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UP FRONT

SHOOT, SHOOT, CUT AND SCORE: THE ART OF MAKING OUTDOOR FILMS

ACLU GOES IN THE BACKCOUNTRY, CAN’T PLACES, AT THE TOP HAT, NEWS MONTANA’S RANGE NOISE ROGUE ON CITIZENS WE ALL JUST STAY UNBURIED? COMES TO REDEEM POP


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


UP FRONT

SHOOT, SHOOT, CUT AND SCORE: THE ART OF MAKING OUTDOOR FILMS

ACLU GOES IN THE BACKCOUNTRY, CAN’T PLACES, AT THE TOP HAT, NEWS MONTANA’S RANGE NOISE ROGUE ON CITIZENS WE ALL JUST STAY UNBURIED? COMES TO REDEEM POP


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Missoula Independent Page 2 February 9 – February 16, 2012

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nside Cover Story

Damien McInnis grew excited in 2010 when WalMart and the Idaho-based general contractor Engineered Structures hired his company, Picasso Brothers, along with 103 other subcontractors, to work on a yearlong store expansion and renovation of the retailer’s Highway 93 South Supercenter, in Missoula. Though McInnis was Cover photo by Chad Harder still working on the project, payments to Picasso Brothers stopped in July of 2011. McInnis recalls that an Engineered Structures project manager told him that payment was just around the corner, but, says McInnis, “One week would lead into the next week would lead into the next…and it never materialized.”...14

News Letters Small towns are great places to visit, but........................................................4 The Week in Review An alleged pimp goes down.....................................................6 Briefs Montana’s ACLU goes its own way, and more ..................................................6 Etc. Hamilton’s existential challenge ...........................................................................7 Up Front Flathead filmmaker shoots and jumps ........................................................9 Ochenski The Tester-Rehberg dilemma.....................................................................10 Range Accidental or intentional, an avalanche could bury you................................11 Agenda A screening of Farmageddon at The Roxy ...................................................12

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan Does chocolate love you? ..............................................................18 Happiest Hour Monk’s Bar .......................................................................................19 8 Days a Week It’s a warm wind that blows no good ..............................................21 Mountain High The 2012 Fly Fishing Film Tour ......................................................29 Scope Doug Russell’s layered art of decay ................................................................30 Noise Ascetic Junkies, Places, Tropical World, Cloud Nothings ................................31 Soundcheck Aran Buzzas’s country life....................................................................32 Film Big Miracle, a not-too-stupid feel-good movie .................................................33 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films ...................................................34

www.seankellys.com MONDAY 1/2-priced Indian entrees all day long $6 Rainier Pitchers TUESDAY Fat Tire Pub Trivia 8 pm WEDNESDAY Hump Night Bingo 8 pm Happy Hour 4-6pm $4 Imports THURSDAY Open Mic Night with Mike Avery 9-12pm Happy Hour 4-6pm $2/$4 well drinks Fish & chips $5.95 all day FRIDAY Happy Hour 4-6pm $4 Imports Feckin whiskey gingerales $3/singles $5/doubles

SATURDAY & SUNDAY Brunch 11-2pm • $2 Mimosas

Exclusives Street Talk....................................................................................................................4 In Other News...........................................................................................................13 Classifieds ................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrology..................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle....................................................................................................C-7 This Modern World ...............................................................................................C-11 PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Robert Meyerowitz PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson ASSOCIATE EDITOR Matthew Frank PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Jason McMackin STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Skylar Browning COPY EDITOR Ted McDermott PHOTO INTERN Michelle Gustafson ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Chris Melton, Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Rhonda Urbanski, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Jon Baker MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Brad Tyer, Dave Loos, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Azita Osanloo, Jamie Rogers, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2012 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

Missoula Independent Page 3 February 9 – February 16, 2012


STREET TALK

by Michelle Gustafson

Asked the afternoon of Monday, Feb. 6, on Front Street. UM is paying $160,000 to a Pennsylvania PR firm in an effort to “rebrand” the university’s image. What’s the first thing that comes to mind when you think of the University of Montana? Follow up: If you were changing UM’s image, how would you make it an exciting brand?

Deb Harris: I think the university has a positive image, and I really don’t think they should be spending that amount of money on a PR firm. It’s a lot of money and it’s probably unnecessary. Check the news: I see no need to do a thing. I think it has a good image.

Ashley McKee: I grew up here, so the first thing I think of is when I was younger and would go with my mom to art classes at the university. It’s just something I’ve always known and always been a part of. Portlandia: The image isn’t as strong as it used to be. It now feels like it’s becoming a mini Portland, with a downtown scene with hippies and hipsters.

Mike Steinberg: The first thing is the way the school’s arts and entertainment aspects stretch out into the community. But what’s [the rebranding] intended for? Is it to fill more classrooms, attract endowments, research? New palette: The colors seem outdated. They’re from another era, and set in a particular time. There should be colors of the future!

Deante Nelson: I’m not from here, so I haven’t heard much about it; I just know about the Grizzlies. Wishful thinking: I’d probably want more money toward athletics, music and the arts.

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Comment Agenda News Quirks

Healthy elk, healthy children My compliments to Alex Sakariassen for his article on the elk decline issue (see “What’s eating the elk?” Jan. 26). The data he quotes from Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks concerning the time periods of decline and expansion in the elk populations in southern Ravalli County correspond with our findings. However, judging by the Ravalli County Commissioner’s predator policy, it is obvious that irrationality again trumps science. We recently provided the commissioners with our published study Observations of Brachygnathia Superior in Wild Ruminants in Western Montana, USA. The study is free online. We found that over half of the wild and domestic grazing animals, including elk, examined for the study had symptoms consistent with disruption of the fetal thyroid hormones during development. Most symptoms of fetal hypothyroidism cause the young to die prior to or soon after birth. This, of course, decreases the number of young available to replace the animals that die of natural causes or are killed by humans or other predators. Finding what is causing the hormone disruption and dealing with the actual culprit is the intelligent way, and the only way, to solve the problem of declining ruminant populations. Doing this will also make you and your children healthier. There will be far fewer children born with heart defects, brain malformations (especially autism), a propensity to have asthma, high cholesterol, obesity, diabetes, childhood cancers and the other debilitating health problems the Pentagon has stated are a national security issue. All are symptoms of the disruption of the thyroid hormones during fetal development. Or you can follow the Ravalli County Commissioners’ policies and your children can keep being born with those serious and costly health problems. Strangling, maiming, torturing or poisoning all animals that happen to be caught in snares and traps or that eat the poison spread around or shooting bears, mountain lions and wolves over bait will not protect the young of wild grazing animals or children from the effects of congenital fetal hypothyroidism. Killing preda-

tor species using these inhumane, unethical methods will only decrease the available hunting opportunities, especially for outfitters to guide ethical hunters. Judy Hoy Stevensville

Like the sea The “Ingomar’s fortune” cover photo was great, and it was a well-written article (see Feb. 2). Nice mix of past and present, and tying the very forces of “progress” that created towns like this to the slow withering of so many now.

“If Colstrip had to pay for its pollution, it wouldn’t be competitive. It’s time we close the clunker and replace it with cheaper, cleaner and faster renewables and energy efficiency.” As a New Englander, like the author, I really honed in on his note about the last time he felt the way he did sleeping in Ingomar was by the ocean, and Susan Webber’s thoughts about how bigger places can be overwhelming. I was telling someone today how in 1982, when I first arrived here, I was walking on Main Street and a stranger passed me and said “Hi” with a smile. I turned around to see whom it was they were greeting. Of course, there was nobody else there. I’ve never forgotten that moment. I grew up on the South Shore in Massachusetts, one town in from the sea. One reason I’ve stayed here is that the mountains remind me of the sea—a vast open space with very few humans in it. And to get into that space, I only need a pair of

boots and a backpack, not a pricey boat. Pulling out and highlighting the thread of Susan’s emotions was very poignant. And there was a good eye behind the camera. I appreciated the map, as I still don’t know this vast state very well. Elizabeth Marshall Missoula

Close the clunker PPL Montana spokesman Gordon Criswell recently penned an apology for the Colstrip coal-fired power plant. The Colstrip juggernaut is the eighth largest source of greenhouse gas pollution in the nation and a major source of a host of other pollutants, including sulfur dioxide (which causes acid rain), particulate matter (small particles that travel to the depths of people’s lungs, causing serious respiratory injury) and mercury (a potent neurotoxin). But as Criswell points out, Colstrip provides a lot of electricity. The question is: Do the benefits of the electricity from Colstrip justify its costs? If so, maybe we should keep the plant running despite the pollution and even though it’s nearly a half-century old. If not, maybe we should close the behemoth. Contrary to Criswell’s suggestion, the answer to whether to keep Colstrip running is a resounding “no.” The power from Colstrip doesn’t justify the harm its pollution visits on our state. Two recent studies—Full Cost Accounting for the Life Cycle of Coal, by the late Paul Epstein of Harvard, and Environmental Accounting for Pollution in the United States, by William Nordhaus of Yale—demonstrate that coal costs our economy $345 billion to $500 billion annually and that coalgenerated electricity’s costs exceed its benefits. Coal only stays in business by pushing those costs onto our health and ecosystems. If Colstrip had to pay for its pollution, it wouldn’t be competitive. It’s time we close the clunker and replace it with cheaper, cleaner and faster renewables and energy efficiency. Charyn Ayoub Helena

Comments from MissoulaNews.com

Bachelor wolf

Ryan Schumacher: I’m from here, but went to MSU in Bozeman. From my perspective, I’d say the University of Montana seems like a fun school and people like to party here. Bear down: It’d be more exciting if they had a live mascot at the football games, like a grizzly bear just running around.

The fewer wolves the better, so hopefully he doesn’t successfully mate with a female wolf (see “Shine on, you crazy wolf,” Feb. 2). However, if any wolf-lovers would like to take one for the team and keep the lost lone wolf from going blind, go for it. Posted on February 6, 2012 at 10:01 p.m.

The real crime I hope the task force actually does something to earn their keep. Like

Missoula Independent Page 4 February 9 – February 16, 2012

doing real police work (see “War on drugs,” Feb. 2). How about getting the meth and the prescription drugs off the streets? Or maybe they could help to curb the underage drinking problem. At any rate, further persecution of medical marijuana users and caregivers has to be stopped. Stealing from law-abiding citizens to implement draconian enforcement measures is a crime against the community. Posted on Feb. 2, 2012 at 8:05 a.m.

Be fruitful and multiply Love the wolves. What a beautiful animal. Nicer then some humans. I hope he finds his mate and they have many pups that will move on and have more pups. People that are uneducated about the wolves should have done to them what they want to do to the wolf— they should be hung high and skinned. Save all wolves. Posted on February 7, 2012 at 4:27 AM


Missoula Independent Page 5 February 9 – February 16, 2012


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, February 1

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Comment

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

News Quirks by Michelle Gustafson

The University of Montana has “a problem of sexual assault on and off campus and needs to take steps to address it to insure the safety of all students as well as faculty, staff and guests,” concludes Diane Barz, a former Montana Supreme Court justice hired by UM to investigate nine alleged sexual assaults by students, in a report.

• Thursday, February 2 Police arrest Clifton Ray Dwayne Oliver, 36, for allegedly running a prostitution business out of Missoula’s Staybridge Suites on Expressway. Police bust the operation by posing as a potential client. Justice of the Peace John Odlin sets Oliver’s bail at $250,000.

• Friday, February 3 In the 284th meeting between the rivals, the University of Montana men’s basketball team tops Montana State 67-58 at Worthington Arena in Bozeman. UM, led by sophomore Kareem Jamar’s 21 points, improves to 9-1 in conference play, good for a share of first place.

• Saturday, February 4 A fire breaks out at 2:30 a.m. at a residence on Missoula’s South 7th Street. Three fire engines, an ambulance and city police respond. No one’s hurt. The Missoula Fire Department says creosote in a chimney caused the blaze, resulting in $70,000 in damages.

• Sunday, February 5 Warnings that gave locals a heads-up about beefed up DUI patrols on Super Bowl weekend seem to pay off. During the 72-hour span between Friday and Monday mornings, nine people are charged with driving under the influence. Law enforcement charges three people with DUI during a 24-hour period beginning at 6 a.m. Super Bowl Sunday.

• Monday, February 6 Republican Tim Fox, of Montana City, announces he’s again running for state attorney general. He vows to “join the lawsuit against the job-killing, budget busting federal healthcare law, protect our individual freedoms and make our kids’ safety a priority by cracking down on sexual offenders.”

• Tuesday, February 7 The Missoula-based security company TerraEchos announces that it’s secured $1.55 million in financing to continue developing surveillance technology capable of detecting and responding to threats against the military, government and “high-value civilian targets” like nuclear facilities.

Kate Hermanns struts down the runway in a Hanna MT design at the sixth annual Project Selvedge design competition, which was part of Missoula’s First Friday Art Walk on Jan. 3.

Citizens United Montana ACLU goes rogue The American Civil Liberties Union has always defended the right to free speech—which is why, in 2009, when the U.S. Supreme Court deliberated Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, the organization filed an amicus brief arguing that a law banning unions and corporations from engaging in “electioneering communications” violated the First Amendment. The Court agreed, and its decision would allow for unlimited corporate spending in elections. But the ACLU of Montana is taking a different tack. It supported the state of Montana when it recently upheld its century-old Corrupt Practices Act, which barred direct corporate spending intended to influence election outcomes, despite the Citizens United ruling. By breaking from the national organization, the ACLU of Montana suggests that corporate spending in elections can stifle free speech, not expand it. “If our social, political and economic structure has evolved to the point where not everyone is being heard because some people are dominating the airwaves, then I think that’s cause for concern

among those who favor the free speech rights that are protected by the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution and the Montana Constitution,” says ACLU of Montana Director Jon Ellingson. Likewise, the ACLU of Montana argued in its amicus brief before the state supreme court that corporate corruption “can be found when the evidence indicates that the democratic process has been undermined through intentionally overwhelming the citizenry’s voice and undermining the individual voter’s confidence in the political process.” Montana, Ellingson says, has “mountains” of such evidence: Before the Corrupt Practices Act, during the days of the Copper Kings, corporations dominated the political process. Magnate William A. Clark famously bribed the Montana Legislature to appoint him to the U.S. Senate. Ellingson says such episodes serve “as a lesson to us about what can happen when there is unregulated money introduced into the political process to influence people.” The national ACLU has stuck to its pro-Citizens United stance, though it appears to be softening it. In 2010, the organization’s board revised its campaign-finance policy relating to voluntary public

financing plans, acknowledging that “very large contributions to candidates may lead to undue influence or corruption and, at a minimum, have the appearance of impropriety and undermine public confidence in the electoral system’s integrity.” Matthew Frank

Justice Marble case on hold Cody Marble’s nearly decade-long attempt to clear himself of a 2002 felony rape conviction—a crime he says he didn’t commit—was dealt a setback on Jan. 26. In March 2002, several teenage inmates accused Marble, who was 17 at the time, of raping a 13-year-old while both were incarcerated in the Missoula County Detention Facility’s juvenile wing. Marble was convicted of the crime and sentenced to 20 years in the custody of the Department of Corrections. Since then, Marble has pleaded his case at the Fourth District, the Ninth Circuit and the Montana Supreme courts. In 2009, his persistence gained the attention of the Montana Innocence Project, which began to investigate. In July 2010, the

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Missoula Independent Page 6 February 9 – February 16, 2012

You cannot find peace by avoiding life. ~Virginia Woolf


Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Innocence Project obtained a written recantation from Marble’s alleged victim, referred to in court documents as “R.T.� That gave Marble hope. He filed a petition for post-conviction relief. An evidentiary hearing was scheduled for Feb. 1. However, when the Missoula County Prosecutor’s Office interviewed R.T. under oath on Jan. 26, the young man said that Marble had indeed raped him. R.T. told Missoula County Prosecutor Fred Van Valkenburg that he only recanted to the Innocence Project because the Innocence Project “badgered� him. R.T.’s Jan. 26 deposition prompted the court to put Marble’s evidentiary hearing on hold. The Missoula County Prosecutor’s Office is asking the court to dismiss Marble’s petition and let the 2002 conviction stand. Marble’s attorney, Colin Stephens, says R.T. isn’t credible; that was a fundamental flaw with the 2002 prosecution and it’s the case now. As for the Innocence Project, the nonprofit’s director, Jessie McQuillan, says the assertion that her organization badgered R.T. is false. McQuillan says she can see why R.T. would again change his story: She points to deposition transcripts. Van Valkenburg told R.T. that if prosecutors find he lied during Marble’s 2002 trial, he could be charged with perjury. “In the face of official prosecution threats, it’s really not surprising,� McQuillan says. Van Valkenburg says that if R.T. perjured himself during the 2002 trial and caused an innocent man to be imprisoned, it’s only fair that he be held accountable. Marble’s attorney will respond to the prosecutor’s motion to dismiss by Feb. 15. Jessica Mayrer

Wolves Mutiny or the bounty A few weeks back, Darby outfitter Scott Boulanger mentioned an obscure state statute during an interview with the Indy about possible solutions for Montana’s alleged wolf problem. He cited 81-7-201, a law outlining a county-based bounty program for big predators. Boulanger’s looking for any solution he can find. He isn’t alone. Ranchers recently approached commissioners in Jefferson County with a bounty program proposal on lions and wolves based on 817-201. The commission has to approve the proposal if 51 percent or more of the livestock growers in the county are on board with the petition.

Ochenski

Comment

Becky Jakes-Dockter, chief legal counsel for Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks, says the legal entanglements surrounding a bounty program remain unclear. The agency requires a state-issued hunting tag for wolf and lion kills, putting bounty hunters in a tricky gray area. The only existing exception is for predators killed while actively harassing or attacking livestock. Until FWP knows exactly what ranchers in Jefferson County are proposing, Jakes-Dockter says the agency has no idea what legal issues might arise. Jefferson County Commissioner Leonard

Wortman says any approved bounty program would certainly comply with state law. And despite what 817-201 allows, he doesn’t want to see hunters killing wolf pups or lion kittens. But the situation is at a “boiling point,� Wortman warns. Ranchers aren’t happy. They’ve had wolves thrust on them “against their will.� The Montana Department of Livestock doesn’t keep records on livestock predation, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reported only two confirmed cases of livestock predation by wolves in Jefferson County in 2009. Neighboring Madison County had 26—the second highest in the state. But it’s not just the deaths, Wortman says. Cattle are losing weight. They’re tearing out fences in panic. Ranchers don’t get reimbursed for that. Wally Congdon, regional director for the Montana Cattlemen’s Association in Jefferson County, says his concerns extend beyond livestock growers. Small businesses are hit hard by declining hunting opportunities, he says. More aggressive steps need to be taken, as long as the state and the feds are involved in the discussion.

Agenda

News Quirks

“This isn’t just about ranching,� Congdon says. “This is about rural Montana.� Alex Sakariassen

Fast food It’s good to be square You can’t get a Frosty these days in Whitefish. The Wendy’s franchise there, and five others in Montana, Oregon and Washington, closed last month because their owner, Havre-based BZB Enterprises, “got sideways,� as BZB attorney Jack Quatman puts it, with Wendy’s International. Quatman means that Wendy’s doesn’t want BZB operating its restaurants anymore. Wendy’s claimed in a federal lawsuit filed in January that BZB has “continuously ignored Wendy’s directives and refused to comply with Wendy’s critical, nonnegotiable food safety standards,� breaching the franchise agreement. The company is seeking an injunction to keep BZB from using its brand. A Wendy’s audit of the Whitefish store found a number of problems, not all of which related to food safety. Quatman says things like broken concrete in the drive-thru lane, the lack of a fence around the dumpster and cracked upholstery in the booths were among a “slew of complaints� at the Whitefish location. It appears the situation was worse at BZB’s Wendy’s in Havre. Beginning in 2007, BZB became “increasingly operationally delinquent� at the Havre location, according to the lawsuit. A subsequent audit, in 2008, found 265 cleanliness and food safety problems there, such as dirty equipment and employees not washing their hands. The findings led to Wendy’s scrutiny of BZB’s 10 other Wendy’s locations in the Northwest. “Obviously, at the point that the lawsuit was filed a couple weeks ago, the people at Wendy’s didn’t feel the franchisee was being at all responsive to what they needed them to do, � Max Davis, the Great Falls-based attorney representing Wendy’s, told the Havre Daily News this week. Quatman says it was impossible for BZB to simultaneously address the problems at all six locations given their geographic layout. BZB has until March to answer Wendy’s complaint. “However, I don’t believe there will ever need to be an answer,� Quatman says. “We are working amicably with Wendy’s. They have an interest in protecting their brand, and we have an interest in continuing to work with them.� Matthew Frank

BY THE NUMBERS

1.4

million

The going price for a small Montana town. Pray, a 5-acre burg north of Yellowstone Park, was listed for sale recently. The purchase includes the title of mayor.

etc.

Two years ago, Ravalli County’s conservative community gave birth to a puzzling constitutional initiative. Montana’s sovereignty was under threat, it seemed. The state’s geographic boundaries had been dropped from the Montana Constitution in 1972. Without them, how could we know that we are where we are? Now it appears others in Hamilton—fed up, perhaps, with a Republican-dominated county government—have uncovered yet another geographic quandary straight out of The Twilight Zone. Apparently, the city of Hamilton doesn’t exist. Bitterroot gadfly Michael Spreadbury sent a letter to Gov. Brian Schweitzer late last month claiming Ravalli County’s seat is not legally incorporated. As evidence, he cited a public meeting from August 2009 during which, he claims, Mayor Jerry Steele said the city had no incorporation papers. Spreadbury argued that “no taxes, police force or any form of local government can exist in Hamilton� as a result. Spreadbury further backed his allegation by claiming that James Hamilton, the city’s namesake, annexed Hamilton to Missoula County in September 1890. Now there’s a twist. The only problem with Spreadbury’s letter, according to Ravalli County Clerk Regina Plettenberg, is that Hamilton does exist. “Hamilton exists,� she says, “because it exists.� However, Plettenberg also offered historic documents showing Hamilton’s legal status as an incorporated city. A page from the Ravalli County Commissioner Journals, dated July 14, 1894, mentions the returns from a local vote on incorporation. “A majority of the votes cast in said election,� the journal states, “were in favor of said incorporation.� Plettenberg also sent us a ballot from an election in Ravalli County in 1982. On it is a proposal to “eliminate all services, offices and departments now functioning in the City of Hamilton, Montana.� The measure failed with 209 votes for and 723 against. So Hamilton does exist, and can legally function as Ravalli County’s seat. We have to hand it to Spreadbury, though. He’s got guts. His letter concludes with a stern request for Schweitzer: “Reverting Hamilton, MT to Missoula County as annexed in 1890 and abolishing Ravalli County would support your oath of office and lawful operation of local governments.� Hand Hamilton over to us? That wouldn’t be so bad. They’ve got great beer. But abolishing Ravalli County? Our heads hurt just thinking about it.

