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NEWS

THE MISSING: FEDS SAY TENS OF THOUSANDS OF COBELL RECIPIENTS HAVE YET TO BE FOUND

DOWN ON TVDOUBLING YOUR “DOWNTON” FIX

SCENIC OPINION MEGALOADS, RIVERS DON’T MIX

TO WATCH AT MAM’S ARTS TWO 42 ANNUAL ART AUCTION nd


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


NEWS

THE MISSING: FEDS SAY TENS OF THOUSANDS OF COBELL RECIPIENTS HAVE YET TO BE FOUND

DOWN ON TVDOUBLING YOUR “DOWNTON” FIX

SCENIC OPINION MEGALOADS, RIVERS DON’T MIX

TO WATCH AT MAM’S ARTS TWO 42 ANNUAL ART AUCTION nd


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cover photo courtesy of Studer Trust

News Voices/Letters Forests, oil and gas, and Daniel Zolnikov...........................................4 The Week in Review Rehberg, hunters and a tragic tree well....................................6 Briefs Riverside Cafe, bucket biology and soup kitchens ..............................................6 Etc. Science and sage grouse ..........................................................................................7 News After 40 years, Bill Bevis still keeps it cool at Pineview Park ................................8 News Thousands of Cobell recipients in Montana have yet to be found.......................9 Opinion Megaloads and wild-and-scenic rivers don’t mix...........................................10 Feature Missoula’s unlikely connection to Myanmar’s education reform...................14

Arts & Entertainment Arts Two to watch at MAM’s 42nd benefit art auction....................................................18 Music Futurebirds, Jayke Orvis and the Broken Band, and The Wild Feathers ...........20 Television Dramas for the “Downton” devotee ...........................................................21 Film Osage County offers dark drama, little levity .......................................................22 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films .....................................................23 Flash in the Pan Winter heat .......................................................................................24 Hangriest Hour Steel Toe Distillery.............................................................................26 8 Days a Week Sounds like “mee-uhn-MAR” (or “MYAN-mar”)...................................27 Mountain High Missoula Marathon Registration Party................................................33 Agenda Anniversary of Roe v. Wade .............................................................................34

Exclusives

Street Talk..............................................................................................................4 In Other News......................................................................................................12 Classifieds ..........................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ...........................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y.............................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle...............................................................................................C-7 Camp Sleepover .................................................................................................C-9 This Modern World...........................................................................................C-11

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL PROJECTS Christie Anderson ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Cathrine L. Walters CALENDAR EDITOR Kate Whittle STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen, Jimmy Tobias COPY EDITOR Kate Whittle ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Pumpernickel Stewart, Jonathan Marquis CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Allen MARKETING, PROMOTION & EVENTS COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, Jason McMackin, Brad Tyer, Nick Davis, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Matthew Frank, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Melissa Mylchreest, Rob Rusignola, Josh Quick, Brooks Johnson

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2013 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • January 16–January 23, 2014 [3]


[voices]

STREET TALK

by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked Tuesday, Jan. 14, near the corner of Higgins and Spruce. What charitable cause(s) do you typically contribute to? Follow-up: What’s the farthest you’ve ever had to travel for a work trip?

Jack Renninger: The Boy Scouts of America and UNICEF. I’m an Eagle Scout. On a jet plane: 3,000 miles when I worked in Germany. I was in the service.

K.C. O’Donnell: Conscious Alliance. It’s a food bank program that benefits the Northern Cheyenne. It was started by the music industry about eight years ago. Transcontinental: Over 3,000 miles from coast to coast. I work in the music industry as a visual artist doing staging and lighting.

Will Halliburton: I bust out gardens for all my friends and am putting in a couple orchards for free. I’m trying to diversify the food system here. Across the pond: I worked for an Austrian industrial automobile company, so I guess Austria.

Cyrus Cohea: I donate to Doctors Without Borders. I think the organization uses its budget really well and has a long track record of doing good work. Southbound: Missoula to Hamilton. I was working as a carpenter on the GlaxoSmithKline lab project.

Anya Means: The Watson Children’s Shelter and YWCA. Just to help kids in need and in my own life I struggled with domestic abuse and I think it’s a great program to empower women. Close to home: Not very far. I work in town, so just around Missoula.

[4] Missoula Independent • January 16–January 23, 2014

Real changes I would like to thank Congressman Steve Daines for his work on HR 1526, the Restoring Healthy Forests for Healthy Communities Act, which passed the House of Representatives with strong bipartisan support. The Boone and Crockett Club, along with many hunting organizations, have strongly supported this legislation. Why? Because millions of acres of our national forests are overcrowded, dying from insect infestation and susceptible to uncharacteristically large, hot wildfires. If you hunt and you care about improving the health of our national forests, as the club does, then you realize that we need real changes to help the Forest Service get back in the woods performing active management. Study after study has shown that improvements to forest health, including the resilience of fire prone forests, can be restored through active management. As Congressman Daines and the bipartisan members of the House pointed out when they passed HR 1526, we need aggressive forest management to improve game populations and enhance game habitat. The club will continue to fight for access to public land to hunt and shoot, and to enhance the habitat that supports important game populations like elk and deer. HR 1526 will improve the quality of habitat for all wildlife species while also creating healthy timber based jobs in rural communities in Montana and across the country. William A. Demmer President Boone and Crockett Club Missoula

Shut out On Dec. 9, the Board of Oil and Gas Conservation canceled a scheduled public comment hearing on Energy Corporations of America’s oil well planned along the Beartooth Front. Because of their decision, affected landowners and concerned Montanans had no opportunity to officially voice their concerns about its development. The BOGC’s repression of citizens’ voices indicates that the loyalty of the Board may lie with the industry. Given the BOGC’s membership is comprised of three representatives of the oil and gas industry, one landowner with mineral

L

rights, one landowner without mineral rights, one from the public and one attorney, it’s clear the industry holds a majority over any other group impacted by oil and gas development. Because of the oil and gas industries’ overwhelming representation on the BOGC, it’s not surprising they acquiesced to ECA’s last-minute demand to deny Northern Plains Resource Council and Carbon County Resource Council comments because, although ECA and the

“He has become a voice of a new generation of public officials who are committed to protecting our freedoms in the digital age.” BOGC had timely received the complete file, a certificate of delivery had been not included. When this was brought to the councils’ attention, and the valid certificate being promptly provided, it’s also not surprising that the board refused to accept it and allow the public comment hearing to proceed. Apparently, the board is against hearing Montanans’ concerns and in favor of ECA’s chief executive officer’s publicly stated goal that he “would love to bring something like the Bakken … to the area in the Big Horns and other areas in Montana.” Charles Sangmeister Nye

32 under 30 In the midst of partisan vitriol in today’s politics, one Montana legislator stands out from the rest. Forbes listed

Rep. Daniel Zolnikov, R-Billings, as one of its “30 Under 30.” The 32 of us who have signed this letter are also all under the age of 30, and come from all corners of Montana. We want to congratulate Rep. Zolnikov, and thank him for his work to protect our privacy rights. Zolnikov, 26, achieved the Forbes honor by pioneering legislation last session to protect our civil liberties. He argued that government officials should have to obtain warrants to conduct searches of cellphone data even before Edward Snowden blew the whistle on massive, unconstitutional (according to two federal judges) NSA surveillance. Once the Snowden scandal broke, Zolnikov’s work received international praise. He has become a voice of a new generation of public officials who are committed to protecting our freedoms in the digital age. As a young legislator, Zolnikov made Montana an example for the rest of the nation, and even other countries, to follow. Laws similar to his requiring government to obtain warrants before accessing cellphone location data have now passed in numerous other states, and more privacy protections are on the way. The current heated debate over digital privacy has broken down party lines and unified many in our generation. We are the ones who will live through a new age of groundbreaking technology and innovation. While these technologies provide exciting new opportunities, they can also create new threats to privacy and freedom if left unchecked. Daniel Zolnikov is on the cutting edge of securing smart policies that will protect our rights for generations to come. We look forward to seeing more great work from him in the future, and again offer our gratitude and congratulations. Kyle Schmauch Kalispell Adam Hertz City Councilman Missoula Mike Hopkins Candidate for SD 49 Missoula as well as 29 others

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via email: editor@missoulanews.com.


missoulanews.com • January 16–January 23, 2014 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Cathrine L. Walters

Wednesday, January 8 The Northern Plains Resource Council sues Montana’s Board of Oil and Gas Conservation in state court after the agency approved a permit for the Denver-based Energy Corporation of America to begin drilling for oil in the Beartooth Mountains.

Thursday, January 9 UM researchers Mark Hebblewhite and Joel Berger publish a study in the national journal Science that documents threats to large carnivores. According to the report, 17 of the world’s 31 biggest predators have lost more than half of their historic range and could face extinction.

Friday, January 10 The Montana Department of Transportation issues a permit that allows a megaload of oil equipment to pass through the state on its way to the Alberta tar sands. The load had been stopped on the state border near Lost Trail Pass awaiting permission to continue its journey.

Saturday, January 11 Douglas Spring, a 54-year-old from California, dies at Whitefish Mountain Resort when he falls into a tree well while skiing with his son. The accident comes on the heels of a lawsuit filed in federal court in December by the parents of a German exchange student who died in a tree well at the resort in 2010.

Sunday, January 12 NBC affiliate KECI returns to DISH Network in Missoula, bringing an end to a bitter and public contract dispute between the affiliate’s owner, Bonten Media Group, and the satellite TV service provider. The dispute began in early December.

Monday, January 13 After toying with the idea, former U.S. Rep. Denny Rehberg announces that he will not run for his old seat or any other public office during the 2014 election cycle. Rehberg says he’s busy with other important endeavors, like the new Burger King franchise he opened in Billings on Jan. 11.

Tuesday, January 14 Hunters hoping for a last windfall of bird meat hit the sloughs and ponds in western Montana on the final day of the state’s duck season. Once sundown rolls around, waterfowl fly without fear as the shotguns go silent.

Unseasonably warm temperatures and rain made for wet conditions during the fourth annual Seeley Lake Pond Hockey tournament on Saturday evening. In all, 48 teams and more than 300 players—including Brett Cunniff, left, and Dustin Thompson, right—competed in the weekend event.

City council

Westsiders win Westside residents secured a first-round victory Monday night when the Missoula City Council voted unanimously to limit where homeless shelters and soup kitchens can setup shop. “I definitely think that the Westside is very happy with the turn of events,” says Elaine Hawk of pLAND Land Use Consulting, who spoke on behalf of neighborhood residents for more stringent regulations governing social services. When the Union Gospel Mission announced last year that it intended to move from its current Toole Avenue location to the former Sweetheart Bakery site on West Broadway, Westsiders felt under siege. They worried about Union Gospel being situated a third of a mile from the Poverello Center homeless shelter’s new location, and called on city officials to protect their neighborhood from the negative fallout that they say can come from clustering social services. Westside Neighborhood Association member Toni Matlock told council on Monday that research from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

[6] Missoula Independent • January 16–January 23, 2014

and the Brookings Institution, among others, shows that housing such services in one district “cultivates an environment of segregation, greater crime, fear and poorer health and, in fact, greater poverty.” In response to those concerns, council approved changes to city zoning code that, if they again endorse the proposal later this month, will prohibit homeless shelters and soup kitchens from operating within a quarter mile of each other, 1,000 feet of a school and roughly one city block of a residential district. The residential buffer would permanently derail Union Gospel’s plans to move into the Sweetheart Bakery site. Among the most controversial provisions with council members was the one requiring shelters and soup kitchens to provide the city with a management plan detailing, for instance, how they intend to deal with alcohol and drug use. Councilman Mike O’Herron took particular exception to a requirement that they submit written strategies for engaging in dialogue with police, neighborhood representatives and local businesses. “I’m kind of concerned about this being the only type of facility where that sort of neighborhood relations plan appears,” he said. O’Herron wasn’t the only one who raised issues with

the changes. Union Gospel Mission’s Candace Day warned that dispersing services across town could have unintended consequences. “If you have no transportation to get to the help that you need, you ignore the problem,” she said. “And the problem gets worse and the public pays for your problem...” Council is scheduled to again vote on the proposal after a public hearing scheduled for Jan 27. Jessica Mayrer

Business

Feds target Riverside Cafe During a recent lunch hour, the Riverside Cafe at 247 W. Front Street had its doors locked and its curtains drawn. Chairs inside the restaurant were stacked atop tables and a note on the doors read, “We are closed for the holiday season. Happy Holidays to all of you. Thank you.” Two weeks after the New Year, however, the restaurant remains closed. The lack of activity has prompted patrons to post inquiries on the cafe’s Facebook page asking, “What happened?” Riverside owner Jackie Thornton told the Independ-


[news] ent in an email that she tentatively aims to reopen the cafe in early February. She did not elaborate on why it’s currently closed. The reason could involve mounting financial challenges facing the business. County records indicate that the federal government between July and December placed three liens against Thornton’s business, Thornton Enterprises, for the tax years 2010 through 2013 totaling $168,000. According to those records, Thornton Enterprises owes the money for failing to pay Social Security or Medicare taxes on behalf of its employees. “We have made a demand for payment of this liability, but it remains unpaid,” the federal filings state. Additionally, the Montana Department of Labor has since 2011 placed three workers’ compensation liens against Thornton’s holdings amounting to $6,700. Public records indicate that the state assigned those debts to Missoula Collection Bureau Services. On July 29, meanwhile, the DOL filed a motion in Missoula District Court to collect $3,123.75 “for unpaid wages and penalties,” according to court records. “A final determination was made that the respondent is in violation of the wage payment act ...” Attempts to ask Thornton about how her company’s mounting debt will impact Riverside’s future went unanswered. Missoula-based SEB Partnership owns the building that houses Riverside Cafe, and SEB Partnership’s Scott Long said in an email that he isn’t aware of Thornton’s future plans. “We have not been contacted by the tenant, to my knowledge,” he said. The cafe opened in September 2012 with a wellreceived menu of rustic American cuisine developed by Chicago chef Derrick Wcislak. The location was the previous home to Front Street Pasta and Wraps, which was also owned by Thornton. Jessica Mayrer

Fish

FWP kicks bucket biology Bucket biology is bad. That’s the message the governor’s five-person Fish, Wildlife and Parks Commission communicated on Jan. 9 when it approved a new set of rules to combat the illegal introduction of aquatic wildlife into Montana’s lakes, rivers and streams. At a meeting in Helena, the commissioners unanimously supported legal measures that will shore up FWP’s efforts to respond to illegal fish introductions. If the new rules are officially adopted, the agency will have to conduct an investigation within 30 days of learning about introduced invasive species. The agency will also have a variety of management options open to it, including the use of fish barriers, nets, habitat manipulation

and chemicals. These new measures are now subject to public comment. The proposed rules are a response to the increasing prevalence of “bucket biology,” a practice in which anglers and others introduce non-native species like northern pike, walleye and carp into waterways to increase fishing opportunities. “All this does is take long-standing FWP policies and puts them into an administrative rule and gives them the force of law,” says Dan Vermillion, the commission chairman. “We have illegal introductions occurring with more regularity, on the West side of the divide in particular, and people bringing warm water fish into cold water fisheries.” Bruce Farling, executive director at Montana Trout Unlimited, says the new administrative rules are a sign

that the state is taking the bucket biology problem more seriously. “The problem is we have a bunch of people in this state who take it upon themselves to introduce species all across waters in Montana that are not native to the area and generally have a harmful effect,” says Farling. “They are doing it without any sort of biological analysis, without talking to the folks who fish these particular waters. It is armchair fisheries management and it is illegal. ... These guys are vandals.” FWP estimates that there have been 538 illegal or unauthorized introductions in the state since it began keeping records, with the majority of those introductions in western Montana. Jimmy Tobias

Agriculture

The perks of BEER Sen. Jon Tester announced last month he was throwing his support behind the Brewers Excise and Economic

BY THE NUMBERS

$428,240.17 Amount owed by M2Green Redevelopment LLC for back taxes on the former Smurfit-Stone Container mill site it purchased in 2011. Relief Act, a bill aimed at cutting the excise tax on U.S.brewed beer from $18 per barrel to $9. The measure would also reduce the tax rate for small brewers from $7 per barrel to $3.50. Tester said the effort would help brewers “double-down on their success and strengthen Montana’s reputation for great-tasting beer.” Tester’s announcement included an estimate from MillerCoors that the BEER Act’s tax reduction would “result in a $1.46 million increase in barley sales.” Dan Kidd, a director with the National Barley Growers Association, says his industry is “very supportive” of any excise tax reduction that allows domestic brewers to invest more in production. “Those dollars would find their way back to the farms,” he says. According to the national Beer Institute, the brewing industry’s use of barley products nationally has skyrocketed from 2.2 million pounds in 1992 to more than 128 million pounds in 2012. MillerCoors currently contracts with more than 800 barley growers in the Northern Rockies, including about 250 in Montana. In 2011, Anheuser-Busch reported to the Montana Legislature that it contracts with 675 barley growers in Montana alone and purchases $55 million worth of malt barley from the state annually. Those companies have also invested heavily in their in-state barley infrastructure. MillerCoors was scheduled to complete construction of a 3.2-million-bushel barley elevator in Power last month—its second in the state. The company intends to address expansion of an Idahobased water conservation pilot project to Montana in its annual sustainability report this year. “If you look at the last 10 years, it’s just a dramatic shift in the amount of barley that everybody’s getting out of Montana,” Kidd says. “Montana’s rapidly becoming the number one player when it comes to malt barley.” The upward trend is further perpetuated by Montana’s ongoing craft brewing boom. The Montana Brewers Association states that roughly half of the six million pounds of malted grain used by Montana microbreweries each year comes from in-state. As the industry expands, Kidd says, “they’re going to need more barley.” The BEER Act was introduced in the Senate in 2009 and again in 2011, with Tester acting as a co-sponsor both times. Neither attempt made it past committee. Alex Sakariassen

ETC. You can’t swing a Sierra Club mug in this state right now without hitting one of the many industry-sponsored op-eds or press releases decrying key provisions in Montana’s proposed sage grouse conservation plan. As the state moves to protect the greater sage grouse and avoid the bird’s listing under the Endangered Species Act, coal, gas and business groups are pushing back. Unfortunately, many of their published claims and policy proposals turn out to be misinformed or downright misleading. Consider the Montana Chamber of Commerce’s recent opinion piece in the Billings Gazette, in which they ask Gov. Steve Bullock to remove key provisions in the plan. “Eliminate the three-year cessation of development activities if grouse populations fall, regardless of the cause and through no fault of human or development activity,” it reads. “Drought, disease, wildfire and other natural disasters are beyond human control.” It’s a little difficult to accept the assertion that drought, disease and wildfire are unrelated to development activity. University of Montana biologist Dave Naugle and other scientists have published numerous studies that show how coal bed methane development in Montana and Wyoming leaves liquid waste stagnating in storage pools across the landscape. These pools provide habitat for the mosquitos that carry West Nile Virus and exacerbate viral outbreaks in fragile grouse populations. In this case, development leads to disease. And across the greater sage grouse’s range, scientists and government agencies have documented how invasive plants like cheatgrass increase both the frequency and intensity of grouse-killing wildfires. These grasses are introduced and spread by humans. Then there’s the many billion tons of carbon our industrial society pumps into the atmosphere each year. Might that play a role in worsening droughts and intensifying wildfires? Clearly development activity has a role in the “natural disasters” that promote sage grouse mortality. The provision to stop development if grouse populations decline is crucial and shouldn’t change. The sage grouse problem is complex—a bird is at risk of extinction and Montana’s rural communities face tough choices about their economic future. But state policy makers and stakeholders cannot afford to ignore established science. If these powerful interests continue to undermine the state’s sage grouse conservation plan then the bird will be listed under the ESA. The Montana Chamber of Commerce and its partners in science denial will howl, but, hey, that’s justice. Chickens (and their wild cousins) always come home to roost.

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missoulanews.com • January 16–January 23, 2014 [7]


[news]

Ice man After nearly 40 years, Bill Bevis keeps it cool at Pineview Park by Jimmy Tobias

Smoked Duck. Grits. Corn Nuts. Collards. or Spiced Squash Tamale. Cilantro. Pepitas. Cotija. Chicken Sausage Gumbo. Rice. or Frisée. Bacon. Red Wine Vinaigrette. Poached Egg. Braised Lamb. White Beans. Roast Carrot. Carrot Top Persillade. or Top Sirloin. Yukon Gold Potatoes. Mushroom Marmalade. Asparagus. or Potato and Greens Torta. Arugula. Carrot Purée. Shallot Jam. Chocolate Terrine. or Profiterole with Big Dipper Ice Cream.

[8] Missoula Independent • January 16–January 23, 2014

lot of time, the county allowed us to reserve certain times for the ice makers to play.” When Glacier Ice Rink opened its doors, it relieved some of the pressure on Pineview’s crew. In 2007, Pineview Park was transferred from the county to the city. Bevis and other members of the park board led a successful campaign to pass a bond issue in their special improvement district that raised $750,000 to equip the park with improved facilities. The ice makers now work with the city to maintain the outdoor rink and receive $1,000 annually to fund the operation. “It is fantastic. We would not be able, using city staff resources, to come close to maintaining the rink to the level and quality that volunteers are able to do,” says Donna Gaukler, director of Missoula Parks and Recreation. “They are out there super late at night and very early in the morning. ... I think it is a huge service to the entire community and it is really cool to have a natural surface ice rink available to folks for free.” Today, rink-goers use twoby-four boards to split the ice between free skaters and hockey players, and the rink includes a special area for beginning skaters and children. When the weather gets too photo by Cathrine L. Walters warm, Bevis closes the rink to Bill Bevis rides a special-made tractor that helps resurface the ice rink at Pineview Park. protect the surface. He says that The former University of Montana English professor has been overseeing the site since 1975. everyone follows the rules. “What has really pleased The ice-making team smooths the slick us, since we built the new park, there is three feet of water in the course of two hours,” says Bevis, a retired University of surface of each new layer using a wild-look- such community support for it,” he says. Montana English professor. “In the morn- ing tractor equipped with a horizontal “Like, even the teenagers obey the rules. We ing it had melted out of the ground some- power broom on the front and a plow on don’t have to police it.” where underneath … and there were the back. The team built its own water Each year, Bevis and his team plan a shards of ice sticking in the air. It looked pump and has a custom-made hose setup new major improvement. This summer he that allows volunteers to work with maxi- hopes to level the sod underneath the rink like the Arctic.” After the firefighter debacle, Bevis de- mum efficiency. so that the ice is more flat. He says he would The outdoor rink at Pineview was the also like to install a webcam at the rink so cided to take over. The following year, he most reliable ice in town until Glacier Ice users know whether or not it’s open for formally started the rink at Pineview Park. “Ice is really a subtle, beautiful thing,” Rink was built in the 1990s, says Bevis. The public use. says Bevis, who learned the ice-making craft special topography and limited light in the When asked what he has learned from while growing up in the Northeast. His red Rattlesnake Valley kept the site open for all these years of ice making, Bevis laughs. wool coat matches his rosy cheeks, and he three months a year and it quickly became “I’ve learned patience, not trying to do looks like a man who has spent a lifetime popular. too much at once, the right amount of “In the early ’90s, before Glacier rink water, not too much,” he says. “And those outdoors in freezing temperatures. At 72 years old, he plays in two hockey leagues, was built, we were having real problems,” valuable lessons have utterly failed to participates in daily pickup games at says Bevis. “The ice makers could not get spread to the rest of my life in any way, but Pineview and still tends to the rink. He out there to play hockey because there I can make ice.” notes that three other “bored” members— were such crowds. In order to keep up Paul Sharkey, Craig Podner and Dave Har- the energy for ice making, which takes a jtobias@missoulanews.com The outdoor ice rink at Pineview Park in the Rattlesnake has a storied past. Before it became a favorite spot for hockey players and skaters, it was a graveyard and then a farm and hospital for the poor and indigent. When Bill Bevis first laid eyes on the plot of land in winter 1974, it was a county park and local firefighters were trying to pool water into a depression at the park’s back end to create a rink. “They had two fire hydrants open and two trucks and they put in like two or

mon—and 15 volunteers, many of whom are hockey players, have joined the effort of maintaining the site. Bevis says the first lesson of proper ice making is not to pool water like the well-intentioned firefighters did 40 years ago. The key is building the ice layer by layer. For the first layer, “you have to have white ice, not just ice,” he says. “You can’t have transparent or dark ice because the sunlight will come through and warm up the ground and melt everything. We whiten it by misting with the big rubber hose.”


