Page 1

UP FRONT

LAKE COUNTY DEPUTIES TAKE SHERIFF TO FEDERAL COURT

THE BEST WESTERNS FOR WESTSIDERS RARE SNOWY OWLS NEWS ATOREASON RANGE SOUNDCHECK COWBOY UP AT VFW PRAISE ‘OBAMACARE’ PERCH IN POLSON


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


UP FRONT

LAKE COUNTY DEPUTIES TAKE SHERIFF TO FEDERAL COURT

THE BEST WESTERNS FOR WESTSIDERS RARE SNOWY OWLS NEWS ATOREASON RANGE SOUNDCHECK COWBOY UP AT VFW PRAISE ‘OBAMACARE’ PERCH IN POLSON


Missoula Independent Page 2 February 23 – March 1, 2012


nside Cover Story

What drives the periodic coat color changes of animals such as Montana’s snowshoe hares, and is it something the animals can adjust? These questions, mused upon for centuries yet never fully studied, have lately taken on extra significance ..................14

Cover photo by Colin Ruggiero

News Letters Chill out, trapper haters ..................................................................................4 The Week in Review State wolf hunt ends.................................................................6 Briefs A reason for Westsiders to praise “Obamacare”................................................6 Etc. A nauseating smirk ................................................................................................7 Up Front Northside Superfund site languishes...........................................................8 Up Front Lawsuit divides Lake County Sheriff ’s Department ....................................9 Ochenski The myth of clean resource extraction returns ........................................10 Range Rare snowy owls find perches in Polson ........................................................11 Agenda Wild Waters in the West ................................................................................12

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan Planting the seed of seed ordering ...............................................18 Happiest Hour Ole Beck VFW Nights.......................................................................19 8 Days a Week Save the snow bunnies!....................................................................21 Mountain High Viewing winter raptors....................................................................29 Scope Headwaters’ cutting-edge dancers put love to the test ..................................30 Noise Secret Powers, The Whizpops, Brett Netson and more ..................................31 Soundcheck The Best Westerns ................................................................................32 Film This Means War misses the mark .....................................................................33 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films ...................................................34

Exclusives Street Talk....................................................................................................................4 In Other News...........................................................................................................13 Classifieds ................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrology..................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle....................................................................................................C-7 This Modern World ...............................................................................................C-11

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Robert Meyerowitz PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson ASSOCIATE EDITOR Matthew Frank PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Jason McMackin STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Skylar Browning COPY EDITOR Ted McDermott PHOTO INTERN Michelle Gustafson ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Chris Melton, Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Rhonda Urbanski, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Jon Baker MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Brad Tyer, Dave Loos, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Azita Osanloo, Jamie Rogers, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2012 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

Missoula Independent Page 3 February 23 – March 1, 2012


STREET TALK

by Michelle Gustafson

Asked on the Hip Strip in downtown Missoula. This week’s feature story examines how climate change might affect snowshoe hares. Do you feel that climate change has affected you? Follow up: If you could change one thing about Missoula’s climate, what would it be?

Dallas Saffel: Oh yeah. I constantly try to cut back on my emissions and my carbon footprint. In Seattle, there was a crazy ice storm about three weeks ago and we lost power for about five days. Making lemonade: I wouldn’t change it in Missoula. The climate’s great! It’s cold and snowy, but there is also a lot of sunshine, too.

James Quigley: It’s changed the fishing with the hotter summers, and the longer heat waves stress out the trout populations. Seems like this winter is setting us up for a tough summer. Skank’d: Lose the inversion pollution. There is a lot of smog in town. There’s nothing you can really do about it, but if I could change something, that would be it.

Arnica Lande: We obviously haven’t had much snowfall at all, which is a big bummer. It hurts me by preventing me from doing what I normally do for fun in the winter, like snowboarding and sledding. Socked in: I wish the inversion over the valley would lighten up so it was more sunny.

Willa Lande: I think climate change has affected the winters. I mean, I used to visit Missoula and snow would be up to my knees this time of year. That no longer happens. In Hamilton, we have no snow and lots of sunshine. We used to have snowshoe hares on the West Fork, but since 2005 I haven’t seen them anymore. Wait five minutes: You know, I like the climate here. Spring does go on pretty long, though. I wish there were more defined seasons.

Randy Leachman: Yes. Geese are having problems. They’re showing up in weird places where they shouldn’t be. Something is going on with their migration direction. Wait five days: Hard to say. We do need more snowpack in the mountains.

Missoula Independent Page 4 February 23 – March 1, 2012

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Let ’em trap Wow. I would think you and your readers have had enough of this antitrapping rhetoric, but I guess not (see Letters, Feb. 16). Some guy minding his own business doing what he wants and some nosey person with binoculars is watchin’. Yes, beaver are beautiful but harvesting them doesn’t hurt them today as it did in 1820. Same with any furbearer that is harvested. Enough propaganda on how they die. Odds are the trapper used a body gripper that kills them instantly. Pretty? Nope. But quick. Everything has a season and people, whether you like their sport or not, have the right to choose their sport. They don’t need your blessings any more than you need theirs when you walk the dog. I live on the Clearwater and have two dogs. When I take them out for a walk I am aware of snowmobilers and trappers—and they are on a lead because of it. I can’t mount up and ride the ol’ saddle-mule because of snowmobilers. It’s their season, so I don’t ride. If you hate and despise trapping, so be it, but let those who do (I no longer trap) do it. I like wolves, too, but if one was taking a toll on my stock I’d defend them. I bet most of you might hate that idea, too. Until spring keep Fido on a leash. Let folks of all walks of life enjoy what they want. Most folks who deal with the natural resources of this great state understand the need to manage (not exterminate) those resources. Harvesting is never pretty, nor should it be taken lightly, but as a conservationist it should be done. Angelo Pecora Seeley Lake

Baucus clears the air Do you want to leave your children a Montana where the air is safe to breathe and the fish are safe to eat? Most of us would likely say “yes.”

Yet in today’s industrial age, we cannot take such things for granted. Indeed, parts of our state suffer from bad air pollution. And over 50 bodies of water, including popular fisheries such as Flathead Lake and Fort Peck Reservoir, have warnings urging children and women of childbearing age to avoid eating too much fish due to mercury contamination. Mercury, arsenic and other toxic pollutants emitted from power plants pose a

“Trappers don’t need your blessings any more than you need theirs when you walk the dog.”

risk for neurological damage, birth defects, cancer, and premature death. Other types of air pollutants pose a risk for asthma and cardiovascular diseases. Fortunately, some or our leaders understand these risks and the need for protections that reduce dangerous pollution. In 1990, Sen. Max Baucus led an overwhelmingly popular, bipartisan effort to modernize the Clean Air Act. The bill, signed into law by the first President Bush, required polluters to

install technologies that capture toxins such as mercury and hydrochloric acid before they are released into our air. But politics and industry pressure being what they are, implementation of this law has been delayed for more than 20 years. Only now has the Environmental Protection Agency finally released rules for industry that will put them in line with this law. While we may grumble about the slow wheels of government, industry has had over two decades to prepare for these rules. Back in 2001, Baucus cited the need for these long-delayed anti-pollution safeguards: “The American Lung Association, the American Public Health Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics all testified that we are facing a public health crisis due to air pollution.” He added: “All the studies on the Clean Air Act generally have reached the conclusion by a huge factor that the benefits of the Clean Air Act outweigh the cost of the Clean Air Act.” Thanks to Baucus, we will soon see the cleanup of toxic pollutants from Montana’s largest industrial sources as well as cleanup of asthma and respiratory-impairing pollutants from sources like Colstrip. Each year across America, the newly adopted mercury and air toxics standard alone will help prevent 11,000 premature deaths, 4,700 heart attacks and 130,000 asthma attacks. While these standards should have been implemented a long time ago, they will help make Montana’s air and water safer for present and future generations. We thank Baucus for his past and continued support of the Clean Air Act. Thanks to his leadership, perhaps we will leave our children a Montana where air is safe to breathe and fish are safe to eat. Greg Lind Missoula Craig Mathews West Yellowstone

Comments from MissoulaNews.com

Doubt it They intend to ask the Montana Legislature to address the issue during its upcoming session? (See “Housing,” Feb. 16.)
Working to benefit the citizens of Montana might put a serious crimp in their truly important work: legalizing hunting with spears and silencers, creating armed militias in every town, permitting guns in schools, removing Obama’s name from the ballot, withdrawing the U.S. from the U.N., proclaiming global

warming beneficial to the state, etc. Posted on February 16, 2012 at 10:39 a.m.

Typical Wal-Mart I am a locksmith in Ohio, and the first three times that Wal-Mart had us out to do locks for them, we had to sue them to get paid (see “Save money, live better?” Feb. 9). We won all three times, but from that point forward we told WalMart that they are cash only. Pay cash when we finish or call someone else.

They now adhere to our rule. I have done numerous jobs since then at various locations around northeast Ohio and every time, they pay me cash. The trick is, never let it get to where you have to deal with corporate. They appear to have a business model in place for contractors. Pay nobody. If half of the contractors are too small to sue, then they have gotten half of their work performed for free. Typical Wal-Mart. Posted on February 20, 2012 at 7:57 p.m.


Missoula Independent Page 5 February 23 – March 1, 2012


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, February 15

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Comment

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

News Quirks by Michelle Gustafson

Montana’s second wolf-hunting season ends, with hunters having killed 166 wolves, about 75 percent of the 220-wolf quota. The season was initially scheduled to end Dec. 31, but the FWP Commission extended it, allowing hunters to bag an additional 45 wolves.

• Thursday, February 16 State Sen. Kim Gillan, a Democrat from Billings who has served eight sessions in the Montana Legislature, files to run for U.S. House, a seat currently held by Denny Rehberg. Gillan calls Rehberg a “do-nothing” congressman. She leads all candidates on the June primary ballot in fundraising.

• Friday, February 17 The U.S. Supreme Court puts on hold a Montana court ruling that upheld the state’s century-old law that limits independent campaign expenditures. Attorney General Steve Bullock says he’s “disappointed that for the first time in 100 years Montanans won’t be able to rely on our corporate spending ban to safeguard the integrity of our elections.”

• Saturday, February 18 Sophomore guard Kareem Jamar tallies a triple-double—21 points, 11 rebounds, 11 assists—to lead the University of Montana men’s basketball team to a 94-79 win over the University of Hawaii Warriors at UM’s Dahlberg Arena. It’s the ninth straight victory for the Grizzlies.

• Sunday, February 19 Six hikers trapped by a snowstorm in the Bridger Mountains spend the night waiting for a helicopter to rescue them Sunday morning. Rescue workers, hampered by heavy snow, spend 15 hours looking for the hikers, who were in the mountains for a wildlife photography shoot.

• Monday, February 20 Charles John Dundon III, of Connell, Wash., is snowmobiling west of the Hungry Horse Reservoir south of Glacier National Park when he and a companion trigger an avalanche that buries Dundon and kills him. It’s the second avalanche fatality in northwest Montana this month.

• Tuesday, February 21 Missoula County joins a new, national database called Smart911 that allows residents to create personal and household profiles intended to assist responders in the event of an emergency. The service will cost the county about $21,000 a year. Register at Smart911.com.

With chalk outlining her body, anti-coal protester Cassie Scheets lays down in the Wells Fargo parking lot in downtown Missoula Sunday afternoon to bring attention to increased coal exports from Montana. Scheets and other protesters marched from the University of Montana to the downtown train tracks, stopping at the bank and the offices of Rep. Denny Rehberg and Sen. Max Baucus on the way.

Business Rickshaw reduction Over the past eight years, rickshaws have become a light-hearted distraction from the skimpy outfits, squad cars and drunken shouting matches that dominate most summer nights in downtown Missoula. It’s hard to recall a time when they didn’t roll by every few hours, pop music blaring and rowdy passengers squealing with glee. The rickshaws will roll again. How often is a question even Garden City Gondola founder Jonas Ehudin can’t quite answer. All he can say is “they’ll be more rare.” “Last summer, demand was down,” Ehudin says. “So was the average tip that people gave us. We figured it was just the recession finally hitting Montana and the rickshaw company being kind of a luxury.” In the past drivers collected $100 a night on average; in 2011, they were lucky to get close to that—likely a “function of asking people to pay whatever they want,” Ehudin says. So Garden City Gondola is scaling back. Last season the company had 20 drivers from spring to fall, says Gondola partner Steven Schorzman. This year it’ll be more like five.

“We’re not going to have bikes out all the weekend nights,” Schorzman says. “Really, the frequency and scheduling and timing is going to be much more ad hoc.” The change is partly due to restructuring at Garden City Gondola. Two of the company’s five partners left. The rest agreed that the present business model—renting the rickshaws to drivers and requesting a percentage of tips in return—isn’t working. Rickshaws have always been a novelty, says business partner Sophia Kircos. Maybe three drivers on the streets some nights is over-saturation. One of Garden City Gondola’s biggest concerns is return on investment. The company is a side project for everyone involved. Schorzman says the group was constantly repairing rickshaws last year, nearly doubling the amount of time and energy each partner put in. The financial returns remained roughly the same. No one at Garden City Gondola is really complaining. They don’t drive rickshaws to get rich. For Ehudin, the business is a community builder, connecting drivers and passengers with folks on the street simply dancing to the rickshaw’s music. That’ll be an infrequent connection this summer. “It’s kind of going back to the way the compa-

ny started,” Ehudin says. “It was just a serendipitous thing. If you found a rickshaw, you’d better jump on it, ’cause you don’t know when you’ll see another one.” Alex Sakariassen

Health Breaking ground on the Westside Legal challenges and political spats have obscured the benefits of the federal Affordable Care Act, known as “Obamacare” by its critics. But one was on display last Thursday night inside the Lowell School library. Mock-ups of a new school-based health-care clinic rested on easels, and more than a dozen Westsiders, sitting in kid-sized plastic chairs around thigh-high tables, reviewed the plans, largely voicing approval. The one-story, 2,500-square-foot clinic, designed to resemble neighboring houses, will likely be built this summer on a patch of park ground adjacent to Lowell School, paid for by a $500,000 grant Missoula County’s Partnership Health Center was awarded last July. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Service’s School-Based Health Center Capital Program gave out about 200 such

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Missoula Independent Page 6 February 23 – March 1, 2012

“An idea isn't responsible for the people who believe it.” ~Don Marquis


Inside

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grants in fiscal year 2011. The Lowell School clinic will be the first in Montana. It’ll be located in one of Missoula’s poorer neighborhoods. More than a quarter of Lowell students—kindergartners through fifth graders—qualify for free or reduced-price lunch, and about 70 are homeless. “With the numbers come some at-risk and underserved students,” Principal Brian Bessette said during the meeting. Which is why, when Partnership Health Center landed the grant and contacted Missoula County Public Schools about where the clinic might go, Lowell was chosen. According to the National Assembly on SchoolBased Health Care, these clinics have been found to significantly increase student access to health care, reducing inappropriate emergency room visits and Medicaid expenditures, while lowering rates of student absenteeism and tardiness. Students are more likely to use mental-health services, leading to fewer discipline referrals. All of which helps foster academic success. Partnership Health Center already provides care regardless of income at its two downtown locations. About six Partnership personnel will staff the Lowell School clinic, offering primary care and dental and behavioral health services. Partnership Director Kim Mansch said her employees are already “fighting to come work here.” Jerry Nelson, who’s lived down the road from Lowell School for 56 years, attended Thursday’s meeting, and he told Bessette and Mansch, “You’re breaking new ground, there’s no question about that.” Matthew Frank

Elk North Hills grass greener The elk are teeming in Missoula’s North Hills. Counts in the 1980s put the population in the double digits; last year the herd was 622 strong. All it takes is a spotting scope to catch the odd glimpse from town. But the elk are causing problems. They graze on ranches. They knock down cattle fences. They eat tulips. And they’re growing less wild, says Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks biologist Vickie Edwards. All it took was a heavy winter in 1996 to force the herd down above Interstate 90. Forage there is rich and safety plentiful. Elk began migrating to that winter range earlier, and leaving later.

Ochenski

Comment

“Those elk figured out really quickly that yes, the grass really is greener on the other side,” Edwards says. Since 2002, FWP has been trying to motivate the North Hills elk to continue their migratory tradition. They’ve done so through early rifle seasons in the Rattlesnake Wilderness, early hunts on private ranches, and a special game damage hunt in winter. As of Feb. 15—the last day of the game damage hunt this season—hunters took a record 11 elk from the North Hills. Edwards calls the many separate hunts “death by a thousand cuts.” “We’ve got folks trying to make a living out there,” Edwards says. “And it’s an economic hardship to have elk consuming standing grasses, getting into haystacks, tearing down fences.”

Photo by Chad Harder

Economics aside, the elk in hunting district 283 are simply way over objective. Lengthy stays and large numbers in the North Hills are bad for both the elk and the environment. FWP faces a unique problem here: elk numbers in the eastern portion of 283, where hunter access is easier, aren’t nearly as strong. Increasing the hunting quota will only stress those elk more. That’s why the FWP Commission designated a new sub-district Feb. 16 stretching west from Rattlesnake Creek to Highway 93, with 50 elk licenses available on a draw in 2012. And it’s why Edwards plans to submit an amendment to FWP’s 2005 elk management plan setting a separate population objective for the North Hills herd. “Those elk are growing within the wildland urban interface,” Edwards says. Of course, managing a hunt on the outskirts of Missoula presents its own challenges. FWP has to set safety zones and work closely with hunters and with local residents to make sure there are no accidental targets in the crosshairs. Alex Sakariassen

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Agenda

News Quirks

Housing The price is right Missoula Housing Authority Executive Director Lori Davidson already has big plans for the three properties that, if all goes as planned, the city of Missoula will donate to MHA next week. MHA administers a variety of programs that help low-income people find housing. Its waiting list runs roughly 2,000 families long. The city’s donation will chip away at that demand. It’s early yet, but Davidson envisions the three parcels—all of them located south of Broadway near the River Trail—could accommodate roughly 14 housing units. “It is exciting,” Davidson says. She hopes to draw upon a long-time MHA goal: to have College of Technology carpentry and heavy equipment program students build housing on one of the donated properties. “We’ve been looking for a project to work with COT for many years,” she says. In 2009, the Montana Legislature passed a law that enables cities to directly donate land to nonprofit organizations that use it for affordable housing. If the gift is approved by council during its regularly scheduled meeting Feb. 27, it will mark the first time Missoula conducts a transaction under the new law. Council has hashed out how best to use the properties for nearly a year. Councilwoman Cynthia Wolken, who chairs the Administration and Finance Committee that originally deliberated the donations, says city department heads were given first dibs on the land. There were no takers. City staffers also asked other area nonprofits if they were interested in using the land for lowincome housing. They didn’t bite, either, Wolken says. “Everybody had a chance to participate.” The city doesn’t have recent appraisals for the properties. Wolken says that’s because lawmakers didn’t see the point in hiring someone to calculate the worth of the three “awkward parcels” slated for donation. Other than the the donation value itself, the city isn’t incurring any costs. (MHA will pay the title search bill, estimated at $1,000.) Wolken says when the issue was deliberated in committee, council members agreed that it makes more sense to donate the properties than to continue paying for their upkeep. “We all agree that this is the most fiscally responsible—to dispose of this property,” she says. Jessica Mayrer

BY THE NUMBERS

$58

million

Start-up loan the federal government plans to award the Montana Health Co-op as part of the 2010 Affordable Care Act. The co-op could begin business as a new health insurer in the state by 2014.

etc. There was an unusual moment of silence inside the Wilma Theatre during the Big Sky Documentary Film Festival on Monday evening. Code of the West Director Rebecca Richman Cohen stood on the stage and dialed up on her cell phone Cherrie Brady, of Safe Community Safe Kids, the Billings-based group that helped put the kibosh on Montana’s medical marijuana industry. “She’s not going to answer,” hollered a slender, tattooed woman. Another man in a brown baseball cap said, “Tell her, ‘Her kids could do a lot worse than to turn out like me.’” The tattooed woman was right. Brady didn’t answer. She was slated to participate in a debate after a screening of the work-in-progress Code of the West, which documents the debate over medical marijuana that played out during the 2011 Montana Legislature. Brady doesn’t want Montana to become a destination for pot peddlers. In the film she’s the antagonist to the medical marijuana advocates. Code of the West filmmakers also followed Republican House Speaker Mike Milburn as he introduced a bill that aims to repeal Montana’s Medical Marijuana Act. During a strategizing session on the bill, the legislator from Cascade told his colleagues that he used to be a fighter pilot. As such, he said one must negotiate from a position of strength. Milburn’s bill died in committee March 14, 2011— the same day federal law enforcement agencies executed 26 search warrants at marijuana dispensaries across the state. Filmmakers interviewed Milburn after the raids. He smirked. “I don’t have a lot of compassion, I guess, for their industry,” he said. The smirk stood out in stark contrast to the fear expressed by marijuana advocate Tom Daubert during interviews conducted roughly two months after the raids. Daubert didn’t know then if he would face federal charges for his work with Montana Cannabis, which grew to be among the largest dispensaries in the state. Daubert left the business before the legislative session and the raids. “I’ve never felt terror until right after the raids,” he said. Daubert isn’t the only former caregiver who feels terrorized by the feds. His story reflects hundreds of other providers who believed they were protected under Montana law and now fear prosecution. It’s too bad Brady was a no-show. Fireworks in the Wilma could’ve been fun.

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Missoula Independent Page 7 February 23 – March 1, 2012


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Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

No end in blight Northside Superfund site languishes by Jessica Mayrer

The White Pine and Sash Superfund site is a fenced-in field of knapweed just north of the Scott Street Bridge in Missoula. On a recent day there’s an empty beer can in the grass outside the fence, and a hypodermic needle stuck into the ground, plunger side up. Mike Stevenson eyes this blighted land with frustration many days when he commutes past on Interstate 90 from his Grant Creek home to downtown Missoula. In 1999, he and six other investors purchased 30 of the White Pine and Sash Superfund site’s 43 acres. The Montana Department of

site in 1994. In 1999, Huttig Building Products, which owned White Pine Sash and Door when it closed in 1996, sold 12 acres to Zip Beverage and 30 acres to Scott Street Partners, Stevenson’s investment group. A year later Zip and Scott Street Partners sold 15.5 acres to the city. The three stakeholders each donated one acre to the city for a park. Though Huttig no longer owns the property, the state holds it legally responsible for the cleanup. Huttig has over the years removed contaminated soil, regularly tested for contaminants, and installed a sys-

also testing 21 homes in a roughly oneblock radius from the foot of the Scott Street Bridge to Waverly Street. Owen says it’s too early to say if chemical vapors threaten human health. “We’ll definitely know more in a few weeks, when we have the soil gas results,” Owen says. “At this point we haven’t seen anything that requires an immediate action...This is really making sure there isn’t a risk.” Bob Oaks, director of the North Missoula Community Development Corporation and longtime Northside advo-

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Missoula Independent Page 8 February 23 – March 1, 2012

Photo by Chad Harder

The White Pine and Sash Superfund site on Missoula’s Northside.

Environmental Quality still hasn’t issued the final cleanup standards for the site, much less a final cleanup order. “We’ve been waiting a long time for someone to say, ‘Okay, do this. And you’re okay,’” Stevenson says. Stevenson worked for 16 years at the Missoula-based environmental remediation company Envirocon. He knew full well that investing in a state-designated Superfund site was risky. But he didn’t see himself getting saddled with—and paying taxes on—a blighted weed lot for more than a decade. “We didn’t feel that the environmental impacts were all that great—that they could be pretty easily handled,” he says. “[With] a bulldozer and three months you probably could have cleaned that property up.” Between 1920 and 1996, this parcel was a bustling manufacturing operation called White Pine Sash and Door. It used petroleum products and pentachlorophenol, often called penta or PCP. Wood products were dipped into underground vats of a PCP mixture to reduce fungus and mold growth. The Environmental Protection Agency says PCP is a likely carcinogen. In the late ’80s, state scientists discovered the PCP-contaminated soil. The state declared White Pine and Sash a Superfund

tem to treat groundwater. The city, too, has worked to remediate its land, which now houses the Missoula Public Works Department. Seeing remediation efforts wind down on other portions of the property, Scott Street Partners asked the DEQ on Jan. 7 to make a “no further action determination” for its 19.2 acres. The city is waiting for the same. That would green-light commercial development. “We are anxious to develop the property,” Stevenson says. He’ll have to wait longer. On Feb. 3, the DEQ informed Scott Street Partners that there’s more cleanup to do. There remain elevated levels of cadmium and buried wood waste. “When [wood] degrades, the bacteria give off methane and it gets trapped in there,” says DEQ Project Officer Colleen Owen. “[It] can be at levels that are potentially explosive should you put a building structure over it.” And now there’s another hitch: The DEQ is for the first time testing whether vaporized chemical compounds that linger 30 feet underground are being released into the atmosphere. Armed with new technology, the agency is testing the southern portion of the White Pine and Sash site, and around Zip Beverage. It’s

cate, says he, like Stevenson, would love to see the long-blighted White Pine developed. But he’s wary of Scott Street Partners’ request for a commercial cleanup standard. Commercial standards are lower than residential standards. “We would like to see the site cleaned up to the highest and best that the law could require,” Oaks says. “If it’s cleaned up to residential standards, then commercial development can happen there, housing development could happen there. It doesn’t close the door on anything.” The DEQ will use its chemical vapor data to help draft cleanup mandates for the White Pine and Sash property. The public will be invited to weigh in before the agency finalizes its decision. In the meantime, Owen says she understands the frustrations with the pace of the cleanup, but it’s the DEQ’s responsibility to use the best science available to ensure the area is safe. “When it comes to answering the question of whether it’s impacting peoples’ health, it’s just a really important piece for us at this point to make sure that that isn’t an issue before we move forward,” Owen says. jmayrer@missoulanews.com


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Good cops, bad cops Federal lawsuit splits Lake County Sheriff’s Department by Matthew Frank

For months a handful of law enforcement officers in Lake County have been denying allegations of misconduct. Now they’ll be defending themselves in court. Five current and former officers in the Lake County Sheriff ’s Department filed a lawsuit in federal court Tuesday alleging that four of their colleagues, including the sheriff and undersheriff, retaliated against them for bringing forward evidence of wrongdoing within the department, ranging from a deputy’s lies about serving as a U.S. Marine to several officers’ involvement in a poaching group

criminal purpose,” violated the federal Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, or RICO, by attempting to prevent plaintiffs from providing evidence of the “unlawful killing, poaching and interstate transportation of illegally taken game.” As the Independent reported in December, Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks in September 2010 began investigating the so-called Coyote Club, a circle of Lake County law enforcement officers who’d allegedly been poaching game animals for years. The investigation, which is ongoing,

tigation with due diligence. It was simply a strong-arm tactic to send a message of fear and intimidation... Basically, ‘Don’t question what we are doing here in Lake County. Don’t bring attention to us. Don’t point out the corruption—or we will come to your home, search it and seize your property.’” In the lawsuit, Gehl, Kendley, Read and Woods all claim to have been reprimanded for attempting to expose misconduct in the department. Kendley reported that Duryee had altered a rifle registered to the Lake County Sheriff ’s Department to make it a machine gun, a violation of

The plaintiffs: Ben Woods, Terry Leonard, Levi Read, Steve Kendley, and Mike Gehl.

known as the “Coyote Club.” The plaintiffs—Detective Mike Gehl, Detective Steve Kendley, former Reserve Deputy Terry Leonard, Deputy Levi Read and Deputy Ben Woods—have been “reprimanded in their employment, have suffered demotions, have been denied promotions, and have been subjected to a hostile work environment by the leadership of the Lake County Sheriff ’s Department because of the exercise of their First Amendment constitutional rights as well as the exercise of their duty as Montana Peace Officers,” the lawsuit states. The plaintiffs claim that the defendants—Sheriff Jay Doyle, Undersheriff Dan Yonkin, and officers Mike Sargeant and Dan Duryee—“have formed and continue to operate an organization of officers the purpose of which is to engage in illegal activities and the covering up of such illegal activities by retaliation against officers who ‘don’t go along’ with this group.” “These gentlemen did not want to file this suit,” says the plaintiffs’ attorney, Rich Buley, of Missoula. “However, because of the total inaction of Lake County officials, as well as state officials, including the attorney general’s office, they had no option.” The lawsuit further alleges that the defendants, “acting in concert and with

has centered on former reserve deputy Jesse Jacobs and Jason Nash, an officer with the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, but the dozens of interviews conducted by Game Warden Frank Bowen also implicate the defendants, specifically Sargeant and Duryee. The lawsuit goes on to claim that defendants Doyle and Yonkin violated Leonard’s civil rights when they searched his home and confiscated his computer in September 2010. Earlier that year, with the sheriff ’s election upcoming, Leonard had created two websites to disseminate information about the alleged misconduct in the sheriff ’s department. Suspected of having committed the misdemeanor crimes of “election materials not to be anonymous, and criminal defamation,” his home was searched. The lawsuit claims Yonkin downloaded the data on Leonard’s computer even though the search warrant didn’t allow for searching the computers themselves. Leonard’s property wasn’t returned to him until February 2011. No charges were filed against him. Leonard told the Independent late last year that the Lake County Sheriff ’s Department “had no intention of seeing justice done or even conducting a proper inves-

federal law. Read complained that Duryee fabricated his tales of Gulf War combat. (That purported experience earned Duryee command of Lake County’s Special Response Team. He later admitted to lying about his military service.) The plaintiffs all made complaints about Doyle, Sargeant and Duryee’s belonging to the Coyote Club, and about officers stealing ammunition that had been donated to the department. Gehl, Read and Woods were suspended without pay. Gehl and Kendley were also demoted, punishment, they claim, for taking their complaints to state Attorney General Steve Bullock in January 2011. The demotions, the suit states, came as a “direct result of their exercise of their constitutional rights of free speech.” Doyle has denied that the demotions resulted from meeting with Bullock. Doyle didn’t return calls seeking comment. “Everything they are alleging has already been investigated—fully,” he said of the allegations late last year. “These aren’t the only actions of wrongdoing or breaking of laws that we intend to present at trial,” Buley says. “There’s much more.” mfrank@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent Page 9 February 23 – March 1, 2012


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Here we go again The myth of clean resource extraction returns 20

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www.tanglesmt.com

The federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 more commonly referred to as the “Superfund” program, was signed into law in the last days of Jimmy Carter’s presidency. Shortly thereafter and much to the shame of Montanans, Butte, Anaconda, and the entire Clark Fork River down to the Milltown Dam became America’s largest Superfund site. It looked like the mining industry was finally being held accountable for the almost unimaginable environmental damage it has wreaked upon Montana. But now, after a decades-long public relations battle, the resource extraction industries are again pushing the myth that such activities can be “done right” to protect Montanans and their environment. That’s pure, unadulterated baloney. For more than a century Montana has been a resource extraction colony for Wall Street’s “Captains of Industry.” Those who have studied Montana history can easily recount the sad tales, from the initial efforts to remove the native Indians from areas they had occupied for thousands of years to the massive land giveaways to the railroads that “opened the West.” Those railroads were supposed to serve Montanans in exchange for the millions of acres of free federal lands, but today many of those tracks, especially those to smaller communities, now lie rusting or ripped out while the offspring corporations of the railroad barons sell the land for subdivision development after having shaved it bald through industrial logging. Likewise, the cattle barons demanded—and still demand—the removal of anything that competes with their livestock for grass or threatens them through predation or disease. The millions of bison that once roamed the Great Plains paid the greatest price of appeasement when they were wiped out nearly to extinction. But so, too, were the wolves, grizzlies, mountain lions and coyotes mercilessly killed en masse to keep the stockgrowers happy. Then came the timber barons, who turned the virgin old growth forests of the state into stump fields while reaping fabulous wealth. And of course we live still with the grim legacy left behind by the copper kings, which, besides the wholesale destruction of the headwaters of the mighty Columbia River, goes far beyond Butte and includes thousands of unre-

Missoula Independent Page 10 February 23 – March 1, 2012

claimed mines and mills still littering— and poisoning—the state. Late in the game came the oil and gas industry, which ran in booms and busts across the Hi-Line and eastern Montana, leaving behind thousands of abandoned wells that continue to pollute precious aquifers as well as surface lands and waters. For a brief moment in time, a decade or two at most, Montanans fought back

“It’s apparent that ‘doing it right’ is nothing but industry double-talk for business as usual.” against the destruction. Our 1972 Constitution threw off the copper collar with the guarantee that every Montanan had an “inalienable right” to a “clean and healthful environment.” That same Constitution established the Resource Indemnity Trust, levying a small tax on certain resource extraction industries to ensure that “all lands disturbed by the taking of natural resources shall be reclaimed.” Going into the new millennia it looked like we had perhaps turned a corner, learned from history, and were seeking other avenues of economic activity. Learned scholars dubbed this the “New West” while others, especially politicians seeking populist votes, praised the “restoration economy” that would redress past damages. We were told that rivers could be repaired, ecosystems could be brought back into balance and endangered species could be saved from extinction and even reintroduced. The resource extraction industries took full advantage of such political folderol claiming they were no longer the mining, logging, ranching, and oil and gas industries of the past. The “new” resource extractors, we were told, would “do it right” in the future. Foolishly, many Montanans—and especially those same politicians seeking populist votes— took that bait hook, line and sinker. And then came the Great Recession,

in which “jobs” took precedent over everything, including in what shape we leave Montana for future generations. The resource extraction industries went at it with a vengeance to make up for lost time. Coal bed methane, natural gas fracking, massive mining of coal to be shipped to China, and a new “war on wolves” to keep Montana safe for cows while keeping bison locked tight within Yellowstone’s borders. Even the timber industry, for which the housing bust mostly eliminated the demand for lumber, has found a champion in Sen. Jon Tester and Gov. Brian Schweitzer to mandate harvest levels on national forests to theoretically “maintain the timber infrastructure.” The truth is that nothing much has really changed. Golden Sunlight, once lauded as the poster child of “new mining,” continues to leak toxins into the groundwater that will have to be treated “in perpetuity.” Coalbed methane has seriously degraded the Tongue River with saline waste water. Oil and gas drilling in the Bakken Formation promises to leave behind centuries of leaking wells whose cases only degrade further with time as well as undetermined fracking chemicals that poison groundwater. If anyone thinks things have changed, take a minute to talk with the folks in Marysville, where a Canadian gold mining company is destroying wells, disrupting residents with around-the-clock noise and pollution and ruining a recently-paved road to the community. It’s apparent that “doing it right” is nothing but industry double-talk for business as usual—and a convenient dodge for weak-kneed politicians and their backers whose convictions on environmental protection are far outweighed by their political ambitions and allegiance to the resource extraction industries. In the meantime, Montana still sits right near the bottom of the per capita income barrel. We can learn from the past and chose to leave the devastation of natural resource extraction behind. Or we can ignore the on-going and growing problems and believe the fairy tale. The choice is ours. But make no mistake, the price will ultimately be paid by future generations. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


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Winged irruption Rare snowy owls find perches in Polson by Christina Nealson

It took only two hours for me to reach the apparent miracle that was occurring near Flathead Lake in Polson: Snowy owls had turned up here after flying all the way from the Arctic, and everybody in the town seemed to know about it. I’d never seen these spectacular, twofoot-tall birds, which can boast a wingspan of up to five feet, but I’d always wanted to, and here was my chance. A fellow birder pointed the way, and suddenly, there they were, looking like ghost owls assembled on subdivision rooftops. Twelve white sentinels broke the skyline like fluffy chimneys, their unlikely perch points on sunny shingles commanding a 360-degree view. There was the expansive Flathead Lake to the north and tundralike hunting fields below. The birds’ beauty and foreign presence were breathtaking. When a bevy of birds flies far south like this it’s called an “irruption,” a sudden, unpredictable mass movement of individuals into an area where they’re uncommon. The last irruption of snowy owls to Polson occurred in 2005-2006. That time they wintered about a mile from this subdivision, laying claim to fence posts and old farm machinery. Irruptions are usually regional, occurring in the Northwest, Northeast, or in areas of British Columbia. But this year has been unprecedented. Thousands of owls have detoured south from coast to coast; they’ve been seen in Seattle, Vancouver, Kansas, the Ohio River Valley, Boston, South Dakota, and even in the fields north of Denver International Airport. This migration is exciting the nation, as people who don’t usually travel to see birds load up the children and drive miles to see the majestic white owls. One man told me,

“I’m a bow-hunter not a birdwatcher, but I wanted to see these birds with my boy.” A few miles south of Polson, in the Mission Valley, is the small but mighty Ninepipes Owl Research Institute, home to Denver Holt, a man who has studied snowy owls for over 25 years. Some scientists believe this irruption was caused by a crash in the lemming population. Lemmings constitute 90 percent of the snowy owls’ diet. But others believe that the opposite is true. It could be that an overpopulation of lemmings resulted in too many owls—five to seven owlets hatching at once as opposed to the usual one or two—and that the result-

“People vie to be part of the mystery, capturing the owls not with guns, but with eyes and cameras.” ing overpopulation pushed the birds out of the Arctic in search of winter food supplies. “It’s all speculation,” says Holt. “No one knows that the lemming population crashed. We do know they are showing up healthy, not stressed and uninjured.” Holt believes that good feeding leads to good breeding, and between the lake and the tundra-like fields, the birds above Polson have a ready supply of mice, voles, ducks, hares and fish. And, I would think, the occasional house cat. The birds this day were roosting in the

sun on patches of crusty roof snow. They are one of the few diurnal owls, active in the day, and the largest owl by weight, with the female adult weighing up to six pounds. A hunting bird can reach speeds of 69 mph; a female defending her chicks will launch like a stealth bomber from a half-mile away and strike at 25 mph, tearing through cotton layers and down jackets and into flesh with ease. Wolves don’t faze them. Oglala Sioux warriors who excelled in battle wore caps of snowy owl feathers. The owls appear in cave art from 10,000 years ago, and you could say that they continue to live on in the deep recesses of our reptilian brain. Their ghostly white feathers may have something to do with our fascination, as white symbolizes innocence, purity, spiritual power—and, in some cultures, death. Depending on where you go in their polar world, the bird is known as the ermine owl, tundra ghost, Scandinavian night bird, white terror of the North or Ookpik. Holt says the scope of this nationwide irruption makes it the greatest wildlife event in many years. After the birds showed up in 1966, he recalls, you couldn’t walk into a farmhouse without seeing a snowy owl— dead and stuffed. Now, people vie to be part of the mystery, capturing the owls not with guns, but with eyes and cameras. As for the owls I watched in Polson, the birds always seemed to be scanning the fields beyond, their dazzling yellow eyes never missing a move. It was a blessing to be in their presence. Christina Nealson is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org ). She lives and writes in Libby, Montana.

Missoula Independent Page 11 February 23 – March 1, 2012


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This is one of those things that you might not think about as China and all of Asia expands and modernizes: fresh water. Petroleum and mineral resources get most of the attention because they have been completely commodified, whereas our ready access to water allows us to forget that it is a commodity as well. As populations continue to grow and the uptick in manufacturing creates a greater need for electrical power, more dams are being built in Asia and are often touted as a cleaner, greener, safer alternatives to coal-fired power plants, which is true-ish. Of course, all power generation incurs an environmental cost of some sort, so one has to wonder: What will happen to all of the fish in these newly dammed rivers? Not just any fish, but fish the likes of which you’ve never seen. We’re talking about mega fish like Mekong giant catfish (aka dog-eating catfish), the giant Eurasian trout which can weigh over 200 lbs. and measure six feet in length, stingrays that can weigh

from 550 to 990 lbs., with a length, including tail, of up to 16 ft. Obviously in waterways as vast as the Yangtze and Mekong, there are probably untold types of creatures that we’ll never know. So, yeah, that’s Asia. We have plenty of water around here. Our easy access to it makes us forget how amazing it is that we can get a drink in almost any building in America. We should talk about water. Often. The folks at the UM Wilderness Institute think so, too, as they continue to host their weekly Wild Waters in the West Lecture Series. This week Don Vermillion of the Montana FWP talks about those mega fish in Asia and the importance of saving the fish and their habitat. The UM Wilderness Institute hosts the Wild Waters in the West Lecture Series event “Mega Fish in Central Asia” with Sweetwater Travel Co. owner and FWP Commissioner Don Vermillion on Tue., Feb. 28, at 7 PM in UM’s Gallagher Business Building Rm. 122. Free.

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 23

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 28

Learn how the pros live the sustainable lifestyle during Cheri Chastain’s (of Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.) lecture at the Sustainable Business Council’s 10th Anniversary Sustainability Lecture. Gallagher Business Building, Rm. 106. 6–7 PM. Free.

Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsoleck during Compassionate Communication Non-Violent Communication Weekly Practice Group at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. 519 S. Higgins. Noon–1 PM. Free.

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 24

Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 115 S. 3rd St. W. 1-3 PM. For information call 543-3955.

Practice being peaceful in a world of differences during the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center’s Intercultural Dialogue Group, a monthly meeting that aims to bring together people from various backgrounds for an afternoon of conversation and peacemaking. Every last Fri. of the month at 4:30 PM in the library of the Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call Betsy at 543-3955 or email peace@jrpc.org for more info. Business owners, learn how to promote, reinvest in and reinvent your town and contribute to your community at the Hamilton Downtown Association’s Membership Drive. Enjoy some beers, friends and prizes, y’all. Bitter Root Brewery. 5–7 PM. Soroptomist International of Kalispell hosts a screening of the documentary film Sex and Money, which uncovers the gruesome world of child sexual exploitation. FVCC Arts and Technology Building, Rm. 139. 6:30 PM. Free. The Northern Rockies Rising Tide fights for the northern Rockies, including tackling the megaload issue and so much more. Jeannette Rankin Peace Center back room. 510 S. Higgins Ave. 7–8:30 PM.

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 25 If you have compulsive-eating problems, seek help and support with others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Sat. at 9 AM in Room 3 in the basement of First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free. Visit oa.org. Get help with them taxes so we can pay for wars, roads and drones at UM’s Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program. Bring your ID, Social Security cards, W-2 and any other tax docs you may have. Both spouses must be present if you’re filing jointly. Gallagher Business Building Rm. 209. 9 AM–4 PM. Free.

Be a good egg and donate blood because we still can’t get blood from outer space. American Red Cross. 2401 N. Reserve, Ste. 6. 3–6 PM. Call 800-REDCROSS to schedule an appt. You don’t know nothin’ about Africa, so learn from Prof. Solomon Gofie of the University of Addis Ababa during his talk Transnational Influences in the Horn of Africa: Change and Continuity. UC, Rm. 332. 6–7 PM. Free. YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts YWCA Support Groups for women every Tue. from 6:30–8 PM. An American Indian-led talking circle is also available, along with age-appropriate children’s groups. Free. Call 543-6691. The UM Wilderness Institute brings scholars, writers, scientists and explorers together to share stories of how water shapes our lives, landscapes and politics in the Wild Waters in the West Lecture Series. This week, Don Vermillion, owner of Sweetwater Travel Co. and FWP commissioner, gives a lecture titled Mega Fish Conservation in Central Asia. Gallagher Business Building Rm. 122. 7 PM. Free.

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 29 Families First hosts For Girls Only: A Heart to Heart Talk on Growing Up, with Julie Metzger, RN, MN. This two-part workshop is for parents or trusted adults and girls 10-12 years old. 6:30–8:30 PM. $30 per duo, $10 for each additional child. greatconversations.com.

THURSDAY MARCH 1 Peace and Justice Film Series hosts Incident at Oglala: The Leonard Peltier Story, which follows a shootout that occurred on the Pine Ridge Reservation in 1975 between AIM members and the FBI. Gallagher Business Building Rm. 122. 7 PM. Free.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent Page 12 February 23 – March 1, 2012


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I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - When police pulled over Walter Upshaw, 32, for failing to come to a complete stop before entering a roadway in Orlando, Fla., Upshaw apologized to Officer Shawn Overfield and explained, “My gun is digging in my hip.” Overfield found the loaded .380-caliber pistol, which Upshaw, as a convicted felon on probation, is prohibited from carrying. (Orlando Sentinel) A gunman, identified as Mostafa Kamel Hendi, 25, demanded cash at the We Buy Gold store in Hendersonville, N.C., but when he stepped behind the counter to get the money, clerk Derek Mothershead knocked him unconscious with a left hook and grabbed the weapon, which turned out to be a pellet gun. Mothershead called the police and, when Hendi came to, handed him a roll of paper towels, sprayed the floor with cleaner and made him clean up his own blood. (Greenville, S.C.’s WYFF-TV) BRITS GOT RHYTHM? - Facing a shortage of male applicants to perform at the opening and closing ceremonies at the 2012 London Olympics, the organizing committee announced it’s urgently seeking “more men—particularly if you have rhythm. This means those of you who can dance but also drum, or do any sport, job or hobby that involves keeping to time.” (Britain’s The Telegraph) SLIGHTEST PROVOCATION - Police in Palm Bay, Fla., said Earl Persell, 56, attacked his live-in girlfriend during a heated argument over musical performers Ike and Tina Turner. (Melbourne’s Florida Today) Authorities charged Marvin Potter, 60, with murdering a couple in Mountain City, Tenn., because they deleted his adult daughter as a friend on Facebook. (Associated Press) TOUJOURS EGALITÉ - The Montreal school board will require all students to speak only French, not just in classrooms, but also in hallways, in cafeterias and on playgrounds. The rule, which takes effect in September, is aimed at the influx of immigrants, whose children are required to attend French-language schools. Fifty-three percent of the city’s 110,000 students have a mother tongue other than French. “There will be no language police,” Diane De Courcy, who chairs the city’s school board, declared, explaining that monitors who overhear children speaking another language will gently tap them on the shoulder—not on the head—to tell them, ‘Remember, we speak French. It’s good for you.’” (Ottawa Citizen) BUDGET-CUT FOLLIES - After the Scottish Borders Council announced that budget cuts would require closing four registry offices where marriage notices, known as banns, are posted, councilor Kenneth Gunn warned of an outbreak of incest. “In these days of broken marriages and extended families,” children may grow up “ignorant of their own relations” and marry, Gunn said. “It isn’t going to be too long before we have a union which could produce offspring if we do not play by the well-founded rules.” (Glasgow’s The Daily Record) REASONABLE EXPLANATION - Police who arrested Evelyn Marie Fuller, 49, for robbing a bank in Waynesburg, Pa., reported she confessed to the crime and “stated she wanted to use the money to pay for dentures she was unable to get through welfare until next year.” (Associated Press) HOODWINKERY - Accused of stabbing a bartender in LaCrosse, Wis., Anquin St. Junious, 32, later suffered a beating that hospitalized him. While St. Junious sat motionless in a wheelchair, his attorney asked Circuit Judge Scott Horne to release his client from jail because he can’t move his arms, can’t walk for more than 15 seconds and has a hole in his throat that is susceptible to infection if he remains in custody. Contradicting the claim was surveillance video showing St. Junious doing pushups in his jail cell. The judge refused to release St. Junious and promptly doubled his bond. (LaCrosse Tribune) Police investigating a cross burning in the driveway of a mixed-race couple in Panama City, Fla., assumed it was a hate crime. Two days later, the wife, Donna Williams, who is white, said she found handwritten notes taped to the front and side doors, warning her “that I better not leave that nigger.” It was signed “KKK.” Wondering, “When did the KKK start supporting black and white interracial marriages,” she noticed the handwriting was similar to her husband’s. When police questioned LB Williams, 50, he admitted setting the fire and writing the note, hoping to frighten her so she wouldn’t divorce him. (Panama City’s News-Herald)

Montana Grizzlies Basketball this Week: Griz Basketball:

Thursday Feb. 23rd @ 7 pm Montana v. Northern Arizona Coca Cola Dodgeball Tournament Semifinals and Coca Cola Dodgeball Tournament Finals.

After prison psychologist Laurie Ann Martinez, 36, reported that a stranger beat, robbed and raped her at home in Sacramento, Calif., police investigators spent hundreds of hours on the case before concluding that Martinez faked the crime. Authorities said she split her own lip with a pin, scraped her knuckles with sandpaper, had a friend punch her in the face and even wet her pants to make it appear that she’d been knocked unconscious. Martinez, her friend and two co-workers eventually admitted the whole episode was a setup aimed at convincing Martinez’s husband that the couple needed to move to a safer neighborhood. Instead, they filed for divorce six weeks after the incident. “If all you wanted to do is move,” police Sgt. Andrew Pettit said, “there’s other ways than staging a burglary and rape.” (Associated Press)

Saturday, Feb. 25th @ 7 pm Montana v. Montana State

LAWMAKERS OF THE WEEK - Oklahoma State Sen. Ralph Shortey introduced a bill that would prohibit the manufacture or sale of any food in which aborted fetuses were used to develop any of the ingredients. Shortey admitted that he knows of no company that uses human fetuses in food research but said he drafted his measure based on “suggestions” he read on the Internet. (Associated Press)

Dodgeball Tournament Finals

Protesting a bill that would require women to undergo an ultrasound before having an abortion, Virginia State Sen. Janet Howell attached an amendment requiring men to have a rectal exam before obtaining a prescription for erectile dysfunction medication. The Republican-controlled senate passed the mandatory ultrasound measure but rejected Howell’s amendment by a vote of 21 to 19. (The Huffington Post)

Join the Grizzlies for the 3rd Annual Fan Tailgate, from 4-6:30 in the East and West Auxiliary Gyms! Hot dogs and refreshments are $1 a piece with free soda and water. A men’s Griz-Cat game ticket is required for entry.

Tuesday, Feb. 28th @ 7 pm Montana v. Weber State Lady Griz Basketball:

Saturday, Feb. 25th @ 2 pm Montana v. Montana State Halftime Performance by Bitteroot Gymnastics Student-Athlete Big Sky Conference Food Drive – Please bring a non-perishable food item.

SUPPORT THE TROOPS - When the family history website Ancestry.com filed a Freedom of Information Act request for information about deceased veterans, the Department of Veterans Affairs responded. After Ancestry.com posted the information, the VA learned it had included data about 2,200 not-yet-dead vets. “Fortunately,” Jerry L. Davis, the VA’s chief information security officer, said, “no personal health information was included in this data release.” Social Security numbers were provided, however. As a result, the VA offered every affected veteran free credit monitoring for one year at no charge. (Department of Veterans Affairs)

Missoula Independent Page 13 February 23 – March 1, 2012


by Hillary Rosner • photos by Colin Ruggiero

ehind the wheel of his boxy red Ford F-250 truck, complete with crimsoncarpeted dashboard, L. Scott Mills sipped his watery coffee and headed east from Missoula. It was 18 degrees outside on a dim morning last November. As the sun rose and the sky turned white, Mills followed Route 200 along the lazy Blackfoot River, northeast toward Seeley Lake. Bright yellow larches blazed among the pines. A dusting of snow from a few days earlier still clung to the hillsides. Just past Seeley Lake, Mills, a University of Montana conservation biologist, turned into the forest on an old logging road and parked behind his field assistants’ blue pickup. Tucker Seitz and Sean Sultaire, two recent UM grads, were readying antennas and receivers, beginning their daily task of tracking some of the 30-odd radio-collared hares hopping around the Seeley-Swan Valley this winter. We zipped our jackets, donned blaze-orange vests—hunting season had just begun—and tromped into the woods. We ducked around lodgepole pines and Douglas firs, traipsing across bear grass and

B

fallen spruce logs on terrain speckled with a light cover of snow. Seitz and Sultaire held their antennas in front of them, turning the metal rods to catch a signal. They listened to the steady beeps on receivers they’d hung from their necks. After about 15 minutes, they closed in on a hare, narrowing its location to an area of about 50 square feet. Then they spotted it. Under a downed lodgepole, its upper branches and needles intact and forming a curtain of green and brown, the snowshoe hare sat nearly motionless, its lanky ears towering upright above its head. It crouched in a small hollow—a “form,” in hare-tracker parlance–that it had made in the dirt. It took me a few moments to locate the hare, even with Mills’ help. All that gave it away, finally, was the black of its eye framed by light fur.

Missoula Independent Page 14 February 23 – March 1, 2012


Mills is trying to understand a biological phenomenon crucial to animal survival: seasonal camouflage. What drives the periodic coat color changes of animals such as snowshoe hares, and is it something the animals can adjust? These questions, mused upon for centuries yet never fully studied, have lately taken on extra significance. Like dozens of species that live in temperate climates around the globe, snowshoe hares grow new coats twice a year to blend in with the landscape. As climate change alters these landscapes—and places that once were snowy white become increasingly brown—the animals’ future will likely depend in part on whether their camouflage can adapt in response. Evolution is not just about one species ever-soslowly transforming into another. It’s also about much smaller, much faster changes that can determine whether a species will endure or perish as its world shifts. Aided in part by fast, relatively inexpensive DNA analysis, scientists are tracking these changes and using them to help predict the future of species. They’re probing fish that live in polluted waters for clues to how they tolerate toxins, and sequencing the genes of invasive plants to learn— based on the plants’ family trees—which pose the biggest threats to native species. To make effective conservation decisions in the age of climate change—what to save, how to save it—biologists need to understand how species adapt and change, and how past and future evolution affects their odds of survival. Every week, Mills’ team locates each collared hare and records the color of its coat—what percentage white or brown—and the amount of snow-covered ground in its immediate surroundings. Hoping for a good look at this particular male hare, Seitz squatted about four feet away from its hiding place and snapped a photo, then moved in closer and clicked again. As Seitz edged forward, the hare hopped from its hideout and covered a few dozen yards of forest before pausing. Out in the open, we could see its fur clearly. Its body was mostly brown, though flecked with white, and its face was predominantly white from its nose up to its eyes. As winter looms, all the hares in this Montana forest begin to turn white within a week of one another, regardless of snow conditions or temperature, triggered by the disappearing sun. But once it starts, each hare’s transformation—which can take up to two months to complete—is unique. Some hares turn white on their faces first, with their new fur spreading from nose to rump; others metamorphose in reverse. Some hares turn mostly white early on, keeping just a bit of brown for several weeks; others try on a tiny sample of white coat, as if waiting a while before committing to the whole outfit. Beyond the initial sunlight trigger, though, what controls this seasonal cycle remains a puzzle. Can this particular hare adjust its internal rhythms? Will its descendants acquire a gene that helps match their fur to their habitat? Because hiding, even in plain sight, is the snowshoe hare’s ticket to survival, you might never see one while you’re out walking in the woods. The species is currently doing fine in Montana, and elsewhere across North America. That’s good news for these ecosystems’ meat eaters—coyotes, wolves, bobcats, martens, hawks—all of which have a taste for hare. Thanks to the carnivores, a hare’s average

life span in the wild is just a year. Nearly all of them meet the same end; it’s only a matter of time. While this state of affairs is unfortunate from the hare’s perspective, it helps keep the rest of the ecosystem humming along just fine—especially because hares breed like, well, rabbits. But like so much in nature, it’s a fragile balance. If hares become too easy to catch, their populations are likely to crash—and perhaps take down the predators that depend on them.

cery items for lynx,” Mills said, sitting in his creaky Missoula office in the university’s 1920s-era Forestry building. “But that’s how I got drawn in.” The project involved a relatively simple management question: Would certain types of logging disrupt the hare population, and ultimately threaten lynx survival? To answer it, Mills spent several years engaged in the slightly gruesome business of fitting hares with radio collars and essentially waiting for them to die. He’d record where and when they died, and, if possible, what ate them.

Researcher L. Scott Mills with a bagged snowshoe hare.

A slightly gruesome business Mills, 50, who is trim with sandy blond hair and whose own beard is turning white from the middle outward, began studying snowshoe hares in 1997. Just four years out of a Ph.D. program at UC-Santa Cruz—where he studied the effects of forest fragmentation on voles, working with the prominent conservation biologist Michael Soulé—and two years into an assistant professorship at UM, he began studying hares because they’re a major food source for the Canada lynx, which was slated for listing under the Endangered Species Act. “Of course, I believe hares are more important than just as gro-

Out in the woods tracking hares, he began to notice certain patterns. During full moons when there was snow on the ground, the hares tended to move around much less than at other times—and they were also less likely to live to see the dawn. “When they’re glowing under a full moon on snow,” said Mills, “they respond behaviorally. And there is a cost to making the wrong decision: They die.” He found a similar pattern in open patches of forest, including clear-cuts: Hares of either color moved more freely, and survived longer, in closed-canopy parts of the forest than in the open. In other words, the hares’ visibility has a big impact on their survival.

Mills also noticed a third pattern, one that seemed counterintuitive at the time: Far more hares died in the fall and spring than in winter or summer. “That was surprising to me when I first saw it,” he recalled, “because you’d think, in winter it’s 20 below zero, the predators are hungry, the snow is deep—shouldn’t hares die more in the wintertime?” But this was 10 years ago, before anyone was thinking about mismatches between animals’ camouflage and their habitats. Because the same amount of snow doesn’t fall on the same date from year to year, and because it can take so long for hares to acquire their seasonal coats, inevitably there are times when the animals lack camouflage—they’re brown in a white world or white in a brown one. This was always true, even before humans intervened. Recently, though, anecdotal reports of mismatched hares have been on the rise. Over the past decade, as word of his research has spread, Mills has received a growing number of autumn phone calls from hunters. (“They’ll say, ‘Hey, Scott, I was out deer hunting last week and I saw one of your white bunnies out hopping around.’”) Many of the veteran hunters tell him the same thing: “The old-timers will say, ‘We used to always have snow by the first of November, I’d always be hunting deer on snow, and now it’s really rare to have an opening day,’ the third week of October, ‘where there’s snow on the ground.’” If hares start turning white at the same time each year but the snow keeps arriving later, and if the hares are more likely to be eaten when they don’t match their surroundings, then their future prospects could be bleak. Snowshoe hares, with their long legs, slender ears, and outsized feet, could become one more victim of climate change. In this scenario, as winter shrinks, the poor snowshoe hare will fall increasingly out of sync with the new seasonal cycles; eventually, like the polar bear, it’ll become another cover model for collapsing ecosystems. There’s just one problem with this simple version of things: We have no scientific evidence that it’s true. Given that species that change their coat color— weasels, ptarmigans, Arctic foxes, hamsters—live across much of the world, our understanding of them remains exceptionally sketchy. We don’t really know whether hares that are mismatched to their environment are more likely to die; it’s entirely possible that more hares die in spring and fall for some other reason, like changes in forest cover or shifting diets. We don’t even know whether there really are more mismatched hares now than there used to be. It’s even unclear whether the hares know if they’re camouflaged. Coming upon one that’s white when the ground is bare, or brown when the forest is snow-covered, is “like the most embarrassing thing that can happen in the field,” said Mills. “It’s like walking in on someone taking a shower. Because you look over and there, six feet away from you, is this totally white hare that’s just sitting there. And it feels like that hare is thinking, ‘Oh, yeah, he can’t see me.’ But then other times”—when the hares bolt—“it seems like they really can look down and say, ‘Yikes, I’m mismatched!’ So we’re trying to quantify it.” One thing is certain, though: On average, there are fewer days of snowpack than there used to be. In fact, it was at a 2007 lecture on global warming’s

Missoula Independent Page 15 February 23 – March 1, 2012


regional impacts that Mills had an epiphany about behavior or the process of evolution. A growing said Mills, “but a person could start talking about the future of his research. Steve Running, a Missoula number of scientists are now studying this, drawing ‘directed evolution.’ Should we be taking hares from colleague who shared the Nobel Peace Prize for his on evolutionary theory and genetics to answer ques- Colorado that turned white two weeks later and moving them up to Montana because they will be work with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate tions about ecology and conservation. The notion that some species may adapt perfect- able to change their phenotype”—their physical Change, put up a slide showing that the biggest sign of climate change across the world’s temperate ly well to their new living conditions—changing appearance—“in a way that tracks climate change? regions wasn’t a change in temperature, but a what they eat, or where they nest, or when they turn That very quickly becomes a discussion of, should decline in the number of days with snow-covered white—expands the range of policy options. If local we be playing God to try to direct evolution? It’s an extreme—and possible—policy ground. “When I saw that slide,” discussion.” said Mills, “it all came together for me Scientists have begun using to realize, wow, OK, so these hares the term “evolutionary rescue” to are changing no matter what, and describe situations in which they’re confronting this reduction species can save themselves from of snow on the ground. That’s when it oblivion by adapting to altered all crystallized.” environments. In a study pubMills’ excitement about a new line lished in the journal Science last of inquiry was quickly tempered by regret: Suddenly, his previous research summer, Andrew Gonzalez and represented a dozen years of missed Graham Bell, biologists at opportunities. He hadn’t collected a sinMontreal’s McGill University, set gle piece of information on coat color. out to learn whether baker’s yeast More than four years after Running’s could evolve to live in saltier contalk, he’s still kicking himself. “I had ditions. They found that over a relall these radio-collared hares in the atively short period of time, the late ’90s, but it just didn’t occur to me yeast evolved ways to deal with a to record their coat color when they major change to its environment. Photo courtesy L. Scott Mills, University of Montana were killed. (The yeast’s success in a saltier A hare off: white rabbit in a changing landscape. “And to put salt in the wounds,” he world depended on whether its continued, laughing, “one of the first population was connected to other times I submitted a grant on this project and I said adaptation is possible through evolution, scientists populations, enabling genes to migrate, and how that we’ve had 175 hares that were collared to look need to think about ways to facilitate it, such as quickly salinity increased. Populations that experiat sources of mortality, one of the reviewers wrote, ensuring large-enough gene pools for natural selec- enced a slow rise in salinity, and had time to build ‘It’s too bad Mills didn’t actually record whether or tion to act upon. up useful genetic mutations, were far better able to But this concept also points to more extreme survive a sudden salt increase later.) not the hares that got killed were mismatched.’ policy options. “I’m not going to be that person,” Yeah, I know it’s too bad!” You can’t exactly extrapolate from single-celled

Talking about ‘directed evolution’ A few years ago, Mills attended a meeting of a Western Governors’ Association advisory group. There, he began to believe that the contemporary approach to conservation was too narrow. The governors wanted to know how to deal with climate change’s coming impacts on their states’ ecosystems. The group—mostly policy people, along with a handful of scientists—immediately converged on a standard tenet: Do whatever you can to facilitate species’ movement northward and up in elevation. “It was astonishing to me,” Mills said, “how quickly the conversation went that way.” So he raised his hand and made a suggestion: “Let’s talk some about adaptation.” Helping ensure that species can move if they need to—by opening or protecting migration corridors, say—is a basic, vital principle of conservation thinking in the age of global warming (and a big cause for Soulé, Mills’ former advisor). Many species—the pika, the rufous hummingbird, the sachem skipper butterfly—have already reacted to climate change by shifting their ranges, and they are only the first responders. It’s not that Mills thinks the approach is wrong. As a respected conservation biologist who recently spent a year in Bhutan on a Guggenheim fellowship, helping train local scientists to monitor and protect their country’s crucial populations of tigers and other endangered mammals, Mills understands as well as anyone the growing importance of migration routes. But he believes certain species may have other options. Some animals and plants may not need to move at all: Changes to their habitat, while significant, could turn out to lie within the range of conditions they can already tolerate. “That’s the part we know very little about,” Mills said. “We just don’t know very much at all about how much animals will be able to locally adapt,” either through individual

Mills weighs a hare.

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fungi to mammals—as Gonzalez put it, “There’s no way we can use yeast to predict how the polar bear will fare”—but it’s a step toward understanding how evolution and ecology interact. “If a species experiences lots of variability in temperature throughout the year, you’d predict it has a high tolerance to changes in temperature,” said Chris Funk, a biologist at Colorado State University who is researching that hypothesis in insects. Bugs that live in the world’s temperate mountains, such as the Rockies, could fare better than their counterparts in tropical mountains—in Ecuador, for example—because they’ve already evolved to tolerate greater fluctuations. “The question right now,” said Funk’s colleague Amy Angert, a CSU biologist who studies plants, “is, do people need to be aiding dispersal,” that is, moving plants and animals? “Or will species be able to change quickly enough, through evolutionary adaptation, in a way that will help offset that need? They don’t need to rely solely on movement if they can run in place.”‘

Keeping up with weather In his race to understand the hidden biology of the snowshoe hare, Mills is leaving no lodgepole log unturned. His collaborators include Paulo Alves, a Portuguese scientist who helped sequence the rabbit genome; Steve Running, the climate scientist, who is creating highly localized models that can predict the amount of snow for any day of the year at any specific spot in Mills’ study area; and Jeff Good, a geneticist who recently joined the faculty at Missoula. In the basement of a building not far from Mills’ office, dozens of Siberian hamsters scurry about in plastic cages. The cute little dwarf hamsters, roughly the size of gerbils, are native to southern Russia and Kazakhstan. Like snowshoe hares, they change from dark to light and back again with the seasons. Good is breeding them, exposing them to various amounts of light, and studying things like their metabolic rate and how much heat they can retain—all in an effort to decipher the genes and genetic pathways involved in seasonal coat-color change. Crucial to unlocking the mystery of the morphing fur is one fairly basic question: Are hares genetically programmed to change at a certain pace? One potential clue may lie in the Pacific Northwest. There, some groups of snowshoe hares stay brown all year. “Just about every coat-colorchanging species you can name has some part of their range where they don’t change,” said Mills. This indicates genetic variation—a version of a gene or group of genes that makes coats change color, and another version that keeps them the same yearround. It may be possible, then, for populations of hares to evolve different coat-color reactions. “If they have potential to evolve,” said Mills, “you’ve gotta think about facilitating the process of evolution.” That means ensuring that there are lots of hares in each population, that they can mingle with hares from other populations and that they aren’t stressed by such things as diseases or clear-cuts. The presence of genetic variation also gives researchers convenient tools to study the mechanisms of color change. With his Siberian hamsters, Good is hoping to find a gene that might control the transformation’s onset. They could then look for a version of that gene in hares. If hares in Montana and Washington had different forms of the gene, it could prove that the color shift is genetic. Even in places where most hares change color, some individuals remain brown all year round. So Mills and his colleagues are also asking, are there differences in gene expression, or hormone produc-


tion, among the hares? It’s a lot of steps, a lot expect to see over the next 80 years,” Mills example, and if the ground was still brown said. “And the result is that hares, at least to a around him, it might seek out a nice southof research, and a lot of “ifs.” Still, as daunting and wide-ranging as large extent, were able to adjust the (pace of facing slope.) “Maybe,” said Mills, “there’s not the mismatch you’d expect intuitively.” Mills’ project is, some preliminary answers their) coat change to match the snow.” On the bleak November morning in the Based on other seasonal phenomena are already emerging. Unpublished results suggest that the hare population is shifting that are better understood, such as fattening Seeley-Swan Valley, we scrambled down a its cycles from one year to the next to stay in up and growing thicker fur, Mills thinks tem- dangerously steep slope on the trail of a sync with the weather—an environmental perature might control the rate of change. female hare. We found it in a cozy hollow response, rather than an evolutionary one. He’s scattering temperature monitors—little under a juniper bush surrounded by a sprinkling of snow. Its fur, visible when Mills and Marketa Zimova, a master’s stuyou came up close, was predomident from the Czech Republic who is white, though here and there studying the specifics of the hares’ coat Coming upon a hare that’s nantly on its small body—on its face, its changes—as she put it, “How do they its enormous front feet—remchange, when, how long does it take, and white when the ground is neck, nants of its brown summer garb perwhat is the cost of mismatch”—have sisted. Still, it was far more white graphed two years’ worth of information bare, or brown when the than the first hare we saw. on the animals’ seasonal color alongside Studying hares in the wild is a data on snow accumulation. forest is snow-covered, is bittersweet endeavor. Biologists On the graph, a gray line indicates who study larger, long-living mamthe snow and a black line shows the average whiteness of the Seeley Lake hares. “like the most embarrassing mals, such as bears, might track the same individual animal for years. The lines track each other. Last year was With hares, though, you’re never a big snow year; autumn was fairly northing that can happen in sure if each encounter will be the mal, but the spring snow stuck around last. “You really kind of get attached much longer than usual. “The amazing the field,” said Mills. “It’s to them,” Mills said. (After he finthing,” said Mills, tracing the lines on the his Ph.D., Mills couldn’t bear chart with his finger, “is that the hares like walking in on someone ished to part with some voles from his disshifted remarkably.” They began to sertation research; he brought them change back to brown at the same time taking a shower.” along when he moved from Santa they normally do, but they stayed mostly Cruz to Moscow, Idaho, where white for about two weeks longer than he briefly worked before coming they did in 2009, when there was far less snow in the spring. At Mills’ second field site, metal buttons—around his field sites and to Missoula.) Seitz snapped some photos and flushed near Gardiner, the snow persisted even attaching them to the hares’ radio collars to longer. And the hares stayed white even determine whether the animals have some the hare from its juniper hideout so the team sort of thermal regulator that helps them could see it in full view. Sultaire recorded longer, too. Last winter, the region had the greatest change quickly or slowly. The buttons meas- the coat color and snow cover data, while number of days with snow on the ground in ure the outside temperature, and will ideally Mills got down on all fours to inspect the holthe past 40 years. Meanwhile, the previous show whether hares choose to hang out in low. An excellent home for a hare, he winter ranks among the lowest for that peri- warmer or cooler places to speed or slow concluded. Only a very wily—or very hunod. “So in those two years, we got a window their change. (If a warmer temperature could gry—coyote would venture onto a hillside on the kind of drastic change we might help a hare stay brown longer in the fall, for this steep.

Mills lugs an armful of traps.

And then it was time to head back to the truck. “See you next week,” Seitz called to the hare, as we climbed back up the hill. “Hopefully.” A different version of this story appeared first in High Country News. editor@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent Page 17 February 23 – March 1, 2012


dish Planting the seed of seed ordering the

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FLASHINTHEPAN Ordering seeds in the dead of winter might seem like jumping the gun, but the days are getting longer, and it’s almost time to start the garden. If you aren’t picky about the varieties you want to grow, you could skip this step and buy your seeds at the grocery or garden store, and get seedlings at the farmers’ market. For many people, though, gardening is as much about process as product, and ordering seeds is an integral part of the experience. The adventure writer Tim Cahill once wrote, “I am a man who sits around at home reading wilderness survival books the way some people peruse seed catalogs or accounts of classic chess games.” Cahill followed that observation with a story about a lost hiker who survived a cold night by using the pages of his wilderness survival guide to start a fire. The pages of a good seed catalog can start a fire of a different sort: a fire in your belly for a kick-ass garden. Most seed catalogs have online counterparts, but many people enjoy the act of leafing through the dogeared, tea-stained pages of a hard copy. Most outfits will send you one if you call. And if you’ve ordered seeds in the past, the companies you bought from have probably sent you their new volumes by now. There are so many good seed catalogs out there, and the numbers are growing, so it’s nearly impossible to name all the worthy ones. But here’s a list of some favorites. Johnny’s Selected Seeds of Albion, Maine, is the 800-pound gorilla of the garden and small-farm seed business. The part of me that roots for the underdog feels wrong about plugging Johnny’s at the expense of lesser-known outfits. On the other hand, not mentioning Johnny’s would be like omitting The Rolling Stones from a discussion of rock and roll. Many of the farmers I know use Johnny’s as their main supplier, only going elsewhere for the odd variety they can’t get from Johnny’s. Others use Johnny’s as a last resort, because it’s more expensive, getting what they can from smaller outfits. Beyond growing and selling seeds, Johnny’s maintains research farms where new crop varieties are developed. Sunshine squash, Bright Lights chard, and Carmen peppers are among its most popular inhouse breeds. That same innovative spirit has been applied to hand tools, including a game-changing collinear hoe designed by gardening luminary (and

Johnny’s board member) Eliot Coleman. Johnny’s also sells record-keeping software for small farms. All of this, combined with accessible customer support and lightning-fast order processing and delivery has earned Johnny’s a place in the hearts of those whose livelihoods depend on farming, and gardeners who like being treated like farmers. This year will mark the completion of a change in ownership, years in the making, from company founder Rob Johnston to his employees. Let’s hope the legendarily tight ship doesn’t spring any leaks in the transition. While the values behind Johnny’s align with what most people consider “organic,” the company

Photo by Ari LeVaux

sells both conventional and organic seeds. In a letter to a customer published on the Johnny’s website, Johnston praises Vermont’s High Mowing Seeds as a great option for all-organic seeds. Like Johnny’s, High Mowing also has a breeding program, focused exclusively on developing traits of value to organic growers. Another New England outfit is the co-op Fedco Seeds, of Waterville, Maine. It’s on my list for its whimsically illustrated catalog, spunky activist spirit, and great selection of heirlooms. New Mexico’s Gourmet Seeds has a special place in my heart for its impressive selection of imported Italian seeds—in particular those for bitter greens like escarole, endive, and radicchio. As my packets of smuggled Italian seeds are running low, I’ll soon be running to Gourmet Seeds for reinforcements. Like many other seed companies, Gourmet Seeds is following Johnny’s lead in becoming a one-stop shopping destination for seeds and supplies, including Italian hand tools.

by ARI LeVAUX

Totally Tomatoes of Wisconsin isn’t, in fact, totally about tomatoes. The company sells a fair selection of other plant seeds, especially peppers. But its collection of tomato seeds, both heirloom and hybrid, is second to none. Speaking of specialists, Willits, California-based DripWorks is your go-to source for water-wise irrigation. Gardens can be gluttonous consumers of water, but cutting back on irrigation can be hazardous unless it’s done right. A well-designed irrigation system can drastically reduce water waste while delivering the right amount where it’s needed. DripWorks’ 72-page catalog has all the gear you need, along with technical support that includes an array of instructional videos posted to YouTube. Bountiful Gardens, also of Willits, has carved out a specialty niche by offering a big selection of grain crops like barley, amaranth, millet, and oats, and oil crops like oilseed sunflower and oilseed radish. It even stocks a home oil press for the serious homesteader. America’s oldest seed company, D. Landreth, has a legendary catalog filled with detailed histories and descriptions of heirloom and vintage seeds, and historic information from an archive of Landreth catalogues dating back to 1839. Unlike most catalogs, this one comes with a $5 price tag due to its unusually high production costs. In a perfect world I would also have space to discuss Southern Exposure, Park Seed, Seed Savers Exchange, Jung’s, Peaceful Valley, Territorial Seed Company, One Green World, Seedlisting, and many others. As you peruse, don’t let the fire in your belly exceed your time or skill level (not to mention the size of your plot). One easy way to keep it simple is to limit your purchases to seeds that can be directseeded, i.e. planted directly in the dirt, like spinach or carrots, and stay away from plants that are best started in trays, like tomatoes. Raising seedlings isn’t rocket science, but unless you have a greenhouse and the required supplies, they probably won’t be as robust as what you can buy from the farmers’ market in spring. After many lessons learned the hard way, I’ve reluctantly put seedlings in the same category as hanging sheet rock and changing the oil in my car. Yeah, I can do it myself, barely. But the results are better if I leave it in the hands of the experts.

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Missoula Independent Page 18 February 23 – March 1, 2012

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Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Monday – Friday, 7:30 – 2. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins • 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to late. $-$$ Burger Shack 1900 Brooks • 549-2194 (Holiday Village) LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED! Come take a bite out of our ½ lb big & beefy burgers! We're the the only burger joint in Missoula serving 100% Certified Angus beef, hand-


dish

the pattied, charbroiled and made to order. We have over 18 mouthwatering specialty burgers to choose from and there’s always a Burger Deal of the Day. Check out our selection of Far Out Phillies made with Certified Angus top sirloin-tossed with our own housemade sauces. Even the burps taste good! Open Monday thru Saturday 11am to 8pm. Call ahead or order to-go 549-2194. Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 39 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks • 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am-2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm SunWed and 11am-10pm Thurs-Sat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$$ Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 Cold Stone Creamery offers the Ultimate Ice Cream Experience. Ice Cream, Ice Cream Cakes, Shakes, and Smoothies the Way You Want It. Come in for our weekday specials. Get Gift Cards any time. Remember, it's a great day for ice cream at Cold Stone Creamery. $-$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. We deliver and we cater! Double Front Chicken 122 W. Alder • 543-6264 Number of years ago Double Front was built, 101. Number of years it’s been cooking chicken, 75. Number if years in the Herndon family, 49. Always getting that perfect chicken dinner, timeless.

Come find out why we are rule of the roost. Always the best, Double Front Chicken. $-$$ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. • 721-6033 Missoula's Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. M-TH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am-4pm, Sat 8am4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula's best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. 532-2056 Brooks and Browns Trivia Night is back. $7 Bayern Pitchers plus appetizer specials. Every Thursday from 7-10pm. $50 Bar Tab to winning team. Warm up your chilly nights with our Hot Jalapeno Artichoke Dip. We have Classic French Onion Soup and hearty Bison chili made in house daily. Fall in love with our Bacon Cheeseburger Meatloaf-stuffed with crispy Daily’s bacon and cheddar cheese, served with cheddar mashed potatoes and corn. And finish the best meal in town with our New Orleans style Bread Pudding with warm caramel sauce and Big Dipper vanilla bean Ice cream. We still have Happy Hour from 4-7 every day and on game days we offer wings specials and all your favorite local micro-brews. Everyone loves our SUNDAY BINGO NIGHT! Sundays 6-9 pm at Brooks and Browns. Same happy Hour specials ($5 pulled pork sliders, ? order wings, ? nachos; $6 Bud Lite pitchers) Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula.

HAPPIESTHOUR Ole Beck VFW nights Claim to fame: The VFW has long been the place for veterans of war with its collection of historical guns and medals. Now that the bar has opened its doors to live music—especially on Thursday night—there’s a whole new post10 p.m. vibe. What you’re drinking: For the Thursday night crowd it’s all about $1.50 16 oz. cans of Miller High Life and Olympia; on a recent Thursday night show-goers cleaned out 30 cases of Oly. Also high profile: the “Man Can”— a 32 oz. (that’s a quart!) of beer for $3. For the record, plenty of ladies can be seen hoisting the “Man Can.” Who you’re drinking with: The bar’s happy hour from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. is a hit for the day crowd, which consists of Vietnam veterans and a small group of regulars drinking 50-cent-off drafts and well drinks. Between 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. it’s quiet time, but after that you’re drinking with college kids, plus connoisseurs of rock ’n’ roll. Who you’re listening to: The free shows of mostly local musicians have been a big hit. The bar’s residency program allows one band to take over the venue each month, playing every Thursday night. They get to hone their

Photo by Erika Fredrickson

sound with the help of soundman Joey Connell (of Hi-Tech Audio), and select fellow bands to fill out the line-up. Who’s pouring: On a recent Thursday night bartender Odessa Joseph pours for a crowd twodeep. Joseph says she loves her day crowd, but she fits right in with the rock crowd, too, telling stories of seeing White Zombie and The Ramones back in the early 1990s. The bar used to close around 11 p.m. Now the madness goes until 2 a.m. “It’s working out awesomely,” she says, “I love it.” How to find it: 245 W. Main next to Biga Pizza. —Erika Fredrickson Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, e-mail editor@missoulanews.com.

SATURDAYS $1 SUSHI 4pm-9pm Mondays & Thursdays - $1 SUSHI

(all day)

Tuesdays - LADIES' NIGHT 4pm-9pm Not available for To-Go orders

Missoula Independent Page 19 February 23 – March 1, 2012


Comfort Food At Really Comfortable Prices.

Mon-Fri 7am - 4pm (Breakfast ‘til Noon)

Sat & Sun 8am - 4pm (Breakfast all day) 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com All our menu items are made from scratch, featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive tea menu. Missoula's Original Bubble Teas. Beer, Wine and Sake available. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Rotating music and DJs. Lunch 11:30-3:00, Happy Hour 3-6, Dinner 5-10. $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Joker's Wild Restaurant, Lounge and Casino 4829 N. Reserve • 549-4403 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 Days a week. Steak, Seafood, Banquets, Cocktails, Wedding Receptions and so much more. Good Food, Good Fun, Good Times for All! Where the Joker's Wild About you! $-$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West • 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ The Mercantile Deli 119 S. Higgins Ave. • 721-6372 themercantiledeli.com Located next to the historic Wilma Theater, the Merc features a relaxed atmosphere, handcrafted Paninis, Sandwiches, and wholesome Soups and Salads. Try a Monte Cristo for breakfast, a Pork Love Panini for lunch, or have us cater your next company event. Open Monday – Saturday for breakfast and lunch. Downtown delivery available.

Februar y

MISSOULA'S BEST

COFFEE SPECIAL

COFFEE

Butterfly House Blend $10.95/Lb. Missoula’s Best Coffee

BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

The Mustard Seed Asian Café Southgate Mall • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our allnew bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our non-smoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, microbrews, fine wines & signature drinks. Takeout & delivery available. $$-$$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. • 543-3188 Don’t feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$

IN OUR COFFEE BAR

BUTTERFLY 232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $8.50. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $7.75. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$. Pearl Café 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French specialties, bison, elk, and fresh fish daily. Delicious salads and appetizers, as well as breads and desserts baked in-house. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Philly West 134 W. Broadway • 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday - Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. Pita Pit 130 N. Higgins 541-PITA (7482) • pitapitusa.com Fresh Thinking Healthy Eating. Enjoy a pita rolled just for you. Hot meat and cool fresh veggies topped with your favorite sauce. Try

$…Under $5

Missoula Independent Page 20 February 23 – March 1, 2012

our Chicken Caesar, Gyro, Philly Steak, Breakfast Pita, or Vegetarian Falafel to name just a few. For your convenience we are open until 3am 7 nights a week. Call if you need us to deliver! Sapore 424 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-6695 Voted best new restaurant in the Missoula Independent's Best of Missoula, 2011. Located on Higgins Ave., across the street from Wordens. Serving progressive American food consisting of fresh house-made pastas every day, pizza, local beef, and fresh fish delivered from Taste of Alaska. New specials: burger & beer Sundays, 5-7 $9 ~ pizza & beer Tuesdays, 5-7 $10 ~ draft beers, Tuesday -Thursday, 5-6:30 $3. Business hours: Tues.- Sat. 5-10:30 pm., Sat. 10-3 pm., Sun. 5-10 pm. Authentic Thai Restaurant 221 W. Broadway • 543-9966 sawaddeedowntown.com Sa Wa Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors- no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisine. Now serving beer and wine! $-$$ Sean Kelly’s Empire Grill 130 W. Pine St. • 542-1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for lunch & dinner. Featuring brunch Saturday & Sunday from 11-2pm. Serving international & Irish pub fare. Full bar, beer, wine, martinis. $-$$ Silvertip Casino 680 SW Higgins • 728-5643 The Silvertip Casino is Missoula’s premiere casino offering 20 Video gaming machines, best live poker in Missoula, full beverage liquor, 11 flat screen tv’s and great food at great prices. Breakfast Specials starting at $2.99 (7-11am) For a complete menu, go to www.silvertipcasino.com. Open 24/7. $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI Sushi Hana Downtown offering a new idea for your dining experience. Meat, poultry, vegetables and grain are a large part of Japanese cuisine. We also love our fried comfort food too. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. Corner of Pine & Higgins. 549-7979. $$–$$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins • 327-8929 Stop in when you're in the neighborhood. We'll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula's best lunch for under $6. Mon.Sat. 11-10 Sun 12-9. Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you'll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. Tamarack Brewing Company 231 W. Front Street • 830-3113 facebook.com/tamarackmissoula Tamarack Brewing Company opened its first Taphouse in Missoula in 2011. Overlooking Caras Park, Tamarack Missoula has two floors -- a sports pub downstairs, and casual dining upstairs. Patrons can find Tamarack’s handcrafted ales and great pub fare on both levels. Enjoy beer-inspired menu items like brew bread wraps, Hat Trick Hop IPA Fish and Chips, and Dock Days Hefeweizen Caesar Salads. Try one of our staple ales like Hat Trick Hop IPA or Yard Sale Amber Ale, or one of our rotating seasonal beers, like, Old 'Stache Whiskey Barrel Porter, Headwall Double IPA, Stoner Kriek and more. Don’t miss $8 growler fills on Wednesday and Sunday, Community Tap Night every Tuesday, Kids Eat Free Mondays, and more. See you at The ‘Rack! $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Drive • 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming • 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$ YoWaffle Yogurt 216 W. Main St. 543-6072 (Between Thai Spicy and The Shack) www.yowaffle.com YoWaffle is a self-serve frozen yogurt and Belgian waffle eatery offering 10 continuously changing flavors of yogurt, over 60 toppings, gluten free cones and waffles available, hot and cold beverages, and 2 soups daily. Indoor and outdoor seating. Meetings welcome. Open 7 days a week. Sun-Thurs 11 AM to 11 PM, Fri 11 AM to 12 AM, Sat. 10 AM to 12 AM. Free WiFi. Loyalty punch cards, gift cards and t-shirts available. UMONEY. Like us on facebook. Let YoWaffle host your next birthday party! $

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over


8

days a week

Arts & Entertainment listings February 23 – March 1, 2012

THURSDAY February

23

Show them whippersnappers that you’re still the trick-takingest player in town during the Missoula Senior Center’s Pinochle Tournament at 1 PM. 705 S. Higgins.

nightlife Learn how the pros live the sustainable lifestyle during Cheri Chastain’s (of Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.) lecture at the Sustainable Business Council’s 10th Anniversary Sustainability Lecture. Gallagher Business Building, Rm. 106. 6–7 PM. Free. Get buckwild with the fam when Barnaby Wilde performs at the Draught Works Brewery. 915 Toole Ave. 6–8 PM. Free. Bring your miscellany of talents down the ‘Root for the The Roxy’s open mic night. Anything goes: comedy, juggling, music and prescient children rapping about the streets. Hamilton. 120 N. 2nd. 7 PM. $5. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn-Downtown. 7–10 PM. Love hurts. Headwaters Dance Co. presents its big gala concert Meditations on Love featuring five duets on the subject of Love and closing with a global romp through the world of social dance at the MCT Center for Performing Arts. 7:30 PM. $15/$10 students and seniors. $40 includes a post-performance party in the lobby on Friday night’s performance, including food and drink with the company and an intimate performance. (See Scope this issue) Fans of grammar, logic and rhetoric, grab your liberal arts degrees and head down to the Central Bar and Grill’s trivia night,

No Tupperware here. Leftover Salmon performs its big-time flavor of bluegrass at the Wilma Theatre on Thu., Mar. 1 at 8 PM. $21. tickets are available at Rockin Rudy’s.

hosted by local gallant and possible Swede Thomas Helgerson. 143 W. Broadway. 8 PM. Free. Get pleasantly weirded out by PDX’s Yards who perform with Whoopass Girls and Trashfire. Zoo City Apparel. 139 E. Main. 8 PM. $5. Show ‘em that pop culture knowledge is just as important as having a job during Trivial Beersuit at the Lucky Strike Casino. Prizes for podium finishers. 1515 Dearborn. 8–10 PM.

Grab ye olde acoustic and learn “Sundown” before you roll into Sean Kelly’s open mic night. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursdays to sign-up. 8:30 PM–Midnight. It’s not the name of a new fast-attack submarine. Regan Clancy is a band from the state end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Feb. 24, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to The Calemander c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

tTimes Run 2/24- 3/1

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

The Artist Nightly at 7 & 9

Big Sky Documentary Film Festival Screening Friday through Sunday

www.thewilma.com

Beer & Wine AVAILABLE 131 S. Higgins Ave. Downtown Missoula 406-728-2521

Missoula Independent Page 21 February 23 – March 1, 2012


capitol! And they have indie-folk rockin’ friends called Sillyredhat, Boys and the Chalfonts. The Palace. 9 PM. $5.

month at 4:30 PM in the library of the Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call Betsy at 543-3955 or email peace@jrpc.org for more info.

Party Trained is back from its worldwide tour and ready to rock your purty pink panties off, at the Sunrise Saloon. 1101 Strand. 9 PM. Free.

nightlife

Hear what the music of Violet Jessop may have sounded like when One Leaf Clover plays the Union Club. 9 PM. Free. Hit Pulse (inside the Press Box) for tuneage and grooveage with gal singer Andrea Harsell. 9–Midnight. Free. It’s the final performance for this month’s VFW residents, The Best Westerns. Come hear that high lonesome pro-gay wolf sound, with VTO and Steppenwolfshit. 245 W. Main. 9 PM. Free. (See Soundcheck this issue) Get sweaty with all the beautiful people at the Dead Hipster Dance Party, where love and funk is in the air. The Badlander. 208 Ryman St. $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM–midnight. He’ll cure your tremors with a sweet shot of country: Russ Nasset hits up the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., for a solo set this and every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free. Put on a clean shirt, we have company. Hamilton’s best power trio Temper-Airly brings the big bats to The Top Hat for some dee-lish rockin’. 9:30 PM. Free.

FRIDAY

24

February

Practice being peaceful in a world of differences during the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center’s Intercultural Dialogue Group, a monthly meeting that aims to bring together people from various backgrounds for an afternoon of conversation and peacemaking. Every last Fri. of the

Missoula Independent Page 22 February 23 – March 1, 2012

Business owners, learn how to promote, reinvest in and reinvent your town and contribute to your community at the Hamilton Downtown Association’s Membership Drive. Enjoy some beers, friends and prizes, y’all. Bitter Root Brewery. 5–7 PM. Can you kick it? Yes you can up at the Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery when El 3-Oh! performs in the tasting room. 4175 Rattlesnake. 5–9 PM. Free. Perhaps a bit of rogan josh is on the menu at FVCC’s Chef’s Night: A Taste of India, brought to you by the folks at the Culinary Arts Program. 6 PM. $49. RSVP at fvcc.edu/chefstable.html. Mah gawd, the immoveable force meets the unstoppable object when the Hellgate Rollergirls host a sibling rivalry bout between the Dirt Road Dolls and the hated Brawlin’ Mollies. Two teams, one track, let the bodies hit the floor. Adams Center. 6 PM. $15 VIP/$10 general/Kids 10 and under free. griztix.com. Help find a cure for Childhood Whirling Disease when The Whizpops and The Scribblers perform at Family Friendly Friday at the Top Hat. 6–8 PM. Free. (See Noise this issue) Soroptomist International of Kalispell hosts a screening of the documentary film Sex and Money, which uncovers the gruesome world of child sexual exploitation. FVCC Arts and Technology Building, Rm. 139. 6:30 PM. Free. The Northern Rockies Rising Tide fights for the northern Rockies, including tackling the megaload issue and so much more. Jeannette Rankin Peace Center back room. 510 S. Higgins Ave. 7–8:30 PM.


Step-two-three to A Night of Waltz and Chocolate where beginners and pros alike can get their dance on. Bring some chocolate to share. No street shoes! The Barn Movement Studio, 2926 S. 3rd W. 7–8:30 PM. Free. I said, are you ready to laugh?! If so, check out Show Me the Funny, a stand-up and sketch comedy show with Teresa Waldorf and Rosie Ayers. Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main. 7 PM. $12/$10 adv./$8 students. ddcmontana.com. Feel the beat of the rhythm of the night at the UM School of Music Student Ensemble Series event World Percussion Concert. University Theatre. 7:30 PM. $11/$6 seniors/$5. The UM School of Music Student Recital Series features the wellnamed Deva Siblerud, soprano. Music Recital Hall. 7:30 PM. Free. Knock the CK off your pants and head to the Eagles to see the Wild Coyote Band. 2420 South. 8 PM. Free. The Bigfork Community Players get their farce on y’all, when they perform Ken Ludwig’s Leading Ladies. To sum up: Shakespeare, shenanigans, suspicions. Bigfork Center for Performing Arts. 8 PM. $16/$11 seniors/$6 under age 12. bigforkcommunityplayers.com. Get on board the funship for Kitty’s Dirty Thirty, a birthday party for Missoulian Kitty Deyo with electronic DJs Hendawg, the Milkcrate Mechanic and Ir8prim8. The Badlander. 9PM. Free. I guess this is growing up, Reptile Dysfunction performs its final show, along with Bozeman’s Hurdles and the handsomest band in town, The Juveniles. Palace. 9 PM. $5. Head up Charlo way and get that irie fix that is reggae band Chele Bandulu. Nine Pipes Lodge. 41000 Hwy. 93. Charlo. Free. Get down, turn around, and check out Russ Nasset and the Revelators at the Union Club. 9 PM. Free. Be a county mounty (oh my) when County Line performs country dancing tunes at the Sunrise Saloon. 1101 Strand. 9:30 PM. Free. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. This is not a threat: I’ll House You with DJs Kris Moon, Mike Stolin and Hotpantz does happen at The Jolly Cork’s. 112 N. Pattee St. (Front St. entrance). 10 PM. Free. At Dawn We Rage delivers just one fix of dubstep and/or electron-

ica along with dub-hoppers Protohype. Top Hat. 10 PM. $12/$10 adv. with $5 surcharge for those aged 18-20. Stretch out and exercise that liver with $4 Guiness pints during Sean Kelly’s St. Practice Day, with celtic music by Michael Gill. 130 W. Pine. 10 PM. Free.

SATURDAY

25

February

If you have compulsive-eating problems, seek help and support with others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Sat. at 9 AM in Room 3 in the basement of First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free. Visit oa.org. Get help with them taxes so we can pay for wars, roads and drones at UM’s Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program. Bring your ID, Social Security cards, W-2 and any other tax docs you may have. Both spouses must be present if you’re filing jointly. Gallagher Business Building Rm. 209. 9 AM–4 PM. Free. The Heirloom Winter Market still has plenty of local num-nums for you and yours, including farm-fresh eggs, butter, sausage, lavender, honey and more, more, more! Ceretana Gallery and Studios, 801 Sherwood. 10 AM–1 PM. Hear some of the best opera singers in the world during The Met: Live in HD presents Verdi’s Ernani. Chicanery is afoot. Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins. $20/$18 seniors/$15 student. You won’t find out where the buried treasure of Lolo Pass is, but you’ll certainly learn something during Hal Stearns’ talk Hidden Gems of Lewis and Clark at Travelers’ Rest State Park Winter Storytelling Series. 1/2 mile west of Lolo on Hwy. 12. 11 AM. $4/free for kids 18 and under. Call 273-4253. Take a well-explained tour of the the Ansel Adams exhibit at the MAM with RMSP Director Neil Chaput de Saintonge. 335 N. Pattee. Noon. Free. Party down with all the chillin’ creatures during Hibernation Celebration! Kids can learn about what the turtles, frogs and ground squirrels are up to this time of year at the Montana Natural History Center. 120 Hickory. 2 PM. $3/$1 members. Love hurts. Headwaters Dance Co. presents its big gala concert Meditations on Love featuring

five duets on the subject of Love and closing with a global romp through the world of social dance at the MCT Center for Performing Arts. 2 PM. $15/$10 students and seniors. $40 includes a post-performance party in the lobby on Friday night’s performance, including food and drink with the company and an intimate performance. (See Scope this issue)

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nightlife Kevin Van Dort plays all the music that’s fit to, uhh, hear. Draught Works Brewery. 915 Toole. 5:30–8 PM. Free. Hear the next generation play all that jazz during Big Sky High School Jazz Band and Music Technology Program’s Blue Note Cafe fundraiser. Music, desserts, silent auction and prizes. Big Sky High School. 6 PM. $10.

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Head down the ‘Root and hear Slow Falls make the Blue Montana Country sound at the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6–8:30 PM. Free. Meet new friends or get Mee Maw out of the house during Community Swing Dance Saturday at Martha Jane’s Uptown Dance. This event is for those 16 and up and has lessons from 6–7 PM with dancing from 7–9 PM. 1008 Burlington Ste. D. $7. DalyJazz brings more quality jazz tuneage to Missoula with Italian pianist Simona Premazzi who is joined by bassist Yasushi Namamura and drummer Rodney Green. 7 PM. $40 suggested donation. RSVP at dalyjazz@gmail.com. Charla Bauman plays guitar in the style of no one else: ‘new-old jazzy pop folk with a country soul.’ Hidden Legend Winery. Sheafman Corner, five miles south of Victor. 7–9 PM. Free. Dance the night away when the Missoula Senior Center hosts a Saturday Night Dance with the Heart to Heart Duo. 705 S. Higgins. 7–10 PM. Free. Love hurts. Headwaters Dance Co. presents its big gala concert Meditations on Love featuring five duets on the subject of Love and closing with a global romp through the world of social dance at the MCT Center for Performing Arts. 7:30 PM. $15/$10 students and seniors. (See Scope this issue) The Glacier Symphony is joined by violinist Nigel Armstrong for a night of blistering fingerboard work. Whitefish Performing Arts Center. 7:30 PM. $18-$32. gcsmusic.org.

Missoula Independent Page 23 February 23 – March 1, 2012


The UM School of Music Student Recital Series features trumpet bumper Travis Higa. Music Recital Hall. 7:30 PM. Free. The Bigfork Community Players get their farce on y’all, when they perform Ken Ludwig’s Leading Ladies. To sum up: Shakespeare, shenanigans, suspicions. Bigfork Center for Performing Arts. 8 PM. $16/$11 seniors/$6 under age 12. bigforkcommunityplayers.com.

Presidents’ Day

SALE Everything in the Store 10% Off Dansko - Keen Alegria - Merrell

20% Off Birkenstock - Bogs Haflinger - Chaco

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Missoula Independent Page 24 February 23 – March 1, 2012

Have a wet, hot winter at the Symes Hot Springs Hotel when folksters Kathy Colton and The Reluctants perform. 8–10 PM. Free.

and older wanted. MCT Center for the Performing Arts. 200 N. Adams. Call 728-1911. See the paintings of Juanita Small Salmon and the pottery of Betty Duncan at The Red Poppy, with new age pianist Drew Hartung. Ronan, across from True Value. 1–4 PM. Free. Go with the jam when The Rocky Mountain Grange Hall, 1436 S. First St. south of Hamilton, hosts a weekly acoustic jam session for guitarists, mandolin players and others, from 2–4 PM. Free. Call Clem at 961-4949.

DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo bring the arty to the party during Absolutely, a dance party featuring every style of rump-shaking tuneage. The Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2 for 1 Absolut drinks until 11 PM. Free.

The Bigfork Community Players get their farce on y’all, when they perform Ken Ludwig’s Leading Ladies. To sum up: Shakespeare, shenanigans, suspicions. Bigfork Center for Performing Arts. 2 PM. $16/$11 seniors/$6 under age 12. bigforkcommunityplayers.com.

Be a county mounty (oh my) when County Line performs country dancing tunes at the Sunrise Saloon. 1101 Strand. 9:30 PM. Free.

Occupy Missoula General Assembly takes place at the Union Hall. 208 E. Main St. 2–4 PM. occupymissoula.org.

Bring your blinders and be numberwang when The Crazy Naked Canadians bust out a night of electronic tunes from B.C., including J-Wiggle, DJ Buffalo Child and DJ Matty K doing dubstep, electro and moombahton. With visuals by Amber Bushnell and poi performances by the Fuzzy Animal Clan Sexy Girls. Palace. 9 PM. Free. Shimmy-shimmy yaw it’s Tom Catmull and the Clerics helping you dance off that wintertime padding. Super-nice of them. Union Club. 9 PM. Free. DJ Dubwise supplies dance tracks all night long so you can take advantage of Sexy Saturday and rub up against the gender of your choice at Feruqi’s. 10 PM. Free. Call 728-8799. I am about to share with you a shocking secret: Reverend Slanky performs funk at the Top Hat. 10 PM. $5.

SUNDAY

26

February

Join photog Eileen Rafferty for the Ansel Adams Drop-In Tour at the MAM and get insider info on the best-known photog of all-time. 335 N. Pattee St. Are you feeling pretty and witty and gay? Then you ought to audition for the MCT production of West Side Story. Male and female actors, singers, dancers and gymnasts 16

Glacier Symphony is joined by violinist Nigel Armstrong for a night of blistering fingerboard work. Flathead High Performance Hall. 3 PM. $10-$32. gcsmusic.org. Chase McBride and Mountain Breathers make your Sunday an’ I don’t have to run day at the Draught Works Brewery. 915 Toole. 4–7 PM. Free.

nightlife Listen to some real live writers during the Second Wind Reading Series, where MFA students and teachers share their stories with the world. This week it’s Dana Fitz and Karin Schalm. The Top Hat. 5 PM. Free. Get some num-nums in your belly at Garden City Harvest’s family stye dinner Wintergreens. The event also boasts the omni-present Mayor John Engen hosting a pie and cake auction, as well as a wine raffle and music by Whippletree. Governor’s Room in the Florence Hotel. $18/$10 for kids 2-10. Buy your tix online at gardencityharvest.org. DalyJazz brings more quality jazz tuneage to Missoula with Italian pianist Simona Premazzi who is j o i n e d b y b a s s i s t Ya s u s h i Namamura and drummer Rodney Green. 7 PM. $40 suggested donation. RSVP at dalyjazz@gmail.com. No need for white gloves and jazz hands when The Jacob Thomas Quintet performs jazz for your pleasure. Top Hat. 7 PM. Free. We’ll sell you the whole seat, but you’ll only need the edge during


Photo by Chad Harder

Lizard kings. The Reptile Dysfunction plays its final show (seriously!) with Bozeman’s Hurdles and Missoula’s Juveniles on Fri., Feb. 24 at 9 PM. Palace. 147 W. Broadway. $5.

the Feruqi’s Chess Tournament. Double elimination. Prizes for podium finishers. 7 PM. 318 N. Higgins. $5. Grab some borscht and join the String Orchestra of the Rockies for Eastern European Landscapes an exploration of the folk traditions of Hungary, Poland, Latvia and Serbia. Music Recital Hall. 7:30 PM. $20/$10 students. Italy’s foremost acoustic guitar shredders Guitar Republic are dropping onto the stage at the Whitefish Theatre Co. for a night of chitarra molto ben eseguito gioco, of course. 7:30 PM. $27. Close out the weekend in style with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz & DJs, during the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with the Donna Smith Trio. Free.

MONDAY

27

February nightlife

Easiest way to make rent since keno: Bingo at the VFW. 245 W. Main. $10 buy-in. Tom Catmull performs tuneage and takes requests for ‘Brown Eyed Girl’ at the Red Bird Wine Bar. 11 N. Higgins. 7–10 PM. Free. Don’t just express yourself, be expressive at the ZACC’s weekly, one-hour poetry workshop. 235 N. 1st St. 8 PM. Free. Fans of nerdcore and geekrock are in luck as purveyors of nerd culture tuneage Kirby Krackle and Adam Warrock perform at Muse

Comics and Games. 2100 Stephens Ave. #107. 8 PM. $7. (See Noise this issue) Just for the record, it ‘s vinyl night at Milkcrate Monday’s with the Milkcrate Mechanic with DJs Enkrypted, Special K and Kodel. The Palace. 9 PM. Free, with free pool and $6 pitchers of PBR. Open Mic at the VFW seems like a fine idea, especially with 2 for 1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. Call Skye on Sunday at 531–4312 to reserve your spot in the line-up or I bet you could roll in and be all, “Dude, I do a perfect Sublime.”

TUESDAY

28

February

Make it happen for Fun with Yoga at the Families First Children’s Museum might work for you and the kids. 11 AM. 225 W. Front. $4.25. Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room and work on your elk camp locution at the Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters. All are invited. 12–1. 5205 Grant Creek Dr. Free. Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsoleck during Compassionate Communication Non-Violent Communication Weekly Practice Group at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. 519 S. Higgins. Noon–1 PM. Free. Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 115 S. 3rd St. W. 1-3 PM. For information call 543-3955.

Be a good egg and donate blood because we still can’t get blood from outer space. American Red Cross. 2401 N. Reserve, Ste. 6. 3–6 PM. Call 800-REDCROSS to schedule an appt. Understand what the cloud people are saying at Weather Explorations Family Night for ages 5-7. Bitterroot Public Library. Call 363-1670 to register. See 60 teams of Montana high schoolers drop knowledge about everything from energy policy to Azerbaijan at the Academic Worldquest Competition. The winners go on to compete nationally. UC Ballroom. 4:30 PM. montanaworldaffairs.org.

nightlife Start making sense at the weekly Taking Pounds Off Sensibly Meeting (TOPS) at First Baptist Church in Whitefish. Weigh-in at 5 PM. Meeting at 5:30 PM. For more info., call 862-5214. Aim your sights on the 8 ball when the Palace hosts a weekly 9ball tournament, which is double elimination and starts with sign-up at 6 PM, followed by games at 7. $10 entry fee. You saw House Party, but you still can’t do the Kid ‘N Play. Do something about it by taking the Downtown Dance Collective’s Beg./Int. Hip Hop dance class with Heidi Michaelson. 1221 W. Main St. 6–7 PM. ddcmontana.com The VFW hosts my kind of threeway during a night of Singers, Songwriters and Spaghetti, with food provided by the Blue Bison Grill. 245 W. Main St. 6 PM. Free.

Missoula Independent Page 25 February 23 – March 1, 2012


You don’t know nothin’ about no Africa, so learn from Prof. Solomon Gofie of the University of Addis Ababa during his talk Transnational Influences in the Horn of Africa: Change and Continuity. UC, Rm. 332. 6–7 PM. Free. YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts YWCA Support Groups for women every Tue. from 6:30–8 PM. An American Indian-led talking circle is also available, along with age-appropriate children’s groups. Free. Call 543-6691.

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The UM Wilderness Institute brings scholars, writers, scientists and explorers together to share stories of how water shapes our lives, landscapes and politics in the Wild Waters in the West Lecture Series. This week, Don Vermillion, owner of Sweetwater Travel Co. and FWP commissioner, gives a lecture titled Mega Fish Conservation in Central Asia. Gallagher Business Building Rm. 122. 7 PM. Free. Listen and learn when Robert Lee reads letters and poems he compiled while teaching for the Missoula Writing Collaborative in Haida Indian village on Prince of Wales Island in Alaska. Shakespeare & Co. 103 S. 3rd W. 7 PM. Free. (See Spotlight this issue) Take a load off while you get a load of some of the area’s better musicians during the Musician Showcase at Brooks and Browns in the Holiday Inn-Downtown. $7 Big Sky pitchers and $2 pints. 200 S. Pattee St. Free. So much of a good thing. The UM School of Theatre and Dance presents Anton Chekhov’s tragic comedy The Cherry Orchard, as adapted by Tom Stoppard. Masquer Theatre. 7:30 PM. $16/$14 seniors

and students/$10 for those 12 and under. Tix available at UMArts Box Office. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? What delicious snack cracker was actress Sandy Duncan a pitchwoman for in the ’80s? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.) Now this is comedy, Frenchy! Get your chuckle on during Comedy Night at Lucky Strike Casino. 151 Dearborn Ave. 8 PM. $5. Join the Slow Falls Trio for an evening of what music critic Guy LaFleur calls “Blue Montana Country,” at the Flathead Lake Brewing Co. 424 N. Higgins. 8–10 PM. Free. The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. Bow down to the sounds at Royal Reggae, featuring dancehall jams by DJs Supa, Smiley Banton and Oneness at the Palace at 9 PM. Free. Make some lefse and dig out the kæstur hákarl when The Dodgy Mountain Men get their stompgrass on during the Badlander’s Live and Local Night. Openers TBA. 9 PM. Free. The Zootown Acoustic Throwdown brings pugilistic heat and guitar strummin’ to the Top Hat, with Javier Ryan, Grit and more. 10 PM. Free.

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221 East Front St. • 543-6966

M - F 9:30 - 8 • SAT 9-6 • SUN 11-6 WWW.TRAILHEADMONTANA .NET Missoula Independent Page 26 February 23 – March 1, 2012

The 2012 Snowbowl Cup Gelande North American Championship February 24th, 25th & 26th • REGISTRATION: Friday, Feb. 24th from 10am to 4:30pm in Snowbowl Lodge. • ENTRY FEES: $105 for Pros; $50 for Amateurs. Includes 3-day T-Bar ticket, t-shirt. Helmet & proof of medical insurance required. • SPECTATORS WELCOME: Sunday, Febuary 26th non-skier admission is $3 per person. No personal alcholic beverages allowed. Please carpool.

THANKS TO OUR LOCAL SPONSORS Ace Hardware • Bayern Brewing, Inc. • McCue Construction Missoula Independent • Oz Architects • Montana Headwall The Loose Caboose • Axis Physical Therapy • Red's Towing Sean Kelly's • Roemer's Tire & Automotive Center Galusha Higgins & Galusha • Iron Horse Brew Pub The Rhinoceros • Rick's Auto Body Huff Construction • Sign Pro • Worden's Market UBS Financial Services

for more information, contact Snowbowl 406-549-9777 www. montanasnowbowl.com


WEDNESDAY February

29

Pack up the things you carry and hump on over to the Brown Bag Lecture Literature and the Vietnam War: A Comparative Perspective given by American lit and ethnic studies prof. Quan Manh. Mansfield Conf. Rm. Noon–1 PM. Free.

nightlife Let them dance, or at least give it a try, during Kids’ Hip Hop (7–10 years old) at the Downtown Dance Collective. No dance experience is necessary and drop-ins are welcome. Just wear good clothes for dancing. 121 W. Main St. 5–6 PM. ddcmontana.com Have the fine (seriously) helper peoples at the ZACC teach the whole darn goon squad, kids and Uncle Rick, how to make something useful at Free Relief Printing Night. Staff will be on hand to show you the ways of the printshop. 235 N. 1st. 5–7 PM. Free. Pre-register at zootownarts.org. Relive the awkwardness of Kevin Arnold during MUD’s Sadie Hawkins Community UNite Pint Night at the Northside Kettlehouse. 50¢ per pint goes to MUD. 5–8 PM. Artists of all levels are invited to the MAM’s non-instructed Open Figure Drawing Class. This class gives artists the opportunity to draw from a for-real person. Ages 18 plus (you and the model). 335 N. Pattee St. 6–8 PM. $7/$5 members. Families First hosts For Girls Only: A Heart to Heart Talk on Growing Up, with Julie Metzger, RN, MN. This two-part workshop is for parents or trusted adults and girls 10-12 years old. 6:30–8:30 PM. $30 per duo, $10 for each additional child. greatconversations.com. So much of a good thing. The UM School of Theatre and Dance presents Anton Chekhov’s tragic comedy The Cherry Orchard, as adapted by Tom Stoppard. Masquer Theatre. 7:30 PM. $16/$14 seniors and students/$10 for those 12 and under. Tix available at UMArts Box Office. Black Eyed Peas fanatics are welcome to belt out their fave jamz at the Badlander during Kraptastic Karaoke, beginning at 9 PM.

Featuring $5 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free. Too much booty in the pants? Then dance, dance, dance during Progressive, a night of trance, house and other dancing music styles, with DJs Jay Boogie, Dre and Coma. Palace. 9 PM. Free, with progressive PBR special that goes up every half hour. Request ‘My Wife Left Town with a Banana’ when John Smith plays acoustic folk and rock for all you music hearers. Top Hat. 10 PM. Free. Pub trivia answer: Wheat Thins

THURSDAY March nightlife

01

Oh word, soon-to-be-famous-best-buy-oneof-her-pieces-while-you-can-afford-them artist Courtney Blazon opens her new exhibit called My Street Has Strange Houses at the UC Gallery. This deal is multi-media, two and three-dimensional and undoubtedly rad. 5–7 PM, with an artist talk at 5:30 PM. Free. Peek at the works of UM’s School of Art students during the MFA Thesis Reception, which features two exhibitions Giving the Ghost, an individual and collaborative works by Will Hutchinson and Nathan Tonning, and Suspension of Disbelief by Yaro Shon Neil. UM Gallery of Visual Arts in the Social Sciences Building. 5–7 PM. Free. Bring your miscellany of talents down the ‘Root for the The Roxy’s open mic night. Anything goes: comedy, juggling, music and prescient children rapping about the streets. Hamilton. 120 N. 2nd. 7 PM. $5.

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Peace and Justice Film Series hosts Incident at Oglala: The Leonard Peltier Story, which follows a shootout that occurred on the Pine Ridge Reservation in 1975 between AIM members and the FBI. Gallagher Business Building Rm. 122. 7 PM. Free. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn-Downtown. 7–10 PM. So much of a good thing. The UM School of Theatre and Dance presents Anton

Missoula Independent Page 27 February 23 – March 1, 2012


Chekhov’s tragic comedy The Cherry Orchard, as adapted by Tom Stoppard. Masquer Theatre. 7:30 PM. $16/$14 seniors and students/$10 for those 12 and under. Tix available at UMArts Box Office.

Fans of grammar, logic and rhetoric, grab your liberal arts degrees and head down to the Central Bar and Grill’s trivia night, hosted by local gallant and possible Swede Thomas Helgerson. 143 W. Broadway. 8 PM. Free.

Dust off the Chacos and get a sitter, Leftover Salmon plays the Wilma Theatre. 8 PM. $21. Tix available at Rockin Rudy’s.

a job during Trivial Beersuit at the Lucky Strike Casino. Prizes for podium finishers. 1515 Dearborn. 8–10 PM.

Show ‘em that pop culture knowledge is just as important as having

Grab ye olde acoustic and learn “Sundown” before you roll into Sean Kelly’s Open Mic night. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursdays to sign-up. 8:30 PM–Midnight. Get sweaty with all the beautiful people at the Dead Hipster Dance Party, where love and funk is in the air. The Badlander. 208 Ryman St. $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM–midnight. It smells like teen spirit and urinal cakes when Bird’s Mile Home begins their month-long residency at the VFW, with PD Lear and King Elephant. 245 W. Main. 9 PM. Free. If you’re a chickenhawk huntin’ for a chicken check with Athens Georgia’s psych-country purveyors Futurebirds for possible sightings, with Airstream Safari and Skeeterhawk. Palace. 9 PM. $5.

Photo by Michelle Gustafson

Cherry pickers. The UM School of Theatre and Dance presents The Cherry Orchard, Anton Chekhov’s tragic comedy adapted by Tom Stoppard, featuring Cally Shine and Daniel Haley at the Masquer Theatre from Tue., Feb. 28 through Sat., Mar. 3 at 7:30 PM. Tickets are available at the UM Arts Box Office and cost $16/$14 seniors and students/$10 for those 12 and under.

Missoula Independent Page 28 February 23 – March 1, 2012

Bite an ear and tell him you love him during the Ugly Pony show at the Sunrise Saloon. 9 PM. Free. Man, I was in Ibiza one time and I can’t tell you a thing about it, but I

can tell you that Pulse hosts a Foam Party tonight, with two big daddy meatstraw foam makers. Anything goes. Located inside the Press Box. 835 E. Broadway. 9 PM. Free. Set your hair on fire and no one will notice when Big John Bates is burping out his roots-punk numbers, with the Juveniles at the Dark Horse. 1805 Regent. $7. Grab a paddle and your best booty shorts for Whitewater Ramble’s bluegrass extravaganza at the Top Hat. 10 PM. $7.

It’s mid-winter, your house is a sty. Do some cleaning this week and for crying out loud in the night unclutter your lives. Hook me up with the goods by sending your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Mar. 2 to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to The Calemandar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”


MOUNTAIN HIGH F act: Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) mainly effects those who sit in front of the TV all winter waiting for summer and bloating their bellies with cheese fries and spettekaka . We’ll forgive you those culinary dalliances as long as you promise to get off the couch and into the great big old outdoors just once this week. Before you cluck your tongue and roll your eyes at my words, know this: I am not asking you to do anything but dress comfortably, pack a lunch and pull out the binoculars you received for subscribing to Sports Illustrated back in 1989. No back-country hikes. No snowshoes. No energy bars required. Besides, we’re only a short drive from the Mission Valley and its multitudes of wintering raptors and other birds, which spend their winter-tide days at the Pablo and Ninepipe national wildlife refuges wiling the days away hunting for mice and lazing about

power lines. But if you can’t tell a bald eagle from a cat, you might as well join some of the area’s most ardent fans of birds, Five Valley Audubon. The group is tracking up to the Mission Valley for its annual viewing of winter raptors, including rough-legged hawks and northern harriers. With these eagle-eyed bird lovers by your side you are sure to learn something, see something and maybe pick up a wintertime hobby that won’t break the bank (unless you start buying $2,500 Swarovski spotting scopes). Remember, winter vacation is for the birds. Five Valley Audubon’s trip to the Mission Valley to view winter raptors departs from the middle of the Adams Center Fieldhouse parking lot on Sat., Feb. 25, at 8 AM, or you can meet them at the Cenex on the south side of Ronan at 9 AM. Please bring weather-appropriate clothing and a lunch. Free. fvamissoula.org.

Photo by Chad Harder

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 23 Get on up, ah, to the Ninemile Wildlife Workgroup Lecture Series where James Brown of Five Valleys Audubon speaks about Birds and Conservation in the Greater Missoula Area. Ninemile Ranger Station. 20325 Remount Rd. 7 PM. Free. ninemilewildlife.org.

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 24 During its 2nd Harvest Food Drive Ski Lookout has an offer for you: Bring three cans of food today and receive a lift ticket. ‘Nuff said. skilookout.com. Things get dangerous in the backcountry, give yourself a bit more knowledge to protect yourself during Missoula Avalanche’s Level 1 Avalanche Class for Snowmobilers. There is an evening class, plus two days in the field. 5 PM. $150. For more info. call the UM Outdoor Program at 243-5172. missoulaavalanche.org. Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s (formerly the Flathead Valley Over the Hill Gang) weekly meeting to talk about being awesome, past glories and upcoming activities. Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free.

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 25 Have a sit-down steak dinner, maybe win a new rifle and help support Ravalli County Fish and Wildlife Association during their 30th Banquet to Benefit Wildlife. Ravalli County Fairgrounds. TIME $35. rcfwa.org. Pack a lunch and get out to view winter raptors with names like Northern Harrier and Rough-legged hawk! Badass. Five Valleys Audubon leads the way. Meet in the middle of the Adams Center Fieldhouse parking lot at 8 AM or the Cenex on the south side of Ronan at 9 AM. All are welcome. Have some fun in the snow and seek out treasure dur-

ing the Marshall Mountain Adventures geocaching event. Use GPS to find goodies in the snow and get some exercise. Co-sponsored by REI and Missoula Parks and Rec. Marshall Mountain Ski Area. 10–3 PM. Yo jibbers, time to show off your swag and steez during Lost Trail’s Steezin’ for no Reason Slopestyle. Any and all are welcome to attend or participate. Registration from 9 AM–1 PM, slopestyle at 1 PM. Prizes and schwag, of course. $10. The good eggs at Trout Unlimited are hosting a Banquet and Auction to Raise Money for Cold Water Conservation. Silent and live auctions with tons of insane fishing-related prizes and a steak dinner, c’mon do it (no need to be a TU member). Hilton Garden Inn. Doors at 5:30 PM. $50. westslopetu.org. Down the ‘Root you gotta fine old event, the Selway Bitterroot Foundation’s Montana 2012 Winter Gathering and Fundraiser with NPS archeologist Pei-Lin Yun who spent two years living with the Pume people of Venezuela. Auction, snacks and drinks. Hamilton City Hall. 6:30–9 PM. Free. selwaybitterroot.org.

MONDAY FEBRUARY 27

SPICY CALAMARI Hefeweizen-marinated calamari, cornmeal dusted and flash fried, served with a sweet Sriracha sauce. $4.95

TAMARACK WINGS Jumbo wings tossed in your choice of Buffalo, Switchback Stout BBQ, or Pacific Rim sauce served on a bed of beer-battered fries with a side of bleu cheese. $7.95

BABY BACK RIBS AND FRIES A half rack of tender pork ribs smothered in our Stout barbeque sauce on a bed of beer-battered fries. $9.95

VEGGIE QUESADILLA Filled with diced tomatoes, olives, bell peppers and green onion. Served with our house-made salsa. $6.95 Add Chicken-$2

CHICKEN STRIPS Beer-battered chicken breast strips on a pile of beer battered fries. Served with a side of our house-made Ranch. $8.95

THE HELLGATE PIZZA Pepperoni, Redneck Italian sausage, red onion, jalapeños, black olives and fresh garlic, with marinara and mozzarella, finished with Sriracha. $13.95 & $20.95

At Slacker Mondays, from 6 PM until close, slackline fans can come to Freestone Climbing Center at 935 Toole Ave. to test their balance. $13/$10 for students. Visit freestoneclimbing.com. Learn the little things that make shredding the kind so much sicker at REI’s Basic Ski and Snowboard Maintenance. 3275 N. reserve. 6:30–8 PM. Free.

THURSDAY MARCH 1 You’ll be climbing up a wall at Freestone Climbing Center’s Ladies Night. 935 Toole Ave. 5–10 PM. $6.50/$5 students. calendar@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent Page 29 February 23 – March 1, 2012


scope

Hearts on fire Headwaters’ cutting-edge dancers put love to the test by Melissa Mylchreest

It wasn’t until watching dancers Brian Gerke and tic, humorous, and poignant, the two of them integrate Steinunn Ketilsdóttir perform recently that I realized how conversation, sound and the theatrical well. under-utilized some parts of the body often are in modern At one point during their hour-long show dance. The mouth, for example. I can’t think of another Steinunn and Brian DO Art: How to Be Original dance performance I’ve seen that uses the mouth not just (which was shown last weekend, but will not be shown as a vehicle for emotional expression—a smile, a frown—but this coming weekend), they perform a "brainstorming" as an integral, malleable body part to be stretched, prod- session of sorts. Gerke dances center-stage, experided, and put on display. At one point the duo locked menting with new movement sequences, while mouths, jaws wide, breathing frantically back and forth. The Ketilsdóttir stands on the sidelines, nixing each audience was forced to wonder about oxygen deprivation, attempt. "No," she says, over and over. When his moveand how long two people can fill one another’s lungs with ment resembles that of another choreographer, she carbon monoxide before collapsing on the floor. calls him on it. "Trisha Brown? No. No Trisha," and The dancers seem to thrive on this brand of creativ- then later, "Gaga? No Gaga." Finally frustration takes ity; stretching the expected limits of dance, and placing over, and he stands, fingers pressed to the bridge of his the audience in a position that’s maybe a little uncom- nose, a portrait of defeat. She latches onto the gesture, fortable, but provocative nonetheless. Ketilsdóttir wads tells him it’s the most brilliant thing she has seen. up a piece of clothing, stuffs it up her shirt, and asks a If the sequence ended here, it would be clever—a bit series of questions about her baby (“What if nobody likes slapstick, but clever. But the sequence doesn’t end, and the my baby? What if my baby is too long? What if it’s too two of them tumble into a wild physical and verbal dialogue short?”) the audience chuckles and nods. When, seconds about authenticity, beauty, truth, expression and a series of later, Gerke chases her, kicks her in the stomach and she "don’t" and "just" statements: "Don’t apologize.” “Don’t lets her “belly” drop to the floor, the audience gasps in stop.” “Just be pretty.” “Just make art." In writing, this real shock. Ketilsdóttir’s subsequent screaming and accusations roar around the space, and the viewers writhe in their seats. This weekend, the innovative duo performs with several other dancers in Meditations on Love, a concert for Headwaters Dance Co.’s annual gala. Or, usually annual. Headwaters performed its place-based concert Montana Suites in 2010, and then artistic director Amy Ragsdale took a year-long hiatus, which makes the professional company’s return all the more sweet. This year’s concert is a series of duets based on the theme of “love,”—be it romantic, parental, or love of an activity, such as dance. Ragsdale collaborated with dancers to choreograph four pieces, including one called “...and then they’re 18” and another, “She’s so—long!” UM dance professor Nicole Bradley Browning is the choreographer of a piece involving white hoop skirts, called “Listen.” Finally, Gerke and Ketilsdóttir, whose Icelandic dance company is called “Steinunn and Brian,” will perform the first of a trilogy, Crazy in Love with Mr. Perfect, which has only been performed once before in the United States. Exploring the idea of a “right” partner, it wonders if this person exists, and if so, why is he/she so hard to find? The duo’s cuttingedge style and rave reviews makes the Missoula performance a highly anticipated event. Gerke is a Missoula native, graduate of UM’s dance program, and a company member of Headwaters. Ketilsdóttir was born and raised in Iceland, and came to the U.S. to study dance at CUNY Hunter College in New York. It was at Hunter that they first met in 2004, when Brian spent a semester there. Serendipitously their paths crossed several times in the dance world after this, and, recognizing their creative synchronicity, Gerke joined her in Iceland in 2007 where they formed their company. Since then they’ve created a trio of works exploring the treacherous terrain of love, relationships and sex. These are common themes on which to build dances, but Ketilsdóttir and Gerke stress that what really sets their work apart is its autobiographical nature and its attendant intimacy. True though this may be, I think this is only one attribute of several that distinguish their work in the field. Above all, this is smart dance that is not only aesthetically fascinating but conceptually intriguing as well. The pair makes successful and perceptive social commentary not just through Headwaters Dance Co.’s concert Meditations on the vehicle of dance, but about dance too. At times sarcas- Amy Ragsdale.

Missoula Independent Page 30 February 23 – March 1, 2012

sounds borderline-sentimental, overly earnest. Translated to the body, however, it’s hard-driving, frantic, raw and gets to the heart of the chaotic balance of the creative process with all its self-doubt, self-indulgence, collaboration and critics’ demands. With simple costumes and only sporadic music, the performance insists that the audience be present, to focus entirely on the dancers and each aspect of the dance—not simply the movement, but the words, the subtle shifts in mood, the questions raised, the contact between dancers and the relationship between dancer and audience. At moments tender, at others violent, their work is irresistible in its fearlessness. Headwaters Dance Co. presents Meditations on Love at the MCT Center for Performing Arts Thu., Feb. 23, through Sat., Feb. 25, at 7:30 PM nightly, with a 2 PM matinee Sat. $15 general/$10 students and seniors. $40 patron tickets include the Friday night show plus a post-performance party in the lobby with food and drink. For online tickets go to griztix.com. arts@missoulanews.com

Photo by Chad Harder

Love, features Steinunn Ketilsdóttir, top, and


Scope Noise Soundcheck Film Movie Shorts Secret Powers More Songs About Her self-released

Hard to believe it’s been five years since it all started. The oohs and ahhs. The catchy lyrics. The keyboard solos and foot-tapping harmonies. Secret Powers took the likes of Electric Light Orchestra, the Beatles and Sweet, threw them in a blender and served up a brand of power pop all Missoula’s own. Five years, five albums later, and the music still grabs you. Maybe it’s the theme that makes More Songs About Her such a treat. From “Impossible Girl” to “Telepathic,” each of Secret Powers’s new compositions stirs up memories of walks walked, gazes gazed and necks necked. Maybe it’s the host of local guest musicians like Bob Marshall and Chris Bacon. Or maybe it’s the band’s

The Whizpops The Adventures of Stretch McCoy self-released

Even the most patient parent can only handle so much children’s music. The Wiggles should be played to punish terror suspects. All that repetition from Dora will melt grownup brain cells faster than meth. The only way for elders to survive this genre is to cling to the stuff that could pass as good music, regardless of whether the lyrics cover eating one’s vegetables or not. The Whizpops, a local band previously known as The Unknowns, thankfully leap over this bar with great humor, intelligence and, above all, excellent musicianship. The Adventures of Stretch McCoy is unabashedly

Kirby Krackle and Adam WarRock The difference between geek rock then and geek rock now is that the current crop of geek rockers have ditched the make-up and mesh muscle shirts in favor of ironic tees and sounds that needn’t shock to be heard. At least that is the case for Seattle’s Kirby Krackle, who has forgone the pseudo-darkness of KISS and the Misfits’ burlesque lyrics to make geek/nerd rock that is sophisticated and respects its audience. Really what’s worse: A 30-something-year-old singing about a girl he loved back in high school or singing about the Watcher? “Ring Capacity” has a hook-filled chorus that crescendos just right and has your toe-tapping even if you don’t know who Kyle Rayner is. That’s the difference between good nerdcore and the rest.

Brett Netson Simple Work For the Dead New Black Records

You will like the new Brett Netson solo album Simple Work For the Dead if you love Built to Spill. I personally like Built to Spill, in part because they possess what Simple Work For the Dead so belligerently lacks: a sense of humor. This album seems suffused with cold gray light. In the promotional material, Netson explains that “if there is a reoccurring theme, it’s a medita-

steady ascension. They were solid from their debut, Explorers of the Polar Eclipse. These days? Polished granite. More Songs About Her does boast a wild card: the addition of Oblio Joes veteran John Brownell to the permanent lineup. Where Shmedly Maynes’s lyrics are whimsical, Brownell’s are emotionally complex, even anguished. He paints the object of his affections in “Caroline” with Shins-esque poetry; she’s “wormwood sage,” she’s “tawny rage.” Throw in a chorus of lovelorn crooning and you quickly forget this is Brownell’s first chapter in the band’s five-year story. (Alex Sakariassen) geared toward the preschool and elementary school crowd, but there’s still plenty for parents to enjoy. “Dinner Time (I’m Not Hungry Again)” made me laugh out loud as a kid rebels against getting called inside to eat and imagines his food coming to life. His lettuce has a head, the corn ears and the potato eyes. “The Owl Song” and “The Bat Song” manage to mix educational content with catchy Americana melodies; the latter cleverly breaks into the “Batman” theme with a series of “bat facts.” While most of the album sticks to a folk sound, “Forest Communities” reaches toward jam band territory. It’s a welcome changeup that does for trees what Phish’s “Cavern” did for shoes, and will take adults of a certain age back to a time when they danced with the same merry abandon as their kids will while listening to The Whizpops. (Skylar Browning) The Whizpops plays a CD-release show Friday, Feb. 24, at 6 PM, at The Top Hat. The Scribblers open. Free.

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Adam WarRock is a rapper who treads in the same thematic territory as KK. Rhyming is all about dropping references, esoteric or other wise; WuTang’s love of kung fu and MF Doom’s deeply esoteric allusions come to mind. WarRock is no different, he delivers rhymes with the alacrity of a Shaolin monk’s leap. (Jason McMackin) Kirby Krackle and Adam WarRock perform at Muse Comics and Games on Mon., Feb. 27 at 8 PM. 2100 Stephens Ave. #107. $7. tion on the end of capitalism and cheap energy.” Compare this approach to the work of, say, KISS, whose reoccurring [sic] theme was partying every day. Those are two different understandings of what rock music should do, and one of them is considerably more ambitious. That ambition would be noble if it were more fully realized. Unfortunately, Simple Work For the Dead also sounds like it was simple work for Brett Netson. Most of the tracks were recorded “as they were written and in one sitting,” which is a recipe for either vibrant spontaneity or disappointment. At approximately 20 percent rock and 80 percent minorkey dirges, disappointment wins the day here. In places, the album sounds like the call to embrace meaningful uncertainty that Netson wanted it to be. Mostly, it just sounds slight. (Dan Brooks)

Missoula Independent Page 31 February 23 – March 1, 2012


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New twangled The Best Westerns cowboy up at the VFW by Jason McMackin

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Electronic, bluegrass, punk, metal, noise, ukulele, twee it’s all happening in the Missoula music scene. So why not a spot of what some might call alt-country? Aka actual country music, not modern country radio’s broad, bedridden interpretation of the genre. Hey Nashville, how about some tunes devoid of the painful twang of clichés? Didn’t think so. Fortunately, right here in Missoula, The Best Westerns are creating honest, evocative country and western music that is perhaps a bit more western than it is country.

The Best Westerns

Modern country music spends so much time embracing Southern mythology and American authenticity that a casual listener might assume that a star like Jason Aldean only takes time out to record when he’s not shoulder-deep in a cow giving birth. The Best Westerns are aware of the power of that mythology. They aspire to own glistening Nudie suits. But they also aspire to create smart compositions, to hone their sound. Lap steel “gitarist” Dave Martens sums up the group’s spirit, “You don’t have to be a cowboy to play country music.” Although most anything goes fashion-wise at the VFW—where the band’s taken up residency for the last month—cowboy hats with boots still draw attention. You can wear one or the other with nary a glance, but the combo still makes those who equate country music with Denny Rehberg a poke nervous. However, The Best Westerns aren’t here to pee in your Wheaties® or give you a hard time about the pink scarf your mom knitted for you. Anything but. According to drummer Riley Flynn the band is “progay wolf,” after all. Not a surprise once you see them perform, each rocking a hat like they do it every day (they don’t), and like they’ve done it their entire lives, (they haven’t). Bassist Ryan Scott, owner of the

Missoula Independent Page 32 February 23 – March 1, 2012

biggest hat in the band, says “the nostalgia and rebelliousness” of their dress and sound helps the band and the audience “buy into the western cowboy thing.” In other words, if it looks and sounds like a country duck it probably is a country duck. Their performance turns out to be as fun as it is affecting. Martens, who also plays drums for The Magpies, isn’t afraid to jump up and join the crowd while flailing away on the tambourine, especially when he forgets the chords to a song. The rest of the band digs in and plays hard with easy confidence, bantering with one another and the crowd when necessary, but it’s guitarist/singer Izaak Opatz’s voice that is the focus of their sound. Somewhere in the baritone range, he is reminiscent of non-country singer Mark Lanegan in richness and nuance. The band plays and the audience is rapt and it appears that they have achieved Opatz’s goal of “getting people to change their mind about country music.” No doubt these fellas can play country music, but it’s happenstance that Photo by Chad Harder they do. “It’s the last thing I thought we’d be playing,” says lead guitarist Dan Codiga. Opatz concurs with Codiga, who he has played with since their days in Whitefish. “I don’t listen to it but I play it,” he says. “I’ve become a fan of country music since we started this band.” For most westerners and/or office assistants, country music is in the air, as inescapable as Miller Lite at a demolition derby, so it isn’t an alien format to the group. After mid-tempo rocking and doing the singersongwriter thing “we sped up the tempo and made it country,” Martens says. They quickly learned to appreciate the nuances of country music’s sound, and began to manipulate it. “We might not be country, but we are re-appropriating the country sound,” Opatz says, “which has an expected sound, so it’s easier to surprise people with unexpected emotion, turns of phrase or figurative language.” Yeah, I heard Toby Keith says that to all the girls. The Best Westerns perform at the final night of their VFW residency on Thu., Feb. 23, at 9 PM, with VTO and Stepponwolfshit. 245 W. Main St. Free. arts@missoulanews.com


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Running on empty Surprise! This Means War misses the mark by Scott Renshaw

It has taken decades of watching and writing about movies, but This Means War might have finally helped me articulate what should be a fundamental rule for escapist entertainment: The more preposterous the situation at the center, the more genuine the characters need to be. Suspension of disbelief is a fundamental requirement for any fantastic taleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;cinematic or otherwiseâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; but that disbelief needs to be suspended from something. And that something is almost always the central characters. You only find yourself sneering, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yeah,

wife (Abigail Spencer) and young son (John Paul Ruttan), and a childhood tragedy that apparently contributes to FDRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one-night-only womanizing ways. But without a firm grasp on who these guys are and what they want, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing here but the gimmick that finds them using satellites and gadgetry to thwart one another. Lauren, as a character, makes even less sense. Her erratic personality suggests she should be under surveillance for more traditional reasons. Is she the anxious, solitary basket case who freaks out when she sees her

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rightâ&#x20AC;? when the filmmakers have given you no reason to believe that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anything at stake. The most fertile breeding ground for incredulity is the empty hole where a protagonist should be. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no inherent reason why the premise for This Means War couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have generated a thoroughly entertaining â&#x20AC;&#x153;something for everyoneâ&#x20AC;? movieâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a romantic-action-comedy with a heart. The set-up finds C.I.A. field agents Tuck (Tom Hardy) and FDR (Chris Pine) as work partners and best friends, stuck behind desks after an assignment goes bad. With extra time to kill, the sensitive Tuck starts pondering his lackluster romantic life, and tries out an online dating site meetup with Lauren (Reese Witherspoon). Soon thereafter, right around the corner in a video store, ladiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; man FDR meets a hot babe who catches his eye. And son of a gun if it isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Lauren. When the two pals figure out that theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re interested in the same woman, they each set out to win her over, using all the professional and technological C.I.A. resources at their disposal. Co-screenwriter Simon Kinberg worked wonders with a similar â&#x20AC;&#x153;romantic entanglements go high-techâ&#x20AC;? concept in Mr. & Mrs. Smith, so either he had a load of crap to begin with in the story written by Timothy Dowling and Marcus Gautesen, or he completely forgot how to anchor a story in the real world. There are a few token moments that establish some light-hearted oneupmanship between Tuck and FDR, but virtually nothing to indicate why such an intense rivalry would suddenly emerge between two apparently inseparable bros. The film introduces Tuckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s separation from his

ex-boyfriend on the street with his new fiancĂŠe? Or is she the cocky, self-assured woman who parries every FDR come-on in that video store with saucy banter? When the time comes for Lauren to make her difficult torn-between-two-lovers, acting-like-a-fool choice, might it have been possible for her selection to advance her character arc in some way, instead of feeling like the result of a coin flip? Witherspoon can be an appealing comedic performer, but Lauren isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t merely unsympathetic; she practically doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t exist except as a trophy. There are stretchesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not the ones that in any way involve the vengeance-seeking crime boss (Til Schweiger) who pointlessly raises the stakesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;when This Means War works on a purely superficial level. Chelsea Handler capably negotiates the role of Laurenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dirty-mouthed best friend to deliver the biggest laugh lines. And some of the best gags built around the agentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; escalating war of woo sneak in for a score. But, in general, director McGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (Charlieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Angels) film just barrels ahead, not truly exciting enough to work as a thrill ride, or funny enough to work as a simple comedy. It has to find something meaningful in this chaotic triangleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;like the perils of keeping parts of yourself secret from the people you claim to love, as Mr. & Mrs. Smith did so effectively between gunshots. This film never does. The problem isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the wild situations; the problem is that the wild situations donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t actually involve anything that feels like a person. This Means War continues at the Carmike 12. arts@missoulanews.com

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Missoula Independent Page 33 February 23 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; March 1, 2012


Scope Noise Soundcheck Film Movie Shorts OPENING THIS WEEK ACT OF VALOR The world’s finest navy, the United States Navy, unleashes Navy SEALs on kidnappers and terrorists. You done messed up again, terrorists. Starring Alex Veadov and dozens of uncredited SEALs. Rated R. Carmike 12: 1:30, 4:45, 7:30 and 10 pm. Big D: 1, 4, 6:45 and 9:20 pm. Pharaohplex: 6:50 and 9:10 pm, with 3 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Stadium 14: 12:10, 2:30, 4:50, 7:10 and 9:30 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat.

dancer? It seems black-and-white to me. Starring Jean Dujardin and Bérénice Bejo. Rated PG-13. Wilma: 7 and 9 pm nightly. Big Sky Documentary Film Festival screening films Fri.-Sun.

robot and the boy’s father. Directed by Martin Scorcese and starring Ben Kingsley and Sacha Baron Cohen. Rated PG. Carmike 12: 3D: 7:35. Stadium 14: 3D: 1:05 and 7:05 pm.

10 pm. Stadium 14: 12:25, 3:25, 6:25 and 9:25 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. 1, 3:50, 6:40 and 9:30 pm, Mon.-Thu.

CHRONICLE Three high school boys gain superpowers and have a surprising lack of control when it comes to their urges. Starring, Michael B. Jordan and Michael Kelly. PG-13. Village 6: 4 and 7 pm, with matinees at 9:30 pm on Fri. and Sat. and 1 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Stadium 14: 12:40,

JOURNEY 2: THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND A kid and his mom’s boyfriend search for grandpa on a topsy-turvy island where big things are small and vice versa. Opposites, people love ‘em. Starring Dwayne Johnson and Michael Caine. Rated PG. Carmike 12: 4:45 and 9:45 pm. 3D: 1:45 and 7:15 pm. Pharaohplex: Sat. and Sun at

THIS MEANS WAR Two CIA agents battle for Reese Witherspoon’s affections with gadgets galore. Will either try writing her a poem? Starring Chris Pine and Tom Hardy. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12: 1:15, 4:15, 7:30 and 10 pm. Pharaohplex: 2, 4, 7 and 9 pm. Stadium 14: 12:05, 2:35, 5:05, 7:35 and 9:55 pm, Fri.-Sun. 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 and 9:25 pm, Mon.-

3 pm. 3D: 7 and 9 pm. Stadium 14: 12:05 and 5:05 pm, Fri.-Sun. and 4:25 pm Mon.-Thu.

Thu. Entertainer: 4, 7 and 9 pm. Mountain: 2, 4, 7 and 9 pm.

MY WEEK WITH MARILYN Michelle Williams plays Marilyn Monroe in this story about the terse relationship between Sir Laurence Olivier and the actress during production of The Prince and the Showgirl. Rated R. Stadium 14: 2:30 and 7:10, Fri.-Sun. 1:15 and 7:15 pm, Mon.-Thu.

THE VOW Hello V-Day! Rachel McAdams wakes up from a coma with severe memory loss and finds her hunky husband romancing her once again. Starring Channing Tatum. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12: 1:30, 4:30, 7 and 9:30 pm. Pharaohplex: 7 and 9 pm, with matinees Sat. and Sun at 3 pm. Stadium 14: 1:10, 4:10, 7:10 and 9:30 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. Showboat: 4:15, 7 and 9 PM.

Goat for it. Wanderlust opens Friday at the Village 6 and Stadium 14.

1:10, 4:10, 7:10 and 9:30 pm, Mon.-Thu. Mountain: 2, 4, 7 and 9 pm. GONE Amanda Seyfried’s sister disappears and Amanda is such an egomaniac that she thinks the serial killer who tried to kidnap her two years ago is the culprit, cuz it’s always about Amanda. Rated PG13. Carmike 12: 1:45, 4:45, 7:45 and 10 pm. Stadium 14: 12:20, 2:40, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50 and midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 and 9:45 pm, Mon.-Thu. TYLER PERRY’S GOOD DEEDS A wealthy businessman learns how the other half lives when he falls for the gorgeous cleaning lady. Starring Tyler Perry and Gabrielle Union. Rated PG13. 4:15 and 7:15 pm, with shows at 9:45 pm of Fri. and Sat. and 1:15 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. WANDERLUST A couple of busy Manhattan professionals find themselves out of work and living on a rural commune and having sexy, topless good times. Starring Paul Rudd and Jennifer Aniston. Rated R. Village 6: 4:30 and 7:30 pm, with shows at 10 pm of Fri. and Sat. and 1 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Stadium 14: 12:25, 2:45, 4:55, 7:25, 9:45 and midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. 1:20, 4:20, 7:20 and 9:20 pm, Mon.-Thu.

NOW PLAYING THE ARTIST Will talking pictures end silent film star George Valentin’s career? Will he find love with a young

2:40, 4:40, 7:40 and 9:40 pm, with midnight shows Fri. and Sat. 1:20, 3:30, 6:40 and 9:20 pm, Mon.-Thu. Entertainer: 4, 7 and 9 pm. THE DESCENDANTS George Clooney takes his daughters on a trip to confront the man she has been cheating on him with. Did I mention his wife is on life support? Rated R. Stadium 14: 12:55, 3:55, 6:55 and 9:25 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. 1:05, 4:05, 6:50 and 9:15 pm, Mon.-Thu. GHOST RIDER: SPIRIT OF VENGEANCE Fire in the hole! Johnny Blaze sets his head on fire and does battle with the devil. Starring Nicolas Cage. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12: 3D: 1, 4, 7 and 9:20 pm. Village 6: 7 pm daily, with matinees Sat. and Sun. at 1 pm. 3D: 4 pm daily, with 10 pm shows on Fri. and Sat. Stadium 14: 12:40, 2:40, 4:40, 7:20 and 9:35 pm, with midnight shows Fri. and Sat. 1:35, 6:45 and 9:25 pm, Mon.-Thu. Mountain: 2:15, 4:15, 7:15 and 9:15 pm. THE GREY Wolves hunt Liam Neeson in Alaska after his plane goes down. Wolves, you just messed up. Rated R. Village 6: 4 and 7 pm, with shows at 10 pm on Fri. and Sat. and 1 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Stadium 14: 4:05 and 9:40 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. HUGO Based on a children’s book no one in this office has ever read, Hugo is the story of a Parisian orphan who lives in the walls of a train station during the 1930s. There is a mystery, too, involving a

Missoula Independent Page 34 February 23 – March 1, 2012

SAFE HOUSE A young CIA agent is tasked with looking after a fugitive in a safe house. Denzel shows up and stuff gets real. Starring Denzel Washington and Ryan Reynolds. Rated R. Carmike 12: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 and 10 pm. Village 6: 4:30 and 7:30 pm, with shows at 10 pm on Fri. and Sat. and 1:30 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Pharaohplex: 6:50 and 9:10 pm, with 3 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Stadium 14: 1, 4, 7 and 9:35 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. Mountain: 2, 4:30, 6:50 and 9:15 pm. THE SECRET WORLD OF ARRIETTY A family of four-inch tall people are discovered living in regular-sized people’s house. Worlds collide. Starring the voices of Amy Poehler and Will Arnett. Rated G. Carmike 12: 1, 4, 6:30 and 9 pm. Stadium 14: 12:15, 2:35, 4:45, 7:15 and 9:20 pm, with midnight shows Fri. and Sat. 1:45, 4:15, 6:35 and 9:15 pm, Mon.-Thu. STAR WARS: EPISODE I 3D Two Jedi Knights uncover a galaxy-wide plot. This time in 3D. Starring Ewan McGregor and Natalie Portman. Rated PG. Carmike 12: 3D: 1, 4, 7 and

THE WOMAN IN BLACK In a time when men wore pocket watches, a young lawyer goes to a remote village and finds it terrorized by the vengeful ghost of a scorned woman. Starring Daniel Radcliffe. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12: 4:15 and 9:50 pm. Stadium 14: 12:10, 4:50, and 9:20 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. 4:30 and 9:30 pm, Mon.-Thu. Showboat: 4, 7:15 and 9:15 pm. Capsule reviews by Jason McMackin. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., Feb. 24. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-F I LM; S t a d i u m 14 i n K a l i s p e l l – 752 - 78 0 4 . Showblispell–752-7804.


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M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

February 23 - March 1, 2012

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Scholarships for former residents of Watson Children’s Shelter. The Watson Children’s Shelter Alumni Educational Support Fund now has a new funding source for any students pursuing higher education, trade school or specialized training. Eligibility and application is available at www.watsonchildrensshelter.org. There is no deadline for submission. Non-profit martial arts school fundraiser. Spaghetti dinner/silent auction Friday 24th 5 p.m. $5/person $15/family 354 Cooper Hamilton.

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Table of contents

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Advice Goddess . . . . . .C2 Free Will Astrology . . .C4 Public Notices . . . . . . . .C5

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Send it. Post it. classified@missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com


COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

ADVICE GODDESS By Amy Alkon

SHOVE THY NEIGHBOR My commitment-phobic boyfriend of several years is also my neighbor. I resolved to make it work with him and then caught him on FriendFinder exchanging numerous messages with some woman in Tijuana. He claimed he was just being friendly. I asked if he’d correspond with a guy. He responded, “No. I’m not gay.” Humiliatingly, I’ve let him use me for things he can’t afford. (He’s been unemployed for two years.) He sometimes showers at his tiny apartment but basically uses it for storage. He refuses to move in with me so we could pay expenses with money his grandma gives him for his rent, but he spends all his time at my place (where I pay for everything). He partakes of my cable TV, internet, food, and beer, and he even eats food I buy specially for my 9year-old son. Well, he’s now my exboyfriend. As he’s been many times before. What’s with him? Is talking to some random woman on the internet worth losing everything over? – Fuming Feminists have hammered into us girls that we aren’t supposed to sit around dreaming of being rescued by some prince. Somehow, I don’t think the alternative’s supposed to be opting for the mooch neighbor who eats your kid’s food while using your DSL to talk to some chiquita in Tijuana. Reality, like angry little dogs, often bites. Every day, I wake up wishing for home-invasion housecleaners. But, as much as both nature and I abhor a vacuum, at a certain point, I have to pull one out, lest my rugs provide shelter to a lot of little things with a lot of little legs. You, likewise, can pretend you’ve found Prince Charming, but that won’t transform your Parasite Charming (not even if you throw both hands into the air and say “Poof!” six or seven times, very energetically). Why do you keep taking him back? You’re probably engaging in “future discounting,’ an econ term explaining how we’re prone to forgo big benefits down the road for a small immediate reward. It helps to recognize that you’ll be tempted to go for the quick fix. You’ll be lonely some night and want a snuggle, rationalize all the reasons he isn’t so bad after all, and before you know it, there’ll be a familiar barnacle attaching itself to the beer tap on your hull. To avoid backsliding, don’t rely on yourself to gin up self-control in the moment; use tricks like “precommitment” to your goal, a strategy originated by Nobel Prizewinning economist Thomas Schelling and recommended by Dr. Roy Baumeister and John Tierney in their book, “Willpower.” Pre-

commitment involves setting things up in advance so it’s hard to cheat. Research suggests that two of the most helpful measures are recruiting others to monitor your progress and establishing financial penalties for relapse the higher, the better. It also helps to give yourself small rewards for daily good behavior. Maybe put aside $5 on each day you don’t call him and give yourself occasional lump-sum rewards (like at the two months loser-free mark). The website stickK.com can help. (You can configure it to forfeit your money to a cause you hate if you fail.) Research from Baumeister’s lab also suggests that practicing daily self-discipline unrelated to your goal (say, making yourself a weird green health shake every morning) increases overall self-control. This should increase your self-respect. Which should increase your chances of having a man in your life who sings your praises stuff like “your lips are like wine,” not “your Wi-Fi’s, like, free.”

Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio

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bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

PET OF THE WEEK Dallas has a contagious grin! The glass is ALWAYS half-full from her point of view. Looking for an active companion? Come spend some time with Dallas! She is super smart and fun to take hiking. She'll keep up with you on outdoor adventures but is happy to snuggle on the couch at the end of a long day. She is already housetrained, cratetrained, and knows basic cues. Call the Humane Society at (406)549-3934 for more information or visit www.myhswm.org.

IDLE WORSHIP I’ve been delighted and humbled by my interactions with this girl who goes to my favorite coffee shop. She is in a band and probably has lots of dates and fans, but I keep picturing us together, and not just sexually making dinner, going on hikes, doing little couple-y things. I’m not sure why she’d want to go out with me, but I can’t stop thinking about her. –Fixated It’s the teenage fangirl approach to being a man. (Are your bedroom walls plastered with photos of her that you took while pretending to check your phone?) Here you are imagining this woman running slow-motion through a field of daisies into your arms. The reality: She’s walking out of the coffee shop, probably without giving you a second thought. Yes, she might be out of your league. There’s a way to know for sure in seconds, and it’s by asking her out. Pining over a woman transforms her from a person to an unapproachable ideal. The more you grow your fantasy girl the more impossible it’ll be for you to speak to the real deal. If you want an imaginary something in your life, have an imaginary goldfish. Should things go badly, you could make it die an imaginary death and flush it down your imaginary toilet.

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Sign up for fall NOT ARTISTIC? Come have some fun painting. Instruction & art supplies furnished. Complimentary wine or tea. 327-8757

Art Hang up • 839 S. Higgins

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail Adv i c e A m y @ a o l . c o m (www.advicegoddess.com).

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2 February 23 – March 1, 2012


COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

GENERAL

Peace happens... One heart at a time.

ASSISTANCE MANAGER, Lewistown Rental, LLC - Looking for an opportunity in a dynamic, growing company? This full-time position is responsible for running an equipment rental operation. Successful candidate will have mechanical and customer service knowledge, HS diploma/GED, and 2 years management experience. Wage negotiable. Benefits include health insurance and IRA. Send resume/references to lewrental@midrivers.com or call 406-538-9033

546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

Ken's Barber Shop Children & Walk-ins Welcome Haircuts-$8.50 • Beard Trims-$4 8:30am - 5:30pm • Tuesday-Saturday 1114 Cedar St, Missoula, MT • 728-3957

BANQUET MANAGER. Holiday Inn #9623638 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS

MUSIC

1st Interstate Pawn. 3110 South Reserve, is now open! Buying gold and silver. Buying, selling, and pawning items large and small. We pay more and sell for less. 406-721(PAWN)7296.

MUSIC LESSONS In-house lessons on guitar, ukelele and piano. Sign up now! MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds entrance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 549-0013. www.montanamusic.com

FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation non-denominational 1-800-475-0876

ANTIQUES HUFF’S ANTIQUE SHOW. Feb. 25th, 10-5, and Feb. 26th, 104, MetraPark, Billings. Admission $5.00 - good both days. (406)238-9796

COMPUTERS Even Macs are computers! Need help with yours? CLARKE CONSULTING @ 5496214 RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway 543-8287

Thift Stores 1136 W. Broadway 930 Kensington

Outlaw Music

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Missoula's Stringed Instrument Pro Shop!

Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

724 Burlington Ave. outlawmusicguitarshop.com

Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 7210190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

PETS & ANIMALS DOGS: #2022 Blk/Brown, Collie X, SF, 2.5yrs; #2121 Blk/brown, Aussie X, NM, 10yrs; #2159 Black/white, Heeler X, SF, 1yr; #2170 Black, Lab X, NM, 10mo; #2176 Blue Merrel, Great Dane, SF, 4yrs; #2214 White/tan, Lab/Pit X, SF, 1.5yrs; #2245 Blk/white, Husky X, NM, 2yrs; #2260 Brown/white, St Bernard X, SF, 8yrs; #2270 Black, Pit Bull, SF, 7yrs; #2271 Blk/tan,

EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

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Great Gear Great Prices 111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

EMPLOYMENT

Sharpei/Jack Russell X, NM, 8yrs; #2282 Tan/blk, Shep/Rhodi X, NM, 5yrs.For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 3 6 3 - 5 3 1 1 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840. PIGS: #2179 Blackish/Grey, Pot Belly Pig, SF, 5yrs CATS: #0624 Black, Am Short Hair, NM, 4 yr; #1230 White/Grey, Tabby, ALH, SF, 9yrs; #1330 Black/white, ASH, SF; #1551 Dilute Torti, DMH, SF; #1553 Black, Bombay X, SF; #1604 Orange/white, M, DSH, 1 1/2yrs; #1621 Dilute Torti, SF, BSH, 8 yrs; #1623 Orange Tabby, DSH, SF, 2yr; #1676 Orange Tabby, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #1809 Calico, Siamese X, SF, 8 months; #1818 Black/white, Siamese X, SF, 2yrs; #1833 Black, DSH, SF, 5yrs; #1857 DMH, SF, 4yrs; #1886 Black, DSH, NM, 6mo; #1948 Grey, DSH, SF, 10ys; #1949 Black, DMH, SF, 1yr; #2061 White/red, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #2098 Black, ASH, NM, 4yrs; #2125 Dilute Calico, DSH, SF, 4yrs #2145 Orange/white, Maine Coon X, NM, 7yrs; #2147 Grey, Maine Coon, NM, 2yrs; #2162 Grey Torbi, British

Shorthair, SF, 7yrs; #2163Blk/white, DMH, NM, 5yrs; #2164 Dilute Calico, Maine Coon X, SF, 4yrs; #2165 Orange, Main Coon X, NM, 7yrs; #2166 Black Torti, DLH, SF, 14yrs; #2171 Black Torti, DSH, SF, 1yr; #2175 Cream/grey, Persian, SF, 2yrs; #2182 Blk/white, ASH, NM, 7yrs; #2195 Grey/creme, Maine Coon X, SF, 4yrs; #2200 Grey Tabby, ASH, NM, 2yrs; #2242 Grey Tabby, DSH, SF, 5yrs; #2258 White/Blk, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #2264 Cali/Rust/Grey, DLH, SF, 5yrs.For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

GARAGE SALES After you scour the sales, plan your savvy weekend at MissoulaEvents.net

BARTENDING $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training available. 1800-965-6520 ext. 278 CONSERVATION TECHNICIAN. Outside work, must be able to lift and carry 75 pounds. #9812387 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 FIRE LOOKOUT. Relief position #9812435 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 Job hunting is stressful. You deserve a break. Get started at www.MissoulaEvents.net

TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-545-4546

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PRESCHOOL TEACHER. Honeybear Daycare #2981253 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

OPPORTUNITIES

Wildland Fire Training; Basic and Refresher. 406-543-0013 www.blackbull-wildfire.com

HEALTH CAREERS REGISTERED NURSE. Providence cardiac surgery. #9623635 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

SALES

Dream Again! Earn an income you deserve. Free online training, flexible hours. www.homebiz-2freedom.com $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easyworkjobs.com Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

FINANCIAL REPRESENTATIVE. NW Mutual Insurance #9959893

PROFESSIONAL CITY OF NEW TOWN hiring police chief. Salary DOQ/exp. Great Benefits. Must be eligible for ND P.O.S.T. Send resume: City of New Town, P.O. Box 309, New Town, ND 58763, email: ntauditor@restel.net COMPUTER PROGRAMMER. #2981243 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 EARN $500 A DAY by selling Final Expense Insurance policies to the ever growing senior market. Same Day Advances. Great Agent Benefits. Proven Lead System. Liberal Underwriting. Exotic Incentive Trips. LIFE INS. LICENSE REQUIRED. Call Lincoln Heritage: 1-888-713-6020

Assistant Professor School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science The University of Montana in Missoula, MT seeks an Assistant Professor for the School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science. Interested applicants should visit http://umjobs.silkroad.com/ to view full job description and instructions on how to apply. (U of M Tracking Code 347-254) ADA/EOE/AA/Veteran’s Preference Employer

Program Specialist Housing Choice Voucher The Missoula Housing Authority seeks a high-energy, dedicated individual to perform duties of Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Program Specialist. Position will be full time. Position starts at $11.32 per hour. Duties include: Under general supervision, coordinates and implements the policies and procedures of the assisted housing programs administered by the Housing Authority. For required application package visit www.missoulahousing.org/about/employment or contact Adam Ragsdale, Missoula Housing Authority, 1235 34th Street, Missoula, MT 59801. (406) 549-4116 x128, aragsdale@missoulahousing.org. Applications reviewed every Friday until position is filled.

SKILLED LABOR METAL WELDER/FABRICATOR #9939856 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 SATELLITE INSTALLER. Western Montana #9959820 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3 February 23 – March 1, 2012


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): I invite you to identify all the things in your life that you really don’t need any more: gadgets that have become outdated, clothes that no longer feel like you, once-exciting music and books and art works that no longer mean what they once did. Don’t stop there. Pinpoint the people who have let you down, the places that lower your vitality, and the activities that have become boring or artificial. Finally, Aries, figure out the traditions that no longer move you, the behavior patterns that no longer serve you, and the compulsive thoughts that have a freaky life of their own. Got all that? Dump at least some of them. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): If you’re a woman, you could go to the perfume section of the department store and buy fragrances that would cause you to smell like Jennifer Lopez, Britney Spears, Eva Longoria, or Paris Hilton. If you’re a man, an hour from now you could be beaming an aroma that makes you resemble a celebrity like Antonio Banderas, Usher, David Beckham, or Keith Urban. You could even mix and match, wearing the Eva Longoria scent on your manly body or Usher on your female form. But I don’t recommend that you do any of the above. More than ever before you need to be yourself, your whole self, and nothing but yourself. Trying to act like or be like anyone else should be a taboo of the first degree. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “I try to take one day at a time,” says Ashleigh Brilliant, “but sometimes several days attack me all at once.” I think you may soon be able to say words to that effect, Gemini and that’s a good thing. Life will seem more concentrated and meaningful than usual. Events will flow faster and your awareness will be extra intense. As a result, you should have exceptional power to unleash transformations that could create ripples lasting for months. Would you like each day to be the equivalent of nine days? Or would four be enough for you?

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): When actor Ashton Kutcher is working on the set of his TV show Two and a Half Men, he enjoys spacious digs. His trailer is two stories high and has two bathrooms as well as a full kitchen. Seven 60-inch TVs are available for his viewing pleasure. As you embark on your journey to the far side of reality, Cancerian, it might be tempting for you to try to match that level of comfort. But what’s more important than material luxury will be psychological and spiritual aids that help keep you attuned to your deepest understandings about life. Be sure you’re wellstocked with influences that keep your imagination vital and upbeat. Favorite symbols? Uplifting books? Photos of mentors? Magic objects?

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Veterans of war who’ve been wounded by shrapnel often find that years later, some of the metal fragments eventually migrate to the surface and pop out of their skin. The moral of the story: The body may take a long time to purify itself of toxins. The same is true about your psyche. It might not be able to easily and quickly get rid of the poisons it has absorbed, but you should never give up hoping it will find a way. Judging by the astrological omens, I think you are very close to such a climactic cleansing and catharsis, Leo.

c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Distilled water is a poor conductor of electricity. For H2O to have electroconductivity, it must contain impurities in the form of dissolved salts. I see a timely lesson in this for you, Virgo. If you focus too hard on being utterly clean and clear, some of life’s rather chaotic but fertile and invigorating energy may not be able to flow through you. That’s why I suggest you experiment with being at least a little impure and imperfect. Don’t just tolerate the messiness. Learn from it; thrive on it; even exult in it.

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): According to my reading of the astrological omens, you are neither in a red-alert situation nor are you headed for one. A pink alert may be in effect, however. Thankfully, there’s no danger or emergency in the works. Shouting and bolting and leaping won’t be necessary. Rather, you may simply be called upon to come up with unexpected responses to unpredicted circumstances. Unscripted plot twists could prompt you to take actions you haven’t rehearsed. It actually might be kind of fun as long as you play with the perspective Shakespeare articulated in As You Like It: “All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players.”

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Dear Rob: For months I’ve had a recurring dream in which I own a pet snake. Here’s the problem: The only cage I have to keep the snake in is sadly inadequate. It has widely spaced bars that the snake just slips right through. In the dream I am constantly struggling to keep the snake in its cage, which is exhausting, since it’s impossible. Just this morning, after having the dream for the billionth time, I FINALLY asked myself, what’s so terrible about letting the snake out of its cage? So I gratefully wrote myself this permission note: ‘It is hereby allowed and perfectly acceptable to let my dreamsnake out of its cage to wander freely.’ Scorpio Devotee.” Dear Devotee: You have provided all your fellow Scorpios with an excellent teaching story for the upcoming weeks. Thank you!

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist Susan Clarion RNC CA MATS 552-7919 Energy Balancing and Acupressure Meridians. Hand and foot reflexology. 493-6824 or 3994363 IF YOU USED YAZ/YAZMIN/OCELLA BIRTH CONTROL PILLS or a NuvaRING Vaginal Ring Contraceptive between 2001 and the present and developed blood clots, suffered a stroke, heart attack or required gall bladder removal you may be entitled to compensation. Call Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800535-5727

Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie Clarion 406-552-7919 National Alliance on Mental Illness, Missoula Affiliate. WEEKLY SUPPORT GROUPS Family & Friends: Tues. 6:30 p.m.,Thurs. 10:00 a.m. Providence.Ctr., 902 N. Orange St., Rm. 109. Recovering? Call 552-5494 for meeting information. Past life regression. Find out what your soul has experienced in other lifetimes. It helps you understand your strengths, talents, fears and rela-

Awaken your Spirit

LINDA BLAIR is offering computerized homeopathy and testing via the BodyScan 2010 for you and your pets, as well as colonics. 28 years in holistic medicine. 406-471-9035

Shamanic counseling

Hypnosis & Imagery

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ESCAPE Swedish•Deep Tissue Reiki•Vibrational Energy Work Chakra Clearing

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MARSHA KIRCHNER 406-728-8458

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f

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): For million of years, black kite raptors made their nests with leaves, twigs, grass, mud, fur, and feathers. In recent centuries they have also borrowed materials from humans, like cloth, string, and paper. And in the last few decades, a new element has become quite popular. Eighty-two percent of all black kite nest-builders now use white plastic as decoration. I suggest you take inspiration from these adaptable creatures, Sagittarius. It’s an excellent time for you to add some wrinkles to the way you shape your home base. Departing from tradition could add significantly to your levels of domestic bliss.

Carpal Tunnel?

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): There are many examples of highly accomplished people whose early education was problematical. Thomas Edison’s first teacher called him “addled,” and thereafter he was home-schooled by his mother. Winston Churchill did so poorly in school he was punished. Benjamin Franklin had just two years of formal education. As for Einstein, he told his biographer, “my parents were worried because I started to talk comparatively late, and they consulted a doctor because of it.” What all these people had in common, however, is that they became brilliant at educating themselves according to their own specific needs and timetable. Speaking of which: The coming weeks will be an excellent time for you Capricorns to plot and design the contours of your future learning.

Try Acupuncture 728-2325

h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Nigeria has abundant deposits of petroleum. Since 1974, oil companies have paid the country billions of dollars for the privilege of extracting its treasure. And yet the majority of Nigerians, over 70 percent, live on less than a dollar a day. Where does the money go? That’s a long story, with the word “corruption” at its heart. Now let me ask you, Aquarius: Is there a gap between the valuable things you have to offer and the rewards you receive for them? Are you being properly compensated for your natural riches? The coming weeks will be an excellent time to address this issue.

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Gawker.com notes that American politician John McCain tends to repeat himself a lot. Researchers discovered that he has told the same joke at least 27 times in five years. (And it’s such a feeble joke, it’s not worth re-telling.) In the coming week, Pisces, pease please please avoid any behavior that resembles this repetitive, habit-bound laziness. You simply cannot afford to be imitating who you used to be and what you used to do. As much as possible, reinvent yourself from scratch and have maximum fun doing it. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Msla Affiliate.

Acupuncture & Herbal Care

Since 1992

WEEKLY SUPPORT GROUPS

Family & Friends: Tues. 6:30 p.m.,Thurs. 10:00 a.m. Providence.Ctr., 902 N. Orange St., Rm. 109 Recovering?: Call 552-5494 for mtg. info

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4 February 23 – March 1, 2012

tionships. 406-961-4449. Serving Western Montana. Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 241-3405 With over 500 events per month, you’re sure to find something for Body, Mind and Spirit at www.MissoulaEvents.net

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PUBLIC NOTICES

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ADULT

CITIY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, until 3:00 p.m., on Tuesday, February 28, 2012, and will then be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for construction of the following: City of Missoula Project 09005 Safe Routes to Schools Improvements The project consists of curb ramp and crosswalk related improvements at various locations adjacent to schools in the City of Missoula, Montana This project is funded in part with funding from the MDT CTEP Program and is subject to all applicable Federal/State regulations, as indicated within the specifications. Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project Manual addressed to the City Clerk, City of Missoula, enclosed in sealed envelopes plainly marked on the outside

“Proposal for City of Missoula Project 09-005 Safe Routes to Schools improvements” The envelopes shall also be marked with the Bidder’s Name, Address and Montana Contractor’s Registration Number, if available. Proposals must be accompanied by cash, cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of

the contract, and protection of the City of Missoula against liability. A complete set of the Contract Documents and Project Manual will be furnished the Contractors making application therefore from the Office of the City Engineer, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana, upon payment of $50.00 by company check, cashier’s check, or bank money order (cash can not be accepted). Full amount of payment will be refunded upon return of the plans and specifications in good condition within ten (10) days after bid opening. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1406-444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to executing the contract. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula Business Licensing requirements. All iron or steel materials to be permanently incorporated into the Project shall be produced in the United States, and certified as indicated within the specifications. There will be a nonmandatory pre-bid conference at the Mayor’s Conference Room, Missoula City Hall, 435 Ryman St., Missoula, MT. at 11:00 a.m. on Thursday, February 16, 2012. Interested contractors are encouraged to attend. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their race, ancestry, color, handicap, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital status, creed, ex-offender status, physical condition, political belief, public assistance status or sexual preference except where these criteria are reasonable bona fide occupational qualifications. The City of Missoula reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids, and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to the bid opening at 3:00 p.m. on Tuesday, February 28, 2012. The City of Missoula provides accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the City. In the case of documents, recordings or verbal presentations, alternative accessible formats will be provided. To request accommodation, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (406)552-6080. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the city’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, until 3:00 p.m., on Tuesday, February 28, 2012, and will then be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for construction of the following: City of Missoula Project 10019 Lolo Street – Bridge to Duncan Dr. - Curb and Sidewalk Improvements This project consists of removing and replacing approximately 6,000 square feet of city sidewalk, 2,300 lineal feet of new curb, sewer service stubs, and associated improvements. This project is funded in part with funding from the MDT CTEP Program and is subject to all applicable Federal/State regulations, as indicated within the specifications. Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project Manual addressed to the City Clerk, City of Missoula, enclosed in sealed envelopes plainly marked on the outside “Proposal for City of Missoula Project 10-019 Lolo Street – Bridge to Duncan curb and sidewalk improve-

ments” The envelopes shall also be marked with the Bidder’s Name, Address and Montana Contractor’s Registration Number, if available. Proposals must be accompanied by cash, cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of the City of Missoula against liability. A complete set of the Contract Documents and Project Manual will be furnished the Contractors making application therefore from the Office of the City Engineer, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana, upon payment of $50.00 by company check, cashier’s check, or bank money order (cash can not be accepted). Full amount of payment will be refunded upon return of the plans and specifications in good condition within ten (10) days after bid opening. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1406-444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to executing the contract. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula Business Licensing requirements. All iron or steel materials to be permanently incorporated into the Project shall be produced in the United States, and certified as indicated within the specifications. There will be a nonmandatory pre-bid conference at the Mayor’s Conference Room, Missoula City Hall, 435 Ryman St., Missoula, MT. at 11:00 a.m. on Thursday, February 16, 2012. Interested contractors are encouraged to attend. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their race, ancestry, color, handicap, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital status, creed, ex-offender status, physical condition, political belief, public assistance status or sexual preference except where these criteria are reasonable bona fide occupational qualifications. The City of Missoula reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids, and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to the bid opening at 3:00 p.m. on February 28, 2012. The City of Missoula provides accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the City. In the case of documents, recordings or verbal presentations, alternative accessible formats will be provided. To request accommodation, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (406)552-6080. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the city’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID STREET MAINTENANCE MATERIALS Notice is hereby given that SEVEN separate sealed bids will be received at the office of the Missoula City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, until 1:00 p.m., on March

1, 2012 and will then be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room for furnishing the following Materials: City Project No. 100-2012 MATERIAL BID ITEMS (1) 500 Tons of Emulsified Asphalt (3) 5,000 Tons of Hot Mix Asphalt (4) 4,000 Tons of Sand Surfacing (5) 4,500 Tons Seal Coat Aggregate (6) 3,000 Tons 3/8” ‘Driveway Grade’ Hot Mix Asphalt (7) 8,000 Tons Grade “D” Hot Mix Asphalt (8) 1,000 Tons Drain Aggregate (sump rock) Bidders shall bid on bid proposal forms addressed to the City Clerk, City of Missoula, enclosed in separate sealed envelopes, with separate bid security for each bid, plainly marked on the outside either; “Proposal for City Project No. 101-2012 (1) 500 Tons of Emulsified Asphalt; or “Proposal for City Project No. 103-2012 (3) 5,000 Tons of Hot Mix Asphalt; or Proposal for City Project No. 104-2012 (4) 4,000 Tons of Sand Surfacing; or Proposal for City Project No. 105-2012 (5) 4,500 Tons of Seal Coat Aggregate; or Proposal for City Project No. 106-2012 (6) 3,000 Tons 3/8” ‘Driveway Grade’ Hot Mix Asphalt; or Proposal for City Project No. 107-2012 (7) 8,000 Tons Grade “D” Hot Mix Asphalt; or Proposal for City Project No. 108-2012 (8) 1,000 Tons Drain Aggregate (sump rock).” Proposals must be accompanied by cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of the City of Missoula against liability. Bidders may obtain specifications, bid proposal forms, and other information from the City Street Division, Public Works City Shop Complex, 1305 A Scott Street, Missoula, MT 59802. (406) 5526359 or 552-6361. Pursuant to Section 18-1-102 Montana Code Annotated, the City is required to provide purchasing preferences to resident Montana vendors and/or for products made in Montana, against the bid of a nonresident if the state of the nonresident enforces a preference for residents. The City of Missoula reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to bid opening at 1:00 p.m. on March 1, 2012. /s/ MARTHA L. REHBEIN City Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT Dept. No 1 Cause No. DV-11-1557 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION. ESTATE OF RICHARD HOWARD WILLIAMS, Deceased, DARINDA WILLIAMS, Personal Representative, and DARINDA WILLIAMS, Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT C. SAMUEL, Defendant. THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED RESPONDENT: Robert C. Samuel. You, the Defendant, are hereby summoned to answer the Complaint in this action, which is filed with the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer and serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff’s attorney within (21) twenty one days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action is brought to obtain relief of which is stated in the Complaint, specifically for the purpose of determining ownership in the Irrigation system purchased and used by Richard Williams and Darinda Williams on the Kona ranch Leasehold. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court, the 7th day of February, 2012. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of the District Court By: Andrew Jenks, Deputy Clerk

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5 February 23 – March 1, 2012


PUBLIC NOTICES MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-07-32 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF IRVING FRANK SATZER, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to PATRICIA ECKER and JUNE HAIG, the Co-Personal Representatives, return receipt requested, c/o Semansky Law Office, at PO Box 3267, Great Falls, MT 59403 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED 13th day of February, 2012. /s/ Patricia Ecker, CoPersonal Representative /s/ June Haig, CoPersonal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Judge Ed Mclean Cause No. DV-11-928 NOTICE OF HEARING In Re the Name Change of Shelby Erickson NOTICE is hereby given that the Petitioner, Crystal Baird, has filed a petition with this Court requesting to change the name of a minor child from Shelby Erickson to Shelby Lorraine Erickson. NOW, therefore, notice is given to all persons interested in the matter that a hearing on the petition will be held at the Courthouse in Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, on Wednesday February 29, 2012 at 1:15 p.m., in the above-named Court, at which time objections to said Petition will be heard. DATED this 19th day of January, 2012. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-11-1258 Judge: Hon. Ed McLean Dept. No. 1 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION. ZINVEST, LLC, Plaintiff, vs KIM SHEA, a/k/a KIM L. HALVORSON, individually and as surviving joint tenant of MICHAEL SHEA; BENEFICIAL MONTANA INC., d/b/a BENEFICIAL MORTGAGE CO., YOUNG ELECTRIC SIGN CO., DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, CHILD SUPPORT; DEANNA SAALE, and all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate, or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the complaint and adverse to plaintiff's ownership or any cloud upon plaintiff's title thereto, whether such claim or possible claim be present or contingent, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS: ALL OTHER PERSONS, UNKNOWN, CLAIMING OR WHO MIGHT CLAIM ANY RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, OR INTEREST IN OR LIEN OR ENCUMBRANCE UPON THE REAL PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT ADVERSE TO PLAINTIFF'S OWNERSHIP OR ANY CLOUD UPON PLAINTIFF'S TITLE THERETO, WHETHER SUCH CLAIM OR POSSIBLE CLAIM BE PRESENT OR CONTINGENT: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to respond to the Complaint to Quiet Title in this action which is filed in the Office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer and serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff's attorney, W. Scott Green, 2817 2nd Avenue North, Suite 300, Billings, Montana 59101, within twentyone (21) days after service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service, and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the arrangement prayed for in the Complaint. This action is brought to quiet title to the Plaintiff in the following described real property in Missoula County, Montana: A tract of land located in the SE1/4NW1/4 of Section 17, Township 12 North, Range 17 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Beginning at a point on the southwesterly boundary of Lot 3, Block 3 of Donovan Creek Acres, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof, which said point of beginning is south 1575.5 feet and east 2392.1 feet, more or less, from the northwest corner of said Section 17; thence from said point of beginning S.56º00'E., along said southwesterly boundary of Lot 3, Block 3, 310.0 feet to a point which is south 1748.8 feet and east 2649.1 feet, more or less, from said northwest corner of Section 17; thence S.34º00'W., 100.00 feet to a point which is south 1831.7 feet and east 2593.2 feet, more or less, from said northwest corner of Section 17; then N..56º00'W., 310.0 feet to a point which is south 1658.4 feet and East 2336.2 feet, more or less, from said northwest corner of Section 17; thence N.34º00'E., 100.0 feet to the point of beginning. As shown in Warranty Deed recorded September 8, 1970 in Book 25 of Micro Records at Page 197. Excepting therefrom the following described portion: Beginning at a point on the southwesterly boundary of Lot 3, Block 3 of Donovan Creek Acres, which said point is South 1575.5 feet and East 2391.1 feet, more or less, from the Northwest corner of said Section 17; thence S.56º00'E., a distance of 175.5 feet to the true point of beginning of this description; thence continuing S.56º00'E., a distance 134.5 feet; thence S.34º00'W., a distance of 100 feet; thence N.56º00'W., a distance of 129.0 feet; thence N.30º51'18"E., a distance

of 100.14 feet to the point of beginning. As shown in Warranty Deed recorded March 23, 1973 in Book 47 of Micro Records at Page 248. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court this 7th day of February, 2012. (SEAL) SHIRLEY E. FAUST, CLERK OF DISTRICT COURT By: /s/ Casey Kragh, DEPUTY CLERK MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-12-26 Ed McLean, Presiding. NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF KENNETH E. LIZOTTE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said Deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Victoria A. Otto, the Personal Representative, Return Receipt Requested, c/o Skjelset & Geer, PLLP, PO Box 4102, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 17th day of February, 2012. /s/ Victoria A. Otto, Personal Representative. /s/ Douglas G. Skjelset, Attorney for the Estate MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP-12-24 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF Wendy F. McQuaide, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Christian, Samson & Jones, PLLC, Attorneys for the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 310 West Spruce, Missoula, MT 59802 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 14th day of February, 2012. CHRISTIAN, SAMSON & JONES, PLLC. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Probate No. DP-11-222 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF BRUCE B. GAMBLE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to SHAWN E. ROSSCUP, attorney for the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at PO Box 9410, Missoula, Montana 59807 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED: December 13, 2011. /s/ Elizabeth Caldwell, Personal Representative. /s/ Shawn E. Rosscup, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-12-16 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF WILDA M. CULP, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to James R. Culp, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested,in care of Thiel Law Office, PLLC, 315 West Pine, PO Box 8125, Missoula, Montana 59807 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 1st day of February, 2012. THIEL LAW OFFICE PLLC Attorney for Personal Representative /s/ Matthew B. Thiel MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY, Cause No. DV-12-74 Dept. No 2. Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Claudine Noel Wiley Frohmader, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Claudine Noel Wiley Frohmader to Claudine Noel Cellier. The hearing will be on March 6, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: January 27, 2012. /s/ Robert L. Deschamps III, District Court Judge NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 12/18/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200632688, Bk 789, Pg 569, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Scott McWatters and Kelly McWatters, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Parcel I: A parcel of land being a portion of Govern-

ment Lot 2 located in Section 19, Township 14 North, Range 22 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana, being more particularly described as Tract A on Certificate of Survey No. 5585. Parcel II: Together with a non-exclusive easement for ingress and egress as described in easement recorded December 15, 2004, in Book 744 of Micro Records, Page 1640. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 03/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 21, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $277,830.31. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $259,993.39, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on May 3, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.97054) 1002.206690-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 12/15/98, recorded as Instrument No. 199834018, Bk. 566, Pg. 1422, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which David E. Chamberlain, a single person was Grantor, Norwest Mortgage, Inc. was Beneficiary and First Montana Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First Montana Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Parcel E of Certificate of Survey No. 3983, located in the Northwest quarter (NW1/4) of Section 17, Township 12 North, Range 17 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Less and excepting therefrom any right, title or interest in any minerals, mineral rights or related matters, including but not limited to oil, gas, coal, and other hydrocarbons. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 16, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $87,037.10. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $71,944.10, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 27, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, succes-

sor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.73996) 1002.156751-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/27/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200730982, Bk 809, Pg 883, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which James Leonard Sampson, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 15 of Hurt First Addition, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 16, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $164,920.13. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $158,804.88, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 27, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.97982) 1002.206550-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/30/10, recorded as Instrument No. 201008604, B:859, P:491, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Mark Edward Baker and Bernice G. Baker, unmarried was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 2 of Warren Acre Tracts, a platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 27, 2011, the amount

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C6 February 23 – March 1, 2012

necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $114,223.10. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $109,881.06, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on May 8, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.98015) 1002.206882-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 09/06/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200523744, Bk 759, Pg 1351, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Veronica L. Morgan, a married person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Parcel 5 of Certificate of Survey No. 351, located in the NW1/4 of Section 13, Township 15 North, Range 22 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 03/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 29, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $284,820.23. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $264,607.47, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on May 11, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.95442) 1002.200790-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 07/15/09, recorded as Instrument No.

200917604, Bk 843, Pg 1246, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Jhawn D. Thompson and Misty J. Thompson, as joint tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage, LLC was Beneficiary and Western Title and Escrow was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Western Title and Escrow as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lots 12, 13, 14 and 15 in Block 14 of the Townsite of Frenchtown, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat of record in Book 1 of Plats at Page 57, together with the Northerly half of vacated Bedard Street adjoining said Lots 12, 13, 14 and 15 in Block 14 of the Townsite of Frenchtown as vacated by Resolution recorded April 7, 1966 in Book 2 of Micro Records at Page 533. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201119250, Bk 885, Pg 877, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 07/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 3, 2012, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $168,374.51. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $159,856.94, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on May 16, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.97589) 1002.207163-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 16, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THE WEST 1/2 OF LOT 3 AND ALL OF LOTS 4 AND 5 IN BLOCK 81 OF SCHOOL ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Jason Bagaoisan, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., A Montana Corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on April 15, 2009 and recorded on April 22, 2009 in Book 837, Page 1298 as Document No. 200909262. The beneficial interest is currently held by Guild Mortgage Company, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $673.21, beginning June 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 1, 2011 is $121,409.54 principal, interest at the rate of 5.000% now totaling $2,522.37, late charges in the amount of$ 148.46, and other fees and expenses advanced of $301.87, plus accruing interest at the rate of $16.63 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be ad-

vanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 7, 2011 /s/ Dalia Martinez First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham) On this 7th day of December, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Marti A Ottley Notary Public Inkom, ID Commission expires: 8/15/2012 Guild V Bagaoisan 41291.630 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 16, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT 12 OF LOST MINE SUBURBAN TRACTS NO. 2, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF John S. Weiss and Carla J. Weiss, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of trust dated July 12th, 2007 and recorded on July 23th, 2007 in Book 802, Page 149, under Document No. 200718747. The beneficial interest is currently held by MetLife Home Loans, a division of MetLife Bank, N.A. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,018.48, beginning February 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 17, 2011 is $261,472.03 principal, interest at the rate of 6.6250% now totaling $33,960.76, late charges in the amount of $264.12, escrow advances of $6,141.01 and other fees and expenses advanced of $104.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $47.46 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting


PUBLIC NOTICES only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BEUSED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 5, 2011 /s/ Dalia Martinez First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham) On this 5th day of December, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Marti A Ottley Notary Public Inkom, ID Commission expires: 8/15/2012 Metlife v Weiss 41305.274 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 16, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: LOT B26 OF WINDSOR PARK, PHASE II, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. David Englund and Teresa Englund, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated December 27, 2006 and recorded December 29, 2006 in Book 789, Page 1057 under Document No. 200633176. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc.. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,544.17, beginning May 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 19, 2011 is $176,711.37 principal, interest at the rate of 6.8750% now totaling $7,685.99, late charges in the amount of $427.63, escrow advances of $1,237.76, and other fees and expenses advanced of $506.80, plus accruing interest at the rate of $33.28 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an

interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 6, 2011 /s/ Dalia Martinez First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 6th day of December, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Amy Gough Notary Public Bingham County, ID Commission expires: 5-26-2015 Citimortgage V. Englund 42011.569 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 3, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: DOC ID #: 00010836378208005 CERTIFICATE OF

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT LEGAL ADVERTISEMENT The City of Missoula Design Review Board will conduct a public hearing on Wednesday, March 14, 2012 in the City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine Street, Missoula, at 7:30 p.m. to consider the following applications:A request from Linda Lennox of Epcon Signs for Special Signs; Signs as Part of Building for North Centre II located at 2800 N. Reserve St. (SEE MAP T).Your attendance and your comments are welcome and encouraged. E-mails can be sent to hkinnear@co.missoula.mt.us. Project files

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s SURVEY NO. 552, A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE SOUTHWEST ONEQUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST ONEQUARTER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 11 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA Julianne A. Pitts and James C. Pitts, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on August 16, 2005 and recorded on August 16, 2005 in Book 758, Page 358 under Document No. 200521181. The beneficial interest is currently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $933.29, beginning August 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 1, 2011 is $143,448.48 principal, interest at the rate of 6.125% now totaling $12,447.06, late charges in the amount of$139.98, escrow advances of $3,486.97, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,262.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $24.07 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING THE MISSOULA COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT will be conducting a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday, March 7, 2012 in the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine, Missoula, MT, on the following item: 1. A request by Knife River for a variance from the 500’ setback requirement from a residential zoning district for a batch plant and aggregate bin building proposed on the property addressed as 4815 Mullan Road, zoned JTL-Allen Special District. See map W.

may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 28, 2011 /s/ Dalia Martinez First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho )) ss. County of Bingham) On this 28th day of November, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Marti A Ottley Notary Public Inkom, ID Commission expires: 8/15/2012 Bac V. Pitts 42019.191 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 6, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana; Lots 20, 21 and the West 4 feet of Lot 22 of Block 36 of the Amended Plat of a portion of Car Line Addition, located in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Recording Reference: Book 129 of Micro Records at Page 605 Gary A. Linton II and Tammy K. Linton, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Community Bank-Missoula, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated January 30, 2004 and recorded on February 4, 2004 in Book 725, Page 1880 under Document No 200403051. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. successor by merger Principal Residential Mortgage, Inc. First

American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $831.30, beginning May 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 16, 2011 is $80,469.63 principal, interest at the rate of 7.0% now totaling $3,986.77, late charges in the amount of $419.02, escrow advances of $2,042.91, suspense balance of $-38.74 and other fees and expenses, advanced of $394.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $15.43 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors, if such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed

EAGLE SELF STORAGE

will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 226, 249, 517, 533, and 540 Units contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday February 27, 2012. All auction units will only be shown each day at 3 P.M. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage office at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59804 prior to Tuesday February 28, 2012, 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

Public Notice

may be viewed at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants at 435 Ryman St., Missoula, Montana.If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling 2584657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services.

If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling the Office of Planning and Grants at 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. For a complete legal description or additional information regarding the special exception and variance request you may contact Jamie Erbacher at the same number or by e-mail at jerbacher@co.missoula.mt.us.

The Missoula City Council will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Monday, March 5, 2012, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana: 129 W. Front Street – Microdistillery Conditional Use Request from Ryan Montgomery for a Conditional Use approval for property located at 129 W Front Street (see Map V), zoned CBD-4 (Central Business District). The applicant requests the Conditional Use in order to construct a new microdistillery production and retail facility at this location. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request and case file are available for public inspection at the Office of Planning and Grants, 435 Ryman Street. Call 258-4657 for further assistance. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 258-4657. The Office of Planning and Grants will provide auxiliary aids and services.

"Going Negative"–totally in denial.

by Matt Jones

ACROSS

1 Stations in some labs 4 "Mama's Gun" singer Erykah 8 U.S. Surgeon General under Reagan 12 "Play something better!" 13 Prized cards, to collectors 14 Polite refusal 15 Tip collector 16 Spoiler in a familiar saying 18 "Oh 7, why'd you have to go and eat 9? And 6, did you help 7 out of fear? I'm shocked!" 20 Swamp beast 21 National chain of "bakerycafes" 22 Caprice 23 Big cheese in Holland 27 Bodily sac 28 "I can see you on a cold day and you're like a cloud...I'm impressed..." 32 Twisted, like a smile 33 Falls on many honeymoon trips 34 Rum ___ Tugger (47-down character) 37 "Hmmm...I'm stumped as to how you landed a role on 'The Addams Family'..." 39 Without leaves 42 Those ladies, in Tijuana 43 Radio choices 44 GM service 47 Chaz's mother 48 "Oh yeah, like I'd ever see a guy with a ruffled shirt and heaving chest in real life..." 53 Ad line spoken while grabbing a box of cereal back 54 ___ Lingus (Irish airline) 56 Year, to Yvette 57 1970s model Cheryl 58 Wu-Tang Clan member 59 Suffix after Brooklyn 60 Lat. and Lith., once 61 Drops in a field

Last week’s solution

DOWN

1 Simple sammich 2 One of a pair of newscasters 3 Group of sisters 4 ___ mi (Vietnamese sandwich) 5 Vicinity 6 Red ink 7 Mil. branch at Lackland 8 It'll floor ya 9 Hawk relative 10 Canadian NHL team 11 Test in H.S. 13 Campus recruiting org. 14 Serpent deity group, in Hinduism (in RUN AGAINST) 17 Quick swim 19 Grave marker 22 Dir. opposite ESE 23 Do some video production 24 Early info-sorting program 25 Mythical giant with 100 eyes 26 Ben Stiller's mom Anne ___ 29 "Would You Like to Buy ___?" ("Sesame Street" song) 30 Greek war god 31 Body art, for short 34 It's swiped to check in 35 Command in some games of tag 36 "North by Northwest" film studio 37 Stinging herbs 38 Mayor of Los Angeles, 2001-2005 39 Meticulously-trimmed tree 40 Name 41 They're given in the "Wheel of Fortune" bonus round 45 "Ellen" actor ___ Gross 46 Czech play where the word "robot" came from 47 It left Broadway on Sept. 10, 2000 49 Has dinner 50 Diamondback stats 51 Host Ken of MTV's "Remote Control" 52 Russian fighter jets 55 Like some sugar

©2012 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 February 23 – March 1, 2012


PUBLIC NOTICES without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 29, 2011 /s/ Becky Stucki First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho )) ss. County of Bingham) On this 29th day of November, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Becky Stucki, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Marti A Ottley Notary Public Inkom, ID Commission expires: 8/15/2012 Citimortgage V Linton 42011.536 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 9, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 3 IN BLOCK 1 AND A 1/30TH INTEREST UNDIVIDED OR, IN AND TO LOT 11 IN BLOCK 2 OF SWANLAND RECREATION SITES, A SUBDIVISION OF THE COUNTY OF MISSOULA, STATE OF MONTANA LESS AND EXCEPT THAT PORTION CONVEYED TO THE STATE OF MONTANA IN BOOK 402 MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 1738. Virgil L. Phelps and Diane L. Phelps, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on June 10, 2009 and recorded on June 15, 2009 in Book 841, Page708 under Document No. 200914268. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage Corporation. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $812.75, beginning August 1, 2011, and each month subsequent which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 25, 2011 is $128,806.87 principal, interest at the rate of 6.25000% now totaling $2,541.95, late charges in the amount of $121.89, escrow advances of $641.32, and other fees and expenses advanced of $42.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $22.06 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the

deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 5, 2011 /s/ Dalia Martinez First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho )) ss. County of Bingham) On this 5th day of December, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Marti A Ottley Notary Public Inkom, ID Commission expires:8/15/2012 PHHV Phelps 41392.823 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 9, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THE FOLLOWING -DESCRIBED PREMISES IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, TO WIT: LOT 4 IN BLOCK 5 OF ELMS ADDITION NO. 4, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. TAX ID# 917302 Christine L. Staggs, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Lawyer’s Title Insurance Co, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated March 14, 2008 and recorded April 1, 2008 in Book 816, Page 310, as Document No. 200807134. The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,142.79, beginning July 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 16, 2011 is $238,423.82 principal, interest at the rate of 3.50000% now totaling $4,515.34, late charges in the amount of $961.22, escrow advances of $2,910.91, suspense balance of $-847.38 and other fees and expenses advanced of $34.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $22.86 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 5, 2011 /s/

Dalia Martinez First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham) On this 5th day of December, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Marti A Ottley Notary Public Inkom, ID Commission expires: 8/15/2012 Gmac / Staggs 41207.948 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 9, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the South Door of the First American Title Company of Montana, located at 1006 West Sussex, in Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: PARCEL I: LOT 12 IN BLOCK 2 OF MOUNT SENTINEL ADDITION NO. 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. PARCEL II: LOT 13 AND THE EAST 25 FEET OF LOT 14 IN BLOCK 2 OF MOUNT SENTINEL ADDITION NO. 1, IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. RECORDING REFERENCE: BOOK 780 OF MICRO AT PAGE 1244 John Bakos, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Bank of America, N.A., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 2, 2008 and recorded on July 8, 2008 under Document No. 200815987, Book 822, Page 767. The beneficial interest is currently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,437.67, beginning November 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 22, 2011 is $371,336.74 principal, interest at the rate of 6.625% now totaling $28,066.57, late charges in the amount of $365.64, escrow advances of $6,570.55 and other fees and expenses advanced of $837.56, plus accruing interest at the rate of $67.40 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default, The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 5, 2011 /s/ Dalia Martinez First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham) On this

5th day of December, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Marti A Ottley Notary Public Inkom, ID Commission expires: 8/15/2012 BAC v Bakos 42019.252 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 05/25/2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which CLARK G. ANDERSON as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to STEWART TITLE as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC, as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 05/25/2007 and recorded 05/31/2007, in document No. 200713508 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 798 at Page Number 594 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 2 OF TOWER LOTS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 1125 TOWER STREET, Missoula, MT 59804. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-12. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 09/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $194,451.04 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 3.02% per annum from 08/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 01/10/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0085495 FEI NO. 1006.142564 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 05/21/2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which JEFFERY A ANDERSON, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE & SEPARATE PROPERTY as

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C8 February 23 – March 1, 2012

Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 03/08/2007 and recorded 03/14/2007, in document No. 200705934 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 793 at Page Number 749 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOTS 11 AND 12 IN BLOCK 19 SOUTH MISSOULA, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 446 EDITH ST, Missoula, MT 59801-3914. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 02/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $220,834.53 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.00% per annum from 02/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 01/05/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0000509 FEI NO. 1006.151029 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 05/21/2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which SCOTT DEAN JOHNSON, AND MARY ELIZABETH JOHNSON, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 06/23/2006 and recorded 06/30/2006, in document No. 200616003 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 778 at Page Number 63 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 14 IN BLOCK 5 OF BITTERROOT HOMES ADDITION NO. 3, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 809 DIXON AVE, Missoula, MT 59801-8619. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default

for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 09/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $184,614.96 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 7.125% per annum from 09/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 01/05/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 120000772 FEI NO. 1006.151027 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 05/29/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which WILLIAM C BOWERS, AND THEO JOSEPHINE BOWERS as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON, ATTORNEY AT LAW as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 09/25/2006 and recorded 09/29/2006, in document No. 200625008 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 784 at Page Number 257 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOTS 3 AND 4 IN BLOCK 2 OF SOL ACREAGE TRACTS SUBDIVISION, 2ND FILING, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 11915 VIRGINIA LN, Missoula, MT 59804-9766. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 09/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $224,376.77 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 2.00% per annum from 09/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due

or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 01/13/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 120002029 FEI NO. 1006.151666 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 06/04/2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which RONNY L. STRAIGHT AND VICKI L. STRAIGHT HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 07/25/2003 and recorded 07/31/2003, in document No. 200327979 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 713 at Page Number 573 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 14 IN BLOCK 2 OF EL MAR ESTATES PHASE I, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 8440 PHEASANT DRIVE, Missoula, MT 59808. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 11/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $110,421.58 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.25% per annum from 11/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 1/20/2012 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0029886 FEI NO. 1006.132267

LEGAL SERVICES Montana’s best injury and disability lawyers. Automobile accidents, bodily injury and disabilities, workers compensation, social security disability. Bulman Law Associates P.L.L.C. www.bulmanlaw.com or call 721-7744


RENTAL

SUSTAINAFIEDS SUSTAINAFIEDS

APARTMENTS

Ask about our line of efficient and gas appliances. Oasis Montana located in Western Montana, open weekdays. 406-777-4309. www.oasismontana.com

1 Bedroom Near the U $520 All utilities paid. Off street parking. GATEWEST 728-7333 1 Bedroom Walk to the U $525 W/G/S pd. Gas heat, coin-op laundry, off street parking GATEWEST 728-7333

Bulman Law Associates P.L.L.C. A coordinated team approach. People helping people recover from injuries. www.bulmanlaw.com or call 721-7744

1 Bedroom Duplex Off Reserve $495 W/D hookups, garage, W/S/G paid, no smoking, no pets. GATEWEST 728-7333

Natural Housebuilders, Inc., *ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes* Additions/Remodels* HIGHER-COMFORT crafted building* Solar Heating* 3690940 or 642-6863* www.naturalhousebuilder.net

1024 Stephens #4 2bd/1ba central location, off-street pkng., coinops on site, hardwood floors, cat? … $675 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 11265 NAPTON: LOLO 3-BEDROOM, HOOK-UPS, 2ND FLOOR, DECK-AREA, NEW KITCHEN LINO, SHARED YARD, 1 ¾ BATHROOMS, STORAGE, NO SMOKING OR PETS ALLOWED $695* $200.00 COSTCO GIFT CERTIFICATE! *Garden City Property Management 549-6106

Renewable Energy Supply and Design. Oasis Montana located in Western Montana, open weekdays. 406-777-4309. www.oasismontana.com Residential and commercial remote and utility-tied power systems and solar water pumping. Call us about your power project! Oasis Montana located in Western Montana, open weekdays. 406-777-4309. www.oasismontana.com Through creative partnerships and innovative development, the Missoula Housing Authority provides quality housing solutions for low and middle income households in Missoula and the surrounding area. Visit us at missoulahousing.org

11270 Napton Way A2 3bd/1ba in Lolo, coin-ops, shared yard, central location … $775 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

Starting at $10 per Month! www.ierecycling.net

Homeword.org

Natural Housebuilders, Inc. ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes Additions/Remodels • Solar Heating HIGHER-COMFORT crafted building

369-0940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

ClearSky Climate Solutions is a climate change consulting firm and broker of carbon offsets. We design climate change mitigation projects, or projects that reduce the atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases, with landowners in numerous countries and involved in various economic activities. These projects generate certified and registered carbon offsets that we in turn broker to parties interested in offsetting their climate change footprint. Website: www.clearskyclimatesolutions.com Phone: 406-721-3000 Address: 415 N. Higgins Ave., suite 116 City: Missoula State: Montana Zip Code: 59802 Contact: Keegan Eisenstadt

1805 PHILLIPS: 1 BEDROOM, SECOND FLOOR, DINING AREA, DECK-AREA, ON-SITE LAUNDRY FACILITIES, SOME QUALIFICATIONS *, OFF STREET PARKING, NO SMOKING OR PETS, HEAT PAID $590. Garden

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

2 Bedroom North Russell $615 H/W/S/G/ paid, coin-op laundry, off street parking & storage.

2100 Stephens • 728-7333

City Property Management 5496106 1914 S. 14th St. Brand new studios, central location, w/d, a/c, shared yard, garage space avail. $575. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 2 Bedroom Close to Good Food Store, $695 H/W/S/G paid, dishwasher, coin-op laundry, off street parking, on a quiet cul-de-sac GATEWEST 728-7333 2 Bedroom Great Location $650 W/S/G paid, W/D hookups, dishwasher, new flooring, storage, carport. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 Bedroom North Russell $595 H/W/S/G/ paid, coin-op laundry, off street parking & storage. GATEWEST 728-7333

Summit Property Management, LLC.

549-3929

www.rentspm.com 1&2

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

549-7711 Check our website! PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

WEEKLY curbside Recycling

1848 S. 4TH ST. W. #3: 2 BEDROOM, 2ND FLOOR W/ PRIVATE DECK-AREA, CARPORT & STORAGE, ON-SITE LAUNDRY, BIG CLOSETS, CENTRAL-BY GOOD FOOD STORE, NO SMOKING/DOGS, CAT OK !, HEAT PAID, $750Garden City Property Management 549-6106

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

FREE LAUNDRY SOAP

I.E. Recycling

1547 S. Higgins Ave. #5 1bd/1ba HEAT PAID! Centrally located near schools & shopping, features coinops on site, off-street parking, & a/c … $675 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

www.alpharealestate.com

Find your new home with

Professional Property Management 1511 S Russell • 721-8990

professionalproperty.com

2 bed near the mall, $650. W/S/G INCLUDED. DW, W/D hookups, Storage, Carport, Cat on approval, New interior flooring

2100 Stephens • 728-7333

2 BR MOVE IN CONDITION! 2BR/1.5 bath condo located in Missoula’s Northside neighborhood. New carpet, tile and paint throughout. This 2 level unit includes W/D, carport parking, outside storage unit, snow and trash removal. Quiet neighborhood, bus stop in front of building, close to downtown. Move in condition, $800/mo, no smoking, small pets ok 207.2410

FIDELITY Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

251-4707 Rent Incentive

1 BD Apt 1409 2nd St. $450/mo. 1 BD Apt 524 Hickory $480/mo. 2 BD Apt Uncle Robert Ln. $645/mo. Visit our website at www.fidelityproperty.com

GardenCity

Property Management

422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

MHA Management An affiliation of the Missoula Housing Authority

Now Leasing Solstice 1535 Liberty Ln. 2BR standard units Rent $705 Deposit $650

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. "Let us tend your den" Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

Finalist

Finalist

1 bed, Walking distance to the U, $550. W/S/G paid. Gas heat, Coin-op laundry, Off-street parking. No pets.

2100 Stephens • 728-7333

2 Bedroom 1 & bath $850 washer and dryer in unit, dishwasher, garbage paid, covered parking. GATEWEST 728-7333

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing

1225 34th St. 2 BR Heat included Seniors 55+ or w/ disability Rent $600 Deposit $650 330 N. 1st St. W. 2BR all utilities paid Rent $691 Deposit $650 149 W. Broadway 1BR Heat/w/s/g paid Central Downtown location Rent $500 Deposit $550

30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

Some restrictions apply. For more information contact MHA Management at

www.gatewestrentals.com

549-4113

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 February 23 – March 1, 2012


RENTAL 2339 Mary #3 2bd/1ba HEAT PAID! New carpet & lino, shared yard, coin-ops, off-street pkng., close to Reserve St. … $650 Grizzly Property Management 5422060 2342 BURLINGTON: BEAUTIFUL TOP QUALITY 2-BEDROOM CONDO!, MICROWAVE, STORAGE, DW, YARD, HU’S, DOUBLE BATH SINK, DISPOSAL, NO SMOKING, #1-MAIN FLOOR WITH PATIO BRIGHT–ON END, #8 - 2ND FLOOR WITH DECK & SOME PERGO FLOORS, 1 PET Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1739 PARK: 1 BEDROOM, NEAR ROSE PARK, SECOND FLOOR, ON-SITE LAUNDRY FACILITIES, BRIGHT, SHARED YARD, NICE CONDITION,, NO SMOKING OR DOGS, CAT CONSIDERED !! $595Garden City Property Management 549-6106

1113 ROLLINS: 2 BEDROOM, SLANT STREET AREA, 2ND FLOOR, WASHER & DRYER HOOK-UPS, DECK AREA, HUGE SHARED YARD, DINING AREA, NO SMOKING OR PETS ALLOWED, HEAT PAID, $750 Garden City Property Management 549-6106 102 CAMELOT CT. #8: 2 BEDROOM,NEAR PLAYFAIR PARK & SPLASH MONTANA, ON-SITE COIN-OP LAUNDRY FACILITIES, CARPORT, BIG STORAGE, PARKING, NO SMOKING/DOGS, CAT OK!, $57 Garden City Property Management 549-6106 Studio near the Orange Street Food Farm, $450. ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED. Coin-op laundry, Offstreet parking. GATEWEST 728-7333 Studio North Russell $475 H/W/S/G paid coin-op laundry, off street parking & storage. GATEWEST 728-7333

MOBILE HOMES Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent w/s/g/elec included $400/month 406-273-6034

DUPLEXES 3907 Buckley Pl., 2bd/1ba. S X S duplex, shared yard, single garage, w/d hkups, just off 39th St. … $695 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 811 Monroe St. 1bd/1ba SxS unit in lower Rattlesnake, carport, w/d hookups, yard … $675 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 834 Stoddard St. 2bd/1ba SxS Northside unit, off-street pkng., shared yard … $600 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

MALL, DINING AREA, YARD (YOU WATER/WE MOW), NO SMOKING/CATS, DOG OK !!, $675 Garden City Property Management 549-6106

HOUSES 1229 VAN BUREN: 3 BEDROOM HOUSE IN THE RATTLESNAKE!!, 3 STORY, 2 _ BATHROOMS, HOOKUPS, DW, DISPOSAL, DBLE GRG + PARKING, NO SMOKING, PET OK! $1350 Garden City Property Management 549-6106 1518 W. Central 4bd/1ba, centrally located, dbl. gar., covered patio, dog? … $1300 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

$100.00 COSTCO GIFT CERTIFICATE GCPM , $750, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com

site storage, large partially fenced yard ... $950. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

310 ½ DEARBORN: ALLEY HOUSE, 3 BDRM, UNIQUE LAYOUT, FENCED YARD, PARKING, STORAGE, JUST OF HIGGINS – NEAR THE UNIVERSITY, HOOKUPS, NO SMOKING, PET OK ! $895 Garden City Property Management 549-6106

VISTA VIEW: NEWER HOUSES!, JUST NORTH OF THE “WYE”, 3 BDRM, 2 BATH, PANTRY, A/C, WOOD FLOORS, CERAMIC TILE, BREAKFAST BAR, DINING ROOM, DEN-AREA, HOOK-UPS, FULL UNFINISHED BSMT, GRANITE COUNTERTOPS, DW, JETTED TUB, PROPANE HEAT, KITCHEN ISLAND, BEAUTIFUL VIEWS OF MISSOULA VALLEY, 3-CAR GARAGE W/ OPENERS, TWO DECKS, NO SMOKING, PET CONSIDERED !! * MUST HAVE 1 4-WHEEL OR ALLWHEEL DRIVE VEHICLE . $1450. Garden City Property Management 549-6106

3901 O’Leary: Two bedroom, 2 story unit, Newer, Carport, Storage, Free cable, Private deck, #219 has washer and dryer, 1 1/2 bath, Dishwasher, No smoking or pets allowed$100.00 COSTCO GIFT CERTIFICATE GCPM , $825, 5496106, gcpm-mt.com

2210 ½ NORTH: 1 BEDROOM, SIDE BY SIDE DUPLEX, HOOK-UPS, SINGLE-CAR GARAGE, BY THE

1800 S. 4th W. #8 : Two bedroom, 2nd floor, Dining area, Big closets, Large unit, New Carpet, Near Good Food Store, Off street parking, On site laundry, No smoking or dogs allowed, Cat considered

2bed, 1bath wood/gas heat, appliances $700/month first and last down + deposit Located in Hamilton 210-3164

Did you find the perfect place? Now plan your perfect weekend at MissoulaEvents.net

LOWANCE AND $1300 LANDSCAPING ALLOWANCE. Call Betsy for more info 880-4749.

Great single wide 2 bed, 2 bath mobile on large lot with double car garage. Fenced yard, lots of trees and curbing around the landscaping. Covered deck. 1641 Stoddard, Missoula. $99,500. MLS#20116883. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

PRICE REDUCED 4 bed 2 bath house on one full landscaped acre near Wye. Great Well at 30 gpm. 2 gas fireplaces, updated kitchen and bathrooms. $280,000. MLS #20120012. 9869 Lee’s Lane, Missoula. Call Anne 546-5816 for details. www.movemontana.com

Rattlesnake dream property with a 1 bedroom apartment! 3 bed, 2 bath, 3 car garage located on over 1/2 acre manicured & landscaped gardens & lawn. UG sprinkler, “secret garden” & fenced yard. $425,000. MLS#20114396. Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.2404rattlesnake.com.

9856 Anderson Rd 3 bd/1.5 ba, w/d hkups, dw,gas fireplace, on

COMMERCIAL 223 W. FRONT ST:. DOWNTOWN COMMERCIAL SPACE!, 1000 SQUARE FEET+

FULL BASEMENT STRG, NEAR CARAS PARK, ONE SMALL PARKING SPOT, NO SMOKING OR PETS APPROX. $1250/MONTH Garden City Property Management 5496106 2801 CONNERY #B: NEWER BUILDING, 2ND FLOOR, 2,078 SQUARE FEET, TWO OFFICES, KITCHEN-AREA, LARGE OPEN AREA, BEHIND HOME DEPOT, NO SMOKING OR PETS ALLOWED $1,000 $650. Garden City Property Management 549-6106

ROOMMATES ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 120 N Easy St.: Enjoy one-level living a short walk from the river in this turn-key 3bd/2bath home on a concrete foundation. 1 block from a city park, and minutes from the university, this home features a large fenced yard, landscaping, and an area in the private back yard that is wired for a hot tub. $179,000 - MLS # 20120171. Call Shannon Hilliard at 239-8350 today! www.120NEasy.com 18737 Sorrel Springs Lane, Frenchtown, $379,000 MLS # 20113420, 4 bedroom 2 1/2 bath, Beautiful home on 4 acres with spectacular views. Call Betsy Milyard for a showing today at 880-4749. 2511 Sunridge Court $225,000 MLS # 20116337 5 bedroom 3 bath THE HOUSE HAS CENTRAL AIR, VAULTED CEILINGS, A MASSIVE FAMILY ROOM WITH GAS FIREPLACE AND MUCH MORE. OVER 2800 SQ. FT. OF FINISHED LIVING SPACE, THERE IS PLENTY OF ROOM FOR ENTERTAINING FRIENDS AND FAMILY. Call Betsy Milyard for a showing today at 880-4749.

55+ COMMUNITY 2 Bed, 2 Bath, large family room. Homeowners fee is $370/mo. includes clubhouse, sewer, garbage, land lease, snow removal & lawn care. $129,900 • MLS#10006023. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. 6106 Longview $235,000 MLS # 20116338 Large 4 Bedroom 2 Bath home located in the South Hills. This home features hardwood floors, open floor plan, and large fenced yard. Call Betsy Milyard for more info 880-4749.

I can help you sell your home! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com

860 Haley, Florence $550,000 - MLS# 20115636 5 bedroom, 3 bath, 2 car garage home available. Over 5000 finished square ft. Tons of space, game room and its own movie theater - perfect for living and entertaining! Your own private movie theater comes with 55” LED 3D TV, seven theater chairs, and an awesome sound system.

Looking for a place to call home? Call me! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com

Call Betsy Milyard for more info 880-4749.

Megan Lane, Frenchtown, $199,900 MLS: 10007166 BRAND NEW 3 BED, 2 BATH HOME ON 1 ACRE. HOME TO BE BUILT SO YOU CAN PICK YOUR COLORS AND SOME FINISHING TOUCHES. GENEROUS $2000 APPLIANCE AL-

Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free comparative market analysis. 360-8234

Looking for homebuyer education? Call me! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com

PRICE REDUCED! Manufactured 3 bed 2 bath home, permanent foundation, low maintenance vinyl siding, 3 acres, partially fenced, double garage. Large deck with awning over looking the Bitterroot Valley. Large master bedroom with nice master bath. 663 Ridge Road, Stevensville. $179,000. MLS#20117486. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. PRICE REDUCED! Well maintained 4 bed home w/ hardwood flooring in living, dining and kitchen. Fully fenced backyard w/ deck. Nicely landscaped w/ mature trees and srubs. UG sprinklers in both front and back yard. 232 Cap De Villa, Lolo. $230,000. MLS#20116816. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

Three story townhome near North Reserve. Two Bed, one Loft, three bath with fenced yard and double car garage. GREAT Deal at $180,000. MLS #20117696. 3741A Concord, Missoula. Call Anne 546-5816 for details. www.movemontana.com View or list properties for sale By Owner at www.byownermissoula.com OR call 550-3077 Wonderful 5 bed, 3 bath home @ top of Fairviews with 2 car garage. Level lot! Borders open

space. All new carpet & interior paint. Trex deck off dining room. Great views! Back yard is fenced. $275,000. MLS#20116161. Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.110artemos.com

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES For a limited time a purchase of a condo at the Uptown Flats will include a large flat screen TV and assistance with up to $5000 Buyers closing costs!The Uptown

Flats have two one bed one bath units at $149,900. Call Anne 546-5816 for showing. www.movemontana.com Four bed, 1-1/2 bath, 3 car garage home at 345 Brooks st. Close to downtown, neighborhood coffee shop/restaurant, and university. Long time family home has potential to also have downstairs rental. Just $275,000 MLS 20117301 Call Anne 5465816 for details. www.movemontana.com

RICE TEAM

Robin Rice • 240-6503

916 Kern St. $124,500 1bd/1ba, 670 sq. ft. + bsmt storage. Room to ad on. New furnace & electric. Owner may carry.

880-0090

gregorys@mccueco.com

FEATURED LISTING • Great investment properties! • Discounted price for 4 units. • Owner will carry contract.

$469,875 MLS#20120451

1810 Stoddard 1325/1315 Byron

Janet Lybert

Cell: (406) 360-2879

jlybert@missoulahomes.com

8169 Lower Miller Creek • 3 Bed, 2 bath Well kept manufactured home on five productive acres in Upper Miller Creek. • 2 storage sheds, a detached double car garage and a separate shop/garage. • Only be 5 minutes from town. • $250,000 • MLS # 20113133.

“FAMOUS NINE MILE HOUSE” • Purchase the restaurant/bar, the house, outbuildings, & 4 trailer spots for • Dynamite investment for the right person with great potential for income from the rentals and the restaurant. • $449,000 • MLS # 20113100

860 Haley, Florence • 5 Bedroom, 3 Bath, 2 Car Garage • Over 5000 Finished sqft. Amazing home with gorgeous views, & paved road access. Tons of space, game room and its own movie theater - perfect for living and entertaining! • $550,000 • MLS #20115636

PRICE REDUCED

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10 February 23 – March 1, 2012

117 Dallas, in LOLO. $184,900 • 3 Bed 2 Bath home on the hill in Lolo. • Spacious living room, large backyard & deck, great views of the mountains, and huge family room in the basement. • Perfect home for RD financing.

Please call me with any questions Astrid Oliver Senior Loan Originator Guild Mortgage Company 1001 S. Higgins Ave 2A Missoula, MT 59801

Phone: 406-258-7522 Cell: 406-550-3587 NMLS # 395211, Guild License #3274, Branch 206 NMLS # 398152


REAL ESTATE MANUFACTURED HOMES

COMMERCIAL

Beautifully Newly Remodeled. 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Lot rent is $255/mo Setup in beautiful park. 626-4514 or 546-9475

321 N. Higgins Commercial building on coveted downtown location with lots of foot traffic. Building only for sale. Call Anne 546-5816 for showing. www.movemontana.com

LAND FOR SALE

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL

Beautiful 14 acre parcel just west of Huson. Meadow with trees & pasture. Modulars or double wides on foundation ok. Owner may finance. 23645 Mullan Road, Huson. $169,900. MLS#20112135. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

QUICK CASH FOR REAL ESTATE NOTES and Land Installment Contracts. We also lend on Real Estate with strong equity. 406721-1444 www.Creative-Finance.com

MISSOULA’S CONDOS AT THEIR FINEST UPSCALE DOWNTOWN LIFESTYLE Rochelle Glasgow

544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

Missoula Properties

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www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

THE UPTOWN FLATS 1 and 2 bedroom condos available

Starting at $149,900 OPEN HOUSE: Sunday Noon-4pm or call Jeff or Anne for Appointment

Jeff Ellis

Anne Jablonski

529-5087

546-5816 PORTICO REAL ESTATE

www.theuptownflatsmissoula.com

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21079-

6IEP)WXEXI0IRHMRK'IRXIV`+EVJMIPH` GWGLQEYX^$JWFQWPEGSQ Homes: 744 Rollins . . . . . . . . .Slant St. charmer . . . . . . .$129,900 2325 Wyoming . . . . . .4BR/2Ba . . . . . . . . . . . .$209,900 2107 Park . . . . . . . . .Perfect Location . . . . . . . .$227,500 350 W. Central . . . . . .Tastefully remodeled . . . . .$235,000 930 Turner . . . . . . . .2.5 lots; can be split . . . . .$195,000 629 North Ave. W. . . . .Amazingly Adorable! . . . . . .$259,900 345 Brooks . . . . . . . .Heart of Missoula . . . . . .$275,000 300 W Central . . . . . . .Lewis & Clark beaut! . . . . .$289,900 6526 MacArthur . . . . . .Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$289,000 611 Stephens . . . . . . .Character galore . . . . . . . .$325,000 203 N Curtis . . . . . . . .Older Farm House . . . . . . .$225,000 4112 Yorkshire . . . . .Pleasant View. 2 Story . . . .$229,000 2636 Roderick . . . . . .Craftsman Style . . . . . . .$305,000 Homes w/land: 3209 Rodeo . . . . . . . .10+ acres . . . . . . . . . . .$474,900 2348 River Rd . . . . . . .House & Land to build! . . .$535,000 Land: NHN S 13th West . . . . .Vacant lot in Missoula . . . .$50,000 2215 S 13th W . . . . . .fenced lot w/services . . . . . .$70,000 17467 W Nine Mile . . . .11.08 acres, Huson . . . . .$104,000 Commercial: 1535 Liberty Lane . . . .New Lease Space . . . . . . . .$ 11-15 321 N Higgins . . . . . . .Heart of Downtown . . . . . .$780,000 Townhomes/Condos: 1530 S 12th W . . . . . .Green Construction . . . . . .$259,900 Uptown Flats . . . . . . . .Upscale Downtown Starting at $149,000

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 February 23 – March 1, 2012


Bridgeport Brewing

$6.59

6 pack

Western Family 6 oz. Yogurt

Red Ripe Roma Tomatoes

40¢ each

69¢ lb.

Painted Hills, All Natural Boneless Rump Roast or Bottom Round Steak

$3.99 lb.

Deschutes Brewing

$11.49 12 pack

Western Family Sour Cream

$1.18 16 oz.

Dole Tender Asparagus

$1.69 lb.

Family Pack Boneless Beef Ribeye Steak

$6.99 lb.

Chateau St. Jean California Wines

$9.99

Hunt's Snack Pack Puddings

97¢

US #1 Brussel Sprouts

$1.39 lb.

Gold'n Plump Whole Chicken

$4.69 56 oz.

4 pack

.75 liter

Angel Soft Bath Tissue

Purex Laundry Liquid

$5.97

$4.28

24 count

72 oz.

2 lb. Bag Organic Minneolas or Blood Oranges

$3.29 each

Gold'n Plump Boneless Breast

$8.99 38 oz.

3 lb. Bag Organic Fuji Apples

Lynn Wilson Corn Tortillas

$2.69

89¢

lb.

11 oz.

701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 7 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188 | orangestreetfoodfarm.com


Sharing What We Love to Do... An MCPS festive of creative art, entertainment and fun!

Call for art ist s! Missoula County Public Schools seeks Missoulians of all ages to participate in a new festival that will highlight both student and community artists, musicians, entertainers and skilled experts during the week of Sunday, April 15 through Saturday, April 21. The festival will include a series of â&#x20AC;&#x153;creative eventsâ&#x20AC;? where individuals and/or groups can showcase their music, art, dance, poetry, drama and other creative expressions throughout the week. Venues will be set up all over the city offering visitors and attendees a week of music festivities, visual and performing arts, special demonstrations of unique skills and talents, and much more in a family friendly atmosphere. Local artists, musicians, entertainers and skilled experts are invited to participate or perform during the festival. The district will provide venues and registration is free. MCPS is seeking local businesses and community organizations to assist with sponsoring various events. Applications to participate in the festival are due Friday, March 2. For more info and/or to apply: mcps.k12.mt.us

Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture

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