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Missoula Independent Page 7 February 9 – February 16, 2012


Missoula Independent Page 8 February 9 – February 16, 2012


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

The right angle Flathead filmmaker hunts more than big game by Alex Sakariassen

to think about what’s really going on,” he says. “They get caught up in it. That’s just good filmmaking. It’s that way in Hollywood, it’s that way anywhere.” The industry is changing. Advances in technology have made high-quality equipment and production costs cheaper. The internet and a multitude of cable channels make distribution easier. The price of hiring a director of photography or a gaffer or a key grip hasn’t changed, Opre says, but gone are the days when he’d get a camera package from Panavision and spend hundreds on processing film. Now, he primarily uses an $800 digital camera. “Anybody can take a video camera today and go on a deserted tropical island with a dozen playmates in bikinis and film for a week,” he says. “I guarantee somebody can take that footage and make a video that will sell. The challenge for us is to take these cool experiences—hunting or extreme sports or whatever— and film it in a way that makes it even more compelling.” Still, Opre says he doesn’t really feel he needs to compete; he’s in this less for the money than to motivate interest in the outdoors. But he is tailoring his productions in more creative Photo courtesy of Ryan Rowe ways. Through director’s cuts, he’s hoping to slow the pace of Tom Opre packs out a mountain goat hide on an Alaska hunt. “Eye of the Hunter” and play off ple across the country on trips to Alaska, when extreme sports were nabbing serious certain hunts as feature films. He’s expandCanada, Florida and his backyard in airtime on cable networks and which ed the show’s influence in recent years as Montana. He even has people overseas tun- spawned an ATV-centric twin, “Mountains well, by hosting an Extreme Huntress contest. The goal is to supply the hunting coming in; he occasionally exchanges emails and Mud.” Opre quickly set himself and Tahoe munity with a pool of female role models with U.S. soldiers serving in Afghanistan. “Our whole goal behind ‘Eye of the Films apart. He saw the competition as lit- who are “attractive, professional, have famHunter’ is to create the most well-pro- tle more than junk. “We always film guys ilies and are good hunters,” Opre says. Critics have panned the Extreme duced, most-watched outdoor television with helmets on,” he says. “We don’t film show in the industry,” Opre says. “Our guys that are drunk, we always stay on the Huntress contest. Opre calls them the “antigoal eventually is to take it mainstream, to trail, always use designated water crossings. hunting” contingent. 2010 contest winner put it on the Discovery Channel or And it looks really cool because of how I Rebecca Francis fits Opre’s description: She’s a mother of eight with two bachelor’s film it.” History Channel.” Opre’s obsessed with angles and com- degrees, one in psychology and one in denOpre grew up in the outdoors. His father, Tom E. Opre, wrote outdoor articles position. A dramatic musical score is his tal hygiene. She’s been charged by an for Field and Stream, Outdoor Life best friend, an editing room his play- African lion and once felled an Alaskan Magazine and the Detroit Free Press for 30 ground. The tone of “Eye of the Hunter” brown bear with a single bowshot at 45 years. Tom worked with iconic filmmaker isn’t meant to be documentary, he says. It’s yards. Francis now works as a co-host on and legendary angler Glen Lau in the dramatized to reflect the tension and sus- “Eye of the Hunter”—a testament, it seems, 1960s, producing “Sports Afield,” one of pense of a real hunt. And his pacing is fre- to Opre’s dedication to expanding the television’s first outdoor programs. Much netic. In an episode set to air this year, show’s influence. “It’s a labor of love, really,” he says of of what the younger Opre does today was Opre squeezes a sketchy bush plane landing, a trek across an Alaskan glacier and a the show. “It’s almost anti-climactic to kill influenced by his upbringing. “I used to sneak in my dad’s office and painstaking hillside approach on a group of something, because getting phenomenalthrow up rolls of 15mm film on the projec- mountain goats into a mere 21 minutes. ly great footage is in some ways more tor,” he says. “It was cool, watching these Even his commercials are fast-paced; he’ll inspiring and satisfying than actually guys on big lakes in Canada catching big use up to 50 or 60 shots in a 30-second bit. killing the animals.” “You can move the viewer around so northern pike. It inspired me, I think, to get quickly that they never really have a chance into the business I’m in.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com Tom Opre, who lives just outside Kalispell, doesn’t boast about his accomplishments as a sportsman, a globetrotter and an outdoor filmmaker. His living room does all the boasting for him. There’s a dall sheep mount above his fireplace. The heads of deer, antelope, caribou, zebra, warthog and water buffalo line the walls. He has two rugs on the carpet, from a zebra and an Alaskan brown bear. The only thing missing is a camera. These days, most of Opre’s hunts aren’t very private. He hosts NBC Sports’ successful cable program “Eye of the Hunter,” inviting tens of thousands of peo-

Opre ended up working for Lau after graduating from Grand Valley State University in Michigan in 1990. His career trajectory has been “unorthodox” since then, he says, starting with the founding of his own film production company, Tahoe Films Limited, the year he left school. “I just started doing shit,” he says. That included a stint producing films for the Discovery Channel’s “Shark Week.” It includes a long string of commercial projects for companies such as Sea-Doo watercraft and Chevrolet and his first televised series, on snowmobilers, “Extreme Velocity: Sled Heads,” which appeared

Missoula Independent Page 9 February 9 – February 16, 2012


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks



20

Best of Missoula



Sins of omission



Who owns Montana’s next senator?

11

275 W. Main St • 728-0343

www.tanglesmt.com

This week started out with frontpage news about Montana’s muchwatched race for the U.S. Senate seat now held by Democrat Jon Tester. An investigation by the Associated Press revealed that Tester’s challenger, Republican Congressman Denny Rehberg, had failed to accurately report the sources of campaign contributions as required by the Federal Elections Commission (FEC). The revelation has touched off a battle between the Rehberg and Tester campaigns about transparency, trust, honesty and hypocrisy that leaves citizens in a conundrum about where to cast their vote in November. Rehberg’s forms did not list the occupations of 189 contributors in the first nine months of 2011. Now, had those contributors been homemakers or retirees, it’s unlikely the story would have been front-page news. But as the AP discovered by cross-referencing campaign databases, those whose occupations were not listed turned out to be high-level D.C. lobbyists and some wellknown public figures such as former Vice President Dan Quayle, who is chairman of Cerberus Capital Management and president of Quayle & Associates. Rehberg has been pounding Tester for months because Tester is the leading recipient of lobbyist campaign contributions out of the entire 535 members of Congress. Even more ironically, Tester narrowly defeated incumbent senator Conrad Burns in 2006 by highlighting Burns’s financial connections to D.C. lobbyists and painting him as a tool of special interests. The problem, at least according to the Rehberg campaign, is that the omission of occupation was made by the donors, who simply left that part of the form blank. Likewise, if you believe Rehberg, his campaign staff has been trying to get that information and fill in the blanks to comply with federal election law. To say that explanation strains Rehberg’s credibility would be putting it mildly. The FEC rules only require that campaigns exert their “best effort” to comply with the occupation listing, yet Rehberg’s campaign seems to have fallen short of that. According to accusations from the Tester campaign, however, it’s a matter of trust, not verification. “This is exactly why Montanans can’t trust Dennis Rehberg,” Tester spokesman Aaron

Missoula Independent Page 10 February 9 – February 16, 2012

Murphy said. “He just called for ‘100 percent transparency’ in campaign fundraising, then he hid the money he takes from Washington lobbyists.” Yet, as Tester and Rehberg sling mud at one another, leveling charges and counter-charges, there is a far greater

The FEC rules only require that campaigns exert their “best effort” to comply with the occupation listing, yet Rehberg’s campaign seems to have fallen short of that. question that Montanans should be asking as they try to navigate the rapids of this race for the Senate. Tester is the leading recipient of lobbyist donations in the House and Senate. Rehberg has no problems with special interests dumping contributions in his campaign war chest. The seminal question, therefore, is who will Montana’s next U.S. Senator wind up representing? Will it be the special interests and lobbyists who dump millions into their campaigns or the little people of Montana who cannot afford what it takes to play in this high-stakes game? This is where it gets tough to discern the differences between Tester and Rehberg. Remember last summer, when Tester suddenly opposed a measure to limit the charges large banks could levy on debit card users? That left many of Tester’s former supporters scratching their heads, since the big banks and investment firms had recently crashed the economy, received massive bailouts from the federal government and suffered neither harm nor punishment for their part in destroying the lives of mil-

lions of Americans who lost homes, jobs and hope for the future. What was Tester doing weighing in on their side? That riddle might be solved when you go to the OpenSecrets.org website, look at Tester’s campaign contributors and find that J.P. Morgan Chase makes Tester’s top five, as does Visa, Inc. Tester received over $60,000 in campaign contributions from big banks. Take a minute or two longer on the OpenSecrets site and you’ll see that the top five occupations or industries that contributed to Tester’s campaign are, in descending order, Lawyers/Law Firms, Lobbyists, Retired, Securities and Investments, and Commercial Banks. Taken together, they represented almost $2 million in contributions by the end of 2011. Small individual contributions only amounted to 8 percent of Tester’s campaign funds, while large individual contributions and PACs accounted for 86 percent. Rehberg, meanwhile, doesn’t have much to brag about in this regard. Perhaps because of all the blanks in his campaign reporting, the OpenSecrets database has considerably less specific information available at this time, such as a breakdown between large and small individual contributions or a list of his top five donors and the top five industries or occupations that are funding his campaign. The effect of special interests “investing” in candidates became painfully obvious to Montanans when Senator Max Baucus took a lead role in formulating the Obama health care legislation two summers ago. Deep in the pockets of the insurance, pharmaceutical and health industries, Baucus refused to allow any discussion of universal or single-payer health care, instead kowtowing to his donors and inserting the onerous requirement that all Americans buy health insurance by 2014. The conundrum for Montanans is obvious. Although we’ll cast the votes to decide whether Tester or Rehberg goes to the Senate, it’s still business as usual in D.C., with both bought by special interests. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

An avalanche calls It doesn’t really matter who started it by Molly Loomis

On Jan. 24, an avalanche raced down the slopes of Mount Taylor, a 10,352-foot peak in Wyoming’s Teton Range. You might think this is hardly worth mentioning, since thousands of avalanches scour mountainsides in the West each winter. The Mount Taylor avalanche, however, has launched a flurry of debate in the world of backcountry skiing—a place where there’s no admission and few enforced safety regulations. Even though the parking lot at the base of this popular backcountry ski area was packed with cars, the slide—which turned out to be massive—had been intentionally triggered by a local mountain guide. Luckily, no one was hurt, though someone might easily have been; hundreds of skiers were in the area. Strange as it may sound to non-skiers, intentionally triggering an avalanche is a common safety practice in backcountry skiing. In theory, it allows an experienced skier to blunt the potential danger of a future avalanche from the relative safety of the top of the slope. With this in mind, Greg Collins, who had skied Mount Taylor hundreds of times, deliberately set off the avalanche. He publicly apologized later, explaining that he never expected the slide to be as big as it was. The avalanche tumbled over 2,500 feet before plowing over a creek often crossed by skiers. “It would have been a fatality [if anyone had been there],” David Fischel told the Jackson Hole News & Guide; he had skied down Coal Creek shortly after the slide occurred. “I hope this will be a lesson for folks who ski up there. They put people like me at risk.” But has any lesson been learned? Comments from people have poured in from the international backcountry skiing community, and they range from outrage and anger to strong support for Collins. Critics decry Collins’s actions as selfish and irresponsible—especially consid-

ering this winter’s unpredictable snow conditions—while many of his defenders say uphill skiers bear no responsibility for the people below them. Risk, they insist, is inherent in any wilderness experience. After all, as some have pointed out, “wild” is a part of wilderness.

Are we heading toward a future backcountry filled with ski cops and a fat book of rules, or will we be forced to accept reduced access? But does skiing in heavily used areas such as Teton Pass truly constitute an outing in the wild? And where’s the line between pursuing your own goals and ignoring the safety of other people in the neighborhood? If this had occurred in a ski resort with rules and regulations, the answers would be easy. But it happened in the backcountry, on public land, where we all have equal opportunity to recreate and where the only bosses are usually ourselves. Moreover, the Tetons aren’t the only place an event like this has occurred. Utah and Montana have had similar incidents. If it hasn’t already happened in other mountains ranges around the West, it likely will, sooner or later. Before anyone decides to ski in the backcountry, there are lots of questions to answer, ranging from choice of equipment to current weather and snowpack condi-

tions. Yet there seem to be few rules for acceptable behavior once we’re out there. Of course, that’s why many of us are drawn to mountain towns where we can escape into crowds of aspens, not people. But like it or not, the woods are filling up with more and more people doing their own thing. When that is combined with unclear ethics, such as the degree to which a skier is or isn’t concerned about other skiers, I’m reminded that Americans have become extraordinarily willing to sue one another. Are we heading toward a future backcountry filled with ski cops and a fat book of rules, or will we be forced to accept reduced access? It is ironic that for years many skiers have fought to keep snowmobiles out of popular backcountry skiing terrain, in part fearing the hazard of a snowmobile racing up a mountain to a “high point” and triggering an avalanche. Now, I fear, we have brought that kind of argument into our own ranks. Are we going to return to the days of tire slashing in the Tetons, as happened at the height of the skiing-snowmobile controversy? One blogger suggested aggressive bumper stickers might be a first step: “I intentionally kick off avalanches. Skiers below beware.” Instead, why don’t we thank the powder gods that it didn’t take a fatality to get this conversation going? All too often in an event like this, tears drown out the sounds of dialogue. Let us hope that this avalanche—which harmed no one—will wake us up to our responsibilities as backcountry skiers. Let’s remember that although we choose to ski in a wild place, we are not always alone. Let’s make sure that our fun remains as safe as we can make it. Molly Loomis is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). She lives on the west side of Teton Pass in Victor, Idaho.

Missoula Independent Page 11 February 9 – February 16, 2012


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Somehow, I often find myself yell-talking late into the evening, usually in other people’s kitchens, most often about food or the lack of Michael Anthony in the current incarnation of Van Halen. But I digress. During these yell-talking brouhahas, my childhood filled with summertime farm labor is invariably brought up in order to trump any counter-arguments. It’s handy for me that I can mention various fruits and vegetables that I picked as a teenager and younger, the irrigation pipe that I moved and the tractors that I drove, because most people cannot. It’s a shame that the opportunity for kids to work and be around food as it grows and gets packaged and shipped has waned to nil with the advent of large-scale industrial farming. This lack of direct knowledge makes it easier for people to ingest McRibs or Taco John’s beef tacos or to have no clue what a tomato should taste like. While trying to find that tomato and avoid the

McRib, filmmaker Kristin Canty discovered that government policies favor agribusiness over flavor and choice, and that while cigarettes come with warning labels, it is essentially illegal to purchase or produce certain raw dairy products for human consumption due to the risk of E. coli poisoning, even though fresh, raw dairy is chock-full of delicious nutrients. Canty’s film Farmageddon illustrates how small farms can make the best-tasting and best-for-us foods while getting the boot heel from over-lobbied government agencies that support agribusiness and ignore the glaring moral and scientific dilemmas of factory farming. –Jason McMackin

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 9

Mended Hearts Chapter #324 of Missoula hosts speaker Deb Sybrant PA-C of the International Heart Institute, followed by a valentine construction for current St. Pat’s heart patients. St. Pat’s Hospital Broadway Building Conf. Center. 2 PM. Call 329-5824.

Make your meetings go better (check your personal anecdotes) by attending the Missoula Nonprofit Network’s class Achieving Your Mission Through Effective Committee Meetings at the City Life Community Center. 1515 Fairview Ave. 11:30–1 PM. Free for members/ $10 for others. missoulanonprofit.org. The Riverfront Neighborhood Council Meeting and Soup Social takes place from 4:30–6 PM at the Montana Natural History Center. Let’s talk traffic and playground equipment. 120 Hickory. The Peace and Justice Film Series brings us Cry of the Snow Lion, a film about the dopest critters in the Himalayas and the lives of the people who live atop the roof of the world. Gallagher Business Building, Rm 122. 7 PM. Free.

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 10 Hey takers, let’s do a little giving and donate some blood at the American Red Cross from 10–2 PM. 2401 N. Reserve St., Ste. 6. Call 800-REDCROSS to schedule an appointment.

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 11 Get your heart did at St. Pat’s Hospital Heart Expo, where you can assess your risk of heart disease with discounted blood tests and other screens. 500 W. Broadway. 7–12 PM. If you have compulsive-eating problems, seek help and support with others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Sat. at 9 AM in Room 3 in the basement of First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free. Visit oa.org.

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 12 Students and parents, join College Goal Montana for free assistance filling out FAFSA forms. Trust me, you’ll need it. Gallagher Business Building. 1–4 PM. smartaboutcollege.org.

MONDAY FEBRUARY 13 Need to brush up on that algebra or writing course before you pay a king’s ransom to get a D in Comp 101 at the university? Sign-up for the Lifelong Learning Center’s Adult Education Program, which hosts seven weeks of college prep assistance. 310 S. Curtis. Mon.-Thu., from 8–11:30 AM. Free. Call 549-8765.

The Heirloom Project and Real Cooking host a screening of Farmaggedon at the Roxy Theater in Missoula Sat., Feb. 11, at 7 PM. There will be a short discussion after the film. $5.

Help choose what type of traffic control device will be installed at the Town Pump at Hwy. 200 during the Bonner Milltown Community Council Meeting. Bonner School LIbrary. 7 PM.

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 14 Learn how various groups manage the sage/steppe ecosystems and all of the other systems around the Upper Missouri River during the Natural Resource and Environmental Policy Forum The Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative: A Collective Vision for our Landscape with Yvette Converse of US Fish and Wildlife Service. UM Law Building Rm. 101. Noon. Free. We’ll let the title of this Brown Bag Lecture do the work. Geoengineering the Climate: Technologies for Rebalancing or Reinforcing Global Inequity by Jason Blackstock, Senior Fellow for Energy and the Environment at the Centre for International Governance Innovation and visiting research scholar at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Austria. Mansfield Center Conf. Rm. 12–1 PM. Free. YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts YWCA Support Groups for women every Tue. from 6:30–8 PM. An American Indian-led talking circle is also available, along with age-appropriate children’s groups. Free. Call 543-6691. The UM Wilderness Institute brings scholars, writers, scientists and explorers together to share stories of how water shapes our lives, landscapes and politics in the Wild Waters in the West Lecture Series. This week, Phil Condon, Asst. Professor of Environmental Studies at UM, gives a lecture titled Jacob’s Island: A Reading. Gallagher Business Building, Rm. 122. 7 PM. Free.

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 16 The Peace and Justice Film Series hosts Bajo Juarez: The City Devouring Its Daughters, a film about the denigration of women in the border town of Juárez, Mexico. Guest speakers include Norma Andrade, Micheel Salas Ramirez and David Peña. UC Theater. 7 PM. Admission by donation.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent Page 12 February 9 – February 16, 2012


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - After three men stole a coin collection worth several thousand dollars from a home in Corbett, Ore., they redeemed the coins in a Coinstar coin-counting machine for about $450, according to Multnomah County sheriff’s deputies. The machine rejected about 500 silver quarters, which the suspects cashed in at a bank for face value. “The obvious answer,” victim Dan Johnson Sr. said, is “that the crooks were idiots.” Deputies identified one of the suspects as Johnson’s son, Dan Johnson Jr. (Portland’s KPTV-TV) After Tina Cafarelli, 36, used a stolen welfare benefits card to buy $64 worth of soda at a supermarket in Lynn, Mass., police Officer Craig Fountain, watching her on loss-prevention video, said she immediately inserted the 216 cans into the store’s digital can-return machine without first emptying them, expecting a $10.80 deposit refund. Instead, according to manager Kevin Wilson, the full cans caused “well over $250” damage to the machine. (Lynn’s The Daily Item) SUPPLY-SIDE ECONOMICS - The Environmental Protection Agency is penalizing the companies that supply motor fuel about $6.8 million for failing to comply with the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act, which requires them to blend 6.6 million gallons of cellulosic biofuel into their gasoline and diesel. The companies were unable to meet the requirement because the specified additive is unavailable commercially. (The New York Times) Hoping to generate new interest in the Powerball lottery game, officials announced starting jackpots would double from $20 million to $40 million. Officials added that the price of Powerball tickets would double from $1 to $2. (Chattanooga, Tenn.’s WRCB-TV) As part of the Obama administration’s “Campaign to Cut Waste,” the U.S. Mint all but halted production of $1 coins bearing the likeness of dead presidents, even though the Presidential $1 Coin Act of 2005 requires the Mint to issue four new coins a year through 2016. A few coins will still be minted for collectors, but the cutback will save $50 million a year in production and storage costs, according to officials, who said lack of demand led to nearly 40 percent of coins already minted being returned to the Federal Reserve. “The call for Chester A. Arthur coins is not there,” Vice President Joseph R. Biden said. (The Washington Post) WHEN GUNS ARE OUTLAWED - Fred Parker, 41, walked into a gambling parlor in Sharon, Pa., began touching the walls and gambling machines, then announced he has MRSA, a serious staph infection that resists antibiotics. Police said Parker threatened to infect the cashier unless he gave Parker money. When the cashier refused, Parker left empty-handed but was arrested a short time later. “It’s our first case of robbery by threat of infectious disease,” police Chief Mike Menster noted. (Sharon’s The Herald) REASONABLE EXPLANATION - Police investigating reports of a man handcuffed inside a car outside a drugstore in Uniontown, Pa., found Stephen M. Carr, 28, “wearing makeup, female eyeglasses, a female shirt, female pants, stockings and high heels.” A chain around his neck was secured with a lock and led behind the driver’s seat, where it was attached to Carr’s ankles with handcuffs. Officers said Carr told them “he came to Walgreens to get his wife a drink, and being dressed like a woman is hard to just walk into the store. So he chained up/restrained himself to build himself up to going into the store dressed like a woman to get his wife a drink.” (Pittsburgh Tribune-Review) CLAIM GAME - A federal judge in New York City ordered the maker of Fresh Step cat litter to stop showing a television commercial that makes “insufficiently reliable” claims about the product’s ability to handle smells. Judge Jed S. Rakoff called the comparison tests depicted in the ads insufficiently true to the real-life habits of cats. (The New York Times) The Atlanta-based fast-food chain Chick-fil-A demanded that Vermont folk artist Bo Muller-Moore, 38, stop using the slogan “eat more kale” on bumper stickers and T-shirts to promote local agriculture because it comes too close to the company’s slogan, “eat mor chikin.” A letter from a Chick-fil-A lawyer said Muller-Moore’s message “is likely to cause confusion of the public and dilutes the distinctiveness of Chick-fil-A’s intellectual property and diminishes its value.” Muller-Moore’s lawyer, Daniel Richardson disagreed, observing, “I don’t think anyone will step forward and say they bought an ‘eat more kale’ shirt thinking it was a Chick-fil-A product.” (Associated Press) PROBLEM SOLVED - Hoping to discourage commuters from riding on top of trains, Indonesian authorities began suspending rows of grapefruit-sized concrete balls to rake over the roofs of trains as they pull out of stations or go through rail crossings. Hosing down scofflaws with red paint, threatening them with dogs and asking religious leaders for help have failed to discourage roof riders, who risk danger—dozens are killed or injured each year—to escape overcrowded railway cars, avoid paying for a ticket or experience the thrill. “We’ve tried just about everything, even putting rolls of barbed wire on the roof, but nothing seems to work,” Mateta Rizahulhaq, an official of the state-owned railway company PT Kereta Api, said. “Maybe this will do it.” As for concerns that the balls could seriously hurt or even kill the roof riders, he insisted that wasn’t his problem, noting, “They don’t have to sit on top.” (Associated Press) 911 FOLLIES - Police arrested Joan Mayo in St. Cloud, Fla., after she called 911 six times but wouldn’t say why. She screamed obscenities at dispatchers and berated them, declaring the nature of her emergency was “none of your business. Just send me a sergeant.” When responding officers warned her not to abuse the emergency number, she told them she had no regard for the 911 system and would call whenever she wanted to. Neighbor Lillian Morales explained, “She just wanted cigarettes.” (Orlando’s WFTV-TV) Police arrested John R. Pacella, 38, in Willowbrook, Ill., after they said he called 911and announced he “wanted to see an officer because he wanted to fight with them.” (Chicago Tribune) CHEAP DATES - Police arrested Khadijah Baseer after they said she opened customers’ car doors at a McDonald’s drive-through in Burbank, Calif., and offered to have sex in exchange for chicken McNuggets. (The Burbank Leader) Robert Edward De Shields received a 10-year prison sentence and must register as a sex offender after he was convicted of sexually assaulting an 8-month-old chihuahua at a home in Sacramento, Calif. (Los Angeles Times)

Missoula Independent Page 13 February 9 – February 16, 2012


n Dec. 18 of last year, Damien McInnis looked at the empty space under his family’s Christmas tree and worried. “There was nothing,” says the father of six. McInnis owns Picasso Brothers Painting, in Missoula. He’s a big guy with gray hair, blue eyes and a tidy goatee. On a brisk Friday afternoon, he’s quick to crack a joke from behind a desk in his Inez Street office. When he was a kid in Toledo, Ohio, McInnis wanted to be a rock guitarist. Today, he’s still serious about his guitar playing but his priorities have changed: He’s responsible for a family and up to 15 employees. He studies marketing strategies and customer service. Growth plans are charted in black ink on a wall-sized whiteboard across from his cluttered desk. The work has paid off, he says proudly. Last year, Picasso Brothers sales topped $305,000—its biggest year yet. McInnis grew excited in 2010 when Wal-Mart and the Idaho-based general

O

contractor Engineered Structures hired Picasso Brothers, along with 103 other subcontractors, to work on a yearlong store expansion and renovation of the retailer’s Highway 93 South Supercenter, in Missoula. Though McInnis was still working on the project, payments to Picasso Brothers stopped in July of 2011. McInnis recalls that an Engineered Structures project manager told him that payment was just around the corner, but, says McInnis, “One week would lead into the next week would lead into the next…and it never materialized.” In October, McInnis filed a $50,348 mechanic’s lien on Wal-Mart’s Highway 93 South property. The lien lets subcontractors such as McInnis claim a portion of a landowner’s property. In the more than two decades McInnis has done business in Missoula, he says, he never before had to file a lien on a job. He joined a growing club: McInnis is one of 11 subcontractors and suppliers who have filed liens against Wal-Mart in Missoula County in the last year.