[news]

The missing Thousands of Cobell recipients in Montana have yet to be found by Alex Sakariassen

That site highlighted another ongoing A little over four years ago, the U.S. De- have an allotment that makes them eligible partment of the Interior agreed to a $3.4 bil- for a portion of the settlement. David problem for the Cobell settlement last lion settlement in a landmark case alleging Smith, the attorney representing the settle- month. The Garden City Group issued a decades of government mismanagement of ment’s recipients, says the firm’s made sig- fraud alert to beneficiaries after an indiIndian trust accounts. The first of those set- nificant strides in recent months. When it vidual was contacted by someone claimtlement payments were finally made last started tracking down the so-called Where- ing to be associated with the firm. The year—two years too late to be celebrated by abouts Unknown last year, there were impersonator requested information about the individual’s personal bank acBlackfeet tribal member and lead plaintiff more than 60,000 individuals on the list. “We literally get dozens of calls each count. As millions of dollars trickle out to Elouise Cobell, who died in fall 2011. But as the New York-based claims administrator day,” Smith says. “We’re finding over 1,000 tribal members nationwide, fraud and manipulation have become an increasing Garden City Group prepares to send the [Whereabouts Unknown] a month.” next round of checks in the coming Yet the search continues for nearly concern. “This settlement can benefit you, your months, the firm is still working to track 30,000 people, accounting for $32 million down nearly 30,000 beneficiaries whom the in settlement payments. Many of those are family and your communities, but we must federal government has been unable to lo- members of tribes in Montana. The 728 ben- all be aware of the potential negative impacts,” Jefferson Keel, cate. Approximately 728 president of the Naof those are listed as tional Congress of members of Cobell’s own American Indians, said tribe. in a public service anProgress toward imnouncement distribplementing the settleuted to radio stations ment has proven slow nationwide early last since Congress approved year. “Dishonest people it in late 2011. Last sumknow about the settlemer tribal leaders in ment and are figuring Montana and Wyoming ways to take money were still voicing frustrafrom you. Be aware and tions with the Interior’s be watchful.” foot-dragging on the $1.9 Many of the settlebillion Land Buy-Back ment recipients are Program, an allocation trusting individuals, established in the legal Smith says. They’ve agreement to help tribes been “shocked, surconsolidate ownership of prised, when they learn fractionated individual photo by Cathrine L. Walters that this person does land allotments on resernot have their best invations. The agency only Four years ago, Blackfeet tribal member Elouise Cobell won a announced its first land landmark $3.4 billion settlement from the U.S. government. terest at heart.” Perhaps the most buy-back offers last But the government still can’t locate roughly 30,000 of the tribal ironic twist in the probmonth, on the Pine Ridge members slated to receive that money. lems still plaguing the Reservation in South Dakota. Washington’s Makah tribe became eficiaries on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation Cobell settlement is that the flawed adthe second to sign a land buy-back agree- are owed a total of just over $735,000. At dresses can be traced back to the very misment with the Interior this week. Fort Peck, 900 are missing and set to receive management that prompted Cobell’s suit in According to the Interior’s updated more than $1 million. Those figures include the first place. The Individual Indian Money Land Buy-Back implementation plan re- individuals who aren’t technically listed as account data the claims administrator began leased in November, there are roughly 2.9 Whereabouts Unknowns by the Interior but working with came directly from the Interior—data the agency acknowledged lacked million purchasable fractionated acres on have undeliverable addresses. 150 Indian reservations nationwide. The Garden City Group counts more than current mailing addresses for more than agency says it’s unclear how many of the es- 2,000 others in Montana–spread among the 83,000 accounts. Both the Garden City timated 243,000 individual owners of those Confederated Salish and Kootenai tribes, Group and the Interior’s Office of the Spetracts will be willing to sell their land; two Crow, Northern Cheyenne, Fort Belknap cial Trustee are operating call centers for years have already passed in the program’s and Rocky Boy reservations–due more than those who need to correct their information. Smith calls it the biggest vestige of the 10-year window. $2.1 million. As for the individual settlement recipThe Garden City Group is primarily historic mismanagement of IIM accounts. “Basically we inherited Interior’s data ients, the Garden City Group distributed working to locate these people with the the first wave of payments in 2013 and help of tribal officials. “That’s truly been the with all its problems,” he says. “One of the roughly 293,000 tribal members have al- most effective way,” Smith says. The firm issues in the lawsuit was it was mismanaged ready received at least some of their also oversees the Cobell settlement website, and they didn’t know the location of a large money. The firm’s priority now is locating indiantrust.com, which currently has a page number of people.” the beneficiaries who are, in a sense, miss- dedicated to helping account holders upasakariassen@missoulanews.com ing. Some might not even be aware they date their contact information.

missoulanews.com • January 16–January 23, 2014 [9]


[opinion]

Alternate route Megaloads and wild-and-scenic rivers don’t mix by Linwood Laughy

Just west of the Nez Perce Reservation border near Lewiston, Idaho, a 644,000pound heavy-haul transporter carrying tar sands mining equipment rounded a curve at 1:00 a.m. on Aug. 6, only to find a human blockade waiting. Police in a dozen squad cars flipped on flashing lights as over 200 Nez Perce Indians and dozens of their allies swarmed onto Highway 12. Their goal: halting the giant load to protest its transport across the reservation. Over the next hour, the sounds of chanting, drumming and singing echoed from the walls of the canyon. Then the arrests began, including eight members of the Nez Perce Tribal Executive Committee. Another tense hour passed before the mega-transport crept forward toward the Clearwater-Lochsa Wild and Scenic River corridor and the Montana border at Lolo Pass. But the protesters had spoken, and within hours media would carry their voices across North America. My wife, Borg Hendrickson, and I were among that group. For three years, we’ve been trying to block the effort of international corporations to industrialize U.S. 12 in Idaho. The companies say they must travel this remote route to send gargantuan mining equipment to northern Alberta’s tar sands. We say the corridor is a national treasure, a magnet for tourists and not a safe route for these monster loads. For 100 miles, Highway 12 hugs the banks of two of America’s original wild-andscenic rivers. It is the nationally designated Northwest Passage Scenic Byway and one of only 30 All-American Roads. But corporate giants such as ExxonMobil, ConocoPhillips, General Electric and others, encouraged by Idaho’s governor and helped at every turn by the Idaho Transportation Department, saw Highway 12 as theirs to take—from its neighbors, its thousands of annual visitors and from America. Grassroots opposition has steadily grown, however, and during the last three

years, state and federal courts have taken the side of the scenic byway. So far, an ExxonMobil subsidiary has transported only one of 207 proposed megaloads over Highway 12 and seven miles into Montana, where it sat for 13 months before being scrapped. The company has since reported being $2 billion over budget on its Kearl tar sands project, largely because of difficulties getting its equipment through Idaho and Montana.

“We are all concerned about the growth of corporate power and the consequent bullying of people and disregard for natural places.” Last October, a General Electric subsidiary abandoned its Highway 12 megaload plans after a federal judge ordered the U.S. Forest Service to protect the LochsaClearwater Wild and Scenic River Corridor and temporarily close Highway 12 to megaloads. The Nez Perce Tribe, conservation groups and thousands of individual citizens are continuing their effort to make this closure permanent. Eight miles downstream from the Nez Perce’s highway blockade last August, the Port of Lewiston lies on the Clearwater River’s north bank near its confluence with the Snake. The port isn’t that busy: between

2000-2011, the total tonnage it shipped decreased by 61 percent, including declines in every commodity—grains, lumber and paper from a nearby mill. Megaloads were to be the port’s salvation. “If one oil company is successful, many more will follow,” the Lewiston Port proclaimed in its application for federal economic recovery funds to extend a container dock that today ships less than 30 percent of its previous cargo. So far, however, plans for the port to bail out declining lower Snake River barging have foundered. Which brings us to salmon. Most scientists believe that federal dams may have tipped the scale from recovery to extinction of Snake River salmon. “Someone needs to speak for the animals,” a Nez Perce Tribal Executive Committee member told reporters shortly before the tribe’s megaload blockade. Our fight to preserve the ClearwaterLochsa corridor we have long called home has led my wife and me through agency offices and courtrooms to the tar sands of northern Alberta, to the decline of commercial navigation on the lower Snake, and now, to the endangered salmon and steelhead trout that swim, in dwindling numbers, past our front door. Along the way, we’ve been joined by thousands of fellow citizens who share a love of wild rivers and wild fish. We are all concerned about the growth of corporate power and the consequent bullying of people and disregard for natural places. Like returning salmon, we swim upstream, but our numbers are growing, and our voices persist. Linwood Laughy is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org ). He and his wife founded FightingGoliath.org, a network of individuals and organizations working to keep Highway 12 from being converted to a heavy haul route for giant industrial equipment.

photo by Chad Harder

[10] Missoula Independent • January 16–January 23, 2014


missoulanews.com • January 16–January 23, 2014 [11]


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CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - Police responding to a home invasion in Des Moines, Iowa, spotted suspect Lopez Christian Webster, 32, fleeing the scene on foot and gave chase. When he tried to dodge between the rail cars of a moving train, the train sliced his body in two. (Des Moines Register) Eager to divorce his wife but not to pay her alimony, Edward Nelson, 65, hatched a scheme that began with his driving from their home in Bridge, Ore., and booking a hotel room in Idaho for a week. After staying only one night, however, Nelson snuck back into Bridge, taking back roads and paying cash so his movements couldn’t be traced. He shot his wife in the head, killing her, and then killed his next-door neighbors and set both houses on fire, trying to make the murders look like the work of a psycho killer who attacked randomly while he was out of town. The fires attracted the attention of a neighbor, who recognized Nelson’s truck driving away and alerted police. Nelson pleaded guilty, vowing to “die in prison and spend eternity in hell.” (Eugene’s KCBY-TV)

STAR QUALITY - An Indian merchant named Chandrashekhar posted a billboard in Tamil Nadu intending to honor the late Nelson Mandela. The sign showed a photo of actor Morgan Freeman instead of one of the South African leader. Freeman portrayed Mandela in the 2009 film “Invictus.” The merchant blamed the mistake on the billboard’s designer. (Agence France-Presse) FLUSH WITH WEALTH - Workers cleaning a Jet Airways aircraft at Kolkata, India, found 240 gold bars worth more than $840,000 that had been left in the lavatory. Regional authorities disclosed that cleaning crews have made “scores” of similar discoveries, which are connected to smuggling operations. A passenger carries the gold aboard an international flight bound for India, hides it in the lavatory and leaves it there when exiting the plane to clear customs. The aircraft itself continues as a domestic flight. A new passenger retrieves the gold and carries it off the plane because customs officers don’t check domestic flights. (Britain’s Daily Mail)

CAGE RATTLERS OF THE WEEK - The Nonhuman Rights Project filed four lawsuits asking a New York state court to establish the “legal personhood” of chimpanzees and affirm their basic right not to be held captive for entertainment or research. Chimpanzees “possess complex cognitive abilities that are so strictly protected when they’re found in human beings,” Steven Wise, president of the non-profit declared. “There’s no reason why they should not be protected when they’re found in chimpanzees.” (Reuters)

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FLATHEAD TRANSIT [12] Missoula Independent • January 16–January 23, 2014

ANALS OF MEDICINE - Medical researchers have developed a robot butt. The device is designed to train student doctors to give prostate exams, according to its inventors, Drs. Benjamin Lok and Carla Pugh. The plastic posterior is hooked up to a video screen featuring a virtual male named “Patrick” who is bent over a desk. “The mannequin is instrumented with force sensors that can measure where the student is examining and with how much pressure,” Lok said, adding that Patrick even measures eye contact between the student and the virtual patient to help improve bedside manner. (The Huffington Post) SLIGHTEST PROVOCATIONS - Nadja Svenson, 22, stabbed her father in the chest at their home in Londonderry, N.H., while “the two were out looking at the stars on a clear night, and began arguing over where the Big Dipper and other constellations are in the sky,” Detective Chris Olson said. “It escalated from there.” (Manchester’s New Hampshire Union Leader) Sheriff’s deputies who arrested Edward Aronson, 76, after they said he broke his wife’s hip during a scuffle at their home in Lake Worth, Fla., explained that the two argued because she objected to his using a dating website. “She accused me of cheating and was yelling at me, so I pushed her,” Aronson admitted. (South Florida Sun Sentinel) Tristan P. Olson, 18, beat his father and then tried to shoot him with a crossbow at their Seattle home because the victim wouldn’t give him the keys to the family car. Olson’s father told authorities that he refused to hand over the keys because the son had slept most of the day instead of doing his homework. (Seattlepi.com) Contisha Q. Hayes, 21, stabbed her sister in the chest, according to police in Akron, Ohio, after the two got into a fight over apple fritters that a third sister was making. Investigators said that the two other sisters “started to play fight” over the treat, but the playing turned serious when Tamara D. Delaney, 21, pulled Hayes’s hair. (Akron Beacon Journal)

LITIGATION NATION - A citizens group is suing the city of La Jolla, Calif., demanding that it eradicate the “foul, noxious and sickening odors” left by birds and sea lions defecating on the rocks below restaurants overlooking scenic La Jolla Cove. Citizens for Odor-Nuisance Abatement blames the foul smell on city officials, who two years ago approved a fence to keep people away from the rocks. Since then, birds and marine mammals have flocked to the site. The lawsuit complains that sea lions particularly have made the problem “much worse” because they’re eating strong-smelling anchovies on the rocks. Removing the fence, the lawsuit contends, would let people clamber on the rocks and, by doing so, chase away the birds and mammals to defecate elsewhere. (Los Angeles Times) WASTE OF TASTE - The chief cause of food waste in the United Kingdom is fussy shoppers, according to the supermarket chain Tesco. Officials reported that in the first six months of 2013, its U.K. stores threw away 30,000 tons of edible food that customers rejected because they “always pick the cream of the crop” and turn down old or misshapen produce, regardless of whether taste is affected. “Customers will always make the choice of the one that cosmetically looks better,” Matt Simister, Tesco’s food sourcing director, told a House of Lords panel. “That’s a very difficult reality for us.” By contrast, Simister noted, Eastern European customers more willingly accept less than perfect-looking food. (Britain’s Daily Mail)

LEST WE FORGET - After movie star Paul Walker died in a car crash, Scottish authorities reported that a car burst into flames during a gathering to honor Walker organized by a group of car enthusiasts. Police charged a 19-year-old man with causing the fire, which began “after revving the engine for 20 minutes in tribute.” (Scotland’s STV)


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missoulanews.com • January 16–January 23, 2014 [13]


I

n a way, Cho Cho Lwin’s story starts with a young boy in a small village in her home country of Burma, now known as the Republic of the Union of Myanmar. It was early 2004 and Lwin, a travel consultant at the time, was guiding a wealthy Swiss hotelier named Peter Gautschi by request through the type of rural setting seldom trod by tourists from the Western world. Myanmar’s people had been under the reign of a military government since 1962, when General Ne Win led a successful coup against Prime Minister U Nu, and the country had suffered from years of political corruption, anti-government riots and repression. Education was in particularly dire straits by 2004, the same year a power struggle ousted a new prime minister and saw him placed under house arrest. Government-run public schools were brutally underfunded, and despite rapid regrowth in the 1990s, Myanmar’s centuries-old monastic school system remained financially dependent on impoverished rural communities and suffered from a lack of suitable infrastructure. During their trip beyond the crowded city of Mandalay, on the way to a high-altitude town once known to British colonists as a “hill station,” Lwin and Gautschi stopped by a tiny school in the village of Ohn Chaw. Even Lwin, a welleducated woman who had attended uni-

versity and studied English, had never set foot in a monastic school before. What they saw were more than 100 students of various ages sitting on the ground or in trees, watching with rapt attention as Buddhist monks worked through lessons on mathematics, Burmese and English. Gautschi was touched by the scene. Then he met the boy. Lwin remembers the boy being about 9 or 10 years old. He was hoping to undertake shinbyu, or the novitiation ceremony required for Burmese boys to become novice monks, but Lwin quickly learned that his parents could not afford the robes and other materials necessary for the rite. Gautschi offered to cover the costs and sponsor the boy. Lwin still has photos of the ceremony on her laptop, along with scores of images of the Ohn Chaw school children seated in clusters on the ground. That moment in 2004 quickly brought her and Gautschi together, and demonstrated for her Gautschi’s selfless spirit. His goodwill didn’t stop with sponsoring the boy’s novitiation. After the ceremony, Lwin and Gautschi continued their trip, yet Gautschi insisted on stopping by the school again on their way back. They spoke with the abbot, who explained that de-

spite the monastic mission to educate impoverished rural students, schools like his receive no financial backing from the government—hence the lack of sheltered classrooms. “So Peter took all his money out, which is in the mixed currency of U.S. dollar, Singapore dollar, Hong Kong dollar, Burmese dollar, all total valued about $2,200 U.S.” recalls Lwin, who now lives in Missoula with her husband and two children. “He said, ‘What can we do with that? Can we help with the classroom, or should we help with uniforms or stationary?’ Then the abbot said, ‘Okay, we can help with classroom.’ That’s what was needed. So Peter handed money to me and then he left. He went back to Hong Kong.” Just like that, Lwin became the first Myanmar-based volunteer for the Studer Trust, an organization Gautschi founded in 2002 with the goal of building schools in China. She oversaw construction of the new Ohn Chaw classroom, a 43-foot-long

open-walled shelter complete with benches and tables. When the project was done, she had $100 of Gautschi’s money left. With it they hosted an opening ceremony—what would prove to be the first of 60 for Lwin, Gautschi and the Studer Trust in Myanmar to date.

T

he 366-mile highway stretching between the Burmese cities of Yangon and Mandalay has developed a reputation for danger since its completion in 2011. News reports from the region commonly refer to it as Myanmar’s “death highway,” a critical strip of infrastructure initially ordered by the military junta in 2005 and completed in what engineers have since admitted was a rush job. Officials have recorded more than 470 crashes there in the past four years. In 2013 alone, such accidents resulted in 546 injuries and 100 deaths. Among those deaths was Studer Trust founder Peter Gautschi. Gautschi had arrived in Hong Kong in the early 1950s to take up a position as a junior executive for the famed Peninsula Hotel. The cigar-smoking, golf-playing Swiss native eventually rose to the presidency of the company, and expanded his portfolio even further by founding the luxury Swiss-Belhotel chain in 1987. As he explained in a 2010 interview with Forbes magazine, which had just named him one of Asia’s “heroes of philanthropy,” Gautschi kicked off his retirement in 2001 with a $40,000 donation to UNESCO for a school project in China’s Hunan Province. But when he visited the school himself to gauge the effectiveness of his investment, he felt his money had been wasted. He saw Western-style flush toilets with no piping, radiators without boilers, and more

photo courtesy of Studer Trust

[14] Missoula Independent • January 16–January 23, 2014


than 200 fewer students than he’d been led to believe. “I thought I could do better myself,” he told Forbes. And so the Studer Trust— named for Gautschi’s mother—was born. Until he met Lwin, Gautschi had never considered expanding his organization’s scope beyond China. But the work was hardly complete on his first school in Ohn Chaw before construction began on a second Myanmar school, Aung Ka Bar in the village of Gway Gyi Kone. The classrooms were simple, open-air structures at that time, but the Studer Trust’s design quickly evolved to include fully walled buildings, two-story schools, even a classroom on stilts in Pauk Par. And it didn’t take long for Gautschi to drum up financial support from friends and other philanthropists, including fellow Swiss-born Hong Kong transplant Walter Wuest. Gautschi’s primary goal with the Studer Trust was to offer investors something more than hollow assurance. The organization has no central office and only a handful of paid personnel. As Gautschi wrote in a 2009 editorial to the South China Morning Post, “We serve as a bridge between those who are willing to help and those who are less fortunate. I motivate friends and volunteers with similar views and values to contribute time and money to the trust.” Those with the Studer Trust who do get a paycheck get one straight from Gautschi’s own pocketbook. “What makes Studer Trust very unique is my salary, the ground team salary, everything is paid by Peter’s separate account,” says Lwin, who began working for the Studer Trust full-time in 2005. Studer Trust employees work from home on computers and cellphones, or on the ground in the countries their projects are based in. That way, Lwin continues, administrative overhead is kept to a mini-

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Cho Cho Lwin and her family relocated to Missoula in June 2006, a time when Myanmar was still under military rule. None of them had ever seen snow before. They’re now comfortably settled in the community.

mum, and donors know exactly where their money is going. “[Peter] would rather go to the individual and then show them what we are doing and if that individual likes it, then he donates the money,” Lwin says. Gradually, the organization expanded its efforts from rudimentary $2,000 classrooms to scholarships, teacher salaries, computer centers and summer English programs. Much of the staff ’s time—including Lwin’s—is spent following up on

photo courtesy of Studer Trust

Lwin’s work with the Studer Trust requires her to return to Myanmar several times a year, where she follows up on the progress at schools the organization has built.

projects to monitor progress. Most of the time communities are overwhelmingly grateful for the new infrastructure, Lwin says. But the Studer Trust’s website notes that in revisiting a few past projects, personnel witnessed classrooms falling into decline, “neglected or misused by the communities who had been so appreciative in the beginning.” Following up on those projects and providing incentives for continued community support for education has become the best way for the

Studer Trust to make sure its donor investments are lasting ones. “Studer Trust project managers visit every project at least once a year to identify and address any ongoing concerns such as building repair, painting, furniture, teaching tools, teachers’ salaries, and student scholarships at these schools, which are run and maintained by the monastic school system,” Lwin says. “Myanmar, without a doubt, needs a higher education system that can produce

students capable of critical thinking and innovation.” Gautschi made it a point to occasionally oversee the work of his organization. According to the Studer Trust, Gautschi attended the groundbreaking ceremony last June for a new school building in the village of Shwe Myo. Photos from the event show Gautschi and the school’s abbot pounding bamboo stakes into the ground to mark the new foundation, and Gautschi personally poured the blessing water over his marker. Locals thanked Gautschi in English. Shortly after that ceremony, on June 6, 2013, Gautschi was killed when his Toyota Prado collided head-on with another car while traveling the Yangon-Mandalay Highway near the city of Nay Pyi Taw. The Myanmar Times reported that Gautschi’s driver was attempting to pass another vehicle when the accident occurred. Two Myanmar nationals from the other car were also killed. Lwin, who was in the car with Gautschi at the time, suffered a minor knee injury. “Our car lost control,” Lwin says, “and then went down to the ditch and rolled over. Peter died at the accident … But we keep continuing, and he left sufficient funds to run the projects, so we are okay. He set it up, a really good foundation, so we would be able to carry on the projects.” Lwin considers herself part of that stable foundation, and remains as focused as ever on continuing the Studer Trust’s efforts in rural Myanmar. The organization offers children in those communities an opportunity, she says. “Otherwise they would never get a chance even for basic literacy.”

