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UP FRONT

SNOWPOCALYPSE: THE FLUFFY STORM THAT BROUGHT MEN TO THEIR KNEES

IT COMES TO POT, FREE WITH YOUR DREAM KARP DOC PROFILES NEWS WHEN RANGE FILM FEDS REIGN SUPREME HOME: AN EPA NIGHTMARE BELOVED ’90s BAND


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


UP FRONT

SNOWPOCALYPSE: THE FLUFFY STORM THAT BROUGHT MEN TO THEIR KNEES

IT COMES TO POT, FREE WITH YOUR DREAM KARP DOC PROFILES NEWS WHEN RANGE FILM FEDS REIGN SUPREME HOME: AN EPA NIGHTMARE BELOVED ’90s BAND


Missoula Independent Page 2 January 26 – February 2, 2012


nside Cover Story

Julie Fillingham was standing stock-still and quiet in the dense undergrowth of the Bitterroot River’s West Fork during hunting season last year, waiting for a bull elk to pass by, when something on the forest floor caught her attention. At first Fillingham thought it was a stump. Lifting her binoculars for a closer look might have spooked the elk, so she just watched; whatCover photo courtesy of Craig Jourdennais ever it was, it was squat, black and motionless against the pre-dawn brush, and it was just 40 yards away. Only when she saw the tracks later did she realize she’d been staring at a wolf ............................................14

News Letters FWP is the devil in disguise—and it’s a bad disguise......................................4 The Week in Review Why, snow, of course ...............................................................6 Briefs Federal judge turns a deaf ear to Montana pot law..........................................6 Etc. At the center of the storm, answering pissy calls .................................................7 Up Front Montanans in the vanguard of the Citizens United fight............................8 Up Front Snowpocalypse, a photo essay.....................................................................9 Ochenski Will Keystone XL be the Democrats’ donnybrook? ..................................10 Range The ham-handed EPA fights a dream-home builder.......................................11 Agenda The 37th Annual Economic Outlook Seminar...............................................12

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan Grafting tomatoes ..........................................................................18 Happiest Hour Hot drinks with a kick .....................................................................19 8 Days a Week It’s just frosting 24-7 ........................................................................21 Mountain High Discover History Through Storytelling...........................................29 Scope Taking a shot at Homegrown Comedy ...........................................................30 Noise Cat Heaven, Juveniles, Sandrider, Oneohtrix Point Never..............................31 Theater UM’s Doubt needs a touch of work .............................................................32 Film Documentary bows at the altar of KARP ...........................................................33 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films ...................................................34

130 West Pine St. Downtown Missoula • 542-1471 kitchen open till 10pm

www.seankellys.com MONDAY 1/2-priced Indian entrees all day long $6 Rainier Pitchers TUESDAY Fat Tire Pub Trivia 8 pm WEDNESDAY Hump Night Bingo 8 pm Happy Hour 4-6pm $4 Imports THURSDAY Open Mic Night with Mike Avery 9-12pm FRIDAY Happy Hour 4-6pm $4 Imports Feckin whiskey gingerales $3 single/$5 double SATURDAY & SUNDAY Brunch 11-2pm • $2 Mimosas

Exclusives Street Talk....................................................................................................................4 In Other News...........................................................................................................13 Classifieds ................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrology..................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle....................................................................................................C-7 This Modern World ...............................................................................................C-11 PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Robert Meyerowitz PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson ASSOCIATE EDITOR Matthew Frank PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Jason McMackin STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Skylar Browning COPY EDITOR Ted McDermott ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Chris Melton, Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Rhonda Urbanski, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Jon Baker MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Brad Tyer, Dave Loos, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Azita Osanloo, Jamie Rogers, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2012 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

Missoula Independent Page 3 January 26 – February 2, 2012


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Comment Agenda News Quirks

STREET TALK

by Chad Harder and Michelle Gustafson

Asked Monday morning near the Missoula County Courthouse. Last week brought the seventh greatest winter storm in Missoula’s history. What do you think about the way Missoulians drive in snow? Follow up: What’s been your worst snow-driving experience?

Joshua Ramirez: Well, just recently I almost got hit crossing the street, so I’d say they’re pretty crazy. I see them sliding all over and almost hitting stuff. Oh grade: My worst experience was while operating a grader in Deer Lodge. I got too much snow on the blade and it pulled me off the road and into a ditch. It took another grader to pull me out.

Erriche Anton Von Greenbrier: For the most part, Missoulians do all right, although they need to slow down and enjoy the drive. There’s just a helluva lot of snow and lots of near-accidents, mostly by those driving like they’re hyped up on speed and don’t care about road conditions. Shhh…. My case manager crashed the car a week and a half ago. He lost control and slammed into a curb, but he doesn’t want to talk about it.

Linda Taylor: Not very good, pretty much too fast for conditions and like their cell phone is up their ass. Twentyfive points: My worst was someone else driving. I was crossing the street and got hit by a car. I mean, I’m slow and walk with a cane and they should keep an eye out. I hit the ground pretty good and was sore for a few days, but I got up and walked away from it.

Jeannie O’Loughlin: Actually, I’d say they drive very considerately. I’m a pedestrian most of the time and they almost always stop and let me cross. They handle the snow and other problems very well. Gun it: I used to drive a sports car, when I lived in Kansas City, and when it was snowy or icy, I’d just slide around all over the place, trying to avoid anybody else.

Aaron Hanks: Overall, I’d say pretty well. They’re mostly pretty respectful. I’ve been stuck two times and got help getting out, so I’m happy to return the favor. Roll with it: About 15 years ago, we were heading up to Hyalite Reservoir in a crappy Nissan pickup to go snowshoeing when we went off the road and rolled it over. Nobody was hurt because the snow was so deep, so we just got out and tipped it back over and kept going.

Let FWP starve! Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks is reported to be running out of money because of decreased hunting license purchases, and is considering asking the legislature for license fee increases. This is the first obvious symptom of something known as agency “death spiral” for FWP. Over the past two decades, FWP has come to focus on wildlife and biology when it should have been focused on fish and game. This includes FWP’s shocking tolerance and support for large predators. FWP’s total, willing, even eager cooperation with fostering excessive populations of large predators has long been predicted to end in a financial crash for the agency as word unavoidably spreads that there is no game left to hunt so there is no reason to buy a license. For too long, FWP leaders have leaned on the scales of public policy by making excuses for the devastation wrought upon game herds by large predators, by fudging game counts and census numbers and by blaming any game population declines that could not be covered up on climate change, sunspots, lazy hunters or aliens— anything but the truth. This cover-up culture has been fostered by senior staff, always near retirement, who knew they’d be long gone from the hot seat when the FWP financial bus blundered off a cliff. If the overall FWP attitude had not been so hell-bent on “ecosystem management,” “biological diversity,” “natural balance” and other similar catchy but terminal “green” ideas destined to end hunting, FWP managers would have predicted the current agency financial crisis years ago. Nobody at FWP noticed or cared several years ago when the editor of the NRA’s nationwide American Hunter magazine published a feature article about his fruitless elk-hunting trip to southwest Montana, a trip where the only tracks he saw were wolf tracks. Nobody at FWP noticed or cared about the other hundreds of warnings from Montana citizens. Worse, those warnings were even ridiculed by FWP in mad pursuit of its own agenda. The stock mantra from FWP managers has been: “We’re the professionals. We know best. The outcome that concerned citizens predict will never come to pass.” The “evidence” of crashing game herds that citizens offer is just “campfire stories” and is without merit because it doesn’t come from paid FWP “professionals.” Yet when retired FWP employees, freed from the institutional FWP muzzle, tell that FWP-tolerated wolves are turning the Montana landscape into a “biological desert,” FWP dismisses such comments summarily. For the last two decades, FWP has been busy digging a hole for itself. As it sees daylight disappearing around the edges of the hole, it still won’t quit digging. Of course, the obvious solution for the bureaucratic-bound and reality-disconnected FWP will be to announce, “We’ve been managing wildlife for the general public

Missoula Independent Page 4 January 26 – February 2, 2012

(including the non-Montana public) for years. Now we need the general public to pay the bills.” FWP has so fouled its nest by wasting the Montana hunting resource on predators and inadvisably removing hunters from the economic equation that it will now go to the legislature asking for relief, including increased fees that hunters simply won’t pay to access a vanishing resource, and, ultimately, tax increases on the general taxpayer, seeking a bailout from the results of its bad decisions.

“What FWP needs is not more or alternate sources of money, but a total change in attitude and culture.” You can bet that when FWP approaches the legislature demanding an allowance increase as a reward for having flunked Econ 101, the Montana Shooting Sports Association and thousands of Montana hunters will be there to say “Absolutely no way.” FWP has not only ignored the many warnings from Montana hunters, it has mocked and disrespected them. Also ignoring a state law requiring it to control large predators to protect game herds, FWP has bulled its way down a path surrounded with warning signs. What FWP needs are not more or alternate sources of money, but a total change in attitude and culture. Until that happens, let FWP starve. It is not serving Montana. Gary Marbut Montana Shooting Sports Association Missoula

Where’s Rehberg been? The Forest Jobs and Recreation Act balances timber harvests with conservation of the most scenic and wild places in Montana. Intended to promote cooperation and collaboration in the management of national forests, it is the result of just that. The bill already has the backing of timber interests from the Montana Wood Products Association to the Montana Logging Association, as well as local timber mills like Sun Mountain Lumber and RY Timber. It also has the backing of conservation groups, from Montana Trout Unlimited to the Montana Wilderness Association. For seven years, these partners and many others have worked tirelessly to balance their interests and create more certainty for all. Rep. Denny Rehberg has been in office the entire time. Now, in the eleventh hour and in an election year, he is proposing massive changes that would replace certainties with contingencies. With so many Montanans in agreement, why

would Rehberg not support a bill that accomplishes so much? The idea that the Forest Jobs and Recreation Act won’t create jobs is absurd. It requires the government to sign logging contracts for at least 7,000 acres in the Beaverhead-Deerlodge and Kootenai national forests every year. Most of the areas proposed as wilderness are already managed as wilderness, and these exceptional places will entice people to live, work and play in Montana for many generations. Creating opportunities to responsibly harvest timber while ensuing that our most scenic and wild places remain vibrant is a step in the right direction, and one that I urge Rehberg to take with us. Jason T. Brown Helena

Stop the subsidies Rep. Denny Rehberg is running for senator on the slogan “get the federal government out of our lives.” I’m sure the taxpayers in the rest of the nation would appreciate his efforts, since Montanans receive $1.47 back in federal dollars for every dollar we send to Washington. And Montana’s rural communities, Rehberg’s core supporters, get an even larger per capita percentage of the federal largess, including things like federal highway funds, federal fire fighting, federal flood insurance and disaster relief, FAA’s Airport Improvement Program for rural communities and many other federal programs worth cutting. However, the greatest percentage of federal dollars on a per capita basis goes to Montana’s welfare farmers and ranchers, who have received $5.89 billion in subsidies between 1995 and 2010. To name a few ag subsides and not give a comprehensive list, there are federal price supports for wheat, corn and other crops, the Market Loss Assistance Program, loan deficiency payments, Hard Winter Wheat Incentive payments, the Supplemental Revenue Assistance Payment Program, hail insurance, drought insurance, the Livestock Compensation Program, the Emergency Livestock Feed Program, the Livestock Indemnity Program, the Livestock Emergency Assistance Program, wool subsidies, the Milk Income Loss Contract Program, Dairy Market Loss Assistance, the Milk Income Loss Transitional Payment, the Dairy Economic Loss Assistance Program, the Sugar Beet Diversion Program, the Sugar Beet Disaster Program, the Wetlands Reserve Program, the federal Conservation Reserve Program, the Livestock Forage Disaster Program, federal marketing support, ag research stations, the Conservation Security Program, Counter Cyclical Payments, the Marketing Loan Program, export subsidies and the Risk Management Agency. The best way to save money and get the government off our backs is to stop government assistance to Montana’s welfare ranchers and farmers. George Wuerthner Helena


Missoula Independent Page 5 January 26 – February 2, 2012


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, January 18

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Comment

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

News Quirks by Michelle Gustafson

Kalispell judge Dana Christensen takes the oath of office at the Russell Smith Federal Courthouse in Missoula, making him the state’s 17th federal judge. Christensen, who was nominated by U.S. Sen. Max Baucus, replaces U.S. District Judge Donald Molloy, who last year took “senior status” and with it a lighter case load.

• Thursday, January 19 A snowstorm of historic magnitude hits Missoula, prompting droves of stir-crazy locals to remove their clothes, pretend like they’re enjoying summertime activities, take a photo and post it on a new Missoulabased Facebook page called “Frosters Anonymous.” Between Thursday and Tuesday, the page garners more than 4,000 “likes.”

• Friday, January 20 The Missoula Police Department responds to reports of two vehicle robberies on South Avenue by following two sets of footprints left in the snow. Law enforcement follows the tracks to Higgins Ave., where the alleged thieves are found walking with backpacks full of stolen goods, including a $1,500 camera belonging to the Independent.

• Saturday, January 21 The University of Montana men’s basketball team squashes the Sacramento Hornets 85-56 at Dahlberg Arena. The score is a season high for the Griz, which has won eight of its last nine games. The team improves to 6-1 in league play and 13-6 overall. Montana plays Eastern Washington Jan. 26.

• Sunday, January 22 Jonathan Reed Koontz, 29, is arrested for felony aggravated assault, disorderly conduct and carrying a concealed weapon after law enforcement responds to a disturbance at Koontz’s home and finds an injured woman.

• Monday, January 23 The Missoula City Council grants Homeword $200,000 in federal funds to add to the local affordable housing stock by acquiring and rehabilitating a multi-family property at 1805 Phillips Street. During the meeting, council draws from federal coffers to award 12 grants totaling more than $1.15 million.

• Tuesday, January 24 Allegiant Air announces that beginning April 27 it will run direct flights from Missoula to Oakland, Calif., with introductory one-way fares as low as $39.99. Allegiant will also add direct flights to Oakland from Bozeman, Billings and Kalispell.

Three-year-old Henry Erickson and his sister Beatrice keep an eye on their dad, George, as he skates in a game pitting Bayern Brewery against the Silver Slipper Bar and Grill at Missoula’s Glacier Ice Rink on Sunday, Jan. 22.

Sexual assault UM and Title IX About a year ago, Missoula police told University of Montana head football coach Robin Pflugrad that a woman had filed a criminal sexual assault complaint against UM athletes. Yet, as UM President Royce Engstrom acknowledged during a community forum last week, an unnamed “campus employee”—Pflugrad—failed to report the allegations to his supervisor, as he should have. The Missoula County Prosecutor’s Office found insufficient evidence to charge the suspects after the woman said four men assaulted her during an offcampus house party Dec. 15, 2010. School administrators made aware of such allegations are typically required under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 to conduct investigations independent from law enforcement inquiries. UM only launched its formal investigation last month, after two additional students reported to a campus employee that they were assaulted in separate incidents this past fall. UM is now investigating five alleged assaults. Title IX guarantees men and women equal edu-

cational opportunity. “If assaults and rapes are occurring, that obviously is going to interfere with students’ access to education,” says Ariela Migdal, senior staff attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union’s Women’s Rights Project, in New York. Title IX reporting requirements, however, are complicated by the fact that it appears the woman who came forward in December 2010 did not directly contact the university. “Schools also have to get consent from the complainant or the victim before they’re going to do certain actions including an investigation,” Migdal says. “That’s the line that they’re going to be faced with, if somebody who’s not the student reports an off-campus sexual assault.” Because sexual violence in an academic setting compromises educational opportunities, student conduct codes use a lower threshold than that employed in the criminal justice system to evaluate guilt. In the criminal justice system, suspects must be found guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. At UM, sexual aggressors are found guilty based on a preponderance of evidence, meaning it’s more likely than not that they committed the crime. Students who violate the conduct code are subject to suspension

and expulsion. UM’s Director of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Lucy France says the university is working to clarify reporting requirements among campus staffers. “I think we need some self-examination of how we comply with this,” she says. “If we can do a better job of making a safe environment, that’s what we want to do.” UM Executive Vice President Jim Foley says President Engstrom has made it very clear that all criminal allegations involving students should be brought to Engstrom. Jessica Mayrer

Health Filling the void Patty Kent doesn’t see western Montana as underserved when it comes to inpatient treatment for addiction. This portion of the state, she says, is wholly un-served. “There’s absolutely no inpatient beds for addiction in western Montana,” says Kent, director of housing for the Western Montana Mental Health Center. “If you need inpatient care right now, you’re

“Peace is when time doesn’t matter as it passes by.” ~Maria Schell

Missoula Independent Page 6 January 26 – February 2, 2012


Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

most likely driving to Billings.” WMMHC’s effort to change that gained significant steam this week. On Jan. 23, the Missoula City Council approved a $420,000 community development block grant for a 16-bed inpatient treatment unit at the health center’s Missoula campus. The project will cost $2.5 million; Kent says the grant— funded through federal HUD money—puts the center within $500,000 of its goal. Montana presently has just two inpatient facilities for addiction treatment, the Montana Chemical Dependency Center in Butte and the Rimrock Foundation facility in Billings. Kent says both present challenges for locals, as far as affordability and proximity. According to Melissa Gordon with Missoula’s Office of Planning and Grants, there’s consistently a two-month waiting list at the facility in Butte and Rimrock has a mandated 28-day program that costs an average of $15,000. Comparatively, “the program started in Missoula will have a flexible timeline, so patients can stay anywhere from three to 45 days,” Gordon says. “And the average cost for a 15-day visit for folks without insurance will be just over $3,000.” Kent adds that the center would employ at least 16 people, from doctors to cooks, and come with a $1 million annual payroll. Now the project enters an intensive fundraising campaign, one Kent feels will be bolstered by the city’s recent action. The block grant requires that the new inpatient unit devote roughly half its services to uninsured and low-income patients. Kent hopes that requirement will act as a guarantee for private donors and foundations that their money is going to a good cause. And if all goes well, these beds will merely be the first phase in filling the void. “We are ultimately hoping to develop a larger facility, which would involve completely renovating the historic hospital at Fort Missoula,” Kent says. That, she says, would be a roughly 40-bed facility. Alex Sakariassen

Marijuana Damn Supremacy Clause! After federal agents raided 26 medical marijuana facilities around Montana in March 2011, some caregivers, who found themselves potentially facing federal drug charges even though they were operating under state law, went on the offensive. They sued the federal government, claiming the raids had violated their constitutional rights. They hoped to find a crack in federal authority that would allow them to use Montana’s medical marijuana law as a defense. On Jan. 20, U.S. District Judge Donald Molloy,

Ochenski

Comment

of Missoula, ruled that there’s no such crack, dismissing the case altogether. He bluntly wrote: “We are all bound by federal law, like it or not.” In his order, Molloy addressed the Ogden Memo, the document issued in October 2009 by U.S. Deputy Attorney General David Ogden, which emphasized that prosecuting marijuana traffickers continued to be a “core priority” but that pursuing them should not focus resources “on individuals whose actions are in clear and unambiguous compliance with existing state laws providing for the medical use of marijuana.” That memo catalyzed Montana’s medical marijuana industry, leading many to believe the days of federal raids were over. The number of patients on the state’s rolls would top 30,000 by the middle of 2011. But, Molloy wrote, “A reasonable person, having read the entirety of the Ogden Memo, could

not conclude that the federal government was somehow authorizing the production and consumption of marijuana for medical purposes. Any suggestion to the contrary defies the plain language of the memo.” Among the arguments made by the plaintiffs, which included the Montana Caregivers Association and MCM Caregivers, was that the searches and seizures were unreasonable—a violation of the Fourth Amendment—because federal authorities failed to acknowledge that the plaintiffs were acting legally under Montana law. “Whether the plaintiffs’ conduct was legal under Montana law is of little significance here,” Molloy wrote, “since the alleged conduct clearly violates federal law.” The plaintiff ’s attorney, Carl Jensen, of Great Falls, says the decision has implications for any medical marijuana patient in any state. And, of course, for his clients, who could face decades in prison if convicted of federal charges. “I was hopeful that they’d…have a look at

Agenda

News Quirks

whether there [are] at least some rational limits to federal authority,” Jensen says, “but at least Judge Molloy doesn’t think so.” Matthew Frank

Politics

BY THE NUMBERS

0.7

percent

Montana’s economic growth rate for 2011, according to an Economic Outlook report released by UM’s Bureau of Business and Economic Research this week. The rate fell from 1.5 percent in 2010.

Elephants in the room President Obama stood before the nation Tuesday night, Jan. 24, in a red dotted tie. He vowed to bring manufacturing back to the U.S. He vowed to increase high school graduation rates and train two million Americans in skills demanded by the job market now. He vowed to open 75 percent of the nation’s offshore oil and gas holdings, to tax multinational corporations and build a lasting partnership with Afghanistan. At Missoula’s Finn and Porter, three people watched the president’s speech. A dozen members of the Missoula Republican Party sat not 100 yards away, behind the closed door of the Canyon banquet hall, busying themselves with their monthly meeting. The State of the Union slipped by unnoticed. The GOP had a lot on its plate, including chicken cordon bleu. Sen. Bob Lake of Hamilton was set to give a speech. He’s running for Montana’s Public Service Commission this year against incumbent Missoula Democrat Gail Gutsche. There’s plenty for the Republicans to talk about. The presidential primary race has had more debates than M*A*S*H had seasons. The party’s list of gubernatorial hopefuls in Montana is endless. Who has weight around here? “I feel like I could support any of the [presidential] candidates who are up,” says Jim Sadler, a longtime Missoula school board trustee who himself is up for re-election this year. “Right now, I’m kind of favoring Gingrich.” Sadler’s pick is a popular choice. Newt has “more fire,” Bill Buseman says. On the gubernatorial side, Rick Hill’s a clear favorite. In fact, Sheila Cook, who works on Hill’s local campaign, says Missoula has been Hill’s second strongest source of financial support. “He’s got a lot more name recognition than the others,” Cook says. The usual GOP concerns don’t seem important this time around. Republican candidate Rick Santorum, for example, seemed too focused on social topics like gay marriage while locals care more about jobs, money and the deficit. Social issues are “so yesterday,” Sadler says. As are personal flaws. In the end, Sadler says, he just wants “a fully vetted nominee whose warts and scandals are already all known.” After all, he says, “Clinton got re-elected.” Alex Sakariassen

etc.

We suspect Missoula Street Superintendent Brian Hensel agreed to an interview only because it offered a brief respite from the chaos around his department’s building, which was ground zero for coordinating snow removal following the seventh biggest snowstorm— about 16 inches fell between last Tuesday and Thursday—in Missoula’s recorded history. The affable, forthright Hensel, wearing a cap on his bald head, jeans and a well-worn Carhartt jacket over a hoody, leaned back in his chair, hands behind his head, and kicked his black leather boots up onto the desk in his office, which is decorated with PBR, Miller Light and Hamms signs. He’s got 12 years—the past 11 as superintendent—under his belt, and while he’s sleep deprived, he seems surprisingly unfazed by the weeklong effort to dig out Missoula. And that’s probably good, because the city’s been digging another hole. As of Tuesday, the city had spent $18,000 on overtime hours, $3,000 more than had been budgeted for the entire winter. “It’s one of those deals where obviously we can’t quit working,” Hensel says. Hensel’s team consists of 28 people—22 full-timers, three seasonals, two foremen and an administrator. They have about 20 rigs—plows, deicers, sanders, graders, loaders, blowers and blades. They were running non-stop, with operators working 14-hour shifts. His secretary fielded more than 100 calls a day. On Monday night, when Hensel updated City Council on the status of snow removal, he said all of the phone calls they’d received were “wonderful.” The sarcasm was as thick as the rock-hard snow berm on the Orange Street Bridge. “Some of them were angry, a couple of them were belligerent, most of them were requests for plowing residential streets that we hadn’t gotten to yet,” Hensel said in his office. “Some of them were, ‘You shouldn’t be getting paid, you’re wasting taxpayers money.’ ‘If you’re going to plow, do it right.’ Blah, blah, blah…The real pissy ones, they’ll call, swear at you and be belligerent, and then leave no number, no name.” Lighten up, Missoula! Jeez. And here we thought you were all entertaining yourselves by “frosting,” skiing downtown and building 12-foot-high snowmen. In any case, the work isn’t done. Hensel’s crew has turned to clearing the center berms in downtown and elsewhere, clearing storm drain inlets so the eventual melt doesn’t cause a flood—and hoping to finish it all before the next big dump.

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Missoula Independent Page 7 January 26 – February 2, 2012


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Unincorporated power Citizens United protestors taking fight to legislature by Matthew Frank

20

Best of Missoula

11

275 W. Main St • 728-0343

www.tanglesmt.com

Beer Drinkers’ Profile THROWBACK TO THE WAYBACK

OUT FROM UNDER Sometimes life requires a little digging out: after a mega-snowstorm, doing year-end work, getting ready for taxes. At least there's beer. Stop by and have one.

Meet an old friend or find some new ones. Something New Is Always Happening At The Horse

501 N. Higgins • 728-8866

Missoula Independent Page 8 January 26 – February 2, 2012

On Friday, Jan. 20, a day before the second anniversary of the Supreme Court decision Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, drumming and chanting protestors trudged through snow-socked downtown Missoula and assembled in front of the federal courthouse. City Councilman Jason Wiener stood on a makeshift wooden platform on the sidewalk and roused the crowd with the words of Theodore Roosevelt, first spoken more than a century before, about fighting corporate domination.

influence elections. “Clearly the impact of unlimited corporate donations creates a dominating impact on the political process and inevitably minimizes the impact of individual citizens,” Montana’s justices wrote. The plaintiff, Western Tradition Partnership, a conservative advocacy group dedicated to fighting “environmental extremism,” has appealed the ruling, setting up a showdown before the U.S. Supreme Court. Among those who followed Wiener onto the soapbox were Councilwoman Cynthia Wolken, who drafted the “anti-

They face long odds. Amending the constitution requires a two-thirds vote in both the U.S. House and Senate and ratification by three-fourths of, or 38, state legislatures. And the movement will have to overcome opposition from groups who supported the Citizens United decision, such as the libertarian Institute for Justice. IJ attorney Steve Simpson told National Public Radio last week that it’s “a little bit ironic” that people are “banding together in groups and exercising their right to free speech, to protest a court decision that held that people should be able to band together in groups and exercise their right to free speech.” But on Friday, the Missoula protestors seemed unfazed. They were energized by lofty oratory and the state’s rebuttal of the U.S. Supreme Court, with some chanting “It’s good to be a Montanan.” Speaking to the crowd, Wolken shot down cynics who have said the city’s resolution is meaningless. “It matters,” she said. “It matters to us. It mattered, I think, to Photo by Chad Harder the Montana Supreme Court, and it’s going to matter to the People gather to protest the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision at Missoula’s legislature. We’re going to federal courthouse Friday, Jan. 20. make it matter to the “‘In our day’—then as in now—‘it corporate personhood” resolution that Montana Legislature. We’re going to get a appears as the struggle of freemen to 75 percent of Missoula voters supported resolution passed…that says we need a gain and hold the right of self-govern- in last November’s election; Councilman constitutional amendment.” ment,” Wiener boomed through a mega- Dave Strohmaier, a Democratic candiAt the end of the 45-minute rally, phone, “as against the special interests, date for Montana’s U.S. House seat; Wiener returned to the stand to again who twist the methods of free govern- University of Montana political science quote Roosevelt’s “New Nationalism” ment into machinery for defeating the professor Paul Haber; and Missoula Rep. speech. “‘The citizens of the United Dick Barrett. popular will.’” States must effectively control the mighty Now Missoula and Montana are mov“Montana, get ready,” Barrett said. “We commercial forces which they have ing to the center of that struggle. haven’t seen nothing yet. With the Citizens called into being,’” Weiner intoned. The protestors came to decry the United decision we can expect money to “‘There can be no effective control of Supreme Court’s 5-4 Citizens United rul- pour into independent expenditure cam- corporations while their political activity ing, which allows for unlimited campaign paigns, and since we are a small state with remains. To put an end to it will be neispending by corporations. They numbered an election coming up on which the make- ther a short nor an easy task’—he said in well over 100, topping the crowds reported up of the U.S. Senate heavily depends, that 1910—‘but it can be done.’ And we’re in much larger cities on a day when dozens corporate money is going to pour into going to do it.” of courthouses around the country were Montana. For our statewide and legislative Last week, Western Tradition “occupied.” The protests were coordinated elections…we are protected by Montana Partnership asked the Montana Supreme by Move to Amend, an organization seeking law and the Montana Supreme Court deci- Court not to enforce the state’s ban on to change the U.S. Constitution to overrule sion upholding our prohibition on corpo- independent political expenditures until Citizens United. rate political spending. But in the races for the U.S. Supreme Court weighs in. On Missoula’s protestors also came to the U.S. Senate and the House, our democ- Monday, Jan. 24, Attorney General Steve praise the Montana Supreme Court, which racy is up for sale—and the bidding is going Bullock urged the Montana court to keep on Dec. 30 became the first to defy Citizens to be intense.” the ban in place. United. The court found that Citizens The protestors see themselves at the On Jan. 25, Montana Sens. Max United did not negate Montana’s Corrupt vanguard of a populist movement akin to Baucus and Jon Tester said they supPractices Act, a citizens’ initiative passed in others in American history that, as Haber port reversing Citizens United. 1912 that stopped powerful and corrupt told the crowd, “corrected the relationship mining companies from spending freely to between capitalism and democracy.” mfrank@missoulanews.com


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Snowpocalypse by Chad Harder

A series of warm, moisture-laden storms charged into western Montana last week, bringing a white wave that left skiers rejoicing and shovelers cursing. The storm was the biggest so far this year, and one of the biggest on record. The National Weather Service called it “extraordinary,” noting that the 15.7 inches of snow that fell from Jan. 17-19 marks the seventh deepest dump since records

were first kept in 1893. (The record, 41.1 inches of snow over Christmas in 1996, was unthreatened.) Totals were greater high in the mountains. Lost Trail/Powder Mountain recorded 50 inches in 48 hours, and Montana Snowbowl claimed almost as much in just a few days more. The owners of Yurtski reported snow falling at three inches per hour in the Swan Range.

Snow shovelers, owners of flat-roofed homes and drivers of low-clearance vehicles had a less enjoyable week as temperatures rose, rain fell and the light and fluffy powder morphed into heavy sludge. And it probably isn’t over. NASA reported last week that “La Niña, ‘the diva of drought,’ is peaking, increasing the odds [of] stormy weather this winter and spring.”

Photos by Chad Harder

Missoula Independent Page 9 January 26 – February 2, 2012


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Dems divided Obama decision on Keystone XL splits party The Keystone XL pipeline has been a hot topic of debate since it was first proposed by the Canadian oil giant TransCanada last year. More than 1,200 people who oppose the massive, 1,700mile pipeline were arrested in demonstrations in Washington, D.C. last fall, including prominent environmentalists, movie stars and citizens who fear both the pipeline’s contribution to global warming and the potential for serious, long-term pollution. Last week, President Obama chose not to approve the project as currently proposed, a decision that has split Democratic officeholders and constituency groups in an already challenging election year. The proposed pipeline would run from the tar sands oil production facilities in Alberta across Montana and then south all the way to Gulf Coast refineries. The controversies surrounding it range from the destruction of boreal forests, impacts on both Canadian and American Indians and the final destination of the refined petroleum products, which are by no means guaranteed to stay in the U.S. Perhaps the single greatest concern regarding the route was the section that passed over Oklahoma’s Sand Hills, which lie above the massive Ogallala Aquifer, upon which millions of people rely for drinking and irrigation water. Obama had wanted to postpone his decision on Keystone XL until after the November elections, but it was forced upon him by Congress via a rider on the bill to extend unemployment benefits and the payroll tax cut. Ironically, that bill passed the Democratic-controlled Senate on a 97-3 vote, with Senators Jon Tester and Max Baucus, both Democrats, in favor. Tester and Baucus, as well as Republican Rep. Denny Rehberg, have been over-the-top vocal in their support for the pipeline, primarily as a jobs creator. Add to that the equally vocal support from Gov. Brian Schweitzer, Attorney General Steve Bullock and a host of other Democratic candidates and officeholders. Likewise, the project has received union support both in Montana and nationally. Those lined up against the pipeline, however, are primarily constituencies that are normally supporters of Democrats. Besides a huge number of environmental groups, the pipeline is also being opposed, through a variety of groups, by farmers, ranchers and landowners along the route. Most recently, Montana state Senator Jonathan Windy Boy, a Democrat, penned an op-ed column praising the

Missoula Independent Page 10 January 26 – February 2, 2012

Obama decision and highlighting opposition from a coalition of tribal historic preservation offices, which are concerned about historic sites along the proposed pipeline route. Indians by and large have been an important Democratic constituency and are credited for Jon Tester’s narrow win in his bid for the Senate six years ago. Adding to the debate is the serious question of just how many jobs the pipeline will actually generate and how many of those jobs will be permanent. A hilarious short video on YouTube titled “To Infinity And Beyond: Keystone XL Jobs

Senators Jon Tester and Max Baucus, as well as Republican Rep. Denny Rehberg, have been over-the-top vocal in their support for the pipeline, primarily as a jobs creator.

Claims Spill All Over The Map” illustrates the wildly fluctuating estimates, which go from thousands to tens of thousands to hundreds of thousands to even a million jobs. The video, which was produced by Media Matters, ends with TransCanada Vice President Robert Jones telling CNN it would create “hundreds, but certainly not thousands [of jobs], because those are construction jobs.” If Obama’s decision were final, the controversy would be over and the impact, while causing discord among Democrats and their support groups, would likely be minimal. But it’s not. The bill to extend unemployment benefits and payroll tax cuts that Congress passed in December was a short-term measure that expires next month. Already

the leaders of the Republican-controlled House have announced that they will once again tie Keystone XL approval to any measure further extending the benefits and cuts. That puts Democrats in a tough spot. The old “jobs versus the environment” debate is once again rearing its ugly head and Keystone XL appears to be the focal point. Given the state of the economy, it’s easy for many Democrats to jump on the jobs bandwagon and take their environmental constituents for granted as they have before. After all, goes that logic, who are the environmentalists going to vote for if not Democrats? But that game has been played many times and this time around it includes the tribal constituencies, some of whom, in recent years, have in fact decided to vote for someone other than Democrats, and could again. In the meantime, it sets up a quandary for folks like Tester, who’s running for reelection in a tough battle with Rehberg. It could play an equally large part in Bullock’s campaign for governor. Putting both environmentalists and tribes on the block for a foreign-owned pipeline to mostly ship Canadian tar sands oil for possible export doesn’t seem like the most prudent course in what are expected to be close races in November. Yet how can Tester, Baucus or Bullock credibly withdraw their former support for the pipeline? They could admit that the number of jobs the pipeline will create is much less than the ridiculous estimates upon which they formerly based their support. They could admit that there’s no guarantee whatsoever for the worn-out excuse of “energy independence” and that the oil may actually wind up in China. But I wouldn’t bet on it. Elected officials are loath to ever admit they made a mistake. The higher up the ladder you go, the worse it is. Of that, Iraq and Afghanistan provide indisputable evidence. In the same week in which Obama gives his prime-time State of the Union address, Democrats have a tough decision to make with potentially huge consequences. They can support Keystone XL, with its environmental uncertainties and supposed jobs, or they can risk the strategic blunder of a split party. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


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Pity the Sacketts? The EPA takes on dream-home builders by Judith Lewis Mernit

It’s hard not to feel for Mike and Chantell Sackett, the Idaho couple who saw their plans for a dream home on a remote Idaho lake kiboshed by the EPA in 2007. In early January, when their case against the federal agency went before the U.S. Supreme Court, their lawyer, Damien Schiff, told a story of shock and deprivation, one designed to terrify independent dreamhome builders nationwide. “They have been injured by the EPA,” Schiff argued. The agency’s “arbitrary and capricious” decision making has “turned their world upside down.” But the Sacketts aren’t the only ones whose dreams are at stake here. Sackett v. Environmental Protection Agency should also worry another set of Westerners: people whose livelihoods depend on tourists who come to their national forests to fish, relax or otherwise enjoy clean water and public land that is still untrammeled by development. Because as the case plays out in the courts and the news, EPA officials seem increasingly distanced from the people whose natural resources they’re charged with protecting. Even if the nine justices uphold two lower court opinions and throw the Sacketts’ case out, the agency and its staff will probably still look like the bullies Chantell Sackett says they are—or worse, as Idaho Republican Sen. Jim Risch diplomatically puts it, like the “Gestapo.” According to the Sacketts, people in their employ were dredging away on their new lot, 500 feet from the shore of Priest Lake, when three EPA representatives turned up and ordered them to stop: The workers, they said, were destroying a wetland protected by federal law. The EPA then sent the Sacketts a “compliance order” threatening up to $75,000 per day in fines. The Sacketts lost the $23,000 they invested in their land, and their plans were crushed. Worse, they couldn’t dispute the wetland designation in court because a mere compliance order, however threatening, isn’t open to such challenges. For that, you have to wait until the feds are about to throw you in jail. So the Sacketts, with free help from the Pacific Legal Foundation, sued the EPA not

over whether their land contains wetlands, but over their due-process right to plead their case before a judge. Schiff, whose firm lives to dismantle environmental law in the name of property rights, effectively portrayed the Sacketts as a helpless couple trapped in a no-man’s land between the permit-granting U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the bullying EPA, confused and misled about what the term “wetland” even means.

As the case plays out in the courts and the news, EPA officials seem increasingly distanced from the people whose natural resources they’re charged with protecting. The EPA’s lawyer, on the other hand, plunged the court into such a thicket of legalese that little useful information emerged unscathed. “We believe that the following steps are necessary in order to achieve prospective compliance with the act, and if you don’t do these things you will be subject to the following penalties because you will then be in violation of the act and you will be subject to the penalties,” U.S. Deputy Solicitor General Malcolm Stewart argued. To which Chief Justice John Roberts appropriately replied, “I didn’t follow that.” But the Sacketts don’t really deserve the sympathy they’re getting. A timeline Chantell Sackett created for the Army Corps of Engineers reveals that she and her husband knew early on that they were building on a wetland. The Sacketts run an excava-

tion and construction business; the law should not have been a mystery to them. Even the local golf course brags about its stunning wetlands. Nor did the EPA officials show up at the Sackett lot unbidden; they were responding to a complaint from a local resident. Some area residents are battling against a 14-lot subdivision planned for the north end of Priest Lake, which is also a refuge for threatened bull trout in the Kaniksu National Forest. That forest also supports black and grizzly bears, along with wolves, elk and caribou. Those creatures might be mere trivialities to the Sacketts, who in an interview with a sneering right-wing radio host shrugged that they see no wildlife save the occasional, desultory deer. But many of their fellow residents, including some humans, feel differently. And they have property rights, too. Those rights are hardly helped, however, by the EPA’s clumsy communication and apparent institutional hostility to the press—or to any kind of good storytelling, even before the nation’s highest court. Forty years ago, Congress wrote the Clean Water Act with the clear understanding that individuals alone can’t protect the clean lakes and streams upon which they depend. Enforcing that law certainly includes restraining developers big and small who might carelessly pollute our waterways. But unless someone in the Obama administration steps up to tell that story—to explain that the EPA is in fact an agent of the people, acting on our behalf— these kinds of little-guy-faces-down-the-feds scenarios will continue to dominate the discussion over how best to protect our water, air and wilderness. The forces that want to eliminate those protections altogether will prevail. And we’ll all lose.

Have you been diagnosed with Cancer?

Judith Lewis Mernit is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). She is also a contributing editor for High Country News and lives in Venice, California.

Missoula Independent Page 11 January 26 – February 2, 2012


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If I typed what I understood about the economics of the Treasure State, this sentence would have ended nine words ago. But here’s what I do know: Most of us will do anything to live here, regardless of the lack of jobs and low wages and high home prices. Some of us will work two or three parttime jobs. Some of us will spend years traveling hundreds of miles to work in the Bakken, “the oil patch.” That’s all you need to know about the economics of the state. A few years ago, there were a few Montana plates in and around Williston, North Dakota. Then some Idaho plates. Then Oregon and Washington and more and more “4s,” “13s” and “7s.” It was when the Texas and Wyoming plates arrived that you knew things were getting bad everywhere. Those were traditionally busy oil and gas states; the Texans came to take our jobs, even though “our jobs” were 500 miles from our homes and families. The oil patch is moving east, and it has been for five years. That tells me that more Montana men, mostly, will spend six months or more away from their kids and wives each year. That the lure of money will make them strangers to their families.

That Montana ought to do something about it. In the meantime, let’s hear what the economists’ numbers have to say about our fair state during the 37th Annual Economic Outlook Seminar. This year’s topic is Montana’s New Energy Frontier: What are the Prospects? Tom Richmond of the Montana Board of Oil and Gas will talk about those prospects, while economists Patrick Barkey and Paul Polzin from the Bureau of Business and Economic Research at UM will present economic forecasts. There will also be a luncheon panel to discuss local economic issues. Too bad their luncheon won’t be a Hot Stuff personal pizza, a giant pickle and a $14 burger made of recycled cow bits, because that’s how we roll out in the patch. —Jason McMackin

THURSDAY JANUARY 26

MONDAY JANUARY 30

The Missoula at-risk housing coalition holds the sixth annual Project Homeless Connect event. Services provided include medical care, dental care, hair cuts, legal advice and housing assistance, among others. 300 E. Main St. 10 AM–3 PM. Free. Call Melissa at 258-4980.

A pre-recorded talk by Paul Cienfuegos titled We the People plays at the Missoula Public Library. The talk covers strategies for participatory democracy and rightsbased organizing. Large meeting room. 7 PM. Free.

Get in shape, girl. Not with a ThighMaster, silly: Get your Financial Fitness on with Homeword before you buy that house and find yourself underwater. 127 N. Higgins Ave. 6–9 PM. $10.

FRIDAY JANUARY 27 The topic at the 37th Annual Economic Outlook Seminar is Montana’s New Energy Frontier: What are the Prospects? The event features Tom Richmond, administrator and petroleum engineer for the Montana Board of Oil and Gas. Hilton Garden Inn. 3720 N. Reserve St. 8–1 PM. $80, includes booklet, lunch and a chance for college credit. Practice being peaceful in a world of differences during the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center’s Intercultural Dialogue Group, a monthly meeting that aims to bring together people from various backgrounds for an afternoon of conversation and peacemaking. Every last Fri. of the month at 4:30 PM in the library of the Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call Betsy at 543-3955 or email peace@jrpc.org for more info. The Northern Rockies Rising Tide fights for the northern Rockies, including tackling the megaload issue and so much more. Jeannette Rankin Peace Center back room. 510 S. Higgins Ave. 7–8:30 PM.

SATURDAY JANUARY 28 If you have compulsive-eating problems, seek help and support with others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Sat. at 9 AM in Room 3 in the basement of First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free. Visit oa.org. January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month and St. Pat’s, Community Medical Center and Partnership Health Center are offering free cervical screenings for lowincome, uninsured women. Partnership Health Center, 323 Alder St. 9–4 PM. Free.

Th e 37 t h A n n u a l Ec o n o m i c O u t l o o k Seminar takes place on Fri., Jan. 27, from 8 AM to 1 PM, at the Hilton Garden Inn. Cost is $80. Continuing education credits are available. To register or for more info. go to bber.umt.edu or call 243-5113.

TUESDAY JANUARY 31 Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 115 S. 3rd St. W. 1-3 PM. For information call 543-3955. Think of all the demons you’ll be releasing from your flesh when you donate blood at the American Red Cross. 2401 N. Reserve St. Ste. 6. Call 800-REDCROSS. YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts YWCA Support Groups for women every Tue. from 6:30–8 PM. An American Indian-led talking circle is also available, along with age-appropriate children’s groups. Free. Call 543-6691. The UM Wilderness Institute brings scholars, writers, scientists and explorers together to share stories of how water shapes our lives, landscapes and politics in the Wild Waters in the West Lecture Series. This week, Joseph Hovenkotter, staff attorney for Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, gives a lecture titled Indian Trial Interests and Activities Relating to Western Waters. Gallagher Business Building Rm. 122. 7 PM. Free.

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 1 The YWCA hosts a Community Sexual Assault Dialogue for Women. The event focuses on women and their experiences. 1130 W. Broadway Ave. 6–8 PM. For more info., call Melissa at 543-6691.

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 2 Those wishing to advocate for women and children, check out the YWCA’s volunteer orientation. After the orientation, a 45-hour training plan begins on S a t . , F e b . 2 5 . To a t t e n d , e m a i R e b e c c a a t rpettit@ywcaofmissoula.org. The Flathead City-County Health Dept. hosts Growing Up Male, a workshop that develops understanding and communication between parents and sons ages 10-13. Program includes films and discussions. 1035 First Ave W. 5:30–8:30 PM. $20 per couple includes dinner. Preregistration is required. Call 751-8101.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent Page 12 January 26 – February 2, 2012


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I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - David Sherman, 49, stole a DVD player from a Wal-Mart store in Gretna, Neb., but didn’t get far because 24 Sarpy County sheriff’s deputies were in the store for “Shop with a Cop Night.” Some of the deputies escorting 75 underprivileged children spotted Sherman running from the store with the DVD player, gave chase and caught him hiding in a car. (Omaha’s WOWT-TV) Bolivian authorities intercepted a van carrying 204 1-kilogram bags of cocaine that aroused their suspicion because all of the brick-sized bags were wrapped in red and stamped with the Nazi swastika. (Australia’s News.com.au) SECOND-AMENDMENT FOLLIES - After Transportation Security Administration screeners detected a loaded gun in a carry-on bag at Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, they turned it over to police Officer N.J. Phillips. Richard Popkin, the owner of the .22 Magnum revolver, was telling Phillips how to clear the weapon when it accidentally fired, Phillips said, “grazing the left side of my face.” (CNN) Two sheriff’s officers were eating at a convenience store in Sevierville, Tenn., when they began discussing the weight difference of their semi-automatic service weapons. Cpl. Chris Huskey, 40, unloaded his .40caliber pistol and handed it to Deputy Adam Bohanan, 27. Bohanan handed the gun back to Huskey, who started to reload, but the gun accidentally fired. The bullet went through a 15-inch computer screen and continued into a cooler, where it lodged in a package of bologna. (Knoxville News Sentinel) Police arrested Bill Robinson, 66, for firing a 12-gauge, double-barrel shotgun at some mistletoe on a tree at a shopping mall in DeKalb County, Ga. Insisting that a shotgun is the best way to get mistletoe, Robinson explained he would’ve gotten it from a neighbor’s tree, but the neighbor was away. “I didn’t want to go shooting in his yard if he wasn’t home,” he said. (Atlanta’s WGCL-TV) A 22-year-old Navy SEAL shot himself in the head at his home in San Diego, Calif., while trying to convince a companion that the pistol was safe to handle. Police Officer Frank Cali said the man had been drinking with a woman and was showing her his 9 mm handgun, which he believed was unloaded. He offered to let her hold it, but when she declined, he tried to demonstrate how safe it was by putting it to his head and pulling the trigger. (Escondido’s North County Times) TOO SHORT TO RUN - U.S. District Judge John A. Gibney denied a request by four presidential candidates to add their names to Virginia’s March 6 primary ballot because they failed to collect the required 10,000 signatures. Only Mitt Romney and Rep. Ron Paul qualified. In addition, state officials said Newt Gingrich’s petition had 1,500 signatures that appeared to be signed by the same person. “If someone is running for president of the United States,” state Sen. Ryan T. McDougle, chair of the Virginia Senate Republican caucus, said, “you would think they would understand the requirements.” (The Washington Post) SHIRKING-CLASS HEROES - Scott Bennett, 45, published a newspaper obituary for his mother, even though she was still alive. Brookville, Pa., police Chief Ken Dworek said Bennett submitted the bogus notice to The Jeffersonian Democrat so he could get paid bereavement leave from his job. After the mother appeared at the newspaper to dispute the obituary, Bennett was charged with disorderly conduct. (Oil City’s The Derrick) Manhattan high school teacher Mona Lisa Tello, 61, claimed to have been on jury duty for a total of 15 days, but authorities accused her of forging her jury-duty notice. “The letter had wrong dates, wrong room number, wrong address, different words misspelled,” city school district Special Commissioner for Investigation Richard Condon said. “She had not done any jury duty.” Tello resigned but kept her pension. (New York’s WCBS-TV) Joan Barnett, 58, told her employer that her daughter died in Costa Rica so she could spend two and a half weeks vacationing there. Barnett, who lost her job as a parent coordinator at Manhattan High School, aroused suspicion by faxing a death certificate to the school to qualify for bereavement leave that had “slightly different fonts which were not aligned properly,” according to special investigator Richard Condon. Investigators also confirmed that Barnett booked the tickets for her vacation more than three weeks before she said her daughter died. (New York’s Daily News) TIME-BIDING FOLLIES - A Canadian couple were vacationing in Oregon when the 75-year-old wife died in their car. The 71-year-old husband then drove for 225 miles with her body beside him before calling authorities, who advised him to stop at the nearest police station. She was examined and officially declared dead. “He wasn’t sure what to do, so he kept driving,” said police Chief Robert Burks of Tonasket, Wash., about 20 miles south of the border. “He was taking her home, probably, to deal with it up there.” (Washington’s The Wenatchee World) Paramedics responding to a 911 call from a man reporting that his 78-year-old mother was experiencing chest pains said that when they arrived at the Philadelphia home, the man asked if they could also take his 84-year-old father, who a police source said had been “dead for a couple days.” (Philadelphia’s Daily News) BE FRUITFUL AND MULTIPLY - Despite “legitimate concerns” by federal health authorities, Trent C. Arsenault, 36, vowed to continue making free sperm donations, insisting he’s helping low-income people with infertility. Arsenault, a computer security expert who lives in Freemont, Calif., claims to have fathered 14 children, with four more on the way, and donated sperm to between 60 and 75 families since he started offering his services in 2006. Food and Drug Administration officials notified Arsenault to cease his operation for failing to follow rules governing sperm banks, but his lawyers insisted the standards don’t apply because his donations are “individual intimate partner arrangements” allowed by law. (MSNBC) Bill Johnson, 52, a conservative Republican who ran for governor of Alabama in 2010 and has campaigned against same-sex marriage, spent most of last year in New Zealand coordinating earthquake recovery efforts and donating sperm to lesbian couples. Johnson, who is married, used an alias to meet women online that wanted to get pregnant. Three women he met are pregnant, another three have received his sperm and three more are considering his services. He explained the urge to become a biological father was “a need that I have.” (Auckland’s New Zealand Herald)

Lady Griz Basketball This Week: Thursday, Jan. 26 @ 7 pm Montana v. Eastern Washington Halftime Performance by the Montana Super Skippers Staff Appreciation Night for UM faculty and employees

Saturday, Jan. 28 @ 2 pm Montana v. Portland State Northwest Burn Foundation Game Halftime Performance by the UM Dance Team Please bring a food donation to any Grizzly Athletics event to help support the Student Athletic Advisory Committee’s food drive!

Missoula Independent Page 13 January 26 – February 2, 2012


ulie Fillingham was standing stock-still and quiet in the dense undergrowth of the Bitterroot River’s West Fork during hunting season last year, waiting for a bull elk to pass by, when something on the forest floor caught her attention. At first Fillingham thought it was a stump. Lifting her binoculars for a closer look might have spooked the elk, so she just watched; whatever it was, it was squat, black and motionless against the predawn brush, and it was just 40 yards away. Only when she saw the tracks later did she realize she’d been staring at a wolf. “I went back over to where I was standing,” she says. “The sun was up. No black stump, but wolf tracks…I kept thinking, ‘It looks like the black head of a dog, with ears.’ It was.” Fillingham and her husband, Scott, have hunted and guided in the West Fork for the better part of a decade. The two run the Hamilton-based Accurate Outfitters and cover a range of hunting districts: 240, 270 and 250, which includes the West Fork. Non-resident hunters are their bread and butter. But there’s a new hunter in the woods these days, a hunter largely absent from this region for half a century. Scott Fillingham says he used to see a moose every time he ventured up the West Fork. He’d run his hounds there without a leash on mountain lion hunts. He’d hunt the high ridges and pack trails

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for elk, which numbered nearly 1,500 when he first branched out on his own with Accurate Outfitters five years ago. He doesn’t see moose up the West Fork anymore, he says. And he leashes his hounds if he chases lions. The elk? They mostly hang out at lower elevations now, in dense brush and along rocky slopes. The Fillinghams don’t take clients after elk anymore. They can’t, they say. And they know who—or, rather, what—is to blame. “There’s tracks all over,” Scott says. Wolf tracks. Last year, Fish, Wildlife and Parks set a harvest quota of 18 gray wolves in the West Fork, in only the second wolf hunt in Montana since the species was first reintroduced to the Northern Rockies in 1995. Beginning with an experimental population of 66 in Yellowstone National Park, wolves have dispersed throughout Montana, their numbers bolstered by migrants from Canada and transplants in central Idaho. By the end of 2010, FWP estimated there were 566 wolves in Montana—an increase of 7.4 percent over 2009. Idaho estimated its 2010 wolf population at just over 700. In December, FWP deemed it necessary to extend the 2011 wolf hunt across much of the state, through Feb. 15, 2012. Hunters have only managed to remove three wolves from the West Fork since the season began last year.

“There’s places you can’t put your foot down without stepping in wolf turds,” says Scott Boulanger, a member of the Bitterroot Elk Working Group and owner of Circle KBL Outfitters, the only outfitter with overnight camps in the West Fork. “They’ll run those pack trails, they’re like us. They’re going to take the easiest path, run the ridges just like we do. You don’t want to go through the thick blow-down crap… Those are the places the elk are trying not to be.” The situation in the Bitterroot often borders on volatile. Hunters, outfitters, public officials and business owners are crying out for the state to take more drastic steps to cull the wolves. The predators are killing all the game, they say; FWP has sacrificed one species, the elk, for another. The numbers sound convincing. The dramatic drop in the West Fork elk herd— 1,900 in 2005 to 764 in 2010, according to FWP—roughly coincides with the expansion of wolves into western Montana. In considering the quota for its 2011 hunt, FWP estimated the current West Fork wolf population at around 30. Locals tell stories about glowing eyes peering out of the forest near trailheads. They talk about pets disappearing from front yards and porches and about feral canines seated near bus stops in the early morning, watching school children. Public meetings are dominated with the stuff of Grimms’ Fairy Tales.

But what’s really behind this steep decline in elk numbers? For FWP, it isn’t an easy answer to come by biologically. In late 2010, the agency announced a three-year study to address the condition of elk herds in the Bitterroot’s East and West forks, with a start-up price of $150,000. Biologists collared 40 cows and ear-tagged 66 calves in spring 2011 in order to track their movements. They captured an additional 19 cows and 31 calves last fall, hoping to boost data on wolf predation through the winter. Hunters don’t doubt the wolves are to blame, but as year one of the elk study wraps up, FWP is uncovering data that may suggest otherwise.

WHERE THERE’S TRACKS… Ben Jimenez circles what looks like a scene from a Cormac McCarthy novel. We’re not far up the Hughes Creek drainage, which meanders through the snow-covered blow-down toward the West Fork. The snow at our feet is packed solid and stained with blood, urine and bird shit. In the center of it all, on its back, rests one of the forest’s latest victims: an elk calf. At least, what’s left of an elk calf. Jimenez surveys the frozen carcass with a detective’s eye. He peels hide away from spine with a folding knife. He exam-

FOLKS IN THE BITTERROOT KNOW THE ANSWER IS WOLVES. STATE BIOLOGISTS AREN’T SO SURE. by Alex Sakariassen

Missoula Independent Page 14 January 26 – February 2, 2012


ines the chipped and broken tips of ribs. When he’s seen enough, he cuts through fat and tendon on a rear leg joint and pulls the femur away. He sets it down next to his pack. “Wolf kill?” I ask. Jimenez glances at the large canine tracks littering the snow nearby. There’s a distinct dog-like turd lying a few feet from the carcass. It certainly seems like wolves were here. “Looks like something did chew on those ribs,” Jimenez says. “That’s typical wolf behavior. They’ll gnaw on the ribs.” Jimenez goes on to explain what the hunters who found this carcass told him: They discovered it five days ago, fairly fresh, close to this Forest Service road. They followed what they took to be wolf tracks into the forest, where they discovered about nine bedding spots. But Jimenez is a biologist and FWP’s main man in the field for its elk study. He can’t form an opinion based solely on word-of-mouth and circumstantial evidence. There’s enough evidence for him to postulate; as for a definitive answer, he’s non-committal. Jimenez, 35, has spent the better part of the last year either in or above the East and West forks. Roughly twice a week, he travels by truck or air to monitor the elk herds. The truck is a battered FWP rig with a burned-out headlight that he puts about 2,500 miles on a month. The plane is a two-seater Super Cub kitted with an array of telemetry instruments. This elk study, funded through a combination of state dollars and private donations, isn’t cheap. After poking at the carcass a bit more, Jimenez picks up a hefty, fourpronged telemetry antenna and starts scanning the bushes. The receiver emits a rapid “ping” that grows stronger and fades as he walks around. He’s searching for an ear tag. He finds it buried in the snow a few yards away. He cracks the calf ’s femur in half on the tailgate of his truck. Usually, he can get a rough idea of the animal’s health from the texture of the fat in the marrow, but this one’s too frozen to tell, so he chucks both pieces back into the forest. “I have no doubt people get wolves,” he says as we head back down to the main branch of the West Fork. He means that they see them. “I’ve seen them from the air quite a bit, and I’ve heard them on the ground howling. But when you hear stories of, ‘Oh, they were surrounding us in our tent and we looked out and saw their eyes all around us’…you kind of nod your head and let it go.” The West Fork is revered in the Bitterroot. Located above the small town of Conner, it’s a relatively close getaway that lies partly in the untamed SelwayBitterroot Wilderness. Hunters, campers, day-hikers and fishermen frequent it. It’s attracted trophy homes at lower elevations as well as expansive ranches like the Triple Creek, which topped Travel + Leisure’s list of best American hotels last year. The streams hold westslope cutthroat, brook and rainbow trout. Elk, moose and white-

Photo by Chad Harder

FWP biologist Ben Jimenez spends at least two days a week monitoring collared elk in the Bitterroot’s West Fork.

tail and mule deer used to graze the lowlying fields by the hundreds. Some find this last point—the decades-long abundance of game—ironic. The Corps of Discovery, headed by Lewis and Clark, nearly died of starvation while wintering in the Bitterroot in 1805. The same herds FWP is now studying are likely related to elk brought to the Bitterroot by railcar in the 1930s as part of an elk augmentation effort statewide. “It wasn’t until probably the ’90s that we were dealing with over-populations of elk,” says FWP biologist Craig Jourdonnais, whose grandfather was involved in the augmentation. “The older folks remember all the work it took to get there, and I think that’s part of what’s driving the frustration. They don’t want to go backward.” Explanations for the recent elk decline vary, among residents in the Bitterroot as well as among governmental agencies. FWP doesn’t dismiss the possibility that wolves are to blame, but they’ve pointed to a growing list of other possibilities, mostly related to a changing landscape. The U.S. Forest Service offered its hypothesis for the decline in a 2009 draft travel plan for the Bitterroot National Forest. It acknowledged local concerns over wolves while suggesting that human hunters might have had more to do with it. “FWP increased the number of antlerless elk permits in the mid-2000s because elk populations exceeded objectives, and recent antlerless harvests have been high,” the report states. “FWP feels that the decline in elk numbers in the Bitterroot is likely primarily due to increased antlerless harvests achieving a planned management reduction, and that there is no evidence that wolves or combined predator numbers have much to do with the decline of elk counted through 2008.” The Forest Service also said that poor forage in 2006 might have contributed to

stress the following year, and could explain low survival rates for elk calves. The main problem up the West Fork is calf recruitment, the rate at which young elk survive their first years and reproduce. Right now, calves aren’t surviving long enough to replace older elk in the herd. At last count, there were only 11 calves per 100 cows in the West Fork. Healthy herds have about 25. As for the hunting pressure cited by the Forest Service, that reduction

was planned, Jourdonnais says. Those populations should have rebounded quickly, and they haven’t. Biologists believe there could be many factors at play here. That’s why Jimenez checks the marrow on dead elk: If it’s weak and looks gelatinous, it could be indicative of poor nutrition and explain poor survival in harsh months. If all he sees are wolf kills, that could be telling, too.

Photo by Chad Harder

John Wood of Big Bear Taxidermy displays a wolf hide.

Missoula Independent Page 15 January 26 – February 2, 2012


So far, Jimenez has been less alarmed by wolf activity in the West Fork than by other factors. He was surprised to find that mountain lions killed 13 tagged elk calves last year. And they’ve noted far fewer black bear kills than they anticipated. Wolf predation will likely increase as more snowpack accumulates this winter, he says. Last year, the agency recorded only three confirmed wolf kills on tagged calves. Considering the high rate of lion predation, Jourdonnais says, the study may highlight a need for FWP to more thoroughly investigate the lion population in the West Fork. The agency has no solid population figures. Wolves could be taking the rap for them. Or, Jimenez says, the wolves could just be contributing to a lion problem by pushing lions off fresh kills. Jimenez hopes to get some remote field cameras placed on dead game to capture possible predator interactions. Or perhaps the problem lies outside the West Fork. Tracking the elk’s movements is vital to knowing where portions of the herd spend their summers. Biologists won’t have a full set of such data until Jimenez finishes collecting dropped elk collars. But depending on where the elk tend to forage, FWP could be looking at a separate branch of its study dedicated to analyzing vegetation at summer grounds. Jimenez says that aspect would likely be taken up by FWP’s partner in the project, the University of Montana. The question of movement among the elk seems as important as predation. And it feeds into a broader concern

about changes on the landscape. The West Fork doesn’t look like it did decades ago, Jourdonnais says. There’s significantly more irrigated land on the valley bottom, which could mean elk aren’t moving to public land at higher elevations in the fall as they once did. From what Jimenez has seen from the air and the ground, the elk aren’t crossing Highway 93 into the East Fork and the Big Hole, not in any large numbers. And they aren’t moving into Idaho. Years ago, Jourdonnais says, people felt strongly that there was a significant amount of movement by the West Fork elk over Nez Perce Pass. But, he says, “I cannot find that contingent of elk that we would feel are Idaho elk, so there may be some changes along those lines as well— that we’re just not getting the same kinds of movement and migration we did decades ago.” If elk are staying in the West Fork year-round, it’s not the West Fork as it used to be. The wildfires of 2000 torched thousands of acres of thick forest in the Bitterroot, changing habitat for scores of species. The intensity varied greatly in the East and West forks, Jourdonnais says, making it difficult to determine exactly how those fires impacted the elk, but it has “removed a lot of the security cover that was there at one time,” he says. “Those elk have not necessarily tended to abandon the areas that they’ve always occupied. In some cases, it makes them more visible to hunters because the understory is burned off.” The fires could also explain the dramatic spike in elk numbers in the mid

Photo by Chad Harder

Outfitter Scott Boulanger used to make a living guiding elk hunts in the West Fork.

2000s, Jimenez says. Between 2000 and 2005, the West Fork population rose from 1,215 to 1,914. Wildfires typically generate rapid forage growth, which lasts five to 10 years. As that growth subsides, however, the forage may not be enough to sustain such a large elk herd. “You saw a pretty big spike in elk numbers sometime in the early to mid 2000s,” he says. “They were up to 1,800 or 1,900. It could have been a lot of

things, but that coincided with when the burn was really productive.” The elk study still has two years to go. People in the Bitterroot want answers now. “It might be global warming,” says outfitter Scott Boulanger. “Maybe Bigfoot. You know what I think it is? It’s aliens. Aliens could be snatching up all the calves. We don’t know. There’s a lot of things out there happening unexplained. You prove to me there’s no such

Photo by Chad Harder

FWP’s Ben Jimenez searches for an ear tag near the remains of an elk calf in the West Fork.

Missoula Independent Page 16 January 26 – February 2, 2012

thing as Santa Claus. It’s smoke and mirrors, man.”

TEMPERS TESTED Boulanger doesn’t get riled easily. He’s a big guy, barrel-chested, with cowboy boots and the look of countless days in the backcountry. His smart phone squawks with updates from his hunting camp. He has a long-range radio app that lets him communicate with his crews out in the woods. But talk about the West Fork long enough and redness begins to spread across Boulanger’s face. He speaks faster, interrupts himself in mid-sentence. He bought Circle KBL Outfitters 14 years ago and runs the only overnight hunting camp in the West Fork. He used to make his living taking non-resident hunters after elk up there, for four or five years. He’d take in 50 hunters a season at $3,000 a head. “I fed my family, paid my mortgage, just on West Fork elk hunting,” he says. “Gone. The income last year was zero dollars.” Boulanger isn’t the only one talking about financial loss. In response to the elk decline, FWP restricted the number of hunting permits in the West Fork to 25. A mere 10 percent of those—two tags—are available to non-resident hunters. For the few outfitters operating in the West Fork, the limit amounts to a death sentence for elk guiding in District 250. Scott Fillingham didn’t book a single elk hunter there last year, shifting his activity almost solely to districts nearer to his Hamilton base. On June 4, 2011, Indian Summer Outfitters owner Joe Ferraro held an auction for his outfitting equipment, his stock, his outfitter client list and his domain name. Ferraro’s fellow outfitters point to his closure—and his inability to sell much of his business—as just one example of the difficulties the elk decline has generated.


Hotels, too, are suffering. Jerry Dicken, owner of the Mountain Spirit Inn, in Darby, appeared before the Ravalli County Commission late last year to testify to his economic struggle. He echoed the popular sentiment that wolves are to blame for decreasing elk and deer populations. In the past several years, he says, he’s seen a dip in seasonal business indicative of the decline in hunter visits to the Bitterroot. “In 2008, our November occupancy was 45 percent. In 2009, it was 31 percent. And in November 2010, it was only 23 percent.” Dicken says he hasn’t yet calculated the loss of business through the 2011 hunting season. Hunters apparently just aren’t flocking to the Bitterroot in search of trophy elk the way they used to. Local hunters aren’t having much luck either. “Not very many people are able to tag much,” Dicken says. “A lot of the hunters here in the past year basically went after cows. That was it. They just went out for the meat instead of the bigger elk. There just weren’t many to be had.” Big Bear Taxidermy in downtown Darby keeps hearing the same thing from hunters: There just isn’t any game in the West Fork. They keep busy tanning hides and cranking out black bear rugs. On a recent Thursday, the shop had a zebra hide and an ibex hide resting on one of the backroom tables. Big Bear gets a lot of out-of-state business, says Dustin Nielsen, who’s worked preparing hides and mounts at the shop for four years. And they did receive several wolves from Montana and Idaho already this season, including one of the three shot up the West Fork. There have been very few elk this season, though, he says, and fewer mule deer and moose. The economic trickle effect of the elk decline coupled with the supposition that wolves are to blame caught the attention of Ravalli County officials last year. Commissioners called on locals to submit stories of run-ins with wolves and to supply information about how businesses have been hit by the wolf ’s reintroduction. The evidence began to stack up. A Hamilton rancher shot two wolf pups standing in a field near his sheep in August. A third pup was hit by a car on Highway 93 south of Darby later that month, supposedly while feeding on road kill. Commissioner Suzy Foss said residents no longer feel safe allowing their children to play outside unsupervised. “We have historic cattle ranches from the Sula basin to Florence going under, especially those with grazing permits they can no longer use,” Foss wrote to FWP officials and Gov. Brian Schweitzer in September. “Our farm production is down due to elk feeding year round in hay and grain fields…Pets are disappearing from front porches. Sheep, goats and chickens are prey to young lions and wolves down on the valley floor due to the losses in our deer populations and the fact that they too have been driven from the forests to the river bottoms following the remaining herds seeking safety.”

FWP has recognized a problem with wolves in the Bitterroot, even if it hasn’t taken the steps demanded by outfitters. As the issue of state management over wolves raged in federal court in 2010, the agency requested that U.S. Fish and Game extend management privileges in the Bitterroot in time for a 2011 hunting season to cull the wolf population. The animals were once again delisted last spring, however, placing management in FWP’s hands and giving officials time to arrange a fall hunt. FWP maintains its stance that a fair-chase season should be enough to fill quotas. “Hunters may not realize that there are good, accessible areas for wolf hunting remaining, and that there are still open quotas,” Quentin Kujala, FWP’s fish and wildlife section chief, said in a statewide wolf quota update this month. “For those wanting to harvest a wolf, now is the time.” Boulanger wants more. Hunters can’t meet the state’s quotas under the restrictions placed on wolf hunting, he says, arguing that FWP’s hunting regulations and harvest quotas amount to a “predator protection plan.” His temper flares when he thinks back on all the explanations FWP has offered for not taking more aggressive action against wolves. Locals have demanded more lenient predator hunts, pointing to Idaho as a model. Montana Sportsmen for Fish and Wildlife has outlined the differences in predator control between the two states on the group’s website. Idaho allows baiting and trapping for lions, bears and wolves; Montana doesn’t. Non-resident predator tags in Idaho are $31.75; in Montana, they’re $350. The seasons are longer in Idaho. You don’t have to wear orange. There’s no wolf quota. Rattling off this list, Boulanger’s voice rises. “When the discussion at the meeting turns into increased bear harvests, increased lion harvests and increased wolf harvests,” he says, “Craig Jourdonnais says, ‘You know, I was reading a study the other day, and if you remove more than 6 percent of the adult sow bears, you’re going to have an impact on the population, so we better be careful.’ Craig, that’s the problem! …You’re breaking your own rules! It says you must manage [predators] and you’re not! Our deer and elk numbers are 63 percent below objective, we’re in the toilet, we have no recruitment and you just say you want to be careful about the bears?” It isn’t Jourdonnais’s fault that there aren’t any elk up the West Fork, Boulanger says. And it isn’t the fault of Jourdonnais’s boss, regional wildlife manager Mike Thompson. Boulanger blames seven people: FWP’s director, its commission and the governor who appointed them. “The commission in Helena is so far disconnected from the general public,” he says, “that you could have a war in the streets of Darby with wolves hanging off of poles and

street signs, there could be lynching and bombings and mayhem, and the commission would just be, like, ‘Let’s have a meeting.’ “Their idea of addressing the wolf harvest was to extend the season [to February 15], and you don’t have to wear orange,” Boulanger continues. “When that doesn’t work, what are they going to do? Extend it another month?” Earlier this month, FWP requested a second extension for the wolf hunt in the West Fork, ending April 1. No wolves have been harvested from the area since the agency issued its first season extension in December.

the study, says the higher-than-expected ratio of lion kills on calves last year suggests a need to understand better the distribution and density of feline predators in the East and West forks. But until her team gathers more data on wolf predation this winter, Proffitt won’t know how high a priority additional lion data will be. After collecting body-condition data from roughly 200 adult elk cows in various drainages throughout 2011, Proffitt says the study will likely also branch out to investigate forage quality later this year. “What we’ve seen with the bodycondition work,” she says, “has highlighted the need for us to…actually get out and do some vegetation sampling and try

Photo courtesy of Craig Jourdonnais

State biologists prepare to release a cow elk on Andrews Creek after checking its health.

BLEEDING BEYOND BORDERS The situation doesn’t appear to be getting better anytime soon. In fact, the problems in the West Fork are beginning to bleed beyond the borders of District 250. The elk population in the East Fork has plateaued in the past few years. Jourdonnais notes that bull calf numbers are actually declining and that calf survival is becoming a concern. FWP is now looking at scaling back hunting opportunities in District 270 this fall. Bull elk hunters may have to get a permit, though the number of permits would remain unlimited since the elk population there remains above the agency’s management objective of 3,000. What’s behind this downward trend? The first year of the elk study has highlighted at least two new priorities for FWP’s biologists. Kelly Proffitt, who heads

and better understand the nutritional resources available to elk, particularly the West Fork elk.” Meanwhile, locals demand action. FWP understands their concerns, Jourdonnais says. His experience in the Upper Bitterroot has taught him that economic factors are an important consideration in wildlife management, he adds. “When you have a loss of hunter numbers and you have more restricted opportunities, certainly businesses feel that,” he says. “It’s not something we should just ignore.” Montana’s current ability to manage wolves through public hunts places some control in the hunters’ hands. And Montana Sportsmen for Fish and Wildlife is doing what it can to encourage such hunts, by offering a $100 prize to any hunter who bags a wolf. But so far this

season, hunters have only filled 60 percent of the statewide 220-wolf quota. Dustin Nielsen at Big Bear Taxidermy and Jerry Dicken at Mountain Spirit Inn say they haven’t heard of many hunters venturing into the West Fork for wolves. Scott and Julie Fillingham have heard wolves howling a few hundred yards away, they say, but “can’t get them out of the trees to get a shot.” Boulanger offered his clients a lionwolf combo hunt this season, but only in his outfitting district on the Selway in Idaho, where lax restrictions and cheaper tags are more enticing to non-resident hunters. “Obstacle one: the price,” Boulanger says of marketing Montana wolf hunts. “Non-resident tags are $350. What’s the chance of killing a wolf? Slim to none.” Boulanger’s dug into state and county laws, hoping to find a more aggressive way to fight elk predation. He points to a section of Montana Code that outlines a petition procedure for livestock owners to implement a county-based predator bounty program. In mid-January, the Ravalli County Commission released a draft of a county wolf-control policy that calls for a quota-less hunt with extended seasons and allows trapping. The issue sets neighbor against neighbor in the Bitterroot. Marc Cooke, in Stevensville, who is pro-wolf, says he hasn’t lost any friends over wolves yet but he’s been in countless heated discussions. Cooke founded the National Wolfwatcher Coalition eight months ago in an effort to balance anti-wolf sentiments and already has 3,975 members nationwide, he says. “What I see happening is, you’ve got the individuals that are radicals on both sides, and there’s no room to compromise. They’re digging in.” Cooke says he’s not against hunting, just “irrational fear and hate.” He adds that he thinks the wolves are the targets of subconscious misdirection. “I think people see wolves as a form of the federal government,” he says. “They didn’t have enough input when [wolves] came here, and now that the wolves are here, they’re not happy.” FWP has already gone too far with its wolf hunts, he says. Others, like Jerry Dicken, don’t think they’ve gone far enough. “The wolf,” Dicken says, “is a sore subject.” Yet Ben Jimenez says there’s been a positive response to FWP’s study. The locals might razz you a bit, he says, especially when they get to know you, and they may not have the kindest words for his agency, but they understand the importance of learning more about the complexities of the West Fork’s elk. Beyond solving the mystery of the Upper Bitterroot’s elk decline, the study’s data will provide a thorough baseline for comparison with other elk herds throughout the region—a component that state managers largely lack at present. “I don’t think there’s going to be one quick fix,” Jimenez says. “It took us a while to get to this point, and it’s going to take us a while to get back.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent Page 17 January 26 – February 2, 2012


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FLASHINTHEPAN With the days getting longer, it’s officially time to start planning the garden. At the very least, make a cup of tea and open a seed catalog. Depending on what you have in mind, it might be time to place an order. If your plans include tomatoes, especially heirlooms, it’s worth considering ways to fortify them. Anyone who’s lost tomatoes to blight knows the heartbreak of yanking whole plants still laden with fruit and removing them from the scene. This is a big reason why many small farmers and serious gardeners have picked up the art of tomato grafting in recent years. Done much the same way that fruit trees are grafted, it’s a slick process that has helped growers achieve dramatic improvements in tomato yield and disease resistance, especially against soil-borne diseases like blight. Disease is more of a problem now than ever. The efficiencies of global travel have enhanced the ways that plant disease can spread. And fickle weather conditions can create opportunities for disease to break out in unexpected places. Ask a New England tomato grower about the 2009 season, and expect a grimace for an answer. The late blight fungus hopped from field to field virtually overnight, taking hold thanks to unseasonably cool and wet conditions in June and July. Few tomatoes, heirloom or hybrid, organic or conventional, survived. The pathogen that causes late blight, Phytophthora infestans, also caused the potato blight of the infamous Irish famine. Conditions favor late blight only sporadically in New England, and in 2009 many gardeners had never seen it. Home gardeners were apparently the primary incubators for the disease. The outbreak was blamed on infected tomato plants sold at garden stores. The easiest way to avoid late blight (there’s also a related early blight) is to choose from an everwidening selection of hybrid seeds for blight-resistant plants. I grew Mountain Magic and Defiant last year, both of which are resistant to both early and late blights. We had a cool, wet summer last year, and several gardeners and farmers I know lost their tomatoes to blight. My resistant tomatoes did great, and Mountain Magic is tastier than most heirlooms. Dark, rich and meaty, they grow in beautiful red clusters of smallish fruit. I’d grow Mountain Magic even if blight were eradicated.

Beyond blight, there are many other tomato maladies to which tomatoes are sensitive, especially those tasty, fragile heirlooms. There are wilts, nematodes, rot and viruses, salty soil, good old-fashioned cold and, now that average summer temperatures are rising, heat. Grafting tasty tomatoes like heirlooms onto tough hybrid rootstock is an interesting way of dealing with these issues and of growing stronger, more productive tomato plants. As with fruit tree grafts, the upper part of the graft, called a scion, is chosen based on favorable characteristics of the fruit they produce. The heirloom scion is spliced onto rootstock—the stem and roots half—of especially hearty, disease-resistant, vigorously producing varieties.

In Montana, the typically dry summers don’t favor blight, but Missoula farmer Josh Slotnick is nonetheless excited to graft tomatoes this year for the first time. “In the literature, it appears that grafted tomatoes are much more vigorous and productive,” he told me. “Heating greenhouse space in the spring and fall is expensive. If we can get more tomatoes per square foot, it’s worth doing. Plus it’s cool, and I want to learn a new thing.” It is pretty cool, and actually quite simple. In a mesmerizing YouTube video (http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=WSwTCwlhFgo) produced by the U n i v e r s i t y o f Ve r m o n t E x t e n s i o n S e r v i c e , Westminster farmer Mike Collins demonstrates several grafting techniques. He makes the moves look easy, using only a sharp blade and some plastic clips to execute the simple yet delicate steps. In Vermont, the growing season is a sprint and every second matters. Collins, who has been grafting tomatoes for 15 years, compares the various options in terms of growing days lost or gained.

by ARI LeVAUX

Some companies sell seed bred specifically for rootstock: plants that, if grown out, would produce small, inedible fruit. These seeds tend to be expensive—the Johnny’s Selected Seeds catalog charges about $25 bucks for a package of 50 seeds. Johnny’s stocks four varieties of rootstock, including the Maxifort seeds that Collins uses. Lynn Montgomery has been farming in New Mexico for 40 years. He told me he never used to worry about late blight, but in recent years it’s become an issue he’s had to adapt to. Montgomery grows tomato seedlings in Actinovate, a type of bacteria that can be applied as a fungicide to combat acute outbreaks of fungal disease. By drenching his potting soil with Actinovate, Montgomery is able to get the bacteria growing in the tomato plants, where they’ll live throughout the tomato’s life. Meanwhile, Montgomery is preparing to graft himself to the grafting bandwagon. He ordered rootstock seeds and grafting clips and seed for some of his scions from Johnny’s and more scion seed from totallytomato.com. Like Collins, Montgomery will use Maxifort for his rootstock seeds. Maxifort offers broad disease resistance and grows robust, deep roots, which enhance the uptake of nutrients and water, building strong, productive plants. I was surprised to learn in the Sunrise tomatografting forum (what, you didn’t know there are tomato-grafting forums?) that you don’t need to order those expensive rootstock seeds. Many hybrid tomato plants are bred with all kinds of disease resistance, like those Mountain Magic tomatoes that so captured my heart. In fact the Mountain lineage of tomatoes, including Mountain Magic, includes some of the most diseaseresistant plants there are. They make great rootstock. It’s also possible to graft several different scions onto a single rootstock, so that a single plant can produce Brandywines, green zebra, yellow stripe and purple Cherokee tomatoes. Such a strategy might be useful for limited-space situations, like container gardens, which are especially susceptible to disease. If you’re growing tomatoes in containers, or just lazy, or cramped for space, more nurseries are stocking grafted tomatoes. It’s also possible to order them online. Now you have no excuse not to get your graft on.

LISTINGS $…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway (across from courthouse) • 728-8900 Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wifi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 As January darkens Missoula with our traditional grey sky…..think Bernice’s. New wood floors, brick walls, and huge windows beckon those who need to see light, feel warmth and sit quietly as the new year begins. Enjoy a cup of joe, Tipus Chai, a slice of cake, croissant, or a herb cream cheese hardroll. In fact, just enjoy! Get to

Missoula Independent Page 18 January 26 – February 2, 2012

know someone new in Bernice’s open/shared seating and welcome in the New Year. xoxo Bernice. bernicesbakerymt.com. Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced beega) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Big Sky Drive In 1016 W. Broadway 549-5431 Big Sky Drive In opened June 2nd 1962. We feature soft serve ice cream, shakes, malts, spins, burger, hot dogs, pork chop sandwiches and breaded mushrooms all made to order. Enjoy our 23 shake and malt flavors or the orange twist ice cream. Drive thru or stay and enjoy your food in our outdoor seating area. Lunch and dinner, seven days a week. $-$$

Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Monday – Friday, 7:30 – 2. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins • 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to late. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 39 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and cof-


dish

the fee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks • 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am-2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm Sun-Wed and 11am10pm Thurs-Sat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$$ Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross • 549-5595 Cold Stone Creamery offers the Ultimate Ice Cream Experience. Ice Cream, Ice Cream Cakes, Shakes, and Smoothies the Way You Want It. Come in for our weekday specials. Get Gift Cards any time. Remember, it's a great day for ice cream at Cold Stone Creamery. $-$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. We deliver and we cater! Double Front Chicken 122 W. Alder • 543-6264 Number of years ago Double Front was built, 101. Number of years it’s been cooking chicken, 75. Number if years in the Herndon family, 49. Always getting that perfect chicken dinner, timeless. Come find out why we are rule of the roost. Always the best, Double Front Chicken. $-$$ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. • 721-6033 Missoula's Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. M-TH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am-4pm, Sat 8am4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$

Januar y

COFFEE SPECIAL

Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula's best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. • 532-2056 Brooks and Browns Trivia Night is back. $7 Bayern Pitchers plus appetizer specials. Every Thursday from 7-10pm. $50 Bar Tab to winning team. Warm up your chilly nights with our Hot Jalapeno Artichoke Dip. We have Classic French Onion Soup and hearty Bison chili made in house daily. Fall in love with our Bacon Cheeseburger Meatloafstuffed with crispy Daily’s bacon and cheddar cheese, served with cheddar mashed potatoes and corn. And finish the best meal in town with our New Orleans style Bread Pudding with warm caramel sauce and Big Dipper vanilla bean Ice cream. We still have Happy Hour from 4-7 every day and on game days we offer wings specials and all your favorite local micro-brews. Everyone loves our SUNDAY BINGO NIGHT! Sundays 6-9 pm at Brooks and Browns. Same happy Hour specials ($5 pulled pork sliders, ? order wings, ? nachos; $6 Bud Lite pitchers) Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. Hunter Bay Coffee and Sandwich Bar First Interstate Center 101 East Front St hunterbay.com • 800.805.2263 Missoula’s local roaster since 1991 - now open downtown in the First Interstate Center! Stop by for hand-crafted gourmet coffees and espressos plus made-from-scratch, healthy sandwiches and soups. Enjoy the sunshine from our patio! Free Wi-Fi and Free Parking in the upper deck lot. Open Monday through Saturday. Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay

HAPPIESTHOUR Hot drinks Why you’re here: It’s the morning after a long night out on the town. You’re ready for a big breakfast to refuel your ravaged body—and a little hair of the dog. On the other hand, you could be here because you took it easy the night before, studying or doing work (you do-gooder, you!), and now you’re venturing out into Missoula’s winter wonderland and looking for a way to give your weekend morning a big boost. Here are some warm, happy options. Irish coffee: Irish coffee is a full glass of coffee plus whiskey (Jameson Irish whiskey is recommended) and some Baileys, topped with whipped cream. Old Post bartender Pat Allgeier doesn’t skimp on the booze, so one glass is all you need to get a buzz on. Spiced cider: Not into the cream? Try hot apple cider spiked with Captain Morgan spiced rum. It’s sweet and a little surly—something to make you feel like you’re starting your morning out on a high seas adventure. Even if you’re just going to go back home and take a nap.

Hot toddy: The favorite of Old Post waitress Leah, who says it’s the perfect old-timey remedy for a cold. We agree. The lemon, honey and hot water mix deliciously with Maker’s Mark to warm the body and create the perfect chest Photo by Dave Knadler decongestant and sinus cleanser. Not that we’re doctors. Mexican coffee: The least popular hot drink of them all, but possibly a favorite for extreme tequila lovers. This one is coffee mixed with tequila, triple sec and Kahlua. It’s the kind of coffee that puts hair on your chest and has you starting the morning with, “Yo no soy marinero. Soy capitán.” Where to find it: Any bar that serves coffee. But you’ll definitely find these drinks at the Old Post at 103 W. Spruce St., on the corner of Higgins Ave., next to Wordens. —Erika Fredrickson Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, e-mail editor@missoulanews.com.

Va l e n t i n e

Organic El Salvador Dark Roast Shade Grown Fair Trade

$10.95/lb. Missoula’s Best Coffee

BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

BUTTERFLY HERBS

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

SATURDAYS $1 SUSHI 4pm-9pm Mondays & Thursdays - $1 SUSHI

(all day)

Tuesdays - LADIES' NIGHT 4pm-9pm Not available for To-Go orders

Missoula Independent Page 19 January 26 – February 2, 2012


awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com All our menu items are made from scratch, featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive tea menu. Missoula's Original Bubble Teas. Beer, Wine and Sake available. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Rotating music and DJs. Lunch 11:30-3:00, Happy Hour 3-6, Dinner 5-10. $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. 721-1312• www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$

Draught Works presents the inaugural

"Frosters Anonymous" party this Friday, January 27, from Noon-8. Wear summer clothing reflecting your favorite summer activity. Props Welcome. Get a photo taken by our photographer of you drinking a beer on our snowy beach and receive

one free pint. Find us at facebook.com/draughtworks & facebook.com/gofrosting

Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West • 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ The Mercantile Deli 119 S. Higgins Ave. • 721-6372 themercantiledeli.com Located next to the historic Wilma Theater, the Merc features a relaxed atmosphere, handcrafted Paninis, Sandwiches, and wholesome Soups and Salads. Try a Monte Cristo for breakfast, a Pork Love Panini for lunch, or have us cater your next company event. Open Monday – Saturday for breakfast and lunch. Downtown delivery available. The Mustard Seed Asian Café Southgate Mall • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our allnew bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our non-smoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, microbrews, fine wines & signature drinks. Takeout & delivery available. $$-$$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. 543-3188 Don’t feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $8.50. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $7.75. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$. Pearl Café 231 E. Front St. 541-0231 Country French specialties, bison, elk, and fresh fish daily. Delicious salads and appetizers, as well as breads and desserts baked in-house. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Philly West 134 W. Broadway • 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday - Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. Pita Pit 130 N. Higgins 541-PITA (7482) • pitapitusa.com Fresh Thinking Healthy Eating. Enjoy a pita rolled just for you. Hot meat and cool fresh veggies topped with your favorite sauce. Try our Chicken Caesar, Gyro, Philly Steak, Breakfast Pita, or Vegetarian Falafel to name just a few. For your convenience we are open until 3am 7 nights a week. Call if you need us to deliver! Sapore 424 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-6695 Voted best new restaurant in the Missoula Independent's Best of Missoula, 2011. Located on Higgins Ave., across the street from Wordens. Serving progressive American food

$…Under $5

Missoula Independent Page 20 January 26 – February 2, 2012

consisting of fresh house-made pastas every day, pizza, local beef, and fresh fish delivered from Taste of Alaska. New specials: burger & beer Sundays, 5-7 $9 ~ pizza & beer Tuesdays, 5-7 $10 ~ draft beers, Tuesday -Thursday, 5-6:30 $3. Business hours: Tues.- Sat. 5-10:30 pm., Sat. 10-3 pm., Sun. 5-10 pm. Authentic Thai Restaurant 221 W. Broadway • 543-9966 sawaddeedowntown.com Sa Wa Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors- no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisine. Now serving beer and wine! $-$$ Sean Kelly’s Empire Grill 130 W. Pine St. 542-1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for lunch & dinner. Featuring brunch Saturday & Sunday from 11-2pm. Serving international & Irish pub fare. Full bar, beer, wine, martinis. $-$$ Silvertip Casino 680 SW Higgins 728-5643 The Silvertip Casino is Missoula’s premiere casino offering 20 Video gaming machines, best live poker in Missoula, full beverage liquor, 11 flat screen tv’s and great food at great prices. Breakfast Specials starting at $2.99 (7-11am) For a complete menu, go to www.silvertipcasino.com. Open 24/7. $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI Sushi Hana Downtown offering a new idea for your dining experience. Meat, poultry, vegetables and grain are a large part of Japanese cuisine. We also love our fried comfort food too. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. Corner of Pine & Higgins. 549-7979. $$–$$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins • 327-8929 Stop in when you're in the neighborhood. We'll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula's best lunch for under $6. Mon.Sat. 11-10 Sun 12-9. Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you'll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. Tamarack Brewing Company 231 W. Front Street Missoula, MT 59802 406-830-3113 facebook.com/tamarackmissoula Tamarack Brewing Company opened its first Taphouse in Missoula in 2011. Overlooking Caras Park, Tamarack Missoula has two floors -- a sports pub downstairs, and casual dining upstairs. Patrons can find Tamarack’s handcrafted ales and great pub fare on both levels. Enjoy beer-inspired menu items like brew bread wraps, Hat Trick Hop IPA Fish and Chips, and Dock Days Hefeweizen Caesar Salads. Try one of our staple ales like Hat Trick Hop IPA or Yard Sale Amber Ale, or one of our rotating seasonal beers, like, Old 'Stache Whiskey Barrel Porter, Headwall Double IPA, Stoner Kriek and more. Don’t miss $8 growler fills on Wednesday and Sunday, Community Tap Night every Tuesday, Kids Eat Free Mondays, and more. See you at The ‘Rack! $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Drive 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$ YoWaffle Yogurt 216 W. Main St. 543-6072 (Between Thai Spicy and The Shack) www.yowaffle.com Let YoWaffle host your next birthday party! YoWaffle is a self-serve frozen yogurt and Belgian waffle eatery offering 10 continuously changing flavors of yogurt, over 60 toppings, gluten free cones and waffles, hot and cold beverages, and 2 soups daily. Build it your "weigh" at 42 cents per oz. for most items. Open 7 days a week. Sun-Thurs 11 AM to 11 PM, Fri 11 AM to 12 AM, Sat. 10 AM to 12 AM. Free WiFi. Loyalty punch cards, gift cards and t-shirts available. UMONEY. Like us on facebook.

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over


Arts & Entertainment listings January 26 – February 2, 2012

8

days a week

Photo courtesy of Anna Schwaber

Hee-hee, huh, haw-haw-haw. Bluegrass shredders The Infamous Stringdusters go to eleven at the Top Hat Thu., Jan. 26, at 10 PM, with Nicki Bluhm and the Gramblers. $18/$15 advance at the Top Hat and Ear Candy.

THURSDAY January

26

The Missoula at-risk housing coalition holds the sixth annual Project Homeless Connect event. Services provided include medical care, dental care, hair cuts, legal advice and housing assistance, among others. 300 E. Main St. 10 AM–3 PM. Free. Call Melissa at 258-4980.

Bitterroot women, go on and make America great again with your entrepreneurship. Check out the Grand Opening of Montana Women’s Business Center Office in Hamilton and learn what kind of help it can provide. 274 Old Corvallis Rd. Call 374-9416.

nightlife Get a whiff of that breath when the Mountain Breathers, featuring Chase McBride and Michael Corson, perform some folk tunes at the Draught Works Brewery. 915 Toole Ave. 5–8 PM. Free.

Get in shape, girl. Not with a ThighMaster, silly: Get your Financial Fitness on with Homeword before you buy that house and find yourself underwater. 127 N. Higgins Ave. 6–9 PM. $10. Bring your miscellany of talents down the ‘Root for the The Roxy Open Mic Night. Anything goes: comedy, juggling, music end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Jan. 27, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calemander c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

"I got a Small Wonders futon for my birthday!" H A N D M A D E

F U T O N S

125 S. Higgins 721-2090 Mon – Sat 10:30 – 5:30 smallwondersfutons.com

Missoula Independent Page 21 January 26 – February 2, 2012


and prescient children rapping about the streets. Hamilton. 120 N. 2nd. 7 PM. $5. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn-Downtown. 7–10 PM. Josh Wagner’s post-apocalyptic, post-Christmas dark comedy Ringing Out is on its second run at the Crystal Theater. 515 S. Higgins Ave. Doors at 7 PM, show at 7:30 PM. $15/$13 adv. for adults and $10/$8 adv. for students. Tix available at Bridge Pizza or ringingout.com. Fans of grammar, logic and rhetoric, grab your liberal arts degrees and head down to the Central Bar and Grill’s Trivia Night, hosted by local gallant and possible Swede Thomas Helgerson. 143 W. Broadway. 8 PM. Free. Check your royal identity at the door for the Missoula Community Theatre’s performance of Once Upon A Mattress. MCT Center for the Performing Arts. 200 N. Adams St. 8 PM. $21. Call 728-7529 or go to mctinc.org. Lifer and road dog Martin Sexton brings his years of rock and roll experience to the Wilma Theatre stage, with Adam Gontier. 8 PM. $25. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s. Grab ye olde acoustic and learn “Sundown” before you roll into Sean Kelly’s Open Mic night. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursdays to sign-up. 8:30 PM–Midnight. Read carefully: the Dead Hipster Dance Party returns to The Badlander for its 200th night of straight wildin’ out, with music starting at 9 PM. 208 Ryman St. 9 PM. $3, with $1 wells from 9 PM–midnight. Help a local dude fight the good fight during Help Punch Marc’s Cancer in the Face Benefit, a fundraiser for Missoulian Marc Doty (a wildland firefighter diagnosed with cancer), featuring sets by The Reptile Dysfunction, Birds Mile Home, Naomi Campbell’s Chicken Noodle Soup, Cybury, PD Lear and Pretty Pretty Good. The Palace. 9 PM. $5 suggested donation.

Tom Richmond, administrator and petroleum engineer for the Montana Board of Oil and Gas. Hilton Garden Inn. 3720 N. Reserve St. 8–1 PM. $80, includes booklet, lunch and a chance for college credit.

SPOTLIGHT over the top If you get to live long enough, your childhood will return to you. For me, it has in many ways: a “Dukes of Hazzard” movie, “Dallas” returning to TV, roller derby, Rambo, Rocky, Star Wars, Van Halen, the 49ers in the NFC Championship game. It seems that us Gen-Xers are becoming as obnoxiously nostalgic as our Boomer parents (without the moral high horse, thank you much). So, obviously, arm wrestling would make its return. This time, though, it isn’t a burly biker with a shaved head and anchor tattoos battling a struggling truck driver trying to win the love of his son; instead, it’s women taking their turn and, daddy, they ain’t messin’ around.

Attention all you fame-hungry frostitutes. Draught Works Brewery is hosting a Frosters Anonymous Party. Wear your summer gear and hang out on the deck and get yourself a free pint. Props are welcome, as is being rad. 915 Toole Ave. Noon–8 PM.

Photo by Chad Harder

do they get said proceeds? Easy. With bribes. This is how it works, once inside you trade money for tickets: one dollar, one ticket. The tickets can be used to bribe wrasslers to throw a match, to bribe the referee to WHAT: Garden City Lady Arm Wrestlers (GCLAW) look the other way at an opporInaugural Brawl tune moment and to bribe the WHO: DJ Collin of Ink Mathematics, post-brawl music by celebrity judges: Courtney The Chalfonts and Pillow Fort Blazon, artist extraordinaire; Josh Slotnick, PEAS Farm Director; WHEN: Tue., Jan. 31, at 7:30 PM and Bob Marshall, owner of Biga Pizza. Fans can also fill the buckWHERE: Zoo City Apparel, 139 E. Main St. ets of their favorite wrasslers with tickets just to show some HOW MUCH: $2 love. For the bravest of fans, Costello says that after the offiWe have Strawberry Pancake, aka Ellie cial brawl you can put up your tickets and chalCostello, to thank for the creation of the Garden lenge any arm wrestler to a one-on-one throwCity Lady Arm Wrestlers (GCLAW). After being down. But you won’t do it, cuz you’re skeered. part of a ladies arm wrestling league in Virginia, With music by DJ Collin from Ink Mathematics Costello decided it was high time for Missoula to and post-brawl tunes by The Chalfonts and Pillow have one of its own. She has recruited a dozen or so willing gals with sobriquets such as Gruff Fort, the Inaugural Brawl is, Costello says, “as Muffin, Sassy Squatch and Rainbow Fright to much a show as competition.” I offer this: Hands “wrassle” for a good cause. All proceeds go to down, the GCLAW Inaugural Brawl will be the Garden City Harvest, the nonprofit who works on most successful arm wrestling event of the winter. community building through agriculture. And how –Jason McMackin

Get something like lucky when Bozeman’s One Leaf Clover play some good old rock at the Union Club. 9 PM. Free. Standards galore and a pint a beer too, when the Joan Zen Jazz Quartet do the ‘Root right at the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6-8:30 PM. Free. Kick jive to Missoula’s star producers during Two Dolla Billz, a night of local electronic music made by local producers, including SAuce, MetaTron, Sounsiva, Dubuddah and Lecture. Palace. 9 PM. $5 for those 18-20/$2 for those 21 plus. Get high on the music of Northern Lights and dance,

dance the night away under them lights. Sunrise Saloon. 9 PM. Free. He’ll cure your tremors with a sweet shot of country: Russ Nasset hits up the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., for a solo set this and every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free. After living it up like they’re going down for the last few weeks, the Juveniles wrap up their month-long residency at the VFW with an album release and are joined by Cat Heaven and a reunion by ‘90s stalwarts VTO. 245 W. Main St. 10 PM. Free. (See Noise in this issue.) The Marty Friedman and Jason

Missoula Independent Page 22 January 26 – February 2, 2012

Becker’s of bluegrass show off their virtuosity at The Top Hat when The Infamous Stringdusters shred their fretboards and melt your face...off, with Nicki Bluhm and the The Gramblers. 10 PM. $18/$15 adv. Tickets available at The Top Hat and Ear Candy.

FRIDAY

27

January

The topic at the 37th Annual Economic Outlook Seminar is Montana’s New Energy Frontier: What are the Prospects? The event features

If you’ve got some active upand-comers, check out the Roots Preschool and Kindergarten Open House. The school is movement-based and focuses on music, yoga, gymnastics, experiential learning and tons of fun. 736 Cooper St. (inside Bitterroot Gymnastics). 2–4 PM. Call 728-4258. Join Joe Gilpin of Alta Planning & Design for a workshop called A Tour of Cutting Edge Bikeway Design at the Missoula City Council Chambers. 140 W. Pine St. 2–4:30 PM. Free. Practice being peaceful in a world of differences during the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center’s Intercultural Dialogue Group, a monthly meeting that aims to bring together people from various backgrounds for an afternoon of conversation and peacemaking. Every last Fri. of the month at 4:30 PM in the library of the Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call Betsy at 5433955 or email peace@jrpc.org for more info.

nightlife Bike Walk Alliance for Missoula (BWAM) holds its annual meeting at the Downtown Dance Collective, where Joe Gilpin presents What Does Bike Culture Look Like? 121 W. Main St. 5 PM. Free. RSVP at missoulabikewalk.org. Enjoy the gypsy jazz of El 3-Oh! and sip some vino at the Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery. 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 5–9 PM. Free. The 25th anniversary of the Whitefish ArtWalk kicks off at Stumptown Art Studio with a guided tour of 30 pieces dis-


played in various downtown businesses from 6–7 PM. 145 Central Ave. Free. Lizzi Juda and the Klezmer Band get the kids all wound up at Family Friendly Friday. Top Hat. 6-8 PM. Free. Turn off the TV and get your children to the Missoula Symphony Orchestra Family Concert: Spaceman Invades Symphony!, a one-hour long concert designed for kids to enjoy with their parents. University Theatre. 7 PM. $8. missoulasymphony.org. Step it out after you sweat it out with the Soul City Cowboys at the Symes Hot Springs Hotel. 7 PM. Free. The Northern Rockies Rising Tide fights for the northern Rockies, including tackling the megaload issue and so much more. Jeannette Rankin Peace Center back room. 510 S. Higgins Ave. 7–8:30 PM. Grab a BLT and give the bacon industry a boost by checking out Kill All Redneck Pricks: A Documentary Film about a Band Called KARP. Fact: Karp is boss and hella influential. Crystal Theater. 515 S. Higgins Ave. 7 and 9 PM. $7. (See Film in this issue.) Straight out of Chad but operating out of Montreal, H’Sao plays afro-pop with soaring a cappella vocals and a variety of instrumentation, too. Whitefish Theatre Co. 1 Central Ave. 7:30 PM. $27.

Help the UM School of Theatre and Dance learn how to fly (high!) at the 9th Annual American College Dance Festival Benefit Concert. Money raised at the door will allow students to attend American College Dance Festival Northwest Regional in Utah. All types of dancing in this student-run, modern production. PARTV Building, Open Space. 7:30 PM. $5 (or more, if you’ve got it) at the door. Check your royal identity at the door for the Missoula Community Theatre’s performance of Once Upon A Mattress. MCT Center for the Performing Arts. 200 N. Adams St. 8 PM. $21. Call 728-7529 or go to mctinc.org. Bring a sack of rabbits and watch the Wild Coyote Band go nuts on the Eagles Lodge stage. 2420 South Ave. W. 8 PM. Free. Get high on the music of Northern Lights and dance, dance the night away under them lights. Sunrise Saloon. 9 PM. Free. Pick up your battle axes and go forth metalheads when Walking Corpse Syndrome, Beefcurtain and Paradise in Guyana disassemble the stage at the Dark Horse. 1805 Regent. 9 PM. Free. Slap it up, flip it, rub it down cuz Chele Bandulu is bringing the reggae poison to all you all dancing bears. 9 PM. The

Badlander. 208 Ryman St. Free. Grab the tightiest, whitiest drawers you’ve got and head to the Panty Rock Drag Show, a night of drag performances and dancing, with tunes by DJ Mermaid. Palace. 9 PM. $10 for those 18-20/$5 for those 21 and up. Proceeds go to fund the UM Women’s Resources Center’s production of the Vagina Monologues. Walk the line but don’t cross it when Beyond the Pale brings music for you to spin that lass or lad by to the Union Club. 9 PM. Free. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. Wet your whistle and tap your toes to the rock and roll jammage that is MIller Creek. The Top Hat. 10 PM. $5. This is not a threat: I’ll House You with DJs Kris Moon, Mike Stolin and Hotpantz does happen at The Jolly Cork’s. 112 N. Pattee St. (Front St. entrance). 10 PM. Free.

SATURDAY

28

January

Hey ladies in the house, the Missoula Businesswoman’s Network is calling out to ya to attend its Women’s Symposium. Guest speaker Nicole Johnson discusses

Wilma Theatre Friday February 3rd Doors at 7pm • Show at 8pm

Tickets are $12 Available at:

Get yourself a hearty, midseason powder stoke! The 62nd annual installment from Warren Miller Entertainment is coming to Missoula just in time for winter’s greatest days. Narrated by Olympic Gold Medalist Jonny Moseley and shot on location on five continents. Meet Warren Miller athletes Lynsey Dyer and Andy Mahre! A portion of all proceeds, including $5 of each ticket sold at The Trail Head, go to benefit the West Central Montana Avalanche Foundation

Intermission raffle to benefit WCMAF including gear from Black Diamond, Eddie Bauer First Ascent, Lift tickets to local resorts and much more! Missoula Independent Page 23 January 26 – February 2, 2012


Locked Out 6:30 p.m. Made in Dagenham 8:10 p.m.

The Dark Side of Chocolate 6:30 p.m. Jaffa, the Orange’s Clockwork

*Co-Sponsored by UM, International Programs

8:00 p.m.

Always a bridesmaid. Martin Sexton performs a lifetime worth of country/rock/Americana at the Wilma Theatre on Thu., Jan. 26, at 8 PM. Tickets are $25 and available at Rockin Rudy’s.

how you can balance your professional and personal lives. Fee includes luncheon, workshops and access to nearly 50 vendor booths. Hilton Garden Inn, 3720 N. Reserve St. $50/$45 members. 8–5 PM. discoverMBN.com If you have compulsive-eating problems, seek help and support with others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Sat. at 9 AM in Room 3 in the basement of First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free. Visit oa.org. January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month and St. Pat’s, Community Medical Center and Partnership Health Center are offering free cervical screenings for low-

Missoula Independent Page 24 January 26 – February 2, 2012

income, uninsured women. Partnership Health Center, 323 Alder St. 9–4 PM. Free. The Heirloom Winter Market still has plenty of local numnums for you and yours, including farm-fresh eggs, butter, sausage, lavender, honey and more, more, more! Ceretana Gallery and Studios, 801 Sherwood. 10 AM–12 PM. Bring your goodies (paintings, ceramics, sculptures, antiques) by the Dana Gallery and get “Antiques Roadshowed” during the Art, Antique & Artifact Event featuring appraiser Timothy Gordon. 246 N. Higgins Ave. 10:30–2 PM. danagallery.com Get a special picture of Ansel Adams when Missoulian photo editor Kurt Wison guides a

tour of Adams’ works at the MAM. 335 N. Pattee St. 12 PM. Free. Baking is the finest profession on earth, after writer and tree surgeon, and baking is something you should know how to do. If you don’t have a clue, let Anne Little of MUD train you up on how to make dutch oven cinnamon rolls and other leavened breads during Basic Bread Making. 1–4 PM. $20/$10 members. To register call 721-7513 or email info@mudproject.org Check your royal identity at the door for the Missoula Community Theatre’s performance of Once Upon A Mattress. MCT Center for the Performing Arts. 200 N. Adams St. 2 PM and 8 PM. $21/$17


matinee. Call 728-7529 or go to mctinc.org.

nightlife John Floridis strums tunes for your dart-throwing pleasure at the Draught Works Brewery. 915 Toole Ave. 5–8 PM. Free. David Horgan and Beth Lo take you to a better place, take you to a better land when they perform at Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery. 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 5–9 PM. Free. Somebody call a doctor: Blue to the Bone plays traditional bluegrass, with high lonesome harmonies and all them classic instruments. Bitter Root Brewery, Hamilton. 6–8:30 PM. Free. Don’t be a Mrs. Grundy. Get on the trolley for the Daly Mansion fundraiser Speakeasy at Riverside. The “roaring ‘20s”-style event fea-

tures the music of The Ed Norton Stomperz, entertainment by the Hamilton Players and the gams of dancer Tony Dees. Admission includes one drink and plenty of hors d’oeuvres. Dress the part and be sure to have plenty of cabbage for betting and such. For the secret password, call April at 363-6004 ext. 3. 7 PM. $40. Forget Robert Wagner and Stefanie Powers, the Heart to Heart Duo plays tunes at the Missoula Senior Center’s Saturday Night Dance. 7–10 PM. 705 S. Higgins Ave. 543-7154. Help the UM School of Theatre and Dance learn how to fly (high!) at the 9th Annual American College Dance Festival Benefit Concert. Money raised at the door will allow students to attend

American College Dance Festival Northwest Regional in Utah. All types of dancing in this student-run, modern production. PARTV Building, Open Space. 7:30 PM. $5 (or more, if you’ve got it) at the door. Don’t you think they should do a tribute to Aerosmith at the Indoor Grizzly Marching Band Concert? A guy can dream, right? University Theatre. 7:30 PM. $11/$6 seniors/ $5 students. The Steel Toe Floes back right up into folk music like it were the olden times, at the Symes Hot Springs Hotel. 8–10 PM. Free. Swig drinks while listening to old-school rock hits, ‘80s tunes or modern indie rock songs when Dead Hipster presents Takeover!, which features “drinkin’ music” DJ’d by the Dead Hipster DJs starting at 9

PM at the Central Bar & Grill, 143 W. Broadway St. Includes drink specials and photos with Abi Halland. Free. DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo cut their sandwiches into four triangles during Absolutely, a dance party featuring every style of rump-shaking tuneage. Doors at 9 PM. 2 for 1 Absolut drinks until 11 PM. Free. See what’s under the rocks when Haunted by Waters, A Midnight Drive and Little Giants play every kind of rock in the canyon. The Palace. $5 for those 18-20/Free for those 21 and up. If the springs ain’ hot enough for ya, maybe the tuneage of the Soul City Cowboys is. Quinn’s Hot Springs. Paradise. 9 PM. Free. Good ol’ Americans Whiskey Rebellion bring some fine

music to dance by. Feel free to role-play as Alexander and Mrs. Hamilton. Union Club. 9 PM. Free. Dance the two-step and scoot your boots to the Mark Duboise Band at the Sunrise Saloon. 9:30 PM. Free. DJ Dubwise supplies dance tracks all night long so you can take advantage of Sexy Saturday and rub up against the gender of your choice at Feruqi’s. 10 PM. Free. Call 728-8799. Join the keepers of the lofty house in a metal dome of brutality when Zebulon Kosted, Throne of Lies, Bridgebuilder and Abe Cody rock the VFW. 10 PM. Free. Have a nibble of all sorts of musical flavors when the world jazz ensemble Tapas plays the Top Hat. 10 PM. Free.

Missoula Independent Page 25 January 26 – February 2, 2012


SUNDAY

29

January

After temple, join a museum staffer for the Ansel Adams Drop-In Tour at the MAM and get insider info. on the bestknown photog of all-time. 335 N. Pattee St. Noon. Go with the jam when The Rocky Mountain Grange Hall, 1436 S. First St. south of Hamilton, hosts a weekly acoustic jam session for guitarists, mandolin players and others, from 2–4 PM. Free. Call Clem at 961-4949. Family-friendly Grammy winner Bill Harley performs tunes for kids and adults alike at the University Theatre. 2 PM. Premium tickets: $21.75/ $16.75 students. Regular tickets: $16.75/$11.75 students. More than 3,000 keyboards have lost their homes this year due to natural disasters. Help them out by attending the Keyboard Society Benefit Concert. UM Music Recital Hall. 3 PM. $25 reserved/ $20 general/$10 seniors and students. There’s no football or NASCAR (thanks goodness), so check out Tom Catmull strumming guitars and singing some tunes instead at the Draught Works Brewery. 915 Toole Ave. 4–7 PM. Free.

nightlife Occupy Missoula General Assembly takes place at the Union Hall. 208 E. Main St. 5:30 PM. occupymissoula.org. Listen to some real live writers during the Second Wind Reading Series, where MFA students and teachers share their stories with the world. This week it’s Kirsi Marcus and Elizabeth Robinson. Top Hat. 5 PM. Free. Load up your belly and help educate the children during the Spiri at Play Pizza Fundraiser and Silent Auction at Biga Pizza. All the pizza and salad you can eat for $10/$5 kids. 241 W. Main St. 5–8 PM. Check your royal identity at the door for the Missoula Community Theatre’s performance of Once Upon A Mattress. MCT Center for the Performing Arts. 200 N. Adams St. 2 PM and 6:30 PM. $19/$17 matinee/$15 children evening. Call 728-7529 or go to mctinc.org. You don’t have to take our clothes off to have a good time when The Suna Quintet plays jazz at the Top Hat. Do so if you’d like, though. 7 PM. Free. Close out the weekend in style with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz & DJs, during the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with the Donna Smith Trio. Free.

MONDAY

30

January

Need to brush up on that algebra or writing course before you pay a king’s ransom to get a D in Comp 101 at the university? Sign-up for the Lifelong Learning Center’s Adult Education Program, which hosts seven weeks of college prep assistance. 310 S. Curtis. Mon.-Thu., from 8–11:30 AM. Free. Call 549-8765.

nightlife Stay in yeti-wrasslin’ form this winter by attending Clinical Herbalist Britta Bloedorn’s two-part class Herbal Medicine for Winter Wellness at the Red Willow Learning Center. 825 W. Kent St. 6–8 PM. $45 (slidingscale available). Register at redwillowlearning.org. A pre-recorded talk by Paul Cienfuegos titled We the People plays at the Missoula Public Library. The talk covers strategies for participatory democracy and rights-based organizing. Large meeting room. 7 PM. Free. Grab your pierogi and listen to the sweet soothing tunes of Beth Lo and David Horgan at the Red Bird Wine Bar. 7–10 PM. Free. Be a good kitty and don’t scratch the records at

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31

January

Put up the hogs, comb MeeMaw’s hair and head down to the Flathead Brewing Co. for a snort of bluegrass from Pinegrass. 424 N. Higgins Ave. 8 PM. Free. Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room and work on your elk camp locution at the Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters. All are invited. 12–1. 5205 Grant Creek Dr. Free. Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 115 S. 3rd St. W. 1-3 PM. For information call 543-3955. Think of all the demons you’ll be releasing from your flesh

nightlife Aim your sights on the 8 ball when the Palace hosts a weekly 9 ball tournament, which is double elimination and starts with sign up at 6 PM, followed by games at 7. $10 entry fee. You saw House Party, but you still can’t do the Kid ‘N Play. Do something about it by taking the Downtown Dance Collective’s Beg./Int. Hip Hop dance class with Heidi Michaelson. 1221 W. Main St. 6–7 PM. ddcmontana.com The VFW hosts my kind of three-way during a night of Singers, Songwriters and Spaghetti, with food provided by the Blue Bison Grill. 6 PM. Free. The Bitter Root Public Library offers up the always popular, never out of style origami crane folding class. 306 State St. Hamilton. 6 PM. To sign-up, call 363-1670. YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts YWCA Support Groups for women every Tue. from 6:30–8 PM. An American Indian-led talking circle is also available, along with age-appropriate children’s groups. Free. Call 543-6691. The UM Wilderness Institute brings scholars, writers, scien-

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Missoula Independent Page 26 January 26 – February 2, 2012

TUESDAY

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Milkcrate Monday’s Vinyl Night, with the Milkcrate Mechanic and DJs Geeter, Aaron Bolton and Kodel, starting at 9 PM. Free, with free pool and $6 pitchers of PBR. Open Mic at the VFW seems like a fine idea, especially with 2 for 1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. Call Skye on Sunday at 531–4312 to reserve your spot in the lineup or I bet you could roll in and be all, “Dude, I do a perfect Sublime.”

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tists and explorers together to share stories of how water shapes our lives, landscapes and politics in the Wild Waters in the West Lecture Series. This week, Joseph Hovenkotter, staff attorney for Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, gives a lecture titled Indian Trial Interests and Activities Relating to Western Waters. Gallagher Business Building Rm. 122. 7 PM. Free. Take a load off while you get a load of some of the area’s better musicians during the Musician Showcase at Brooks and Browns in the Holiday Inn-Downtown. $7 Big Sky pitchers and $2 pints. 200 S. Pattee St. Free. You won’t get a concussion when you listen to Bob Ledbetter play percussion at the UM School of Music Faculty and Guest Artist Concert. Music Recital Hall. 7:30 PM. $12/$8 seniors and students. Winner takes it all, losers takes the fall at the Garden City Lady Arm Wrestlers inaugu-

ral brawl. Ladies wrassle arms for charity, with all proceeds going to Garden City Harvest. Music by DJ Colin of Ink Mathemetics. Zoo City Apparel. 139 E. Main St. 7:30–11:30 PM. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? What’s the Hungarian word for pepper? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.) Hey-a giggle piggies, snort your way over to Comedy Night at the Lucky Strike Casino and Bar for laughs and such. 1515 Dearborn Ave. 8 PM. $5. The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. Get a sack to holler into when Black Mountain Moan plays

the hill country blues at the Badlander’s Live and Local Night. Openers TBA. Music at 10 PM. Free. Bow down to the sounds at Royal Reggae, featuring dancehall jams by DJs Supa, Smiley Banton and Oneness at the Palace at 9 PM. Free. Keep your mouth closed and breathe through your nose when the Mountain Breathers play original and covers of folk tunes and the like at The Top Hat. 10 PM. Cover TBA.

WEDNESDAY

01

February

The YWCA hosts a Community Sexual Assault Dialogue for Women. The event focuses on women and their experiences. 1130 W. Broadway Ave. 6–8 PM. For more info., call Melissa at 543-6691. The YWCA seeks volunteers for their GUTS (Girls Using Their Strengths!) program. Volunteers work with girls from

Missoula Independent Page 27 January 26 – February 2, 2012


elementary through high school and help develop them into leaders and good eggs. Applications due by Feb.1. Go to ywcaofmissoula.org.

nightlife Let them dance, or at least give it a try, during Kids’ Hip Hop (7-10 years old) at the Downtown Dance Collective. No dance experience is necessary and drop-ins are welcome. Just wear good clothes for dancing. 121 W. Main St. 5–6 PM. ddcmontana.com Artists of all levels are invited to the MAM’s non-instructed Open Figure Drawing Class. This class gives artists the opportunity to draw from a for-real person. Ages 18 plus (you and the model). 335 N. Pattee St. 6–8 PM. $7/$5 members. Learn the basics at Matthew Marsolek’s Beginning Hand Drum Class and show your older brother you deserve to be in his Santana tribute band, Abraxas. The course takes place over five weeks and is $55 or $12 per class. 515 W. Front St. (Old Western MT Family Clinic Building). To register, email matthew@drumbrothers.com or call 531-8109. Black Eyed Peas fanatics are welcome to belt out their fave jamz at the Badlander during Kraptastic Karaoke, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $5 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free. Love and Light drops Canadian electronic bombs on the dancing peoples at The Top Hat. 10 PM. Cover TBA. Trivia answer: Paprika.

THURSDAY February

02

Those wishing to advocate for women and children, check out the YWCA’s volunteer orientation. After the orien-

Peas! The Missoula Community Theatre presents the musical comedy Once Upon A Mattress, based on the fairytale “The Princess and the Pea.” Thu. and Fri. Jan. 26 and 27, at 8 PM. Sat., Jan. 28, at 2 PM and 8 PM. Sun., Jan. 29, at 2 PM and 6:30 PM. Tickets are $15 to $21. Call 728-7529 or go to mctinc.org.

tation, a 45-hour training plan begins on Sat., Feb. 25. To attend, email Rebecca at rpettit@ywcaofmissoula.org.

nightlife Celebrate the grand opening of Homeword’s award-winning Solstice Building. Bring something for the Missoula Food Bank. 1535 Liberty Lane. 5–7 PM. Set the pie on the windowsill, Aunt Betty, and cool your heels at the Draught Works Brewery while Joan Zen sings and plays into the night. 915 Toole Ave. 5–8 PM. Free. See them zippers fly at Sew Lounge, hosted by Selvidge Studio. Folks can

Missoula Independent Page 28 January 26 – February 2, 2012

mingle, mend and sew while using Selvidge’s sewing machines and sergers. Get assistance from the staff, too. 509 S. Higgins Ave. 6–8 PM. $10 per hour. Bring your miscellany of talents down the ‘Root for the The Roxy Open Mic Night. Anything goes: comedy, juggling, music and prescient children rapping about the streets. Hamilton. 120 N. 2nd. 7 PM. $5. Learn more (something?) about artist Fra Dana during art history and criticism professor Dr. Valerie Hedquist’s lecture The Fra Dana Legacy. PARTV Building, Masquer Theatre. 7 PM. Free. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big

Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn-Downtown. 7–10 PM. Fans of grammar, logic and rhetoric, grab your liberal arts degrees and head down to the Central Bar and Grill’s Trivia Night, hosted by local gallant and possible Swede Thomas Helgerson. 143 W. Broadway. 8 PM. Free. Grab ye olde acoustic and learn “Sundown” before you roll into Sean Kelly’s Open Mic night. Call 5421471 after 10 AM Thursdays to sign-up. 8:30 PM–Midnight. Throw off those inhibitions and put in your ear plugs, because Party Trained rocks the Sunrise Saloon. 1101 Strand Ave. 9 PM. Free. Pass the bar exam and crunk it up at the Dead Hipster Dance Party, where people will start calling you Dwight Schrute with the way that you eat beets. The Badlander. 208 Ryman St. $3, with $1 well drinks from 9–Midnight. Do your bit about how white people drive at Missoula Homegrown Stand-Up Comedy Open Mic at the Union Club. Sign-up to participate. Free. The Best Westerns begin their monthlong residency at the VFW, with Mahatmama Gandi, Vera and Velcro Kicks (cassette release). 10 PM. Free. To coin a phrase, music means a lot to me, like love I make it when I can. Roster McCabe is gonna make a lot of love when they bring their high-energy style to The Top Hat, with More Than Lights. 10 PM. $5. Get it together and become a frostitute this week. Be a real American hero! Or just be internet famous. Send your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Jan. 27 to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to The Calemandar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff to me online. at missoulanews.com.


MOUNTAIN HIGH W ords are significant things. They are alive. They grow and change as they age. They have personality and history. Words can mislead and misdirect. You know this if you’ve been to Plentywood, Mont. There is no wood there. None. Unless you count broken down cottonwood trees and knotted shelterbelts, which are more weed-like than tree-like. The Turtle Mountains in North Dakota remind one of a turtle, but share little in common with mountains (the nearby College of Forestry seems like a stretch, as well). But imagine trying to change the names of these places. It would be an impossible task. Let’s call Plentywood “Kindahillyfortheareaanddecentinthefallwhenitspheasanthuntingseasonland.” Let’s call the Turtle M o u n t a i n s t h e “ Tu r t l e H i l l s .” W a t c h a s the saddened vacation home owners from Fargo find out their houses are worth half as much as they paid for them. Words, too, tell our story. Particularly words on maps. Jack Puckett plans to tell that part of the story

at the Discover History Through Storytelling program at Traveler’s Rest State Park. His talk, Origin of Place Names Given by Lewis & Clark, explains the place names the duo gave to various geographic features from the Yellowstone River, up Lolo Pass and down into the Lochsa side of the world in Idaho. With 32 years of experience as a USFS Ranger in western Montana and Northern Idaho, Puckett is uniquely qualified to share his knowledge. —Jason McMackin

The Discover History Through Storytelling program Origin of Place Names Given by Lewis and Clark, is led by Jack Puckett, retired USFS Ranger, on Sat., Jan. 28 at 11 AM and lasts until noon. The program takes place at Traveler’s Rest State Park, one-half mile west of Lolo on Hwy. 12. $4/Free to those 18 and under. For more info., go to travelersrest.org or call Vivica at 542-5518.

Photo by Chad Harder

THURSDAY JANUARY 26 Just in time to really gnarmageddon it, the Montana Backcountry Alliance and Montana Wilderness Association host the shreddy-shreddy Backcountry Ski Film Festival to get your stoke on. Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. 7 PM. $10. You’ll be climbing up a wall at Freestone Climbing Center’s Ladies Night each Thursday. 935 Toole Ave. 5–10 PM. $6.50/$5 students.

FRIDAY JANUARY 27 Hey little archers and aspiring archers, Bowhunter Certification Courses will be held Sat., Jan. 23, and Sat., Feb. 11, from 8:30 AM–5:30 PM. The field course for both will be Sun., Feb. 12, from 1–4 PM. 3201 Spurgin Rd. Register by following the education links at fwp.mt.gov. Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s (formerly the Flathead Valley Over the Hill Gang) weekly meeting to talk about being awesome, past glories and upcoming activities. Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free.

SATURDAY JANUARY 28 Join the Critterman, Denny Olson, at the Winter Birds of Prey course offered by the Glacier Institute. After meeting at FVCC, the group will seek out raptors, owls and then some. $65. Call for more info. 755-1211. I suppose everybody’s heard about the birds that are here for the winter, but if you’d like to see them, too, join the Flathead Audubon Society Lower Valley Field Trip, where snowy owls, raptors and other birds are here to be heard and seen. Meet at the Somers Park ‘n’ Ride at 8 AM. Call Bob evenings to sign-up: 837-4467. Shake off the icicles and jog off them beers and cheese logs during the Frost Fever 5K Run/Walk. The run begins at McCormick Park and cruises the Clark Fork. Register sooner than later to avoid the late fees. Race time 10 AM. missoulaparks.org. Do it like the wapiti do and join the Montana Wilderness Association on a Winter Wilderness Walk called Elk in Winter. The walk begins at the

Rattlesnake Trailhead and explores the elks’ winter range. Three miles long but conditions could require a bit of effort due to snow conditions. Call Bert to reserve your spot: 542-7645. Head up to Seeley and learn about the benefits of forest reforestation during Montana Wilderness Association’s Winter Wilderness Walk at Colt Summit. Hikers walk Colt Creek Rd., which will soon be removed to benefit Bull Trout. The hike is considered easy to moderate. Meet at Rovero’s Gas Station/Ace Hardware in Seeley Lake. 10 AM. Free. Call Gabriel to reserve your spot: 541-8615. Found out what a lolo is when retired USFS Ranger Jack Puckett tells us the Origin of Place Names Given By Lewis and Clark at Traveler’s Rest State Park. 1/2 mile west of Lolo on Hwy. 12. 11–12 PM. $4/Kids free. Lone Pine State Park’s Kid’s Snow Stomper Program called Making the Journey describes the hows and whys of animal migration to kids ages 4–7. Did I mention they get to make an elk, too? Sweet. 300 Lone Pine Rd. Kalispell. 11–12 PM. $3. Join a ranger from Lone Pine State Park in Kalispell for a Winter Discovery Snow Shoe Hike. BYOSS or rent a set from the park for $5. Familes with kids 10 and up welcome. 1–2 PM. Call Mary Beth at 7552706 ext. 2.

MONDAY JANUARY 30 At Slacker Mondays, from 6 PM until close, slackline fans can come to Freestone Climbing Center at 935 Toole Ave. to test their balance. $13/$10 for students. Visit freestoneclimbing.com.

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 2 The folks at the Montana Natural History Center teach the young ‘uns how to observe and connect with nature at the miniNaturalists Pre-K Program, for ages 2–5. 120 Hickory St. 10–11 AM. $3/$1 members. You’ll be climbing up a wall at Freestone Climbing Center’s Ladies Night each Thursday. 935 Toole Ave. 5–10 PM. $6.50/$5 students. calendar@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent Page 29 January 26 – February 2, 2012


scope

Funny ha-ha From setup to punchline at Homegrown Comedy by Keema Waterfield

Contrary to popular belief, Homegrown Comedy is not a new strain of sativa, though local comedians all agree it’s twice as addictive as a bowl of Purple Diesel and three times more fun. In November, I attended Missoula’s Homegrown Stand-Up Comedy Open Mic for the first time, to find out for myself what those jokesters were all about. The Union Club was packed that night, with comedians, their friends, people like me just along for the ride and random bar patrons all making up separate audiences. In the bathroom, at the bar, on the sidewalk, at your table, everywhere you turned, people were talking about comedy: critiquing performers, comparing favorite comedians, remembering jokes, everyone talking until it got so you could barely hear the comics on stage. I grew up on stage, singing and performing, but I’d never seen an open mic audience like that one. It made me want to be part of the show, not part of the crowd. Except (according to one guy I dated) I wasn’t blessed with a funny bone at birth. My friend Stephanie Dyer-Luck once had me knock-kneed and

Ten years ago, I learned to rock climb because I hated being afraid of heights. After I figured out what Homegrown Comedy was all about, I wanted to try standup for the same reason: I hated living in fear of my awkward sense of humor, because it kept me from learning how to be funny. If not for John Howard, a comedian and the man behind Homegrown Comedy, I’d never have realized that what makes stand-up different from being funny is that you don’t have to be a natural comedian or, in my case, funny at all. Most comics plan their show, using jokes they’ve thoughtfully crafted and revised over time, then memorized like a monologue. It turns out that, given enough time, anyone can write comedy. Howard is a big guy with a wandering eye and stage presence oozing out of every sweaty pore. You couldn’t find a funnier, friendlier, more inspiring comedy coach than John. His open mic differs from others in that he hosts two rehearsals a month at his house for comedians to run through their bits and offer improvement, like Nat Danger’s suggestion: “Tighten up the line about homeless drunks in Alaska losing limbs as fast as strippers

doubled over with a story about a half rotten moose leg and a slowspeed escape on Alaska’s Seward Highway. I’ve always wanted to do that, bowl people over with my wit and charm. I tried, until my teenage stepdaughter, Ella, got in the habit of saying, “Yep, that’s my humor-challenged Keema,” whenever my poorlytimed and awkward runaway stories caught people off guard.

l o s e c l o t h e s . ” O r, M a t h e w Kettlehake: “Don’t forget to pause for laughter, dork.” (He didn’t say “dork,” that’s just how I heard it.) Only five people showed up at the first rehearsal, two weeks before the December 1 gig, and twice as many the second week. Besides me, only David Dupuis was new to the group, having just arrived in Missoula six weeks earlier from a summer job at Yellowstone. I would be the second female to take the stage in seven months. “I still don’t know how to write a joke,” I confessed at each rehearsal. I could wrap my mind around “a bit” more

Missoula Independent Page 30 January 26 – February 2, 2012

easily than a single joke, a distinction I struggled with. Beau Newell, one of the few comedians to perform at open mic every month, illustrated the difference between them thus: “A story about how I have to explain the puke on the front of my new shirt to my girlfriend equals a bit. I had a drug test come back negative. Cool, but now I have to find a new dealer equals joke.” When I first met Howard, I asked him how to fill five minutes with jokes. He broke it down like this: Start with a random crazy story, follow up with a few things you hate, maybe throw in another random crazy story and then wrap it up with a “call back,” some humorous refrain that returns to your opening joke. “Look for a story arc,” he insisted. “Make your jokes build on each other.” After that? “Just like acting, you rehearse your lines,” Howard said. “Out loud. In front of a mirror. All the time.” And if your roommate thinks maybe you’re having a nervous breakdown in your bedroom? Move to the living room and practice in front of him. “That’s the only way to find out if a joke works. If your roommate doesn’t laugh, you drown that dead baby.” Dead babies are jokes that fail to thrive, and I drowned two pages of them. I probably should have drowned another page rather than trying to fill the whole five minutes, but I didn’t. And I had a tough act to follow: Cody Smith, a very funny comedian who’d risen in the ranks from total newbie to headliner in six months. When it came time to face the audience, I swallowed the bile in the back of my mouth, packed the fear away in a little corner of my brain and tried to summon my inner comedian. But I don’t know what an inner comedian feels like, so I settled for just running through my lines as I’d memorized them. I told jokes about fat Alaskan alcoholics (ubiquitous) and homelessness (unpleasant). I made fun of my height (short), Alaskans who talk too much about being Alaskan (me) and my cat (who suffers from both species confusion and an oedipal complex, in that he thinks his mother is a dog), then I wrapped it all up by returning to crazy Alaskans. Probably the crowd was feeling generous, but people actually laughed for three full minutes, which is my new all-time record. Afterward, Howard pounded me on the arm Illustration by Jonathan Marquis and said, “You’ll be back, I think.” Maybe I will. I see now what makes comedy addictive: one laugh isn’t enough. When my five minutes were up, I didn’t want to quit: I wanted to keep going until there were no straight faces left in the crowd. Homegrown Comedy kicks off at the Union Club Thursday, Feb. 2, at 10 PM and continues the first Thursday of each month. Free. arts@missoulanews.com


Scope Noise Theater Film Movie Shorts

Juveniles Take One Self-released

A summer or three ago, I happened upon one of the Juveniles’ initial shows at The Badlander. The crowd was sparse. Things were not going well. “Mistakes were made.” I distinctly remember guitarist Dave Parsons asking for the audience to stop clapping. That said, the band’s latest incarnation performs with verve and vigor. The sound is pure ’80s four-on-thefloor punk rockitude and the hooks they are a-plenty. The album is a live affair. Misplaced notes appear here and there, alongside squeaks, pops and vocals that are on the verge of busting a gullet. The first track, “Hedge Your Bets,” is all you need to hear before you decide whether to go further. A big sloppy openmouth kiss from a dirty bass introduces the tune, and

Cat Heaven The Litterbox Sessions Self-released

The newest project featuring Tyson Ballew does sloppy pop punk just right. Cat Heaven’s jangly hooks seem to fall apart momentarily, then recollect themselves. On The Litterbox Sessions, minor chord-driven songs never come off too bossy or self-serious. As usual, Ballew’s lyrics are a good balance between spitting personal/social commentary and sweet imagery. In one line, he gives us a scene: the seaside, a sky of gliding light and shots of whiskey. In “Our

Sandrider Sandrider Good To Die Records

I’ll never forget that moment at Total Fest a few years back. I was just breezin’ by the second stage in The Palace to get a PBR when I was stopped dead in my tracks by Seattle’s Sandrider, who were splitting minds and rocking so hard that it makes me dizzy just thinking about it. Finally, their debut goods are delivered in seven solid epic tunes that will be wedged somewhere in this new explosive metal/punk/prog/whatever spectrum (Kylesa, Red Fang, etc). Rather than exclusively lean too heavily on those genres, Sandrider raise the flag toward that late’80s damp tube-amp basement vibe, when scuzzysounding color vinyl singles were sent to your mail-

the drums start driving like a pumping pogo stick. Breathlessly slung back and forth, the song is nearly all chorus, sounding like a tantrum. The highlights arrive on the album’s final three originals, as legitimate adult anger and frustration erupt in “My Damnation” and “Your Rebellion,” while “Manscape!” provides a bit of comic relief (who hasn’t shaved a Flying V into their back hair?). The sound is traditionally agro punk, all raw, but it cooks. (Jason McMackin) Juveniles wrap-up their month-long residency at the VFW on Thu., Jan. 26, at 10 PM with a re-united VTO and Cat Heaven. Free.

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Last Days (In the Netherlands)” he pinpoints a whole storyline in just the line, “I cried out for you. What a dumb thing to do.” On two tracks, Ethan J. Uhl sings in the raucous, heartfelt yelling style of Brian Whitson and the Night Wolves or Blake Schwarzenbach of Jawbreaker. Uhl wrote the glittery fist-pumping anthem “Scouts Honor” and he sings on closing gem “(Fuckin’ Up) In Montana,” which Ballew wrote. “Manifest Destiny” is the weakest track. Overly obvious themes and a dragging chorus set it apart from the otherwise spontaneous sounding album. “Dictator Rock” is much fresher, wrapping humor and societal jabs into one package. And I love weird shout-outs like “Sometimes I really miss Matt, Brent, Tom and Dan.” It doesn’t matter if you don’t know who they are, you miss old friends, too. (Erika Fredrickson) Cat Heaven plays at the VFW Thursday, Jan. 26, at 10 PM with the Juveniles and VTO. Free.

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box and gigs were a $3 cover charge with beer included. Songs like “The Corpse” could’ve easily appeared on the Sub Pop 200 comp and “The Judge” could be on the first few rounds of the Dope, Guns Am-Rep compilations. You’ll be skating your ass off to “Scatter,” the LP’s brain-melter. The riffs are uncomplicated and steady, always picking up steam and digging up Jesus Lizard, Pink Fairies and KARP in one short wheezing breath. Hook up your crappy speakers for a listen. Everything I’ve said so far is understatement. (Bryan Ramirez)

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Missoula Independent Page 31 January 26 – February 2, 2012


Scope Noise Theater Film Movie Shorts

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UM’s Doubt deserves more tension

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Missoula Independent Page 32 January 26 – February 2, 2012

In the opening scene of Doubt, Father Brendan Flynn delivers a sermon with such confidence and zeal that we immediately like him—quite the accomplishment given the uneasy undercurrent of the sermon’s subject. In the realm of religion, uncertainty and crises of faith can come off as weakness, but Flynn is the kind of reassuring charismatic character that can put his flock at ease. “Doubt can be a bond as powerful and sustaining as certainty,” he says from the pulpit. “What do you do when you’re not sure?” From the sermon onward, the issue of doubt surfaces in surprising and dark ways. The Montana

We can trace the problems to that aforementioned first scene—the sermon delivered with such energy by Shanahan, who looks like a young Robert De Niro. Our hopes are raised and we expect the rest of the play to sustain that same emotional punch. Instead, we get a performance that occasionally goes for—or accidentally achieves—laughs in the strangest of places. Given this is a play about suspicions of child sexual abuse, that makes for some really uncomfortable moments. Take the scene where Sister Aloysius talks to the younger nun about her suspicions. It’s a good scene, but like others it suffers from glibly delivered lines by Hunt, who plays up the old shrew angle more than necessary. Her reproachful words to Sister James should make us cringe with their seriousness—after all, she’s playing a dangerous game with her convictions and the Father’s career and life. Instead, it’s almost sitcom-esque, where we and the younger nun are in on the joke that the older nun is just a batty lady at whom we should laugh and roll our eyes. As the young, innocent nun, UM student McRae maintains a fresh and earnest energy central to the character throughout the show. She’s the only one of the cast members who never stumbled over a line during the opening night performMontana Rep’s Doubt stars Brendan Shanahan, Caitlin ance I attended. But her responses McRae and Suzy Hunt. to the sister’s suspicions are more Repertory Theatre’s rendition of John Patrick Shanley’s often played in a rapid and flustered manner, which Pulitizer- and Tony-award winning parable tackles that doesn’t help in building the suspense surrounding the story head on—with varying degrees of success—in a ultimate decision about the Father’s guilt. four-person, one-act production, directed by Greg As that targeted priest, Shanahan is consistent Johnson, about the collateral damage that can accom- throughout, though he’s at his best in the two scenes pany both sides of an accusation. when he’s on stage by himself. He has an easy and The suspicions here are harbored by Sister friendly rapport with the audience, but because he Aloysius Beauvier (Suzy Hunt), the stern principal of St. could also be guilty, his presence is equally creepy Nicholas Catholic School in the Bronx, circa 1964, who and disturbing. is so old-fashioned that she rails more than once about Likewise, Sarina Hart is memorable in her one the use of ballpoint pens. We learn early on in a meet- scene as Mrs. Muller, called into the school by Sister ing with the young and naïve eighth grade teacher Aloysius to discuss her troubled son’s situation. We feel Sister James (Caitlin McRae) that Sister Aloysius is con- her desperation as a mother who seems willing to overcerned about the welfare of Donald Muller, one of look the abuse of her son so as long as it means he will Sister James’s students. graduate in the spring. Though she’s not specific, it’s evident the concerns The set is well-constructed but spare, successfully regard interactions between Father Flynn (Brendan allowing the focus to be on the dialogue. A few clever Shanahan) and Muller, who happens to be the school’s props and background window projections provide first African-American student. Aloysius is fishing for quick and unobtrusive changes of location. The scene confirmation of those suspicions in her discussion with moves several times from an office to a garden with ease. the younger nun, who is reluctant to say too much for UM’s Doubt is entertaining. It just too often fails to fear of falsely incriminating the affable priest. maintain the anxiety and tension it should. That slow Everyone here is in a bad spot, including of course loss of emotion results in a particularly impotent closFather Flynn, who reacts defiantly when confronted by ing scene that left me wishing for more. the older nun. Sister James awkwardly observes the Montana Rep’s Doubt continues at the meeting, unsure of who to believe. Montana Theatre in the PARTV Center Thu., Jan. There’s a lot to like here. The Montana Rep’s inter- 26–Sat., Jan. 28; Tue., Jan. 31–Thu., Feb. 2, and pretation is more focused and engaging than the 2008 Sat., Feb. 4, nightly at 7:30 PM, plus a Sat., Jan. 28, film adaptation of Doubt starring Meryl Streep and matinee at 2 PM. $20 Go to montanarep.org or call Philip Seymour Hoffman, but there’s also a curious 243-4581. incongruity that disrupts the tone and fails to provide the level of intensity this fascinating story deserves. arts@missoulanews.com


Scope Noise Theater

Film Movie Shorts

KARP lives! Doc pays tribute to a beloved band by PJ Rogalski

Initially K.A.R.P (Kill All Redneck Pricks) was a photocopied newsletter scattered throughout the hallways of Tumwater High in Washington. Written by students Chris Smith, Jarred Warren and Scott Jernigan, it railed against the ignorance and bigotry they perceived in their classmates. From those three high school misfits sprang the band KARP. And unlike most outcroppings of teen angst, these guys possessed musical chemistry and developed underground notoriety that most bands never achieve.

There’s more to our care than you might think. shine down on the band, dark clouds began to gather. Guitarist Chris Smith was battling serious addiction and depression, the extent of which was unknown to his bandmates and childhood friends. The jokes stopped and the band withered under the duress. When Badgley started the filming process a few years ago, he was warned that he probably wouldn’t be able to track down Smith; he’d been MIA from music scenes since KARP had disbanded. Smith spent the following years on the streets, in rehab facilities

and, eventually, in prison. Badgley did find him, though, and the subsequent interviews offer an honest look at a talented, funny man who spent some serious time battling demons. It’s sad beyond comprehension that Jernigan is missing from the film. He died in a boating accident in Seattle in 2003, leaving a giant hole in a community that remembers him—via film interviews—as a funny, kind, talented man, and as a monster behind the drum kit. At the time of his death, Jernigan had joined forces with Jarred Warren once again to form the nucleus of The Whip, which was a beautiful if fleeting beast of a band. Warren, current bass player in the Melvins and Big Business, might just be one of the most genuinely likeable individuals in rock n’ roll and is an unstoppable bass-playing machine. In the film, Warren seems downright grounded. The wounds of the past obviously wear heavily, but he has carried on, flying the same flag he did when he played through an old karaoke machine in the early days of KARP. This is a film made about, and by, people who have spent a lot of time and energy supporting a grassroots rock ’n’ roll movement. It’s for fans of music and fans of art—for people who make music because they see no other way. Kill All Redneck Pricks screens at the Crystal Theatre Friday, Jan. 27, at 7 PM and again at 9 PM. $7. arts@missoulanews.com

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Legions of KARP fans started pumping their virtual fists when word spread via the internet that a documentary on the band was in the works. Director Bill Badgley, of the band Federation X (which has played many times in Missoula), asked that any live footage floating around be submitted for possible use. The call was answered and the result is Kill All Redneck Pricks, which draws from 20 hours of live footage and 150 hours of interviews with people close to the band. A lot of questions were left unanswered when the band effectively dissolved in 1998, and this film provides some answers—although maybe not the ones you’d hoped for. Those lucky enough to witness KARP bludgeon its audience with an aural sledgehammer realized that they were a part of something special. For the bulk of the ’90s, the cult of KARP continued to gain ground nationwide. Their records kept getting better and they weren’t afraid of packing up the van and taking their ruckus on the road, amassing fans as they chugged through basements and bars. They were a focal point of the vital Olympia music scene that had served as the stomping ground for predecessors and contemporaries like Bikini Kill, Beat Happening and Unwound. In one interview, Adam Shea, friend of the band, pretty well sums it up: “They were the perfect embodiment of what you’d want three frustrated, nerdy teenage boys to be doing.” There was something incredibly pure about KARP. It seemed as though big things were on the horizon for them. But just as the sunshine of success started to

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Missoula Independent Page 33 January 26 – February 2, 2012


Scope Noise Theater Film Movie Shorts OPENING THIS WEEK THE ARTIST Will talking pictures end silent film star George Valentin’s career? Will he find love with a young dancer? It seems black-and-white to me. Starring Jean Dujardin and Bérénice Bejo. Wilma: 7 and 9 pm, with matinees at 1 and 3 pm on Sat. and Sun. No evening show on Sun., Jan. 29. Stadium 14: 12:05, 2:30, 4:50, 7:05 and 9:30 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. 1:40, 4:10, 7:05 and 9:25, Mon.-Thu. THE GREY Wolves hunt Liam Neeson in Alaska after his plane goes down. Wolves, you just messed up. Village 6: 4:30 and 7:30 pm, with 10 pm shows on Fri. and Sat, and matinees at 1:30 PM on Sat. and Sun. Pharaohplex: 6:50 and 9:10 pm, with 3 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Stadium 14: 1:15, 4:15,

past. Will they or won’t they? Also starring Jason O’Mara. Carmike 12: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 and 9:45 pm. Pharaohplex: 7 and 9 pm, with matinees Sat. and Sun at 3 pm. Stadium 14: 12:10, 2:20, 4:40, 7:10 and 9:40, with midnight shows Fri. and Sat. 1:45, 4:15, 7:10 and 9:40 pm, Mon.-Thu

NOW PLAYING BEAUTY AND THE BEAST 3D A pretty girl is held captive by a beast. Disney teaches young women how to choose a mate. We all win. Updated to 3D. Voices by Robby Benson and Paige O’Hara. Carmike 12: 1:15 pm. 3D: 4, 6:30 and 8:30 pm. Stadium 14: 12, 2:10, 4:30, 7 and 9:15 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. 1:20, 4:10 and 7 pm, Mon.-Thu. CONTRABAND A former smuggler has to do one more job to res-

12: 1, 4:15, 7:15 and 10 pm. Pharaohplex: 6:50 and 9:10 pm, with 3 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Stadium 14: 12:55, 3:55, 6:55 and 9:45 pm. 1:10, 4:20 and 7:45 pm, Mon.-Thu. THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO (U.S.) Based on Stieg Larsson’s book, a journalist gets some help finding a person from a spooky lady. Stars Daniel Craig and Rooney Mara. Village 6: 4:15 and 7:30 pm, with matinees at 1 pm on Fri. and Sat. Stadium 14: 9 pm. Showboat: 4 and 6:50 pm, with 9:40 pm shows on Fri. and Sat. HAYWIRE Oh no you didn’t! A lady black ops soldier is wronged and certainly gets revenge. Starring former MMA fighter Gina Carano, Ewan MacGregor and Michael Fassbender (and his penis). Village 6: 4 and 7 pm, with shows at 9:30 pm on Fri. and

MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE GHOST PROTOCOL Ethan Hunt and his crew are forced to go rogue, y’all. Told you not to bomb the Kremlin. Starring Tom Cruise and Paula Patton. Stadium 14: 12:35 and 6:35 pm, with midnight shows Fri. and Sat. 1:10 and 6:40 pm, Mon.-Thu. Showboat: 4:15, 7 and 9:20 pm. RED TAILS The Tuskegee Airman are called to duty, so you Nazi punks best watch your six. Starring Terence Howard and Cuba Gooding Jr. (he’s back!). Carmike 12: 1, 4, 7 and 9:50 pm. Village 6: 4 and 7 pm, with shows at 10 pm on Fri. and Sat. and 1 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Pharaohplex: 6:50 and 9:10 pm, with 3 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Stadium 14: 1, 4, 6:45 and 9:30 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. 1:05, 3:50. 6:50 and 9:30 pm, Mon.-Thu. SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF SHADOWS Perhaps Mr. Holmes and Dr. Watson will match wits with Professor Moriarty once again. Indubitably. Starring Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law. Carmike 12: 1, 4, 7, and 9:50 pm. Stadium 14: 1:05, 6:45 and 9:35 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY One last mission. Retired spy George Smiley returns to duty and looks to foil a Soviet Cold War plot, in this film based on John le Carré’s book. Starring Gary Oldman and Colin Firth. Wilma Theatre: 7 and 9:15 pm, matinees Sat. and Sun. at 1 and 3:15 pm. No evening show Sun., Jan. 29. UNDERWORLD: AWAKENING Humans battle lycans and vampires. There will be no making out in trees during this one. Starring Kate Beckinsale and Michael Ealy. Carmike 12: 3D: 1, 1:30, 4, 4:45, 7, 7:30, 9:30 and 9:50 pm. Village 6: 4:30 and 7:30 pm nightly, with 9:30 pm shows on Fri. and Sat. and 1:30 matinees on Sat. and Sun. Pharaohplex: 7 and 9 pm, with matinees Sat. and Sun at 3 pm. Stadium 14: 3D: 12:05, 2:15, 4:35, 7:20 and 9:50, with midnight shows Fri. and Sat. 1:25. 4:15, 7:05 and 9:20 pm, Mon.-Thu. Entertainer: 4, 7 and 9 pm. Mountain: 2:15, 4:30, 7 and 9 pm.

Always bring a knife to a wolf fight. The Grey opens Friday at the Village 6, Pharaohplex, Stadium 14 and Mountain Cinema.

7:15 and 9:45 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. Mountain: 2, 4:15, 6:50 and 9:15 PM. THE IRON LADY Meryl Streep guns for Oscar gold as Britain’s Iron Lady, Margaret Thatcher. Also starring Jim Broadbent and Richard E. Grant. Stadium 14: 1:10, 4:10, 7:10 and 9:40 pm, with midnight shows Fri. and Sat. 1:10, 4:10, 7:10 and 9:30 pm, Mon.-Thu. MAN ON A LEDGE A man is being talked off a ledge by police while a huge jewelry heist goes on nearby. Someone’s getting fired. Starring Elizabeth Banks and Sam Worthington. Carmike 12: Big D: 1:30, 4:30, 7 and 9:30 pm. Pharaohplex: 7 and 9 pm, with matinees Sat. and Sun at 3 pm. Mountain: 2, 4:15, 6:50 and 9:15 PM. ONE FOR THE MONEY A newly unemployed and divorced Katherine Heigl gets a job at her cousin’s bail bond business and finds herself hunting a cop from her romantic

cue his drug dealer bro-in-law from some bigger drug dealer, so on and so forth. Starring Mark Wahlberg and Kate Beckinsale. Carmike12: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 and 10 pm. Village 6: 7 pm, with shows at 9:50 pm on Fri. and Sat. Stadium 14: 1, 4, 7, and 9:45 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. Mon.-Thu.: 1:10, 4:10, 7:10 and 9:45 pm.

Sat. and 1:15 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Stadium 14: 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7:15 and 9:45 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. 1:30, 4:20, 7:10 and 9:25 pm, Mon.-Thu. Mountain: 2:15, 4:30, 7 and 9 pm.

THE DESCENDANTS George Clooney takes his daughters on a trip to confront the man his wife has been cheating on him with. Did I mention his wife is on life support? Carmike 12: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 and 9:50 pm. Stadium 14: 1:05, 3:50, 6:55 and 9:35, with a midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. 1:05, 3:50, 6:55 and 9:35 pm, Mon.-Thu.

HUGO Based on a children’s book no one in this office has ever read, Hugo is the story of a Parisian orphan who lives in the walls of a train station during the 1930s. There is a mystery, too, involving a robot and the boy’s father. Directed by Martin Scorcese and starring Ben Kingsley and Sacha Baron Cohen. Carmike 12: 3D: 7:35. Village 6: 3D: 1 and 4 pm. Stadium 14: 3D: 3:30 and 9:15 pm. Mon.-Thu.: 3:55 and 9:25 pm.

EXTREMELY LOUD AND INCREDIBLY CLEAR An unbelievably precocious child searches New York City for the lock that matches the key left behind by his father who died on September 11th. Starring Tom Hanks and Sandra Bullock. Carmike

JOYFUL NOISE Two choir directors bicker over how to win something which may not exist: the national choir competition. Starring Dolly Parton and Queen Latifah. Carmike 12: 1:15, 4:25, 7:35 and 10 pm. Stadium 14: 4:05 pm.

Missoula Independent Page 34 January 26 – February 2, 2012

WAR HORSE A young man’s horse is enlisted for use by the cavalry during WWI, so of course the young man joins up for a spot of adventure and to find that beloved creature. Spielberg directs, cue well-lit faces. Carmike 12: 6:45 and 10 pm. Stadium 14: 3:15 and 6:30, with midnight shows Fri. and Sat. 1 and 6:35 pm Mon.-Thu. WE BOUGHT A ZOO Matt Damon buys a struggling pet sanctuary after his wife dies and falls in “like” with zookeeper Scarlett Johansson. Directed by Cameron Crowe. Carmike12: 2, 5 and 8 pm. Stadium 14: 12:20 and 9:35 pm, Fri.-Sun. 3:55 and 9:40 pm Mon.-Thu. Capsule reviews by Jason McMackin. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., Jan. 27. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-F I LM; S t a d i u m 14 i n K a l i s p e l l – 752 - 78 0 4 . Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.


Missoula Independent Page 35 January 26 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; February 2, 2012


M I S S O U L A

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COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Have sexual health questions? The Montana Access Project (MAP) Receive answers to your sexual health questions via text from sexual health experts. Text 666746 Type ASKMAP (space) enter your question. Free & Confidential. askmap.info Save The Date! 2012 Trade Show, February 18 & 19th at the Adams Center. 10-5.

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Table of contents Advice Goddess . . . . . .C2 Free Will Astrology . . .C4

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Estimates

Public Notices . . . . . . .C5

Snow Plowing /Removal

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Pet Page . . . . . . . . . . . .C9

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Rocko Four year old Rocko has a commanding presence but give him some love and he’ll melt in your arms! He will chirp at your for attention and LOVES to be petted. He has an independent streak so he is happy to entertain himself while you are away. Like all good sidekicks, he is by your side when you need him but still has his own responsibilities to keep him busy (catnaps and chasing toy mice to name a few!) Visit the Humane Society of Western Montana today and fill out a MYM Adopter Survey to determine which feline-ality is a purrfect fit for your home! Call (406)549-3934 for more information.

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I SMELL A RUT I just got dumped by a guy who swore he was ready to settle down (after years of serial monogamy). His relationship history reminded me of the man you wrote about recently who had been married and divorced five times and was on relationship number six. Woman number six wrote you, “He’s in his 50s; his marriage-hopping has to stop.” Obviously, she’s fooling herself, but what’s his deal? What’s anyone’s who gets married over and over? —Morbidly Curious

Some model their marriage on their parents’ and some on their parents’ car lease. (Sadly, hanging a new-car smell pine tree around the wife’s neck doesn’t seem to stem the flow of trade-ins.) Everybody wants to believe their love will last, but when a guy’s marrying Wife Number Five, some honesty in vow-making seems called for—for example, “Till mild boredom do us part.” And in keeping with the trend of using movie lines in the ceremony, the groom can turn to the minister at the end and state the Schwarzeneggeraccented obvious: “I’ll be back.” The notion that the only valid relationship is one that ends with the partners in twin chairs on the veranda of Senior Acres, rocking off into the sunset together, keeps some of the wrong people chasing it. The truth is, some people just aren’t wired for forever. That’s okay—providing they’re honest with themselves and their partners that for them, lasting relationships last only so long (“when two become as one” and then one starts getting all fidgety for the next one). Even for those who are determined to make forever work, there’s a problem, and it’s called “hedonic adaptation”—getting acclimated to positive additions to our lives and no longer getting the lift out of them that we did at first. This happens with boob jobs, lottery wins—and marriage, explained happiness researcher Dr. Sonja Lyubomirsky on my weekly radio show. Lyubomirsky writes in her terrific book, The How of Happiness, of a 15-year study in Germany showing that couples got a big boost in happiness when they got married—a boost that, on average, lasted two years. According to Lyubomirsky, research shows that the most powerful ways to combat hedonic adaptation are adding variety and expressing gratitude. You add variety by shaking up your date night routine, going on vacation (even a quick one), and varying your daily life in small, fun ways. You can express gratitude by buying

or making some little thing to say how much you appreciate your partner or by verbally admiring his or her hotitude and wonderful qualities. Lyubomirsky explained, “Gratitude is almost by definition an inhibitor of adaptation,” because adaptation means we’re taking something for granted. “Being grateful for something is appreciating it, savoring it—i.e., NOT taking it for granted.” Predicting whether a particular guy is a romance junkie can be tough. (It’s not like a meth habit. There are no scabs.) A girlfriend-hopper might swear he’s ready to settle down and believe it—until the moment he realizes he’s not. You’ll want to believe him; we all tend to lead with our ego: “I’ll be the one he’s different for.” This is risky if your ovaries are on the clock. If, however, you can just live in the moment and hope for lots more moments...well, there’s always that chance you’ll end up being his eighth and only.

ON CROWD NINE The man I’ve been in a long-term on-and-off relationship with has started seeing someone else. He’s cagey about the details, but what’s really bothering me is that she has no clue that I exist. I’m tempted to write her an anonymous note, telling her that I was here first, have been here a long time, and am continuing to have sex with her Lothario. —Pen Poised

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Bennett’s Music Studio Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available. bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

Like many people around the holidays, your thoughts turn to the have-nots: “Hi, I believe you have not heard that I’m having sex with your new boyfriend.” The reality is, you’re looking to escape feeling vulnerable by lashing out. (When life gives you lemons...break some other woman’s windows with them.) The “anonymous” note is really about telling this woman, “Hey! I’m here! I’m lovable! I’m important!” Well, there’s a better way to say those things, and it won’t even take a stamp. Just call this man and say goodbye. This means finally admitting that the parameters of this relationship aren’t working for you. Come on...you’re wellaware you aren’t his one and only, yet there you are complaining, “Waiter, waiter! There’s a harem in my soup!” What is there to say to you but “Yes, madam, of course there is. It’s the Lothario special. It comes with other women on the side.”

G o t a p r o b l e m ? Wr i te A m y Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2 January 26 – February 2, 2012

Sign up for fall NOT ARTISTIC? Come have some fun painting. Instruction & art supplies furnished. Complimentary wine or tea. 327-8757

Art Hang up • 839 S. Higgins


EMPLOYMENT

MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS

MUSIC

1st Interstate Pawn. 3110 South Reserve, is now open! Buying gold and silver. Buying, selling, and pawning items large and small. We pay more and sell for less. 406-721(PAWN)7296.

New Year special: Yamaha P95 88-note digital piano with stand $639.00. Missoula’s #1 Music Store. MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds entrance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 549-0013. www.montanamusic.com

2011 CERTIFIED STRAW 550 big squares. Weed free. Asking $65/ton, delivery available. (406)462-5522 or 366-3687 FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation non-denominational 1-800-475-0876 Handspun Yarn Local Handspun yarn http://www.thespinstartshere.n et/yarn.html

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FURNITURE Used Furniture & Appliances Affordable, Quality, and For a Good Cause! Donation Warehouse, 1804 North Ave West Most couches under $100, appliances under $200 2404042 or donationwarehouse.net

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GENERAL BARTENDING $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training available. 1-800-965-6520 ext. 278 GREAT CAREER OPPORTUNITY in Montana’s service of first choice. Earn more with the skills you have. Learn more of the skills you need. In the Montana Army National Guard, you will build the skills you need for a civilian career, while developing the leadership skills you need to take your career to the next level. Benefits: $50,000 Loan Repayment Program. Montgomery GI Bill. Up to 100% tuition assistance for college. Medical & dental benefits. Starting at $13.00/hr. Paid job skill training. Call 1-800GO-GUARD. NATIONAL GUARD Part-time job...Full-time benefits LOOKING FOR A HIRED MAN to work on a farm south of Richland. Could be year round work or seasonal work March October. Housing is available. Pay depends on experience. Galen Zerbe 406-228-4311 Work. Daryl Toews 406-3927171 Cell

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Must have strong leadership skills, good driving history, and able to travel in Montana and nearby States. Email resume to Recruiter1@osmose.com or apply online at www.OsmoseUtilities.com EOE M/F/D/V OWNER/OPERATORS $5,000 SIGN-ON BONUS! Tons of warm, prosperous South TX runs! Frac Sand Hauling. Must have tractor, pneumatic trailers, blower. (817)980-6095 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1800-545-4546

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Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments Thift Stores

MORGENROTH MUSIC 1136 W. Broadway 930 Kensington

1105 W Sussex, Missoula 549-0013 www.montanamusic.com

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montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3 January 26 – February 2, 2012


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): The coming week is likely to be abnormally free of worries and frustrations. I’m afraid that means you’re not going to have as much right to complain as you usually do. Can you handle that? Or will you feel bereft when faced with the prospect of having so little to grumble about? Just in case, I’ve compiled a list of fake annoyances for you to draw on. 1. “My iPhone won’t light my cigarette.” 2. “The next tissue in my tissue box doesn’t magically poke out when I take one.” 3. “I want some ice cream, but I overstuffed myself at dinner.” 4. “I ran out of bottled water and now I have to drink from the tap.” 5. “My cat’s Facebook profile gets more friend requests than me.” 6. “When people tell me I should feel grateful for all I have instead of complaining all the time, I feel guilty.” TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The state of California was named after a storybook land described in a 16th-century Spanish novel. The mythical paradise was ruled by Queen Calafia. Gold was so plentiful that the people who lived there made weapons out of it and even adorned their animals with it. Did the real California turn out to be anything like that fictional realm? Well, 300 years after it got its name, the California Gold Rush attracted 300,000 visitors who mined a fortune in the precious metal. Your assignment, Taurus: Think of the myths you believed in when you were young and the fantasies that have played at the edges of your imagination for years. Have any of them come true, even a little? I suspect that one may do just that in the coming weeks and months. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In Bill Moyers’ DVD The Language of Life, poet Naomi Shihab Nye is shown giving advice to aspiring young poets. She urges them to keep an open mind about where their creative urges might take them. Sometimes when you start a poem, she says, you think you want to go to church, but where you end up is at the dog races. I’ll make that same point to you, Gemini. As you tune in to the looming call to adventure, don’t be too sure you know what destination it has in mind for you. You might be inclined to assume it’ll lead you toward a local bar for drinks when in fact it’s nudging you in the direction of a wild frontier for a divine brouhaha.

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Renowned comic book writer Grant Morrison claims he performed a magic ritual in which he conjured the spirit of John Lennon, who appeared and bestowed on him the gift of a new song. I’ve heard Morrison sing the tune, and it does sound rather Lennonesque. The coming week would be a good time for you to go in quest of a comparable boon, Cancerian: a useful and beautiful blessing bequeathed to you by the departed spirit of someone you love or admire.

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “There are works which wait, and which one does not understand for a long time,” said Oscar Wilde. “The reason is that they bring answers to questions which have not yet been raised; for the question often arrives a terribly long time after the answer.” I predict that sometime soon, Leo, you will prove that wisdom true. You will finally learn the brilliant question whose crucial answer you got years ago. When it arrives, you will comprehend a mystery that has been churning in the semi-darkness all this time.

c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Shedding is healthy—not just for cats and dogs and other animals but also for us humans. Did you know that you shed thousands of particles of dead skin every hour? And just as our bodies need to shed, so do our psyches. I bring this up, Virgo, because you are in an unusually favorable phase to do a whole lot of psychic shedding. What should you shed exactly? How about some of these: old ideas that don’t serve you any more, habits that undermine your ability to pursue your dreams, compulsions that are at odds with your noble intentions, resentment against people who did you wrong a long, long time ago, and anything else you carry with you that keeps you from being fully alive and radiant. To paraphrase Thomas Jefferson, the price of freedom and aliveness is eternal shedding.

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist Susan Clarion RNC CA MATS 5527919 Energy Balancing and Acupressure Meridians. Hand and foot reflexology. 493-6824 or 399-4363 Love Specialist, Stops Divorce, Cheating, Reunites Separated Partners, Solves Severe Problems. Never Fails. FREE 15 MINUTE Reading By Phone 718-300-3530 or 1-866-5246689 Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie Clarion 406-552-7919

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “A single sunbeam is enough to drive away shadows,” said St. Francis of Assisi. I’m afraid that’s an overly optimistic assessment. In many circumstances, just one ray of light may not be sufficient to dispel encroaching haze and murk. Luckily for you, though, there will be quite an assortment of sunbeams appearing in your sphere during the coming weeks. Here’s the complication: They won’t all be showing up at once, and they’ll be arriving in disparate locations. So your task will be to gather them all up and unite them so they can add to each other’s strength. If you do that successfully, you’ll have more than enough illumination to chase away any darkness that might be creeping around.

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): According to research published in the journal Psychological Science, many people are virtually allergic to creative ideas. When asked to consider a novel proposal, they’re quite likely to reject it in favor of an approach that’s well-known to them. (More info here: tinyurl.com/3oor4nq.) This could be a problem for you in the coming weeks, Libra, since one of your strengths will be your ability to come up with innovations. So it won’t be enough for you to offer your brilliant notions and original departures from the way things have always been done; you will also have to be persuasive and diplomatic. Think you can handle that dual assignment?

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Poet Elizabeth Alexander says that in order to create a novel, a writer needs a lot of uninterrupted time alone. Poems, on the other hand, can be snared in the midst of the jumbled rhythms of everyday chaos—between hurried appointments or while riding the subway or at the kitchen table waiting for the coffee to brew. Alexander says that inspiration can sprout like grass poking up out of the sidewalk cracks. Whether or not you’re a writer, Sagittarius, I see your coming weeks as being more akin to snagging poems than cooking up a novel.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “A true poet does not bother to be poetical,” said the poet Jean Cocteau. “Nor does a nursery gardener perfume his roses.” I think that’s wise counsel for you in the coming weeks, Capricorn. It’s important that you do what you do best without any embellishment, pretentiousness, or self-consciousness. Don’t you dare try too hard or think too much or twist yourself like a contortionist to meet impossible-to-satisfy expectations. Trust the thrust of your simple urges.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Collectors prefer wild orchids, says William Langley, writing in the UK’s Telegraph. Orchids grown in nurseries, which comprise 99.5 percent of the total, are tarnished with “the stigma of perfection.” Their colors are generic and their petal patterns are boringly regular. Far more appealing are the exotic varieties untouched by human intervention, with their “downy, smooth petals and moistened lips pouting in the direction of tautly curved shafts and heavily veined pouches.” Whatever your sphere or specialty is, Aquarius, I suggest you model yourself after the wild orchid collectors in the coming days. Shun the stigma of perfection.

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): While doing a film a few years ago, actress Sandra Bullock stumbled upon a stunning secret: Rubbing hemorrhoid cream on her face helped shrink her wrinkles and improve her complexion. I predict that at least one and possibly more comparable discoveries will soon grace your life. You will find unexpected uses for things that were supposedly not meant to be used in those ways. Here’s a corollary, courtesy of scientist Albert Szent-Gyorgyi, that describes a related talent you’ll have at your disposal: “Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought.”

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Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4 January 26 – February 2, 2012

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MISSOULA COUNTY Notice is hereby given that Missoula County has issued a Request for Qualifications for procuring engineering services for the preparation of a Preliminary Engineering Report for the Riverview Drive Bridge in Seeley Lake, Montana. Responses will be received at the Missoula County Public Works Department, Attention: Erik Dickson, County Engineer, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808, until 4:00 PM on February 3, 2012. A copy of the Request for Qualifications may be obtained at the above address, by calling the Public Works Department at (406) 258-3772 or by email request to edickson@co.missoula.mt.us. All requirements and scoring criteria are detailed in the Request for Qualifications. Selection of the consultant will be based on written responses. The award will be made to the consultant whose qualifications are deemed most advantageous to Missoula County, all factors considered. Responses shall be sealed and marked “Statement of Qualifications for Riverview Drive Bridge PER.” /s/ Erik K. Dickson, P.E., County Engineer MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD Title III Fuel Mitigation Requests Notice is hereby given that a proposal for allocation of Missoula County funds for the purpose of fuels mitigation projects was put before the Board of County Commissioners on January 11, 2012. The funds originate from the federal government as part of the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act of 2000, and are being spent under Title III of that Act. The following allocations are proposed: To mitigate the effects of wildfire by supporting Firewise Communities Programs, including cost sharing on fuels mitigation projects: $25,000 to Missoula Rural Fire District; $25,000 to Frenchtown Rural Fire District; $25,000 to Seeley Lake Rural Fire Department; $25,000 to Swan Ecosystem; $20,000 to Missoula City Fire Department. Agencies receiving these allocations must have the funds spent by September 30, 2012, or those funds will revert to Missoula County for re-allocation by the Board of County Commissioners. The Board of County Commissioners will act on these proposals at their regularly scheduled Weekly Public Meeting on Wednesday, March 14, 2012 at 1:30 p.m. in Room 201 of the Missoula County Courthouse Annex. Any person wishing to be heard on the matter may submit written or other materials to the Commissioners and/or speak at the hearing. Comments may also be submitted anytime prior to the hearing by phone, mail, fax or personal delivery to the Commissioners at their offices in the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, Fax (406) 7214043 email bcc@co.missoula.mt.us. Additional information on the proposals may be obtained from Chris Lounsbury, Emergency Services Manager, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802; or by calling (406) 258-4469. DATED THIS 11th DAY OF January 2012. Chair, Board of County Commissioners MISSOULA COUNTY SHERIFF’S SALE COMMUNITY BANK-MISSOULA, INC., a Montana corporation, Plaintiff, vs. BRYLA CORPORATION, a Montana corporation, TOBY M. HANSEN and KELI L. HANSEN, MARY TAYLOR, DAVID O. ROBERTS, POST BUCKLEY SCHUH and JERNIGAN INC., MONTANA FARMERS UNION INSURANCE AGENCY, COLLECTION BUREAU SERVICES, O’KEEFE DRILLING COMPANY, INC., JACI INVESTMENTS INC., U.S. INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, Defendants. To Be Sold at Sheriff’s Sale: TERMS: CASH, or its equivalent; NO personal checks On the 15th day of February A.D., 2012, at Ten o’clock A.M., at the front door of the County Court House, in the City of Missoula, County of Missoula, State of Montana, that cer-

tain real property situate in said Missoula County, and particularly described as follows, to-wit: The NE 1/4 SW 1/4 of Section 12, Township 11 North, Range 16 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. EXCEPTING THEREFROM a tract of land conveyed to Northern Pacific Railway Co., in Book “P” of Miscellaneous at Page 8. EXCEPTING THEREFROM a tract of land conveyed to M.R. Wentz in Book “P” of Miscellaneous at Page 14. EXCEPTING THEREFROM a tract of land conveyed to the state of Montana in Book 167 of Deeds at Page 316 and Book 17 of Micro Records at Page 974. The Real Property or its address is commonly known as Section 12, Township 11 North, Clinton, MT 59825. Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining. Dated this 26th day of January A.D., 2012. /s/ CARL C. IBSEN Sheriff of Missoula County, Montana By /s/ Patrick A. Turner, Deputy MISSOULA COUNTY FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT PERMIT APPLICATIONS The Office of Planning and Grants has received the following applications for Floodplain Development Permits: 1.County Floodplain Permit Application #12-16.  An application from Spencer Properties, LLC to work within the Bitterroot River floodplain.  The project is located at 4285 Hwy 93 South on the northwest side of Buckhouse Bridge in Section 1, Township 12N, Range 20W and includes the construction of a fill cap and construction of wetlands in accordance with the MT DEQ closure plan for the Norm Close landfill.  2.County Floodplain Permit Application #1217.  An application from the Yellowstone Pipe Line Company to work within the Clark Fork River floodplain.  The project is located adjacent to 10515 Rustic Rd in Section 34, Township 13N, Range 18W and includes the replacement of an in-channel petroleum pipeline having minimal cover with a new pipeline bored 40’ beneath the deepest portion of the existing channel.  The full applications are available for review in the Office of Planning and Grants in City Hall. Written comments from anyone interested in these applications may be submitted prior to 5:00 p.m., February 17, 2012. Address comments to the Floodplain Administrator, Office of Planning & Grants, 435 Ryman, Missoula MT 59802 or call 258-4841 for more information.   MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DN-10-46 Department No. 1 Judge Edward P. McLean SUMMONS AND CITATION IN THE MATTER OF DECLARING H. B., A YOUTH IN NEED OF CARE. TO: ALFRED RODELL PAYTON Re: H.B., born September 12, 1996 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Child and Family Services Division (CFS), 2677 Palmer, Suite 300, Missoula, Montana 59808, has filed a Petition to Terminate the Mother’s and Father’s Parental Rights and Grant of Permanent Legal Custody to CFS with the Right to Consent to Adoption or for said Youth to be otherwise cared for; Now, Therefore, YOU ARE HEREBY CITED AND DIRECTED to appear on the 7th day of March, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. at the Courtroom of the above entitled Court at the Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, then and there to show cause, if any you may have, why the Mother’s and Father’s rights should not be terminated; why CFS should not be awarded permanent legal custody of the Youth with the right to consent to the Youth’s adoption; and why the Petition should not be granted or why said Youth should not be otherwise cared for. Alfred Rodell Payton is represented by a Courtappointed attorney through the Office of State Public Defender, 610 Woody, Missoula, Montana, 59802, (406) 5235140. Your failure to appear at the hearing constitutes a denial of your interest in custody of the Youth, which denial will result, without further notice of this proceeding or any subsequent proceeding, in judgment by default being entered for the relief requested in the Petition. A copy of the Petition hereinbefore referred to is filed with the Clerk of District Court for Missoula County, telephone: (406) 258-4780. WIT-

NESS the Honorable Edward P. McLean, Judge of the above-entitled Court and the Seal of this Court, this 4th day of January, 2012. /s/ EDWARD P. MCLEAN District Judge MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Ed McLean Probate No. DP12-9 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF BONNIE LOU HEHN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the Personal Representative, Steve Richard Smith, return receipt requested, at Tipp & Buley, P.C., PO Box 3778, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 17th day of January, 2012. /s/ Elver Hehn, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP-11-232 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF LOIS LORRAINE FARNES, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to LARRY L. FARNES, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Marsillo & Schuyler, PLLC, 103 South 5th Street East, Missoula, MT 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 22nd day of December, 2011. /s/ Larry L. Farnes, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Probate No. DP-12-8 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF FREDERICK G. HEIMBERGER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed Co-Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Sheila Bonnand and Barbara Superneau, CoPersonal Representatives, by certified mail, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane PC, PO Box 4747, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 13th day of January, 2012. /s/ Sheila Bonnand, Co-Personal Representative /s/ Barbara Superneau, CoPersonal Representative. WORDEN THANE PC, Attorneys for Personal Representative /s/ Patrick Dougherty MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP-12-10 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF LAVONA E. SCHREIBER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Penny L. Bowman, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 4110 Weeping Willow Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803, or filed with the Clerk of the abovenamed Court. DATED this 17th day of January, 2012. /s/ Penny L. Bowman, Personal Representative. GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC /s/ Nancy P. Gibson, Attorney for Personal Representative NOTICE OF PRELIMINARY DETERMINATION for the issuance of a MISSOULA AIR QUALITY PERMIT Source: Gravel Crushing Plant Applicant: Ward Crushing L.L.C. The Missoula City-County Health Department has received a complete application for an Air Quality Permit for a gravel crushing plant to be operated at the following location: Section 33, Township 16 North, Range 22 West near Nine Mile Creek, Missoula County. Upon review of the permit application and other information, the Department finds that Ward Crushing L.L.C. has filed a complete application indicating the proposed facility is capable of meeting applicable requirements of the Air Pollution Control Program. Therefore, the Department hereby gives notice of the preliminary determination to issue an Air Quality Permit to Ward Crushing to operate the gravel crushing plant. The permit will be issued with several conditions attached. The Department will make a final determination concerning the application on February 13th, 2012. Any interested person may review a copy of the application and proposed permit at the Environmental Health Division, 301 West

Alder, Missoula, MT 59802. Written comments on the preliminary determination will be accepted until 5:00 PM February 10th, 2012. Comments should be sent to the attention of Benjamin Schmidt, Air Quality Specialist (email: bschmidt@co.missoula.mt.us ). NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 05/03/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200711046, Bk. 796, Pg. 1088, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Francena M. Gamboa was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for GreenPoint Mortgage Funding, Inc. was Beneficiary and Insured Titles LLC was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles LLC as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 12 in Block 10 of West View Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to JPMorgan Mortgage Acquisition Corp. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 03/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of November 21, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $183,432.45. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $155,400.56, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 2, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.71558) 1002.205378-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/23/06, recorded as Instrument No. 20621518, Bk-781, Pg-932, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Dan Lockwood was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Heritage Bank was Beneficiary and Stewart Title of Missoula County was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title of Missoula County as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 23 of Avalon Meadows, Phase I, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201118697, Bk-781, Pg932, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 08/01/11 installment payment and

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5 January 26 – February 2, 2012


PUBLIC NOTICES all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of November 21, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $31,325.85. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $27,033.55, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 3, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.97433) 1002.205474-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/11/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200801066, Bk-811, Pg1299, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Brett Beaver was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage, LLC was Beneficiary and Title Services, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 7 in Block 8 of Rangitsch Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 7, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $143,803.38. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $128,535.10, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 18, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the

foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.77249) 1002.206207-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 12, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 38-B OF COUNTRY CREST 3B, LOTS 38-A, 38B, 38-C & 38-D A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Rickey J. Blankenship and Debra E. Blankenship, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on January 16, 2007 and recorded on January 16, 2007 as Document No. 200701254 Book 790 Micro Records Page 792. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage, Corporation. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,982.87, beginning July 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 1, 2011 is $320,218.57 principal, interest at the rate of 5.70100% now totaling $9,127.80, late charges in the amount of $198.24, other fees and expenses advanced of $64.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $50.02 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 3, 2011 /s/ Becky Stucki First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham) On this 3 day of November, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Becky Stucki, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Marti A Ottley Notary Public Inkom, ID Commission expires: 8/15/2012 Phh V Biankenship 41392.818 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 12, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American

Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 11A of South Missoula, Block 82, Lots 11A and 12A, a platted subdivision in the city of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official Recorded Plat thereof. Grace De La Torre, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Eletronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated November 20, 2008 and Recorded November 21, 2008 in Book 829, Page 1037 under Document Number 200826050. The beneficial interest is currently held by Guild Mortgage Company. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,246.16, beginning April 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 1, 2011 is $161,052.14 principal, interest at the rate of 6.00% now totaling $6,415.38, late charges in the amount of $348.95, and other fees and expenses advanced of $518.02, plus accruing interest at the rate of $26.47 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 3, 2011 /s/ Becky Stucki First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham) On this 3rd day of November, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Becky Stucki, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Marti A Ottley Notary Public Inkom, ID Commission expires: 8/15/2012 Guild Mortgage V De La Torre 41291.560 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 12, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT 2 IN BLOCK 2 OF CARLTON TRACTS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF, EXCEPT PARCEL “A” OF AMENDED PLAT OF TRACTS 1 AND 2, BLOCK 2, CARLTON TRACTS William S. Morton and Cheryl C. Morton, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, as Trustee, to

secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on May 26, 2006 and recorded on May 30, 2006 in Book 775, Page 330 under Document No. 200612367. The beneficial interest is currently held by Nationstar Mortgage LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,351.15, beginning June 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 4, 2011 is $237,652.87 principal, interest at the rate of 7.875% now totaling $8,049.39, suspense balance of $1,513.03 plus accruing interest at the rate of $51.27 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 8th, 2011/s/ Dalia Martinez First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ) )ss. County of Bingham ) On this 8th day of November, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Marti A Ottley Notary Public Inkom, ID Commission expires: 8/15/2012 Nationstar v Morton 41706.507 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 16, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 2 IN BLOCK 8 OF LINDA VISTA SEVENTH SUPPLEMENT PHASE 5, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Peter B. Hance and Sara N. Hance, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 12, 2003 and Recorded on June 12, 2003 under Document # 200320718, in Bk-708, Pg1339. The beneficial interest is currently held by EverBank successor by merger to Everhome Mortgage Company. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C6 January 26 – February 2, 2012

said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,341.32, beginning August 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 18, 2011 is $189,870.31 principal, interest at the rate of 6.37500% now totaling $3,589.83, late charges in the amount of $201.21, and other fees and expenses advanced of $92.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $33.16 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 9, 2011 /s/ Dalia Martinez First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham) On this 9th day of November, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Marti A Ottley Notary Public Inkom, ID Commission expires: 8/15/2012 Everhome V. Hance 41470.162 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 27, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: Lots 16 and 17 in Block 48 of East Missoula, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. EDWARD BIELSKI, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to ARTHUR F. LAMEY, JR, ESQ, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, by DEED OF TRUST DATED MAY 7, 2004 AND RECORDED MAY 13, 2004 in Book 732, Page 145 UNDER DOCUMENT NO. 200412852.. The beneficial interest is currently held by WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE UNDER THE INDENTURE RELATING TO lMH ASSETS CORP., COLLATERALIZED ASSET-BACKED BONDS, SERIES 2004- 6. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $622.53, beginning April 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 16, 2011 is $81,686.00 principal, interest at the rate of 7.39000% now totaling $10,812.13, late charges in the

amount of$622.40, escrow advances of $2,944.71, suspense balance of $-376.16 and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,779.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $16.54 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 20 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 21, 2011 /s/ Dalia Martinez First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham) On this 21st day of November, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Marti A Ottley Notary Public Inkom, ID Commission expires: 8/15/2012 GmacVBielski 41965.332 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 5, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT 17-C3-A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 2618, LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 14 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Angelina L McDonald, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, Inc, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated August 31, 2005 and recorded on August 31, 2005 at 4:43 o’clock P.M., in book 759, Page 432, under Document No 200522825. The beneficial interest is currently held by US Bank National Association as Trustee. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,192.80, beginning August 1, 2007 and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 26, 2011 is $169,614.45 principal, interest at the rate of 7.375% now totaling $60,363.15, late charges in the amount of $3,511.64, escrow advances of $8,370.54, suspense balance of $-703.95 and other fees and expenses advanced of $5,977.60, plus accruing interest at the rate of $34.27 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such

amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors, if such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 31, 2011 /s/ Becky Stucki First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham) On this 31 day of October, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Becky Stucki, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Blackfoot, ID Commission expires: 2/18/2014 GMAC V McDonald 41342.666 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 6, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 9 IN BLOCK 1 OF WEBBER ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF Eugene Karl Schafer and Janet Lindquist Schafer, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Equity Direct Mortgage Corp, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated May 8, 1998 and recorded May 13,1998 in Book 541, Page 296, as Document No. 9812132. The beneficial interest is currently held by Aurora Bank FSB. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $945.00, beginning January 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of September 20, 2011 is $97,135.05 principal, interest at the rate of 10.00% now totaling $27,217.82, late charges in the amount of $236.25, escrow advances of $7,319.92, suspense balance of $-233.34 and other fees and expenses advanced of $8,233.83, plus accruing interest at the rate of $26.61 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee,


PUBLIC NOTICES may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 2, 2011 /s/ Becky Stucki First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ) )ss. County of Bingham ) On this 2 day of November, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Becky Stucki, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Blackfoot, ID Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Aurora/Schafer 40990.128 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 04/25/2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which MARY ANN DOWDALL A SINGLE HIS/HER OWN RIGHT as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to STEWART TITLE OF MISSOULA COUNTY, INC. TITLE CO. as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 03/30/2007 and recorded 03/30/2007, in document No. 200707447 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 794 at Page Number 744 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 319 OF PLEASANT VIEW HOMES NO. 4, PHASE 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 3912 MELROSE PLACE, Missoula, MT 59808. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS, CWALT INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-15CB, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 09/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $115,518.34 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.625% per annum from 09/01/2010

until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 12/12/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-9840407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 110145575 FEI NO. 1006.149510 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 04/27/2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which MICHAEL SHAYLOR, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE & SEPARATE PROPERTY as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 08/11/2006 and recorded 08/14/2006, in document No. 200620517 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 780 at Page Number 1409 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 8 OF SUNRIDGE VILLAGE, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 2511 SUNRIDGE CT, Missoula, MT 59803-2646. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 200631CB, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-31CB. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 08/01/2010, and all subsequent installments

Missoula Police Department Sale ABANDONED VEHICLES TERMS: $85.00 MINIMUM BID Notice is hereby given to all owners of the following vehicles; unless reclaimed, the following vehicles will be sold at the Missoula Police Department Auction on Thursday Feb 9th, 2012, at 10:00 am at Pro-Towing @ 1922 S 3rd St W, Missoula, in the County of Missoula, State of Montana, property situated in the County of Missoula, particularly described as follows: Agency #. . . . . . . . Vehicle Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VIN PAV12 003 . . . . . . 1978 COVE MH Cream . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F44CD7V057086 PAV12 011. . . . . . . 1977 DREA VAN MH Whi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CGL257U161122 PAV12 019. . . . . . . 1999 HYUN ELAN 4D Blue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KMHJF25F0XU799580 PAV 12 023 . . . . . . 1986 NISS SEN 2D Crm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JN1PB14SXGU154697 PAV12 026 . . . . . . 1992 TOYT PK TK Whi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4TARN81P9NZ000094 PAV12 027 . . . . . . 1990 HOND PRE 2DR Red . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JHMBA4125LC000428 PAV12 028 . . . . . . 1981 BMW 528i 4D Gry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WBACJ9508B6784254 PAV12 029 . . . . . . 1994 FORD TAU 4D Sil. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1FALP5247RG105778 PAV12 031 . . . . . . 1999 FORD ESCT 2D Blk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3FAKP1131XR168457 PAV12 032 . . . . . . 1985 CHEV S10 PK TK Whi(011712)*** . . . . 1GCCT14B2F8190853 PAV12 033 . . . . . . 1997 OLDS CUT 2D Blk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1G3WH12M5VF302770 PAV12 034 . . . . . . 1992 FORD RANG PK TK Sil . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1FTCR15T1NPA85649 PAV12 037 . . . . . . 1993 FORD EXPLR XL 4X4 Whi . . . . . . . . . . . 1FMDU34X6PUD57910 PAV12 038 . . . . . . 1984 JEEP CHER WGN 4D Gry . . . . . . . . . . . 1JCML7846HT104090 PAV12 039 . . . . . . 1989 MAZD 626 4D Whi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JM1GD2221K1746483 PAV12 040 . . . . . . 1994 ISU ROD SUV Whi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4S2CY58V5R4306740 PAV12 042 . . . . . . 1999 VW JETTA 4D Grn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3VWPA81H6XM225462 PAV12 043 . . . . . . 1998 FORD CNTR 4D Blu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1FAFP6633WK276041 PAV12 044 . . . . . . 1991 BUICK REG 4D Mar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2G4WD54T5M1810813 PAV12 045 . . . . . . 1955 CHEV ZZZ FLTBD PK TK Blk . . . . . . . . . X255J010891 PAV12 046 . . . . . . 2001 MAZD 626 4D Whi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1YVGF22D315223544 PAV12 047 . . . . . . 1978 TOYT COA 4D Blu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TE38137786 PAV12 050 . . . . . . 1998 FORD CNTR 4D Grn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1FAFP66LXWK310377 PAV12 052 . . . . . . 1991 CHRY NY 4D Gry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1C3XY66R8MD270855 PAV12 056 . . . . . . 1992 FORD ESCT 2D Grn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1FAPP1282NW113834 PAV12 057 . . . . . . 1976 DODG MH WHI/BLU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F44CF6V102535 PAV12 058 . . . . . . 2003 SUBA BAJA SIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4S4BT61C736104493 PAV12 060 . . . . . . 1990 CADI DEV 4D TAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1G6KS5336LU802879 PAV12 062 . . . . . . 1991 BUICK PRK 4D BLU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1G4CW53LXM1638301 PAV12 064 . . . . . . 1981 SUZ MC BLK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JS1NK41A2B2105896 PAV12 065 . . . . . . 1989 TOYT COA 4D SW BLU (012812)*** . . JT2AE94V8K0041908 PAV12 066 . . . . . . 1990 FORD RANG PK TK RED(012812)*** . . 1FTCR10A5LUC26808 PAV12 068 . . . . . . 1981 SUBA GL 4D YEL (020512)*** . . . . . . JF1AB43B2BB224452 PAV12 069 . . . . . . 1997 CHRY TOW VAN RED (020412)***. . . . 1C4GP54R9VB227425 PAV12 072 . . . . . . 1994 MITS DIAM 4D GRN (020712)*** . . . . JA3AP47H2RY022081 PAV12 073 . . . . . . 1993 MERC SABL 4DR TRQ(020612)***. . . . 1MELM5045PG47625

Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances. NO WARRANTY is made as to the condition or title of these vehicles. Vehicles are available for preview February 9 th, at 9:45 am. Payment by Cash or Check at time of Sale. Dated this the 20th day of January, 2012. Mark Muir, Chief of Police Annie Nordby, Abandoned Vehicles

together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $230,659.43 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.75% per annum from 08/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 12/13/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-9840407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 110056505 FEI NO. 1006.139538 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING THE MISSOULA COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT will be conducting a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 15, 2012 in the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine, Missoula, MT, on the following item: 1.A request by Sun Mountain Sports for variances from the Missoula Development Park maximum height and front yard setback requirements on the property legally described as a portion of Lot 3 Block 8 of Missoula Development Park Phase II and a portion of Park 9. See map R.

If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling the Office of Planning and Grants at 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. For a complete legal description or additional information regarding the special exception and variance request you may contact Jamie Erbacher at the same number or by e-mail at jerbacher@co.missoula.mt.us.

05/08/2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which PHILIP J. O’CONNELL AND JULIE E. GIBSON, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to INSURED TITLES, LLC. as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 01/28/2005 and recorded 01/31/2005, in document No. 200502537 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 747 at Page Number 585 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOTS 10 AND 11 IN BLOCK 1 OF MOUNT SENTINEL ADDITION NO. 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 440 EAST KENT AVENUE, Missoula, MT 59801. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 09/01/2011, and all subsequent installments

LEGAL ADVERTISEMENT

The City of Missoula Design Review Board will conduct a public hearing on Wednesday, February 8, 2012 in the City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine Street, Missoula, at 7:30 p.m. to consider the following applications: A request from Linda Lennox of Epcon Signs for Special Signs; Signs as Part of Building for NorthCentre II located at 2800 N. Reserve St. (SEE MAP T).

Your attendance and your comments are welcome and encouraged. E-mails can be sent to hkinnear@co.missoula.mt. us. Project files may be viewed at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants at 435 Ryman St., Missoula, Montana. If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services.

d s

"Puh-leeze!"–you've got to e-nun-ci-ate.

by Matt Jones

ACROSS

DOWN

1 King with a golden touch 6 Place to get a mocha and a paper 15 Lofty poet 16 Travel website with longtime spokesman William Shatner 17 Make those clumsy fools earn their living? 19 Send a quick message 20 The Band Perry's "If ___ Young" 21 Weapon at Hogwarts 23 Genesis name 27 Missouri River tributary 28 Jacob's twin 29 "On the Road" protagonist ___ Paradise 30 Portioned (out) 31 Redundantly named undergarment? 35 Response: abbr. 36 Florida city home to the headquarters of Telemundo 37 Behavior modification? 40 Hug in the shower? 45 "That's a tough ___ follow..." 47 Dig in 48 Finito 49 Take a knee on the field 50 Three-person card game 52 Money on the line 53 Rent-___ 54 Dutch ___ 56 Practice for being forced into something? 64 Too forward, as behavior 65 Dating game show of the 1990s 66 Rings out 67 On film

1 Get the yard done 2 Words exchanged at the altar 3 What the dead take, in a macabre phrase 4 Invited to one's apartment 5 Group that sang the line "I'm Kilroy!" 6 Computer's "brain," for short 7 He won the NHL's top rookie award while still a teenager 8 Newton fruit 9 It's also called the "Lincoln Law" (found in GOLF CART) 10 Swirly swimmer 11 Girl who lives in the Plaza Hotel 12 Personal information, literally 13 Immune system booster 14 Does the field again 18 Fifth qtrs. 21 "Rushmore" director Anderson 22 Home of the Sun Devils: abbr. 24 Palatial homes 25 Unseen disaster waiting to happen 26 Canada's first province, alphabetically 27 Home of a mail order steak business 32 "I was not expecting it to be that good" 33 Small inlet 34 Ric-___ (wavy fabric) 37 Bullring hero 38 "It Was a Good Day" rapper 39 Island stop on a Caribbean cruise 41 "Killing Me Softly with His Song" singer Flack 42 Ties 43 Fully prepared 44 The elderly, for short 46 Bullring hero, again 51 Temperature tester 55 Ginormous 57 It's the hottest thing around 58 Org. that gives out 9-digit IDs 59 Upstate N.Y. school 60 The night before 61 Guys 62 Ending for lemon or Power 63 Trippy tab

Last week’s solution

©2012 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com)

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 January 26 – February 2, 2012


PUBLIC NOTICES together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $215,622.03 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 7.625% per annum from 09/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 12/23/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-9840407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 110148466 FEI NO. 1006.150246 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 05/07/2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with

any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which ALTON M. KANE AND EILEEN N. KANE as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to PINNACLE TITLE & ESCROW as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. MIN# 100199400004566148, as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 05/23/2008 and recorded 05/29/2008, in document No. 200811995 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 819 at Page Number 972 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 199 OF DOUBLE ARROW RANCH PHASE IV, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION OF MISSOULA COUNTY, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLATT THEREOF. Property Address: 821 GRANDVIEW DRIVE, Seeley Lake, MT 59868. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 10/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments

RENTALS and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $208,947.63 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.00% per annum from 10/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 12/22/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-9840407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 110147830 FEI NO. 1006.150233

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EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

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ROOMMATES

MHA Management An affiliation of the Missoula Housing Authority

"Let us tend your den"

FIDELITY

www.naturalhousebuilder.net

9856 Anderson Rd 3 bd/1.5 ba, w/d hkups, dw,gas fireplace, on site storage, large partially fenced yard ... $950. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

www.alpharealestate.com

369-0940 or 642-6863

allowed GCPM , $650, 5496106, gcpm-mt.com

422 Madison • 549-6106

Starting at $10 per Month! www.ierecycling.net

ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes Additions/Remodels • Solar Heating HIGHER-COMFORT crafted building

801 Prince #4: One bedroom, 2nd floor, New carpet, Single car garage, On site laundry, Free cable, Just off of Russell, No pets or smoking

Property Management

549-7711 Check our website!

Natural Housebuilders, Inc.

2BR Condo Avail 2/1 New paint/carpet throughout, new wood laminate LR, 1.5 bath, 2 level condo, quite Northside neighborhood. Close to downtown, bike to UM, bus stop on same block. Includes W/D (not coin-op),carport pkg & storage unit. Trash pickup, snow removal included. No pets. No smkg. $800/mo. Will respond to inquiries promptly 207.2410

GardenCity

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

WEEKLY curbside Recycling

parking, Free cable, Dishwasher, No pets or smoking allowed GCPM , $510, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com

549-4113

1 BD Apt 1409 2nd St. $465/mo. 1 BD 4-plex 113 N. Johnson $465/mo.

Homeword.org

1 BD Apt 524 Hickory $480/mo. 2 BD Apt Uncle Robert Ln. $645/mo. Visit our website at www.fidelityproperty.com

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C8 January 26 – February 2, 2012

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals • Professional Office & Retail Leasing

30 years in Missoula

Call for Current Listings & Services Email: gatewest@montana.com


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana

541-7387

549-3934

SCOUT

At the shelter we all agree that Scout is simply the nicest dog in the world. He's loving, gentle, well-mannered, and always grateful for attention. We know he's going to make some lucky family a wonderful pet!

RIGBY

KIRA

Kira is a a beautiful, friendly lady who needs a family where someone is home most of time -- stay-at-home mom, retired person or couple, someone who works at home, etc. She just wants to be with her people!

3-year-old Rigby is an active and intelligent Australian Cattle Dog. She has experience with livestock and gets along well with most other dogs. Daily training exercises to provide mental stimulation are just as important as physical exercise for smart dogs.

Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MTSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

BUTCH

Butch is a petite fellow, so we gave him a bigguy name to make up for his small size. He's quite friendly, likes to be handled, and is one of the tidiest rabbits we've ever cared for. He does, however, want a real home! 2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

BARNABY

Barnaby is a very playful older kitten, but he really needs more room than his cage at the shelter. Besides always have a truly sweet look on his face, he also has outstanding tabby marking on his body.

NYLES

This stunning young adult male is super outgoing! He has a lovable disposition and enjoys snuggling on a lap. Nyles gets along well with most other cats. He is quiet and sweet. Who could resist his charming good looks?

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

FRED

Fred's owner moved and left him behind, the same owner who had named him Fathead. This handsome, shy fellow deserves better than that! We changed his name and are hoping for a new, loving owner soon.

BELLA

This gorgeous older tortoiseshell is very easy to get along with. She doesn't have the typical torti sass you would expect. She is 8 years old and thus is a candidate for the Seniors for Seniors adoption program.

Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

Flowers for every bride.

www.missoulafoodbank.org

In Trouble or in Love? The Flower Bed has

For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

PAT T O N

Patton is a big, fluffy, friendly guy whose favorite activities are eating and then lounging around until it's time to eat again! We have him on diet food, and we think he'd be more active in a real home with a family.

MISSY

5-year-old Missy is patiently awaiting her forever home. She LOVES to play with feather toys and use her scratching board. Missy is an independent cat and wont be very demanding of your time.

affordable flowers for all your needs.

Improving Lives One Pet at a Time

The Flower Bed

Missoula’s Unique Alternative for pet Supplies

2405 McDonald Ave. 721-9233

JAZZ

This active Australian Shepherd cross adores other dogs, cats, and even ferrets! She is 5 years old and is very playful. She loves to go for walks on her leash. She is very responsive and well-trained. Her adoption fee is $90.

www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275

627 Woody • 3275 N. Reserve Street Corner of 39th and Russell in Russell Square

MARA

Gorgeous Mara is an outgoing Maine Coon adult. She gets along well with other cats. Mara will rub up against you until you give her some attention. She is not as large as some Maine Coons but still has the gorgeous coloring and fur.

MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

These pets may be adopted at AniMeals 721-4710 MANALA

Manala was a happy girl, living her life in a home that she loved, until the new baby became allergic to her. She is hoping she gets a chance to find a forever family to unconditionally love her just as much as she loves them.

JUNE

The afternoon summer sun, blue sky, white puffy clouds...June is not only a beautiful month, but June is also a beautiful kitty. You can enjoy June all year long by giving her a forever home! Equus & Paws, L.L.C.

BOULDER

A boulder is defined as a large, smooth piece of rock detached from its place of origin. Boulder was detached from his place of origin as a kitten during our 2010 kitten season. He is a beautiful 1 1/2 year-old Tuxedo kitty. 715 Kensington Ste 8

406-240-1113 A Nice Little Bead Store In A Nice Little Town 105 Ravalli St Suite G, Stevensville, MT 59870 406.777.2141

2825 Stockyard Rd. www.equusandpaws.com • 406.552.2157

Find me on FACEBOOK jessicagoulding.zenfolio.com specializing in weddings, pets, families, babies, senior J. Willis Photography pictures, fine art, and more!

SHY

Taken away from his home with his lifelong companion, and who was adopted from AniMeals not long after arriving, Shy became somewhat reclusive. This 3-year-old went through a tough time and internalized his pain of losing what he thought was his forever home. Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 January 26 – February 2, 2012


REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 18737 Sorrel Springs Lane, Frenchtown, $379,000 MLS # 20113420, 4 bedroom 2 1/2 bath, Beautiful home on 4 acres with spectacular views. Call Betsy Milyard for a showing today at 880-4749. 120 N Easy St.: Enjoy one-level living a short walk from the river in this turn-key 3bd/2bath home on a concrete foundation. 1 block from a city park, and minutes from the university, this home features a large fenced yard, landscaping, and an area in the private back yard that is wired for a hot tub. $179,000 - MLS # 20120171. Call Shannon Hilliard at 239-8350 today! www.120NEasy.com

2511 Sunridge Court $225,000 MLS # 20116337 5 bedroom 3 bath THE HOUSE HAS CENTRAL AIR, VAULTED CEILINGS, A MASSIVE FAMILY ROOM WITH GAS FIREPLACE AND MUCH MORE. OVER 2800 SQ. FT. OF FINISHED LIVING SPACE, THERE IS PLENTY OF ROOM FOR ENTERTAINING FRIENDS AND FAMILY. Call Betsy Milyard for a showing today at 880-4749. 4 bed 2 bath house on one full landscaped acre near Wye. Great Well at 30 gpm. 2 gas fireplaces, updated kitchen and bathrooms. $289,000. MLS #20120012. 9869 Lee’s Lane, Missoula. Call Anne 546-5816 for details. www.movemontana.com 6106 Longview $235,000 MLS # 20116338 Large 4 Bedroom 2 Bath home located in the South

Hills. This home features hardwood floors, open floor plan, and large fenced yard. Call Betsy Milyard for more info 880-4749. 860 Haley, Florence $550,000 MLS# 20115636 5 bedroom, 3 bath, 2 car garage home available. Over 5000 finished square ft. Tons of space, game room and its own movie theater - perfect for living and entertaining! Your own private movie theater comes with 55” LED 3D TV, seven theater chairs, and an awesome sound system. Call Betsy Milyard for more info 880-4749. Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free comparative market analysis. 360-8234 Enjoy country living close to town, 3 bed, 2.5 bath home. Covered

deck front and back. Large double detached garage with additional living quarters. Carport behind garage for extra storage. Nice views and close to Forest Service land for horse back riding and hiking. Lolo Creek close for fishing. Park on the North boundary. Fence between Lot 1 and 2 not on property line. Will sell with adjacent 1.71 acre lot. $299,900. MLS#20115937. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. Great single wide 2 bed, 2 bath mobile on large lot with double car garage. Fenced yard, lots of trees and curbing around the landscaping. Covered deck. 1641 Stoddard, Missoula. $99,500. MLS#20116883. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

RICE TEAM

Robin Rice • 240-6503

8169 Lower Miller Creek • 3 Bed, 2 bath Well kept manufactured home on five productive acres in Upper Miller Creek. • 2 storage sheds, a detached double car garage and a separate shop/garage. • Only be 5 minutes from town. • $250,000 • MLS # 20113133.

“FAMOUS NINE MILE HOUSE” • Purchase the restaurant/bar, the house, outbuildings, & 4 trailer spots for • Dynamite investment for the right person with great potential for income from the rentals and the restaurant. • $449,000 • MLS # 20113100

860 Haley, Florence • 5 Bedroom, 3 Bath, 2 Car Garage • Over 5000 Finished sqft. Amazing home with gorgeous views, & paved road access. Tons of space, game room and its own movie theater - perfect for living and entertaining! • $550,000 • MLS #20115636

PRICE REDUCED

Specializing in Residential Rentals in Missoula

117 Dallas, in LOLO. $184,900 • 3 Bed 2 Bath home on the hill in Lolo. • Spacious living room, large backyard & deck, great views of the mountains, and huge family room in the basement. • Perfect home for RD financing.

meticulousmanagement.com 406-241-1408

Please call me with any questions Astrid Oliver Senior Loan Originator Guild Mortgage Company 1001 S. Higgins Ave 2A Missoula, MT 59801 Phone: 406-258-7522 Cell: 406-550-3587 NMLS # 395211, Guild License #3274, Branch 206 NMLS # 398152

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10 January 26 – February 2, 2012

I can help you sell your home! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com Looking for a place to call home? Call me! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com Looking for homebuyer education? Call me! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com Megan Lane, Frenchtown, $199,900 MLS: 10007166 BRAND NEW 3 BED, 2 BATH HOME ON 1 ACRE. HOME TO BE BUILT SO YOU CAN PICK YOUR COLORS AND SOME FINISHING TOUCHES. GENEROUS $2000 APPLIANCE ALLOWANCE AND $1300 LANDSCAPING

ALLOWANCE. Call Betsy for more info 880-4749. Rattlesnake dream property with a 1 bedroom apartment! 3 bed, 2 bath, 3 car garage located on over 1/2 acre manicured & landscaped gardens & lawn. UG sprinkler, “secret garden” & fenced yard. $425,000. MLS#20114396. Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.2404rattlesnake.com. Three story townhome near North Reserve. Two Bed, one Loft, three bath with fenced yard and double car garage. GREAT Deal at $180,000. MLS #20117696. 3741A Concord, Missoula. Call Anne 546-5816 for details. www.movemontana.com View or list properties for sale By Owner at www. byownermissoula.com OR call 550-3077

Well maintained 4 bed home w/ hardwood flooring in living, dining and kitchen. Fully fenced backyard w/ deck. Nicely landscaped w/ mature trees and srubs. UG sprinklers in both front and back yard. 232 Cap De Villa, Lolo. $239,000. MLS#20116816. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. Wonderful 5 bed, 3 bath home @ top of Fairviews with 2 car garage. Level lot! Borders open space. All new carpet & interior paint. Trex deck off dining room. Great views! Back yard is fenced. $275,000. MLS#20116161. Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.110artemos.com


REAL ESTATE CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES For a limited time purchase a condo at the Uptown Flats will include a large flat screen TV & assistance with up to $5000 Buyers closing costs! The Uptown Flats have two 1 bed 1 bath units at $149,900. Call Anne 546-5816 for showing. www.movemontana.com Four bed, 1-1/2 bath, 3 car garage home at 345 Brooks st. Close to downtown, neighborhood coffee shop/restaurant, & university. Long time family home has potential to have downstairs rental. Just $275,000 MLS 20117301 Call Anne 546-5816 for details. www.movemontana.com

MANUFACTURED HOMES New Listing! Manufactured 3 bed 2 bath home, permanent foundation,

low maintenance vinyl siding, 3 acres, partially fenced, double garage. Large deck with awning over looking the Bitterroot Valley. Large master bedroom with nice master bath. 663 Ridge Road, Stevensville. $190,000. MLS#20117486. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

LAND FOR SALE Beautiful wooded 3.69 acres, 550 feet of Twin Creeks frontage. Easy access from Hwy 200 on well maintained county road. Modulars or manufactured homes on a permanent foundation are allowed. Seller will carry contract with $50,000 down at 7 % interest. $184,900. MLS#10005586. Robin Rice @ 2 4 0 - 6 5 0 3 . riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

COMMERCIAL 321 N. Higgins Commercial building on coveted downtown location w/ lots of foot traffic. Building only for sale. Call Anne 546-5816 for showing. www.movemontana.com

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL QUICK CASH FOR REAL ESTATE NOTES and Land Installment Contracts. We also lend on Real Estate with strong equity. 406-7211444 www.Creative-Finance.com

Homes:

744 Rollins . . . . . 2325 Wyoming . . . 120 Bickford . . . . 2627 O'Shaughnessy 350 W. Central . . . 930 Turner . . . . . 629 North Ave. W. . 345 Brooks . . . . . 300 W Central . . . 6526 MacArthur . . . 611 Stephens . . . . 909 Herbert . . . . .

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.Slant St. charmer . . .4BR/2Ba . . . . . . . .Slant Streets . . . . . .Duplex . . . . . . . . .Tastefully remodeled .2.5 lots; can be split .Amazingly Adorable! .Heart of Missoula .Lewis & Clark beaut! .Views . . . . . . . . . .Character galore . . .Near Bugbee Park .

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.$159,900 .$209,900 .$219,900 .$229,000 .$235,000 .$242,000 .$259,900 .$275,000 .$289,900 .$299,000 .$345,000 .$349,900

Homes w/land:

9625 Cedar Ridge . . . . . .11+ Acres close in . . . . . . . .$299,000 2348 River Rd . . . . . . . .House & Land to build! . . . . . .$535,000 Land:

Rochelle Glasgow

544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

&Y]MRKELSYWI# ;I´PPWLS[]SY XLI[E]LSQI

Missoula Properties

Upper Sawmill Creek Ln. NHN S 13th West . . . . 2215 S 13th W . . . . . 1150 Cramer Cr . . . . 17467 W Nine Mile . .

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.15 acres Cascade County . . . . . .$30,000 .Vacant lot in Missoula . . . . . . .$50,000 .fenced lot w/services . . . . . . . .$70,000 .6.88 acres w/cabin . . . . . . . . .$79,000 .11.08 acres, Huson . . . . . . . .$104,000

Commercial:

1535 Liberty Lane . . . . . .New Lease Space . . . . . . . . . . .$ 11-15 436 S 3rd W. . . . . . . . . .Historical Register . . . . . . . . .$449,0005 Townhomes/Condos:

1400 Burns . . . . . . . . .Energy Efficient . . . .Starting at $112,500 Uptown Flats . . . . . . . . .Upscale Downtown . .Starting at $149,000

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21079-

+EVJMIPH` OPETMIVVI$JWFQWPEGSQ

MISSOULAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CONDOS AT THEIR FINEST UPSCALE DOWNTOWN LIFESTYLE THE UPTOWN FLATS 1 and 2 bedroom condos available

Starting at $149,900 OPEN HOUSE: Sunday Noon-4pm or call Jeff or Anne for Appointment

Jeff Ellis

Anne Jablonski

529-5087

546-5816 PORTICO REAL ESTATE

www.theuptownflatsmissoula.com Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 January 26 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; February 2, 2012


Deschutes Brewing

$6.59 6 pack

Assorted Zoi Greek Yogurt

Boneless Beef Sirloin Tip Roast

Nature Sweet Cherub Tomatoes

89¢

$2.99 lb.

$2.59

6 oz.

Pabst Blue Ribbon*

$14.99 24 pack

Natural Directions 4 oz. Fruit Bowls

$1.88 4 pack

pint

Family Pack Boneless Pork Sirloin Steak

$1.99

Living Butter Lettuce

$2.99 each

lb.

*America’s #4 Dealer

Washington State 14 Hands Wine

$8.99

Assorted Campbell Chunky Soups

$1.67

Gold'n Plump 24 oz. Drums or Thighs

California Cara Cara Oranges

$2.19

$1.49

lb.

each

18.8 oz.

.75 liter

Western Family Double Roll Bath Tissue

Western Family Bagged Cereal

Family Pack Boneless Top Sirloin Steak

3 lb. Bag Organic Honey Crisp Apples

$2.77

$2.88

$4.49 lb.

$3.99

6 count

28-32 oz.

each

Nautilius Medium Tail Off Cooked Shrimp

California Brussel Sprouts

$1.69 lb.

$10.89 32 oz.

701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 7 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188 | orangestreetfoodfarm.com


World Headquarters All Valentine’s Cards & Goodies 25% off All Compact Discs, New & Used $2off All Jewelry 25% off All Body Products 25% off All Posters & Art 25% off All Cards, Journals & Paper Products 25% off All Toys 25% off All Clothing 25% off All Chocolates & Candies 25% off

Rudy’s II Record Heaven All Vinyl - New & Used 25% off All Turntables, Cartridges & Stereo Equipment 25% off SALE ENDS 1/29/12


Missoula Independent