,” from her collection of profiles, The Bullfighter Checks Her Makeup also became the basis for the 2002 film Blue Crush. Most of the stories in Bullfighter, and probably the material she will read in Missoula on Friday, could easily lend themselves to the same big screen treatment. And if they never do, just read the pieces–you’ll get the picture.

place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? How many surfaces does a Möbius strip have? (Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.) Don’t forget your blue snowsuit when Johnny Winter unleashes a blizzard of blues when the legendary guitarist plays with his band at the Wilma Theatre, starting at 8 PM. $31/$29 advance, with tickets at Rockin Rudy’s and online at skytics.com All royalty gets irie during Royal Reggae Night, which features free pool plus reggae, dancehall and hip hop remixes spun by an array of DJs starting at 9 PM at the Palace. Free. Jam the indigo out of your system when Harry Davids, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, presents Blues Jam and Microbrews night with Kevin Van Dort, where a full blues band plays along with guest artists every Tue. starting at 9:30 PM. Free, with $1 off Microbrews. Contact Kevin at 3965731 to play.

for 1st, 2nd, 3rd

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Male Amateur Night: Sunday, May 15th!

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Lather yourself in fish oil and get simmered with a mixture of Irish folk and reggae when Bangers and Hash plays the Badlander’s Live and Local night at 9 PM. Peoples opens. Free.

TUESDAY March

30

Bring an intellectual appetite to UM’s International Brown Bag Lecture Series, which continues with the talk “My Fulbright Experience in Uruguay: From Cattle to Computers,” and begins at noon in Room 303 of the Old Journalism Building. Free. Call 243-2288. UM’s Lessons of Our Land: The Indian Land Tenure Foundation Speaker Series continues with talk by Julie Cajune, at 4 PM in Room 105 of UM’s Payne Family Native American Center. A reception follows atç 5:30 PM. Free. Visit buffalosfire.com.

nightlife Double your aural pleasure with some musical treasure when the

The Psychology of Relationships with Ken Silvestro Are you experiencing: Repetitive patterns of poor relationships? • The affects of trauma as a young child in current relationships? • A desire for deeper and more satifying relationships? • A desire for greater self-esteem in relationships? • A desire to better understand your partner and yourself? Then this is the course for you! Join Ken Silvestro for this fascinating look at relationships and their complexitites.

Wednesdays, April 6-May 4, Noon-1pm For more information or to register, please contact Kathy Mangan at 406-721-0033 or rwlcmt@gmail.com. For a complete listing of our classes, please visit www.redwillowlearning.org. Sliding scale fee available. Red Willow Learning Center, 825 West Kent Street, Missoula

Missoula Independent

Page 27 March 24–March 31, 2011


Joan Zen Duo plays Stevensvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blacksmith Brewing Co., 114 Main St., at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 777-0680.

A Memoir from the Western High Plains, starting at 7 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881.

Political science junkies unite when UM presents Is the Language of Politics the Language of the People? Brazil, Lula and the Controversies Around His Discourse, a talk with presenter Monica Zoppi that begins at 7 PM in Room 332 of the University Center. Free. Call 243-2288.

Check out a story about a playboy who just wants to dance when the UM School of Theatre and Dance presents a performance of the musical Crazy for You, starting at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 children age 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit umtheatredance.org.

Check out a story about a playboy who just wants to dance when the UM School of Theatre and Dance presents a performance of the musical Crazy for You, starting at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 children age 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets.

Laugh it up while watching a story about a drama critic and his kill happy family when the Montana Actorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Theatre presents a performance of Joseph Kesselringâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Arsenic & Old Lace, at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $12/$6 for student rush tickets at the box office only. Visit mtactors.com.

Energize your feet with a night of music when Georgiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Montana Skies plays the Ronan Performing Arts Center, 35885 Round Butte Road, at 7:30 PM. $14/$12 advance at Fiddle Sticks School of Music and Shannon Nunlist Physical Therapy in Polson, and True Value Hardware in Ronan.

See no hipster evil. State Radio plays alternative rock at the Wilma Theatre Sat., March 26, at 8:30 PM with openers Golden Dogs. $20/$18 advance, with tickets available at Rockin Rudyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Ear Candy Music, The Source in the UC, and online at browpapertickets.com.

Laugh it up while watching a story about a drama critic and his kill-happy family when the Montana Actorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Theatre presents a performance of Joseph Kesselringâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Arsenic & Old Lace, at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $12/$6 for student rush tickets at the box office only. Visit mtactors.com.

Dance with your favorite tusk when Nederland, Colo.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Elephant Revival plays â&#x20AC;&#x153;transcendental folkâ&#x20AC;? music at 10 PM at the Top Hat. $10/$8 advance at Ear Candy Music. (See Noise in this issue.)

EL3-OH! appoints you king of the Gypsy jazz underworld when it plays at 8 PM at the Stensrud Building, 314 N. First St. W. Cost TBA.

March

The Old Post Pub hosts a Pickinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Circle at 9 PM. Free. A MĂśbius strip has only one surface.

Seek out some future volunteer adventure during a Peace Corps Information Session, which features info and tips from representative Tenly Snow and begins at 4 PM in Room 327 of the University Center. Free. Call 243-2839.

Nashvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The David Mayfield Parade plays the Palace at 9 PM. Stellarondo opens. $5. (See Noise in this issue.)

TUESDAY

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30

nightlife Hang with some expert string pluckers when Him & Her (a duo featuring Travis Yost and Caroline Keys) plays tunes featuring upright bass, acoustic guitar and banjo during the Top Hatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s monthly artist-in-residence series every Thu. in March from 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8 PM. Free, all ages. Eugene, Ore.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tyler Fortier would rather drink a pint of glass than the remnants of your sponge bath when the musician plays Americana at 6 PM at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-PINT. Trip out on the other side, of our state that is, when author Ruth McLaughlin reads and signs copies of her book Bound Like Grass:

Bat those eyelashes and get rid of those hot flashes with some hip hop when Wapikiya Records artists RegMachine, Pallas Athena, Frodie, OverTime and Dice play the Palace at 9 PM. $5. Hang with your brothers from another DNA strand when Seattleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The Staxx Brothers plays hip hop, soul and rock at 10 PM at the Top Hat. $5. Pour some events sugar on me by kindly sending your event info by 5 PM on Fri., March 25 to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff to me online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see a link that says â&#x20AC;&#x153;submit an event.â&#x20AC;?

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0 2 / / ,  * L I W  & D U G V  $ Y D L O D E O H  Missoula Independent

Page 28 March 24â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 31, 2011

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MOUNTAIN HIGH S pring may have officially sprung, but that doesn’t mean your days of competitive shredding and carving are over. That’s because this weekend you can please your inner powderhound—and win some sick prizes for your skills on the hill—during two regional competitions that promise to be a wicked good time. Your first option comes this Saturday during the Skiesta Splashdown SummerSux Fest at Lost Trail, which begins with registration at 9 AM. It features a big air competition and a pond skim, plus a pig roast, music with Miller Creek, and prizes for best costume. You also have the chance to get voted as the Skiesta King or Queen, which will offers winners a “Powder Thursday Pass” for the 2011-2012 season.

Then, on Sunday, you can head to Montana Snowbowl for its annual North Dakota Downhill—a “slide and glide” contest that’s open to people of all ages and abilities. It’s also free, and anyone who enters gets a prize. So get out there and carve it up, but don’t forget to wax your weapons of choice! L o s t Tr a i l ’ s S k i e s t a S p l a s h d o w n SummerSux Fest is Sat., March 26, with registration at 9 AM. $10 to enter the contest. Visit ltpark.com/comps to download a liability waiver. Montana Snowbowl’s North Dakota Downhill is Sun., March 27, starting around 1 PM at the ski area, 1700 Snowbowl Road. Call 549-9777.

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FRIDAY MARCH 25 Chill with some mountaineers and witness thousands of snow geese as they migrate to Canada when The Rocky Mountaineers presents a trip to Freezeout Lake to see the waterfowl migration, starting today and running through Sunday at the lake, near Fairfield off Hwy. 89. Free, but you must make your own lodging arrangements. Email Julie at jawkal@hotmail.com. Give thanks for the snow goddess when the North Shore Nordic Club presents its Thanks for the Snow Party, an end-of-season fundraiser that begins with a social at 6 PM, is followed by a free chili feed at 6:30, and moves into music from The Bad Larrys at 7 PM, all at the Garden Bar in Bigfork, 451 Electric Ave. Funds raised will be used to pay for new grooming equipment. $10 donation requested. Call Dave at 837-0783.

SATURDAY MARCH 26 Duck out and get your geese ogling on when the Five Valleys Audubon Society presents a full-day field trip to look for waterfowl and early migrants at the Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge near Stevensville, starting with a carpool meet-up at 8 AM at the parking lot of UM’s Adams Center. Alternately, you can meet at 9 AM at the visitor center of the refuge, off of Wild Fowl Lane. Free. Call Larry at 5495632 and visit fvamissoula.org. Have a ramblin’ good time on your two-wheeler with a pedaling mob when Missoulians on Bicycles presents the Clinton Ramble, a 34-mile ride that begins at 10 AM at the Eastgate Parking lot on East Broadway Street, and takes you to Clinton with a potential side trip to Wallace Creek or Starvation Creek. Free. Visit missoulabike.org/ride-page for more details. Pound the dirt for a good cause during Run 4 A Wish, a 5k race that benefits the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Montana and begins with day-of registration at 8 AM, followed by the race at 10, at Missoula’s Equestrian Park, on the corner of 35th Street and North Avenue West. Includes door prizes and snacks after the race. $10 per person, with advance registration at Runner’s Edge. Call Carrie at 240-0087 or email clittle@wishworld.org. Anklebiters get into the tracking groove when Missoula Children and Nature and The Great Bear Foundation present a wildlife tracking event, which features the chance for kids ages 6 and up to learn about wildlife, track ID, bear awareness

skills, plus make their own plaster cast of an animal track, starting at 11 AM at The Great Bear Foundation, 802 E. Front St. Free, but children must be accompanied by an adult. Registration requested by calling Ian at 396-9562.

THE TREASURE CHEST Crafts & Hobbies 1612 Benton • 549-7992

Get rid of some of your old but still good sleeping bags, backpacks and other outdoors gear in order to help out the Mountain Shepherds—a community run, eco-tourism organization located in the Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve in India—during the Nature-Link Institute’s Gear for the Garhwal drive, which runs through April 30 with drop off locations at Pipestone Mountaineering, The Trail Head, Aerie Wilderness Medicine, UM’s Outdoor Program and REI Missoula. Call 370-2294 and visit nature-link.org for details.

SUNDAY MARCH 27 Hang with some ice carvers and witness their stunning moves when the Missoula Figure Skating Club presents its Spring Skating Spectacular, which features solo, duet and group performances by members of its club and its skate programs, and starts at 4 PM at the Glacier Ice Rink, 1101 South Ave. W. Free, but donations are accepted. Visit missoulafsc.org. Just don’t chug the H2O when the Watershed Education Network presents a stream monitoring training session, which features the chance to learn about the biological, chemical and physiological aspects of local rivers and streams, and runs today and tomorrow from 4–7 PM at the Greenough Park Pavilion, 1629 Monroe St. Be sure to bring water, layered clothing and socks for waders. Call 541-9287 or email water@montanawatershed.org.

WEDNESDAY MARCH 30 Run with a heady brew on your mind when Run Wild Missoula presents another installment of its Beer Run with a run of about 5 miles starting from Stone of Accord, 4951 N. Reserve St., at 5:45 PM for “back of the pack” runners and 6 PM for others. Free. Visit runwildmissoula.org. Roll out with your favorite biking mob when Missoulians on Bicycles presents its Wednesday Weekly ride with a 20-mile jaunt that begins at 6 PM at Big Dipper Ice Cream, 631 S. Higgins Ave., and takes you through Greenough Park and on to Fort Missoula. Free. Visit missoulabike.org/ride-page for details on upcoming rides. calendar@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 29 March 24–March 31, 2011


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Attitude is everything For dance choreographer Steve Teran, pop culture rules the world by Skylar Browning

Heidi Jones Eggert, an assistant professor of dance at There’s a moment during Steve Teran’s swarming, don nothing but black tights, black bras, black sports coats sassy group dance piece “Strut” when it appears the joke and black sunglasses, and sexily slink across the stage or UM, points out that Teran may focus on pop, but he still just may be on the audience. The six dancers, each decked standoffishly slouch to the side. They never make contact follows the same artistic process as his contemporaries. out in pounds of bling, preen across the stage with with each other, nor reveal their eyes. They are, in every He’s simply using the program’s resources to pursue his goal of eventually choreographing music videos and other enough attitude to make a diva blush—think fashion run- way, untouchable. Teran combines “Smoking Haute” with another all- dance in Los Angeles. (Editor’s note: The author’s wife is way pout crossed with serial killer scowl. Meanwhile, the immanently danceable track “Something Like This” by women piece titled “Bitch.” He says the two dances, which a faculty member in UM’s dance program, but not affiliatScissor Sisters blares from the sound system. Hips and feature Minogue’s “Slow” and Spears’ “Phonography,” ed with The Main Attraction.) Jones Eggert says Teran’s shoulders pulse. Swagger dominates. Those stares never respectively, aren’t about anything other than a palpable interests and drive make him stand out for two reasons: He’s not just the only student in a prewaver. As if it were possible, the dominantly modern dance program to attitude ratchets up. Then, naturalpursue a different genre, but he’s also ly, glitter falls from the ceiling. It’s successfully choreographed so much all enough to wonder, in a mix of in the same vein that he’s in the rare awe and giggles, is this guy serious? position of presenting an evening’s In short, yes. worth of work. Teran is an unapologetic devo“He makes smart choices,” Jones tee of in-your-face pop dance. For Eggert says. “Stevie doesn’t accept him, it’s high heels over toe shoes, what’s already been done. He takes brash spectacle instead of abstract what’s out there and builds on it with meaning, Britney Spears ahead of his own ideas. If he wasn’t pushing Martha Graham. And he’s fiercely himself, that’d be a problem. But he serious about all of it. There’s has a vision. He’s always reinventing never any wink, or ironic hipster pop dance on his own.” nudge. In an arts culture that puts Jones Eggert calls “Strut” a perfect a premium on name-dropping the example. The way Teran plays with timmost tragically obscure talent, ing and creates a tension with the audiTeran aligns himself squarely with ence makes it more than some easily the world’s biggest stars. consumable, ultimately forgettable “I can’t help what I like, so pop dance. why be ashamed?” he says, sound“It’s sexy but smart, with just ing very matter of fact. “I’m into enough tongue-in-cheek to keep the mainstream. I don’t do avant audience on edge,” she says. “That garde.” piece brings me to my knees every time Teran’s influences assure that I see it.” his first evening-length dance conAnd that’s exactly what Teran’s cert, which debuts this week, will aiming for. be unlike the typical Missoula mod“People should feel like moving ern dance show. Titled The Main after they see my work,” he says. Attraction, it features 12 original But “Strut” didn’t originally come pieces choreographed by Teran, 13 together the way he hoped. Ideas he dancers from the University of brought to the first rehearsals fell flat. Montana dance program, four origHe kept with it, however, and over time inal short videos and a healthy created a dance that has since repredose of music from the likes of Photo courtesy Amanda Opitz sented UM at a regional collegiate Spears (seven songs total), Kylie Minogue, Lady Gaga and Janet Dance choreographer Steve Teran, center, refers to his evening-length concert as dance conference and been selected Jackson. In fact, Teran likens the “a pop dance spectacular” and lists Britney Spears as his biggest influence. “I can’t for the UM’s year-end concert. In typiwhole evening to a touring rock help what I like, so why be ashamed?” he says. “I’m into mainstream. I don’t do cal fashion, the turning point came when Teran switched up the style and concert that will “transport audi- avant garde.” posture of the piece. ence members like passengers in a “At some point I realized I wanted us to be a gang,” he limousine through the hypnotic, the dark, the glamorous, sense of female power. Like a lot of Teran’s work, they conand the urban worlds of pop culture.” vey more of an attitude than a specific meaning—and, as says. “In my mind, we’re this group of badasses on our way to a disco. We’re street chic. We’re a bunch of badass“I’m largely influenced by the whole scene,” says Teran, long as it’s a distinctive attitude, he’s just fine with that. “I feel like sometimes, in an overall generalization of es on our way to a disco, walking down a dark alley, ready who graduates from UM’s dance program in May and counts Spears as his biggest inspiration. “I’ve grown up the Missoula audience, my dance gets looked at as pretty for anything. That’s how I see it.” It may not hold the high-concept meaning other watching music videos and concert tours and performanc- superficial,” he says. “It does have elements of that—it’s es on TV like the Video Music Awards. My work reflects that, certainly flashy—but I hope they understand that a lot of artists aspire to, but a mob of modish dancers let loose on the town sure makes the mainstream more attractive. but with my own take on things. It’s familiar, but still mine.” work went into it. “I don’t think everything has to be a statement on “Smoking Haute,” one of the pieces in The Main The Main Attraction continues at the University Attraction, speaks to that fine line in Teran’s choreogra- some sort of social event or a commentary,” he adds. “I’ve phy. Some of the movement resembles Madonna’s 1990 learned that I can create things that are intelligent, that of Montana PAR-TV Open Space through Saturday, music video for “Vogue” in how the dancers frame their have choreographic thought and that can be stimulating. March 26, at 8 p.m. nightly. FREE. face and body with their hands. But “Smoking Haute” goes Maybe it’s not abstract or challenging someone’s thinking, beyond just striking a pose. Teran’s four female dancers but it can still be stimulating.” sbrowning@missoulanews.com

Page 30 March 24–March 31, 2011


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Books

Elephant Revival Break in the Clouds Ruff Shod

There’s an earthy yet mystical quality this band possesses that’s hard to define. It’s like understanding the scientific explanation of a flower, but still finding its unusual beauty elusive. The pastoral vocal melodies and lilting compositions on the Nederland, Colo.-based group’s latest release are no exception, somehow conveying all the glow and charm of a summer evening in under an hour. Even after repeated listens, Bonnie Paine’s riveting, graceful voice on “Drop” still sends chills down the spine. It’s a feeling that sticks with the listener throughout the album, as if the transcendental folk quintet is casting spells instead of writing songs. Sage Cook’s humble rasp on “Cosmic Pulse” conveys a somber

The David Mayfield Parade The David Mayfield Parade 9th Grade Records

“Two hearts beat like four dancing feet when they move to the rhythm of love,” says the inside packaging of The David Mayfield Parade’s debut. It is therefore difficult to get the CD into your stereo without wincing, but it’s worth it. That chunk of prose captures what is best and most frustrating about the Avett Brothers collaborator’s solo album, which reminds us of the difference between “sincere” and “honest.”

Railroad Earth Railroad Earth One Haven Music

The distinctly folk-rock direction taken on this eponymous album should come as little surprise to Railroad Earth fans. The New Jersey outfit has written some of the best progressive bluegrass tunes of the last decade, but despite their traditional string band lineup—plus a drumkit—the group has always been a rock band. After drawing comparisons to the rootsier side of classic acts like The Band and the Grateful Dead throughout their career, the musicians may also achieve timelessness given the songcraft displayed here. There are plenty of fiddle licks and mandolin swells on this release, but the emphasis is on the drum kit and electric guitar, especially on tracks like “Long Walk

Massy Ferguson Hard Water Spark and Shine

Seattle’s Massy Ferguson is a perfectly shameless perpetration of Americana’s genre-blending panoply of staid musical tropes and prosaic vocals that confuse a miasma of melancholy for emotional ascendancy. It’s about time we officially add “Americana” to the pantheon of Stuff White People Like. Dude, I get why you people like this sort of thing. Hard Water is an encyclopedia of peaceful, inoffensive pop sensibility. Kicking off “Long Time No See” with a lightly distorted guitar riff that is as much

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wistfulness to the beat of a djembe, and Bridget Law’s old-timey fiddle mastery teases dancers to find a partner on “Lexington.” While it’s hard to pick favorites out of this tasteful medley of folk instruments and imaginative lyrics, Paine’s contributions are consistently captivating. From her tasteful, fleet-fingered washboard playing to her shy-but-persuasive vocal harmonies, the siren’s allure stitches the rest of the band’s elements together. The result is an eloquent album equally profound and seductive. (Jed Nussbaum) Elephant Revival plays the Top Hat Wednesday, March 30, at 10 PM. $10/$8 in advance at Ear Candy Music.

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Mayfield is at his best when he lets his mellifluously unpredictable melodies guide simple arrangements, as on “Blue Skies Again.” His clear country voice is pleasantly adorned with the creaks and runs of a Travis Tritt, and it gives his songs a quiet immediacy. Yet approximately half of this album is dedicated to explaining the vital importance of love. The lyrics, “You’re like a savior who can save me from this life. / I’d give it all to have you in my arms tonight,” feel like interchangeable parts, and they refuse intimacy on what should be a very personal album. Mayfield’s talent is versatile, but he turns it a little too often to guaranteed appeal, yielding an album your aunt will love. That’s not bad, but he’s capable of better. (Dan Brooks) The David Mayfield Parade plays the Palace Wednesday, March 30, at 9 PM with Stellarondo. $5. Home” and “Black Elk Speaks,” the latter of which delivers the tough appeal of a ’70s Mustang tearing down the open highway. The ethereal, psychedelic jams of RRE’s live shows aren’t lost on this studio release either, and they are captured perfectly on “Spring-Heeled Jack.” For all the extra muscle displayed here, however, the highlight is “Day on the Sand,” which strips down to frontman Todd Sheaffer’s savvy guitar fingerpicking and distinguished songwriting. It provides an intimate window into the core of the band’s sound. (Jed Nussbaum) Railroad Earth plays the Wilma Theater Friday, March 25, at 7:30 PM. $26, tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s or vootie.com. Miranda Lambert as it is Brooks and Dunn is smart and, darn it, catchy. Americana insists upon reminding us that its vague steel guitars and country-lite twang is a representation of simpler times, simpler folk. It makes sense that the ballad of wayward militia secessionists, “Freedom County,” is reminiscent of Springsteen, Petty, Mellencamp and Zevon (the master and person most responsible for this musical flavor). However, MF makes a go at differentiating itself with an outro flute solo. I suppose. Back to the steel guitar. It works. It is the voice of sadness. “Aspartame” revels in that voice and rocks solid background vocals which, along with drippy guitar, wallow in Allman Brothers’-esque goodness à la “Melissa.” That said, Hard Water is tough to swallow. (Jason McMackin) Massy Ferguson plays the University Center atrium Friday, March 25, at noon. Free.

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Page 31 March 24–March 31, 2011


SAVE THE DATE! Prana Family Practice Mindy Opper PA-C Ayurvedic Wellness Counselor Jiivana Integrative Health Laura Marx Family Nurse Practitioner Ayurvedic Wellness Counselor

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Missoula Independent

Page 32 March 24–March 31, 2011

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Nightly at 7 & 9:10 7 ONLY on Fri 3/25, Sat 3/26 & Tue 3/29 • Sun at 1 & 3:10

Grand Opening of the Red Willow Center

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BONG HiTS lights up freedom of speech issues FULL BAR AVAILABLE 131 S. Higgins Ave. Downtown Missoula 406-728-2521

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by Azita Osanloo

If I’ve learned anything from Footloose, it’s this: endnotes and bibliography. In truth, there are times The new kid in school, often anxious to find his niche when his prose is more than a little turgid. Yet, for among already established social groups, is most likely those with the patience to keep up with Foster, the to succeed once he’s embraced his role as an outsider. rewards are many. Beginning with the differing accounts of exactly If he can morph into a rebellious outsider, all the better (this will also make him more attractive to girls, but what happened on Glacier Avenue, Foster points out how that very narrative is contested terrain. He uses that’s beside the point). In 2002, a high school senior in Juneau, Joe Akira Kurosawa’s 1950 film Rashoman as an entry point Frederick, was one such deviant outsider. Depending for discussing how Frederick and Morse’s accounts differ from one another. This is on whom you ask, Frederick has important because while neither since become an unlikely champiparty disputes the raw fact that on of civil rights or a self-righteous Frederick and his buddies pain in the ass. On January 24, unfurled the BONG HiTS banner, 2002, then 18-year-old Frederick the details surrounding that rallied 13 other students in the creundisputed fact differ wildly from ation and unfurling of a 14-foot one another and those differences banner reading BONG HiTS 4 form the foundation of each JESUS as the Winter Olympic torch party’s case. While Frederick relay passed Juneau-Douglas High insists he was conducting a freeSchool on Glacier Avenue. dom of speech exercise off school Frederick, then a senior, was grounds (Glacier Avenue is across a relative newcomer to Alaska; he the street from, not directly on, had enrolled at Juneau-Douglas Juneau-Douglas’s campus), Morse the year before (it was his third believes the banner, however high school in three years), havobliquely, promoted illegal drug ing come to the Last Frontier by use during a school event (stuway of Seattle, Wash., and, before dents were taken out of class to that, Texas. Reflecting on his BONG HiTS 4 Jesus: A Perfect watch the torch relay pass). a c t i o n s , F r e d e r i c k o n c e Constitutional Storm in Alaska’s Capital As Foster follows the events remarked: “I’m trying to think of James C. Foster why I pushed the envelope more paperback, University of Alaska Press from Frederick’s initial appeals to the school board (which upheld than other people around 373 pages, $29.95 the suspension), to the Ninth here…Maybe [it’s] because I’m new in the community…Whereas, if I’d grown up Circuit (which sided with Frederick) and ultimately to the Supreme Court, Foster gives us a shrewd account here…I’d be less likely to do it…” For his mischief-making on Glacier Avenue, of the workings of those judiciaries: their complexities, Frederick was suspended for 10 days by then-principal, their players and how they evolved during the six-plus Deborah Morse, who added a criminal trespass order years of ensuing litigation. The climax of the story is not the Supreme Court to the suspension. Claiming the banner was an exercise in free speech and that his subsequent suspension was decision. A quick Internet search will tell you the 5–4 in violation of his First Amendment rights, Frederick decision ruled in Morse and the school board’s favor, with the majority decision stating that the First sued the Juneau school district and Morse personally. Okay, so it’s not quite like debating the city Amendment does not prevent educators from supcouncil for the right to dance at your own prom, but pressing student speech, at a school-sponsored event, Deborah Morse and the Juneau School Board v. when that speech is reasonably viewed as promoting Joseph Frederick did make it all the way to the illegal drug use (whether or not the banner was actualSupreme Court. Not every high school hellion can ly promoting such use was the subject of immense claim their senior stunt caught the attention of the debate). Foster’s dissection of the 5–4 decision is the real gem of this worthy book, revealing just how diverhighest court in the land. The case and its aftermath is the subject of James gent the views of the justices were on the case. Among C. Foster’s comprehensive and thoughtful new book, the nine justices, a total of five separate opinions were BONG HiTS 4 Jesus: A Perfect Constitutional Storm in written and Foster makes a compelling case for how Alaska’s Capital. Foster, a political science professor at the precedent set by Morse v. Frederick is a messy one Oregon State University–Cascades chronicles the that may ultimately undermine the First Amendment. In his conclusion, Foster makes a case for how the events of January 24th in scrupulous detail, giving the reader a context for the geographic, cultural, and dispute need not have gone to trial. “How might [those (especially) judicial contexts in which the case is involved] break free from their self-defined rigid role,” placed. What appears, at first, to be a typical high Foster writes, “and seize the surprising opportunities school prank, complete with sophomoric innuendo, that might result?” Indeed. James Foster discusses BONG HiTS 4 Jesus at unfolds into a complex discussion of just how much freedom of speech students have in public schools. Fact & Fiction Thursday, March 24, at 7 PM. Free. Foster is an astute, thorough scholar. Accordingly, his book is replete with more than a hundred pages of arts@missoulanews.com


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Movie Shorts

Tough love Blue Valentine hurts so good by Dave Loos

almost half of the film, allow for an understanding of how we arrived at Point B that is rare in most relationship movies. There is no invented backstory for Dean and Cindy—there is actual story, and it’s a moving one. Both early 20-somethings come from troubled families, but while Cindy has dreams of graduating from college and going to medical school, Dean seems happy to stroll through life as the talented underachiever with zero ambition. But he’s a good man who believes in love at first sight—and he loves Cindy enough to marry her despite the very real possibility that the child she is pregnant with may not be his. As enthralled with each other as they may be, it’s also easy to see the seeds of an oncoming train wreck, and when Blue Valentine returns us to the present day those seeds have surfaced in the form of mutual resentment and frustration that is, quite simply, hard to watch. Cindy can’t stand that the hipster slacker she fell in love with won’t even try to tap into his potential. He’s happy working as a house painter because it allows him to focus his energy on being a husband and father. He just doesn’t understand the point of ambition. She criticizes him for having a job where it’s “And now here’s my rendition of ‘Born This Way.’” okay to have a beer at 8 a.m. And the similarities between Wnter’s Bone and He sees it as a perk. Gosling, who has made the leap Blue Valentine are clear, not only in tone but in dia- from a poor-man’s Edward Norton to one of the best logue, pacing and barren cinematography. But where- young actors around, is good in the flashbacks and as the latter followed a 17-year-old teenager on a quest even better playing Dean five years later—hairline to find her father in the poverty-stricken Ozarks, Blue receding, cigarette in mouth, utterly confused and Valentine dives full force into the inner-workings of stressed about a collapsing marriage. And Williams, who has now received Oscar nomione relationship in working-class Pennsylvania. Both films have the unnerving quality of making the rest of nations for this movie and Brokeback Mountain, is as the world disappear, camera lens tight on its subjects good here when talking and arguing with Dean as she and unwilling to pan out. Awkward moments in Blue is during the many moments of painful silence. As Valentine last 30 seconds longer than you expect them impossible as it may be to will someone to change and to, while the most painful scenes (like in an abortion to become a different person, it sure isn’t for lack of tryclinic) last even longer. The film refuses to engage in ing on Cindy’s part. She stares at him—often when he’s easy outs or to camouflage moments of anguish with a not looking—with eyes that ask what went wrong and sad song or quick cut away. These are all admirable is this is a fixable situation? But what is it she really wants him to be? Dean is a traits—just consider yourself warned. This may be the faithful husband and by the looks of it a good and lovworst first-date film of the year. As storylines go, there are no real surprises in Blue ing father. He stuck with Cindy when many men might Valentine. We begin at the end—or at least the begin- have bailed. This may be the hardest question of all, ning of the very end—of a marriage that has obviously and one without an answer that makes any logical been teetering on a precipice for some time. That a sense. In other words, it’s like a lot of relationships. child is involved only makes the situation that much Some survive. Others do not. In this film, we already more sad and complicated. The film takes place over kind of know the answer before getting into the how less than three days, but much of the movie is spent and why. That Blue Valentine delves into that territory examining the beginnings of the relationship from five with such honesty is not only courageous, but also or so years earlier when Dean (Ryan Gosling) meets exceedingly rare. Blue Valentine continues at the Wilma Theatre. Cindy (Michelle Williams) in a chance encounter at a nursing home. These flashbacks to Point A, which account for arts@missoulanews.com I enjoyed Blue Valentine much the way I “enjoyed” Winter’s Bone, which is to say I felt slightly masochistic at the end, unable to shake images and scenes of a floundering marriage that are chilling and haunting and uncomfortable in ways rarely attempted these days. There is a reason for this of course—people go to movies to escape the very things that Blue Valentine and Winter’s Bone magnify to a degree that can suck all the air out of a theater, unwilling to let anyone exhale for two hours. It’s tense, it’s frustrating, but in the right hands, under the right direction, it also can approach brilliance.

“Mind if I join you?”

H A N D M A D E

F U T O N S

125 S. Higgins 721-2090 Mon – Sat 10:30 – 5:30 smallwondersfutons.com

UM International Week Sunday, March 27 12:00-5:00 PM International Culture & Food Festival ~ University Center (UC)

Monday, March 28th 12:00 PM Kick Off! Unity Dance and Drum ~ UC Atrium 4:00 PM Study Abroad Panel Discussion ~ UC 330

Tuesday, March 29 12:00 PM An Insider’s Story on the US Institute of Peace ~ Mansfield Center Conference Room, Mansfield Library 4th Floor. 3:30 PM Work Abroad Workshop ~ Lommasson Center 154 7:00 PM The Drain on our World: Population growth and its affect on water stress and scarcity ~ UC North Ballroom.

Wednesday, March 30 12:00 PM My Fulbright Experience in Uruguay ~ Old Journalism 303 3:00 PM Race, Ethnicity, & the Fear of the Other ~ UC 332 7:00 PM Is the Language of Politics the Language of the People? ~ UC 332

Thursday, March 31 12:00 PM Change Your World: Intern Abroad ~ UC 330 3:00 PM Cross Cultural Chat ~ UC Jus’ Chillin 4:00 PM Make a Difference Overseas: Peace Corps Information Session ~ UC 327 7:00 PM Hearts and Minds: A classic documentary on the Vietnam War ~ UC Theater

Friday, April 1 12:00 PM Iraq: Rich Civilization and Diverse Population ~ UC 330

For more information go to: Missoula Independent

umt.edu/ip

Page 33 March 24–March 31, 2011


Scope OPENING THIS WEEK BALLET IN CINEMA: COPPELIA The Paris Opera Ballet presents its rendition of this classic tale, which is about a doctor and his infatuation with a doll he created that he hopes will come to life. Carmike 10: 11:30 only on Monday. DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: RODRICK RULES This adaptation of Jeff Kinney’s fiction/comic-book of the same name follows Zachary Gordon as he tries to navigate middle school, impress a crush, and keep mum about a house party that his brother hosted. Carmike 10: 4:20, 7:15 and 9:40, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no Sun. show at 9. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: noon, 2:20, 4:45, 7:05 and 9:20, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30, with an additional Fri.–Sun. matinee at 1:45. Entertainer Cinema in Ronan: 4, 7 and 9.