O

n a chilly December afternoon, Lwin blends in with the crowd at a downtown Missoula coffee shop. She sits in front of her laptop, a cellphone and a cup of tea, wearing a puffy down coat—

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Missoula’s Peaceknitters meet once a week in the back of Joseph’s Coat, and have taken to knitting plush toys for Lwin to take with her for school children in Myanmar.

missoulanews.com • January 6–January 13, 2011 [15]


nothing to suggest to the casual observer that she is effectively our town’s philanthropic ambassador to an entire Southeast Asian country. “I’m very lucky and very happy to be here in Missoula,” Lwin says. “A lot of friends, they know what I’m doing and they’ve been very supportive.” Lwin’s unlikely arrival in Missoula followed a fortuitous route not unlike her initial meeting with Gautschi. About one year after her trip with Gautschi to Ohn Chaw, Lwin’s husband, Bo Bo Khant, won a highly competitive United States green card lottery. The couple wanted every opportunity for their two daughters, particularly when it came to education. Lwin was lucky; she says she received a good education in Myanmar and high marks in school despite not being able to afford special classes. She attended governmentrun schools in urban Mandalay her entire life, and went on to get a bachelor’s degree from Mandalay University in 1999. “Those days when I was in school were so corrupted,” Lwin says. “Monastic schools were banned and if your parents couldn’t [afford] to send you to government school, you would never get educated.” Khant planned to go ahead of the rest of the family to New York City and find work. It would be the first time he ever left Myanmar. Lwin was still working part-time as a travel consultant and ended up chatting one day with two clients from Montana. She joked that they might bump into each other in the U.S. someday. One of the clients, John Price Anderson, who

owns a home in Missoula but spends much of his time in Indonesia, asked what her family’s plan was for finding housing and work stateside. “He said, ‘Oh, well, it’s not a good idea to go to New York,’” Lwin recalls. “They said, ‘Do you have family or friends or any relatives in the United States?’ I told them no, because the rest of my family, my two daughters and my husband, they’d never been out of the country. So they said, ‘What? No, then, it’s not a good idea to go to New York. Why don’t you go to Missoula and stay at my place?’” Lwin and Anderson continued to exchange emails for the next few months, making arrangements for her family to live in his house until they could get settled. In June 2006, Lwin, Khant and their two daughters arrived in Missoula thinking they’d move on to a different community with a Burmese population within a year. But they fell in love with western Montana. Khant now owns and operates Bo Bo Electric, and works as the resident electrician and general technician for Missoula Children’s Theater. Lwin works remotely as one of the Studer Trust’s two directors, traveling back to Myanmar several times a year to oversee projects in person. During her time in Missoula, she’s also managed to develop a pipeline of goodwill between her native country and her new home.

L

ast October, Kathi and Glenn Wood made a point of telling their Burmese guide that, regardless of what else he had

planned, their trip to Myanmar had to include a stop at the Studer Trust’s lake-top Pauk Par preschool. The couple wanted to visit their friend from Missoula, Lwin, who was conducting follow-up work in the country, and see one of the schools she’d talked so much about. “People actually live on this lake,” Glenn says. “They grow gardens, floating gardens, and they can harvest them. It’s a very famous place because it’s been inhabited for, I don’t know, centuries. They scrape the bottom of the lake and use that for fertilizer, so they’re self-sufficient.” Kathi met Lwin through a weekly Jeannette Rankin Peace Center knitting circle known as the Peaceknitters. One year before the Woods’ trip, Lwin had asked the group to help her supply toys to some of the students at the Studer Trust schools. The group

photo courtesy of Glenn Wood

photo courtesy of Studer Trust

Among the schools the Studer Trust has funded is a preschool in the lake-top village of Pauk Par.

[16] Missoula Independent • January 16–January 23, 2014

had already knitted a parcel of teddy bears for the relief effort in Haiti after Hurricane Sandy. For Pauk Par, a few in the group made plush fish for the 40 or so preschoolers who are shuttled to school across the lake by boat each morning. “Some people would knit balls for them,” Kathi says. “I had crocheted a bowling set for my grandson a few years back, with 10 pins and the ball and everything, so I said, ‘Why don’t I make a bowling set for these kids?’” When the Woods arrived at Pauk Par, Lwin was waiting for them. The three of them passed out clothes made for the children by Missoula’s Christ the King Church and watched as the kids played with the plush toys Lwin had delivered earlier. Kathi asked their teacher whether there was anything else the school needed. “They want to increase the number of students, but they want to buy their own boat,” Kathi says. “And the community where the school is located, the land part of it, there is the boat factory that makes these boats. Somehow, I want to raise money toward a boat for the school.” After learning about the specific type of boat the villagers desired, the Woods and Lwin figured the cost would come to roughly $1,500. Kathi is now raising the funds herself and intends to pass them to the Studer Trust to fund the new boat. The effort shows how Lwin’s deep emotional investment in improving the situation in Myanmar has spread to others in Missoula. “I would love to be able to give them money for that boat, because that means that more children are being educated, and that’s

map illustration by Kou Moua

their goal,” Kathi says. “If you saw the size of the building they started in and the size of the building now, it’s so wonderful that this foundation … gave them the money.” The Woods aren’t the only ones who have visited Myanmar in recent years. Tourism in the country has increased dramatically since the military junta was replaced with a parliamentary government in 2011. Hundreds of political prisoners were released, and the new government began drafting laws ensuring basic human rights. Freedom of the press was established, and the Associated Press last spring became the first international news agency to open a foreign bureau in the capital of Yangon. The Woods say they got a travel visa in no time, and most places accepted American currency. A long era of religious and ethnic oppression has ended. Now, Myanmar is struggling to rebuild—and fast. For Lwin, increased travel and attention to Myanmar underscores the mission she set out to achieve with the Studer Trust. Most children in rural areas don’t make it past primary education; many villages don’t even have their own middle schools. Students drop out because


they’re unable to travel safely to neighboring villages for continued education, or they begin to go to work with their parents at a young age. “We have no basic infrastructure,” Lwin says. “We have no proper software. And because of the poor education in the past, today even we would like to hire teachers, but there are not very many educated or graduated people that we can

In other words, as her country enters a new chapter on the international stage, her work has become increasingly pressing.

L

win doesn’t talk much about the personal toll Gautschi’s death had on her. Her follow-up trip last fall was the first since the accident.

photo courtesy of Glenn Wood

Preschool students at Pauk Par play with a crochet bowling set and other plush toys made for them by Missoula’s Peaceknitters. The group’s next project is to knit hats for the children, who commute to school each day by boat.

hire. Some of them never received proper teacher’s training.” The Studer Trust has tried to ease those problems. Over the years, the organization has funded teacher salaries and built three bridges to provide safe passage for students between villages even during the rainy season. When Cyclone Nargis devastated communities in the Irrawaddy Delta in May 2008, killing more than 138,000 people and destroying some 700,000 homes, the Studer Trust responded by raising 545,156 Hong Kong dollars—about $70,300 U.S.—for the relief effort. The money funded construction of 100 homes, 177 fishing boats, one pier and a footpath in the region. Lwin says she collected an additional $10,000 from Missoula donors after holding a fundraising event at China Woods home furnishing store. “It is very important for me, knowing that the place where I live also supports my work, trusts our work over there, and are willing to support the Burmese people,” Lwin says. Lwin sees the situation in Myanmar improving. Obtaining permits and dealing with local authorities used to be the Studer Trust’s biggest hurdles; Lwin says she was once interrogated for two hours during a work trip by officials she felt were simply holding out for a bribe. Political tensions and corruption are gradually easing, and Western tourists like the Woods are flooding into the country. But that transformation is raising new challenges, both for Myanmar’s still-developing infrastructure and for the Studer Trust’s effort to improve a rural education system made up of relatively untrained and inexperienced teachers and administrators. Lwin says those educators demonstrate strong passion, but they often have “no more than 11 years of basic schooling.”

They were close, though, she says, a friendship easily summed up in a photograph of Lwin on the Studer Trust website. She’s smiling, her arms wrapped around Gautschi’s chest outside one of the Studer Trust’s schools. Gautschi towers almost two feet taller than her, decked out in sunglasses and a baseball cap, a camera hanging around his neck. He’s laughing. What Lwin will say is that Gautschi left his organization in good order. He meticulously arranged for his private account to continue paying the Studer Trust’s administrative costs, and his friends and donors have offered their ongoing support. It is difficult, Lwin admits, due to Gautschi’s role as their sole fundraising liaison. He’d dedicated the last decade to improving education for thousands of children throughout Myanmar and China, she adds, and his “indomitable spirit” will be missed. His death left the organization in the hands of Lwin, her co-director in China and the rest of the Studer Trust team. It’s now their labor of

love as much as it was his, and Lwin says they all intend to see his work completed. “Even though he’s not here anymore, we’re still continuing,” she says. Lwin is hopeful that the Missoula community can continue to support her endeavor, as well. To that end, she recently checked in with teachers and Studer Trust personnel to see what need western Montana could contribute next. She’s suggested that locals help her collect 70 backpacks for poor students—half for girls, half for boys, all between the ages of 6 and 13. This month, the Studer Trust is primed to break ground on the last piece of Gautschi’s vision: A teacher training center in Mandalay, which Lwin says could be up and running by July. The project marks a shift in the organization’s ongoing mission in Myanmar. The Studer Trust decided last year to stop actively seeking new schools to work with, and opted instead to redouble its efforts maintaining the 60 schools it already helps. Lwin feels refocusing on the quality of the educators in those schools—particularly the strength of their English language instruction skills—is a critical step in continuing Gautschi’s devotion to better the lives of Myanmar’s younger generation. “English is the one subject that we would like to promote to our students, because English teaching in our country is really bad,” Lwin says. “Pronunciation, grammar, everything. So we would like to get native English teachers.” Lwin’s life changed dramatically after that first trip to Ohn Chaw with Gautschi. She credits her good fortune to the education she received, but that remains out of reach for so many others. Lwin only hopes that the opportunities she’s opening up for students back home will strengthen Myanmar’s future. So far, she’s encouraged by the results. “Most of the students also, because we have been doing this for almost 10 years, some of the students, when we helped them in 2006, they are already in first year in university or something like that,” she says. “A lot of students, they go back to their villages because they said, ‘Okay, Studer Trust helped us. Now it’s our duty or responsibility that we should give something back to the community.’” asakariassen@missoulanews.com

photo courtesy of Cho Cho Lwin

Peter Gautschi established the Studer Trust in 2002 to help improve the state of rural education in Southeast Asia. Gautschi paid all of the Studer Trust’s administrative costs himself to ensure that financial donations went entirely to construction projects.

missoulanews.com • January 16–January 23, 2014 [17]


[arts]

Shoot straight, light up Behind the process of two artists represented at MAM’s 42nd annual art auction

T

heo Ellsworth’s monsters and Francis Fox’s bronze horses. Dudley Dana’s digital paintings and Louise Montagne’s sunsets. Stephanie Frostad’s farm life and Tom Foolery’s miniatures. These make up just a sliver of the work represented at the 42nd annual Missoula Art Museum Auction exhibit. This year’s theme is “Artists in the Spotlight,” through which the MAM seeks to honor artists they feel enrich the community. The exhibit of 100 artists—the largest in MAM’s history—is on display now at the museum, but the auction hits the University Center Ballroom Sat., Feb. 1, where Missoula bidders go head-to-head buying up the best of our local offerings. The end goal, of course, isn’t about winning the art—though that’s part of the fun. It’s to help give back to MAM for the work it does in providing powerful art exhibits that are free to the public. Of all the auction artists, 28 have been represented in solo exhibitions at MAM and 15 are first-time participants. To give you a sneak peek into the exhibit and upcoming auction, we talked with two very different artists—Steven Krutek and Jeff Pernell—whose work captured our imagination.

Steven Krutek’s mysterious photos Steven Krutek’s black-and-white photograph, “Salmon, Idaho 6,” shows a woman standing on a lawn with her back to the camera, looking up at a bare tree. The cloudy white sky gives the scene that hint of late winter or early spring when the light is dim and wind chills to the bone. An RV peeking out from the side of the photo and a concrete building in the background add another layer of stark reality. A photographer bent on evoking conventional beauty might have edited those things out or taken the shot from a different angle or, at least, waited for the woman to turn and face the camera before capturing the moment. But in his body of work, Krutek, a photography professor at the University of Montana, doesn’t seem fazed by things that might otherwise not seem photogenic. He seems to embrace those elements and, in doing so, captures the romance of everyday objects and places: A colorful bird lies dead on a leaf in the water. Muddy tire tracks lead to a red access gate, which opens onto a brown grassy field. An antler mount hangs from the wall of an empty town hall where you can imagine the lonely buzz of the fluorescent lights. The woman facing the tree in Salmon, Idaho, ended up being a surprise success. As it turned out, Krutek was actually waiting for that woman to turn around, but she never did. “It was almost like she was turning her back on me,” he says. “I think she was aware of me, but I’m not even sure.” In the photo, which you can view at stevekrutek.com, there is something determined about the way the woman keeps herself turned away with her arms tucked away out of view, across her chest. Whether she’s making a statement on privacy or contemplating the tree in front of her, it’s hard to say. That mystery adds to the image. “It wasn’t until I shot the photo and developed the film that I liked her posture and felt like it was a better portrait with her back turned toward me,” Krutek says. “I was able to go back and see there was value in it with her face turned away.” Krutek’s piece in MAM’s art auction, “Ice Cold Lemonade,” has a little bit more of a classic feel than his other work. It’s a black-and-white shot of a snack stand at the Western Montana Fair crisply contrasted with shadow and sunlight and accompanied by the blur of small children running by. For this one, he used a “toy camera” to give it a little more of a nostalgic look.

“Ice Cold Lemonade” by Steven Krutek

[18] Missoula Independent • January 16–January 23, 2014

WHAT: 42nd Annual Missoula Art Museum WHEN: Sat., Feb. 1, doors open at 5 PM WHERE: University Center Ballroom, third floor HOW MUCH: $90 MAM members/$100 non-members/ $900 table of 10


[arts]

“I find myself meandering over there during fair time just to snap a few pictures,” he says. “The pictures I do snap are with film, and the ones I take at the fair are taken with what’s basically a cheap plastic camera with a horrible lens. It fits in with the fair atmosphere. I’m trying to capture the feel of the fair at face value.” Krutek uses some digital photography, but he’s lured by film. And the toy camera offers more surprises than a high-end film camera because its flaws introduce warps and light leaks and other blemishes to his work that can often give it more texture. It also provides that antiquated feel found in old-timey photo booths at fairs and in touristy destinations. That Krutek uses this style is fitting because in 1995, when he was a young photography student working at the SALT Institute for Documentary Field Work in Maine, he did a photographic study of Romanian gypsies who ran an old-time photo booth at a fair. “They took photos that they produce for people where they dress up in Old West gear,” he says. “[A writer and I] documented their lifestyle—four generations of these folks, which was pretty interesting.” Keeping with that aesthetic, Krutek often uses modern tintype to “Space Cloud” by Jeff Pernell get an antique look. In one, a raptor spreads its wings behind a chain-link fence. It’s hard history of the Colorado Front Range, which was unto tell what’s happening in the photo—is the bird cap- dertaken by several artists, including Robert Adams tured or free?—but the contrast between the black who photographed that West. He’s still an influspray paint Krutek uses in this processing and the ence on me. The images that I photograph are roimage’s exposure makes it seem like something you’d mantic to me because those were my experiences pull from the archives of a natural history museum of the West.” Erika Fredrickson rather than what you’d find in a collection meant to romanticize the West. If Ansel Adams inspired artists to capture the majesty of Western landscapes, Robert Adams’ 1974 Jeff Pernell’s pyro art Some painters experiment with wine or coffee book The New West and his exhibit Topographics: Photographs of a Man-altered Landscape helped give on canvas. Others use massive, plus-size brushes or it a reality check. Krutek prescribes to the latter. bath sponges to produce unconventional textures Whether it’s a lemonade shack at the fair or an RV or and shapes. Jeff Pernell pours gunpowder on his some other man-made element, Krutek doesn’t turn works and lights them on fire. For three years now the Missoula artist has been his lens away from it. Forced to face human elements, a viewer can find a way to embrace the landscape for igniting gunpowder on the surface of his art pieces, what it is, or entertain the thought of how humans incorporating the resulting effects into the very framework of the image. The ashen, smoky blemishes might work to change it. “The West is romanticized with a certain aes- left behind from the burning powder play an integral thetic in mind,” Krutek says. “Originally, I’m from part in his space odyssey mosaics and shadowy abthe Midwest and then went to Colorado. In Col- stractions. “I’m kind of a pyromaniac at heart maybe,” Perorado Springs there is some amazing natural beauty but it’s intermingled with development we have nell says with a laugh. “I love the chaos and how the brought upon the land. There’s a rich photographic material reacts with my actions.”

Pernell developed an interest in the arts as a teenager at Flathead High School in Kalispell. His interest in incorporating gunpowder into his art existed even then, but he couldn’t figure out how to pull it off. Once he obtained a cow skull, painted it and blasted it with a shotgun in attempts to achieve some artistic effect. Instead, he obliterated it. Art took a backstage in his young adult years, but when he found himself coping with a divorce seven years ago, it made a resurgence as a catharsis for the emotional turbulence of his breakup. “What I realized is I had all these huge emotions associated with current stress,” says Pernell. “I let those flow through, and all of a sudden I stopped caring about what I was trying to paint, and just let those new emotions do their thing. And people started reacting to that in a very positive way.” One artist, Cai Guo-Qiang of China, has been exploring the possibilities of gunpowder artwork since the late 1980s. He has established himself as the world’s foremost expert in the subject. Guo-Qiang creates murals—sometimes large enough to cover entire rooms—by igniting gunpowder on the surface of his canvasses in a manner that creates charred silhouettes and landscapes. Pernell first discovered Guo-

Qiang’s work while on a trip to France in 2010, and he began to apply some of the techniques to his own art. On Pernell’s website, gunpowderart.com, you can find a timelapse video of the 14-hour process it took to make his 5-by-8 triptych “Celestial Balance.” Using wood panels covered in a gel medium as his base, he masks off shapes that he wants to remain untouched by the explosion. He paints around the masking, and after the paint has dried he strategically sprinkles the gunpowder across the surface. He places panels on top of the piece in a manner that helps him control how the smoke escapes, and therefore how it alters the image. Then he lights the fire. The result resembles an otherworldly satellite photograph. Bold acrylic colors fan out across the scenery or splatter about with dramatic Ralph Steadman-esque flair. The smoke stains from the ignited gunpowder swirl around the paint and masked-off shapes like deep space oblivion, the intergalactic brume of a science fiction story. Pernell has learned to control what happens when he sets fire to the powder, but mistakes still happen. Using too little gunpowder the first time around calls for re-masking and re-burning, and excessive amounts of gunpowder interferes with the painting or harms the masking work. “When it goes wrong, it goes really wrong,” he says. But even mistakes don’t go to waste. “I’m really conservative about my material,” he says. “I don’t throw things away, I just wait until they have a purpose.” Pernell sold “Celestial Balance” last year to the Pacific Unitarian Church in Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif., and since then he has put more of his art out for public consumption. The Missoula Art Museum selected his piece “Space Cloud” as a silent auction item in its upcoming event. Pernell intends to continue working on his “Space” series, and has ideas for a bonfire series that he would like to explore. “It goes beyond the brain, in my art at least,” he says. “I admire artists that can make humans look like humans and hands look like hands, but for me it’s more like I’m an alchemist looking at the raw materials and how they interact with each other.” Jed Nussbaum arts@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • January 16–January 23, 2014 [19]


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Futurebirds recorded its sophomore album, Baba Yaga, in fits and starts between tours, giving it an unmistakable live feel; not sloppy, but not polished either, and revved up with the momentum that a band probably only finds on the road. Pedal steel, reverb-laden guitars and straightahead beats leave no doubt that this is psychedelic Southern rock, straight out of Athens, Ga. And, in a way, Futurebirds’ self-aware, contemplative lyrics, nasal vocals and layered harmonies sound a little like a deeper-South version of My Morning Jacket. Baba Yaga requires more than one listen. The songs, each clocking in at five minutes or more, feel long and, unfortunately, all have similar mid-range tempos that seem to blend together. The effect can be a little soporific. And, perhaps because nearly all the band members have contributed songs, not all of the tracks rise to the same level of craftsmanship. The ones that do shine in unexpected and insidious ways: The sound grows on you, and with each listen you’re pulled further into the hazy, slightly intoxicated world the musicians seem to inhabit. You’re compelled to listen harder, and to try and understand the muddy lyrics. Once you do, “Virginia Slims” reveals

photo courtesy of Jason Thrasher

itself to be a tune about growing up fast and high, and “St. Summercamp,” which sounds a bit like the Dead’s “Wharf Rat,” offers a laid-back tribute to lazy days and simple pleasures. In folklore, Baba Yaga is a perplexing figure: A woman neither good nor evil, a forest-dweller living in a house perched on enormous chicken feet. While the connection isn’t immediately clear between this witchy figure and Futurebirds, a close listen shows that the album can be—for better or worse—just as beguiling and shadowy as Baba Yaga herself. (Melissa Mylchreest) Futurebirds plays the Top Hat Thu., Jan. 23, at 10 PM. $8.

Jayke Orvis and the Broken Band, Bless This Mess Back in the mid-’80s I saw the Swedish hair metal band Europe (of “The Final Countdown” fame) play a show in Seattle. They did a rock version of the classical piece “Flight of the Bumblebee” that allowed guitarist John Norum to flash his chops. It was cool enough live, but in retrospect it felt like just an exercise in wankery. That’s basically how I feel about a lot of bluegrass, too, particularly when it comes to the new wave of tattooed musicians playing punkgrass, like Jayke Orvis and The Broken Band. The opening song on Orvis’ Bless This Mess, “Murder of Crows,” seems like it should be dark and brooding. Instead, it’s an instrumental chock-full of that kind of high speed, self-serving solo trading that I hate in bluegrass. It put me off right out of the gate,

but I stayed with it—and I came around. Why should I have an attitude about musicians who actually showcase the mastery of their instruments? On Bless This Mess, The Broken Band members solidify themselves as top-shelf players. And because Orvis is no crooner, he provides a nice, rougher offset to the technical prowess of the musicians. The cleverly written songs have a brash edge to them. Ultimately, what this band and its music is about is a good time, and at rock volume I found myself smiling and bobbing my head. I’m pretty sure that’s the point. (Chris La Tray) Jayke Orvis and The Broken Band play the VFW Fri., Jan. 17, with James Hunnicutt and The Whiskey Hooves. 10 PM. $8.

The Wild Feathers, The Wild Feathers This is one of those rare Warner Bros. records I grabbed off the rack on a whim because the first track, “Backwoods Company,” kicked all kinds of rock ’n’ roll ass when I tried it out at the store listening station. While the rest of the record doesn’t live up to the same level of stinky riff-abuse, it’s still a surprisingly good listen. Hey, I’m a guy who grew up on classic rock and it’s clear these guys did too, so we were like brothers from the moment the first note hit my ear hole. The Wild Feathers are from Nashville by way of Austin, made up of multiple stellar songwriters—Taylor Burns, Joel King, Ricky Young, Preston Wimberly

[20] Missoula Independent • January 16–January 23, 2014

and Ben Jarvis—who were all previously lead singers in their own bands. This creates room for big, shiny harmonies on the power choruses, and I love that kind of sound. While most of the album offers midtempo songs with power ballads sprinkled in, there are still some high moments that make my guitarrock-worshipping soul exult. The solo on “Hard Times,” for example, almost demands a music video with the lead player on a mountaintop, the wind fanning his hair in waves. That the album can evoke that kind of imagery means I’m not even going to hold the glossy production and big label against them. (Chris La Tray)


[tv]

these are the good old days.