McInnis says he had to file the lien; he was tens of thousands of dollars short of where he’d expected his business to be heading into winter, a time when tradespeople like him like to have some money salted away, and he couldn’t pay his employees. He turned down another job because he couldn’t afford to buy supplies, he says. “Every day that went by,” he says, “things got worse.” On Dec. 19, Engineered Structures offered to settle with McInnis. The company said it would pay him $14,300, rather than the $50,000 McInnis says Picasso Brothers was owed. McInnis took the money. “They just wave it in front of your face,” he says. “Because they’re cashstrong, their position is strong. They could wait another six months to pay me…I needed to pay bills. I wanted to give a Christmas to my kids.” McInnis’s story is similar to that of dozens and perhaps hundreds of subcontractors and suppliers across the country. Tradespeople from Missoula to Kalispell and California to New York—most of

Save money, live better? People building Wal-Mart say they just want to get paid. by Jessica Mayrer photos by Chad Harder

Missoula Independent Page 14 February 9 – February 16, 2012

whom have worked under different general contractors—say Wal-Mart is notoriously bad about paying the people who build and renovate its stores. “The only way to describe them is ruthless,” says Herb Lande, who owns Imperial Construction Associates in Joliet, Ill. Lande says he waited almost two years to get paid $70,000 he was owed by WalMart and is still waiting for payment for another job for the giant retailer. “I do Costco all the time, and Costcos are amazing,” he says. “They treat their employees well. And Targets are good…Everyone’s got a better track record than Wal-Mart, everybody.”

‘IT’S NOT UNUSUAL’ A woman wearing a blue bandanna loads bottles of a red sports drink into a minivan parked in front of Wal-Mart’s Highway 93 South store on a recent sunny Saturday morning as Wal-Mart greeters stand at the front door. “Good morning!” say the women in blue vests. “Welcome to Wal-Mart!”


Inside, old men in khakis walk next to women pushing shopping carts and bleary-eyed teenagers who carry cereal boxes. Wal-Mart’s 2010 expansion enabled the retailer to add what amounts to an entire grocery store, within about 145,000 square feet. Now, just about everything one needs to sustain a modern lifestyle is here—shoes for $10; sweatshirts for $6.97; a meat aisle overflowing with pork, beef and chicken that’s just steps aways from a pharmacy. Sam Walton launched the first WalMart in 1962 in Rogers, Ark. By 1980, the company had grown to 276 stores in 11 states. Wal-Mart opened its first Sam’s Club membership warehouse in 1983. In 1 9 8 8 , Wa l - M a r t r o l l e d o u t i t s Supercenters, adding groceries to its already formidable offerings. Today, it does more than 200 million transactions a week in more than 8,500 retail stores across 28 countries. The company had sales of $419 billion in fiscal year 2011, making it the biggest corporation in the world. According to The Economist, only the United States Department of Defense and the Chinese People’s Liberation Army have more employees. Wal-Mart Spokesperson Delia Garcia says that it’s not unusual for payments to subcontractors to get hung up amid large and complex commercial building projects. “It’s not specific to Wal-Mart,” she says, adding, “It’s not unusual for there to be continued negotiations between the general contractor and the subcontractors.” Also, Garcia says, most of the suppliers and contractors that worked on the Missoula project did not file liens. “There are only a handful of subcontractors where [Engineered Structures] is working to resolve payment…This is really a matter to be discussed with the general contractor and the subcontractors they hired.” Engineered Structures, based in Meridian, Idaho, has overseen 79 WalMart construction and renovation projects. According to its website, each of those contracts was worth between $5 million and $25 million. Its president, Neil Nelson, says he appreciates the work that Missoula-based tradespeople did on the Wal-Mart Supercenter. Most of the liens they filed have been released now, he says. Given that the Missoula project only ended in October of 2011, Nelson says, it doesn’t seem to him that the tradespeople had to wait too long to be paid. “We’re still within what I consider a commercially reasonable time frame.” Nelson adds that he’s seen an increase in the number of such liens since the real estate bubble deflated. Contractors and suppliers have become more cautious, he says, which makes them more likely to seek protection by filing a lien. “Suppliers are less patient with subcontractors,” Nelson says. “Their fuse to get paid is shorter than ever.” According to the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder’s Office, 62 mechanic’s liens were filed in the county in 1986.

Gary Linton of GTL Excavating, in Missoula, says Wal-Mart and its general contractor, Engineered Structures, took advantage of him and other area subcontractors.

Missoula Independent Page 15 February 9 – February 16, 2012


“I paid $15,000 to paint Wal-Mart,” says Damien McInnis (also shown on cover) of Missoula’s Picasso Brothers Painting.

Filings began to increase in the mid ’90s, jumping from 46 in 1993 to 107 in 1994. In 2008, 242 mechanic’s liens were filed. That number dropped to 105 in 2011.

‘LIKE BEING BULLIED’ Jeff Brochheuser owns Butte Steel & Fabrication in Chico, Calif. He still has a diagram of a roof plan for a new Wal-Mart Supercenter that he worked on in Fairfield, Calif. Tennessee-based EMJ Construction worked as Wal-Mart’s general contractor on that project. EMJ contracted with Butte Steel to assemble the steel roof on the Fairfield Supercenter. Brochheuser estimated the job would take 4,500 hours to complete. Based on that estimate, his contract was for $415,000. But Brochheuser says EMJ asked him to complete tasks that went far beyond the scope of his contract. Rather than the 4,500 hours Brochheuser had estimated for the job, he says, Butte Steel logged 12,000. That translated to an additional $600,000. “The thing about Wal-Mart, how they really get you, is their change-order proj-

ects,” Brochheuser says. “They force you to do a lot of extra work.” Brochheuser was paid for his original contract, he says, yet was nearly forced to declare bankruptcy because EMJ and WalMart refused to pay him for $600,000 of additional work. When he contacted WalMart, he says, he was told it was EMJ’s responsibility. So Brochheuser sued WalMart. He was able to avoid an expensive and potentially devastating legal proceeding because his contract was governed by the American Institute of Steel Construction’s code of standard practices. According to the AISC handbook, ultimate responsibility for payment falls to the property owner—in this case, WalMart. Brochheuser settled for an undisclosed amount of money. After a television station reported on Butte Steel’s dispute with Wal-Mart, Brochheuser says, he heard from others with similar experiences. “It’s not just my project, it’s rampant,” he says. Herb Lande of Imperial Construction in Chicago concurs: Wal-Mart’s general contractors are notorious for their hardnosed tactics, he says. “When you do

Missoula Independent Page 16 February 9 – February 16, 2012

extra work for them, they have you on an incredibly short leash where you can’t even break even.” In Montana, Tom Sliter of Sliter’s Ace Lumber and Building Supply, in Somers, filed a lien against Wal-Mart in March 2010. Sliter says his company provided $24,000 in cement, lumber and cleaning supplies for Wal-Mart’s new Hutton Ranch Plaza Supercenter in Kalispell. The project’s general contractor, the Henry Carlson Company, of South Dakota, withheld payment for months, Sliter says. Sliter was one of 12 suppliers and subcontractors to file a lien on Wal-Mart’s Hutton Ranch Plaza property in 2010, according to the Flathead County Clerk and Recorder’s Office. Sliter says he was forced to haggle with the Henry Carlson Company over who should pay for brooms, lumber and an $1,800 finance charge, among other things. Sliter says he thought about suing but worried he’d be outgunned. He settled for $19,000. “It’s kind of like being bullied,” he says. “I really resent it.”

‘THE WORLD’S FORCED INTO THIS WAL-MART SOCIETY’ Art Crum’s workshop is set atop a ramshackle property just over the Buckhouse Bridge from Wal-Mart’s Highway 93 South Supercenter, in Missoula. The owner of Crum Construction, he sits beside a wood stove in his cold workshop on a recent winter day. The shop smells like burning wood and motor oil and is decorated with posters of bronzed women in pastel-colored bikinis. Crum is 75. His father founded the family business in 1951. Art started working for it at 16. He took time out in the late ’50s to become an airplane navigator. He went on to fly with the Air National Guard for seven years, working for Crum Construction during the week. “We’ve never had more than what we could use,” he says. “I’ve raised my family and helped several other people raise their families.” Despite his waning energy and the increasing aches and pains that come with age, Crum says, he pulled a couple of all-nighters working on Wal-Mart’s


Highway 93 South project in Missoula last year. His company prepped the job site for the retailer’s expansion, dug foundation footings, lay concrete and installed storm sewers, he explains. His contract was for $411,000. The company started the job in September of 2010, he says. His crew hurried to get it done as winter set in. Crum worked day and night driving the dump truck and front loader. Change orders brought Crum’s bill for the job to $490,000, he says; Engineered Structures paid him about $440,000. The last check arrived in September of 2011. Crum says he repeatedly called Engineered Structures. “It was always either, ‘Not in the office,’ ‘Not available,’ ‘I’ll call you back in five minutes’…They wouldn’t respond to my email.” In October of last year, Crum filed a lien for $42,583. He’s yet to see any of that money, he says. The toughest part of not getting paid, he says, is that he hasn’t been able to pay his asphalt and plumbing suppliers. “It’s tough on your credibility and your reputation.” Crum says that since his father founded the family business, it’s only filed one other mechanic’s lien, in 1964. The difficulty of not being paid what he thinks he was entitled to has been compounded by the slowing of the building industry, he says.

Wal-Mart does more than 200 million transactions a week in more than 8,500 retail stores across 28 countries.

According to the Missoula Public Works Department, $99.8 million was spent in commercial and private construction in 2006. That number dropped to $89.1 million in 2007 and to $54.9 million in 2010. Last year, the trend reversed, climbing back up to $87.8 million. Gary Linton of GTL Excavating, in Missoula, is no doubt feeling some of the pain of that trend, but he also has a more tangible antagonist. Linton filed a $49,000 lien against Wal-Mart’s Highway 93 South property last October.

“We just all feel used,” he says. “They came to town. They’re big-time. We all thought, ‘Okay, we can work. We’ll get all caught up. We were all of the same mindset. And we’re all worse off now because of it.” Linton says that now that he’s seen firsthand how the retailer’s “always low prices” affect people who work for WalMart, he’s advised his family not to shop there. “Okay,” he says, “so we’re getting everything from China. Nothing’s being made in the U.S. anymore. And everybody goes there and buys from them. The

world’s forced into this Wal-Mart society— and nobody sees the veil behind the veil.” Damien McInnis, of Missoula’s Picasso Brothers Painting, agrees up to a point. He’s still recuperating from his losses on the Wal-Mart project, he says. He’s on a budget now. But after he settled for 29 cents on the dollar of his lien claim late last year, where did he go to buy Christmas presents? “Wal-Mart,” he says. “They do have good prices.”

jmayrer@missoulanews.com

Art Crum says during the past 60 years that his family’s done business in Missoula, it’s only twice filed a lien for failure to pay: once against a private homeowner, in 1964, and again last year—against Wal-Mart.

Missoula Independent Page 17 February 9 – February 16, 2012


dish The dark and light sides of chocolate the

FLASHINTHEPAN Valentine’s Day is the chocolate industry’s holiday season. With an eye toward this February’s annual love-fest, the International Labor Rights Forum purchased an advertising slot on a jumbotron outside the Super Bowl’s Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis on which to broadcast a video called “Hershey’s Chocolate: Kissed by Child Labor.” Africa produces seventy percent of the world’s cocoa—much of it with the region’s infamously cheap labor. “In West Africa, where Hershey’s sources much of its cocoa, over 200,000 children are forced to harvest cocoa beans every year,” said Judy Gearhart, executive director of the ILRF, via a press release. On the day the Super Bowl ad was announced, Hershey’s released a statement detailing steps it would take toward improving labor and sustainability practices, including a $10 million investment in its West African suppliers. That was enough to buy the company a temporary reprieve from the ILRF. “Hershey’s pledged to take the first step to address rampant forced and child labor in its supply chain,” said Sean Rudolph, ILRF’s campaigns director, “so we decided to pull the ad as a gesture of good faith.” The scuffle highlights the dark side of a food that, like love, can be bitter or sweet. In addition to labor issues, chocolate plantations can be responsible for deforestation when growers raze rainforest to plant more cocoa trees. But chocolate production can also be empowering to farmers and relatively healthy for the environment. A few years ago, I had the opportunity to visit some cocoa producers in Brazil who demonstrate the potential of chocolate to create positive change. Like coffee, chocolate trees can be grown beneath the forest canopy instead of replacing it. In the Atlantic Rainforest of Brazil this cultivation strategy is called cabruca. Also sometimes called “chocolate rainforests,” cabrucas are composed of shade-tolerant cacao trees grown under a forest canopy. Leaf litter is allowed to build up on the forest floor, and a diverse ecosystem of plants and insects develops. Cabrucas can include other cash crops like rubber trees, cassava and banana, papaya and other fruit trees. The cabrucas I visited are a far cry from the monoculture-style chocolate plantations that dominate the chocolate industry. Many such plantations

have failed in recent years thanks to nutrient depletion and the spread of a plant disease called Witch’s Broom. The cabrucas have shown dramatically more resistance to these problems. One grower I visited, a Swiss expat named Ernst Goetsch, has made good business of buying depleted and abandoned chocolate monoculture plantations and converting them into vibrant cabrucas. He’s managed to employ a lot of local people and restore value to previously worthless land, while producing a lot of chocolate.

Photo by Ari LeVaux

In addition to the environmental benefits, the cabruca system offers a solution to the labor problems often associated with chocolate. The cacao plant is extremely responsive to tender loving care like pruning, mulching and amendments with compost. On a small scale, given lots of love, cocoa yields can more than double. This makes it a viable cash crop for small landholders. While the term cabruca is used only in Brazil, the concept of rainforest-friendly chocolate has taken root to some degree wherever chocolate is grown, even in West Africa. As part of Hershey’s new commitment to fair-trade and sustainably grown chocolate, the company’s Bliss and Dagoba lines will soon be sourced exclusively from Rainforest Alliance-certified operations. The change is due in part to pressure from groups like the International Labor Rights Forum, and in part to chase profit; artisanal chocolate is one of the fastest growing segments of the food business. “Every time there’s a new trade show, we see new faces,” Jason Willenbrock of Posh Chocolat in Missoula told me. When he and his wife Ana opened

by ARI LeVAUX

shop seven years ago, they were the only chocolatiers in Montana. Now there are more than a dozen. Willenbrock says they considered riding the “bean to bar” wave, where producers make products from “single origin” cacao from a specific region or even a specific plantation or cabruca. Single-origin chocolate is the equivalent of “varietal” wines, made from a single type of grape grown in one place. As with wine, blended chocolates will often top single origin products in taste, and blending is where experts like Culinary Institute of Americatrained Willenbrock have an edge. He describes chocolate in terms like “buttery or chalky mouthfeel,” and notes the complex terroir of cacao grown in diverse systems like cabrucas. Chocolate is an industry rife with stories, and stories—like rainforest friendly—sell product, even if they’re plain wrong, says Willenbrock, who cites the fame of Belgian chocolate as an example. “This time of year, everyone wants to make chocolate fondue. And for some reason many of the recipes call for Belgian chocolate,” Willenbrock told me. He says when Valentine’s Day rolls around he has to brace for the annual onslaught of fondue makers looking for Belgian chocolate. It’s frustrating, he says, because Belgian chocolate makers tend to be “among the worst” of the Africa-sourcing chocolate makers, in terms of environmental and labor practices, and also in terms of quality. “There’s absolutely no reason to choose Belgian chocolate, for fondue or anything else,” he said. Recipe Jason Willenbrock’s (non-Belgian) chocolate fondue 1 1/4 cup heavy cream 6 oz chopped chocolate (preferably South American origin chocolates in the 65% range) 1 oz cognac or brandy Sponge cake squares or strawberries In a heavy bottom pot slowly bring cream to simmer. Slowly incorporate the chopped chocolate by whisking in a little at a time until it melts completely. Whisk in the cognac and keep it warm. Serve immediately with sponge cake squares or strawberries.

LISTINGS Best Breakfast In Town! www.thinkfft.com Mon-Thurs 7am - 8pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

$…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway (across from courthouse) • 728-8900 Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wifi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 Valentines might be Bernice’s favorite holiday! Celebrate your romance with a box of cupcakes, conversation heart cookie or an espresso truffle. Make your mother or grandmother feel valued with a selection of Linzer cookies or a heart shaped Huckleberry filled White Wine Cake. Or treat yourself! Show yourself a little love.

Missoula Independent Page 18 February 9 – February 16, 2012

Enjoy a chocolate dipped heart cookie and a deep, dark, interesting cup of Joe. Bernice’s Bakery: fresh baked, from scratch, for your pleasure. xoxo Bernice Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced beega) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Big Sky Drive In 1016 W. Broadway • 549-5431 Big Sky Drive In opened June 2nd 1962. We feature soft serve ice cream, shakes, malts, spins, burger, hot dogs, pork chop sandwiches and breaded mushrooms all made to order. Enjoy our 23 shake and malt flavors or the orange twist ice cream. Drive thru or stay and enjoy your food in our outdoor seating area. Lunch and dinner, seven days a week. $-$$

Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Monday – Friday, 7:30 – 2. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins • 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to late. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 39 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and cof-


dish

the fee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am-2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm Sun-Wed and 11am-10pm ThursSat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$$ Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 Cold Stone Creamery offers the Ultimate Ice Cream Experience. Ice Cream, Ice Cream Cakes, Shakes, and Smoothies the Way You Want It. Come in for our weekday specials. Get Gift Cards any time. Remember, it's a great day for ice cream at Cold Stone Creamery. $-$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. We deliver and we cater! Double Front Chicken 122 W. Alder 543-6264 Number of years ago Double Front was built, 101. Number of years it’s been cooking chicken, 75. Number if years in the Herndon family, 49. Always getting that perfect chicken dinner, timeless. Come find out why we are rule of the roost. Always the best, Double Front Chicken. $-$$ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. 721-6033 Missoula's Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked

goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. M-TH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am-4pm, Sat 8am-4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula's best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. 532-2056 Brooks and Browns Trivia Night is back. $7 Bayern Pitchers plus appetizer specials. Every Thursday from 7-10pm. $50 Bar Tab to winning team. Warm up your chilly nights with our Hot Jalapeno Artichoke Dip. We have Classic French Onion Soup and hearty Bison chili made in house daily. Fall in love with our Bacon Cheeseburger Meatloaf-stuffed with crispy Daily’s bacon and cheddar cheese, served with cheddar mashed potatoes and corn. And finish the best meal in town with our New Orleans style Bread Pudding with warm caramel sauce and Big Dipper vanilla bean Ice cream. We still have Happy Hour from 4-7 every day and on game days we offer wings specials and all your favorite local micro-brews. Everyone loves our SUNDAY BINGO NIGHT! Sundays 6-9 pm at Brooks and Browns. Same happy Hour specials ($5 pulled pork sliders, ? order wings, ? nachos; $6 Bud Lite pitchers) Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$

HAPPIESTHOUR Monk’s Bar What you’re doing: It’s the first Friday in February, and we’re listening to music by Russ Nasset and the Revelators. The band performs under blue lights on Monk’s new stage, above a massive dance floor that leaves plenty of room to boogie. Since opening the new bar four months ago, Monk’s general manager, Justin Manzer, has been working to lure performers from across the Northwest. The bar hosts everything from honkytonk to industrial metal to burlesque performances. “I want it to be diverse,” Manzer says. Who you’re drinking with: It varies depending on who’s performing. At about 9:30 last Friday night, it was men in khaki pants and Griz shirts and well-coiffed women in heels. As the evening wore on and DJ Squirmi prepared to spin a set, a handful of younger people filed in. What you’re drinking: Monk’s offers a variety of martini, shot and drink specials nightly. Tonight’s selections include an Effen black cherry-pomegranate martini for $4, champagne for $2.50 and apple shots for $2.