Noise

Books

additional Fri.–Sat. show at 9:55, and Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 12:05, 1:05, 4:05, 6:10, 7:05 and 9:45, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. BEASTLY This teen drama follows a vain high schooler who seeks to change his shallow ways after a fellow classmate casts a spell that turns him into an unsightly dude. Village 6: 4:15 and 7:30, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at 9:35, and Sat.–Sun.

Film

Movie Shorts

Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 6:45 and 9:30, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. THE KING’S SPEECH After English aristocrat Colin Firth gets crowned King George VI of England, he tries to rid himself of a nasty stammer so he can give good speeches to his fellow Brits, who are on the brink of World War II. Oh, and in case you didn’t know, the film received “Best Picture” at the Oscars, among other accolades. Wilma Theatre: nightly at 7 and 9:10, with 7 only shows on Fri., Sat. and Tue., and Sun. matinees at 1 and 3:10. Stadium 14 in Kalispell:

SUCKER PUNCH Emily Browning and a cast of other ladies including Abbie Cornish, Jena Malone, Vanessa Hudgens and Jamie Chung are locked up in an asylum, and must use their tripped out imaginations to escape their crappy existence. Guns blaze and battles with samurais arise in this fantasy film from the director of Watchmen and When pantsless parties go sour. Sucker Punch opens Friday at the Village 6. 300. Village 6: 4:15 and 7:15, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at 9:55, and Sat.–Sun. show at 1:15. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and matinees at 1:15. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 2:30, 12:45, 3:50, 6:35 and 9:15, with an additional 9:10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 7:30 and 9:40, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1, 4, 7 and midnight. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4, 7 and 9. LIMITLESS 9:45, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. BLUE VALENTINE Bradley Cooper’s a writer with a case of creative Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:15, with If you’ve ever been in a serious relationship for blockage who finds his muse after he takes an Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. more than a few years, this is like several snap- experimental pharmaceutical called NZT—which

NOW PLAYING THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU Matt Damon’s a gung ho politico aiming for a senate seat who gets heartstruck by Emily Blunt, but soon finds out that some guys from The Adjustment Bureau—a group of men who decide peoples’ destinies—want to destroy his chances at scoring love. The film is based on a short story by late sci-fi writer Philip K. Dick. Carmike 10: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:45, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:15. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:05, 3:55, 6:40 and 9:25, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. BATTLE: LOS ANGELES There isn’t any smoke on the water, but there’s plenty of fire in the sky in this film. That’s because aliens have invaded, and Aaron Eckhart and his platoon of arse-kicking marines have to fight ‘em off. Carmike 10: 4:15, 7:25 and 10, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Village 6: 4:30 and 7:25, with an

Missoula Independent

OPERA IN CINEMA: THE MAGIC FLUTE Mozart’s story about a lost prince, a golden flute, and odes to love hits the screen for a performance that was filmed at the Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. Carmike 10: 7:30 only on Wed. PAUL Seth Rogan aims for guffaws by lending his talents as the voice of a hitchhiking alien picked up by Simon Pegg and Nick Frost—two buddies heading to Area 51 for sci-fi kicks. From that point, the duo tries to help Rogan get back to his clan of extra terrestrials. Sigourney Weaver and Jason Bateman co-star. Village 6: 4:30 and 7:20, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at 9:55, and Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:20, 4:15, 7:15 and 9:45, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight.

THE GRACE CARD A down-on-his-luck cop with racist tendencies sheds his bigotry and finds answers to his problems when a coworker, an African American pastor shows him the spiritual light. If you couldn’t tell already, this is a religious flick. Village 6: 4 and 7, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at 9:55, and Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1.

TO CATCH A DOLLAR: MUHAMMAD YUNUS BANKS ON AMERICA Nobel Prize winner and economist Muhammad Yunus tries to rid the world of poverty by giving poor people non-collateral loans through the bank he founded. This documentary focuses on the beginnings of the American branch of this microfinance organization. Carmike 10: 7:30 only on Thu.

navigate the wacky world of Mars after aliens abduct his mom Joan Cusack—because Martians apparently need real mothers to raise their offspring. Carmike 10: 4:35, 7:15 and 9:25, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 2. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 2:30, 7 and 9:15, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Stadium 14 in Kalispell in 2-D: noon and 4:50.

shots through its honeymoon highs and heart wrenching lows. But instead of you and your significant other, Ryan Gosling and Michelle Williams play the parts. Wilma Theatre: nightly at 7 and 9:10, with 9:10 only shows Fri., Sat. and Tue., and Sun. matinees at 1 and 3:10. CEDAR RAPIDS Insurance agent Ed Helms cures his small-town squareness by getting blotto with weirdo funnyman John C. Reilly, Isiah Whitlock Jr. (Sen. Clay Davis from “The Wire”) and others during a routine business trip to a convention in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:35. GNOMEO AND JULIET Shakespeare’s tale of unrequited love gets adapted for the 3-D CGI generation. This time, the story revolves around two garden gnomes—a red hat gnome and a blue hat gnome—who try to forge a relationship amid a fight between their respective gnome peoples. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 12:10 and 4:45. HALL PASS Owen Wilson and Jason Sudeikis are buddies who get the thumbs up from their respective wives— Jenna Fischer and Christina Applegate—to be bachelors for a week without any consequences. Drunken revelry and flirting, consumption of pot brownies and trips to Applebee’s ensue. Carmike 10: 7:30 and 10, with no shows on Wed. or Thu.

Page 34 March 24–March 31, 2011

seems like a cross between meth and coffee. Of course, Cooper soon realizes he’s gotta keep dipping into his stash in order to do things like help Robert De Niro run a company. Carmike 10: 4:30, 7:30 and 9:55, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: noon, 2:25, 4:50, 7:20 and 9:45, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30, with an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45. THE LINCOLN LAWYER Defense attorney Matthew McConaughey makes a living off of defending slimy dudes, but his workload takes a killer turn when he takes an offer to defend shady richboy Ryan Phillippe, who’s accused of rape and attempted murder. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:50, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:25, 4:20, 7 and 9:40, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. LORD OF THE DANCE 3D Leave your dancing shoes at home and kick back to this visually enhanced version of the popular Irish musical and dance production. Carmike 10: Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1. MARS NEEDS MOMS Disney brings us this 3-D animated flick about a 9 year-old boy, voiced by Seth Green, who has to

RANGO Johnny Depp lends his voice as an animated pet chameleon who decides he’s going to be the sheriff of an old western town populated by various hardened critters. Some might call this a spaghetti Western for kids. Carmike 10: 4, 4:30, 7 and 9:35, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 1:30. Village 6: 4 and 7, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at 9:35, and Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 12:15, 1:15, 3:15, 4:15, 6:15 and 9:15, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:15, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:15. RED RIDING HOOD When a forest-dwelling werewolf kills Amanda Seyfried’s sister, Gary Oldman is called in to find the blood-thirsty bastard. Trouble is, the beast just might be Seyfried’s cuddle buddy. This movie is sort of like the ancient fairytale, but with a fantasy and horror-laden twist. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:35, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 12:40, 3:40, 6:50 and 9:35, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. UNKNOWN Liam Neeson thinks he’s lost his marbles after he wakes up from a car crash-induced coma and realizes that his wife no longer remembers him. Neeson soon finds out what we all fear: Some jerkwad stole his identity. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 3:10 and 9. Capsule reviews by Ira Sather-Olson. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., March 25. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-F I LM; S t a d i u m 14 i n K a l i s p e l l – 752 - 78 0 0 . Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.


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M U L B E R RY

Mulberry is a 4-year-old Maine Coon Mix. Mulberry loves people and lived with Daschunds in her previous home. Her personality stays true to the Maine Coon breed, as she is the type of cat to just "go with the flow."

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RUBY

Ruby is a petite grey tiger cat who got lost and then ended up being a barn cat. She longs to have a real family again and to live in the house with the people! It would be alright if there were other cats there too. 2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

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LONGFELLOW

He was named for the poet when he was just a little kitten, but he's actually growing up to match his name -- long and lanky! He's also just about the friendliest cat we've ever seen, and he loves to play. Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

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Mercedes is the world’s finest luxury cat. This 1year-old female tuxedo is very fast, but always keeps the element of safety in mind. If you’re looking for the perfect sleek and stylish cat this spring, Mercedes is sure to be everything you’ve dreamed of and more!

DUDE

The Dude abides! 3year-old Dude happens to be the life of the party! This cattle dog/ chow chow mix thinks that everything is fun and interesting, especially people. This Dude is intelligent, active and looking for a fun-loving person to adopt him.

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MEEKA

Meeka is a longerhaired cat with extremely attractive tabby markings on her body. She also has a sweet face and a personality to match. She would probably do best as an only cat, but that's alright: lots of people want just one cat!

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TOMAH

Statistically speaking, dog owners smile and laugh more than non-dog owners. Those that spend time with Tomah, the Malamute, smile and laugh twice as much as those who don’t. But please don’t be fooled by his size, for he is merely a teddy bear in an arctic dog’s coat! 7-year-old Tomah loves all creatures, big and small.

LOTTIE

Lottie is a delicate flower looking for a sunny person to help her bloom. You see, Lottie is a shy, yet delightful pooch who is looking for a person to bond with. This 3-year-old cattle dog is housetrained, rarely barks and has lived with cats.

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These pets may be adopted at AniMeals 721-4710 CONRAD

I’m Conrad! When I first got to AniMeals I was skinny and not well taken care of. Now I’m strong and healthy. I’ve got a pair of shoulders that could carry the weight of the world. I’m sleek and shiny with a smoky gray coat. My eyes are bright and mischievous! People always tell me how handsome I am.

PEEK A BOO

Peek a boo, I see you! That’s my name and I love to play games! At first people always think I’m shy, but make no mistake – that’s a lie! My colors are black and white and my green eyes shine so bright. I love to dream of my very own house.

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MISSY

Hi I’m Missy. I’m only a year old and am already one cool cat. Don’t be fooled by my sweet demeanor, I’ve got some zest behind these eyes and I’m not afraid to show it. I’m loads of fun and love to entertain! Whether it’s a quiet dinner party or a summer bash, I take every opportunity to jump into the limelight. Equine Sports & Canine Massage Traveling Practitioner Grooming Boutique & Spa 2825 Stockyard Rd; Opening Soon

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LEXUS

When you think of a brand new car what do you think of? I think Lexus! Why? They’re fast, smooth, sleek and slim. They define luxury, innovation and class. Think you could never afford to own a Lexus? Think again because you can! Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

Page 35 March 24–March 31, 2011


www.missoulanews.com

March 24 - March 31, 2011

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Have sexual health questions? The Montana Access Project (MAP) Receive answers to your sexual health questions via text from sexual health experts. Text 666746 Type ASKMAP (space) enter your question. Free & Confidential. askmap.info Red Willow Learning Center now available to rent. 1000’ space for classes or meetings. Video conferencing, AV, beverage service. 825 West Kent. Call Kathy 880-2639. Support groups for survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault each Tuesday at YWCA

Missoula. Orientation Group, Living in Peace, and Domestic Violence Native Women’s Talking Circle. Groups also available for children/teens. Dinner at 5:30, groups start at 6:30. Please arrive by 6:15 if you have children. 1130 W. Broadway. 543-6691 for more information.

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ADVICE GODDESS

MARKETPLACE

By Amy Alkon

MANAGED FRISK A recent column of yours really ticked me off. You stated, “While men can have sex without an emotional connection, women generally need to feel emotionally close to their partner first.” You could not be more wrong. I’m a very goodlooking and fit man, and I would never have sex with someone I didn’t have feelings for. To further prove my point, I know just as many high-class women who have sex with men they do not have feelings for! So women are just as guilty as men. There is no “generally” about it. —A Real Man When a heterosexual man has a one-night stand, which three words best describe how he’s likely to feel afterward: “used, degraded, dirty” or “lucky, lucky, lucky!”? Many women say they can hook up and walk away like men do, and they probably believe that. It seems kind of uncool to be all emotional when you want to be tough and all “no big deal” about casual sex. But we all get our marching orders from our genes. Some of these are unisex, like, “Yoohoo, sharp teeth to your left. Better run!” But there are also separate sets of directives for men and women, corresponding to our physiological differences. In “What Women Want—What Men Want,” anthropologist John Townsend explains, “Because women can be impregnated and abandoned and men cannot, women’s emotions evolved to evaluate the quality and reliability of male investment. These emotions act as an alarm system that urges women to test and evaluate investment and remedy deficiencies even when they try to be indifferent to investment.” Yes, this “Dad or Cad?” detector women have seems to be missing the all-important on-off switch. In one of Townsend’s studies, he found that even when women just wanted to hump and dump a guy, sex “made them feel vulnerable, and thoughts crossed their minds like ‘Does he care about me, is sex all he was after, will he dump me in the morning?’ These thoughts were difficult to suppress.” They’re also especially disheartening to young women who’ve been taught that “gender is a social construct” and who conflate being equal under the law with being the same. Sure, girls can do lots of things boys can do…but should they? Hooking up with some random himbo seems like a bad idea if your “I am woman, hear me roar” typically gives way to “I am woman’s genes, hear me whimper that we hope he’ll call us in the morning.”

MISC. GOODS

Don’t mistake this as a call for prudery. I’m not suggesting that women who want no-strings sex trade their NuvaRings for chastity rings. And, regarding your contention that there’s no “generally” about men, women, and casual sex—sure, there are exceptions: men who get all emo afterward and women who wish that the guy would evaporate already. Studies don’t explain every person; they paint a picture of the average person. There are women who can’t have casual sex (they can’t help but get attached), but the research suggests to me that some women might just need to differentiate between casual sex and too-casual sex. When a woman isn’t up for a boyfriend (or spending a year with her knees crossed), maybe a “friends with benefits” thing could work for her—if it’s a friend she’s known and trusted for more than the 26 minutes he spent chatting her up after “last call.”

SPANKING THE JUNKIE We all have our indulgences, but how much porn is too much? My boyfriend has hundreds of porn bookmarks in his smart phone. He showed them off to me at dinner and said there were 300. Is having so many a sign that it’s less about amusement than it is about compulsive behavior? By the way, he’s generally a collector of things. —The Girlfriend A guy can show his girlfriend his Hot Wheels collection and she’s unlikely to start fretting that he’ll be having sex with her but picturing Bobby Unser. And then there’s your boyfriend, who’s turned the Android into his Porndroid. He may or may not have a porn problem. It’s a problem for you if you feel you aren’t getting enough time, sex, and attention. But what’s definitely a problem is the hostility and passive-aggressiveness of a boyfriend who can’t just watch on the sly; he has to stick it in his girlfriend’s face. Is this really somebody you want to spend a lot more time with? If not, the next time he shoves his phone across the dinner table and asks, “Seen the position of the day?” you might show him one of your own—one you like to call doggie bag-style: woman, from behind, carrying the rest of her dinner out the restaurant door to go find a guy who’s nice to her.

1st Interstate Pawn. 3110 South Reserve, is now open! Buying gold and silver. Buying, selling, and pawning items large and small. We pay more and sell for less. 406-721-(PAWN)7296. Firewood for sale! Save money on your heating bill. We have cords of lodgepole that are dry and ready to burn. This wood lights easily and burns hot. Will deliver anywhere in Missoula or the greater Missoula area (i.e., Potomac, Blackfoot, Seely, Bitterroot, Arlee, Alberton). Cords can be rounds or split, or a combination. Ask us about our multicord discount. Single cords: rounds are $100/cord and split is $125/cord. Stacking fee negotiable. Call Greg at 406-2444255 or 406-546-0587 to order yours today. Wood available all winter long. FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation non-denominational 1-800-475-0876 SAWMILLS-Band/Chainsaw SPRING SALE - Cut lumber any dimension, anytime. Make Money and Save Money in stock ready to ship. Starting at $995.00. www.NorwoodSawmills.com/30 0N 1-800-661-7747, Ext.300N

COMPUTERS Even Macs are computers! Need help with yours? CLARKE CONSULTING @ 5496214 RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway 543-8287

MUSIC GUITAR LESSONS. Learn to play at the next level. Rock, Blues, Country. Dave Stang 721-1652

MORGENROTH MUSIC ADULTS ... Piano Class Forming. Learn to play the piano in a fun, informal way with the latest in technology to enhance your learning. 12 weeks $89 includes materials. MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds entrance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 549-0013. www.montanamusic.com Outlaw Music Specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, Tuesday-Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am-6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533. Outlawmusicguitarshop.com WWW.GREGBOYD.COM One of the world’s premier music stores. (406) 327-9925.

PETS & ANIMALS AKC Mini-Dachshund Pups We are a family breeder with 4 adorable males left to find good homes. Please visit our website to view more photos, learn more about us, our dogs, and pricing. 406-241-2574 CATS: #9414 British short Hair X, Blk/Tan Tabby, SF; #0330 Black/brown tabby, SF, Am Long Hair, Adult; #0358 Brown Tabby, Main Coon X,Diabetic, SF, 2yrs; #0588 Grey Tabby, Am Short Hair, SF; #0624 Black, Am Short Hair, NM, 4 yr; #0644 Black/white, SF, Manx X, 9 mo; #1061 Torti, ASH, SF, 7mo; #1065 Orange Tabby, ASH, NM, 2 yrs; #1162

EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

549-6214

THINK SPRING SALE 1136 West Broadway 549.1610 920 Kensington 541.3210

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)..

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2 March 24 – March 31, 2011

111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

NEW OWNER, NEW LOOK

The Mommy Shoppee Maternity • Nursing • Consignment & Sales • Shower Gifts & More • Call for hours 401 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT •406.728.2208 www.themommyshoppee.com Griz card discounts Visit our sister company Pananche Hair Design

Black/white, DMH, SF, 1 yr; #1220 White/grey, ASH, SF, 5 yrs; #1230 White/Grey Tabby, ALH, SF, 9 yrs; #1255 Tuxedo, DLH, SF, 2 yrs; #1259 Orange/Buff, ALH, NM, 5 yrs;; #1275 Grey/Tan Tick, ASH, NM, 4yrs; #1283 Seal Point, Burmese X, SF, 5.5 yrs; #1298 Grey, Tabby, ASH, SF; #1307 Chocolate Point, Siamese.Snowshoe, SF, 1yr; #1330 Black/white, ASH, SF; #1333 Black, Maine Coon X, NM, 7yrs; #1339 Silver Tabby, DSH, SF, 2yrs; #1364 Tan/Black, DSH, SF, 1 yr; #1367 Grey w/white, ASH, NM; #1369 Orange/white, DSH, NM, 3yrs; #1372 Grey Tabby, DSH, NM; #1373 Grey/white, DLH, NM; #1390 Grey/brown, DSH, NM, 3yrs; #1391 Grey, DSH, SF, 5yrs; #1403 Grey Tabby, Siamese X, SF, 3yrs; #1405 White, ASH, SF, 3yrs; #1412 White, DLH, SF, 3yrs; #1413 Grey/white Tux, ASH, SF, 3yr; #1425 Tan/black, Siamese, NM; #1432 White, DMH, NM, 4yrs; #1440 Orange/creme, DLH, NM, 6yr: #1441 Tan/grey, DSH, NM; #1448 Calico, DMH, SF, 3yrs. For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

Outlaw Music

541-7533

Missoula's Stringed Instrument Pro Shop!

Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

724 Burlington Ave. outlawmusicguitarshop.com

DOGS: #1219 Black, McNabb Blue Heeler X, NM, 2yrs; #1312 Mastiff/Hound X, SF; #1313 Red/white, Heeler X, SF; #1315 Brown/Black, Shepherd X, SF, 4 yrs; #1317 Lab/Hound X, Black, SF, 4yr; #1332 Black, Lab/Pit X, NM, 1yr; #1346 Black/white, Pit Bull, SF, 6yrs; #1363 Black/tan, German Shepherd/Dobie X, NM, 1.5 yrs; #1410 Black/white, Lab/Pointer X, SF, 7yr; #1431 Red/white, Pit Bull. NM, 1yr. For photo listings see our web page at www. montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www. montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

WANTED TO BUY WANTED: MINERAL INTERESTS OIL & GAS LEASES-Experienced Family Owned Oil Production & Exploration Co. We’ll help you Monetize your Mineral Assets. Send details to: P.O. Box 8946, Denver, CO 80201. 877-7543111. MineralAssets@qwestoffice.net WANTED: Used Vespa or Lambretta Italian scooters. Running or for parts. Call Dave 208-201-1140. Will pay cash.


ADULT

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist Susan Clarion RNC CA MATS 5527919 Classes at Meadowsweet Herbs: Healthy Skin from the Inside Out Join Meadowsweet’s Kimberly DeVries to learn about healing the skin from the inside out. Learn how you can help your liver and other eliminatory organs do their jobs better so the skin doesn’t have to take on a heavier load. Thursday March 24 7-9 pm, Cost: $20. Makng your Own Natural Body Care: Healthy Skin from the Outside In Join Meadowsweet’s own Kimberly DeVries to learn

how to make your own natural body care. Thursday March 31, 7-9 pm, Cost: $20. Take home each product you make for an additional $10. Integrative Medicine and the Art of Healing Integrative health is combing parts into a whole, or removing barriers that separate and segregate the healing process. Laura Marx, Family Nurse Practitioner and Ayurvedic Wellness Counselor, helps us develop the perspective to look at the bigger picture. Wednesday April 6, 7-9 pm Cost: Free. Stress Management Naturally Katrina Farnum will lead this calming class, focusing on ways to manage stress using various modalities including herbs, supplements, breathing techniques and honoring our

Kaimu Mystical Poet looking for Muse.

808-443-1786

QUITTING SMOKING?

Try Acupuncture 728-2325

Acupuncture & Herbal Care

Since 1992

own inner voices. Tuesday April 12, 7-9 pm, Cost: $20. Basic Soap Making Learn the art of making your own homemade soap. Saturday April 16 OR Saturday May 21, 11am-4pm. Cost: $50, Materials fee $25. Making your own Natural Body Care Learn how to use natural bath and body products to promote healthy hair and skin. Wednesday April 20, 79pm. Cost: $20, Materials fee $5. Making Your Own Lip Balms and Salves Spring is a great time to stock up on your salves and lip balms so you can use them throughout the summer. Heal those sun-cracked lips, soothe bee stings, cuts, burns and scrapes without the use of any petroleum or artificial preservatives. Tuesday April 26, 7-9 pm. Cost: $20. Take home a salve and lip balms for an additional $10. Homeopathy for Infants and Children Homeopathic medicines are safe for all ages. Ease of use and quick results, makes homeopathy a welcome alternative for treating babies and children. Thursday April 28, 7-9pm.

Cost: Free. A New Approach to Headaches Dr. Jeffrey Friess of the Golgi Clinic provides a perspective that looks beyond the headache and addresses the underlying cause of the disharmony. Tuesday May 17, 7-9pm. Cost: Free. Environmental Effects on Preconception and Pregnancy From preconception through delivery, an expecting couple may modify every nutritional, behavioral and lifestyle factor possible to ensure a healthy child. Dr. Teresita Martinez of the Golgi Clinic discusses the impact the environment has on our health and what we can do about it. Tuesday May 24, 7-9pm. Cost: Free. Advanced Soap Making Did you like the Basic Soap Making class or do you already make you own soaps? This is the class for you! In this class you will also do hands on soap making including developing your own recipe with an in depth discussions of additives, colorants, and natural preservatives. Saturday May 28 11am-4pm. Cost: $50, Materials fee $35. Meadowsweet Herbs, 180 S.

Hypnosis & Imager y * Smoking * Weight * Negative self-talk * Str e s s * D e p r e s s i o n * E m p o w e r y o u r s e l f

redwillowlearning.org 721-0033

728-5693 • Mar y Place MSW, CHT, GIS

Is what you are doing not working?

We c a n h e l p w i t h t h a t .

3rd St. W., Missoula, MT 59801 728-0543 www.meadowsweet-herbs.com Deborah Gregory, Nurse Practitioner Providing women’s healthcare ... one female at a time. •Birth control to young & older. •Annual exams. •Hormonal issues •Prenatal care. Accepting all insurance types. Debbie Gregory, Nurse Practitioner, 721-9999 Community Medical Center #3, 2835 Fort Missoula Road, Suite 305. Escape with Massage$50. Swedish & Deep Tissue. Gift Certificates Available. Janit Bishop, CMT. 207-7358 127 N. Higgins

Chakra Yoga Workshop Nancy Ruby Nathan Zavalney

$115 or $95

w/This AD April 2 • 9am-5:30pm w/ break Asana, pranayama, meditation, more! Awaken and balance your energy body!

Inner Harmony Yoga 214 E. Main St. Ste B Entrance in alley in back

www.yogamotion.com

406-585-9600

MASCULINE, EXPERIENCED FULL BODY MASSAGE FOR MEN IN MISSOULA. Mark(406)728-2629 Rosie Smith Moondance Healing Therapies, Massage & BodyTalk. New client discounts. 240-9103 Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 241-3405

SWEET & DISCRETE Escort Referral Service

829-6394

NOW HIRING www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

EMPLOYMENT GENERAL

and to apply. Screening starts immediately. No phone calls, please.

BARBER WANTED. Montana Barber’s License Required. Call 7283957

PROFESSIONAL

EXPERIENCED CDL DRIVER wanted for crude oil tanker or pnuematic trailer, top pay...406-6907131 or 406-655-3385

PLANNER - Lake County, MT seeks qualified applicants to fill a professional land use Planner position, fulltime, 40 hours per week. Pays $13.50 - $15.00 per hour DOE ($28,000 – $31,200/year), plus benefits. For full job description, qualifications, duties, application, and requirements go to www.lakecounty-mt.org/employment/ employment.html or contact the Lake County Planning Department, 106 Fourth Ave. E., Polson, MT 59860, (406) 883-7235, planning@ lakemt.gov. Position is open until filled. First application review is Wednesday, March 30, 2011.

FILE CLERKS. Immediate need for 12 temporary workers to work for 13 days (8 a.m. to 5 p.m.) starting April 18th. #9951415 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 FT DELIVERY DRIVER. Load, unload, deliver, pick up packages up to 75 lbs. and maneuver up to 150 lbs. with assistance. Must be 21 due to DOT regulations. #2979250 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 LAWN MAINTENANCE for summer season. Monday through Friday, with occasional Saturdays, for 30 to 40 hours per week. Pay starts at $8.00 per hour DOE. #2979245 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

542-2147 • 2204 Dixon

Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie Clarion 406-552-7919

Parks and Recreation summer jobs: Aquatics, Recreation. Lifeguard/ WSI classes starting April 11. Details at www.missoulaparks.org. Apply at Currents in McCormick Park. No phone calls, please. SERVERS & KITCHEN STAFF. Missoula golf course seeking FT & PT Servers and Kitchen Staff. Must be available weekends and holidays. Serving, working the beverage cart, completing food prep work, light meal prep, heating sandwiches and light grill work. Employer is willing to train. Need excellent customer service skills and be groomed for public contact. 9 am and 5 pm for 20 to 40 hours per week. Work days may vary. Pay is $7.35/hour plus tips. Job is seasonal lasting through the end of October-weather permitting. #2979234 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

SKILLED LABOR 1st, 2nd, 3rd Class Boiler Operator: Will be maintaining and operating boiler room. Must be able to lift 50 pounds occasionally. #9951418 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 JUNK VEHICLE COORDINATOR for the Missoula Health Department. Conduct investigations and enforce laws related to junk vehicles, solid waste, public nuisances and Community Decay Program.

#2979248 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/ Missoula, 1-800-545-4546 WILDLAND FIREFIGHTERS needed: FFT1 or FFT2 or ENGINE BOSSES. Looking for crew to man Type 3, 4 and Type 6 Engines, Weed Wash Station, Air-Ops Trailer, and Mobile Fill Station for Wildland Fires. Duties will vary depending on qualifications and position. MUST HAVE: Proper training and certifications. MUST HAVE all credentials on paper. MUST HAVE current 2011 Standards Refresher and Pack Test. Employer can use applicants with Yellow Card or Red Card, but MUST HAVE all other credentials. Need reliable transportation to pick up point. Wage varies by position. Job will vary depending on Fire Season and calls by the USFS. Pay begins when truck is signed up and ends when you return and park truck in driveway. Must be ready to go to work at short notice. Hiring as soon as possible so specific training can be completed. Go to the following web sites for fire Trng: www.fenixforestry.com www.bitterrootwildfire.com; www.rmfc-usa.com; suzanne@fenixforestry.com

WANTED! Area Representatives: Mentor foreign teens, aide in placements, earn extra income. Host Families. Share cultures, develop extended family. No fees! Shelli: 1866-360-0598; www.pieusa.ORG Working Dogs for Conservation is hiring two positions 1)Conservation Dog Handler p/t May-Oct, 10-12 hrs/week, $15/hour, based in Missoula and 2)Canine Field Specialist f/t permanent w/ up to 6 mo. travel/year. $26.5-28k/year start DOE. Based in Missoula or Bozeman. Email Aimee at aimee@workingdogsforconservation.org for job description

IND

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3 March 24 – March 31, 2011


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): Were you under the impression that the sky is completely mapped? It’s not. Advances in technology are unveiling a nonstop flow of new mysteries. In a recent lecture, astronomer Joshua Bloom of the University of California described the explosion of wonder. One particular telescope, for example, detects 1.5 million transient phenomena every night, and an average of 10 of those turn out to be previously undiscovered. Reporting on Bloom’s work, Space.com compared astronomers’ task to “finding a few needles in a giant haystack night after night.” I see this challenge as resembling your imminent future, Aries. Mixed in with all the chatter and hubbub, there are some scattered gems out there—rich revelations and zesty potentials. Will you have the patience to pinpoint them? TAURUS (April 20-May 20): If you’re thinking of calling on a ghost to provide you with information, make sure you know how to banish it when you’re finished milking it. If you’re considering a trek into the past to seek some consolation or inspiration, drop breadcrumbs as you go so you can find your way back to the present when it’s time to return. Catch my drift, Taurus? It’s fine to draw on the old days and the old ways, but don’t get lost or stuck there. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): From an astrological point of view, it’s a favorable time for people to give you gifts and perks and blessings. You have my permission to convey that message to your friends and associates. Let them know it’s in their interest to be generous toward you. The truth, as I see it, is that they will attract rewards for themselves, some unexpected, if they help you. So what’s your role in this dynamic? Be modest. Be grateful. Be gracious. At the same time, rake it all in with supreme confidence that you deserve such an outpouring.



CANCER (June 21-July 22): Nobel Prizes are awarded to geniuses in a variety of fields for work they’ve done to elevate science and culture. But have you heard of Ig Nobel Prizes? The Annals of Improbable Research hands them out to eccentrics whose work it deems useless but amusing. For instance, one recipient was honored for investigating how impotency drugs help hamsters recover quickly from jet lag. Another award went to engineers who developed a remote-control helicopter to collect whale snot. In 2000, physicist Andre Geim won an Ig Nobel Prize for using magnetism to levitate a frog. Unlike all of his fellow honorees, however, Geim later won a Nobel Prize for his research on a remarkable substance called graphene (tinyurl.com/NobelGraphene). I think you’ll soon have a resemblance to him, Cancerian. Some of your efforts will be odd and others spectacular; some will be dismissed or derided and others will be loved and lauded.



LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If you have ever fantasized about setting up a booth at the foot of an active volcano and creating balloon animals for tourists’ kids, now is an excellent time to get started on making that happen. Same is true if you’ve ever thought you’d like to be a rodeo clown in Brazil or a stand-up comedian at a gambling casino or a mentor who teaches card tricks and stage magic to juvenile delinquents. The astrological omens suggest that playfulness and risk-taking would synergize well right now. There’s even a chance that if you found a way to blend them, it would lead to financial gain.



VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You’ve arrived at a phase in your cycle when you’ll have the opportunity to scope out new competitors, inspirational rivals, and allies who challenge you to grow. Choose wisely! Keep in mind that you will be giving them a lot of power to shape you; they will be conditioning your thoughts about yourself and about the goals you regard as worthy of your passions. If you pick people of low character or weak values, they’ll bring you down. If you opt for hard workers with high ideals, they’ll raise you up.



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “There’s no key to the universe,” writes Swami Beyondananda. But that shouldn’t lead us to existential despair or hopeless apathy, adds the Swami. “Fortunately, the universe has been left unlocked,” he concludes. In other words, Libra, there’s no need for a key to the universe! I offer you this good news because there’s a similar principle at work in your life. You’ve been banging on a certain door, imagining that you’re shut out from what’s inside. But the fact is that the door is unlocked and nothing is stopping you from letting yourself in.



SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): When you travel to Mozambique, the Ministry of Fish and Wildlife gives you a warning about the frequency of human encounters with lions out in nature. “Wear little noisy bells so as to give advanced warning to any lions that might be close by so you don’t take them by surprise,” reads the notice you’re handed. I’m certain, Scorpio, that no matter where you are in the coming week—whether it’s Mozambique or elsewhere—you won’t have to tangle with beasts as long as you observe similar precautions. So please take measures to avoid startling goblins, rascals, and rogues. If you visit a dragon’s domain, keep your spirit light and jingly. If you use a shortcut that requires you to pass through the wasteland, sing your favorite nonsense songs as you hippety-hop along.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Few things make me more excited than being able to predict good tidings headed your way. That’s why, as I meditated on your upcoming astrological aspects, I found myself teetering on the edge of ecstasy. Here’s what I foresee: a renaissance of pleasure . . . an outbreak of feeling really fine, both physically and emotionally . . . and an awakening of your deeper capacity to experience joy. Here’s your mantra for the week, generated by my friend Rana Satori Stewart: yum yum yum yum yum / yum yum yum yum yummy yum / yum yum yum yum yummy yummy yum yum.



CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): CNN reported on two neo-Nazi skinheads from Poland, a married couple, who discovered they were actually Jews. It turned out that during World War II, the truth about their origins had been hidden by their parents for fear of persecution. Years later, when the Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw informed them that they were members of the group they had hated for so long, they were shocked. Since then, they have become observant Jews who worship at an orthodox synagogue. The new perspective you’ll be getting about your own roots may not be as dramatic as theirs, Capricorn. But I bet it will lead to a shift in your self-image. Are you ready to revise your history? (More info: tinyurl.com/Ex-skinheads.)



AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): My astrological colleague Antero Alli says that a lot of good ideas occur to him while he’s taking a shower. He also finds frequent inspiration while riding his bike. Why, then, does he not enjoy biking in the rain? He doesn’t know. I bring this up, Aquarius, because you’re entering a phase of your cycle when flashes of insight and intuition are likely to erupt at a higher rate than usual. I suggest you aggressively put yourself in every kind of situation that tends to provoke such eruptions—including ones, like maybe riding your bike in the rain, that you haven’t tried before.



PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): A Canadian man named William Treble once found over a thousand four-leaf clovers in a single day. Niamh Bond, a British baby, was born on the tenth day of the tenth month of 2010—at exactly 10:10 a.m. and 10 seconds. My friend Allan told me he was driving in suburbia the other day when two white cats bolted across the road right in front of him. And yet as lucky as all that might sound, it pales in comparison to the good fortune that’s headed your way, Pisces. Unlike their luck, which was flashy but ultimately meaningless, yours will be down-to-earth and have practical value. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

EMPLOYMENT MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR The Missoula Independent is seeking a creative dynamo with strong administrative, communication and organization skills to coordinate our marketing and promotions efforts, as well as provide support to the advertising staff. Marketing and/or promotions experience required; media experience preferred. We offer good compensation and benefits, and a great working environment. Send resume – with salary expectations – to Lynne Foland, PO Box 8275, Missoula 59807 or email lfoland@missoulanews.com

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION Wildland Fire Training; Basic and Refresher. 406-543-0013 www.blackbull-wildfire.com

HEALTH CAREERS REGISTERED NURSES or certified LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSES to work in Missoula, St Ignatius and/or Superior. Requires Montana’s driver’s license and own vehicle. Nursing license verification

CHIP TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED FOR LOCAL HAULS • Home daily • Good pay • Benefits • 2 years exp. required

1-800-700-6305

needed upon application process. Work week will vary and include weekends. Work in Superior: 12 hour shifts, and Missoula and St. Ignatius: 10 hour shifts that include both day and night. Starting pay DOE and qualifications. Medical and Dental offered after probationary period. 2979251 MIssouula Job Service 728-7060 Seeking a full time PA/NP. Blue Mountain Clinic is seeking a full time Physician Assistant/ Nurse Practitioner! Experience in primary care and reproductive health in an out-patient setting a plus. Salary DOE, great benefits! E-mail resume and cover letter to annie@bluemountainclinic. org, fax to 406-543-9890, or mail to Blue Mountain Clinic, 610 N California Street, Missoula, MT 59802. Seeking a full time PA/NP. Blue Mountain Clinic is seeking a full time Physician Assistant/ Nurse Practitioner! Experience in primary care and reproductive health in an out-patient setting a plus. Salary DOE, great benefits! E-mail resume and cover letter to annie@bluemountainclinic. org, fax to 406-543-9890, or mail to Blue Mountain Clinic, 610 N California Street, Missoula, MT 59802.

Seeking a full time PA/NP. Blue Mountain Clinic is seeking a full time Physician Assistant/ Nurse Practitioner! Experience in primary care and reproductive health in an outpatient setting a plus. Salary DOE, great benefits! E-mail resume and cover letter to annie@bluemountainclinic. org, fax to 406-543-9890, or mail to Blue Mountain Clinic, 610 N California Street, Missoula, MT 59802.

SALES REAL ESTATE AGENTS Clearwater Montana Properties in participation with Cabela’s Trophy Properties is seeking to add selected agents to our team. We take pride in our innovative and progressive marketing, our team environment, and most of all we are proud to give back to the communities where we work, using earnings from our successes. If you are at the top of your game or need a new start and you are motivated, hardworking, and place value in doing the right thing, reply in confidence to Kevin Wetherell-Broker/Owner at Kevin@CMPMontana.com

PUBLIC NOTICES CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, until 3:00 p.m. on Tuesday, April 5, 2011,, and will then be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for construction of the following: Mullan Road-Reserve to Broadway Asphalt Repairs Project 11-004 This project consists of removing and replacing approximately 6,000 square yards of 4” asphalt and base repair where needed. Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project Manual addressed to the City Clerk, City of Missoula, enclosed in sealed envelopes plainly marked on the outside “Proposal for City of Missoula Project 11-004 Mullan Road - Reserve to Broadway, Asphalt Repairs The envelopes shall also be marked with the Bidder’s Name, Address and Montana Contractor’s Registration Number. Proposals must be accompanied by cash, cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of the City of Missoula against liability. A complete set of the Contract Documents and Project Manual will be furnished the Contractors making application therefore from the Office of the City Engineer, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana, upon payment of $50.00 by company check, cashier’s check, or bank money order (cash can not be accepted). Full amount of payment will be refunded upon return of the plans and specifications in good condition within ten (10) days after bid opening. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4 March 24 – March 31, 2011

calling 1-406-444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated on the basis of race, ancestry, color, physical or mental disability, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital or familial status, creed, ex-offender status, physical condition, political belief, public assistance status or sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, except where these criteria are reasonable bona fide occupational qualifications Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula Business Licensing requirements. The City of Missoula reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids, and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to the bid opening at 3:00 PM April 5, 2011 The City of Missoula provides accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the City. To request accommodation, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (406)552-6080. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the city’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, until 2:00 p.m., on Tuesday, April 12, 2011, and will then be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for construction of the following: Curb and Sidewalk Improvements University Area Ph. III – McLeod to Beckwith City of Missoula Project 06047 This project consists of removing and replacing approximately 28,000 square feet of residential city sidewalk, 1,000 linear feet of curb repairs, asphalt repair and other associated improvements. Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project Manual addressed to the City Clerk, City of Missoula, enclosed in sealed envelopes plainly marked on the outside “Proposal

for City of Missoula Project 06-047 University Area Ph. III – McLeod to Beckwith curb and sidewalk improvements” The envelopes shall also be marked with the Bidder’s Name, Address and Montana Contractor’s Registration Number. Proposals must be accompanied by cash, cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of the City of Missoula against liability. A complete set of the Contract Documents and Project Manual will be furnished the Contractors making application therefore from the Office of the City Engineer, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana, upon payment of $50.00 by company check, cashier’s check, or bank money order (cash can not be accepted). Full amount of payment will be refunded upon return of the plans and specifications in good condition within ten (10) days after bid opening. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1-406-444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated on the basis of race, ancestry, color, physical or mental disability, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital or familial status, creed, ex-offender status, physical condition, political belief, public assistance status or sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, except where these criteria are reasonable bona fide occupational qualifications Successful

contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula Business Licensing requirements. Prospective bidders are highly encouraged to attend a pre-bid conference, which will be conducted by the owner at the City Hall Mayor Conference Room, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT. at 11:00 a.m. on Monday, April 4, 2011. The City of Missoula reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids, and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to the bid opening at 2:00 p.m. on April 12, 2011. The City of Missoula provides accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the City. To request accommodation, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (406)552-6080. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the city’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID STREET MAINTENANCE MATERIALS Notice is hereby given that TWO separate sealed bids will be received at the office of the Missoula City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana 59802, until 3:00 p.m., on April 5, 2011 and will then be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room for furnishing the following Materials: City Project No. 10-003 MATERIAL BID ITEMS (1) 1,750 Gallons of Yellow Traffic Marking Paint and 1,250 Gallons of White Traffic Marking Paint (2) 16,200 Pounds Reflective Glass Beads Bidders shall bid on bid proposal forms addressed to the City Clerk, City of Missoula, enclosed in separate sealed envelopes, with separate bid security for each bid, plainly marked on the outside either; “Proposal for City Project No. 10-003 (1) Traffic Marking Paint”; or “Proposal for City Project No. 10-003 (2) Reflective Glass Beads.” Bidders may submit bids for one or both items. The envelopes shall also be marked with the Bidder’s Name and Mailing Address. Proposals must be accompanied by cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation


PUBLIC NOTICES authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Bidders may obtain specifications, bid proposal forms, and other information by visiting www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids, or from the City Engineering Division, Public Works Department, 435 Ryman St, Missoula, MT 59802. (406) 552-6092 Pursuant to Section 18-1-102 Montana Code Annotated, the City is required to provide purchasing preferences to resident Montana vendors and/or for products made in Montana, against the bid of a nonresident if the state of the nonresident enforces a preference for residents. The City of Missoula reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to the bid opening at 3:00 p.m. on April 5, 2011. /s/ MARTHA L. REHBEIN, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on April 11, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider an ordinance amending Missoula Municipal Code Chapter 13.04.010, entitled “Connections with Public Sanitary Sewers Required” and Section 13.04.020 entitled “Connection to Public Sanitary Sewer upon Property Transfer-Required” pertaining to gray water discharge and providing exceptions to public sanitary sewer connections upon property transfer. For further information, contact Steve King, Public Works Director at 552-6353. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein CMC, City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS & PROPOSALS (RFQ/P) FOR ENGINEERING SERVICES ENGINEERING SERVICES FOR THE DESIGN OF THE MILWAUKEE TRAIL LIGHTING – ORANGE TO GARFIELD PROJECT City of Missoula, Montana City Project No. PR 11-04 MTL NOTICE TO ENGINEERING CONSULTING FIRMS: Notice is hereby given by the City of Missoula, Montana (City), an Equal Opportunity government, that it will receive written statements of qualifications and professional proposals (RFQ/P) for the preliminary design, final design and construction management of the Milwaukee Trail Lighting – Orange to Garfield Project (Project). Request for proposal and submission requirements may be obtained from the City Website: www.ci.missoula.mt.us/Bids or from the Parks & Recreation Offices, 600 Cregg Lane, Missoula, Montana 59801, Monday through Friday, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, or by calling (406) 721PARK. Professional proposals shall be submitted to Parks & Recreation before 5:00 p.m., local time the 7th day of April, 2011. This solicitation is being offered in accordance with State statutes governing procurement of professional services. Accordingly, the City of Missoula reserves the right to negotiate an agreement based on fair and reasonable compensation for the scope of work and services proposed, as well as the right to reject any and all responses deemed unqualified, unsatisfactory or inappropriate. The City of Missoula is an EEO/AA, M/F, V/H Employer. Qualified women, veterans, minority and handicapped individuals are strongly encouraged to submit proposals. CITY OF MISSOULA SECTION 00100 INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received by the City of Missoula at the office of the City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana, 59802, until 2:00 p.m. local time on Tuesday, April 12, 2011, for the construction of the “Lower Miller Creek Road Curb and Sidewalk Improvements”, and will then be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s conference room. The project

consisting of new curb/gutter, sidewalk; new storm drainage, inlets, manholes, sumps, and tie-ins to existing culverts; asphalt removal and installation, topsoil and turf establishment and associated improvements. The project is funded in part or in whole with funding from the Federal Highway Administration Western Federal Lands Highway Division and is subject to all applicable Federal/State regulations, as indicated within the specifications. The Project is located on Lower Miller Creek Road, approximately 500’ west of the Miller Creek Road roundabout to Linda Vista Boulevard, in Missoula, Montana. All base bid work must be substantially complete within 45 calendar days after the commencement date stated in the Notice to Proceed. Additional contract time will be allowed for accepted bid alternatives. The contract documents consisting of Drawings and Project Manual may be examined or obtained at the Engineering Division, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana 59802. Copies of Drawings and Project Manual will be furnished to Contractors upon payment of a nonrefundable fee of $50.00 by company check, cashier’s check, or bank money order (cash cannot be accepted). Each Bid shall be accompanied by bid security made payable to owner in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the bidder’s maximum bid price and in the form of cash, a cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in Montana or by any banking corporation incorporated under the laws of Montana; or a bid bond (on form attached if a form is prescribed) issued by a surety authorized to do business in Montana meeting the requirements of Paragraph 5.01 of the General Conditions. The bid bond shall act as a guarantee that the bidder, if the bid is accepted, will promptly execute the contract, secure payment of worker’s compensation insurance, and furnish a satisfactory faithful performance bond in the amount of 100 percent of the contract price and a payment bond in the amount of 100 percent of the contract price. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors bidding or doing work on this project will be required to be registered with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI). Forms for registration are available from the Department of Labor and Industry, P.O. Box 8011, 1805 Prospect, Helena, Montana 59604-8011. Information on registration can be obtained by calling 1-406444-7734. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of the construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by Federal Law. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their race, color, religion, sex or national origin. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula Business Licensing requirements. Proposal must be sealed and marked “Lower Miller Creek Road Curb and Sidewalk Improvements” and marked “Sealed Bid” with the contractor’s name, address, and Montana Contractor’s Registration Number, and be addressed to: City of Missoula Clerks Office, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT 59802. This project is funded with Federal Funds; therefore, the contractor shall not pay less than the latest Federal Davis Bacon minimum wage as determined by the U.S. Secretary of Labor. A copy of the wage rates are attached as part of the specifications in Section 00910. Domestic Materials (“Buy America”): All iron or steel materials to be permanently incorporated into the project shall be produced in the United States, and certified as indicated within the specifications in Section 00900. Bidder is subject to 182-401 et. Seg., Montana Code Annotated and amendments thereto and regulations issued there under, relating to prevailing wages, benefits, and other requirements. No claim for additional compensation will be allowed based upon a lack of knowledge or a misunderstanding of any such requirements by bidder or failure to include in bid adequate increases in such wages over the term of the contract. Prospective bidders are highly encouraged to attend a pre-bid conference, which will be conducted jointly by the owner and engineer at the City Hall Mayor Conference Room, 435 Ryman St., Missoula Montana 59802 at 10:00 a.m. on

Monday, April 4, 2011. All questions relative to this project prior to the opening of bids shall be directed to the engineer. It shall be understood, however, that no specification interpretation will be made by telephone, nor will any “or equal” products be considered for approval prior to award of contract. The engineer for this project is: DJ&A, P.C., 3203 Russell Street, Missoula, Montana 59801, with questions addressed to Chris Anderson at (406) 721-4320. The owner reserves the right to reject any or all bids, to waive any informality in a bid, or to accept the lowest responsive and responsible bid and bidder, and to make awards in the interest of the owner. The low bid shall be determined on the basis of the lowest Base Bid, or lowest combination of Base Bid and accepted Alternative Bids if alternatives are included. The owner may accept in any order; any, all or none of the Alternative Bids. The City of Missoula provides accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the City. To request accommodations, please contact the City of Missoula Office of City Clerk at (406) 552-6080. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein - C.M.C, City Clerk MISSOULA COUNTY FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT PERMIT APPLICATION The Office of Planning &and& Grants has received a floodplain application from Mr. Kirk Scrafford to work within the Bitterroot River floodplain. The project is located in Section 26 Township 11N Range 20W and includes the excavation of a new pond. The pond is proposed to be excavated on a separate parcel adjacent (West) of a parcel previously authorized under permit #07-10. The primary purpose of Floodplain Development Permits is to promote the public health, safety, and general welfare, to minimize flood losses in areas subject to flood hazards, and to promote wise use of the floodplain. Copies of the full applications are available for review in the Office of Planning and Grants in City Hall. Written comments from anyone interested in County floodplain permit application # 11-11 may be submitted prior to 5:00 p.m., April 15, 2011. Address comments to the Floodplain Administrator, Office of Planning and & Grants, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802 or call 258-4841 for more information. MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE INVITING PROPOSALS Notice is hereby given that sealed proposals will be received at the PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808, until 10:00 o’clock a.m. Friday, April 8 2011 at which time the bids will be opened and read in the conference room, Missoula County Public Works, for the purpose of purchasing of Ten Thousand (10,000) Tons of 3/4” Asphaltic Plant Mix. Specifications and bid procedures for this purchase can be obtained at the Public Works Division, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808. Proposals must be accompanied by security in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the amount of the bid as a guarantee that the

successful bidder will enter into the required contract and in the form specified in MCA 18-1-203, for example: cash, cashier’s check, certified check, bank money order, or bank draft, any of which must be drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the state of Montana or a banking association incorporated under the Laws of Montana; or a bid bond or bond executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the state of Montana. THE CONTRACT WILL BE AWARDED TO THE LOWEST RESPONSIBLE QUALIFIED BIDDER WHOSE BID PROPOSAL COMPLIES WITH ALL THE REQUIREMENTS. The Board of County Commissioners of Missoula County, Montana, reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Proposals shall be sealed and marked “Proposal for Asphaltic Plant Mix – 2011” and addressed to: Missoula County Public Works 2011 Asphaltic Plant Mix Bid 6089 Training Drive Missoula, MT 59808 MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE INVITING PROPOSALS Notice is hereby given that sealed proposals will be received at the PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808, until 10:00 o’clock a.m. Friday, April 8 2011 at which time the bids will be opened and read in the conference room, Missoula County Public Works, for the purpose of applying Magnesium Chloride Dust Palliative to approximately 88 miles of gravel roads throughout various geographic areas within Missoula County. All work is to be performed in accordance with the plans and specifications on file in the Office of the Public Works Department and shall be performed under the supervision of the County Engineer or his designated representative. Specifications and bid procedures can be obtained at the Office of Public Works at 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT. Proposals must be accompanied by security in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the amount of the bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract and in the form specified in MCA 18-1-203, for example: cash, cashier’s check, certified check, bank money order, or bank draft, any of which must be drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the state of Montana or a banking association incorporated under the Laws of Montana; or a bid bond or bond executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the state of Montana. THE CONTRACT WILL BE AWARDED TO THE LOWEST RESPONSIBLE QUALIFIED BIDDER WHOSE BID PROPOSAL COMPLIES WITH ALL THE REQUIREMENTS. Proposals shall be sealed and marked “Proposals for 2011 Missoula County Road Dust Abatement” and addressed to: Missoula County Public Works 2011 Dust Abatement Bid 6089 Training Drive Missoula, MT 59808 MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF CLOSE OF REGULAR

PUBLIC NOTICE COMMUNITY-BASED ORGANIZATION APPLICATIONS Missoula County is currently accepting applications from governmental or health and human service nonprofit organizations that provide basic/critical needs assistance to at-risk populations in the Missoula area. For more information or to receive a Community-Based Organization (CBO) application form, please call 258-3712. Applications may be picked up at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants, 435 Ryman S t r e e t , M i s s o u l a , M T, o r o n t h e w e b , http://www.co.missoula.mt.us/opgweb/Grants/. The deadline for submittal is Wednesday, April 27, 2011.

VOTER REGISTRATION AND OPTION FOR LATE REGISTRATION Notice is hereby given that regular* registration for the Special District Elections to be held on May 3, 2011, will close at 5:00 p.m., on April 4, 2011. *NOTE: If you miss this regular registration deadline, you may still register for the election by showing up at the county fairground’s election center up to and including on Election Day. Between noon and the close of business on the day before Election Day, you can complete and submit a voter registration card, but you will need to return to the local election center on Election Day to pick up and vote a ballot. All active and inactive**electors of the Special Districts are entitled to vote at said election. Ballots will be automatically mailed to Active Electors only. If you are a registered voter and do not receive a ballot, contact the county election office to update your information as necessary and receive a ballot. Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the County Election Administrator. If you have moved, please have your registration transferred to your present address. DATED this 24th day of February 2011. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Missoula County Election Administrator MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on April 11, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider an ordinance amending Missoula Municipal Code, Chapter 15.32 entitled “Building Permits,” providing for low voltage permits. For further information, contact Don Verrue, Building Official at 552-6042. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein CMC, City Clerk MISSOULA COUNTY REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS The Missoula County Department of Public Works has issued a request for qualifications (RFQ) for a consultant to prepare an Enterprise GIS Implementation Plan. Any firm interested in responding to the RFQ is invited to do so by 5:00PM, Wednesday, April 11, 2011. Qualification statements will be reviewed and evaluated by Friday, April 22, 2011. All questions related to the project should be directed to Jeff Seaton, Missoula County Public Works 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808, (406)258-4816, jseaton@co.missoula.mt.us. Interested firms may obtain the complete project description and RFQ on Missoula County’s website:

COPPERSTONE STOR-ALL will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 101, 134, 143. 144, 201, 252, 268, 274, 335, J101, K129, and K133. Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, vehicles & other misc household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday, April 11th, 2011 at 9:00 AM by appt only by calling (406) 728-7867. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 8700 Roller Coaster Rd, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to Tuesday, April 12th, 2011 at 4:00 P.M. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

www.co.missoula.mt.us/bidsandproposals or by contacting Jeff Seaton. Firms should submit one (1) original statement, four (4) copies, and one (1) electronic copy on CD. The electronic copy must be either MS Office or Adobe Acrobat. Qualification statements must be sealed and marked “Qualification Statement for Enterprise GIS Implementation Plan” and submitted to: Jeff Seaton, Missoula County Public Works, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808. Missoula County reserves the right to reject any and all statements. MISSOULA COUNTY SHERIFF’S SALE JACK MEYER, PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF EARL PRUYN, MINOTT PRUYN, SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE OF THE ESTATE OF BERTHA PRUYN, JUDY M. GRUNOW AND JANICE N. MCKINNEY, AS TRUSTEES UNDER THE WILL OF NORMAN E. THYFAULT, Plaintiffs, vs. GRIZZLY DEVELOPMENT COMPANY and GEORGE R. BAILEY IV, Defendants. To Be Sold at Sheriff’s Sale: TERMS: CASH, or its equivalent; NO personal checks On the 14th day of April A.D., 2011, at Ten (10:00) o’clock A.M., at the front door of the Court House, in the City of Missoula, County of Missoula, State of Montana, that certain personal property situate in said Missoula County, and particularly described as follows, to-wit: Tract 4 of Certificate of Survey No. 2876, located in the S_SW_ of Section 26, Township 12 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana LESS that portion conveyed to Montana Department of Transportation in Book 504 of Micro at Page 906, records of Missoula County, Montana. AND Tract 1-A of Certificate of Survey No. 2002, located in the SW_ of Section 26, Township 12 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana.

Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining. Dated this 24th day of March A.D., 2011. /s/ CARL C. IBSEN Sheriff of Missoula County, Montana By /s/ Patrick A. Turner, Deputy MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Dept No. 3 Cause No. DV 11-244 REQUEST FOR HEARING AND ORDER IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF ANNE P. GRAHAM ON BEHALF OF SCOTT JAMES MYERS. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a hearing is set for April 21, 2011 at 9:00 a.m. to enter a decree of name change. Claims against this name change must be either mailed to Anne P. Graham, return receipt requested, in care of Law Offices of Alex Beal, PLLC, 217 N. 3rd Street, Suite J, Hamilton, MT 59840, or filed with the Clerk of the above court. Dated this 9th day of March, 2011. /s/ Alex Beal MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Dept No. 3 Cause No. DV 11-246 REQUEST FOR HEARING AND ORDER IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF ANNE P. GRAHAM ON BEHALF OF HARRISON STEVEN MYERS. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a hearing is set for April 21, 2011 at 9:00 a.m. to enter a decree of name change. Claims against this name change must be either mailed to Anne P. Graham, return receipt requested, in care of Law Offices of Alex Beal, PLLC, 217 N. 3rd Street, Suite J, Hamilton, MT 59840, or filed with the Clerk of the above court. Dated this 9th day of March, 2011. /s/ Alex Beal MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, COUNTY OF MISSOULA Dept. No. 2 Probate No. DP-07-112 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF STEPHEN L. SWAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Nina Swan, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o SOL & WOLFE Law

CITY OF MISSOULA

RESOLUTION NUMBER 2011-022 A RESOLUTION OF INTENT TO REZONE PROPERTY LEGALLY DESCRIBED AS LOT 4 OF BLOCK 1 OF MISSOULA DEVELOPMENT PARK (PHASE 1), LOCATED IN SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 14 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M. (SEE MAP O), FROM THE MISSOULA DEVELOPMENT PARK SPECIAL ZONING DISTRICT “NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCIAL” SUBDISTRICT TO THE MISSOULA DEVELOPMENT PARK SPECIAL ZONING DISTRICT “LIGHT INDUSTRIAL” SUBDISTRICT. WHEREAS, 76-2-201 M.C.A. authorizes the Board of County Commissioners to adopt zoning regulations; and, WHEREAS, the Board of County Commissioners did adopt zoning regulations for Missoula County through the passage of County Resolution 76-113, as amended; and, WHEREAS, 76-2-202 M.C.A. provides for the establishment and revision of zoning districts; and, WHEREAS, a request to rezone the property legally described above was reviewed by the Missoula Consolidated Planning Board at a public hearing held February 1, 2011 and February 15, 2011; and, WHEREAS, a notice of public hearing for the February 1, 2011 public hearing was advertised in The Independent on January 13, 2011 and January 20, 2011, and a notice of the public hearing continuation to February 15, 2011, was advertised in The Independent on February 10, 2011 and February 17, 2011; and WHEREAS, a hearing was held by the County Commissioners of Missoula County on March 2, 2011, in order to give the public an opportunity to be heard regarding the proposed amendments to the zoning district; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Board of County Commissioners of Missoula County will receive written protest for a period of thirty (30) days after publication of this notice on March 17, 2011, from persons owning real property within the contiguous boundaries of the “Neighborhood Commercial” subdistrict of the Missoula Development Park Special Zoning District. FURTHER, copies of the Missoula Development Park Special Zoning District are available for inspection at the office of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder and the Office of Planning and Grants PASSED AND ADOPTED THIS 10th DAY OF MARCH 2011 BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ATTEST: MISSOULA COUNTY Vickie Zeier, Clerk and Recorder /s/ Jean Curtiss, Chair /s/ APPROVED AS TO FORM: Bill Carey, Commissioner /s/ James McCubbin, Deputy County Attorney /s/ Michele Landquist, Commissioner /s/

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5 March 24 – March 31, 2011


JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r

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PUBLIC NOTICES Firm, PLLP at 101 East Broadway, #300, Missoula, Montana 59802 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court at the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802. DATED January 13th, 2011. /s/ Nina Swan, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, COUNTY OF MISSOULA Dept. No. 2 Probate No. DP-11-39 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF RUSSELL D. KINNEY, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Karen Koefelda, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o SOL & WOLFE Law Firm, PLLP at 101 East Broadway, #300, Missoula, Montana 59802 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court at the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802. DATED February 3, 2011. /s/ Karen Koefelda, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-11-330 Dept. No. 1 Ed McLean Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Heather Winters-Jones, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Heather Ann WintersJones to Heather Ann Winters. The hearing will be on April 20, 2011 at 1:30 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Richard Goodwin, Deputy Clerk of Court

ACROSS

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1 Company behind FarmVille and CityVille 6 Perrins' steak sauce partner 9 It may get passed in secret 14 Tennis star Chris 15 Clip-___ (tie types) 16 Magazine edition 17 Follow through on a promise 20 Leaky tire sound 21 Gave a rat's ass 22 Super Mario World console, for short 23 Isolates 25 Sudden increase in wind 29 Dig one's claws into 34 Be a positive, on balance 38 Went out with 39 "Ruh-___!" (Scooby-Doo line) 40 "Beavis and Butt-Head" spinoff 41 Gave the thumbs-up to 42 Portions (out) 44 Schooner filler 45 Debussy's "La ___" 46 Hands-free phone feature 48 Medvedev's country: abbr. 49 Breakfast cereal brand 51 Doing the nasty 55 Split-second look 56 Cream in the hair care aisle 58 Like some pantyhose 59 Swiss cheese 60 Baby docs 61 "It Was Written" rapper 62 180 degrees from NNE 63 Highest point

1 Letters in a British puzzle? 2 Cosmetician Rocher 3 Wilco guitarist Cline 4 Gray, in Grenoble 5 Off-road rambler 6 Ecological Seuss character, with "The" 7 ___ nous 8 Phoenixes rise from them 9 Lively dance 10 Bears, in Bolivia 11 "Help ___ the way!" 12 Like some art class models 13 Dick Tracy's girl 18 Bad bacteria 19 She was told to "stifle" by Archie 23 Ran in the laundry 24 Have to have 25 Not Gomorrah 26 Reason for 2011 relief efforts 27 Speak 28 Filled with wonder 30 Simple rhyme scheme 31 Harder to find 32 Fond farewell 33 Russian rulers, once 35 What some are destined for 36 "A Buddhist walks up to a ___ stand and says, 'Make me one with everything'" 37 Blue man group? 42 Singer Etheridge 43 Folk singer Pete and his poet uncle Alan, for two 46 Go on 47 Candle-making material 49 MDXXV doubled 50 Actor Neeson 51 Amorphous horror movie villain, with "The" 52 Mid-road turnarounds 53 Final, for instance 54 22-across rival, once 55 Ronny & the Daytonas hit 57 Oscar winner Harrison

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MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-11-33 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF EDWARD F. FOWLER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Julie E. Gibson, PO Box 17931, Missoula, Montana 59808, return receipt requested, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 21st day of March, 2011. /s/ Julie E. Gibson, Personal Representative of the Estate of Edward F. Fowler MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP-11-26 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF KATE ELIZABETH JIVIDEN (a/k/a KATIE ELIZABETH JIVIDEN,) Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Debra Worthen-Brey, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 4110 Weeping Willow Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803, or filed with the Clerk of the above-named Court. DATED this 31st day of January, 2011 /s/ Debra Worthen-Brey, Personal Representative GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC /s/ Nancy P. Gibson, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DV-11-252 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION. MISSOULA FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, v. MARK ALAN CHAPMAN, a/k/a MARK A. CHAPMAN, JUDITH F. CHAPMAN, NEW ERA BICYCLES, INC., CITY OF MISSOULA, and MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA TO DEFENDANT NEW ERA BICYCLES, INC., GREETINGS: You are hereby SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in this Action which is filed with the above-named Court, a copy of which is served upon you, and to file your answer with the Court and serve a copy thereof upon Plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days after the service of this SUMMONS, or such other period as may be specified by law, exclusive of the day of service. Your failure to appear or answer will result in judgment against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. A filing fee must accompany the answer. This action is brought for the purpose of foreclosing the following-described real properties located in Missoula County, Montana: Lots 17 and 18, Block 29, Park Addition, according to the official plat thereof as filed in the Clerk and Recorder’s Office, Missoula County, Montana, TOGETHER WITH vacated 16 foot alley lying immediately east of, adjoining and contiguous to said Lots 17 and 18 AND The South 125.76 feet of Lot 36 of U.S. Government Tract Survey located in Section 30, Township 13 North, Range 19 West. P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. LESS AND EXCEPTING THEREFROM the Southerly 30.030 feet and the Easterly 60.060 feet of said land as conveyed to the County of Missoula for roadway purposes July 30, 1984, in Book 209 of Micro Records at Page 590 records of Missoula County, Montana. FURTHER LESS AND EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion of said premises conveyed to the State of Montana Department of Transportation, in

May 2, 1991, in Book 328 of Micro Records at Page 1810, records of Missoula County, Montana. RECORDING REFERENCE: Book 634 of Micro at page 667. Dated this 15th day of March, 2011. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: /s/ Diane Overholtzer, Deputy Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DV-11-319 NOTICE OF HEARING ON PROPOSED NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE NAME CHANGE OF: ALISSA RICHELE RAHN, MICHELLE MARIE TURNER, Petitioner. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT Petitioner, Michelle Marie Turner, has petitioned the District Court for the Fourth Judicial District for a change of name from Alissa Richele Rahn to Alissa Richele Rahn Turner, and the petition for name change will be heard by District Court Judge John W. Larson on the 21st day of April, 2011, at 9:00 a.m., in the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana. At any time before the hearing, objections may be filed by any person who can demonstrate good reasons against the change of name. DATED this 10th day of March, 2011. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Maria A. Cassidy, Deputy Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 John W. Larson Case No. DP-1144 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF ROGER D. CLARK, also known as ROGER DUANE CLARK, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to, Kennesha Harmon the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at Tipp & Buley, P.C., PO Box 3778, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 8th day of March, 2011. /s/ Kennesha Harmon, Personal Representative NOTICE OF HEARING The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a hearing on the proposed expenditure of Open Space Bond proceeds on the following project: 1. Sixmile 1 Conservation Easement A hearing on a proposal to use $350,000 in Open Space bond funding towards the purchase of a conservation easement on 890 acres of land in the Sixmile area owned by Keith and Linda Ward. The conservation easement would be held by the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. The proposed match is approximately $4.20 for every dollar of open space funding expended. The Commissioners will conduct the hearing at 1:30 p.m., Wednesday, March 30, 2011, in Room 201 of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 W Broadway, Missoula, Montana. Any person wishing to be heard on the matter may speak at the hearing and/or submit written or other materials to the Commissioners at the hearing or by mail, fax or personal delivery to the Commissioners at their offices in the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, FAX (406) 721-4043. Copies of the proposed project are available for public inspection at the Missoula County Office of Rural Initiatives, 317 Woody, Missoula, Montana. Telephone 258-3432; or you may contact Pat O’Herren in Rural Initiatives at 258-4981. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling 2583422. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 12/22/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200632901 BK 789, Pg 782, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which James F. Curlin was Grantor, Wells Fargo Financial Montana, Inc. was Beneficiary and First American Title Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 5 in Block 6 of El Mar Estates Phase 1, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 06/29/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 14, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $193,736.02. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $184,346.95, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on May 27, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C6 March 24 – March 31, 2011

The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7777.14771) 1002.184001-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 07/13/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200717888, Bk. 801, Pg. 737, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which John D. Dugan was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage LLC was Beneficiary and Title Services, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract 11 of Certificate of Survey No. 49 located in the West One-Half of Section 17, Township 15 North, Range 21 West, P.M., Missoula County, Montana. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200910414, Bk. 838, Pg. 1051, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance, LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 21, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $213,940.21. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $203,975.02, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 1, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.74012) 1002.184508-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/23/04, recorded as Instrument No. 200411500, Bk 731, Pg 361, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Kraig A. Michels and Marie L. Michels, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc. was Beneficiary and First American Title Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lots 6, 7, 8, and the East One-Half of Lot 9 in Block 58 of Daly’s Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Recording Reference: Book 662 of Micro Records at Page 560 Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes

and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 19, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $247,782.76. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $241,305.77, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on May 31, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.92066) 1002.184338-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 12/26/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200733230, Bk 811, Pg 102, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Michael L. Padrotti and Traci L. Padrotti, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 6 of 44 Ranch, Phases 1 and 2, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 1, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $357,433.48. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $311,224.72, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 13, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.72393) 1002.150878-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/10/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200514158, Bk-754 Pg-463, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Anirban Mitra, a married man was Grantor, JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary

and Insured Titles, LLC was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles, LLC as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 10 of Canyon View Two, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200808559, B:817, P:0336, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/07 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 31, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $216,305.19. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $165,696.52, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 13, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.74055) 1002.185641-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 29, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Tract 8B of Certificate of Survey No. 5413, located in the Southwest one-quarter of Section 17, Township 15 North, Range 21 West, Principal Meridian, Montana, Missoula County, Montana. Pamela E Lensman, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to PHH Mortgage Services, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on May 16, 2005 and recorded on May 20, 2005 in Book 752, Page 1183, under document No 200511882. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage Services. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,017.18, beginning September 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 24, 2010 is $106,959.92 principal, interest at the rate of 5.875% now totaling $1,966.95, late charges in the amount of $102.54, escrow advances of $626.32, and other fees and expenses advanced of $47.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $17.22 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing


PUBLIC NOTICES conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 20, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On December 20, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Phh V Lensman 41392.718 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE To be sold for cash at Trustee’s sale on July 25, 2011 at 10:00 a.m., on the front (south) steps of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, all of Trustee’s right, title and interest to the following-described property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Tract 1 of Certificate of Survey No. 5162, located in the W1/2 NW1/4 NW1/4 of Section 24, Township 12 North, Range 19 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. TOGETHER WITH an easement for the purpose of ingress and egress as disclosed in Book 107 of Micro at Page 69. Lyle L. Brown and Anita Brown, as Grantors, conveyed the real property to Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to First Citizen Bank of East Missoula, as Beneficiary, by Trust Indenture recorded August 3, 2005, in Book 757 of Micro at page 753, records of the Missoula Clerk and Recorder. A Substitution of Trustee designating Kevin S. Jones as Successor Trustee was recorded November 15, 2010, in Book 869, Page 343, Document 201022450, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The default of the obligation, the performance of which is secured by the aforementioned Trust Indenture, and for which default of this foreclosure is made , is for failure to pay the monthly payments as and when due. Pursuant to the provisions of the Trust Indenture, the Beneficiary has exercised, and hereby exercises, its option to declare the full amount secured by such such Trust Indenture immediately due and payable. There presently is due on said obligation the principal sum of $54,954.30, plus interest at a rate of 8.5% totaling $11,684.14, and late fees of $42.48, for a total amount due of $66,680.92 as of March 10, 2011, plus the costs of foreclosure, attorney’s fees, trustee’s fees, escrow closing fees, and other accruing costs. The Beneficiary has elected, and does hereby elect, to sell the abovedescribed property to satisfy the obligation referenced above. The Beneficiary declares that the Grantor is in default as described above and demands that the Trustee sell the property described above in accordance with the terms and provisions of this Notice. DATED 11th day of March, 2011. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Trustee. STATE OF MONTANA)) ss. County of Missoula). On this 11th day of March, 2011 before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Kevin S. Jones, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. (SEAL) /s/ Christy Shipp, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at: Missoula, Montana My Commission Expires: 5-7-2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 16, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 2 IN BLOCK 2 OF NEW MEADOWS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT OF RECORD IN BOOK 13 OF PLATS AT PAGE 16 Christopher S Hewitt and Stephanie M Hewitt, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J Peterson of Mackoff, Kellogg, Kirby and Kloster, PC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated January 28, 2005 and recorded on January 31, 2005 at 3:29 o’clock P.M., in Book 747, Page 571, under Document No 200502523. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $884.26, beginning July 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation

and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 10, 2010 is $170,581.62 principal, interest at the rate of 2.00% now totaling $1,505.62, escrow advances of $721.79 and other fees and expenses advanced of $290.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $9.35 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 5, 2011 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA )) ss. County of Stark) On January 5, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 CitiMortgage v Hewitt 41926.640 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 16, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 5 in Block 9 of High Park #5, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof Keith Larkin and Janet J Larkin, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title of Missoula, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated November 30, 2005 and Recorded on December 1, 2005 at 4:30 o’clock P.M., under Document No 200531932. The beneficial interest is currently held by The Bank of New York Mellon formerly known as The Bank of New York as successor Trustee to JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as Trustee for the Certificateholders of Structured Asset Mortgage Investments II Trust 2006-AR1 Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-AR1. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $713.64, beginning November 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 31, 2010 is $213,031.72 principal, interest at the rate of 6.125% now totaling $21,338.49, late charges in the amount of $316.14, escrow advances of $9,457.55 and other fees and expenses advanced of $447.55, plus accruing interest at the rate of $35.75 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents

(valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 5, 2011 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA )) ss. County of Stark) On January 5, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Emc/larkin NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 16, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 7 OF HIDDEN HILLS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Troy Gaswint, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to American Title and Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corp., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 17, 2002 and recorded July 11, 2002 at 1:00 o’clock P.M., in Book 684, Page 1765, under Document No. 200219624. The beneficial interest is currently held by The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, National Association FKA The Bank of New York Trust Company, N.A. as successor to JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A. as Trustee, Mortgage Asset-Backed PassThrough Certificates, Series 2003-RP1. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,491.86, beginning December 1, 2007, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 28, 2011 is $103,246.31 principal, interest at the rate of 12.625% now totaling $33,397.58, late charges in the amount of $1,323.86, escrow advances of $7,782.95 and other fees and expenses advanced of $5,619.42, plus accruing interest at the rate of $35.71 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COL-

LECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 5, 2011 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On January 5, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 Litton V Gaswint 41462.1993 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 2, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT 16 C OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 1825, LOCATED IN THE NORTHWEST ONE- QUARTER OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 21 WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MONTANA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Timothy J Trudell and Stephanie D Trudell, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to PHH Mortgage Services, as Beneficiary, by Deed of trust dated March 31, 2006 and recorded April 5, 2006 in Book 771 Page 815 under Document No. 200607566. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage Corporation. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,689.16, beginning June 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 2, 2010 is $266,993.87 principal, interest at the rate of 6.12500% now totaling $24,642.04, late charges in the amount of $675.52, escrow advances of $3.589.21, and other fees and expenses advanced of $358.25, plus accruing interest at the rate of $44.80 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 23, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On December 23, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 PHH V. Trudell 41392.723 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 6, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT FIFTEEN (15) OF CANYON VILLAGE NO. 2, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF. R. Steven Nuckols and Joanna M. Nuckols, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, LLC, as Trustee, to

secure an obligation owed to Community Bank-Missoula, Inc., as Beneficiary, by DEED OF TRUST DATED APRIL 27, 2005 AND RECORDED ON APRIL 29, 2005 IN BOOK 751, PAGE 799, UNDER DOCUMENT NO 200509868. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,950.57, beginning May 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 13, 2010 is $252,974.68 principal, interest at the rate of 5.625% now totaling $24,184.23, late charges in the amount of $2,005.38, escrow advances of $7,083.77, and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,024.68, plus accruing interest at the rate of $29.99 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 27, 2010 /s/Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On December 27, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 CitiMortgage V. Nuckols 41926.469 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 06/29/2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which ROSALEE J MURPHY as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to TITLE SERVICES, INC. as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 09/23/2005 and recorded 09/28/2005, in document No. 200525526 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 761 at Page Number 296 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: THE NORTH 78 FEET OF THE WEST 20 FEET OF LOT 8, THE NORTH 78 FEET OF LOTS 9 AND 10 IN BLOCK 86 OF SCHOOL ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 1735 SHERWOOD STREET, Missoula, MT 59802. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA

COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 05/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $93,087.95 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.625% per annum from 04/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 02/11/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 10-0121850 FEI NO. 1006.112780 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 06/21/2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which ARMEDA HOOVER AND GERALD HOOVER as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to MARK E. NOENNIG as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 04/05/2005 and recorded 04/06/2005, in document No. 200507784 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 750 at Page Number 417 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOTS 1 AND 2 IN BLOCK 88 OF DALY’S ADDITION NO. 2, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 2101 SOUTH 14TH STREET, Missoula, MT 59801. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, BY BAC GP, LLC, ITS GENERAL PARTNER, AS ATTORNEY-IN-FACT. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 08/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $131,949.74 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 8.001% per annum from 08/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 02/07/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380

Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0009283 FEI NO. 1006.128818 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 06/27/2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which SANDRA A. DEAL as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY OF MONTANA as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 12/13/2006 and recorded 12/19/2006, in document No. 200632433 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 789 at Page Number 314 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT B19 OF CANYON CREEK VILLAGE PHASES 5, 6, 7 AND 8, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 4711 ADALAIDE LANE, Missoula, MT 59808. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 06/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $107,937.31 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 4.375% per annum from 05/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 02/09/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 10-0124750 FEI NO. 1006.113581 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 06/17/2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which MARK L CHEFF, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE & SEPARATE PROPERTY as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 05/03/2005 and recorded 05/09/2005, in document No. 200510602 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 751 at Page Number 1533 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: TRACT 2A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5619, LOCATED IN THE SOUTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 5 AND THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 13 NORTH, RANGE 16 WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MONTANA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA.

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 March 24 – March 31, 2011


PUBLIC NOTICES Property Address: 3512 Bear Creek Road, Bonner, MT 59823. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 01/01/2009, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $186,907.22 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.375% per annum from 12/01/2008 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and

expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 02/02/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 10-0108972 FEI NO. 1006.110351 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 07/05/2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which THOMAS SKOOG, A SINGLE PERSON as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON, ATTORNEY AT LAW as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 04/08/2010 and recorded 04/08/2010, in document No. 201006639 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 857 at Page Number 1324 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows:

LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 3A OF PERRY ADDITION, LOT 3, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 2413 39TH ST, Missoula, MT 59803-1122. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 11/01/2010 and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $162,056.97 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.25% per annum from 11/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the

amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 02/15/2011 ReconTrust Company, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0011175 FEI NO. 1006.128934 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 07/05/2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which BILL J GODWIN as Grantors, conveyed said real property to INSURED TITLES LLC as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 03/01/2007 and recorded 03/02/2007, in document No. 200704983 in Book/Reel/Volume Number N/A at Page

Number N/A in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LOT 8 IN BLOCK 15 OF ROSELAND ADDITION NO. 2, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 4002 MOUNT AVENUE, MISSOULA, MT 59804. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 12/01/2009, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $203,975.64 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.00% per annum from 11/01/2009 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become

due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 02/16/2011 ReconTrust Company, N.A. Successor Trustee Wendi Abed-Rabboh, Authorized Signer 2380 Performance Dr, TX2-984-0407 Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 10-0120049 FEI NO. 1006.112584 PUBLIC NOTICE The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Tuesday, April 5, 2011, at 7:00 p.m. in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. The Board of County Commissioners is scheduled to hold a public hearing on this item on Wednesday, May 4, 2011, at 1:30 p.m. in Room 201 of he County Courthouse annex located at 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, Montana. Amendments to the Missoula County Subdivision Regulations The Missoula County Rural Initiatives Office proposes amendments to Article 8 of the Missoula County Subdivision Regulations that address Divisions of Land Exempt from Review. The purpose of these revisions is to clarify the use of exemptions and make minor revisions to the application and review requirements. Examples of amendments include, but are not limited to: clarification of the use of exemptions for condominiums, format of application submittal, removal of the Missoula County Attorney’s Office as the reviewing agency and replacing it with “designated Missoula County

SERVICES GENERAL CONTRACTORS

Renovator, testimonials available. Hoythomes.com or 7285642

Natural Housebuilders, Inc. • Passivhaus Designs • Smaller Homes • Additions/Remodels • 369-0940 OR 642-6863 • www.naturalhousebuilder.net

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Dog and Cat Sitting. When staying home is the best option for your pet, I’ll come to your home for visits. Nelson Dog and Cat Care, Denise Nelson, 4065 2 9 - 5 6 3 1 , nelsondmarie@aol.com

146 Woodford St. 728-1948

960 E. Broadway 728-1919

Drive a little, save a lot! Blue Mountain Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x20 $65 Bitterroot Mini Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x10 $45 • 10x15 $55 10x20 $65 • 10x30 $85 • 542-2060 "Let us tend your den"

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Request for Qualifications: The BitterRoot Economic Development District (BREDD), with the Mineral County Board of Commissioners and Airport Board, seeks a qualified aviation consultant to conduct a Needs Assessment and Business Plan for the Mineral County Airport. Up to $60,000 is available for this project. Proposals due April 8, 2011. The RFQ can be accessed at http://www.bredd.org. Request for Qualifications: The BitterRoot Economic Development District (BREDD), with the Mineral County Board of Commissioners and Airport Board, seeks a qualified aviation consultant to conduct a Needs Assessment and Business Plan for the Mineral County Airport. Up to $60,000 is available for this project. Proposals due April 8, 2011. The RFQ can be accessed at http://www.bredd.org.

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department”, requiring a public meeting instead of public hearing for the consideration of family transfers, providing for administrative review of agricultural exemptions, and setting a 1 year deadline for filing exemptions with up to a 1 year extension. The proposed amendments to the Missoula County Subdivision Regulations are available for public and agency comment. The amendments can be viewed at www.co.missoula.mt.us./rural. They are also available for public inspection at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants (City Hall, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula), Missoula County Rural Initiatives (office location: 317 Woody Street, Missoula), Missoula County Clerk and Recorders Office (Missoula County Courthouse Annex, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula) and the Missoula County Commissioners Office (Missoula County Courthouse Annex, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula). Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. Comments may be directed to Missoula County Rural Initiatives at 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59802 or via email to ri@co.missoula.mt.us. If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. Request for Qualifications: The BitterRoot Economic Development District (BREDD, Inc) is offering interested individuals or organizations an opportunity to submit a proposal to BREDD to provide Technical Assistance to regional Forest Businesses. Up to $220,000 is available for this project. Proposals due March 24, 2011. Access the RFQ at http://www.bredd.org. Contact Melissa Fisher at mfisher@bredd.org or 406258-3423 with questions.

Request for Qualifications: The BitterRoot Economic Development District (BREDD), with the Mineral County Board of Commissioners and Airport Board, seeks a qualified aviation consultant to conduct a Needs Assessment and Business Plan for the Mineral County Airport. Up to $60,000 is available for this project. Proposals due April 8, 2011. The RFQ can be accessed at http://www.bredd.org.

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HANDYMAN Squires for Hire. Carpentry, Drywall, Painting, Plumbing, General Handyman. I actually show up on time! Bret 544-4671

HOME IMPROVEMENT Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead

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240-4648

RENTALS APARTMENTS PUBLISHER’S NOTICE EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

APARTMENTS FOR RENT 1 & 2 Bedroom FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished apartments. UTILITIES PAID. Close to U & downtown. 549-7711. Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com 118 West Alder- Historic Park Place Hotel at the heart of downtown –Secured entry, Studio and 1 bedroom units now offering newly remodeled loft style living with great views, coin-ops and flat rate for gas heat. Rent $525-$595. Contact PPM for rent specials. 721-8990

Ninemile mother-inlaw: 1-bedroom, view of the beautiful Ninemile valley, storage, carport, all paid, $450, GCPM, 549-6106 gcpmmt.com 1502 Ernest Ave #5 1bd/1ba $545 hook-ups, off-street parking, new paint $950. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1506-1510 Ernest. Close to fairgrounds, Splash MT, and Playfair Park. 2bed/1bath $695/month with heat included. Single garage, DW, A/C, coinops. Contact PPM for availability 721-8990.

2201 W. Railroad #106 $850/$850 deposit. Move in Special-2 weeks free rent. 2 Bed/1.5 bath, G/S paid, D/W, microwave, washer/ dryer & microwave. Carport & storage. NO PETS. GATEWEST 728-7333

Corvallis, 4,500 sqft warehouse space, 7 bay doors, 40 Cents SqFt offered by Greener MT Prop Mgmt, 370-7009

329 E. Front #B5 - $510/$510 deposit. W/S/G paid. Coinop laundry, off street parking & close to the U. NO PETS. GATEWEST 728-7333

2 bdrm—Rattlesnake Home $1100, fenced, garage, washer/dryer, new carpets. One dog permitted with references and pet deposit. (307)-699-0554.

444 Washington 1bd/1ba $650 w/ Heat paid! Coin-ops, downtown, off-street parking. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C8 March 24 – March 31, 2011

HOUSES

2426 Ernest - $1050/$1050 deposit. NEW 3 bed/1.5 bath with D/W, Washer/dryer, Microwave & garage. NO PETS GATEWEST 728-7333

Ninemile Valley: Redone doublewide, wood floors, 3bedrooms, 2-baths, den, pet welcome, $875, GCPM, 5496106 gcpm-mt.com

COMMERCIAL Downtown Studio office storage warehouse space available, various sizes & prices. Contact 239-2206.

ROOMMATES ALL AREAS-ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of

online listing with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse. Visit: http://www.roommates.com Seeking that SPECIAL housemate. Abode is COZY with CALMING ENERGY. You have furnished living area and 2 bedrooms suitable for any age. Senior citizen OK. I have my living area downstairs. Come check it out. $460. 3703225. 735 Cleveland Street. HAD VOICEMAIL, BUT LOST PHONE PRIOR TO CALLING YOU BACK!


HOME PAGE

MLS# 20111042

• Leaded glass windows, high ceilings, oak floors, original trim & fresh paint • Modern updates. www.431ePine.com

$499,900

899 Lolo, Missoula

MLS# 10006516

$324,900

431 E Pine St.

MLS#20110236

Jed Dennison

Shannon Hilliard

jed@zillastate.com • www.zillastate.com

shannon@prudentialmissoula.com www.ShannonHilliard.com

$495,000

6821 Kelsey Court

Jon Freeland

406-239-8350

406-531-1216

Beautiful Georgetown Lake Acreage

• 5 bedroom, 3 bath home • Great, big open kitchen. • Great Views off the deck • Priced competitively with the other homes in the area

• 5 Bed, 2 bath A.J Gibson home

• 2 bed, 1 bath • Lower Rattlesnake starter home • Great location • Priced to move!

$170,000

FEATURED LISTING

FEATURED LISTING

FEATURED LISTING

Enjoy the unobstructed views of Georgetown Lake and the Anaconda Pintler Wilderness Area from this beautiful 9-acre parcel. The property is a mix of meadow and trees gently sloping to within 100' of the lake shore. USFS land separates the parcel from the actual shoreline. Access is year round and power and phone are available. The final plot is recorded and septic is approved. The fishing in the lake is fantastic and the surrounding area offers unlimited year round recreational opportunities.

406-360-8234

jfreeland@missoulahomes.com

Fantastic Rock Creek Cabin

Rock Creek Road, Clinton

$184,000 Deeded Creek Access. This great 1 br, 1 ba cabin is situated on 1.5 acres with deeded access to "Blue Ribbon" Rock Creek. The home features tile floors, Viking range and hood, gas fireplace with electric back-up heat in all rooms, lg walk-in steam shower and custom wood blinds. Great views, trees, easy access, and the entire 1.5 acres is grass with full u/g sprinkler system. Located just 8 miles up Rock Creek on paved, county maintained road. Commute to Missoula is about 35 minutes.

3 acres just 9 miles up, on the creek side of a paved, county maintained road. Beautiful level ground w/ septic system. Power and phone are to the property and wells in the area are shallow. Deeded access to Rock Creek from the property. Enjoy watching the Big Horn Sheep that roam the surrounding cliffs and hillsides. This is a great spot for a year round home or vacation cabin.

$159,000

Call Kelly Vigne-Lee • 546-8798 • www.streamsiderealty.com $128,900

$179,900

$156,900 CONDO 3Bd, 1.5 bath w/fireplace. All appliances included.

3Bd, 1bath. All new interior. Ready to move in.

3Bd, 1bath w/greenhouse and established garden beds.

MLS #20110684

MLS #2011520

MLS #20111551

Jeannette Williams 239-2049

3811 Stephens #34

1940 S 5th W

1013 Sherwood

jeannette@montana.com

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 March 24 – March 31, 2011


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1&2

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

Professional Property Management

GardenCity

Property Management

Call PPM for all your rental needs ppm@montana.com professionalproperty.com

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

406-721-8990

549-7711 Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com

422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

FIDELITY

Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

251- 4707

2 BD APT Uncle Robert Ln. $605$620/mo.

Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

MHA Management An affiliation of the Missoula Housing Authority

220 S. Catlin 3 BR $635 WSG paid/W/D $650 deposit

226 S. Catlin 2 BR $574 WSG paid / W/D in unit $600 deposit

149 W. Broadway

"Let us tend your den" Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

Finalist

Finalist

1601 South Ave • 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals • Professional Office & Retail Leasing

30 years in Missoula

Call for Current Listings & Services Email: gatewest@montana.com

2 BD APT 1309 Cooper $580/mo. Visit our website at

www.fidelityproperty.com

1 BR $450 $500 deposit/heat paid Some restrictions apply. For more information contact MHA Management at

549-4113

REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 3 bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage. Master bed w/ closet/office area, Large storage shed, new deck & underground sprinklers $220,000 • MLS # 10007009. Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com Affordable Condo, Didn’t think you could afford to buy your own place? This sweet, new, green-built development may be cheaper than rent. 1400 Burns, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Beautiful River home on Bitterroot just minutes from Missoula. 3 bed 2 bath with a deck that could hold the whole party. $979,000 or Equity Shares available. MLS 10006007. Call Anne 546-5816 for showings. Windermere Real Estate Classic North Side Beauty, fantastic updates, hardwood floors, beautiful decor, lots of room on double lot to garden, outbuildings and rented studio shares bath and kitchen, 622 N. 4th 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Condo Along the River -Close to the U, one-of-a-kind 2br Edgewater Condo, highly desirable, hardwood floors, lots of character, fantastic location. 521 Hartman #2, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Deck Overlooks Clarkfork River for income qualified first time homeowners, great 2bdr condo, attached 2 car garage, like new, pets allowed, 1401 Cedar St #22 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Farm Houses w/land in Missoula, these funky farm houses boast lots of land to spread out and do your thing, Development potential. 3278787 porticorealestate.com Five bedroom 4+ bath townhome on golfcourse with excellent views and gracious space. $445,000.

MLS 10007754. Call Anne 5465816 for showings. Windermere Real Estate GORGEOUS CENTRAL MISSOULA CONDO. 3 Bdr/2.5 Baths, fenced back yard, large single garage, tile floors, stainless appliances, spacious master bedroom, vaulted ceilings, tile flooring, all just a short walk to the Good Food Store. Prudential Montana. $189,900. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or visit www.mindypalmer.com GORGEOUS CRAFTSMAN STYLE TARGET RANGE HOME ON 0.94 ACRES. 5 Bdr/3.5 Bath, double garage, hardwood & tile floors, gourmet kitchen, breakfast nook, main floor master, 2 family rooms. Close to schools, shopping, and the Bitterroot River. $469,000. Pru-dential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com GORGEOUS HANDCRAFTED HOME IN 3.3 ACRES ON PETTY CREEK. 3 Bdr/2.5 Baths, Main

floor master suite, great room, gorgeous kitchen, hardwood floors, heated double garage, with guest quarters, and great views. $595,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com GORGEOUS LOWER RATTLESNAKE HOME. 4 Bdr, 2 Baths, separate heated studio, wide-plank fir floors, 10’ high ceilings, great kitchen, lots of light, all just steps from Greenough Park and trails. $310,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Great 3 Bed 2 Bath home on the hill in Lolo. This home features a spacious living room, large backyard and nice deck, great views of the mountains, and huge family room in the basement. Perfect home for RD financing. $189,900. MLS # 20110854. Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com

GREAT CENTRAL MISSOULA LOCATION. 3 Bdr/2 Baths, detached heated studio, multi-level deck, carport, oak flooring, sunny kitchen, family room, utility/storage room, bonus room with private bath and more. Prudential Montana. $199,900. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com GREAT NORTHSIDE LOCATION. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, fenced yard, hardwood floors, fireplace, lots of natural light, washer/dryer, off-street parking, walk to community gardens, parks, brew pub and downtown . Prudential Montana. $169,900. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Handsome, Spacious Home on Prime Upper Miller Creek Acreage, 5+ bedrooms, with out of town living on quiet cul-de-sac, and acres. Rodeo Rd. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

IMMACULATE HOME ON A 20,000 SQFT LOT. Beautifully updated & maintained 4 Bdr/3 Bath Lolo area home. Great yard and deck, spacious living room and family room, great kitchen with breakfast bar & dining area, master bedroom and more. $269,900. Prudential Montana. More info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

RICE TEAM

Janet Rice • 240-3932

Robin Rice • 240-6503

Open House Sunday 3/27 2:30-4:30pm 370-7689 1331 Bulwer St #B 2 bed 1 bath $139,900 www.bulwercondo.isnowforsale.com

US Government Real Estate for Sale Missoula Fireweather Site, 2.7 Acres

W. Broadway St., Missoula, MT 59808

ONLINE AUCTION U.S. General Services Administration

Contact Veronica Capron at 817-978-4246 or visit

propertydisposal.gsa.gov

2511 Sunridge Court • 5 bed, 3 bath home in South Hills • Central air, vaulted ceilings, • Yard w/ underground sprinklers & privacy fence. • $240,000 • MLS # 10007275

NEW! TO BE BUILT! Megan Lane, Frenchtown

• 3 Bed, 2 bed home on 1 acre • $2000 appliance allowance • $1300 landscaping allowance • $199,900 • MLS #1000716!

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10 March 24 – March 31, 2011

PRICE REDUCED 3811 Stephens #35, Missoula • 3 bed, 1.5 bath centrally located condo • 1bedroom has deck • Gas fireplace, tall ceilings in living room • New trim, interior paint and vinyl • $135,000 • MLS # 20110908 117 Dallas, in LOLO. $189,900 • 3 Bed 2 Bath home on the hill in Lolo. • Spacious living room, large backyard & deck, great views of the mountains, and huge family room in the basement. • Perfect home for RD financing.

Pride of ownership w/ many updates, end unit! Brand new carpet, newer paint throughout w/ very attractive colors, new bath and kitchen fixtures, upgraded light fixtures. Lower level features large living room, with pergo flooring through out. Single attached garage and small backyard. www.1729ethel.com. May have downpayment/closing cost Asst for those who qualify. MLS#20111473

1729 Ethel Lane • $163,000 For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Rochelle

Missoula Properties Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com


REAL ESTATE

LOG HOMES. Hand peeled, hand crafted, saddle notch, full scribe, full length logs. Top quality craftsmanship at very affordable prices. missioncreekloghomes.com or (406)745-2110 NEW LISTING! 3 Bed/2 Bath, includes kitchen appliances, single level living, A/C, concrete patio out back door, chain link fence (back yard), UG sprinklers, vinyl siding, one block to Hellgate Elementary School. Excellent condition. $209,000. MLS#20111250. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. New! To be built! 3 Bed, 2 bed home on 1 acre. Buyer can pick colors & finishing touches. $2000 appliance allowance & $1300 landscaping allowance. $199,900 • MLS #10007161 Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com Price Reduced 3 bed, 1.5 bath centrally located condo w/ 1 car garage. 1 bedroom has deck, gas fireplace, tall ceilings in living

room. New trim, interior pain and vinyl. $139,900 • MLS # 20110908 Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com PRICE REDUCED! 2 bdrm 2 bath manufactured home. Addition for possible den or office. Shop & extra space in dbl garage. Zoned for multifamily or commercial. NOW ONLY $114,900. MLS#906610. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. Price Reduced! 3 Bed, 2 Bath, 2 car garage. Nice deck in private back yard. Close to Clark Fork River. Close to recreation area for horse back riding, hunting, snowmobiling and 4 wheeling. $174,900. MLS#10004303. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam @bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. PRICE REDUCED! 4 bedroom, 2 bath home on large fenced lot, deck, fire pit, close to schools, walking paths and shopping. Newer furnace, water heater, gas fireplace. $239,900. MLS#

20110384. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@ bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. PRICE REDUCED! 5 bed, 3 bath home in South Hills. House has central air, vaulted ceilings, big family room with gas fireplace. Yard w/ underground sprinklers and privacy fence. 2 car garage. Great home for entertaining! MLS # 10007275. $240,000. Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com PRICE REDUCED! 55+ COMMUNITY 2 Bed, 2 Bath, large family room. Homeowners fee is $370/mo. includes clubhouse, sewer, garbage, land lease, snow removal & lawn care. $129,900 • MLS#10006023. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@ bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. Rare Wilma Building Condo – unique loft style condo offers a carefree, fun lifestyle with an amazing view on top of the historic

Wilma, $219,900 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Rattlesnake Home on Large Lot, nice 3br home sits on very rare lot, mature landscaping, tennis court, home has lots of upgrades, 506 Redwood 327-8787 porticorealestate.com SINGLE LEVEL LIVING CLOSE TO THE BITTERROOT RIVER. 4 Bdr/3 Bath single-level Stevensville home. Great, open floor plan, incredible mountain views, next to public park, walk to Downtown Stevi or Bitterroot River. $219,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Unique Lower Rattlesnake home near Bugbee Nature Area, 3Brm, 4Ba, Tree-top views, Lots of upgrades like granite countertops and lots of gorgeous wood throughout, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com View or list properties for sale By Owner at www.byownermissoula. com OR call 550-3077

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES 3 BR Townhome FSBO near GFS Like new 3-br, 1.5-ba townhouse for sale for $182,500. No HOA fees. Central location at 2019 7th St near the Good Food Store. Attached garage, private fenced yard, nice upgrades throughout home. Call 531-0930 for appointment. See byownermissoula.com for details. Agents welcome. 3344B Connery Way. Modern three level townhome. Easy maintenance yard, 2 bd 3 ba dble car garage. $192,000. MLS 10006082. Call Anne 546-5816 for showings. Windermere Real Estate Uptown Flats Unit #213 1 bed 1 bath and all the amenities included in this Quality Downtown Condo. $149,900. MLS 20110263. Call Anne 546-5816 for showings. Windermere Real Estate

LAND FOR SALE 3.5 ACRES BARE LAND ON PETTY CREEK. Gorgeous bare land parcel straddling Petty Creek. Septic, well, and utilities in place. Gorgeous building spot with mountain, creek, and valley views. Custom builder available. $149,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com ARIZONA LAND LIQUIDATION, $99/mo., 1 & 2 1/2-Acre ranch lots. 1 hour from Tucson Int’l Airport. NO CREDIT CHECK! Guaranteed Financing, Money Back Guarantee. (800) 631-8164 Code 4054 www.sunsiteslandrush.com Own 20 Acres. Only $129/mo. $13,900 near growing El Paso, Texas (safest city in America!) Low down, no credit checks, owner financing. Free map/pictures 8662 5 7 - 4 5 5 5 www.sunsetranches.com Secluded 20 Acres 15 Minutes to Missoula, property boasts nice

choices for building site, a healthy and beautiful forest setting, and easy commute. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

COMMERCIAL 321 N. Higgins for sale. Many updates to this grand ole downtown building. $875,000. MLS 10003350. Call Anne 546-5816 for showings. Windermere Real Estate

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL QUICK CASH PAID FOR YOUR REAL ESTATE NOTE! Local Investor buys private mortgages, trust indentures & Land Installment Contracts. Call Today for a FREE Bid on buying a portion or all of your note. We also lend on Real Estate, must have at least 40% equity. (800)999-4809 www.CreativeFinance.com

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 March 24 – March 31, 2011


Gold'n Plump Just Bare Chicken Boneless Breast

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701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 9 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188 | orangestreetfoodfarm.com


KUFM needs your support! PLEDGE WEEK is coming:

April 9 - 16 Community members are encouraged to donate thank you gifts for financial contributions from listeners. Past items have included dinner parties, massages, baby booties, homemade strudel, ski trips and more. We also need people to answer phones during pledge week: call 243-4988 to schedule a spot.

More info: www.MTPR.org

The UM Music and Theatre & Dance Departments present

Crazy for You The new GERSHWIN comedy musical

Montana Theatre, 7:30pm March 4-26, 29 - April 2 More info: www.umtheatredance.org

SPIRIT OF MISSOULA ART SHOW Art with the children, by the children, for the children

April 1, 6:00 - 8:00pm Downtown Dance Collective 121 W. Main, Missoula Food * Music * Silent Auction Proceeds benefit Spirit at Play

Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture.