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www.trailheadmontana.net [2] Missoula Independent • February 8–February 15, 2018


News

consent campaign poster on cover courtesy makeyourmovemissoula.org

Voices The readers write .............................................................................................................4 Street Talk What we talk about when we talk about consent...................................................4 The Week in Review The news of the day, one day at a time..................................................6 Briefs Project Spokane gets an earful, a solar speedbump, and smoking guns.......................6 Etc. Montana’s factually challenged anti-trafficking initiatives ..................................................7 News Seth Bodnar seizes the moment.......................................................................................8 News You may not have to suffer pelvic pain in silence............................................................8 Opinion Dan Brooks: UM athletics and (the appearance of ) cultural change......................10 Opinion Planning for a post-fossil fueled West........................................................................11 Feature Breaking down the barriers that stand between Missoula and great sex ...............14

Arts & Entertainment

Arts Missoula’s kings, queens and in-betweens talk DIY fabulousness.......................18 Music Syrinx Effect, Ron Pope and Total Control........................................................19 Art Kate Machain’s Elements reveals the art of reduction ...........................................20 Film Call Me by Your Name: Guadagnino does love just right ...................................21 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films .....................................................22 BrokeAss Gourmet French kiss chicken ....................................................................23 Happiest Hour Sweet temperance at the Montgomery Distillery ..............................25 8 Days a Week One of ‘em was almost warm! ..............................................................26 Agenda Writing letters with the Incarcerated Workers Organizing Committee ..........33 Mountain High Skimo race, then party, at Snowbowl ...............................................34

Exclusives

News of the Weird ......................................................................................................12 Classifieds....................................................................................................................35 The Advice Goddess ...................................................................................................36 Free Will Astrology .....................................................................................................38 Crossword Puzzle .......................................................................................................41 This Modern World.....................................................................................................42 GENERAL MANAGER Andy Sutcliffe EDITOR Brad Tyer PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson CALENDAR EDITOR Charley Macorn STAFF REPORTERS Alex Sakariassen, Derek Brouwer STAFF REPORTER & MANAGING EDITOR FOR SPECIAL SECTIONS Susan Elizabeth Shepard COPY EDITOR Jule Banville EDITORIAL INTERN Micah Drew ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua GRAPHIC DESIGNER Charles Wybierala CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer SALES MANAGER Toni Leblanc ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Steven Kirst, Declan Lawson MARKETING & EVENTS COORDINATOR Ariel LaVenture CLASSIFIED SALES REPRESENTATIVE Declan Lawson FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Scott Renshaw, Nick Davis, Hunter Pauli, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Rob Rusignola, Chris La Tray, Sarah Aswell, Migizi Pensoneau, April Youpee-Roll, MaryAnn Johanson Melissa Stephenson

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

Copyright 2018 by the Missoula Independent. All rights reserved. Reproduction, reuse or transmittal in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or through an information retrieval system is prohibited without permission in writing from the Missoula Independent.

missoulanews.com • February 8–February 15, 2018 [3]


[voices]

STREET TALK

by Alex Sakariassen

This week the Indy’s annual Love & Sex Issue focuses on Missoula’s consent campaign.

How do you define affirmative consent? Have you ever intervened in a situation you thought looked sketchy or coercive?

Tara Walrus: If you’re not OK with something, you should express that. And respect it if it’s expressed to you. Personal experience: I’ve certainly had to remove myself from situations because I thought it could have turned more threatening. It’s about expressing how you feel and what you are and aren’t OK with. Most of the time, it works.

Jonathan Pierce: I think that affirmation is a little seductively easy to try and define, because it boils down to yes or no. But it’s not always that easy. That’s why I think it’s good we’re having the conversation. Only in the abstract: I luckily haven’t really been forced to. I’ve definitely heard of friends being in situations where I would have intervened if I’d been there.

Alisha Arnsparger: I define consent as an enthusiastic agreement between two people. Preparing others: Personally, no. But I have been able to participate in a lot of bystander training, whether consent is compromised or not.

The racism dialogs

I thoroughly enjoyed Erika Fredrickson’s review of our production of On Golden Pond (“Sentimental on the surface: Montana Rep’s On Golden Pond,” Jan. 25). Especially interesting are her thoughts on Norman Thayer’s racism and anti-Semitic remarks and hence his point of view. It was of great concern to us and was the first topic we discussed on the first day of rehearsal. Norman’s “country club” racism is inherent to his character. He is indeed flawed. We kept it in for the very reason Erika posits in her review: We hope to create discussion, or that “talk on the way home in the car” moment, as I like to put it. We hope that audiences will notice that racism comes in many guises, and what might have seemed innocent and acceptable in 1974 no longer is in 2018. It is also an interesting generational question. So thank you, Erika, for being such a vital, interesting and interested part of our community dialogue. Greg Johnson Artistic Director The Montana Repertory Theatre

Elizabeth Poole: I feel it has to be mutual, and that’s not just with words but with body language, anything that does give the message that you don’t want that to happen. A plus and a minus: I actually haven’t really run into that situation, which is maybe good and bad at the same time. It would definitely be a significant memory in my mind.

Asked Tuesday afternoon at Clyde Coffee.

[4] Missoula Independent • February 8–February 15, 2018

Editor’s note: Thus far, no Missoula County taxpayer money has been directed to Project Spokane.

Roger Ver might be the Bitcoin Jesus, but Andreas Antonopoulos is the cryptocurrency theologian (“The Bitcoin Barons: How a marketer and a money launderer sold Montana on digital gold,” Jan. 25). To understand this you must know first that blockchain is not equivalent to Bitcoin. Blockchain is a solution to the doublespend problem with digital currency. Money is a communication. Cal Schindel Frenchtown In Missoula County’s haste to attract high-tech businesses, the county just might be a bit too quick to release taxpayer money. While Missoula lags in affordable housing, our social services are being cut. (Example: help for the mentally ill, [since] more than a third of the petitions to involuntarily commit, according to County Attorney Kirsten Pabst, involve the homeless). Some of our tax money is going to a business whose owner’s and operator’s past, according to the Missoula Independent, is “sketchy.” And by sketchy, they seem to me to be users — users of others’

L

ing his operation to Houston. Thanks for getting this brought to people’s attention. Steven Comstock facebook.com/missoulaindependent

Thumbs down

The performers were awesome (“Lyle Lovett and Robert Earl Keen at the Wilma,” Jan. 30). The drunk, maybe stoned, let’s just say annoying girls giggling behind us throughout everything and the lady texting in front of us the whole time were lame. Erin Kautz facebook.com/missoulaindependent

Tough choices

“We hope that audiences will notice that racism comes in many guises, and what

The gospel of bitcoin might have seemed

Look before we leap

Seth Sivinski: You have to bring it up, say, “Is this OK?” If any party makes their intentions known, the other party has to respond. It should be a discussion, not an assumption. Stepping in: Yeah, actually. Both times at bars. Once there was almost a fight. The other time the guy asked me if she was my girlfriend. As if that should have mattered.

money, users of cheap energy, users of the environment (noise pollution from the plant) and users of people’s faith and trust. I would rather my tax money go to help the homeless to relieve their plight in life than to these “users.” Please, Missoula County, screen potential businesses better before you give them our money. Renee Valley Missoula

innocent and acceptable in 1974 no longer is in 2018.” The time to act

People need to quit pussyfooting around and nail this guy (“A Flathead homeless shelter promises respite for veterans. Why do so many veterans say it doesn’t deliver?” Feb. 1). It’s not helping anybody for him to keep bilking employees and lying to veterans about the services he offers. Darci Coffman facebook.com/missoulaindependent

Fair warning

I am in a couple of veterans groups with members in Houston and the surrounding area. I sent this article to some of them since he made the claim of mov-

As to autonomy: Yes, smoking is objectively bad (“Another smoking revision,” Jan. 25). The relative benefits are mild compared to the relative detriments. However, we live in a world that values autonomy and free will and freedom of choice. If people want to hurt themselves, fine. That’s their right, as autonomous people. We’re even willing to risk their bad choices potentially hurting others because we value freedom of choice and autonomy so much. If we didn’t, there would be a breathalyzer on every driver’s side car door. As to the slippery slope: Once we start outlawing smoking in public, why can’t we outlaw every potentially harmful act? Skateboarding is dangerous to the user and potentially to others. The benefits of skateboarding are relatively low compared to the benefits. Why don’t we outlaw skateboarding based on the same logic? Also enforcement would cost the same or more than putting in some kind of pro-health initiative in Missoula. I would leave that to the experts, but being pro health might work better long term than expensive individual targeting. Lily Crespo facebook.com/missoulaindependent

Act naturally

Chase Reynolds needs a job, no doubt (“Etc: Montana goes to the Super Bowl,” Feb. 1). It’s “natural,” in our current era of celebrity over substance, for him to consider politics. In my opinion, public servant is not really his forte. Maybe in 10 years, when he has a little more life under his belt. Nancy Dunne facebook.com/missoulaindependent

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via email: editor@missoulanews.com.


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missoulanews.com • February 8–February 15, 2018 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW Wednesday, January 31 President Donald Trump signs a bill sponsored by Montana’s delegation to name a 9,765-foot peak in the Lee Metcalf Wilderness after Montana conservationist Alex Diekmann.

Thursday, February 1 The Indy reports that University of Montana women’s soccer coach Mark Plakorus did not have his contract renewed after administrators found texts to numbers affiliated with Las Vegas escort services on his universityissued phone.

Friday, February 2 Dr. Chris Christensen, 69, is sentenced to 10 years in state prison after being found guilty of negligent homicide for the overdose deaths of two patients to whom he prescribed opioids. The sentence is stayed pending appeal.

Saturday, February 3 The Missoula Art Museum hosts its 46th Benefit Art Auction in the University Center Ballroom. The winning bid on a John Buck painting of a grizzly bear in Paris was $10,000. Man, we’re underpaid.

Noise pollution

Bitcoiners get earful

The sleepless residents of Bonner finally got a chance to look the source of their unrest in the eye. A representative from bitcoin mine Project Spokane — not owner Sean Walsh, a “very busy businessman” who lives out of state, but the new local manager, Jason Vaughan, who joined the company a month ago — sat in the front row of the Bonner School cafeteria as residents pleaded for the noise to stop. Ryan Thompson, a 30-something man who lives two miles up the Blackfoot River with his wife and their 17-month-old infant, was polite, but his comparison was provocative. “What I don’t want to see happen is a repeat of history,” he said. “This place suffered the consequences of businesses that sat upstream of the Blackfoot and the Clark Fork, and all that pollution trickled down and hurt this community immensely.” The collective description offered by the 70 people who attended the Feb. 5 special meeting of the Bonner-Milltown Community Council is indeed insidious, even novelistic. Mike Harrison’s hum-

mingbirds are gone. Carol Kenyon started taking anxiety medication. Dogs no longer want to play outside. Marriages are strained. Thompson’s wife, Caitlin, gets headaches. Other bird species, which rely on sound to detect danger, may have “avian PTSD,” said Erick Greene, a University of Montana wildlife biologist asked to lend his expertise. And if the sound is driving birds away, what might it be doing to Thompson’s baby’s brain, she wondered? It reads like postmodern sci-fi, but the creeping noise pollution, a byproduct of minting cryptocurrency, will remain reality for Bonner-area residents for months to come. They’ve been complaining for eight months already, prompting the mill site landlord, Steve Nelson, to design a mitigation plan that involves replacing more than 400 fans. But the fans can’t be installed until winter ends, and even the acoustics engineer hired to study the problem says the fix will only cut sound levels in half, at best. Nelson is treated as a community hero for his work redeveloping the former lumber mill, and he speaks in sincere tones. Council members even warned attendees not to “beat up” on him. All three county commissioners and several state lawmakers attended, though none suggested solutions.

Residents were more willing to put the screws to Project Spokane, which several attendees suggested is more interested in profit than being good neighbors. In particular, the company’s aspiration to quadruple its mining capacity seemed at odds with Vaughan’s claim that a quieter, liquid cooling system for the servers would be “extremely costprohibitive.” “What they’ve done is revitalize this mill and bring back lots of jobs and lots of payroll and lots of products,” resident Gary Matson said of property co-owners Nelson and Mike Boehme. “Bitcoin is a little bit different. We don’t trust it.” Derek Brouwer

Smoking guns

Lawyers, cigars and money

The Families First Children’s Museum downtown has been dark for two months. A note is tacked to the door letting would-be patrons know that the museum has been smoked out by fumes from the private cigar club downstairs. Earlier tests found that the air quality in the museum at 225 W. Front St. exceeded EPA standards,

Sunday, February 4 The Philadelphia Eagles win Super Bowl LII over the New England Patriots 41-33. Eagles safeties coach Tim Hauck is a former Griz player and brother of current Griz coach Bobby Hauck.

Monday, February 5 Tickets go on sale for the annual Montana Democrats’ fundraiser, the Mansfield Metcalf Dinner. Joe Biden will be this year’s keynote speaker. General admission tickets sell out within 24 hours at $70 apiece.

Tuesday, February 6 The University of Montana announces the return of Brent Pease to Griz Nation as assistant head coach and wide receivers coach. Pease played for the Griz in the 1980s and returned to coach from 1991 to 1998.

If you haven’t heard yet, we’re closing our sweet little diner on the 18th. So make sure you give it all of your love before then. It deserves it.”—Uptown Diner manager Sydney Madill, in a Feb. 3 Facebook post. The diner has been a popular downtown spot for breakfast and milkshakes for 27 years.

[6] Missoula Independent • February 8–February 15, 2018


[news] Executive Director Nick Roberts says, and a more recent round of testing detected what patrons’ olfactory nerves had suspected for months: Tobacco particulate is inside the museum. “I don’t even know how many people” have complained, a museum manager told the CityCounty Health Board a year ago. But operators of Fool’s End, the private lounge in the building’s lower level, where members enter by keypad, still aren’t convinced there’s a problem. (The company’s attorney declined to comment). In the latest court filings entered into the lawsuit filed against the club by the Health Board, Fool’s End signaled that it will be scrutinizing patron complaints. To do that, they’ve hired Pat Barkey, the mustachioed and bespectacled University of Montana economist known for his annual statewide economics roadshow, to run a statistical analysis. If the case goes to trial, Barkey will testify “whether the statistical significance of complaints or persons allegedly affected in this matter are a ‘considerable number of persons’ as required by Montana law.” Barkey’s number crunching isn’t even the most arcane of the semantic arguments that could decide whether the club can remain open. In addition to claiming that the club is a public nuisance, the health board contends that Fool’s End is violating the state’s Clean Indoor Air Act, which prohibits smoking in “enclosed public places.” Both sides have hired engineers and architects to attest to the separateness or inseparability of the two rental units, which do not share an indoor entry point or a ventilation system. One of Fool’s End’s other expert witnesses, architect Steve Adler, submitted his analysis of what constitutes a “room,” a “space,” an “area” and, yes, a “building.” The case is winding toward trial after Judge Leslie Halligan declined to issue a summary ruling last July, saying that a decision hinges on the dispute over how connected the business spaces are. Missoula County has now spent $2,500 in court costs, deputy county attorney John Hart says. But to Roberts, the situation seems pretty simple. “This seems like a smoking gun reality that [the museum] is a business with tobacco in it,” he says. Derek Brouwer

Solar tariff

Speed bump, not roadblock

In the waning days of 2017, Bozeman-based solar company OnSite Energy purchased a large quantity of photovoltaic panels, enough to cover its existing contracts. Co-founder Orion Thornton says the move was meant to buffer the company — and its customers — from a decision the company knew President Trump was likely to make in January. Sure enough, on Jan. 22, Trump announced a 30 percent tariff on imported panels, spurring industry experts to predict as much as a 10 percent bump in the overall cost of solar installations. “We bought 250 kilowatts of panels for projects that we already had contracted, so that protected our customers,” Thornton says. “We didn’t want to have to go back to them and say, ‘Hey, this tariff was enacted. We need to renegotiate the contract.’” The national solar industry response to Trump’s tariff has been less than enthusiastic, with the Solar Energy Industries Association claiming it could result in the delay or cancellation of billions of dollars in solar investments. But the Montana Renewable Energy Association’s Andrew Valainis says Trump’s decision is “more of a speedbump than a roadblock” in Montana. Most of the projects undertaken by Montana-based companies are smaller residential or commercial jobs, making them more adaptable than larger utility-scale installations, which Valainis and Thornton agree will take the hardest hit. Thornton estimates that, on average, 90 percent of the panels OnSite Energy uses are imported. The company offers its customers the option of paying slightly more for American-made panels, he says, but using imports was never a question of sacrificing quality, since foreign sources like LG and

BY THE NUMBERS

141

Number of signs to be installed citywide — including neighborhood identification and “Welcome to Missoula” gateway monuments — in Phase 2 of Missoula’s Wayfinding Project, according to a city building permit application. The new signage will cost an estimated $840,000, funded by the city and private partners.

Panasonic “are really solid companies, really good products.” Thornton does acknowledge that the tariff will push prices up on future contracts, “but it’s not going to stop the industry in any regard … Commercial projects are still going to be a viable investment for businesses.” Lee Tavenner, co-owner of Missoula’s Solar Plexus, says the bulk of the panels his company uses come from Oregon-based manufacturer SolarWorld, which is now clawing its way back from a bankruptcy filing last year. Even though they’re sourced domestically, Tavenner is anticipating the price he pays for panels to increase, based on feedback from his suppliers. By how much, he says, is still unclear, but he doesn’t expect the tariff to be as big a hit to the types of residential and commercial installations Solar Plexus deals with. After all, he says, the panels are only a portion of the cost of going solar — about a quarter of the total, once labor, permitting and other equipment are factored in. “Even though there’s going to be some price increase,” Tavenner says, “it’s not enough that it should scare you away.” Alex Sakariassen

ETC. January was national Human Trafficking Prevention Month, and Attorney General Tim Fox took the opportunity to tout his office’s anti-trafficking initiatives. There’s a problem, though: The human trafficking statistics on Fox’s website have no basis in fact. Here’s an excerpt: “In the United States alone, nearly 300,000 children are trafficked for sex every year … The average age of girls forced into the sex trade is between the ages of 12-14. It’s estimated that fewer than 2% are ever rescued or leave ‘the life.’” Fox’s office sourced the 300,000 and 1214 numbers to a 2001 study by University of Pennsylvania researchers Richard Estes and Neil Weiner, which actually says that 300,000 children in the U.S. are at risk of being trafficked. Estes himself has said the study is outdated at best and shouldn’t be cited. The Crimes Against Children Research Center has pleaded, “PLEASE DO NOT CITE THESE NUMBERS” in a 2008 factsheet. The Washington Post’s Glenn Kessler did a thorough fact check showing how “at risk” became conflated with “victims,” and how the 1214 age doesn’t hold up. As a result, Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, and Sen. Amy Klobuchar, DMinn., stopped citing the numbers. To support the claim that “fewer than 2% are ever rescued,” Fox’s office pointed to a story on the Daily Signal, a conservative publication of the Heritage Foundation, that contains no reference to sex trafficking rescues in the U.S. All three of these numbers are repeated as fact in a Missoulian editorial last February. A group that lobbies on behalf of sex workers and sex trafficking victims in Alaska successfully amended state law to provide immunity from prostitution charges for anyone who reports a violent crime, if doing so informs law enforcement that they were engaged in prostitution. A similar practice has recently been adopted in San Francisco, as advocates for trafficking victims seek immigration reform, better services and legal immunity. It would behoove the officials charged with fighting trafficking to take a cue and pay more attention to what they’re really fighting.

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missoulanews.com • February 8–February 15, 2018 [7]


[news]

A defining debut New UM president Seth Bodnar seizes the moment by Derek Brouwer

If leadership is about rising to the occasion, it follows that there must be an occasion to rise to. So University of Montana President Seth Bodnar approached his first message to campus as a chance to make the case that UM is at a “critical juncture” and faces a “defining moment.” A quick archive search shows that observers have been placing UM at a “critical juncture” for years. The Missoulian said so in 2015, administration critics said it in the days after Bodnar’s predecessor, Royce Engstrom, was fired, and Board of Regents chair Fran Albrecht said it in August, as the search that found Bodnar neared its conclusion. “We see that there are some decisions ahead, OK?” Bodnar told a ballroom full of UM staff on the morning of Jan. 31. “I would tell you we also have incredible opportunities. And in this defining moment we, as a community, have a choice. We have a choice to drift, to defer decisions, to let external forces shape our future. Or we have a choice to jointly align on a clear path and own our future.” He then pushed the rhetoric further, riffing on UM’s 125-year history by encouraging the audience to help chart a path that will sustain the university “not just for 125 more years, but for 1,025 more years.” His slide deck promptly crashed. Bodnar said “uh oh,” and the crowd laughed off the technical difficulty. The reaction moment was a testament to Bodnar’s charisma, which he’s quickly shown as one of his strengths. The trait has been particularly welcomed by Griz faithful, for whom Engstrom’s bookish demeanor never seemed to rise quite to the occasion. Bodnar’s Jan. 3 introductory campus-wide email summarizing the “defining moment” idea received mostly rave reviews on eGriz forums. “Leadership…. What a refreshing concept,” one poster wrote. Bodnar is certainly making good on his pledge to be a visible president

[8] Missoula Independent • February 8–February 15, 2018

sions,” i.e., cuts, put the budget back into balance. Bodnar said he wants UM to find its “north star” so it can make those cuts smartly. The metaphor is borrowed from faculty union president Paul Haber, who used it in his public critiques of UM’s most recent planning process. It wasn’t the only borrowed idea: Bodnar’s whole presentation could be understood as his attempt to put a bow on ideas that have long been floating around the university. Bodnar’s honeymoon seemed, at first, to come to an abrupt end when it was revealed Feb. 1 that UM initially obscured its firing of women’s soccer coach Mark Plakorus. Plakorus’ behavior had generated complaints from his players for years, and he had been found to have texted Las Vegas escort services from his university phone, but the university first announced his departure simply as a resignation. During his public addresses, Bodnar reiterated a commitment to transparency and student safety. Hearing that, Missoulian editor Kathy Best says she decided to email Bodnar, suggesting to him that those priorities appeared to be in opposition to the university’s handling of Plakorus, given the allegations against him, which the paper was still photo courtesy the Montana Office of the trying to confirm. Commissioner of Higher Education Less than 24 hours later, the uniNew University of Montana President versity came clean about the reasons Seth Bodnar is receiving a warm wel- for Plakorus’ departure. Bodnar come from Griz faithful ahead of difclaimed he hadn’t discussed the initial ficult budget-cutting decisions. press release with Athletic Director The media savvy Bodnar also Kent Haslam, but he quickly emailed the hosted the press for a private recitation campus acknowledging that the univerof his hour-long campus speech, which sity should do better. A few days later, he had memorized virtually to the word. the same newspaper that prodded him The presentation revealed that UM faces toward transparency applauded the new a $3.5 million shortfall next year, which president. will grow to $10 million by 2022. Bod“Bodnar deserves all due credit for nar said he plans to make up the “ma- ensuring that this incident was not kept jority” of the gap by increasing revenue, covered up,” the paper wrote in a Feb. 5 which UM has failed to do in recent editorial, calling it “a good first step.” years, with the rest to be patched over with one-time funds until those “decidbrouwer@missoulanews.com ahead of budget-cutting decisions. He taped a welcome video to students and played it cool with student newspaper reporters who asked if he smoked weed at West Point (he says he didn’t). He tweets from campus functions, and he and his wife, Chelsea, a Missoula native, mingled at the Missoula Art Museum’s Jan. 3 charity auction like belles of the ball.


[news]

Sensitive subjects The vagina is a muscle, you know by Susan Elizabeth Shepard

Kim Mize holds up a model of the pelvis that she uses to show patients where their pelvic floor muscles are. It looks a little like she’s about to Poor Yorick the pelvis, and she has been known to make light with patients to get them comfortable talking about the problems she treats: urinary incontinence, pain during sex and pelvic floor problems after prostate surgery. “It’s a bit of a taboo subject,” Mize says. Accordingly, her exam room is as private as she can make it, with an attached restroom so patients don’t have to venture into a hallway once their appointment has begun. Mize has been at Alpine Physical Therapy on Stockyard Road since June. Prior to that, she was at the University of Montana School of Physical Therapy, where she still teaches, for more than 14 years, and she’s specialized in pelvic health for more than 20. When she first started in the field, pelvic floor rehabilitation was known mainly as a way to help women with urinary incontinence after childbirth. The primary exercise used for that — Kegels, named for the doctor who first prescribed them — can be difficult to learn without instruction. Most patients who benefit from her instruction are fighting against the pelvic floor muscles, Mize says. “It’s three things: [they’re] holding their breath, using their abs and using their glutes.” While a weak pelvic floor is the most common patient complaint, Mize, like other specialists, also treats problems that arise because of a pelvic floor that is too tense. “Much like you carry tension in your neck, like your neck muscles or your upper shoulder muscles that kind of give you headaches or just painful knots in your muscles, some people have knots in their pelvic floor,” Mize says. “So it feels like a headache in the pelvis, essentially. So these women that have this will sometimes not be able to tolerate penetration, so intercourse is not fun.” Mize says most of her patients arrive with straightforward cases of pelvic floor weakness, and about 25 percent are men. Patients with problems related to pelvic

floor tension are fewer in number for a variety of reasons, Mize says. “Part of that is there are other people that do what I do in town, and so they see some of them,” she says. (There are pelvic floor specialists at Three Rivers, Valley and Missoula Bone and Joint.) And part of it is that they just suffer silently. “They are having pain, and either they’re not telling their physician or the physician doesn’t know that we treat it.” Doctors will often seek a medical reason for pain during intercourse, Mize says, and while some physicians will immedi-

use themselves to release trigger points. The Pelviwand bears some resemblance to G-spot stimulators, but is distinguished by being made in the U.S. with medical-grade cast acrylic, according to Liz Janapol, the CEO of Pelvic Therapy Incorporated. Janapol says PTI is working toward FDA approval for its devices, but until then the company’s website bears a disclaimer reading, “Novelty use only.” The usual initial examination process is digital, during which Mize manually measures pelvic floor strength and demonstrates the proper way to contract

ALL THE B.S.* YOU NEED AT PRICES YOU CAN AFFORD. photo by Susan Elizabeth Shepard

Kim Mize demonstrates diagnostic techniques with a pelvis model.

ately refer patients to physical therapy for incontinence and pelvic pain, others send them all the way to Minnesota before they make it into her office. “I’m still having people come to me from the Mayo Clinic … their regular doctor didn’t know what to do with them, sent them to Rochester, Minnesota, and they have a full-day workup, and then they say, ‘Oh, you need a physical therapist,’” Mize says. “It’s like, I was here all along!” As with any other muscle, there are ways to release trigger points in pelvic floor muscles. Mize can do an examination and find those points so the patient knows where they are, and there’s a tool called a Pelviwand (previously known as the Therawand) that patients can learn to

and relax muscles. For patients who wish to avoid an internal examination, Mize uses an ultrasound to show them their muscles. “They can see their pelvic floor lift and relax, and relate that to what it feels like, and then their exercises are more effective and they don’t have to undress. They just have to put a probe on their belly,” she says. Mize still sees patients who are surprised there is a treatment for their pain, which she says should be recognized as a treatable condition. “I have frequently said before, and I’ll say again, that intimacy should not hurt,” Mize says. “Sex shouldn’t be painful.” sshepard@missoulanews.com

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Reduce. Reuse. Rebuild. 1515 Wyo m i n g S t | w w w. h o m e re so u rc e. o rg missoulanews.com • February 8–February 15, 2018 [9]


[opinion]

Keeping scandal quiet UM athletics and the appearance of cultural change by Dan Brooks

Appetizers for Two Island Mussels, Coconut, Curry, Poached Jalapeno, Tomato, Spinach, Grilled Olive Bread 18 Fresh Blue Pointe Oysters with Cava Mignonette 24 Bone Marrow, Roasted Canoe Bone, Aged Blue Cheese Crust, Lemon Shallot Confit with Grilled Toast Points 16 Fresh Burrata, Fresh Greens, House Bruschetta, Balsamic Glace, Toast Points 12 Elk Meatballs, Huckleberry BBQ Glaze, White Chocolate Parsnip Puree, Crispy Jalapeno Dust 14

Soup and Salad French Onion Soup, Caramelized Onion, Cognac, Toasted Crostini, Three Cheeses 9 Beet Salad for Two, Arugula, Carrot, Parsnip, Candied Walnut, Feta, Blood Orange Honey Vinaigrette and Beet Chips 12 Traditional Caesar, Romaine, Aged Parmesan, Fried Capers, House Crouton 7

Entrees Smoked Pork Loin, Jalapeno Apple & Herb Slaw, Honey Mustard Vinaigrette, Chorizo Hash 28 Pan Seared Sea Bass, Sesame Crusted, Steamed Clams, Baby Bok Choy, Fingerling Potatoes, Baby Mushrooms, Lemon Burre Blanc, Basil Oil 32 Crispy Duck, Chestnut Cream Caramelized Apple, Brussel Sprouts, Pomegranate Gastrique, Sweet Potato Crisps 26 Blackened Ribeye 14 oz., Smokey Blue Cheese Crust, Mashed Yukon Potatoes, Broccolini 36 The House Porterhouse 18 oz., Poblano Polenta Cake, Sweet Onion Puree, Cabernet-Herb Pan Sauce, Parmesan Tuile 48 Wonton Ravioli, Butternut Squash, Lemon Cream, Ricotta, Pepitas, Cilantro, Lime Zest 24

Dessert Banana Crème Brulee for Two Fresh Berries and Mint 12 Chocolate Pots De Crème with Fresh Berries for Two 10 Chambord Chocolate Brownie Sundae for Two 13

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[10] Missoula Independent • February 8–February 15, 2018

When the University of Montana announced last week that it would not renew the contract of women’s soccer coach Mark Plakorus, Athletic Director Kent Haslam claimed Plakorus had resigned. “It really did come down to both he and I deciding it’s a good time for him and it’s a good time to make a change,” Haslam told Bill Speltz of the Missoulian and 406mtsports.com, adding that the coach and university officials “mutually agreed it was time for him to move on.” Later in the week, however, Independent intern Micah Drew reported that Plakorus had been fired after an investigation found text exchanges with Las Vegas escort services on his work phone. Congratulations to Drew, who will be rewarded with an extra serving of gruel. The mysterious woman who sold you to the Indy would be very proud of you, if she could be found. Also, are we to understand that the UM Athletic Department has been less than forthcoming about an issue involving sexual misconduct? We should note here that there is no evidence Plakorus hired any escorts. The university does not record the contents of text messages, only numbers, dates and times. Also, UM was not looking for escort-service contacts when it examined the records on Plakorus’ university-issued phone. According to the Missoulian, UM’s Title IX office discovered the exchanges while conducting a “team culture survey” prompted by some students’ concerns about the coach’s “excessive texting” with players. Whether this behavior influenced UM’s decision not to renew Plakorus’ contract has been unclear from its public statements, which have focused on the escort texts instead. But Haslam didn’t mention any of that at first. He cast the end of the coach’s tenure as Plakorus’ personal decision to move on. Plakorus echoed this explanation in his own press release, saying that he was stepping down “to pursue new opportunities that will allow me to grow as both a coach and person.” It makes a lot of sense that Plakorus would explain it that way. The university’s decision is harder to understand.

For years now, UM has scrubbed away at the stains left by sexual assault scandals involving its athletic department. It has worked hard to establish a new public reputation as a safe place for women. Now, by misleading the press and conniving in Plakorus’ exit story, it has sent the message that UM is a safe place to violate policy and then go away quietly. That is not what we want from our newly conscious university and its ostensibly contrite athletic department. In hindsight, it would have been better for Haslam to lay his cards on the table. He

“By misleading the press and conniving in Plakorus’ exit story, UM has sent the message that it is a safe place to violate policy and then go away quietly.” might have said that Plakorus used his work phone to communicate with escort services. He might even have described the findings of the team culture survey and followed it up with a strong statement about the university’s commitment to protecting women on campus. That would have been satisfying. This botched cover-up, on the other hand, suggests that the UM athletic department has learned little from its previous mistakes. But this line of reasoning reveals a flaw in how we think about UM and what we want from it in the post-scandal era.

I can think of a reason Haslam didn’t tell reporters why Plakorus was fired: lawsuits. You can’t put someone out of a job and then tell the press that a survey of women’s soccer players found him creepy. That’s the legal equivalent of a homemade noose. From a risk-management perspective, letting Plakorus resign quietly was the correct play. And all the incentives in the UM system encourage Haslam and administrators in similar positions to think in terms of risk management. The problem with risk management is that it’s unsatisfying. We see the university’s past scandals as a cultural problem. We want UM to demonstrate that its culture has changed, ideally with public gestures that will begin to make up for the public screwups of the past. But the university is not a person who ignored sexual misconduct before and wants to call it out now. It is an institution. Its behavior in situations like these has less to do with culture than with the institutional incentives at work on a public university. In this case, the incentive for UM to protect itself as an employer outweighed its incentive to demonstrate a commitment to protecting women. That might seem cynical, especially from the perspective of the individual who is at no risk of a wrongful termination lawsuit. The individual wants UM to prove that it has changed. The institution, on the other hand, is incentivized primarily to prevent another scandal like the one that threatened it earlier this decade. If we want to understand UM’s institutional behavior, we should recognize that the best way to prevent a scandal is to prevent misconduct, but the second best way is to try to prevent public knowledge of misconduct. That’s what the athletic department did last week. I find it unfortunate. I don’t think we should approach it as good or bad, though, so much as predictable. The university is responding to the incentives at work. If we want it to act differently, we should give it different reasons. Dan Brooks is on Twitter at @DangerBrooks.


[opinion]

The well is dry The West needs a post-fossil fuels plan. Now. by Jesse Alston

Western states that power their economies on fossil fuels need to start getting real. It’s been a long and lucrative ride, but the age of fossil fuels is ending, and failure to plan for a realistic future is going to have severe repercussions for folks across the West. The evidence is clear and mounting that the coal bust this time is radically different from its predecessors. Since 2010, more than half of U.S. coal power plants — 268 of 530 — have announced retirement, with 27 announcements coming in 2017 alone. A decade ago, coal produced 48.5 percent of U.S. electricity. In 2016, it produced just 30.4 percent. And even as new plants announce retirement (on average) every two weeks, only one U.S. coal plant is currently under construction. It will power a single university in Alaska. Coal’s prospects abroad are little better. The European Union last year approved stricter pollution controls that could lead to one-third of its coal plants closing by 2021. Britain plans to close all of its coal plants by 2025. India is mothballing coal-plant plans at a breakneck pace, and coal use in China is largely leveling off as the nation’s government tries to combat politically untenable pollution problems. Even if foreign coal demand holds steady, U.S. producers will have trouble exporting it from coal-loathing Pacific Coast states or a British Columbia angry about lumber tariffs. The export outlook is grim. Petroleum and natural gas should heed these clear warning signs. Both fuels have stable near-term outlooks, but scientists warn that net greenhouse gas emissions must reach zero before 2050 to avert catastrophic climate change. Country-wide bans on gas-powered vehicle sales are set to begin in Europe as early as 2025, electric vehicles seem poised to take off worldwide even sooner, and leading U.S. Democrats have introduced a bill to convert the entire electrical sector in this country to carbon-free sources by 2050.

While these major changes may be years away from reducing demand for oil and natural gas as rapidly and dramatically as coal has declined, it’s foolish to believe demand will last forever. Like coal, these fuels could fade faster than anyone predicts. Utilities like Colorado’s Xcel Energy and Des Moinesbased MidAmerican Energy are already finding that switching to renewables saves money for customers.

“Western states need to plan for a future in which we are no longer able to pad our budgets with free money vacuumed up from underground.”

Despite this drumroll of bad news for fossil fuels, some Western politicians continue to hide their heads in the sand. Wyoming Republican Gov. Matt Mead has repeatedly promised to “double down” on coal. New Mexico Republican Gov. Susana Martinez’s “all of the above” energy plan was rolled out two years ago at an event headlined by oil baron T. Boone Pickens. Even Democrats can’t escape the fever. Montana Democratic Gov. Steve Bullock told an industry group in Octo-

ber that he expects fossil fuels to play a major role in Montana for decades. But even though coal is still the state’s most significant fossil fuel, three-quarters of the plants that burned Montana coal in 2012 are scheduled to retire by 2030. This willful ignorance will lead to big problems. Journalists constantly report on what the decline of fossil fuels will mean for jobs and local communities, but the impact will be even greater because so many Western states depend on fossil fuels for substantial parts of their state budgets. Royalties from fossil fuel extraction on federal land in the West sent about $1.3 billion into state coffers in 2016 alone — and that doesn’t include severance taxes and royalties from extraction on state lands, which are even bigger. This isn’t solely a future issue. Wyoming, Montana and Alaska are already seeing big budget holes from the decline in oil and coal prices. Teachers, doctors, police departments and children in towns across the West bear the brunt of those cuts. Western states need to plan for a future in which we are no longer able to pad our budgets with money vacuumed up from underground. We need to have a realistic conversation about which government services we’re willing to finance with new taxes, and which ones we’re not. Western states have a relatively easy path to building a better future, if appropriate measures are taken soon. We have low taxes, relatively strong and popular state governments, cash stocked in mineral-funded accounts, and enough time to adjust our course before truly tough times hit. But unless we use those advantages to start planning for the future now, we will surely face a crisis when the flow of mineral money trickles to a halt. Jesse Alston is a contributor to Writers on the Range, the opinion service of High Country News (hcn.org ). He writes on environmental and policy issues and lives in Laramie, Wyoming.

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MontanaSnowbowl.com | Open All W Week! eek! missoulanews.com • February 8–February 15, 2018 [11]


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[offbeat]

NEWS THAT SOUNDS LIKE A JOKE – In Turkmenistan’s capital, Ashgabat, drivers of black cars are facing high costs to repaint their cars white or silver after President Gurbanguly Berdymukhammedov banned black vehicles because he thinks the color white brings good luck. Police began seizing dark-colored vehicles in late December, and owners have to apply for permission to repaint and re-register them. The average wage in Ashgabat is about $300 a month (or 1,200 manats); one Turkman told Radio Free Europe that he was quoted 7,000 manats for a paint job, but was told that the price would rise within a week to 11,000 manats. “Even if I don’t spend any money anywhere, I will be forced to hand over pretty much my entire annual salary just to repaint,” the unnamed man said, adding that his black car had already been impounded. BRIGHT IDEA – Noting that “nobody else has done it,” on Jan. 4 Nebraska state Sen. Paul Schumacher of Columbus proposed a novel constitutional amendment with the goal of stimulating growth in western Nebraska: Delegate complete or partial sovereignty over a designated, limited and sparsely populated area. “If I were a major business, I would not want Omaha or Lincoln ... telling me what to do,” Schumacher said. The Lincoln Journal Star reported that the senator believes his concept would attract businesses looking for no state or local taxes and no state or local regulations. It presents the opportunity to “have your own state,” he explained. The Nebraska legislature must approve the resolution before citizens get a chance to vote. PUBLIC SAFETY – Tennessee’s legislature has a newly renovated home in the Cordell Hull building in Nashville, so Lt. Gov. Randy McNally and House Speaker Beth Harwell have been busy outlining some new rules. “Hand-carried signs and signs on hand sticks” will be strictly prohibited because they pose a “serious safety hazard.” Animals, too, will be turned away at the door, reported The Tennessean on Dec. 21. But in a dizzying twist of irony, McNally and Harwell will continue a policy they enacted last year, which allows holders of valid gun permits to bring their weapons into the building. MY KINGDOM FOR A BURRITO – Tampa, Florida, resident Douglas Jon Francisco, 28, was arrested for DUI after he mistook a Spring Hill bank drive-thru lane for a Taco Bell. On Jan. 17, around 5 p.m., the bank branch manager noticed a driver passed out in a blue Hyundai sedan in the drive-thru lane. When the manager went out to the car and banged on the window, Francisco woke up and tried to order a burrito, according to the Tampa Bay Times. After being set straight about the bank not serving Mexican fast food, Francisco drove around to the front of the building and parked, where deputies found him and administered a field sobriety test, which he failed. “He made several statements that were differing from reality,” a Hernando County Sheriff’s deputy reported. – A Facebook event calling for a candlelight vigil to remember a destroyed Taco Bell restaurant in Montgomery, Alabama, started as a joke. But according to United Press International, about 100 people showed up on Jan. 21 to pay their respects to the popular fast-food restaurant, which burned on Jan. 17 after electrical equipment sparked a fire. The owner promised to rebuild and “have a true celebration upon re-opening.” TAKE THAT! – In Dresden, Germany, police reported that two men were injured on Jan. 15 after hitting each other with their cars in consecutive accidents. The first man, 49, pulled into a handicapped parking spot, then saw his mistake and backed out, accidentally hitting a 72year-old man walking behind the car. The two men exchanged information for a report, then the older man got into his car and reversed out of his parking spot, hitting the younger man. Both men suffered only slight injuries, according to the Associated Press. FOR THE LOVE OF ANIMALS – Richard the 15-year-old pony, of Bridgton, Maine, has had a rough winter. He was suffering from cancer of his penis and infection when temperatures plummeted to negative 25 degrees, which caused frostbite. As a result, part of the animal’s flesh broke off while he was being examined, the Associated Press reported. The Animal Rescue Unit in Bridgton has taken responsibility for the pony and has raised more than $4,000 for his care, including reconstructive surgery. Brogan Horton of Animal Rescue Unit said the goal is for Richard to live out his life pain-free.

OAC.

CLICHE COME TO LIFE – Outdoorsman Sergey Terekhov, 64, had just let his dogs out to run before a January hunting outing in Russia’s remote Saratov region when one of the dogs bounded back to him and clawed the trigger of Terekhov’s double-barreled shotgun, shooting the man in the abdomen. The Telegraph reported that his brother rushed Terekhov to the hospital, but he died less than an hour after the shooting. ROAD RAGE – Distracted driving caused long backups and at least one minor traffic accident on Jan. 20 as a man wandered along I-95 in Philadelphia — in the buff. The Philadelphia Inquirer reported the stripped-down man walked along the shoulder and in and out of the right lane around noon, throwing items at cars before being taken into custody by police. His name was not released. Send your weird news items with subject line WEIRD NEWS to WeirdNewsTips@amuniversal.com

[12] Missoula Independent • February 8–February 15, 2018


missoulanews.com • February 8–February 15, 2018 [13]


ating is often fraught, but for Kelly McGuire, things can get complicated especially fast. As the prevention coordinator at Missoula County’s Relationship Violence Services, which specializes in sexual violence response and education, and the co-founder of Make Your Move! Missoula, which specializes in sexual violence prevention, she often fields difficult questions about sexual assault and harassment before the bread basket even arrives. “Earlier this week, I was on a first date with a guy, and when he was asking me about my job, affirmative consent came up,” she says. “He said that asking permission takes the fun out of sex — and I had to stop him right there and explain the whole thing to him.” “The whole thing,” of course, is the concept of sexual consent and, on a grander scale, McGuire’s personal and professional mission to educate everyone in Missoula County about it. She might have taken one step closer to accomplishing it by enlightening her date, even if she lost interest in going out with him again. Sexual assault and sexual harassment have been on minds nationwide for months, and everyone seems to be talking about it. The #MeToo movement sprang to life in October 2017 after the New York Times broke Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein’s sexual misconduct scandal, leading to a waterfall of allegations against entertainment and media figures including Kevin Spacey, Charlie Rose, Louis C.K., Garrison Keillor and Al Franken. The allegations also led to millions of women sharing their own stories of sexual violence and harassment on social media. While it’s clear from the online

D

Consent campaign poster courtesy Make Your Move! Missoula

response that the movement has struck a national nerve, and is generating concrete consequences in industries like Hollywood and media, it’s less clear if change is afoot locally, beyond those bubbles. Ask the people on the front lines of sexual violence prevention, intervention and education here in Missoula and they

all say some version of the same thing: Missoula is a bit different from most other places, because Missoula got its wake-up call on the subject of sexual violence six years ago, when the U.S. Department of Justice investigated 350 reported sexual assaults in Missoula and then Jon Krakauer wrote a book — Missoula: Rape

and the Justice System in a College Town — about it. Suddenly, due to a few highly publicized sexual assault cases, the many issues surrounding how rape happens, how it is reported and how it is handled by the justice system moved front and center, and organizations from the police department to the city to the university scrambled to make changes. In some ways, local sexual violence educators agree, that means Missoula is ahead of the curve when it comes to education, outreach and cultural attitudes. In other ways, it means that Missoula has a head start understanding the biggest barriers to progress. Brenna Merrill, Make Your Move! Missoula’s other co-founder, has gotten a good glimpse at how Missoula is different. “I was at a conference in North Carolina, and no one had read [Missoula] or knew our backstory,” she says. “People didn’t experience it like we did. So, the #MeToo conversation for people here is a little different, because we were forced to start confronting the problem years ago.” In fact, many of the people who are now fighting to prevent sexual violence in Missoula joined the fight directly because of the Missoula rapes and resulting DOJ investigation, a prolonged episode that many of them refer to simply as “2012.” McGuire had been involved in Missoula City County Relationship Violence Services since 2010, but when the scandal hit, everyone, including the mayor, the college president and the police chief, suddenly had the interest and increased motive to mount a significant response to the issues of women’s safety and sexual assault. Also, thanks in part to the DOJ and the City Council, there were

Breaking down the barriers that stand between Missoula and great sex by Sarah Aswell

[14] Missoula Independent • February 8–February 15, 2018


suddenly extra funds to make action possible. The result was a sexual assault reporting campaign called “It’s Your Call,” followed by the formation of Make Your Move! Missoula. “The earlier campaign was great, but it put the burden of responsibility back on the victims,” McGuire explains. “We came out and said, this is great, but we need to prevent sexual assault in the first place. We need to eradicate it.” Eradicating sexual violence — or at least significantly curbing it — involves two big puzzle pieces that seem simple in theory: affirmative sexual consent and bystander intervention. Consent, in particular, is vital to stopping sexual assault in its tracks, while not placing an extra burden on bystanders or potential victims. If everyone always received enthusiastic consent from their partners before acting (and if everyone checked to make sure their partner was in a free and clear mindset), incidents of sexual assault would plummet, not to mention the reduction of those troublesome Aziz Ansari-style “bad sex” cases. And although there would likely continue to be a small number of serial sex offenders who don’t care about consent, study after study has found that most men who rape don’t consider themselves rapists, though they freely admit to engaging in non-consensual sex. Make Your Move! Missoula is a coalition of Missoula County’s Relationship Violence Services, the University of Montana’s Student Advocacy Resource Center, the YWCA and the county’s Missoula Forum for Children and Youth. While Relationship Violence Services works in the public schools, teaching consent workshops that focus on healthy romantic and sexual relationships to middle schoolers and high schools, MYM rolls out educational campaigns aimed at older teens and adults (the first was about bystander intervention; the second, launching this spring, is about consent). MYM also offers free trainings to bar staff designed to help curb sexual violence and harassment downtown. At the college level, the Student Advocacy Resource Center, directed by Drew Colling, is tasked with educating the university population about sexual assault and sexual violence, in addition to extensive counseling, academic advocacy, Title IX advocacy and 24/7 crisis response. Like MYM, SARC gained the resources and manpower to expand its program as a result of the events of 2012 — this time from the university. UM freshman currently attend a mandatory one-hour presentation about bystander intervention and consent, take an online sexual assault prevention course called Personal Em-

“There’s a part of consent that analyzes your place in the world and your partner’s place in the world before you can say yes or no in authentic ways.” powerment Through Self Awareness (PETSA), and take an online refresher course called Haven Plus as juniors. Even with educators offering free resources at seemingly every turn, the push for prevention faces significant barriers. The first, and perhaps trickiest, is that consent education is more complicated than it looks, and misconceptions run deep, even among those who think they get it. Merrill and McGuire lament that explicit verbal consent is often perceived

I’m older or more experienced, or if I have other sorts of social power, then consent is going to require conversation. There’s a part of consent that analyzes your place in the world and your partner’s place in the world before you can say yes or no in authentic ways.” Educators also battle gender stereotypes and gendered expectations in the bedroom, from the social pressure that men feel to be sexually active and pursue women aggressively to the constant cul-

Finally, McGuire says, the contemporary consent conversation is too focused on the question of legality (as in the case of the Aziz Ansari story) instead of the question of respecting boundaries and taking care of your partner’s wants and needs. “We need to understand the difference between legal consent and ethical consent,” she says. “These aren’t terms I’ve encountered, but I use them to explain the difference between Montana’s consent statute and what it looks like

photo by Amy Donovan

Make Your Move! Missoula co-founders Brenna Merrill, left, and Kelly McGuire.

as unsexy and overly formal (it’s not, they add), and a 2016 study in the Journal of Sex Research showed that participants still considered “not saying no” the biggest cue that a person is consenting to sex, when, in fact, freezing up and “not saying no” — known as tonic immobility — is an extremely common response to sexual assault. At the same time, Merrill says, there’s a lack of understanding about situations in which partners may not have the ability to say no. Such situations go far beyond incapacitation with drugs or alcohol. “Consent is more than just making sure you get a yes,” she explains. “It involves understanding power dynamics. If

tural signaling to women that femininity is passive and pleasing and pleasant (without, of course, overt sexuality). Prevention educators are fighting literally hundreds of daily messages that support gendered sexual expectations. “I’m always looking for clips from popular culture to show kids that depict portrayals of consent,” says McGuire, “but there basically aren’t any! In movies and on TV, people read each other’s minds, and it’s assumed the people want to kiss or have sex without asking. We don’t have a culture where we understand that we all want to be asked before someone does something to us, even though it would benefit both men and women.”

when someone tries to pressure someone else into sex — the issue of agreeing without wanting. I don’t want to teach kids the bare legal minimum of consent, because that’s not good enough.” The next barrier to prevention education is interest: Many people simply don’t know that they lack knowledge when it comes to sexual violence prevention, bystander intervention and consent. And, McGuire adds, men especially may be resistant to learning if they feel blamed, targeted or defensive about their own past actions. Even when individuals or organizations know sexual violence is a problem, acting on that knowledge can be difficult.

missoulanews.com • February 8–February 15, 2018 [15]


“A Make Your Move! Missoula survey found that 84 percent of respondents in Missoula had encountered sexual harassment or had a physical altercation in bars in the last year.” “The best folks may be saying, ‘Hey, this #MeToo thing is happening and I want to make a change,’” Merrill says. “But I don’t think most people know what resources are available or how to ask for them. Talking about sexual violence can be draining, and thinking about it and processing it can be hard without help. In a less kind light, I think that some people can feel silenced, or like it’s just a women’s issue, or that it’s happening in Hollywood and not affecting you or your employees or your business.” A good example of organizations acknowledging the problem but failing to take action is the response to Make Your Move’s bar workshops, which offer free, ongoing sexual violence prevention training and support to bar staff around Missoula. The program launched last spring, after a MYM survey found that 84 percent of respondents in Missoula had encountered sexual harassment or had a physical altercation in bars in the last year, while more than 60 percent had experienced either unwanted sexual comments or unwanted sexual touch. Only two local bars (the VFW and the Rhino) have completed the training, and the Sunrise Saloon is scheduled for training next month. The Badlander complex trained its staff under an older program in 2013.

Consent campaign poster courtesy Make Your Move! Missoula

Tanner Court, canteen operations manager at the VFW, immediately saw the trainings as necessary, even though it meant paying his staff for the extra time. “Since we run a music venue and bar, it’s important to create a place where people can feel safe and invited, regardless of how they look, a safe space where they can be themselves and not worry about negative outside distractions,” he says. Court says that he personally feels more comfortable being trained to respond appropriately in the case of a sexual harassment incident, and hopes that patrons who see the Make Your Move! sticker on the VFW’s front door know that they are in a place where the bartenders and security are trained to intervene. Why haven’t more Missoula bars signed up for the training? “Honestly, besides paying the staff for training, the other reason to not do it might be fear of the fact that they haven’t been doing it,” Court says. “They feel the status quo is fine and don’t want to make the effort to make a change. Some of the bars may be scared about learning what they are supposed to do — that they would know about the higher standard and have to be held accountable.” It’s also difficult to reach non-students. High school and college programs ensure that sexual violence prevention educators have a captive audience, but older adults can move through the world ignorant of changing viewpoints, evolving culture and myths about sexual harassment, sexual assault and consent. In many cases, Merrill says, people in their late 30s and older lack the vocabulary to talk about issues like “enthusiastic consent” and “gender expression.” MYM focuses on the 16-34 demographic, and tries to reach nonstudents not only through the bar work-

shops, but also via media campaigns that include posters, videos, radio ads, social media posts and an Instagram book club. The #MeToo movement has reached Missoula not just in conversations about sexual assault and the judicial system, but also in increased awareness of workplace harassment and bad sex, in which one person feels violated, dehumanized or simply unheard. “One positive of this mainstream event” — #MeToo — “is that we’re starting new conversations,” Merrill says. “When we just focus on rape prevention and response to rape, we’re only focusing on one sliver of sexual violence. Understanding that sexual harassment and ‘bad sex’ are violations, even if they aren’t rape, is an important thing. It gives language to people’s experiences, and reminds us that we have to respond to all acts of sexual violence and dehumanization.” At SARC, Colling is already seeing an impact from the #MeToo movement among students. “One of the biggest challenges is that students are coming to college, and many of the concepts we cover, like consent, are totally new to them,” she says. “They can be 18 before I get a chance to talk with them. But with the #MeToo movement, I can already feel a shift, when we are in classrooms and during our trainings. Not only have they heard about this, but they want to be educated, and they know it’s important.” The final barrier to prevention education is, not surprisingly, money. MYM has been funded by the city, the county, United Way and, until recently, a grant from Raliance, a national collaborative funded by the NFL that aims to end sexual violence within the span of a single generation. The $50,000, one-year Raliance

Your Affirmative Sexual Consent Cheat Sheet Sexual consent does not just mean explicitly asking new partners for permission before intercourse. There’s a bit more to it than that. Here’s what Make Your Move! Missoula wants you to know.

• Verbal consent is best. Body language can be a helpful indicator, but nothing is clearer than a firm “yes,” especially if you are with a new partner. Asking for consent doesn’t have to be formal or clinical — it can be as easy as asking what your partner would like. You can even use dirty words!

• A consenting partner has to have a free and clear mindset. Before anything happens, confirm that your partner is feeling no pressure from you or anyone else. They must be sober and conscious. There must also not be a significant undiscussed power differential between you and your partner that might affect one partner’s ability to say no.

• Lack of protest or resistance is not consent. Freezing up is a common response to being in an uncomfortable sexual situation, which is why waiting to hear “no” is such a poor way of approaching consent.

• Your partner can say no at any time, even in the middle of sexual activity. Nope, you don’t get to sexually assault someone based on a technicality like, “But you wanted to a minute ago.” Also, the fact that you engaged in sexual activity with your partner in the past does not equal current consent.

• Consent isn’t just for new partners. Practice enthusiastic, affirmative consent every time you try a new activity, or any time you aren’t sure if your partner is feeling it in the moment. Even people who have been partnered for many years can benefit from consent.

[16] Missoula Independent • February 8–February 15, 2018

• Consent is a process. Think about consent as an ongoing conversation that can span from, “Do you want to try this new thing I’ve been thinking about?” to, “Since we work together and I’ve been promoted to manager, we should probably chat…” • Be respectful about rejection. Rejection happens, and you should know how to accept it without pushing back or acting hurt. Try lines like, “I’m glad you said something,” or, “No worries, I want you to be comfortable,” or “That’s OK, I’m happy just being with you.” • Here’s a list of some things that do not count as consent: dressing in revealing clothing, drinking alcohol, flirting, going home with you, going into your bedroom, getting naked.


grant ran out in May 2017, and since then, MYM has been funded by a patchwork of city, county and other grant money. The county’s relationship violence services manager Shantelle Gaynor and McGuire are currently applying for grants, but McGuire says that if money can’t be found by the end of the fiscal year, Brenna Merrill’s position will probably be cut. Statewide budget cuts also affect local resources. The Montana Human Right Bureau, based in Helena, was dealt a $135,000 budget cut in January that makes traveling for investigations and trainings impossible. The bureau can now no longer offer free workplace sexual harassment trainings in Missoula, cutting a line of prevention to the non-student population. McGuire and Merrill say MYM would like to take over those trainings, but whether it can depends on finding the money to fund it. The research end of sexual violence prevention in Missoula also requires significant funding. In 2012, the Department of Justice required, and largely funded, a campus-wide climate survey that measured student attitudes and experiences regarding sexual assault, their awareness levels regarding sex-based discrimination and their experience with campus and community resources. Created, administered and analyzed by psychology professors including Christine Fiore (University

The campus climate surveys already conducted show a trend toward increased awareness regarding multiple common rape myths. And even though the #MeToo movement may be short on concrete steps toward change, it does have people talking about topics that used to be taboo. And as McGuire knows, cultural change ultimately does come down to individuals. “Getting yourself educated is the most important thing you can do,” she says. “Reflect on times in your life when you’ve seen sexual harassment and didn’t intervene because you didn’t know what to do. Read everything that is being written about sexual assault and consent right now. Teach your kids about consent and bodily autonomy. And believe survivors.” She ends with a refrain that everyone working in sexual violence prevention circles back to again and again: Integrating affirmative consent into your own life, right now, is something you can do to create change. And it won’t ruin your sex life. “The thing I want people to understand most is that consent is linked to great sex,” she says. “Consent goes hand in hand with better communication and healthier relationships and sex positivity. The goal isn’t less sex. It’s better sex for everybody.”

of Montana) and Alison Pepper (Missoula College), among others, the survey was taken by thousands of students over the fall of 2013, 2014 and 2015. The results, which are still being analyzed, not only help track the success of the education programs, but also add insight into what prevention programs like SARC and MYM focus on during educational and training sessions, down to small details. For example, Pepper says that based on data collected by the survey regarding sexual assault myths (such as “she was asking for it” and “he didn’t mean to”), SARC has been able to make specific changes to its curriculum to make it more effective and relevant. The climate surveys stopped after 2015 when DOJ funding ceased, and although Fiore and Pepper would like to continue the research, the funding isn’t there. While much of their personal labor is already unpaid and university servicebased, the survey is large, computerbased, and involves purchasing gifts or prizes for students who agree to participate. While SARC funding seems safe — the center was recently ranked Priority 1 in the university’s program prioritization process, positioning it for development and growth — it will suffer from a lack of formal feedback from the student body. Despite these stumbling blocks, Pepper says there’s reason to feel positive.

editor@missoulanews.com

Consent campaign poster courtesy Make Your Move! Missoula

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missoulanews.com • February 8–February 15, 2018 [17]


[arts]

Drag DIY Missoula’s kings, queens and in-betweens talk tips and tricks for being fabulous by Charley Macorn

I

n a hallway at the University Center on the University of Montana campus, a group of uniformed ROTC students furiously take notes as an instructor grimly points to a whiteboard. Occasionally, one of the students glances away from the lesson, distracted by the buzz of excitement coming from a neighboring meeting room full of people sporting dyed hair and pride buttons. The enthusiastic crew in the meeting room is part of a bi-weekly workshop called “So You Think You Can Drag” designed for anyone — mostly newbies — to get tips for and guidance in the art of drag. “I love the clothing,” someone says. “I would dress that way every day if I could.” “What’s stopping you, other than society?” asks another person “Society is a pretty big factor,” they answer. “That and money.” Jaz Dierenfield, the workshop’s instructor, smiles. “I’m not sure what we can do about society,” Dierenfield says. “But as for money, look at me: I’m a broke college kid and I find a way.” Dierenfield has performed around the world, from London, England, to Portland, Oregon, since taking part in their first drag show while studying at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks. Dierenfield’s drag persona, Aladdin Glambert, is a flashy and dynamic blur of energy that seems completely removed from the soft-spoken physics student teaching the workshop. The idea to teach the workshop sprang from Dierenfield’s realization that a lot of people in their personal life were showing an interest in drag, and most of them had no idea where to start. As the student coordinator for the Student Involvement Network and the outreach director for UM Lambda, Dierenfield realized they were in the best position to facilitate it. “The drag community has been so supportive and encouraging and empowering here in Montana.” Since its founding 30 years ago, the Imperial Sovereign Court of the State of Montana has produced dozens of drag

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

The monthly ISCSM drag show at the Badlander features personas including Vanilla Wafer.

shows every year throughout the state. “It’s a bit of a surprise when people [outside the state] find out about Montana’s long history of drag performance,” says Johnny Barber, a drag performer and UM history grad student. Helena, Bozeman and even Great Falls all have thriving drag scenes, but Missoula’s stands out with its monthly themed drag shows at the Badlander, tight-knit community of performers and supportive environment. Still, even in a welcoming atmosphere, drag can be an intimidating prospect for newbies. Where do you start in a field known for its use of makeup, costumes and choreography? In an artform dedicated to big characters and big costumes, it can be terrifying for someone wanting to make their break in the world of drag. And that’s where the workshop comes in.

[18] Missoula Independent • February 8–February 15, 2018

Even though some of Missoula’s performers have been performing for decades, they all started somewhere, and people like Dierenfield say they are more than willing to share their best tips for starting drag on a budget. What it takes? Attitude, learning from your mistakes and saving a couple of bucks whenever you can. “Firstly, figure out what kind of queen you want to be,” says Matty Oliver, who has been performing as Zara Renea Spritzer for almost nine years. Just putting on a dress or wig doesn’t make you a drag queen, Oliver says. Everything you put on should serve your inner character. “You can have the best wig and the best makeup and the best dress, but if you don’t have the inside figured out, you’re in trouble.”

When Oliver started in drag, they procured a stash of makeup by stealing their mother’s Mary Kay Cosmetics samples. This allowed them to play around to see what worked for them, but they still recommend trying on your makeup a few times before wearing it in public. “I felt fierce, but I looked busted as fuck when I first went out,” Oliver says. If you don’t have any experience with makeup, Oliver recommends checking out YouTube tutorials and, in lieu of stealing makeup from your mom, trying some of the cheaper brands before investing a lot of money. Wigs, commonly associated with drag culture, but by no means a necessity, can also be a daunting undertaking. Oliver currently spends between 40 to 80 hours prepping each wig before a performance in a painstaking process that evolved over the years

through trial and error. For the beginner, however, they recommend purchasing cheap wigs. “Don’t just take them out of the bag and put it on your head,” Oliver says. “Take it out, brush it out, style it; a little work can go a long way. You learn the most from your failures.” Johnny Spritzer, the drag alter ego of Barber, also knows the importance of learning from mistakes. Early in their career, Barber, like many rookie drag kings, bound their breasts with an Ace bandage. Binding, the process of compressing your breasts to create faux pectoral muscles, has a long tradition in drag culture. But while the bandage effectively compresses breasts, it’s also incredibly dangerous. A decade ago, Barber discovered just how dangerous it can be backstage at a show. Moments before Johnny Spritzer was to take the stage to compete for the title of Mr. Gay Missoula, Barber coughed, and immediately heard a loud snap. The compression of the bandage, coupled with the cough, fractured one of their ribs. Barber still took the stage and performed through the pain, even winning that coveted title, but never used an Ace bandage again. “I got really drunk after that,” Barber says. “I want to save other people from that pain. If you’re someone with breasts and you want to bind, please, please, please use a binder.” Binders go for around $20 online, and it’s easy to find cheap clothing and other accessories on the internet, too. Locally, clothing can be picked up on the cheap from Missoula’s plethora of thrift stores, or at the drag performer favorite, Ross Dress for Less. “I’ve gotten some of my favorite pieces for five or six dollars at Ross Crossdress for Less,” says Oliver, laughing. At the workshop, Dierenfield leads the enthusiastic attendees through the schedule for the bi-weekly workshop and gives some final advice. “Be a part of the community. Drag is great for personal expression and challenging gender norms, but it’s also a great opportunity to make connections with people.” arts@missoulanews.com


[music]

Sky high Syrinx Effect releases a cinematic album Syrinx Effect mixes ambient loops, pop hooks, drum samples and horns to create what sounds like a full jazz ensemble batting notes back and forth with a laptop DJ. Surprisingly enough, all that sweet, tumultuous noise is being made by just two people: Naomi Siegel on trombone, melodica and various electronics and Kate Olson, also on various electronics, plus clarinet and soprano sax. On the band’s latest album, A Sky You Could Strike a Match On, the duo flexes its creative muscles (along with guest drummer Eric Eagle) in songs that jump between humor, melancholy and aggression. “The Bankrobber Song,” for instance, starts out in a circus-like frenzy then slows to crawl before speeding back up with Charleston-esque flair. But it’s “Moblig-

ations” that really highlights Syrinx Effect’s instrumental storytelling chops. It starts with a spare intro of horns and drums, played staccato-like and contrasted against near silence. The song builds into a sultry melody: horns and drums strut and eddy, marching forward like a ragtag Mardi Gras band winding down for the night. The final minute in the six-minute track drops suddenly into an ominous soundscape where horns honk like geese passing across a full moon buried in fog. It’s a cinematic piece that makes a strong case for the marriage of electronic toys and brass. (Erika Fredrickson) Ear Candy hosts a listening party for Syrinx Effect’s A Sky You Could Strike a Match On, Thu., Feb. 8, at 6 PM.

Ron Pope, Worktapes Twin Falls, Idaho, is not a place that typically sparks nostalgia about anything, but Ron Pope’s soft crooning about it works as a way into his latest EP, Worktapes. The spartan track, with only piano and accordion backing up Pope’s orotund vocals, sets the mood for the rest of the album. The tracks that follow are a warm, quiet, listen-at-night-while-driving-in-the-rain creation that showcases the best of the independent artist. The seven-track release is a bite-sized sequel to his 2017 album Work — an upbeat, more energetic collection of songs. In contrast, Worktapes is mellow and raw; straight narrative songwriting that

provides a more lyrical meditation. It is a collection of aural Polaroids. The only embellishment on the EP comes from a host of collaborations with other musicians. While the ultimate feel is that of Ron Pope, alone in a studio, playing by himself, the appearances by Ray Charles (trumpet), Mike Riddleberger (drums, Bleachers), and co-producer Ted Young (percussion, The Rolling Stones), to name a few, add that extra hint of depth that pulls the album together. (Micah Drew) Ron Pope plays the Top Hat Mon., Feb. 12, at 8 PM. with the National Parks and the Heart Of. $20/$17 advance.

Total Control, Laughing At the System It’s hard to put a finger on what Total Control is about because on any given album the Australian band nimbly jumps from electronic synth, à la Gary Numan, to being drum-driven punk rippers. And that’s their appeal to me, their disregard of genre in exchange for vibe, which seems like more of an exercise in creative freedom than punk strictures usually permit. This incredibly well-executed music — moody, angry, synthy, future punk — somehow maintains continuity through it all, which adds up to a really cohesive body of work that isn’t easy to find with other bands.

I got into Total Control because it was started by Mikey Young, whose band Eddy Current Suppression Ring was more meat and potatoes rock, but still felt like something new. Laughing at the System has a weird resigned feeling about it, sort of posthope or something, but it’s also pretty enough with a continued focus and tight execution. My favorite track, “Laughing at the System Pt. 2,” is the catchiest, which may mean I have a shallow affinity for hooks, but also might speak to Total Control’s ability to deliver the proverbial goods with guitars and acoustic drums, for which I continue to be a sucker. ( Josh Vanek)

missoulanews.com • February 8–February 15, 2018 [19]


[art]

Happy endings Katie Machain and the art of reduction

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[20] Missoula Independent • February 8–February 15, 2018

by Erika Fredrickson

Katie Machain grew up in a family of engineers and doctors and, while it was her goal to follow suit, it wasn’t her instinct. In 2009, she enrolled at the University of Montana as an electrical engineering student, but by 2013, she had come out the other end of her studies with a bachelor’s degree in fine art. “I love math and process, but I didn’t want to sit at a desk and make schematics all day,” Machain says. “For me to dive into an art career felt really risky. But I wanted to do something more unique. And I did.” During her years at UM, Machain studied under James Bailey, an artist known for experimental printmaking approaches. She discovered a love for reduction printmaking, aka suicide block print, which satiated her desire to create art but also fed her engineering brain. The reduction printing process is a lot like other types of printmaking, because it involves carving images into wood, covering it in ink and making a print. But it requires some extra calculation — almost like treating images as equations — and an eye for architecture. In “Fire” is one of eight reduction prints in Katie Machain’s new exhibit at Bernice’s Bakery. reduction printmaking, after each layer is printed, new reliefs are carved into the people’s. I started making faces inside the landwood and others are removed to make the next scapes just to draw [the viewer’s] eye in and play off layer. By the end, the ink print is a full-on picture the idea that we are born from the earth and we re— multi-layer and often multicolor — but the wood- turn to it and we all need to be kind to each other.” The fleetingness of the reduction process conblock has been carved and reduced so many times, it’s destroyed. Hence the nickname: suicide print. nects well with the themes of birth and death, too. “You’re reducing the block, then printing, and Printmaking was created as a way to mass produce art then reducing again,” Machain says. “With regular work, but the suicide method works against that idea. “I just love it,” Machain says. “I’m a process printmaking, printmakers can go back and reprint their work as many times as the block will allow. girl. Reduction printing requires so many different levels, and it’s something where the engineer in But mine, once it’s done, it’s done.” Machain’s new exhibit at Bernice’s Bakery, El- me is satisfied and the arts side is satisfied. And ements, features eight reduction prints illustrating once I’m done, I can never go back. They become earth, wind, fire, ice, nature, darkness and light. limited prints in that way. I like having something They are landscapes but with human faces embed- that’s one of kind.” Katie Machain’s Elements shows through ded in clouds, cliffs and the smoke of a forest fire. “I’m drawn to landscapes and nature,” Machain the end of February at Bernice’s Bakery. Visit says. “I think almost everyone can relate to it. But katiemachain.com. landscape is also really common in art, so it’s hard efredrickson@missoulanews.com to make your own landscapes stand out from other


[film]

Sexy trouble Guadagnino does love just right by Molly Laich

Timothée Chalamet, left, and Armie Hammer star in Call Me by Your Name.

On average, I can only tolerate about one love story a year. In 2016, I accepted the romance in the stark sci-fi picture Arrival, probably because it doesn’t occupy much screen time and it ends in realistic calamity. It’s not that I dislike romance or don’t believe in love; it’s just that most of the time, I find the delivery a little far-fetched. Alas, I’ve made room in my heart once again, for director Luca Guadagnino’s Call Me by Your Name, which treats romantic love as the rare, precious and ultimately fleeting thing that I’ve come to believe it to be. James Ivory adapts the screenplay, based on a novel by André Aciman. The movie has been nominated for four Academy Awards, which include Best Picture, a Best Original Song nod for Sufjan Stevens’ “The Mystery of Love,” Best Performance from its young male lead, Timothée Chalamet, and a Best Adapted Screenplay nod for Ivory. Of these, I suspect it has a shot at Best Screenplay and nothing else, but who gives a hoot about all that. That Montana audiences finally, finally get to see this picture surrounded by loved ones and mountains at the Roxy Theater is its own reward. We begin in the summer of 1983, somewhere in northern Italy, where Elio (Chalamet) and his parents live perhaps the most enviable existence imaginable. They eat breakfast outside, surrounded by apricot and peach trees. Elio spends his days swimming in watering holes, reading books and playing music. He’s a gifted, multi-lingual 17-yearold with kind, gentle parents, surrounded by beautiful girls, and again, all this succulent fruit hanging patiently in every direction. Elio’s on-screen life serves as a nice reminder that not every moment is made of tangled wires and car payments — some things are just nice. Michael Stuhlbarg plays Elio’s father (gracefully and wonderfully), a Jewish American profes-

sor named Mr. Perlman who is married to his Italian wife, Annella (Amira Casar). Each summer, the family hosts a student in their home, hence the arrival of the impossibly hunky Oliver (Armie Hammer), come to send everyone into a tizzy. I was struck by how large and imposing Hammer looks on screen, how silly his sneakers and shorts combination hit the otherwise idyllic Italian countryside. It’s as if Team America has arrived with all its brash and pomp, but it’s fine. He just takes some getting used to. Always it is this way with Guadagnino’s films, as in 2015’s A Bigger Splash, where Americans get into all sorts of sexy trouble in Italy. It’s as if Guadagnino needs to take us gently by the hand and fly us all the way across the ocean, away from our puritan roots, before we can loosen up and experience any kind of real sensuality. When I first saw this movie at Sundance way the heck back in January of 2017, I didn’t know that I was watching a coming-of-age, same sex romance. But movies are magic, are they not? Even with the worst films, I’m always struck by how the slightest glances, the way the camera lingers between two people, make it quickly obvious which characters are meant to hook up later on. Gay romances are the best, because we see the hints and still we doubt ourselves. It’s just our imagination, they couldn’t possibly, etc. If it’s that way for us watching, imagine how it would be to live in that skin. The romance in Call Me by Your Name takes its sweet time to unfurl. Every moment is delicious, and I believe in it precisely because the aftermath hurts so good. Call Me By Your Name opens at the Roxy Fri., Feb. 9.

Partially Located on National Forest Lands Photo © GlacierWorld.com

arts@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • February 8–February 15, 2018 [21]


[film]

OPENING THIS WEEK THE 15:17 TO PARIS Clint Eastwood’s new film recounts the true story of the 2015 Thalys train attack, and the three Americans who put themselves in danger to save the lives of strangers. Rated PG-13. Stars several people playing themselves, as well as Tony Hale and Jaleel White. Wait, you’re telling me Urkel is in this movie? Is Eastwood okay? Has he been yelling at empty chairs again? Playing at the Pharaohplex and the AMC 12. FACES PLACES (VISAGES, VILLAGES) Agnès Varda was one of the leading figures of the French New Wave. Now this 89-year-old filmmaker partners with acclaimed photographer and muralists JR for a road trip to create giant portraits of the people they meet on their journey. Rated PG. Directed by Agnes Varda. Playing at the Roxy. FIFTY SHADES FREED Ana and Christian Grey explore new levels of masochism, which are nothing compared to the levels exhibited by fans of this franchise. Rated R. Stars Jamie Dornan, Dakota Johnson and that unmistakeable hankerin’ for a spankin’. Playing at the Pharaohplex and the AMC 12. PETER RABBIT Beatrix Potter’s beloved bunny makes the hop from children’s books to the big screen as a fast-talking, twerking jerk who throws all-night ragers in Mr. McGregor’s house. Rated PG. Featuring James Corden, Sam Neill and the realization that no one at Sony knows how to read. Playing at the AMC 12 and the Pharaohplex.

NOW PLAYING 12 STRONG The game plan for beating the Taliban in Afghanistan involves help from an unexpected source. That source, of course, being horses. I’m a little upset they didn’t just call the movie Horse War or Horse Soldiers or literally anything other than the boring and generic title it ended up with. Rated R. Stars Chris Hemsworth, Michael “Pottersville” Shannon and Rob Riggle. Playing at the AMC 12. CALL ME BY YOUR NAME A Jewish-American boy living in northern Italy falls head-over-heels in love with a bookish and musical grad student. You’ll never look at peaches the same way again. Rated R. Stars Armie Hammer, Timothee Chalamet and Michael Stuhlbarg. Playing at the Roxy. (See Film)

CRONOS (1993) Guillermo del Toro made his feature debut with this highly unorthodox tale of immortality, drinking blood and baby Ron Perlman. Rated R. Also stars Federico Luppi and Claudio Brook. Playing Sat., Feb. 10 at 8 PM at the Roxy.

story is told through painstaking animation. Every single one of this film’s 65,000 frames is an oil-painting, hand-painted by hundreds of artists around the world. Rated PG-13. Stars Douglas Booth, Saoirse Ronan and Aidan Turner. Playing at the Roxy Wed., Feb. 14 at 7 PM.

DARKEST HOUR As the unstoppable Nazi forces roll across Western Europe, the new Prime Minister of Great Britain has to make the hardest decisions of his life. Rated PG-13. Stars Gary Oldman, Lily James and Kristin Scott Thomas. Oldman sure loves being in movies with the word Dark in the title, doesn’t he? Playing at the AMC 12.

MAN ON WIRE (2008) Winner of the Academy Award for Best Documentary film, this high-flying film focuses on a Frenchman’s attempt to illegally tightrope walk between the World Trade Center’s twin towers. Rated PG-13. Directed by James Marsh. Playing Mon., Feb. 12 at 7 PM at the Roxy.

DUNKIRK Director Christopher Nolan takes a break from blowing our minds with high-concept sci-fi to create a perfect double feature with Darkest Hour. Rated PG-13. Stars Harry Styles, Tom Hardy and Cillian Murphy. Playing at the Roxy Sun., Feb. 11 at 7 PM. THE GREATEST SHOWMAN P.T. Barnum might be best known for coining the phrase “there’s a sucker born every minute,” but the life of the famed circus founder still has a few surprises up its sleeve. Rated PG. Stars Hugh Jackman, Zac Efron and Zendaya. Showing at the Pharaohplex and the AMC 12.

THE POST In the 1970s, the federal government was lying to the American people and attacking the free press, a cornerstone of our democracy. I’m sure glad things aren’t like that anymore! Rated PG-13. Stars Tom Hanks, Meryl Streep and Bob Odenkirk. I wonder who is going to play me when they eventually make a movie about the Indy? Playing at the AMC 12. PUTNEY SWOPE (1969) After the sudden death of the chairman of the board, a secret ballot to chose his replacement selects the one candidate no one thought could win. Not Rated, but definitely an R by today’s standards. Stars Arnold Johnson and Joe Madden. Robert Downey Sr. directs this subversive classic about race, advertising and the nature of corporate corruption. Plays Fri., Feb. 9 at 9 PM at the Roxy.

THE SHAPE OF WATER Did you ever watch Creature from the Black Lagoon and think to yourself, dang, I wanna have sex with that? Guillermo del Toro did, apparently. Rated R. Stars Sally “Paddington 2” Hawkins, Doug Jones (not that one) and Michael “Pottersville” Shannon. Playing at the This White Stripes tribute band is lit af. Faces Places opens at Roxy and the Pharaohplex.

HOSTILES Unrelated to Eli Roth’s series of torture films which are spelled differently anyway, an army captain is tasked with transporting a dying Cheyenne war chief from New Mexico to Montana. You had me at Montana. Rated the Roxy. R. Stars. Christian Bale, Wes Studi and Ben THE MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE Foster. Playing at the AMC 12 and the Pharaohplex. After being delayed by three years, the Maze Runner series comes to an end with more of the same stuff I, TONYA Did you know figure skater Tonya Harding was the we saw in the Hunger Games movies. Rated PG-13. first American woman to complete a triple axel in Stars Dylan O’Brien, Kaya Scodelario and Barry Pepcompetition? Of course not. We all remember her per. Playing at the AMC 12. from the wildest scandal in sports history instead. Rated R. Stars Margot Robbie, Sebastian Stan and Al- MISS SHARON JONES! (2015) lison Janney. Playing at the Roxy. With a powerful voice and a stronger personality, this JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE It took them 22 years, but Jumanji is finally getting a sequel without any of the original cast. Didn’t they learn their lesson with Zathura? Rated PG-13. Stars Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Kevin Hart and Jack Black. Playing at the Missoula AMC 12 and the Pharaohplex. LOVING VINCENT He was a brilliant, passionate painter who changed the world of art forever. Now Vincent Van Gogh’s

[22] Missoula Independent • February 8–February 15, 2018

PADDINGTON 2 Everyone’s favorite marmalade-loving bear is back in a sequel to 2014’s surprise hit. This time he’s in prison, which, to be honest, is a pretty bold choice for a kid’s movie. Rated PG. Stars Hugh Bonneville, Peter Capaldi and Sally “The Shape of Water” Hawkins. Playing at the AMC 12.

former corrections officer turned singer was on top of the world until she was diagnosed with a lifethreatening illness. Not Rated. Directed by Barbara Kopple. Playing Thu., Feb. 15 at 7 PM at the Roxy. MY FRIEND DAHMER You remember that one really weird kid you hung out with in high school? I wonder what he’s up to now. Rated R. Stars Ross Lynch, Alex Wolff and Anne Heche. Playing Thu., Feb. 8 at 7 PM at the Roxy.

STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI A bold and evil empire takes what it wants and destroys those who stand in its way. Who will oppose this tide of darkness? So far it’s already bought Marvel, 20th Century Fox and Star Wars. Rated PG-13. Stars Daisy Ridley, Mark Hamill and Carrie Fisher. Playing at the Missoula AMC 12. TO THE ENDS OF THE EARTH (2016) Extreme energy, the end of economic growth and the people caught in the middle dominate this documentary about the battle to keep Earth sustainable. Not Rated. Directed by David Lavalle. Playing Thu., Feb. 8 at 8:30 PM at the Roxy. Capsule reviews by Charley Macorn. Planning your outing to the cinema? Get up-todate listings and film times at theroxytheater.org, amctheatres.com and pharaohplex.com to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities.


[dish]

French kiss chicken by Gabi Moskowitz

BROKEASS GOURMET

There is no question that my love language is culinary. Sick in bed? I’ll bring over pho! Just had a baby? I’ll be over with a pan of Brown Butter Pumpkin Mac and Cheese. But to me, there is no food more potent with love than a freshly roasted whole chicken with herbs and garlic. As it roasts, its heavenly scent fills your kitchen, wafting down the halls (and perhaps even into the apartment next door), letting everyone know that something special is being cooked. It’s simple, but the very definition of wholesome, and goes with just about anything. This isn’t the first chicken I’ve roasted, but it may be the easiest preparation. Here, I blend the classic French dried herb combination Herbes de Provence (a mixture of savory, marjoram, rosemary, thyme, oregano and lavender) with chopped garlic, salt and pepper, and slather it thickly over a beautiful whole chicken. The herb-garlic mixture does double duty, creating a crust that helps hold moisture in, while also infusing the chicken with all that herbaceous flavor. The product is a wonderfully juicy, rustic chicken that should be served with simple sides that complement but don’t overwhelm it. Roasted potatoes, a creamy risotto or sauteed cannellini beans would be great options, along with something sturdy and green, like massaged kale or roasted rapini. So, instead of chocolate or roses, consider giving a freshly roasted chicken this Valentine’s Day. Not only does it kind of look like a heart, but you can’t make soup broth out of leftover chocolates and roses. Serves 4

Ingredients 1 whole (5-pound) roasting chicken, giblets removed 4 garlic cloves, chopped 1/8 cup Herbes de Provence (usually found near the spices) 2 tsp each salt and pepper Directions Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Rinse the chicken under cool running water and pat dry using paper towels. Place in a large (at least 9x13) casserole pan and set aside. Combine the garlic, Herbes de Provence, salt and pepper in a bowl. Mix well to combine. Slather the garlic-herb mixture all over the chicken, inside the cavity, and all over the skin, slipping your hand between the skin and the flesh to rub a bit in there as well. If desired, truss the chicken (this is not required). Place the chicken breast-side-up in the pan and cover tightly with foil. Roast, covered, for 30 minutes (if your chicken is larger or smaller than 5 pounds, adjust the cooking time slightly). Uncover the chicken and roast for 25 to 30 minutes, or until the skin is golden-brown and the juices run clear (stick a knife into the thigh to check this). Let rest for 5 minutes, then carve and serve hot. BrokeAss Gourmet caters to folks who want to live the high life on the cheap, with delicious recipes that are always under $20. Gabi Moskowitz is the blog’s editor in chief and author of The BrokeAss Gourmet Cookbook and Pizza Dough: 100 Delicious Unexpected Recipes.

missoulanews.com • February 8–February 15, 2018 [23]


[dish] Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$

“PROST!” Located above Bayern Brewery 1507 Montana Street Monday–Saturday | 11a–8pm BayernBrewery.com

Bridge Pizza 600 S Higgins Ave. 542-0002 bridgepizza.com A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11am - 10:30pm. $-$$ Brooks & Browns 200 S. Pattee St. 721-8550 Brooks & Browns Bar & Grill is the place to relax and unwind while enjoying our New Feature Menu. Great selection of Montana Brews on tap! Come down as you are and enjoy Happy Hour every day from 4-7p and all day Sunday with drink and appetizer specials changing daily. Thursday Trivia from 7:30-9:30. Inside the Holiday Inn Downtown Missoula. $-$$

Reserve Your Table For Valentine's Day Enjoy Curries, Noodles, Sake, Tea, and Wine

Gluten-Free & Vegan NO PROBLEM

FEBRUARY

COFFEE SPECIAL

VA L E N T I N E G I F T S FROM THE HEART

Butterfly House Blend

$10.95/lb.

BUTTERFLY HERBS

BUTTERFLY HERBS

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

Burns Street Bistro 1500 Burns St. 543-0719 burnsstbistro.com We cook the freshest local ingredients as a matter of pride. Our relationship with local farmers, ranchers and other businesses allows us to bring quality, scratch cooking and fresh-brewed Black Coffee Roasting Co. coffee and espresso to Missoula’s Historic Westside neighborhood. Handmade breads & pastries, soups, salads & sandwiches change with the seasons, but our commitment to delicious food does not. Mon-Fri 7am 2pm. Sat/Sun Brunch 9am - 2pm. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 45 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$

Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West 541-FOOD The GFS Deli features made-to-order sandwiches, Fire Deck pizza & calzones, rice & noodle wok bowls, an award-winning salad bar, an olive & antipasto bar and a self-serve hot bar offering a variety of housemade breakfast, lunch and dinner entrées. A seasonally-changing selection of deli salads and rotisserie-roasted chickens are also available. Locally-roasted coffee/espresso drinks and an extensive fresh juice and smoothie menu complement bakery goods from the GFS ovens and Missoula’s favorite bakeries. Indoor and patio seating. Open every day 7am-10pm. $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St. 549-7723 grizzlyliquor.com Voted Missoula’s Best Liquor Store! Largest selection of spirits in the Northwest, including all Montana microdistilleries. Your headquarters for unique spirits and wines! Free customer parking. Open Monday-Saturday 9-7:30. $-$$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 ironhorsebrewpub.com We’re the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we’ll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Iza 529 S. Higgins • 830-3237 izarestaurant.com Local Asian cuisine feature SE Asian, Japanese, Korean and Indian dishes. Gluten Free and Vegetarian no problem. Full Beer, Wine, Sake and Tea menu. We have scratch made bubble teas. Come in for lunch, dinner, drinks or just a pot of awesome tea. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm, Dinner M-Sat 3pm-close. $-$$ Liquid Planet 223 N. Higgins • 541-4541 Whether it’s coffee or cocoa, water, beer or wine, or even a tea pot, French press or mobile mug, Liquid Planet offers the best beverage offerings this side of Neptune. Missoula’s largest espresso and beverage bar, along with fresh and delicious breakfast and lunch options from breakfast burritos and pastries to paninis and soups. Peruse our global selection of 1,000 wines, 400 beers and sodas, 150 teas, 30 locally roasted coffees, and a myriad of super cool beverage accessories and gifts. Find us on facebook at /BestofBeverage. Open daily 7:30am to 9pm. Liquid Planet Grille 540 Daly • 540-4209 (corner of Arthur & Daly across from the U of M) MisSOULa’s BEST new restaurant of

$…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over

[24] Missoula Independent • February 8–February 15, 2018


[dish] 2015, the Liquid Planet Grille, offers the same unique Liquid Planet espresso and beverage bar you’ve come to expect, with breakfast served all day long! Sit outside and try the stuffed french toast or our handmade granola or a delicious Montana Melt, accompanied with MisSOULa’s best fries and wings, with over 20 salts, seasonings and sauces! Open 7am-8pm daily. Find us on Facebook at /LiquidPlanetGrille. $-$$ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. (on the hip strip) 543-7154 themissoulaseniorcenter.org Did you know the Missoula Senior Center serves delicious hearty lunches every week day for only $4 for those on the Nutrition Program, $5 for U of M Students with a valid student ID and $6 for all others. Children under 10 eat free. Join us from 11:30 - 12:30 M-F for delicious food and great conversation. $ The Mustard Seed Asian Cafe Southgate Mall 542-7333 Contemporary Asian fusion cuisine. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combine the best of Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences. Full menu available at the bar. Award winning desserts made fresh daily , local and regional micro brews, fine wines & signature cocktails. Vegetarian and Gluten free menu available. Takeout & delivery. $$-$$$ Nara Japanese/Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy its warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer, Wine and Sake. $$-$$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. 543-3188 orangestreetfoodfarm.com Experience The Farm today!!! Voted number one Supermarket & Retail Beer Selection. Fried chicken, fresh meat, great produce, vegan, gluten free, all natural, a HUGE beer and wine selection, and ROCKIN’ music. What deal will you find today? $-$$$ Pearl Cafe 231 E. Front St. 541-0231 pearlcafe.us Country French meets the Northwest. Idaho Trout with King Crab, Beef Filet with Green Peppercorn Sauce, Fresh Northwest Fish, Seasonally Inspired Specials, House Made Sourdough Bread & Delectable Desserts. Extensive wine list, local beer on draft. Reservations recommended. Visit us on Facebook or go to Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Pita Pit 130 N Higgins 541-7482 pitapitusa.com Fresh Thinking Healthy Eating. Enjoy a pita rolled just for you. Hot meat and cool fresh veggies topped with your favorite sauce. Try our Chicken Caesar, Gyro, Philly Steak, Breakfast Pita, or Vegetarian Falafel to

name just a few. For your convenience we are open until 3am 7 nights a week. Call if you need us to deliver! $-$$

Sweet temperance at Montgomery Distillery

HAPPIEST HOUR

Rumour 1855 Stephens Ave. 549-7575 rumourrestaurant.com We believe in celebrating the extraordinary flavors of Montana using local product whenever it's available. We offer innovative vegetarian, vegan, gluten-free, meat & seafood dishes that pair beautifully with one of our amazing handcrafted cocktails, regional micro-brews, 29 wines on tap or choose a bottle from our extensive wine list. At Rumour, you'll get more than a great culinary experience....You'll get the perfect night out. Open daily: restaurant at 4.00pm, casino at 10.30am, brunch sat & sun at 9.30am Sushi Hana 403 N. Higgins 549-7979 SushiMissoula.com Montana’s Original Sushi Bar. We Offer the Best Sushi and Japanese Cuisine in Town. Casual atmosphere. Plenty of options for non-sushi eaters including daily special items you won’t find anywhere else. $1 Specials Mon & Wed. Lunch Mon–Sat; Dinner Daily. Sake, Beer, & Wine. Visit SushiMissoula.com for full menu. $$-$$$

Taco Sano Two Locations: 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West 1515 Fairview Ave inside City Life 541-7570 • tacosano.net Home of Missoula’s Best BREAKFAST BURRITO. 99 cent TOTS every Tuesday. Once you find us you’ll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9pm 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$ Tia’s Big Sky 1016 W. Broadway 317-1817 • tiasbigsky.com We make locally sourced Mexican food from scratch. We specialize in organic marinated Mexican street chicken (rotisserie style) fresh handmade tortillas, traditional and fusion tamales, tacos, pozole and so much more. Most items on our menu are gluten free and we offer many vegetarian and vegan options. We also have traditional Mexican deserts, as well as drinks. Much of our produce is grown for us organically by Kari our in house farmer! Eat real food at Tia’s!

Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over

photo by Susan Elizabeth Shepard

What you’re drinking: Something off the Temperance Menu at Montgomery Distillery, whose menu includes a thoughtfully expansive nonalcoholic selection that goes far beyond most bars’ “choice of mixers.” As a bonus, everything on that menu costs just $3, which is less than you can get out of most coffee shops for. Fancy cocktail bars already have fancy tinctures and garnishes and mixers on hand, so it’s easier for them to whip up a virgin drink that’s a step up from the usual. Also, they have chocolate milk. So really, what are you drinking? While my coworkers had adult beverages, I tried the Calamity Jane and the Bumble Bee, the two more complex selections. The Calamity Jane is like a sophisticated Shirley Temple or an upmarket Sonic Cherry Limeade, made with grenadine and lime mixed with honey and soda water. It’s a refreshing drink that isn’t too sweet. But it was the Bumble Bee that really delivered, with a sweet and tart flavor profile courtesy of a honey shrub and lemon. Mixed

with soda water and garnished with a full rosemary shrub, it was visually attractive and satisfying to drink. You can also order a Mini Mule (ginger beer with lime) or a Little Dude (Kalispell Creamery milk and chocolate syrup). When are you drinking? Before 8 p.m., that’s for sure. The staff makes no bones about enforcing last call around 7:40 p.m., thanks to Montana’s distillery rules. Why aren’t you drinking booze? In the spirit of this week’s cover story, you’re teetotaling in order to be an effective bystander. Where are you drinking? The Montgomery Distillery tasting room at 129 W. Front St. —Susan Elizabeth Shepard Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

2230 McDonald Ave, Missoula, MT 59801 Sunday–Thursday 2–9PM Friday & Saturday 12–9PM

GREATBURNBREWING.COM missoulanews.com • February 8–February 15, 2018 [25]


WED | 7 PM Hippie Sabotage plays the Wilma Wed., Feb. 14. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $25/$20 advance.

FRI | 10:15 PM The Skurfs play the Top Hat Fri., Feb. 9. Doors at 9:30 PM, show at 10:15. $5.

[26] Missoula Independent • February 8–February 15, 2018

WED | 7:30 PM Vocalist Greta Metassa performs Jazz for Lovers at UM Music Building Wed., Feb 14 at 7:30 PM. $25.


UPCOMING AUG

03

FEB

14 FEB

20 FEB

PIXIES

SLEIGH BELLS

AUG

19

HIPPIE SABOTAGE

MAR

LETTUCE MATISYAHU

MAR

PATH OF RIGHTEOUSNESS TOUR

22

FOREST OF FAITH TOUR & EMINENCE ENSEMBLE

MAR

AN EVENING WITH

FEB

ORGONE

ZION I, DJ MACKLE

THE INFAMOUS

03 STRINGDUSTERS

YONDER MOUNTAIN STRING BAND MAR UMPHREY’S MCGEE

10 14

APR

02 SHOVELS & ROPE 03

08

ON SALE FRI

REBELUTION STEPHEN MARLEY, COMMON KINGS,

FEB

26

RUSS LIQUID

MINISTRY

CHELSEA WOLFE

DOROTHY

MAR TALIB KWELI THE SKURFS & 02 NIKO IS LOCKSAW CARTEL 09 SOLD OUT MAR RON POPE FEB THE NATIONAL PARKS 06 MR. CARMACK LIVE 12

FEB

SAT | 8 PM Phoebe Hunt & the Gatherers play the Hamilton Performing Arts Center Sat., Feb. 10 at 8 PM. $39.

& THE HEART OF

FEB

15 FEB

21

THE WIND & THE WAVE MONOPHONICS PNUT BUTR

MAR

09

SPAFFORD

MAR

THE MOTET

10

TICKETS & INFO AT LOGJAMPRESENTS.COM

MON | 8 PM Ron Pope plays the Top Hat Mon., Feb. 12. Doors at 7:30 PM, show at 8. $20/$17 advance.

missoulanews.com • February 8–February 15, 2018 [27]


Look at all those double consonants! Revelators frontman Russ Nassett plays a solo show at Draught Works from 6 PM–8 PM. Free. You never know what skills could save your life one day. Learn to lap dance like a pro at Lap Dance 101 at the Fox Club. 5 PM–7 PM. $35.

nightlife Singer-songwriter John Floridis plays Bitter Root Brewing from 6 PM–8 PM. Free. Preview and listen to Syrinx Effect's new album with a free listening party at Ear Candy Music. 6 PM. BYOB. I think it's spelled Oregon. Los Angeles-based soul band Orgone play the Top Hat. Doors at 8:30 PM, show at 9. $15/$12 advance. Tyler Barham presents a special night of music at the Sunrise Saloon. 8:30 PM. Free. Kris Moon hosts a night of volcanic party action at the Badlander. 9 PM. Free. Honeycomb Dance Party at Monk's. 9 PM. Free. Aaron "B-Rocks" Broxterman hosts karaoke night at the Dark Horse Bar. 9 PM. Free. Larry Hirshberg provides the tunes at Highlander Beer. 6 PM–8 PM. Free.

Friday 02-0 9

02-0 8

Thursday

Writer Gina Ochsner presents the fiction craft lecture Mistakes I Have Made and Great Advice I Wish I Had Taken to Heart at 12 PM in the Dell Brown Room of Turner Hall. Free.

nightlife Friends, Missoulians, opera lovers, lend me your ears; Handel's Julius Caesar premieres at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts. 7:30 PM. $15– $20. Dead Hipster I Love the '90s Dance Party takes you back to a time when the President could be impeached for lying. The Badlander. 9 PM. $3. Missoula's late night party se-

ries centered around art, music and expression returns to Missoula Winery and Event Center. Bohemia kicks off at 9 PM. $10/$8 advance. The Skurfs and Locksaw Cartel play the Top Hat. Doors at 9:30 PM, show at 10:15. $5. Southern rock rebels The Hankers play the Sunrise Saloon. 9:30 PM. Free. Brrrrrrrrrr. The Shiver plays the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. Brute Finesse, Rooster Sauce and Mermaid Book Club unite for a night of music at the VFW. 10 PM. Free.

The Hankers play the Sunrise Saloon Fri., Feb. 9 at 9:30 PM. Free.

high notes

Spotlight George Frideric Handel was one of the excellent basis for an opera itself. But until Baroque era's greatest composers. His life someone gets off their duff and puts pen to was full of travel, paper, all we have to remember passionate adven- WHAT: Handel's Julius Caesar the great composer is his impresture and a heapsive body of work. ing spoonful of WHO: UM Opera Theater and Handel's Julius Caesar tells the Symphony Orchestra famous story of the great Roman tragedy. Honestly, leader and toga enthusiast chasing his life, from his WHEN: Fri., Feb 9 at 7:30 PM his enemy Pompeo into Egypt. Surchildhood in Gerthrough Sun., Feb 11 at 2 PM prisingly, his blood feud kicks off many, practicing a series of murders, near assassithe harpsichord in WHERE: MCT Performing Arts nations and politically motivated secret so as not to marriages. All the story really tick off his music- HOW MUCH: $15–$20 needs is some dragons and two hating father, to MORE INFO: mctinc.org years between acts to make this a his later years proto-Game of Thrones. This where he was blinded by a phony surgeon, would make an opera, produced through a collaboration be-

photo courtesy Terri Elander

tween MCT, UM Opera Theatre and UM Symphony Orchestra, proves that while we are all destined to die, music lives on forever. —Charley Macorn

Delicious

IS ON THE MENU

Benefiting

FEBRUARY 22 2 - MARCH MARCH 3 • SPOKANE, W WA A InlanderRestaurantWeek.com rantWeek.com

[28] Missoula Independent • February 8–February 15, 2018

#Inland #InlanderRW erRW


Four years ago, Ethan Sky was just getting his start in stand-up comedy. At the time, Missoula only had one monthly open mic, and he realized the only way for him to get more stage time was if he gave it to himself. Wanting to find a way to make his showcase stand out, he talked to his friend Theo Smith, who operated a food cart. To-

hot stuff

food cart has expanded to become Masala, and Sky's comedy showcase has become one of the best standup showcase in the state. Ironically, all the work that goes into creating a big event with so many moving pieces, left Sky with less time to practice his material. As such, he's stepped away from performing to serve as the shows MC. In the spirit of its foundWHAT: The Curry Comedy Series ing, Sky brings in the most talked WHERE: The Public House about comedians, but he always gives WHEN: Sat., Feb. 10. Doors at 5:30 PM, time to fresh voices dinner at 6, comedy at 7 who have wowed HOW MUCH: $20theroxytheater.org him at one of Missoula's many comedy open mics. This gether they would offer comedy year's line up includes favorites from the best local stand-up co- like Becky Margolis, Michael medians, while dishing out deli- Beers, as well as Indy contribucious curry. Thus the Curry tors Sarah Aswell and Dan Comedy Series was born. Brooks. —Charley Macorn In the intervening years, that

Saturday 02-1 0

Spotlight

Winter Storytelling at Travelers' Rest State Park continues with William Marcus's Back Roads of Montana. 11 AM. Free.

Good Old Fashioned plays a mixture of old-time bluegrass, folk, country and blues at Bitter Root Brewing. 6 PM–8 PM. Free.

Caras Nursery and Landscape hosts an Orchid Show from 12:30 PM–3:30 PM. Free.

Bob Wire turns the honky tonk knob to maximum at Imagine Nation Brewing. 6 PM–8 PM. Free.

We promise we won't tell your kids about this event. Shopkins Live! brings the product of a corporate monoculture based around feeding kids consumerism and gender roles to the Dennison Theatre. $29.50–$39.50.

Michael Shaw plays Highlander Beer. 6 PM–8 PM. Free.

Missoula Public Library's Winter Wellness series presents a workshop of fighting fake news. Over a million people are expected to attend. It's gonna be huge. MPL's Large Meeting Room. 2 PM. Free. Handel's Julius Caesar continues at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts at 2 PM, Brute. $15–$20 Western Cider begins the seasonal rite of Wassail to raise community spirit. Costume pageantry, music and old British traditions start at 5 PM. Free.

Basses Covered uncover a night of music at Draught Works from 6 PM–8 PM. Free. The Curry Comedy Series returns to the Public House for stand-up comedy and food. Doors at 5:30 PM, dinner at 6, show at 7. $20. (See Spotlight.) Handel's Julius Caesar continues at the MCT. 7:30 PM. $15–$20.

nightlife I just can't wait to be queen! The kings and queens of the Imperial Sovereign Court of the State of Montana host Let It Go, a drag celebration with a twist of Disney. Doors at 8 PM, show at 9. $5.

Run Amok provides the Mardi Gras music at the Union Club. 8 PM. Free. Phoebe Hunt & the Gatherers play the Hamilton Performing Arts Center. Rolling Stone called her one of its top 10 new country artists you should know. $39. 8 PM. Celebrate Fat Tuesday with Lolo Hot Springs Mardi Gras Party. Costume contests, drink specials and more. 9 PM. Free. The Badlander’s Absolutely Dance Party gets rolling at 9 PM. Free. Southern rock rebels The Hankers play Sunrise Saloon. 9:30 PM. Free. Be at peace, be aware of your breathing, be at Joan Zen Band at the Union Club. 9:30 PM. Free. What kind of messed up dog is that? Ugly Pony plays the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. Let's think globally while acting locally. Tahj and the Sweatshop Sneakers play the Top Hat at 10:15 PM. Free.

missoulanews.com • February 8–February 15, 2018 [29]


02-1 1

Sunday Green Source hosts a Valentine's Day Pop-up featuring fair trade jewelry, specialty chocolates and more. 11 AM–2 PM. David Horgan, Beth Lo and Antonio Alvarez provide the soundtrack at Bayern Brewery from 11 AM–2 PM. Free.

February

SALE Everything

Missoula Sons of Norway Lodge host a non-competitive, cross country ski event just for kids. 12 PM–3 PM. Visit sonmissoula.com for more info. Free. Nothing says love like accordion music! The 5 Valley Accordion Club's Valentines Day Dance.1PM– 4 PM at Sunrise Saloon. Free.

in the Store

Handel's Julius Caesar continues at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts at 2 PM, Brute. $15–$20

Dansko - Keen Birkenstock - Merrell

Dad? Mom? Ned and Nicole play Draught Works from 5 PM– 7 PM. Free.

20% off Alegria - Bogs Haflinger - Chaco

20Born%- Clarks off

The Ed Norton Big Band plays the Montana Winery for your dancing pleasure at 6 PM. $9. The Dram Shop hosts an after-hours pairing of beer and cookies. Time to obliterate the last of my New Year's resolutions. 6:30 PM–8:30 PM. $25. Space is limited.

nightlife

The Ed Norton Big Band plays the Montana Winery for your dancing Every Sunday is "Sunday pleasure at 6 PM. $9. Funday" at the Badlander. Play cornhole, beer pong and other games, have drinks Sip a fancy cocktail for a cause at every drink sold is donated to a and forget tomorrow is Monday. Moscow Monday at the Mont- worthy local organization. 12 9 PM. gomery Distillery. A dollar from PM–8 PM.

Monday 02-1 2

10% off

Indulge your inner Lisa Simpson with live jazz and a glass of craft beer on the river every Sunday at Imagine Nation Brewing. 5 PM–8 PM.

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[30] Missoula Independent • February 8–February 15, 2018

UM President Seth Bodnar addresses the Missoula City Club at Doubletree Hotel. 11 AM. Register at cityclubmissoula.com. $20.

Where was Tim Allen's neighbor when JFK was shot, huh? The Absent Wilson Conspiracy plays Red Bird Wine Bar. 7 PM–10 PM. Free.

nightlife

UM jazz groups perform at the Break Espresso. 7:30 PM–9:30 PM. Free.

Prepare a couple of songs and bring your talent to Open Mic Night at Imagine Nation Brewing. Sign up when you get there. Every Monday from 6–8 PM.

Do you think he calls his tour bus the Popemobile? Ron Pope plays the Top Hat. Doors at 7:30 PM,

show at 8. $20/$17 advance. Motown on Mondays puts the s-ou-l back into Missoula. Resident DJs Smokey Rose and Mark Myriad curate your favorite Motor City hits at the Badlander. 9 PM. Free. Every Monday DJ Sol spins funk, soul, reggae and hip-hop at the Badlander. Doors at 9 PM, show at 10. Free. 21-plus.


Bitter Root Brewing's Mardi Gras party features the music of the perfectly spelled Mudslide Charley. 6 PM–8 PM. Free.

The Humanities Institute presents Professor Christopher Preston's Wildness and the Anthropocene: Notes from Montana, as part of its faculty lecture series. Dell Brown Room of Turner Hall 4 PM–5 PM. Free and open tot he public.

Author and photographer Tim Palmer presents Wild and Scenic Rivers: An American Legacy, as part of the Rivers Will Run Lecture Series. Gallagher Business Building Room 123. 7 PM. Free. Visiting artist Duane Slick gives a lecture on how he uses humor and deception to reveal absurdity about colonial assumptions about Native Americans. Missoula Art Museum. 7 PM. Free. Guest flutist Mark McGregor performs the Montana Premiere of Hiraeth by composer Emilie LeBel. UM School of Music. 7:30 PM. $12.

nightlife Step up your factoid game at Quizzoula trivia night, every Tuesday at the VFW. 8:30 PM. Free. This week's trivia question: What outlaw held up his first bank on today's date in 1866? Answer in tomorrow's Nightlife. This next song is about drinking a LaCroix in your Subaru with your dog. Missoula Music Showcase features local singers and songwriters each week at the Badlander. 9 PM. Free.

02-1 4

Wednesday

02-1 3

Tuesday

Every Wednesday is Community UNite at KettleHouse Brewing Company's Northside tap room. A portion of every pint sold goes to support local Missoula causes. This week raise a glass for the Pink Boot Society. 5 PM–8 PM.

nightlife Kimberlee Carlson fills the air with romantic music at Bitter Root Brewing. 6 PM– 8:30 PM. Free.

broth and more. 6 PM– 9 PM. $70. RSVP ASAP. 1951 Kensington Ave. Wait a minute, someone put tobacco in my water pipe! Hippie Sabotage plays the Wilma. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $25/$20 advance. Win big bucks off your bar tab and/or free pitchers by answering trivia questions at Brains on Broadway Trivia Night at the Broadway Sports Bar and Grill. 7 PM. Trivia answer: Jesse James. Nationally recognized vocalist Greta Metassa performs Jazz for Lovers at UM Music Building. 7:30 PM. $25.

David Horgan and Beth Lo perform original jazz at Caffe Dolce from 6 PM–9 PM. Free.

Kraptastic Karaoke indulges your need to croon, belt and warble at the Badlander. 9:30 PM. No cover.

Want to go out for Valentine's Day, but you're still on your New Year's diet? Moonlight Kitchens hosts a full-on paleo dinner featuring steak tartar, veal bone

Every Wednesday is Beer Bingo at the Thomas Meagher Bar. Win cash prizes along with beer and liquor giveaways. 8 PM. Free.

Kimberlee Carlson fills the air with romantic music at Bitter Root Brewing. Wed., Feb. 15, from 6 PM–8:30 PM. Free.

missoulanews.com • February 8–February 15, 2018 [31]


02-1 5

Thursday Take a behind-the-scenes class for wouldbe and wannabe dancers at the Fox Club. 5 PM–8 PM. $35. Celebrate the University of Montana's 125th birthday with the annual Charter Day celebration at Dennison Theatre. 5 PM. Free and open to the public. Carla Green Jazz provides the tunes at Draught Works from 6 PM–8 PM. Free.

nightlife All those late nights watching gameshow reruns are finally paying off. Get cash toward your bar tab when you win first place at trivia at the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM. Hambone and the Headliners headline a night of music at the Sunrise Saloon. 8:30 PM. Free.

Kris Moon hosts a night of volcanic party action at the Badlander. 9 PM. Free. Is it big? Yeah, yeah, yeah. It's not small. No, no, no. Groove the night away at the Honeycomb Dance Party at Monk's. 9 PM. Free. Aaron "B-Rocks" Broxterman hosts karaoke at Dark Horse Bar. 9 PM. Free. Jackson Holte and the Highway Patrol, Ocelot Wizard and the Pool Boys unite for a night of music at the VFW. 9 PM. We want to know about your event! Submit to calendar@missoulanews.com at least two weeks in advance of the event. Don’t forget to include the date, time, venue and cost. I don't miss dating, I just miss someone else paying for dinner occastionally.

The Wind and the Wave plays the Top Hat Thursday, Feb. 15, at 9 PM. $12 advance/$15 day of show.

HealthWise Chiropractic DR. PAUL MILLER 25 Years Experience HANDS-ON, NO-NONSENSE Insurance accepted. Reasonable non-insured rates.

2100 Stephens Ste 118, Missoula (406) 721-4588 healthwisemissoula.com Mention this ad for 25% off initial visit.

Medical Marijuana Recommendations Alternative Wellness is helping qualified patients get access to the MT Medical Marijuana Program. Must have Montana ID and medical records. Please Call 406-249-1304 for a FREE consultation or alternativewellness.nwmt@gmail.com

[32] Missoula Independent • February 8–February 15, 2018


Agenda According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the prison industrial complex has 1.5 million incarcerated people in the United States. Roughly half of that number are employed, but poorly compensated for their labor. As per the 13th Amendment, which states that “neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for a crime … shall exist,” these workers are legally considered slaves. The Incarcerated Workers Organizing Committee (IWOC) is a prisoner-led section of the Industrial Workers of the World that forms a resistance to prison slavery and provides incarcerated workers with the tools and resources needed to improve living and working conditions. According to the IWOC website, incarcerated workers do not benefit from minimum wage laws, safety regulations or worker’s compensation for injuries on the job. The IWOC’s goal is to help guarantee workers the same rights as other workers, expose companies that profit off their labor and ultimately end mass incarceration. To aid them in their mission, the Missoula branch of the IWOC is hosting a letter writing workshop this Friday at Imagine Nation Brewing. The aim of the workshop is to build bridges be-

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 8

hoist a pint while helping a great cause. This week 50 cents from every beer goes to Montana Backcountry Hunters and Anglers. 4 PM–8 PM.

The Wild Mercy Reading Series celebrates writing, community and winter. This week Nick Littman and Mason Voehl read their work. FLAT Studio, 633 S. 5th St. E. 6:30 PM. Free.

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 13

Fifty cents from every pint sold at Bitter Root Brewing goes to support the Lost Trail Ski Patrol.

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 9

Missoula's Incarcerated Workers Organizing committee hosts a letter writing workshop at Imagine Nation Brewing. 6 PM–8 PM.

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 10

Southgate Mall hosts an afternoon of events to fight against heart disease. Go Red For Women starts at 12 PM at the clock court. Free. Visit goredforwomen.org for more info.

tween incarcerated people across the state and their allies on the outside, with the goal of offering support and resources. —Micah Drew Imagine Nation Brewing host the IWOC Write to Prisoners Workshop Friday, Feb. 9, at 6 PM. Free.

MONDAY FEBRUARY 12

Giving Bock Night at Highlander Beer lets you

What does climate change mean for the Missoula Valley in terms of temperatures, precipitation and snowpack? The League of Women Voters, Climate Smart and Clark Fork Coalition hosts a free public forum on Missoula's future sustainability. Missoula Public Library. 7 PM.

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 14

Every Wednesday is Community UNite at KettleHouse Brewing Company's Northside tap room. A portion of every pint sold goes to support local Missoula causes. This week raise a glass for the Pink Boot Society. 5 PM–8 PM.

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 15

NAMI President Jack Shifflett hosts a community conversation about suicide at Open Way Mindfulness Center. 7:30 PM–9 PM. Free.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

missoulanews.com • February 8–February 15, 2018 [33]


Mountain High ach Missoula season offers a fringe outdoor sport that attracts a niche breed of enthusiast. In the summer it’s trail running, in the fall it’s cyclocross. And in the winter? There’s the Randonee Radness. Randonee, also known as skimo racing, involves ascending a mountain with specialized bindings and skins, turning around and skiing back down, and repeating ad nauseum. The Thursday night race series held at Snowbowl celebrates human-powered winter travel, which makes it distinctly different from the gravity-powered travel most people are familiar with. Now in its third year, Randonee Radness runs for five weeks, culminating in a party after the final race on February 8. Each week features a different looped course, which participants try to complete as many times as they can in an hour. The event website lists three categories for racers: Lightweight for “Nerds wearing spandex,” Heavy Metal for

E

“90 percent of the racers” and the self explanatory Splitboard. Race Director Mike Foote, a world-class trail runner in the summer, competed in the Skimo World Cup last winter. He has described skimo as an endurance freak’s winter dream, but also a way for people who love to be outside to do just that. “It’s 5 percent endurance freaks, 95 percent people looking for a good time,” he says. This ski party thrives on spectators and “stoke” — so bring both.

—Micah Drew The Randonee Radness culminates with a final race at Snowbowl followed by a party Thu., Feb. 8 at 6:30 PM. $15.

Phone and Internet Discounts Available to CenturyLink Customers The Montana Public Service Commission designated CenturyLink as an Eligible Telecommunications Carrier within its service area for universal service purposes. CenturyLink’s basic local service rates for residential voice lines are $22.00 per month and business services are $32.00 per month. Specific rates will be provided upon request. CenturyLink participates in a government benefit program (Lifeline) to make residential telephone or broadband service more affordable to eligible low-income individuals and families. Eligible customers are those that meet eligibility standards as defined by the Federal Communications Commission and state commissions. Residents who live on federally recognized Tribal Lands may qualify for additional Tribal benefits if they participate in certain federal eligibility programs. The Lifeline discount is available for only one telephone or broadband service per household, and can be on either wireline or wireless service. Broadband speeds must be 15 Mbps download and 2 Mbps upload or faster to qualify. Lifeline discounts include a transfer restriction (port freeze). This means that you are unable to obtain the Lifeline discount on service with another provider for a period of time. The length of time depends on the services you purchase – 60 days for voice telephone service, 12 months for qualifying broadband service. Certain exceptions to the transfer restrictions may apply. See http://www.lifelinesupport.org/ls/change-my-company.aspx for more information. A household is defined for the purposes of the Lifeline program as any individual or group of individuals who live together at the same address and share income and expenses. Lifeline service is not transferable, and only eligible consumers may enroll in the program. Consumers who willfully make false statements in order to obtain a Lifeline discount can be punished by fine or imprisonment and can be barred from the program. If you live in a CenturyLink service area, please call 1-855-954-6546 or visit centurylink.com/lifeline with questions or to request an application for the Lifeline program.

[34] Missoula Independent • February 8–February 15, 2018

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 8 Montana Native Plant Society's February lecture features a talk about the prairies of Saskatchewan and the plants that grow there. Gallagher Business Building. 7 PM. Free and open to the public.

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 10 Big Sky Resort hosts the 2018 Montana Slopestyle Championship in the Switfy Terrain Park. Visit smokingacestour.com for more info and registration. $35–$40. The 2018 Fire Fighting Equipment Expo shows off the best in new technology. Watch a PowerHawk tear open a car on site. How cool is that? UC Ballroom. 10 PM–5 PM. Free.

12 PM–3 PM. Visit sonmissoula.com for more info. Free.

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 13 Author and photographer Tim Palmer presents Wild and Scenic Rivers: An American Legacy, part of the Rivers Will Run Lecture Series. Gallagher Business Building Room 123. 7 PM. Free.

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 15 The 2017 Hunting Film Tour brings the best in conservation-minded, fair chase films to the Wilma. Doors at 6 PM, show at 7. $18/$15 advance.

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 11

How do porcupines reproduce? Show off your outdoor knowledge at Naturalist Trivia Night at the Montana Natural History Center. 7 PM. $5 suggested donation. BYOB.

Missoula Sons of Norway Lodge hosts a noncompetitive, cross country ski event just for kids.

Montana Snowbowl hosts snowboard racing from 6 PM–8 PM. $10 cash only.


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EMPLOYMENT Adminstrative Assistant. Will be responsible for answering phones, data entry, and customer account maintenance.Will also have light bookkeeping Please visit our website at lcstaffing.com and refer to order #41000 for a full job description.

Auto Body Technician Assistant. Seeking self-motivated and mechanically-inclined person to assist the experienced body techs. Please visit our website at lcstaffing.com and refer to order #40585 for a full job description.

Customer Service Representative. Permanent position with opportunity for career advancement and on-the-job training provided! Please visit our website at lcstaffing.com and refer to order #40374 for full job description.

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Earn $300-$1000 per month working part-time! The Missoulian is looking for reliable individuals to deliver the daily newspaper in the Missoula, Bitterroot and Flathead areas. For individual route details go to: missoulian.com/carrier If you’re looking for extra income, are an early riser and enjoy working independently, you can make money and be done before most people get going with their day. If this sounds like you, please submit your inquiry form today at missoulian.com/carrier or call 406-5230494. You must have a valid driver’s license and proof of car insurance. This is an independent contractor business opportunity.

pests using a hand/backpack sprayer. Please visit our website at lcstaffing.com and refer to order #40967 for a full job description.

Pest Control Service Technician.Will be assigned to work residential and commercial sites, including Missoula, Bitterroot, Lincoln, Butte, and Dillion, with an average of 8-10 jobs a day. Will control

Production Control. Building materials company recruiting for enthusiastic production member to add to their growing safety-conscious and friendly team! Please visit our website at lc-

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staffing.com and refer to order #40548 for a full job description. Production Paint Mixer. Responsible for color matching and tinting paint. Have previous related experience. Requires understanding of primary/secondary colors and their compliments. Please visit our website at lcstaffing.com and refer to order #40986 for a full job description.

PROFESSIONAL Controller.Will prepare financial reports and forecasts for future growth, prepare annual budget, direct all accounting practices, oversight inventory control process, and maintain relationships with lenders and auditors. Please visit lcstaffing.com and refer to order #40921 for a full job description

Place your classified ad at 317 S. Orange, by phone 543-6609x115 or via email: classified@missoulanews.com


EMPLOYMENT SKILLED LABOR ELECTRICIAN - Missoula County Public Schools Apply now for this position! Go to www.mcpsmt.org and click on “Employment” for job descriptions and detailed instructions for applying. ~Equal Opportunity Employer ~

BURDEN OF ‘POOF!’

Out of the blue, my boyfriend of two years broke up with me. Not long afterward, I saw pix on Facebook of him with some other girl. It’s been two months since our breakup, and he wants to reconcile, so whatever he got into obviously tanked. We were planning on moving in together in the spring. (Maybe he got cold feet?) I still love him, but I’m worried. Did he just break up with me to be with this girl? How do I know this won’t happen again?

—Fighting Uncertainty We crave certainty, and we get freaked out by uncertainty. If we weren’t like this, there would be no horror movies, because somebody would say, “Whoa ... I hear this weird, unearthly growling in the basement,” and their friend would say, “Yeah, whatever” and keep playing chess, and the monster would cry itself to sleep off camera. Interestingly, there are some lessons for dealing with potential romantic horror from actual horror fare. Evolutionary researcher Mathias Clasen, author of Why Horror Seduces, believes that one reason we appreciate horror movies is that they allow us to have an intense scary experience under safe circumstances — basically acting as a sort of mental training to help us protect ourselves in dire situations. For example, from a list of horror movie survival tips at the website Slasher Mania: “As a general rule, don’t solve puzzles that open portals to Hell.” Because horror movies are “evolutionarily novel” — meaning they didn’t exist in the ancestral environment that shaped the psychology still driving us today — our brains tend to respond to fictional slasher/zombie/demon stuff as if it were real. So, upon entering a tall building, I occasionally flash on a helpful life lesson I picked up from “The Shining”: If the elevator opens and a flood of blood comes out, take the stairs. Research by Clasen and his colleagues (presented at a 2017 academic conference I attended, but not yet published) appears to give preliminary support to his horror-movies-aslife-prep hypothesis. There is also published research showing benefits from what I’d call “preparative worrying.” For example, social psychologist Kate Sweeny found that law students who worried more about taking their bar exam felt much better about their results — whether they passed or tanked the thing — compared with those who didn’t fret or didn’t fret much. Sweeny notes that findings from her research and others’ support two benefits of worry. Worry amps up motivation — spotlight-

ing “the importance of taking action” to head off some undesirable outcome. Worry also leads people “to engage in proactive coping efforts” — providing an emotional airbag should things go badly. As for your situation, sadly, Apple and Amazon have been remiss in giving Siri and Alexa a crystal ball feature, so there’s no way to know for sure whether this guy would just end up bouncing again. But there is a helpful way to “worry” about a possible future with him, and it’s to do it like a scientist, estimating “probabilities” — what seems likely to happen based on prior experience and information. To do that, ask yourself some questions: Is he generally a person who feels an obligation to be careful with other people’s feelings? How in touch is he with his own? Is he easily bored and does he have a big lust for novelty and excitement (called being “high in sensation-seeking” by psychologists)? Next, factor in your own temperament — how emotionally fragile or resilient you are. Practically speaking, the question to ask yourself: “If he left again, how crushing would that be for me?” However, in answering that, it’s important to get specific about the actual worst-case scenario; for example: “I’d spend four months deforesting the Pacific Northwest by binge-weeping into Kleenex.” This might be a price you’re willing to pay for a shot at being with the man you love, especially if you hate trees. Ultimately, as psychologist Gerd Gigerenzer, who studies decision-making, writes: “Understand that there is no certainty and no zero-risk, but only risks that are more or less acceptable.” If you conclude that you can accept the potential downsides of trying again with him, consider that his aborted jaunt off into Otherwomanland may have been a good thing. Sometimes it takes a wrong turn to point us in the right direction. Or, putting that another way, perhaps through your boyfriend’s going for what he thought he wanted, he figured out what he really wants. To avoid being resentful over this little detour of his, maybe use the experience as a reminder to appreciate what you have as long as you have it. As we’ve seen, there are no guarantees in life — not even that the government has safeguards on the missile strike warning system stronger than your grandma’s AOL password. (Hi, Hawaii — glad you’re still with us!)

HVAC Service Technician. Company proudly services both residential and commercial needs in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Please visit our website at lcstaffing.com and refer to order #40984 for a full job description. HVAC TECHNICIAN - Missoula County Public Schools Apply now for this position! Go to www.mcpsmt.org and click on “Employment” for job descriptions and detailed instructions for applying. ~Equal Opportunity Employer

Carpenters Needed: IMCO, a Washington State based heavy civil construction company has immediate openings for experienced civil carpenters on its Thompson Falls, MT jobsite. Successful candidate will have 4+ years’ construction experience, considerable knowledge of safety procedures and hazards related to construction. Criminal background check required. Drug free Business. Equal Opportunity Employer. Apply online at: www.imcoconstruction.com

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EMPLOYMENT POSITIONS AVAILABLESEE WEBSITE FOR MORE INFO Must Have: Valid driver license, No history of neglect, abuse or exploitation Applications available at OPPORTUNITY RESOURCES, INC., 2821 S. Russell, Missoula, MT. 59801 or online at www.orimt.org. Extensive background checks will be completed. NO RESUMES. EEO/AA-M/F/disability/ protected veteran status.

Career Opening: Full-time, licensed MH Adult Outpatient Counselor committed to superior client services. Min. Qualif.: Masters in behavioral sciences, Licensed in Washington State, 2 year’s experience or able to be licensed w/in 6 mos. Call Taylor @ 509-334-1133 if interested in applying. Pediatric Dental Assistant. Qualified candidates MUST have 2+ years of DA experience for consideration. Please visit our website at lcstaffing.com and refer to order #41102 for a full job description. Take an online course in Medical Coding, Medical Transcription, Pharmacy Technician, and more. http://www.referral.careerstep.com/ ref10228

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Place your classified ad at 317 S. Orange, by phone 543-6609x115 or via email: classified@missoulanews.com [36] Missoula Independent • February 8–February 15, 2018


PUBLIC NOTICES MNAXLP ATTENTION Lewis & Clark Subdivision RSID 8918 Sunset West Subdivision RSID 8925 The Annual Drinking Water Quality Report, also known as the Consumer Confidence Report for the monitoring period of January 1st through December 31, 2017 is now available by calling Tami Quinn at 406-370-1838 or email at waterutil@qwestoffice.net. Missoula County Request for Proposals Missoula County is seeking proposals for the operation of a coffee shop located inside the Missoula County Courthouse. The full text of this Request for Proposals may be found on Missoula County’s website: https://www.missoulacounty.us/government/administration/auditor-s-office/b ids-proposals/test-rfp-page Proposals will be accepted until March 9, 2018 at 5:00 PM. Late proposals will not be accepted. The proposals must be in a sealed envelope and marked “Courthouse Coffee Shop RFP.” Proposals may either be sent to David Wall, Missoula County Auditor, 200 W Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 or hand delivered to David Wall, Missoula County Auditor, 199 W Pine Street, Room 136, Missoula, MT 59802. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DV-17-1235 Dept. No.: 2 Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Aaron Michael Duffy, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Aaron Michael Duffy to Aaron Michael Hampf. The hearing will be on 30/06/2018 at 11:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date January 23, 2018 /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Molly A. Reynolds, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DV-18-32 Dept. No.: 4 Karen S.Townsend Order Setting Hearing In the Matter of the Name Change of Jane Goffe McIntosh, Petitioner.This Court orders Name Change Hearing.The hearing on the Petition for Name Change filed in this case is set for: 03/06/2018 at 3:00 p.m. at the Missoula County Courthouse. Date 1/24/2018 By /s/ Karen S.Townsend, District Court Judge

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP-18-35 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF SHERRI LIERMAN, a/k/a SHERRY LIERMAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed as Personal Representative of the above-named Estate.All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to MARY ELIZABETH HEALEY, a/k/a MARY BETH HEALEY, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Goodrich & Reely, PLLC, 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 31st day of January, 2018 /s/ Mary Elizabeth Healey, Personal Representative GOODRICH & REELY, PLLC 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801 Attorneys for Personal Representative By: /s/ Shane N. Reely, Esq. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-18-15 Hon. Leslie Halligan Presiding. NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF SHANNON KAYE KENT, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate.All persons having claims against the said Deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Joseph A. Bailey IV, the Personal Representative, Return Receipt Requested, c/o Skjelset & Geer, PLLP, PO Box 4102, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 16 day of January, 2018. /s/ Joseph A. Bailey IV, Personal Representative SKJELSET & GEER, P.L.L.P. By: /s/ Suzanne Geer Attorneys for the Estate STATE OF MONTANA ):ss. County of Missoula) I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. SIGNED this 16 day of January, 2018. /s/ Joseph A. Bailey

IV, Applicant SUBSCRIBED AND SWORN TO before me this 16 day of January, 2018. /s/ Suzanne Geer Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at Stevensville, Montana My Commission Expires October 2, 2020 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP-18-20 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF MARA L. HELLAND, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Matt J. Halttunen, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of Paul E. Fickes, Esq., at 310 W Spruce Street, Missoula, MT 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 22nd day of January, 2018. /s/ Matt J. Halttunen c/o Paul E. Fickes, Esq. 310 West Spruce St. Missoula, MT 59802 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DP-18-30 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: RAYMOND E. ANTHONY, SR., Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Raymond E. Anthony, Jr. and Dennis L.Anthony have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the Deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice, or their claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Jones & Associates, PLLC,Attorneys for the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 2625 Dearborn Avenue, Ste. 102A, Missoula, MT 59804, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of Montana the foregoing is true and correct. Dated this 29th day of January, 2018. /s/ Raymond E. Anthony, Jr., Co-Personal Representative /s/ Dennis L. Anthony, Co-Personal Representative /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): British athlete Liam Collins is an accomplished hurdler. In 2017, he won two medals at the World Masters Athletics Indoor Championships in South Korea. Collins is also a stuntman and street performer who does shows in which he hurtles over barriers made of chainsaws and leaps blindfolded through flaming hoops. For the foreseeable future, you may have a dual capacity with some resemblances to his. You could reach a high point in expressing your skills in your chosen field, and also branch out into extraordinary or flamboyant variations on your specialty. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): When he was 32, the man who would later be known as Dr. Seuss wrote his first kid’s book, And To Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street. His efforts to find a readership went badly at first. Twenty-seven publishers rejected his manuscript. On the verge of abandoning his quest, he ran into an old college classmate on the street.The friend, who had recently begun working at Vanguard Press, expressed interest in the book. Voila! Mulberry Street got published. Dr. Seuss later said that if, on that lucky day, he had been strolling on the other side of the street, his career as an author of children’s books might never have happened. I’m telling you this tale,Taurus, because I suspect your chances of experiencing a comparable stroke of luck in the coming weeks will be extra high. Be alert! GEMINI (May 21-June 20): A survey of British Christians found that most are loyal to just six of the Ten Commandments. While they still think it’s bad to, say, steal and kill and lie, they don’t regard it as a sin to revere idols, work on the Sabbath, worship other gods or use the Lord’s name in a curse. In accordance with the astrological omens, I encourage you to be inspired by their rebellion. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to re-evaluate your old traditions and belief systems, and then discard anything that no longer suits the new person you’ve become. CANCER (June 21-July 22): While serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II, Don Karkos lost the sight in his right eye after being hit by shrapnel. Sixty-four years later, he regained his vision when he got butted in the head by a horse he was grooming. Based on the upcoming astrological omens, I’m wondering if you’ll soon experience a metaphorically comparable restoration. My analysis suggests that you’ll undergo a healing in which something you lost will return or be returned.

a

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The candy cap mushroom, whose scientific name is Lactarius rubidus, is a burnt orange color. It’s small to medium-sized and has a convex cap. But there its resemblance to other mushrooms ends. When dried out, it tastes and smells like maple syrup.You can grind it into a powder and use it to sweeten cakes and cookies and custards. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, this unusual member of the fungus family can serve as an apt metaphor for you right now. You, too, have access to a resource or influence that is deceptive, but in a good way: offering a charm and good flavor different from what its outer appearance might indicate.

c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A grandfather from New Jersey decided to check the pockets of an old shirt he didn’t wear very often. There Jimmie Smith found a lottery ticket he had stashed away months previously. When he realized it had a winning number, he cashed it in for $24.1 million — just two days before it was set to expire. I suspect there may be a comparable development in your near future, although the reward would be more modest. Is there any potential valuable that you have forgotten about or neglected? It’s not too late to claim it.

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The U.S. Geological Survey recently announced that it had come up with improved maps of the planet’s agricultural regions. Better satellite imagery helped, as did more thorough analysis of the imagery.The new data show that the Earth is covered with 618 million more acres of croplands than had previously been thought. That’s 15 percent higher than earlier assessments! In the coming months, Libra, I’m predicting a comparable expansion in your awareness of how many resources you have available. I bet you will also discover that you’re more fertile than you have imagined.

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In 1939, Scorpio comic book writer Bob Kane co-created the fictional science-fiction superhero Batman. The “Caped Crusader” eventually went on to become an icon, appearing in blockbuster movies as well as TV shows and comic books. Kane said one of his inspirations for Batman was a flying machine envisioned by Leonard da Vinci in the early 16th century. The Italian artist and inventor drew an image of a winged glider that he proposed to build for a human being to wear. I bring this up, Scorpio, because I think you’re in a phase when you, like Kane, can draw inspiration from the past. Go scavenging through history for good ideas! SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I was watching a four-player poker game on TV. The folksy commentator said that the assortment of cards belonging to the player named Mike was “like Anna Kournikova,” because “it looks great but it never wins.” He was referring to the fact that during her career as a professional tennis player, Anna Kournikova was feted for her physical beauty but never actually won a singles title. This remark happens to be a useful admonishment for you Sagittarians in the coming weeks.You should avoid relying on anything that looks good but never wins. Put your trust in influences that are a bit homely or unassuming but far more apt to contribute to your success.

f

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): A Chinese man named Wang Kaiyu bought two black-furred puppies from a stranger and took them home to his farm. As the months passed by, Wang noticed that his pets seemed unusually hungry and aggressive. They would sometimes eat his chickens. When they were two years old, he finally figured out that they weren’t dogs, but rather Asian black bears. He turned them over to a local animal rescue center. I bring this to your attention, Capricorn, because I suspect it may have a resemblance to your experience. A case of mistaken identity? A surprise revealed in the course of a ripening process? A misunderstanding about what you’re taking care of? Now is a good time to make adjustments and corrections.

h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Charles Nelson Reilly was a famous American actor, director and drama teacher. He appeared in or directed numerous films, plays and TV shows. But in the 1970s, when he was in his forties, he also spent quality time impersonating a banana in a series of commercials for Bic Banana Ink Crayons. So apparently he wasn’t overly attached to his dignity. Pride didn’t interfere with his ability to experiment. In his pursuit of creative expression, he valued the arts of playing and having fun. I encourage you to be inspired by his example during the coming weeks, Aquarius.

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): According to ancient Greek writer Herodotus, Persians didn’t hesitate to deliberate about important matters while drunk. However, they wouldn’t finalize any intoxicated decision until they had a chance to re-evaluate it while sober. The reverse was also true. Choices they made while sober had to be reassessed while they were under the influence of alcohol. I bring this to your attention not because I think you should adhere to similar guidelines in the coming weeks. I would never give you an oracle that required you to be buzzed. But I do think you’ll be wise to consider key decisions from not just a coolly rational mindset, but also from a frisky intuitive perspective. To arrive at a wise verdict, you need both. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES.

PUBLIC NOTICES MNAXLP Court. DATED this 31st day of January, 2018. /s/ Amanda Hackenbruck, Personal Representative Bjornson Jones Mungas, PLLC By: /s/ Craig Mungas Attorneys for Amanda Hackenbruck, Personal Representative Montana Fourth Judicial District Court, Missoula County Probate No DP 18-10 District Judge Leslie Halligan NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MARJORIE M. JENSEN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed as the Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or their claims will be forever barred. Claims must be mailed to Mark S. Jensen, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at c/o Crowley Fleck PLLP, 500 Transwestern Plaza II, 490 North 31st Street, Suite 500, P.O. Box 2529, Billings, Montana 59103, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 11th day of January, 2018 /s/ Mark S. Jensen, Personal Representative of the Estate of Marjorie M. Jensen, deceased NOTICE OF HEARING The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a hearing on the proposed expenditure of Open Space Bond proceeds on the following project: Hayes FamilyPotomac Project A hearing on a proposal to use up to $295,000 of Open Space bond funding towards the purchase of a conservation easement on 569 acres located off of Potomac Rd. near Potomac, MT. Five Valleys Land Trust would hold the conservation easement.The cost in bond funding per acre would be approximately $518. The Commissioners will conduct the hearing at 2:00 p.m.,Thursday, February 8, 2018, in Room 151 of the County Courthouse, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, Montana.Any person wishing to be heard on the matter may speak at the hearing and/or submit written or other materials to the Commissioners at the hearing or by mail, fax or personal delivery to the Commissioners. Offices: 199 West Pine. Mail: 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. FAX: (406) 721-4043. Copies of the proposed project are available for public inspection at the Missoula County Community and Planning Services, 323 W.Alder, Missoula, Montana. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned Successor Trustee will, on May 29, 2018 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charges by the Successor Trustee, at the following place: On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 John A. “Joe” Solseng, a member of the Montana state bar, of Robinson Tait, P.S. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust in which George E. Clark and Gloria J. Clark, as Grantor, conveyed said real property to First American Title as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for American Brokers Conduit, beneficiary of the security instrument, said Deed of Trust which is dated January 24, 2007 and was recorded on January 30, 2007 as Instrument No.

200702493, Book 791 at Page 514 Micro Records, of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located at 111 Willow Ridge CT, Missoula, MT 59803 and being more fully described as follows: LOT 29 OF WILLOW RIDGE TOWNHOUSES,A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. The beneficial interest under said Deed of Trust and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Banc of America Funding Corporation 2007-3, U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee.The Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the Promissory Note (“Note”) secured by said Deed of Trust due to Grantor’s failure to timely pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. The default for which foreclosure is made is grantors’ failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments totaling $10,867.73 beginning April 1, 2017 through December 26, 2017; plus corporate advances of $1,166.00; plus property inspection fees of $64.05; plus legal fees of $12.51; together with title expense, costs, trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $123,735.59 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.12500 percent per annum beginning March 1, 2017; plus outstanding fees and corporate advances of $1,257.56; plus escrow of $2,088.89; together with title expense, costs, trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. Due to the defaults stated above, the Beneficiary has elected and has directed the Trustee to sell the above-described property to satisfy the obligation. Notice is further given that any person named has the right, at any time prior to the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Deed of Trust reinstated by making payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Deed of Trust, together with Successor Trustee’s and attorney’s fees. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall

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be the return of monies paid to the Successor Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Dated: January 11, 2018 /s/ John A.“Joe” Solseng John A. “Joe” Solseng, a member of the Montana state bar,Attorney of Robinson Tait, P.S., MSB #11800 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE To be sold for cash at a Trustee’s Sale on June 4, 2018, 10:30 AM at the main entrance of Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway Street, Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, State of Montana: Lot 18B of the Homesteads, a platted Subdivision of Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official Recorded Plat thereof, recorded in Book 20 of Plats, at Page 4. More commonly known as 2229 Hillside Drive, Missoula, MT 59803-1152. Alfred K. Greene and Erica Davis-Greene, as Grantors, conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana, a Montana Corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Universal American Mortgage Company, LLC, its successors and assigns, by Deed of Trust on August 27, 2015, and filed for record in the records of the County Clerk and Recorder in Missoula County, State of Montana, on August 28, 2015 as Instrument No. 201516444, in Book 950, at Page 327, of Official Records. The Deed of Trust was assigned for value as follows: Assignee: Pingora Loan Servicing, LLC, a Delaware Limited Liability Company Assignment Dated: December 28, 2016 Assignment Recorded: December 28, 2016 Assign-

COPPERSTONE STOR-ALL will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent on Saturday February 24th, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. Units can contain furniture, clothes, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc. household goods. A silent auction will be held Saturday February 24th at 11:00 a.m. at 8700 Roller Coaster Rd, Missoula, MT 59808. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final. BLUE MOUNTAIN MINI STORAGE 5900 HWY 93 South, Missoula, MT 59803

Will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units but not limited to: A6, A8, A10, A14-15, A48, A51-52, A53-54, A65-66, A71, A75-76, A77-78, A79, A80, A81-82, A83, A84, B6, B9, B14, B16, B20, B23, B26, B27, B34, B37 Units contain misc. household goods, furniture, toys, clothes, tools and other misc. items. We will hold a live auction starting at 2:00PM on Friday, February 9, 2018. Payment will be due immediately at acknowledgement of winning bid. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Unit must be emptied by buyer at least 10 business days from day of sale. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final. Please contact Grizzly Property Management, Inc. at (406) 542-2060 or rentals@grizzlypm.com with any questions.

Place your classified ad at 317 S. Orange, by phone 543-6609x115 or via email: classified@missoulanews.com [38] Missoula Independent • February 8–February 15, 2018


PUBLIC NOTICES MNAXLP ment Recording Information: as Instrument No. 201623519, in Book 972, at Page 947,All in the records of the County Clerk and Recorder for Missoula County, Montana Benjamin J. Mann is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, State of Montana, on March 1, 2017 as Instrument No. 201703702, in Book 975, at Page 760, of Official Records.The Beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust due to Grantor’s failure to make monthly payments beginning August 1, 2017, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. By reason of said default, the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable. The total amount due on this obligation is the principal sum of $177,832.28, interest in the sum of $3,853.01, escrow advances of $878.77, other amounts due and payable in the amount of $249.52 for a total amount owing of $182,813.58, plus accruing interest, late charges, and other

fees and costs that may be incurred or advanced.The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantor. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale, and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation.The sale is a public sale and any person, including the Beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed, without any representation or warranty, including warranty of title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing

conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The Grantor, successor in interest to the Grantor, or any other person having an interest in the property, has the right, at any time prior to the Trustee’s Sale, to pay to the Beneficiary, or the successor in interest to the Beneficiary, the entire amount then due under the Deed of Trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Deed of Trust with Successor Trustee’s and attorney’s fees. In the event that all defaults are cured the foreclosure will be dismissed and the foreclosure sale will be canceled. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason. In the event of a

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bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the Trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Successor Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Dated this 25th day of January, 2018. Benjamin J. Mann, Substitute Trustee 376 East 400 South, Suite 300, Salt Lake City, UT 84111 Telephone: 801-355-2886 Office Hours: Mon.-Fri., 8AM-5PM (MST) File No. 48810 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE To be sold for cash at a Trustee’s Sale on May 17, 2018, 11:00 AM at the main entrance of Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway Street, Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, State of Montana: A Tract of land located in the South one-half of Section 4,Township 15

North, Range 22 West, P.M.M., Missoula County Montana, being more particularly described as Tract 2 of Certificate of Survey No. 3690.Together with a non-exclusive easement for the purpose of ingress and egress from the above described premises to the public road. More commonly known as 27785 Isaac Road, aka 27785 Isaac Creek Road, Huson, MT 59846. Michael F. Manthey, as Grantor, conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Countrywide Bank, FSB, its successors and assigns, by Deed of Trust on January 16, 2008, and filed for record in the records of the County Clerk and Recorder in Missoula County, State of Montana, on January 25, 2008 as Instrument No. 200801735, in Book 812, at Page 394, of Official Records. The Deed of Trust was assigned for value as follows: Assignee: Bank of America, N.A. Assignment Dated: July 27, 2015 Assignment Recorded: August 3, 2015 Assignment Recording Information: as Instrument

Annual Drinking Water Quality Report, 2017 El Mar/New Meadows Water System RSID 8916 PWS #MT0000517 We’re pleased to provide you with this year's Annual Quality Water Report. We want to keep you informed about the excellent water and services we have delivered to you over the past year. Our goal is and always has been, to provide to you a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. Our water source is ground water from seven wells. El Mar/New Meadows water system is a Rural Special Improvement District and is managed by Missoula County Public Works. No regular meetings are held. We have completed a source water protection plan that provides more information such as potential sources of contamination to our drinking water supply. This plan can be found online at http://nris.state.mt.us/wis/swap/swapquery.asp Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present include: Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria that may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife; Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming; Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses; Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems; Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health. Important information about Lead MCLG in Drinking Water: We monitored for lead and copper in June of 2017. All of our samples are in compliance with the Lead and Copper Rule. If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Missoula County is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead. Parameter Lead Copper

Date 6/15/2017 6/15/2017

90th % value No Detects 0.089

Units Ppm Ppm

Action level .015 1.3

Source of Contamination Household plumbing Household plumbing

The Test Result table uses terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with. To help you better understand these terms we've provided the following definitions: No Detects (ND) - laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present. Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/l) - one part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2000 years or a single penny in $10,000,000. Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) - one part per million corresponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000. Action Level (AL) - The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Contaminant

Violation Y/N

Sample Date

Nitrate+Nitrite as N

N

4/4/17

Highest Level Detected 1.42

Barium

N

7/5/11

Combined Uranium

N

7/1/14

No. 201513819, in Book 948, at Page 502, All in the records of the County Clerk and Recorder for Missoula County, Montana Benjamin J. Mann is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, State of Montana, on November 14, 2017 as Instrument No. 201723001, in Book 989, at Page 459, of Official Records.The Beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust due to Grantor’s failure to make monthly payments beginning April 1, 2017, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. By reason of said default, the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable. The total amount due on this obligation is the principal sum of $61,392.53, interest in the sum of $4,348.53, escrow advances of $0.00, other amounts due and payable in the amount of $900.62 for a

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) - The “Maximum Allowed” (MCL) is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. MCL’s are set at very stringent levels. To understand the possible health effects described for many regulated constituents, a person would have to drink 2 liters of water every day at the MCL level for a lifetime to have a one-in-a-million chance of having the described health effect. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) - The “Goal” (MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Picocuries per liter (pCi/L)-picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water. El Mar Estates/New Meadows water system monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The table below shows the results of any detects in our monitoring for the period of January 1st to December 31st, 2017. For contaminants that are not monitored yearly, the table below has the most recent data per DEQ/EPA required monitoring.

Barium - Some people who drink water that contains barium in excess of the MCL over many years could experience an increase in their blood pressure. Copper - Copper is an essential nutrient, but some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over a relatively short amount of time could experience gastrointestinal distress. Some people who drink that water contains copper in excess of the action level over many years could suffer liver or kidney damage. People with Wilson's disease should consult their personal doctor. Lead - Infants and children who drink water that contains lead in excess of the action level could experience delays in their physical or mental development. Children could show slight deficits in attention span and learning abilities. Adults who drink this water over many years could develop kidney problems or high blood pressure. Nitrate+Nitrite - Infants below the age of six months who drink water that contains nitrate in excess of the MCL could become seriously ill and if untreated could die. Symptoms include shortness of breath and blue-baby syndrome. Alpha emitters - Certain minerals are radioactive and may emit a form of radiation known as alpha radiation. Some people who drink water containing alpha emitters in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer. Combined Uranium -Exposure to uranium in drinking water may result in toxic effects to the kidney. Some people who drink water containing alpha emitters, such as uranium, in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer. Combined Radium 226 & 228 -Some people who drink water containing radium –226 or -228 in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer. Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). We ask that all our customers help us protect our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life and our children’s future. Our system had no violations. We’re proud that your drinking water meets or exceeds all Federal and State requirements. We have learned through our monitoring and testing that some constituents have been detected. The EPA has determined that your water IS SAFE at these levels. We’re pleased to report that our drinking water is safe and meets federal and state requirements. This report will not be mailed but if you would like a copy or if you have any questions about this report or concerning your water, please contact Tami Quinn. I am a certified operator with years of experience and can be reached at 406-370-1838 or waterutil@qwestoffice.net. Unit Measurement MCLG ppm

10

0.5

ppm

2

0.003

ppm

0

MCL Likely Source of Contamination 10 2

Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits Erosion of natural deposits

0.03 ppm Erosion of natural deposits

Gross Alpha

N

7/1/14

4.9

pCi/L

0

15

Combined ‘Radium 226 & 228

N

4/4/17

0.7

pCi/L

0

5 pCi/L

Erosion of natural deposits Naturally occurs in some drinking water

Place your classified ad at 317 S. Orange, by phone 543-6609x115 or via email: classified@missoulanews.com missoulanews.com • February 8–February 15, 2018 [39]


PUBLIC NOTICES MNAXLP total amount owing of $66,641.68, plus accruing interest, late charges, and other fees and costs that may be incurred or advanced.The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantor. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale, and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation.The sale is a public sale and any person, including the Beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed, without any representation or warranty, including warranty of title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The Grantor, successor in interest to the Grantor, or any other person having an interest in the property, has the right, at any time prior to the Trustee’s Sale, to pay to the Beneficiary, or the successor in interest to the Beneficiary, the entire amount then due under the Deed of Trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Deed of Trust with Successor Trustee’s and attorney’s fees. In the event that all defaults are cured the foreclosure will be dismissed and the foreclosure sale will be canceled.The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason. In the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the Trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Successor Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Dated this 2nd day of February, 2018. Benjamin J. Mann, Substitute Trustee 376 East 400 South, Suite 300, Salt Lake City, UT 84111 Telephone: 801-355-2886 Office Hours: Mon.-Fri., 8AM-5PM (MST) File No. 50825 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 25, 2018, at 11:00 AM at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana:The N1/2 of Lots 1 and 2, which N1/2 of said lots is a tract 80 feet facing Spruce Street and 58.75 feet facing “A” Street, of Block “A” of the REPLACEMENT PLAT OF LA POINT ADDITION, according to the official plat thereof, as filed in the Clerk and Recorder`s Office, Missoula County, Montana Joseph J.Turk III and Dorene M. Turk, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Allen L. Karell, ESQ., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to One Stop Mortgage, Inc., a Wyoming Corporation, as Beneficiary, by Deed of

Trust dated on May 24, 1999, and recorded on June 2, 1999 as Book 584 Page 1372, Doc Number 199914976.The beneficial interest is currently held by U.S. Bank NA, successor trustee to Bank of America, NA, successor in interest to LaSalle Bank National Association, as trustee, on behalf of the holders of the Bear Stearns Asset Backed Securities Trust 2005-2, Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2005-2. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is currently the Trustee. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments beginning April 1, 2017, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 7, 2017 is $93,844.72 principal, interest totaling $4,216.76, escrow advances of $615.12, suspense balance of $-51.00, plus accruing interest, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced.The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation.The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale.The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days.THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 22, 2018 /s/ Rae Albert Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho )) ss. County of Bingham) On this 22nd day of January, 2018, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Rae Albert, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Kaitlin Ann Gotch Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 07/29/2022 Select Portfolio Servicing Inc. vs Joseph J Turk III Dorene M Turk 104401-1

RENTALS NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE To be sold for cash at Trustee’s Sale on May 25, 2018, at 10:00 a.m., on the front (south) steps of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, all of Trustee’s right, title and interest to the following-described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A piece, parcel or tract of land lying in the South ½ of Lot 12, Section 16, Township 12 North, Range 17 West, Montana Principal Meridian and more particularly described as follows, to-wit: Beginning at a point on the line of the north right-of-way of U.S. Highway No. 10, S.67 32’00”E. a distance of 90.00 feet from the intersection of the west line of said Lot 12 and the north right-of-way of said U.S. Highway No. 10, thence S.67 32’00” E. along the north right-ofway of said U.S. Highway No. 10 a distance of 123.00 feet; thence N. 22 03’46” E. a distance of 350.89 feet; thence S.89 58’00” W. a distance of 328.10 feet to the intersection of the west line of said Lot 12; thence S.00 07’00” W. along the west line of said Lot 12 a distance of 18.60 feet; thence S.67 32’00” E. a distance of 90.00 feet; thence S. 00 07’00” W. a distance of 225.00 feet to the point of beginning. Deed Exhibit #3683. Recording Reference: Book 111 of Micro Records at Page 927. Anthony Hummel Jr. and Crystal Hummel, as Grantors, conveyed the real property to Western Title and Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Gilbert S. Rice and Janet A. Rice, as Beneficiaries, by Trust Indenture dated April 20, 2015, and recorded that same date in Book 942, Page 1345, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. A Substitution of Trustee designating Kevin S. Jones as Successor Trustee was recorded January 16, 2018, in Book 991, Page 1072, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The default of the obligation, the performance of which is secured by the aforementioned Trust Indenture, and for which default of this foreclosure is made, is for failure to pay the monthly payments as and when due. Pursuant to the provisions of the Trust Indenture, the Beneficiaries have exercised, and hereby exercise, their option to declare the full amount secured by such Trust Indenture immediately due and payable. There presently is due on said obligation the principal sum of $102,776.54, plus interest at a rate of 6% totaling $1,267.11, late fees and other fees totaling $372.00, for a total amount due of $104,415.65, as of January 17, 2018, plus the costs of foreclosure, attorney’s fees, trustee’s fees, escrow closing fees, and other accruing costs.The Beneficiaries have elected, and do hereby elect, to sell the above-described property to satisfy the obligation referenced above. The Beneficiaries declare that the Grantors are in default as described above and demands that the Trustee sell the property described above in accordance with the terms and provisions of this Notice. DATED 17th day of January, 2018. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Trustee STATE OF MONTANA ))ss . County of Missoula) On this 17th day of January, 2018, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Kevin S. Jones, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. /s/ Christy Shipp (SEAL) NOTARY PUBLIC for the State of Montana Residing at Missoula, MT My Commission Expires May 07, 2021

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DUPLEXES 2 bed, 1 bath (duplex) w/garage, $950 near Good Food Store, newly remodeled, front & back yard, W/D hookups & off street parking. S/G paid. NO PETS, NO SMOKING. Gatewest 728-7333 211 S. 4th Street East #1. 3 bed/1 bath, close to U, W/D hookups $1050. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 2300 McDonald #3. 1 bed/1 bath, new flooring and paint, close to shopping and parks $650. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

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Place your classified ad at 317 S. Orange, by phone 543-6609x115 or via email: classified@missoulanews.com [40] Missoula Independent • February 8–February 15, 2018


JONESIN’

REAL ESTATE

CROSSWORDS By Matt Jones

Rochelle Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

MANUFACTURED For Sale 2- 2012 16x80 mobile homes in great condition $43,900 delivered and set up within 150 miles of Billings. 406-259-4663

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“Running Free”–it’s freestyle, sobeit. ACROSS 1 Big meals 8 Abrasive stones 15 Restricted, one way 16 Amount of a minor shock 17 Frazzle 18 Thorny problem 19 Glance of contempt 20 Oprah's longtime partner Graham 21 They hold onto everything 23 Barnyard noise 24 Give permission 28 Reason for news to interrupt regular programming 36 Roam (about) 37 "Le Misanthrope" playwright 38 Assessment that may determine how well you work with others 40 In a way 41 "411" 43 Fuel-efficient vehicle

50 Tiny organism 54 Lovingly, in music 55 Freeloaders 56 Fallen for 57 First name on Mount Rushmore 58 "Gimme," in more words 59 Tooth component 60 Egg containers

DOWN 1 Early Baseball Hall-of-Famer Edd 2 Film composer Morricone 3 "Bear" that's not a bear 4 Like ___ in the headlights 5 Fathered 6 "Fiddler on the Roof" protagonist 7 Completely avoid, with "of" 8 Detergent containers that I shouldn't have to tell you never to eat 9 Fathom, e.g. 10 "___ Kalikimaka" (Bing Crosby holiday song) 11 Exclamation akin to "Eureka!" 12 Council 13 Jazz trumpeter Ziggy 14 Played terribly 22 Sound of lament 25 Relating to coins or currency 26 Mail delivery site?

27 ___ May Clampett ("Beverly Hillbillies" daughter) 28 Oil additive letters 29 Early start? 30 Food involved in "typewriter eating," according to tvtropes.org 31 Caption seen early in an alphabet book, maybe 32 NASDAQ newcomers 33 "It comes ___ surprise ..." 34 E-file agency 35 Badminton divider 39 Some capts.-to-be 41 "Grrr!" 42 Mythological weeper 44 Kitchen appliance brand 45 TV weatherman Al 46 Armour's Spam rival 47 Apartment that's owned 48 "Lord of the Rings" actor Sean 49 "The Tonight Show" house band, with "The" 51 "Fancy meeting you here!" 52 Rowan Atkinson's "Mr." character 53 J.D. Salinger title character

©2018 Jonesin’ Crosswords • editor@jonesincrosswords.com

Place your classified ad at 317 S. Orange, by phone 543-6609x115 or via email: classified@missoulanews.com missoulanews.com • February 8–February 15, 2018 [41]


REAL ESTATE LAND

18740 E. Mullan, Clinton

$279,500

Charming 2 bedroom, 1 bath home on 1.37 acres. 4 car garage & large barn. Apple tree, 2 plum trees & underground sprinklers. Permitted & approved septic in place & ready for a mobile home. MLS#21707610

13221 Old Freight. Approximately 11 acres in St. Ignatius with Mission Mountain views. $86,900. Shannon Hilliard 239-8350 shannonhilliard5@gmail.com Real Estate - Northwest Montana – Company owned. Small and large acre parcels. Private.Trees and meadows. National Forest boundaries. Tungstenhold-

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Call Vickie Amundson at 544-0799 for more information

801 N. Orange St. Unit #104 in The Uptown Flats. 1 bed, 1 bath Upscale Condo. Close to Downtown. South facing with lots of natural sunlight $162,000

2025 36th Street • $259,900 Wonderful 4 bed, 2 bath single family home on 9,100 fenced sq.ft. lot. Newer roof, elec. service & windows. Gas fireplace and double garage.

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Place your classified ad at 317 S. Orange, by phone 543-6609x115 or via email: classified@missoulanews.com [42] Missoula Independent • February 8–February 15, 2018


Building the foundation of our community missoulanews.com • February 8–February 15, 2018 [41]


Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal or people, politics and culture.

Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal or people, politics and culture.