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YES, TIMBER IS BACK IN BONNER, BUT CAN THE COMPANY TOWN BE REVIVED? ROSEVELT TURNS PLANNED TREATMENT CENTER VELCRO KICKS, NEWS AT FT. MISSOULA DRAWS GRIPES RANGE OVER IN GRAVE SCOPE THE NOW ON CASSETTE!

UP FRONT


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


YES, TIMBER IS BACK IN BONNER, BUT CAN THE COMPANY TOWN BE REVIVED? ROSEVELT TURNS PLANNED TREATMENT CENTER VELCRO KICKS, NEWS AT FT. MISSOULA DRAWS GRIPES RANGE OVER IN GRAVE SCOPE THE NOW ON CASSETTE!

UP FRONT


Missoula Independent Page 2 March 22 – March 29, 2012


nside Cover Story

Colton Wilson has a tombstone tattooed on his right forearm. On a recent late-winter day, the 21-yearold moves constantly inside the visitor center at Shelby’s Crossroads Correctional Facility. He picks at his fingers, clenches his hands and shifts his feet. He runs his hands through his dark, wavy hair. The worst Cover photo by Chad Harder part of prison, he says, is being put in administrative segregation. Wilson and the other inmates call it “the hole.” ...................................14

News Letters The Obama bombshell ....................................................................................4 The Week in Review A sober St. Pat’s? Nah................................................................6 Briefs The return of granny flats .................................................................................6 Etc. Is there anything we can’t sell to China? ..............................................................7 Up Front Bonner sneaks back to life...........................................................................8 Up Front Democrats try to create jobs........................................................................9 Ochenski Is this it for the Endangered Species Act?.................................................10 Range Fake sportsmen recruit Romney.....................................................................11 Agenda The Montana Abolition Coalition hosts a discussion...................................12

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan It’s time for pink slime ..................................................................19 Happiest Hour Shots at the Union Club ..................................................................20 8 Days a Week We’re tired of arguing.......................................................................22 Mountain High The North Dakota Downhill (at Montana Snowbowl) ...................29 Scope Reclusive Missoula garage-surf band The Velcro Kicks...................................30 Noise Jerry Joseph, Broken Note, Umphrey’s McGee, Charlie Parr .........................31 Arts Photo Finish showcases blood, sweat and knees ..............................................32 Film The Hunger Games is a quiet blockbuster ........................................................33 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films ...................................................34

Exclusives Street Talk....................................................................................................................4 In Other News...........................................................................................................13 Classifieds ................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrology..................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle....................................................................................................C-7 This Modern World ...............................................................................................C-15

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Robert Meyerowitz PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson ASSOCIATE EDITOR Matthew Frank PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Jason McMackin STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Skylar Browning COPY EDITOR Ted McDermott PHOTO INTERN Michelle Gustafson ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Chris Melton, Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Brad Tyer, Dave Loos, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Azita Osanloo, Jamie Rogers, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2012 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

Missoula Independent Page 3 March 22 – March 29, 2012


STREET TALK

by Michelle Gustafson

Asked on the afternoon of St. Patrick’s Day, at Sean Kelly’s beer garden.

What’s the craziest thing you’ve ever done on St. Patty’s? Follow up: Among other things, this day celebrates the luck of the Irish. What’s the luckiest you’ve ever gotten?

Ryan Brenteson: I don’t remember a whole lot, but I was in Dublin last year for St. Patrick’s Day. I tried to swing dance with the street performers before a parade there. I’m pretty sure I annoyed all the street people there. Gimme five: I once won $5 in the Washington lottery. I probably spent the money on beer.

Jayme Nevell: This St. Patty’s has been the craziest so far...waking up to doing [Irish] car bombs this morning. Scratch that: I won $30 on my 18th birthday, here in Montana. I bought more scratch lottery tickets with it but didn’t win again.

Manny: Three years ago I lost my car in Butte. I reported it stolen and rode the bus back to Missoula. Then I got a phone call from the police in Butte that they had found it—right where I left it! I rode the bus back to Butte the same day to get it. Back in the box: I was on a cruise and I hit three jackpots in a row on my birthday! I won around $2,000 and spent it on the cruise. Tim Joyner: When I was a senior in high school in New York, me and my friends skipped school on St. Patty’s Day and took the train down to the city. We were drinking on the train and some cops monitored us until we got to Grand Central Station. My mom found out and gave me a tongue-lashing, but it was totally worth it. Lady luck: I’m lucky because I have a great family here in Missoula and I have two sisters here that watch over me.

Sannan Solberg: I remember it was in college. I remember wearing green tights. But that’s about all I can remember. Pre-Patty party: Besides last night? Let’s leave it at that.

Missoula Independent Page 4 March 22 – March 29, 2012

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Live and let live

Biggest story ever

In his recent letter to the Independent (see “Let ’em trap,” Feb. 23), Angelo Pecora of Seeley Lake expresses the opinion that the trapping debate— especially the part of it carried on by trapping’s critics—has gone on long enough. For the most part, Pecora makes his case with admirable civility, although he drifts toward undue disparagement when he resorts to using a term like “anti-trapping rhetoric” to describe the writings of those who genuinely, and in a heartfelt way, abhor trapping’s implicit cruelty. Moreover, Pecora displays a misunderstanding of anti-trapping sentiment when he says “Enough propaganda on how they die” when referring to what non-trappers have to say about the ordeals that animals caught in leg-hold traps endure before they’re clubbed or drowned: “propagandizing” is not the primary intention of those who graphically allude to the suffering and misery that trapped animals experience; the primary intention is to engender awareness of the terrible unkindness that trapping really is, in hopes of convincing us to stop doing it. Judging by what he says in his letter, Pecora would seem to be a live-and-letlive kind of guy. But I wonder what his limits are in that regard. Evidently, he’s willing to countenance his neighbors’ trapping for “sport” when the “season” for it arrives. But he’s also a guy who loves his dogs and his mule. I’m just wondering whether he’d be okay with a dog-owning, mule-owning neighbor who badly mistreated those animals. Would he be upset by his neighbor’s behavior? Would he try to interfere with his neighbor’s “right” to be an abuser of animals? What Pecora and other trapping apologists need to realize is that antitrapping “types” perceive animal trapping as animal abuse, a perception that’s hardly inaccurate, really, given what a trapped animal actually goes through once the muscles, nerves, blood vessels and bones of its foot or leg are hardclamped between the jaws of a steel trap, typically for hours on end. This is not to say that it is trapping’s purpose or trappers’ intention to torment wild animals; and yet, animal torment is an all too frequent outcome of animal trapping. And for what? So that trophy wives and the nouveau riche can relish a vainglorious exhibitionism? Frankly, I find it hard to imagine a true woodsman being willing to cater to that kind of human idiocy. I’m grateful to our local papers, the Indy and the Missoulian, for their willingness to make room for the trapping-adverse viewpoint. Thomas A. Azzara Missoula

I pen this letter with a heavy heart. I’m afraid the United States of America that we know and love just may be in her last days. Right is wrong, up is down, and there seems to be no common sense left anywhere.

“Animal torment is an all-too-frequent outcome of animal trapping. And for what? So that trophy wives and the nouveau riche can relish a vainglorious exhibitionism?”

Earlier this month, after a six-month forensic investigation by a team of law enforcement professionals, Joe Arpaio, a sheriff in Arizona, called a news conference to announce the findings of that investigation. He found there was definite probable cause that both the birth certificate and the Selective Service registration card released by the White House as being that of President Barack Obama were forgeries. What? If a duly sworn officer of the law says the evidence he’s uncovered has revealed probable cause that a crime has been committed, that means that any reasonable person would come to the same conclusion when presented with the evidence at hand. If any reasonable person in this audience of readers would like to see the evidence for themselves, the video of the press conference and the evidence presented can be easily found on the internet. Unfortunately, most folks on both sides of this issue have a preconceived opinion based upon their political leanings, rather than bothering with messy little things like the facts.

Here we have a sitting president who has released documents that a duly elected officer of the law says are forgeries. If that’s not news, I don’t know what is. That should have made four-inch headlines on the front page of every newspaper in America. But it was nowhere. Instead, countless gallons of ink were spilled across the pages of our fair state’s newspapers day after day, with countless angry people calling for a judge to resign over a stupid off-color joke. Wait a minute. Let me get this straight. A judge with a dirty joke on his rap sheet is newsworthy and the president presenting forged documents is not? The free press in our country must all be on a lunch break. It’s patently obvious that either Arpaio or Obama is lying, and nobody even seems to care. I suppose many people must think that Arpaio is just some sort of a right-wing nut job. That’s usually the first derogatory accusation that’s directed toward anyone that dares question anything about our president. If that happens to be your stance, I challenge you to see the facts for yourself. This is far bigger than politics. If the sheriff is indeed a nut job, and he has no probable cause, then he needs to be exposed for a fraud and his badge should be ripped from his chest. But, if the opposite is true, then we need to deal with the facts and proceed out of the horrible mess it creates the best we can. Unfortunately, ignoring the elephant in the room is not going to make him go away. I’ve written to our senators, our representative and our state attorney general, as well as countless other officials, and to date have only received the courtesy of one reply, from a member of the Montana Legislature. It’s inconceivable that anyone holding the highest office in our land could actually have the audacity to engage in fraud, forgery and the willful deception of the American people to this degree. If proven, this is the biggest story since July 4, 1776— and folks on both sides of the aisle just can’t believe it could possibly be true. If we don’t have the rule of law, our country is over. The result is total anarchy. If the White House is above the law, why should anyone else bother to obey it? All of us—Democrats, Republicans, independents and everyone in between— need to stand tall and make our voices heard loud and clear in the halls of Congress. We need to contact our representatives and demand a Congressional hearing to get to the bottom of this sordid mess. Let’s forget our political posturing and worry concerning the coming elections and get the facts on the table, so we can deal with them. The very survival of our country depends upon it. Ken Overcast Chinook


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Missoula Independent Page 5 March 22 – March 29, 2012


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, March 14

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Comment

VIEWFINDER

Agenda

News Quirks by Michelle Gustafson

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals upholds the federal law that removed wolves in Montana from the endangered species list. Sen. Jon Tester, a primary backer of the law, applauds the ruling, “because Montana’s wolves are recovered, and they must be managed like other wildlife.”

• Thursday, March 15 Target Range Elementary School fourth-grader Dominick Sharp is trapped inside his South 7th Street West home as a fire rages through the house. Multiple fire engines and dozens of firefighters respond to the blaze. Sharp’s mother and three siblings escape from the fire unharmed, but 11-yearold Dominick dies.

• Friday, March 16 A University of Montana student files a police report alleging that Grizzlies quarterback Jordan Johnson raped her last month. The woman had already received a temporary restraining order against Johnson. Johnson denies the allegation. It’s the 11th allegation of sexual assault involving a UM student, dating back to the fall of 2010.

• Saturday, March 17 Locals wearing tall green hats, short chartreuse skirts and unwieldy shamrocks flood downtown Missoula for St. Patrick’s Day festivities. An Indy staffer spots a crew of such celebrants carrying, for some reason, a Christmas tree toward the Silver Dollar Saloon on Railroad Street.

• Sunday, March 18 Some opt not to heed law enforcement warnings about beefed up DUI patrols for the Saint Patrick’s Day weekend. Between Friday noon and Sunday midnight, city and county patrols cite 17 people for drunk driving. Eleven others are ticketed for having an open container.

• Monday, March 19 Sixty-four genetically pure bison from Yellowstone National Park are transported to the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. Assiniboine and Sioux tribal members from Fort Peck welcome the relocation, while Montana cattle producers worry the move could fuel the spread of brucellosis.

• Tuesday, March 20 Will Cherry, a junior point guard on the University of Montana basketball team, which lost to Wisconsin last week in the NCAA championship tournament, is named to the 2012 Lou Henson Mid-Major AllAmerica Team. Cherry was also the Big Sky Conference’s Defensive Player of the Year.

Hellgate High School senior Adelheid Langner works the uneven bars atop a moving car during the 31st annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade in Missoula. A defending state gymnastics champion, Langner will compete at the Montana Gymnastics State Championships in Billings March 23 and 24.

Growth Missoula eyes ADUs again Newly elected City Councilman Alex Taft’s first order of business on Missoula’s governing body is a whopper. He’s proposing that the council allow accessory dwelling units—or “granny flats,” as they’re sometimes called—on properties in neighborhoods that currently only allow singlefamily housing. Missoula zoning regulations forbid more than one housing unit on parcels in single-family residential neighborhoods. Taft proposes changing that to allow one additional rental unit, as long as the owner lives in the other. “I would be quite satisfied with what we put forward,” he says. A 4 percent rental vacancy rate can make it tough to find affordable apartments in Missoula. And purchasing a home on the area’s average income isn’t easy. Taft sees his proposal as a way to beef up affordable housing stock. Accessory units, however, have long been contentious in Missoula. Council last took up the issue in 2009, when the city rewrote its zoning regulations. Lawmakers heard from locals who worried that increasing population density would

change the character of their neighborhoods. Council agreed to compromise on the issue, allowing accessory units in areas that already allowed multi-family housing, such as Missoula’s Westside. Areas zoned for single-family homes, such as the University District, remained off limits to granny flats. Councilman Jon Wilkins opposed accessory units in single-family districts in 2009 and does now. “You’re doing away with single-family neighborhoods,” he says. Taft’s referral is further complicated by the fact that in January, Montana’s attorney general issued an opinion that mandates property owners go through a subdivision review process before creating more than one detached unit on any given parcel, even if local zoning regulations say otherwise. The mandate means Taft’s referral could encourage the conversion of basements into a separate living quarters or attaching apartments to existing homes. Missoulians who want to build a detached unit would still have to go through the headache of subdivision reviews. The Montana Legislature will likely address conflicting development mandates during the 2013 legislative session. In the meantime, the city

will begin what will no doubt be another long conversation about how the Garden City should grow best. “We’re going to get a lot of advice from the community,” Taft says. Jessica Mayrer

Newspapers Missoulian, Indy “right-size” Jamie Kelly, a Missoulian reporter for 15 years, is leaving the paper at the end of the month. As of Monday, he was the only employee who had accepted a voluntary buyout, which the Missoulian recently offered to senior staff in an effort to cut costs. Kelly declined to comment on his departure. Missoulian Publisher Jim McGowan says the paper’s owner, Lee Enterprises, which emerged from Chapter 11 bankruptcy in late January, made the buyout option available to the Missoulian a couple of years ago. McGowan decided it was time to use it. “Obviously it’s been a slow year,” he says. “We’re not in any kind of dire situation. But I’d heard rumblings of a few folks who were contemplating leaving, so we wanted to test the water to

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Missoula Independent Page 6 March 22 – March 29, 2012

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out. ~Anton Chekhov


Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

see if that was the case.” McGowan says the paper intends to hire new people to replace Kelly and any other staffers who take the buyout. But new hires may work in different departments, reflecting demands in new areas. “Our whole plan isn’t necessarily to [reduce] overall bodies,” he says, “you’ll just see some shifting around of resources.” The Independent is also making changes to cope with an evolving newspaper publishing industry and challenging economy. The paper has recently taken steps to reduce its distribution in the Flathead Valley. And earlier this month it laid off two employees, one in the display advertising department and one in the classified advertising department. “We’re in a challenging advertising environment,” says Independent Publishing President Matt Gibson. “Historically, we’ve run with a fairly large sales staff in an effort to stimulate growth. But it’s just not available in this current economic climate. So we had to right-size, as they say.” In 2011, according to Newspaper Association of America statistics, online advertising jumped $207 million industry-wide compared to 2010, while print advertising dropped by $2.1 billion—which means print losses outpaced online gains 10 to 1. Matthew Frank

Ochenski

Comment

ry comes back in waves. Quarry Brewing’s new digs in uptown were packed when we arrived, their Emerald Isle Green Beer clearly in vogue. The throng at the Silver Dollar Saloon was singing a rousing rendition of “Drunken Sailor” not long after cops busted up a fight outside the front door, reportedly arresting three. We bumped into a few Missoula folks drawing on the fogged-over windows at the Headframe Spirits distillery on Montana Street with their fingers. They were first-time visitors to Butte’s St. Paddy’s Day, too—and loving it. “We should start coming here every year,” says our old college buddy Bill Oram. He drove up from Salt Lake City Friday, drawn by legend and a desire

Butte, America The morning after The “Pasty Capitol of the World” is out of pasties. We’re hunkered in a booth at Gamer’s Cafe early Sunday morning, our blood-shot eyes and slumped shoulders saying everything for us. Last night was our first time in Butte on St. Patrick’s Day. We think we survived. Our waitress, Tina, apologizes for the pasty shortage. The green-clad mobs cleaned the restaurant out of its storied Cornish dish yesterday. “We’re making more now, but it’ll be a while,” she says. They’d better hurry; it’s only 9 a.m. and already more bloodshot eyes are trickling in the door. There’s been talk since yesterday afternoon that this was the busiest St. Paddy’s in Butte yet. The Montana Highway Patrol anticipated 10,000 visitors, and the Billings Police Department even sent two officers to bolster the Butte PD’s presence. Butte reported 45 arrests Saturday, down from 100 in 2008. I wouldn’t be surprised if every visitor had been at the M&M Bar at least once last night. The place was so crowded, people were leaning out an open window. Tina refills the coffee and our day of Irish revel-

Photo by Jonathan Marquis

to see if Butte would live up. “Seriously, let’s make this a tradition.” For Butte, it already is. The city’s been hosting a St. Patrick’s Day parade since 1882. There’s no open-container law, so the post-parade festivities have only grown more popular. Locals refer to Butte as “Ireland’s Fifth Province.” The cheesy green beads and shamrock sunglasses aside, the assessment doesn’t seem far off. Fights may break out, police citations may spike, but it’s not often that embracing complete strangers and singing pub songs at the top of your lungs become social norms. The sentiment at our breakfast table seems unanimous: We’ll be back next year. Maybe we’ll have better luck getting pasties. Alex Sakariassen

Agenda

News Quirks

BY THE NUMBERS

Fort Missoula Treatment center spooks some A grassroots group called Save the Fort says that clients of a proposed Western Montana Mental Health Center addiction treatment facility at Fort Missoula could threaten the integrity of the historic site. “The element of risk will be enhanced,” says Tate Jones, who’s working with Save the Fort to stop the project. The Western Montana Mental Health Center is hoping to renovate the old Fort Missoula hospital so it can accommodate roughly 40 adults for up to 45 days of addiction treatment. It’s asking the Historic Preservation Commission for a preservation permit based on the center’s renovation plan for the old hospital. The permit would constitute a first step toward getting the treatment center off the ground. Jones, who serves as executive director of the Rocky Mountain Museum of Military History, says throughout the past several years, a significant amount of preservation work has gone into rehabilitating the historic site. “It’s become a very respectable historic park,” he says. “It’s unprecedented to do social services in a historic park. It’s just simply not done.” The Mental Health Center’s development director, Patty Kent, says the program is voluntary and not administered through the criminal justice system. There’s no reason to suspect that people who are voluntarily treating chemical addictions will harm historic properties, she says. “The idea that addicts are all criminals is just plain old wrong.” In fact, Kent says, recent data show that the largest segment of people seeking treatment are middleaged women addicted to prescription drugs. The need for treatment facilities like the one planned for Fort Missoula is currently so acute that locals travel to treatment centers hundreds of miles away, Kent says. “The need is staggering.” Even with the commission’s approval, the Fort Missoula project won’t become a reality for years. The Mental Health Center is first focusing its energy—and fundraising efforts—on a planned 16-bed inpatient treatment center slated for a site at the intersection of California and Wyoming streets. Kent says the center will evaluate that project, which is due to open in the spring of 2013, before moving forward with fundraising for the Fort Missoula project. “Then and only then would we look to a larger facility at Fort Missoula.” The Historic Preservation Commission will discuss the proposal during its regularly scheduled meeting April 5. Jessica Mayrer

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It’s an ill wind that blows in the U.S. Senate. It can’t muster enough votes to pass an extension of the wind energy production tax credit that’s set to expire at the end of the year. Last week, senators deadlocked at 49-49, 11 votes shy of a filibuster-proof majority. The credit has helped generate an average of about $18 billion in private investment in domestic wind power over the last few years. In Montana, it’s been crucial to the state developing its wind power capacity from a single megawatt in 2004 to nearly 400 megawatts today. Even oil giant BP came out this week in support of the extension, with its alternative energy director saying that the incentive is “genuinely working” and that the uncertainty is putting wind energy projects on ice and leaving turbine-manufacturing plants idling. Why the impasse? Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee Chairman Jeff Bingaman, a Democrat from New Mexico, charges that Republicans are withholding support so they can use the extension as a bargaining chip when they debate the extension of the Bush tax cuts. Apparently, those Republicans are fine gambling with tens of thousands of jobs and a rapidly growing cleanenergy industry for a chance at keeping tax rates low on the rich. Of course, this doesn’t surprise. Such polarization and dysfunction is why recent polls show that about 83 percent of Americans disapprove of the way our representatives are doing their jobs. But you know what? In Montana, the tax credit extension may not make much of a difference. Even with it, our wind industry apparently has reached a plateau. “It just can’t be boiled down to whether or not the production tax credit is extended,” says John Vincent of Montana’s Public Service Commission. “Even if it is, unless there’s demand—unless there’s a market for the energy, regardless of its source—you’re going to see a reduction in new plants.” Vincent points out that energy oversupply issues in the Pacific Northwest forced Bonneville Power Administration to curtail 350 megawatts of wind energy generation last spring. Montana ranks third in the country in wind energy potential. But we don’t have the transmission lines to get the power to markets that need it. And even if we did, we have a geographic disadvantage. Even Idaho is outpacing Montana in producing wind power for large markets. But wait: What if we could ship all our wind power to China...?

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Missoula Independent Page 7 March 22 – March 29, 2012


Beer Drinkers’ Profile THROWBACK TO THE WAYBACK

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Knock on wood Timber’s back in Bonner by Matthew Frank

BEER + LAUGHTER = GOODNESS

On a recent dreary Sunday afternoon, dozens of old-timers line the pews of Our Savior’s Lutheran Church in Bonner. In the church lobby, black-and-white photographs of the company town’s 1940s-era cottages lie on tabletops. Glenn Smith, who has a white beard, big belly and deep, folksy voice, sits at the front of the church and leads a couple of hours of storytelling. That’s why everyone’s here: to share memories of a town that was built and defined by a once-thriving lumber mill.

of continuous lumber production and leaving a company town without a company. A big part of the riverside town’s identity are the 40 or so white houses the Anaconda Company built for its workers along the tree-lined street across from the mill. When Stimson closed the mill, the houses were slated for demolition. Deeppocketed, Missoula-based developer Scott Cooney stepped in to save them. In early 2008, he purchased and began refurbishing 26 of the historic houses, and then he rent-

Boehme and Steve Nelson, partners in Missoula-based Western Montana Development, became the owners of the 170-acre Bonner mill in mid-December. The purchase included 16 company houses. Boehme and Nelson recently made an offer on the 26 houses Cooney lost in bankruptcy. Mostly dead or beetle-killed logs have been piling up on the log yard for the past few months. On Monday, the Washingtonbased chipping company Willis Enterprises,

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Logs await chipping at the Bonner mill site.

You hear about grade-school pals with nicknames like Lefty, Mule Ears, Donuts and Goosey; shiny Schwinn bicycles; getting shot in the butt with a BB gun; buying beer in nearby Milltown with a forged note from dad; paying 18 cents a week for the newspaper. Smith remembers it as a “Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn-type environment— something I wouldn’t trade for all the experiences in the world. This was a very special place up here.” And, of course, you hear about the mill, which employed hundreds. Smith worked there for 45 years. “One of the things I learned from the folks out here in Bonner was that they firmly believed in an honest day’s work for an honest day’s pay,” he says. Nostalgia has only grown in the four years since the mill shut down. But today there’s a familiar sight at the log yard across the street: piles and piles of logs. As the economy slowly turns around, a few businesses are taking root at Bonner’s mill site. The mill, initially known as the Blackfoot Mill, began operating in 1886 to meet the demands of the Butte mining boom and railroad expansion. In 1898, timber baron A.B. Hammond sold it to the Anaconda Company, owned by Marcus Daly, one of Montana’s copper kings. Anaconda owned the mill until 1972, when it sold it to Champion International. In 1993, Champion sold the mill to Stimson Lumber Company. In 2008, amid plummeting demand, Stimson closed it, ending 122 years

Missoula Independent Page 8 March 22 – March 29, 2012

ed them out. That was only the beginning of Cooney’s plans for Bonner. He bought other land around the mill, envisioning a housing development, medical center and senior living home. He told a reporter that he’d like to “take the cyclical nature of the wood-products industry out of here and give people consistent economic engines for the next 100 years.” Bonner’s transformation would mirror the the removal of the Milltown Dam, built in 1886 to generate electricity for the mill, and the larger Superfund restoration of the confluence of the Blackfoot and Clark Fork rivers. But last July, Cooney and his company, Blackfoot Land and Water, filed for bankruptcy protection. Court documents show he’s more than $1.6 million in debt, with assets worth more than $4.4 million. He was hit with a lawsuit alleging that he withdrew at least $560,000 for his personal use from a company account holding tenant deposits. He told the Indy last summer that he had to move money around because of a “never-ending” divorce. Last month, the bankruptcy court rejected Cooney’s reorganization plan and took possession of the 26 Bonner houses. A thick envelope of bankruptcy documents showed up in tenants’ mailboxes. Cooney didn’t return calls seeking comment. Cooney had “grandiose ideas for the whole area, and unfortunately he didn’t have the financial wherewithal to bring that together,” says Mike Boehme.

through a contract with the paper products company Boise Inc., began turning those logs into chips, which will be shipped by rail to a paper mill in Wallula, Wash. Northwest Paint, which finishes lumber products, has also taken up residence at the mill site. As has MacArthur Co., a roofing outfit. And a small company called Hellgate Forge. All together, they employ about 40. “The people that we’ve talked to in Bonner are just ecstatic,” Boehme says, “because that mill was there for over 100 years, and all of a sudden, in 2008, it got shut down and it’s just been kind of wasting away. Now there are some new things going on out there.” Wood products may not always be the anchor of the site. Boehme and Nelson are betting that all kinds of industries will be attracted to its 850,000 square feet of buildings, railroad spur line, close proximity to Interstate 90, existing discharge and air quality permits and one mile of Blackfoot River frontage. The Montana Department of Environmental Quality announced last month that high concentrations of PCBs remain there, but that multimillion-dollar burden is Stimson’s. Boehme listened to the stories at the church about how closely connected the mill and the community used to be. “There’s no way in today’s society you’re going to duplicate that,” he says. “But we would like to do good things for Bonner.” mfrank@missoulanews.com


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For Rep. Jon Sesso, a Democrat from tion, much of the 2013 session for the concern for Sesso. He recalls that the Butte, the 2011 Legislature wasn’t the suc- Democrats will focus on investment. The mantra of many freshman conservative lawcess it could have been. Promising discus- WGM Group talked about it; for the first makers in 2011 seemed to be “smaller govsions on the real issues facing Montanans time in 20 years, President and C.E.O. ernment.” But that’s not what he’s hearing took a back seat, he says. “Ideological meas- Brent Campbell told lawmakers, the firm from businesses and citizens on the JOBS has no major projects for local contrac- Tour, he says. Rather than calls for fewer ures dominated the landscape.” Meanwhile, high unemployment rates tors. The representative from MEA-MFT regulations and less government spending, continued to make headlines in western pleaded for smart investment as well; Sesso says he’s hearing calls not to tinker Montana. Contractors were hard pressed hundreds of Montana teachers have been “for tinkering’s sake.” “They really want stability,” Sesso says. for work. At the same time, the state’s east- laid off since the recession began, and ern counties began to realize how ill-pre- thousands more have not seen a pay raise “Many times we heard, ‘The one thing we’d pared their infrastructures were for the in years. Everyone appeared to be vying like you to concentrate on is not changing for a chunk of the state’s $400 million in everything all the time...Every two years, Bakken oil boom. you change one regulation or another. Stop “I don’t think we were nearly as suc- estimated annual revenue. it already. We’re okay with cessful in 2011 as we the level of regulation. We could have been,” says want certainty.’” Sesso, the current House Hands adds that Minority Leader. “Our newly developed regularecord in 2011 was not tions, such as the U.S. what we set out to do.” Food and Drug Rep. Betsy Hands, Administration’s push for a Democrat from lower phosphate levels in Missoula, says, “There’s dishwashing detergent, going to be a huge have opened new doors amount of pressure” to for Montana-based labs catch up in the 2013 legand development compaislative session. And the nies. She puts Missoula’s key words on nearly Rivertop Renewables and every politician’s lips are Bozeman’s BioSciences the same: job creation. Laboratories—both stops An atmosphere of on the JOBS Tour—high slight urgency settled on that list. on the Missoula City Photo by Michelle Gustafson The real challenge Council chambers at noon Feb. 27. Legislators Rep. Betsy Hands says Montana has to catch up on job creation. Democrats have highlighted in advance of next from nearly every nearby Much of the Democrats’ planned year’s legislature is economic growth on House or Senate district put off their lunch breaks to talk about boosting the state’s investment could come in the form of infra- tribal land. On the Blackfeet Reservation, economy. Representatives from various structure. Sesso says Montana’s Bakken- Sesso says, “there’s not a lot of growth. businesses and organizations—MEA-MFT, a affected counties are struggling to catch up There they are in the shadow of one of the statewide education union; Planned with demands for better roads, bigger jewels of Montana, Glacier Park, and strugParenthood; the WGM Group, a Missoula- schools and more housing. Helping those gling to gain a foothold in the tourism based design and engineering firm; areas with improvements through the economy.” Start-ups, he says, “are not Missoula Economic Partnership—joined in. Treasure State Endowment Program or choosing that area for their development Missoula marked the latest stop in a other state funding avenues is one part of prospects.” As the pressure builds to find weeks-long sojourn across Montana titled the picture; the other is recognizing similar solutions to Montana’s pockets of economic instability, he sees a growing need the Jobs Opportunity and Business needs in other parts of the state. Strength (or JOBS) Tour. The Montana “Infrastructure is your backbone for to lean on Native American leadership in Democratic Party announced the initiative economic development,” Hands says. the legislature for answers about what the earlier this year, with the goal of building a “So if we can use those investment pools state can do on sovereign soil. The Democrats aren’t alone. Hands comprehensive list of legislative proposals. as a way to expand how we use those By the time they reached Missoula, the funds, we might be able to help out both says her caucus is reaching across the aisle during the interim to informally discuss Democrats had visited 14 cities, spoken sides of Montana.” with representatives of 30 businesses and Such investment could be seen as a how to make 2013 a more successful seshosted scores of public forums. And they job creator. It could also be seen as a sion. Rep. Walter McNutt, a Republican still hadn’t made it to northwestern short-term political solution to a more from Sidney, even hosted the JOBS Tour’s leg in the northeastern portion of the state. Montana, where unemployment rates complex problem. “Hopefully, we’ll have enough hover in the mid to high teens. Conservatives nationwide panned Can lawmakers create jobs? President Barack Obama’s American responsible legislators this time to see “Our job is to enable others to suc- Recovery Act, which funded road construc- clear to concentrate on what we can do,” ceed,” Sesso says. “And to provide the tools, tion and other infrastructure projects Sesso says, “as opposed to some of the the training and in some cases the funding across the country in 2009. The contracting other issues they were preoccupied with in the ’11 session.” to allow these businesses to create jobs and jobs were many but short lived. move forward.” The potential in Montana for a partisan If the Missoula meeting is any indica- split on infrastructure-related proposals is a asakariassen@missoulanews.com

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Missoula Independent Page 9 March 22 – March 29, 2012


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Courts can’t stop it On review, Endangered Species Act gets mauled Last week, the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals finally ruled in the case challenging the constitutionality of the rider sponsored by Montana’s Sen. Jon Tester that removed wolves from the protection of the Endangered Species Act. It was the first time in the 37-year history of the ESA that a species had been removed for political instead of scientific reasons. With the court’s rejection of the appeal, the Endangered Species Act may be as threatened as the plants and animals it was designed to save. The case, formally titled Alliance for the Wild Rockies, et al., vs. Ken Salazar, et al., sought to overturn a ruling issued last August by Federal District Judge Don Molloy. While it had been characterized as being about wolf reintroduction and the hotly debated question of whether the wolves were recovered and therefore no longer needed ESA protection, wolves were not really the point in question. Tester’s rider included language that made its provisions exempt from judicial review. The appeal questioned whether that violated the constitutional separation of powers. Section 1713 of the Department of Defense and Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011 read: “Before the end of the 60-day period beginning on the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of the Interior shall reissue the final rule...without regard to any other provision of statute or regulation that applies to issuance of such rule. Such reissuance (including this section) shall not be subject to judicial review…” In his ruling on the case, Molloy sharply criticized the use of a last-minute rider on an unassociated appropriations bill as “a tearing away, an undermining and a disrespect for the fundamental idea of the rule of law. The principle behind the rule of law is to provide a mechanism and process to guide and constrain the government’s exercise of power. Political decisions derive their legitimacy from the proper function of the political process within the constraints of limited government, guided by a constitutional structure that acknowledges the importance of the doctrine of Separation of Powers. That legitimacy is enhanced by a meaningful, predictable and transparent process… Inserting environmental policy changes into appropriations bills may be politically expedient, but it transgresses the process envisioned by the Constitution by avoiding the very debate on issues of political importance said to provide legitimacy. Policy changes of questionable political viability, such as occurred here, can be

Missoula Independent Page 10 March 22 – March 29, 2012

forced by using insider tactics without debate, by attaching riders to legislation that must be passed.” Molloy continued, “If I were not constrained by what I believe is binding precedent from the Ninth Circuit, and on-point precedent from other circuits, I would hold Section 1713 is unconstitutional because it violates the Separation of Powers doctrine…It is the function of the courts to consider arguments of principle in order to enforce a statute, even if the statute itself stems from an altered policy. This distinction holds true even when the legislative process employed involves legislative prestidigitation.”

These fine points of the law mean nothing to the wolves, of course, which have been killed by the hundreds in Montana and Idaho since Molloy’s ruling was issued.

The “prestidigitation” Molloy referred to was the inclusion of what he termed “magic words,” writing: “In my view, the Ninth Circuit's deference to Congress threatens the Separation of Powers; nonspecific magic words should not sweep aside constitutional concerns.” Yet, despite such misgivings, Molloy concluded that “so long as Congress uses the words ‘without regard to any other provision of statute or regulation that applies,’ or something similar,” Tester’s rider was constitutional. It was the strength of Molloy’s argument that prompted the appeal to the Ninth Circuit, although the plaintiffs knew their chances were slim. The court

would have to overturn a Supreme Court ruling and would be unlikely to do so. In the end, the Ninth Circuit upheld Molloy’s ruling that Tester’s rider was constitutional but added some interesting opinions along the way. In April of last year, Tester told the Missoulian, “We’re really not changing the Endangered Species Act. We’re taking a recovered species off [the endangered species list] and putting it under state control for management. We’ll manage that wildlife species like we manage all wildlife species, and that’s on the state level.” That’s not what the Ninth Circuit found, writing instead that “[h]ere, Congress has directed the agency to issue the rule ‘without regard to any other provision of statute or regulation that applies to issuance of such rule.’ This court has held that, when Congress so directs an agency action, with similar language, Congress has amended the law... Congress effectively provided that no statute, and this must include the ESA, would apply... Congress thus amended the law.” The Ninth Circuit also addressed Molloy’s “magic words,” writing: “There are no ‘magic words’ that can sweep aside constitutional concerns…here, however, it is clear that Congress intended to amend the law so as to avoid the usual course of administrative proceedings that include judicial review; otherwise, it would have been unnecessary for Congress to act at all.” These fine points of the law mean nothing to the wolves, of course, which have been killed by the hundreds in Montana and Idaho since Molloy’s ruling. But upholding it does mean something to those seeking to circumvent the Endangered Species Act. It means that any member of Congress can toss aside protections for any species if he or she slaps a rider on an unrelated, must-pass bill and includes the magic words to exempt it from challenges in the courts. With hundreds of species edging nearer to extinction every day, Congress should be strengthening, not weakening, the Endangered Species Act. Yet, following Tester’s nefarious lead, it may well be the Endangered Species Act that’s condemned to extinction, falling victim to more species-specific, politically expedient riders. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


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Teddy turns over Romney is no Roosevelt conservative by Ben Long

One of the goofier gaffes Mitt Romney has made on this year’s campaign trail occurred when he mentioned a recent Montana hunting trip but couldn’t seem to remember whether he had pursued elk or moose. Dig deeper, though, and that hunting trip reflects something more sinister than a slip of the tongue. President Theodore Roosevelt left America a rich legacy of abundant wildlife and millions of acres of public lands. But influential and well-heeled hunters are stabbing Theodore Roosevelt in the back by trying to recruit Mitt Romney to undermine TR’s legacy. Roosevelt championed a simple idea that is the foundation of all conservation and wildlife management in North America. That is the idea that wildlife belongs to all of us, not just to the rich or the land-owning elite. This is the linchpin that holds together America’s national parks, forests and wildlife refuges and that inspired the successful effort to rescue game animals like whitetail deer, turkey and elk from nearextinction, as well as the attempt to save endangered species like peregrine falcons and bald eagles. This is a uniquely American commitment. In Europe, wildlife has traditionally been considered the property of the landowner or nobility. Hunting and fishing—the little that remains—is entirely in the hands of the elite. The idea that wildlife belongs to all citizens and should be managed by professionals using sound science is called the North American Model of Wildlife Management. Most hunting and conservation groups, including conservative, venerable hunting and gun organizations such as the National Rifle Association, Boone and Crockett Club and the Pope and Young Club, embrace the model. But not everyone. In particular, meet Don Peay and Sportsmen for Fish and Wildlife. The group was founded in Utah and has spread throughout the West.

One state at a time, SFW is dismantling the very idea of a public wildlife resource and replacing it with special privileges for the privileged. In Montana, SFW is pressuring county commissioners to circumvent the state wildlife commission on predator management. In Arizona and Idaho, SFW is lobbying legislatures to allow landowners to own and sell hunting privileges, independent of the rules all other citizens have to live by.

One state at a time, Sportsmen for Fish and Wildlife is dismantling the very idea of a public wildlife resource and replacing it with special privileges for the privileged. In Alaska, SFW worked to have its state president, Corey Rossi, appointed head of the Division of Wildlife Conservation at the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. Rossi had no professional credentials, but loads of political connections. Today, Rossi stands accused of violating game laws he was sworn to defend. That’s gotten a bit of press, including a recent interview where Don Peay spelled out SFW’s radical agenda. Speaking to the Anchorage Daily News, Peay dismissed Theodore Roosevelt’s legacy as “socialism” that needs to be “revisited.”

“We understand the North American model, where wildlife belongs to the people, but we’re also seeing dramatic reductions in game populations in the western United States under that model,” he said. This reading of history puts Peay and SFW in some pretty lonely company. But lonely company can include the powerful, and in Alaska, that company included thenGov. Sarah Palin. It also leads to Mitt Romney, the most likely Republican nominee for president. Just who took Mitt Romney on that almost memorable moose—or was it elk?— hunt in Montana? Don Peay, who bragged of this political connection in an email to members of SFW. Romney hails from Massachusetts, a state lacking in wildlife and wildlife habitat. Recently, he revealed how little he knows about the nation’s public land. “Unless there’s a valid, legitimate and compelling public purpose, I don’t know why the government owns so much of this land,” said Romney, campaigning in Nevada. I suppose Romney could crack a history book and read why Theodore Roosevelt and others created this public estate that fills most Westerners with pride. Instead, he listens to Don Peay. Something tells me they’re talking about big bucks, but not the ones with antlers. What can sportsmen do? Here’s a suggestion: Before you give a dime to a “conservation organization” or give a vote to a political candidate, make sure they answer this question: Do you believe the wildlife of North America belong to all of us, equally, or do you think it should be sold to the highest bidder?” If they don’t answer, or answer wrong, keep looking. They aren’t looking out for you. Ben Long is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org ). He is an outdoorsman, author and conservationist in Kalispell.

Photo courtesty of the Bureau of Land Management

Missoula Independent Page 11 March 22 – March 29, 2012


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

With DNA evidence exonerating prisoners throughout the U.S., it seems nothing short of ignorant for state and federal governments to continue executing prisoners, but here we are in 2012 ignoring science (no surprise) and continuing to spend millions of dollars to kill prisoners rather than house them for the rest of their lives. Counterintuitive, right? It should cost less to kill someone than to house him, but with our long appeals process it costs as much as $2 million more just to kill a man. It’s fortunate that the system is so long and time-consuming, at least from the incarcerated individual’s perspective. Since 1973, at least 130 people have escaped death row after being cleared by new evidence, according to deathpenaltyinfo.org. Don’t get too upset if you’re

The Missoula Chapter of the Montana Abolition Coalition hosts a video screening and discussion at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., on Sat., Mar. 24, at 2 PM. mtabolitionco.com.

THURSDAY MARCH 22

TUESDAY MARCH 27

Canadian polar bear biologist Dr. Ian Stirling talks about life up north during his lecture The Ecology of Polar Bears, Climate Warming and the Effects on Polar Bear-Human Interactions. Urey Lecture Hall. 7 PM. Free.

Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsoleck during Compassionate Communication Non-Violent Communication Weekly Practice Group at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. 519 S. Higgins. Noon–1 PM. Free.

I have a bad felling that this installment of the Peace and Justice Film Series, Tipping Point: The Age of the Oil Sands, does not have much in the way of good news. Gallagher Business Building, Rm. 122. 7 PM. Free.

What exactly are those Chinese up to? Find out at River Yang’s Mansfield Center Brown Bag Lecture Chinese Collectivism: Myth or Reality? UM Mansfield Conf. Rm. Free.

Learn how it is in Iran at the screening of Education Under Fire, a film about the Iranian government’s denial of educational services to those who voice disagreement with the man. Liberal Arts Bldg., Rm. 305. 7 PM. Free.

FRIDAY MARCH 23 For builders interested in strutting their stuff for a good cause, get onboard (ha!) and sign-up for the 10th Annual Boys and Girls Club Playhouse and Pet Palace Auction Fundraiser. Build something rad. Show it off at Southgate Mall. Auction it off in June. Contact Anne for specifics at 239-6505. NCBI’s Community Building Bridges Workshop seeks to teach folks prejudice reduction and how to understand one another’s varied experiences. 1130 W. Broadway. 9 AM–4 PM. $40. ncbimissoula.org.

a fan of the death penalty: 10 were executed for every one that was exonerated. Since 1998, the Montana Abolition Coalition has worked to end the death penalty in Montana. The group is made up of individuals and faith-based and human-rights organizations. They’re hosting a series of short videos about the death penalty at the Missoula Public Library and encourage the public to watch and discuss the repercussions of this legal and often cruel practice. –Jason McMackin

Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 115 S. 3rd St. W. 1-3 PM. For information, call 543-3955. YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts YWCA Support Groups for women every Tue. from 6:30–8 PM. An American Indian-led talking circle is also available, along with age-appropriate children’s groups. Free. Call 543-6691. The UM Wilderness Institute brings scholars, writers, scientists and explorers together to share stories of how water shapes our lives, landscapes and politics in the Wild Waters in the West Lecture Series. This week, Christine Brick, Clark Fork Coalition science director, gives a lecture titled Reviving a River: What Does It Take to Make the Clark Fork Clean, Healthy and Whole? Gallagher Business Building Rm. 122. 7 PM. Free.

The Northern Rockies Rising Tide fights for the northern Rockies, including tackling the megaload issue and so much more. Jeannette Rankin Peace Center back room. 510 S. Higgins Ave. 7–8:30 PM.

Jim Burchfield, UM College of Forestry and Conservation dean, gives a lecture titled Global Free-Riders: Environmental Services and the Common Good as part of the UMAA’s community lecture series, Seeking Justice: Hope in Hard Times. UC Theatre. 7–8:30 PM. $5.

SATURDAY MARCH 24

WEDNESDAY MARCH 28

The Montana Abolition Coalition hosts a Death Penalty Movie Night at the Missoula Public Library, which features five short films and a discussion. 2–4 PM. Free. (See Agenda in this issue.)

Put in your two cents or quit yer belly achin’ when Missoula Parks and Rec hosts a Playground Vision Workshop for White Pine Park. 1500 Burns St. 6–7:30 PM.

MONDAY MARCH 26

THURSDAY MARCH 29

Blue Mountain Clinic, along with the Missoula AIDS Council, offers free, anonymous and blood-free HIV testing. 610 N. California. 1–4 PM. Free. Call 721-1646.

Can soccer unite disparate factions of people? Is the game really more than a game? Find out at the Peace and Justice Film Series screening of the documentary Pelada. Gallagher Business Bldg. Rm. 122. 7 PM. Free.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent Page 12 March 22 – March 29, 2012


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - David Kelly, 52, sat idling at a traffic light in Chicago shortly after midnight when, according to a sergeant in a police squad car next to him, Kelly rolled down his window and yelled, “Hey, you looking for me? You guys want me?” The sergeant pulled Kelly over to check. While approaching Kelly’s vehicle, the sergeant smelled pot and noticed the butt of a handgun. A search turned up a .357 Magnum handgun on the front seat, a loaded assault rifle with additional magazines in the back and about 30 grams of cannabis. Kelly also lacked a valid driver’s license. Before the resulting multiple weapons and drug charges, including driving while under the influence of cannabis, Kelly had no prior criminal history and outstanding warrants. (Chicago Tribune) A man walked into a bank on Stock Island, Fla., wearing shorts on his head. He handed the teller a note demanding, “Give me what are 20s and 50s.” The shorts covered his head but not his face, which was captured by surveillance cameras. Confused by the note, the teller asked what the man wanted. He said “never mind” and walked out. Police no sooner broadcast a detailed description of the suspect than sheriff’s Deputy Matt Dowling spotted Eli Escalera, 43, on a nearby street fitting the description and removing a pair of dark-colored pants that matched those worn by the robber. (Florida Keys Keynoter) LAWMAKERS TO THE RESCUE - Louisiana Sen. Dan Claitor introduced a bill making it illegal for drive-through daiquiri shops to use lids with a hole for straws. “The bill simply says it can’t be preperforated,” the lawmaker said, declaring that removing the straw hole would make it harder for drive-through daiquiri customers to drink and drive. (New Orleans’s WWL Radio) SLIGHTEST PROVOCATION - Sheriff’s deputies accused Alicia Martin, 28, and Kathryn Rayannic, 23, of attacking two bar employees in St. James City, Fla., because they were angry that none of the customers was willing to pay to see their breasts. Witnesses said the women had consumed “excessive quantities” of beer at the bar, and when they ran out of money “were offering to show their boobs for drinks,” waiter Shaun Bassett said. “Basically, when they were turned down, they kind of got a little rowdy.” The two victims escorted the women to the parking lot, where the women turned and punched one employee in the head and threatened the other with a knife. (Fort Myers’s WZVN-TV) San Bernardino County sheriff’s officials said Mario Naranjo, 44, and Miguel Naranjo, 22, tried to buy beer at a store in Hesperia, Calif., but their credit card was declined. After trying but failing twice more, the father and son stabbed the clerk in the neck and stomach with a seven-inch folding knife. Then they hit him with an 18-pack of Natural Ice beer because, a sheriff’s official said, they felt disrespected. (San Bernardino’s The Sun) A clerk at a Detroit gas station shot a customer who complained that the price of condoms was too high. Police said the customer bought a box of condoms but told the clerk he could have gotten them cheaper elsewhere. After being denied a refund, the customer began tossing items off the shelves. The night clerk appeared with a gun and fired a warning shot that struck the customer in the shoulder. He died at the hospital. (Detroit’s WWJ-TV) Philadelphia police accused Tyrirk Harris, 27, of fatally shooting his 47-year-old neighbor after the neighbor’s dogs pooped in his yard. “We believe this is not an isolated incident,” Chief Inspector Scott Small said. “There have been arguments over these dogs in the past.” (Philadelphia’s WCAU-TV) WAY TO GO - While visiting a friend in Havelock, N.C., Gary Allen Banning, 43, took a gulp from a jar by the kitchen sink that he thought contained a beverage but was really gasoline. He spit it out, according to police investigators, but some got on his clothes. Then he lit a cigarette. He burst into flames. He died at the hospital. (Associated Press) An explosion killed a 20-year-old man and injured two friends keeping warm in a garage in Taylor, Mich., after one of them poured gasoline on a wood-burning stove with a fire going. (Detroit Free Press) SECOND-AMENDMENT FOLLIES - After Andrew Seals, 24, started to sit down in a bathroom stall at a Wal-Mart in Mesa, Ariz., his Ruger .357-caliber revolver fell out of its holster. It fired a round, police Sgt. Ed Wessing reported, that went through the stall door, ricocheted off a wall into a ceiling light, then struck the floor, missing a man standing at a urinal by just five feet. (Phoenix’s The Arizona Republic) WINDBAGGERY - Police arrested a carpenter in Zimbabwe, according to Lawyers for Human Rights, after loyalists of President Robert Mugabe reported overhearing the man question whether Mugabe still had the strength to blow up balloons at his 88th birthday celebration. (Associated Press) SHOW-OFF - Sharon Smiley, 48, was fired from her job as a reception and administrative assistant at a Chicago real estate company because she punched out of work for lunch but remained at her desk to finish a project a manager had assigned her. When another manager told her it was time to go to lunch, she refused. Company police at Equity Lifestyle Properties, where she’d worked for 10 years, requires hourly workers to take a 30-minute lunch break. Smiley filed for unemployment benefits but was ruled ineligible because she had been discharged for misconduct connected with her work. An appeals court called the ruling “clearly erroneous.” After receiving benefits for nine months, Smiley found a similar job that allows her to work at her desk during lunch all she wants. (ABC News) WHO’D HAVE GUESSED? - Hurricanes could topple at least half of the offshore wind farms, each costing upward of $175 million, that the government proposes building in the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, scientists at Carnegie Mellon University warned, because the wind turbines can’t handle high winds. (New Scientist) FETISHES OF THE WEEK - Investigators accused veteran third-grade teacher Mark Berndt, 61, of seeking sexual gratification by blindfolding pupils to play a “tasting game” and then spoon-feeding them his semen. (Los Angeles Times) A judge sentenced Anthony Garcia, 32, to two years in federal prison for tricking four women at an Albuquerque, N.M., grocery store into sampling yogurt laced with his semen. (Albuquerque’s KOAT-TV)

Missoula Independent Page 13 March 22 – March 29, 2012


Missoula Independent Page 14 March 22 – March 29, 2012


Colton Wilson has a tombstone tattooed on his “They grabbed my meds” right forearm. On a recent late-winter day, the 21-yearIn the months before Colton Wilson was slated to old moves constantly inside the visitor center at attend boot camp at the Treasure State Correctional Shelby’s Crossroads Correctional Facility. He picks at Training Center, in 2009, he was prescribed three his fingers, clenches his hands and shifts his feet. He drugs: Lamictal, a mood stabilizer; Abilify, an antipsyruns his hands through his dark, wavy hair. chotic; and Vyvanse, a stimulant. The worst part of prison, he says, is being put in The drugs worked. His mother, who had always administrative segregation. Wilson and the other gone out of her way to fend off her son’s mood swings inmates call it “the hole.” “There’s no distraction, it’s just you and the walls, everything goes through your mind,” Wilson says. “Some people it doesn’t affect very badly…But it’s hard for me.” Wilson’s always had a hard time taking direction. That’s why he lands in the hole. In 2005, he was diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity and bipolar disorders. “I flipped out,” he recalls. His parents hospitalized him after he threatened to kill himself. Psychiatrists put him on a series of medications that made him tired, incoherent and, sometimes, more angry. He stopped taking the prescribed medications. In March 2007, Wilson, then 16, was caught with his girlfriend robbing vehicles in his hometown of Charlo. Witnesses tried to apprehend them. Wilson stabbed a man in the neck. Prosecutors in Lake County charged Wilson with felony assault with a weapon. He pleaded guilty and was sentenced to a 90-day boot camp overseen by the Montana Department of Corrections and a six-year deferred sentence. The Crossroads Correctional Facility in Shelby At this point, it would be easy to write off Wilson’s story as typical: A messed-up kid screws up, hurts someone and gets put away, for his own good and paralyzing fear, was shocked. “It took almost a year and others’. Yet it’s what happens next, not just to and a half to get all of the pieces of the puzzle put Wilson but to many others like him, that raises some together,” Donna Wilson says. “Once we got to that eyebrows about the fate of people with severe psychi- point—night and day difference with this kid.” The judge who presided over Colton’s case atric problems in Montana’s jails and prisons. During the past three decades, as state psychiatric ordered that he take the medications while at Treasure hospitals have curbed services, prisons have become State. Colton’s nurse practitioner warned boot camp home to a record number of mentally ill people. Of the staff that Colton wouldn’t make it through the Training 2,490 people in custody with the Montana DOC, 703, Center if he didn’t stay on the medications. Colton’s mother filled his backpack with family or 28 percent, are taking psychotropic medications. photos, a Bible and his prescriptions. The family drove Experts say prisons and jails simply aren’t Colton to Missoula. He was then transported to the equipped to handle people with severe mental illness. Many contend that Wilson and other such camp, at Deer Lodge. Colton remembers that day. inmates actually get worse in prison, leaving communi- “They grabbed my meds and my Bible and shackled me ties to foot an even larger tab for jails and hospitals. It up and we hit the road,” he says. In a lawsuit filed in February against the Treasure also leaves people like Wilson more likely to commit State Correctional Training Center, the DOC and the another crime.

state, the family argues that Treasure State employees withheld Colton’s medications for nearly a week. The suit alleges that six days after Colton arrived at Treasure State, DOC psychiatrist Dr. David Schaefer prescribed Abilify but didn’t approve the other drugs. Schaefer did not respond to the Independent’s request for comment. The DOC, citing pending litigation, declined to comment on the specifics of Colton’s case. Colton again became combative. He called the

guards names. His behavior got him kicked out of boot camp and a subsequent DOC program. The court rescinded his plea deal and he was re-sentenced to 20 years in DOC custody, with 15 suspended. The Wilsons’ suit contends that the DOC’s failure to provide prescribed medications for Colton violated his constitutional right to receive adequate medical care while incarcerated. “It’s just like if you have someone who’s a diabetic...and they need insulin, it’s a serious medical condition,” says Colton’s Missoula attorney, Terance P. Perry, of Datsopolous, MacDonald & Lind. Colton would not be incarcerated today had he been given his medication, his family argues. His case is similar to those in two other lawsuits filed since 2000, which allege that mentally ill inmates were punished with increasing severity because they didn’t receive proper mental health treatment.

In 2003, the Montana Supreme Court issued a sharply worded opinion against the DOC for its treatment of mentally ill prisoner Mark Edward Walker. Last year, a district judge intervened on behalf of a lawsuit filed by the ACLU; that suit involved Raistlen Katka, a mentally ill inmate who, as a minor, had been placed in administrative segregation in the high-security unity at Montana’s Men’s State Prison. Court documents in both cases allege the DOC violated constitutional protections against cruel and unusual punishment. Both Walker and Katka made suicide attempts while in custody. The problem, says National Association on Mental Illness Montana Executive Director Matt Kuntz, is that prisons are designed to curb the bad behavior of rational people. The premise may seem simple: Behave, and you don’t get in trouble. But people with serious mental illness don’t always think rationally. There’s a tendency to act out, which, in a prison setting, can lead to progressively harsher punishments. “They commit crimes for different reasons than people who don’t have serious mental illnesses,” Kuntz says. “It’s a disruption of neural circuits. That affects how they think, feel and act.” Kuntz says stories like Wilson’s and those of other Montana inmates reflect a system that’s ill equipped to handle the complexities of mental illness. “As long as the prisons are a place that we rely on to house our mentally ill, the Department of Corrections is going to fail,” he observes. “It’s like asking someone to hold water with a strainer—they don’t have the right tools…Eventually somebody, and maybe it’s going to be the Wilsons, is going to make the state of Montana pay for it.”

“We definitely have a problem here” The details of Colton Wilson’s case are worth a closer look, if only to understand how such a person falls through the cracks in Montana’s corrections system. His mother, Donna Wilson, sensed something was wrong with her youngest son early. “He was just temperamental and very emotional,” she says. “It was real hard to settle him down.” Colton slept in his parents’ bed many nights. It helped alleviate the little boy’s anxiety. She home schooled him, breaking lessons into bite-sized increments, sometimes just 15 minutes. But his moods worsened. Colton was cited for being a minor in possession of alcohol and for possession of dangerous drugs. Fights at home escalated. He accused his mom of trying to poison him.

Missoula Independent Page 15 March 22 – March 29, 2012


and lobotomies, a surgical proce- went on to help create dozens of new state hospitals dure in which nerves in the frontal across the east and into the Midwest. In 1877, Montana’s Territorial Legislative Assembly lobe are severed. Those unable to manage awarded Dr. Charles F. Mussingbrod and Dr. A. Mitchell mood swings and hallucinations a contract to care for the “insane of the Territory of were cared for at home. Unluckier Montana.” That first year, in Warm Springs, the facility ones lived in almshouses—over- housed 13 patients. Gardens, a greenhouse and a dairy crowded and dirty taxpayer-funded dotted the site. The state purchased the institution in 1912. Warm public homes—or in jail. In the early 1840s, Unitarian Springs State Hospital that year housed 854 patients. By the mid-20th century, psychiatric institutions reformer Dorothea Dix was shocked at what she found in across the nation were outgrowing their capacity. Massachusetts almshouses and Funding did not match needs. State hospitals became prisons. She would later tell policy overcrowded warehouses. Raistlen Katka in a court appearance. He was In 1954, the first effective anti-psychotic medicamakers that ill people were incarcerated as a minor and tried to kill himself. Photo courtesy Eliza Wiley, Helena Independent Record “chained, naked, beaten with rods tion, Thorazine, became available. The drug revolutionand lashed into obedience.” They ized how society, the ill and their families coped with Colton started Saint Ignatius High School in 2004, ing, an amphetamine, would not be prescribed. were held in “cages, closets, cellars, stalls, pens…” mental illness. Within eight months, more than two milwhere he was aggressive toward other students and Instead, he gave Colton the antidepressants Celexa and Dix first encountered cases of what she lion patients were taking it. prone to angry outbursts. A school counselor asked to Wellbutrin. President John F. Kennedy’s presidency further called “transcendent madness” in 1841, while volunDonna says the drugs caused Colton to unravel fur- teering to teach Sunday school at an East Cambridge revolutionized the nation’s strategies for combating meet with the family. “She was very kind,” Donna recalls. “She said, ‘Oh, Donna, you’ve got to get him ther. He threatened a guard and was written up for get- jail. She was so shaken by what she saw that she mental illness. Kennedy had an intimate knowledge of into Ronan Mental Health, we definitely have a problem ting jailhouse tattoos. DOC put him in the Maximum resolved to embark on a more than two-year tour of the challenges wrought by such maladies. His sister Security Unit. “He ends up in isolation,” Donna says. Massachusetts’ poorhouses and prisons. Her goal Rosemary was developmentally disabled and mentally here. I can see it.’” In 2005, Colton was diagnosed with ADHD and “He was totally freaking gonzo.” ill. She was lobotomized at 23. was reform. Schaefer prescribed lithium in July 2010. It made oppositional defiant disorder. That year he was hospiIn 1963, Kennedy told Congress that he aimed to She documented a long list of unsanitary and inhutalized twice for his threatening and self-destructive Colton ill and feverish. He’s not currently taking any mane conditions. One woman in particular stood out. completely overhaul the country’s mental health appabehavior. During the second hospitalization, in 2005, medications, nor is he in counseling. He’s ratus. Rather than “social quarantine, a proSaint Patrick Hospital diagnosed the teenager with slated to get out March 14, 2014. He says he longed or permanent confinement in huge, can make it until then, but, he says, other bipolar disorder. unhappy mental hospitals where they were They sent Colton to a residential treatment center inmates seem worse. Sometimes he hears out of sight and forgotten,” Kennedy said ill in Utah. He went through neurobehavioral testing. He men screaming at night inside the Crossroads people should be returned to their Correctional Facility, in Shelby. He says they saw psychiatrists and nurse practitioners. communities. He laid out a plan for new Donna was dumbfounded. “I really didn’t know have conversations with people who aren’t mental health centers. They would be anything about mental health,” she says. “I thought he there. “There are some people with pretty places where people could find support was a temperamental kid, I can’t control him. He’s a bad mental illness. I feel sorry for those guys.” while remaining independent. Chances are, those men don’t have the good boy, but yet he’s a bad boy.” Fewer than half of the community menAfter Colton was charged with stabbing the man in support that Colton does. His family contintal health facilities Kennedy planned for Charlo, the Wilsons worked desperately to stabilize ues to fight a legal battle on multiple fronts. came to fruition. him. Donna read everything she could find about bipo- In addition to the civil suit filed last month, In 1955, there was one psychiatric bed lar disorder. She made phone calls to treatment pro- they’re asking Montana’s Ninth Judicial available for every 300 Americans. Today, grams that had months-long waiting lists. They sent him District Court to order his release based on that number is one per 3,000. the allegation that he would not be incarcerto another treatment center, this time in Idaho. Warm Springs State Hospital in Donna says no combination of drugs, confinement ated today if the DOC had provided proper Montana housed 1,890 people in 1954. or encouragement seemed to work. “We were left hav- medical care. A hearing is scheduled for April Roughly 200 are treated there today. The ing to deal with this very difficult psychiatric case on 26 to debate that complaint. state’s population during that same period The Montana Supreme Court already our own.” grew by more than 400,000. That’s why the Wilsons were so pleased when denied one such appeal. But Donna is persistColton responded to the three medications prescribed ent. She wants to hold DOC accountable. She “Psychological torture” by Missoula psychiatric nurse practitioner Kiely believes people should at least know the horOn December 13, 1994, Cascade Howard. (Howard declined to comment for this article, ror that her mentally ill son faces while alone County Prosecutors charged Mark Edward in administrative segregation. She’s written citing privacy constraints.) Walker with felony forgery, arson and two It made it all the more devastating to see Colton letters to Gov. Brian Schweitzer and DOC counts of criminal mischief. again fall apart in DOC custody. Donna could only Director Mike Ferriter. She testifies before Walker had been diagnosed with watch in shock as the judge revoked his plea agreement lawmakers and listens to the stories told ADHD. He admitted to forging his brother's by other parents during legislative proceedand sentenced him to more incarceration. signature on several checks. The other Ben and Donna Wilson, Colton’s parents, at home in Charlo Colton was put in the Montana State Prison at Deer ings. Too many of them, she says, sound charges stemmed from a fire that he started Lodge. Donna told mental health staff there that Colton like Colton’s. in his parents’ garage. “This is so much bigger than my kid,” she says. She defied “efforts for controlling the contaminating needed his full complement of medicines to function, In exchange for dismissal of the criminal mischief but her pleas seemed not to matter, she says. She was “This is a tragedy.” violence of her excited passions,” Dix said. “Every form charges, Walker pleaded guilty to negligent arson and especially frustrated when Schaefer, the DOC psychiaof polluting phraseology, was poured forth in torrents, felony forgery. The Eighth Judicial District Court sentrist, called her in January 2010. He told Donna that sweeping away every decent thought and giving reality tenced him to five years with the Department of Colton had antisocial personality disorder, which, unlike “Heaven into hell” to that blackness of darkness which, it is said, might Corrections. bipolar disorder, is not commonly thought treatable. Some early American settlers believed demons convert a heaven into hell.” The sentence was suspended. However, Walker Schaefer told her that he saw no evidence of bipo- lived in people who exhibited ungovernable behavior. Dix told legislators that more hospital beds were violated the terms of his probation, prompting the state lar disorder or ADHD, she says. He cited prison safety The afflicted were called “lunatics” and “madmen.” needed. They agreed and funded an expansion of the to revoke the original sentencing agreement. Walker concerns when saying that the Vyvanse Colton was tak- Doctors treated them with ice baths, malarial infections state asylum in Worcester. Before her death in 1887, Dix fled. In 1997, he was arrested in Colorado.

Missoula Independent Page 16 March 22 – March 29, 2012


For seven months, Walker remained incarcerated in the Colorado Department of Corrections. Psychiatric staff in Colorado diagnosed him with bipolar disorder and prescribed Lithium. The Montana Supreme Court would later find that Walker received no major disciplinary write-ups while in Colorado. In November 1998, Walker was extradited to Montana and re-sentenced to five years with the Montana DOC. He was transferred to Montana State Prison on February 5, 1999. Five days later, Walker asked David Schaefer, the Montana DOC psychiatrist, to ensure that he received food with his lithium to ease nausea. Court documents allege that Schaefer learned of Walker’s request as early as Feb. 20 but did not meet with Walker until March 11. By then, Walker had stopped taking his lithium. When Schaefer finally reviewed Walker’s file, he diagnosed him with antisocial personality disorder with narcissistic traits rather than bipolar disorder. Schaefer did not prescribe lithium. Between August 1999 and January 2000, Walker averaged 11 major disciplinary write-ups a month. He spit on guards and covered his cell walls with ketchup, mustard and mayonnaise. On Oct. 8, 1999, he tried to hang himself with a sheet. Four days later, he tried to hang himself again, this time with his prison overalls. Prison officials placed him on a behavior management plan. It included being placed in a cell alone without his mattress, pillow and personal belongings. His clothing was also taken away. Walker was on disciplinary detention in January 2000. Because he had no paper or pen, he asked a neighboring inmate to help him draft a legal filing. Walker alleged in that petition that MSP officials were subjecting him to cruel and unusual punishment. He asked the court to intervene on his behalf. The Montana Supreme Court reviewed the case on appeal. In 2003, after Walker had already been released from DOC custody, the court issued a strongly worded opinion against the state. It noted that Montana’s constitutional right to human dignity mandates even greater protection than the federal constitution’s Eighth Amendment protections against cruel and unusual punishment. “If the particular conditions of segregation being challenged are such that they inflict a serious mental illness, greatly exacerbate mental illness or deprive inmates of their sanity,” the justices wrote, “then [prison officials] have deprived inmates of a basic necessity of human existence—indeed, they have crossed into the realm of psychological torture." In a landmark decision, the court directed DOC to adjust its policies and report back in 180 days. A courtappointed monitoring committee, composed of a retired psychiatrist, an attorney and an investigator, scrutinized prison procedures during multiple visits to MSP in 2004. The committee noted that MSP altered its policies after the Walker decision. DOC, for instance, opened the Martz Diagnostic and Intake Unit in 2004. The unit basically serves as a reception area, where mental health staffers take inmates’ histories before they enter the prison. Behavior management plans were changed, too. A mental health evaluation is now required before such a plan can be implemented. Similarly, psychiatric staff now have authority to pull

an inmate off such a plan if they feel the inmate is worsening. According to the report, “MSP appears to have taken significant steps to ensure that the behavioral management plans do not exacerbate the inmate’s mental health condition and do not inflict serious mental illness or deprive inmates of their sanity.”

“This person doesn’t really need treatment” Raistlen Katka’s father beat him with belt buckles and wire hangers. Court documents filed on Katka’s behalf say his father encouraged the little boy’s half siblings to beat him with baseball bats and locked him in his room for days at a time. Katka was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder, mood disorder and major depressive disorder. Doctors prescribed a variety of psychotropic medications. He lived with multiple family members and in foster care before he acted out and got sent to the Pine Hills Youth Correctional Facility. Katka got into a fight with two Pine Hills guards. He later pleaded guilty to two counts of Montana State Prison, at Deer Lodge assault on a peace officer. His plea agreement stipulated that he be transferred to adult court and As with the Walker and Wilson lawsuits, the Katka sentenced to DOC custody for five years. As with Colton Wilson, the district court recom- case alleges the state violated constitutional protections mended that Katka be placed in a three-month DOC against cruel and unusual punishment. Dr. Terry Kupers is a clinical psychiatrist and profesboot camp. He would then be eligible for parole. In sor at the Wright Institute Graduate School of 2007, DOC sent him to the Missoula Assessment and Psychology in Berkeley, Calif.. He’s also a forensic menSanction Center for evaluation. The center is housed in tal health expert who’s consulted with the U.S. the Missoula County Detention Facility. Inmates taken Department of Justice and Amnesty International. He into DOC custody are sent there to evaluate appropritestified during the Katka and Walker legal proceedings. ate placement. A center psychologist recommended that Katka The DOC’s use of behavioral management plans, even receive ongoing mental health treatment and mood-sta- after the Walker decision, exacerbates mental illness, Kupers says. He maintains: bilizing medication. “What happens is a series of worsening punishOne month after Katka arrived at the center, staffers placed him in the facility’s maximum-security ments. They reach the point where they’re both unconunit. During the six months Katka spent there, he was stitutional and cause human breakdown. That’s what placed on suicide watch at least once. He didn’t make it happened in both the Walker and Katka cases.” Kupers says long periods of stress and anxiety actuto boot camp. He was transferred to Montana State ally alter how the mind works: People in their teens and Prison in February 2008, just after his 16th birthday. Katka damaged a fence at the prison, prompting early 20s, like Wilson and Katka, have rapidly developing DOC to send him to a restricted segregation unit. Five brains. Neural pathways are blazing emotional trails that days a week, he spent 23 hours a day in his cell alone. the mind will follow for years to come. When young peoHe didn’t get out at all on the other two days. His men- ple experience repeated cycles of disorganized thinking, tal state worsened. He acted out. The prison placed him hallucinations or depression, they become more prone on a behavior management plan that included dressing to that, as pathways in the brain that are triggered by psyhim in a gown and putting him in a padded cell with no chotic episodes or manic episodes become habituated. running water that remained lit through the night. “It’s like a rut in a road,” Kupers says. The ACLU of Montana intervened on Katka’s There are other similarities among the cases, behalf, filing a lawsuit against the state and the DOC in including the antisocial disorder diagnosis. Kupers says 2009. The suit alleges that DOC placed the teenager on that while some studies show that approximately 15-25 behavior modification plans at least six times between percent of any prison population has antisocial personSeptember 2008 and September 2009. The lawsuit also ality disorder, that number plummets when doctors claims that Katka was pepper sprayed and shot with an evaluate a more extensive list of diagnostic criteria electroshock gun. that includes, for instance, the inability to empathize Katka attempted suicide four times. Twice, he bit with others. through his wrist until he punctured a vein. His attorKupers says institutions can use antisocial neys say that during his last suicide attempt, Katka personality disorder diagnoses and another classificaused a shaving razor to slit his wrists while he was tion, “malingering,” which means exaggerating or in the shower. Emergency personnel had to faking, to skirt constitutionally mandated treatment resuscitate him. responsibilities.

“What the psychiatrist is essentially saying is this individual does not warrant mental health services,” Kupers says. “They actually should be treated as just an ordinary prisoner and punished when they do something wrong…I believe what’s going on is the budget for mental health services within [a given corrections department] is relatively very inadequate. And then the psychiatrist justifies the inadequacy by saying ‘This person doesn’t really need treatment.’” DOC declined to comment on that allegation, citing pending litigation. Katka’s attorneys, including Ron Waterman, who’s filed multiple cases against DOC, say they also see an inordinate number of antisocial diagnoses in the state prison system. “Oftentimes, those people who come through the system somehow or another are magically cured of those diseases and those mental health issues and they all end up as an antisocial personality,” Waterman says. “It is a pattern that is remarkable in the frequency.” District Judge Jeffrey Sherlock intervened in the Katka case last August. He prohibited DOC from placing Katka in solitary. Katka is now on parole, living with his grandfather outside of Havre. Waterman says he’s responding well to the ongoing mental health treatment he’s had access to since the ACLU intervened.

“Security comes first” The Montana State Prison in Deer Lodge houses murderers, thieves and rapists. Some of the men who live there aren’t welcome anywhere else. “We do not have a choice who comes to us,” says Montana State Prison Health Services Bureau Chief Cathy Redfern. “We get what we get. And we deal with who we have.” DOC staff declined to comment on the Wilson and Katka cases. However, Redfern and some of her colleagues agreed to talk to the Independent about the

Missoula Independent Page 17 March 22 – March 29, 2012


overall challenges that come from housing—and providing medical care—to hundreds of mentally ill inmates. Since the Walker decision, the men’s prison has increased its mental health staff significantly. It now has 21.5 mental health positions; one of them is a psychiatrist. Other facilities contract out for psychiatric services. The Crossroads facility, where Colton Wilson is now, uses tele-medicine. Montana State Prison Mental Health Program Director Jill Buck says even the slightest staffing increase helps. In 2010, MSP received funding to hire three temporary mental health staffers. “We found that just having those mental health techs on night shift decreased those acting-out behaviors,” Buck says. “It helped with counseling, de-escalating situations.” They’ve since lost funding for two of the three positions. Montana State Prison is the only DOC facility with specific accommodations for inmates with psychiatric problems. Two

money into community programs such as facilities that stabilize people in crisis, “so folks don’t have to be driven across the state in the back of a police car.” The bill died in a House legislative committee during the 2007 session. Lewis and Clark County Prosecutor Leo Gallagher echoes Roessmann when saying part of the reason people end up in jail is that there are too few services. “There’s not a good mental health system in the communities,” he says. “There’s a dearth of psychiatric care.” For instance, Gallagher says, there’s a threemonth wait to even get a pre-sentence mental health evaluation at the state hospital. Lewis and Clark County doesn’t yet have a mental health court. Missoula does. And it helps keep offenders with psychiatric illnesses out of prison, says Deputy Missoula County Prosecutor Leslie Halligan.

Colton Wilson

mental health units at the Men’s Prison accommodate 25 prisoners. Buck says she has to be selective about whom she admits there. “We don’t like to put straight behavioral problems on the unit, because we do have severely mentally ill people in our unit,” she says. “We do have to make sure we protect them.” DOC Senior Legal Counsel Diana Koch says that courts sometimes sentence severely ill prisoners to the Warm Springs State Hospital. But that facility isn’t secure, meaning if inmates are dangerous, they’ll likely end up in the prison. “Some of them come to Montana State Prison, even if they have not reached maximum benefit at the hospital,” Koch says. “When they start acting out at the hospital, the only place that they can go is to the prison.” In 2007, DOC and the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, which operates the Warm Springs State Hospital, asked the Montana Legislature for help. They proposed creating a “Secure Treatment and Examination Program,” a forensic unit on the Warm Springs campus. It would have been a place where violent offenders could receive treatment for mental illness in a secure hospital setting. Disability Rights Montana, which advocates for people with mental illness, criticized the proposal, which would have cost $3.8 million to get off the ground and an additional $4.6 million in new funding annually. Disability Rights attorney Anita Roessmann argued that legislators would be wiser to put that

Missoula Independent Page 18 March 22 – March 29, 2012

Mental health court participants voluntarily participate in a judicially supervised treatment plan developed by a team of court staff and mental health professionals. A lot of what the courts do is simply help people access hard-tofind services. Buck, at DOC, says that many inmates at the Men’s Prison haven’t received any mental health care prior to being incarcerated. “A lot of inmates cannot afford mental health care in the community,” she says. “They come here and they get top-notch mental health care.” Buck’s worked for the Men’s Prison for 13 years. She bristles when asked if prison care is inadequate. The facility is accredited by the National Commission on Correctional Health Care, she points out, and employs licensed professionals. “We care about these inmates. We care about their mental health issues. We want them to succeed.” There are actually some benefits to receiving treatment in prison, Buck says. It offers time for people to work through mental health and behavioral challenges while abstaining from alcohol and drugs. But, Buck adds, “When you’re trying to provide therapy in a secure environment, that’s a challenge in and of itself. Security comes first. And that’s our motto.” jmayrer@missoulanews.com


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A time for slime FLASHINTHEPAN If there’s one thing America can agree on, it’s that pink slime is scary. The hamburger filler made from processed beef trimmings has been in use for decades, but now, thanks to social media-fueled campaigns and traditional media coverage from outlets as varied as Fox News and MSNBC, we’re suddenly terrified of the stuff. But is pink slime really any worse than pink cylinders like hot dogs or yellow nuggets of mechanically separated poultry? Probably not. But it seems to represent a discussion that’s time has come. After having quietly graced pre-made beef patties in the U.S. since the early 1990s, pink slime hit the mainstream in the 2008 documentary “Food, Inc.” An executive from Beef Products Inc., which makes the pink product officially known as Lean Finely Trimmed Beef, proudly welcomed the cameras into his futuristic facility, and said the product is in 70 percent of America’s pre-made burger patties. Then, a 2009 Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times exposé reported that BPI had been lowering the levels of ammonium hydroxide used to treat LFTB, in response to complaints about the product’s strong ammonia smell. These reductions in treatment caused several batches of burger destined for school lunches to test positive for E. coli and salmonella. Since the Times story, public outcry has forced several fast food joints to quit using the stuff in burgers, and supermarkets are dropping products that contain LFTB. When news broke on March 5 that the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National School Lunch Program had just purchased seven million pounds of LFTB to mix with ground beef, the anti-slime forces rallied again. This isn’t the first time USDA’s school lunch program has purchased LFTB, but judging by the pushback, it might be the last. Campaigns and industry counter-campaigns have been waged, petitions have been circulated and innumerable Twitter hashtags have been generated, all in the name of pink slime. Nobody without a financial interest in BPI could argue with a straight face that LFTB isn’t kind of gross. But does that make it evil? Processed meats like hot dogs, baloney and chicken nuggets seem, on the surface, no less icky than pink slime. Unlike LFTB, many nuggets and cylinders are made with mechanically separated meat. Chicken, turkey and pork carcasses, already picked clean of presentable cuts, are pushed through filtering

machinery under high pressure, removing every last scrap of tissue. The resulting fragments are used in chicken nuggets, in turkey and pork sausage and in many other processed meats. Mechanically separated beef, on the other hand, is no longer approved for human consumption, due to concerns that bovine spinal cord fluid could spread mad cow disease. The final bits of beef are recovered via other methods that, while highly mechanized, are less traumatic to the carcass, minimizing spinal fluid leakage. So if you’re averse to ingesting spinal fluid, beefbased pink slime is actually a better bet than chicken nuggets or hot dogs containing pork or poultry.

Photo courtesy of Beef Products Inc.

The biggest difference between LFTB and most other processed meats lies in how they are preserved. LFTB is dosed with ammonium hydroxide to raise the slime’s pH high enough to kill bacteria. These ammonium levels are not close to being toxic, but they still smell and taste foul, tempting processors to go light on the treatment to make the product more palatable. While LFTB is an ingredient for extending ground beef, the other forms of processed meat I’ve been comparing it to are finished products, stable at refrigerator temperatures because they’ve been preserved by agents stronger than ammonium hydroxide. Some legal preservatives have been linked to cancer, and the World Cancer Research Fund has recommended that people avoid processed meats altogether. While preservatives in processed meats are considered ingredients and thus require labeling, BPI has successfully argued that its ammonium hydroxide is a processing agent, not an ingredient, meaning it needn’t be listed on the product label. For something that isn’t an ingredient, ammonium hydroxide has certainly made its presence felt. As

by ARI LeVAUX

the Times reported, blocks of LFTB had a heavy stench even when frozen, causing BPI to cut the treatment down to precariously low levels. To its credit, BPI has since improved its safety protocols and now leads the industry in testing for not just one but for all of the so-called Big Six strains of E. coli. Assuming BPI can control the bacteria in its product, what’s left to hate? Gerald Zirnstein, a former USDA inspector, coined the term “pink slime” in a 2002 email. But his chief complaint about the stuff, according to the Times story, isn’t that it’s dangerous, pink or slimy, but that it’s misidentified. “I do not consider the stuff to be ground beef,” he said, “and I consider allowing it in ground beef to be a form of fraudulent labeling.” This is hardly damning criticism—it’s like complaining that 2 percent milk is being labeled as whole milk. And LFTB is, in fact, pure beef, except for the ammonium hydroxide processing agent. So it kind of is ground beef, arguably. Implicit in Zirnstein’s comment is the assumption that the non-muscle beef tissue in LFTB is less nutritious than the muscle tissue in burger meat. But the tissues from which LFTB is made, including collagen, do in fact have nutritional value, as BPI rightly claims on its new website pinkslimeisamyth.com. Indeed, people pay a lot of money for collagen supplements in pill form. So, is pink slime any worse than pink cylinders, yellow nuggets, brown breakfast sausage patties or any number of mystery meat products? Probably not. And for what it’s worth, it isn’t even slimy. On March 15, ten days after the war on pink slime in schools began, the USDA announced it would “provide schools with a choice to order product either with or without Lean Finely Textured Beef.” On the surface, this may seem like a decisive end to the war. But as Tom Philpott pointed out in a post for Mother Jones, USDA only supplies about 20 percent of the food in public school cafeterias. And much of the rest must be purchased from suppliers that slime their taco filling, lunch meats and other beef products. As with most kinds of slime, it’s easier to mix in pink slime than it is to remove it. Personally, if I can’t get good, intact meat tissue to eat, I’m happier and healthier eating none at all.

LISTINGS $…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over

tion of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wifi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$

Alcan Bar and Grill 16780 Beckwith St. Frenchtown • 626-9930 Tantalize your taste buds with Angus beef burgers, chicken strips, shrimp, and biscuits and gravy from Alcan Bar & Grill. With more than 20 years of experience and 10 years in the business, we have been offering fresh meals and beverages at the area's most competitive prices. Our friendly professionals offer personalized service and make sure you leave our restaurant as one of our friends. We offer have a variety of specials for ladies night and sports events featuring drink specials and free food. Contact us today and enjoy our incredible menu selection. 9 am – 2 am Mon-Sun.

Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 Have you checked out Bernice’s web-site: bernicesbakerymt.com? Are you a fan of Bernice’s on Facebook? Did you catch that silly Christmas video on YouTube? Viewed the Montana Home Shopping Showcase? Bernice’s not only has awesome breakfast pastries, elegant cakes, signature wedding cakes, fresh bread, cookies & treat galore, lunch, and excellent coffee. Bernice’s has great employees who rock the social media! 34 years of solid goodness! Check out our social media and then stop by to celebrate a job well done! xoxo Bernice

Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway (across from courthouse) • 728-8900 Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selec-

Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-

ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Big Sky Drive In 1016 W. Broadway 549-5431 Big Sky Drive In opened June 2nd 1962. We feature soft serve ice cream, shakes, malts, spins, burger, hot dogs, pork chop sandwiches and breaded mushrooms all made to order. Enjoy our 23 shake and malt flavors or the orange twist ice cream. Drive thru or stay and enjoy your food in our outdoor seating area. Lunch and dinner, seven days a week. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Monday – Friday, 7:30 – 2. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty.

Missoula's Original

Brain Food www.thinkfft.com Sun-Thurs 7am - 8pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

Missoula Independent Page 19 March 22 – March 29, 2012


dish

the

HAPPIESTHOUR Shots at the Union Club The Occasion: The Friday before St. Patty’s Day, the Indy staff is down at the Union Club, having a meeting. During a lull, we test out the storied establishment’s most popular shots, with the help of bartender Robin. Duck Fart: Kahlua, Bailey’s Irish cream and whiskey. This is not a shot named with polite sensibilities in mind. Our smart, organized and fun publisher, Lynne Foland, doesn’t care. She takes the lead and throws back this frothy-looking shot. Her report: It is overwhelming with Bailey’s, so if you’re a fan of the cream, you’ll like this one. Redheaded Slut: Peach schnapps, cranberry juice and Jägermeister. Our beloved photographer Chad Harder was expecting it to be overly sweet. Not so, apparently. The Redheaded Slut is dangerously mild, with just a hint of fruitiness. Do we have a convert? Fireball Whiskey: This cinnamon-flavored whiskey is all the rage these days. Our calendar editor, Jason McMackin, aka The Calemander, says in typical big-voiced, WWF fashion, “If you haven't tried Fireball Whiskey yet, I have nothing to say to you.” On Thursdays, Fireball Whiskey shots at the Union Club are $2. Apple Jax: The Union Club just recently made this an official shot. The combination of

Photo by Skylar Browning

Fireball Whiskey, Apple Pucker and cranberry juice makes it taste a little like Apple Jacks cereal or a hard cider. Our editor, Robert Meyerowitz, takes a shot. “Wow. Weird,” he says. “It’s actually really good. I would drink 5 or 6 of these.” Uh oh. Crown Royal: This is a pretty no-frills shot, the kind a journalist needs when she’s deep into a scandalous story the night before deadline. Or something. Crown Royal and Jameson shots alternate as specials on Friday and Saturday nights for $2.75. Other shot specials: On Sundays, you can get $1 shots and pool. Not into shots? Oh, okay. You can always get $2.25 domestic bottles and cans or well drinks, Monday through Friday, from 4 to 6 p.m. Salud! How to find it: The Union Club is located at 208 E. Main St. in downtown Missoula. —Erika Fredrickson

BUY 1 Entrée GET 1 FREE of equal or lesser value*. MUST PRESENT COUPON *Valid through March 31, 2012.

Mon-Fri 7am - 4pm (Breakfast ‘til Noon)

Sat & Sun 8am - 4pm (Breakfast all day) 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622

SATURDAYS $1 SUSHI 4pm-9pm Mondays & Thursdays - $1 SUSHI

(all day)

Tuesdays - LADIES' NIGHT 4pm-9pm Not available for To-Go orders

Missoula Independent Page 20 March 22 – March 29, 2012

The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins • 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to late. $-$$

Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. We deliver and we cater!

Burger Shack 1900 Brooks • 549-2194 (Holiday Village) LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED! Come take a bite out of our ½ lb big & beefy burgers! We're the the only burger joint in Missoula serving 100% Certified Angus beef, handpattied, charbroiled and made to order. We have over 18 mouthwatering specialty burgers to choose from and there’s always a Burger Deal of the Day. Check out our selection of Far Out Phillies made with Certified Angus top sirloin-tossed with our own housemade sauces. Even the burps taste good! Open Monday thru Saturday 11am to 8pm. Call ahead or order to-go 549-2194.

Double Front Chicken 122 W. Alder • 543-6264 Number of years ago Double Front was built, 101. Number of years it’s been cooking chicken, 75. Number if years in the Herndon family, 49. Always getting that perfect chicken dinner, timeless. Come find out why we are rule of the roost. Always the best, Double Front Chicken. $-$$

Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 39 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks • 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am-2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm Sun-Wed and 11am10pm Thurs-Sat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$$ Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 Cold Stone Creamery offers the Ultimate Ice Cream Experience. Ice Cream, Ice Cream Cakes, Shakes, and Smoothies the Way You Want It. Come in for our weekday specials. Get Gift Cards any time. Remember, it's a great day for ice cream at Cold Stone Creamery. $-$$

Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. • 721-6033 Missoula's Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. MTH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am-4pm, Sat 8am-4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West • 41-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula's best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. • 532-2056 Brooks and Browns Trivia Night is back. $7 Bayern Pitchers plus appetizer specials. Every Thursday from 7-10pm. $50 Bar Tab to winning team. Warm up your chilly nights with our Hot Jalapeno Artichoke Dip. We have Classic French Onion Soup and hearty Bison chili made in house daily. Fall in love with our Bacon Cheeseburger Meatloafstuffed with crispy Daily’s bacon and cheddar cheese, served with


cheddar mashed potatoes and corn. And finish the best meal in town with our New Orleans style Bread Pudding with warm caramel sauce and Big Dipper vanilla bean Ice cream. We still have Happy Hour from 4-7 every day and on game days we offer wings specials and all your favorite local micro-brews. Everyone loves our SUNDAY BINGO NIGHT! Sundays 6-9 pm at Brooks and Browns. Same happy Hour specials ($5 pulled pork sliders, ? order wings, ? nachos; $6 Bud Lite pitchers) Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com All our menu items are made from scratch, featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive tea menu. Missoula's Original Bubble Teas. Beer, Wine and Sake available. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Rotating music and DJs. Lunch 11:30-3:00, Happy Hour 3-6, Dinner 5-10. $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West • 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ The Mercantile Deli 119 S. Higgins Ave. • 721-6372 themercantiledeli.com Located next to the historic Wilma Theater, the Merc features a relaxed atmosphere, handcrafted Paninis, Sandwiches, and wholesome Soups and Salads. Try a Monte Cristo for breakfast, a Pork Love Panini for lunch, or have us cater your next company event. Open Monday – Saturday for breakfast and lunch. Downtown delivery available. $-$$ The Mustard Seed Asian Café Southgate Mall • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our allnew bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our non-smoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, microbrews, fine wines & signature drinks. Takeout & delivery available. $$-$$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. • 543-3188 Don’t feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $8.50. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $7.75. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$. Pearl Café 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French specialties, bison, elk, and fresh fish daily. Delicious salads and appetizers, as well as breads and desserts baked in-house. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Philly West 134 W. Broadway • 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday - Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. Pita Pit 130 N. Higgins 541-PITA (7482) • pitapitusa.com Fresh Thinking Healthy Eating. Enjoy a pita rolled just for you. Hot meat and cool fresh veggies topped with your favorite sauce. Try

our Chicken Caesar, Gyro, Philly Steak, Breakfast Pita, or Vegetarian Falafel to name just a few. For your convenience we are open until 3am 7 nights a week. Call if you need us to deliver! Sapore 424 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-6695 Voted best new restaurant in the Missoula Independent's Best of Missoula, 2011. Located on Higgins Ave., across the street from Wordens. Serving progressive American food consisting of fresh house-made pastas every day, pizza, local beef, and fresh fish delivered from Taste of Alaska. New specials: burger & beer Sundays, 5-7 $9 ~ pizza & beer Tuesdays, 5-7 $10 ~ draft beers, Tuesday -Thursday, 5-6:30 $3. Business hours: Tues.- Sat. 5-10:30 pm., Sat. 10-3 pm., Sun. 5-10 pm. Authentic Thai Restaurant 221 W. Broadway • 543-9966 sawaddeedowntown.com Sa Wa Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors- no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisine. Now serving beer and wine! $-$$ Sean Kelly’s Empire Grill 130 W. Pine St. • 542-1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for lunch & dinner. Featuring brunch Saturday & Sunday from 11-2pm. Serving international & Irish pub fare. Full bar, beer, wine, martinis. $-$$

March

COFFEE SPECIAL

Mocha Java Blend $10.95/lb. Missoula’s Best Coffee

BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

Silvertip Casino 680 SW Higgins • 728-5643 The Silvertip Casino is Missoula’s premiere casino offering 20 Video gaming machines, best live poker in Missoula, full beverage liquor, 11 flat screen tv’s and great food at great prices. Breakfast Specials starting at $2.99 (7-11am) For a complete menu, go to www.silvertipcasino.com. Open 24/7. $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI Sushi Hana Downtown offering a new idea for your dining experience. Meat, poultry, vegetables and grain are a large part of Japanese cuisine. We also love our fried comfort food too. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. Corner of Pine & Higgins. 549-7979. $$–$$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins • 327-8929 Stop in when you're in the neighborhood. We'll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula's best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 11-10 Sun 12-9. Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you'll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. Tamarack Brewing Company 231 W. Front Street 830-3113 facebook.com/tamarackmissoula Tamarack Brewing Company opened its first Taphouse in Missoula in 2011. Overlooking Caras Park, Tamarack Missoula has two floors -a sports pub downstairs, and casual dining upstairs. Patrons can find Tamarack’s handcrafted ales and great pub fare on both levels. Enjoy beer-inspired menu items like brew bread wraps, Hat Trick Hop IPA Fish and Chips, and Dock Days Hefeweizen Caesar Salads. Try one of our staple ales like Hat Trick Hop IPA or Yard Sale Amber Ale, or one of our rotating seasonal beers, like, Old 'Stache Whiskey Barrel Porter, Headwall Double IPA, Stoner Kriek and more. Don’t miss $8 growler fills on Wednesday and Sunday, Community Tap Night every Tuesday, Kids Eat Free Mondays, and more. See you at The ‘Rack! $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Drive 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$ YoWaffle Yogurt 216 W. Main St. • 543-6072 (Between Thai Spicy and The Shack) www.yowaffle.com YoWaffle is a self-serve frozen yogurt and Belgian waffle eatery offering 10 continuously changing flavors of yogurt, over 60 toppings, gluten free cones and waffles available, hot and cold beverages, and 2 soups daily. Indoor and outdoor seating. Meetings welcome. Open 7 days a week. Sun-Thurs 11 AM to 11 PM, Fri 11 AM to 12 AM, Sat. 10 AM to 12 AM. Free WiFi. Loyalty punch cards, gift cards and t-shirts available. UMONEY. Like us on facebook. Let YoWaffle host your next birthday party! $

Missoula Independent Page 21 March 22 – March 29, 2012


8

days a week

Arts & Entertainment listings March 22 – March 29, 2012

THURSDAY March nightlife

22

See the works of up-and-comers Michael Flynn and Sarahjess Hurt at their MFA Th e s i s E x h i b i t i o n R e c e p t i o n . S o c i a l Sciences Bldg., Gallery of Visual Arts. 5–7 PM. Free. Tom Catmull unloads the wagon and dusts off his playing guitar and pleases your ears with tunes-a-plenty at the Draught Works Brewery. 915 Toole. 5–8 PM. Free. Fact: the South will not rise again. But check out the Civil War Display at the Ravalli County Museum for artifacts of the war that once belonged to soldiers from the Bitterroot Valley. 205 Bedford in Hamilton. 6 PM. Free. Canadian polar bear biologist Dr. Ian Stirling talks about life up north during his lecture The Ecology of Polar Bears, Climate Warming and the Effects on Polar Bear-Human Interactions. Urey Lecture Hall. 7 PM. Free. I have a bad felling that this installment of the Peace and Justice Film Series, Tipping Point: The Age of the Oil Sands, does not have much in the way of good news. Gallagher Business Building, Rm. 122. 7 PM. Free. Learn how it is in Iran at the screening of Education Under Fire, a film about the Iranian government’s denial of educational services to those who voice disagreement with the man. Liberal Arts Bldg., Rm. 305. 7 PM. Free. The Ninemile Wildlife Workgroup Lecture Series hosts Whisper Camel-Means and Kylie Paul for a talk titled Monitoring the US 93 North Wildlife Crossing Structures: Do They Work? My guess: They do. Ninemile Ranger Station. 7 PM. Free. Hear the voice of soprano Kristin Allford at the Student Recital Series in the Music Recital Hall. 7:30 PM. Free. Get a note from your doctor before you fall out at the Last Hard Comedy Tour at the Crystal Theater. 515 S. Higgins. 7:30 PM. $5.

MITCHELL

MASSAGE THERAPY

ERIC MITCHELL, LMT Massage Therapist/Owner

406-207-9480 MitchellMassage.abmp.com Missoula Independent Page 22 March 22 – March 29, 2012

Ad astra cum symphonia. Classic rock legends Kansas are joined by the UM Symphony Orchestra on Thu., Mar. 29, at 8 PM in the University Theatre. Tickets are $50 for reserved seats and $25 for students and can be purchased at Rockin Rudy’s and ticketfly.com. Fans of grammar, logic and rhetoric, grab your liberal arts degrees and head down to the Central Bar and Grill’s trivia night, hosted by local gallant and possible Swede Thomas Helgerson. 143 W. Broadway. 8 PM. Free. Harvard Business School prof. John D. Black talks about Global Natural Resource Markets: Perspectives from Business Strategy during his installment of the President’s Lecture Series at UM. Montana Theatre. 8 PM. Free. Get sweaty with all the beautiful people at the Dead Hipster Dance Party, where love and funk is in the air. Badlander. 208 Ryman St. $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM–midnight. Grab your gal pals and motor over to the Silver Slipper’s Ladies Night for Karaoke by Figmo. Do that one about the shack where love is. Be sure you have a Fred lined up. 4055 Brooks. 9 PM. Free. The battle continues, as some of MSO’s finest musical talents battle it out each Thursday in

the Top o’ the Mic Trilogy competition to crown the champion of music at Sean Kelly’s. 130 W. Pine. 9 PM. Free. Don’t get derailed by work. Take a ride with Party Trained at the Sunrise Saloon. 1101 Strand. 9 PM. Free. Shane Clouse is going country on that backside when he performs at Pulse inside the Press Box. 835 E. Broadway. 9 PM. Free. Get your freak on, nature boy, with the boys of Birds Mile Home during the fourth week of their VFW Residency, with Kevin Koutnik and the Protectors and Hello Ghost. 245 W. Main. 9 PM. Free. Smell what a legend sounds like when lifers and PDXers Jerry Joseph and the end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., March 23, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to The Calemander c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S


Jackmormons bring buckets of thunder and loads of lightning to the Palace. 9 PM. $8. (See Noise in this issue.) Get a good mix of all them musical flavors, just like a pan bagnat, when House of Quist plays jams at the Union Club. 9 PM. Free. “Kiss my ash,” the sign says, and head to the Volcano Party at Monk’s Bar with DJ Kris Moon, which is a benefit for XTC’s Guatemala Theater Restoration Project. 225 Ryman. 9 PM. $3. He’ll cure your tremors with a sweet shot of country: Russ Nasset hits up the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., for a solo set this and every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free. Taste the fresh tunes of the Mountain Breathers when they perform indie/folk jammage at The Top Hat. 10 PM. Free.

FRIDAY March

23

NCBI’s Community Building Bridges Workshop seeks to teach folks prejudice reduction and how to understand one another’s varied experiences. 1130 W. Broadway. 9 AM–4 PM. $40. ncbimissoula.org. The Missoula Indian Center invites you to check out their digs at its Open House, which includes tours, refeshments and an elucidation of services offered. 839 W. Central. Noon–3 PM. Free. Someday you will ache like I ache, if you decide to become a writer. Get a leg up with Debra Gwartney, author of Live Through This, at her Memoir Writing Craft Lecture.

UM Education Bldg. Rm. 312 (Moved from McGill Hall, Rm. 210.) 12:10–1 PM. Free.

nightlife What do you know? Heaven is a place on earth when El 3-Oh! plays the Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery tasting room. 4175 Rattlesnake. 5–9 PM. Free. Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s (formerly the Flathead Valley Over the Hill Gang) weekly meeting to talk about being awesome, past glories and upcoming activities. Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free. The Hangin’ Art Gallery in Arlee hosts a supper with bluegrass music by the Gravely Mountain Boys. Free is a very good price. 5:30–8 PM. Pass the hat. Give the kids whirling disease when The Whizpops perform at Family Friendly Friday at The Top Hat. 6–8 PM. Free. Hear a couple of the best in the biz when Debra Gwarteny and Barry Lopez hold a Nonfiction Reading sponsored by the UM CW Program and the President’s Writers-inResidence Series. UM North Underground Lecture Hall. 7 PM. Free. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Flamenco fans are shouting ¡Que bueno!, as spring has arrived with Patio Andaluz: Baile de Primavera, a show chock full of spanish guitar and dancing. Crystal Theater, 515 S. Higgins. 7 PM. $10/$7 adv. and are available at Rockin Rudy’s. The Northern Rockies Rising Tide fights for the northern Rockies, including tackling the megaload issue and so much more. Jeannette Rankin Peace Center back room. 510 S. Higgins Ave. 7–8:30 PM.

Fargin’ iceholes, The Lady Pirates of Captain Bree is a swashbuckling musical comedy brought to you by the Bigfork Center for Performing Arts. 7:30 PM. Tix $5-10. bigforktheatre.org. Day by day, you’ll be humming the tunes of Godspell, if the Missoula Community Theatre has anything to say about it. 200 N. Adams. 8 PM. $21. mctinc.org. Embrace modern dance with the Bare Bait Dance Co. during its performance of Views from Grandma’s Porch, a story of smalltown life choreographed by Joy French. Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main. 8 PM. $10/$8 students. Irie eyes are smiling when local reggae makers Chele Bandulu play the Union Club. 9 PM. Free. Bingo, bango, bongo, it’s wicked spooky dubsteppist Broken Note delivering the bulbous beats with a side of heavy gravy, with Ebola Syndrome and DJ Kris Moon. Badlander. 9 PM. $10/$7 adv./$2 surcharge for those ages 18-20. (See Noise in this issue.) Dust off your skankin’ socks and grab your hollering pole when rocketeers I Hate Your Girlfriend burn the whole village, along with Boys and Bird’s Mile Home. Palace. 9 PM. $5. This is your one-way ticket to midnight: Blessiddoom, Walking Corpse Syndrome and Mahamawaldi slay dragons and stomp guts at the Dark Horse Bar. 1805 Regent. 9 PM. Free. Grab some swagger and freak that funk with Sick Kids DJ and Drums at Monk’s Bar. 225 Ryman. 9 PM. $3. Do it under the neon moon with the Mark Duboise Band at the Sunrise Saloon. 1101 Strand. 9:30 PM. Free.

He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. This is not a threat: I’ll House You with DJs Kris Moon, Mike Stolin and Hotpantz does happen at The Jolly Cork’s. 112 N. Pattee St. (Front St. entrance). 10 PM. Free. Leave the still with Uncle Bunk while you head to The Top Hat for an evening of stompgrass and the like with The Dodgy Mountain Men, plus Aran Buzzas. 10 PM. $3.

SATURDAY March

24

Day by day, you’ll be humming the tunes of Godspell, if the Missoula Community Theatre has anything to say about it. 200 N. Adams. 2 pm, $17. 8 PM, $21. mctinc.org. Pack a lunch, birders. Five Valleys Audubon is taking an all-day trip to the Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge near Stevi. for early spring birding. Meet at 8 AM at the UM Field House parking lot. Call Larry for more info. at 549-5632. If you have compulsive-eating problems, seek help and support with others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Sat. at 9 AM in Room 3 in the basement of First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free. Visit oa.org. Show all that haters you got that swag or just hang and bang at Lost Trail’s Cold Smoke Freeride event. One part contest, one part party, the freeride has tons of prizes and music by The Bass Face Crew, Como Se Va, Ebola Syndrome and M-ad at the after party. $500

Missoula Independent Page 23 March 22 – March 29, 2012


for first place (dang!). $50 to enter the contest. LTfreeride@gmail.com. Stretch out them flabby old legs, Darcy, and help out Meals On Wheels while you’re at it at the Wheat Montana 5K Run/Walk, which is a fundraiser for MOW. 2520 S. 3rd W. 9 AM. $18/$16 adv. registration. runmt.com. Be a Richie Tenenbaum lookin’ sucka w h e n t h e M o n t a n a Te n n i s Association hosts Missoula Plays Tennis, a tennis-filled event with prizes and lessons and info. on leagues. City Life Community Center, 151g Fairview. 9 AM–Noon. Free. The Daly Mansion Spring Lecture Series presents The Lectures of K. Ross Toole (focusing on Mr. Daly

and the Bitterroot Valley), the legendary UM history prof., facilitated by Don Erdman. 251 Eastside Hwy. 363-6004 ext. 4. The Heirloom Winter Market still has plenty of local num-nums for you and yours, including farm-fresh eggs, butter, sausage, lavender, honey and more, more, more! Ceretana Gallery and Studios, 801 Sherwood. 10 AM–1 PM. The 2nd Annual Montana International Children’s Film Festival hosts a farmer’s grip of films for kids and those who are still kids at heart (aww). You name it, you can watch it: French anime, Godzilla and the Clark Fork School production The Magic Within. 10:30 AM–Midnight. $8/$6 kids. For a complete schedule, go to micff.org.

The Travelers’ Rest State Park Storytelling Series continues with Salish Stories as told by Tony Incashola, Salish Culture Committee Director. 1.2 mile west of Lolo on Hwy. 12. $4/18 and under free. If you think you’ve got the moxie to be the next Martha Plimpton or John Francis Daly, bring your fine self and your two-minute monologue down to the 24-Hour Play Festival Audition. UM Schreiber Gymnasium. Noon-3 PM. Now that spring is here, it’s time to trim that big bush and those nappy trees. Join MUD for its Basic Tree Pruning Workshop with Mark Vander Meer. 629 Phillips. 1 PM. $20/$20 members. mudproject.org.

Flamenco fans are shouting ¡Que bueno!, as spring has arrived with Patio Andaluz: Baile de Primavera, a show chock full of spanish guitar and dancing. Crystal Theater, 515 S. Higgins. 2 pm and 7 PM. $10/$7 adv. and are available at Rockin Rudy’s.

Grandma’s Porch, a story of smalltown life choreographed by Joy French. Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main. 8 PM. $10/$8 students.

C’mon, get happy, see kids act their hind ends off at the Whitefish Theatre Co.’s The Poetry Cafe, which features actors in grades 6-10. 1 Central Ave., Whitefish. 2 pm and 7 PM. $5 suggested donation.

DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo back the truck up and unload bangin’ beats and boxes of Thom Mcans at Absolutely, a dance party featuring every style of rump-shaking tuneage. The Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2 for 1 Absolut drinks until 11 PM. Free.

The Montana Abolition Coalition hosts a Death Penalty Movie Night at the Missoula Public Library, which features five short films and a discussion. 2–4 PM. Free. (See Agenda in this issue.)

nightlife Fab Five Freddy knows Tom Catmull has all the right moves. See them in action at the Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery tasting room, 4175 Rattlesnake. 5–9 PM. Free.

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Word Inc. hosts their annual auction and fundraiser for low-income women and families, Many Faces of Women. The event includes art and dessert auctions, shenanigans by emcees Bernie Kneefe and Mark Heyka, tunes by DJ Mermaid and tapas-style dining. Holiday InnDowntown, 200 S. Pattee. 6 PM. $25/$20 adv. wordinc.org. Grab a beer and go dutch when Kevin Van Dort performs at the Draught Works Brewery. 915 Toole. 6–8 PM. Free.

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Missoula Independent Page 24 March 22 – March 29, 2012

Clothing for a Cause, not just to cover up your bits, is a fundraiser, fashion show and clothing sale for Mountain Home Inc., a nonprofit transitional-living program for young moms and babies. GLR Building, 350 Ryman. $25, includes $10 voucher for clothes, food or drinks. mountainhomemt.org. Let’s be honest, nobody hates Great Falls more than the people who live there, so here come the Electric City Roller Grrrlz looking to big time Missoula’s own Brawlin’ Mollies in a roller derby Wrecking Brawl for the ages. Adams Center. $15 reserved/$10 general/Free to those 10 and under. griztix.com. Enjoy the soothing sounds of the Heart to Heart Duo and dance the night away at the Missoula Senior Center. 705 S. Higgins. 7–10 PM.

MONTANA’S QUALITY ROCK

Odyssey of the Stars: A Celebration of Artistic Journeys hosts ‘98 UM graduate Palmer West, who has worked on all sorts of films you’ve heard of. This year’s show In the Moment features UM students, faculty and West. University Theatre. 7:30 PM. $31/$16 students. griztix.com. Fargin’ iceholes, The Lady Pirates of Captain Bree is a swashbuckling musical comedy brought to you by the Bigfork Center for Performing Arts. 7:30 PM. Tix $5-10. bigforktheatre.org. Embrace modern dance with the Bare Bait Dance Co. during its performance of Views from

Take a soak and take in the tunes of Voodoo Horseshoes when they perform at the Symes Hot Springs Hotel. 8–10 PM. Free.

Joan Zen performs for all you lovely lovers of loving at the Union Club. 9 PM. Free. Saddle up and ride on over to the Lumberjack Saloon for an evening with country jammers Sho Down. Get a cabin or ride the shuttle. 9 PM. Free. Raise the rainbow flag high, because tonight the Palace hosts LAMBDA’s Queer Prom, with DJs Tygerlily and Raven Digitalis, as well as drag shows and belly dancing. All proceeds go to LAMBDA. 9 PM. $5/$5 surcharge for those 18-20. Do that dance quick, mama, cuz the word is up when DJ Squirmy plays the hits at Monk’s Bar. 225 Ryman. 9:30 PM. Free. Ooh, me gusta los touring bands! Naomi Punk and Grease Kitten of Olympia perform the rock and the roll, along with locals The Velcro Kicks and Shahs, at the VFW. 134 W. Main. 9 PM. $3. (See Scope in this issue.) Do it under the neon moon with the Mark Duboise Band at the Sunrise Saloon. 1101 Strand. 9:30 PM. Free. DJ Dubwise supplies dance tracks all night long so you can take advantage of Sexy Saturday and rub up against the gender of your choice at Feruqi’s. 10 PM. Free. Call 728-8799. Dunk yourself in a big ol’ tub of Americana and roots music with Charlie Parr, Ellie Nuno, Rossco and Stu. The Top Hat. 10 PM. $10/$8 adv. (See Noise in this issue.)

SUNDAY March

25

Those dastardly berzerking childrens driving you bonkers? Teach them to relax during S.N. Goenka’s Meditation for Children Course at Sussex School. 1800 S. 2nd W. Free. children.dharmma.org. Join photogs Kathy Eyster and/or Lee Silliman for the Ansel Adams Drop-In Tour at the MAM and get insider info on the best-known photog of all-time. 335 N. Pattee St. Get back in shape and learn something new at Freestone Climbing Gym’s Intro. to Bouldering course, which introduces basic techniques, safety stuff, ethics and more. Class includes 1.5 hours of instruction and


Reinholdt at Draught Works Brewery. 915 Toole. 4–7 PM. Free. The Brazilian dance of war known as capoeira featured the original b-boyz. Check out Capoeira for a Cause: A Hellgate Senior Project, a fundraiser to benefit underprivileged kids in Brazil, which features a short film about capoeira. Ten Spoon Vineyard, 4175 Rattlesnake. 4–7 PM. $20/$10 students.

nightlife Listen to some real live writers during the Second Wind Reading Series, where MFA students and teachers share their stories with the world. This week, it’s the lovely and wonderful fiction writer Shawn Haggerty and poet Prageeta Sharma. The Top Hat. 5 PM. Free.

Kick the bucket. Rubblebucket brings their rowdy psych-dance live show to The Top Hat, 134 W. Main, on Sun., Mar. 25, at 10 PM with Twiddle. Tickets are $10. two weeks of unlimited climbing. 935 Toole. 12–1:30 PM. $40. How much is Uncle Benny’s dress collection worth? What about all those purple candles form the ‘70s? Find out at the Friends of Missoula Public Library Appraisal Fair, where local experts judge your wares and raise money for the library. Missoula Public Library. Noon–4 PM. $5 per item. Get your snack on and expand that palate beyond the brown and white food groups at the International Culture and Food

Festival. This year’s theme is A Taste of Traditions. University Center. Noon–5 PM. $5/$3 for children 3-12. Go with the jam when The Rocky Mountain Grange Hall, 1436 S. First St. south of Hamilton, hosts a weekly acoustic jam session for guitarists, mandolin players and others from 2–4 PM. Free. Call Clem at 961-4949. Day by day, you’ll be humming the tunes of Godspell, if the Missoula Community Theatre has anything to say about it. 200 N. Adams. 2 PM,

$17. 6:30 PM, $19/$15 for children. mctinc.org. Fargin’ iceholes, The Lady Pirates of Captain Bree is a swashbuckling musical comedy brought to you by the Bigfork Center for Performing Arts. 7:30 PM. Tix $5-10. bigforktheatre.org. Occupy Missoula General Assembly takes place at the Union Hall. 208 E. Main St. 2–4 PM. occupymissoula.org. Let Sunday fade to black with the help of delicious beers and the tuneage of 907 Britt and Richie

MUD needs you to answer a few questions and help them raise money during the Trivia and Tool Librarian Auction Fundraiser at the Flathead Lake Brewery. From 5–11 PM, $1 from each pint goes to MUD. Trivia begins at 6 PM and costs $10 for teams of up to five members. 424 N. Higgins. Try something a little different at Kay Linda Walker’s talk about Theta Healing at Colter’s Coffee in Kalispell. 424 S. Main. 6–8 PM. Free. Close out the weekend in style with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz & DJs, during the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with the Josh Farmer, The Vanguard Combo and Front Street Jazz. Free.

Test your skills against Missoula’s best players in a double-elimination Guitar Hero Tournament and Party at Feruqi’s. Finalists compete at the expert level, so you best get to practicing “Killing in the Name Of.” 318 N. Higgins. 8 PM. $5 to enter. Umphrey’s McGee brings the space rock “improg” to the Wilma Theatre for a night of tripped out lazers and sweep-picking pizzazz. 8 PM. $20. Tix available at Rockin Rudy’s or ticketfly.com. (See Noise in this issue.) It’s about to get downright weird up in The Top Hat, with Afrobeat/indie whack-o’s Rubblebucket, who bring giant robot puppets, a Blondie medley and more insanity to their shows. Plus Twiddle. 10 PM. $10.

MONDAY March

26

Blue Mountain Clinic, along with the Missoula AIDS Council, offers free, anonymous and blood-free HIV testing. 610 N. California. 1–4 PM. Free. Call 721-1646.

nightlife At Slacker Mondays, from 6 PM until close, slackline fans can come to Freestone Climbing Center at 935 Toole Ave. to test their balance. $13/$10 for students. Visit freestoneclimbing.com.

2339 Mary #3

1024 Stephens #4

218 Barclay - A

1914 S. 14th St. W Apt A & B

2 bedroom upper unit located in central Missoula. Rent includes heat and storage unit! New carpeting and shared deck that leads into the shared yard. Coin-ops are available. Off-street parking. No pets or smoking. ***Please call about the Rent Incentive for this rental!!! *** Rent: $650 • Deposit: $660

Two bedroom apartment located on the main level of two story building. Recent upgrades are new vinyl windows, updated countertops and dishwasher was installed. All tenants have access to the pool and there are coin-ops on site. Rent: $675 • Deposit: $685

2 bedroom upper level of duplex in Lolo. Includes carport, large front lawn, hook-ups and near local shopping. No pets or smoking. Rent: $825 • Deposit: $835

Brand new and ready to view studio apartments! Two upper units and one lower unit with open floor plans. Includes microwave, W/D and Air conditioning. Trash, yard care & sewer paid. Shared garage. No pets or smoking. ***Please call about the Rent Incentive for this rental!!! *** Rent: $575 • Deposit: $585

Missoula Independent Page 25 March 22 – March 29, 2012


Easiest way to make rent since keno: Bingo at the VFW. 245 W. Main. $10 buy-in. You know them cooks at the Red Bird Wine Bar got some seasonal food chubbies going, so why not see what the happs is with the menu and listen to the tunes of Steve Kalling, Keaton Wilson and DR Hansell? 7–10 PM. Free. Don’t just express yourself, be expressive at the ZACC’s weekly, one-hour poetry workshop. 235 N. 1st St. 8 PM. Free. Watch the claws, kittens, because it’s Vinyl Night this Milkcrate Monday, with DJs Enkrypted, Special K, Kodel and the Milkcrate Mechanic. The Palace. 9 PM. Free, with free pool and $6 pitchers of PBR.

Open Mic at the VFW seems like a fine idea, especially with 2 for 1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. Call Skye on Sunday at 531–4312 to reserve your spot in the line-up or I bet you could roll in and be all, “Dude, I do a perfect Sublime.” We like the cars that go boom as much as Bunny, so if you do too check out Eligh (of the Living Legends) and Amp Live (of Zion I), who perform indie hip-hop for all y’all players, with locals Shaymlusly Elliterate, David Dalla G and Linkletter. Badlander. 9 PM. $10/$5 surcharge for ages 18-20. Grandfatherglen ain’t a town in Scotland, it’s a folk-a-matic outfit outta Missoula and they are playing The Top Hat. 10 PM. Cover TBA.

TUESDAY March

27

Make it happen, for Fun with Yoga at the Families First Children’s Museum might work for you and the kids. 11 AM. 225 W. Front. $4.25. Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room and work on your elk camp locution at the Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters. All are invited. 12–1. 5205 Grant Creek Dr. Free. Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsoleck during Compassionate Communication Non-Violent Communication Weekly Practice Group at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. 519 S. Higgins. Noon–1 PM. Free. What exactly are those Chinese up to? Find out at River Yang’s Mansfield Center Brown Bag Lecture Chinese Collectivism: Myth or Reality? UM Mansfield Conf. Rm. Free. Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 115 S. 3rd St. W. 1-3 PM. For information, call 543-3955.

nightlife Start making sense at the weekly Taking Pounds Off Sensibly Meeting (TOPS) at First Baptist Church in Whitefish. Weigh-in at 5 PM. Meeting at 5:30 PM. For more info., call 862-5214. You saw House Party, but you still can’t do the Kid ‘N Play. Do something about it by taking the Downtown Dance Collective’s Beg./Int. Hip Hop dance class with Heidi Michaelson. 1221 W. Main St. 6–7 PM. ddcmontana.com The VFW hosts my kind of three-way during a night of Singers, Songwriters and Spaghetti, with food provided by the Blue Bison Grill. 245 W. Main St. 6 PM. Free. YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts YWCA Support Groups for women every Tue. from 6:30–8 PM. An American Indian-led talking circle is also available, along with ageappropriate children’s groups. Free. Call 543-6691. The UM Wilderness Institute brings scholars, writers, scientists and explorers together to share stories of how water shapes our lives, landscapes and politics in the Wild Waters in the West Lecture Series. This week, Christine Brick, Clark Fork Coalition science director, gives a lecture titled Reviving a River: What Does It Take to Make the Clark Fork Clean, Healthy and Whole? Gallagher Business Building Rm. 122. 7 PM. Free. Jim Burchfield, UM College of Forestry and Conservation dean, gives a lecture titled Global Free-Riders: Environmental Services and the Common Good as part of the UMAA’s community lecture series,

Missoula Independent Page 26 March 22 – March 29, 2012


Seeking Justice: Hope in Hard Times. UC Theatre. 7–8:30 PM. $5. Take a load off while you get a load of some of the area’s better musicians during the Musician Showcase at Brooks and Browns in the Holiday InnDowntown. $7 Big Sky pitchers and $2 pints. 200 S. Pattee St. Free. The kids will be headed back to Glendive soon, so check out the UM Symphony Orchestra Concert while they’re still in Missoula tooting their horns and sawing their fiddles. University Theatre. 7:30 PM. $11/$6 seniors/$5 students. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. What is the only North American gem included in the Crown Jewels of England? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.) Bow down to the sounds at Royal Reggae, featuring dancehall jams by DJs Supa, Smiley Banton and Oneness at the Palace at 9 PM. Free. Fight for your right to make a jerk of yourself and win money doing it at Karoke with DJ LRock at the Press

Box. First place wins a $25 bar tab. On the last Tues. of the month, the winners battle for supremacy. 835 E. Broadway. 9 PM. Free. Go doughnuts at the Badlander’s Live and Local night with space grassers Voodoo Horseshoes and rabbit hole energizers Modality. 9 PM. Free.

WEDNESDAY March

28

Dust off that steed of yours and do your buns a favor at the Spring Tuneup Benefit for the Montana Horse Welfare Council. The event allows you and your critter to get reacquainted and has all-day, AM and PM sessions. Go to mthorse.org for more info. This installment of the International Brown Bag Lecture Series titled The University of Montana in India hosts a bevy of speakers including Sandy Ross, Prageeta Sharma, Keith Bosak and Peter Barker. UM Stone Hall, Rm. 303. Noon–1 PM. Free.

nightlife Put in your two cents or quit yer belly achin’ when Missoula Parks and Rec hosts a Playground Vision Workshop for White Pine Park. 1500 Burns St. 6–7:30 PM. Artists of all levels are invited to the MAM’s non-instructed Open Figure

Drawing Class. This class gives artists the opportunity to draw from a for-real person. Ages 18 plus (you and the model). 335 N. Pattee St. 6–8 PM. $7/$5 members. It’s better than cobbler: the Montana Museum of Art & Culture presents Steppin’ Out: The Shoemaker’s Art, a talk given by Sharlott Battin of the Metropolitan Opera and a Broadway shoe designer. Oh, gurl. UM PARTV Center. 7 PM. Free. Surfer and musician Donavon Frankenreiter performs the jams that make people fall in love at the Wilma Theatre, with Matt Grundy. 8 PM. Tix $23/$21 adv. and are available at Rockin Rudy’s and ticketfly.com. Black Eyed Peas fanatics are welcome to belt out their fave jamz at the Badlander during Kraptastic Karaoke, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $5 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free. Sack your banker and start a fire with them corduroys at Progressive, a night of house music and house music-friendly tunes, with DJs Jay Boogie, Mauricio, Dre and Coma. Progressive PBR pint specials, with the price rising 25 cents each half hour. Palace. 9 PM. Free. Get lucky with Lucky’s at Pulse, when space grassers Voodoo Horseshoes perform music for your aurul pleasure. 835 E. Broadway. 9 PM. Free.

SPOTLIGHT stranger than fiction I first read Barry Lopez’s work while aboard the USS Austin. The amphibious ship made “boxes” in the Adriatic Sea for 62 days in a row, all while in sight of land during the day and molten volcano lava at night. Needless to say, I had a lot of time on my hands to read (as a Radioman with no working radios, life was pretty dull). I found a copy of Lopez’s Rediscovery of North America in the ship’s library. The book questioned Columbus’s legacy and how we continue to be influenced by the choices of the explorer and the conquistadors that came after him. Pretty heady stuff at the time. I shared the book and the ideas in it with many of my shipmates. The irony that we were doing a bit of “conquistadoring” ourselves while floating on the picturesque Adriatic was lost on most of them. But sailors tend to be contrarians, so a few of us who owned Bad Religion T-shirts began wondering what the foxtrot we were doing out there. That’s how good Lopez can be. He can darn near start a mutiny, at least intellectually. Lopez is also the author of Arctic Dreams, winner of the 1986 National Book Award, as well as several other wellreceived fiction and nonfiction works, including Of Wolves and Men. His archives are maintained at Texas Tech University.

Photo courtesy of David Liittschwager

Debra Gwartney’s memoir Live Through This is a National Critics Circle finalist and features a mutiny of its own. It is the story of her teenage daughters running away after she and her husband divorced. Gwartney WHERE: UM’s North Underground Lecture Hall also co-edited with Lopez a collection of vanishing terms for the American landscape called Home WHEN: Fri., Mar. 23, at 7 PM Ground: Language for an American Landscape. The HOW MUCH: Free book seeks to curate the terms that were once commonly used to describe the landscape. Terms such midden, pack ice and kiss tank. The best writing makes readers question humanity’s motives and asks them to reimagine the world they live in; both Lopez and Gwartney ask us to do those things and more. WHAT: Barry Lopez and Debra Gwartney nonfiction reading

—Jason McMackin

Missoula Independent Page 27 March 22 – March 29, 2012


Anything goes at the unofficial Umphrey’s McGee after party, with Bend, Ore.’s everything-but-the-kitchensink band Empty Space Orchestra. The Top Hat. 10 PM. $7/$5 with UM ticket stub from the Wilma. (Pub trivia answer: Montana’s Yogo Sapphire.)

THURSDAY March

29

The Missoula Cultural Council’s Annual Arts Awards Luncheon gives tribute to a wide variety of artists who consistently kick artistic booty. Double Tree Hotel. 11:30 AM–1 PM. $25. missoulacultural.org. The Bitterroot Public Library Brown Bag Discussion Group talks about Stones from the River by Ursula Hegi. 306 State St., Hamilton. Noon.

nightlife Hey, Flounder, you too can come on down to the Kettlehouse Beer Kollege Graduation Party, even if you didn’t make it to class. Bob Wire and the Bob Wire Band plays the tunes, and the beer makes you fall in love three times an hour. Union Club. 9 PM. Free. Sculpture student Burke Jam has a rad name and an opening reception for his exhibition Sound of Place. UM UC Art Gallery. 5 PM, with an artist’s talk at 7 PM. Free. Get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at the weekly meeting of the Treasure State Toastmasters. Community Medical Center meeting rooms. 2827 Ft. Missoula Rd. 6–7 PM. Free. Taste the old days when Black Mountain Moan performs oldtimey Americana tunes for all y’all at the Draught Works Brewery. 915 Toole. 6–8 PM. Ditch that external frame pack and folding shovel you got for graduating from Mesa State College in 1987 and have the folks at REI teach you the art of lightweight backpacking. 3275 N. Reserve. 6:30 PM. Free. Take a trip back in time during Silent Movie Night at the Crystal Theater, where films by Andy Smetanka and Harry Langdon are live-scored

Missoula Independent Page 28 March 22 – March 29, 2012

Photo courtesy of Larry Mills

Sunshine superman. Donovan Frankenreiter plays the Wilma Theatre on Wed., Mar. 28 at 8 PM with Matt Grundy. Tickets are $23/$21 advanced and available at Rockin Rudy’s or ticketfly.com. by Next Door Prison Hotel. 515 S. Higgins. 7 PM. $7. Can soccer unite disparate factions of people? Is the game really more than a game? Find out at the Peace and Justice Film Series screening of the documentary Pelada. Gallagher Business Bldg. Rm. 122. 7 PM. Free. Three Way Street is more than a French film title; it’s also a band performing at the Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery tasting room. 4175 Rattlesnake. 7–9 PM. Free.

Party, where love and funk is in the air. Badlander. 208 Ryman St. $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM–midnight. The battle continues, as some of MSO’s finest musical talents battle it out each Thursday in the Top o’ the Mic Trilogy competition to crown the champion of music at Sean Kelly’s. 130 W. Pine. 9 PM. Free. Be someone’s sledgehammer when Kalispell’s A New Faith brings the metal and rockin’ from up yonder, with Tonto’s Rage and Last December. Palace. 9 PM. $5.

Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn-Downtown. 7–10 PM.

The fry bread and corned beef train comes to an end tonight, at the final show of Bird’s Mile Home’s VFW Residency. With The Plurals and Total Combined Weight. 134 E. Main. 9 PM. Free.

Fans of grammar, logic and rhetoric, grab your liberal arts degrees and head down to the Central Bar and Grill’s trivia night, hosted by local gallant and possible Swede Thomas Helgerson. 143 W. Broadway. 8 PM. Free.

It’s a bluegrass and folk battle royale with The Dodgy Mountain Men and Grandfatherglen, plus undercarders The Wench. The Top Hat. 10 PM. $6.

This is literally the point of no return, as the men of Kansas aren’t getting any younger. No worries, though: They have enlisted the aid of the UM Symphony Orchestra. 8 PM. $50/$25 students. Tix available at Rockin Rudy’s or ticketfly.com. Show ‘em that pop culture knowledge is just as important as having a job during Trivial Beersuit at the Lucky Strike Casino. Prizes for podium finishers. 1515 Dearborn. 8–10 PM. Get sweaty with all the beautiful people at the Dead Hipster Dance

Let’s play a fun game. Find two things that you wouldn’t normally do this week and do them. Hook me up with the goods by sending your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Mar. 23, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to The Calemandar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”


MOUNTAIN HIGH H ow apropos that one of the spring’s better events comes to us just after the vernal equinox. That event is Snowbowl’s flagship race, in my mind anyway: the always epic, never-disappointing North Dakota Downhill. It’s apropos because the course itself is a metaphor for the way we wintertime revelers experience the snow season. The course begins on a relatively steep intermediate hill before it kicks you out onto the many-hundred yard flat. The sound and fury of rustling GoreTex as you drop in is what early winter is all about. Wind blasts into your helmet so fast your ears ring. Go, go, go! every chance, regardless of conditions. No friends on powder days blah, blah. By the middle of the season and the middle of the course, the nicks and minor back pains slow you down. You secretly hope nobody emails you at 8 a.m. to tell you that it’s go time, pack

up and rally. The ND Downhill’s finish comes slowly, as does the winter’s. There are fits and starts. A smooth patch and you pick up a bit of speed, even though your are technically riding uphill, but you are riding so slow you feel as if you are going backwards. Alas, only a few of us boarders make it to the dogleg left that takes you back down to the base area without unstrapping bindings and skooching for a few. Those of us with the right build (fat being the right build) and the right wax can win this thing. For one day only, being the best has nothing to do with skill. The best are those of us still riding hard in March. The ones already talking about next season. The North Dakota Downhill takes place at Montana Snowbowl on Sun., Mar. 25, and there are prizes for all ages and abilities. Free. Call for more info: 549-9777.

THURSDAY MARCH 22 The Ninemile Wildlife Workgroup Lecture Series hosts Whisper Camel-Means and Kylie Paul for a talk titled Monitoring the US 93 North Wildlife Crossing Structures: Do They Work? My guess: They do. Ninemile Ranger Station. 7 PM. Free.

FRIDAY MARCH 23 Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s (formerly the Flathead Valley Over the Hill Gang) weekly meeting to talk about being awesome, past glories and upcoming activities. Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free. Get back in shape and learn something new at Freestone Climbing Gym’s Intro. to Bouldering course, which introduces basic techniques, safety stuff, ethics and more. Class includes 1.5 hours of instruction and two weeks of unlimited climbing. 935 Toole. 7–8:30 PM. $40.

SATURDAY MARCH 24 Last call for geese lovers. Gander (ha!) at the migrating birds during the Montana Natural History Center’s Saturday Discovery Day: Snow Geese Migration at Freezeout Lake. Led by FWP snow geese expert Mike Schwitters. $60/$50 members. 7–6 PM. Call 327-0405 to register. montananaturalist.org. Pack a lunch, birders. Five Valleys Audubon is taking an all-day trip to the Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge near Stevi. for early spring birding. Meet at 8 AM at the UM Field House parking lot. Call Larry for more info. at 549-5632. Show all that haters you got that swag or just hang and bang at Lost Trail’s Cold Smoke Freeride event. One part contest, one part party, the freeride has tons of prizes and music by The Bass Face Crew, Como Se Va, Ebola Syndrome and M-ad at the after party. $500 for first place (dang!). $50 to enter the contest. LTfreeride@gmail.com.

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Stretch out them flabby old legs, Darcy, and help out Meals On Wheels while you’re at it at the Wheat Montana 5K Run/Walk, which is a fundraiser for MOW. 2520 S. 3rd W. 9 AM. $18/$16 adv. registration. runmt.com.

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Photo by Chad Harder

April 12-15, 2012 INB Performing Arts Center• Spokane, WA

The Hellgate Hunters & Anglers host an evening of auctions, food and fibbing during Wild Night for Wildlife, with Field and Stream contributing editor Hal Herring. Karl Tyler Chevrolet showroom, 3663 N. Reserve. 6 PM. $35 family/$20 individual, cost includes one-year membership in HHA.

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Get back in shape and learn something new at Freestone Climbing Gym’s Intro. to Bouldering course, which introduces basic techniques, safety stuff, ethics and more. Class includes 1.5 hours of instruction and two weeks of unlimited climbing. 935 Toole. 12–1:30 PM. $40.

HOTEL PACKAGE INCLUDES: • Tickets to IN THE HEIGHTS • Room accommodations • Roaring Start Breakfast • Hotel parking & transportation

MONDAY MARCH 26 At Slacker Mondays, from 6 PM until close, slackline fans can come to Freestone Climbing Center at 935 Toole Ave. to test their balance. $13/$10 for students. Visit freestoneclimbing.com.

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Dust off that steed of yours and do your buns a favor at the Spring Tune-up Benefit for the Montana Horse Welfare Council. The event allows you and your critter to get reacquainted and has all-day, AM and PM sessions. Go to mthorse.org for more info.

THURSDAY MARCH 29 Ditch that external frame pack and folding shovel you got for graduating from Mesa State College in 1987 and have the folks at REI teach you the art of lightweight backpacking. 3275 N. Reserve. 6:30 PM. Free. calendar@missoulanews.com

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Missoula Independent Page 29 March 22 – March 29, 2012


scope

Subject to change The Velcro Kicks talk cassette tapes and alternate endings by Erika Fredrickson

There’s a lot of folk- and Americana-inspired rock music in this town, a lot of electronic and metal. Seattle 1990s guitar rock is coming back into style, as is shame-free indie dance pop. The Velcro Kicks are a different beast. Their new album, Sub-Humanoid Toxoid, dabbles in samples but is mostly a throwback to late-1970s, early-1980s spooky garage-surf. It’s like The Cramps or The Mummies if those bands had embraced psychedelia and then been shot up into space to play to an infinite audience. A few weeks ago The Velcro Kicks occupied the #1 and #3 spots on KBGA radio’s top 30 songs. The trio thought that was pretty cool, though they barely made a fuss about their cassette tape—yes, cassette tape—release party that same week. They just aren’t self-promoters. They don’t play out much and have no website. Though they’ve existed since 2009, they only recently made a Facebook page, which provides very little information. “It’s more mysterious that way...I guess,” says guitarist/singer Tony Matts, as if offering up one possible explanation. The most recent action from the band? Days after the tape release party, they put up some posters around town to advertise where people can download their tape online for free. So, obviously, they’re not in it for the money, either.

Matts, who grew up in Boise, was born to younger parents who listened to Blondie, Talking Heads and Tears for Fears. He came to Missoula 12 years ago for the music scene, after seeing new-wave rock band Volumen tear up the now-defunct Jay’s Upstairs club. “It was the best time of my life compared to the other shows I’d been to,” he says. Drummer Dave Martens, originally from Havre, also got hooked on the Missoula scene after a Volumen show. The two have been avidly involved in the music scene ever since. Matts played in the glam-punk band Black Velvet Elvis and in Victory Smokes. Martens is currently in the Magpies, The Best Westerns and Rooster Sauce. Martens met The Velcro Kicks’s bass player, Ryan Scott, at a show a year ago. Scott (also in The Best Westerns) is from Texas. He played in punk bands, took a liking to At The Drive-In and The Mars Volta and at 18 got to be a roadie for a touring country band called Orange County. He moved to Missoula on a whim to live with his brother and sister-in-law. At a rock show one night, he ran into Martens. Martens was admiring Scott’s Dinosaur Jr. T-shirt. (“I had met Jay Mascis once,” says Martens, “and he was a dick. But it was still an awesome moment for me.”) They played in a band called

Pure showmanship. The Velcro Kicks features Dave Martens, Ryan Scott and Tony Matts.

Missoula Independent Page 30 March 22 – March 29, 2012

Photo by Michelle Gustafson

Streetlight People with singer Fletcher Reveley, who ended up being the first bassist for The Velcro Kicks before Scott took the reins. No surprise—Missoula’s a town full of musical cross-pollinators. Matts is The Velcro Kicks’s main songwriter and he’s an experimental sort, as evidenced by a couple of the band’s YouTube videos. A video for their song “On the Floor/Out the Door” uses an old 1950s clip of a conservative father-knows-best businessman listening to his reel-to-reel tape recorder in the comfort of his living room. “I get perfect hi-fidelity,” the man says to the viewing audience. “Still, my work is confined to stacking records or loading tapes, clicking a switch and listening. And what listening!” The man smiles euphorically and just for a moment we hear the uplifting swell of orchestral music, which is quickly drowned out by The Velcro Kicks’s dirty garage raucousness. The video for “Only Omega” also uses old clips—this one is some sort of anti-porn propaganda, showing pin-up and Playboy girls with censored tape over their eyes and intimate parts. This song, like “On the Floor,” feels like a social statement. But Matts is most interested in the aesthetic contrasts between video and song. Even the song itself is texture rather than story. “The whole idea behind ‘Only Omega’ was that it was supposed to be a sound explosion,” he says. “It’s not really about the content, it’s more feeling. That’s the motivation. Sometimes it’s hard to pin down specific words I’m saying. The words start to set in after a while—but it’s all subject to change. And in that process the words start to lose their meaning.” Listening to the cassette tape is less like hearing a story than experiencing a strange dream. Within the stomping, creeping garage-rock sound are surprising details: mathy riffs, brassy horn samples that spring forth momentarily, snappy beats suffocated by something like a wind tunnel. Casual moments give way to franticness. (Side B is all sound collage made by Matts with Raisin Bran marketing slogans punctuated by cool bass lines, for instance.) Cassette tapes are on the rise, barely. Some small labels have started specializing in tape. Locals such as 10Year-Old Girlfriend and The Whoopass Girls, among others, are on the cassette train. It was a convenient format for Matts: “I have a Walkman, so it’s okay, and then my car had a tape deck, so that’s all I was listening to anyway,” he says. Scott drove around to five thrift stores one Saturday and still couldn’t find even a crappy cassette deck. That could change if the cassette has a comeback like vinyl has. The Velcro Kicks make a good live show, too. This isn’t heady art rock, it’s hedonism and you can tell they’re in it for the fun. Their collage-like weirdness and laissezfaire attitude makes cookie-cutter shows out of the question, which is a good thing. “Every time we practice a song, it has to have a different ending,” says Martens. “It’s not a pet peeve. I just forget how we end things, because it’s always changing.” The Velcro Kicks play the VFW Saturday, March 24, at 9 PM, opening with Shahs for Olympia, Wash.’s Naomi Watts and Grease Kitten. $3. arts@missoulanews.com


Scope Noise Arts Film Movie Shorts Jerry Joseph & The Jackmormons Happy Book Response Records

Jerry Joseph doesn’t beat around the bush. First thing he sings on Happy Book is “I’ve got to tell you / I’d really love to get high / Pour out my crackerjack / Cutting it straight to the prize.” Not so intriguing, except for Joseph’s public struggle with drug addiction. How annoying to be the reviewer who mentions that again, but the fact only adds to how guts-filled and genuine this album is. Besides the Jackmormons’ tight musicianship, what makes it shine most is Joseph’s deft composition—startling songs full of battle scars, rendered in an uplifting way that makes you want to live better. Joseph’s vocals burn and snarl rock-god style, distantly reminiscent of David Bowie or Jimi Hendrix. In

Broken Note Broken Note creates dubstep and drum ’n’ bass that’s dark, grimy, scary and strangely addictive. The London-based producer offers nailtough dance music fit for modern day horror films, and he injects an aggressive punk and metal sensibility into his music. His 2008 track “Crux” brings to mind robots shooting flaming shards of shrapnel at each other while an ogre-like overlord shouts commands. It’s apocalyptic and brutal in the best possible way, yet it

Umphrey’s McGee If the neologism “improg” doesn’t scare you off, continue reading. Improg is the marriage of improvisation and progressive rock. Before you start tripping balls about “them dang hippies getting high and taking you space truckin',” this group’s sonic vision is more akin to King Crimson and the electronical sounds of Daft Punk than to Phish or the Dead. However, Umphrey’s McGee grooves as well as any hippie-dippy jam band and isn’t afraid to coerce listeners into some light twirling with extended rhythmic passages before bursting forth with hot-lick guitar solos supercharged by a couple of Tubescreamer distortion pedals, à la Trey Anastasio. Often the jams return to earth via metalesque sections filled with chunky, strutting guitars and sweep-picking shenanigans that would have any Guitar Institute of Technology graduate perking up her ears.

Charlie Parr Keep Your Hands On The Plow House of Mercy

Sometimes it feels like Charlie Parr is already dead. Maybe it’s because his recordings sound older than dirt and twice as gritty, or it could be his intrinsic obsession with mortality. Maybe it’s because his music is just plain haunting. Parr sticks mostly to old gospel tunes on his latest release, crafting folk/blues arrangements that sound neither sanctimonious nor irreverant, just authentic and as worn out as the cover of a preacher’s Bible. He

“Kicking Hong Kong,” he offers a glowing yet lonely world of jade and gold, big lights, crowds, the ocean and temple monkeys. “Radio Cab” and “The Road Home” are country-flavored, perfect to accompany a coastal adventure in a VW bus along Highway 1. Here, Joseph is carefree but never escapist; he sings, “Place your finger right into my wounds / Call my name and howl it at the moon / Swear I’m gonna love you ’til I die.” Even all the ark and whale and God references aren’t off-putting—he’s no born-again preacher. This is his best album in his 20-yearplus music career. (Erika Fredrickson) Jerry Joseph & The Jackmormons play the Palace Thursday, March 22, at 9 PM with Dodg y Mountain Men. $8.

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also features crisp ambient chords drenched in reverb that hover in the mix. That contrast between dark and ethereal is satisfying. The tune “Mask of Gas,” off his album Terminal Static, could be the soundtrack to a death march dance party, and I mean that as a compliment; growling bass teams up with a punchy, one-two beat, while a staccato synth line propels the song toward something fierce but unknown. It’s not a stretch to say Broken Note is the cream of the crop within bass-heavy dubstep. His wicked design skills and pummeling industrial-tinged beats are intense and innovative. And, yes, he’s better than Skrillex. (Ira Sather-Olson) Broken Note plays the Badlander Friday, March 23, with Ebola Syndrome and Kris Moon. $10/$7 pre-sale at Ear Candy and Rockin Rudy’s. Like any good jam band, Umphrey’s McGee frequently winks and nudges at classic tracks as varied as the Beatles’ “Norwegian Wood,” Ozzy’s “Crazy Train” and RimskyKorsakov’s musical masturbation showpiece “Flight of the Bumblebee.” These winks can come off as either smug or impressive, depending on how high you are on bath salts. Regardless, they are a testament to the musicians’ virtuosity and remind us that Girl Talk hasn’t replaced the real thing yet. (Jason McMackin) Umphrey’s McGee plays the Wilma Sunday, March 25, at 8 PM. $20. enlisted some help from his local Duluth, Minn., music scene (particularly the harmony vocals of his wife, Emily), but the record still feels as stark as the North Country winters Parr is used to. This rustic sonic quality is one of the greatest charms of the record, lending depth to the songs and allowing natural reverb to fill the empty space with ghostly echoes. This man’s distinct ability to tell a story is engrossing, especially on dirges like “East Virginia Blues” or Blind Willie Johnson’s ode to the Titanic, “God Moves on the Water.” The album reaches its high point at the very end with “Poor Lazarus,” a greasy, simmering, stomp-and-holler tune that groans for eight minutes with ruminations straight from the mouth of an open grave. ( Jed Nussbaum) Charlie Parr plays The Top Hat Saturday, March 24, at 10 PM. $10/$8 advance.

SPICY CALAMARI Hefeweizen-marinated calamari, cornmeal dusted and flash fried, served with a sweet Sriracha sauce. $4.95

TAMARACK WINGS Jumbo wings tossed in your choice of Buffalo, Switchback Stout BBQ, or Pacific Rim sauce served on a bed of beer-battered fries with a side of bleu cheese. $7.95

BABY BACK RIBS AND FRIES A half rack of tender pork ribs smothered in our Stout barbeque sauce on a bed of beer-battered fries. $9.95

VEGGIE QUESADILLA Filled with diced tomatoes, olives, bell peppers and green onion. Served with our house-made salsa. $6.95 Add Chicken-$2

CHICKEN STRIPS Beer-battered chicken breast strips on a pile of beer battered fries. Served with a side of our house-made Ranch. $8.95

THE HELLGATE PIZZA Pepperoni, Redneck Italian sausage, red onion, jalapeños, black olives and fresh garlic, with marinara and mozzarella, finished with Sriracha. $13.95 & $20.95

Missoula Independent Page 31 March 22 – March 29, 2012


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Run for your lives Photo Finish captures Missoula athletes

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by Keema Waterfield

If you’re like me, every now and then you eagerly throw on a pair of shorts, strap on running shoes and hit the pavement for a little recreational jog. Eagerly, that is, until the second mile, when your screaming right knee makes the act of extending your legs about as pleasurable as poking out your own eye with a fork. Fortunately, a lot of Missoulians either have better knees or they’re better at running through the pain, because Missoula is the place for runners, as Neil Chaput de Saintonge’s exhibit Photo Finish illustrates. Standing in the middle of the Rocky Mountain

Marathon. In the photo, Jeanne smiles as a ribbon is placed around her neck. There’s a story in every photo. The tow-headed child on his knees at the starting line, the throng of runners leaning into a flurry of snow, the couple holding hands and laughing midstride. The stories are in the moments beyond the frozen sprint, around the next corner, after the crowd cheers. Which is why it comes as no surprise when Neil tells me that, while people know him from his years studying under Ansel Adams, landscape photography isn’t his great passion. “I love telling stories,” he says. “Documentary photography is my favorite.”

Photo courtesy of Neil Chaput de Saintonge

School of Photography Gallery, surrounded by three walls lined with prints of contestants contesting, spectators spectating and runners running, Photo Finish feels more like a starting line. My lungs expand, my calves tense, I can practically hear the masses cheering. I’m waiting for the crowd to leap from the wall, for the starter pistol to fire. What surprises me most is how something as pedestrian as images of random people participating in a sport—one that always leaves me as envious as a fenced-in puppy watching coyotes—can be so intriguing. Perhaps it’s envy that pins me to the portion of the exhibit reserved for photos of the famed Missoula Marathon. Look at those faces: the concentration, determination, pain, exultation. See those fists pumping the air, the goofy costumes, the kids and the runners with disabilities? They’re your neighbors and your children. The skinny dudes racing in their underwear may have bagged your last six-pack at the Orange Street Food Farm. “That one’s Jeanne Chaput de Saintonge,” RMSP receptionist Melanie Wright tells me during my first visit, pointing out a photo of Neil’s wife and business partner, co-owner of RMSP, from the 2010 Missoula

Missoula Independent Page 32 March 22 – March 29, 2012

Like me, Neil wishes he could run, but a slight lung condition limits him to race walking. His 19year-old son, Forest Chaput de Saintonge, is a serious runner though. Forest ran all four years at Hellgate High School, and now at UM. For Neil, it was an easy leap from shooting high school meets to volunteering his lens during Run Wild Missoula races. “What a wonderful group,” he says, adding that his appreciation for it was the motivation for Photo Finish. “This show publicizes Run Wild’s work, emphasizes what’s going on in this run-happy city,” he says. And what better way to support a community you love than to give the photos away to anyone who chooses to claim his or her portrait? Walking through Photo Finish, it’s easy to feel like you’re a part of something. I’m almost as much a participant here in the RMSP gallery as I’d have been at any of the races. Fire the pistol, I want to shout. I’m ready. Photo Finish continues through April at the RMSP Gallery, 216 N. Higgins Ave. Mon.–Fri. from 8 AM to 5 PM. arts@missoulanews.com


Scope Noise Arts Film Movie Shorts

Girl power

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The Hunger Games sports a gripping heroine by Scott Renshaw

Here’s what’s remarkable and extraordinary about Suzanne Collins’s The Hunger Games: not all that much, really. Don’t misunderstand; there’s nothing wrong with it. It’s a solid, satisfying read and no crime against literature, unlike other much-adored recent book series we could name. But Collins mines familiar dystopian ground, building around the kind of publicspectacle, blood-and-circuses concept that has fueled everything from Logan’s Run to Death Race 2000, from The Running Man to the Japanese Battle Royale. Once again, the future’s such a blight, you gotta wear blades. Yep, there’s little that’s new under the dome of The Hunger Games’ battle arena—except the character at the center. Katniss Everdeen is the kind of heroine too little seen in pop culture: a strong and capable young woman, utterly human in her anxieties about her shortcomings and in no way defined by the men around her,

“Come here often?”

unlike the young heroines of other much-adored recent book series we could name. It’s easy to understand why female readers in particular have gravitated to her adventures with a sense of personal connection. There’s one thing a film adaptation of The Hunger Games simply had to do, and that’s give audiences a Katniss as gripping and powerful as Collins’s creation. That’s exactly what director Gary Ross does by casting the remarkable Jennifer Lawrence—although the choice does seem like something of an obvious one. Like her breakout Oscar-nominated role in Winter’s Bone, Lawrence’s Katniss is a teenager living in an impoverished area, helping support a family with an absent father and an emotionally devastated mother. The premise finds Katniss volunteering to take the place of her younger sister as her district’s female “tribute” in the ritual competition-to-the-death known as The Hunger Games—a tradition built on a punishment for a failed attempt at overthrowing the government. But there’s nothing superhuman about Katniss, or her sacrifice. She’s just a loving big sister putting the safety of others ahead of herself. Ross’s first act in particular does a terrific job of

showcasing Lawrence, focusing on the bleak world of District 12 in muted grey tones and a complete absence of background score. On the whole, The Hunger Games is a surprisingly quiet blockbuster, which plays perfectly into Lawrence’s presence as an actor. She’s equally convincing as the uncompromising spirit who shakes up a crowd with a demonstration of her archery prowess and as the introvert frustrated at the idea that she has to become a likeable reality-television star. And the star and director both nail the beginning of the competition itself, as a terrified Katniss visibly shakes at the fate awaiting her, and the opening minutes of the Games themselves explode in an almost mute jumble of carnage. The Hunger Games soars when Lawrence’s Katniss is the focal point—and when she’s not, it doesn’t. Where Collins’s book leaves largely subtextual the idea that Katniss could be a rallying point for disenfranchised citizens, the film introduces several scenes making it considerably more overt that President Snow (Donald Sutherland) and the Games’ overseer ( Wes Bentley) are stacking the deck against her. The screenplay—by Ross, Collins and screenwriter Billy Ray (Shattered Glass)—features some frustrating inefficiencies, like opening with onscreen captions explaining the origins of the Games, then repeating much of that same story in a video presentation. The dialogue is spare, but when it comes, it’s too often baldly expository. And there’s the unfortunate matter of Katniss’s District 12 co-participant in the Games, Peeta, played by Josh Hutcherson who disappears into the background, as he’s unable to match Lawrence’s performance in commitment to the concept. As is the case with the book, the second half ’s focus on sheer survival propels the narrative forward in a generally satisfying way, building tense individual set pieces on Katniss’s relationships with Peeta and with a young combatant named Rue (Amandla Stenberg), who becomes a surrogate sister. There’s not much time to explore fully the world of Panem that gave rise to the Games—or anything that might be distinctive about this mass-marketed slaughter— but that’s not a major problem. When it works best, The Hunger Games isn’t really about the Hunger Games. It’s a showcase for the low-key ferocity of Jennifer Lawrence, playing the kind of hero that’s always the most compelling: the kind who begins to change the world simply by doing what she believes is the only right thing to do. The Hunger Games opens at the Carmike 12 on Friday, March 23.

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Missoula Independent Page 33 March 22 – March 29, 2012


Scope Noise Arts Film Movie Shorts OPENING THIS WEEK THE HUNGER GAMES Oh lordy, in the future children are chosen by The Man to fight to the death on live TV. Wait, there’s TV in the future? Heinous. Starring Jennifer Lawrence and Stanley Tucci. PG-13. Carmike 12: 1, 2:15, 4, 6, 7, 9:15 and 10 pm. Midnight and 12:45 am shows on Fri. Big D: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 and 10:30 pm. 1 am show on Fri. Village 6: 4 and 7 pm, with 10 pm shows on Fri. and Sat. and 1 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Midnight show on Fri. Pharaohplex: 6:40 and 9:20 pm, with 3 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Stadium 14: 12,12:30 1, 3:15, 3:45, 4:15, 6:30, 7, 7:30, 9:45 and 10:15 pm, with midnight shows Fri. and Sat. Add’l shows at 2, 5:15 and 8:30 pm, Mon.-Thu. Mountain: 1:30, 4:15, 7 and

Starring Peyman Moaadi and Leila Hatami. PG13. The Wilma: 7 and 10 pm nightly. 7 pm only on Sat., Mar. 24, Sun., Mar. 25, and Wed., Mar. 28. Matinee on Sat., Mar. 24, at 1 pm.

NOW PLAYING 21 JUMP STREET Let’s jump into the story of a couple of dopey cops who go back to high school to foil an undercover drug ring. Starring Jonah Hill, Channing Tatum and Peter Deluise (jokes). Rated R. Carmike 12: 1:45, 4:45, 7:45 and 10:15 pm. 12:30 am show on Fri. Pharaohplex: 7 and 9 pm, with Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 pm Stadium 14: 1:05, 4:05, 7:05 and 9:35 pm, with midnight shows Fri. and Sat. Mountain: 4:30, 6:50 and 9 pm, with 2 pm matinees Fri.-Sun.

R. Wilma: 9 pm nightly, no show on Sat., Mar. 24, Sun., Mar. 25 and Wed., Mar. 28. THE DESCENDANTS George Clooney takes his daughters on a trip to confront the man his wife has been cheating on him with. Did I mention his wife is on life support? Rated R. Village 6: 4:30 and 7:30 pm, with shows at 10 pm of Fri. and Sat. and 1:30 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. JOHN CARTER Holy Christ-figure, Batman! Vietnam vet John Carter must defend a lady and battle creatures twice his size, all while on Mars. Cue the “Hero’s Journey.” Starring Taylor Kitsch and Willem Dafoe. PG-13. Carmike 12: 3D: 1:45, 4:45, 7:45 and 10:15 pm. Village 6: 4 and 7 pm, with matinees

6: 7 pm, with 1 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. 3D: 4 pm, with 9:10 pm shows on Fri. and Sat. Pharaohplex: 3D: 7 and 9 pm, with Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 pm. Stadium 14: 12:10, 4:40 and 9:25 pm, with midnight shows Fri. and Sat. 3D: 12:40, 2:15, 3, 5:10, 6:55, 7:25 and 9:40 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. Mountain: 4, 6:45 and 9 pm, with 2:15 pm matinees Fri.-Sun. Showboat: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:15 pm. PROJECT X What happens when the YouTube generation throws a rager? Same thing that happened before camera phones. Starring Thomas Mann and Oliver Cooper. Rated R. Carmike 12: 7:30 and 9:50 pm. Stadium 14: 12:25, 2:40, 4:55, 7:25 and 9:55 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. RED TAILS The Tuskegee Airman are called to duty, so you Nazi punks best watch your six. Starring Terence Howard and Cuba Gooding Jr. (He’s back!) Stadium 14: 6:30 and 9:50 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. 6:50 and 9:35 pm, Mon.Thu. Showboat: 1:30 pm. SAFE HOUSE A young CIA agent is tasked with looking after a fugitive in a safe house. Denzel shows up and stuff gets real. Starring Denzel Washington and Ryan Reynolds. Rated R. Village 6: 4:30 and 7:30 pm, with shows at 10 pm on Fri. and Sat. and 1:30 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Stadium 14: 3:50 and 9:25 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. SILENT HOUSE A young lady is trapped in her parent’s lakeside vacation home and things get really weird fast, as she finds that she can’t communicate with the outside world. Starring Elizabeth Olsen and Adam Trese. Rated R. Village 6: 4:15 and 7:15 pm, with shows at 9:45 pm on Fri. and Sat. and 1:15 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Midnight show on Fri. THIS MEANS WAR Two CIA agents battle for Reese Witherspoon’s affections with gadgets galore. Will either try writing her a poem? Starring Chris Pine and Tom Hardy. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12: 1:15, 4:15, 7:30 and 10 pm. Midnight show on Fri. Pharaohplex: 2, 4, 7 and 9 pm. Stadium 14: 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 6:55 and 9:30 pm, with midnight shows Fri. and Sat.

“What is a teen snuff film?” The Hunger Games opens Friday at the Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex, Stadium 14, Entertainer and Mountain Cinema.

9:15 pm, Fri.-Sat. 1:30, 4:15, 7:15 pm, Sun. 4:15, 7 and 9:35 pm, Mon.-Thu. Entertainer: 4, 6:45 and 9:30 pm, with 1 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. OCTOBER BABY A college girl learns she is the adopted survivor of a failed abortion. Starring Rachel Hendrix and John Schneider. PG-13. Carmike 12: 1, 4, 7 and 9:30 pm. Midnight show on Fri. Stadium 14: 1, 4, 7 and 9:45 pm, with midnight shows Fri. and Sat. OPERA IN CINEMA: LA BOHÈME This Puccini opera follows Parisian lovers falling in and out of the big L. Carmike 12: 7 pm on Tue., Mar. 27. RAMPART The last of his breed, a renegade LAPD cop struggles with the reality of his surroundings. Starring Woody Harrelson and Sigourney Weaver. Rated R. Carmike 12: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 and 10 pm. 12:10 am show on Fri. A SEPARATION Winner of Best Foreign Language Film in 2012, in which a family must choose between taking care of their child or an aging parent with Alzheimer’s.

ACT OF VALOR The world’s finest navy, the United States Navy, unleashes Navy SEALs on kidnappers and terrorists. You done messed up again, terrorists. Starring Alex Veadov and dozens of uncredited SEALs. Rated R. Carmike 12: 1, 4, 6:45 and 9:20 pm. Midnight show on Fri. Pharaohplex: 6:50 and 9:10 pm, with 3 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Stadium 14: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 and 9:40 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. Showboat: 4:15, 7 and 9:15 pm. THE ARTIST Will talking pictures end silent film star George Valentin’s career? Will he find love with a young dancer? It seems black-and-white to me. Starring Jean Dujardin and Bérénice Bejo. Rated PG-13. Wilma: 7 pm nightly, 9:10 pm shows on Sat., Mar. 24, Sun., Mar. 25 and Wed., Mar. 28. Matinee on Sat., Mar. 24 at 3:10 pm. A DANGEROUS METHOD Jung versus Freud, toss in a romantic entanglement and you got yourself a movie. Starring Viggo Mortensen and Michael Fassbender. Rated

Missoula Independent Page 34 March 22 – March 29, 2012

at 10 pm on Fri. and Sat. and 1 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Pharaohplex: 6:45 and 9:15 pm, with 3 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Stadium 14: 12:10, 3:10, 7:10, 9:10 and 10:10 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. 3D: 1:10, 4:10, 7:10, 9:10 and 10:10 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. Mountain: 4:30, 7 and 9:30 pm, with 2 pm matinees Fri.-Sun. JOURNEY 2: THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND A kid and his mom’s boyfriend search for grandpa on a topsy-turvy island where big things are small and vice versa. Opposites, people love ‘em. Starring Dwayne Johnson and Michael Caine. Rated PG. Carmike 12: 1:45 and 4:30 pm. Stadium 14: 2:15, 7:05 and 9:15 pm, with midnight shows Fri. and Sat. 3D: 12:05, 4:35 and 9:10 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. DR. SEUSS’ THE LORAX Make Fox News angry and take your kids to this story of young boy’s love of a girl and the grumpy fella that protects the environment. Starring the voices of Taylor Swift and Danny Devito. Rated PG. Carmike 12: 1:30, 4:30, 6:45 and 9 pm. 3D: 1, 4, 6:30 and 8:45 pm. Midnight show on Fri. Village

THE VOW Hello V-Day! Rachel McAdams wakes up from a coma with severe memory loss and finds her hunky husband romancing her once again. Starring Channing Tatum. Rated PG-13. Stadium 14: 12:50 and 6:50 pm. WANDERLUST A couple of busy Manhattan professionals find themselves out of work and living on a rural commune and having sexy, topless good times. Starring Paul Rudd and Jennifer Aniston. Rated R. Village 6: 4:30 and 7:30 pm, with shows at 10 pm of Fri. and Sat. and 1:30 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Midnight show on Fri.

Capsule reviews by Jason McMackin. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., Mar. 23. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-F I LM; S t a d i u m 14 i n K a l i s p e l l – 752 - 78 0 4 . Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.


Missoula Independent Page 35 March 22 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; March 29, 2012


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

March 22 - March 29, 2012

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Scholarships for former residents of Watson Children’s Shelter. The Watson Children’s Shelter Alumni Educational Support Fund now has a new funding source for any students pursuing higher education, trade school or specialized training. Eligibility and application is available at www.watsonchildrensshelter.org. There is no deadline for submission.

Park 3/15. Pic on craigslist. 531.2454

TO GIVE AWAY

LOST SONY CYBERSHOT CAMERA REWARD. Camera’s memory card has irreplaceable birthday photos on it. Lost at the Palace March 5th. Please call (406) 853-2655 to return either camera or card.

FREE miscellaneous household goods and cloths, stuffed toys, baskets, decorations, etc. 728-0889

MIX YOUR OWN YOGURT CREATIONS

Table of contents Advice Goddess . . . . . .C2 Free Will Astrology . . .C4 Pet Page . . . . . . . . . . . .C5 Public Notices . . . . . . . .C6 Crossword . . . . . . . . . .C7 Home Page . . . . . . . . .C12 Sustainafieds . . . . . . .C13 This Modern World . .C15

THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE

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LOST & FOUND

Estimates

Lost Cat M Neut. Wht w/ gray tabby on tail, ears and body. Lost near Msla W.Side

bladesofglorylawncarellc.com

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Hot Stone, Deep Tissue & Swedish Gift Certificates available

Rosemary Polichio 239-0474

P L AC E YOUR AD: Deadline: Monday at Noon

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416 E. Pine Street Missoula MT

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Send it. Post it. classified@missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

PET OF THE WEEK Racer Howdy! Racer’s my name and I’m looking for a new friend. I’m a 2 year old German Shepherd/Cattle dog mix. I enjoy exploring the woods, taking long walks on the river bank and meeting new people. I’m well-mannered indoors and love to learn. I promise to be a devoted family member for years to come! Have you heard ‘bout the Mega Match-a-thon? Sunday March 31st and April 1st the Humane Society is hosting a MEGA adoption event with tons of furry friends and adoption specials. Visit www.myhswm.org for more information.

“When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened for us.” – Alexander Graham Bell


ADVICE GODDESS

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD INSTRUCTION

By Amy Alkon

ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com

THE SPINSTER CYCLE I’m a 32-year-old woman with a Ph.D. I’m beyond happy with my career path, but I’m not meeting men I’m impressed with or inspired to see again. A girlfriend sent me a New York Times op-ed by a historian named Stephanie Coontz, who said that highly educated women can find a man if they drop “the cultural ideal of hypergamy that women must marry up.” Coontz advises women to “reject the idea that the ideal man is taller, richer, more knowledgeable, more renowned or more powerful.” She claims a woman’s marital happiness is predicted not by how much she looks up to her husband, “but how sensitive he is to her emotional cues and how willing he is to share the housework and child-care. And those traits are often easier to find in a low-key guy than a powerhouse.” She then adds, “I’m not arguing that women ought to ‘settle.’” Really? Sounds that way to me. — Dismayed Yes, you can have it all a high-powered education, a high-powered career, and the perfect high-powered man to go with. Of course, it helps if you’re willing to relax your standards a little, like by widening your pool of acceptable male partners to include the recently deceased. I respect Stephanie Coontz as a historian, but as a forecaster of economic and romantic possibilities for women, I have to give her a thumbs-down. Coontz claims that “for a woman seeking a satisfying relationship as well as a secure economic future, there has never been a better time to be or become highly educated.” Actually, as doctorate holders “Occupying” sleeping bags outside city halls will tell you, that depends on what you’re becoming highly educated in. Ph.D. in financial engineering? Hedge fund, here you come. Ph.D. in Tibetan gender studies? You’ll be lucky to be teaching the merits of pulverized lavender in the body oils section of the food co-op. Coontz is wrong again in deeming hypergamy women’s preference for men of a higher socio-economic status a cultural construct. The preference for the alpha male is biological, an evolutionary adaptation that exists in women across cultures and species. (Do we really think the lady peacock wants the alpha male peacock because she’s been watching way too much “Desperate Housewives”?) Some feminist academics claim that women only want big bucks/high status men because they lack those things themselves. But, a number of studies by

evolutionary psychologists have found that women with big bucks and big jobs want men with bigger bucks and bigger jobs. Even women who are feminists. Dr. Bruce J. Ellis writes in “The Adapted Mind” that when 15 feminist leaders described their ideal man, they repeatedly used words like “very rich,” “brilliant,” and “genius” (and they didn’t mean “genius with a baby wipe!”). So, if you’ve become the man you would’ve married in the ’50s, don’t be surprised if your mating pool starts to seem about the size of the one that comes with Barbie’s Dream House. Biology is neither fair nor kind. What those pushing feel-good sociology don’t want to believe or tell you is that you increase your options by being hot or hotting yourself up the best you can. Obviously, looks aren’t all that matter, but while your female genes are urging you to blow past the hot pool boy to get to the moderately attractive captain of industry, men evolved to prioritize looks in women, so powerful men will date powerfully beautiful waitresses and baristas. As evolutionary psychologist Dr. David Buss writes, “Women’s physical attractiveness is the best known predictor of the occupational status of the man she marries and the best known predictor of hypergamy.” There isn’t a person on the planet who doesn’t have to settle. (Maybe Brad Pitt farts in bed.) Want kids? You’re more likely to find yourself a husband to have them with if you do as Coontz suggests go for a man who’s shorter, poorer, and not that intellectually exciting but who’s emotionally present and willing to be appointed vice president of diaper rash. Problem solved if you can keep from seething with contempt for his lack of ambition and intellect. A lack of respect for one’s spouse is definitely not the ground happy marriages are built on. That’s why settling is most wisely discussed not as some blanket policy for women, but in terms of what an individual woman wants and what she’s willing and able to give up to get it. Realistically assessing that for yourself is how you find your happiest medium between possibly being in a panic to find a sperm donor at 42 and trying to make it work now with some guy who watches the soaps after dusting a few surfaces and drinking a few too many glasses of blush wine.

Drivers Education for students and adults starting May 2012. Call for detail 241-7219.

Piano Lessons At YOUR Home All Ages, All Levels

Bruce- 546-5541 Peace happens... One heart at a time. 546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

Ken's Barber Shop Children & Walk-ins Welcome Haircuts-$8.50 • Beard Trims-$4 8:30am - 5:30pm • Tuesday-Saturday 1114 Cedar St, Missoula, MT • 728-3957

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NOT ARTISTIC? Come have some fun painting. Instruction & art supplies furnished. Complimentary wine or tea. 327-8757

Art Hang up • 839 S. Higgins

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail Adv i c e A m y @ a o l . c o m (www.advicegoddess.com).

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2 March 22 – March 29, 2012

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Need a roommate? Check out our local online classifieds to find the perfect one.


SERVICES

MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS 1st Interstate Pawn. 3110 South Reserve, is now open! Buying gold and silver. Buying, selling, and pawning items large and small. We pay more and sell for less. 406-721(PAWN)7296. FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation non-denominational 1-800-475-0876

COMPUTERS Even Macs are computers! Need help with yours? CLARKE CONSULTING @ 5496214 RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway 543-8287

FURNITURE BEDROOM SET. Antique, hard-rock maple. Large dresser & mirror, double bed, head & footboards, 2 bedside tables, E-Firm mattress & box springs. $500. 406-871-1940 after 6:00 p.m.

MUSIC MUSIC LESSONS In-house lessons on guitar, ukelele and piano. Sign up now! MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds en-

Thift Stores 1136 W. Broadway 930 Kensington

Outlaw Music

541-7533

Missoula's Stringed Instrument Pro Shop!

Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

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trance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 549-0013. www.montanamusic.com YAMAHA GRAND PIANO C2. Polished ebony. Great condition. Used little. $15,000/OBO. 406862-1387 Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 7210190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

PETS & ANIMALS AKC Min Pin Puppies For Sale 2 Males and 2 Females avail Black and Tan Ready 03/07/12 Call 829-0729 Bitterroot Humane Association Beautiful 2 yr. old white and tan spayed female lab/pit cross. Smart, playful and affectionate. $65.00 fee. Call 961-3029. CATS: #1230 White/Grey, Tabby, ALH, SF, 9yrs; #1551 Dilute Torti, DMH, SF; #1623 Orange Tabby, DSH, SF, 2yr; #1809 Calico, Siamese X, SF, 8 months; #1818 Black/white, Siamese X, SF, 2yrs; #1833 Black, DSH, SF, 5yrs; #1948 Grey, DSH, SF, 10yrs; #2061 White/red, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #2125 Dilute Calico, DSH, SF, 4yrs; #2147 Grey, Maine Coon, NM, 2yrs; #2162 Grey Torbi, British Shorthair, SF, 7yrs; #2166 Black Torti, DLH, SF, 14yrs; #2171 Black Torti, DSH, SF, 1yr; #2182 Blk/white, ASH, NM,

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7yrs; #2187 Blk/wht, DMH, NM, 1yr; #2190 Grey/white, DSH, NM, 14yrs; #2209 Dilute Calico, DSH, SF, 7yrs; #2242 Grey Tabby, DSH, SF, 5yrs; #2264 Cali/Rust/Grey, DLH, SF, 5yrs.For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840. DOGS: #2022 Blk/Brown, Collie X, SF, 2.5yrs; #2121 Blk/brown, Aussie X, NM, 10yrs; #2159 Black/white, Heeler X, SF, 1yr; #2181 Blue/Grey, Lab/Hound, SF, 2yrs; #2191 White/Cream, Husky X, SF, 7yrs; #2194 Blue Merle, Aussie, NM, 9yrs; #2200 Black/tan, GSD, SF, 3yrs; #2201 Black/tan, Rott, NM, 2yrs; #2214 White/tan, Lab/Pit X, SF, 1.5yrs; #2232 Brown/Cream, Malamute X, NM, 1yr; #2233 Blk/white, Heeler/Aussie X, NM, 3yrs; #2234 Blk/white, Border Collie X, NM, 2yrs; #2245A Blk/tan, Dobie X, SF, 5yrs; #2245 Blk/white, Husky X, NM, 2yrs; #2246 Blk/wht, Collie X, NM, 1yr; #2254 Blk/white, Aussue, SF, 3yrs; #2257 Blk/white, Newfi/Lab X, NM, 2 1/2 months; #2270 Black, Pit Bull, SF, 7yrs; #2271 Blk/tan, Sharpei/Jack Russell X, NM, 8yrs; #2282 Tan/blk, Shep/Rhodi X, NM, 5yrs.For photo listings see our web page at w w w. m o n t a n a p e t s . o r g Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

GARAGE SALES

FINANCIAL

HANDYMAN

Bookkeeping Need your books cleaned up before tax preparation? Professional bookkeeping service provides help with bank accounts, payroll and payroll taxes, accounts payable/receivable, financial statements, QuickBooks consultation. 250-0261.

Squires for Hire. Carpentry, Drywall, Painting, Plumbing, General Handyman. I actually show up on time! Bret 544-4671

FREE Booklet and tips on appealing a denial of Social Security Disability Benefits. Bulman Law Associates P.L.L.C. www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com or call 721-7744

HOME IMPROVEMENT Natural Housebuilders, Inc., *ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes* Additions/Remodels* HIGHERCOMFORT crafted building* Solar Heating* 369-0940 or 642-6863* www.naturalhousebuilder.net

Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator, testimonials available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642 You’ll find plenty of classes and seminars to finish that project at MissoulaEvents.net

MISCELLANEOUS Errand and Grocery Shopping done for you. You need it done, give me a call. Lic. and Ins. Angie 406-690-3361

House and Pet Sitting I will watch your home and animals. Dogs to exotics. Too busy? Daily dog walking. Play and purr time, yard, litter, cage cleaning included. Angie 406-690-3361. Licensed and insured.

TRAVEL ND COMMUTERS UNITE! Ride from Williston kicking butt? Choose RNR Stagelines. Relax. Rest. Arrive rarin’ to go. 406-7777323

UMPHREY

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Drive a little, save a lot! Blue Mountain Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x20 $65 Bitterroot Mini Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x10 $45 • 10x15 $55 10x20 $65 • 10x30 $85 • 542-2060 Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

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550-2375

Oriental & Fine Rug Cleaning

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Furnace check & clean $75 Serving Missoula, Ravalli, and Mineral counties. 406-241-2598

After you scour the sales, plan your savvy weekend at MissoulaEvents.net

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Black’s Deck Finishing & Residential Painting

Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

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AUTO CRUISEGENERAL CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car.com

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montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3 March 22 – March 29, 2012


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): Not bad for a few weeks’ work, or play, or whatever it is you want to call this tormented, inspired outburst. Would it be too forward of me to suggest that you’ve gone a long way toward outgrowing the dark fairy tale that had been haunting your dreams for so long? And yet all this may just be a warm-up for your next metamorphosis, in which you make an audacious new commitment to becoming what you really want to be when you grow up. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): This week I’m taking a break from my usual pep talks. I think it’s for the best. If I deliver a kind-hearted kick in the butt, maybe it will encourage you to make a few course corrections, thereby making it unnecessary for fate to get all tricky and funky on you. So here you go, Taurus: 1. The last thing you need is someone to support your flaws and encourage you in your delusions. True friends will offer snappy critiques and crisp advice. 2. Figure out once and for all why you keep doing a certain deed that’s beneath you, then gather the strength and get the help you need to quit it. 3. It’s your duty to stop doing your duty with such a somber demeanor and heavy tread. To keep from sabotaging the good it can accomplish, you’ve got to put more pleasure into it. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The German word Weltratsel can be translated as “World Riddle.” Coined by the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, it refers to questions like “What is the meaning of existence?” and “What is the nature of reality?” According to my reading of the astrological omens, Gemini, you’re now primed to deepen your understanding of the World Riddle. For the next few weeks, you will have an enhanced ability to pry loose useful secrets about some big mysteries. Certain passages in the Book of Life that have always seemed like gobbledygook to you will suddenly make sense. Here’s a bonus: Every time you decipher more of the World Riddle, you will solve another small piece of your Personal Riddle.

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CANCER (June 21-July 22): “The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.” So wrote George Bernard Shaw in his book Man and Superman. From the hints I have gleaned, Cancerian, you are now in an ideal phase to be the sort of unreasonable man or woman who gets life to adapt so as to better serve you and your dreams. Even if it’s true that the emphasis in the past has often been on you bending and shaping yourself to adjust to the circumstances others have wrought, the coming weeks could be different.

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist Susan Clarion RNC CA MATS 552-7919 Energy Balancing and Acupressure Meridians. Hand and foot reflexology. 493-6824 or 3994363 Garden Mother Herbs General Store NOW OPEN! Teas, Tinctures, Balms, Books and more! 529-3834. 345 W. Front Suite C. LINDA BLAIR is offering computerized homeopathy and testing via the BodyScan 2010 for you and your pets, as well as

Past life regression. Find out what your soul has experienced in other lifetimes. It helps you understand your

Louise Harvey Scents of Wellness Master Touch Reflexology foot treatments with Young Living essential oils.

MARSHA KIRCHNER

721-5373

mkirchner@centric.net

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Hypnosis & Imagery

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In his book Word Hero, Jay Heinrichs offers us advice about how to deliver pithy messages that really make an impact. Here’s one tip that would be especially useful for you in the coming days: Exaggerate precisely. Heinrichs gives an example from the work of the illustrious raconteur, American author Mark Twain. Twain did not write, “In a single day, New England’s weather changes a billion times.” Rather, he said, “In the spring I have counted 136 different kinds of weather inside of four-and twenty hours.” Be inspired by Twain’s approach in every way you can imagine, Leo. Make things bigger and wilder and more expansive everywhere you go, but do it with exactitude and rigor.

* Smoking * Weight * Negative self-talk * Stress * Depression * Empower yourself

728-5693 • Mary Place MSW, CHT, GIS

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ESCAPE

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “Liminality” is a term that refers to the betwixt and between state. It’s dawn or dusk, when neither night nor day fully rules. It’s the mood that prevails when a transition is imminent or a threshold beckons. During a rite of passage, liminality is the phase when the initiate has left his or her old way of doing things but has not yet been fully accepted or integrated into the new way. Mystical traditions from all over the world recognize this as a shaky but potent situation a time and place when uncertainty and ambiguity reign even as exciting possibilities loom. In my estimate, Virgo, you’re now ensconced in liminality. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The Argentinian writer Antonio Porchia said there were two kinds of shadows: “some hide, others reveal.” In recent weeks, you’ve been in constant contact with the shadows that hide. But beginning any moment now, you’ll be wandering away from those rather frustrating enigmas and entering into a dynamic relationship with more evocative mysteries: the shadows that reveal. Be alert for the shift so you won’t get caught assuming that the new shadows are just like the old ones.

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Every winter, hordes of ants have overrun my house. At least that was true up until recently. This winter, the pests stayed away, and that has been very good news. I didn’t have to fight them off with poison and hand-to-hand combat. The bad news? The reason they didn’t invade was because very little rain fell, as it’s supposed to during Northern California winters. The ants weren’t driven above ground by the torrents that usually soak the soil. And so now drought threatens our part of the world. Water shortages may loom. I propose that this scenario is a metaphor for a dilemma you may soon face, Scorpio except that you will have a choice in the matter: Would you rather deal with a lack of a fundamental resource or else an influence that’s bothersome but ultimately pretty harmless?

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You’re entering one of the most buoyant phases of your astrological cycle. Your mandate is to be brash and bouncy, frothy and irrepressible. To prepare you, I’ve rounded up some exclamatory declarations by poet Michael McClure. Take them with you as you embark on your catalytic adventures. They’ll help you cultivate the right mood. McClure: “Everything is natural. The light on your fingertips is starlight. Life begins with coiling molecules and nebulae. Cruelty, selfishness, and vanity are boring. Each self is many selves. Reason is beauty. Light and darkness are arbitrary divisions. Cleanliness is as undefinable and as natural as filth. The physiological body is pure spirit. Monotony is madness. The frontier is both outside and inside. The universe is the messiah. The senses are gods and goddesses. Where the body is there are all things.”

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You know those tall, starched white hats that many chefs wear? Traditionally they had 100 pleats, which denoted the number of ways a real professional could cook an egg. I urge you to wear one of those hats in the coming weeks, Capricorn or whatever the equivalent symbol might be for your specialty. It’s high time for you to express your ingenuity in dealing with what’s simple and familiar...to be inventive and versatile as you show how much you can accomplish using just the basics.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): As I was driving my car in San Francisco late one night, I arrived at a traffic signal that confused me. The green light was radiant and steady, but then so was the red light. I came to a complete stop and waited until finally, after about two minutes, the red faded. I suspect you may soon be facing a similar jumble of mixed signals, Aquarius. If that happens, I suggest you do what I did. Don’t keep moving forward; pause and sit still until the message gets crisp and clear.

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): A woman named Joan Ginther has won the Texas Lottery four times, collecting over $20 million. Is she freakishly lucky? Maybe not, according to Nathaniel Rich’s article in the August 2011 issue of Harper’s. He notes that Ginther has a PhD in math from Stanford, and wonders if she has used her substantial understanding of statistics to game the system. (More here: tinyurl.com/LuckAmuck.) Be inspired by her example, Pisces. You now have exceptional power to increase your good fortune through hard work and practical ingenuity.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie Clarion 406-552-7919 National Alliance on Mental Illness, Missoula Affiliate. WEEKLY SUPPORT GROUPS Family & Friends: Tues. 6:30 p.m.,Thurs. 10:00 a.m. Providence.Ctr., 902 N. Orange St., Rm. 109. Recovering? Call 552-5494 for meeting information.

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Family & Friends: Tues. 6:30 p.m.,Thurs. 10:00 a.m. Providence.Ctr., 902 N. Orange St., Rm. 109 Recovering?: Call 552-5494 for mtg. info

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4 March 22 – March 29, 2012

strengths, talents, fears and relationships. 406-961-4449. Serving Western Montana. The Aesthetic Plastic Surgery Center offers an array of skin treatments including laser skin rejuvenation, laser hair removal, dermaplane, medical grade peels, customized facials and full body waxing. Our product lines include SkinCeuticals, NIA 24,

Obagi and Jane Iredale. Call Vanessa Barger, our licensed Aesthetician, at 542-7300 to schedule an appointment. Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 241-3405 With over 500 events per month, you’re sure to find something for Body, Mind and Spirit at www.MissoulaEvents.net

Awaken your Spirit

Shamanic counseling Soul retrieval • Power retrieval Releasing attachments Marge Hulburt • 241-7260 www.BlueEagleWoman.com


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana

541-7387

549-3934

LOKI

Loki is a happy, active older fellow who would love to have a real home again. He can be a bit uncertain with new people, but gentle handling and kind words have proven quite effective at the shelter.

DALLAS

SUZIE

Suzie was just a pup when she was adopted, but her family was away from home a lot, so she didn't get all the companionship and training she needed. She's a sweet young dog who will be a great pet for the right loving family.

Dallas has a contagious grin!She also LOVES to learn new tricks and work for her snacks. She is available for adoption today. but if she is still here on March 31st and April 1st she hopes to go home during the Mega Match-a-thon!

Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MTSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

GUTHRIE

Guthrie is a small young cat with a huge personality. He was quite shy when he first came to the shelter, but now he has found his purr, loves to be petted, and runs and plays just as much a possible.

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

ADELE

Yes, this Adele was named for the pop singer, and we can only hope she will be as successful in her quest for a loving home as the other Adele has been in her career! We'd like to see that sad face look happy again. Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

BLAZER

Blazer was a treasured pet for eight years, but then his owner died. He doesn't understand why he's now living in a cage in our cat room. He's sad and lonely, but more than willing to start over with a new family.

BERT

Big-boy Bert is a 2-3 year old American Bulldog mix. He's a mellow fellow who gets along well with other dogs. Bert is looking for someone to snuggle with! He has a heart of gold! His energy needs don't match his size and he is very well-mannered indoors.

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

J O H N WAY N E

Gregarious John Wayne is a snuggle bug! He loves to crawl on your lap and cuddle. He'll keep you company as you go about your chores and will be right there with you when you're ready for a break! He is 8 months old and tons of fun.

Flowers for every bride. In Trouble or in Love? The Flower Bed has affordable flowers for all your needs.

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The Flower Bed

Missoula’s Unique Alternative for pet Supplies

2405 McDonald Ave. 721-9233

NAIROBI

ROSE

Rose has been at the shelter longer than any other animal, and she'll be glad to tell you that eight months is way too long to live in a cage! She's a calm, quiet cat who loves children; she really wants a family that includes some.

ELLE

Sweet-natured Elle is a "Leader of the Band." Her Meet-Your-Match color is green and she is confident and gregarious. Elle has lived with cats, dogs and kids. Fill out a MeetYour-Match adopter survey to find out your color!

Elegant Nairobi will roll and purr for your attention. She has flowing long fur and loves to sit on a lap! Nairobi is the purrfect cat. She likes to snuggle but is not too needy. Find your furry friend at the Mega Matcha-thon on March 31st from 12 - 8 pm and April 1st from 12 - 5 pm.

www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275 627 Woody • 3275 N. Reserve Street Corner of 39th and Russell in Russell Square

LEO

Bend your knees when you pick up this big boy! This guy's a snuggler! Visit the Humane Society's website at www.myhswm.org to view all available animals and find out more about the MEGA Match-a-thon at the end of the month!

MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

These pets may be adopted at AniMeals 721-4710 CELESTE

Celeste could very well become your own piece of heaven. She is a big, beautiful four-year-old who came to us in the Spring of 2011. Being that her name means “heavenly," we can’t think of a better angel for any household, and neither can she!

BOULDER

A boulder is defined as a large, smooth piece of rock detached from its place of origin. Boulder was detached from his place of origin as a kitten during our 2010 kitten season. He is a beautiful 1 1/2-year-old Tuxedo kitty. Equus & Paws, L.L.C.

NESSA

The epitome of glamour. This charming green-eyed five-year-old was born to be the star of her own show in her own home. Although she has called AniMeals home since June of 2011, she is not giving up hope that her forever family is coming to get her. 715 Kensington Ste 8

406-240-1113 A Nice Little Bead Store In A Nice Little Town 105 Ravalli St Suite G, Stevensville, MT 59870 406.777.2141

2825 Stockyard Rd. www.equusandpaws.com • 406.552.2157

J. Willis Photography

Find me on FACEBOOK jessicagoulding.zenfolio.com specializing in weddings, pets, families, babies, senior pictures, fine art, and more!

SERENA

Serena means calm or serene in Latin. I think that is pretty fitting for me considering I never get too worked up about anything. I just sit back and take life as it comes. If I’ve learned one thing in my five short years it’s that sweating the small stuff just isn’t worth the worry. Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5 March 22 – March 29, 2012


PUBLIC NOTICES

EMPLOYMENT GENERAL

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BARTENDING $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training available. 1-800-965-6520 ext. 278

Dream Again! Earn an income you deserve. Free online training, flexible hours. www.homebiz-2freedom.com

Hamilton Farmers Market Info Booth Staff, paid PT, begins Apr. 18th. Call Job Service at 363-1822 for more information. Job hunting is stressful. You deserve a break. Get started at www.MissoulaEvents.net

PROFESSIONAL Development Coordinator Watson Children's Shelter, Inc. seeks a FT Development Coordinator. For more information visit watsonchildrensshelter.org

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easyworkjobs.com

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TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION Wildland Fire Training; Basic and Refresher. 406-543-0013 www.blackbull-wildfire.com

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CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, until 2:00 p.m., on Tuesday, April 10, 2012, and will then be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for construction of the following: Milwaukee Trail Lighting PR 12-04 ML This project consists of the installation of new trail lighting system along the Milwaukee Trail from Orange Street to California Street. Project includes new LED luminaires, poles, pole bases, and associated electrical. PRE-BID CONFERENCE: Prospective bidders are strongly encouraged to attend a pre-bid conference at 1:30 p.m., March 29, 2012 at the Currents Aquatic Center Conference Room, 600 Cregg Lane, Missoula, MT. A walk-through of the project site after completion of the meeting will be conducted. Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project Manual addressed to the City Clerk, City of Missoula, enclosed in sealed envelopes plainly marked on the outside “Proposal for City of Missoula PR 12-04 ML Milwaukee Trail Lighting” The envelopes shall also be marked with the Bidder’s Name and Montana Contractor’s Identification Number. Proposals must be accompanied by cash, cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of the City of Missoula against liability. No bid will be considered which includes federal excise tax, since the City is exempt therefrom and will furnish to the successful bidder certificates of exemption. A complete set of the Contract Documents and Project Manual will be furnished to the Contractors making application from CTA Architects Engineers, 306 West Railroad Street, Missoula MT 59802, (406) 7289522, upon payment of $50.00 by company check, cashier’s check, or bank money order (cash cannot be accepted). Full amount of payment will be refunded upon request within ten (10) City business days following bid opening provided that complete plans and bid proposal package are returned in good condition. A Project Manual submitted for bid is retained for legal purposes and is therefore not refundable. After 10 City business days, the remaining checks will be deposited; no reminder calls will be made. Plans and project manual are available for viewing at the following locations: Missoula Plans Exchange 201 North Russell Street Missoula, MT 59801 (406) 5495002 http://www.mpe.us iSqFt (Selbys) 1914 North Ave West Missoula, MT 59801 (406) 5435101 http://www.isqft.com Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C6 March 22 – March 29, 2012

with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1406-444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their race, color, religion, sex or national origin. The City of Missoula reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids, and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to bid opening at 2:00 p.m. on April 10, 2012. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the city’s website at http://ww.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, until 2:00 p.m., on Tuesday, April 10, 2012, and will then be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for construction of the following: City of Missoula Project MPR 12-001 Stump Grinding The project consists of tree stump grinding, clean up and topsoil back fill at various public rights of way locations throughout the City of Missoula, Montana Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project Bid request addressed to the City Clerk, City of Missoula, enclosed in sealed envelopes plainly marked on the outside “Proposal for City of Missoula Project MPR12-001 Stump Grinding” The envelopes shall also be marked with the Bidder’s Name, Address and Montana Contractor’s Registration Number, if available. Proposals must be accompanied by cash, cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of the City of Missoula against liability. A complete set of the Contract Documents will be furnished to the Contractors from the Office of the City Forester, 100 Hickory Street, Missoula, Montana. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula Business Licensing requirements. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their actual or perceived

race, color, national origin, ancestry, religion, creed, sex, age, marital or familial status, physical or mental disability, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or because of their association with a person or group of people so identified. except where these criteria are reasonable bona fide occupational qualifications. The City of Missoula reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids, and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to the bid opening at 2:00 p.m. on Tuesday, April 10, 2012. The City of Missoula provides accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the City. In the case of documents, recordings or verbal presentations, alternative accessible formats will be provided. To request accommodation, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (406)552-6080. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the city’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA Request for Proposals - Safety and Risk Management Consultant The City of Missoula is requesting proposals from qualified consulting firms and/or individuals to: 1. Assess risk management needs for workers’ compensation, property protection and liability exposures for the City of Missoula. 2. Analyze City of Missoula workers’ compensation, property and liability loss data for trends, identify problem areas and recommend training programs to manage risks. 3. Review city policies (safety, personnel, etc.) leases, contracts etc. for language affecting risk management, loss control and safety considerations; review documents to identify and rectify deficiencies with respect to risk and make recommendations to ensure documents adequately manage potential risks. Proposals are due April 27, 2012 before 5:00 p.m. and should be addressed to the Gail Verlanic, City of Missoula Human Resources Department, 435 Ryman St, Missoula, MT 59802-4297, A detailed outline of services requested can be obtained on-line at http://www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bi ds or from: Gail Verlanic Human Resources Director City of Missoula 435 Ryman Street Missoula, Montana 59802-4297 (406) 552-6130 gverlanic@ci.missoula.mt.us CITY OF MISSOULA REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP) FOR ENGINEERING SERVICES ENGINEERING SERVICES FOR CURB AND SIDEWALK DESIGN AND STAKING City of Missoula, Montana City Project No. 10025 Van Buren – Vine to Elm NOTICE TO ENGINEERING CONSULTING FIRMS: Notice is hereby given by the City of Missoula, Montana, and Equal Opportunity government, that it will receive written statements of qualifications and professional proposals for curb and sidewalk design and staking on Van Buren Street between Vine and Elm. Request for proposal and submission requirements may be obtained by visiting www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids, from the City Engineer, City of Missoula, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana 59802-4297, or by call-

ing (406) 552-6345. Four (4) copies of written statements, qualifications and professional proposals shall be submitted to the City Clerk’s Office, City of Missoula, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana 59802-4297 before 5:00 p.m., local time the 29th day of March, 2012. This solicitation is being offered in accordance with State statutes governing procurement of professional services. Accordingly, the City of Missoula reserves the right to negotiate an agreement based on fair and reasonable compensation for the scope of work and services proposed, as well as the right to reject any and all responses deemed unqualified, unsatisfactory or inappropriate. The City of Missoula is an EEO/AA, M/F, V/H Employer. Qualified women, veterans, minority and disabled individuals are strongly encouraged to submit proposals. MISSOULA COUNTY FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT PERMIT APPLICATION The Office of Planning & Grants has received a floodplain application from Ken Verley to work within the Butler Creek floodplain. The project is located at 9225 Butler Creek Road in Section 24, Township 14N, Range 20W and includes the replacement of an undersized culvert. The full application is available for review in the Office of Planning and Grants in City Hall. Written comments from anyone interested in County floodplain permit application #12 - 21 may be submitted prior to 5:00 p.m., April 13, 2012. Address comments to the Floodplain Administrator, Office of Planning & Grants, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802 or call 2584841 for more information. MISSOULA COUNTY Notice is hereby given that sealed proposals will be received at the Office of the Missoula County Public Works Department in the City of Missoula, Montana until 10:00 A.M., Thursday April 5th 2012 at which time bids will be opened and read in the Public Work’s Conference Room for the purpose of applying Magnesium Chloride Dust Palliative to approximately 85 miles of gravel roads throughout various geographic areas within Missoula County. All work is to be performed in accordance with the plans and specifications on file in the Office of the Public Works Department and shall be performed under the supervision of the Director of Public Works or his designated representative. Specifications and bid procedures can be obtained at the Office of Public Works at 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT. Proposals must be accompanied by security in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the amount of the bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract and in the form specified in MCA 18-1203, for example: cash, cashier’s check, certified check, bank money order, or bank draft, any of which must be drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the state of Montana or a banking association incorporated under the Laws of Montana; or a bid bond or bond executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the state of Montana. THE CONTRACT WILL BE AWARDED TO THE LOWEST RESPONSIBLE QUALIFIED BIDDER WHOSE BID PROPOSAL COMPLIES WITH ALL THE REQUIREMENTS. Proposals shall be sealed and marked “Proposals for 2012 Missoula County Road Dust Abatement Program” and ad-


PUBLIC NOTICES dressed to: Missoula County Public Works, 2012 Dust Abatement Bid, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808 MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE of Availability of Environmental Assessment and Public Hearing Missoula County is preparing an application for a Treasure State Endowment Program (TSEP) Grant from the Montana Department of Commerce (DOC). TSEP grants are a state action subject to the Montana Environmental Policy Act (MEPA). As required by the MEPA and DOC regulations, Missoula County has prepared a draft Environmental Assessment (EA) that evaluates the potential environmental effects and consequences of the proposed project. This notice announces the availability of the draft EA for public review and comments as well as the date and time of a Public Hearing regarding the proposed project. The proposed action generally consists of the replacement of the Riverview Drive Bridge crossing the Clearwater River approximately one mile west of Seeley Lake. Copies of the draft EA are available for review at the office of the Missoula Department of Public Works, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, Montana, 59808. Missoula County will consider all substantive comments received in response to the draft EA. The Missoula County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing at 6:00 p.m. on Thursday, March 29, 2012 at the Seeley Lake Elementary School, in order to discuss the draft EA and present the preliminary engineering research for the proposed project. At the Public Hearing, the proposed project will be explained, including the purpose and proposed area of the project, activities, budget, environmental issues, and TSEP grant issues. After the hearing, all comments will be reviewed and considered and Missoula County will decide that either: 1. An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is necessary; 2. The Environmental Assessment did not adequately reflect the issues raised by the proposed action and must be revised; or 3 .An EIS is not necessary, and make a final decision on the proposed action (submitting the application for TSEP funding). All interested persons will be given the opportunity and are encouraged to ask questions and to express their opinions regarding this proposed project and its environmental impacts. Comments may be given orally at the hearing or submitted in writing before 1:30 p.m. on March 29, 2012. Written comments should be sent to: Missoula County Public Works Department at 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, Montana, 59808. For further information, contact Erik Dickson, Missoula County Engineer, at 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808, or call (406) 258-3772. /s/ Board of Commissioners, Missoula County. MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF HEARING The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a hearing on the proposed expenditure of Open Space Bond proceeds on the following project: 1. Travelers’ Rest State Park Land Acquisition: A hearing on a proposal to use up to $300,000 of Open Space bond funding towards the acquisition of land by Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks in the Lolo area. Two parcels totaling 23.69 acres would be added to the adjacent Travelers’ Rest State Park (TRSP). The acquisition would be temporarily held by Five Valleys Land Trust until MFWP completed the purchase.

The Commissioners will conduct the hearing at 1:30 p.m., Wednesday, March 28, 2012, in Room 201 of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 W Broadway, Missoula, Montana. Any person wishing to be heard on the matter may speak at the hearing and/or submit written or other materials to the Commissioners at the hearing or by mail, fax or personal delivery to the Commissioners at their offices in the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, FAX (406) 721-4043. Copies of the proposed project are available for public inspection at the Missoula County Office of Rural Initiatives, 317 Woody, Missoula, Montana. Telephone 258-3432; or you may contact Pat O’Herren in Rural Initiatives at 258-4981. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling 258-3422. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. MISSOULA COUNTY SHERIFF’S SALE TWO RIVERS, LLC, Claimant, Against KIMBERLY J. SEVILLE, Owner, and DIXIE HENSRUD, Owner. To Be Sold at Sheriff’s Sale: TERMS: CASH, or its equivalent; NO personal checks. On the 3rd day of April A.D., 2012, at Ten(10:00)o’clock A.M., at 12115 Bale Road, Lolo, County of Missoula, State of Montana, that certain personal property situate in said Missoula County, and particularly described as follows, to-wit: 1972 Bonnavilla MB, 14x66, VIN 271718 Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining. No warranty is made as to the condition or title of the personal property. Dated this 22nd day of March A.D., 2012. /s/ CARL C. IBSEN Sheriff of Missoula County, Montana By Patrick A. Turner, Deputy MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Robert L. Deschamps, III Cause No. DV-11-1509 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION. NORMAN E. TAYLOR Plaintiff, v. MAGDALENE L. WOLVERTON, EARL CHARLTON, WAVA CHARLTON AND RALPH F. GREEN, WALLACE PAULSON, J. VIOLA HERAK TRUST, their heirs and devisees and all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate, or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the Complaint, adverse to Plaintiff’s ownership or any cloud upon Plaintiff’s title thereto, whether such claim or possible claim be present or contingent, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA to all persons claiming any interest in or lien upon the real property described in this summons or any part of the real property, defendants: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint for Quiet Title in this action, which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, within sixty (60) days after the first publication of this Summons, and set forth what interest or lien, if any, you have in or upon that certain real property or any part of the real property situated in the county of Missoula, state of Montana as described as follows: That portion of Lot Twenty-five (25) of Cobban and Dinsmore’s Orchard Homes, Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Starting at the Southeast corner of said Lot Twentyfive (25), and thence running North along the East line of said Lot Twentyfive (25) a distance of 300 feet, thence at right angles and in a westerly direction a distance of 150 feet, thence at right angles and in a southerly direction 300 feet to the South line of said Lot Twenty-five (25), and thence in an Easterly direction and along the South line of said Lot Twenty-five (25) a distance of 150 feet to the point of beginning. Recording Reference: Book 598, Page 582 You are further notified that, unless you appear and answer, the Plaintiff will apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the complaint as follows: 1. That the Court make a

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s complete adjudication of the title to the above-described real property and that by Decree of the Court it be declared and adjudged that no Defendant has any estate or interest whatsoever in and to said land or lien or encumbrance thereon and that the title to the above-described real property is quieted in Plaintiff; 2.That Defendants, Magdalena L. Wolverton, Earl Charlton, Wava Charlton and Ralph F. Green, their heirs and devisees and all other persons, known and unknown, be forever enjoined and barred from asserting any claim whatever in and to the within described real property, or any part thereof, adverse to Plaintiff; and 3. That Plaintiff have such other or further relief as the Court may deem proper. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court, the 29th day of February, 2012. /s/ Shirley E. Faust CLERK OF DISTRICT COURT Attorneys for Plaintiffs: GARLINGTON, LOHN & ROBINSON, PLLP 350 Ryman Street P. O. Box 7909 Missoula, MT 59807-7909 Telephone (406) 523-2500 Telefax (406) 5232595 By: /s/ Jenny M. Jourdonnais March 22, March 29, April 5, April 12, April 19, 2012 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DR-12-133 Department No. 1 Summons for Publication IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF: Brian Barnes, Petitioner, and Kathryn Barnes, Respondent. THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED RESPONDENT: You, the Respondent, are hereby summoned to answer the Petition in this action, which is filed with the Clerk of Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer and serve a copy thereof upon the Petitioner within twenty days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the Petition. The action is brought to obtain a dissolution. Title to and interest in the following real property will be involved in this action: Dated this 9th day of March, 2012. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: /s/ Michelle Vipperman, Deputy Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DN-10-46 Dept. No. 1 Judge Edward P. McLean SUMMONS AND CITATION IN THE MATTER OF DECLARING H. B., A YOUTH IN NEED OF CARE. TO: DAWN DRAWDY Re: H.B., born July 12, 1996 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Child and Family Services Division (CFS), 2677 Palmer, Suite 300, Missoula, Montana 59808, has filed a Petition to Terminate the Mother’s and Father’s Parental Rights and Grant of Permanent Legal Custody to CFS with the Right to Consent to Adoption or for said Youth to be otherwise cared for; Now, Therefore, YOU ARE HEREBY CITED AND DIRECTED to appear on the 11th day of April, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. at the Courtroom of the above entitled Court at the Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, then and there to show cause, if any you may have, why the Mother’s rights should not be terminated; why CFS should not be awarded permanent legal custody of the Youth with the right to consent to the Youth’s adoption; and why the Petition should not be granted or why said Youth should not be otherwise cared for. Dawn Drawdy is represented by Kelli Sather, Office of State Public Defender, 610 Woody, Missoula, Montana, 59802, (406) 5235140. Your failure to appear at the hearing constitutes a denial of your interest in custody of the Youth, which denial will result, without further notice of this proceeding or any subsequent proceeding, in judgment by default being entered for the relief requested in the Petition. A copy of the Petition hereinbefore referred to is filed with the Clerk of District Court for Missoula County, telephone: (406) 258-4780. WITNESS the Honorable Edward P. McLean, Judge of the above-entitled Court and the Seal of this Court, this 8th day of March, 2012. /s/ Edward P. McLean, District Judge MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-12-33 Dept. No. 3 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: KERRY MCMENUS, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are re-

quired to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to John Boyle, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at c/o Sullivan, Tabaracci & Rhoades, P.C., 1821 South Avenue West, Third Floor, Missoula, MT 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 26th day of January, 2012. /s/ John Boyle, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-12-40 Dept. No. 1 Judge Ed McLean. NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of JOAN M. MANDEVILLE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above estate. All persons having claims against the Decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Charles E. Mandeville, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of his attorneys, Crowley Fleck PLLP, 305 South 4th Street East, Suite 100, PO Box 7099, Missoula, MT 598077099, or filed with the Clerk of the Court. DATED this 2nd day of March, 2012 /s Charles Mandeville Dated this 2nd day of March, 2012 CROWLEY FLECK PLLP. /s/ Dirk A. Williams, Attorneys for Personal Representative

DV-12-178 Dept. No. 1 Ed McLean Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Sarah Ann Zbinden, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Sarah Ann Zbinden to Sarah Ann WinterNight. The hearing will be on April 4, 2012 at 1:30 p.m. The hearing will be a the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: 2/17/2012. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Susie Wall, Deputy Clerk of Court

ACROSS

Central Mini Storage

EAGLE SELF STORAGE

will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 44, 226, 239, 440, 517, 540, 568, 577, and 629. Units contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday March 26, 2012. All auction units will only be shown each day at 3 P.M. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage office at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59804 prior to Thursday, March 29, 2012, 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

by Matt Jones

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-12-207 Dept. No. 4 Karen S. Townsend Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Susan Johnson Cole Rose, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Susan Johnson Cole Rose to Susan Elaine Rose. The hearing will be on April 3, 2012 at 3:00 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: February 28, 2012. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: Laura M. Driscoll, Deputy Clerk of Court

Montana Fourth Judicial District Court, Missoula County Cause No.

will action to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 11, 17, 24. Units contain misc items. These units may be viewed by appt only by calling 543-9798. Please speak to Shannon. Written sealed bids may be submitted to the storage offices at 401 SW Higgins Missoula, MT 59803 prior to March 30, 2012 at 3:00pm. Auction sales will be final after this date. Buyers bid will be for the entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. ONLY cash or money order will be accepted as form of payment.

"Double Scoop"–everything sorta melted together.

Notice of Close of Regular Voter Registration and Option for Late Registration Notice is hereby given that regular* registration for the Special District Elections to be held on May 8, 2012, will close at 5:00 p.m., on April 9, 2012.*NOTE: If you miss this regular registration deadline, you may still register for the election by showing up at the county fairground’s election center up to and including on Election Day. Between noon and the close of business on the day before Election Day, you can complete and submit a voter registration card, but you will need to return to the local election center on Election Day to pick up and vote a ballot. All active and inactive electors of the Special Districts are entitled to vote at said election. Ballots will be automatically mailed to Active Electors only. If you are a registered voter and do not receive a ballot, contact the county election office to update your information as necessary and receive a ballot. Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the County Election Administrator. If you have moved, please have your registration transferred to your present address. DATED this 27th day of February 2012. Vickie M. Zeier Missoula County Election Administrator

1 Just barely covering, with "over" 9 Change for the better 14 1970s-80s sitcom signoff 15 Hardin of "The Office" 17 Double scoop that's part sugary nuts, part three-flavored 19 Visibly took notice 20 Former senator Feingold 21 Airline until 2001 22 2, 4, 6 or 2008 24 ___ Solo (character played by Peter Griffin on "Family Guy") 25 Hosp. area 28 Not-real-strict quality 31 "This is your brain on drugs" prop 32 Double scoop that's part multicolored, part liqueur 35 They sound just like D# 36 Alyssa of "Who's the Boss?" 38 Double scoop that's part chocolate, part citrus 42 DVR button 43 Distance between markers 44 Doc for head stuff: abbr. 45 "There's a mouse behind the fridge!!!" 46 Hair grossness 47 "___ was saying..." 48 Condo division 50 Coupe alternative 55 Double scoop that's part sweet and chunky, part tart 59 Caber-___ (Highland games competitor) 60 Early 2012 U.S. disasters (in a legit but unusual spelling) 61 Prefix before dactyl 62 It may end in PEZOLCFTD

Last week’s solution

DOWN

1 Economist's stats 2 "Tomb Raider" heroine Croft 3 "I Left Something Turned ___ Home" (Trace Adkins song) 4 "Star Trek" lieutenant 5 Little cut 6 Actor McDiarmid 7 Away from SSW 8 Indigenous people that Paraguay named its currency after 9 "Famous" cookie guy 10 Diner on the sitcom "Alice" 11 Tom's QB opponent, in Super Bowl XLVI 12 Imperfect, as a substitute 13 Threaten, in a way 16 They Might Be Giants song with the line "And her voice is a backwards record" 18 Less sullied 22 Sun ___ (Chinese revolutionary) 23 Abbr. after a phone number, on a business card 25 Tend to a sprain 26 Business with biscotti 27 Least happy, in Vegas 28 Release 29 End-of-aisle product offer 30 Lily Allen hit of 2006 33 Planking or Tebowing 34 Suffix for percent 37 Toronto's prov. 39 Find at an archeological dig 40 Do bird calls, say 41 Digital camera output 42 Look shocked, maybe 48 Online gamer, e.g. 49 Possibly insane Roman ruler 50 Lip ___ contest 51 "In the Valley of ___" (2007 Tommy Lee Jones film) 52 ___ double take 53 Love, Latin-style 54 Oriole's pad 56 Ending for Canton or Siam 57 Comedian Jo ___ 58 Before, to Robert Burns

©2012 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 March 22 – March 29, 2012


PUBLIC NOTICES MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-12-38 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF LOIS JAMES WAGNER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to John Paul Wagner, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane PC, PO Box 4747, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 29th day of February, 2012. /s/ John Paul Wagner, Personal Representative WORDEN THANE P.C. Attorneys for Personal Representative /s/ Gail M. Haviland MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP12-44 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JOYCE D. OLSON, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Brian Zottnick, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 4110 Weeping Willow Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803, or filed with the Clerk of the abovenamed Court. DATED this 5th day of March, 2012. /s/ Brian Zottnick, Personal Representative. GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC /s/ Nancy P. Gibson, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA

COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Case No. DP12-41 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of ROBERT DENNIS GENG, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the Personal Representative, Karen Hayward, return receipt requested, at Tipp & Buley, P.C., PO Box 3778, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 6th day of March, 2012. /s/ Karen Hayward, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Karen S. Townsend Probate Case No. DP-12-24 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of LOUISE R. RAFF, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the Personal B. Thrailkill, return receipt requested, at 1221 Lincoln Court, Missoula, Montana 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 7th day of March, 2012. /s/ Deborah B. Thrailkill, Personal Representative 1221 Lincoln Court, Missoula, MT 59802 /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: Gayle Johnston Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate Case No. DP-12-34 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of FLORENCE WESTON YOUNG, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN

that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the Personal Representative, Mark Weston, return receipt requested, at 2240 Cales Ct. Missoula, MT 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 28th day of February, 2012. /s/ Mark Weston, Personal Representative, 2240 Cales Ct. Missoula, MT 59802 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-12-37 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF GORDON H. SIMMONS, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Sarah S. Lester, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested,in care of Thiel Law Office, PLLC, 315 West Pine, PO Box 8125, Missoula, Montana 59807 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 29th day of February, 2012. THIEL LAW OFFICE PLLC Attorney for Personal Representative /s/ Matthew B. Thiel MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY In the Matter of the Name Change of Christopher John Thompson, Dept. No. 2 Cause Number DV12-86. Notice is herebygiven that a hearing on Christopher John Thompson’s Petition to change his name to Christopher John Kerney will be held on April 17, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. at the Missoula County Courthouse, 200

West Broadway, Missoula, before the Honorable Robert L. Deschamps NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to §71-1-301, et seq. of the Montana Code Annotated, the undersigned hereby gives notice of a trustee’s sale to be held on the 31st day of May, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock a.m, on the steps of the Courthouse of Missoula County located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, of the following described real property located in Missoula County, Montana: PARCEL 1: TRACT 2A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5342, LOCATED IN THE SOUTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 16 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. AND PARCEL 2: TRACT 39 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 1925, LOCATED IN THE WEST ONE-HALF OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 14 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MONTANA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Sharon E. Schneider and Robert J. Schneider, as Grantors, conveyed the above-described real property, and the improvements situated thereon, if any, to Title Services, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Bitterroot Valley Bank d/b/a Clark Fork Valley Bank, organized and existing under the laws of the State of Montana, who was designated as Beneficiary in a Real Estate Trust Indenture dated August 15, 2008 and recorded on August 15, 2008 as Document No. 200819254 in Book 824 at Page 1236 of the official records of Missoula County, Montana (“Trust Indenture”). Dan G. Cederberg, a licensed Montana attorney, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee dated December 15, 2011, and recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. Grantors have defaulted in the performance of the said Trust Indenture and associated Universal Note by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,202.21 for the month of April,

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C8 March 22 – March 29, 2012

2011, and of $1,229.18 for the month of May, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. As of December 28, 2011, the sum of $11,135.65 is past due. As of December 28, 2011, the principal balance due was the sum of $143,396.91 principal, plus $8,000.61 accrued interest, with interest continuing to accrue on the principal at the variable rate set out in the Universal Note, which is currently 7.70% per annum, and other fees and expenses that may be advanced. The Beneficiary may disburse any amounts as may be required to protect Beneficiary’s interest. If Beneficiary elects to make such disbursements, sums paid shall become additional indebtedness secured by the Trust Indenture. In accordance with the provisions of the Trust Indenture and Universal Note , the Beneficiary has elected to accelerate the full remaining balance due under the terms of the Trust Indenture and Universal and has elected to sell the interest of Sharon E. Schneider and Robert J. Schneider, the original Grantors, their successors and assigns, in and to the aforedescribed property, subject to all easements or covenants existing of record or evident on the property at the time of sale to satisfy the remaining obligation owed. Beneficiary has directed Dan G. Cederberg, as Successor Trustee, to commence such sale proceedings. Those with an interest in the property and who appear from the public record to be entitled to notification of these proceedings are: Occupants 2403 Highway 83 N. Seeley Lake MT 59868 Occupants 10460 Sweet Pea Way Missoula MT 59808 Robert J. and Sharon E. Schneider 10460 Sweet Pea Way Missoula MT 59808 Department of the Treasury I.R.S. 2681 Palmer Street, 2nd Floor Missoula MT 59808 Internal Revenue Service Stop 8420-G PO Box 145595 Cincinnati OH 45250-5595 Internal Revenue Service District Director

Rocky Mountain District Attn: S.P.E. 5020 600 17th Street Denver CO 80202 - 2490 Successor Trustee is unaware of any party in possession or claiming right to possession of the subject property other than those persons noticed herein. DATED this 20th day of January, 2012. /s/ Dan G. Cederberg, Successor Trustee STATE OF MONTANA) : ss. County of Missoula) This instrument was acknowledged before me on the 20th day of January, 2012, by Dan G. Cederberg, Successor Trustee. (Notarial Seal) /s/ Susan Marshall Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at: Missoula, Montana My commission expires: 17 March 2015 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/12/11, recorded as Instrument No. 201101220, B: 872, P: 1035, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Kristina L. Edsall and Tanner S. Dempsey, as joint tenants with rights of survivorship was Grantor, JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Chicago Title Insurance Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Chicago Title Insurance Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lots 21 and 22 in Block 86 of Car Line Addition, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 03/01/11 installment payment and all monthly

installment payments due thereafter. As of January 16, 2012, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $144,205.95. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $134,297.00, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on May 29, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-


PUBLIC NOTICES Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7037.79418) 1002.207567-File NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/26/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200702634, Book 791, Page 655, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Mark W. Knight and Laura A. Knight, husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Home123 Corporation was Beneficiary and First American Title Insurance Company was Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 55-B of Snider Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200807848, Bk. 816, Pg. 1024, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to HSBC Bank USA, National Association as Trustee for Deutsche Alt-A Securities Mortgage Loan Trust, Series 2007-AR3. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 19, 2012, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $880,319.70. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $599,322.54, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 1, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7777.26264) 1002.97599-File NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/19/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200702241 Bk-791 Pg262, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Leslie Beck Ames, a married person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and First American Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 26 of Maloney Ranch Phase VI, a platted subdivision iin Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if

applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 26, 2012, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $315,193.74. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $305,000.00, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 8, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.98604) 1002.208212-File NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/12/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200527308, BK 762, PG 554, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Ward J. Veneklasen and Pamela L. Veneklasen, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Insured Titles, LLC was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles, LLC as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 1 in Block 4 of Linda Vista Tenth Supplement Phase I, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 08/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 30, 2012, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $313,824.40. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $259,200.00, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 12, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The con-

veyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.06348) 1002.131336-File NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 05/05/10, recorded as Instrument No. 201008854 B: 859 P: 741, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Chris Froines was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage, LLC was Beneficiary and First American Title Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 1 of R And R Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201120535 B: 886 P: 762, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 30, 2012, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $362,091.39. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $350,363.67, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 12, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.98238) 1002.208663-File NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 23, 2012,

at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 1 OF SUNDOWN RANCH ESTATES SUBDIVISION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Michael W Goggin, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 24, 2003 and recorded on June 30, 2003 at 4:11 o’clock P.M., in Book 710, Page 650, under Document No 200323422. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Morgan Stanley ABS Capital I Inc. Trust 2003-HE3, Mortgage PassThrough Certificates, Series 2003HE3. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,328.58, beginning February 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 18, 2011 is $153,979.03 principal, interest at the rate of 7.5% now totaling $34,252.46, escrow advances of $1,859.60, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,338.64, plus accruing interest at the rate of $31.64 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 14, 2011 /s/ Becky Stucki First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 14th day of December, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Becky Stucki, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Marti A Ottley Notary Public Inkom, ID Commission

expires: 8/15/2012 47024.967

Chase/goggin

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 30, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 9 OF WHITE WATER PARK SUBDIVISION, TOGETHER WITH AN UNDIVIDED 1/9TH INTEREST IN THE COMMON AREA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF AS ESTABLISHED BY CASE NO. 49481, IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA Janet Delzer, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title and Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on January 27, 2006 and recorded on January 27, 2006 in Book 768, Page 41 as Document No. 200602042. The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage, LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $814.09, beginning July 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 16, 2012 is $170,128.41 principal, interest at the rate of 3.00000% now totaling $3,186.99, late charges in the amount of $449.91, escrow advances of $2,924.70, suspense balance of $622.13 and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,435.75, plus accruing interest at the rate of $13.98 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 21, 2011 /s/ Dalia Martinez First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 21st day of December, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to

me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Marti A Ottley Notary Public Inkom, ID Commission expires: 8/15/2012 GMAC V Delzer 41965.618 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 14, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PREMISES IN MISSOULA COUNTY, STATE OF MONTANA: LOT 20 AND THE WEST 11.8 FEET OF LOT 21 IN BLOCK 5 OF GLENWOOD PARK ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Patrick R. Ferrell, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated March 12, 2007 and recorded April 12, 2007 in Book 795, Page 293 under Document No. 200708598. The beneficial interest is currently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,329.98, beginning October 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 27, 2011 is $227,996.09 principal, interest at the rate of 7.000% now totaling $21,086.56, late charges in the amount of $1,502.09, escrow advances of $3,742.75, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,977.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $43.73 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PUR-

POSE. Dated: January 6, 2012 /s/ Dalia Martinez First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 6th day of December, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Amy Gough Notary Public Bingham County, ID Commission expires: 5-26-2015 BacVFerrell 42019.175 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 06/19/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which TODD PRESSLER AND TRACY PRESSLER, AS JOINT TENANTS as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to PINNACLE TITLE AND ESCROW as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 02/08/2008 and recorded 02/15/2008, in document No. 200803360 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 813 at Page Number 455 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 7 IN BLOCK 8 OF LINDA VISTA SEVENTH SUPPLEMENT-PHASE VI, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 6894 LINDA VISTA BOULEVARD, Missoula, MT 59803. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 05/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $262,927.03 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.625% per annum from 05/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 02/07/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 March 22 – March 29, 2012


PUBLIC NOTICES Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0062353 FEI NO. 1006.140199 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 06/18/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which LEONARD T SMITH, AND CONNIE L THOMPSON, AS JOINT TENANTS as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to CHARLES J. PETERSON as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. MIN# 100025500001136777, as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 08/24/2009 and recorded 08/28/2009, in document No. 200921349 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 846 at Page Number 794 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 30-A OF DINSMORE’S ORCHARD HOMES ADDITION NO. 4, LOTS 29 AND 30, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 3070 SOUTH 7TH STREET WEST, Missoula, MT 59804. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize

sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 10/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $395,546.15 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.00% per annum from 10/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 02/02/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 120008290 FEI NO. 1006.152876 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 06/22/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following

place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which LESLIE I. CONNELL as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to STEWART TITLE OF MISSOULA COUNTY, INC. as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 09/25/2008 and recorded 09/30/2008, in document No. 200822419 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 827 at Page Number 204 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 448 OF PLEASANT VIEW HOMES NO. 4, PHASE 2, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 3841 Lexington Avenue, Missoula, MT 59808. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 10/01/2009, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $223,424.51 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.375% per annum from 10/01/2009 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may dis-

burse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 02/08/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 10-0108987 FEI NO. 1006.110520 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 06/25/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which CLINTON J ADCOCK AND AMBER K ADCOCK, AS JOINT TENANTS as Grantors, conveyed said real property to TITLE SERVICES as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 01/16/2009 and recorded 01/22/2009, in document No. 200901326 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 832 at Page Number 357 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: TRACT 9A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 4379, LOCATED IN THE SOUTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 14 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M., MIS-

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10 March 22 – March 29, 2012

SOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Property Address: 6003 AIRWAY BLVD, Missoula, MT 59808. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 05/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $313,492.39 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.00% per annum from 05/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 02/09/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 100139822 FEI NO. 1006.117071 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD

FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 06/25/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which ANTHONY M GORDON, AND RENEEA J GORDON, AS JOINT TENANTS WITH RIGHT OF SURVIVORSHIP as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON, ATTORNEY LICENSED IN THE STATE OF MONTANA as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 10/03/2008 and recorded 10/08/2008, in document No. 200823029 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 827 at Page Number 814 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 9A OF LOW’S ADDITION NO. 10, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH A 15 FOOT WIDE SEWER AND WATER EASEMENT AS SHOWN ON THE PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION. Property Address: 620 S GARFIELD ST, Missoula, MT 59801-2262. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay

the monthly installment which became due on 09/01/2009, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $168,118.79 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.625% per annum from 09/01/2009 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 02/09/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 100110374 FEI NO. 1006.110532 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 06/29/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECON-


PUBLIC NOTICES MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT

Notice of Polling Place Locations, Accessibility Designations, Voting System Exhibition, Diagrams and Voting Instructions Statement of the Location of Precinct Polling Places and Accessibility Designations for the March 27, 2012, Target Range School Levy Election: The polling place will be open for voting from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.

SAMPLE INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW TO VOTE ON AN M-100 PRECINCT COUNTER VOTING SYSTEM

Notice of Voting System Exhibition, Diagram and Voting Instructions: Please note that the county’s voting systems are on public exhibition at Missoula County Election Office. Please see diagrams of the voting system(s) and ballot arrangement and instructions on voting below.

The following is a diagram for the M100 Precinct Ballot Counter that will be at each polling place.

TO VOTE: 1. To vote, you must blacken the oval completely.

SAMPLE INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW TO VOTE ON AN AUTOMARK VOTING SYSTEM The AutoMARK is a ballot-marking system that will be in use during the upcoming election. Its main purpose is to allow voters with disabilities and other special needs to mark a ballot privately and independently. If you wish to vote on the AutoMARK, please inform the election judge at your polling place that you would like to do so. The election judge will give you a ballot (with the stub removed) that will go in the machine. After the system accepts the ballot, the system will provide instructions on how to vote the ballot. In order to make the ballot easier to read, you can change the contrast and font size. You can mark your choices by touching the screen or by using the keypad, which features written and Braille markings. The AutoMARK system will confirm your selections on the screen and by audio. After you verify that your selections are correct, the system will fill in your choices on the ballot and print the ballot. The ballot will then go to an election judge for depositing in the ballot box. If you need assistance at any time during the process, simply request it.

SAMPLE SECRETARY OF STATE (Vote for One) John Doe Thomas Jefferson Jane Q Public

VOTE BOTH SIDES – CHECK BALLOT TO SEE IF THERE ARE ISSUES PRINTED ON BOTH SIDES OF THE BALLOT TO BE VOTED ON. 2. USE A #2 PENCIL OR BLACK INK TO MARK YOUR BALLOT. An Optical Scanner will count your ballot. If you use any other type of pen, it may not be counted correctly by the Scanner. OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION REGARDING YOUR BALLOT: When marking your ballot you should NOT make an X or a check mark. You should NOT cross out, erase, or use correction fluid on the ballot and if you make an error, you should request a new ballot. READ INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY! If you mark more candidates than you are allowed to mark for that position, it is considered an overvote. You may request a new ballot if you overvote in any race. If you do not correct your ballot, that race will not count because of the overvote; however, the remainder of your ballot will be counted. After you mark the ballot, you will be directed to place the ballot in the M-100 precinct counter, which will alert you to errors, if any, tabulate your choices and then deposit the ballot in the ballot box.

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 March 22 – March 29, 2012


PUBLIC NOTICES TRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which DAVID O LARSON, AND THERESA J LARSON, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 01/11/2007 and recorded 01/18/2007, in document No. 200701444 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 790 at Page Number 982 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOTS 1, 2, AND 3 IN BLOCK 80 OF SOUTH MISSOULA, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 900 MARSHALL STREET, Missoula, MT 59801-3612. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 11/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $197,074.67 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.00% per annum from 11/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other

expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 02/14/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0011452 FEI NO. 1006.153611 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 06/29/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which GIBBY CARLASCIO, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE & SEPARATE PROPERTY as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. MIN: 100133700027548919, as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 11/21/2007 and recorded 11/23/2007, in document No. 200730481 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 809 at Page Number 382 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT A14 OF WINDSOR PARK, PHASE 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 4288 HERMIONE LANE, Missoula, MT 59808. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of

such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 11/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $215,587.75 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.50% per annum from 11/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 02/14/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 120011479 FEI NO. 1006.153612 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 06/26/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which FORREST E EBBS, MARRIED as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to ERIC

TRAN as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 03/26/2007 and recorded 04/11/2007, in document No. 200708497 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 795 at Page Number 192 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PREMISES IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, TO-WIT: TRACT 15-B OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5418 LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 13 NORTH, RANGE 16 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY: THE APN IS SHOWN BY THE COUNTY ASSESSOR AS 5865351; SOURCE OF TITLE IS BOOK 736, PAGE 671 (RECORDED 07/16/04) MORE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED AS: TRACT 15-B OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5418 LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 13 NORTH, RANGE 16 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Property Address: 355 MYSTIC MOON, Potomac, MT 59823. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 10/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $371,209.53 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.875% per annum from 10/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such

amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 02/16/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 120010697 FEI NO. 1006.153821 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 07/03/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which JAMES JOSHUA MAYES as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY OF MONTANA INC as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 01/15/2010 and recorded 01/15/2010, in document No. 201001033 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 853 at Page Number 1314 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOTS 15 & 16 IN BLOCK 43 OF HOMEVALE ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 326 WEST SUSSEX AVENUE, Missoula, MT 59801. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA

COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 10/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $212,831.07 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.00% per annum from 10/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 02/17/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 120012683 FEI NO. 1006.153985 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE. To be sold for cash at Trustee’s sale on July 17, 2012 at 10:00 a.m., on the front (south) steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, all of Trustee’s right, title and interest to the following-described property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lots 35 and 36 in Block 55 of Carline Addition, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. J. Clair Rasmussen and Barbara Rasmussen, as Grantors, conveyed the real property to Insured Titles, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to First Security Bank of Missoula, as Beneficiary, by Trust Indenture recorded September 8,

2006, in Book 782 of Micro at Page 958, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The Beneficiary’s interest in the Trust Indenture was assigned to Jack Meyer, as Personal Representative of the Estate of Earl M. Pruyn, by assignment recorded February 7, 2012, in Book 889 of Micro at Page 496, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. A Substitution of Trustee designating Kevin S. Jones as Successor Trustee was recorded February 28, 2012, in Book 890, Page 436, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The default of the obligation, the performance of which is secured by the aforementioned Trust Indenture, and for which default of this foreclosure is made, is for failure to pay the final payment as and when due. Pursuant to the provisions of the Trust Indenture, the Beneficiary has exercised, and hereby exercises, his option to declare the full amount secured by such Trust Indenture immediately due and payable. There presently is due on said obligation the principal sum of $25,152.65, plus interest at a rate of 8.5% totaling $199.15 and back-due taxes paid totaling $6,082.39, for a total amount due of $31,434.19, as of February 29, 2012, plus the costs of foreclosure, attorney’s fees, trustee’s fees, escrow closing fees, and other accruing costs. The Beneficiary has elected, and does hereby elect, to sell the above-described property to satisfy the obligation referenced above. The Beneficiary declares that the Grantor is in default as described above and demands that the Trustee sell the property described above in accordance with terms and provisions of this Notice. DATED 29th day of February, 2012. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Trustee. STATE OF MONTANA)) ss. County of Missoula). On this 29th day of February, 2012, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Kevin S. Jones, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. (SEAL) /s/ Christy Shipp, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at: Missoula, Montana. My Commission Expires: 5/7/2013

LEGAL SERVICES Montana’s best injury and disability lawyers. Automobile accidents, bodily injury and disabilities, workers compensation, social security disability. Bulman Law Associates P.L.L.C. www.bulmanlaw.com or call 721-7744

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New Indicators Show a Housing Rebound By Jennifer Taylor, 2012 MOR President The messages the American public have received in terms of housing and an economic recovery have been mixed at best; but home sale numbers and prices, low mortgage rates, and a spike in home builder confidence point to a housing turnaround. Rebounding from another slow year in the Nation and Missoula, the housing market is picking up steam. Prospective home buyers are taking advantage of insanely low mortgage rates and reductions in home prices. Home buyers have opportunities now that they haven’t had in years in terms of inventory and bang for their buck. For example: Desired monthly payment-$1,000 • Current Interest Rate-3.88% • House Price$213,000 2007 Interest Rate-6.00% • House Price-$167,000 In addition, although economists have suggested for years that a turnaround in the housing market will be necessary in order for the economy to recover, politicians are just now getting the message. It seems that this issue will play a key role in the upcoming elections. Below are headlines that illustrate both recovery and how regulations may help (or hurt) in the future. HouseLogic: Home Sales Rise in December Existing-home sales continued on an uptrend in December, rising for a third consecutive month and remaining above a year ago, according to the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®.

CNN Money: Mortgage Applications Surge Amid Record-Low Rates Mortgage loan applications surged 23% last week, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association, as record-low interest rates convinced many home owners it was time to refinance into lower-cost loans. Wall Street Journal: Home-Builder Sentiment Hits Highest Level Since Mid-2007 U.S. home builders’ sentiment rose in January to the highest level in 4 1/2 years, the latest in a series of signs that the housing market is finally beginning to recover after a prolonged bust. The State: Rally for Home Ownership Bridges Political Divide Hundreds turned out in a diverse crowd for a rally designed to head off prospective federal legislation that could hurt home buyers and owners. The well-publicized rally attracted Republican presidential candidate and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, along with U.S. Rep. Jim Clyburn (D-S.C.), and former U.S. Rep. J.C. Watts of Oklahoma, a Republican. HouseLogic: Time for GOP Candidates, and Obama, to Step Up on Housing Policy If you’ve been paying attention to the Republican presidential candidates lately, you wouldn’t guess that housing is one the most important issues on voters’ minds. Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum, and Newt Gingrich — the top three finishers in most national polls — have been fairly quiet on the issue. Instead, the leading Republican contenders have been narrowly focused on attacking President Barack Obama’s jobs record.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C12 March 22 – March 29, 2012

At the heart of the matter is the fact that no matter what the economy is or what a politician says, homeownership is still a dream for most Americans. And with many indicators are pointing towards positive trends and positive political attention, now might just be a good time to dip your toes in the water.

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2014 South 12th West #C. 1 bedroom, central location, offstreet parking, onsite coin-op laundry, free cable. No dogs or smoking. Cat considered. All paid $625. Garden City Property Management 549-6106 2339 Mary #3 2bd/1ba HEAT PAID! New carpet & lino, shared yard, coin-ops, off-street pkng., close to Reserve St. … $650 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 808 KEMP: LARGE 1 BEDROOM WITH BUILT-INS, MAIN FLOOR, BIG STORAGE, PARKING, AIR CONDITIONER, * FREE CABLE *, NO DOGS OR SMOKING, CAT CONSIDERED !! ALL PAID $625 Garden City Property Management 549-6106

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All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

2 Bedroom North Russell $595 H/W/S/G/ paid, coin-op laundry, off street parking & storage.

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Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent w/s/g/elec included $400/month 406-273-6034

DUPLEXES 1016 Charlo 2bed/1bath, new carpet, freshly painted, off-street parking, W/D hookups. $695 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 218 Barclay “A” 2 bed, 1.5 bath, central Lolo location, all utilities paid. Shared yard, carport, DW & shared W/D. $825. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

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1805 PHILLIPS: 1 BEDROOM, SECOND FLOOR, DINING AREA, DECK-AREA, ON-SITE LAUNDRY FACILITIES, SOME QUALIFICATIONS , OFF STREET PARKING, NO SMOKING OR PETS, HEAT PAID $590. Garden City Property Management 5496106

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1024 Stephens #4 2bed/1bath central location, off-street parking., coin-ops on site, hardwood floors, cat? … $675 Grizzly Property Management 5422060

1301 MONTANA: STUDIO, 2ND FLOOR WITH PRIVATE DECK, NEWER, PERGO FLOORS!, FREE CABLE, LAUNDRY, FULL KITCHEN W/ DISHWASHER, STORAGE, NO SMOKING OR PETS $625 Garden City Property Management 549-6106

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Through creative partnerships and innovative development, the Missoula Housing Authority provides quality housing solutions for low and middle income households in Missoula and the surrounding area. Visit us at missoulahousing.org

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Palace Apartments 149 W. Broadway 1BR Heat/w/s/g paid Central Downtown location Rent $500 Deposit $550 Some restrictions apply.

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Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C13 March 22 – March 29, 2012


RENTAL HOUSES 103 Cove Court. 2bed/1.5 bath South Hills home, W/D hookups, patio, DW, yard. $925. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 1800 S. 4th W. #8 : Two bedroom, 2nd floor, Dining area, Big closets, Large unit, New Carpet, Near Good Food Store, Off street parking, On site laundry, No smoking or dogs allowed, Cat considered $100.00 COSTCO GIFT CERTIFICATE

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3901 O’Leary: Two bedroom, 2 story unit, Newer, Carport, Storage, Free cable, Private deck, #219 has washer and dryer, 1 1/2 bath, Dishwasher, No smoking or pets allowed $100.00 COSTCO GIFT CERTIFICATE GCPM , $825, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com

VISTA VIEW: NEWER HOUSES!, JUST NORTH OF THE “WYE”, 3 BDRM, 2 BATH, PANTRY, A/C, WOOD FLOORS, CERAMIC TILE, BREAKFAST BAR, DINING ROOM, DEN-AREA, HOOKUPS, FULL UNFINISHED BSMT, GRANITE COUNTERTOPS, DW, JETTED TUB, PROPANE HEAT, KITCHEN ISLAND, BEAUTIFUL VIEWS OF MISSOULA VALLEY, 3-CAR GARAGE W/ OPENERS, TWO DECKS, NO SMOKING,

824 Stoddard St. 4 bed/2.5 bath Northside home, recent remodeling, shared fenced yard,

PET CONSIDERED !! MUST HAVE 1 4-WHEEL OR ALLWHEEL DRIVE VEHICLE $1450. Garden City Property Management 549-6106

ROOMMATES $375, $300 deposit. Most utilities included. Own room & bathroom, kitchen access. Responsible, courteous, quiet, M or F. 531-9250

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. Roommate needed ASAP 27 year old elementary teacher seeking roommate as soon as possible in a spacious two bedroom house. The house has hardwood floors, a comfortable living space, dishwasher, hot tub, and a large fenced yard. The rent is $375, with a $375

deposit. The utilities are split in half with the landlord. The lease is 6 months, with month to month thereafter. please contact Ciara Everett @ 406-691-0020

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 120 N Easy St.: Enjoy one-level living a short walk from the river in this turn-key 3bd/2bath home on a concrete foundation. 1 block from a city park, and minutes from the university, this home features a large fenced yard, landscaping, and an area in the private back yard that is wired for a hot tub. $179,000 - MLS # 20120171. Call Shannon Hilliard at 239-8350 today! www.120NEasy.com 1641 Stoddard. Great single wide 2 bed, 2 bath mobile on large lot with double car garage. Fenced yard, lots of trees and curbing around the landscaping. Covered deck. $99,500. MLS#20116883 Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. 2014 29th Ave Nice split entry 4 bed home with lots of room. Brand new furnace, hot water heater and pressure tank. Radon mitigation system in place. Nice large deck, large fenced yard with many mature fruit and pine trees. Centrally located very close to schools and shopping but has a rural feel. $225,000. MLS#20110384. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. 2511 Sunridge Court $225,000 MLS # 20116337 5 bedroom 3 bath THE HOUSE HAS CENTRAL AIR, VAULTED CEILINGS, A MASSIVE FAMILY ROOM WITH GAS FIREPLACE AND MUCH MORE. OVER 2800 SQ. FT. OF FINISHED LIVING SPACE, THERE IS PLENTY OF ROOM FOR ENTERTAINING FRIENDS AND FAMILY. Call Betsy Milyard for a showing today at 880-4749.

Affordable Townhomes Didn’t think you could afford to buy your own place? This sweet new, green-built development may be your ticket. NEW PRICES! 1400 Burns, 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Amazingly Adorable & Uniquely Charming 3 bedroom, 2 bath home with wood floors, new siding, lots of light, double lot, large garage, great location. 629 North Ave. W. $250,000 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free comparative market analysis. 360-8234 Character + and Ready to Move Into! Corner lot, close to schools, great trees, lots of upgrades, 3 bedroom, 1 bath, full basement, so much house for this price of $227,500. 2405227 2107 Park St. porticorealestate.com Did you find the perfect place? Now plan your perfect weekend at MissoulaEvents.net Fabulous 3 +1 bed 2 bath Open house Sat. 3/17, Sun. 3/18, Sat. 3/24, and Sun 3/25 1-4 pm. 4114 Rainbow Dr. Missoula, MT. Come see this move-in-ready home in a clean, quiet, friendly neighborhood that is within walking distance of grocery and retail shopping. Three bedrooms, one bonus room, and two full bathrooms. Many extras: beautiful hardwood floors, energy star windows, new high-efficiency gas furnace and new water heater, fire place, central vac, dishwasher, garbage dis-

posal, partially finished basement with loads of storage, private fenced backyard, storage shed, east-facing covered patio, garden plot, mature apple and cherry trees, and other waterwise, low-maintenance mature landscaping. Call to see. 406493-6532 or 208-995-4872 Fabulous 3 +1 bed 2 bath Open house Sat. 3/17, Sun. 3/18, Sat. 3/24, and Sun 3/25 1-4 pm. 4114 Rainbow Dr. Missoula, MT. Come see this move-in-ready home in a clean, quiet, friendly neighborhood that is within walking distance of grocery and retail shopping. Three bedrooms, one bonus room, and two full bathrooms. Many extras: beautiful hardwood floors, energy star windows, new high-efficiency gas furnace and new water heater, fire place, central vac, dishwasher, garbage disposal, partially finished basement with loads of storage, private fenced backyard, storage shed, eastfacing covered patio, garden plot, mature apple and cherry trees, and other waterwise, lowmaintenance mature landscaping. Call to see. 406-493-6532 or 208-995-4872 Five bedroom, 4 bath townhome with 2 car garage on The Ranch Club golf course. Amazing views. Golf everyday! 2640B Tanbark Way MLS #20120690 $399,000. Call Anne for details. 546-5816 www.movemontana.com

downstairs rental. Just $265,000 MLS 20117301 Call Anne 5465816 for details. www.movemontana.com Handsome, Spacious Home on Prime Upper Miller Creek Acreage, 5+ bedrooms, with out of town living on quiet cul-de-sac, 10 acres. Rodeo Rd. 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Historic Preservation award-winning Marshall House Beautiful professional building with great design for offices or home and awesome exposure for business. 436 S 3rd W. $395,000 2405227 porticorealestate.com Huge Lot Bungalow Style Home Middle of Missoula, close to Good Food Store, 1/2 acre + lot, enormous shop, great home. 203 Curtis, 2405227 porticorealestate.com I can help you sell your home! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com Immaculate Rose Park Area Home This light filled home offers a fantastic floorplan, 2 family rooms, large deck and nice backyard for entertaining. 300 Central, 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

Looking for a place to call home? Call me! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com Looking for homebuyer education? Call me! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com Open & Light & Green & Clean: Efficiency abounds in this 3 BR, 2.5 ba stand alone super insulated condo with heated floors and so much more. 1530 S 12th W. Near Good Food Store and bike trails. 240-5227. porticorealestate.com PRICE REDUCED 4 bed 2 bath house on one full landscaped acre near Wye. Great Well at 30 gpm. 2 gas fireplaces, updated kitchen and bathrooms. $280,000. MLS #20120012. 9869 Lee’s Lane, Missoula. Call Anne 546-5816 for details. www.movemontana.com Rattlesnake dream property with a 1 bedroom apartment! 3 bed, 2 bath, 3 car garage located on over 1/2 acre manicured & landscaped gardens & lawn. UG sprinkler, “secret garden” & fenced yard. $425,000. MLS#20114396. Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.2404rattlesnake.com.

Four bed, 1-1/2 bath, 3 car garage home at 345 Brooks. Close to downtown, neighborhood coffee shop/restaurant, and university. Long time family home has potential to also have

6106 Longview $235,000 MLS # 20116338 Large 4 Bedroom 2 Bath home located in the South Hills. This home features hardwood floors, open floor plan, and large fenced yard. Call Betsy Milyard for more info 880-4749.

Rochelle Glasgow

544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

Missoula Properties

8169 Lower Miller Creek • 3 Bed, 2 bath Well kept manufactured home on five productive acres in Upper Miller Creek. • 2 storage sheds, a detached double car garage and a separate shop/garage. • Only be 5 minutes from town. • $250,000 • MLS # 20113133.

“FAMOUS NINE MILE HOUSE” • Purchase the restaurant/bar, the house, outbuildings, & 4 trailer spots for • Dynamite investment for the right person with great potential for income from the rentals and the restaurant. • $449,000 • MLS # 20113100

860 Haley, Florence • 5 Bedroom, 3 Bath, 2 Car Garage • Over 5000 Finished sqft. Amazing home with gorgeous views, & paved road access. Tons of space, game room and its own movie theater - perfect for living and entertaining! • $550,000 • MLS #20115636

PRICE REDUCED 117 Dallas, in LOLO. $184,900 • 3 Bed 2 Bath home on the hill in Lolo. • Spacious living room, large backyard & deck, great views of the mountains, and huge family room in the basement. • Perfect home for RD financing.

Please call me with any questions Astrid Oliver Senior Loan Originator Guild Mortgage Company 1001 S. Higgins Ave 2A Missoula, MT 59801

Phone: 406-258-7522 Cell: 406-550-3587 NMLS # 395211, Guild License #3274, Branch 206 NMLS # 398152

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C14 March 22 – March 29, 2012

Vacation Rental 4 Sale Charming vacation rental half a mile from Georgetown Lake and 6 miles from Discovery. This cabin has been a vacation rental for 7 years with many return clients, is being sold turn-key, and produces $20,000 per year income. It is in great shape and is being sold fully furnished including the hot tub. The site is 2.0 acres at the end of a private couldesc with easy year-round access and great views. Priced at $209,000, visit www.cabinmt.com for photos or call 406-546-4797. Vacation Rental 4 Sale Charming vacation rental half a mile from Georgetown Lake and 6 miles from Discovery. This cabin has been a vacation rental for 7 years with many return clients, is being sold turnkey, and produces $20,000 per year income. It is in great shape and is being sold fully furnished including the hot tub. The site is 2.0 acres at the end of a private couldesc with easy year-round access and great views.

Priced at $209,000, visit www.cabinmt.com for photos or call 406-546-4797. 2 Bdr, 2 Bath Central Missoula home close to the Good Food Store. $189,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 2 Bdr, 2.5 Bath Hellgate Meadows home with a two car garage. $245,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 1 Bath Central Missoula home with a two car garage. Close to the Good Food Store. $189,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath Rose Park home on a corner lot. $249,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

RICE TEAM

Robin Rice • 240-6503


REAL ESTATE 3 Bdr, 2 Bath single level Stevensville area home on 6.3 cross-fenced acres with a large shop. $339,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4 Bdr, 2.5 Bath Upper Rattlesnake home in a great neighborhood. $415,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4 Bdr, 3 Bath Grant Creek/Prospect Meadows home next to open space. $322,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 541-547 South 2nd West. Wonderful 4-plex in great neighborhood. Suitable for condo conversion. Newer rubber membrane roof. $275,000. MLS #20120840 Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.541547s2ndst.com Wonderful 5 bed, 3 bath home @ top of Fairviews with 2 car garage. Level lot! Borders open space. All new carpet & interior paint. Trex deck off dining room. Great views! Back yard is fenced. $275,000. MLS#20116161. Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.110artemos.com

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES 2 Bdr, 1.5 Downtown Missoula condo. Zoned for Residential or Commercial use. $339,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com For a limited time a purchase of a condo at the Uptown Flats will include a large flat screen TV and assistance with up to $5000 Buyers closing costs!The Uptown Flats have two one bed one bath units at $149,900. Call Anne 546-5816 for showing. www.movemontana.com

LAND FOR SALE 23645 Mullan Beautiful 14 acre parcel just west of Huson. Meadow with trees & pasture. Modulars or double wides on foundation OK. Owner may finance. 23645 Mullan Road, Huson. $169,900. MLS#20112135. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

COMMERCIAL 321 N. Higgins Commercial building on coveted downtown location with lots of foot traffic. Building only for sale. Call Anne 546-5816 for showing. www.movemontana.com

East Missoula building lot with great trees and a sweet â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;hood. $65,000. 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

views. $629,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

OUT OF TOWN

860 Haley, Florence $550,000 - MLS# 20115636 5 bedroom, 3 bath, 2 car garage home available. Over 5000 finished square ft. Tons of space, game room and its own movie theater - perfect for living and entertaining! Your own private movie theater comes with 55â&#x20AC;? LED 3D TV, seven theater chairs, and an awesome sound system. Call Betsy Milyard for more info 8804749.

18737 Sorrel Springs Lane, Frenchtown, $379,000 MLS # 20113420, 4 bedroom 2 1/2 bath, Beautiful home on 4 acres with spectacular views. Call Betsy Milyard for a showing today at 880-4749. 4 Bdr, 3 Bath Florence area home on 10 acres with Bitterroot River frontage. Horse Barn, cross-fenced. $449,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4 Bdr, 3 Bath Stevensville area home on 13.9 acres with panoramic Bitterroot Mountain

240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. Lolo end of Cul-de-sac Beauty: Open, light, private, quiet and in immaculate condition. Huge yard, 3 bedroom, 2 bath home with hardwood, tile and beautiful warm colors. 5697 Explorer Court. $225,000. 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

Megan Lane, Frenchtown, $199,900 MLS: 10007166 BRAND NEW 3 BED, 2 BATH HOME ON 1 ACRE. HOME TO BE BUILT SO YOU CAN PICK YOUR COLORS AND SOME FINISHING TOUCHES. GENEROUS $2000 APPLIANCE ALLOWANCE AND $1300 LANDSCAPING ALLOWANCE. Call Betsy for more info 880-4749.

PRICED TO SELL! 32499 Bible Lane, Alberton. 3 Bed, 2 Bath, 2 Car Garage. Seller motivated, nice home close to Clark Fork river. $159,900. MLS# 20121030. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

HUGE PRICE REDUCTION! 232 Cap De Villa, Lolo. Well-maintained 4 bed home w/ hardwood flooring in living, dining and kitchen. Fully fenced backyard w/deck. Nicely landscaped w/mature trees and shrubs. UG sprinklers in both front and back yard. $219,900. MLS#20116816. Robin Rice @

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6IEP)WXEXI0IRHMRK'IRXIV`+EVJMIPH` WLERWIR$JWFQWPEGSQ

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C15 March 22 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; March 29, 2012


Missoula's Own Kettlehouse

$13.99 8 pack

Western Family Frozen Corn, Green Peas, Mixed Vegies & Green Beans

68¢

Painted Hills All Natural Extra Lean Ground Beef

$3.89

On The Vine Ripe Tomatoes

99¢ lb.

lb.

16 oz.

Pabst Blue Ribbon 16 oz. cans

$16.99 24 pack

Sutter Home Cabernet, Chardonnay, Merlot or Sauvignon Blanc

$4.29

Boulder Canyon Hickory Barbeque Potato Chips

Painted Hills All Natural Boneless Tri Tip Steak

$1.39

$5.99

5 oz.

lb.

Natural Directions Organic Applesauce

Gold'n Plump Just Bare Chicken Boneless Chicken Breast

$2.97

$3.98

Mexico Juicy Pineapple

79¢ lb.

California Cara Cara Oranges

$1.19 lb.

14 oz.

43 oz.

.75 liter 20 oz. Boneless Thighs, too.

Western Family Assorted Pastas

98¢ 16 oz.

Western Family Assorted Pasta Sauces

Norbest Premium Turkey Hindquarters

98¢

lb.

$1.29

Florida Bicolor Corn

59¢ each

24 oz.

IQF Nautilus Cod or Snapper Fillet

3 lb. Bag California Minneolas

$5.19

$2.79

lb.

bag

701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 7 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188 | orangestreetfoodfarm.com


2nd Annual

Montana International Children's Film Fest Fun for the whole family! Saturday, March 24, Wilma Theatre For schedule & info: micff.org

Arlee Buttercup Run! Saturday, March 31 Established in 1992 to benefit the children of Arlee To register or for more information:

buttercuprun.com or 406-726-3335

Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture.

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