Soap dish Television dramas for the “Downton” devotee by Kate Whittle

The skyrocketing popularity of the Masterpiece series “Downton Abbey,” now in its fourth season, has people who might never have paid attention to a period piece before regularly tuning in on Sunday evenings to catch the latest installment of the soapy drama in early-1900s England. “Downton” is about as hip as a PBS show about repressed British people can get, with product tie-ins, regular blog recapping and magazine spreads on Edwardian-inspired fashion. Even Patton Oswalt live-tweets his reactions to new episodes. (Sample: “I hope they reveal that Lady Mary is Morrissey’s great-grandmother.”) It’s heartening that a character-driven show with hardly any racy sex, car crashes or explosions can gar-

are a mess. “True Blood” fans will be particularly stoked to see Stephen Moyer (aka vampire Bill Condon) playing the Bannerman’s shellshocked son just back from serving the war—and we see a shot of his nude rear end in the very first episode. “Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries,” 2012–2013 Miss Phryne Fisher cavorts about Melbourne, Australia in roughly the same time period as “Downton,” but the Granthams would undoubtedly be appalled by her fearless first-wave feminist antics. Miss Fisher, a beautiful and wealthy heiress, puts her considerable wit and intellect toward solving murders. The show’s

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The Edwardian stink eye

ner such attention. Not that there’s anything wrong with those things, but it’s nice to be able to talk about a current TV show with buddies at the bar and your Great-Aunt Connie. But British period programs are nothing new, of course. So if “Downton” has wet your whistle for oldfashioned outfits, crisp accents, high drama, class divides and sexual tension, then here are five other shows—most on Netflix—to tide you over when the next Sunday seems too far away. “Upstairs, Downstairs,” 1971–1975 This BBC classic paved the way for “Downton,” with its portrayal of the staff serving the rich Bellamy family in a posh London townhouse. The series opens in 1903, and goes on to cover three decades in five seasons. Every melodramatic plot twist you could hope for is included, from illegitimate babies to political machinations to gay love affairs. It has a soapy, often lighthearted feel, as daydreamy maids, uppity butlers and randy footmen mock each other and their masters. There’s lots of shrieking in Cockney accents, too, like: “She couldn’t tell a feather duster from a boa constrictor!” “The Grand,” 1997–1998 In a post-WWI Manchester, the Bannerman family endeavors to restore the glory of the lavish hotel they’ve ran for generations. The show balances the sweet innocence of the hotel’s young maids with the lusty shenanigans of the family members. As things roll along, we learn that not all is as it seems: a society dame is actually a brothel madam, a loving brother aims to bed his sister-in-law, and the hotel’s finances

soundtrack and fashions are informed by gorgeous Jazz Age influences. Miss Fisher scales buildings wearing heels, tosses aside fur cloaks to chase after bad guys and keeps a gold-plated pistol in her purse. She takes several different lovers throughout the season, too, making for a fun and free-spirited antidote to all these other sexually repressed shows. “The Paradise,” 2012 The Masterpiece miniseries, which aired last year, is based on Émile Zola’s novel The Ladies Paradise. The ambitious, handsome businessman John Moray is striving to make his groundbreaking department store a success, and Denise, a clever salesgirl, has some bright ideas—but she’ll have to avoid the wrath of Moray’s jealous, conniving on-and-off-again fiance, Lady Katherine Glendenning. Shifting sexual mores, the rise of consumer-driven capitalism and emergence of the middle class are the backdrop for the romantic intrigues. “Call the Midwife,” 2012–now As the series begins, Jenny Lee, a young, wideeyed midwife fresh out of nursing school, arrives in London’s rough and tumble East End to work out of a convent staffed by nurse nuns. Jenny Lee sports a curled bob, impeccable lipstick and wasp-waisted dresses as she deals with quirky colleagues, fist-fighting pregnant women and lots of slimy newborns. Prepare for heartwarming moments, odd humor and painfully outdated medical knowledge. It might make you grateful for 21st century birth control, too. kwhittle@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • January 16–January 23, 2014 [21]


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[film]

Family feud Osage County offers dark drama, little levity by Molly Laich

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Breakfast with a side of regret

August: Osage County is being marketed as a black comedy, and technically it’s true. But still, I feel tricked. Maybe it was the happy twang of the Lumineers’ song in the film’s trailer that so disarmed me. The crazy mother’s pill popping seems like it’s going to be a cute problem, instead of what it is: A devastating portrait of how drug abuse, secrets and lies ricochet interminably through families. If they cut a trailer that betrayed the true tone of the movie, no one would have the energy to leave their house to get to the theater. It’s really that upsetting. Meryl Streep stars as Violet Weston, a matriarch from Oklahoma who takes a lot of pills—and I mean a lot—while her husband Beverly (Sam Shepard) drinks. It’s an agreed-upon arrangement until Beverly goes missing, thus bringing their grownup children back home together for the first time in what we can only assume has been quite a while. Barbara Weston ( Julia Roberts) arrives with her husband Bill (Ewan McGregor) and their teenage daughter Jean (Abigail Breslin). Their marriage is on the rocks, and it’s all, “Sure, I’m leaving you for a younger woman but maybe it’s your fault too.” Karen (Juliette Lewis) shows up with her latest fiancé (Dermot Mulroney), and we learn right away how Karen’s chosen to deal with a shattered upbringing: She’s always upbeat, she goes from one man to the next, and she never seems to learn from her mistakes. The third daughter, Ivy ( Julianne Nicholson), went ahead and stayed in Oklahoma, an act that seems needlessly stoic until you learn she’s sticking around to be closer to her love, Little Charles (Benedict Cumberbatch), who may or may not be her cousin. Finally, Uncle Charles and Aunt Mattie Fae, played by Chris Cooper and Margo Martindale, have their own stakes in the game—spoilers that are too explosive to reveal here. John Wells directs a script by Tracy Letts, which he adapted from his own Pulitzer Prize-winning play, and that’s where you’ll find the bones of this mess. I liked in particular the scene around the dinner table, which will be familiar to you if you’ve seen the trailer.

[22] Missoula Independent • January 16–January 23, 2014

The teenager, Jean, tells the family that when you eat animals you ingest their fear. Everyone laughs at her and it’s cute at first, but as the moment has time to stretch out, you see just how dismissive and cruel these people can be, how everyone is playing out their old family patterns and how unsettling it is whenever the dynamic gets disrupted. You can almost see another film emerging 20 years later, starring Jean’s pent-up rage, unleashed. Letts also wrote a 2011 film called Killer Joe about another dysfunctional family of mostly grownups. It’s one of my favorite movies of the last several years, and it offers much more of the thing we mean when we say “black comedy,” but never mind. What happens when parents and children come back together as adults? They are both the same and strangely changed by what the world’s done to them since they left. Everyone’s had years apart to write the story of everyone else. In August: Osage County, the conflict between Barbara and Violet takes center stage. They’re both strong-willed women who each feel they haven’t done anything wrong, baffled and exasperated by the other’s complete failure to understand the true reality of the situation. I wonder sometimes if that isn’t the source of nearly all our human bickering: Your reality clashing up most unpleasantly with mine, and always our dogged commitment to be right. This movie marked the first time in a long while that I had to leave the theater from too much weeping. I can’t pinpoint exactly what it was, but it triggered some nerve inside of me. I think it was all the shouting at each other. I felt out of control and depressed. It made me want to go slam the door to my bedroom and listen to my Radiohead records. This is a good but unpleasant movie that takes an unflinching look at addiction. If it reminds you of your own family, my condolences. If it doesn’t, well, sit back and be grateful for that. August: Osage County continues at the Carmike 12. arts@missoulanews.com


[film] fantasy. Starring Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson and Liam Hemsworth. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex, Showboat.

OPENING THIS WEEK AMERICAN PROMISE Filmmakers followed two African American boys through 12 years of schooling, revealing insights about modern family life, the promise of education and discrimination along the way. Not rated. Screening at the Roxy Jan. 17-19 at 6:30 and 9 PM.

THE LEGEND OF HERCULES Can one demigod and his three-dimensional abs overcome the odds to make a decent hero movie? Good thing I’m not a gambling woman. Starring Kellan Lutz, Gaia Weiss and Scott Adkins. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12.

DEVIL’S DUE A newlywed is knocked up after a black-out night on her honeymoon, and soon discovers that this is one sinister hangover. Starring Allison Miller, Zach Gilford and Steffie Grote. Rated R. Carmike 12.

LONE SURVIVOR Mark Wahlberg stars as Marcus Luttrell, one of the SEAL team members in the botched 2008 Operation Red Wings Taliban assassination mission. And David Bowie and Brian Eno wrote the theme song, cool beans. Also starring Taylor Kitsch and Emile Hirsch. Rated R. Carmike 12.

JACK RYAN: SHADOW RECRUIT High-cheekboned CIA agent (and aren’t they all?) Jack Ryan must thwart a Russian plot to destroy the U.S. economy. Starring Chris Pine, Kevin Costner and Keira Knightley. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Entertainer, Pharaoplex. NEBRASKA A disheveled old boozehound, convinced he’s won the lottery, brings his estranged son along on the trip from Billings to claim the prize in Nebraska. Starring Bruce Dern, Will Forte and June Squibb. Rated R. Carmike 12. THE NUT JOB An ornery squirrel must get out of his shell to raid Maury’s Nut Store for enough food to get through winter. Anticipate the acorniest of jokes. Featuring the voices of Will Arnett, Katherine Heigl and Brendan Fraser. Rated PG. Showboat, Carmike 12, Pharaoplex. RIDE ALONG A smart-alec security guard tags along with his fiance’s cop brother to prove his mettle, but he could be in for more than he bargained. Starring Ice Cube, Kevin Hart and Tika Sumpter. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaoplex.

NOW PLAYING 12 YEARS A SLAVE A free black man is lured by con artist and sold into slavery in the antebellum United States. Starring Chiwetel Ejiofor, Michael K. Williams and Michael Fassbender. Rated R. Wilma, Pharaoplex. THE ADVENTURER: THE CURSE OF THE MIDAS BOX Seventeen-year-old Mariah Mundi must unravel an ancient curse to save his family in a steam-

PHILOMENA A cynical journalist sets out with an elderly woman to help find her long-lost son. Rated PG13. Starring Judi Dench, Steve Coogan and Sophie Kennedy Clark. Wilma. Preaching from the top of Mount Subaru. Nebraska opens this week at the Carmike 12.

punk-inspired world. Starring Michael Sheen, Lena Headey and Sam Neill. Rated PG. Wilma.

Nell Cattrysse. Not rated. Screening at the Roxy Jan. 17-19 at 7:15 and 9:15 PM.

ALL IS LOST Robert Redford stars as a stranded sailor at sea who must battle a certain death and his own inner demons. Written and directed by J.C. Chandor. PG-13. Wilma.

FROZEN A Nordic princess endeavors to find her sister and bring her back to their snowy kingdom. A whimsical talking snowman joins in the adventure, too. Starring the voices of Kristen Bell, Josh Gad and Idina Menzel. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex.

AMERICAN HUSTLE Sexy, swindling, 70s-fabulous misfits led by a con man get involved with the FBI, in a story mega-loosely based on the real Abscam sting operation. Starring Christian Bale, Amy Adams and Bradley Cooper. Rated R. Carmike 12. ANCHORMAN 2: THE LEGEND CONTINUES Ron Burgundy and crew are dusting off their suit jackets and taking their fantastic hair to New York City. Starring Will Ferrell, Christina Applegate and Paul Rudd. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex. AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY Strong-willed broads and dysfunctional family collide in an Oklahoma home. Starring Meryl Streep, Dermot Mulroney and Julia Roberts. Rated R. Carmike 12. (See Film.) THE BROKEN CIRCLE BREAKDOWN Belgians, bluegrass, epic romance and crushing heartbreak play out in a contender for the Oscars’ Best Foreign Language Film category. Starring Veerle Baetens, Johan Heldenbergh and

SAVING MR. BANKS Walt Disney coaxes the curmudgeonly P.L. Travers into selling the movie rights to her novel, a little book you may have heard of called Mary Poppins. Starring Emma Thompson, Tom Hanks and Annie Rose Buckley. Rated PG-13. Showboat.

Capsule reviews by Kate Whittle. GRAVITY A space shuttle accident leaves two astronauts untethered in space and struggling to survive in director Alfonso Cuarón’s intense drama. Starring Sandra Bullock, George Clooney and Ed Harris. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12. HER Remember, weirdo loner dudes, all you really need is a disembodied woman’s sexy voice to attend to your every emotional need. Starring Joaquin Phoenix, Scarlett Johansson and Amy Adams. Rated R. Carmike 12.

Planning your outing to the cinema? Visit missoulanews.com’s arts section to find up-to-date movie times for theaters in the area. You can also contact theaters to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 and Village 6 at 541-7469; Wilma at 728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603.

THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG 100-percent more hot elf action is on tap in the second installment of the kids-book-turnedgiant-trilogy. Starring Martin Freeman, Ian McKellen and Richard Armitage. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex. THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE Katniss Everdeen and boring ol’ Peeta are back for the second installment of the dystopian teen

missoulanews.com • January 16–January 23, 2014 [23]


[dish]

Winter heat by Ari LeVaux

SUSHI TUESDAYS 5pm to close • Reservations accepted.

Veggie options, too!

Times Run 1/17/14 - 1/23/14

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

The BIg Lebowski Fri 1/17 at 8 12 Years a Slave Nightly at 7 & 9:20 Sat at 1 & 3:20 Philomena Nightly at 7 • Sat at 1 NO show Fri 1/17 All Is Lost Nightly at 9 • Sat at 3 NO show Fri 1/17

Beer & Wine AVAILABLE

131 S. Higgins Ave. Downtown Missoula 406-728-2521

thewilma.com

S ta r t t h e d a y with a hearty b r e a k fa s t . Biscuit Breakfast Sandwich – $4. Dine In or Carry Out. This week only! Open 7am – midnight. 2300 West Broadway

406.926.3375

www.laughinggrizzly.com

[24] Missoula Independent • January 16–January 23, 2014

Red and green chile are two manifestations of the same pepper that together form the backbone of New Mexican cuisine. Both colors, and their accompanying exceptional flavors, are worth discussion and praise. But only one of these, red, is widely available outside of the Southwest. Red chile is not only easy to get, but is cheap and easy to prepare. Red was the original chile—the chile that fed this region year-round for centuries. The pods are harvested after turning a deep shade of red, and sundried. Red chile is often stored decoratively in beautifully strung ristras, though for practical purposes, storing red chile in powder form makes the most sense. Powder takes less space and the storage conditions can be better managed. Cooking red chile from powder is also more convenient than grinding up whole pods. Green chile, by contrast, is harvested before it’s fully mature, in late summer, and flame-roasted. The only way to store green chile is to freeze it, which wasn’t an option until recent decades. Before the widespread availability of freezers, green chile was primarily a seasonal delicacy, and to this day, the difficulty and expense of shipping frozen green chile makes it much harder to obtain outside of the Southwest. Red chile is a forgiving dish, leaving plenty of room for creativity. At the very least, it requires nothing but oil, water and salt to bring out the flavor in a sauce. But onions, garlic, butter, chicken stock, oregano and pumpkin seeds really help. I use a clean coffee grinder for the seeds, which gets them to a peanut butter-like consistency. Another optional ingredient—and I emphasize the word optional in hopes of avoiding retribution— is cumin. Like it or not, some people put cumin in their red chile, which for many New Mexicans is a sign that they have no idea what is going on, at best. Reaction from the New Mexican anti-cumin coalition can be swift and severe. Even if you like spicy food, I recommend using the mildest red chile you can get. Many people confuse chile heat with flavor, but they’re not the same thing. In fact, too much heat can make it hard to taste the sweet, acrid flavor of the chile. If you require a certain level of heat, keep some hot chile powder available and adjust for taste. It’s much easier to add heat than remove it. For a quart of basic red chile sauce, start with 2 tablespoons oil and 1 tablespoon of butter in a pan on

FLASH IN THE PAN

low/medium. When the oil is hot, add 1 medium onion, minced. The finer the onion is chopped, the smoother the sauce will be. I’ll often grate the onion into the pan as the oil is heating, which tear-gasses the entire kitchen but gets the onion very fine. (Some people use onion powder for a smoother sauce, but I don’t mind a few small bumps in exchange for fresh onion.) Cook the onion slowly until it sweats and caramelizes. Then remove the pan from heat and stir in 1 tablespoon of ground pumpkin seeds, 1 tablespoon of oregano and a sprinkling of garlic salt. Then, add 1 cup of mild red chile powder, and mix it thoroughly with the other ingredients. Add 3 cups of water, a cup at a time, stirring carefully to hydrate everything. You want the chile about the consistency of a coconut curry or turkey gravy. Add more water, if necessary, a little at a time until it thickens properly. Return briefly to the heat until it reaches a simmer. If you added too much water you can cook it longer in order to thicken it, but I prefer to heat my red chile as minimally as possible. It will turn darker, and can get more bitter, with prolonged cooking. It can also dry out and burn if you’re not careful. There are two basic ways of using red chile. One is as a condiment, served atop or on the side of some finished product, like scrambled eggs, a hamburger, fries, fish or anything savory. Alternatively, red chile can be used as an ingredient. Chopped meat simmered in red chile is called carne adovada. Shrimp simmered in a chile and tomato red sauce is the Mexican dish camarones diablo, or devil shrimp. You can simmer beans in red chile, or use it as a base for stew. But cook the beans or stew first, and then add the red chile at the end and simmer briefly. The Spanish verb “enchilar” means to coat with chile, and I would be remiss not to mention the most famous conjugation of that word, enchiladas, the lasagna of the Southwest. Corn tortillas are covered in chile—enchiladan, as it were—and these lathered tortillas are layered along with cheese and/or meat, and baked at 300 degrees until warm and delicious. Last but not least, a little red chile in chocolate cake, brownies or pots de crème will add gravitas, without taking these desserts too far from the realm of sweetness. Once a taste for red chile gets into your bones, it can be hard to remove. Red chile is a flavor that is almost never out of place, and warm as the desert sun.


[dish] Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway • 728-8900 (across from courthouse) Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Nothing says Bernice’s like the cold, grey month of January. Come in, sit quietly, or share a table with friends in our warm and cozy dining room. Enjoy a cup of joe, a slice of cake, or a breakfast pastry as the sun beams in through our large glass windows. Want a healthy lunch? Come by in the afternoon and try a salad sampler or Bernice’s own Garlic Hummus Sandwich on our Honey Whole Wheat Bread. Bless you all in 2014! xoxo bernice. bernicesbakerymt.com $-$$ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced beega) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Mon.–Fri., 7:30–4, Sat. 84. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. $ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins • 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$ Brooks & Browns Inside Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. • 532-2056 This week at Brooks and Browns...1/17 Blue Moon 6-9 pm. 1/21 John Floridis 6-9 pm. Sunday Funday (Happy Hour all day). Martini MONDAY ($4 select martinis). Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 41 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 • ciaomambo.com The vibrant energy at Ciao Mambo is fantastically accompanied by steaming hot pizzas, delicious assortments of pastas and of course authentic Italian wine. We focus on making sure that whether it be date night, family night, or business dinners we accommodate whatever the need! And do not forget there are always leftovers! Open 5 to close every day, come make us your go to dinner destination! $-$$ Dickey’s Barbecue Pit 143 W. Broadway Downtown Missoula • 203.1557 Taste why Dickey’s Barbecue is the world’s best barbecue since 1941! Try our 8 juicy hot pit smoked meats, like our southern pulled pork or our family recipe polish sausage. We even offer 11 home-style sides, like our creamy cole slaw and fried okra. Don’t forget we’re also your catering experts! Any event, any size – let Dickey’s do the cooking, and you can take the credit. Graduation parties, weddings, office functions, you name it! Dickey’s Barbecue is the perfect catering choice for groups of all sizes – from 10 to 10,000! Don’t forget-Kids Eat Free Sundays & everyone enjoys FREE ice cream every day! Dickey’s Barbecue. Seriously, Pit Smoked. Open 7 days a week. Offering a full liquor bar. $-$$

$…Under $5

Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$ El Cazador 101 S. Higgins Ave. 728-3657 Missoula Independent readers’ choice for Best Mexican Restaurant. Come taste Alfredo's original recipes for authentic Mexican food where we cook with love. From seafood to carne asada, enjoy dinner or stop by for our daily lunch specials. We are a locally owned Mexican family restaurant, and we want to make your visit with us one to remember. Open daily for lunch and dinner. $-$$ The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and gluten-free options. Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. Mon-Sat 11am-5pm. Downtown Missoula. $ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. M-TH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am-4pm, Sat 8am-4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West 541-FOOD The GFS Deli features made-to-order sandwiches, a rotating selection of six soups, an award-winning salad bar, an olive & antipasto bar and a self-serve hot bar offering a variety of housemade breakfast, lunch and dinner entrées. A seasonally changing selection of deli salads and rotisserie-roasted chickens are also available. Locally-roasted coffee/espresso drinks and an extensive smoothie menu complement bakery goodies from the GFS ovens and from Missoula’s favorite bakeries. Indoor and patio seating. Open every day, 7am – 10pm. $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St. 549-7723 www.grizzlyliquor.com Voted Missoula's Best Liquor Store! Largest selection of spirits in the Northwest, including all Montana micro-distilleries. Your headquarters for unique spirits and wines! Free customer parking. Open Monday-Saturday 9-7:30 www.grizzlyliquor.com. $-$$$ Heraldo's Mexican Food 116 Glacier Dr. • Lolo, MT 59847 406-203-4060 HeraldosMexicanRestaurant.com Lunch and Dinner. Open 7 Days • Eat-in or Carry-out • Handmade Tamales • Burritos • Chimichangas • Flautas • Fajitas • Combo plates and MORE. See our menu at www.heraldosmexicanrestaurant.com. Order Your Holiday Tamales Now! Also sold year-round. Call for details. $-$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We’re the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we’ll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over

JANUARY

COFFEE SPECIAL

Organic Nicaragua Dark Roast Fair Trade Shade Grown

$11.60/lb.

BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

SATURDAYS 4PM-9PM

MONDAYS & THURSDAYS ALL DAY

BUTTERFLY 232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

$1

SUSHI Not available for To-Go orders

missoulanews.com • January 16–January 23, 2014 [25]


[dish]

Steel Toe Distillery HAPPIEST HOUR Where you’re going: The Steel Toe Distillery is tucked away on a piece of land just outside of Potomac, off Highway 200. You can walk or drive up the hill to a cozy, hobbit-like shack where you can pull up a chair around the 50-gallon still and taste the whiskey. This isn’t some yuppie watering hole or hipster gathering spot; it’s a place for taking an hour to kick back and bs straight-up Montana-style. What you’re drinking: Uncle Carl’s Prohibition Style Whiskey is a sturdy 120-proof whiskey with a little bite and a lot of warmth, and it’s smooth enough that it tastes 80 proof. It’s aged two months in charred oak barrels using “selective moonshine techniques.” All the ingredients are local, except for the sugar and the bottles. Who you’re drinking with: “Uncle Carl,” aka Carl Bock, owns the distillery with his wife, Christina. Carl is a gregarious sort with an assortment of hilarious one-liners. “I’m just a cat in the woods makin’ moonshine,” he says. (Well, he did make moonshine, but his current operation is legal.) He’s fond of his whiskey, but he has

no pretenses about it. “It’s a working man’s whiskey,” he says. “And I have a full, 100-percent money-back guarantee. If you don’t like it, bring it back. I’ll drink it!”

photo by Erika Fredrickson

Who else you’re drinking with: The Bocks used to run a sanctuary on site for injured animals. Currently, they care for three Arctic wolves who you can view from the backdoor of the distillery as you sip your spirits.

How to get it: At the distillery you can get a free 4-ounce taste, and bottles cost $30 each. The next batch doesn’t come out until Jan. 25, but you can pre-order now. How to find it: It’s about 20 minutes from Missoula. Drive east on Highway 200 and turn right just past Johnsrud Park when you see the Steel Toe sign. —Erika Fredrickson Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com

Iza 529 S. Higgins 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Contemporary Asian cuisine featuring local, vegan, gluten free and organic options as well as wild caught seafood, Idaho trout and buffalo. Join us for lunch and dinner. Happy Hour 3-6 weekdays with specials on food and drink. Extensive sake, wine and tea menu. Closed Sundays. Open MonFri: Lunch 11:30-3pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm, Dinner 5pm-close. Sat: Dinner 5pm-close. $-$$ Jimmy John’s 420 N. Higgins 542-1100 jimmyjohns.com Jimmy John’s - America’s Favorite Sandwich Delivery Guys! Unlike any other sub shop, Jimmy John’s is all about the freshest ingredients and fastest service. Freaky Fast, Freaky Good - that’s Jimmy John’s. Order online, call for delivery or visit us on Higgins. $-$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. 543-7154 (on the hip strip) Did you know that the Missoula Senior Center serves delicious hearty lunches every week day for only $6? Anyone is welcome to join us for a delicious meal from 11:3012:30 Monday- Friday for delicious food, great conversation and take some time to find a treasured item or garment in our thrift shop. For a full menu and other activities, visit our website at www.missoulaseniorcenter.org. The Mustard Seed Asian Cafe Southgate Mall 542-7333 Contemporary Asian fusion cuisine. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combine the best of Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences. Full menu available at the bar. Award winning desserts made fresh daily , local and regional micro brews, fine wines & signature cocktails. Vegetarian and Gluten free menu available. Takeout & delivery. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Pearl Cafe 231 East Front St. 541-0231 pearlcafe.us Country French meets the Northwest. Idaho Trout with Dungeness Crab, Rabbit with Wild Mushroom Ragout, Snake River Farms Beef, Fresh Seafood Specials Daily. House Made Charcuterie, Sourdough Bread & Delectable Desserts. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Philly West 134 W. Broadway 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. $-$$ Plonk 322 N Higgins 926-1791 www.plonkwine.com Plonk is an excursion into the world of fine wine, food, cocktails, service and atmosphere. With an environment designed to engage the senses, the downtown establishment blends quality and creativity in an all-encompassing

$…Under $5

[26] Missoula Independent • January 16–January 23, 2014

dining experience. Described as an urban hot spot dropped into the heart of the Missoula Valley and lifestyle, Plonk embodies metropolitan personalities driven by Montana passions. Romaines 3075 N. Reserve Suite N 406-214-2659 www.romainessalads.com We provide you with the convenience of delicious salads, sandwiches and soups. Our salads include over 30 wholesome ingredients. Our homemade soups change with the season as different ingredients become available. If hearty sandwiches are your favorite, then visit Romaines for one of our braised meat sandwiches. We also have a Montana Hummus sandwich made from Montana grown garbanzo beans. At last, local, fresh, and healthy! $-$$ Roxiberry Gourmet Frozen Yogurt Southgate Mall Across from Noodle Express 317.1814 roxiberry.com Bringing Missoula gourmet, frozen yogurt, using the finest ingredients (no frozen mixes), to satisfy your intense cravings with our intense flavors. Our home-made blends offer healthy, nutritional profiles. We also offer smoothies, freshmade waffle cones, and select baked goods (gluten-free choices available). Join Club Roxi for special offers. See us in-store or visit our website for information. $-$$ Sis’s Kitchen 531-5034 sisskitchen.com Wheat, Gluten & Allergen Free Foods. Frozen & Dry Mix Products. Sis’s Kitchen plays a part in Best of Missoula “Best Pizza” Winner’s for 2008-2012. Find our products at: The Good Food Store • Biga Pizza • Bridge Pizza • Pizza Cafe in Ronan (12”crust). $-$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins 327-8929 Stop in when you’re in the neighborhood. We’ll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula’s best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 11-10 Sun 12-9. $-$$ Taco John’s 623 W Broadway 2600 S Reserve West-Mex® is about fresh taste and BOLD flavors. Taco John’s recipes make you smile and yell “OLÉ”. We combine hearty helpings of seasoned meats, crispy Potato Olés®, and flavorful cheeses with fresh-made Mexican specialties like burritos, tacos, and quesadillas. All topped off with bold sauces, spices and salsas. You’ll find West-Mex® cooking makes for an unbeatably satisfying meal. See you soon ... Amigo :) $-$$ Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 tacosano.net Once you find us you’ll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over


development to sewing—or work on a project with the Open Time/Project Development, with instructor Jim. Missoula Public Library. Noon-3 PM. The Thursday Young Artists After School Program gets the chilluns involved with all manner of art history and media. ZACC. 2:155 PM. $12/$10 for members. Ages 6-11. Call 549-7555 to learn more.

January 16–January 23, 2014

nightlife

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Cup of ambition. Missoula Community Theater presents 9 to 5: The Musical, at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, Jan. 17–19 and Jan. 22–26. Wed. through Sat. at 7:30 PM, plus Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2 PM. $15-$21. Visit MCTinc.org or call 728-7529.

THURSDAYJAN16 Bring your inner goddess along (but keep her away from the Shock Top, gurl can’t handle her drink) for Spank! The Fifty Shades Parody, a musical take on the book that your cousin in Iowa is obsessed with. Wilma. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $35.50. Tickets at jadepresents.com, Rockin Rudy’s and 866-300-8300.

If your name is Simon and you like to do drawings, you’re gonna lurve Continuing D r a w i n g : Pe r s p e c t i v e Po r t r a i t s w i t h Marilyn Bruya. Participants will explore contour and gesture drawing and use of perspective. Ages 18-plus, new and ongoing students welcome. Missoula Art Museum. Thursdays from 10 AM-1 PM. $100/$90 for Missoula Art Museum members. Call 728-0447 or email reneet@missoula artmuseum.org.

Take your boots off before the Lunch ReBoot Yoga with Mary Hanson, with breathing, stretching and relaxing poses. Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent Ave. Thursdays, Jan. 9-March 27, from noon to 12:50 PM. $40 for the six week series/$9 drop-in. Call 721-0033 or email info@redwillowlearning.org. All those driven to create with MakerSpace can come in to learn about its resources—for everything from software

Get rolling on that resolution to be more rad with the new four-week adult beginners’ class at Aikido of Missoula, 208 E. Main St. The course introduces Aikido principles, basic techniques, breath awareness and self-defense. Class meets Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30-5:45 PM, through Feb. 6. Call 549-8387 or visit AikidoMissoula.com to learn more. Now’s the time to put in your two cents and “Make Your Art Desires and Needs Known” at the Zootown Arts Community Center’s open meeting, where ZACC staff will share a strategic plan and ask for input about its growth over the next three years. 235 N. First St. 6 PM. No cost to attend. Missoula’s own Jordan Lane plays his thoughtful tunes at the Top Hat dinner show, starting around 6 PM. Free. Overcome your fears and take a stand when Treasure State Toastmasters mentors folks in leadership and public speaking. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free. Join Hospice of Missoula for Community Conversations on Death and Dying, where facilitators educate people on how to talk about this oft-uncomfortable subject. The Loft, 119 W. Main St. 6–8 PM. Free. Thursday is the new Friday and 50 is the new 30 and orange is the new black, so plan accordingly when Russ Nasset plays Draught Works, 915 Toole Ave. The Burns St. Beastro cart might be parked outside with plates of tasty munchables, too. 6-8 PM. No cover. Turn on, tune in, but don’t drop out when Tom Catmull and Radio Static play the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6-8:30 PM. No cover. It ain’t the wallflower who gets to take home the cutie, so get out there on the floor for the Country Two-Step dance class with Cathy Clark of NW Country Swing. Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave., from 7-8:30 PM. Feel the inspiration flow after the Dance Movie Night, showing taped performances of Mikhail Baryshnikov and members of the

missoulanews.com • January 16–January 23, 2014 [27]


[calendar] American Ballet Theatre executing “The Little Ballet”, “Sinatra Suite” and “Push Comes To Shove”. Downtown Dance Collective. Doors at 7:15, movie at 7:30. $5/free for ages 16 and under. Check out ddcmontana.com. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM. The Inspire Health Film Festival continues today, with The Genius of Marian, about a woman’s struggle with Alzheimer’s, at 6 PM, and A Place at the Table, about hunger in America, at 8 PM. Roxy Theater. $7/$6 students/$5 for kids, or two shows for $10. Q&A with local experts to follow. During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, local talented folks may titillate your eardrums. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up. Hone your performance skills at the Broadway Inn’s open mic night, with Big Sky Pool Party in the Cabana starting at 5 PM, singing and prizes at 9 PM. Includes $3 Big Sky beer special. 1609 W. Broadway St. No cover. We can’t promise it’ll be like Coyote Ugly, but don your best sparkly top just in case when Soul City Cowboys play the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave., at 9 PM. No cover. Count on a good time when Cryptochrome, Triple 3 MC, 3 DHR, Dufresh and Rockstocki play the Palace, with lighting by Pulse. 9 PM. Free. Shramanuary is halfway there, baby, living on a prayer, and for this edition, Shramana’s metal is accompanied by the musical stylings of Total Combined Weight, Arctodus and Future Users: Beta, a new experimental rock dealio. VFW, 245 W. Main St. 9 PM. $3, 18-plus. Cash for Junkers elevates the evening with some western swing, honky tonk and old-school jazz at the Top Hat. 9:30 PM. No cover. Ain’t nothing wrong with a little bump and grind—just be cool and ask first, lovelies. The Badlander hosts the Drop Culture Dance Party, featuring hot trax and a rotating cast of DJs. $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight; women get in free before 10.

FRIDAYJAN17 Shut the eff up, Donny, and head to The Dude Abides: 2014, featuring a showing of The Big Lebowski, plus a costume contest, and live music from Miller Creek, at the Wilma. Show at 8. $7/$5 in advance at the Wilma Box Office and Rockin Rudy’s. Plus, Montgomery Distillery is offering Dude-inspired cocktails at 129 W. Front St.

Spark some creativity after the bell rings with the Young Artists After School Program, where kids can learn art fundamentals, history and techniques while using several media. ZACC. Ages 6-11 on Mondays and Wednesdays, from 3:155:30 PM. Ages 12-16 on Fridays from 3:45-5:30 PM. $12/$10 for members. Call 549-7555 to learn more.

Put on your power pantsuit before the Missoula Community Theater presents 9 to 5: The Musical, at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts. Performances on Jan. 17– 19 and Jan. 22-26. Wed. through Sat. at 7:30 PM, Sundays at 6:30 PM, plus Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2 PM. $15-$21, tickets at the MCT box office, MCTinc.org or by calling 728-7529.

cutt and the Whiskey Hooves, raise a holler at the VFW, 245 W. Main St. 9 PM. $8. (See Music.) Lolo Hot Springs Resort hosts the weekly TomBourine Show, plus you can get your soak on and rent a cabin. 9:30 PM. No cover. Rocker Steven Roth, whose previous outfit Redstone Hall opened for notables like Audioslave, plays

operatic feats Music is one of the greatest and most easily accessible means of sticking up for something. You might first think of pop punk songs about how mom and dad suck or, more seriously, the ’60s folk songs in protest of Vietnam. In the case of Tibetan performer Tsering Lodoe, he sings as a way to stick up for an entire country and culture. The Tibet Autonomous Region has long been under the control of China, which activists accuse of human rights violations and quashing indigenous culture. Possessing a picture of the Dalai Lama, for instance, is a crime punishable by torture and jail, according to freetibet.org.

WHO: Tibetan singer Tsering Lodoe WHEN: Sat., Jan. 18, at 5 and 8 PM WHERE: Roxy Theater HOW MUCH: $20 MORE INFO: theroxytheater.org

Lodoe grew up in India, raised by refugees from Kham Tibet, and was chosen to study at the Tibetan Institute of Performing Arts in Dharamsala as a 9year-old. He’s made it his life’s work to promote the music and dance of Tibet, spreading the word about its struggle for freedom, and has had his music featured in major films like Himalaya and Seven Years in Tibet. He’s performed for Pope John Paul and several times for the Dalai Lama, most recently in Portland. Tibetan dance varies regionally, for the fast rhythms of Lhasa to the more elaborate style of the Kham area; these generally are combined for Ti-

nightlife Chilluns can play while Mom and Pop get their whiskey on with Family Friendly Friday at the Top Hat, 68 PM. No cover. Jan. 17 features tunes from Pinegrass. Calling all unattached fun-seekers over 45, Singles of Missoula meets for drinks and bingo at the Lucky Strike, 1515 Dearborn Ave. 6:30-8:30 PM. $6 gets you cards and a pint or well. Call Nancy with questions at 251-3330. Your paramour will appreciate your thriftiness at the Cheap Date Night, where the Missoula Public Library screens a free, recently released motion picture. Doors open at 6:45 PM and close at 7:15. Enter off Front Street. Free.

[28] Missoula Independent • January 16–January 23, 2014

betan opera, and incorporated with traditional folk tales. Tibetan opera is listed on UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage Lists. For upcoming concerts at the Roxy, Lodoe plays drums, cymbals and damyin. Ani Tsering Wangmo, a Buddhist performer known as “the singing nun,” joins Lodoe on stage. I won’t pretend to be remotely qualified to talk about the fine points of Tibetan opera, but I can appreciate people who sing out in the face of oppression. —Kate Whittle

Russ Nasset and the Revelators are on a mission from God, and you’ll just have to find out what it is for yourself at the Union Club. 9 PM. No cover. Amanda Bynes will be stoked when Drake, Jackson and Parr play the Dark Horse, 1805 Regent, starting around 9 PM. No cover. There’s no place like home, so check out the EDM-oriented I’ll House You party with DJs in assorted flavors at the Badlander. 9 PM. Free. Party down with all manner of cool peeps at the Queer Party, with DJs Owlie and Tygerlily. Palace, 9 PM. No cover. Jayke Orvis and the Broken Band, along with James Hunni-

his rock and/or roll infused with classic sounds at the Top Hat. 10 PM. $5.

SATURDAYJAN18 Make a little mess, cause a little trouble when local Americana rock outfit The Ruins, along with Ted Ness & The Rusty Nails, play the Palace. 10 PM. No cover. It’ll go down sweet and easy when jazz trio Triple Sec plays swing, bossa nova, ballads and blues at the Missoula Winery and Event Center, 5646 W. Harrier Drive. 8-10 PM. No cover. Band in Motion don’t care how many gutter balls you throw when

they play the lounge at Westside Lanes, 1615 Wyoming St. 9 PM. No cover. Stay true to your root vegetables with the Heirloom Winter Farmers Market, which offers produce, honey, crafts and more, in the Floriculture Building on the Western Montana Fairgrounds. 10 AM-2 PM on Saturdays. Do some self-renovation with the New Year, New You Whole Self Wellness Expo, with several vendors catering to health, fitness, financial and organizational needs, plus an appearance from Winnie the Pooh. University Center Ballroom. 10 AM-4 PM. Discover the origin of names around Missoula that you know and love when Salish elder Louis Adams presents Place Names and Landscapes at the third week of the Winter Storytelling Series at Travelers’ Rest State Park in Lolo. 11 AM. $4/free for members and ages 18 and under. Visit travelersrest.org to learn more. Music is an aeroplane so share the gift of it with the chilluns at Kids’ Vibrations, a 45-minute funtime featuring local musicians, dancing and playing instruments. Now meeting at the Missoula Senior Citizens’ Center, 705 Higgins Ave. 11– 11:45 AM. Donations accepted. Corvallis children’s author Wendy Ervin signs Boo-Boo, (the second in the Boo-Boo series dontcha know), along with Rod Overholt, author of kid-oriented Christian book I’m Lost: Which is the Right Path? Hastings, 2401 Brooks St., from noon-2 PM.

nightlife Tibetan opera singer Tsering Lodoe, who recently performed for the Dalai Lama, along with Ani Tsering Wangmo, plays two shows at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins. 5 PM and 8 PM. $20. Call the Roxy at 728-9380 or visit theroxytheater.org to learn more. (See Spotlight.) MudSlide Charley presents gutbucket blues for your enjoyment at the Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave., from 5-8 PM. No cover. The Beans ‘n’ Joe Show, featuring Curtis Rathburn and Teri Llovet , plays “songs you forgot you love” at Blacksmith Brewing Company in Stevi. 6 PM. No cover. In case you didn’t know that there’s a First Most Popular Slide Show of All Time (Al Gore’s Inconvenient Truth), well you oughta learn that the Second Most Popular Slide Show of All Time is Marty Essen’s Around the World in 90 Minutes. He performs this talk, which covers critical environmental issues, scientific discoveries and adventure stories, at the Corvallis High School old gym. 6 PM. $5/$3 for students, free for kids under 8. Proceeds support the Corvallis Middle School’s science olympiad team trip to Nationals.


[calendar]

High tide. San Diego’s Tribal Seeds play the Top Hat Sun., Jan. 19, at 8 PM. $17/$15 in advance, 18-plus. Tickets at Rockin Rudy’s, the Top Hat and tophatlounge.com

See if the Nothing Evers mean what they say when this happygroove group plays the dinner show at the Top Hat. 6 PM. Free. Commune with the joyful spirit within you when Joan Zen plays uplifting, soulful grooves at Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6-8:30 PM. No cover. Captain Wilson Conspiracy gets jazzy and a little sassy at Finn and Porter, 100 Madison St. 7-9 PM. No cover. Party down to support veterans at the monthly dance with Wild Coyote Band at the American Legion Hall, 825 Ronan St. 7-11 PM. $7. Put on your power pantsuit before the Missoula Community Theater presents 9 to 5: The Musical, at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts. Performances on Jan. 17– 19 and Jan. 22-26. Wed. through Sat. at 7:30 PM, Sundays at 6:30 PM, plus Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2 PM. $15-$21, tickets at the MCT box office, MCTinc.org or by calling 728-7529. The Missoula Folklore Society presents a contra dance with tunes provided by Sassafras Stomp upstairs at the Union Hall. Janet Grove has the call. Beginner workshop from 7:30-8, dancing from 811 PM. $9/$6 for members. Seattle-based funny dude Mitch Burrow recounts lively tales from his experience in the Marines, Japan and Iraq at a comedy night at the Roxy Twin Theater in Hamilton. 8 PM. $10. Visit roxyclubtheater.com. Absolutely DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are like Shabba-Doo and Boogaloo Shrimp, saving rec centers one beat at at time. Get hip

to their jamz, hippies. Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2-for-1 Absolut drinks until midnight. $2. The Jack Saloon and Grill (formerly the venerated Lumberjack) presents live music on Saturdays. 7000 Graves Creek Road. 9 PM. Josh Farmer Band gets to work while you bat your eyelashes at the Union Club, 9 PM. Free. Prepare for a great ball of funky tits from outer space when Shakewell and Cure for the Common play high-energy funk at the Top Hat. 10 PM. $5.

SUNDAYJAN19 The History Roundtable presents a demonstration of toys and tools used by early Native tribes of the area with Norman Jacobson, plus Willie Bateman will display Indian artifacts from his collection. St. Ann Catholic Church, 9015 Hwy. 200 E. in Bonner. 2 PM. Free. Email bonnermilltownhistorycenter@gmail.com to learn more. Discover what the nifty MakerSpace is all about with the Open Creativity Session, hosted by volunteer and artist Cait Finley, to discuss projects like 3D printing. Missoula Public Library. 1-3 PM. Dance the cabin fever blues away when the Golden Age Club hosts dances on the first, third and fifth Sunday afternoons through March, an alcohol-free event with potluck snacks during breaks. 727 Fifth St. in Hamilton. 1-4 PM. $3. Kick out the jams down the ‘Root at the dining room of the Sapphire Lutheran Homes, corner of

10th and River streets. Players of all levels are invited to bring their guitars, mandolins, harmonicas, fiddles, banjos, dobros, or other acoustic instrument. Music includes old-time country, bluegrass, swing, cowboy, folk, old standards, etc. Folks who want to play or just listen are encouraged to come. For more information, call John at 381-2483. Free. The non-instructed Open Figure Drawing afternoon invites artists ages 18 and older to draw from a live model. Missoula Art Museum. 3-5 PM. Register by calling 406728-0447, or visit missoulaartmuseum.org. $7/$5 for members. Citizens who are passionate about the planet are invited to Earth As Lover, Earth As Self, a talking/healing circle hosted at a private Missoula home Sundays at 4 PM. Call Louisa at 406-214-2410 to learn more.

nightlife Bring along Artoo and Threepio when El 3-OH! play Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave., from 5-7 PM. Free. Put on your power pantsuit before the Missoula Community Theater presents 9 to 5: The Musical, at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts. Performances on Jan. 17– 19 and Jan. 22-26. Wed. through Sat. at 7:30 PM, Sundays at 6:30 PM, plus Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2 PM. $15-$21, tickets at the MCT box office, MCTinc.org or by calling 728-7529. Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Starts at 8 PM with Front Street Jazz. Free.

missoulanews.com • January 16–January 23, 2014 [29]


[calendar] Connect with your reggae roots when San Diego’s Tribal Seeds play the Top Hat. 8 PM. $17/$15 in advance, 18-plus. Tickets at Rockin Rudy’s, the Top Hat and tophatlounge.com.

The tunes will be totes seasonal and local when Whitefish trio Fresh Off the Vine plays Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. 7-10 PM. Free. Open mic at the VFW, 245 W. Main St., seems like a fine idea, especially with 2-for-1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. 10 PM. Free. Call Joey at 406-229-0488 to get yourself a spot. The always-mysterious Masquerade Monday goes down at the Palace, hosted by the enigmatic Famous Raymus. BYOMask. Palace. 9 PM. No cover.

MONDAYJAN20 See how one intrepid ginger stuck it to NBC executives with Conan O’Brien Can’t Stop, the documentary about his six-monthlong tour after getting ousted from “The Tonight Show.” Screening at the Top Hat’s Monday Movie Night at 7:30 PM. Free. Show J.J. Abrams who’s boss after the Screenwriting Workshop, a six-week class where you’ll learn how to format and plot out film scripts. ZACC, 235 N. First St. Mondays from 6-8 PM through Feb. 17. $75. Call 549-7555 or visit zootownarts.org to learn more. Heyo, school’s out and most municipal offices are closed, too, for ‘tis Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Rasa O’Neill presents Therapeutic Yoga for Wellness and Healing, with gentle stretches, breath work and guided meditation. Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent St. Mondays from noon to 1 PM. $40 for six weeks/$9 dropin. Ongoing class. Call 721-0033 to learn more.

MONDAYJAN21 Get your daily dose of vitamin PBR whilst Flathead outfit Fresh Off the Vine delivers sweet pop tunes to the Badlander. 9 PM. No cover. Get wired in. LA trio Crooks on Tape plays Stage 112 Thu., Jan. 23, at 7 PM. $12/$10 in advance. Check out stageonetwelve.com.

Brush up on your skillz with the Bridge Group for those in need of a refresher course. Missoula Senior Center, Mondays at 1 PM. $1.25. Spark some creativity after the bell rings with the Young Artists After School Program, where kids can learn art fundamentals, history and techniques while using several media.

ZACC. Ages 6-11 on Mondays and Wednesdays, from 3:15-5:30 PM. Ages 12-16 on Fridays from 3:455:30 PM. $12/$10 for members. Call 549-7555 to learn more.

nightlife Show how big your gray matter can get at Super Trivia Freakout.

Win a bar tab, shots and other mystery prizes during the five rounds of trivia at the Badlander. 8:30 PM. Free. Local Deadheads have got you covered when the Top Hat presents Raising the Dead, a curated broadcast of two hours of Jerry Garcia and co. from 5 to 7 PM. Free, all ages. Learn about the stress-relieving and health-enhancing benefits of ayurvedic healing with Mindy Opper’s Ayurveda 101 three-week series. Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent St. Mondays, Jan. 6-Jan. 20, from 6:30-8:30 PM. $125 for the course. Call 721-0033 or email info@redwillowlearning.org to learn more. Bingo at the VFW: the easiest way to make rent since keno. 245 W. Main. 6:45 PM. $12 buy-in. Hey, David Lynch lovers, The Roxy Theater shows episodes of “Twin Peaks,” a few at a time, every Monday at 7 PM. Homemade pie and Black Coffee Roasting Co. decaf and regular available. $5.

Missoula Moves to Amend rallies against the fourth anniversary of the Citizen’s United decision at the Federal Courthouse, across from the post office on 200 E. Broadway. Noon. Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room for Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters, at 5205 Grant Creek Dr., and work on your elk-camp locution with the best. All are invited. Noon– 1 PM. Free. The After School Art Adventure class invites kids ages 6-11 to check out current exhibits and then dig in to their own projects, like printmaking, paper weaving, fantasy character paintings, drawing and more. Missoula Art Museum. Runs through Feb. 18, on Tuesdays from 3:45-5:15 PM. $50/$45 for members. Scholarships available, too. Call 728-0447 or visit missoulaartmuseum.org to learn more.

nightlife It’s always a real glutenous good time when Wheat Montana,

Cannabis Clinic Medical Marijuana Licensing Clinics

Call 406-249-1304

to schedule an appt with our doctor MEDICAL RECORDS REQUIRED

Serving Patients in the Kalispell and Missoula Areas [30] Missoula Independent • January 16–January 23, 2014


[calendar] 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Boys Bluegrass from 5:30 to 8 PM. Free. Call 3270900. Writers of all stripes can meet somewhere besides a bar for once with the Writer’s Group facilitated by John Robinson at Bitterroot Public Library. 6:30-8 PM every other Tuesday. Montana poet Gary Lundy (and bell hooks aficionado, perhaps) reads from his new chapbook, when voices detach themselves, at Shakespeare and Co., 103 S. Third St. W. 7 PM. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free pub trivia, which takes place every Tuesday at 8 PM. Here’s a question to tickle your brainwaves: Who said, “It costs a lot of money to look

this cheap”? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.) Venerated reggae dude Anthony B, along with DJ Natty Herbman, chill out at the Top Hat, starting at 9 PM. $17/$15 in advance. Tickets at Rockin Rudy’s, the Top Hat and tophatlounge.com/events.

Spark some creativity after the bell rings with the Young Artists After School Program, where kids can learn art fundamentals, history and techniques while using several media. ZACC. Ages 6-11 on Mondays and Wednesdays, from 3:155:30 PM. Ages 12-16 on Fridays from 3:45-5:30 PM. $12/$10 for members. Call 549-7555 to learn more.

WEDNESDAYJAN22

nightlife

You can say you heard ‘em back when after you check out the special pre-screening of Tom Catmull’s Radio Static performance on Montana PBS’ “11th and Grant” program, which airs on PBS on Thu., Jan. 23 at 7 PM and Sat., Jan. 25 at 9:40 PM. Roxy Theater. Social hour at 7:30 PM, hour-long show at 8 PM. $5.

Sip a giggle water and get zozzled, baby, with the weekly Jazz Night presented by the Basement Boyz at the Top Hat. 6 PM. Free. Country outfit Nashville 406 guarantees they’ll find the right dance numbers at the Top Hat. 9:30 PM. Free. Sip a giggle water and get zozzled, baby, with the Top Hat’s

weekly Jazz Night. 6 PM. Free, all ages. Jan. 22 features Flathead outfit Fresh Off the Vine. Put on your power pantsuit before the Missoula Community Theater presents 9 to 5: The Musical, at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts. Performances on Jan. 17–19 and Jan. 22-26. Wed. through Sat. at 7:30 PM, Sundays at 6:30 PM, plus Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2 PM. $15-$21, tickets at the MCT box office, MCTinc.org or by calling 728-7529. Calling all cool cats and party animals, Random Music for Random Kitties busts out to bring you grooves from DJ Haus, Tygerlily and more. 9 PM. No cover, plus $5 PBR pitchers and free pool. (Trivia answer: Dolly Parton.)

THURSDAYJAN23 Keep yer stick on the ice and head to the ZACC for an all-ages shindig with Illinois hardcore/postrock outfit Ice Hockey, Pancakes, Confidence Man and the Whoopass Girls. 235 N. First St. W. 8 PM. $5. No alcohol. The Thursday Young Artists After School Program gets the chilluns involved with all manner of art history and media. ZACC. 2:15-5 PM. $12/$10 for members. Ages 6-11. Call 549-7555 to learn more.

nightlife Sussex School hosts an open house, and peeps are invited to

Valentine’s Day Side-By-Side

Valentine’s Day Special

Valentine’s Day Side-By-Side

Deep Tissue Tranquility Massage

1 Hour Massage $35.00

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90 Minutes $150 Great gift for lovers, family or friends.

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Java • 2PM Have you ever wanted to learn programming? Take our Java class. Beginners welcome. 3D Design • 4PM Do you want to learn to design your own 3D objects? Class uses Rhinoceros 3D. DIY Amp Build • 6PM Have you been missing a little homespun nostalgia in your sound? Join the guided Audio Amplifier Build Series!

Free Community Days 2-7PM Tues & Wed Membership Days 2-7PM Thurs & Fri Maker Classes Noon - Close • Sat 1804 North Ave West • Missoula Details at: meetup.com/MissoulaMakerspace missoulanews.com • January 16–January 23, 2014 [31]


[calendar]

Under the neon moon. Rocker Steven Roth plays the Top Hat Fri., Jan. 17 at 10 PM. $5.

Hilton Garden Inn - Missoula 3720 North Reserve St.

JANUARY

25th & 26th, 2014 Saturday • 9am to 5pm Sunday • 9am to 3pm Admission Fee $6 per person Children 12 & under free when accompanied by an adult

For information call Marilyn

208-241-4005 [32] Missoula Independent • January 16–January 23, 2014

tour the space, meet the staff and learn about its progressive curriculum from 5:30-7:30 PM. 1800 S. Second St. W. Sussex is now enrolling grades K-8, check out sussexschool.org. Montana-born, Nashville-honed singersongwriter Kristi Neumann plays the Top Hat dinner show. 6 PM. We’ll all be on a first-name basis when Rick and Phil play Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave., from 6-8 PM. Free. Singer-songwriter fella Luke Dowler plays his pop tunes with just a little scruff at the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6-8:30 PM. No cover. See if you can catch Tricky Dick in action when LA trio Crooks on Tape plays weirdo pop music at Stage 112, at the Elk’s at 112 Pattee St. 7 PM. $12/$10 in advance. Check out stageonetwelve.com. It ain’t the wallflower who gets to take home the cutie, so get out there on the floor for the Country Two-Step dance class with Cathy Clark of NW Country Swing. Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave., from 7-8:30 PM. Put on your power pantsuit before the Missoula Community Theater presents 9 to 5: The

Musical, at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts. Performances on Jan. 17–19 and Jan. 2226. Wed. through Sat. at 7:30 PM, Sundays at 6:30 PM, plus Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2 PM. $15-$21, tickets at the MCT box office, MCTinc.org or by calling 728-7529. Prepare for ultra-heavy ultra-rock when Bozeman’s Archeron Thodol, Grunt and Mahamawaldi play the VFW, along with Shramana, for week four of Shramanuary. 245 W. Main St. 9 PM. $3, 18-plus. Georgia’s own laid-back, psych-countryrock outfit Futurebirds play the Top Hat at 10 PM. $8. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s, the Top Hat and tophatlounge.com. (See Music.) Working the nine-to-five, it’s a way to make a livin’. Submit events to Calapatra by 5 PM on Fridays to calendar@missoulanews.com to ensure publication in print and online. Don’t forget to include the date, time and cost. If you must, snail mail to Calapatra c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801. You can also submit events online. Just find the “submit an event” link under the Spotlight on the right corner at missoulanews.com.


[outdoors]

MOUNTAIN HIGH

N

ow that we’re in the bleak and muddy part of winter, July seems all too far away. But lately I’ve noticed a new gleam of determined desperation in the eyes of runners on the river trail; for them, the sort who want to be able to run 26.2 miles without collapsing, July might seem all too soon. I’m referring to the annual Missoula Marathon, scheduled for July 11–13. This week, a series of events hosted by Olympian runner Jeff Galloway marks the countdown to race day, starting with a registration party at Big Sky Brewery on Jan. 29. The cost to register for the marathon goes up from $75 to $90 on Feb. 1, so thrifty runners will want to take note. What kind of work goes into preparing for a marathon? A lot of running, obviously, but also developing an understanding of your diet, hydration needs,

how to pace yourself and your body’s capacity to carry on with depleted energy stores. Professional runners advise that you should be averaging about 40 miles a week for five to six weeks prior. You’ll also want a decent pair of shoes. Prepare for extreme chafing (Google abounds with gnarly pictures of bleeding nipples). This isn’t a casual thing to take on: after all, the first-ever marathoner who ran 26.2 miles died. Is it all worth it? Come July, we’ll find out. —Kate Whittle

Mullan Reserve combines the best of regional design and environmental sensitivity with amenities that promote an exceptional lifestyle. The result is Missoula's most innovative and comfortable apartment community.

The Missoula Marathon Registration Party is at Big Sky Brewery Mon, Jan. 29 from 6-8 PM. No cost to attend. See our listings below for more Marathon-related events, or visit missoulamarathon.org.

Energy-Efficient Features: LED Site Lighting Energy Star Appliances • High-Grade Insulation Exterior features include an extraordinary clubhouse, private gardens, open spaces and a pool and fitness center. Residences include oversized storage and balconies, bike hangers, shaker cabinetry, plank-style floors and custom finishes.

4000 Mullan Road • Missoula • 406 543 0060 mullanreserveapartments.com photo by Cathrine L. Walters

THURSDAY JANUARY 16 You resolved to do more cross-country skiing this year, so get after it with the Cross-Country Skiing in the Bitterroots informational evening. Experts will chat about the groomed trail systems at Chief Joseph Pass and Lake Como, plus off-trail excursions.Trail Head, 221 E. Front St. 7 PM.

FRIDAY JANUARY 17 It must be avalanche season or somethin’, ‘cause there’s a four-day Level 1 Avalanche Class with AAA-certified instructor Dudley Improta out at Yurtski, in Lolo National Forest. Visit yurtski.com or call 406-721-1779 for information and sign-up. Just in time to rescue your January doldrums, the Seeley Lake Winterfest is here, with two weekends of events, including concerts, snow sculptures, a cross-country ski race, biathlon, parade, snowmobile poker run and more. Fri., Jan. 17–Sun., Jan. 19 and Fri., Jan. 24–Sun., Jan. 26. Visit seeley lakeevents.org/schedule.html to learn more.

SATURDAY JANUARY 18 Make like Katniss Everdeen and check out the bowhunter education class that starts today. Online/field combo courses are available. Check out http fwp.mt.gov/education/hunter/bowhunter Ed.html to learn more. Them waters might be chilly, but you can b.s. about trout anyway when the Rock Creek Fisherman’s Mercantile hosts a weekly Fly Tyer’s Roundtable. Y’all can drink coffee, learn new patterns and use tools and materials for free. Rock Creek Fisherman’s Mercantile, 73 Rock Creek Road in Clinton. 10 AM. Call 825-6440 or email rcmerc@blackfoot.net for more details.

SUNDAY JANUARY 19 Make like Finnish village-raider Herkko RosvoRonkainen at the Pacific Northwest National Wife Carrying Contest, just make sure you’re bringing home your own lady. The competition is part of the annual winter carnival at Lookout Pass Ski Area and

includes prizes. (Pro tip: Estonian champions wives’ ride upside-down, holding onto the husband’s waist.)

TUESDAY JANUARY 21 You’ve conquered the Missoula Marathon once, now aim higher with Olympian Jeff Galloway’s “Improving Your Missoula Marathon Time” workshop at the Runner’s Edge, 304 N. Higgins Ave. 5:30-6 PM. Free. With six months to train, this’ll be a snap, so check out the “Missoula Marathon or Half: You Can Do It” workshop with Olympian Jeff Galloway at the Doubletree Hotel. 7 PM. Free.

WEDNESDAY JANUARY 22 As part of the Missoula Marathon gear-up, Good Food Store hosts the Fat Burning for Runners workshop from noon-1 PM. The answer probably doesn’t involve ice cream, sadly. Free. The Three-Hour Running School with Jeff Galloway is probably not a good time to work on your spitball, but you can get stoked for the Missoula Marathon. Doubletree Hotel, 100 Madison St. 5:308:30 PM. $99/$49 for Galloway Training Program participants. Visit runwildmissoula.org. Get the crew together for the Missoula Alpine Ski Race League, wherein four-person teams (including at least one woman) face off in head-to-head races. Hosted by Snowbowl Wednesday evenings from Jan. 22–March 5 at 7 PM, with final race and party on March 7. Lots of prizes and Big Sky brew gear for the winners. $395 per team. To learn more, contact Jay Rutherford at jay.rutherford@gmail.com. You’ll bee super smart after the Becoming a Beekeeper workshop with the members of Big Sky Beekeepers, which covers topics including materials needed, hive design and insect behavior. Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St. 7-8 PM. $4 suggested donation/free for MNHC members. calendar@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • January 16–January 23, 2014 [33]


[community]

In 1973, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 7-2 in Roe v. Wade that the right to privacy includes a woman’s right to choose an abortion. Pre-Roe America was a lot like countries where abortion is illegal today; women attempted dangerous home remedies or had unsafe, clandestine procedures, sometimes by doctors of questionable training. In some cases, women tried to kill the fetus with objects like crochet hooks, knitting needles or even vacuum cleaners, according to oral testimony collected by historian and former state Rep. Diane Sands. In Missoula, Blue Mountain Clinic marks the anniversary of Roe with a memorial to the late activist Judy Smith and celebration of safe, legal procedures on Jan. 22. Part of the event is an art installation using wire hangers, which have become the unofficial symbol of illegal abortions. It’s

a barbaric past, but one that women’s rights advocates are still fighting against today, like Texas Sen. Wendy Davis’ famous filibuster last year against an antiabortion bill. Women’s access to abortion is continually hampered, often by the same groups that protest the means of preventing abortion: sex education and birth control. BMC got some pushback on Facebook for the wire hanger project from people who feel it’s macabre; but as one woman responded in a comment, “I remember the days when young girls would go to “a place” to get an abortion. I remember the stories of back alleys... blood... infection... sterility and death. I do not feel bad if this makes someone uncomfortable... this is the way it used to be.” It’s activists like Judy Smith and organizations like BMC working to keep our country from returning to those days. —Kate Whittle A reception at Blue Mountain Clinic marks the 41st anniversary of Roe v. Wade and remembers Judy Smith on Wed., Jan. 22, from 6:30-8:30 PM at 610 California St. Visit bluemountainclinic.org to learn how to participate in the art project.

[AGENDA LISTINGS] THURSDAY JANUARY 16 Honor your connection to the earth and the glorious array of life on it during the Children of the Earth Tribe Song and Chant Circle at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. 519 S. Higgins, enter through back alley door. 7:30-9 PM. Free will offering.

FRIDAY JANUARY 17 UM professor Anya Jabour addresses the complex relationship between women’s rights and racial justice in the U.S. at the brown bag lunch lecture, “Mutually Reinforcing or Mutually Exclusive? U.S. Women’s Rights and Racial Justice From a Historical Perspective.” Hosted by the YCWA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway. 1 PM. Bring a lunch, if you like.

SATURDAY JANUARY 18 Learn about maintaining healthy relationships at Co-Dependents Anonymous, which meets at 11:30 AM on Saturdays at the Fourth D Alano Club, 1500 W. Broadway. Contact Koryn for more information at 493-4431.

MONDAY JANUARY 20 Drink up for a cause at today’s edition of Moscow Monday at the Montgomery Distillery, 129 W. Front St., where the distillery redistributes the wealth. A dollar from every drink sold is donated to a different nonprofit or good cause each Monday. Family friendly, from noon–8 PM. The annual Missoula Martin Luther King Jr. Day rally starts in Caras Park at 5 PM, followed by a march to St. Paul’s Church at 6 PM for a keynote address on “The Power of Visions” by Paul Gordon Lauren. Community social at 7 PM with refreshments and childcare provided. No cost, but donations appreciated.

TUESDAY JANUARY 21 Discover different approaches to raising kiddos at Empowered Parenting With Balanced View, which meets at Break Espresso from 7:15-8:15 AM Tuesdays.

Montanans Against the Trans-Pacific Partnership gets together for a planning meeting at Sean Kelly’s. 5 PM. Email Liz with any questions at lizstoeckel@gmail.com. The 1,000 Hands For Peace meditation group uses ancient mudras for cleansing the heart. Meets Tuesdays at the Ewam Buddhist Center, S. Third Ave W. 5:30-6:30 PM. Call Clare at 721-8224. Unravel some health care mystery when an Affordable Care Act navigator is on hand for drop-in appointments to help folks figure it out. Missoula Public Library. Mon., Jan. 13 at 3 PM, Tue., Jan. 14 at 6 PM, Tue., Jan. 21 at 6 PM. Get the big picture on 50 years of the environmental movement when Transition Missoula screens A Fierce Green Fire: The Battle for a Living Planet downstairs at the Missoula Public Library. 6:15 PM. Free. To learn more, call Transition Missoula at 728-6049 or email gcbrown@bresnan.net. Hone your talkin’ and listenin’ skills with the Communication Class based on the work of Marshall Rosenberg and the Center for Nonviolent Communication. Living Art Studio, 725 W. Alder St., Unit 17. Runs on Tuesdays from Jan. 14-Feb. 11 from 7 to 8 PM. $90/$50 for two. Call 443-3439 or email info@partrickmarsolek.com to learn more.

THURSDAY JANUARY 23 Activists against corporate influence in elections assemble for the annual Missoula Moves to Amend meeting, which protests the effects of the Citizen’s United decision. Gallagher Business Building, room 123. 7 PM. You don’t have to be a time lord or a doctor to check out the Missoula Time Bank, in which members exchange skills and services instead of money. Orientations are at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. Enter through the alley door. 7 PM. RSVP required prior to the orientation by emailing info@missoulatimebank.org, and visit missoulatimebank.org.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

[34] Missoula Independent • January 16–January 23, 2014


missoulanews.com • January 16–January 23, 2014 [35]


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

January 16 - January 23, 2014

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD ADD/ADHD relief ... Naturally! Reiki • CranioSacral Therapy • Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT). Your Energy Fix. James V. Fix, RMT, EFT, CST 360840-3492, 415 N. Higgins Ave #19 • Missoula, MT 59802. yourenergyfix.com

tinues, and so do we. Will you help? Volunteer or donate today! missoulamedicalaid.org

Grout Rite Your tile & grout specialists. Free Estimates. Over 31 yrs exp. 406-273-9938. www.groutrite.com

THE BOAT SHOW! “Boat Buying Event of the Year” at the Lewis & Clark Fairgrounds, Helena, MT. January 24th, 25th & 26, 2014. The Montana Boat Show’s $3 admission charge gives you a chance at over $1,500 in door prizes! Children under 12 enter free. For info call (406)443-

Missoula Medical Aid: Working for Health in Honduras. In 1998 we responded after a devastating hurricane. The need still con-

Missoula Medical Aid: Working for Health in Honduras. Please donate now at missoulamedicalaid.org!

6400 or 266-5700. Mark Your 2014 Calendar! www.mtboatshow.com

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Table of contents Advice Goddess . . . . . .C2 Free Will Astrology . . .C4

I BUY

Honda • Subaru • VW Toyota • Nissan Japanese/German Cars Trucks SUVs

Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not

327-0300 ANY TIME

Public Notices . . . . . . . .C6 Crossword . . . . . . . . . .C7 Camp Sleepover . . . . .C9 This Modern World . .C11 Pet Page . . . . . . . . . . .C12

P L AC E YOUR AD:

Walk it.

Ken's Barber Shop Children & Walk-in Welcome • 8:30AM-5:30PM • Tue-Sat Haircuts $10 • Beard Trims $5 Senior Citizens $9 1114 Cedar St, Missoula, MT• 728-3957

317 S. Orange

( :

Talk it. 543-6609 x121 or x115

Send it. Post it. classified@missoulanews.com

PET OF THE WEEK Rosco is a sweet young boy with plenty of energy! This nine-month-old lab mix already knows how to “sit” and “shake” and is eager to learn more good habits, like proper leash manners. He’s already getting a jump on his training in Paws Ahead training at the Humane Society! Rosco is like many labs - he loves car rides, loves swimming, loves squeaky toys, loves people. Thanks to Blue Mountain Vet clinic, Rosco is neutered and ready to go home with his new family today! 549-3934 or www.myHSWM.org

"Piglet sidled up to Pooh from behind. "Pooh?" he whispered. "Yes, Piglet?" "Nothing," said Piglet, taking Pooh's hand. "I just wanted to be sure of you." –A.A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh


ADVICE GODDESS

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

By Amy Alkon

TO GIVE AWAY

KIN I SEE YOU NAKED? I'm 22 and deeply in love with the wrong person—my uncle-in-law (my mom's sister's husband). We started confiding in each other, one thing led to another, and we've been sleeping together for over a year. I'm so drawn to him. He's magnetic, charming, a great person, and a devoted dad. I know I need to end this, and before my family discovers it, but my lust for him seems insatiable. —Drowning It's sometimes good to confide things of a personal nature to one's uncle—like that your mother always loved your brother more, not that you aren't wearing any panties. Don't kid yourself that you're into the guy for all of his great qualities, like what a "devoted dad" he is—a term not typically used to describe a dad devoted to sneaking out to meet his niece for sex. Your "insatiability" is textbook behavioral conditioning. Lab rats that only sporadically get a pellet when they push the little bar become obsessed with pushing it. Rats that get a pellet every time will stop pushing when they're no longer hungry and go about their ratty business. Likewise, if this guy were totally available—if you could get sex pellets on demand—you'd stop seeing him through a junkie's glazed eyes and notice who he actually is: a guy who doesn't care enough about devastating his wife and kids to keep his willy in its cage. You aren't going to stop lusting after Uncle Romeo; what you can stop is the behavior that follows: running off to have a sex date with him. Tell him it's over, and then come up with replacement behavior—maybe doing an hour of killer cardio—to plug in whenever the uncle lust bubbles up. To help maintain your resolve, especially at first, consider the kind of woman you want to be. Do the sorts of things this woman would do and avoid doing the sorts of things (and people) she wouldn't. For example, it might be nice to find a guy who loves being around your family, but not because he's already married to somebody in it. And finally, when you're thinking of activities more in keeping with the new you, consider the obvious—that if you're meeting your sex partners at family gatherings, you really need to get out more.

MAKING STALL TALK After three years of dating, I'm ready to propose to my girlfriend. She's in college across the country now, so I'm waiting until late February when she'll be home to visit. My plan is to take her on our favorite hike and ask her there. The thing is, we've been arguing about when (and if) I'm going to propose. It's starting to get awkward and maybe even hurting our relationship, but I'd hate to ruin the surprise by telling her I'll be proposing in a few months and not to worry. Any ideas on how I can keep the peace while keeping my secret? —The Gloom At a certain point, a woman starts to believe the only way she'll get rice thrown at her is to start a food fight at a Chinese restaurant. Of course you want to propose just right, out in nature, complete with small woodland animals holding the "Will you marry me?" sign and breaking out in song. The reality is, you'll probably do okay with just about any proposal that includes a diamond ring and the words, "Will you marry me?" (Ever hear of a woman complaining, "Yeah, all he did is get down on one knee, pull out the little velvet box and tell me he wanted us to spend the rest of our lives together"?) So maybe what's better than the perfect proposal is the perfect-enough proposal—the one that comes before your girlfriend builds up so much resentment that she changes her voicemail message to "Sorry, can't come to the phone right now. I'm having revenge sex with the guy in the next dorm room." You're smart to want to take advantage of the romantic power of surprise, but you can do that on any old Wednesday. My suggestion is that you get on the phone with her one morning (extremely soon) and make like your boss has interrupted your call. Tell her you'll talk to her later, and do that—at her door on one knee. The unexpectedness and the extravagance of your flying there will give her a romantic story to tell in class the next day, and doing it sooner rather than later will allow her to spend the next few months engaged instead of enraged. (Not to worry— you'll have a lifetime of opportunities to make her so pissed off that she refuses to have sex with you ever again.)

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com www.advicegoddess.com

[C2] Missoula Independent • January 16 – January 23, 2014

Pass It On Missoula is a community supported service offering FREE infant, toddler and maternity clothing to ALL Missoula area families! There are NO eligibility guidelines, simply reduce, reuse, and Pass It On locally! Community donations are accepted on location. PIOM offers FREE clothing to those in need, and affordable for all at 3/$5! Located at

2426 W Central Ave and open Monday-Saturday 10AM5:30PM. 274-6430. www.passitonmissoula.com

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EMPLOYMENT GENERAL AFTERSCHOOL COUNSELOR Missoula non-profit is seeking Afterschool Counselors. Requires at least a high school diploma or GED, or 1 to 3 months of related experience and/or training. Must have good communication skills and be able to turn a chaotic situation into a positive functioning activity. Must have experience working with children. CPR and First Aid required or must be obtained within 30 days. Must interact well with youth. Must be available Monday-Friday for listed hours and occasional day camps when public school is not in session. Instruct children in activities designed to promote social, physical, and intellectual growth needed for primary school in the After School Program. Assist the After School Director in planning, developing and implementing all classroom activities. Ensure children’s social, physical, spiritual and mental development in the program. Provide a quality child care program that reflects a positive image of the organiza-

tion and its services to the community. $7.90 to 8.25/hour, depending on experience and ability, plus gym membership. Mon-Fri, 2:30pm to 6pm, for approximately 17 ½ hours per week. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 2985967 BARTENDING $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training available. 1-800-965-6520 ext. 278 DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONAL (DSP) A local employer is seeking both full & part time DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONALS to work with developmentally disabled adults. Familiarity with the needs of people with developmental disabilities, a high school diploma or GED, and a valid Montana driver’s license are required. Individuals will assist with daily living activities and provide social interaction. Must be able to work 32-40 hours per week. Days and shifts vary. Starting wage is $9.02/hour or higher depending on experience. Outstanding benefit package including health,

dental, and retirement. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 2985959 FARM WORK AVAILABLE near Lewistown, MT. Includes grain, clean-up, cattle work. Tobaccofree workplace. Recent farm experience required. Blind Box 454, Box 900, Lewistown, MT 59457 Flatbed Drivers needed from the Missoula area. Home weekly to Bi-weekly • Top pay • Full benefits • New equipment • 2 years experience required • Clean driving record • Must be present to apply. 406-493-7876 Call 9am-5pm M-F only. PHOTOGRAPHER Employer is seeking to hire a part-time Entry-Level PHOTOGRAPHER. NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY! Willing to train (family company). Must be patient, computer literate, friendly and have attention to detail. Seeking only those applicants with a strong commitment to work. Must have reliable transportation and valid drivers license. Overnight, statewide travel IS REQUIRED. **Back-

ground check will be conducted** Work independently at schools to do set up, photography, collection of payments and paperwork. Monday - Friday, 20-25 hours per week. Late January through Mid April 2014. $9.50 per hour. When traveling you will be reimbursed for the actual cost of gas; PLUS $0.10 per mile for your vehicle use; PLUS your hourly wage. When an overnight stay is required, the employer will reimburse the overnight costs, (Room and food). Closes 01/25/14. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 2985965 RESIDENTIAL HOUSE CLEANERS ON-CALL RESIDENTIAL HOUSE CLEANERS needed for America’s #1 house cleaning service. No experience needed, employer will train. MUST have reliable transportation, proof of insurance, valid drivers license and a phone or other means of immediate communication. *Background checks and drug tests will be conducted by employer.* Must be neatly groomed with a professional appearance. NO facial piercings or


EMPLOYMENT visible tattoos allowed. Cleaning residential homes according to company policy. Work will be scheduled for teams of 2-3 people. Guaranteed 8 hours per week. Must be available Mon-Fri between 8:00 am to 5:00 pm and Saturdays as requested. ****NOW OFFERING INCENTIVE BONUSES**** Wages start at $8.00/hour, upon completion of training the wages are approximately $10/hour. Advancement opportunities available. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 2985960

PROFESSIONAL ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER The Missoula Independent, Montana’s premier weekly newspaper, seeks a professional, highly motivated Advertising Sales Manager. The successful candidate will have responsibility for motivating, coaching and inspiring our dynamic sales team. In addition, you’ll be responsible for handling several house accounts and bringing in new business from local, regional and national accounts. If you’re creative, driven and experienced, we want to talk to you. We’d prefer at least 5 years of ad sales management experience, but we’re open to being convinced that your unique and impressive mix of skills is a good fit for our needs. Please send resume & salary requirements to: lfoland@missoulanews.com or PO Box 8275, Missoula MT 59807. Executive Director – Literacy Volunteers of Flathead County Non-Profit Org. PT-2025 hrs per wk/Flex Schedule/PTO Compensation: DOE Candidates should have a passion for literacy, demonstrate exceptional communications and public relations skills. Background in and enthusiasm for fund development and grant writing. Administrative and supervisory experience preferred. Possess effective leadership and organizational abilities. Working knowledge of Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, Outlook and PowerPoint) as well as Access. Submit resume, cover letter and answer the following by Feb. 7 - Describe how your knowledge, skills and abilities will help you deal with varying viewpoints of

volunteers, students and diverse groups of people. Also - Describe your ability to apply for and administer grants and to plan and organize fundraising events. Mail to: Selection Committee LVFC-Ashley Grassa 17 1st Avenue East Kalispell, MT 59901 Or Email: ashley@wvre.us Subject line – Selection Committee Judicial Assistant This position is the primary assistant and staff person for the Standing Master. Responsible for performing all administrative support functions in a professional manner. The assistant will manage the court calendar by scheduling a variety of matters in consultation with the judge and other parties. The 4th Judicial District is a fastpaced environment and the successful applicant must have the ability to multi-task and manage a number of activities. Excellent customer service skills are required as well as solid knowledge of the legal system and legal terminology. Duties also include managing the efficient functioning of the office. Conflict is an inherent part of the position and the successful candidate must be adept at handling different people and issues. Experience with Microsoft Word or Word Perfect is required. A full job description is available from Human Resources at shgrandy@mt.gov. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 9817881 MARKETING AND GRAPHICS PERSON A growing Missoula manufacturing company is seeking to hire a MARKETING AND GRAPHICS DESIGN PERSON. Requires a creative, energetic, experienced individual who displays strong graphic design and communication skills, and thrives in a fastpaced, team-oriented environment. DUTIES INCLUDE BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO: Coordination and distribution of materials to support outside sales and training efforts in North America, International, Schools and tradeshows, updates to existing collateral to support new program functionality and development of new collateral (online and print). Providing concepts and producing print and multimedia content and handling critiques of work from both upper management and colleagues. Work respectfully with others,

consistently create diverse range of marketing materials including; advertisements, brochures, logos, postcards, sales materials, web graphics, social media, presentations, etc. Review of distributors’ catalogs and presenting to distributors catalog revisions and updates in a timely manner. Full time, day shift. $10-$13 per hour depending on experience. Position will grow in responsibility and salary if person proves themselves. Full benefit package. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 2985964 Restaurant Assistant Manager Seeking energetic, motivated individuals for assistant manager at a kitchen focused restaurant. Duties include managing shift, coaching staff, scheduling, training, cash handling, guest service, cooking, food prep and mentoring new employees. Flexible schedule and great pay. Will train person with strong customer service or staff management background. Potential for advancement for top performer. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 9985169

SKILLED LABOR SECURITY OFFICER Graveyard Shift Full-time, MUST pass drug & criminal background checks. Have knowledge of security practices, methods & techniques in a correctional setting, interpersonal communication & conflict resolution. Skill in the use of security equipment & self defense techniques. Ability to physically restrain an individual if necessary. Clean driving record. Work schedule is 11:00 PM until 7:00 AM, Friday thru Tuesday. Starts at $10.50/hr, then $13.00/hr after probationary period. Benefits include ten working days of annual leave, sick leave, and ten days of holiday leave per year. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 2985971

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and re-

fresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-545-4546

HEALTH CAREERS LPN Requires graduation from a licensed practical nursing program. Requires current license as a practical nurse in the State of Montana. RECENT GRADUATES ENCOURAGED TO APPLY. The work is performed while walking or standing most of the time. The work requires medium range lifting, including supply boxes (2030 lbs.); assisting patients on and off the examination tables; carrying, lifting and restraining children. Requires the manual dexterity to perform skills such as drawing blood and giving injections. Provides clinical patient care as member of care team in all aspects of serving the patient. Functions as a member of a care team, with a medical provider. Scribes for provider and assists with the patient visit. Assists provider with minor procedures. Schedules follow up appointments. Triages patients, assessing the patients’ needs in person and on the phone. Manages patient flow, ensuring that the clinic appointments are conducted on schedule. Conducts and records initial health interviews and prepares patients for examination. Gathers and records vital signs including temperature, blood pressure, pulse respirations, height and weight, pain scale, etc. Charts interactions with patients. Full time, permanent positions. Work schedules rotate and include evening and weekend hours. $14.15/hr. CLOSES: 01/16/14. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 2985963 Phlebotomist I Mon- Fri 38pm. Perform a variety of specimen collection techniques from patients in patient service cen-

ters, skilled nursing facilities, assisted living locations, and client’s facilities. Additional duties specific to a location may include: reception, collection of billing information, specimen processing and client and customer service duties. Performs a variety of routine blood drawing procedures, to include venipuncture and capillary techniques, using standard equipment such as vacutainer tubes and sleeves, tourniquets, syringes and butterfly needles. Facilitates the unobserved collection of urine specimens. Greets patients. Interacts directly with patient to obtain information for laboratory records, explain procedures, allay fears, and elicit cooperation. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 9985229 YOGA INSTRUCTOR Missoula family oriented, membership based, non-profit community service agency is seeking a Part-time Yoga Instructor. Must have experience as a yoga instructor. Teach hour-long Yoga classes in a Group Exercise format. Begin as a substitute with the possibility of taking on a regularly scheduled class. Classes are 12:05-12:55pm on Thursday and 10:30-11:30am on Friday, starting January 24th. There is an additional immediate opening on Wednesdays at 5:00pm. Employer can hire 1 or 2 instructors to meet these needs. Total hours available are 3 per week. PAY: $16.88 per class. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 2985966

SALES FULL AND PART TIME SALES ASSOCIATES Abil-

ity to lift over 75lbs. on a regular basis and have a valid driver license. Customer service, product sales, stocking shelves and displays, mixing paint, and occasionally operating a forklift (employer will train) and making deliveries. Store

hours are Monday - Friday, 7:00 AM to 7:00 PM; Saturday, 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM; and Sunday, 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM. Work days and hours may vary, but the employer is flexible. Individual MUST be willing to work at least 2 weekends per month. PAY: Depending on experience. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 2985962 PARTS COUNTER PERSON PARTS COUNTER PERSON wanted to provide customers with professional assistance in obtaining needed auto parts. Employer prefers experience, but is willing to train; will receive training necessary to become proficient in and be designated as store’s sales specialist. Background in mechanics helpful and good communication skills required. Advise customers according to description of malfunction and recommend substitute or modification of parts when replacement is not available. Write up customer orders, make price quotations, take telephone orders, accept payments, handle customer complaints, perform various types of clerical work, assist with inventory, stock shelves and unload incoming stock. Varied hours and days up to 25 hours per week; Monday - Sunday between 7:30am - 9:00pm. WAGE: Depends on experience and qualifications. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 2985961 Verizon Wireless Retailer We are looking for people who are passionate about working with others. This is a sales position, with goals and commission, but the true path to success comes with properly

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serving the customer. We’re more than a retailer. We have a different perspective when it comes to our customers - give them amazing service, selling them everything they need, so they won’t go anywhere else. This sounds simple, and it is, but it takes training (which we provide) and continual practice (which you must do). It also takes a passion for people and learning, and a positive attitude. We are looking for people who bring energy and positivity to their surroundings, and a willingness to learn. We’ll teach you the rest. Compensation is a base wage, plus a commission. With a compensation that is heavily weighted toward performers, we are looking for those who want to have control over their income through personal production. Benefits include dental insurance, 401k, profit sharing, employee discounts and paid time off. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 9985183

INDUSTRIAL MILLWRIGHT INSTRUCTOR Great Basin College, Elko NV, is recruiting for a qualified person to instruct a variety of courses focusing on pumps, power transmissions, rigging, blueprint reading, shaft alignment and other aspects of fixed maintenance repair.

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montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • January 16 – January 23, 2014 [C3]


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT

By Rob Brezsny

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): What part of your life is too small, and you want to make it bigger? Is there a situation that's overly intense and dramatic, and you wish you could feel more light-hearted about it, less oppressed? Are you on a quest that has become claustrophobic, and you'd love to find a way to make it more spacious and relaxed? If you answered yes to any of those questions, Gemini, there's good news. Very soon now, you will have a close encounter with the magic you need to open what has been closed and expand what has been narrow. Be alert for it. Be crafty as you gather it in and harness it for your use.

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In her poem "Catch a Body," Ilse Bendorf says she dislikes the advice "Don't ever tell anybody anything." On the other hand, "Tell everyone everything" isn't the right approach, either, she says. Judging from your astrological omens, Cancerian, I surmise that you're wavering between those two extremes. You're tempted to think you've got to do one or the other. Should you cultivate the power that comes from being silent, and keep people guessing about your true feelings? Or should you seek greater intimacy but risk giving away your power by confessing all your inner thoughts? I suggest you take a middle path. Tell the vivid truth, but carefully and incrementally.

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If a substance has been burned, it can't be burned again. There's no flammable stuff left to feed a fire. That's simple physics. Now as for the question of whether a person can be burned more than once—we're speaking metaphorically here—the answer is, unfortunately, yes. Some folks don't learn from their mistakes and don't have enough emotional intelligence to avoid the bullies and manipulators who burn them again in the future. But I'm confident that you aren't one of these types, Leo, or that at least you won't be in the coming days. You may have been burned before, but you won't be burned this time.

c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): "People who don't take risks generally make about two big mistakes a year," said author Peter Drucker. "People who do take risks generally make about two big mistakes a year." In general I agree with that assessment. But I think it needs to be altered for your situation in the coming months. Here's the adjusted version of the formula: Virgos who don't take risks in 2014 will make an average of 3.1 big mistakes. Virgos who do take risks in 2014 will make, at most, a half a big mistake.

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): "You know what the greatest tragedy is in the whole world?" asks novelist Terry Pratchett. "It's all the people who never find out what it is they really want to do or what it is they're really good at. It's all the people who never get to know what it is that they can really be." If that description applies to you even a little, Libra—if you're still not completely sure what you're good at it and what you want to do—the coming months will be prime time to fix that problem. Start now! How? Open your mind to the possibility that you don't know yourself as well as you someday will. Take vocational tests. Ask smart people you trust to tell you what they think about your special aptitudes and unique qualities. And one more thing: Be wildly honest with yourself about what excites you.

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In his book Schottenfreude: German Words for the Human Condition, Ben Schott dreams up new compound German words for use in English. Here's one that would serve you well in the coming week: Fingerspitzentanz, meaning "fingertips-dance." Schott says it refers to "tiny triumphs of nimble-fingered dexterity." His examples: fastening a bracelet, tightening a miniscule screw, unknotting, removing a recalcitrant sticker in one unbroken peel, rolling a joint, identifying an object by touch alone, slipping something off a high shelf. Both literally and metaphorically speaking, Scorpio, you now have an abundance of this capacity. Everything about you is more agile and deft and limber than usual. You'll be a master of Fingerspitzentanz.

f

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The four elements that compose cocaine are the same as those that make up TNT, caffeine, and nylon: hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. The combinations and proportions of elements are different in each substance, of course. But the point, for our purposes, is that the same raw materials lead to different results. I foresee a similar drama unfolding in your own life, Sagittarius. How you assemble the ingredients you currently have at your disposal could produce either a rough and ragged high, a volatile risk, a pleasant stimulation, or a useful resource. Which will it be?

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Metaphorically speaking, you have recently come into possession of some new seeds. They are robust. They are hardy. They have the potential to grow into big, strong blooms. So when should you plant them, metaphorically speaking? I'm going to suggest that you wait a while longer. It wouldn't be bad for them if you sowed them right now, but I think their long-term vitality will be even greater if you postpone the planting for at least a week. Two weeks might be better. Trust your intuition.

h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The Flemish artist Jan van Eyck (1385-1441) was renowned for his innovative mastery of oil painting. He signed many of his works not just with his name but also with his motto: Als ick kan. Its idiomatic translation is "The best I can do." What he meant was that he had pushed his talent and craft to the limit, and then stopped and relaxed, content that he had given all he could. I invite you to have a similar attitude as you wrap up the projects you're currently involved in, Aquarius. Summon all your passion and intelligence as you create the most excellent outcome possible, but also know when to quit. Don't try too hard; just try hard.

Christine White N.D. Elizabeth Axelrod N.D. Family Care • Nutritional Consultation • IV Therapy • Herbal Medicine • Women’s Health • Massage Physician’s Building #2 • Community Medical Center • 2831 Fort Missoula Road, Ste. 105

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You Tauruses are customarily more grounded than the rest of us. But this week, I'm wondering if you will be tempted to escape the laws of gravity and rebel against the call of duty. I suspect that your dreams, at least, will feature uninhibited forays into the wild blue yonder. While you're sleeping you may float weightlessly in an interplanetary spaceship, become an eagle and soar over forests, wear a futuristic jet pack on your back and zip through the sky, sail across the Serengeti Plains in a hot-air balloon, or have a picnic on a cloud with a feast of cotton candy and sponge cake and mint tea. Would you consider bringing this kind of fun into your waking life?

BLACK BEAR NATUROPATHIC

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Whose enemy are you? Are you anyone's adversary or obstructionist or least favorite person? Answer honestly, please. Don't be in denial. Next question: Do you derive anything useful from playing this oppositional role? If your answer is yes, that's fine. I won't try to talk you out of it. Continue to reap the benefits of being someone's obstacle. But if, on the other hand, you get little value out of this negative relationship, now would be a good time to change it. You have more power than usual to free yourself from being an antagonist.

Bioenergetic, CranioSacral & Physical Therapies. 30 years experience. Body-mind-spirit integration. Shana’s Heart of Healing, Shana Dieterle, LPT 396 5788

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): It's an excellent time to rise up and revolt against conventional wisdom. I urge you to immunize yourself against trendy groupthink as you outwit and outmaneuver the status quo. Have fun and activate your playful spirit to the max as you create workarounds to the way things have always been done. At the same time, Pisces, stay acutely attuned to your compassion and common sense. Don't be a quarrelsome intransigent. Don't be rebellious just to please your ego. If you follow these guidelines, you will be able to pull off a graceful insurrection that both soothes and stimulates your soul. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

[C4] Missoula Independent • January 16 – January 23, 2014

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BODY, MIND & SPIRIT

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Banjo lessons not just for guys anymore. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com Outlaw Music Got Gear? We Do! Missoula’s Pro Guitar Shop specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, Tuesday-Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533. Outlawmusicguitarshop.com Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

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Outlaw Music

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montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • January 16 – January 23, 2014 [C5]


PUBLIC NOTICES INVITATION TO BID Separate sealed bids for construction of Orchard Homes Ditch Company, Intake Improvements Project will be received by the ORCHARD HOMES DITCH COMPANY, MONTANA at the office of the ENGINEER, Morrison – Maierle, Inc., 3011 Palmer Street, Missoula, Montana 59808, until 4:00 P.M. local time on January 24, 2014, and then publicly opened and read aloud. Late bids will be returned unopened. Each bid shall be submitted in a sealed envelope. The envelope shall be clearly marked as follows: “BID PROPOSAL, INTAKE IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT, ORCHARD HOMES DITCH COMPANY” The project generally consists of, but is not necessarily limited to: Demolition of concrete infrastructure; Concrete check structure; Slide gate installation; Canal bank stabilization; Site restoration activities. The Contract Documents consisting of half size Drawings and Project Manual may be examined or obtained at the office of MorrisonMaierle, Inc., 3011 Palmer Street, Missoula, Montana 59808. Required deposit is $75 per set, which is not refundable, by regular mail or United Parcel Service (UPS). Payment of an additional $25 is required for express mail. Added full size drawings may be purchased for an additional $50, non-refundable. There will be a Pre-Bid Conference at the office of the Morrison-Maierle, Inc., 3011 Palmer Street, Missoula, Montana 59808, at 3:00 P.M. on January 17, 2014. Interested CONTRACTORS are encouraged to attend. A tour of the project site will be conducted. CONTRACTOR(s) and any of the CONTRACTOR’s subcontractors bidding on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI). Forms for registration are available from the Department of Labor and Industry, P.O. Box 8011, 1805 Prospect, Helena, Montana 59604-8011. Information on registration can be obtained by calling 1-406-444-7734. Forms for registration can also be obtained online at MT.Contractor.Com. CONTRACTOR’s are required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. All laborers and mechanics employed by CONTRACTOR(s) or subcontractors in performance of the construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by the laws of the state of Montana in accordance with the schedule of Montana Prevailing Wage Rates established by the Montana Department of Labor and Industry included in the Project Manual. Each bid or proposal must be accompanied by a Certified Check, Cashier’s Check, or Bid Bond payable to Orchard Homes Ditch Company in an amount not less than ten percent (10%)

of the total amount of the bid. Successful BIDDERS shall furnish an approved Construction Performance Bond and a Construction (Labor and Materials) Payment Bond, each in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Insurance as required shall be provided by the successful BIDDER(s) and a certificate(s) of that insurance shall be provided. This project is funded in part or in whole with grant/loan funding from the DNRC-RRGL Program. No bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled time for the public opening of the Bids specified above within a period of 60 days. The right is reserved to reject any or all Proposals received, to waive informalities, to postpone the award of the contract for a period of not to exceed sixty (60), and to accept the lowest responsive and responsible bid which is in the best interest of the Orchard Homes Ditch Company. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA MONTANA Probate Case No. DP-13-244 Dept. No. 4 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of Annie M. Magee, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the Personal Representative, Thomas Magee, return receipt requested, at 407 Wolfville, Florence, MT 59833, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 3rd day of January, 2014. /s/ Thomas Magee, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-14-5 Dept. No. 2 Honorable Robert L. Deschamps, III Presiding. NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF WILLIAM W. ADAMS, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said Deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Joan D. Adams, the Personal Representative, Return Receipt Requested, c/o Skjelset & Geer, PLLP, PO Box 4102, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 10th day of January, 2014. /s/ Joan D. Adams, Personal Representative

SKJELSET & GEER, P.L.L.P. /s/ Douglas G. Skjelset, Attorneys for the Estate MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 4 Cause No. DP-14-1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF THOMAS C. MENDLER, Decedent. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed as Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Darlene Joyce KrantzMendler, at St. Peter Law Offices, P.C., 2620 Radio Way, P.O. Box 17255, Missoula, MT 59808, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 3rd day of January, 2014. /s/ Darlene Joyce Krantz-Mendler, Personal Representative I declare under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is true, accurate and complete to the best of my knowledge and belief. DATED this 3rd day of January, 2014. /s/ Darlene Joyce KrantzMendler, Personal Representative DATED this 3rd day of January, 2014. ST. PETER LAW OFFICES, P.C. /s/ Don C. St. Peter MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP2013-4 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF: MARY J. FINLEY, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that James Streeter has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to James Streeter, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Timothy D. Geiszler, GEISZLER & FROINES, PC, 619 Southwest Higgins, Suite K, Missoula, Montana 59803 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 20th day of December, 2013. GEISZLER & FROINES, PC. BY: /s/ Timothy D. Geiszler, Attorneys for the Personal Representative. I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the state of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 6th day of December, 2013. /s/ James Streeter, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Probate No. DP13-251 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN

THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF LIISA M. PARTAKER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Karin Partaker, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane PC, PO Box 4747, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. Dated this 19th day of December, 2013. /s/ Karin Partaker, Personal Representative WORDEN THANE PC Attorneys for Personal Representative /s/ Patrick Dougherty MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Probate No. DP13-254 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DONNA BERNICE BURKE DALTON, a/k/a DONNA B. DALTON, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Gary Dalton, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane PC, PO Box 4747, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 31st day of December, 2013. /s/ Gary Dalton, Personal Representative WORDEN THANE PC Attorneys for Personal Representative /s/ William E. McCarthy MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP13-253 NOTICE OF HEARING OF PETITION FOR PROBATE OF WILL, DETERMINATION OF TESTACY AND HEIRS AND APPOINTMENT OF PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MARY M. MONAGHAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Tina Asby Hansen has filed in the above Court and cause a Petition for the formal probate of the Will of Mary M. Monaghan, deceased, for determination of testacy and heirs, and for the appointment of Tina Asby Hansen as Personal Representative of said Will and estate. For further information, the Petition, as

filed, may be examined in the office of the clerk of the above Court. Hearing upon said Petition will be held in said Court at the courtroom in the courthouse at Missoula, Montana, on the 28th day of January, 2014, at the hour of 1:30 o’clock p.m., at which time all interested persons may appear and object. Dated this 2nd day of January, 2014. /s/ Tina Asby Hansen c/o Boone Karlberg PC PO Box 9199 Missoula, MT 59807 PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE’S ATTORNEY: BOONE KARLBERG P.C. By: /s/ Julie R. Sirrs, Esq. P. O. Box 9199 Missoula, Montana 59807 Attorneys for Tina Asby Hansen MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY No. DP-13-249 Judge Robert L. Deschamps, III NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF VIRGINIA B. ZIELKE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to KAREN V. HARLAN, the personal representative, return receipt requested, c/o CALTON HAMMAN & WOLFF, P.C., 2075 Central Avenue, Suite 4, Billings, MT 59102-4956, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 26th day of December, 2013. /s/ Karen V. Harlan KAREN V. HARLAN, being first duly sworn, upon oath deposes and says: That she has read the foregoing and that the facts and matters contained therein are true, accurate and complete to the best of her knowledge and belief. State of California):ss County of San Diego) Subscribed and sworn to before me on this 26th day of December, 2013, Karen V. Harlan proved to me on the basis of satisfactory evidence to the person who appeared before me. /s/ Diana Madalow, Comm. #1995265 Notary Public California, San Diego County Comm. expires October 25, 2016 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-13-252 Dept. No. 2 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF M. JEANE FEVOLD, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date

of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to KAREN L. FEVOLD, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested at c/o Victor F. Valgenti, Attorney at Law, 200 University Plaza, 100 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above entitled Court. I declare under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is true and correct. Date: 12/23/2013 Place: Missoula /s/ Karen L. Fevold, Personal Representative NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/29/10, recorded as Instrument No. 201002246 B: 854 P: 1128, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Beth A. Streitmatter Heron, unmarried, her heirs and assigns was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract 37-B of Certificate of Survey No. 3358, located in the Southeast quarter of the Northwest quarter (SE 1/4 NW 1/4) and the Northeast quarter of the Southwest quarter (NE 1/4 SW 1/4) and the Northwest quarter of the Southeast quarter (NW 1/4 SE 1/4) of Section 29, Township 13 North, Range 15 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Now known as Tract 1 and Tract 2 of certificate of Survey No. 6139, located in the NW1/4 and the S1/2 of section 29, Township 13 North, Range 15 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 06/01/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of November 12, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $219,852.98. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $210,280.28, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on March 25, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.107693) 1002.260394-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/30/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200631097, Bk. 788, Pg. 366, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Matthew M. Miller and Rebecca L. Miller was

[C6] Missoula Independent • January 16 – January 23, 2014

Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 1 of Kalberg Estates, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201200002 Bk. 887 Pg. 879 Microrecords, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for Structured Asset Securities Corporation Mortgage Loan Trust 2007-WF1. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of November 22, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $604,795.35. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $365,584.06, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 3, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.17612) 1002.99556-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on February 24, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 24B OF HILLVIEW HEIGHTS NO. 7, LOTS 23A, 23B, 24A & 24B, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Phil Corbin and Jennifer Corbin, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Insurance Co, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated December 11, 2003 and recorded January 29, 2004 in Book 725, Page 1382, under Document No. 200402553. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc., successor by merger to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc.. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of


PUBLIC NOTICES $969.26, beginning June 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of September 16, 2013 is $124,624.42 principal, interest at the rate of 5.875% now totaling $2,741.45, late charges in the amount of $101.31, escrow advances of $1,081.55 and other fees and expenses advanced of $188.18, plus accruing interest at the rate of $20.06 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 18, 2013 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham) On this 18th day of October, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shannon Gavin Notary Public State Idaho County Bingham Commission expires: 01/19/2018. CitiMortgage V Corbin 41926.175 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on February 25, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 7 OF RAINBOW BEND ESTATES PHASE TWO, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF LORI L GRANNIS, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 7, 2007 and recorded September 12, 2007 in Book 805, Page 795 as Document No. 200723789. The beneficial interest is currently held by FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (“FNMA”). First American Title

Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,041.81, beginning February 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 14, 2013 is $362,988.77 principal, interest at the rate of 6.750% now totaling $19,920.25, late charges in the amount of $1,225.08, escrow advances of $1,891.03 and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,282.22, plus accruing interest at the rate of $67.13 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 22, 2013 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham) On this 22nd day of October, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. /s/ Amy Gough Notary Public State Idaho County Bingham Commission expires: 5-26-2015 Seterus v Grannis 42008.305 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 3, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 1 IN BLOCK 3 OF AMENDED PLAT OF COUNTRY CLUB ADDITION NO. 2, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Brian W. Jones and Kathlyen N. Jones, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s obligation owed to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated January 14, 2004 and Recorded on January 20, 2004 under Document # 200401525, in Bk725, Pg-354. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. Successor in interest to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc.. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,059.29, beginning July 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 24, 2013 is $171,986.37 principal, interest at the rate of 2.0% now totaling $1,363.31, late charges in the amount of $199.01, escrow advances of $448.36, and other fees and expenses advanced of $265.56, plus accruing interest at the rate of $9.42 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 25, 2013 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham) On this 25th day of October, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shannon Gavin Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 01/19/2018 Citimortgage Vs. Jones 42011.113 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEES SALE on February 18, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 3 in Block 2 of El Mar Estates Phase III, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana,

according to the official recorded plat thereof. Tax Map or Parcel ID No. 5800146 David Brent McClellan, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to I.R.E. Processing, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Beneficial Montana, Inc. D/B/A Beneficial Mortgage Co, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated October 12, 2004 and recorded October 15, 2004 in Book 741 Page 911 under Document No 200429323. The beneficial interest is currently held by Beneficial Financial I Inc Successor by Merger to Beneficial Montana Inc. D/B/A Beneficial Mortgage Co. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,460.73, beginning April 18, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 18, 2013 is $171,955.78 principal, interest at the rate of 8.24% now totaling $37,926.76, and other fees and expenses advanced of $56,358.83, plus accruing interest at the rate of $38.82 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon

EAGLE SELF STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 44, 53, 73, 182, 218, 239, 287, 380, 476, 513, and 659. Units contain furniture, clothes, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc. household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday, January 27, 2014. All auction units will only be shown each day at 3 P.M. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage office at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59804 prior to Thursday, January 30, 2014 at 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 9, 2013 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham) On this 9th day of October, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 Hsbc Vs. Mcclellan 41472.663

CLARK FORK STORAGE

will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 34, 67, 82, 94, 145, 155, 174, 196, 201, 208, 214 and 233. Units can contain furniture, clothes, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting 1/20-23/2014 by appt only by calling 541-7919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to 1/23/2014 at 4:00 P.M. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

SUSTAINAFIEDS Natural Housebuilders, Inc. Energy efficient, small homes, additions/remodels, higher-comfort crafted buildings,

solar heating. 369-0940 or 6426863. www.naturalhousebuilder.net

Natural Housebuilders, Inc. Building the energy-efficient

"A PX Upon You"–the same from start to finish.

by Matt Jones

ACROSS

1 Salon cut? 5 More crafty 11 "Batman" fight scene word 14 1995 role for Kenneth Branagh 15 Jumpsuit hue 16 Chapter of history 17 House funding? 19 "Excitebike" gaming platform 20 Put some muscle into cleaning 21 No-wheel-drive vehicle 22 It may be used in a pinch 23 Occupation with its own category of jokes 25 Disloyal 26 Smoothie ingredient, often 29 On the agenda 30 Winter exclamation 31 Barely make it 35 Compete like Ted Ligety 36 "Her" star Joaquin 37 Meadow murmur 40 Stuffed animal of the '80s 42 Dix or Knox 43 First game 45 "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian" author Sherman 47 Like pickle juice 48 Moved like a crowd, with "about" 51 "___ of Anarchy" 52 Strip in the news 53 Anthony Edwards, in "Top Gun" 57 Pet Shop Boys song "West ___ Girls" 58 Cause of subzero temperatures in the US in 2014 60 Fr. holy title 61 Cheese in some bagels 62 "Take ___ from me..." 63 "Red" or "White" team 64 Bond's martini preference 65 Just meh

Last week’s solution

DOWN

1 Doesn't throw back 2 Traffic cop? 3 "Frankenstein" assistant 4 Well-liked 5 "___ blimey!" 6 Quirkily creative 7 "Don't It Make My Brown Eyes Blue" singer Crystal 8 Latin for "between" 9 Posh exclamation 10 Harrison of "My Fair Lady" 11 The sin bin 12 "Otherwise, I might do something you'll regret!" 13 Trashed 18 "Electronics, Cars, Fashion, Collectibles, Coupons and More" website 22 Swedish car brand founded in 1945 24 Laundromat fixture 25 Show off "these bad boys" 26 "Frontline" network 27 Early boat 28 Economist's average 29 Quarterback's pass, hopefully 32 Corn-centric zone? 33 "Riddle-me-___" (line in a children's rhyme) 34 Gasteyer of "Suburgatory" 36 The hunted 38 Onassis' nickname 39 Took in take-out, e.g. 41 Curry and Wilson 42 Hipsters' hats 43 Get way too into, with "over" 44 Now if not sooner 46 Block you don't want to step on in bare feet 48 Radiance, to the Secret Service 49 "The Compleat Angler" author Walton 50 Onion rings option 52 "Heavens!" 54 "The Simpsons" character always shown wearing a walkman 55 Six of Juan? 56 Former Montreal baseball player 58 Faux ___ 59 Actor Max ___ Sydow

SOLAR ACTIVE HOME

• Custom crafted buildings • Additions/Remodels

369-0940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net

©2014 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • January 16 – January 23, 2014 [C7]


SERVICES HANDYMAN Squires For Hire Carpentry, Remodel, Drywall, Custom Tile, Appliance Repair. Free Estimates. Licensed Contract #163074. Bret Squries, Handyman 406-544-4671

HOME IMPROVEMENT Natural Housebuilders, Inc. Building the energy-efficient SOLAR ACTIVE HOME •

Custom crafted buildings • Additions/Remodels. 369-0940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator. Testimonials Available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642 SBS Solar offers design and installation services for Solar Systems: residential, commercial, on- and off-grid. We also specialize in Energy Audits for home or business. www.SBSlink.com

SBS Solar specializes in design and installation services for Solar Systems: residential, commercial, on- and off-grid. Serving all of Western Montana. www.SBSlink.com

MASSAGE $35/hour Deep Tissue Massage. Zoo City Massage located at 1526 S. Reserve St., Missoula. Call (406) 370-3131

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

RENTALS APARTMENTS 1 bedroom, 1 bath, $550, Downtown, coin-op laundry, storage, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 116 Turner Ct.: Studio, Main floor, Full kitchen & bathroom, Parking, Storage, $473. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!! 1502 #2 Ernest 1 bed/1 bath, W/D hookups, recent remodeling, central location. $600. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1801 Howell #2. 2 bed/1 bath, Northside, deck, shared yard, W/D hookups, storage. $725. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1805 Phillips; very spacious 1bedroom with new flooring and all new paint, laundry on-site with a free bus pass for $625. Contact Colin Woodrow, 406549-4112 x112, cwoodrow@missoulahousing.org 1885 Mount Ave. #2. 1 bed/1 bath, shared yard, storage, central location. $550. RENT INCENTIVE! Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby that all dwellings ad1951 E. informed Broadway. 3 bed/3 vertised in this newspapercondo are available bath, Cobbletstone ononthe an equal opportunity basis. To report disriver! Single garage, W/D incrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free cluded. $1300. Grizzly Property at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair HousManagement 542-2060 ing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

2 bedroom, 1 bath $615, coinop laundry, storage, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bath $695, quiet cul-de-sac, DW, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bath, remodeled, $820, near Southgate Mall, storage, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 2 bath, $825. New complex, W/D hookups, open concept, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 330 S. 6th St. E.: 2+1 Bedroom, Blocks to the U!, Wood floors, Storage, Cat OK, $900. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!! 448 Washington. 1 bed/1 bath, downtown, HEAT PAID, coin-ops on site. $700. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

Lenox; studio located in great historic brick building downtown. All utilities paid and comes with a bus pass for $525. Contact Matty Reed, 406-5494113 x130, mreed@missoulahousing.org River Ridge: 1 and 2 bedroom units available for people 55 and older. Amenities include air conditioning, self-cleaning oven, large windows, spacious cabinets, dishwasher and radiant floor heat. All utilities paid with cable offered at a reduced price. Close to shopping and bus line. $589 to $838 per month. Contact Connie @ 5437500, ctoney@missoulahousing.org

508 E. Front: 1+1 Bedroom, Downtown & by the U, Wood floors, Deck, Laundry, Cat OK, $840. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 5496106; 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!! 735 W. Sussex #3. 2 bed/1 bath, central location, HEAT PAID, coin-ops on site. $700. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

Fireweed; townhome-style 2story, 2-bedroom with in-unit laundry, & free bus pass for $620. Contact Colin Woodrow, 406-549-4112 x112, cwoodrow@missoulahousing.org Gold Dust; 2-bedroom, ADA Accessible (504), polished concrete and radiant heat floors, rooftop gardens, & free bus pass for $691 all utilities included. Contact Matty Reed, 406-549-4113 x130, mreed@missoulahousing.org

MOBILE HOMES

Studio, 1 Bath, room for bedroom but no door, DW, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent. W/S/G/Electric included. $425/month 406-273-6034

1&2

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

549-7711 Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com

Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

1708 Scott St. “A”. 1 bed/1 bath, shared yard, all utilities included, pet? $625. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

ROOMMATES ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

GardenCity

Property Management

"Let us tend your den" Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

422 Madison • 549-6106 Finalist

For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

Finalist

MHA Management manages 10 properties throughout Missoula.

119 N. Johnson 1 Bed Apt. $495/month

[C8] Missoula Independent • January 16 – January 23, 2014

1309 Linnea Lane. 4 bed/2.5 bath, newer home, central location, single garage, small yard, pet? $1300. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

Posting a classified ad ONLINE is FREE!

251-4707

Visit our website at

1404 Toole: 2 Bedroom, Downtown, Near laundromat, Huge, Nice condition, Cat OK, $695. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!!

Did you know?

FIDELITY

fidelityproperty.com

HOUSES

817 Monroe. 1 bed/1 bath, Rattlesnake area, W/D hookups, carport $650. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

Uncle Robert Lane 2 Bed Apt. $660/month

DUPLEXES

321 W. Spruce #1 2 bed/1 bath, all remodeled, shared yard, downtown. $1000. Grizzly Property Management 5422060

Russell Square; 2-bedroom in a lovely senior community with a great location, washer/dryer hookups, and a fantastic floor plan for $650 with heat included. Contact Kelly Abbey, 406-549-4113 x127, kabbey@misshoulahousing.org

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Equinox; 2-bedroom with tall ceilings, located next to the river, a private deck, lots of storage & free bus pass for $620. Contact Colin Woodrow, 406-549-4112 x112, cwoodrow@missoulahousing.org

ROOM FOR RENT. 3 miles west of Mullan Road. $350. Travel trailer space. $350. 5490515/548-1717

All properties are part of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program. The Missoula Housing Authority complies with the Fair Housing Act and offers Reasonable Accommodations to persons with Disabilities.

1235 34th St. • Missoula (406) 549-4113 missoulahousing.org

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing 30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

www.gatewestrentals.com


REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 2607 View Drive. 3 bed, 2 bath ranch-style home in Target Range. Hardwood floors, fireplace & 2 car garage. $239,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate. 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath, remodeled Central Missoula home. $298,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 410 West Sussex. Adorable 2 bed, 1 bath with fenced backyard & single garage. $177,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com 5 Bdr, 3 Bath, remodeled Central Missoula home. $295,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

606 North Avenue West. 3 bed, 2 bath with finished basement & 2 car garage. $255,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com Beautiful home on Rattlesnake Creek. 4 bed, 3 bath with gourmet kitchen, fireplace and deck. $865,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7355, milyardhomes@yahoo.com

2 car garage & 2000+Sqf House! Great value for only $197,000! Can not see neighbors. Breathtaking Mission Mountain Views. Flathead River near by! A must see to appreciate! Call David Passieri @ 406-745-8888

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES

Lewis & Clark Area Home 839 W Central. $220,000 MLS# 20136229. 2 bedroom, 2 bath. Double detached garage and many other sweet features. KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

724B Skyla Court. 3 bed, 2 bath on cul-de-sac near Clark Fork River. Fenced backyard and double garage. $184,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653, pat@properties2000.com

SECLUDED 7+ Acres in NORTH MOIESE AREA! PRIVATE COUNTRY SETTING! Looking for a place for your HOBBY FARM or just want to get away from it all? This could be it! Fruit trees, chicken coop,

Uptown Flats #210. 1 bed, 1 bath modern condo on Missoula’s Northside. $149,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • January 16 – January 23, 2014 [C9]


REAL ESTATE Uptown Flats #306. 1 bed, 1 bath top floor unit with lots of light. W/D, carport, storage & access to exercise room. $162,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com Uptown Flats. Upscale gated community near downtown. All SS appliances, carport, storage and access to community room and exercise room plus more. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com Why Rent? Own Your Own 1400 Burns. Designed with energy efficiency, comfort and affordability in mind. Next to Burns Street Bistro and Missoula Community Co-op. Starting at $79,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

LAND FOR SALE 1265 #B Dakota. Riverfront parcel for to-be-built 3 bed, 2 bath with 2 car garage. $55,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com 160 acres in Grant Creek bordered on two sides by Forest Service land. $750,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 20 Ac of OFF GRID LIVING! ~St. Ignatius~ PRICE REDUCED! 20 beautiful acres of PRIVATE meadow & timber mix in the MISSION MOUNTAINS! Priced @ $89,000. Off grid with NEW access road! Several choice building sites. Seller is anxious & will look at all offers!

UPTOWN FLATS STARTING AT $149,900 Great investment property for potential leasing in highly sought after condo close to downtown. Perfect for out-of-town residents. Only 8 units left!

546-5816

20 Ac of OFF GRID LIVING! ~St. Ignatius~ PRICE REDUCED! 20 beautiful acres of PRIVATE meadow & timber mix in the MISSION MOUNTAINS! Priced @ $89,000. Off grid with NEW access road! Several choice building sites. Seller is anxious & will look at all offers! Contact Mission Valley Properties for more info 406-745-4940 East Missoula Lot At 559 Speedway (Next Door) $55,000. 4,800 square feet. Mature trees, sewer available. KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

NHN Ryans Lane Tract B. 103+/- treed acres with year-round creek near Evaro Hill. $517,250. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com

OUT OF TOWN

PORTICO REAL ESTATE

annierealtor@gmail.com • movemontana.com

3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Historic Stevensville home. $239,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Stevensville area home on 6+ acres. $325,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

5 Bdr, 4 Bath, Stevensville area home on 10 acres. $649,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

4 Bdr, 3 Bath, Clinton area home on 1.6 acres. $298,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

River Access 20525 Schwartz Creek, Clinton. 3 bed, 2 bath, single level living on 1 acre. Walking distance to river fishing access. $250,000. KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

5 Bdr, 3 Bath, Florence area home on 3.2 acres. $575,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

Southwest Montana Real Estate for Philipsburg, Montana: Pintlar Territories. Tom Rue. (406) 6916900. true@blackfoot.net. www. pintlarterritories.com

NHN Frontage Road, Alberton. 2 building sites with Clark Fork River views. $65,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653 pat@properties2000.com

Noxon Reservoir Avista frontage lots near Trout Creek, MT. Red Carpet Realty 728-7262 www.redcarpet-realty.com

Call Anne for more details

Anne Jablonski

Contact Mission Valley Properties for more info 406-745-4940

3 Bdr, 1 Bath Alberton home. $125,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

Beautiful Home On Rattlesnake Creek 4 bed, 3 bath with cathedral ceilings, wood floors, gourmet kitchen, jetted tub and river rock fireplace. Lovely 2nd floor deck overlooks creek.

$865,000 606 North Ave. W. $255,000 • MLS #20136914

Classic 1950's with refinished hardwood floors,arched doorways and built-ins. All new windows & new energy-efficient furnace. Finished basement with family room. Fenced yard with fruit trees & raised beds. Double detached garage. For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Rochelle

Missoula Properties Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com

[C10] Missoula Independent • January 16 – January 23, 2014


REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL EQUITY LOANS ON NONOWNER OCCUPIED MONTANA REAL ESTATE. We also buy Notes & Mortgages. Call Creative Finance & Investments @ 406-721-1444 or visit www.creative-finance.com

FIDELITY Management Services, Inc.

7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7 • 251-4707 Specializes in Residential Property. Serving the Missoula area since 1981.

Visit our website at

fidelityproperty.com

410 West Sussex $177,900 Adorable 2 bed, 1 bath cottage style near Dairy Queen. Well-maintained with remodeled kitchen, fenced backyard & single garage.

Pat McCormick Real Estate Broker Real Estate With Real Experience

pat@properties2000.com 406-240-SOLD (7653)

Properties2000.com missoulanews.com • January 16 – January 23, 2014 [C11]


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control 541-7387 TRUFFLE• Truffle

looks matronly and sedate in her kennel, but we've discovered that she really loves to play fetch. She played so hard in the office one day that she had to rest for a while so she could start over and play some more!

LIONEL•Lionel was scruffy and thin Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MontanaSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

DEUCE•Once he gets to know you,

2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

Deuce is the most loving, loyal, happy, and well-behaved dog ever! He does has some trust issues with new people, but he's working through them and has enormous potential to be a great pet.

PRINCESS•We think Princess could definitely be royalty; we just need to find her a home where she can be queen. 2330 South Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59801 She's a big, happy lady who knows all Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) about being a companion and would love 3708 North Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59808 Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri) to have a special person of her own. Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 9:00am-12:00pm (Sat)

when he was brought to the shelter, but it didn't take long for him to fill out and proudly show off his sleek coat. He's quite a comedian and could provide lots of entertainment for a new family.

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

GLACIER•Glacier is a beautiful older

Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

lady with a sweet manner and a loving personality. She's looking for a quiet retirement home where she can relax in the sunshine and enjoy gentle handling from her family.

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

LIL MAMA•Lil Mama came from a home that included lots of other cats, but she's decided that she really likes having her own space. We think she would also prefer to get all the attention from her family (and not have to share it with other cats).

www.dolack.com Original Paintings, Prints and Posters 139 W. Front St., Missoula (406) 549-3248

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana 549-3934 SHEILA• Sheila is 11 years young. This friendly Shar pei mix likes to go for hikes, play with other dogs or just lay around with you on the couch all day. Come and meet her today and, while you are at the Humane Society, check out the awesome humane training tools and toys available in our Re-Tail store!

Serving the community’s framing needs since 1993 using environmentally sustainable practices.

139 West Front St. inside the Monte Dolack Gallery, Downtown Missoula, MT

(406) 549-3248 • dolack.com

SURF•Surf is a 9-month-old Terrier mix

joys easy living. Abby is a lovely 7-yearold lady in search of an indoor home. She can be a bit shy at first, but she loves to give rubs and head butts. She will quietly talk to you and tell you how much she loves you.

WILLIE • Meet Willie, a sweet senior looking for a retirement home. Willie has lived with other cats and loves a comfy bed. Willie's adoption fee will be waived for a senior adopter as part of the Humane Society's Seniors for Seniors adoption program.

who will be a perfect explorer of small spaces, like those in your home. Thanks to Animal Blessings Pet Hospital, Surf has been spayed and is ready to be adopted. Her adoption includes vaccines, a bag of Science Diet dog food and collar and leash.

AUGUSTINE•This young lady is ready

MAGGIE•Maggie has a permanent smile on her face! She is an active and smart girl who loves other dogs, car rides and hikes. She also has great manners and is housetrained. Maggie is patiently waiting for her adopter to come fall in love with her!

ABBY • Abby, like most senior pets, en-

MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

[C12] Missoula Independent • January 16 – January 23, 2014

to find a home of her own! She came to the shelter with eight tiny kittens who have now all been adopted and Augustine thinks it's her turn. She is an outgoing and affectionate cat; and thanks to Blue Mountain Vet Clinic, Augustine is spayed and ready to go home.

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

Missoula’s Locally Owned Neighborhood Pet Supply Store

www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275 East Broadway • South Russell • North Reserve


Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture