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ETC.

MARCH MADNESS: WHY MISSOULA NEEDED THIS YEAR’S GRIZ, LADY GRIZ WINS MORE THAN EVER

APOSTLE’S NEW NEWS HOW SALARY STACKS UP

FILM

REMEMBERING LOCAL LEGEND SILKWORM

DILEMMA OF MUSIC THE THE WHITE RAPPER


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


ETC.

MARCH MADNESS: WHY MISSOULA NEEDED THIS YEAR’S GRIZ, LADY GRIZ WINS MORE THAN EVER

APOSTLE’S NEW NEWS HOW SALARY STACKS UP

FILM

REMEMBERING LOCAL LEGEND SILKWORM

DILEMMA OF MUSIC THE THE WHITE RAPPER


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[2] Missoula Independent • March 21 – March 28, 2013

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Cover photo by Cathrine L. Walters

News Voices/Letters Coal (again) and physician-assisted suicide...............................................4 The Week in Review ADUs, bill blasts and budgets..........................................................6 Briefs Plows, prayers and dueling billboards ....................................................................6 Etc. Griz, Lady Griz punch their tickets .............................................................................7 News How Apostle’s new salary stacks up.........................................................................8 News Bullock continues overhaul of Fish, Wildlife and Parks...........................................9 Opinion Food for all seasons, even in Montana..............................................................10 Feature Denise Juneau is at the head of the class ...........................................................14

Arts & Entertainment Arts Bother Ali and the dilemma of the white rapper......................................................18 Music Spider + Octopus, Lake Street Dive, Toki Wright and Sallie Ford and the Sound Outside...................................................................................19 Film Doc offers glimpse of Missoula’s post-punk roots...................................................20 Books Chris Dombrowski talks sex, fishing, poetry and the West ..................................21 Film Wonderstone’s comedy relies on flimsy props ........................................................22 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films .........................................................23 Flash in the Pan The gods of grease ...............................................................................24 Happiest Hour Salty Dog ................................................................................................26 8 Days a Week Looking for a hall pass ............................................................................27 Mountain High North Dakota Downhill .........................................................................33 Agenda Many Faces of Women annual auction................................................................34

Exclusives Street Talk..........................................................................................................................4 In Other News .................................................................................................................12 Classifieds ......................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess......................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y .......................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle..........................................................................................................C-5 This Modern World .....................................................................................................C-12

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson INTERIM ARTS EDITOR Kate Whittle PHOTO EDITOR Cathrine L. Walters CALENDAR EDITOR Jason McMackin STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen, Jamie Rogers COPY EDITOR Brooks Johnson ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Pumpernickel Stewart, Jonathan Marquis CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Allen MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, Chris Dombrowski Andy Smetanka, Brad Tyer, Dave Loos, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Matthew Frank, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Melissa Mylchreest

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2013 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • March 21 – March 28, 2013 [3]


[voices]

STREET TALK Asked Tuesday, March 19, outside the Orange Street Food Farm in Missoula. by Cathrine L. Walters People are still debating the salary increase for Missoula Public Schools Superintendent Alex Apostle. What job have you had where you felt you deserved a higher wage for the level of work you were doing? Follow-up: What’s the cushiest job you’ve ever had?

Kathryn Vaughan: I worked at a guest ranch for a while where I pretty much did every job but only got paid for one. Cleaning toilets is pretty crappy. Cashier calisthenics: Bob Ward’s. All I had to do was stand in front of a register. It was pretty easy.

Jason Loman: A job as a customer service representative at DirecTV. Pass the donuts: I’ve always done pretty hard work, so working at DirecTV is probably the cushiest since I sit around all day in front of a computer.

Mindy Hague: I did a lot of CNA work with Alzheimer patients and for the amount of care you give you don’t get paid nearly enough. It’s 24-hour constant care. Cleaning up: Custodial work, because I could do whatever I wanted and on my own time.

Sally Ann Chisolm: I’m a speech pathologist at Missoula County Public Schools. I’m in a top-notch profession and should be competitive with other professionals with similar experience and training. Hard knocks: Have I had a cushy job? I don’t think I have.

Ryan Yarbrough: I feel like I get paid too much for what I do now. I was always a waiter so I always felt I was well compensated for what I did. Siesta!: Now I’m a lumber broker. I buy and sell lumber. I grew up in Mexico so I’m bilingual and do a lot with the manufacturing down there.

[4] Missoula Independent • March 21 – March 28, 2013

Off the mark Dan Person’s recent article on coal development in the Powder River Basin (see “Coal train coming,” March 7) contained a lot of information—some of it true and some of it, unfortunately, far off the mark. This sentence strays the farthest: “Until now, any mining in that corner of the Powder River Basin has been staved off, thanks largely to the efforts of [candy billionaire] Forrest Mars Jr.” What? Forrest Mars’ only role—ever—was to try and keep an industrial railroad from crossing his own ranch. He was never involved in “staving off ” coal mining. Where on earth did the author of this article pick up such a preposterous idea? Let’s give credit where credit is due— to Wally McRae and his son Clint (mentioned in Person’s article), Nick Golder, Irv Alderson and his daughter Jeanie and her husband Terry Punt, and many other local ranchers and other citizens who have stood in the path of coal speculators for decades. And let’s not forget the many people outside the Powder River Basin who have been perennial actors in Montana coal wars long before Forrest Mars decided that a Montana ranch would be a great place to vacation. I have been fighting the Tongue River Railroad ever since I bought my ranch in 1991. I joined the Northern Plains Resource Council shortly thereafter and Northern Plains has helped me keep my ranch and the Tongue River Valley free of the this industrial railroad. Person’s article is not without value, but trying to credit an absentee billionaire with the work local families have been doing for 40 years—this reflects a serious misunderstanding of what has happened in coal country. Mark Fix Miles City

Coal’s far reach Last Thursday I sat in my car, peering south toward Mount Helena, watching the sunset. Held up, parked on Benton as a

L

westbound train barreled by. It is unfair to say just a train held me up, as there were over a dozen cars ahead of me. Checking my side view showed just as many parked behind me, with more to come, backing up traffic all the way onto Custer. I cross these tracks at least twice daily. Sitting there, it hit me. I realized how far-reaching the detriment of Otter Creek’s coal could be. Now, I do not make it to Bighorn Canyon as often since moving from Billings, but southeast Montana’s serene beauty stays with me. It would be a shame to let the

“Imagine the noise, overloaded railways, pollution and jamming of traffic by the effective severing of our towns.”

Tongue River Railroad disrupt everything in its path, ripping through ranches and private property, taking away from one of our state’s treasures. And, that is just the beginning. How many trains would pass by our communities? Imagine the noise, overloaded railways, pollution and jamming of traffic by the effective severing of our towns. This cannot be accepted.

The economic costs are clear and the threats to the health of our communities are very real. Who stands to gain from this coal production? Certainly not every town between Otter Creek and the Idaho border, and definitely not Montanan communities—these are coal exports. Consider the consequences. Call your elected officials, draft letters and let them know Otter Creek is not okay. Thor Kasenko Helena

Yes on HB 505 The Montana Legislature is considering the question of physician-assisted suicide. The Senate has rejected an Oregon-style bill that would have legalized such a practice. The House has passed HB 505, which will end the confusion about assisted suicide in Montana by stating it is illegal. I am in favor of this bill and wish to correct misconceptions recently expressed within the past two weeks in several Montana newspapers. HB 505 seeks to clarify the relevant law, which has been misinterpreted as a result of the Montana Supreme Court Baxter decision of 2009. This decision did not legalize physician-assisted suicide, contrary to claims made by others. The court only stated that a patient’s consent, if given, may be used as a legal defense. Lawyers are scratching their heads about the meaning and the ramifications of this decision, which is why the legislature should act to provide needed clarity. HB 505 only addresses the aiding or solicitation of suicide, including physician-assisted suicide. It specifically does not include end of life palliative care in which a dying person receives medication to alleviate pain or any act to withhold or withdraw life-sustaining treatment authorized by the Montana Rights of the Terminally Ill Act. Passage of HB 505 would leave these rights unchanged. Please contact your Senator by calling 406-444-4800 and tell them to end the confusion. Please tell them to vote “yes” on HB 505. Rick Blevins Great Falls

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via email: editor@missoulanews.com.


missoulanews.com • March 21 – March 28, 2013 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Cathrine L. Walters

Wednesday, March 13 A motion by Missoula Democratic Rep. Ellie Hill to revive a bill that would increase state oversight of religious youth homes, including St. Ignatius’ Pinehaven Christian Children’s Ranch, fails in a 45-52 vote.

Thursday, March 14 Montana Highway Patrol, Ravalli County sheriffs, Stevensville police and the Three Mile Rural Fire District respond when a 51-year-old woman crashes her ATV on Store Lane in Florence. She is flown by Life Flight to a Missoula hospital and treated for head trauma.

Friday, March 15 Mount Jumbo’s Saddle Road and areas south of it, including the Backbone Trail, are reopened for spring frolicking after the annual three-and-half-month closure to protect wintering elk herds.

Saturday, March 16 University of Montana basketball players Kenzie De Boer, Katie Baker, Will Cherry, Kareem Jamar and Jordan Gregory are all named to the Big Sky Conference all-tournament teams after their respective squads win conference titles.

Sunday, March 17 Missoula County deputies respond to the Lewis and Clark Trailer Park after a resident shoots an aggressive visitor in the forehead. Law enforcement says the injured man is taken to the hospital and listed in stable condition.

Monday, March 18 Missoula City Council President Marilyn Marler warns her colleagues to be civil as the lawmaking body again discusses whether to allow accessory dwelling units in single-family neighborhoods. Council sets a public hearing on ADUs for April 22.

Tuesday, March 19 The Montana House deliberates for less than 90 minutes before voting 100-0 to pass a $9 billion state budget. Afterward, representatives stand and applaud their bipartisan efforts.

Brittany Brown and Austin Rosenbaum, wearing protective goggles on left, present their Flaming Petri Dishes project to onlookers at Big Sky High School’s Science Circus on Sat., March 16. Wearing 3-D glasses—or holding glasses in front of the camera lens—enables viewers to see different light spectrums being emitted from the burning nitrate salts inside each dish.

Abortion

Camped out for “saves” Every day since Feb 13, Diane Rotering has spent most of her time standing on a plot of dying grass across the street from the Blue Mountain Clinic. She is not alone. As vigil coordinator for the Missoula chapter of the faith-based, anti-abortion organization 40 Days For Life, Rotering makes sure all the people standing with her—mostly retirement-aged men and women—are kept current on the day’s Bible readings and prayers. “We’re not protesting,” she says. “We’re simply asking people to pray to end abortion.” Since 2004, 40 Days For Life has facilitated demonstrations throughout the U. S. The campaign, which happens simultaneously in over 300 cities twice a year, centers around supporters gathering outside abortion clinics for 12 hours a day for nearly six weeks. According to its website, the mission “is to bring together the body of Christ in a spirit of unity during a focused 40 day campaign of prayer, fasting, and peaceful activism … to turn hearts and minds from a culture of death to a culture of life.” The group claims to have discouraged more than 7,000 women from receiving abortions.

Missoula Coordinator Eric Winegart says the current campaign, which is Missoula’s fifth and runs until March 24, has not yet confirmed the prevention of any abortions (he calls them “saves”), but feels the “culture of death” is strong in the Garden City. “Missoula in particular has a lot of evil,” he says. “We’re here for the women and men who feel that pressure.” But some staff members at BMC feel the group’s peaceful efforts are misguided. BMC Director of Development, Outreach and Communication Lynsey Bourke says the demonstrators’ presence can be intimidating to the clinic’s clientele, the majority of whom are there to receive basic health care. “Eight to 13 percent of the people who come in our doors receive the care they have a problem with … ,” she says. “They just stand out there all day judging people.” That some women may be made uncomfortable by their tactics doesn’t bother supporters of 40 Days For Life. Rotering, who describes herself as a “global Christian,” says having faith in Christ demands this sort of action. “The baby would choose to live, not go in the bucket,” she says. “The baby has a choice no one is thinking of—except God and us.” Jamie Rogers

Lar Autio, M.D. - 329.7398 Board Certified • Family Practice [6] Missoula Independent • March 21 – March 28, 2013

Open space

Buying the farm As spring shoots poke through the soil at the River Road Neighborhood Farm and Community Garden, farm manager Greg Price rattles off the dozens of different types of greens that he’ll nurture this season. “Kale, corn, potatoes,” he says, “celeriac, which is a celery root...” Price has served as the farm manager since 2002. As the Missoula City Council deliberates a proposal that, if approved, will enable him to plant a wider variety of produce on the 3.25-acre property, he’s even more excited about the farm’s prospects than in years past. “It’s a huge deal for us,” he says. Missoula nonprofit Garden City Harvest manages the farm, which already grows more than 25,000 pounds of food annually. That food is donated to the Poverello Center and sold through a community share agriculture program. Additionally, the farm rents 55 community garden plots to primarily low- and moderate-income people for $40 per season. For the past several years, Garden City Harvest has leased the property, growing food on about half of the


[news] parcel. In an effort to ensure the farm is preserved from development in perpetuity, the nonprofit is asking the Missoula City Council to draw $200,000 from a pot of money set aside in 2006 to protect open space and to help buy the farm. Jackie Corday, Missoula’s open space program manager, says the project, if approved, will fill a thus far unmet directive included in the city’s 2006 Open Space Plan that calls to preserve urban farms. “It’s the first community garden that we’ve ever been asked to contribute money toward,” Corday says. The entire purchase price, including associated costs, is $440,000. Garden City Harvest has pledged to foot the remaining $240,000 with a fundraising drive. Corday acknowledges that some may see the purchase as a steep expenditure. However, she says it’s tough to find land in Missoula’s urban core that’s suitable for community gardening. This project is especially valuable, Corday says, because it serves people who might otherwise face challenges accessing fresh produce on a regular basis. City Council and the Missoula Board of County Commissioners will deliberate the proposal April 22. Jessica Mayrer

between May 31 and the end of September last year. An estimated 91 percent of those visitors were nonresidents. More than 200 surveyed travelers said they’d spent at least one night in Red Lodge. In addition to its statement, Bullock’s office offered a 1991 memo from Curtis Menefee, the Rocky Mountain regional solicitor for the U.S. Department of the Interior at the time, outlining responsibility for maintenance of the Beartooth Highway. In it, Menefee writes that “because it is a national park approach road, the National Park Service, until such time as it can transfer the responsibility, must maintain the road.” Those duties include posting signs and warning motorists of hazardous conditions as well as “the usual maintenance actions such as repaving, filling potholes, striping, and even reconstruction of the road.”

Sequester

Yellowstone rebuffed Despite an estimated $1.3 million in budget cuts resulting from the sequester, Yellowstone National Park may not have to delay its opening after all. Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead officially came forward last week with an offer: The Wyoming Department of Transportation would supply equipment and labor to plow the park’s roads, provided the communities of Cody and Jackson could raise the money to fund that work. The announcement came just a week or so after Yellowstone Superintendent Dan Wenk contacted both Mead and Montana Gov. Steve Bullock requesting help. Mead seemed downright eager to answer the call. Bullock’s office, on the other hand, rebuffed Wenk’s plea with not-so-subtle irritation. “Yellowstone Park has been trying to get out of maintaining the federal highway since 1982—the same year their lawyers said it was the Park’s responsibility,” Bullock spokesman Kevin O’Brien wrote in a statement March 7. “We’ll continue to be in touch with Park management as they work through this problem, but we hope they find a solution that allows them to plow the highway in a timely fashion. Doing so would be good for tourists, good for Yellowstone and good for the communities surrounding and supporting it.” According to a recent report from the Institute for Tourism and Recreation Research at the University of Montana, the Beartooth Highway saw 178,904 vehicles

Ironically, back when Menefee drafted the memo, Wyoming was “adamantly opposed to assuming any responsibilities for the road or even agreeing that funds appropriated for maintenance of forest roads be spent on the Beartooth.” It appeared to legal experts at the time that “any solution to the dispersed responsibility that presently exists can only be worked out between the two federal agencies [the Federal Highway Administration and the National Park Service] and possibly the state of Montana.” Mead’s acquiescence—combined with Bullock’s reluctance—seems to have turned that dated assessment on its head, at least for 2013. Alex Sakariassen

Israel

Billboard wars Soon after a pensive-looking cowboy popped up on a billboard alongside Interstate 90 between the Orange and Reserve street exits two months ago, the phones

BY THE NUMBERS Job decrease in the state between December and January, according to total employment estimates from the Montana Department of Labor. Overall, unemployment in Montana increased by a tenth of a percent in January to 5.7 percent.

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started ringing at the Har Shalom synagogue in Missoula. “We got calls from people in the community, nonJews as well,” says Har Shalom Board of Directors President Bert Chessin. It wasn’t the cowboy that got the phones ringing. It was the message the middle-aged man wearing a 10-gallon hat appeared to be pondering: “$8 million a day to Israel just doesn’t make sense!” The Council for the National Interest, a Virginiabased nonprofit, paid for the billboard. Executive Director Phil Giraldi says the nonprofit takes issue with military aid provided by the United States to Israel and designed its campaign to start a conversation about this country’s fiscal priorities. “It’s essentially a question of Israel getting a large amount of money,” he says. The message, however, hit a nerve. Chessin, for one, says the billboard is one-sided and superficial, as well as anti-Israel. Aiming to reclaim the battlefield of public opinion, Har Shalom mobilized and joined forces with Stand With Us, an international nonprofit based out of Los Angeles, to promote its own message. SWU educates about Israel and, according to its website, combats “the extremism and anti-Semitism that often distorts the issues.” SWU’s Gary Ratner says his organization commonly encounters messages like the one in Missoula. “It’s called ‘BDS’—boycott, divestment and sanction,” he says. “It’s an attempt to undermine American support for Israel and the joint values that we hold.” When alerted to such efforts, SWU counters with its own themes, fueling a public relations war that’s played out on buses, billboards and in train stations across the country. Typically the skirmishes occur in progressive strongholds such as San Francisco, Portland and New York, but now it’s stretched to Missoula. This week, after the Council for the National Interest’s billboard contract expired, Har Shalom and SWU paid to erect a new billboard in the same location. For the next two months, rather than the pensive cowboy, commuters heading east on I-90 will see the following message: “Tell Congress Not to Support Palestinian Groups like Hamas, because they don’t want peace.” “We felt that [the other billboard] shouldn’t go unanswered,” Chessin says. Jessica Mayrer

ETC. When University of Montana guard Will Cherry let fly a three-pointer with less than a minute remaining in the Big Sky Conference championship game against Weber State, 7,000 Griz fans were on their feet before the ball was through the net. The basket put UM up 62-57 and incited in the crowd that rare tingle of connectivity that reminds us of why we love sports: everyone at Dahlberg Arena knew the Wildcats weren’t making a comeback. Griz Nation finally had something to smile about. Of course, if you are a Griz basketball fan, you’ve been smiling all season. The Griz won an all-time best 25 straight conference games (dating back to the end of last season) and finished the year with a 19-1 conference record. Head coach Wayne Tinkle has now led UM to three NCAA tournament bids in the last four years and been named Big Sky Coach of the Year two years running. Not to be outdone, the Lady Griz also punched their ticket to the NCAA tournament with a victory in front of the hometown crowd. The win marked legendary coach Robin Selvig’s 798th career victory and 20th March Madness appearance. He was also named the conference’s coach of the year. But the vibe in Dahlberg Arena last Saturday wasn’t only about records, trophies and brackets. Since Dec. 2011, Griz Nation has been in the news for all the wrong reasons. Allegations of sexual assaults recently saw one Griz running back sentenced to prison and a quarterback acquitted after a trial that garnered national attention. In Missoula, the publicity has made pledging your allegiance to the maroon and silver a sometimes polarizing statement that has little to say about sports. Thank Dr. Naismith for basketball. Tinkle and Selvig’s squads are shining at a time when UM needs them most, and they are reminding the skeptics why people gravitate toward fandom. Rare is the feeling of jumping to your feet in unison with 7,000 other people, and rare is the sight of a 6’9” men’s basketball coach throwing his hands in the air and stomping around like a gloating mama chicken. And when you are a Griz fan, rare is the national television broadcast where a sports analyst talks about your team, as CBS’s Seth Davis did last Sunday evening when discussing Syracuse’s second round NCAA tournament game against the heavy underdog from Montana. He’s calling for an upset.

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missoulanews.com • March 21 – March 28, 2013 [7]


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Administration matters How Apostle’s sizable new salary stacks up by Jamie Rogers

On Monday, Jan. 14, the Missoula County Public School board voted 6-4 to award MCPS Superintendent Alex Apostle a 13 percent raise. The new three-year contract boosts Apostle’s salary from $155,000 to $175,000 for the 2012-13 school year; to $185,000 in 2013-14; and to $200,000 for 2014-15. The board’s decision has been met with ire from MCPS employees, students and members of the community. In late January, Hellgate High senior Yetta Stein began an online petition calling for Apostle to reject the raise; to date, 2,000 people have signed the petition. Then, in early February,

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dozens of people spoke out against the contract in a three-hour public comment session before the MCPS board. Just last week, the issue was raised at another meeting, where board members pleaded with critics to look forward and not belabor an already done deal. Many are still not ready to move on. A number of complaints focus on the fact the district is already strapped for cash and is in no position to give raises, while others cite Apostle’s recent job hunt—he was a finalist in April 2012 for the same position in Spokane—as evidence of his waning commitment to Missoula. Still, supporters of the

raise claim Apostle has been a stalwart leader for local schools, pointing out that his Graduation Matters campaign has garnered praise from Montana State Superintendent of Public Instruction Denise Juneau. No matter your stance on Apostle’s compensation, the numbers are difficult to interpret without some context. We compiled salary information on other educators and prominent local public figures to see how Apostle’s new salary stacks up. jrogers@missoulanews.com

2013 Salary Comparison Royce Engstrom, president, University of Montana: $289,466

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Shelley Redinger, superintendent, Spokane Public Schools: $240,000

Alex Apostle, superintendent, MCPS: $175,000

Mick Delaney, head football coach, UM: $160,691

Wayne Tinkle, men’s basketball coach, UM: $135,000

Darlene Schottle, superintendent, Kalispell School District : $121,043

Steve Bullock, governor, Montana: $108,167

High school principal, MCPS (average): $106,637

Denise Juneau, state superintendent of public instruction, Montana: $104,635

Tom Korst, superintendent, Hamilton School District : $95,000

Tenured professor in the English Department, UM (average): $76,426

Teacher with masters degree and 23 years experience, MCPS (maximum): $67,831

Entry-level high school teacher with BA, MCPS: $32,517

20K

40K

60K

80K 100K 120K 140K 160K 180K 200K 220K 240K 260K 280K 300K

Sources: UM Human Resource Services; Spokane Public Schools human resources; MCPS Human Resources and Labor Relations Office; Kalispell School District human resources; Montana State Human Resources division website; Hamilton School District human resources; and MCPS website

[8] Missoula Independent • March 21 – March 28, 2013


[news]

New faces, old issues Bullock continues overhaul of Fish, Wildlife and Parks by Alex Sakariassen

After six years on the Montana Fish, of the agency’s acquisition policies and cur- sition on the commission. His reappointment was narrowly approved on a 27-23 Wildlife and Parks Commission, there’s just rent land holdings. Vermillion maintains his own take on vote. That term expires in 2015. one thing Dan Vermillion hasn’t done yet: Despite new faces, a new chair and new Serve as the commission’s chairman. And the new commission’s top priority. “The biggest issue the department is charges from a new governor, Vermillion while Vermillion says the position “is probably not that different than being vice facing is working on and improving our re- feels confident the FWP Commission will chairman,” the post he’s held for the past lationships out on the landscape with continue to face the same divisive issues that two years, the time to round out his tenure landowners, with sportsmen, with Mon- have punctuated the entirety of his tenure. has come. Now the Livingston-based fly tanans,” Vermillion says. “I really feel like The 2013 Legislature has seen a revival of fishing guide will be heading the five-mem- Fish, Wildlife and Parks is one of those agen- many of the 2011 proposals that plagued ber board charged with overseeing the cies that is integral to the quality of life we the agency on wolves and bison. Regarding broader actions of one of Montana’s most enjoy in Montana. It’s an agency that makes the latter, conservative lawmakers have redecisions about some resources that people newed their efforts this spring to fight the high-profile agencies. agency’s push, spearGov. Steve Bullock headed by former Gov. announced the details Brian Schweitzer, to estabof his FWP Commislish new herds of wild sion overhaul last bison in the state. week. Aside from VerOne of Bullock’s new million taking over the appointees may play to role previously filled by the advantage of those Bob Ream, who will supporting the relocation maintain a seat on the of bison to tribal lands. commission, Bullock Lawrence Wetsit, director released the names of of community services at three new commissionthe Fort Peck Community ers. The announceCollege, will replace rement came just signing commissioner A.J. months after Bullock “Rusty” Stafne. Fort Peck replaced FWP Director tribal chairman Floyd Joe Maurier with MauAzure saluted Stafne in rier’s immediate predDecember 2011 for his ecessor, Jeff Hagener, the agency’s director Dan Vermillion, pictured here teaching President Barack Obama how role in the FWP Commisto fly fish on the East Gallatin River in August 2009, was just appointed sion’s approval to relocate from 2001 to 2008. the new FWP Commission chairman. 63 Yellowstone bison to The promotion to chairman came as something of a surprise care about very passionately, and we’re the reservation. When the bison finally arfor Vermillion. He’d conversed with Bul- tasked with managing wildlife, which is rived last spring, Wetsit, himself an outspolock’s gubernatorial campaign last year re- owned by the public and spends a lot of ken advocate of the cultural benefits of bison conservation, told the National garding fish and game topics—particularly time residing on private land.” wolves and bison, two hot topics in the Vermillion adds he was the logical Wildlife Federation that “the bison’s return south central region of the state Vermillion choice for chairman, given his status as the represents a renewed celebration of who we represents—and had even sent a letter to most senior member of the commission. are as a people.” Fort Peck board member the governor-elect in December requesting But his tenure hasn’t been without its rough Stoney Anketell says he’s sure that Wetsit to be appointed chair. Nearly three months patches. The state Senate nearly rejected his will do what he can to “further the cause.” Wetsit, an avid sportsman and former passed before Bullock’s office responded, current term back in 2011, twice voting asking if Vermillion still wanted the position. along party lines against his reappointment. Fort Peck tribal chairman, believes it’s his “Do I have a big agenda that I’m Vermillion believes the friction came as a re- cultural responsibility to promote an undergoing to try to push as chairman?” Vermil- sult of a contentious reduction in elk standing of how to live alongside all wildlife. lion asks. “No. I don’t see that as my role archery permits in eastern Montana in the While it’s not his sole interest in joining the necessarily. I see the commission’s role in late 2000s. The reduction resulted in limited FWP Commission, Wetsit considers the apgeneral as a sort of citizen’s outreach body opportunities for nonresident hunters, pointment an opportunity to “educate peothat deals with the public, gets feedback prompting backlash from outfitters and ple about the buffalo.” The species has been greatly misunderstood by many in the curfrom the public on issues that affect fish, landowners. “I was the person who sat on and set rent debate, Wetsit says. wildlife and parks and then works with “The buffalo are at the heart of every up an effort—a citizen’s group—to try to the department.” Vermillion may have his own ideas take another look at that issue and come Indian,” he adds. “We’re plains people ... If about the FWP Commission’s role, but Bul- up with other solutions,” Vermillion says. there’s anything that does come before the lock’s recent announcement also came with “Unfortunately, despite going through it [FWP Commission], I definitely will support a pair of gubernatorial charges for the new twice, even citizen’s groups couldn’t agree a lot of the past efforts the state of Montana and the tribes have made.” commissioners. Bullock wants the commis- on a solution.” Largely due to the failure of that effort, sion to develop FWP’s budget for the 2015 Legislature and launch an in-depth review Vermillion found himself battling for his poasakariassen@missoulanews.com

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missoulanews.com • March 21 – March 28, 2013 [9]


[opinion]

Four-season feast Montana co-op maximizes local food all year long by Dean Williamson

Most of what I’ve read lately about food in America makes me lose my appetite. Outbreaks of deadly pathogens that sicken or even kill people. Chemical spray and dead zones. Exploited workers. “Hollywood Food” that looks great but lacks taste and nutrition. It’s enough to make me want to sell my vegetable farm. That is why I am so eager to tell a story about how a few vegetable farmers in one small community are collaborating with a food co-op to realize one big idea: Providing locally grown food year-round. It’s not going to counteract all the bad news, but it is hopeful—and hope is the reason I haven’t sold my farm. The Community Food Co-op in Bozeman is surrounded by mountains, ranches, farms and hay fields, and for its entire 34year history, it has bought only locally produced fresh food grown within 100 miles of Bozeman. This year, it’s planning to buy more—a lot more. Already, in 2012, the Coop doubled the amount of local produce it purchased. This was partly a result of increased demand, encouraged by some of the Co-op’s organizational decisions. The Co-op maintains a central kitchen, where almost all the food is prepared for delivery to its two retail food stores. The management is made up of complete and utter foodies, who understand the ethics of eating locally and the environmental and economic benefits involved. They also understand budgets. The Co-op uses produce daily in its salad bars and prepares hot meals to sell in both food stores. One major change involves how it’s using local produce in the processed foods that can be stored for sale throughout the year, with pumpkin pies as a great example. Right before Thanksgiving in 2011, the Co-op sold roughly $5,000

[10] Missoula Independent • March 21 – March 28, 2013

worth of pies, using canned, locally grown, pre-made pumpkin for filling. That was amazing enough. Last year, though, using local pumpkins that had been processed a month earlier, the Co-op sold nearly $12,000 in pies in the same time period. The local pumpkin surge was a success.

“Processing removes the significant barrier of seasonality, which has historically limited the availability of Montana-grown produce.” To be sure, an extra marketing effort helped create more awareness about the pies and their ingredients, undoubtedly helping sales. And because the Co-op was purchasing in wholesale quantities, growers like myself could drop our prices a bit, meaning that the pies were also less expensive. But that was only the beginning. In 2013, the Co-op wants to significantly increase the amount of local food it uses, mostly by canning, freezing and pickling. Of course, this requires investment—around $50,000 in equipment and 60 more hours

a week in additional staffing during the harvest months. The costs are not paltry, but between grants and increased sales, the Coop anticipates recouping this money within two years. This is a revolutionary change for selling local food. Processing removes the significant barrier of seasonality, which has historically limited the availability of Montana-grown produce. Now, I can sell more food than I could in years past, when I could only sell the Co-op what it could use immediately. It was still a considerable amount, but the seasons limited my sales. With processing, I can grow more food in the summer, keep my prices down for the Co-op, and in return the Co-op can buy more food and sell it for months. Everyone wins: I find a bigger market, making my business more stable. The Co-op finds a steadier supply of local foods, its shoppers get the food they like to eat and the prices stay affordable. This proves that communities can take control of their own food supplies while also helping farmers who use ethical, sustainable, no-spray practices to forge a stronger relationship with a local food organization. I like this story because it shows how any community can make significant moves toward food security and self-reliance, all the while showing positive results on the bottom line. We don’t need laws or scare tactics to make these changes, just trust and strong taste buds. Dean Williamson is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). He is a vegetable farmer in Bozeman, where he also sits on the Board of the Community Food Co-op and coordinates the Sustainable Food & Bioenergy Systems program at Montana State University.


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missoulanews.com • March 21 – March 28, 2013 [11]


[quirks]

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - After finding a gunman in his home in Lauderdale Lakes, Fla., Jacques Baillargeon, 66, sprayed window cleaner in his face. The robber dropped a crowbar and a skullcap, and fled. Sheriff’s officials traced the man, identified as Nathaniel Lee Smith, 29, to his home after he called 911 to report someone had broken into his home and stolen a crowbar and a skullcap matching those left behind. Investigators concluded that Smith reported the items missing to cover himself if they were traced to him. (South Florida Sun-Sentinel) Mario Hili, 64, avoided thousands of dollars in traffic fines by reporting his car stolen each time a traffic camera caught him speeding or running a red light. After the latest incident, Senior Constable Siobhan Daly told an Australian court “it was the 21st time since 2000 that Hili had reported his car stolen. Each time he would find it himself at various locations around Geelong.” Daly said that after the latest incident, police fingerprinted the car and found only Hili’s prints. (Australia’s Geelong Advertiser)

ADDICTED TO MONEY - When Maureen O’Connor, 66, a former mayor of San Diego, appeared in court to answer charges that she had stolen $2,088,000 from a charitable foundation set up by her late husband, her lawyers disclosed that she bet more than $1 billion at casinos to feed her gambling addiction. Noting that O’Connor began gambling after her husband, fast-food chain Jack-in-the-Box founder Robert O. Peterson, died in 1994, lawyer Eugene Iredale stated his client’s actions fit “the syndrome known as grief gambling.” She went through her personal fortune of between $40 million and $50 million, took out second and third mortgages on her home, auctioned her belongings and borrowed from friends. After O’Connor accepted a plea deal giving her two years to repay the foundation, Iredale declared, “This is a woman who has been through real trauma.” (The New York Times) Rita Crundwell, 60, pleaded guilty to stealing more than $54 million from Dixon, Ill., while she was the small town’s comptroller. The thefts occurred over more than 20 years and funded a lavish lifestyle, which included prize-winning horses, expensive jewelry, luxury cars and extravagant parties. During this time, city officials said, her massive thefts crippled Dixon’s budget. She blamed the shortfalls on an economic downturn and late payments from the state government. Noting that since her arrest, his client’s cooperation with authorities in selling off assets toward restitution “has been extraordinary,” public defender Paul Gaziano urged a short sentence. Instead, U.S. District Judge Philip Reinhard sentenced her to 19 years and seven months in prison, declaring, “You showed much greater passion for the welfare of your horses than the people of Dixon you represented.” (Chicago Tribune and Associated Press)

WHEN GUNS ARE OUTLAWED - Authorities charged Timothy John Howard, 30, with robbing another man in Tulsa, Okla., by throwing porcelain tiles at him. (Tulsa World) Police arrested Erik Brown, 36, in Port St. Lucie, Fla., after they said he struck a teenage relative in the face with a Taco Bell burrito during a domestic dispute. Officers reported the victim had “burrito cheese, sauce and meat all over his clothing and face.” (The Smoking Gun) Police accused Ryan Herman, 23, of trying to take a dozen employees at a Wal-Mart store in Glendale, Ariz., hostage by threatening them with a fire extinguisher. When police arrived and told Herman to drop the fire extinguisher, an officer said Herman raised it in a “threatening manner” and had to be Tasered. (Phoenix’s The Arizona Republic)

CLOAK OF INVISIBILITY - A new fashion line aims to make wearers invisible to drone cameras. “Stealth Wear,” by designer Adam Harvey, is made from silver-infused fabric that reflects heat, thereby blocking thermal-imaging cameras. “There’s a lot of products in the stealth area that are too militaristic or are too associated with the tinfoil hat crowd,” Harvey said. “I tried to do something that’s in between.” The line consists of a hoodie, which costs $473, and a burqa, which sells for $2,365. “These are really high-quality fashion garments, not everyday wear,” said Harvey, who previously designed an “anti-paparazzi” handbag that detects and neutralizes camera flashes, and the OFF pocket, which disables cell phone signals. (U.S. News & World Report) SECOND-AMENDMENT FOLLIES - While people entering the State Capitol building in Austin, Texas, wait to be screened by metal detectors and scanners looking for concealed weapons, armed lawmakers may bypass the lines by showing their concealed-carry permit. Of the 181 members of the state House and Senate, as many as half are armed, according to Alice Tripp, legislative director of the Texas State Rifle Association, who said, “There’s a couple who, I used to say, their desks would qualify as a gun show.” Several lobbyists, reporters and other regular visitors to the Capitol who don’t carry firearms nevertheless underwent training to get a concealed-handgun license just to qualify for the express entry. (The New York Times) Since the Dec. 14 shootings at a school in Newtown, Conn., communities in Maine, Virginia, Utah, Pennsylvania and Georgia have passed or considered laws requiring citizens to own guns. “Basically this is a deterrent ordinance,” Councilman Duane Cronic said at the meeting in Nelson, Ga., whose city council unanimously approved mandatory gun ownership. “It’s no more than putting a sign in your front yard saying that ‘ADT protects this home.’ Now the person that may be there (checking) your home out to cause harm to you or your family to break into your house has to decide, ‘When I break that door down, what's on the other side of that door?’” (Associated Press and CNN)

WE’RE FROM THE GOVERNMENT, AND WE’RE HERE TO HELP - Because electric and hybrid motor vehicles don’t make enough noise at low speeds to warn pedestrians, bicyclists and the visually impaired, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration proposed requiring them to make additional noise at speeds slower than 18 miles per hour. The federal agency said it would leave it up automakers how to make the vehicles noisier. (The Washington Post) TOM RIDGE SOLUTION - After the North Carolina House Judiciary Committee approved a bill making it a felony to purposefully expose “private parts,” including a woman’s “nipple, or any portion of the areola,” state Rep. Tim Moore pointed out that women could avoid prosecution by applying duct tape to their nipples. “You know what they say,” Moore quipped. “Duct tape fixes everything.” (Raleigh’s WRAL-TV)

[12] Missoula Independent • March 21 – March 28, 2013


missoulanews.com • March 21 – March 28, 2013 [13]


n election night 2012, Montana Superintendent of Public Instruction Denise Juneau sat glued to her home computer. Every so often she’d hit the refresh button of her browser, checking to see if the secretary of state’s office had updated the vote tally, hoping to learn whether she would keep her job. “I was probably up for 52 hours straight,” Juneau recalls. “Just pushing refresh, that’s all I did.” Earlier that night, she attended an election night party with the Montana Democrats at the Great Northern Hotel in Helena. As results started coming in, and incumbent Democrats like Secretary of State Linda McCulloch and Auditor Monica Lindeen and gubernatorial candidate Steve Bullock all pulled away to victory, cheers erupted in the convention hall. The numbers for Juneau, however, were always too close to call.

O

“Everybody got to do their celebrations,” Juneau says. “I was just sitting there.” That’s when Juneau retreated to her home not far from the Capitol and started hitting refresh on her computer. As the hours wore on, Juneau would creep ahead and then lose her lead, only to gain ground again in the race against her Republican challenger, Sandy Welch of Martin City. A few members of her staff stayed by her side. Her mom, former state legislator Carol Juneau, and dad brought her food. A few months prior, no one would have guessed that Denise Juneau would be caught in such a tight race. It was just September, after all, when she traveled to Charlotte, N.C., to address the 2012 Democratic National Convention. In front of an enthusiastic crowd of 35,000 and a nationwide television audience, Juneau talked about being a member of the Mandan and Hidatsa tribes and growing up on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation. With a small

American flag pinned to the lapel of her dark blazer, she talked about her unprecedented political rise and a startling fact in today’s culture—she is the first and only Native American woman to ever be elected to a statewide office, anywhere. She said that it had been a long journey composed of painful and hopeful chapters for her to arrive on that stage. “We deserve to be part of the American dream,” she said. Denise’s mother, Carol, was in attendance as a Montana delegate, and says she felt a sense of wonder as her daughter addressed the crowd. Carol Juneau, a trailblazer in the indigenous rights movement herself, was acutely aware of the history she was witnessing that night. Eighty-eight years after Congress made American Indians U.S. citizens, 47 years after lawmakers made it possible for all indigenous adults to cast ballots and 5 years after Carol Juneau herself was sworn in as the first American Indian

woman to serve in the Montana Senate, her daughter walked firmly into the national political limelight. “We were all chanting, ‘Juneau, Juneau,’ as she walked up to the stage,” she says. Fast-forward two months, however, and there were no chants. It was just Denise Juneau and a computer screen showing her nail-biting returns. On Nov. 14, the secretary of state released unofficial results showing Juneau ahead of Welch by 2,264 votes. Welch challenged that total, saying publicly that Election Day glitches, such as voting machine errors, could have skewed the numbers. Citing “widespread” problems in polling places, Welch asked a Flathead County District Judge to order a recount. On Dec. 7, the judge complied. On Dec. 11, Welch abruptly dropped her request, citing challenges raising the $115,000 required to verify the total.

PROGRESSIVES HAIL HER AS A NATIONAL STAR. CONSERVATIVES ALMOST BEAT HER IN THE LAST ELECTION. WHICHEVER WAY YOU GRADE STATE SUPERINTENDENT DENISE JUNEAU, HER IMPROBABLE RISE IS IMPOSSIBLE TO IGNORE. by Jessica Mayrer • photos by Cathrine L. Walters

Denise Juneau speaks at the Indian Education for All Best Practices Conference. Carol Juneau, Denise’s mother, helped create the program that her daughter now oversees as state superintendent.

[14] Missoula Independent • March 21 – March 28, 2013


Photo courtesy of Denise Juneau

Stan and Carol Juneau with their children, Ron and Denise.

Thirty-six days after Election Day, the secretary of state officially declared Juneau the winner. She won by 2,231 of the 468,563 votes cast. The whole ordeal drained Juneau. “I didn’t realize how much stress I was living under,” she says. But after a short respite, she was back at work. Spend enough time with Juneau and you realize she’s not one to back down from a fight—nor rest for long even after she’s won.

I

t’s Friday evening at the Governor’s Mansion in Helena and Montana leaders, including Montana Democratic Party Chair Jim Elliott, former U.S. Congressman Pat Williams, Planned Parenthood CEO Stacy James and Helena Republican Rep. Liz Bangerter, among others, munch on cream puffs, stuffed mushrooms and fruit salad under gold-colored chandeliers. Inside the mansion, large living room windows overlook the Capitol Rotunda. Chairs are embroidered with the Montana state seal, depicting the words “Oro y Plata,” the state’s motto, which means “gold and silver.” Denise Juneau sips a diet soda and works the crowd. Everyone’s gathered to celebrate International Women’s Day and to support a fundraiser to benefit the “Montana Woman’s Mural.” When the mural is painted next year, it will commemorate the 100-year anniversary of women gaining the right to vote. But while the event is focused on International Women’s Day, Juneau is more concerned with the day’s developments in the state House of Representatives. Earlier, the House Appropriations Committee heard Juneau’s budget pitch for funding Montana Public Schools. She’s asking the legislature to invest $1.5 billion into the K-12 education system this session. While mingling at the fundraiser, she mines lawmakers for more information about the fate of her request. She learns

that efforts to trim her budget will likely be rolled out the following Monday. At one point she lingers in a corner of the room with first-term Democratic Rep. Kim Dudik of Missoula. The women attended the University of Montana School of Law together and Dudik now sits on the House Appropriations Committee that helps decide her budget’s fate. As the event comes to a close, Juneau almost collides with Gov. Steve Bullock in a doorway between the living room and dining room. After hearing from legislators all evening, Juneau expresses concern about where her budget stands and the upcoming vote.

“I’ll have a bad day on Monday, I think,” Juneau tells the governor. “I’ll call you about it.” Juneau is fiercely protective of her budget and passionate about her work as state superintendent. She says it was public education, after all, that helped set her on a path that would take her to Montana State University, Harvard, UM Law and eventually lead to stuffed mushrooms and fruit salad at the Governor’s Mansion. As Juneau told Democratic National Convention delegates in September, “Teachers are sometimes the only ones who tell our children that they can go from an Indian reservation to the Ivy League.”

It’s because of her personal history through public education that she so aggressively defends its funding. She admits that the issue causes her to lose her cool now and then, mostly when she feels that something is out of her control, like when lawmakers cut her budget. “Five minute rants, maybe, but then I’m done,” Juneau says. “I have my little tantrum, and then I’m good.” The best example came during the 2011 legislative session as fiscal conservatives rolled out a budget proposal that moved to cut education spending. Juneau reacted strongly, and her colorful language was quoted throughout state media. “I’m excited for them to wave the magic handkerchief and pull a rabbit out of the hat to come up with their vision for education,” she was quoted as saying in the Billings Gazette. “Hopefully their rabbit may provide a plan. What I’m afraid of is the rabbit may not have an eye for a vision.” Juneau’s Helena office now features a stuffed rabbit perched inside a black top hat. It was a gift from her staff. Juneau’s communication director, Allyson Hagen, chooses her words carefully when asked if her boss has a temper. “High expectations,” Hagen says. “That’s how I would describe it.” In 2011, Juneau’s “high expectations” grabbed the nation’s attention, when The New York Times reported that she was leading an “educational insurrection” against the federal government’s unpopular No Child Left Behind Act, passed into law in 2002 by George W. Bush. In April, Juneau had sent a protest letter to officials in Washington, D.C., decrying the “strict across the board, one-size-fits-all” mandates included in No Child Left Behind. As the Times reported, “Six weeks later, she hosted a meeting of school chiefs from 10 rural states and passed around her

Denise Juneau in her Helena office. On one of her walls she displays an issue of Oprah magazine that named her one of the nation’s 12 elected officials most likely to “Get things done.”

missoulanews.com • March 21 – March 28, 2013 [15]


Denise Juneau receiving a legislative briefing from her staff.

defiant letter. ‘We’re not asking for permission,’ Ms. Juneau told the group. ‘We’re just telling them we won’t raise our annual objectives this year.’” Despite threats of federal funding cuts, Juneau stood her ground. Superintendents in Idaho and Utah in the coming weeks sent similarly defiant letters to federal officials. The standoff was eventually called off when the Department of Education reportedly discovered that Montana hadn’t taken advantage of an earlier opportunity to adjust its testing targets. As Juneau told The New York Times, “I consider that a win.”

D

enise Juneau comes from a line of tough women. Her mother, Carol, was born on North Dakota’s Fort Berthold Indian Reservation in 1945. It was a time of upheaval. The Mandan, Hidatsa and

Akira tribes of Fort Berthold had only begun to bounce back from the lingering effects of federal expansion, notably a smallpox epidemic that nearly eliminated the entire Mandan tribe. After settling on the reservation in the mid-19th century, the tribes had begun a revival, planting crops in the fertile soil near Minot on the banks of the Missouri River. They also raised horses and cattle. The revival was short-lived. In 1944, Congress approved legislation that directed the Army Corps of Engineers to dam the Missouri River on Fort Berthold to help facilitate irrigation. According to a 1948 report from the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the problem was the plan necessitated flooding “the best lands of the Fort Berthold Indians.” In May of 1948, when tribal chairman George Gillette arrived in Washington, D.C., to consent to the taking, Carol

From left to right, Office of Public Instruction staffer Deborah Halliday, Denise Juneau and OPI communication director Allyson Hagen at the Capitol.

[16] Missoula Independent • March 21 – March 28, 2013

Juneau was 3 years old. Newspapers reported that Gillette signed the documents in tears, saying, ‘‘Right now, the future does not look too good for us.’’ Indigenous people weren’t uniformly granted the right to vote until the mid1960s, leaving little recourse against such incursions. Carol Juneau’s mother and her friends and family on Fort Berthold could only watch hopelessly as their agricultural land and precious timber stock were submerged under water. Carol Juneau says that despite the upheaval, or perhaps because of it, her mother made a point to ensure that each of her 10 children received an education. “I often wonder how my mom provided for us,” Carol Juneau says. “We all went to school.” Seeing few options amid the grinding poverty on Fort Berthold, Carol left North Dakota to finish high school in California, where her older sister had been relocated through a federal program that moved some 100,000 American Indians to urban centers. The relocation program marked an attempt to assimilate indigenous people into the dominant culture. Carol later attended a vocational school in Kansas. It was there that she met her future husband, Stan Juneau, a Blackfeet from Montana. The couple married and on April 5, 1967, Carol gave birth to her dark-haired and blue-eyed daughter, Denise. Carol and Stan moved the family to Montana, where they both attended college. In 1980, Carol earned a master’s degree in education from the University of Montana. She and her husband would both champion the value of education to overcome the challenges faced by the rural poor. When Denise was in second grade, the family moved to Browning, her father’s hometown on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation. Dotted with rolling hay and alfalfa fields, it’s home to roughly 9,000

enrolled members of the Blackfeet Nation. Many of their neighbors struggle with the effects of lingering poverty. Stan and Carol Juneau, however, were both employed as educators and, as such, enjoyed regular paychecks. “Anywhere else we’d probably be middle class, but there we were a wealthy family,” Denise Juneau says. Education and politics were part of the day-to-day discourse in the Juneau household. Through those conversations, Carol and Stan made it a point to teach their children to assert themselves. “You have to speak up, don’t be afraid,” Carol recalls saying. “It’s your right.” Carol says it took time for Denise to embody that personal strength. She wasn’t naturally aggressive. In fact, she was actually a shy kid, hiding behind the legs of her parents when meeting strangers, peering out to investigate foreign faces. “She was just wanting to be comfortable with people, making sure she could trust them,” Carol Juneau recalls. Over the years, though, Denise learned valuable lessons from watching her mother fight for Native rights. When Carol ran for the Montana House in 1998, Denise, then 31, got her first real taste of politicking. Carol went on to serve 12 years in Helena, consistently advocating for education and to advance indigenous voting rights. Another lesson Denise learned from her mother was the importance of home. Her parents instilled a sense of pride in the reservation and a commitment to improving the quality of life. Although Denise earned a bachelor’s in English from Montana State University, a law degree from the University of Montana and a master’s degree from Harvard Graduate School of Education, she went to her mother’s old home on the Fort Berthold Reservation in 1994. Denise taught 9th and 10th grade English and coached speech and debate.

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n a recent Monday morning Denise Juneau wears black slacks, a gray jacket and beaded rainbow earrings. Her hair is cut in a tidy bob and her fingernails are done in a French manicure. By the end of this long day, full of formulating legislative strategies, making public appearances and planning a weekend trip to Harvard to speak at her alma mater, her bob isn’t quite as tidy. But her enthusiasm hasn’t waned. “You hit the wall now and then, but otherwise it’s fine,” she says. Juneau believes she’s making progress in Montana schools. During the 2011-12 school year, for instance, graduation rates reached 83.9 percent, up from 82.2 percent the year prior. Similarly, test scores show that 86 percent of public school students were proficient in reading last year compared to 78 percent during the 2005-06 school year. In light of those accomplishments and her emerging national profile, it remains curious how Juneau could find herself in such a tight race during the last election. But there’s one aspect to


Juneau’s leadership and stubbornness that has created adversaries. She surmises that it was her work on the Montana Board of Land Commissioners that made her a target during her re-election campaign. “I think the negative things that came out this election cycle were all Land Board based,” Juneau says. In 2009, less than a year after she stepped into her position as superintendant of public instruction, the Land Board was charged with weighing the benefits of leasing public land on the Powder River Basin for coal development. The board—comprising the governor, attorney general, auditor, secretary of state and superintendent—is charged with leasing and selling the state’s natural resources on behalf of the public. Money generated by Land Board deals goes to public schools. Therefore, individual members have a significant amount of sway to dictate management of the state’s publicly owned land. During the board’s many months of deliberations over a proposal to allow Arch Coal to mine the Powder River Basin, Juneau attended contentious public meetings and heard both proponents and opponents argue their cases. She also read up on environmental law and, along with members of the Northern Cheyenne tribe, toured the mining area, which has been home to Plains Indians for thousands of years. “It’s a very pristine area,” Juneau says. “I worry about the water down there. There’s not a lot for the ranchers and agricultural things that go on. The water is a huge issue and just the cultural significance—there are a lot of artisan springs that have cultural significance for the Northern Cheyenne.” Juneau took those concerns to heart and says she felt compelled to vote against the deal. During the final vote on the project, she was the only Land Board member to say “no.” Environmentalists praised her; Montana Conservation Voters even granted her the 2010 “Conservation Champion Award.” The “no” vote also earned Juneau enemies. In the months leading up to her reelection bid, her challenger, Sandy Welch, accused the superintendent of playing politics to the detriment of Montana’s schoolchildren. “Denise Juneau is more interested in her political career and the special interests that support her political career,” Welch said during a recorded address after Juneau’s Democratic National Convention speech. “This is why Denise Juneau is in public office.” Juneau illustrates a bit of her sense of humor while mimicking the rhetoric used by groups against her before the election. Using a faux radio announcer’s deep voice, she asks, “She votes against school funding and what does she get? An award!” Overall, Juneau shrugs off the accusations. She stands by her decision and maintains there have to be better ways to fund public education. “What I learned from this election cycle is, you can still vote your conscience.

You can still govern from your center,” she says. “I know that I can govern from my values. That’s what I bring to this office.”

J

ust back from a weekend trip to address the Idaho Democratic Party, Juneau starts her week at the Red Lion Colonial Hotel in Helena, as a circle of young American Indian men beat on drums beneath gold chandeliers. Teachers who are gathered here from across the state tap the tables to the drumbeat while snacking on muffins. The teachers and drummers are gathered for the Indian Education for All Best Practices Conference, a daylong workshop that features discussions and lessons for teachers about how to educate students on Native culture and history. When Juneau steps up to the blanket-covered podium, she notes that Montana’s Indian Education for All directive is finally taking root in public schools.

Eck, one of the delegates to serve during the Constitutional Convention in 1972. “That’s why the Indian Education for All bill came up.” In an effort to fulfill the mandate, Sen. Carol Juneau in 1999 sponsored the Indian Education for All Act. The bill, which passed the legislature that year, called to “give effect to the constitutional principles” included in the 1972 directive. Even then, however, legislators resisted funding the mandate. “We fought each session trying to get a little bit,” Carol Juneau recalls. “We, one time, asked for $60,000, I think, and couldn’t get it. We cut that request down to $25,000. We couldn’t get it.” It took a 2005 Supreme Court decision to compel the legislature to fund Indian education. Lawmakers that year allocated $20.40 per student to fund the constitutional mandate.

Denise Juneau says the whole idea behind Indian Education for All is to elevate discourse among all Montanans and, in doing so, heal old wounds that breed disagreements. “That is the great hope of all of this,” she says.

T

o many, Juneau represents a great hope in politics. Just as she was waiting for the election results last November, Oprah magazine named her one of 12 elected officials in the nation most likely to “Get things done.” A copy of the issue hangs in her Helena office. Then, in January, Governing magazine named Juneau one of the top state Democratic officials to watch. Her mother acknowledges the type of pressure her daughter faces as the first American Indian woman elected to a statewide office. “She has a lot of respon-

Juneau with her executive assistant, Billie LaDeau. “I know that I can govern from my values. That’s what I bring to this office,” Juneau says.

“Collectively, we are making a difference,” Juneau says. On this morning, the teachers learn about the Treaty of Hellgate, in which the Bitterroot Salish, Kootenai and Pend d'Oreille tribes ceded some 23 million acres of land in exchange for the 1.3-million acre Flathead Reservation. Such lessons are incorporated into not just history classes, but also math, science and public speaking. Montana is the only state to incorporate Indian education into its public school core curriculum. The mandate comes from a state constitutional provision added in 1972 that requires the recognition of “the distinct and unique cultural heritage of the American Indians,” and a commitment “in its educational goals to the preservation of their cultural integrity.” The provision was—and remains—unusual compared to other states. However, it took decades to implement. “We passed the Constitution, but found not very many teachers picked up and did anything with it,” says Dorothy

In 2006, the Indian Education for All program finally launched under the supervision of Denise Juneau, who before running for superintendent served as the agency’s Indian Education for All director between 2006 and 2008. Eck, now 89, attributes the program’s current successes to the advocacy of both Carol and Denise Juneau. She points to their ceaseless promotion at regional conventions, as well as in the state legislature. “That’s really why it got pushed ahead, because at any number of gatherings they brought forth this concern,” she says. The Juneaus are excited to see the next generation of students learn lessons that their predecessors likely didn’t. Young Montanans will know that American Indians in many areas of the country weren’t allowed to vote until the 1950s. Similarly, they’ll learn why treaty promises made generations ago are still being debated at the Montana Legislature today.

sibility because of that,” Carol Juneau says. “To do well—and to represent Indian Country.” The spotlight has its price. Although Juneau is accessible to the public and generous with her time, she’s guarded about her personal life. She’s not married. She has no pets. She says she has a “circle of trust,” a core group of friends that she can confide in and blow off steam with. Juneau is similarly private about her political aspirations. Her ascent has been so striking that many speculate about what she’ll do when she terms out in 2016. “We’ll have to see what the political landscape looks like,” she says. “I do know it will likely be public service of some sort. And, whether that’s an elected position or something else, we’ll have to see.” No matter what she chooses, she’ll have the attention of Indian Country, an entire state and, now, the nation. jmayrer@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • March 21 – March 28, 2013 [17]


[arts]

Post-racial myths Brother Ali and the dilemma of the white rapper by Dan Brooks

L

ast week, after MC Hammer was arrested in a mall parking lot outside of Oakland, rapper Brother Ali opined in the Minneapolis Star Tribune that the narrative of a post-racial America is real only for a few privileged individuals. “Obama (and, to a lesser but still imperative degree, entertainment figures) are invoked as evidence that America has outgrown its legacy of institutional racism,” he wrote. “The actual numbers tell another tale entirely.” Brother Ali is right about that. He is also white. Whether his ethnicity should disqualify him from writing about the racial profiling of MC Hammer is an argument he’s been having his whole career. Consider his 2012 album, Mourning in America and Dreaming in Color. The cover features Ali using the American flag as a prayer rug—an image more likely to get him in trouble with both sides of the culture war than any number of gun-and-blunt shots. Perhaps his best-known track is “Uncle Sam Goddamn,” in which he raps that the U.S. government has a “billion-dollar-a-week killing brown people habit.”

“Welcome to the United States,” the chorus goes, “land of the thief / home of the slave.” Again, Brother Ali is pretty much right. He is again not black—so how is it his business to rap about slaves? This question mirrors a larger one that hip-hop has struggled with for the past two decades. Rap music is pop music; it is produced almost entirely by black and Latino men, but its largest consumer demographic is white males aged 14 to 25. It is the music that reclaimed the n-word, but it is also on Top 40 radio. For a generation of Americans, now horrifyingly old, The Chronic was as formative as “Wheel of Fortune” and Superfudge. So is rap American music, or is it black music? Having raised a generation of Americans on hip-hop, are we to forbid 78 percent of them from actually making it? That seems weird. “I was taught life and manhood by black men,” Brother Ali raps on “Daylight,” somewhat arrhythmically. “So I’m a product of that understanding, and / a small part of me feels I’m just like them.” It’s a good point—one that captures the influence hip-hop has

[18] Missoula Independent • March 21 – March 28, 2013

had on so many Americans’ ideas of masculinity and how this country works. It should also be familiar to anyone whose rural cousin is way too into Eminem. Elsewhere on “Daylight,” Ali raps that “race is a made-up thing; I don’t believe in it,” but he also acknowledges that “I benefit from something I hate.” There’s the rub. Brother Ali may not believe in race, but America obstinately does. That tension—between the cultural inheritance of hip-hop and the inherited privilege of being white in the United States—is Brother Ali’s great subject. To call him a conscious rapper is to describe only half of what he is so achingly conscious of. Yes, he raps about institutional prejudice and the reification of a racially unfair system. But he does so without once forgetting that, in the crudest terms, he was born onto the winning team. That dynamic gives Brother Ali’s work the thrilling quality of a highwire act. Two weeks ago, he was featured in a new video for Public Enemy’s “Get Up Stand Up.” It is disconcerting to watch a goateed white man rapping onstage next to Chuck D, but it is

also oddly satisfying. Chuck famously called hip-hop “the black man’s CNN,” but really it was the white kid’s BET. I first learned about racist cops and the cultural presumption of whiteness from Fear Of a Black Planet. To see Brother Ali rapping in front of The Bomb Squad is to know that a generation of my fellow Americans did too. He does not resolve the dilemma of the white rapper so much as suggest that the problem will continue to arise until it becomes unremarkable. His career is based on the premise that black culture is American culture, that hip-hop is part of our inheritance regardless of who our parents are. It is a controversial message, but it’s one rap fans are ready to hear. If he is not the person they want to hear it from, Brother Ali doesn’t much care. Brother Ali plays Stage 112 on Fri., March 22, at 9 PM. $25/$20 in advance at seafarerentertainment.com. 18-plus. arts@missoulanews.com


[music]

Intricate web Spider + Octopus weaves a folky vibe Upon first Google, Missoula-based band Spider + Octopus is as mysterious as its delicate experimental folk. The band’s new album, After the Fire, available on Bandcamp and cassette, is pretty and gentle, filled with subtle layers of instrumentation. Violins weave in and out of acoustic and electric guitar melodies, accompanied by a male vocalist’s lilting lyrics. The band (pronounced Spider Plus Octopus) started out a few years ago as the solo project of Chad Bishop when he lived in Pensacola, Fla. “It was initially just me in a studio recording all the parts,” he says. He’s since moved to Missoula for graduate school. Throughout the years, other musicians have joined in, like Ian Smith of Oblio Joes, and Spider + Octopus will be a full band at its first show in Missoula this week. Bishop hesitates to define Spider + Octopus’ sound. “It’s just exploring different genres, folk music and rock,” he says.

Experimental music can sometimes require an effort to listen to, but in this case, it’s extraordinarily sweet and soothing. (Kate Whittle) Spider + Octopus, Skin Flowers, Mendelssohn and Butter play the Palace Fri., March 22, at 9 PM. $5.

Lake Street Dive Brooklyn’s soulful pop band Lake Street Dive has a few solid records out, but it’s mostly making its mark with excellent live shows. The band has been charming the public coast to coast to dizzying proportions, and last summer I had the pleasure of watching it at the Pickathon festival in Portland. Lake Street Dive seemed to turn Pickathon goers on their heads, considering the next day no one would shut up about the band and its engaging sweetheart-soulful swoon. Bridget Kearney channels the Bob Babbit-Motown style on stand-up bass and guitarist/trumpeter Mike Olson and drummer Mike Calabrese cook up the Steve Cropper/Al Jackson Deep South Stax sound. And then

there’s the torch singer, Rachael Price, with the smoldering voice and impeccable phrasing that send many newly discovered divas straight to the cleaners. Armed with a slew of bouncing, addictive originals adorned with Philly-soul harmonies, the band is just impossible not to shuffle across the dance floor to. Do yourself a favor and lend an ear to Lake Street Dive, and you can blame me for the love hangover the next day. (Bryan Ramirez) Lake Street Dive opens for Josh Ritter and the Royal City Band at the Wilma Mon., March 25, at 7 PM. $24/$21 in advance at Rockin’ Rudys and ticketweb.com.

Toki Wright, A Different Mirror If you’re a fan of Brother Ali, you’ll find plenty to like on fellow Minneapolis rapper Toki Wright’s 2009 album, A Different Mirror. It makes sense, since Wright has been associated with Ali for years. The relationship definitely helped Wright get a few years ahead of his time, but he quickly shakes any notion of less-thanequal on his first and only album with lines like: “I ain’t no hypeman fucker, I’m a live band.” The backing tracks are pure Rhymesayers, marked by occasional orchestration, sudden saxophones and a strong piano presence. Often opening to the sound of vinyl cracking, tracks like “Truth or Dare” lead you down dark alleyways on a rainy Twin Cities night. Some

songs, like “Next Best Thing,” are aware of nostalgic simplicity. Occasional backing female vocals and some smooth jazz sax are also pretty agreeable. But this isn’t an instrumental album by any stretch. The most powerful instrument on A Different Mirror is Wright’s voice. Balanced but edgy and prone to crescendos, his lyrics are adaptive to speed, style and tone. “Devil’s Advocate” is the catchy single, but he gets provocative right where he needs to be, thankfully. (Brooks Johnson) Toki Wright, Kristoff Krane and Carnage bring the Short Circuit Tour to the Top Hat Thu., March 28, at 9 PM. $10.

Sallie Ford and the Sound Outside, Untamed Beast Here’s a bit of revised Tennyson for you: In spring, a young woman’s fancy not-so-lightly turns to thoughts of love. The new album from Portland rockabilly outfit Sallie Ford and the Sound Outside perfectly fits a springtime state of mind. It’s everything I could have hoped for: lusty and ornery and dance-worthy. Untamed Beast hones and perfects the band’s pairing of Sallie Ford’s distinct voice with rock and surf rhythms. It’s also one of the most awesomely female-gazecentric albums I’ve heard in a long time. Ford tells us on

nearly every track that she won’t take any crap and she wants a man to do her right. Literally, on the song “Do Me Right.” It reminds me of Bessie Smith or Etta James, with playful, flirty lyrics like, “Some girls they like mashed potatoes, some girls they like fried green tomatoes, but me I like a certain sweet that only you can give to me.” Untamed Beast could appeal to almost any demographic, but if you’re, say, a young woman bent on enjoying the hell out of life, you might find it downright inspirational. (Kate Whittle)

missoulanews.com • March 21 – March 28, 2013 [19]


[film]

Spinning legends Doc offers glimpse of Missoula’s post-punk roots by Josh Vanek

My introduction to Silkworm came when I lived in the Knowles Hall dorm on the University of Montana campus in the fall of 1992. My neighbor lent me a cassette that I think was some demo stuff from before the band’s first official album, L’Ajre. It was totally unlike anything I’d heard coming from Seattle at the time, and it sounded like an uptight take on Neil Young’s Zuma played by fans of The Smiths and the Cure.

recording engineer from Chicago’s Electrical Audio, sums up the band’s commercial viability, describing it as an acquired taste. “People that like Silkworm, really like Silkworm. They’re not like normal people and there aren’t that many of them.” The documentary is also a fascinating piece of work that examines the zeitgeist of the Nirvana period of the 1990s, from the perspective of an independent band that

Couldn’t You Wait: The Story of Silkworm follows the beloved indie rock band that originated in Missoula. From left: Tim Midgett, Andy Cohen and the late Michael Dahlquist.

Silkworm was a rock band founded in Missoula in 1987 by four Hellgate High School alumni: Tim Midgett, Andy Cohen, Michael Dahlquist and Joel RL Phelps (who left the band in 1994). They moved away to play rock and roll, first to Seattle, then Chicago. After 17 years, the band had become a staple with fans in small clubs across the country when Dahlquist, the drummer, was killed in a car accident in 2005 by a woman trying to commit suicide by ramming her vehicle into his. The years-in-the-making and newly released documentary Couldn’t You Wait: The Story of Silkworm, available for a web download, features recent interviews and live footage dating back to the band’s awesomely awkward adolescent phases. Director Seth Pomeroy offers a well-crafted look at this legendary band, but leaves the viewer with some questions. Silkworm struck me as a rare rock commodity with as much vulnerability in its music as there was rock. For as macho an art form as rock music can be, it spent most of its capital on plaintive, strident odes in the midst of hairfarming dudes with bands named Gruntruck. A Silkworm record might have a muscular riff once or twice, but it wouldn’t be repeated much. As a songwriting device, withholding the delivery of a satisfying familiar part can be weirdly effective. Couldn’t You Wait draws upon the largely male platoon of loyal Silkworm fans for whom its uniquely monastic formula worked. The indie rock A-list includes interviews with Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy, Jason Molina from Songs: Ohia (Molina died just last weekend) and Pavement’s Stephen Malkmus. Former Independent staffer Zach Dundas makes an appearance, describing Silkworm as a band “cut from a different cloth,” with songs about World War II and “crazy psychosexual dramas.” The film establishes what distinguished Silkworm from lots of bands of the era: The members were friends, first and foremost, and they played music simply because they loved to. They also made decisions based only on what was right for the band, and not because of any commercial pressure. Steve Albini,

[20] Missoula Independent • March 21 – March 28, 2013

toured and recorded for important labels like C/Z, Matador and Touch and Go. Silkworm didn’t experience much mainstream success: It hit its commercial high-water mark with 1996’s Firewater and quickly slumped with 1997’s Developer. Matador Records CEO Gerard Cosloy explains the postDeveloper slump in the film, saying, “It kind of felt like they were slightly treading water.” Even bassist Midgett says, “By the time we got to Developer, we were all thinking about where we're going. Typical early-30s ennui crap.” As a dork interested in what Man or Astroman’s Brian Teasley and Chunklet’s Henry Owings think, this is great. As somebody interested in Missoula’s punk rock history, it’s also pretty great, with some awesome fuzzy VHS footage of Silkworm’s previous iteration as post-punk Missoula band Ein Heit and Deranged Diction’s Tom Kipp. But as somebody wanting a little more voyeurism from his documentary, I’m a little let down. We hear that Albini and the Silkworm members went to Hellgate High, that Silkworm members were in the marching band, and they all shared a cool German teacher. But we don’t get into much of the formative story, or what these guys do now. A quick search tells me guitarist Andy Cohen is assistant general counsel for a pharmaceutical firm. Midgett and Cohen formed Bottomless Pit after Dahlquist’s death. Couldn’t You Wait is a well-made film, whether you count yourself a Silkworm fan or not. There’s a point, where Albini describes Michael Dahlquist’s enthusiasm for life, and Albini’s regret for not enjoying life in the moment as Dahlquist had, that is as sincerely moving a moment as any I just saw at the Big Sky Documentary Film Fest this year. Couldn’t You Wait: The Story of Silkworm is available for download at buy.couldntyouwait.com for $5. arts@missoulanews.com


[books]

The physicality of language Chris Dombrowski talks sex, fishing, poetry, parataxis and the West by Nick Davis

Missoula has a well-earned reputation for its high density of successful prose writers, but it’s not too shabby in the per-capita poet department, either. That certainly has something to do with our thriving arts culture, and perhaps also the fact that most careers in this town are as difficult to monetize as that of the poet elsewhere–so there comes a built-in, community-wide wellspring of empathy. Still, and with apologies to the many fine working local poets, past and present, it can be argued that Missoula hasn’t had a transcendent poet of place since the immortal Richard Hugo passed away in 1982. That may be changing. Chris Dombrowski, a Michigan-born poet who fell in love with Missoula upon moving here in 1999, has just released Earth Again, his second full-length book of poetry. It’s a stunning work, rife with gorgeous images of Western lives and landscapes, imbued with a hardscrabble perception that will be instantly recognized by those who have committed their lives and families to this most demanding of paradises. Dombrowski and his family currently split their time between Michigan, where he teaches poetry and nonfiction at the renowned Interlochen Center for the Arts, and Missoula, where as a guide he teaches clients the finer points of fly fishing. The Indy recently caught up with Dombrowski at his winter residence in Traverse City, Mich. You’ve noted that it was Maclean’s A River Runs Through It that set you on course to be a writer. Reading your stuff, it seems that Jim Harrison is a big influence as well. Chris Dombrowski: One never truly knows who one’s influences are. But when I think of Harrison I think of a kind of voraciousness for the physical world and all its incarnations, and the desire to write poems that encompass both the sacred and the profane. If you see that influence there, I’m humbled by it and appreciate it. How did your association with Harrison come about? CD: A mutual friend arranged a meeting, and I was quite nervous to meet him. We had exchanged a few letters over the years, but when you’re meeting your literary hero there’s always the horror story about the guy being a total dud or, worse yet, a total asshole. But the great thing about Jim is he’s one of the few “outdoorsy” writers I’ve ever met who doesn’t disappoint as an angler. I mean, most of us are phonies as far as that’s concerned, but he’s absolutely not. And then as a person he’s been incredibly generous to me, and honest, and warm. We had a great three-day trip on the Big Hole, and have been friends ever since. You’re not afraid of pushing boundaries with your images, particularly when it comes to sexuality. The narrator of “Not Knowledge,” for example, remembers catching a glimpse of his naked mother: “full shot: hair and all. Do our eyes meet? Does / my look of recognition belie my innocence, / reveal I’ve seen similar in the porn-mag Von keeps / under stacked cin-

der blocks? No. Not that I remember. / What nourishment, though. What indelible residue.” That’s pretty bold stuff. CD: I’m interested in memory, and what lasts. The philosopher Bachelard called it “the sudden salience on the psyche”—what is it in life that cuts through and makes something a moment, as opposed to being lost in the unrelenting horizontal rush of time? The first section of the book, as you picked up on, is very sexual, decidedly so. In a sense, the feminine becomes more than just the human feminine, or at least I hope it does. I also qualify that by saying there’s plenty of myth-making going on in that first section, and I often think of all my poems as fictions. I don’t think of them as autobiographical truths because I am pointedly following the music of the language into the truths, not the autobiographical accuracy. For whatever it’s worth, I trust the language of the poem to lead me to truth. You’re obviously a student of literature and literary form, but you frequently pair fairly high-brow literary references with distinctly physical images. CD: I believe in a physicality of language, you know? I believe that words are things. We come to love language in the same ways we come to love the world. We love the way a certain phrase sounds in our mouths, and feels in our chest, the same way we love to follow the traits of, say, the line of a mountain with our eye. And I think when you’re following language and words as your guide, you end up hearing yourself say things that surprise you. That’s a pleasing thing and I would say a necessary thing for me as a writer. Frost said, “No tears for the writer, no tears for the reader,” and I would assert that if I’m not surprising myself with language as a writer, then more than likely the reader won’t be surprised either. You surprised the hell out of me—in the best way—with a couple lines from “Or A Woman”: “The parataxis of her ass, / slight swale of nothing between two hills.” Considering that one definition of parataxis is a poetry technique involving the juxtaposition of starkly dissimilar images, you nailed that on a couple of levels. CD: Getting back to Harrison, I remember having this conversation with him at the Hitching Post in Melrose. We were talking about cleavage and why it is that the nothing, or the nada, between two masses of muscle and skin and tissue is what enamors people to that area. There’s this nothingness that makes this something attractive, right? Without that nothingness, you don’t have it. Look at a canyon, or a range of mountains, and it’s the same thing. Poet George Oppen talks about “The hugeness of that which is missing.” All that philosophical

gobbledy-gook kinda rolled around in my head for a long time and then hearing the kind of assonance— pun intended—in that phrase, that’s the music of the language. You seem to be a poet of place, and that place seems to be the American West. CD: It all goes back to that physicality for me. You mentioned in that first section of the book, the sexual imagery. As cheesy as it sounds, I think of the landscape as the body of the beloved, if you will. Beyond that I don’t know what to say without going over the edge into woo-woo land.

artists, they’re writers, they’re teachers, they’re gardeners, and they are all living with serious passion about what they do. That’s what gets me up in the morning. I’d like to write something that speaks praise of this community, as well as of the landscape. To me it’s a sacred place, it really is. arts@missoulanews.com

Missoula in particular has grabbed your fancy. What is it about this town for you? CD: Someone asked me a while ago what gets me up in the morning to write, and I said, you know, this community, the people I know and love in Missoula—they’re carpenters, they’re boat builders, they ’re

Missoula poet Chris Dombrowski recently released his second full-length book of poetry, Earth Again.

missoulanews.com • March 21 – March 28, 2013 [21]


[film]

Cheap tricks Wonderstone’s comedy relies on flimsy props by Molly Laich

It’s becoming a burden, being sent to Hollywood comedies. Every time, lately, I have to come back and explain to everyone through thick prose why the movie we’re meant to laugh at isn’t funny. Why not just invite me over for tea and I can keep accidentally bringing up your dead husband? That would be equally as fun as watching The Incredible Burt Wonderstone.

of joining the Burt and Anton act, but Burt is all, “A woman magician!” because it’s not quite time for him to start using his brain yet. Will Burt and Anton get back together? Will Burt, through poverty and hardship, develop a better personality? Will they beat out the Brain Rapist in order to debut their bigger and better magic show in a prime time slot in Vegas? Spoiler alert: Yeah. All that

3D PRINTER BUILD ROSTOCK MAX SATURDAY, MARCH 30TH STARTING AT NOON

1804 North Ave. #F 241-7846. REPLIK8TR.com • Memberships available

“So I have you down for the 4 o’clock Kentucky three-way.”

If you’ve seen the movie poster, you can probably guess the plot, but let me take you through it anyway. Burt Wonderstone (Steve Carell) and Anton Marvelton (Steve Buscemi) have been friends since childhood, when they concluded that becoming great magicians would make them likeable. Flash forward 30 years later, and the two are headlining their own show on the Vegas strip. They have bleached blond hair and sequined jackets. It’s a Seigfried and Roy thing, except they don’t use tigers. They’re not gay for each other— Burt has a fancy apartment and sleeps with a bunch of chicks—although the film throws some flimsy jokes in that direction. Burt and Anton have an old-school magic thing going, and it’s just great. But here comes the jerk-off street magician, Steve Gray, aka the “Brain Rapist,” who is obviously a parody of the very real Criss Angel of “Mindfreak” fame. Steve Gray ( Jim Carrey) pulls playing cards out of flesh wounds in his face and does other self-mutilating feats like holding in his urine for 12 days straight. He’s a hit, the crowds love him, and so the Burt and Anton Show needs to either get with the times or else stubbornly fail to do that until the end. Burt and Anton have a “falling out”–if you bother to see this movie, you’ll discover that to be a pun— and so Burt is left to do his stage show alone. It doesn’t work out, and in an instant he goes from $70,000 linens to living in a roadside motel, performing magic in a retirement home. There’s a beautiful assistant named Jane (Olivia Wilde) who’s a gifted magician in her own right. She offers the very sensible solution

[22] Missoula Independent • March 21 – March 28, 2013

stuff happens in a way that’s even more rote and unfunny than I anticipated, and I came into this thing with pretty low standards. The movie’s not a total wash, which makes it all the more disappointing. I read that most of the illusions are real, and they’re genuinely amazing. Vegas culture and the tedium of performing the same show over and over again is believable. A shift from sequins and big props to shock-value-driven street magic is probably a real issue and representative of shifting demographics or whatever, but is it too much to ask that they also try to make their comedy funny? To be fair, these types of comedies rarely work for me. When the lead character is more caricature than real person, when the world they create is too exaggerated, tacky and stupid to ever really be believed, they’ve stretched too thin my patience for disbelief. I should mention Jim Carrey as Steve Gray. It’s a return to his more physical, facial-expression-driven brand of comedy, and the internet seems to agree that it’s a hilarious performance. I’m wondering if we were watching the same movie. I don’t think Pet Detective or Fire Marshall Bill or really anything Jim Carrey does is funny, so on this final point, I am willing to concede that it might just be a matter of taste. The words “Brain Rapist” are pretty funny. I will give them that. The Incredible Burt Wonderstone continues at Village 6 and Pharaohplex. arts@missoulanews.com


[film]

Cheap tricks Wonderstone’s comedy relies on flimsy props by Molly Laich

It’s becoming a burden, being sent to Hollywood comedies. Every time, lately, I have to come back and explain to everyone through thick prose why the movie we’re meant to laugh at isn’t funny. Why not just invite me over for tea and I can keep accidentally bringing up your dead husband? That would be equally as fun as watching The Incredible Burt Wonderstone.

of joining the Burt and Anton act, but Burt is all, “A woman magician!” because it’s not quite time for him to start using his brain yet. Will Burt and Anton get back together? Will Burt, through poverty and hardship, develop a better personality? Will they beat out the Brain Rapist in order to debut their bigger and better magic show in a prime time slot in Vegas? Spoiler alert: Yeah. All that

3D PRINTER BUILD ROSTOCK MAX SATURDAY, MARCH 30TH STARTING AT NOON

1804 North Ave. #F 241-7846. REPLIK8TR.com • Memberships available

“So I have you down for the 4 o’clock Kentucky three-way.”

If you’ve seen the movie poster, you can probably guess the plot, but let me take you through it anyway. Burt Wonderstone (Steve Carell) and Anton Marvelton (Steve Buscemi) have been friends since childhood, when they concluded that becoming great magicians would make them likeable. Flash forward 30 years later, and the two are headlining their own show on the Vegas strip. They have bleached blond hair and sequined jackets. It’s a Seigfried and Roy thing, except they don’t use tigers. They’re not gay for each other— Burt has a fancy apartment and sleeps with a bunch of chicks—although the film throws some flimsy jokes in that direction. Burt and Anton have an old-school magic thing going, and it’s just great. But here comes the jerk-off street magician, Steve Gray, aka the “Brain Rapist,” who is obviously a parody of the very real Criss Angel of “Mindfreak” fame. Steve Gray ( Jim Carrey) pulls playing cards out of flesh wounds in his face and does other self-mutilating feats like holding in his urine for 12 days straight. He’s a hit, the crowds love him, and so the Burt and Anton Show needs to either get with the times or else stubbornly fail to do that until the end. Burt and Anton have a “falling out”–if you bother to see this movie, you’ll discover that to be a pun— and so Burt is left to do his stage show alone. It doesn’t work out, and in an instant he goes from $70,000 linens to living in a roadside motel, performing magic in a retirement home. There’s a beautiful assistant named Jane (Olivia Wilde) who’s a gifted magician in her own right. She offers the very sensible solution

[22] Missoula Independent • March 21 – March 28, 2013

stuff happens in a way that’s even more rote and unfunny than I anticipated, and I came into this thing with pretty low standards. The movie’s not a total wash, which makes it all the more disappointing. I read that most of the illusions are real, and they’re genuinely amazing. Vegas culture and the tedium of performing the same show over and over again is believable. A shift from sequins and big props to shock-value-driven street magic is probably a real issue and representative of shifting demographics or whatever, but is it too much to ask that they also try to make their comedy funny? To be fair, these types of comedies rarely work for me. When the lead character is more caricature than real person, when the world they create is too exaggerated, tacky and stupid to ever really be believed, they’ve stretched too thin my patience for disbelief. I should mention Jim Carrey as Steve Gray. It’s a return to his more physical, facial-expression-driven brand of comedy, and the internet seems to agree that it’s a hilarious performance. I’m wondering if we were watching the same movie. I don’t think Pet Detective or Fire Marshall Bill or really anything Jim Carrey does is funny, so on this final point, I am willing to concede that it might just be a matter of taste. The words “Brain Rapist” are pretty funny. I will give them that. The Incredible Burt Wonderstone continues at Village 6 and Pharaohplex. arts@missoulanews.com


[film]

OPENING THIS WEEK ADMISSION A straight-laced Princeton University admissions officer thinks she may have discovered the son she gave up for adoption when she visits an alternative high school on a recruiting visit. What are the chances this gal will fall in love with the kid’s teacher and get everything she ever wanted out of life? 100 percent. Starring Tina Fey, Paul Rudd and Nat Wolff. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12. THE CROODS Join the first prehistoric family for the very first family road trip and laugh for the very first time at Ryan Reynolds’ jokes. Starring the voices of Nicolas Cage and Emma Stone. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex and Entertainer. G.I. JOE: RETALIATION Great American heroes, the G.I Joes are at battle on two fronts: one involving mortal enemy Cobra, the other involving their own government. Somebody best watch out for that Stormshadow. Starring Channing Tatum, Dwayne Johnson and Bruce Willis. Rated PG-13. Premiers Wed., March 27, at 7 pm. Carmike 12. INAPPROPRIATE COMEDY In this purported sketch comedy movie film about comedy being funny, a computer unleashes the most offensive apps ever into the our world and stirs up what are sure to be some vaguely humorous fart jokes. The most offensive thing about it? It stars Rob Schneider and Lindsay Lohan and Adrienne Brody. Rated R. Village 6. OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN A disgraced Secret Service agent is the only one who can rescue the president. Redemption, y’all, it’s the best. Starring Gerard Butler, Aaron Eckhart and Morgan Freeman. Rated R. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex and Showboat. SPRING BREAKERS Four well-gammed gals are bailed out of jail by a drug dealing weird-o (played by actual weird-o James Franco), so of course they decide to help him go on a crime spree. Starring Vanessa Hudgens, Selena Gomez and Ashley Benson. Rated R. Carmike 12.

NOW PLAYING 56 UP Acclaimed director Michael Apted (Coal Miner’s Daughter, Gorky Park) is at the helm once again in this long-running series which revisits a few British-born blokes every seven years to see how life is treating them. NR. Wilma.

Free supervised playrooms

Fall out boys dance, dance. Olympus Has Fallen opens Friday at Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex and Showboat.

THE CALL A longtime 911 operator must confront a killer from her past while trying to save an abducted girl, because that’s what 911 operators due in real life. Starring Halle Berry, Evie Thompson and Abigail Breslin. Rated R. Carmike 12. DEAD MAN DOWN A lovelorn and bereft woman unites with a crime boss’s right hand man behind the sword of revenge with nothing but the shield of love to protect her. Directed by Niels Arden Oplev (The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo). Starring Colin Farrell, Noomi Rapace and Dominic Cooper. Rated R. Village 6. GREAT EXPECTATIONS LIVE FROM LONDON’S WEST END Oh it’s Pip, Abel Magwitch, Miss Havisham, Mr. Pumblechook, Miss Skiffins and so many other well-named characters in this the latest performance of the Dickens’ classic bildungsroman tale. NR. Carmike 12. IDENTITY THIEF This is a revenge comedy gone awry and back and awry again, wherein a mild-mannered fella tries to recover his stolen ID from the woman (gasp!) who is ruining his credit score with lavish spending sprees. Perhaps we shall learn the true meaning of “identity.� Starring Jason Bateman, Melissa McCarthy, John Cho. Rated R. Pharaohplex. THE INCREDIBLE BURT WONDERSTONE This is a tale pitting the old against the new, the hep versus the hip, the stale agin to the fresh (but mostly it’s about the stale jokes, nyuk, nyuk) as

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magicians compete against one another in a cutthroat magic competition. Bring on the tiger sex gags. Starring Steve Carell, Steve Buscemi, Luke Vanek and Jim Carrey. Rated PG-13. Village 6 and Pharaohplex. JACK THE GIANT SLAYER This is what it’s like when worlds collide. Giants and humans do battle and a boy becomes a man and a woman is loved properly and the indefatigable spirit of humanity is undoubtedly celebrated with shiny medals and a wedding. Rated PG-13. Starring Nicholas Hoult, Stanley Tucci and Ewan McGregor. Carmike 12 and Village 6. OZ THE GREAT AND POWERFUL How exactly did homeboy become the Wizard of Oz? Learn how in this Disney creation story involving a small-time circus magician of dubious community standing who makes his way to the magic land of Oz. Starring James Franco, Michelle Williams and Rachel Weisz. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex and Showboat. QUARTET Things are just plain old hunky-dory at the home for retired musicians until an old firebrand who is also an old flame shows up with her diva panties set to stun. Directed by Dustin Hoffman. Starring Maggie Smith, Michael Gambon and Billy Connolly. Rated PG-13. Wilma. SAFE HAVEN In this adaptation of Nicholas Sparks’ (The Notebook) novel, a woman moves to a small, tight-knit

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community and falls for a local hunk. Guess what? Dark secrets bubble to the surface, that’s what. Starring Julianne Hough, Josh Duhamel and Cobie Smulders. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12. SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK Based on the novel by Matthew Quick, this is the story of a former teacher returning home to his wife and parents after a stint in a mental institution. But things aren’t all turkey and stuffing cuz there is a mysterious woman in the picture, too. Starring Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence and Robert De Niro. Rated R. Carmike 12. SNITCH If any of you jabronis think Dwayne “The Rock� Johnson isn’t going to go undercover for the DEA to rescue his wrongly-accused son from prison you cray-cray. And if you think he isn’t gonna use a semi truck to do it, well I got nothing for you. Also starring Susan Sarandon and Michael Kenneth Williams. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12 and Pharaohplex.

Capsule reviews by Jason McMackin. Moviegoers be warned! For show times please visit missoulanews.com or contact the theaters in order to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 and Village 6 at 5417469; Wilma at 728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603.

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missoulanews.com • March 21 – March 28, 2013 [23]


[dish]

Mon-Fri 7am - 4pm

(Breakfast ‘til Noon)

531 S. Higgins

541-4622

Sat & Sun 8am - 4pm

(Breakfast all day) Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

The gods of grease by Ari LeVaux

SATURDAYS 4PM-9PM

MONDAYS & THURSDAYS ALL DAY

$1

SUSHI Not available for To-Go orders

[24] Missoula Independent • March 21 – March 28, 2013

Foods that are organic or otherwise more “natural” have reached unprecedented levels of public acceptance. But in the valuations and price action that represent truth on Wall Street, fast food companies are beating the tar out of organic corporations. The stock market is a forward-looking indicator, reacting not to the way things are, but to the way the market expects things to be. And the fast food industry is counting on two new varieties of high-oleic soy oil, set to hit the fryers this year, to add gravy to its train. Oleic acid is named after olive oil, the most concentrated naturally occurring source of this monounsaturated fat. Widely lauded for its healthfulness and flavor, olive oil offers many reasons to love it. But it’s the oleic acid that industrial food processors are drooling over—and not necessarily for its supposed heart-friendly virtues. Oleic acid is stable at room temperature for long periods of time, and can endure repeated bursts of heat without breaking down. High-oleic oils first entered the market about 10 years ago as the industry attempted to phase out its use of partially hydrogenated oils—aka margarine—which have been shown to contain dangerous levels of trans fats. Several high-oleic oils have entered the market to fill this void of shelf- and heat-stable fats, including oils made from sunflower, corn and canola seeds. These high-oleic oils have become the industry’s preferred substitute for partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, and are used in all manner of processed food, especially snack foods that need long shelf lives, and in the vats of hot oil used to deep-fry food. While these new oils lack trans fats, they are still not ideal for the industry, explains Melanie Warner in Pandora’s Lunchbox: How Processed Food Took Over the American Meal. “Nearly a decade into the post-trans-fat era, no clear-cut winner for replacing partially hydrogenated soybean oil as processed food’s favorite fat has been found,” she writes. “Corn oil retains a corny taste; canola can only be grown in northern climates, limiting its production; sunflower and safflower are too expensive; and butter is way too expensive, as is coconut oil.” Regular soy oil, Warner notes, is the cheapest form of fat there is, making it the obvious first choice for industry. Soybeans are also one of the best sources of protein in the plant world, which is why pressed soy cake is so valuable as animal feed. Other products, like lecithin and vitamin E, are extracted from soy and sold separately. But despite soy’s multi-market upside, the industry is heavily subsidized. And since everything from burgers to fries to buns contains soy oil, subsidizing soy equals subsidizing fast food. The same can be said about junk food.

FLASH IN THE PAN

Enter high-oleic soybean oil. There are two new types, DuPont’s Plenish and Monsanto’s Roundup-ready Vistive® Gold. Both are made through the genetic modification technique called gene silencing, but there are slight differences between them. Plenish boasts higher oleic acid levels, on par with olive oil at 75 percent. Vistive® Gold is lower in saturated fat, which many people still believe is bad for you. Vistive® Gold also boasts lower levels of linoleic acid, aka omega-6 fatty acid. Efforts by Monsanto and Dupont to perfect higholeic soybean oil, Warner told me via email, are “part of a decades-long struggle by the food industry to make soybean oil suitable for processed foods. Ever since trans fats became a health concern, the oil industry has been trying to find a way to prevent soybean oil from going rancid in food and in frying vats.” Among its many industry-friendly qualities, higholeic soy oil can withstand up to three times as many fryings as the current industry standard. Thus, vegetable oil costs for processed foods could be cut by as much as a third in the coming years, as these products ease their way into our lives. Although soy has been eaten for thousands of years in Asia, it’s mostly been in fermented forms like soy sauce, tempeh, natto, miso and tamari. Even tofu was once commonly fermented. But soy oil was rarely consumed. “The only vegetable oil eaten in any significant quantity was olive oil,” Warner writes. She quotes Joe Hibbeln, acting chief of nutritional neurosciences at a research division of the National Institutes of Health, who calls the rise of soybean oil “the single greatest, most rapid dietary change in the history of Homo sapiens.” The many adjustments, dead-ends and wrong turns that have occurred as Homo sapiens have tried to adapt to vegetable oils might be a clue that we’re trying to fit a square oil into round bodies, so to speak. Our never-ending quest to tweak away health complications and bad odors, and insert supposedly healthful qualities, may turn out to be a fool’s errand. But on the other hand, maybe the gene jockeys at Monsanto and DuPont have finally figured out exactly what we want and don’t want from our oil, and how to get soy oil to be that, and only that. It’s entirely possible. But as the leading indicators on Wall Street are suggesting, it’s more likely they’ve figured out how to squeeze even more profit from soy. Soy is the backbone of junk food and fast food, and high-oleic soybean oil is poised to make related businesses more profitable. Whether the oil turns out to be good for the people who consume it remains to be seen.


[dish] Alcan Bar and Grill 16780 Beckwith St. Frenchtown • 626-9930 Tantalize your taste buds with Angus beef burgers, chicken strips, shrimp, and biscuits and gravy from Alcan Bar & Grill. With more than 20 years of experience and 10 years in the business, we have been offering fresh meals and beverages at the area's most competitive prices. Our friendly professionals offer personalized service and make sure you leave our restaurant as one of our friends. We offer have a variety of specials for ladies night and sports events featuring drink specials and free food. Contact us today and enjoy our incredible menu selection. 9 am – 2 am Mon-Sun. $ Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway • 728-8900 (across from courthouse) Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 Have you checked out Bernice's web-site: bernicesbakerymt.com: Are you a fan of Bernice's on Facebook? Did you catch that silly Christmas video on YouTube? Viewed the Montana Home Shopping Showcase? Bernice's not only has awesome breakfast pastries, elegant cakes, signature wedding cakes, fresh bread, cookies & treat galore, lunch, and excellent coffee. Bernice's has great employees who rock the social media! 34 years of solid goodness! Check out our social media and then stop by to celebrate a job well done! xoxo bernice. bernicesbakerymt.com. $-$$ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Monday – Friday, 7:30 – 2. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. $ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 40 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Cafe Zydeco 2101 Brooks • 406-926-2578 Authentic cajun cuisine, with an upbeat zydeco atmosphere in the heart of Missoula. Accomodates indoor and outdoor seating. Breakfast served all day. Featuring Crawfish omlettes, beignets, and cafe au lait. Open Monday-Wednesday 11am-3pm, Thursday-Saturday 11am8pm, and Sunday 9am-3pm (Beignets available Saturday 11am-2pm, and All Day Sunday) $-$$ Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 • ciaomambo.com The vibrant energy at Ciao Mambo is fantastically accompanied by steaming hot pizzas, delicious assortments of pastas and of course authentic Italian wine. We focus on making sure that whether it be date night, family night, or business dinners we accommodate whatever the need! And do not forget there are always leftovers! Open 5 to close every day, come make us your go to dinner destination! $-$$

$…Under $5

Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am-2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm Sun-Wed and 11am-10pm Thurs-Sat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. 542-7414 Doc's is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you're heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc's is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$

Educate your taste buds! www.thinkfft.com Mon-Thurs 7am - 8pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 *When school is not in session, we often close at 3pm Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and glutenfree options. NOW SERVING BREAKFAST Empanadas! Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! (Happy Hour 3-6 PM Mon-Sat. 2 Empanadas for $7) Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. 9am-5pm Monday-Saturday. Downtown Missoula. $-$$ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. 721-6033 Missoula's Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. M-TH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am-4pm, Sat 8am-4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$ GoodieVille Paxson Plaza by Southgate Mall 406-728-0010 www.goodieville.com Missoula’s only Gluten-Free Bakery and Restaurant offers a full line of savories and sweets. We serve breakfast, lunch and dinner including Pancakes, Pizza, American and Indian fare. We also have extensive vegetarian and vegan options. Open Wed-Sat 7am-9pm and Sun 7am2pm. $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St 549-7723 www.grizzlyliquor.com Missoula's Tailgate Headquarters! We carry all of the spirits & accessories to make your tailgate party a success! Largest selection of spirits in Montana, including locally made whiskey, vodka, gin, rum and wine. We're located downtown with free customer parking. Grizzly Liquor was voted Missoula's #1 Liquor Store! Open M-F 96:30, Sat 9-6. $-$$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula's best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. • 532-2056 Thursday is Trivia Night! Prizes, food and drink specials! Starting at 7 pm. Also,check our brand new wine menu! Considering a staycation? Check out our packages. Call for more details! Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over

missoulanews.com • March 21 – March 28, 2013 [25]


[dish]

Salty Dog HAPPIEST HOUR What it is: A throwback of a cocktail that’s easy to make and perfect to drink as spring weather arrives. All you need to do is rim a highball glass with kosher salt, add ice, pour two ounces of gin or vodka and top with about four or five ounces of freshsqueezed grapefruit juice. Stir and enjoy.

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Iza 529 S. Higgins 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Contemporary Asian cuisine featuring local, vegan, gluten free and organic options as well as wild caught seafood, Idaho trout and buffalo. Join us for lunch and dinner. Happy Hour 3-6 weekdays with specials on food and drink. Extensive sake, wine and tea menu. Closed Sundays. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm, Dinner 5pm-close. Sat: Dinner 5pm-close. $-$$

Hold up, friend. Talk us through this a bit: Not much to discuss, which is why this old hound is a classic. It’s pure preference when choosing between gin and vodka. I wanted to mark the occasion of opening a first-batch bottle of Montgomery Distillery Quicksilver, so I went with vodka. As for the fresh-squeezed grapefruit juice, it’s a no-brainer. Score three for a buck or so and you’ll taste the sweet difference compared to bitter bottled options.

per that recently reminded us of this drink, also suggests the Peppery Dog: vodka, grapefruit juice and pepper syrup made of black peppercorns, water, sugar and lime juice. It reportedly provides a bit of a kick. Call me old-fashioned, but I’d just as well stick with the straightforward original. —Skylar Browning

Old dog, new tricks: The Salty Dog’s been around so long, there are plenty of variations. Skip the salt and you have a Greyhound. Orlando Weekly, a fellow alternative newspa-

Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor at missoulanews.com.

Photo by Skylar Browning

Jakers 3515 Brooks St. 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Jimmy John’s 420 N. Higgins 542-1100 jimmyjohns.com Jimmy John’s - America’s Favorite Sandwich Delivery Guys! Unlike any other sub shop, Jimmy John’s is all about the freshest ingredients and fastest service. Freaky Fast, Freaky Good - that’s Jimmy John’s. Order online, call for delivery or visit us on Higgins. $-$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. 543-7154 (on the hip strip) Heart to Heart Duo, March 23, 7-10pm $5.00. UoM School of Pharmacy Health Fair March 28 11-3 All ages welcome. FREE. For a full menu and other activities, visit our website at www.missoulaseniorcenter.org. Pearl Cafe 231 East Front St. 541-0231 pearlcafe.us Serving country French specialties, Montana elk, Berkshire Pork, and delicious seafood dishes. Delectable salads and appetizers, as well as breads and desserts baked in-house. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Philly West 134 W. Broadway 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. $-$$

$…Under $5

[26] Missoula Independent • March 21 – March 28, 2013

Romaines 3075 N. Reserve Suite N 406-214-2659 www.romainessalads.com We provide you with the convenience of delicious salads, sandwiches and soups. Our salads include over 30 wholesome ingredients. Our homemade soups change with the season as different ingredients become available. If hearty sandwiches are your favorite, then visit Romaines for one of our braised meat sandwiches. We also have a Montana Hummus sandwich made from Montana grown garbanzo beans. At last, local, fresh, and healthy! $-$$ Silvertip Casino 680 SW Higgins 728-5643 The Silvertip Casino is Missoula’s premiere casino offering 20 Video gaming machines, best live poker in Missoula, full beverage liquor, 11 flat screen tv’s and great food at great prices. Breakfast Specials starting at $2.99 (7-11am) For a complete menu, go to www.silvertipcasino.com. Open 24/7. $-$$ Sis's Kitchen 531-5034 sisskitchen.com Wheat, Gluten & Allergen Free Foods. Frozen & Dry Mix Products. Sis's Kitchen plays a part in Best of Missoula "Best Pizza" Winner's for 2008-2012. Find our products at: The Good Food Store • Biga Pizza • Bridge Pizza • Pizza Cafe in Ronan (12"crust). $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI We have quick and delicious lunch specials 6 days a week starting at $7, and are open for dinner 7 nights a week. Try our comfort food items like Pork Katsu and Chicken Teriyaki. We also offer party platters to go and catering for all culinary styles. Lunch 11:30-3 Mon-Sat. Dinner 5-9:30 Every Night. Corner of Pine and Higgins. Very Family Friendly. 549-7979. $-$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins 327-8929 Stop in when you're in the neighborhood. We'll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula's best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 1110 Sun 12-9. $-$$ Taco John’s 623 W Broadway 2600 S Reserve West-Mex® is about fresh taste and BOLD flavors. Taco John’s recipes make you smile and yell “OLÉ”. We combine hearty helpings of seasoned meats, crispy Potato Olés®, and flavorful cheeses with fresh-made Mexican specialties like burritos, tacos, and quesadillas. All topped off with bold sauces, spices and salsas. You’ll find West-Mex® cooking makes for an unbeatably satisfying meal. See you soon ... Amigo :) $-$$ Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you'll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over


tremes. Stories are 10 minutes long. Top Hat, 134 W. Front St. 5 PM. Free. Join Hospice of Missoula for Community Conversations on Death and Dying, where facilitators educate people on how to talk about this oft-uncomfortable subject. March’s guests, Dale Mayer, PhD, RN, presents “What to Expect when the Unexpected Happens” and Josh Simpson, Hospice of Missoula Director of Nursing, facilitates this month’s conversation. The Loft, 119 W. Main St. 6–8 PM. Free.

March 21 – March 28, 2013

This month’s PFLAG Hamilton-Bitterroot meeting presents “I’m Wondering if My Child Might be Gay: What Now?” St. Paul’s Church at 600 S. Third St. in Hamilton. 7 PM. Learn of the health impacts of coal when Dr. Alan H. Lockwood presents “The Silent Epidemic: Coal and the Hidden Threat to Health.” The good doctor focuses on coal pollution’s effects on the respiratory, cardiovascular and nervous systems. Gallagher Business Bldg. Rm. 123. 7–8:30 PM. Free. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM. What does a pente cost? No matter, the UM School of Theatre & Dance’s production of the political thriller Pentecost uncovers how art is more than just pretty picture and instead informs our ideologies and notions of self and nationality. 7:30 PM. $10$20. Visit umtheatredance.org. Casting couch confessional. Comedian Tracy Morgan of “30 Rock” and “SNL” fame brings his comedy stylings to the Dennison Theatre Thur., March 28, at 7 PM. $49.50. Tickets available at griztix.com.

THURSDAYMARCH21 Ride the pommel horse to Dr. Funkenstein’s grave cuz funketeers Shakewell are joined by Muzikata at the Top Hat, 134 W. Front St. 9 PM. $5.

nightlife The UM American Indian Student Services hosts an eight-week Insider/Outsider Film Series at the Payne

Family Native American Center on the UM campus and has a strict B.Y.O.F. (bring your own frybread) policy. This week’s film is The Business of Fancy Dancing. 5–7 PM. Free. Grandma’s Little Darlings drop the bad kitties in the well in favor of good musicmaking at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 6–8 PM. Free. Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on and become

fixated oratorically at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free. Captain Wilson Conspiracy doesn’t make falsehoods, just true enough music at the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6– 8:30 PM. Free. Drink four Mountain Dews and huck yourself over a cliff before heading to the storytelling event Tell Us Something: Ex-

Children of the Earth Tribe Song and Chant Circle at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center is for all those ready to sing in honor of our connection to one another and the earth. 519 S. Higgins (Enter through back alley door.). 7:30 PM. Free will offering. Kristi Neumann, John Adam Smith and Ron Dunbar take the stage at the Crystal Theater, 515 S. Higgins Ave., for a little song/story swapping during Songwriters in the Round. Music never had it so good, except for the time music had German chocolate cake; that was awesome. 8 PM. $12.

missoulanews.com • March 21 – March 28, 2013 [27]


[calendar] The ways of women in beauty parlors down south are explored in the Missoula Community Theatre production of Steel Magnolias. MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. 8 PM. $15-$21. Visit mctinc.org. An artistic bout of sorts ought to tickle your musical fun glands during another installment of Top of the Mic, an open mic competition, starting at 8:30 PM at Sean Kelly’s. Free. The Dead Hipster Dance Party is all kinds of sweaty, but ‘tis the droplets of the beautiful people. Get a taste in the place where love and funk is in the air (sometimes they are the same scent). Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight. Good-time boys Mark Duboise and Crossroads perform country music for you to practice mating rituals by at the Sunrise Saloon. 9 PM. Free. Show up the rest of the room with your version of “Ninja

Survive” when you hit the Dark Horse for Combat Karaoke hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free. Burst your ear holes and bust an old-time groove in your robot walkers at Archaic Revival, an evening of electronic music with local DJs Zafira, Mermaid, MT Chachi and Cadence, at the Palace. 9 PM. Free. Also includes a 2-for-1 well drink special. One of the hardest working bands around, Jerry Joseph and the Jackmormons, perform big old sad songs for all you music lovers at Stage 112 (Inside the Elk’s Lodge), 112 N. Pattee St. 9 PM. $10/$8 advance at Rockin Rudy’s and stageonetwelve.com. The geiger counters will be off the charts at the electronic DJ evening Radioactive with Obson and Mo. Palace. 9 PM. Free. The best-looking event like ever, ever takes place at the VFW, 245 W. Main St., and features the musical likes of Shahs (hawt), The Boxcutters (spiffy),

Cory Fay (I say Cory Yay!) and the yumtastic I Hate Your Girlfriend. 10 PM. $2.

FRIDAYMARCH22

for Canstruction, an uncanny event where can-doers build structures out of cans of food. Check the action from 1–7 PM. (See Agenda.)

nightlife

Like the swans to Capistrano and the monkeys to Siam, the Yonder Mountain String Band returns to Missoula’s Wilma Theatre for a twonight stand, so bring a toothbrush. With special guest The Deadly Gentlemen. 8 PM. $25/$22.50 advance. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s or ticketfly.com. This one’s for the ladies: Retreat, Reconnect and Renew is a weekend-long retreat for women contemplating or experiencing transition in life. It takes place in Arlee. $300. More info at ywcaofmissoula.org. Can you believe it, sucka! The Montana Food Bank Network cannot wait for you to bring your can down to the Southgate Mall

Bring Uncle Charlie and creepy cousin Coco to the Top Hat’s Family Friendly Friday featuring the kid-friendly, mother-approved Whizpops. 134 W. Front St. 6–8 PM. Free. You’ll flip for ACROtainment, a fantastic experience in acrobatic theater that the whole family is certain to dig, featuring approximately 65 youth athletes, along with various guest artists, ACROtainment incorporates gymnastics, acrobatics, dance, trampoline and more. Roots Sports and Learning Center, 216 Commerce St. 6:30 pm. $12. Come have a drink and help ye Big Sky Renaissance Faire raise money for charity. $1 of every drink will help them out, plus there be raffles. Full Moon Saloon in Stevi. 7 PM.

Tea submersion Located downtown

in the historic Masonic Hall 406-529-9477 126 E. Broadway,

Ste.22 Wide selection of tea & tea bar.

[28] Missoula Independent • March 21 – March 28, 2013

LakeMissoulaTea.com

The 96th annual Foresters’ Ball takes place over two nights with dancing music by Kung Fu Kountry and a big-ass dance floor. Friendly reminder: boozy behavior is no longer tolerated. What would Hippy Dan say about that? Adams Center. 7 PM. $20/$35 per couple. Poet Elizabeth Robinson reads her works to those of you with an ear for the literary at the Dell Brown Room in UM’s Turner Hall. 7 PM. Free. What does a pente cost? No matter, the UM School of Theatre & Dance’s production of the political thriller Pentecost uncovers how art is more than just pretty picture and instead informs our ideologies and notions of self and nationality. 7:30 PM. $10-$20. Visit umtheatredance.org. Mix it up and check the flavors of all them dancers at the UM School of Theatre & Dance presentation, Dance New Works: Spring Dance Showcase, at the The Open Space in the UM PAR/TV Center. 7:30 PM. $9/$6 students.


[calendar] Taste the rainbow and kiss the candy girl when Zeppo MT does soul and rock tunes for dancing lads and sassy dames at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. 8 PM. Free. The ways of women in beauty parlors down south are explored in the Missoula Community Theatre production of Steel Magnolias. MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. 8 PM. $15-$21. Visit mctinc.org. Find your own Swayze lookalike and have the (filthy) time of your life at Dirty FKN Dancing, with boogies from MissouBootyKrew, SoledOut Bboy Crew, Your Booty and Lil Sassy, starting at 9 PM. Badlander. Free. I can’t believe it (is) Butter at the Palace tonight, with a tasty host of other Missoulians including Mendelssohn, Spider + Octopus and Skin Flowers. 9 PM. $5. (See Music.)

SATURDAYMARCH23 What does a pente cost? No matter, the UM School of Theatre & Dance’s production of the political thriller Pentecost uncovers how art is more than just pretty picture and instead informs our ideologies and notions of self and nationality. 7:30 PM. $10-$20. Visit umtheatredance.org. The Missoula Winter Market is a family-friendly market much like the Saturday markets, but indoors and during wintertime! Come and enjoy local crafts, artisans, food and entertainment every weekend at 10 AM. 2036 Mullan Rd. Visit missoulawintermarket.com.

Fairgrounds in the Floriculture Building offers you remedies of local produce, meat, baked goods, jam, honey and so much more. 11 AM–2 PM. Footloose Montana hosts a Trapped Pet Release Workshop at Go Fetch!, 3800 Russell Square, from 1–3 PM. Free. The ways of women in beauty parlors down south are explored in the Missoula Community Theatre production of Steel Magnolias. MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. 2 PM. $15-$21. Visit mctinc.org. Come hear local countertenor Kevin Dyal and friends perform works from the early masters. Prince of Peace Lutheran Church,

Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 6– 8 PM. Free. Taste the Great Northwest at Missoula Un-Corked!, a food and wine pairing and music event featuring jazz tunes by Jodi Marshall as well as live and silent auctions. This deal benefits the Missoula Community Chorus. The Keep, 101 Ben Hogan Dr. 6–9 PM. $50. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s or missoulachorus.org. Tom Catmull and the Clerics bare their musical souls and might just show you their buns down at the gas station when they head down the ‘Root to play the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6–8:30 PM. Free.

Party down pre-Nirvana style when The Mighty Flick hits the Dark Horse, 1805 Regent St., for an evening of covers featuring the heart of rock and roll still beating. 9 PM. Free.

John “Poncho” Dobson hosts open mic at Fergie’s Pub every Fri., where you’re bound to mingle with a mix of resort celebs, odd locals and dizzy soakers. You never know who’ll show up and play. It could be you. Starts at 3 PM. 213 Main Street in Hot Springs. Sign up ahead at 406-721-2416 or just show up. Salute yourself, sailor, and march on down to the Top Hat, 134 W. Front St., for some Americana with The Hasslers and a grip of partying the old country way with Cold Hard Cash. 9:30 PM. Free.

Get down with Mr. Robot-O and embrace Skynet at the MAM, 200 N. Pattee St., during the InterExchange Concert: Computer Music, featuring new computer music composition and performance by students from Western Washington University, Montana State University and UM. 7:30 PM. Free.

Jenn Adams makes acoustic music for your gooey insides and Ouzel brings piano, accordion, cello and violin to the party. Missoula Winery, 5646 Harrier Way. 8 PM. $12.

Brother Ali makes hip-hop what it used to be and then some when he performs at Stage 112 inside the Elk’s Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St. 9 PM. $25/$20 advance at Rockin Rudy’s and stageonetwelve.com. (See Music.)

Cash for Junkers might just be the best way to make a party go Wham! Union Club. 9 PM. Free.

Mix it up and check the flavors of all them dancers at the UM School of Theatre & Dance presentation, Dance New Works: Spring Dance Showcase, at the The Open Space in the UM PARTV Center. 7:30 PM. $9/$6 students.

Like the swans to Capistrano and the monkeys to Siam, the Yonder Mountain String Band returns to Missoula’s Wilma Theatre for a two-night stand, so bring a toothbrush. With special guest The Deadly Gentlemen. 8 PM. $25/$22.50 advance. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s or ticketfly.com.

Good-time boys Mark Duboise and Crossroads perform country music for you to practice mating rituals by at the Sunrise Saloon. 9 PM. Free.

The Louie Bond Band makes the dancers do the splits when it performs at the Hideout Bar. 942 Hub Ln. 9 PM. Free.

The Heart to Heart Duo plays the Missoula Senior Center’s Saturday Night Dance, so slide into those glad rags and show the youngsters how it’s done. 705 S. Higgins. 7–10 PM. $5.

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Blind faith. The UM School of Theatre & Dance performs the play Pentecost Tue. through Sat. evenings at 7:30 PM, in the UM PARTV Center. $10-$20. Visit umtheatredance.org.

Hang out and learn the origins of 3-7-77 and other tidbits at the Daly Mansion Spring Speaker Series. This week Patrick Danahy gives a talk called “Vigilantes, Freemasons and Gold Rush Justice in Montana Territory.” 251 Eastside Hwy. in Hamilton. 10 AM. Free. This week’s Living Art workshop is titled Interiors & Exteriors with Odette Grassi, and is for anyone experiencing illness or loss. Living Art of Montana, 725 W. Alder St., #17. Material provided. 10:30–1:30 PM. Free. 549-5329. Never fear lovers of fresh, local vittles, the Heirloom Winter Market at the Missoula County

2512 Sunset Ln. 2:30 PM. Admission is free, but a freewill collection will be taken for HOPE Worldwide, a UN-recognized international charity. You’ll flip for ACROtainment, a fantastic experience in acrobatic theater that the whole family is certain to dig, featuring approximately 65 youth athletes, along with various guest artists, ACROtainment incorporates gymnastics, acrobatics, dance, trampoline and more. Roots Sports and Learning Center, 216 Commerce St. 3 and 6:30 pm. $12.

nightlife Mountain Breathers airs out and sings loveliness at Draught

Hop in the trouble buggy and attend Women’s Opportunity & Resource Development (WORD) Annual Auction & Fundraiser– Many Faces of Women: 1920s Edition, featuring Laura & the Salvation Blues, as well as auctions hosted by Mayor Engen. Florence Building, 111 N. Higgins Ave. 6 PM. $30/$50 for two and includes dinner. Visit wordinc.org. The 96th annual Foresters’ Ball takes place over two nights with dancing music by Kung Fu Kountry and a big-ass dance floor. Friendly reminder: boozy behavior is no longer tolerated. What would Hippy Dan say about that? Adams Center. 7 PM. $20/$35 per couple.

The ways of women in beauty parlors down south are explored in the Missoula Community Theatre production of Steel Magnolias. MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. 8 PM. $15-$21. Visit mctinc.org. Taste the rainbow and kiss the candy girl when Zeppo MT does soul and rock tunes for dancing lads and sassy dames at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. 8 PM. Free. The Dark Horse Band makes the cat go a-yammering down the creek when the group makes dance music for the feet at the Lumberjack Saloon, 7000 Graves Creek Rd. west of Lolo. 9 PM. Free. Shodown chases after Burnside and plays country music for the dancing class at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St. 9 PM. Free. Take the pommel horse to karate town, Jo-Jo, cuz Muzikata plays that good stuff for the folks at the Union Club. 9 PM. Free.

missoulanews.com • March 21 – March 28, 2013 [29]


[calendar] Absolutely with DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are like Shabba-Doo and Boogaloo Shrimp, saving rec centers one beat at at time. Get hip to their jamz, hippies. Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2-for-1 Absolut drinks until midnight. $2. If you wanna know where the hunx are, check out the VFW, 245 W. Main St., during the Needlecraft record release celebration, with Oll Breds, J. Sherri and Bad Naked. Undoubtedly, you should sport a Speedo and rock-hard abs. Or simply shake your wee-wee parts all night long. 10 PM. $2. Party down pre-Nirvana style when The Mighty Flick hits the Dark Horse, 1805 Regent St., for an evening of covers featuring the heart of rock and roll still beating. 9 PM. Free. Be bluesy and get musey when ye olde Black Mountain Moan chains you to a radiator of blues tunes and Polecat shoves Americana into the ether. Top Hat, 134 W. Front St. 9 PM. $5.

THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA PRESENTS THE 2013

INTERNAT ONAL

CULTURE & FOOD FESTIVAL

SUNDAY, MARCH 24

122130Â&#x2021;81,9(56,7<&(17(5 $'0,66,21Â&#x2021;&+,/'5(1 World Food Bazaar Five Hour International Culture Show Childrens World Cultural Pavilions & More With 5th Annual *RRG &auVH )unGUaiVHU AltUuVa ,ntHUnatiRnal RI 0iVVRula 'RnatiRnV WHlFRPHG at thH 'RRU Hosted by the International Student Association & Foreign Student and Scholar Services

SUNDAYMARCH24 Andrew Smith and Hoyt Smith are all, â&#x20AC;&#x153;La, la, la, sing, sang, sung,â&#x20AC;? when the duo performs at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6 PM. Free. The Missoula Winter Market is a family-friendly market much like the Saturday markets, but indoors and during wintertime! Come and enjoy local crafts, artisans, food and entertainment every weekend at 10 AM. 2036 Mullan Rd. Visit missoulawintermarket.com. Strap on your polka feet for the Five Valley Accordion Players at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St. Noon. Free. The Missoula International Friendship Program Auction boasts quality items from around the world including an oil painting by nationally known artist Roger Broer from the Oglala Lakota Nation. University Center, third floor. Noonâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4 PM. Possibly the most wonderful time of the year for Garden City foodies, yes, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the 22nd Annual International Culture and Food Festival. Taste such delights as Brazilian brigadeiro, Ethiopian injera and Vietnamese pork barbecue. Includes parade of flags, cultural shows and so much more. $5/$3 for children 12 and under. University Center. Noon-5 PM. Kick out the jams down the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Root at the dining room of the Sapphire Lutheran Homes, corner of 10th and River streets. Players of all levels are invited to bring their guitars, mandolins, harmonicas, fiddles, banjos, dobros, or other acoustic instrument. Music includes old-time country, bluegrass, swing, cowboy, folk, old standards, etc. Folks who want to play or just listen are encouraged to come. For more information, call John at 381-2483. Free. Do you know where the Mullan Expedition spent the winter of 1861-62? Me neither. Learn about Mullan and his namesake road at the History Roundtable: Mullan Expedition. St. Ann Catholic Church, 9015 Hwy. 200 East in Bonner. 2 PM. Free. Montana Repertory Theatre hosts a staged reading of A Safe Place, a tale of "a family haunted by the past, tormented by shame and guilt,â&#x20AC;? by Greg Patent, better known as a chef and food writer. Masquer Theatre. 3 PM. Free.

[30] Missoula Independent â&#x20AC;˘ March 21 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; March 28, 2013

nightlife Funny dude Brian Regan makes what seems to be his annual pilgrimage to Missoula for a night of stand-up at the Dennison Theatre at 7 PM. $42.50. Tickets available at griztix.com. Hear the words of vets and up-and-comers during the UM MFA programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Second Wind Reading Series at the Top Hat, 134 W. Front St. This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s readers are Kate DiNitto and Peter Schumacher. 5 PM. Free. Bob Wills is still the king of Western Swing, but our very own Western Union is looking to commit some regicide and make some fine old western swing tunes for you all to dance by at the Missoula Winery, 5646 Harrier Way. 6 PM. $5.

Save the fish so you can fish by attending the Trout Unlimited Fundraiser with Cootehill at the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8:30 PM. Free. Close out the weekend in style at the Badlanderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with Josh Farmer, The Vanguard Combo and Front Street Jazz. Free.

More events online: missoulanews.com Rock a Taco tribute t-shirt and put on the ritz when Airstream Safari is joined by 4 on the Floor for an evening of rocking as well as rolling. Top Hat, 1345 W. Front St. 8:30 PM. $8.

MONDAYMARCH25 The Tom Catmull does the do-whack-a at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave., from 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10 PM. Free. Music makers, get your gig on by signing up to perform at the Missoula Farmers Market. Applications accepted through April 1. A $40 stipend is provided. For more information and an application, see the Market website missoulafarmersmarket.com. Visiting sexual violence expert and Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lecture Series speaker Victoria Banyard presents a seminar, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Who Will Help? Creating a Community Response to Sexual Violence Prevention,â&#x20AC;? from 3:10 to 4:30 PM. Gallagher Business Building Room 123. Free.

knight ritter Tesla has an amazing track titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Call It What You Want,â&#x20AC;? wherein lead vocalist and Arkansan Jeff Keith states the following: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Music means a lot to me / Like love I make it when I can.â&#x20AC;? Keithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s axiom elegantly sums up how most musicians feel about sex and music. Unfortunately, it lands on the telling side of another axiom: Show, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tell. This is where musical lifer Josh Ritter one-ups Mr. Keith (Admittedly, using Tesla as a musical touchstone isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t for everyone); Ritter constantly and consistently makes solid, if not pertnear grand music. Ritterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recorded output and touring schedule mark him as someone who intends to grow old playing music, with an album or so released every two years for the past Josh Ritter 14. With sound textures varying from lonely and quiet acoustic numbers to tunes with boisterous horn sections and a multitude of voices, he can play any kind of roomâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;intimate, barroom or concert hall. Even with this being true, the Moscow, Idaho-born Ritter is better known as a

WHO: Josh Ritter and The Royal City Band, with Lake Street Dive WHERE: Wilma Theatre WHEN: Mon., March 25, at 8 PM HOW MUCH: $24/$21 advance at Rockin Rudyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or ticketweb.com

writer to some, having released a well-received novel titled Brightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Passage in 2011. Ritterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest album, The Beast in Its Tracks, finds the man unpacking his recent divorce from fellow musician Dawn Landes. The songs on the new release spend much of their time mingling simple refrains and quietly building layer upon layer of sound until they nearly break like small waves onto sand, a rush of swirling water speeding over the shore. Unlike some breakup albums, these songs seem hopeful, as if Ritter wrote a passel of angry or overwrought tracks early on and dumped them in the river rather than record his rage. Ritter seems to know that the hard work comes during the second draft where narrative and emotional distance allow the songwriter to find and create authentic, affecting music. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jason McMackin


[calendar] The Rough Cut Science Seminar Series shows off the brainiacs of Montana’s scientific community, with presentations on current research each week at 4 PM in the University Center Theater. Visit montanaioe.org/roughcut-series for the schedule.

nightlife Occupy Missoula General Assembly meets at the Union Hall above the Union Club at 6 PM. Visit occupymissoula.org. Join One People’s Public Trust 1776 for a meeting at the Eagle’s Lodge, 2420 South Ave., wherein folks can learn about the group and how to free yourself from financial tyranny. 6 PM. The UM Climate Action Now meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM FLAT, 633 Fifth St. E. 6:30 PM. Bingo at the VFW: the easiest way to make rent since keno. 245 W. Main. 6:45 PM. $12 buy-in. Leave behind bottled violence and embrace the ‘tude of The Dude at the Top Hat’s Monday Movie: The Big Lebowski. 7 PM. Free. Josh Ritter & the Royal City Band makes all the right moves when it performs the crispiest of tunes along with Lake Street Dive at the Wilma. 8 PM. $24/$21 advance at Rockin Rudy’s or ticketweb.com. Sexual violence expert Victoria Banyard speaks on “Sexual Assault as a Societal Problem in America” for the UM President’s Lecture Series. Banyard has championed a program that emphasizes on bringing bystanders in to help prevent violence. Dennison Theatre. 8 PM. Free. You know it’s gotta be a real party when DJ Super Steve rocks the karaoke with the hottest Kamikaze tuneage this side of the hemisphere at the Dark Horse. Are you brave enough to let the computer pick your songs? 9 PM. Free. Ask politely before you rub up against legs and purr at Random Music for Random Kitties, with DJs Milkcrate Mechanic, Jaguar Sleepover, Lootcakes and Earthlink. Badlander. 9 PM. Free, with $5 pitchers of PBR. Open Mic with Joey Running Crane at the VFW, 245 W. Main, seems like a fine idea, especially with 2-for-1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. 10 PM. Free. Call him up and get yourself a slot at 229-0488.

TUESDAYMARCH26 Kira Means has got the 10and-a-half, see it when she performs at the Top Hat’s dinner show from 6–8 PM. Free. Grow on and make some veggies go, cuz the Victor Community Garden is now open to receive reservations for the 2013 summer. The garden offers 20’ by 20’ plots and supplies compost, mulch, tools and watering. $26 for the year, includes rent of a port-apotty. The garden is on 5th Ave, just west of Victor. Contact Jill at 642-3601. Fun with Yoga at the Families First Children’s Museum might work for you and the kids. It might make you cry, too. 11 AM. 225 W. Front. $4.25. Join the arterati at the Missoula Cultural Council’s Annual Arts Awards luncheon at the Doubletree Hotel, 100 Madison St. Award recipients include the Missoula Symphony’s Darko Butorac and Mohan Kartha, director of the Center for Music by People with Disabilities and Spontaneous Music by Children, and many others. 11:30 AM–1 PM. $25. RSVP at 541-0860 or mcc@missoulacultural.org. Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room for Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters, at 5205 Grant Creek Dr., and work on your elkcamp locution with the best. All are invited. Noon–1 PM. Free. Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. Third St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1–3 PM. For information, call 543-3955. The Watershed Education Network hosts Stream Monitoring Training at the Upper Greenough Park Pavillion. This training teaches peeps WEN’s steam monitoring protocols so that they may take part in monitoring field programs. 4:30–7:30 PM. Free. RSVP at 541-9287 or water@montanawatershed.org.

nightlife Have a beer and talk jökulhlaups at the Glacial Lake Missoula Chapter of the Ice Age Floods Institute Pint Night at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 5–8 PM. It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana,

2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Boys Bluegrass from 5:30 to 8 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. In Soviet Russia audience lectures you. Russia on the Oval is the topic of this year’s annual Community Lecture Series at UM. This week UM Department of Mathematical Sciences Chair and Professor Leonid Kalachev gives a talk called “Educational System in Today’s Russia: A View on the Role of Education in a Contemporary Society.” 7 PM. $20 for the complete lecture series/$15 for UM Alumni Association dues-paying members/$10 for students. $5 per lecture at the door. Visit grizalum.org. This week’s speaker at the Wilderness Institute’s Lecture Series, Wilderness on the Edge: The Emerging Roles of Wild Lands in Changing Landscapes is Professor Reed Noss, University of Central Florida Department of Biology, whose talk is titled “Wilderness, Wildness and Biodiversity: We Need All Three.” UM Gallagher Business Bldg. Rm. 122. 7:10 PM. Free. Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek and Aimee Ryan during Compassionate Communication, a non-violent communication weekly practice group, at the University Center Rm. 330. 7–9 PM. Free. What does a pente cost? No matter, the UM School of Theatre & Dance’s production of the political thriller Pentecost uncovers how art is more than just pretty picture and instead informs our ideologies and notions of self and nationality. 7:30 PM. $10-$20. Visit umtheatredance.org. Mix it up and check the flavors of all them dancers at the UM School of Theatre & Dance presentation, Dance New Works: Spring Dance Showcase, at the The Open Space in the UM PARTV Center. 7:30 PM. $9/$6 students. Find your dance and yourself at Turning the Wheel’s Tapestry class, which is a self-expressionfilled improvisational dance bonanza. Headwaters Dance Company studio, 1042 Monroe St. 7:30-9 PM. $10. Proceeds benefit Turning the Wheel’s school programs. The Montana Musicians and Artists Coalition hosts the Musician Showcase at Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St., an evening of

missoulanews.com • March 21 – March 28, 2013 [31]


[calendar] tuneful live tuneage made by locals for locals. 8–11 PM. Free. 18-plus. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free pub trivia, which takes place every Tuesday at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with: Where does the Mullan Road begin and terminate? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.) Party harder than my grandma when she drinks Arbor Mist at the Badlander’s Live and Local Night, with jug band Grandmas Little Darlings and local fella Chris Crecelius. 10 PM.

Watershed Group Community Discussion about creek migration at the Lolo Community Center, 12345 Hwy. 93 S. 7 PM.

real nice to him when he takes the stage at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 5–8 PM. Free.

What does a pente cost? No matter, the UM School of Theatre & Dance’s production of the political thriller Pentecost uncovers how art is more than just pretty picture and instead informs our ideologies and notions of self and nationality. 7:30 PM. $10$20. Visit umtheatredance.org.

nightlife

Gaze across Flathead Lake and groove “to the rock bent country songs” of the Soul City Cowboys up at Swanee’s Bar & Grill just outside of Polson. 8:30 PM. Free.

Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free. Dan Dubuque can do it all. Don’t believe me? Check him out when he per-

Cheyenne Rivers and Adam Borcherdt host a media presentation and talk for the Balanced View organization which “is an innovative model for global standardized education in the actual nature of the human intelligence.” Burns St. Events Center, 1500 Burns St. 6–7:15 PM. Free. John Adams Smith reads passages out of Letters from an American Farmer during the dinner show at the Top Hat, 134 W. Front St. Jokes, he plays music. C’mon guys. 6–8 PM. Free. (Pub trivia answer: The Mullan Road begins at Fort Benton, Mont. and its terminus is near Walla Walla, Wash.) Show the Man how big your gray matter can get at Super Trivia Freakout. Win a bar tab, shots, and other mystery prizes during the five rounds of trivia. Badlander. 6:30 PM. Free. Hey, winter is here and TV ain’t exactly pumping out the good stuff these days, so get off your bum for a few and take Cathy Clark’s West Coast Swing Class at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent Ave. 7 PM. $5. Find out how to best manage your stream (insert pee joke here) at the Lolo

Surfin’ n’ singin’, Donavon Frankenreiter performs for you all at the Wilma Theatre, with Eric Tollefson and Rayland Baxter. 8 PM. $18.

Them hard working, music-making Soul City Cowboys kick it at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St. 8:30 PM. Free.

Mix it up and check the flavors of all them dancers at the UM School of Theatre & Dance presentation, Dance New Works: Spring Dance Showcase, at the The Open Space in the UM PARTV Center. 7:30 PM. $9/$6 students.

nightlife

Dance your way to a free mind and an open body at Turning the Wheel Missoula’s Ecstatic Dance. Headwaters Dance Studio, 1042 Monroe St. 8 PM. $8. Visit turningthewheel.org.

An artistic bout of sorts ought to tickle your musical fun glands during another installment of Top of the Mic, an open mic competition, starting at 8:30 PM at Sean Kelly’s. Free.

WEDNESDAYMARCH27

Get learned at lunchtime during the Mansfield Center Brown Bag Spring 2013 Series. This week Siobhan Lozado, project coordinator, Ethics and Public Affairs Program, The Mansfield Center, gives at a talk called, “Rural Livelihood Strategies and Subsistence Food Production in Belize: Enhancing Small Farmer Food System Resiliency as a mode to Sustainable Risk Management and Participatory Development” Mansfield Center Conference Room. 12:10 PM. Free.

Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30– 10 PM.

More events online: missoulanews.com Burst your ear holes and bust an old time groove in your robot walkers at Archaic Revival, an evening of electronic music with local DJs Zafira, Mermaid, MT Chachi and Cadence, at the Palace. 9 PM. Free. Also includes a 2-for-1 well drink special. Run the gamut from relaxed to riledup at the Palace tonight with country-rockers Viv Savage, Sophi’s Tea and metalheads State of Rage. 9 PM. $5. It’s five o’clock everywhere when you’re bean baggin’. Singer and guitar player Donavon Frankenreiter takes the stage at the Wilma Theatre, Thur., March 28, at 8 PM. $18. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s and ticketweb.com.

Kraptastic Karaoke welcomes Black Eyed Peas fanatics to belt out their fave jamz at the Badlander, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $5 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free. Check out some forward-thinking tunes at Progressive, with DJs Cadence, Mark Myriad, HotPantz and more. 9 PM. Free, with progressive PBR drafts starting at 25 cents and increasing every half-hour.

THURSDAYMARCH28 The UM American Indian Student Services hosts an eight-week Insider/ Outsider Film Series takes place at the Payne Family Native American Center on the UM campus and has a strict B.Y.O.F. (bring your own frybread) policy. This week’s film is Dead Man. 5–7 PM. Free. Tom Catmull might perform Heart’s “All I Wanna Do Is Make Love to You” if you are

[32] Missoula Independent • March 21 – March 28, 2013

forms at Hamilton’s Bitter Root Brewery where he is rumored to play guitar and weld up a coffin simultaneously. 6–8:30 PM. Free. Join the Mike Bader Bearjam for a celebration of their new release Worldwide Blues: 11 all-original blues, funk and R&B songs with themes ranging from global peril, desolation, hopefulness and redemption. This is the first Mike Bader release in six years. Stensrud Building, 314 N. First St. 7 PM. Free. Listen up fans of “30 Rock” and Cop Out: Funny man Tracy Morgan visits the Dennison Theatre on the UM campus with a 7 p.m. show full of jokes. $49.50. Tickets from griztix.com. What does a pente cost? No matter, the UM School of Theatre & Dance’s production of the political thriller Pentecost uncovers how art is more than just pretty picture and instead informs our ideologies and notions of self and nationality. 7:30 PM. $10$20. Visit umtheatredance.org. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big

The Dead Hipster Dance Party is all kinds of sweaty, but ‘tis the droplets of the beautiful people. Get a taste in the place where love and funk is in the air (sometimes they are the same scent). Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight. Show up the rest of the room with your version of “Ninja Survive” when you hit the Dark Horse for Combat Karaoke hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free. Number 5 is alive and at the Short Circuit Tour which features hip-hopperinos Toki Wright, Carnage and Kristoff Krane. Top Hat, 134 W. Front St. 10 PM. $8. PSA—Open them windows and air out that dank old house you live in before you get radon poisoned, hoss. Send your event info to me by 5 PM on Fri., Mar. 22 to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to The Calemandar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”


[outdoors] Times Run 3/22/13 - 3/28/13

MOUNTAIN HIGH The jokes about our neighbors to the east tend to go something like this: North Dakota is so flat that you can watch your dog run away for three days. While that is basically true, especially south of Fargo, there is a bit of skiing to be had in the hilariously named Turtle “Mountains” and the legendary Huff Hills Ski Area near Mandan, which features a whopping 450 feet of vert. In any case, Snowbowl continues its nearend-of-the-season tradition of holding the North Dakota Downhill race. This race takes place on the flat portion of the Paradise run. Of course, when I say flat, I mean this run often crosses over to the uphill side of things, depending on conditions and what the snowcat operators have been doing in

their spare time. This race favors the well-waxed and beefier folks. Momentum is the key and some of us heavy hitters have a chance to win this thing, unlike some of the other races at the bowl. While I don’t encourage cheating, I do encourage you brave souls seeking to take on this challenge to make a few extra trips through the buffet this week and ditch the bowl in favor of a plate of ice cream. —Jason McMackin The North Dakota Downhill takes place at 1 PM on Sun., March 24, at Montana Snowbowl. Registration is free but a lift ticket is necessary to ride the chairlifts.

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FRIDAY MARCH 22 Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s weekly meeting to talk about past glories and upcoming activities at Bigfork’s Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free. Make sure your first time is special by attending First Timer Friday at the Freestone Climbing Center, 935 Toole Ave. in Missoula, at 7 PM. Free if it’s your first visit.

SATURDAY MARCH 23 Gander at gooses by spending an inspiring day watching thousands of migrating snow geese at Freezeout Lake with other like-minded bird fans. The trip is led by snow goose expert and FWP volunteer, Mike Schwitters. Transportation provided. Bird train departs at 7 AM. $60/$50 for MNHC members. To register visit montananaturalist.org. Don’t run on a full stomach during Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which occur at 8 AM every Saturday at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. in Missoula. It’s after the run/walk that you can grab breakfast with other participants. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org. Join Unk and his crew and walk it out at Run Wild Missoula’s 16-week class Train to Walk the Missoula Marathon or Half Marathon at the Missoula Community Medical Center. The group meets twice per week and program costs $65/$40 for members. To learn more visit runwildmissoula.org. Pull out your elastic band sweatpants and step away from the buffet cuz the UM Physical Therapy

Student Association’s seventh annual Bust A Gut 5K begins at the UM Oval at 10 AM today. $20/15 advance. T-shirts are to be had as is a fine time. Visit racemontana.com. Learn more about the Salish, Kootenai, Pend d’Orielle and other tribes at Travelers’ Rest State Park’s Winter Storytelling Series. This week Narcisse Blood shares “Blackfoot Knowledge.” 11 AM–12:30 PM. Free.

SUNDAY MARCH 24 Over 100,000 Snow Geese and swans may soon be at the peak of their migration at Freezout Lake Wildlife Management Area near Choteau. Enough said. Join Five Valleys Audubon to take a peek. Meet at UM Adams Center parking lot at 6 AM for carpooling. $20 suggested donation to cover gas. Call Terry at 214-1194.

TUESDAY MARCH 26 This week’s speaker at the Wilderness Institute’s Lecture Series, Wilderness on the Edge: The Emerging Roles of Wild Lands in Changing Landscapes is Professor Reed Noss, University of Central Florida Department of Biology, whose talk is titled “Wilderness, Wildness and Biodiversity: We Need All Three.” UM Gallagher Business Bldg. Rm. 122. 7:10 PM. Free. The MT Native Plant Society Herbarium Night is going to blow minds when botanist John Pierce presents “An Introduction to Montana Sedges.” Sedges might resemble grass. Rm. 303, Botany Bldg., UM Campus. 7:30 PM.

missoulanews.com • March 21 – March 28, 2013 [33]


[community]

Dudes, dudettes and old-timey suffragettes: It’s time we celebrate Women’s History Month with the style and panache of the flappers of yore by attending Women’s Opportunity & Resource Development’s Many Faces of Women annual auction and fundraiser. While the event ought to be a roarin’ good time, with a pie and dessert auction led by Mayor Engen, music by Laura & the Salvation Blues and vintage glad rags galore, it’s important to remember why supporting this organization is important. WORD has been aiding women and their families since 1986. Programs such as Families in Transitions teach parents how to become a part of their children’s academic success even in the toughest circumstances, such as homelessness. The group

also seeks to empower women via its Women’s Leadership Project, which offers monthly leadership group meetings and bi-annual training sessions. Besides working with women, WORD also provides training for young men in its Mentors in Violence Prevention education program. MVP “seeks to reduce the level of men’s violence against women,” according to the group’s website. —Jason McMackin The Many Faces of Women 2013 Annual Auction and Fundraiser, the 1920s Edition, takes place at the Florence Hotel, 111 N. Higgins Ave., Sat., March 23, at 6 PM. $30/$50 for two and includes dinner, tickets available at wordinc.org.

[AGENDA LISTINGS] THURSDAY MARCH 21 This month’s PFLAG Hamilton-Bitterroot meeting presents “I’m Wondering if My Child Might be Gay: What Now?” St. Paul’s Church at 600 S. Third St. in Hamilton. 7 PM. Children of the Earth Tribe Song and Chant Circle at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center is for all those ready to sing in honor of our connection to one another and the earth. 519 S. Higgins (Enter through back alley door.). 7:30 PM. Free will offering.

SATURDAY MARCH 23 Hop in the trouble buggy and attend Women’s Opportunity & Resource Development (WORD) Annual Auction & Fundraiser–Many Faces of Women: 1920s Edition, featuring Laura & the Salvation Blues, as well as auctions hosted by Mayor Engen . Florence Building, 111 N. Higgins Ave. 6 PM. $30/$50 for two and includes dinner. Visit wordinc.org.

Join One People’s Public Trust 1776 for a meeting at the Eagle’s Lodge, 2420 South Ave., wherein folks can learn about the group and how to free yourself from financial tyranny. 6 PM. The UM Climate Action Now meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM FLAT, 633 Fifth St. E. 6:30 PM.

TUESDAY MARCH 26 Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. Third St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1–3 PM. For information, call 543-3955. The Watershed Education Network hosts Stream Monitoring Training at the Upper Greenough Park Pavillion. This training teaches peeps WEN’s steam monitoring protocols so that they may take part in monitoring field programs. 4:30– 7:30 PM. Free. RSVP at 541-9287 or water@montanawatershed.org.

SUNDAY MARCH 24

Have a beer and talk jökulhlaups at the Glacial Lake Missoula Chapter of the Ice Age Floods Institute PInt Night at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 5–8 PM.

The Missoula International Friendship Program Auction boasts quality items from around the world including an oil painting by nationally known artist Roger Broer from the Oglala Lakota Nation. University Center, third floor. Noon–4 PM.

Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek and Aimee Ryan during Compassionate Communication, a non-violent communication weekly practice group, at the University Center Rm. 330. 7–9 PM. Free.

Save the fish so you can fish by attending the Trout Unlimited Fundraiser with Cootehill at the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6–8:30 PM. Free.

WEDNESDAY MARCH 27

MONDAY MARCH 25 Occupy Missoula General Assembly meets at the Union Hall above the Union Club at 6 PM. Visit occupymissoula.org.

Cheyenne Rivers and Adam Borcherdt host a media presentation and talk for the Balanced View organization which “is an innovative model for global standardized education in the actual nature of the human intelligence.” Burns St. Events Center, 1500 Burns St. 6–7:15 PM. Free.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

[34] Missoula Independent • March 21 – March 28, 2013


missoulanews.com â&#x20AC;˘ March 21 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; March 28, 2013 [35]


www.missoulanews.com

March 21 - March 28, 2013

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Big Sky Bouncers Your biggest and best bouncer house rental company this side of the divide. Half and full day rental (free delivery within 15 miles of Lolo). (406) 273-9001 www.bigskybouncers.com Birth Mama Doula Training: May 17th-19th. bearruncreek@aol.com 546.6452 CHERRY FESTIVAL SEEKING VENDORS Wanted: Seeking vendors for Polson’s Main Street Flathead Cherry

Festival. This is a very well-attended event, held on the main streets of Polson July 20th and 21st. This unique celebration of Montana’s cherries draws many thousands of visitors each year. Three booth sizes are available, making this affordable for anyone. Local Montana-made and cherry-themed products are preferred. Food vendors welcome. To view and fill out an application, please visit www.flatheadcherryfestival.com. Booth spaces are limited and our deadline is May 24, 2013. This is a two-day event and we reserve the right to

Ken's Barber Shop Children and Walk-in Welcome Haircuts-$8.50 • Beard trims-$4 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m Tuesday-Saturday 1114 Cedar St, Missoula, MT• 728-3957

refuse duplicate products. You can direct questions to vendors@flatheadcherryfestival.c om, or 406-686-1155.

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"Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start from now and make a brand new ending" - Carl Sandburg


COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

ADVICE GODDESS By Amy Alkon MADAME OVARY My wife needs a medical test that will involve her being naked in unflattering positions in front of another person, possibly male. I know she won't enjoy this and it certainly isn't sexual, but I want her to request a female gynecologist. She says she's embarrassed to do that, refuses to be controlled by me, and says having a male doctor doesn't bother her. Well, it bothers me terribly. I'm fairly young and not religious, but I was taught that a couple's bedroom—what happens there, their nude bodies, etc.—is for them alone. I'm not insecure, and I know she isn't leaving me, but I strongly feel that her being seen naked by a male practitioner violates the sanctity and intimacy of our marriage, and I can't help but feel like it's cheating. —Distressed It's pretty hard to confuse an exam room with a singles bar—unless the singles bars you've experienced have men leaning over and asking women, "So...when was your last period?" and "Do you leak urine?" Cheating involves having a romance with a person other than your partner, not having him give you a Pap smear. Also, male doctors generally have a female nurse present while examining a female patient (so they won't be accused of any funny business). There will be that rare Dr. Pervo, but according to doctors I spoke to, by week two of their residency, bodies might as well be giant steaks. So, for a male doctor, your wife's "special area" is anything but special; it's the seventh vagina he's seen before lunch. Stamping your feet and denying the obvious—that there's a vast difference between medical touch and sexual touch—helps you manipulate your wife with this ridiculous notion that she "violates the sanctity" of your marriage by getting a male doctor in rotation. So, according to you, what's special about your marriage is just that since you tied the knot, no other man has been assigned to see your wife naked (in a setting more in keeping with performing an autopsy than staging a seduction). Take your "logic" a step further and your wife is two-timing you by even speaking to people who aren't you, and never mind that she isn't exactly revealing her deepest hopes, dreams, and fears to some man in line behind her at the mall. People in loving relationships will often accommodate their partner's ridiculous requests simply to make them happy. Your wife might've been more willing to do that if only you'd appealed to her sympathy instead of demanding that she do all the

changing while you lift nary a brain cell to consider whether your position might be unreasonable. (Refusing to even consider another person's point of view generally causes them to cling even more firmly to it.) Of course, if only you'd look at this through reason-colored glasses, you'd probably acknowledge the reality: If somebody does come between you and your wife, it's unlikely to happen while she's upset, afraid, and grossed out during a medical test. And give doctors a little credit. If you're a doctor, a woman will take her pants off for you because you drive a sports car. There's really no need to come up with some ploy about scraping her cervix for cancerous cells.

BED, BATH, AND BEYOND DISAPPOINTING For Valentine's Day, my boyfriend of two months gave me a gift basket of smelly lotions and shaped soaps. Not my kind of thing, but even more not my thing because I recognized it as a regift of something somebody gave his mom. When I met his parents, this basket was in his mom's bathroom. He's seemed sweet so far, but maybe this gift says he's just using me. —Overscented Ideally, if you're surprised on Valentine's Day, it isn't because your boyfriend's given you that gift that says he cares enough to look under his mom's bathroom sink and see what's still in the package. (Good thing she'd already cracked into that gallon jug of toilet bowl cleaner.) There are several possible explanations for his gift: A. He doesn't care. B. He doesn't have a clue. C. He does care, but Valentine's Day popped up early in the relationship, and he went back and forth on how much lovey-dovey to express—until he ended up at the last-minute gift counter in his mom's bathroom. Give him the gift of time. Paying attention to how he treats you over the next few months will tell you whether he's caring and maybe clueless or whether all he cared about was placating you with whatever gifting roadkill he came upon. You can't train a guy to adore you. A woman can work with caring and clueless— although when her birthday rolls around, she may find herself doing it from behind the wheel of his mom's almost-new car.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

[C2] Missoula Independent • March 21 – March 28, 2013

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LOST & FOUND

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LOST: pink walking cane. Lost around March 7th between Community Hospital, Missoula Public Library and the Equinox located at 1515 Liberty Lane. Lydia 239-7443

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TO GIVE AWAY WE MOVED!! Pass It On Missoula is now located at 2426 W Central Ave. We are a community supported service offering FREE infant, toddler and maternity clothing to ALL Missoula area families! There are NO eligibility guidelines, simply reduce, reuse, and Pass It On locally! Community donations are accepted on location. PIOM offers FREE clothing to those in need, and affordable for all at 3/$5! Located at 2426 W Central Ave and open Monday-Saturday 10AM-5:30PM. 274-6430. www.passitonmissoula.com

ANNOUNCEMENTS 100 SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY ????’s & ANSWERS www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com 721-7744

Volunteer Tutors Needed. Women’s Opportunity & Resource Development (WORD) is seeking college students and community members to work with children in transition in the Missoula public schools. • give just 1 to 2 hours per week • provide academic support • provide mentoring. Tutoring is offered during the school day. Placements are available in both the Middle and Elementary Schools depending

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Accepting Spring Consignments 111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments


MARKETPLACE PETS & ANIMALS Basset Rescue of Montana www.bassetrescueofmontana.or g 406-207-0765 CATS: #2162 Grey Torbi, British Shorthair, SF, 7yrs; #2305 Torti, DSH, SF, 4yrs; #2312 Grey/white, DMH, SF, 10yrs; #2334 Blk/wht, DMH, NM, 15yrs; #2391 Wht/Orange, DSH, SF, 9mo; #2445 Grey/white, DSH, NM, 3yrs; #2455 Black, ASH/Bombay X, SF, 6yrs; #2499 Black, DSH, SF, 1.5yrs;#2508-2509 Black, KITTENS 9wks; #2510 Black, DMH, SF, 9wks;#2520 Grey Torti, DMH, SF, 2yrs; #2521 Orange, DSH, NM, 8wks; #2523 Orange/Buff, DSH, NM, 9wks; #2534 Grey Tabby, DSH, NM, 7rs; #2535 White/Blk Calico, DSH, SF, 6yr; #2561 Black, DSH, NM, 7 1/2yrs; #2569 Black, Siamese/DSH, NM, 10yrs; #2573 Blk/white, DSH, SF, 2.5yrs; #2587 Black, DSH, SF 9 mo; #2599 Grey Torti, DMH, F, 2yrs; #2602 Brn Torti, DSH, F, 8wks; #2615 Grey/Blk, Maine Coon X, F, 9wks; #2663 Blk, DSH, NM, 12wks; #2666 Blk/tan Tabby, ASH, SF, 9wks; #2668 Orange/wht, DSH, NM, 3yrs; $2670 Dilute Torti, Persian, SF, 9yrs; #2676 Blk, DSH, NM, 1yr; #2683 Blk/white, ASH, SF 9wks; #2695 Grey/brown, Russian Blue, NM, 3yrs; #2697 Buff, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #2698 Black, ASH, NM, 1yr; #2706 Buff, ASH, SF, 2yrs; #2708 Flame Point, Siamese X, NM, 12wks; #2722 Grey, Russian Blue, SF, 10yrs; #2723 Grey, Russian Blue, SF, 5yrs; #2724 Buff, ASH, SF, 10yrs; #2726 Tan/Blk Tips, Maine Coon X, NM, 3yrs; #2727 Blk/white, Maine Coon

X, SF, 8mo; #2728 Creme/Blk, Siamese, NM, 6yrs For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840. DOGS: #2169 White/grey, Border/Heeler X, SF, 3 1/2yrs; #2285 Red/Tan, Boxer X, SF, 6yr; #2396 Yellow, Chow/Lab x, SF, 1yr; #2467 Brown, German Shep X, NM, 2yrs; #2564 Brindle, Catahoula, NM, 2yrs; #2575 Brn/white, Husky X, NM, 1yr; #2595 Blk/white, Heeler X, SF, 1yr; #2702 White/brindle, Boxer, NM, 1yr; #2705 Tan, Pit X, NM, 5yrs; #2712 Yellow, Lab/Retriever, NM, 4yrs; #2716 Blk/rust, Dobie/Hound X, NM, 2yrs; #2717 Fawn/white, Pit/Terrier, SF, 3yrs; #2736 Blk/white, Boxer/Lab/BC, SF, 1yr; #2737 Blk/white, F, Boxer/Lab/BC, 2wks; #2738 Brown/white, Boxer/Lab/BC, M, 2wks; #2740 Heeler X, F, 1yr; #2741-2746 BOXER/Lab/BC PUPPIES; For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840. GNERER ANGUS, 70 registered Black Angus bulls (private treaty). Call for brochure. Chris (406)427-5289, Hammond, Steve (406)259-8205, Billings, Joe (406)498-6113, Whitehall.

EMPLOYMENT GENERAL BARTENDING $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training available. 1-800-965-6520 ext. 278 Bike Shop Hiring The Great Divide Cyclery in Helena is hiring! We're looking for an experienced salesperson with competent mechanic skills. You must have a minimum of two years of bike shop experience and be well versed in all aspects of specialty, bicycle retail. This is a 40 hour/week position and has the potential to be year round. If you are highly motivated, would like to work in a great environment with other cycling enthusiasts, and have Montana's best road/mountain bike riding right out your back door please consider sending a resume to: eric@greatdividecyclery.com GREAT CAREER OPPORTUNITY in Montana’s service of first choice. Earn more with the skills you have. Learn more of the skills you need. In the Montana Army National Guard, you will build the skills you need for a civilian career, while developing the leadership skills you need to take your career to the next level. Benefits: $50,000 Loan Repayment Program. Montgomery GI Bill. Up to 100% tuition assistance for college. Medical & dental benefits. Starting at $13.00/hr. Paid job skill training. Call 1-800GO-GUARD. NATIONAL GUARD Part-time job...Full-time benefits

New company in Lolo. Now Hiring! Days and Nights. Call John or Mike 273-2266

SKILLED LABOR TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-545-4546

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION Annual Wildland Fire Refresher Training 406-543-0013 www.blackbull-wildfire.com

HEALTH CAREERS CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANT, part and full-time. Training for qualified candidates. Incentive bonus after 6 months. Benefits. Teton Medical Center Human Resources, 406-466-5763. www.tetonmedicalcenter.net EOE. NURSING HOME ADMINISTRATOR for facility in Choteau, MT. Teton County government operated. Responsible for overseeing, managing operations to ensure quality care. Requires five (5)

years progressively responsible experience in healthcare facility administration, active Montana Nursing Home Administrator’s license or ability to attain upon hire. Deadline 5pm April 3, 2013. Information and complete job description, contact Board of Teton County Commissioners, 406-466-2151, Jim Hodgskiss at jimhodgskiss@3rivers.net REGISTERED NURSES. Current Montana License. Med/Surg experience required. ER Experience helpful. Full benefits. Teton Medical Center Human Resources, 406-466-5763. www.tetonmedicalcenter.net EOE

Montana, as well as membership in 9 Multiple Listing Services across the state. You will experience quality buyer and listing leads like you have not seen before. If you are professional, knowledgeable, charismatic, committed to your ethics and believe in giving back to your community. Please email Kevin Wetherell, Broker/Owner at Kevin@CMPMontana.com

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SERVICES CHILDCARE Diaper Service averages 18 cents per change, so why are you throwing your money away? Local cloth diaper sales & service. Missoula peeps order online and get your goods delivered during diaper route Wednesdays. 406.728.1408 or natureboymontana.com

888-441-3323 ext 101. Locally Owed & Operated. Licensed & Insured. Visit our website www.rcservices.info. THOMAS CLEANING Residential/Commercial. 8+ years experience. Licensed/Insured. Free estimates. Fast, friendly, and professional. References. (406) 396-4847

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HOME IMPROVEMENT Natural Housebuilders, Inc., *ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes* Additions/Remodels* HIGHERCOMFORT crafted building* Solar Heating* 369-0940 or 642-6863* www.naturalhousebuilder.net Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator. Ttestimonials Available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642 SBS Solar offers design and installation services for Solar Systems:

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montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • March 21 – March 28, 2013 [C3]


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): "Nourish beginnings, let us nourish beginnings," says poet Muriel Rukeyser in her poem "Elegy in Joy." "Not all things are blest," she continues, "but the seeds of all things are blest. The blessing is in the seed." I urge you to adopt this perspective in the coming weeks, Aries. Be extra sweet and tender and reverent toward anything that is just sprouting, toward anything that is awakening, toward anything that invokes the sacredness of right now. "This moment," sings Rukeyser, "this seed, this wave of the sea, this look, this instant of love."

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): As you seek more insight on your current situation, consider the possibility that the bad guys may not be as bad as they seem. They might simply be so deeply under the spell of their own pain that they can't see straight. And as for the good guys: I wonder if they are as purely good as they would like you to imagine. It might be the case that they are at least partially serving their own self-interest, while pretending to be utterly altruistic. If there's any truth to these speculations, Taurus, you'd be wise to stay uncommitted and undecided for now. Don't get emotionally riled up, don't get embroiled in conflict, and don't burn any bridges. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Here's your mantra: "I get fresher under pressure." Say it ten times right now, and then repeat it in 10-repetition bursts whenever you need a tune-up. What it means is that you stay cool when the contradictions mount and the ambiguities multiply. And more than that: You actually thrive on the commotion. You get smarter amidst the agitation. You become more perceptive and more creative as the shifts swirl faster and harder. Tattoo these words of power on your imagination: "I get fresher under pressure."

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): "Stories happen to those who tell them," said the ancient Greek historian Thucydides. Modern radio journalist Ira Glass goes even further. "Great stories happen to those who can tell them," he has said. Let's make this strategy a centerpiece of your life plan in the weeks ahead, Cancerian. I have a suspicion that you will need first-hand experience of novel, interesting stories. They will provide the precise nourishment necessary to inspire the blooming of your most soulful ambitions. One way to help ensure that the best stories will flow your way is to regale receptive people with transformative tales from your past.

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): "Dear Rob: I'm spreading the word about Beer Week in your town, and I'd love to see you and your beer-loving readers at some of the events. Any chance you can include some coverage of Beer Week celebrations in your upcoming column? Cheers, Patricia." Dear Patricia: I don't do product placement or other forms of secret advertising in my horoscopes. To allow it would violate the sacred trust I have with my readers, who rely on me to translate the meaning of the cosmic signs without injecting any hidden agendas. It is true that Leos might be prone to imbibing great quantities of beer in the coming week, simply because they'd benefit from lowering their inhibitions, getting in touch with their buried feelings, and expanding their consciousness. But to be frank, I'd rather see them do that without the aid of drugs and alcohol.

c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Hoping to stir up some fun trouble, I posted the following message on my Facebook page: "Don't judge someone just because they sin differently than you." A torrent of readers left comments in response. My favorite was from Sue Sims, who said, "Yeah, they might be better at your kind of sin and you might learn something!" That advice is just the kind of healing mischief you need right now, Virgo. It's a bit ironic, true, but still: Take it and run with it. Study the people who have mad skills at pulling off the rousing adventures and daring pleasures and interesting "sins" that you'd like to call your own.

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The French verb renverser can be translated as "to turn upsidedown" or "to reverse the flow." The adjectival form is renversant, which means "stunning" or "astonishing." I think you may soon have experiences that could be described by those words. There's a good chance that a dry, impoverished part of your life will get a juicy, fertile infusion. A deficiency you have worried about might get at least half-filled. An inadequacy that makes you feel sad may be bolstered by reinforcements. Alas, there could also be a slight reversal that's not so gratifying. One of your assets may temporarily become irrelevant. But the trade-off is worth it, Libra. Your gains will outstrip your loss.

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Professor Martyn Poliakoff creates short Youtube videos to help teach the public about chemistry. In one video, he explains why an explanation he gave in a previous video was completely mistaken. "It's always good for a scientist to be proved wrong," he confesses cheerfully. Then he moves on to speculate about what the right answer might be. I love humility like that! It's admirable. It's also the best way to find out the truth about reality. I hope you will summon a similar attitude in the coming weeks, Scorpio: a generous curiosity that makes you eager to learn something new about stuff you thought you had all figured out.

f

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): On the one hand, menopausal women are no longer able to bear children. On the other hand, they often overflow with fresh possibilities and creative ideas. More time is available to them because their children have moved out of the house or don't require as much care. They can begin new careers, focus on their own development, and devote more attention to their personal needs. So in one way their fertility dries up; in another way it may awaken and expand. I suspect that whether or not you are menopausal, you are on the cusp of a comparable shift in your fecundity: one door closing, another door swinging open.

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The TV reality show Freaky Eaters profiled a woman named Kelly who had eaten nothing but cheesy potatoes for 30 years. Her average intake: eight pounds of potatoes and four cups of cheese per day. "I love cheesy potatoes," she testified. "They're stewy, gooey, and just yum-yum-yummy. They're like crack to me." I'm a bit concerned that you're flirting with behavior comparable to hers. Not in regards to cheesy potatoes, of course, but to some other fetish. I will ask you to make sure that you're not starting to over-specialize. It would be wise to avoid obsessing on a single type of anything.

h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In the 17th century, polite people referred to mountains as "warts" and "boils on the earth's complexion." So says Robert Macfarlane in his book Mountains of the Mind. Annie Dillard describes the peculiar behavior of educated European tourists in the 18th century. When they visited the Alps, she writes in Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, "they deliberately blindfolded their eyes to shield themselves from the evidence of the earth’s horrid irregularity." Don't be anything like those dumb sophisticates, Aquarius. When you spy irregularities in the coming weeks, consider the possibility that they are natural and healthy. This will allow you to perceive their useful beauty.

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You are not for sale. Remember? Your scruples and ideals and talents cannot be bought off for any amount of money. You will not be cheated out of your birthright and you will not allow your dreams to be stolen. Although it's true that you may have to temporarily rent your soul from time to time, you will never auction it off for good. I'm sure you know these things, Pisces, but I suspect it's time to renew your fiery commitment to them. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

[C4] Missoula Independent • March 21 – March 28, 2013

BLACK BEAR NATUROPATHIC & Dr. Christine White Welcome Dr. Elizabeth Axelrod To Our Practice WINTER SPECIAL:

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PUBLIC NOTICES Cassie R. Dellwo MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM 38 Second Ave E Dickinson ND 58601 Phone: 701-227-1841 Fax: 701225-6878 Attorney for the Plaintiff Cdellwo@Mackoff.com MT Bar #11880 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-11-965 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION PHH Mortgage Corporation, Plaintiff, -vs- F. Duke Hermann; First Security Bank of Missoula; and all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the complaint adverse to plaintiff’s ownership or any cloud upon plaintiff’s title thereto, whether such claim or possible claim be present or contingent, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT, F. DUKE HERMANN: You are hereby summoned to answer the Complaint in this action, which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your Answer and serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff’s attorney within twentyone (21) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or Answer, Judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action relates to an equitable lien, foreclosure and quiet title action of a Deed of Trust upon the following described real property in the County of Missoula, State of Montana: LOT 27 AND 28 IN BLOCK 54 OF CAR LINE ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT

THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH PORTIONS “C” AND “D” OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5681, BEING A PORTION OF THE NORTHWEST ONEQUARTER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 13 NORTH, RANGE 19 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court, this 1st day of March, 2013. (SEAL OF THE COURT) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of the District Court By: /s/ Andy Brunkhart Deputy. Dated this 20th day of February, 2013. MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM Attorneys for Plaintiff 38 Second Ave E Dickinson ND 58601 Tel: (701) 227-1841 By: /s/ Cassie R. Dellwo, Attorney #11880 Attorney for the Plaintiff THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION RECEIVED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. NOTICE Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that unless you dispute the validity of the foregoing debt or any portion thereof within thirty days after receipt of this letter, we will assume the debt to be valid. On the other hand, if the debt or any portion thereof is disputed, we will obtain verification of the debt and will mail you a copy of such verification. You are also advised that upon your request within the thirty day period, we will provide you with the name and address of your original creditor, if different from the creditor referred to in this Notice. We are attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. CITY OF MISSOULA FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT PERMIT APPLICATION

The City of Missoula Development Services Department has received a floodplain application from Datsopoulos, MacDonald & Lind, P.C. to work with the Clark Fork Creek floodplain. The proposed project is located Section 22, Township 13N, Range 19W, otherwise know as Brennan’s Wave. The proposed project will include removal of portions of the substructure that have become dislodged and pose a danger to users of the recreational site. The full application is available for review at the Development Services Department located on the second floor of City Hall. Written comments from anyone interested in the City floodplain permit application 13-03 may be submitted prior to 5:00 pm, April 5th 2013. Address comments to the City Floodplain Administrator, Development Services Department, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802 or call 552-6637 for more information. CITY OF MISSOULA FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT PERMIT APPLICATION The City of Missoula Development Services Department has received a floodplain application from the City of Missoula to work with the Grant Creek floodplain. The proposed project is located Section 7, Township 13N, Range 19W and includes the removal of material in the creek at the bridges located at Expressway and International Way. The full application is available for review at the Development Services Department located on the second floor of City Hall. Written comments from anyone interested in the City floodplain permit application 13-04 may be submitted prior to 5:00 pm, April 5th 2013. Address comments to the City Floodplain Administrator, Development Services Department,

435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802 or call 552-6637 for more information. CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the office of the Missoula Downtown Association, 218 E. Main Street, Missoula, Montana, until 10:00 a.m., on March 28, 2013, and will then be opened and publicly read in the Conference Room of the Missoula Downtown Association offices, for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for construction of the following: Fabric Wall System Caras Park Pavilion Missoula Downtown Association This project consists of steel fabrication and assembly of eleven wall systems to be attached to the existing Pavilion structure. The steel fabricator shall supply and install fabric walls, operating mechanism and attachment to existing mechanical winches, and paint. Coordination between all subcontractors shall be the responsibility of the steel fabricator. This project shall require a two-year Parts, Labor & Service Warranty. Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project Manual addressed to the Missoula Downtown Association, enclosed in sealed envelopes plainly marked on the outside “Proposal for Caras Park Pavilion Walls” The envelopes shall also be marked with the Bidder’s Name and Montana Contractor’s Identification Number. Proposals must be accompanied by cash, cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to


PUBLIC NOTICES do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of the Missoula Downtown Association against liability. The MDA is the project manager for the city-owned park, therefore no bid will be considered which includes federal excise tax, since the City is exempt therefrom and will furnish to the successful bidder certificates of exemption. Prospective bidders may access the contract documents and project manual on line at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. Bid results will also be posted on this website. Hard copies of the plans and project manual are available for viewing at the following locations: Missoula Plans Exchange 201 North Russell Street Missoula, MT 59801 (406) 549-5002 http://www.mpe.us iSqFt (Selbys) 1914 North Ave West Missoula, MT 59801 (406) 543-5101 http://www.isqft.com Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1-406-444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their race, color, religion, sex or national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression. The Missoula Downtown Association reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids, and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the MDA’s requirements. Opening Date: Thursday, March 28, 2013 CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of Missoula, Montana will meet Monday, March 25, 2013, at 7:00 o’clock p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Missoula, Montana, to hear public comment on: A resolution amending the annual appropriations for the city of Missoula, Montana, as set forth in the Fiscal Year 2013 budget and Capital Improvement Program that increases the total city budget by

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$62,500 and A resolution of the Missoula City Council approving a requested increase from $1 to $2 per occupied room night assessment for the Tourism Business Improvement District (TBID) created pursuant to Resolution number 7569 adopted October 4, 2010 for a TBID consisting of non-contiguous hotel/motel lands who have voluntarily petitioned the city of Missoula to establish a TBID for the purpose of aiding tourism, promotion, and marketing within the district and allowing hotels/motels outside the city limits in the Missoula urban area to donate funds to the Tourism Business Improvement District. A copy of the proposed resolutions are on file and available at the City Clerk office. For further information contact Marty Rehbein, City Clerk, at 552-6078. Any taxpayer or resident may appear at the meeting and be heard for or against any part of the proposed budget amendment. Mail any comments to: Public Hearing Comment, City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. BY ORDER OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MONTANA. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein City Clerk INVITATION FOR BID CALL FOR BIDS Sealed, lump sum bid entitled: “BID for Anaconda Deer Lodge County NSP Project” will be received by AnacondaDeer Lodge County until 12:00 P.M. local time, April 5, 2013, and then publicly opened and read thereafter. Each Bid shall be submitted in a sealed opaque envelope bearing on the outside the name of Bidder and address. Bids may be mailed or hand delivered to: Mail Delivery: Hand Delivery: Anaconda-Deer Lodge County, Planning Department Attention: Paula Arneson, 800 South Main Street, Anaconda, Montana 59711. If forwarded by mail, the Bid and sealed envelope marked as described above shall be enclosed in another envelope with the notation “SEALED BID ENCLOSED- 716 EAST 3rd STREET” on the face of the outer envelope and addressed as indicated above. Rehabilitation on both structures is advertised together, the bids will be considered for each individual structure on the parcel. PROJECT LOCATION: The Project is located in Anaconda, Montana at 716 East 3rd Street. PROJECT WORK DESCRIPTION: 716 East 3rd St. is a residential lot with two structures. There are two rehabilitation projects within this bid: 1) repair/rehabilitation on the North/main house, 2) repair/rehabilitation of the South/smaller house. The contract will be funded in whole by the Neighborhood Stabilization Program, administered by the Montana Department of Commerce, and is subject to all federal laws and regulations. All contractors and subcontractors must adhere to current wage rates as defined by the Davis Bacon Wage Rates. The Contract Documents may be examined at the Anaconda-Deer Lodge County Planning offices, 800 South Main Street, Anaconda, MT 59711. A Pre-bid meeting will be held on Thursday, March 14th, at the project site at 10:30am, 716 East 3rd Street, Anaconda, Montana. No contractor may submit a bid unless already properly registered in Montana at the time of bid submission with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry. Anaconda-Deer Lodge County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Minorities and women are en-

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s couraged to apply. Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968 also applies. Anaconda-Deer Lodge County reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids, to waive irregularities, to evaluate the bids submitted and to accept the proposal which best serves the interest of the owner. MISSOULA COUNTY FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT PERMIT APPLICATION Missoula County Community and Planning Services has received a floodplain application from Gary Ince to work within the Bitterroot River floodplain. The project is located at 4474 Blue Mountain Rd in Section 2, Township 12N, Range 20W and includes the removal of 6500 cubic yards of gravel for onsite construction purposes. The full application is available for review at Community and Planning Services at 317 Woody St in Missoula. Written comments from anyone interested in floodplain permit application #13-12 may be submitted prior to 5:00 p.m., April 12, 2013. Address comments to the Floodplain Administrator, Community and Planning Services, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 or call 258-4841 for more information. MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF CONSIDERATION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Missoula County Board of Commissioners has the authority to authorize refunds or to waive certain taxes, penalty and interest, fees, and costs that have been paid to the Missoula County Treasurer’s Office under limited circumstances. §15-16603, MCA. The purpose of this refund policy is to explain the Commissioner’s authority to issue refunds or authorize waivers. Consideration on the above will be held before the Board of County Commissioners at their regular weekly public meeting on Wednesday, March 27th at 1:30 p.m., Room B14, Missoula County Administration Building at 199 W. Pine. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Clerk & Recorder /Treasurer 200 W. Broadway St. Missoula, MT 59802 (406) 258- 3234 Date: 3/13/2013 MISSOULA COUNTY Notice of Close of Regular Voter Registration and Option for Late Registration Notice is hereby given that regular* registration for the Special District Elections to be held on May 7th, 2013 will close at 5:00 p.m., on April 8th, 2013. *NOTE: If you miss this regular registration deadline, you may still register for the election by showing up at the county fairground’s Election Center, up to and including on Election Day. Between noon and the close of business on the day before Election Day, you can complete and submit a voter registration card, but you will need to return to the local election office on Election Day to pick up and vote a ballot. All active and inactive electors of the Seeley Lake Rural Fire District are entitled to vote at said election. All electors, as defined in Title 13, who resides in the Missoula Irrigation District or any holder of title to lands within the district who present a proof of payment of taxes on the lands at the Election Center is eligible to vote in the election. Ballots will be automatically mailed to Active Electors only. If you are a registered voter and do not receive a ballot, contact the county election office to update your information as necessary and receive a ballot.

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"You'll Bounce Back"–just like the theme entries. by Matt Jones

CALL, TEXT OR EMAIL for a FREE Market Snapshot Jake Booher

Call or text 406-544-6114 www.JakeBooher.com www.facebook.com/MissoulaProperties Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the County Election Administrator. If you have moved, please update your registration information by filling out a new voter registration card and submitting it to the county election office. DATED this 8th day of March 2013. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Missoula County Election Administrator MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Missoula County Board of Commissioners will hold a public hearing to set the redefined precinct boundaries to conform with legislative district boundaries affected by the adoption of the 2013 Districting and Apportionment Plan under Article V, section 14, of the Montana Constitution. A PUBLIC HEARING on the above will be held before the Board of County Commissioners at their regular weekly public meeting on March 27th at 1:30 p.m., Room B14, Missoula County Administration Building at 199 W. Pine. Interested parties are requested to be present at that time to be heard for or against the proposed precincts and polling places. Written comments will be accepted by the Commissioners’ Office, 199 W. Pine, Missoula, MT 59802, prior to the hearing. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier, Clerk & Recorder/Treasurer 200 W. Broadway St., Missoula, MT 59802 (406)-258-3234 Date: 3/8/13 MISSOULA COUNTY PUBLIC NOTICE The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Tuesday, April 2, 2013, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. 1. Garden City Harvest River Road Farm Conservation Easement A proposal from Garden City Harvest to grant the City of Missoula a conservation easement on an approximately 3.25 acre parcel located adjacent to River Road about 1/5 mile west of Russell St in Missoula, legally described as Lot 12 of Cobban and Dinsmore’s Orchard Homes No. 2, a tract of land located in S.20, T13N, R19W, P.M.M. Information about this project is available from the City Open Space Program Manager, Jackie Corday, at 552-6267. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. Comments may be directed to Missoula Parks & Recreation, 600 Cregg Ln, Missoula, MT, 59801, or via email to jcorday@ci.missoula.mt.us If anyone attending these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice

by calling 258-3432. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT Request for Qualifications for Architectural Services - Missoula County Detention Facility The Missoula County Detention Facility (MCDF), an entity of Missoula County, is seeking statements of qualifications for lead architectural services for the remodel of recreation space within the MCDF building located at 2340 Mullan Rd, Missoula, MT. The selected firm will work with the Owner’s staff to develop the designs for the remodel. Statements of qualifications will be accepted until 5:00 PM, Friday, April 5, 2013. Interested firms may obtain a complete project description on Missoula County’s website at http://www.co.missoula.mt.us/bid sandproposals or by contacting Barbara Berens, 406-258-3227 or bberens@co.missoula.mt.us. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP13-57 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF BETTY C. MELTON, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be for-

EAGLE SELF STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 237, 239, 358, 521, and 610. Units contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc. household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday, March 25, 2013. All auction units will only be shown each day at 3 P.M. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage office at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59804 prior to Thursday, March 28, 2013 at 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

ACROSS

1 Critical hosp. area 4 Ranks on the reggae charts 10 Reagan Supreme Court nominee 14 Late "Soul Train" host Cornelius 15 Creative type 16 Model married to David Bowie 17 Gets the final part of the collection 19 Brand of tea owned by Starbucks 20 System with an iconic joystick 21 90 degrees from starboard 22 Scatter seeds 23 Cash in a coupon 25 Analgesic target 27 "___ Day" (1993 rap hit) 28 Cracker with seven holes 31 They're big in the circulatory system 35 Trite sentiment on a postcard 37 Flame attract-ee 40 Gets the message across 41 ___ a soul (nobody) 42 Makes efforts to attend prom, say 45 Harry Reid's place 46 "Clueless" catchphrase 47 [the spelling's intentional] 50 Gets the keg rolling 52 Something to lean on 54 "Wishing Well" singer Terence Trent ___ 57 Actress Zadora 60 Third-largest city in Japan 61 Falco of "Oz" 62 The west side of Mexico 64 Green gem 65 Detective played by Peter Lorre 66 Shriek from Michael Jackson 67 Part of ASL

68 Chart of constellations 69 Alternatives to urgent care clinics, for short

DOWN

1 It's got your picture on it 2 "Dukes of Hazzard" mechanic 3 Like messed up beds 4 Jealous composer 5 Interior designer's choice 6 ___ Cat (pet food brand) 7 Complaint 8 Rhymes with rhymes 9 Longtime Notre Dame coach Parseghian 10 What some fight until 11 Vizquel of baseball 12 Demolish, as a building 13 Have the 411 18 Season opener? 22 Exhibit 24 Blunder 26 Like some corrosives 29 Vanessa's big brother 30 Company behind FarmVille 32 Syllable before "la la" 33 ___ Lingus (Irish airline) 34 Reserved 35 Golden brew 36 Adoring poems 37 The Cascades, e.g. 38 Smelted stuff 39 The only three-letter element 43 Linger 44 Genre for King Sunny Ade and Femi Kuti 47 Awesome facial hair 48 More gross 49 Rubs the wrong way? 51 Hybrid utensil 53 "Burn Notice" network 54 ___ vu 55 Levine of Maroon 5 56 Take the bus 58 "What ___ problem?" 59 Chemistry 101 study 62 Metric ruler units, for short 63 ___ glance

Last week’s solution

©2013 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • March 21 – March 28, 2013 [C5]


PUBLIC NOTICES ever barred. Claims must either be mailed to LANCE L. MELTON, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Reely Law Firm, P.C., 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 11th day of March, 2013 /s/ Lance L. Melton, Personal Representative. REELY LAW FIRM P.C. 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801 Attorneys for the Personal Representative. By: /s/ Shane N. Reely Esq. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-10-179 Dept. 3 No. Hon. John W. Larson NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of MICHAEL DURAN COURCHENE, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF MICHAEL DURAN COURCHENE: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Wesley G. Redden has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Wesley G. Redden, 35858 Detwiler Road, Arlee, Montana 59821, return receipt requested, c/o Law Office of Patrick G. Sandefur, 100 Ryman, Ste. 700, Missoula, Montana 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 7th day of March, 2013. /s/ Patrick G. Sandefur, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Case No. DV-13-106 Dept. No. 2 NOTICE OF HEARING ON PROPOSED NAME CHANGE In the Matter of the Name Change of CHRISTINE ROSE MIGNEAULT-NORDHUS, Petitioner. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT Petitiioner, Christine Rose Migneault-Nordhus, has petitioned the District Court for the Fourth Judicial District of Montana for a change of name from Christine Rose Migneault-Nordhus to Christine Rose Migneault, and the Petition for Name Change shall be heard by the District Court Judge on the 16th day of April, 2013, at 11:00 A.M. in the Missoula County Courthouse, located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802. At any time before the hearing, objections may be filed by any person who can demonstrate good reasons against the change of name. DATED this 20th day of February, 2013. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley Faust, CLERK OF DISTRICT COURT By: /s/ Andy Brunkhart, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-13-44 Dept. No. 3 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE EDRIS JEAN POWELL, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to K. Andy Powell, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 4110 Weeping Willow Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803, or filed with the Clerk of the abovenamed Court. GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, /s/ Nancy P. Gibson, Attorney for Personal Representative. We declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 27th day of February, 2013, in Missoula, Montana. /s/ K. Andy Powell, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-13-45 Dept. No. 2 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF BRUCE W. ZEMAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that David H. Straus has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to David H. Straus, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Dan Cederberg, PO Box 8234, Missoula, Montana 59807-8234, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this

27th day of February, 2013. CEDERBERG LAW OFFICES, P.C., 269 West Front Street, PO Box 8234, Missoula, MT 59807-8234 /s/ Anne Blanche Adams Attorneys for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-13-46 Dept. No. 2 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MILDRED A. PILE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Delbert Clarke Pile, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 4110 Weeping Willow Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803, or filed with the Clerk of the above-named Court. GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, /s/ Nancy P. Gibson, Attorney for Personal Representative. I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 28th day of February, 2013, in Missoula, Montana. /s/ Delbert Clarke Pile, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-13-227 Dept. No. 2 Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Paul Anthony Gaebel, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Paul Anthony Gaebel to Paul Anthony Emrich. The hearing will be on April 9th, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: 02/26/2013. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Andrew Brunkhart, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP13-23 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MARION RAY (aka “Raymond”) MCWILLIAMS, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Patricia Wax Bowman or Helen Lavon Fair, the Co-Personal Representatives, return receipt requested, at c/o Sullivan, Tabaracci & Rhoades, P.C., 1821 South Avenue West, Third Floor, Missoula, MT 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 28th day of February, 2013. /s/ Patricia Wax Bowman, Personal Representative /s/ Helen Lavon Wax Fair, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP13-43 John W. Larson NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF SHANNON A. BLAKESLEE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Kendra Blakeslee has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be mailed to Kendra Blakeslee, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o David J. Steele II, GEISZLER & FROINES, PC, 619 Southwest Higgins, Suite K, Missoula, Montana 59803 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 22nd day of February, 2013. GEISZLER & FROINES, PC /s/ David J. Steele II, Attorneys for the Personal Representative. I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the state of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 22nd day of February, 2013 /s/ Kendra Blakeslee, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP13-47 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF EDWIN BRESTER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Cheryl A. Jemison-Nelson and Alona J. DeVoe

have been appointed Co- Personal Representatives of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the Deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or their claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Christian, Samson & Jones, PLLC, Attorneys for the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 310 West Spruce, Missoula, MT 59802 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of Montana the foregoing is true and correct. Dated this 28th day of February, 2013 /s/ Cheryl A. Jemison-Nelson, Co-Personal /s/ Alona J. DeVoe, Co-Personal Representative. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP13-35 NOTICE OF HEARING OF PETITION FOR FORMAL PROBATE OF WILL, DETERMINATION OF TESTACY AND HEIRS AND APPOINTMENT OF PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE IN RE THE ESTATE OF JOYCE A. ANDERSON, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Carl Anderson has filed in the above Court and cause a Petition for the formal probate of the Will of Joyce A. Anderson, deceased, for determination of testacy and heirs, and for the appointment of Carl Anderson as Personal Representative of said Will and estate. For further information, the Petition, as filed, may be examined in the office of the clerk of the above Court. Hearing upon said Petition will be held in said Court at the courtroom at the courthouse at Missoula, Montana, on the 26th day of March, 2013, at 2:30 p.m., at which time all interested parties may appear and object. Dated this 28th day of February, 2013. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Attorney for the Personal Representative of the Estate of Joyce A. Anderson MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP13-51 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ALVIRA K. WALLACE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Richard K. Wallace, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane PC, PO Box 4747, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 6th day of March, 2013. /s/ Richard K. Wallace, Personal Representative. I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. /s/ Richard K. Wallace WORDEN THANE, P.C. Attorneys for Personal Representative /s/ Patrick Dougherty MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP2013-32 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of Leland E. Graves, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Mary Ellen Osowski, return receipt requested, at 401 River Drive, Lolo, MT 59847 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 8th day of March 2013. /s/ Mary Ellen Osowski MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-13-54 Dept. No. 1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF THOMAS JAY AZZARA, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to CHRISTINE RUTH GINGERELLI, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in

[C6] Missoula Independent • March 21 – March 28, 2013

care of Douglas Harris, Attorney at Law, PO Box 7937, Missoula, Montana 59807-7937 or filed with the Clerk of the above-named Court. DATED this 7th day of March, 2013. /s/ Christine Ruth Gingerelli, Personal Representative Notice of Public Hearing Homeword Board of Directors will hold their quarterly board meeting Tuesday, March 26, 2013 from 3-5pm at 1535 Liberty Lane, Ste 114. Meeting is open to the public. For more information, contact Kellie Battaglia, Operations and Program Director, at 532-4663 x12. Comments may be mailed to: Homeword, 1535 Liberty Lane, Ste 116A, Missoula, MT, 59808 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 30, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A tract of land located in the Northwest onequarter of the Northeast one-quarter of Section 34, Township 12 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana and more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Northeast corner of said Section 34; thence S. 89° 56’ W., a distance of 2558.60 feet; thence N. 89° 21’ 45” W., a distance of 81.40 feet; thence South a distance of 383.40 feet to the true point of beginning; thence along the boundary of West View No. 2, a proposed subdivision of Missoula County, Montana for the next seven (7) courses, East a distance of 423.02 feet to a non-tangent curve having a radius of 50.0 feet and a chord of 99.70 feet which bears N. 45° 34’ E., ; thence easterly, northeasterly and northwesterly along said curve a distance of 149.31 feet; thence N. 13° 09’ E., a distance of 117.60 feet; thence East a distance of 231.25 feet; thence South a distance of 140.0 feet; thence S. 36°04’ W., a distance of 134.57 feet; thence South a distance of 860.0 feet; thence leaving said proposed subdivision boundary and running West a distance of 673.0 feet; thence North a distance of 924.46 feet to the point of beginning. Recording Reference: Book 137 Page 1405 Micro Records Brady G Nelson and Cindy R Nelson, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title of Missoula County, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Community Bank - Missoula, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 15, 2007 and recorded June 15, 2007 in Bk-799, Pg-716, under document No. 200715183. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust company as Trustee for Starm Mortgage Loan Trust 2007-4, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-4. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,990.00, beginning September 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 10, 2012 is $624,000.00 principal, interest at the rate of 5.75000% now totaling $40,429.29, late charges in the amount of $1,820.00, escrow advances of $5,177.49, and other fees and expenses advanced of $143.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $98.30 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in

cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, whereis basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 27, 2012 /s/ Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham) On this 27th day of December, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Suntrust V Nelson 41531.654 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/04/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200708400 Bk-795 Pg95, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Evangelos M. Itskos and Evanthia Itskos, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Northwest Trustee Services, LLC was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Northwest Trustee Services, LLC as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Parcel 1: Tract 3 of Six Mile Timber Tracts, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. Except any part thereof that may have been conveyed to Missoula County for road purposes. Parcel II: An undivided ten percent (10%) interest in Lot 4 of Six Mile Timber Tracts No. 1, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 08/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 14, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $295,154.54. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $282,753.85, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on May 28, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid

price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.103761) 1002.240673-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 05/23/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200612770, Bk-775 Pg733, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Torbjorn I. Joreteg and Anita R. Joreteg, husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for GreenPoint Mortgage Funding, Inc., its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and First American Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 25 of Mission-Swan Estates, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201224933 B: 905 P: 610, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 22, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $239,322.43. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $229,489.35, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 5, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may

be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.100248) 1002.240878-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/24/93, recorded as Instrument No. 9328618 Book 398 Page 2032 and modified by Agreement recorded 1/31/2006, Instrument No. 200602265 Bk-768 Pg-264, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which James W. Royan, a married man as his sole and separate property was Grantor, Montana Mortgage Company was Beneficiary and Insured Titles, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 11 and the North 10 feet of Lot 12 in Block 1 of Mosby’s Leisure Highlands Addition No. 5, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Recording reference in Book 225 at Page 475 Micro Records. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 199908142 Book 577 Page 274, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Manhattan Bank F/K/A Chemical Bank. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 25, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $60,618.30. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $57,680.61, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 5, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.100553) 1002.241297-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 07/23/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200719267 Bk 802 Pg 669, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Apryl Lange was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage, LLC, its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Stewart Title of Missoula County was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart


PUBLIC NOTICES Title of Missoula County as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 3 in Block 2 of El Mar Estates Phase 1, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201013933 B: 863 P: 224, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP, fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 07/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 13, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $197,851.58. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $187,435.02, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 21, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7021.14860) 1002.242605-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 07/15/09, recorded as Instrument No. 200917604, Bk 843, Pg 1246, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Jhawn D. Thompson and Misty J. Thompson, as joint tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage, LLC was Beneficiary and Western Title and Escrow was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Western Title and Escrow as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lots 12, 13, 14 and 15 in Block 14 of the Townsite of Frenchtown, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat of record in Book 1 of Plats at Page 57, together with the Northerly half of vacated Bedard Street adjoining said Lots 12, 13, 14 and 15 in Block 14 of the Townsite of Frenchtown as vacated by Resolution recorded April 7, 1966 in Book 2 of Micro Records at Page 533. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201119250, Bk 885, Pg 877, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s

failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 07/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 28, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $177,965.15. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $159,856.94, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 10, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.97589) 1002.207163-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/23/10, recorded as Instrument No. 201008049 B: 858 P: 1335, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Bruce N. McGlashan was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Mann Mortgage, LLC, its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and First American Title Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 19 in Block 8 of West View, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201224171 B: 904 P: 1248, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 08/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 30, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $230,530.17. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $220,192.86, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200

West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 11, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.100067) 1002.241839-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 15, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 10 IN BLOCK 14 OF HIGH PARK NO. 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Carlos E Casas, Jr and Sheri L Casas, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated December 11, 2006 and recorded December 14, 2006 under Document No. 200631999, in Bk -788, Pg- 1268. The beneficial interest is currently held by Fannie Mae (“Federal National Mortgage Association”). First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,040.08, beginning December 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 10, 2012 is $202,297.08 principal, interest at the rate of 3.75% now totaling $8,405.37, late charges in the amount of $156.08, escrow advances of $7,738.81 and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,934.98, plus accruing interest at the rate of $20.78 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash, equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, whereis basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or

other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 7, 2012 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 7th day of December, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Seterus v Casas 42008.104 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 26, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 5 of Glaicier Estates, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according the official recorded Plat thereof Darren Bayer and Tami Bayer, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to American Title & Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Chase Bank USA, N.A., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated August 10, 2005 and recorded August 15, 2005 in Book 758, Page 117 under Document No. 200520940. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for J. P. Morgan Mortgage Acquisition Trust 2007-CH3, Asset Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-CH3. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,920.02, beginning September 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 14, 2013 is $354,160.33 principal, interest at the rate of 8.875% now totaling $108,597.31, late charges in the amount of $, escrow advances of $18,048.28, suspense balance of $ and other fees: and expenses advanced of $4,310.10, plus accruing interest at the rate of $86.11 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash

equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 17, 2012 /s/ Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham) On this 17th day of December, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Chase Vs Bayer 41954.860 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 29, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Unit 1330B of Edgewood I Condominiums, a residential condominium in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the Declaration of Condominium, covenants, conditions and restrictions for Edgewood I Condominiums as recorded in Book 773 of Micro at Page 735. Together with a 5% interest per unit in the common area and an exclusive right to use the limited common areas appurtenant to each unit as said common areas and limited common areas are defined in the Declaration of Condominiums, covenants, conditions and restrictions for Edgewood I Condominiums CASEY J. SHELDEN, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated November 22, 2006 and recorded November 27, 2006 in Book 787, Page 1326 under Document No. 200630551. The beneficial interest is currently held by Federal National Mortgage Association (FNMA). First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $651.19, beginning August 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 27, 2012 is $93,133.06 principal, interest at the rate of 6.75% now totaling $3,067.17, late charges in the amount of $65.12, escrow advances of $336.24, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,914.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $17.22 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for

real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 18, 2012 /s/ Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 18th day of December, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Amy Gough Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 5/26/2015 Seterus Vs. Shelden 42008.215 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 29, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A tract of land located in the Northeast one-quarter (NE 1/4) of Section 17, Township 14 North, Range 20 West, Principal Meridian, Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as Tract A of Certificate of Survey No. 5798. Together with a 30 foot private access and utility easement as shown on Certificates if Survey Nos. 5622 and 5798. Jeffery S. McBroom, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Bank Of America, N.A., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on September 11, 2006 and recorded on September 15, 2006 in Book 783, Page 328 under Document NO. 200623676. The beneficial interest is currently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in

the amount of $2,134.83, beginning February 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan The total amount due on this obligation as of January 17, 2013 is $382,383.00 principal, interest at the rate of 6.00% now totaling $78,834.91, late charges in the amount of $3,491.64, escrow advances of $26,212.00, and other fees and expenses advanced of $4,455.82, plus accruing interest at the rate of $62.86 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 21, 2012 Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 21st day of December, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa J. Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 11/6/2018 BAC Vs. McBroom 42019.412 The Regular Board Meeting of the Missoula Housing Authority will be held at 5:30 on Wednesday, Mar 27th, 2013 at Missoula Housing Authority Headquarters: 1235 34th Street, Missoula Montana 59801

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These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control 541-7387 ROLAND• Roland is a big, muscular dog

that we think is mostly Redbone Hound. The color is certainly right, and he has a very melodious Hound voice, but we've noticed that his head is broader than usually seen in Hounds. We've also noticed that he's friendly, lively, and well-behaved in his kennel.

SYD•Syd is small in size, but large in perSouthgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MTSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

MARIE•Marie is most likely a Plott Hound,

as well as being quite a pretty young lady. She's a nice medium size, and she's also very tidy in her kennel. We'd like to adopt her separately from her older companion to give her a chance to develop her own personality and become more bonded with people.

2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

DONNIE•Naming

this handsome fellow after a singer made perfect sense because he often serenades the whole kennel with his baritone Hound voice. He's a lively fellow who 2330 South Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59801 probably knows all about hunting, but who Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) could use some training to make him a bit 3708 North Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59808 more manageable around people. Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri)

sonality. He has a very sweet nature and is warming up from being very shy to being curious and friendly. We know that in a real home it would take no time at all for him to become an interesting, playful companion.

GRAMERCY•Gramercy is a big cat, and

Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

we do mean BIG! There's no fat on him, but he has a large frame and is quite solid. He's also a big shy, although he does love to be handled and petted. He's also been declawed, so he'll need and inside-only home to keep him safe.

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

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CANDICE•We've seen lots of calico cats in the shelter, but seldom one with the dense, vivid coloring that Candice has. This petite lady may not be wearing a coat of many colors, but it's certainly one of very beautiful ones! Her personality is just the opposite -very quiet and sedate.

Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 9:00am-12:00pm (Sat)

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana 549-3934 BEAU•What a Beau! This sweet 6-ye-old Hound/Pointer mix is a must-meet. Good with kids, dogs and cats, he loves to play and creates his own sense of fun. Housetrained and intelligent, he’s a true family dog who enjoys playing fetch, and joining you for a daily jog! Warning (!), you’ll lose your heart to Beau when you meet him. DITTO•Hey, I’m Ditto.

My name implies I might copy you, but I’m really quite independent. Three years old, I’m a reddish-tan-colored Corgi mix from California. Often called outgoing, I enjoy time with other dogs but prefer the alpha role if I’m being honest. I’m a smart boy who’ll listen to you, but I could benefit from a basic manners class.

BABY• Hoping to bring an easy-going kitty home who’s independent, and loves to nap the day away? Meet Baby. She’s a long-haired, black & white 9-year- old sweetheart who has experience living with other dogs and cats. Baby beams when you brush her, and enjoys using a scratching post. A 6-month resident already, she’d really love to find her forever home.

PAVI•Pavi

currently enjoys meandering around the cat room, getting his 20 minutes (+) of play time from the Humane Society’s dedicated cat socializing volunteers. But he is ready to assume his new post as official lapwarmer. Visit the shelter on Highway 93 South to meet Pavi or to learn more about our life-saving volunteer program.

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SOPHIE•Sophie is a sweet and outgoing cat. She has lived comfortably in a home with other cats, and really loves to cuddle with dogs. She can be quite the curious one and is able to open closet doors in order to find a comfortable and dark place to cuddle, but her favorite spot is on her person’s lap.

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

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www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275 627 Woody • 3275 N. Reserve Street Corner of 39th and Russell in Russell Square

STUBBY•Stubby is a confident senior cat MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

who knows what she wants. At the age of 16, we believe she deserves to get her way! She is a great communicator, and will let you know exactly when is the perfect time to pet her, feed her, brush her and the like. If you can relate to this confident gal and would like more information on her, call us or just come for a visit.

These pets may be adopted at AniMeals 721-4701 SHOE•She moved and left him just as he

was approaching his golden years. He never dreamed he would ever be without her. Now here he is being shuffled from one place to another because no one wants him. She named him “Shoe” because as a tiny kitten he had the most endearing habit of curling up and nap-

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

NESSA• I didn’t see a “No cats allowed”

sign anywhere so I marched right up to the open door and went in….the place was named for a cat after all. The Red Lion. I was hoping for a meal and a nice warm bed out of the rain. But the management wasn’t having any of that and they brought me to AniMeals.

ANGEL•My name is Angel and I have been here since I was a 3-month-old kitten. I have lived in the shelter my whole life. Sometimes my roommates tell me stories about when they had homes and I always try to imagine it. They say it’s a place where you get one or more people that will love you and be there for you for the rest of your life. MIKEY•My name is Mikey and I have been

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[C8] Missoula Independent • March 21 – March 28, 2013

with AniMeals since February of 2012. I have no problem making myself visible for adopters to see, so I am not entirely sure as to why I haven’t gotten a new home yet. I hope it’s not because I am a black cat. Did you know black cats tend to be the last cats adopted from shelters? I wouldn’t say that I am bad luck either.

715 Kensington Ste 8

406-240-1113

J. Willis Photography

Find me on FACEBOOK jessicagoulding.zenfolio.com specializing in weddings, pets, families, babies, senior pictures, fine art, and more!


RENTAL APARTMENTS

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731 W. Sussex #4. 2bed/1bath HEAT PAID, carport, coin-ops. $650. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

1 bedroom, 1 bathroom. (2 Weeks Free to Qualified Applicant) $675 (62+ Complex) elevator, microwave, deck, coin-op laundry, off street parking, H/W/S/G paid, No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 1024 Stephens #2. 2bed/1bath ground level apartment, shared yard, coin-ops, cat? $675. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 1335 BYRON: HUGE 1 BEDROOM, 2-STORY, LAUNDRY, DW, STRG, HEAT & CABLE PAID, $725; GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106, 1YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP! 1409 S. 3RD ST. W: 1 BDRM, STORAGE, LAUNDRY, PRIVATE DECK, HEAT & CABLE PAID, $625; GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106, 1YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!

812 KEMP: 1 BDRM, BIG STORAGE, BUILT-INS, CENTRAL LOCATION, ALL + CABLE PAID, CAT OK, $650’ GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106, 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP! 825 SW Higgins Ave. B3. 2 bed/1 bath HEAT PAID, patio, single garage, gas fireplace. $800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

2 bedroom, 1 bath $795 W/S/G paid, newly renovated, Southside location, DW, W/D hookups, carport. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom $595 coin-op laundry, off street parking, storage, H/W/S/G paid, No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom $600 across from Public Library, coinop laundry, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom $695 quiet cul-de-sac, DW, coin-op laundry, off street parking,

New Complex, 1 & 2 bedroom units, $625-$795 DW, A/C, deck, storage, coin-op laundry, limited off-street parking, W/S/G paid, 2 bedroom units have W/D hookups or 2nd bath. No pets. No smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 Solstice Apartments. 2 bed: $751. W/S/G & recycling paid. Comes with Mountain Line E-Z Pass. Missoula Housing Authority. Contact Colin 549-4113 ext. 112 Studio $495. Near St. Patrick’s Hospital, separate room for bed-

room, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

MOBILE HOMES Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent w/s/g/elec included $425/month 406-273-6034

DUPLEXES 3915 Buckley Place. 2bed/1bath, shared yard, W/D hookups, near 39th Street. $725. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

HOUSES 520 West Central. 1bed/1bath, close to schools and parks, yard, W/D hookups. $675. Grizzly Property Management 5422060

ROOMMATES ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

RENTALS OUT OF TOWN

hookups. $1050. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

1&2

11270 Napton Way 1C. 3bed/1bath, shared yard, coinops, central location in Lolo.$800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 514 ROLLINS: 1 BEDROOM, SLANT STREET, 2ND FLOOR, STORAGE, ALL + CABLE PAID, CAT OK, $665; GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106, 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP! 9850 Anderson Road. 4bed/1bath house in Bonner. Spacious yard, basement, W/D

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

549-7711 Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

923 Helen: 1 BDRM, CLOSE TO THE U, 2ND FLOOR, FREE CABLE, LAUNDRY, NICE, $725; GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106, 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP! Equinox Apartments. 2 bedrooms: $620. W/S/G paid. Comes with Mountain Line EZ Pass. Missoula Housing Authority Contact Colin 549-4113 ext. 112

MHA Management manages 10 properties throughout Missoula.

GardenCity

Property Management

1502 Ernest #4. 1bed/1bath, W/D hookups, central location. $575. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1801 Howell #3. 2 bed/1 bath, W/D hookups, storage, shared yard, pet okay. RENT INCENTIVE $725. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

Gold Dust Apartments. 2 bed: $691 all utilities paid. Application fees waived through March. Comes with Mountain LIne E-Z Pass. Missoula Housing Authority. Contact Jordan 549-4113 ext. 127.

All properties are part of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program.

422 Madison • 549-6106 PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

The Missoula Housing Authority complies with the Fair Housing Act and offers Reasonable Accommodations to persons with Disabilities.

1235 34th St. • Missoula (406) 549-4113 missoulahousing.org

30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

www.gatewestrentals.com

251-4707 Rent Incentive

107 Johnson 1 Bed Apt. + Storage $485/month

"Let us tend your den" Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

520 Hickory 1 Bed Apt. $510/month

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing

FIDELITY

Finalist

Finalist

Uncle Robert Lane 2 Bed Apt. $645/month Visit our website at fidelityproperty.com

Did you know? Posting a classified ad ONLINE is FREE!

www.missoulanews.com montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • March 21 – March 28, 2013 [C9]


SUSTAINAFIEDS Natural Housebuilders, Inc., *ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes* Additions/Remodels* HIGHER-COMFORT crafted building* Solar Heating* 3690940 or 642-6863* www.naturalhousebuilder.net

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Natural Housebuilders, Inc. ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes Additions/Remodels • Solar Heating HIGHER-COMFORT crafted building

369-0940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net

REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 11689 Stolen Rock Court. 5 bed, 3 bath, 2 car garage on 3.15 acres. $319,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net 1315 Kelly Island Court. 5 bed, 3 bath on cul-de-sac with sports court, pool & 3 car garage. $559,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com 1360 Starwood Drive. 4 bed, 3 bath in Grant Creek backing open space. 3 car heated garage, garden shed & deck. $449,900. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com 141 Burlilngton. Charming 4 bed, 1 bath with 2 car garage in Rose Park neighborhood. Wood floors under carpet, original hardware. $230,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com 1480 Cresthaven. 3 bed, 2.5 bath on over one private acre. Open floor plan, dream master bathroom and double garage. $344,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 1623 Wild Turkey Lane, Stevensville. Over 200 acre private ranch with creek surrounded by conservation easement land. $949,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula. 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoulaproperties.com 1700 Madeline. 5 bed, 3 bath at foot of Mount Sentinel. Vintage architecture, paned glass, wood floors. $685,000. Vickie & Chris Honzel, Lambros Real Estate 4 0 6 - 5 3 1 - 2 6 0 5 . vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 2 Bdr, 1 Bath single-level Windsor Park home. $168,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 210 Burlington. 4 bed, 2 bath well-maintained home with wood floors, fenced yard & single garage. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com 229 Mansion Heights. 4 bed, 4 bath Prairie Style with deck, patio, floor to ceiling windows and amazing views. $895,000.

Vander Meer's Wildland Conservation Services specializes in forest restoration. We emphasize full utilization of the byproducts of forest restoration by offering custom milling. All wood products are procured from forest restoration, salvage projects, or fuel hazard work. We are also working with local arborists, the city forester and wood artisans to salvage urban trees.

406-541-2565 • www.vanwild.com

Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com 253 Strand. 2 bed, 1.5 bath with hardwood floors, coved ceilings, updated bath. Charming house close to UM. $250,000. Go to MoveMontana.com for more information. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 2905 Larch Camp Road. 3 bed, 2.5 bath on 2.5 acres in Pattee Canyon. Fully furnished. $639,000. Vickie & Chris Honzel, Lambros Real Estate 4 0 6 - 5 3 1 - 2 6 0 5 . vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 3 Bdr, 1 Bath University District home. $290,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath Pleasant View home. $205,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3279 Humble. 3 bed, 2.5 bath 2003 Parade of Homes with 3 car garage. $495,000. Vickie Honzel 406-531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 3455 Jack Drive. 4 bed, 3 bath Linda Vista home with large kitchen, double garage & parklike landscaping. $285,000. Vickie & Chris Honzel, Lambros Real Estate 406-531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 4 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Grant Creek / Prospect Meadows home. $475,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Riverfront home. $395,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4227 South 7th West. Beautiful sample home to be built. 4 bed, 2.5 bath with covered porch and 2 car garage. Lot available separately for $125,000. MLS #20121798, $325,000. Jake Booher, Prudential Montana 5 4 4 - 6 1 1 4 . jbooher@montana.com 4315 Melrose. 3 bed, 2 bath with vaulted ceilings, covered front porch and 2 car garage. $247,500. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties, 5 4 1 - 7 3 5 5 . milyardhomes@yahoo.com

4433A Bordeaux. 2 bed, 2 bath with 2 car garage, fenced yard with pergola. Many upgrades including new flooring. $177,900. Rochelle Glasgow, Missoula Prudential, 728, 8270. glasgow@montana.com

Linda Vista Home to be built at top of Linda Vista with amazing views! One level living, 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on corner lot on Jeff Drive. $279,900. KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com

4100 Mullan #102. Super-efficient studio with gas fireplace, laundry, storage & AC. $100/month HOA fee. $124,900. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com

4705 Potter Park Loop. 2 bed, 1 bath partially finished basement & 2 car garage. $169,900. 4705 PotterParkMoveMoontana.com for more details. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5 4 6 - 5 8 1 6 . annierealtor@gmail.com

Lot 16B MacArthur. 3 bed, 2 bath to be built with fantastic views. $189,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

5108 Village View #6. 2 bed, 2 bath with private deck, patio and single garage. $165,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 5329229. tory@montana.com

Lower Miller Creek. 4 bed, 3 bath with daylight walkout basement, large fenced yard & 3 car garage. $309,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com.

526 Minnesota #B. 2 bed, 1.5 bath energy-efficient condo with large front yard. $130,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com

Maloney Ranch Home For Sale Absolutely gorgeous 4 bedroom 3 bath home with open floor plan, exposed beams, vaulted ceilings and large windows. Spacious kitchen with stainless steel/black appliances, alder cabinets and granite countertops. Hardwood floors throughout the main floor. Beautiful master suite features French doors to one of the 2 patios, large walk-in closet, bath with separate tub and shower. Professionally landscaped yard with underground sprinklers and drip system. For inquiries please call 406-529-6916.

6614 MacArthur. 2 bed, 2.5 bath townhome with amazing views. $194,500. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properites. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net

5209 Dutton Court. 5 bed, 3 bath with fantastic kitchen, laundry room and 3 car garage. Near city park. $339,900. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5 4 6 - 5 8 1 6 annierealtor@gmail.com 5222 Forest Hill. 4 bed, 4 bath on over 3.5 acres near Bitterroot River adjacent to USFS land. $1,095,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estae 532-9229. tory@montana.com 5501 Prospect. 4 bed, 4 bath adjacent to common area in Grant Creek. Sun room, hot tub and many upgrades. $385,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 5846 Prospect Drive. 4 bed, 3 bath Grant Creek home with 2 car garage and great mountain views. Vickie Honzel, Lambros Real Estate 406-531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 6544 McArthur. 3 bed, 2.5 bath with gas fireplace and 2 car garage. $240,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net 7452 Peregrine Court. 4 bed, 3.5 bath Stratford Munufactured on 1/2 acre bordering Flynn Ranch. $329,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free comparative market analysis. 360-8234

Remarkably Cute 2039 South 10th West. 2 bedroom home on large lot very centrally located near Good Food Store, bike trails and schools. Full basement and single garage. $185,000. KD, Portico Real Estate, 240-5227 www.porticorealestate.com

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES 2025 Mullan Road. Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos. Large secure units with affordable HOA dues. Starting at $144,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 8804749. montpref@bigsky.net

Elegant 3 bed, 3 bath with gourmet kitchen, open floor plan & deck. $475,000. Rita Gray, Lambros Real Estate 532-9283. ritagray@lambrosera.com

2801 Highcliff Court #7. 2 bed, 1.5 bath in Grant Creek. Borders treed common area. $125,500. Vickie & Chris Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 406-531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

Fantastic Home With View 6305 St. Thomas. 4 bed, 3 bath, updated and gorgeous setting with large private lot, double garage, landscaped and ready to move into! $310,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

3100 Washburn #31. 2 bed, 1 bath fully remodeled with all appliances & gas fireplace. $100 HOA dues. $115,000. Jake Booher, Prudential Montana 5 4 4 - 6 1 1 4 . jbooher@montana.com

803A Pattee Creek. 2. bed, 1.5 bath condo with garage in 55+ community. $129,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000, 2407653. pat@properties2000.com 839 Discovery. 2 bed, 1.5 bath at base of Mt. Jumbo. Patio, balcony, fenced yard & single garage. $170,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmailcom Affordable Townhomes Didn’t think you could afford to buy your own place? This sweet new, green-built development may be your ticket. STARTING AT $79,000. 1400 Burns. 2405227 porticorealestate.com Beautiful Downtown Triplex Two 2 bedroom units and one 1 bedroom; great rental history; great building on Historic Register with tons of character and in great shape! $359,500. 518 Alder porticorealestate.com 240-5227 Open & Light & Green & Clean Efficiency abounds in this 3 bed, 2.5 bath stand-alone super-insulated condo with heated floors and so much more. $250,000. 1530 S 12th W. Near Good Food Store and bike trails. 240-5227. porticorealestate.com Townhome On The River Land Stewardship Program buyers must qualify. Call KD to find out more about this 2 bedroom 1.5 bath condo with the balcony facing the river and right next to the river trail and close to downtown. $135,000. 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

Did you know? Posting a classified ad ONLINE is FREE!

[C10] Missoula Independent • March 21 – March 28, 2013


REAL ESTATE Uptown Flats. From $149,900. Upscale gated community near downtown. All SS appliances, car port, storage and access to community room and exercise room plus more. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5465816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com

MANUFACTURED HOMES 1825 Burlington. Two central Missoula lots with 3 bed, 2 bath mobile. Great investment or first time buy. $89,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com

Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net Bear Gulch, Garnet Ghost Town. 40 acres bordering BLM land. Great recreational property. $50,000. Jake Booher, Prudential Montana, 544-6114. jbooher@montana.com Bruin Lane Lots. Near Council Groves & The Ranch Golf Course. From $85,000. Jake Booher, Prudential Montana. 5 4 4 - 6 1 1 4 . jbooher@montana.com INVESTORS/FARMERS: Quick cash sale 200 irrigated acres near Ronan, MT. Divided into 7 parcels of 20 to 40 acres. Horte

and Gillette Roads. Priced at $2,700/acre, $540,000. rhaynes@creative-finance.com or Rod 406-360-3050. NHN Old Freight Road, St. Ignatius. 11 acre parcel with Mission Mountain views. $215,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com Rattlesnake Acreage Rattlesnake 1/4 acre lot at the base of Mt. Jumbo with all utilities stubbed to the site and ready to build on. $160,000. KD 2405227. porticorealestate.com

COMMERCIAL 4 Klakken, Noxon. Motel with 9 units, laundromat & 2 rentals on 1/2 acre. $259,000. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. 514 West Spruce. Great office space in vintage building near St. Pat’s. Upgrades to wiring, plumbing, roof & more. $244,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com Commercial Lease Space Fantastic opportunity to

715 Clements. 3 bed, 2 bath mobile & 1 bedroom house on 1/4 acre. $120,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties, 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com

LAND

be neighbors with the awardwinning Homeword Organization. New, LEED registered, high quality, sustainably-built office space close to river and downtown. $11-$15 per sq.ft. KD 2 4 0 - 5 2 2 7 . porticorealestate.com Gorgeous Victorian home zoned for commercial use in a great location $395,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

OUT OF TOWN 102 Boardwalk, Stevensville. 3 bed, 2 bath on almost 3 acres with large 48’x30’ heated shop. $285,000. Robin Rice, Montana

Preferred Properties, 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

11027 Stella Blue, Lolo. Gorgeous 4 bed, 4 bath two story custom home. Gourmet kitchen, spa-like master bath. $425,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com

1978 Waters Edge, Bonner. 4 bed, 2.5 bath on 2.3 Blackfoot River acres. $419,999. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

14205 Cambridge Road, Bonner. 4 bed, 4 bath on over 4 acres on Blackfoot River. Completely furnished. $695,000. Vickie & Chris Honzel, Lambros Real Estate 406-531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

2 Canyon View Drive, East Missoula. 3 bed, 2 bath on large fenced lot. Basement with 2 bonus rooms and double garage. $192,500. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula, 7 2 8 - 8 2 7 0 . glasgow@montana.com

15305 Spring Hill Road, Frenchtown. Beautiful cedar 4 bed, 2.5 bath with 3 car garage & deck on acreage bordering Forest Service. $485,000. Robin Rice @ 240-6503.

2351 Highway 83 West, Seeley Lake. 2 bed, 2 bath with basement & 2 car garage on 2.4 lakefront acres. $583,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Mis-

Rochelle Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507

23645 Mullan. Beautiful 14 acre treed meadow west of Huson. Modulars on permanent foundation allowed. $169,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net

glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

Missoula Properties 728-8270

3.2 Acres in the Wye area. Gorgeous mountain and valley views. $65,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

18715 Felicia Lane $194,900

3010 West Central. Nearly 5 acres in Target Range with 3 bed, 1 bath home. Rural living in town. $499,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com

Rita Gray

531 Minnesota. Great East Missoula building lot. $55,000. Robin Rice Montana Preferred

Lambros Real Estate ERA 406-544-4226 www.ritagray.com

Well-maintained 4 bed, 2 bath manufactured home on permanent foundation on 3.39 acres. Panoramic Frenchtown valley views.

Buying a house? We’ll show you the way home. 0SVM,SHKI6IEP)WXEXI0SER3J½GIV

NMLS UI # 487288

RICE TEAM

Robin Rice • 240-6503

4315 Melrose $247,500 Spacious 3 bed, 2 bath Pleasant View home near Hellgate Elementary. Vaulted ceilings, covered front porch & 2 car garage

141 Burlington $230,000 Charming 4 bed, 1 bath with 2 car garage in Rose Park neighborhood. Wood floors, original doors & hardware

11689 Stolen Rock Court, Frenchtown $319,000 • 5 bed, 3 bath on over 3 acres • Great valley & mountain views

Mullan Heights Riverside Condos Starting at $144,900 • Large secure units with affordable HOA dues

3220 Great Northern Way | 327-1012 lhodge@fsbmsla.com

missoulanews.com • March 21 – March 28, 2013 [C11]


REAL ESTATE soula. 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoulaproperties.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Stevensville area home on 6+ acres. $325,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4 Bdr, 3 Bath Stevensville area home on 13 acres. $575,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 45822 Meadowlark, Polson. 5 bed, 3 bath Lindal Cedar home on over 3 acres on 250 feet of Flathead Lake frontage. $1,600,000. Jake Booher, Prudential Montana 544-6114. jbooher@montana.com 5 Bdr, 3 Bath, Florence area home on 3.2 acres. $575,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

5340 Centauria, Florence. 4 bed, 3 bath tri-level on 5 acres. Fenced for horses, 2 car garage & fruit trees. $319,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 5329229. tory@montana.com 780 Tusas View Lane, Stevensville. 3 bed, 2 bath on nearly 3 acres with 30’x40’ shop. $166,000. Rita Gray, Lambros Real Estate, 532-9283. ritagray@lambrosera.com Big Arm On Flathead Lake. 45765 Meadow Lake Lane. 6 bed, 4 bath with 3 car garage on lakefront acreage. Two additional homes included. MLS #20120312. $1,200,000. Jake Booher, Prudential Montana 544-6114. jbooher@montana.co Home On the River Stevensville River Road home on 1.87 acres. 4 bedrooms, views of the Bitterroot Mountains and right on the Bitterroot River. This is awesome! At-

tached garage plus detached RV garage. $340,000. KD 2 4 0 - 5 2 2 7 . porticorealestate.com

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL QUICK CASH FOR REAL ESTATE NOTES and Land Installment Contracts. We also lend on Real Estate with strong equity. 406721-1444 www.Creative-Finance.com

803A Pattee Creek • $129,900

Pat McCormick

• Second floor 2 bed, 1.5 bath condo with Real Estate Broker Real Estate With Real Experience single garage in 55+ community. pat@properties2000.com • Stair-master lift 406-240-SOLD (7653) • Gorgeous sunset & mountain views. Properties2000.com [C12] Missoula Independent • March 21 – March 28, 2013

5846 Prospect Drive

$455,000 Grant Creek area 4 bed, 3 bath, 3500 sq.ft. • Architectural windows, 2 gas fireplaces, rec/theatre room • Walkout daylight basement, fenced yard & 2 car garage • Incredible mountain views

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Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture

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