Photo by Jessica Mayrer

Ambiance: Those who frequented the Ryman Street bar when it was Amvets will recognize a few holdovers. The stone and redbrick walls remain. However, the space was completely renovated with new floors and tables, fresh paint and a warmer feel. And Monk’s smells better than Amvets did. How to find it: 225 Ryman Street. Hours: Open Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights from 7 on. — Jessica Mayrer Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

Great Food No Attitude.

exp. 2/29/12

Mon-Fri

7am - 4pm

(Breakfast ‘til Noon)

Sat & Sun

531 S. Higgins

541-4622

8am - 4pm

(Breakfast all day)

www.justinshobnobcafe.com

Februar y

COFFEE SPECIAL

Butterfly House Blend $10.95/Lb.

SATURDAYS $1 SUSHI 4pm-9pm Mondays & Thursdays - $1 SUSHI

Missoula’s Best Coffee

BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

BUTTERFLY HERBS

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

(all day)

Tuesdays - LADIES' NIGHT 4pm-9pm Not available for To-Go orders

Missoula Independent Page 19 February 9 – February 16, 2012


Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com All our menu items are made from scratch, featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive tea menu. Missoula's Original Bubble Teas. Beer, Wine and Sake available. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Rotating music and DJs. Lunch 11:30-3:00, Happy Hour 3-6, Dinner 510. $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Joker's Wild Restaurant, Lounge and Casino 4829 N. Reserve • 549-4403 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 Days a week. Steak, Seafood, Banquets, Cocktails, Wedding Receptions and so much more. Good Food, Good Fun, Good Times for All! Where the Joker's Wild About you! $-$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West • 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ The Mercantile Deli 119 S. Higgins Ave. • 721-6372 themercantiledeli.com Located next to the historic Wilma Theater, the Merc features a relaxed atmosphere, handcrafted Paninis, Sandwiches, and wholesome Soups and Salads. Try a Monte Cristo for breakfast, a Pork Love Panini for lunch, or have us cater your next company event. Open Monday – Saturday for breakfast and lunch. Downtown delivery available. The Mustard Seed Asian Café Southgate Mall • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our allnew bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our non-smoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, microbrews, fine wines & signature drinks. Takeout & delivery available. $$-$$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. 543-3188 Don’t feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $8.50. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $7.75. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$.

The Best Westerns Country Rock Thursday 6-8 pm • Live Art, Jason Bohman painting a canvas, Friday 5:30-8ish • John Smith Acoustic Saturday 6-8 • John Floridis Sunday 4-7 3/17: 1st Annual Draught Works St. Patricks Day Shenanigans (open at 10:00 am) Find us at www.facebook.com/draughtworks

Pearl Café 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French specialties, bison, elk, and fresh fish daily. Delicious salads and appetizers, as well as breads and desserts baked in-house. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Philly West 134 W. Broadway • 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday - Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. Pita Pit 130 N. Higgins 541-PITA (7482) • pitapitusa.com Fresh Thinking Healthy Eating. Enjoy a pita rolled just for you. Hot meat and cool fresh veggies topped with your favorite sauce. Try our Chicken Caesar, Gyro, Philly Steak, Breakfast Pita, or Vegetarian Falafel to name just a few. For your convenience we are open until 3am 7 nights a week. Call if you need us to deliver!

$…Under $5

Missoula Independent Page 20 February 9 – February 16, 2012

Sapore 424 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-6695 Voted best new restaurant in the Missoula Independent's Best of Missoula, 2011. Located on Higgins Ave., across the street from Wordens. Serving progressive American food consisting of fresh house-made pastas every day, pizza, local beef, and fresh fish delivered from Taste of Alaska. New specials: burger & beer Sundays, 5-7 $9 ~ pizza & beer Tuesdays, 5-7 $10 ~ draft beers, Tuesday -Thursday, 5-6:30 $3. Business hours: Tues.- Sat. 5-10:30 pm., Sat. 10-3 pm., Sun. 5-10 pm. Authentic Thai Restaurant 221 W. Broadway • 543-9966 sawaddeedowntown.com Sa Wa Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors- no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisine. Now serving beer and wine! $-$$ Sean Kelly’s Empire Grill 130 W. Pine St. • 542-1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for lunch & dinner. Featuring brunch Saturday & Sunday from 11-2pm. Serving international & Irish pub fare. Full bar, beer, wine, martinis. $-$$ Silvertip Casino 680 SW Higgins • 728-5643 The Silvertip Casino is Missoula’s premiere casino offering 20 Video gaming machines, best live poker in Missoula, full beverage liquor, 11 flat screen tv’s and great food at great prices. Breakfast Specials starting at $2.99 (7-11am) For a complete menu, go to www.silvertipcasino.com. Open 24/7. $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI Sushi Hana Downtown offering a new idea for your dining experience. Meat, poultry, vegetables and grain are a large part of Japanese cuisine. We also love our fried comfort food too. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. Corner of Pine & Higgins. 549-7979. $$–$$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins • 327-8929 Stop in when you're in the neighborhood. We'll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula's best lunch for under $6. Mon.Sat. 11-10 Sun 12-9. Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you'll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. Tamarack Brewing Company 231 W. Front Street Missoula, MT 59802 406-830-3113 facebook.com/tamarackmissoula Tamarack Brewing Company opened its first Taphouse in Missoula in 2011. Overlooking Caras Park, Tamarack Missoula has two floors -- a sports pub downstairs, and casual dining upstairs. Patrons can find Tamarack’s handcrafted ales and great pub fare on both levels. Enjoy beer-inspired menu items like brew bread wraps, Hat Trick Hop IPA Fish and Chips, and Dock Days Hefeweizen Caesar Salads. Try one of our staple ales like Hat Trick Hop IPA or Yard Sale Amber Ale, or one of our rotating seasonal beers, like, Old 'Stache Whiskey Barrel Porter, Headwall Double IPA, Stoner Kriek and more. Don’t miss $8 growler fills on Wednesday and Sunday, Community Tap Night every Tuesday, Kids Eat Free Mondays, and more. See you at The ‘Rack! $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Drive • 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming • 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$ YoWaffle Yogurt 216 W. Main St. 543-6072 (Between Thai Spicy and The Shack) www.yowaffle.com Let YoWaffle host your next birthday party! YoWaffle is a self-serve frozen yogurt and Belgian waffle eatery offering 10 continuously changing flavors of yogurt, over 60 toppings, gluten free cones and waffles, hot and cold beverages, and 2 soups daily. Build it your "weigh" at 42 cents per oz. for most items. Open 7 days a week. Sun-Thurs 11 AM to 11 PM, Fri 11 AM to 12 AM, Sat. 10 AM to 12 AM. Free WiFi. Loyalty punch cards, gift cards and t-shirts available. UMONEY. Like us on facebook.

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over


8

days a week

Arts & Entertainment listings February 9 – February 16, 2012

Photo courtesy of Cody Hilleboe

Love, interactively. Symbiotic Circus is a vaudevillian delight, with performances by the Cigarette Girls and Bellatrix, music by Burlesco and jams pumped out until midnight by Bass Face Productions, at the Wilma on Tue., Feb. 14, from 8 pm to Midnight. $32 couples adv./$18 singles adv. Tickets available at Ear Candy.

THURSDAY February

09

Make your meetings go better (check your personal anecdotes) by attending the Missoula Nonprofit Network’s

class Achieving Your Mission Through Effective Committee Meetings at the City Life Community Center. 1515 Fairview Ave. 11:30–1 PM. Free for members/ $10 for others. missoulanonprofit.org. Enjoy all the num-nums and blackouts you can handle at the Missoula Senior

Center’s Swedish Pancake Supper and Bingo Night. 4 PM for supper, 6 PM for bingo. 705 S. Higgins Ave. 543-7154. end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Feb. 10, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to The Calamander c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

Missoula Independent Page 21 February 9 – February 16, 2012


The River front Neighborhood Council Meeting and Soup Social takes place from 4:30–6 PM at the Montana Natural History Center. Let’s talk traffic and playground equipment. 120 Hickory.

nightlife Join UM’s President’s Writer-inResidence, Pulitzer Prize finalist and multi-award recipient Chang-rae Lee for a reading in the Dell Brown Room of Turner Hall. 7 PM. Free. No need to go to all the way to Ohio when Mur Quaglia’s Bridge of Dreams exhibition opens at the UC Art Gallery with an artist’s talk. 5 PM. Free. Dudes, come get your climb on during Freestone Climbing’s Dude’s Night. 935 Toole Ave. 5–10 PM. $6.50/ $5 students. Like a spiritual Indiana Jones, Jack Kornfield guides you through life during the Bitterroot Public Library’s Fellowship Club discussion of his book A Path with Heart: A Guide Through the Perils and Promises of Spiritual Life. 6–7:30 PM. Free. Bring your Western family to see and hear The Best Westerns for an evening of family fun and frolic. Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 6–8 PM. Free.

Sweet, sweet candy is what the 8th Annual Chocolate Lovers Festival is all about. Chef up two identical confections: one to taste and one for lovers to bid on. Proceeds from the chocolate auction go to Arlee Community Development Corp. and the Jocko Valley Library. The event takes place at the Arlee Brown Building Community Center. 6:30 PM. $5 per family/$2 for individuals. Call Kelley at 726-5550. Bring your miscellany of talents down the ‘Root for the The Roxy Open Mic Night. Anything goes: comedy, juggling, music and prescient children rapping about the streets. Hamilton. 120 N. 2nd. 7 PM. $5. The Peace and Justice Film Series brings us Cry of the Snow Lion, a film about the dopest critters in the Himalayas and the lives of the people who live atop the roof of the world. Gallagher Business Building, Rm 122. 7 PM. Free. Humanities Montana Speaker Mark Mathews presents a Black History M o n t h P r o g r a m , J i t te r b u g g i n g Across Color Lines: Integrating American Society Through Black Dance, at the Missoula Public Library. Large Meeting Rm. 7 PM. Free. Join the Noetic Sciences Community Group (IONS) for The Breath: Practices and Psychology, using breath to

You want a great newspaper. . . Lady Griz Basketball this Weekend! Thursday, Feb. 9th @ 7 pm Montana v. Sacramento State Go Red Game – Wear red & help support the American Heart Association. Halftime Performance by the Red Wave Band

Saturday, Feb. 11th @ 2 pm Montana v. Northern Colorado Pink Zone – Wear pink & help support cancer research! Sponsored by St. Patrick’s Hospital Diaper Dash Baby Race – To register your crawling child, please call 243-2696. Please bring a food donation to any Grizzly Athletics event to help support the Student Athletic Advisory Committee’s food drive!

and you want it

FOR FREE Missoula Independent Page 22 February 9 – February 16, 2012


for Lovers) that takes place in 1960s Vegas. 200 N. Adams St. 8 PM. Tix $15$21. missoulacommunitytheatre.org. Grab ye olde acoustic and learn “Sundown” before you roll into Sean Kelly’s Open Mic night. Call 5421471 after 10 AM Thursdays to sign-up. 8:30 PM–Midnight. Bow down to the Row during Dre Day at the Dead Hipster Dance Party, where people will be getting their G-Funk on and buying 40-ouncers at the bar. The Badlander. 208 Ryman St. $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM–midnight. Be the master and owner of your own labor and land during John Smith’s performance down at ye olde Union Club. 9 PM. Free. Forget flavor country, it’s Zoo City Country ‘round these parts and they play at the Sunrise Saloon. 9 PM. Free. Show these fish that you have manners during Synergy Sessions, an electronic music free-for-all, with DJs Ampathy, Dagga, AP and Logisticalone. The Palace. 147 W. Broadway Ave. Free. He’ll cure your tremors with a sweet shot of country: Russ Nasset hits up the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., for a solo set this and every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free. Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Costigan

Gotta have that funk. Kung Fu Kongress performs with the UM Jazz Band and Reverend Slanky at the Buddy Defranco Jazz Festival Benefit, at the Wilma Theatre, on Sat., Feb. 11, at 8:30 PM. Tickets are $15 or $12 advance and available Rockin Rudy’s and the UM School of Music.

improve health, with Sara Bonds and Shawna Moore. Bohemian Grange, 125 Blanchard Lake Rd., Whitefish. 7 PM. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn-Downtown. 7–10 PM. Join the wee little fairies that are the Celtic folk music and theater trio Tricky Pixie for a fundraising adventure to aid

CHECK OUT OUR NEW WEBSITE! From Tap to Tango, Zumba to Oula, the DDC is for Every Body

Lake County Youth Home. Ronan Performing Arts Center. 7:30 PM. $14/$12 adv./18 and under free. Tickets available at cmc@ronan.net or (800) 823-4386. Science meets an old friend for a drink during Dr. Susan Cohen’s lecture Archeology and the Bible: Comparisons and Contrasts, brought to you by the UM Religious Studies Program. Gallagher Business Building, Rm. 123. 7:30–9 PM. Free.

Fans of grammar, logic and rhetoric, grab your liberal arts degrees and head down to the Central Bar and Grill’s Trivia Night, hosted by local gallant and possible Swede Thomas Helgerson. 143 W. Broadway. 8 PM. Free. Hey up-and-coming frenchers, class is in session when the UM School of Music and Missoula Community Theatre present an updated version of Mozart’s Così Fan Tutte (The School

The Best Westerns VFW Residency continues, and they look good doin’ it. This week they’re joined by Ancient Forest, The Skurfs, Emily Goodnight and Ball, Sweat & Tears. 245 W. Main St. 10 PM. Free. The Boxcutters slice through the nonsense with some rock and roll delights, with Airstream Safari. The Top Hat. 10 PM. $5.

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Missoula Independent Page 23 February 9 – February 16, 2012


FRIDAY

10

February

Hey little archers and aspiring archers, Bowhunter Certification Courses will be held Sat., Jan. 23, and Sat., Feb. 11, from 8:30 AM–5:30 PM. The field course for both will be Sun., Feb. 12, from 1–4 PM. 3201 Spurgin Rd. Register by following the education links at fwp.mt.gov. Hey takers, let’s do a little giving and donate some blood at the American Red Cross from 10–2 PM. 2401 N. Reserve St., Ste. 6. Call 800-REDCROSS to schedule an appointment.

nightlife Play bingo and eat sushi from Sushi Hana at the St. Joseph Elementary Annual Valentine Carnival, which also features carnival games, a photo booth and auctions. 503 Edith. 5–9 PM. Wrist bands for all the games are $20. Get your swerve on and taste the flavors of Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery with El 3-Oh! 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 5–9 PM. Forget Wilford Brimley, check out the Kalispell Downtown Association’s A Chocolat Affair. Peeps can cruise downtown businesses and sample chocolate treats while shopping for their valentines. 5-10 PM. downtownkalispell.com.

WIN A MASSAGE! Fill in the thought bubbles. Bring them to any concert to enter the drawing. Winners will be announced Saturday night.

MCT Center for the Performing Arts 7:30 p.m. + Saturday matinee at 2 p.m. Tickets: $15, $10 students and seniors (+fees) Available: GrizTix outlets, griztix.com, or at the door HW Patron Ticket: $40 includes Friday concert + post-concert party at MCT (food and drinks with the company, and an intimate performance) Sponsored by the Missoula Independent and the Montana Cultural & Aesthetic Trust.

Watch painter Jason Bohman create a painting en vivo, at Draught Works Brewery. 5:30 PM. Free. Swing by the ZACC for their always crafty Second Friday exhibition featuring the Cultural Dolls, a collection of international dolls of all sorts. 235 N. 1st St. 5:30–8:30 PM. Free. Go with the flow during Hot House Yoga’s Vinyasa Yoga Te a c h e r Tr a i n i n g , w h i c h focuses on satsang and healing meditation. 127 N. Higgins. 5:30–8:30 PM. $30. Call Veronica at 824-5529. Test drive your million dollar tshirt idea at the ZACC’s Free Silkscreen Night. Staffers conduct demos and guide you step-by-step in the art of being awesome. 235 N. 1st St.

Missoula Independent Page 24 February 9 – February 16, 2012

5:30–8:30 PM. All ages. Free. zootownarts.org. Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s (formerly the Flathead Valley Over the Hill Gang) weekly meeting to talk about being awesome, past glories and upcoming activities. Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free. Bring the Ferguson’s and the kids down to Casey Massey’s performance at The Top Hat’s Family Friendly Friday. 6–8 PM. Free. The YMCA hosts a MotherSon Dance from 6–9 PM for mothers and sons. 3000 S. Russell. $35/$30 adv. Don’t be a hot mess, check out Project Selvedge, where amateur fashion designers compete “Project Runway”-stylie to make MSO a more fashion-forward place. Live fashion show at 6:30 PM. One designer eliminated each week, oh snap! 509 S. Higgins Ave. $1. Fire walk you and yours to the CoMotion Dance Project’s Fire Speaks the Land: An Active Audiences Dance Performance, designed for kids 5–12. $8/$4 children. comotiondanceproject.com. (See Spotlight in this issue.) The Northern Rockies Rising Tide fights for the northern Rockies, including tackling the megaload issue and so much more. Jeannette Rankin Peace Center back room. 510 S. Higgins Ave. 7–8:30 PM. Nothing fishy about the rockin’ style of Stan Anglen and Headwaters, who perform with Flashback out at the Missoula Winery. 5646 Harrier Way. 6–8 PM. $5. Holy jumping up and down Martha, the New Shanghai Circus is back in town to thrill with fearless flips, juking jugglers and cunning contortionists. This stuff is wild, son. University Theatre. 7:30 PM. Tix available at the Adams Center box office or at griztix.com. $29/$13 for those aged 18 and under. (See Spotlight in this issue.) See how long someone can spin a leather sphere on their index finger when the worldfamous Harlem Globetrotters return to the Adams Center at 7:30 PM. $13-$62, available at griztix.com. (See Spotlight in this issue.)

You know where that missing sock went? One of the little people that lives under your floorboards is sleeping in it. See proof at the Whitefish Theatre Company’s performance of The Borrowers, a tale of little people with big hearts, I suppose. O’Shaughnessy Center. 7:30 PM. $18/$14 seniors/$8 students. Leave the pads at home but bring your innate acting abilities to Contact Improv Jam with Hatton Litman, at the Downtown Dance Collective. 121 W. Main St. 7:30–9:30 PM. $15/$12 DDC members. Hey up-and-coming frenchers, class is in session when the UM School of Music and Missoula Community Theatre present an updated version of Mozart’s Così Fan Tutte (The School for Lovers) that takes place in 1960s Vegas. 200 N. Adams St. 8 PM. Tix $15-$21. missoulacommunitytheatre.org. Shine up your rhinestones and listen to the country, swing and jazz sounds of Louie Bond and The Texas Playgirl. Symes Hot Springs Hotel. 8-10 PM. Pass the hat. There won’t be any bush league psyche-out stuff when Miller Creek plays the Bowl Dog Lounge at Westside Lanes, just good tunes and cold Buds. 8:30 PM. Free. It’s a reggae götterdämmerung when locals Chele Bandulu deliver a night of epic tuneage for your irie pleasure. Monk’s Bar. 225 Ryman. 9 PM. $3. Join the lads and lasses for a drink or three and the dancin’ tunes of Whiskey Rebellion. Hardy-har-yo! Union Club. 9 PM. Free. Strap on the robot walkers and clip your nose for the stinky funk sassy soul of Reverend Slanky at The Badlander. 9 PM. $5. Don’t stop, get it, get it at the Codependents CD release hip-hop par-tay, with Zoo Effort and Lyrical Motion. The Palace. 9 PM. $3/$8 for those aged 18-20. Drop the wrench and let the grits burn, baby, cuz Earl Wear and Haywire are coming to the Sunrise Saloon for your dancin’ and imbibin’ pleasure. 1101 Strand. 9 PM. Free.


He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. This is not a threat: I’ll House You with DJs Kris Moon, Mike Stolin and Hotpantz does happen at The Jolly Cork’s. 112 N. Pattee St. (Front St. entrance). 10 PM. Free. Celebrate with Places during their CD release party, with The Canopy and Sick Kids XOXO. The Top Hat. 10 PM. $5. (See Noise in this issue.)

SATURDAY

11

February

Get your heart did at St. Pat’s Hospital Heart Expo, where you can assess your risk of heart disease with discounted blood tests and other screens. 500 W. Broadway. 7–12 PM. The Girls Way is taking a Snowshoeing Day Trip up Lolo Pass way, and you kids and adults are invited. Equipment and transpo provided. 8:30 AM–3 PM or so. $10 suggested donation. Call 830-3018 for more info.

guardians of Asgaard shed tears when they listen. Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. 10 AM. Tix available at Rockin Rudy’s and Shakespeare & Co. $20/$18 seniors/$15 students. The 7th Annual HOOKed on Art Festival celebrates the legacy of Walter Hook and features the MAM’s exhibit of Hook’s Fauna, as well as live music and quilts by Carl Rohr and much more. Bobby Tilton gives a presentation titled Humor and Wisdom: Walter Hook’s Influences at 11 AM. Bonner School. 10–4 PM. Free. friendsof2rivers.org. The Heirloom Winter Market still has plenty of local numnums for you and yours, including farm-fresh eggs, butter, sausage, lavender, honey and more, more, more! Ceretana Gallery and Studios, 801 Sherwood. 10 AM–12 PM. The Super Bowl is over, so spend some quality time with the fam at the Missoula Children and Nature Network’s Family Cross-Country Ski Outing up Pattee Canyon way, with instruction and gear provided by Missoula Outdoor

Learning Adventures. Pre-register by calling Ellie at 410-0236. Missoula Parks and Rec. wants you to discover the treasure trove of fun that is Geocaching at Lubrecht Experiemental Forest. Learn how to operate a GPS and discover what lurks beneath the peat. 10–4 PM. Register Currents Aquatic Center or call 721-PARK. $24. The Bird Woman Falls Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution meets at the Heckathorn Meeting Room of the Whitefish Library to discuss the program How Good an Ancestor Will You Be? 11 AM. Free. Open up your earholes for the Travelers’ Rest State Park Storytelling Series event Powwow Culture given by Salish Tribal Elder Stephen Smallsalmon. Find it 1.2 miles west of Lolo on Hwy. 12. 11 AM. $4/Free for kids 18 and under.

UM School of Music & Missoula Community Theatre present

The School for Lovers by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart PERFORMED IN ENGLISH Sponsored by: Thomas Rickard, M.D. & Catherine Capps, M.D.

February 9–12 MCT CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS TIC K E TS A R E O N SA L E N OW !

728-7529 • www.missoulacommunitytheatre.org MCT accommodates accessibility upon request. Some accommodations require advance notice.

Get ready for the best two-word combo you’ll read all week: subnivean collage. That’s what happens at the Kid’s Snow Stomper Program Under the Snow Blanket, which teaches

If you have compulsive-eating problems, seek help and support with others during a meeting of O v e r e a te r s A n o n y m o u s , which meets this and every Sat. at 9 AM in Room 3 in the basement of First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free. Visit oa.org. This week’s Winter Wilderness Walk is more walk than wilderness, so grab your stuffy Uncle Ed and that layabout cousin of your’n and head to the Family Snowshoe in the Rattlesnake for a short two to three mile hike. Meet at the main parking lot at 9 AM. RSVP by emailing fay.lizzy@gmail.com. Ladies, you’ve got to win this one for Mary Slaney. Run Wild Missoula hosts the Catch ‘Em If You Can 5K, where ladies get a three-minute head start on the boys in a race down the Riverfront Trail. 9:30 AM. $15. runwildmissoula.org. The Met: Live in HD delivers the operatic goods with Wa g n e r ’ s a p o c a l y p t i c e p i c Götterdämmerung, six hours of opera so doomful that the

Missoula Independent Page 25 February 9 – February 16, 2012


youngsters 4- to 7-years-old how those critters live in the cold. Lone Pine State Park. 11–12 PM. $3. Call 755-2706 for more info. Fun, love and fun at the MAM during Saturday Family Art Workshop: It Has to be Valentine’s Day with Loryn Zerr. Make a pop-up collage for that special someone. Designed for parents and children. 11 A.M.–12:30 PM. $5. Pre-register at 728-0447 ext. 22. Focus on healing at Hot House Yoga’s Gayatri Mantra in Motion course with Lea Kraemer. 127 N. Higgins. 12–6 PM. $115. Call Veronica at 824-5529. Join a ranger from Lone PIne State Park in Kalispell for a Winter Discovery Snow Shoe Hike. BYOSS or rent a set from the park for $5. Familes with kids 10 and up welcome. 1–2 PM. Call Mary Beth at 755-2706 ext. 2. Hey up-and-coming frenchers, class is in session when the UM School of Music and Missoula Community Theatre present an updated version of Mozart’s Così Fan Tutte (The School for Lovers) that takes place in 1960s Vegas. 200 N. Adams St. 2 PM and 8 PM. Tix $15-$21. missoulacommunitytheatre.org. The Winter Brewfest 2012 is exactly what it says it is. Some 30 beers on tap, with music by Tom Catmull and the Clerics and Cash For Junkers. Go on and get social. Old Safeway building on West Broadway. 2–8 PM. $10 gets you one 7-ounce glass and two drink tokens; additional tokens are $1 each. It’s real simple: you don’t have a sock monchi-chi, but you need one. Bad. Head to Selvedge Studio’s Sock Monkey Class and make it happen. Fool proof, unlike unconditional love. 509 S. Higgins. $35. 541-7171.

nightlife Feel the burn when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts Footloose Montana, with food by Biga Pizza, music by 907 Britt and Richie Reinholt and a bonfire. 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 5–9 PM. Wolverines are coming to the Open Book Club in Seeley Lake via the works of Doug Chadwick, including a screening of the film Wolverine: Chasing the Phantom at 5:30 PM and a reading by Chadwick from The Wolverine Way at 7 PM. Grizzly Claw Trading Co. Free. Have a beer, talk to friends, sit back and say, “Ahh, John Smith sounds fine right now,” at Draught Works Brewery. 915 Toole Ave. 6–8 PM. Free. The YMCA hosts its annual FatherDaughter Sweetheart Dance from 6–9 PM. 3000 S. Russell. $35/$30 adv. C’mon down and be yourself at the Contra Dance held at the Rocky Mountain Grange, with Celtic Knots

Missoula Independent Page 26 February 9 – February 16, 2012

and lessons for you newbies. This is a fragrance-free events so leave the Drakkar Noir and Charlie at home. Lessons 6:30, dance starts at 7 PM. Call 642–3601. The UM Women’s Resource Center brings The Vagina Monologues to the University Theatre. Proceeds benefit the nice peeps down at the Blue Mountain Clinic. $12/$10 students, available at griztix.com. Giddyup and check out the Wild West Show at Hamilton’s Roxy Theatre, with PD Lear, Aran Buzzas and those nice ladies Steel Toe Floes. 7 PM. $7. (See Soundcheck in this issue.) Show the youngsters you still got that swagger during the Missoula Senior Center’s Saturday Night Dance, with music by the Heart to Heart Duo. 705 S. Higgins Ave. 7–10 PM. You know where that missing sock went? One of the little people that lives under your floorboards is sleeping in it. See proof at the Whitefish Theatre Company’s performance of The Borrowers, a tale of little people with big hearts, I suppose. O’Shaughnessy Center. 7:30 PM. $18/$14 seniors/ $8 students. Treat your valentine to an evening of impressions at the 3rd Annual Valentines Performance of Live, Love & Laugh with celebrity impressionist Jason Hewlett. Bigfork Center for Performing Arts. 7 PM. $32.50. bigforktheater.org. Embrace Argentinian Tango at the Brick Room and help out a worthy cause. This month it’s the UM Dance Program. Lessons at 8 PM, melonga at 9 PM. Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main. $16 couple/$10 ind. ddcmontana.com. Make all that jazz happen during the Buddy DeFranco Jazz Festival Benefit, featuring UM Jazz Band, Kung Fu Kongress and Reverend Slanky. Wilma Theatre. 8:30 PM. $15/$12 adv. Tix available at Rockin Rudy’s and the UM School of Music. DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are the foie gras in your ice cream during Absolutely, a dance party featuring every style of rump-shaking tuneage. The Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2 for 1 Absolut drinks until 11 PM. Free. Drop the wrench and let the grits burn, baby, cuz Earl Wear and Haywire are coming to the Sunrise Saloon for your dancin’ and imbibin’ pleasure. 1101 Strand. 9 PM. Free. Kick the tire and light the fire when Boy Burns Bridge spins the mixes just for kickses at Monk’s Bar. 225 Ryman. 9 PM. $2.


They’re as shameless as a band can be: No Shame rocks the Dark Horse, you pervs. 9 PM. Free. Sniff out the good sounds of the Wild Coyote Band when they play the Lumberjack Saloon. 9 PM. Free. Sing along, dance beside and float aloft on a ship named memory bliss when Zeppo MT performs at the Union Club. 9 PM. Free. Shoot the gap and mind the plugs when PDX’s Casey Neill and the Norway Rats bring their rock and roll infused brand of Americana to the stage, with The Ascetic Junkies and local honky tonkist Aran Buzzas. Palace. $7/$5 adv. stonefly-productions.com. (See Noise and Soundcheck in this issue.) DJ Dubwise supplies dance tracks all night long so you can take advantage of Sexy Saturday and rub up against the gender of your choice at Feruqi’s. 10 PM. Free. Call 728-8799. Oh the power of positivity reigns when Groovesession does the boogie on a reggae woman. The Top Hat. 10 PM. $5.

SUNDAY February

12

Air it out with Montana Naturist Organization for the Mid-Winter Soak and Swim held at Missoula area hot springs. Celebrate the season and nude soaks with friends by contacting montananaturist.org for more info.

Photo courtesy of Michelle Gustafson

Take me to school. The UM School of Music and Missoula Community Theatre present an updated version of Mozart’s Così Fan Tutte (The School for Lovers) that takes place in 1960s Vegas. Opening Thu., Feb. 9 and continuing through Sun., Feb. 12, at the MCT Center for Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. Tix $15-$21. missoulacommunitytheatre.org.

Focus on healing at Hot House Yoga’s Gayatri Mantra in Motion course with Lea Kraemer. 127 N. Higgins. 12–6 PM. $115. Call Veronica at 824-5529. Students and parents, join College Goal Montana for free assistance filling out FAFSA forms. Trust me, you’ll need it. Gallagher Business Building. 1–4 PM. smartaboutcollege.org.

Get your grub on and help out The Girls Way at Biga Pizza’s All-You-CanEat Pizza and Salad Fundraiser. 5 PM. 241 W. Main. $10.

Go with the jam when The Rocky Mountain Grange Hall, 1436 S. First St. south of Hamilton, hosts a weekly acoustic jam session for guitarists, mandolin players and others, from 2–4 PM. Free. Call Clem at 961-4949.

Join photog Eileen Rafferty for the Ansel Adams Drop-In Tour at the MAM and get insider info on the bestknown photog of all-time. 335 N. Pattee St.

Hey up-and-coming frenchers, class is in session when the UM School of Music and Missoula Community Theatre present an updated version of Mozart’s Così Fan Tutte (The School for Lovers)

that takes place in 1960s Vegas. 200 N. Adams St. 2 PM and 6:30 PM. Tix $15$21. missoulacommunitytheatre.org. Enjoy the tickle of ivories at the UM Faculty and Guest Artist Series, featuring pianist Margery Whatley. Music Recital Hall. 3 PM. $12/$8 seniors and students. You know where that missing sock went? One of the little people that lives under your floorboards is sleeping in it. See proof at the Whitefish Theatre Company’s performance of The Borrowers, a tale of little people with big hear ts, I suppose. O’Shaughnessy Center. 4 P M. $18/$14 seniors/$8 students. John Floridis plays music at Draught Works Brewery from 4–7 PM. 915 Toole Ave. Free.

Open your fly and show ‘em what you’ve got during the Skwala Fly Competition at the Bitterroot Water Forum Pint Night. Music by Pinegrass. Bitter Root Brewery. 4–7 PM. Free.

nightlife Occupy Missoula General Assembly takes place at the Union Hall. 208 E. Main St. 5:30 PM. occupymissoula.org. Listen to some real live writers during the Second Wind Reading Series, where MFA students and teachers share their stories with the world. This week it’s Emma Torzs and Joanna Klink. The Top Hat. 5 PM. Free. Get cuffed and stuffed (that’s your business) at the Vigilante Theatre Company’s dinner theater performance

Missoula Independent Page 27 February 9 – February 16, 2012


of House Arrest at Quinn’s Hot Spring’s Resort. 6–7 PM cocktail hour, performance at 7 PM. $35. Call 826-3150 for lodging and dinner theatre packages. Put some swing in your second Sunday when the Ed Norton Big Band plays the Missoula Winery from 6–8 PM, 5646 W. Harrier. $5. missoulawinery.com.

Last Sunday was the Super Bowl, this Sunday is the Tropical World and Abe Coley album release music showcase, with Shahs, Bad Naked, and Trash Fire Presents: Jungle Planet, a Tropical World Tribute Band. Zoo City Apparel. 139 E. Main St. 8 PM. Donate something at the door (kippered snacks).

The Suna Quintet plays the jazz you crave these chilly Sunday eves. The Top Hat. 7 PM. Free.

February

Close out the weekend in style with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz & DJs, during the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with the Donna Smith Trio. Free.

Hey there ‘Rooters, it’s Hunter Education time. Sign-up online by Sun., Feb. 12, and come to the orientation on Mon., Feb. 13, at 7 PM. Assembly of God Church. 601

Missoula Independent Page 28 February 9 – February 16, 2012

MONDAY

13

W. Main. fwp.mt.gov (follow links to Education). Need to brush up on that algebra or writing course before you pay a king’s ransom to get a D in Comp 101 at the university? Sign-up for the Lifelong Learning Center’s Adult Education Program, which hosts seven weeks of college prep assistance. 310 S. Curtis. Mon.-Thu., from 8–11:30 AM. Free. Call 549-8765. Mended Hearts Chapter #324 of Missoula hosts speaker Deb S y b r a n t PA - C o f t h e International Heart Institute, followed by a valentine construction for current St. Pat’s heart patients. St. Pat’s Hospital Broadway Building Conf. Center. 2 PM. Call 329-5824.


nightlife At Slacker Mondays, from 6 PM until close, slackline fans can come to Freestone Climbing Center at 935 Toole Ave. to test their balance. $13/$10 for students. Visit freestoneclimbing.com. Get cuffed and stuffed (that’s your business) at the Vigilante Theatre Company’s dinner theater performance of House Arrest at Quinn’s Hot Spring’s Resort. 6–7 PM cocktail hour, performance at 7 PM. $35. Call 826-3150 for lodging and dinner theatre packages. The High Country Carvers welcomes carvers of all abilities to their meetings, which take place at the Evergreen Fire Dept. No power tools, but you need gloves and a bench hook. 2236 Hwy. 2. 6:30–8:30 PM. Photographer Dick Walker talks warblers during his presentation Magee Marsh–Warbler Mecca and Migrant Trap for the Flathead Audubon Society at the Summit. 205 Sunnyview Ln. 7 PM. Free. Help choose what type of traffic control device will be installed at the Town Pump at Hwy. 200 during the Bonner Milltown Community Council Meeting. Bonner School LIbrary. 7 PM. Ron Dunbar makes it all romantic and junk when he plays folk tunes at the Red Bird Wine Bar. 111 N. Higgins. 7–10 PM. Free. Hear about all the pretty birds that swing through the big old King Ranch during Brian Williams’ program Legal Migrants: The Birds of S o u t h Te x a s . G a l l a g h e r Business Building, Rm. L14. 7 PM. Free. Don’t just express yourself, be expressive at the ZACC’s weekly, one-hour poetry workshop. 235 N. 1st St. 8 PM. Free. Bring your best gal to the Lolo Square and Round Dance Center for the Valentine Dance. 8–9:30 PM. Call 5499437 for more info. It’s time to drop the knife and head to Milkcrate Monday’s with the Milkcrate Mechanic when he hosts Live and Local Hip Hop, with MCs Tajbo, Linkletter and Tonsofun. Don’t forget DJs Enkrypted

and Special K. The Palace. 9 PM. Free, with free pool and $6 pitchers of PBR. Open Mic at the VFW seems like a fine idea, especially with 2 for 1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. Call Skye on Sunday at 531–4312 to reserve your spot in the lineup or I bet you could roll in and be all, “Dude, I do a perfect Sublime.”

TUESDAY

14

February

Those wishing to advocate for women and children, check out the YWCA’s volunteer orientation. After the orientation, a 45-hour training plan begins on Sat., Feb. 25. To attend, email Rebecca at rpettit@ywcaofmissoula.org. The Cultural and Art History Club of Whitefish meets to discuss the only things that matter, like Johannes Vermeer. Stumptown Art Studio. 10– 12 PM. Grab a can of worms and head to the Families First Children’s Museum for the opening of its educational art exhibit Go Fish. The exhibit allows kids to catch fish, measure, identify and release the fish into the wild of the museum. 225 W. Front St. 10 AM–5 PM. Free. Learn how various groups manage the sage/steppe ecosystems and all of the other systems around the Upper Missouri River during the Natural Resource and Environmental Policy Forum The Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative: A Collective Vision for our Landscape with Yvette Converse of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. UM Law Building Rm. 101. Noon. Free. Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room and work on your elk camp locution at the Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters. All are invited. 12–1. 5205 Grant Creek Dr. Free. We’ll let the title of this Brown Bag Lecture do the work. Geoengineering the Climate:

Technologies for Rebalancing or Reinforcing Global Inequity by Jason Blackstock, Senior Fellow for Energy and the Environment at the Centre for International Governance Innovation and visiting research scholar at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Austria. Mansfield Center Conf. Rm. 12–1 PM. Free.

Beer Drinkers’ Profile THROWBACK TO THE WAYBACK

Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 115 S. 3rd St. W. 1-3 PM. For information call 543-3955.

nightlife Are you a romantic idiot? Do you make tacos with a package of “taco seasoning?” Let’s have someone do the hard stuff for you at Aphrodite and Dionysus Go to Dinner. A five-course dinner with five wines is served up by Bravo Catering at The Top Hat, with jazz tuneage by the Vanguard Combo at 5 PM and Tapas later. Cocktails at 6 PM and dinner at 7 PM. $85 per couple. Tix available at The Top Hat. Tired of wearing sexy underpants and shaking your buns for the old lady every Valentine’s Day? Try the ZACC’s Artistic Alternative Valentine’s Day. Couples learn to draw and paint one another’s portrait while sipping on a bit of wine and eating chocolate-dipped strawberries. 235 N. 1st St. $45 per couple. zootownarts.org.

Double Trouble (the Good Kind) If life gets big and gnarly, enjoy it in little sips, with a buddy.

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Start making sense at the weekl y Ta k i n g P o u n d s O f f Sensibly Meeting (TOPS) at First Baptist Church in Whitefish. Weigh-in at 5 PM, meeting at 5:30 PM. For more info. call 862-5214. Aim your sights on the 8 ball when the Palace hosts a weekly 9 ball tournament, which is double elimination and starts with sign-up at 6 PM, followed by games at 7. $10 entry fee. You saw House Party, but you still can’t do the Kid ‘N Play. Do something about it by taking the Downtown Dance Collective’s Beg./Int. Hip Hop dance class with Heidi Michaelson. 1221 W. Main St. 6–7 PM. ddcmontana.com The VFW hosts my kind of three-way during a night of Singers, Songwriters and

Missoula Independent Page 29 February 9 – February 16, 2012


Spaghetti, with food provided by the Blue Bison Grill. 6 PM. Free. YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts Y WCA Support Groups for women every Tue. from 6:30–8 PM. An American Indian-led talking circle is also available, along with age-appropriate children’s groups. Free. Call 543-6691.

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The UM Wilderness Institute brings scholars, writers, scientists and explorers together to share stories of how water shapes our lives, landscapes and politics in the Wild Waters in the West Lecture Series. This week, Phil Condon, Asst. Professor of Environmental Studies at UM, gives a lecture titled Jacob’s Island: A Reading. Gallagher Business Building Rm. 122. 7 PM. Free. Henry Jones, retired border patrol agent and helicopter pilot, speaks at the Missoula Pa t r i o t s m e e t i n g . Va l l e y Christian School. 7 PM. Please bring a non-perishable food item to donate. Take a load off while you get a load of some of the area’s better musicians during the Musician Showcase at Brooks and Browns in the Holiday Inn-Downtown. $7 Big Sky pitchers and $2 pints. 200 S. Pattee St. Free. Don’t be a selfish lover on VDay, head to Crush Wine Bar in Whitefish and participate in Shot Through the Heart: Youth Image Project’s V-Day Photo Booth. Have pro photogs from Alicia Brown Photography take your pic, then sip some champagne and have dessert, all for a good cause. 7–10 PM. $30.

Join sexy saxophonist Johan Eriksson at the UM Faculty and Guest Artist Series. Music Recital Hall. 7:30 PM. $12/$8 seniors and students.

Helena folkateers Kevin Koutnik and The Protectors, plus opener Silly Red Hat. The Badlander. 9 PM. Free.

Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? What song did Haddaway reach number one with in 13 countries in 1993? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.)

WEDNESDAY

Hey-a giggle piggies, snort your way over to Comedy Night at the Lucky Strike Casino and Bar for laughs and such. 1515 Dearborn Ave. 8 PM. $5. Get a taste of the old school with a a gang of the new school during Symbiotic Circus, with performances by the Cigarette Girls, Bellatrix and music by Bass Face Productions. Wilma Theatre. 8–Midnight. $32 couples adv./$18 singles adv. Available at Ear Candy. Get all sorts of romantic when John Patrick Williams plays the Symes Hot Springs Hotel, which has rooms and hot springs. Jus’ sayin’. 8–10 PM. 741-2361. The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. Bow down to the sounds at Royal Reggae, featuring dancehall jams by DJs Supa, Smiley Banton and Oneness at the Palace at 9 PM. Free. Grab your gal’s pic-a-nic basket (don’t be gross) and check out

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Missoula Independent Page 30 February 9 – February 16, 2012

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15

February

Learn about the effects of the Mike Horse tailing dam rupture back in ‘75, when Ron Pierce of the FWP gives the MNHC’s Evening Lecture Aquatic Resource Damage and Restoration Needs in the Upper Blackfoot Mining Complex. 120 Hickory St. 7 PM. $4 suggested donation/ members free.

Art heals at Living Art of Montana’s third Wednesday of every month’s workshop Creative Connections for Cancer Survivors. 12–1:30 PM at the Living Art Studio, 725 W. Alder, #17. Free. Call 549-5329.

All hail Michael Flatley, the Lord of the Dance! He and his crew of delightfully armless dancers bring the fun and the red hair dye to the University Theatre. 7:30 PM. Tix available at GrizTix outlets. $51.50 and $47.50.

nightlife

Join hiking fanatic Jake Bramante as he recounts via photos and video the tale of his effort to hike all 734 miles of Glacier Park’s trails in one summer during his presentation Hike 734 in Glacier National Park. UM campus, Clapp Building Rm. 131. 7:30–9:30 PM. Free.

Kick back and cruise down the rock and roll highway with Los Lonely Boys and Patrolled by Radar at the Wilma. 8PM. $25. Let them dance, or at least give it a try, during Kids’ Hip Hop (7-10 years old) at the Downtown Dance Collective. No dance experience is necessary and drop-ins are welcome. Just wear good clothes for dancing. 121 W. Main St. 5–6 PM. ddcmontana.com Join the helpful Bain Robinson at the Bitterroot Public Library’s Digital Photography course. Bring your camera and the manual (like you need it). 6–7 PM. Free. Artists of all levels are invited to the MAM’s non-instructed Open Figure Drawing Class. This class gives artists the opportunity to draw from a forreal person. Ages 18 plus (you and the model). 335 N. Pattee St. 6–8 PM. $7/$5 members. Hey Brenda, this ain’t L.A., so let’s join Missoula Parks and Rec. and learn how to use a map, compass and GPS unit, um-kay? Beginner Map and Compass Skills meets from 6–8 PM and costs $8. Stop by Currents Aquatic Center to register or call 721- PARK. Join Lindsey Webber down at the ZACC for some Suicide Relief Printmaking. Class size is limited to six peeps so go ahead and register right-quick. 6–8 PM. $45. zootownarts.org. The Ewam Buddhist Center presents Seven Years in Tibet as part of their Compassion Film Series. 180 S. 3rd W. 6:30 PM. Free.

Black Eyed Peas fanatics are welcome to belt out their fave jamz at the Badlander during Kraptastic Karaoke, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $5 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free. Lady DJs spin the tunes while you swoon and guzzle booze at Girl Trouble, a party made by ladies for every kind of booty. Palace. 9 PM. Free. (Pub trivia answer: What Is Love.) It’s all sound hit the 10 PM.

about singularity of when Monophonics stage at The Top Hat. $5.

THURSDAY

16

February

The folks at the Montana Natural History Center teach the young ‘uns how to observe and connect with nature at the miniNaturalists Pre-K Program, for ages 2–5. 120 Hickory St. 10–11 AM. $3/$1 members. Hey nonprofs, learn how to keep the train a-rollin’ at Missoula Nonprofit Network’s workshop Effective Volunteer Recruitment, Management and Retention. Mountain West Bank Conf. Rm. 3301 Great Northern Way. 11:30–1 PM. $10 for non-


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Good luck on Friday, families. You’re going to need it. The scheduling gods created a perfect storm of family-friendly events for the same evening, all situated on the University of Montana campus and set to start within 30 minutes of each other. Parking will be the least of your worries. Deciding which one to attend is the bigger dilemma. Two of the acts involve touring troupes not unfamiliar to these parts. New Shanghai Circus returns to the University Theatre with a dizzying repertoire of acrobatics and tricks based on more than 2,000 years of Chinese tradition. The plate spinning alone looks like something from your WHAT: New Shanghai Circus, Harlem Globetrotters, Fire Speaks the Land WHEN: Fri., Feb. 10, at 7:30, 7:30 and 7 PM, respectively WHERE: University Theatre, Adams Center, and Montana Theatre, respectively HOW MUCH: $29 for the Circus, $13–$62 for hoops, $8 adults/$4 kids for Fire

worst nightmare—only here the dozens of plates don’t shatter on the kitchen floor, and you’re wearing pants. These performers make juggling soccer practice, piano lessons, ballet class and a grocery run look like a spa day.

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The Globetrotters return to the Adams Center with a few tricks of their own. This year’s team boasts the top three performers from last year’s collegiate dunk contest, and the usual on-court hijinks. Count on a bucket of confetti getting tossed into the crowd, a highlight reel worth of trick shots and, in the end, another Washington Generals loss. Finally, the locally based CoMotion Dance Project offers up something completely original: an evening-length performance that puts fire science and fire ecology to movement. Created for family audiences, and featuring the choreography of UM professor Karen Kaufmann and Bare Bait Dance founder Joy French, Fire Speaks the Land explores an inextricable part of the Montana landscape. Add a soundtrack composed and recorded by local musicians, narration from Jack Gladstone and an interactive component that includes a post-show sock-hop, and this one-night performance promises a rare chance to disguise a little education with live entertainment. –Skylar Browning

Missoula Independent Page 31 February 9 – February 16, 2012


members/Free to members. missoulanonprofit.org. What do you give to someone on their 119th birthday? Find out at UM’s 119th Birthday Celebration. At noon, free cupcakes and sweet music are on tap in the UC Atrium. At 5:30 PM, Mayor Engen and a host of celebs celebrate in style in the UC Ballroom.

nightlife See them zippers fly at Sew Lounge, hosted by Selvidge Studio. Folks can mingle, mend and sew while using Selvidge’s sewing machines and sergers. Get assistance from the staff, too. 509 S. Higgins Ave. 6–8 PM. $10 per hour. Go ahead and call it a week, join Black Mountain Moan for tuneage at the Draught Works Brewery. 915 Toole Ave. 6–8 PM. Sip on this: Laramie, Wyo., artist Doug Russell brings his exhibition Confluences to the MAM for Artini: We Too Like To Make Drawings, a night of doodling, sketching and pencil play with Cigarette Girls acting as models and fire from Bellatrix.

Food by James Bar. MAM. 135 N. Pattee. 6–9 PM, with an artist’s talk at 7 PM. Free. (See Scope in this issue.) Bring your miscellany of talents down the ‘Root for the The Roxy Open Mic Night. Anything goes: comedy, juggling, music and prescient children rapping about the streets. Hamilton. 120 N. 2nd. 7 PM. $5. Richard Wheeler reads from and signs copies of The Richest Hill on Earth down at Fact & Fiction. Pretty sure he wrote it, too. 220 N. Higgins Ave. 7 PM. Free. The Peace and Justice Film Series hosts Bajo Juarez: The City Devouring Its Daughters, a film about the denigration of women in the border town of Juárez, Mexico. Guest speakers include Norma Andrade, Micheel Salas Ramirez and David Peña. UC Theater. 7 PM. Admission by donation. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in

the Holiday Inn-Downtown. 7–10 PM. Fans of grammar, logic and rhetoric, grab your liberal arts degrees and head down to the Central Bar and Grill’s Trivia Night, hosted by local gallant and possible Swede Thomas Helgerson. 143 W. Broadway. 8 PM. Free. David Boone plays Missoula’s newest-ish club, Pulse (inside the Press Box). 8–10 PM. Free. Grab ye olde acoustic and learn “Sundown” before you roll into Sean Kelly’s Open Mic night. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursdays to sign-up. 8:30 PM–Midnight. Bow down to the Row during Dre Day at the Dead Hipster Dance Party, where people will be getting their G-Funk on and buying 40-ouncers at the bar. The Badlander. 208 Ryman St. $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM–midnight. What’s better than a sexy cow? An Ugly Pony, that’s what. Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand. 9 PM. Free. Make the other generals cream their bloomers after you tell them you spent an evening with Mad Anthony (the band, not the war hero). Union Club. 9 PM. Free. The Best Westerns are only getting bester during week three of their VFW residency. This week they are joined by The Magpies, Riley Wave, Ancient Forest and Pubic Enema. 245 W. Main. 9 PM. Free. Scrape off the old stink stick and bugaloo shrimp down to The Top Hat for the Emmit Nershi Band, with Head for the Hills. 10 PM. $18/$16 adv., $5 surcharge for those aged 18-20. Let’s do our taxes. Seriously, why wait? In the meantime, hook me up with the goods by sending your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Feb. 10 to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to The Calemandar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”

Missoula Independent Page 32 February 9 – February 16, 2012


MOUNTAIN HIGH U nless you’ve been hangin’ and bangin’ up in the backcountry white room (like me), you’re probably already thinking about fishing. The rivers are generally free of ice and inviting, despite the cold air. Some of you have even been out there, patiently casting into the ice-cold waters, just to keep the wrist loose and the eyes sharp and to get out-of-doors. Or maybe you’ve been doing a bit of ice fishing to take the edge off. But if that isn’t doing it for you, COSTA presents the 2012 Fly Fishing Film Tour at the Wilma Theatre. The tour boasts 11—count ’em, 11—short films about the flyfishing lifestyle. Newbie fisher Robert Thompson, a third-year fly-fisherman, has created ReVerb: A Punk Rock Love Story about his band Pegboy and how

they’ve used fishing to overcome one another and the road to become happier people. The film Hatch seeks out the world’s largest insect hatches and finds a treasure trove of secret fly-fishing. No surprise, the Treasure State shows up in Missouri Trout, the story of dry fly-fishing on the Upper Missouri River near Craig that focuses on the people who give all their energy to the fishing lifestyle. If you can’t contain your desire to see a world of fishing in mere hours, head to thef3t.com for film trailers and fish teasers. The 2012 Fly Fishing Film Tours hooks up with the Wilma Theatre on Fri., Feb. 10, at 7 PM. Tickets are $15 or $12 adv. at Grizzly Hackle, Missoulian Angler, The Kingfisher and Blackfoot River Outfitters.

Photo by Chad Harder

Dudes, come get your climb on during Freestone Climbing’s Dude’s Night. 935 Toole Ave. 5–10 PM. $6.50/$5 students.

Wolverines are coming to the Open Book Club in Seeley Lake via the works of Doug Chadwick, including a screening of the film Wolverine: Chasing the Phantom at 5:30 PM and a reading by Chadwick from The Wolverine Way at 7 PM. Grizzly Claw Trading Co. Free.

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 10

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 12

Hey little archers and aspiring archers, Bowhunter Certification Courses will be held Sat., Jan. 23 and Sat., Feb. 11, from 8:30 AM–5:30 PM. The field course for both will be Sun., Feb. 12, from 1–4 PM. 3201 Spurgin Rd. Register by following the education links at fwp.mt.gov.

Air it out with Montana Naturist Organization for the Mid-Winter Soak and Swim, held at Missoula area hot springs. Celebrate the season and nude soaks with friends by contacting montananaturist.org fro more info.

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 9

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 11 The Girls Way is taking a Snowshoeing Day Trip up Lolo Pass way and you kids and adults are invited. Equipment and transpo provided. 8:30–3 PM or so. $10 suggested donation. Call 830-3018 for more info. This week’s Winter Wilderness Walk is more walk than wilderness so grab your stuffy Uncle Ed and that layabout cousin of your’n and head to the Family Snowshoe in the Rattlesnake, a short two to three mile hike. Meet at the main parking lot at 9 AM. RSVP by e-mailing fay.lizzy@gnail.com. Ladies, you’ve got to win this one for Mary Slaney. Run Wild Missoula hosts the Catch ‘Em If You Can 5K, where ladies get a three-minute head start on the boys in a race down the Riverfront trail. 9:30 AM. $15. runwildmissoula.org. The Super Bowl is over, so spend some quality time with the fam at the Missoula Children and Nature Network’s Family Cross-Country Ski Outing up Pattee Canyon way, with instruction and gear provided by Missoula Outdoor Learning Adventures. Pre-register by calling Ellie at 410-0236. Missoula Parks and Rec. wants you to discover the treasure trove of fun that is Geocaching at Lubrecht Experiemental Forest. Learn how to operate a GPS and discover what lurks beneath the peat. 10–4 PM. Register Currents Aquatic Center or call 721-PARK. $24. Get ready for the best two-word combo you’ll read all week: subnivean collage. That’s what happens at the Kid’s Snow Stomper Program Under the Snow Blanket, which teaches youngsters 4-to-7-years-old how those critters live in the cold. Lone Pine State Park. 11–12 PM. $3. Call 755-2706 for more info. Join a ranger from Lone Pine State Park in Kalispell for a Winter Discovery Snow Shoe Hike. BYOSS or rent a set from the park for $5. Familes with kids 10 and up welcome. 1–2 PM. Call Mary Beth at 755-2706 ext. 2.

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Hey there ‘Rooters, it’s Hunter Education time. Signup online by the Sun., Feb. 12 and come to the orientation on Mon., Feb. 13 at 7 PM. Assembly of God Church. 601 W. Main. fwp.mt.gov (follow links to Education). At Slacker Mondays, from 6 PM until close, slackline fans can come to Freestone Climbing Center at 935 Toole Ave. to test their balance. $13/$10 for students. Visit freestoneclimbing.com. Photographer Dick Walker talks warblers during his presentation for the Flathead Audubon Society Magee Marsh–Warbler Mecca and Migrant Trap, at the Summit. 205 Sunnyview Ln. 7 PM. Free. Here about all the pretty birds that swing through the big old King Ranch during Brian Williams’ program Legal Migrants: The Birds of South Texas. Gallagher Business Building, Rm. L14. 7 PM. Free.

CONNECT

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 15 Hey Brenda, this ain’t L.A., so let’s join Missoula Parks and Rec. and learn how to use a map, compass and GPS unit, um-kay? Beginner Map and Compass Skills meets from 6–8 PM and costs $8. Stop by Currents Aquatic Center to register or call 721- PARK. Learn about the effects of the Mike Horse tailing dam rupture back in ‘75 when Ron Pierce of the FWP gives the MNHC’s Evening Lecture Aquatic Resource Damage and Restoration Needs in the Upper Blackfoot Mining Complex. 120 Hickory St. 7 PM. $4 suggested donation/ members free. Join hiking fanatic Jake Bramante as he recounts via photos and video the tale of his effort to hike all 734 miles of Glacier Park’s trails in one summer during his presentation Hike 734 in Glacier National Park. UM campus, Clapp Building, Rm. 131. 7:30–9:30 PM. Free. calendar@missoulanews.com

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Missoula Independent Page 33 February 9 – February 16, 2012


scope

Rising from the ruins Doug Russell’s layers of mylar and time by Ted McDermott

From February 16 through April 22, an exhibition called Confluences of 50 meticulous and loose drawings will sprawl across two upstairs galleries in the Missoula Art Museum. On a recent Wednesday, though, the works were still stored in a cluttered basement museum room, so I went there and assistant curator and preparator John Calsbeek unfurled elaborate, layered drawings that had been rolled up in poster tubes and spread them out on a padded table. He sifted through paper stacked in cardboard boxes and brought out delicate abstractions of monumental forms. He wore white gloves and pointed out decorative motifs that were borrowed from Islamic art. He showed me that the drawings were done on mylar, a semi-translucent material, and showed me how sheets of this material were layered atop one another. He showed me hidden daubs of paint and marks that indicated how the drawings are to be arranged. He showed me, in short, what seemed like blueprints for the lost civilization of someone else’s dreams. The dreamer of these works is Doug Russell, an artist and professor who lives and works in Laramie, Wyo., and travels regularly to Turkey. “I go to Turkey and I do a lot of drawing on site and make very careful studies,” he says. “And a lot of that stuff goes into my brain…I’m not really referring to anything specific when I’m doing the larger

drawings. I’m more or less pulling from memory. And in that way, maybe it’s similar to a jazz piece, where you have the set structure of the song but then you’re allowed to move inside of that.” This tension, between orderly structure and improvisatory composition, is evident in Russell’s drawings. At first glance, the pieces in his Ebb and Flow series call to mind M.C. Escher’s drawings of impossible buildings and stairwells—except, in Russell’s work, all of the laboriously constructed forms have been leveled by an earthquake and worn away over time. Over the course of 12 large, detailed renderings, Russell depicts modern and traditional Islamic buildings in various states of decomposition—partially erased, purposely smudged. They tilt or are turned upside-down. They seem to be built over each other, on top of each other. The canvases are often crowded and confusing, but their composition never appears arbitrary. Russell makes exacting, compressed and layered depictions that capture the chaos of historical change. “The obvious thing is, I layer the mylar in referencing the fact that there’s layers of history,” he says. “And again, when I’m traveling abroad and I see a street in Istanbul or a street in Rome where there’s a 2,000-year-old piece of architecture in one place and right next to it some more

Doug Russell’s Ebb and Flow series is part of the Wyoming artist’s exhibit opening Thur., Feb. 16, at the MAM.

Missoula Independent Page 34 February 9 – February 16, 2012

modern building, and then there might be something Byzantine underneath that, and there’s, like, a telephone or an internet line strung along the wall from one building to another, it’s obvious how nothing really leaves us. It all sort of stays around and gets reused and gets built upon and taken apart and built into something else. So, I think that’s just an obvious part of my process: a fascination with that layering and depth, really, of history.” The drawings in the other two series of work that will be on display at the MAM, Edifice and Empire, are quieter, sparer and more abstract than those of Ebb and Flow but they continue the project of documenting an imagined and ruined world. “Both the Empire and the Edifice drawings are literally abstract but they’re also more amorphous and relaxed,” Russell says. “If you want to think of it more as an impression of monumental large architecture, maybe it’s more of a feeling through the process of drawing of what I feel when I look at some great piece of architecture…They’re not meant to depict as much as to express a feeling.” Doug Russell’s Confluences opens at the MAM Thursday, Feb. 16, with an Artini reception from 6 to 9 PM, and an artist’s talk at 7 PM. arts@missoulanews.com


Scope Noise Soundcheck Film Movie Shorts

Ascetic Junkies This Cage Has No Bottom Timber Carnival Records

If you play her a song in C or D or E, Kali Giaritta will sing along. “But don’t,” she warns her listener, “play in a minor key, / ’Cause I won’t sing along. / I want to be happy. / I don’t want to be sad.” This is what she tells us, anyhow, on “(i will sing along)” from This Cage Has No Bottom, the latest album from the Portland quintet Ascetic Junkies, with whom she sings and plays keys and strums what sounds like a ukulele. Which is just to say, the Ascetic Junkies don’t mope around, showing off all of their allegedly authentic sadness like so many of their indie rock brethren. They play pop music and they’re cheerful and they don’t apologize for it. Their songs often start off slow and quiet and folky before bursting into the sound of a full

Places No More Wasted Days Self-released

On first listen, N o M o r e Wa s t e d Days sounds like an album ready-made for a TV drama: sensitive, soaring at moments, bass- and guitar-driven. This is pop rock from top to bottom, designed to draw mainstream listeners. Lead vocalist Tyler Glasgow sounds a bit like John Mayer and the tunes would be at home on the radio. Yet, while I usually say “pop” with a sneer, the

Tropical World Sad & Gross Tummy Rock Records

The new Tropical World album takes place in the future, possibly in an alternate dimension and definitely on a spaceship. The musicians may be time travelers—unclear. The setting of Sad & Gross is not so important as the understanding, right up front between band and listener, that these songs are going to be weird. The unifying elements are claves, lounge keyboards and a tendency toward bossa nova. Otherwise, each track is a concept unto itself, built around a single lyric or a particular transition that’s repeated until it becomes a mind-clearing mantra. “I’ve played all of these songs five thousand times before, in the future,” someone named Mikki intones

Cloud Nothings Attack on Memory Wichita Recordings

Young people sound best when they are despairing the future. Attack on Memory begins promisingly, with Dylan Baldi flatly—this adjective holds in both the musical and psychic senses—urging the listener to give up. The song is called “No Future/No Past,” and it segues nicely into “Wasted Days,” in which Baldi screams over and

band gleefully playing hard and singing along together—singing things like “Reno, your children are cooler than you.” As with bands such as The Head and the Heart, there’s some vague Americana influence lurking in the background of the Ascetic Junkies’ sound, but don’t worry: it’s been purged of the minor chords and the blues. Kali can be happy, and maybe so can you. (Ted McDermott) Ascetic Junkies plays the Palace Saturday, Feb. 11, at 9 PM with Casey Neill and the Norway Rats. $7. more I listened, the more I found myself enjoying Places’ sophomore effort. The seven-member band, which has ties to Missoula and Denver, delivers something many pop groups don’t: real musicality. The harmonies take risks that work. The lead guitar is particularly strong. “Walking on Water” is a hit-the-road, rollthe-windows-down, sing-along romp. The quiet “A Fine Line” showcases more nuanced vocals and musicianship. True, the lyrics aren’t particularly inspired, and the band occasionally sounds muddy, like on album opener “Honesty.” But at other moments, Places sound polished and powerful, with the poise of a band that’s been together far longer than their three years. (Melissa Mylchreest) Places plays a CD-release party Friday, Feb. 10, at The Top Hat with The Canopy and Sick Kids XOXO. 10 PM. $5. midway through. It’s a wink to the album’s sense of improvisation, of like-minded musicians developing songs as they record them. More than the space opera, this atmosphere of relaxed collaboration is the unifying concept of Sad & Gross. It’s what makes songs like “Shelby” so oddly touching, and it raises the album from goofy to charming. You can hear everything—individual musicians, even mistakes, as on a Moldy Peaches record. Like the best work of that band, Sad & Gross is a document of something likable and real. (Dan Brooks) over that he “thought [he] would be more than this.” The 20-year-old singer/songwriter seems well on his way to a healthy embitterment, but then we slam headlong into “Stay Useless,” which is like The Killers’ entry in a frat house battle of the bands. Suddenly, youthful nihilism just sounds innocent. I blame Steve Albini, the legendary producer and misanthrope responsible for Attack on Memory’s sneering mids and punishing bass sounds. He seems to have urged Baldi in a direction he absolutely should and maybe doesn’t want to go. Attack On Memory screams like punk rock, but it keeps settling into power pop. For Cloud Nothings, the transition from lo- to hifi is like when the lights come on at a party show. The band is still there; it’s just uncomfortably clear that everything has been happening in a suburban basement. (Dan Brooks)

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Missoula Independent Page 35 February 9 – February 16, 2012


Scope Noise Soundcheck Film Movie Shorts

Country roots How three Hanks found Aran Buzzas by Erika Fredrickson

Aran Buzzas seems like what you might expect of a honky-tonk musician: He wears a black, worn cowboy hat over his long hair and a plaid shirt with pearly buttons, plus a sturdy pair of boots. He plays covers that include “Cry, Cry, Cry” by Johnny Cash and “Swinging Doors” by Merle Haggard. And he’s written and performed originals with titles such as “Another Man’s Woman” and “Back For My Whiskey,” which are part of his frequent live performances around Missoula. Still, you’re not a true-blue country musician if you haven’t had some hard luck stories to back up your hard luck songs—and Buzzas does. It took a breakup for him to find his country voice, though in some ways it was the honky-tonk spirit that found him first. “The key event was my divorce, and that happened around Christmas, 2006,” he says. “In the midst of it, all Aran Buzzas’s song “There’s Always Something (In the Way)” comes out on Outlaw Radio Chicago’s compilation in March.

three of the Hank Williamses came to me, kind of at the same time. I heard Hank III at work and I actually thought it was a joke because, besides Willie Nelson, I’d never heard good country music growing up. A couple of months later, I heard Hank Sr. and everything changed. From there I began listening to the other Hanks and then Waylon and Johnny Cash. It was when I got 24 of Hank Williams’s Greatest Hits checked out from the library that it was just like, ‘This is it.’” Even before the three Hanks entered his life, Buzzas, who is 33, wasn’t new to music. He’d started playing guitar while a sophomore at Hellgate High School, mostly learning classic rock covers from The Doors to Bob Dylan and, with a little more technical experience, Cream. His high school band, Groundswell, was shaped by the grunge wave and, especially, The Red Hot Chili Peppers. “That was our big influence,” he says. “We played Blood Sugar Sex Magik and we were never good enough to pull it off, but we tried. We just did it because we loved it.” They performed at backyard parties, and their “senior splash,” during which they played a cover of “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida” that was longer than the recorded, 17-minute Iron Butterfly version. They accompanied the school choir for “Bohemian Rhapsody,” and they played the Western Montana Fair twice and Missoula’s first First Night New Year’s Eve. The more they played, the more serious Buzzas became about music. He started classes at the University of Montana as a music major and focused on playing folk tunes, following the classic coffeehouse singer-songwriter route. He wrote his first country song, “Biggest Fool,” a year after the divorce. It’s a heavy, lonesome dirge. “I

Missoula Independent Page 36 February 9 – February 16, 2012

was feeling horrible and I was thinking, ‘I’m going to feel like this forever, I’m never going to be right again,’” he says. “And so I wrote that song and it triggered me to start recording again. I went nuts with my four-tack. I put the bass lines on and electric guitar.” Buzzas’s former bandmate from Groundswell, Nate Stephenson, helped him put out a CD in 2008 called Just Bein’ Here. “It sounds homemade,” he says, “but I’m really proud of it. It was a great way to deal with a rough winter.” “Back For My Whiskey,” another country song he wrote during that time, sounds more jovial even though it, too, was inspired by the divorce. He doesn’t go into detail about the situation on record, but if you listen to the song you get the gist. It’s the story of a man going back to his house to get his whiskey from his ex-wife, with his best man to back him up. It begins with the line “Well, there’s no such thing as happy endings because nothing ever ends,” and features the chorus “She tried to rob me and take what’s mine. / And now she’s wasted so much of my time. / I didn’t want to see her face. / I knew it would be risky, / but I still went back...for my whiskey.” “I wasn’t even listening to country music when that happened,” says Photo by Michelle Gustafson event Buzzas. “When I was moving out of the house, everything got weird quickly, and it didn’t need to. There’s no avoiding pain in a situation like that, but sitting down to talk about it wasn’t going to happen. ‘She’s not getting my whiskey’ is what I was thinking at the time. When I left the house, I got into the truck with my best man and I was like, ‘Man, this would make a really good song.’” These days, Buzzas has been playing out quite a bit—despite a frustrating battle with tendinitis—including recently opening for out-of-town country and roots acts such as Molly Gene One-Whoaman Band and The Cheatin’ Hearts. Outlaw Radio Chicago, one of the cornerstone podcasts in the underground country roots movement, is about to release a compilation that, along with Shooter Jennings and other underground outlaw country artists such as Leroy Virgil, The Calamity Cubes, J.B. Beverley and Ten Foot Polecats, features Buzzas with his song “There’s Always Something (In the Way).” He also has a new album in the works that features Missoula all-stars Travis Yost, Caroline Keys, Gibson Hartwell and Sam Nasett, among others. Some songs will be darker than others, as is the way with country. But Buzzas has songs about traveling and pursuing dreams, and some funny ones—like “Cougar Bait.” “Also a true story,” he says, laughing. Aran Buzzas plays Saturday, Feb. 11, at The Roxy in Hamilton at 7 PM with Steel Toe Flos and PD Lear, $7, and later at The Palace in Missoula at 10 PM with The Ascetic Junkies and Casey Neill and the Norway Rats, $5. efredrickson@missoulanews.com


Scope Noise Soundcheck Film Movie Shorts

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Ice breaker

The Artist

Big Miracle balances politics with fun by Molly Laich

Look: I don’t know anything about your children or what they’re into. Sometimes they stare at me at the grocery store as if they know all my secrets, but our relationship ends there. But if I did have kids, I would be grateful for a sweet, non-boring film like Big Miracle to take them to. Man, woman or child, you would have to be some sort of monster to sit through a viewing of a film about whale rescue without being moved. Inspired by true events, the movie begins when a goofy but likeable news reporter, Adam Carlson (John Krasinski), is sent from Anchorage to Alaska’s most

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overly depressing or realistic about it. The film has a lot of fun setting the story in the late 1980s, as when Nathan, a young Eskimo (Ahmaogak Sweeney), gets a shipment of cassette tapes sent up from Anchorage (among them, Def Leppard’s Hysteria; for real, it holds up). There’s some ’80s hair in the beginning to fawn over, but once they’re all on the ice, they just look like bundled up, modern-day Montanans again. A lot of care is taken to present the characters with about as much depth as a family film has room for.

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northern point, by Barrow, for a month of fluffy humaninterest stories. He happens upon a family of whales trapped in the ice, and what follows is the media frenzy that ensues around the logistical, political and cultural challenges of freeing the whales. Drew Barrymore pulls double-duty as both the Greenpeace representative and Krasinski’s ex-girlfriend. You don’t need me to tell you that they make an adorable couple; it’s like they’re made out of snow-frosted gingerbread. From there, the scene is infiltrated with a career-climbing news reporter (Kristen Bell), a self-interested oil tycoon (Ted Danson) and opportunistic but lovable de-icing machine inventors (James Legros and Rob Riggle) all the way from Minnesota, eh? The film deals with the politics of the situation more deftly than I expected. It’s frank about each of the player’s objectives and motives. The Reagan administration is gearing for a Bush Senior presidency, and so has a vested interest in not coming off to the enamored public as whale killers. Dick Cheney (Bruce Altman) makes a few pointed appearances. (He’s credited as “Chief of Staff,” but make no mistake.) When the whales have their big moment, notice how Cheney almost, almost, almost smiles…but doesn’t. Animals have a way of being stubbornly bi-partisan, and it’s a nice escape from present-day reality to see powerful world players at their best. Big life lessons are delivered in simple, deliberate language that’s easy for young children to follow. It offers a gentle introduction to the inner workings of government without being

Barrymore, as the stubborn environmentalist, is passionate but myopic. The Republicans and money people are all about the bottom line, and yet. The Eskimos are hunters of whales, but kind-hearted and reverent. Even the Russians who come in to save the day with their big Soviet barge are sweet. It’s the little things that make a difference here. They shot in Alaska, and the whale heads bobbing to the surface aren’t CGI, but puppets. They look the realest, and it lets the humans react to them with warmth and surprise that doesn’t feel forced in front of a green screen. The movie works overall because it manages to create real tension. It’s not called Big Disappointment. You’ve gone to see an inspirational family film called Big Miracle, so you know it’s going to work out, but even so. I remember the news stories from 25 years ago, and I was still fretting! Be sure and stay through the end credits for the real-life news footage featuring people involved in the story. I thought the Greenpeace lady with a megaphone at the oil-contract bid meeting was a little cliché, but as it turns out, that part is very true. And whatever you do, don’t get all plucky detective about it and research what really happened to those whales. It all worked out and everybody got married, so just go home and feel great about humanity and the environment. Big Miracle continues at the Carmike 12. arts@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent Page 37 February 9 – February 16, 2012


Scope Noise Soundcheck Film Movie Shorts OPENING THIS WEEK JOURNEY 2: THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND A kid and his mom’s boyfriend search for grandpa on a topsy-turvy island where big things are small and vice versa. Opposites, people love ‘em. Starring Dwayne Johnson and Michael Caine. Carmike 12: 1:15 pm. 3D: 1:45, 4:15, 4:45, 6:45, 7:15, 9:15 and 9:45 pm. Village 6: 1:30 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. 3D: 4:15 and 7:15 pm, with shows at 9:45 pm on Fri. Pharaohplex: 7 and 9 pm, with matinees Sat. and Sun at 3 pm. Stadium 14: 2:35, 7:35 and 10 pm, with midnight shows Fri. and Sat. 1:30, 7 and 9 pm, Mon.Thu. Mountain: 2, 4, 7 and 9 pm.

their urges. Starring, Michael B. Jordan and Michael Kelly. Village 6: 4 and 7 pm, with matinees at 9:30 pm on Fri. and Sat. and 1 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Pharaohplex: 7 and 9 pm, with matinees Sat. and Sun at 3 pm. Stadium 14: 12:10, 2:20, 4:30, 7:10 and 9:50 pm, with midnight shows Fri. and Sat. 1:30, 4, 7 and 9:30 pm, Mon.-Thu. Entertainer: 4, 7 and 9 pm.

SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF SHADOWS Perhaps Mr. Holmes and Dr. Watson will match wits with Professor Moriarty once again. Indubitably. Starring Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law. Carmike 12: 1, 4, 7, and 9:50 pm.

THIS MEANS WAR Two CIA agents battle for Reese Witherspoon’s affections with gadgets galore. Will either try writing her a poem? Starring Chris Pine and Tom Hardy. Village 6: Tues., Feb. 14, 7 pm only.

TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY One last mission. Retired spy George Smiley returns to duty and looks to foil a Soviet Cold War plot, in this film based on John le Carré’s book. Starring Gary Oldman and Colin Firth. Wilma Theatre: 9 pm nightly, with 7 and 9:15 pm shows on Sun., Feb. 12 and Thu., Feb. 16.

THE VOW Hello V-Day! Rachel McAdams wakes up from a coma with severe memory loss and finds her hunky husband romancing her once again. Starring Channing Tatum. Carmike 12: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 and 9:30 pm. Pharaohplex: 7 and 9 pm, with matinees Sat. and Sun at 3 pm. Stadium 14: 12, 2:30, 5, 7:30 and 9:55 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. 1:35, 4:05, 7 and 9:20 pm, Mon.-Thu. Showboat: 4:15, 7 and 9 pm.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST 3D A pretty girl is held captive by a beast. Disney teaches young women how to choose a mate. We all win. Updated to 3D. Voices by Robby Benson and Paige O’Hara. Stadium 14: 12:15, 2:15 and 4:15 pm. Mon.-Thu.:1:05 and 4:05 pm. BIG MIRACLE A news reporter and his ex-lady try to rescue a family of gray whales trapped under ice. Let’s hope love is the buoy that saves us all. Starring, Drew Barrymore and John Krasinski. Carmike 12: 1:15, 4:30. 7:30 and 9:45 pm. Stadium 14: 1, 4, 7 and 9:30 pm, with midnight shows Fri. and Sat. CHRONICLE Three high school boys gain superpowers and have a surprising lack of control when it comes to

MAN ON A LEDGE A man is being talked off a ledge by police while a huge jewelry heist goes on nearby, someone’s getting fired. Starring Elizabeth Banks and Sam Worthington. Stadium 14: 1:25 and 6:35 pm, with midnight shows Fri. and Sat. 3:50 and 9:20 pm, Mon.-Thu.

RED TAILS The Tuskegee Airman are called to duty, so you Nazi punks best watch your six. Starring Terence Howard and Cuba Gooding Jr. (He’s back!) Stadium 14: 6:30 and 9:50 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. 6:50 and 9:35 pm, Mon.-Thu.

STAR WARS: EPISODE I 3D Two Jedi Knights uncover a galaxy-wide plot. This time in 3D. Starring Ewan McGregor and Natalie Portman. Carmike 12: 3D: 1, 4, 7, 9 and 10 pm. Big D: 1:30 and 4:30 pm. Village 6: 4 and 7 pm, with shows at 10 pm on Fri. and Sat. and 1 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Pharaohplex: 7 pm, with matinees at 3 pm on Sat. and Sun. Stadium 14: 1, 4, 7, and 9:35 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. 1:15, 4, 6:45 and 9:15 pm, Mon.-Thu.

THE ARTIST Will talking pictures end silent film star George Valentin’s career? Will he find love with a young dancer? It seems black-and-white to me. Starring Jean Dujardin and Bérénice Bejo. Wilma: 7 pm nightly, with 9 pm shows on Sun., Feb. 12 and Thu., Feb. 16. Stadium 14: 12:05, 2:30, 4:50, 7:05 and 9:30 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. 1:40, 4:10, 7:05 and 9:25, Mon.-Thu.

THE GREY Wolves hunt Liam Neeson in Alaska after his plane goes down. Wolves, you just messed up. Village 6: 4 and 7 pm, with shows at 10 pm on Fri. and Sat. and 1 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Stadium 14: 1:05, 4:05, 7:05 and 9:35 pm, with midnight

THE IRON LADY Meryl Streep guns for Oscar gold as Britain’s Iron Lady, Margaret Thatcher. Also starring Jim Broadbent and Richard E. Grant. Stadium 14: 1:10, 4:10, 7:10 and 9:40 pm, with midnight shows Fri. and Sat. 1:10, 4:10, 7:10 and 9:30 pm, Mon.-Thu.

ONE FOR THE MONEY A newly unemployed and divorced Katherine Heigl gets a job at her cousin’s bail bond business and finds herself hunting a cop from her romantic past. Will they or won’t they? Also starring Jason O’Mara. Carmike 12: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 and 9:45 pm. Stadium 14: 12:10, 2:20, 4:40, 7:10 and 9:40, with midnight shows Fri. and Sat. 1:15, 4:10, 6:45 and 9:20 pm, Mon.-Thu.

SAFE HOUSE A young CIA agent is tasked with looking after a fugitive in a safe house. Denzel shows up and stuff gets real. Starring Denzel Washington and Ryan Reynolds. Carmike 12: 2 and 5:30 pm. Big D: 7:30 and 10 pm. Village 6: 4:30 and 7:30 pm, with shows at 10 pm on Fri. and Sat. and 1:30 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Pharaohplex: 6:50 and 9:10 pm, with 3 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Stadium 14: 1:10, 4:10, 7:10 and 9:40 pm, with midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. Mountain: 2, 4:15, 6:50 and 9:15 pm.

NOW PLAYING

Carmike 12: 1 and 7 pm. Stadium 14: 3:50 and 9:10 pm, Fri.-Sun.

UNDERWORLD: AWAKENING Humans battle lycans and vampires. There will be no making out in trees during this one. Starring Kate Beckinsale and Michael Ealy. Carmike 12: 1, 4, 7 and 9:30 pm. Stadium 14: 3D: 12:05, 2:15, 4:35, 7:20 and 9:50, with midnight shows Fri. and Sat. 1:25. 4:15, 7:05 and 9:20 pm, Mon.-Thu. THE WOMAN IN BLACK In a time when men wore pocket watches, a young lawyer goes to a remote village and finds it terrorized by the vengeful ghost of a scorned woman. Starring Daniel Radcliffe. Carmike 12: Big D: 1:30, 4:45. 7:30 and 9:50 pm. Village 6: 4:30 and 7:30 pm, with 10 pm shows on Fri. and Sat, and matinees at 1:30 pm on Sat. and Sun. Pharaohplex: 7 and 9 pm, with matinees Sat. and Sun at 3 pm. Stadium 14: 12, 2:20, 4:40, 7, and 9:50 pm, with midKeeping you safe, all night long. Safe House opens Friday at the Carmike 12, Village 6, night shows on Fri. and Sat. 1:10, 4:20, 6:20 Pharaohplex, Stadium 14 and Mountain Cinema. and 9:40 pm, Mon.-Thu. Mountain: 2, 4:15, 7 and 9 pm. shows on Fri. and Sat. 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 and 9:45 THE DESCENDANTS George Clooney takes his daughters on a trip to pm, Mon.-Thu Mountain: 2, 4:30, 6:50 and 9:15 Capsule reviews by Jason McMackin. confront the man his wife has been cheating on pm. Showboat: 4, 6:50 and 9:15 pm. him with. Did I mention his wife is on life support? Moviegoers be warned! Show times are Carmike 12: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 and 9:50 pm. HUGO good as of Fri., Feb. 10. Show times and locaStadium 14: 1:05, 3:50, 6:55 and 9:35, with a Based on a children’s book no one in this office tions are subject to change or errors, despite has ever read, Hugo is the story of a Parisian midnight shows on Fri. and Sat. 1:05, 3:50, 6:55 orphan who lives in the walls of a train station our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and 9:35 pm, Mon.-Thu. during the 1930s. There is a mystery, too, and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead involving a robot and the boy’s father. Directed to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike EXTREMELY LOUD AND INCREDIBLY by Martin Scorcese and starring Ben Kingsley 12/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; CLOSE An unbelievably precocious child searches New and Sacha Baron Cohen. Carmike 12: 3D: 7:35. Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-F I LM; York City for the lock that matches the key left Stadium 14: 3D: 2:10 and 7 pm. Mon.-Thu.: S t a d i u m 1 4 i n K a l i s p e l l – 7 5 2 - 7 8 0 4 . Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan behind by his father who died on September 1:25 and 6:25 pm. and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130. 11th. Starring Tom Hanks and Sandra Bullock.

Missoula Independent Page 38 February 9 – February 16, 2012


Missoula Independent Page 39 February 9 – February 16, 2012


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Send it. Post it. classified@missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

PET OF THE WEEK Juniper Howdy! My name is Juniper and I am a 7 year old tortitiger. I am looking for a home with sunny windowsills, cushy beds, and lots of toys! I may be a senior but I still love to play. Like all good cats, I have an independent streak and can amuse myself while you are away. I love to snuggle under the blankets when it is time for a nap. Learn more about me and all adoptable animals at www.myhswm.org or call the Humane Society at (406)549-3934.


ADVICE GODDESS

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

By Amy Alkon

YMCA SWEETHEART DANCES Father-Daughter and Mother-Son Sweetheart Dances Dads and moms, bring your daughters and sons to this semiformal Sweetheart Dance. Daughters will receive a corsage and sons will receive a boutonniere at the door. Then dance the evening away to music by a live DJ. Formal pictures will be available for purchase. The dances are at the Y. Father-Daughter Dance - February 11, 6-9pm Mother-Son Dance - February 10, 6-9pm Fee: $30 in advance or $35 at the door

CODE GOO I’m a 33-year-old nurse in a five-month “friends with benefits” thing with a doctor co-worker. I am only 18 months out of an abusive 10-year relationship and wanted something fun and light. We get along well, but he rarely asks me ahead of time about getting together. I know he has a busy schedule, but this bothers me. He will do anything I ask (give me a ride, buy me a coffee if I work late) but doesn’t make kind gestures without being asked and doesn’t talk about his feelings or inquire about mine. My biggest issue is that he doesn’t compliment me. He once said his friend asked him how he got such a beautiful woman. But that’s it. The crazy thing is, he doesn’t even possess the qualities I want in a partner! Are my feelings here simply because he’s here? Can I learn to separate my feelings from what we really have? —Help, STAT I bet the doc doesn’t have patients show up at whim: “Hi, I was in the neighborhood, and I thought I’d have a physical.” It’s understandable that you’d like a little more formal scheduling to your casual sex, but remember that the guy reads Xrays and MRIs, not minds. When you need medical attention—or certain attention from a certain medical professional—you need to make that known, same as you would with a friend: Don’t be so available on a moment’s notice and also ask him to make advance plans. (Enough with this “Undress and put on a robe; the doctor will be with you shortly.”) Although the reasoning department of your brain keeps telling you that you should be friends with benefits, there you are jonesing for girlfriend benefits (flattery, little prezzies, and all). Anthropologist John Marshall Townsend explains that women evolved an emotional alarm system to read whether a man would be a good provider and to compel them to seek cues of commitment. Some women feel especially emotionally connected to their partner following orgasm, probably due to the release of the bonding hormone oxytocin, although the most conclusive research is on rats and prairie voles, and your ability to send email suggests you are neither. Regardless, Townsend’s surveys on casual sex showed that even when women fully intended to use and lose some himbo, many would wake up the next morning and find themselves longing for more from a guy they knew they wanted nothing more from. An apple a day…mainly keeps the creditors away from the apple growers. To keep this doctor away, let on that you’re

longing to use him as a boyfriend instead of just for sex. The thing is, this seems like exactly the right time for you to have exactly the wrong man. Having your sex life staffed up can help you avoid any temptation to get into a relationship, and you can instead figure out and fix whatever led you to be in a 10-year emotionally abusive thing. You may ultimately find casual sex too upsetting, but understanding where your feelings are coming from might help you intellectualize your way out of letting them rule you. Regularly reviewing all the ways this guy’s wrong for you is another way to put the meaningless back into meaningless sex. Remember, the only aisle you should be walking down with him is the one between your bed and your dresser. As that jewelry commercial (doesn’t) go: “Every kiss begins with K-Y.”

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LOST SPRINGER SPANIEL NEEDS MEDS!! Female White and Liver (brown) Female Springer Spaniel. Body is mostly white. Left ear is solid brown. Right ear is mostly white. Three brown spots on her back. Wearing a red collar. Shw went missing on Black Friday in Billings but could be anywhere. REWARD! 406-697-5959

FREE miscellaneous household goods and cloths, stuffed toys, baskets, decorations, etc. 7280889

TO GIVE AWAY

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ANNOUNCEMENTS TRUCK FOR RENT: All cleaning equipment and supplies included. $25/hour. Ole 3277859

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Ken's Barber Shop Children & Walk-ins Welcome Haircuts-$8.50 • Beard Trims-$4 8:30am - 5:30pm • Tuesday-Saturday 1114 Cedar St, Missoula, MT • 728-3957

WORLD WIDE WEB OF LIES Why do men OFFER (as in, announce unasked) that they aren’t dating anyone when that’s a lie? I’m a busy 30-something woman, meeting men almost exclusively online. A guy will often tell me right away (on the first date) that he isn’t seeing anyone. I stumble on the truth by accident on Facebook and what-have-you, lose trust for him, and stop seeing him. —Baffled The male brain is quick to note that eHarmony could be the ticket to eHarem. Even if a man’s looking for “that special somebody,” he may be dreaming of a stable of somebodies and feeling a little guilty about it. Or, maybe he’s dating a few somebodies but “there’s nobody” means “nobody of consequence.” Women evolved to seek commitment from men, and men co-evolved to understand that. Sometimes even an okay guy will engage in some duplicity to make the initial sale— waiting to see whether he’s into you before he ditches Helga, Svetlana, and Amber. You likewise might consider going on a few more dates to see more of a man’s character (or lack thereof) before making your final decision. Then again, maybe the best reason to ditch one of these liars is stupidity: a guy telling you he’s all lonesome, he hasn’t seen a women in years—just hours after his last date was streamed live on the Internet from some bar.

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Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail Adv i c e A m y @ a o l . c o m (www.advicegoddess.com).

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2 February 9 – February 16, 2012

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VALENTINE’S DAY

111 N. Higgins Ave. The Florence Bldg. (on the corner of Higgins and Front Street)

406.546.2044 Visit us on Facebook

EMPLOYMENT GENERAL AUTOMOBILE TRAVEL COUNSELOR. AAA. #2981179 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 BARTENDING $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training available. 1-800-965-6520 ext. 278 CUSTOMER SERVICE. Trucking company #9959405 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 GENERAL FARM/RANCH WORK AVAILABLE. Includes grain, hay, cattle, maintenance,

cleanup, fencing, mechanic work. Experience and riding ability preferred. Alcohol, drug, tobacco-free workplace. Resume, references & background check will be required. 406-366-5695 NATIONAL NUTRITION COMPANY seeking local reps for placement of Immune Health Newspapers in high traffic locations. Excellent income potential with residuals. Call today (800)808-5767 RECEPTIONIST. Medical facility. #9959429 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

PROFESSIONAL Program Specialist Housing Choice Voucher The Missoula Housing Authority seeks a high-energy, dedicated individual to perform duties of Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Program Specialist. Position will be full time. Position starts at $11.32 per hour. Duties include: Under general supervision, coordinates and implements the policies and procedures of the assisted housing programs administered by the Housing Authority. For required application package visit www.missoulahousing.org/about/employment or contact Adam Ragsdale, Missoula Housing Authority, 1235 34th Street, Missoula, MT 59801. (406) 549-4116 x128, aragsdale@missoulahousing.org. Applications reviewed every Friday until position is filled.

SKILLED LABOR

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HEALTH CAREERS REGISTERED NURSE. Home health care. #9959379 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

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OPPORTUNITIES

TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Msla, 1-800-545-4546

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MISC. GOODS 1st Interstate Pawn. 3110 South Reserve, is now open! Buying gold and silver. Buying, selling, and pawning items large and small. We pay more and sell for less. 406-721(PAWN)7296. FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation non-denominational 1-800-475-0876 STEEL BUILDINGS: 5 only 25x30, 30x46, 40x80, 50x104, 60x160. Must move now! Will sell for balance owed. Still crated/free delivery! 1-800411-5709, Ext.53

COMPUTERS Even Macs are computers! Need help with yours? CLARKE CONSULTING @ 5496214

Thift Stores 1136 W. Broadway 930 Kensington

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RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway 543-8287

FURNITURE Used Furniture & Appliances Affordable, Quality, and For a Good Cause! Donation Warehouse, 1804 North Ave West Most couches under $100, appliances under $200 240-4042 or donationwarehouse.net

MUSIC Shop Online Did you know you can shop online at our website www.montanamusic.com? Check it out. Missoula’s #1 Music Store. MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds entrance.

1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 549-0013. www.montanamusic.com Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 7210190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

PETS & ANIMALS CATS: #0624 Black, Am Short Hair, NM, 4 yr; #1230 White/Grey, Tabby, ALH, SF, 9yrs; #1330 Black/white, ASH, SF; #1551 Dilute Torti, DMH, SF; #1553 Black, Bombay X, SF; #1604 Orange/white, M, DSH, 1 1/2yrs; #1621 Dilute Torti, SF, BSH, 8 yrs; #1623 Orange Tabby, DSH, SF, 2yr; #1676 Orange Tabby, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #1678 Tan Tabby, DMH, SF, 1yr; #1753 Blk/tan, Maine Coon X,

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montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3 February 9 – February 16, 2012


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Marriage must be a relation either of sympathy or conquest,” said author George Eliot. I believe the same is true even about intimate bonds that have not been legally consecrated. Each tends to either be a collaboration of equals who are striving for common goals or else a power struggle in which one party seeks to dominate the other. Which of those two models has characterized your romantic history, Aries? Now is an excellent time to begin working to ensure that the partnership model will predominate for the rest of your long life. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “Love loves to love love,” wrote James Joyce in his 1922 novel Ulysses. “Nurse loves the new chemist. Constable 14A loves Mary Kelly. Jumbo, the elephant, loves Alice, the elephant. Old Mr Verschole with the ear trumpet loves old Mrs Verschoyle with the turnedin eye. The man in the brown macintosh loves a lady who is dead. His Majesty the King loves Her Majesty the Queen.” What Joyce said 90 years ago is still true: The world is a churning, burning uproar of yearning. The droning moan of “I want you, I need you” never dies down. Give yourself to that cosmic current without apology this Valentine season, Taurus. Celebrate your voracious ache for love. Honor your urge to merge with reverence and awe for its raw splendor. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I’ve ghostwritten a personal ad for you to give to your Valentine or potential Valentine: “I’m looking for a free yet disciplined spirit I can roll down hills with on sunny days and solve thorny puzzles with when the skies are cloudy. Can you see the absurd in the serious and the serious in the absurd? Are you a curious chameleon always working to sharpen your communication skills? Might you be attracted to a sweet-talking wise-ass who’s evolving into a holy goofball? Emotional baggage is expected, of course, but please make sure yours is organized and well-packed. Let’s create the most unpredictably intriguing versions of beauty and truth that anyone ever imagined.”

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): On average, an adult on planet Earth has sex 103 times a year. But I’m guessing that in the immediate future, Cancerians everywhere may be motivated to exceed that rate by a large margin. The astrological omens suggest that your tribe’s levels of sensual desire may reach astronomical heights. Do you know anyone you’re attracted to who might be willing help you out as you follow your bliss? If not, be your own Valentine. One way or another, it’s prime time to celebrate your relationship with eros.

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I’d love for you to be able to always give the best gifts you have to give without worrying about whether they will be received in the spirit with which you offer them. But that’s just not realistic. I would also be ecstatic if you never had to tone down your big, beautiful self out of fear that others would be jealous or intimidated. And yet that’s not a rational possibility, either. Having said that, though, I do want to note that now and then both of those pleasurable scenarios can prevail for extended lengths of time. And I believe you’re now in one of those grace periods.

c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In accordance with the astrological omens, here’s what I wish and predict for you in the near future: You will be a connoisseur of temptations. By that I mean you will have a knack for attracting and playing with allurements and enticements. More importantly, you’ll have a sixth sense about the distinction between good bait and bad bait—between provocative temptations that will serve your most fervent dreams and debilitating traps that will dissipate your integrity. And when you get a lock on the invigorating, ennobling kind, you will know just how to work with it so that it drives you wild with smart longing.

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Eliphas Levi was a 19th-century author and hermetic magician whose work has had a major influence on Western mystery schools. The great secret of magic, he said, is fourfold: “to KNOW what has to be done, to WILL what is required, to DARE what must be attempted, and to KEEP SILENT with discernment.” Your assignment, Libra, is to apply this approach to your love life. How can you create a relationship with love that will be a gift to the world and also make you smarter, kinder, and wilder? KNOW what magic you have to do. WILL yourself to do it. DARE to be ingenious and inspired. And don’t tell anyone what you’re doing until you achieve your goal.

MARKETPLACE SF, 2yrs; #1786 Blk Tabby, Maine Coon , SF, 1 1/2yrs; #1809 Calico, Siamese X, SF, 8 months; #1818 Black/white, Siamese X, SF, 2yrs; #1833 Black, DSH, SF, 5yrs; #1840 Orange/white, DMH, NM, 9 weeks; #1857 DMH, SF, 4yrs; #1886 Black, DSH, NM, 6mo; #1948 Grey, DSH, SF, 10ys; #1949 Black, DMH, SF, 1yr; #2061 White/red, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #2078 Calico, ASH, SF, 9yrs; #2098 Black, ASH, NM, 4yrs; #2125 Dilute Calico, DSH,

SF, 4yrs; #2133 Grey/white/Ash, Persian X, SF, 2yrs; #2143 Dilute Calico, DSH, SF, 2yrs; #2145 Orange/white, Maine Coon X, NM, 7yrs; #2147 Grey, Maine Coon, NM, 2yrs; #2168 Black, DMH, SF, 6yrs; #2171 Black Torti, DSH, SF, 1yr; #2182 Blk/white, ASH, NM, 7yrs; #2185 Torti, ASH, SF, 2.5yrs; #2186 Blk/Silver, Sokoe Forest X, SF, 2yrs; #2195 Grey/creme, Maine Coon X, SF, 4yrs; #2200 Grey Tabby, ASH, NM, 2yrs; #2261 Blk/White Tux,

Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist Susan Clarion RNC CA MATS 552-7919

LINDA BLAIR is offering computerized homeopathy and testing via the BodyScan 2010 for you and your pets, as well as colonics. 28 years in holistic medicine. 406-471-9035

Energy Balancing and Acupressure Meridians. Hand and foot reflexology. 493-6824 or 3994363

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ESCAPE

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): After analyzing the astro data for this Valentine season, I realized that you could really benefit from being less sober, solemn, and serious about your intimate relationships. That’s why I decided to collect some one-liners for you to use as you loosen up your approach to togetherness. Please consider delivering them to anyone you’d like to be closer to. 1. “Let’s go maniacally obsess about our lives in a soothing environment.” 2. “We’ll be best friends forever because you already know too much about me.” 3. “It would be great if you would schedule your social events around my mood swings.” 4. “I’m sorry I drunk-dialed you before realizing you were already in bed with me.” 5. “I wanna do boring things with you.” (All the one-liners come from Someecards.com.)

f

MARSHA KIRCHNER 406-728-8458

mkirchner@centric.net

Carpal Tunnel?

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Ancient Egyptians thought that drinking bear grease could stimulate ardor, while the Greeks believed that eating sparrow brains would do the trick. When potatoes first appeared in Spain in 1534, imported from the New World, they were used in love potions and worth more than $1,000 a pound. The Asian rhinoceros was hunted nearly to extinction because its horn was thought to have aphrodisiac properties. Just in time for Valentine season, I’d like to suggest that you call on a very different kind of romantic stimulant that costs nothing and doesn’t endanger any species: being a good listener.

Try Acupuncture 728-2325

h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Maybe there is a soulmate for you in this world. Maybe there isn’t. But you can count on this: If that person is out there, you will never bond with him or her by clinging to a set of specific expectations about how it should happen. He or she will not possess all the qualities you wish for and will not always treat you exactly as you want to be. I’m sure you already know this deep down, Aquarius, but hearing it from an objective observer like me might help liberate you further from the oppressive fantasy of romantic perfection. That way you can better recognize and celebrate the real thing.

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “We are all a little weird and life’s a little weird, and when we find someone whose weirdness is compatible with ours, we join up with them and fall in mutual weirdness and call it love.” So proclaimed Dr. Seuss. I think this is an excellent meditation for you during this season of love. You need more permission to share your idiosyncrasies and eccentricities, and you need more freedom to ally yourself with people whose idiosyncrasies and eccentricities you’re compatible with— and on behalf of the cosmos, I’m hereby giving you that permission. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

DOGS: #2022 Blk/Brown, Collie X, SF, 2.5yrs; #2121 Blk/brown, Aussie X, NM, 10yrs; #2214 White/tan, Lab/Pit X, SF, 1.5yrs; #2222 Blk/tan, Rott/Shep, NM, 7yrs; #2239 Blk/brown, Doberman X, NM, 4mo; #2245

Blk/white, Husky X, NM, 2yrs; #2254 Brown/grey, Heeler X, SF, 6mo; #2255 Red/creme, Heeler X, NM, 9mo; #2260 Brown/white, St Bernard X, SF, 8yrs; #2262 Gold, Golen Retriever, SF, 2yrs; #2263 Choc, Lab, SF, 2yrs; #2271 Blk/tan, Sharpei/Jack Russell X, NM, 8yrs.For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT

e

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “The world is an oyster, but you don’t crack it open on a mattress,” said a character in Arthur Miller play. He was referring to the idea that if you’re obsessed with sex and romance, your level of worldly accomplishment may be rather low. It jibes with what a friend in my youth told me when he noticed how much of my energy was engaged in pursuing desirable females: “They don’t build statues in parks for guys who chase women.” I realize you may not be wildly receptive to ruminating on these matters during the Valentine season, Sagittarius. However, the omens suggest I advise you to do just that. It’s a good time to fine-tune the balance between your life-long career goals and your quest for love.

ASH, SF, 1yr.For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

Msla Affiliate.

Acupuncture & Herbal Care

Since 1992

WEEKLY SUPPORT GROUPS

Family & Friends: Tues. 6:30 p.m.,Thurs. 10:00 a.m. Providence.Ctr., 902 N. Orange St., Rm. 109 Recovering?: Call 552-5494 for mtg. info

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4 February 9 – February 16, 2012

National Alliance on Mental Illness, Missoula Affiliate. WEEKLY SUPPORT GROUPS Family & Friends: Tues. 6:30 p.m.,Thurs. 10:00 a.m. Providence.Ctr., 902 N. Orange St., Rm. 109. Recovering? Call 552-5494 for meeting information.

perienced in other lifetimes. It helps you understand your strengths, talents, fears and relationships. 406-961-4449. Serving Western Montana. Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 241-3405

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CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, until 3:00 p.m., on Tuesday, February 28, 2012, and will then be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for construction of the following: City of Missoula Project 09-005 Safe Routes to Schools Improvements The project consists of curb ramp and crosswalk related improvements at various locations adjacent to schools in the City of Missoula, Montana This project is funded in part with funding from the MDT CTEP Program and is subject to all applicable Federal/State regulations, as indicated within the specifications. Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project Manual addressed to the City Clerk, City of Missoula, enclosed in sealed envelopes plainly marked on the outside “Proposal for City of Missoula Project 09-005 Safe Routes to Schools improvements” The envelopes shall also be marked with the Bidder’s Name, Address and Montana Contractor’s Registration Number, if available. Proposals must be accompanied by cash, cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of the City of Missoula against liability. A complete set of the Contract Documents and Project Manual will be furnished the Contractors making application therefore from the Office of the City Engineer, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana, upon payment of $50.00 by company check, cashier’s check, or bank money order (cash can not be accepted). Full amount of payment will be refunded upon return of the plans and specifications in good condition within ten (10) days after bid opening. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1-406-444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to executing the contract. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula Business Licensing requirements. All iron or steel materials to be permanently incorporated into the Project shall be produced in the United States, and certified as indicated within the specifications. There will be a non-mandatory pre-bid conference at the Mayor’s Conference Room, Missoula City Hall, 435 Ryman St., Missoula, MT. at 11:00 a.m. on Thursday, February 16, 2012. Interested contractors are encouraged to attend. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their race, ancestry, color, handicap, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital status, creed, ex-offender status, physical condition, political belief, public assistance status or sexual preference except where these criteria are reasonable bona fide occupational qualifications. The City of Missoula reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids, and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to the bid opening at 3:00 p.m. on Tuesday, February 28, 2012. The City of Missoula provides accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the City. In the case of documents, recordings or verbal

presentations, alternative accessible formats will be provided. To request accommodation, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (406)552-6080. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the city’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the City Clerk Office, Missoula City Hall, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT 59802 until 2:00 P.M. Tuesday, February 14, 2012, and will be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room, City Hall at that time. The City of Missoula will be offering for sale the following surplus equipment: 1990 Mack CF Custom Pumper Bidders shall bid by returning required bid forms to the City Clerk’s Office, City of Missoula, enclosed in a sealed envelope marked plainly on the outside, Bid for Fire Department Surplus Type 1, Opening 2:00 PM, February 14, 2012. Bidders may obtain further information and specifications from the City Fire Department (406) 552-6210. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT, 59802 until 1:00 p.m., on Tuesday, February 21, 2012. The bids will then be opened and publicly read at the: Missoula Redevelopment Agency, Hal Fraser Conference Room, 140 W. Pine Street, Missoula, Montana for the furnishing of all labor, equipment, and materials for construction of the following: MRA 2012 Street Tree Project – URD II & III This project consists of installing 14 street trees on the 1500 & 1600 block of Montana Street in URD II and 6 street trees on the 3100 block of Cark Street, and 32 street trees along Brooks Street between Mount Ave and Paxson St. in URD III. Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project Manual addressed to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT, 59802, enclosed in sealed envelopes plainly marked on the outside “Proposal for MRA 2012 Street Tree Project - URD II & III”. The envelopes shall also be marked with the Bidder’s Name, Address and Montana Contractor’s Registration Number. Proposals must be accompanied by cash, cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of the Missoula Redevelopment Agency against liability. A complete set of the Project Manual and Contract Documents may be furnished or reviewed at the office of the Missoula Redevelopment Agency, 140 West Pine St, Missoula, Montana (406-552-6160), In addition, the Project Manual and Contract Documents may also be examined at the Missoula Plans Exchange, 201 N. Russell, Missoula, Montana. Questions regarding the Project Manual and Contract Documents shall be directed to Tod Gass, Project Manager, Missoula Redevelopment Agency, 140 W. Pine St, Missoula, MT 59802 (406) 552-6159 tgass@ci.missoula.mt.us. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1-406-444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula Business Licensing requirements. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discrimi-

nated on the basis of race, ancestry, color, physical or mental disability, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital or familial status, creed, ex-offender status, physical condition, political belief, public assistance status or sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, except where these criteria are reasonable bona fide occupational qualifications The Missoula Redevelopment Agency reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids, and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials as best meets the Agency’s requirements. Any requests for information or objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the Missoula Redevelopment Agency prior to 12:00 p.m. on February 16, 2012. The City of Missoula provides accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the City. In the case of documents, recordings or verbal presentations, alternative accessible formats will be provided. To request accommodation, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (406)552-6080. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the city’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, until 3:00 p.m., on Tuesday, February 28, 2012, and will then be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for construction of the following: City of Missoula Project 10-019 Lolo Street – Bridge to Duncan Dr. - Curb and Sidewalk Improvements This project consists of removing and replacing approximately 6,000 square feet of city sidewalk, 2,300 lineal feet of new curb, sewer service stubs, and associated improvements. This project is funded in part with funding from the MDT CTEP Program and is subject to all applicable Federal/State regulations, as indicated within the specifications. Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project Manual addressed to the City Clerk, City of Missoula, enclosed in sealed envelopes plainly marked on the outside “Proposal for City of Missoula Project 10-019 Lolo Street – Bridge to Duncan curb and sidewalk improvements” The envelopes shall also be marked with the Bidder’s Name, Address and Montana Contractor’s Registration Number, if available. Proposals must be accompanied by cash, cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of the City of Missoula against liability. A complete set of the Contract Documents and Project Manual will be furnished the Contractors making application therefore from the Office of the City Engineer, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana, upon payment of $50.00 by company check, cashier’s check, or bank money order (cash can not be accepted). Full amount of payment will be refunded upon return of the plans and specifications in good condition within ten (10) days after bid opening. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1-406-444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to executing the contract. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5 February 9 – February 16, 2012


PUBLIC NOTICES Business Licensing requirements. All iron or steel materials to be permanently incorporated into the Project shall be produced in the United States, and certified as indicated within the specifications. There will be a non-mandatory pre-bid conference at the Mayor’s Conference Room, Missoula City Hall, 435 Ryman St., Missoula, MT. at 11:00 a.m. on Thursday, February 16, 2012. Interested contractors are encouraged to attend. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their race, ancestry, color, handicap, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital status, creed, ex-offender status, physical condition, political belief, public assistance status or sexual preference except where these criteria are reasonable bona fide occupational qualifications. The City of Missoula reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids, and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to the bid opening at 3:00 p.m. on February 28, 2012. The City of Missoula provides accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the City. In the case of documents, recordings or verbal presentations, alternative accessible formats will be provided. To request accommodation, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (406)552-6080. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the city’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the City Clerk Office, Missoula City Hall, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT 59802 until 3:00 P.M. Tuesday, February 21, 2012, and will be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room, City Hall at that time. As soon thereafter as is possible, a contract will be made for furnishing the City of Missoula Fire Department with the following: Two (2) Compressed Air Foam Pumping Units Bidders shall bid by returning required bid forms and completed apparatus specifications to the City Clerk’s Office, City of Missoula, enclosed in a sealed envelope marked plainly on the outside, Bid for Fire Department CAFS Units, Opening 3:00 PM, February 21, 2012. Each bidder shall submit a certified check, bid bond, cashier’s check, bank money order or bank draft payable to the City of Missoula. This should be drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana or by any banking corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Montana for an amount which shall not be less than (10%) of the bid, as a good faith deposit for each bid. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal forms. No bid will be considered which includes Federal excise tax, since the city is exempt from them and will furnish to the successful bidder certificates of exemption. The City of Missoula Fire Department reserves the right to determine the significance of all exceptions to bid specifications. The City of Missoula Fire Department reserves the right to reject any and all bids and if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. The City of Missoula Fire Department reserves the right to waive any technicality in the bidding which is not of a substantial nature. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to bid opening. Bidders may obtain further information and specifications from the City Fire Department (406) 552-6210. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, City Clerk MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PROPOSED MOTOR VEHICLE WRECKING FACILITY 9575 FUTURITY DRIVE, MISSOULA, MONTANA Notice is hereby given that the Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a public hearing on the question of whether to support or oppose the application of Pacific Steel & Recycling (Mason Mikkola) for a motor vehicle wrecking facility license at 9575 Futurity Drive, off of West Broadway near the

Wye in Missoula, Montana. This facility is proposed for Section 28, Township 14 North, Range 20 West, two tracts: Tract A is PLAT A6-1, PARCEL 00A, TR A COS 4196; and Tract B is PLAT A6, PARCEL 00B, TR B COS 4196. Both tracts combined are approximately 20 acres in size. Copies of the application are available for review at the Missoula City-County Health Department, 301 West Alder, Missoula, MT and online at www.co.missoula.mt.us/EnvHealth/ The Commissioners will conduct the hearing at their regular Public Meeting on Wednesday, February 22, 2012, at 1:30 p.m., in Room 201 of the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana. Any person wishing to be heard on the matter may submit written or other materials to the Commissioners and/or speak at the hearing. Comments may also be submitted anytime prior to the hearing by phone, mail, fax, e-mail or personal delivery to the Commissioners at their offices in the Missoula County Administration Building, 199 West Pine, Missoula, MT 59802; Fax: (406) 721-4043; Phone: (406) 258-4877; E-Mail: bcc@co.missoula.mt.us DATED THIS 6TH DAY OF FEBRUARY, 2012 BY ORDER OF THE MISSOULA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING THE MISSOULA CITY HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMMISSION will be conducting a public hearing at 7:00 p.m., THURSDAY March 1, 2012, Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine, Missoula, MT, on the following item: 1 The Office of Planning and Grants has received a request from Bechtle Architects, representing the Western Montana Mental Health Center for an Historic Preservation Permit for alterations to the historic Fort Missoula Post Hospital Building. The property is zoned OP3 and is legally described as: Tract 2, Certificate of Survey No. 5112 located in the southwest one-quarter (SW1/4) of Section 31, Township 13 North, Range 19 West, Principal Meridian Montana, Missoula County, Montana; containing 3.32 acres (Map). The request is for the following: Preservation and rehabilitation of the exterior and interior of the existing Fort Missoula Post Hospital, addition of stair tower and elevator for egress and accessibility, and 4,644 square foot addition connected to northwest side of existing building, as detailed in a complete application on file with the Office of Planning and Grants The goal of the Recovery Center @ Fort Missoula (RCFM) is to convert and expand the existing Old Post Hospital building at Fort Missoula from the current office use to an inpatient recovery center. RCFM is designed to meet the needs of adults suffering from chemical dependency and co-occurring psychiatric disorders. If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling the Missoula Office of Planning & Grants at 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. For additional information regarding the Historic Preservation Permit request you may contact Philip Maechling at the 258-4706 or email pmaechli@co.missoula.mt.us. MISSOULA COUNTY SHERIFF’S SALE COMMUNITY BANK-MISSOULA, INC., a Montana corporation, Plaintiff, vs. BRYLA CORPORATION, a Montana corporation, TOBY M. HANSEN and KELI L. HANSEN, MARY TAYLOR, DAVID O. ROBERTS, POST BUCKLEY SCHUH and JERNIGAN INC., MONTANA FARMERS UNION INSURANCE AGENCY, COLLECTION BUREAU SERVICES, O’KEEFE DRILLING COMPANY, INC., JACI INVESTMENTS INC., U.S. INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, Defendants. To Be Sold at Sheriff’s Sale: TERMS: CASH, or its equivalent; NO personal checks On the 15th day of February A.D., 2012, at Ten o’clock A.M., at the front door of the County Court House, in the City of Missoula, County of Missoula, State of Montana, that certain real property situate in said Missoula County, and particularly described as follows, to-wit: The NE 1/4 SW 1/4 of Section 12, Township 11 North, Range 16 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. EXCEPTING THEREFROM a tract of land conveyed to Northern Pacific Railway Co., in Book “P” of Miscellaneous at Page 8. EXCEPTING THEREFROM a tract of land conveyed to M.R. Wentz in Book “P” of

Miscellaneous at Page 14. EXCEPTING THEREFROM a tract of land conveyed to the state of Montana in Book 167 of Deeds at Page 316 and Book 17 of Micro Records at Page 974. The Real Property or its address is commonly known as Section 12, Township 11 North, Clinton, MT 59825. Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining. Dated this 26th day of January A.D., 2012. /s/ CARL C. IBSEN Sheriff of Missoula County, Montana By /s/ Patrick A. Turner, Deputy MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Judge Ed Mclean Cause No. DV-11-928 NOTICE OF HEARING In Re the Name Change of Shelby Erickson NOTICE is hereby given that the Petitioner, Crystal Baird, has filed a petition with this Court requesting to change the name of a minor child from Shelby Erickson to Shelby Lorraine Erickson. NOW, therefore, notice is given to all persons interested in the matter that a hearing on the petition will be held at the Courthouse in Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, on Wednesday February 29, 2012 at 1:15 p.m., in the above-named Court, at which time objections to said Petition will be heard. DATED this 19th day of January, 2012. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Ed McLean Probate No. DP-12-9 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF BONNIE LOU HEHN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the Personal Representative, Steve Richard Smith, return receipt requested, at Tipp & Buley, P.C., PO Box 3778, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 17th day of January, 2012. /s/ Elver Hehn, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Probate No. DP-12-8 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF FREDERICK G. HEIMBERGER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed Co-Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Sheila Bonnand and Barbara Superneau, Co-Personal Representatives, by certified mail, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane PC, PO Box 4747, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 13th day of January, 2012. /s/ Sheila Bonnand, Co-Personal Representative /s/ Barbara Superneau, CoPersonal Representative. WORDEN THANE PC, Attorneys for Personal Representative /s/ Patrick Dougherty MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP-12-10 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF LAVONA E. SCHREIBER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Penny L. Bowman, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 4110 Weeping Willow Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803, or filed with the Clerk of the above-named Court. DATED this 17th day of January, 2012. /s/ Penny L. Bowman, Personal Representative. GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC /s/ Nancy P. Gibson, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-12-16 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF WILDA M. CULP, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to James R. Culp, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested,in care of Thiel Law Office, PLLC, 315 West Pine, PO Box 8125, Missoula, Montana 59807 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 1st day of February, 2012. THIEL LAW OFFICE PLLC Attorney for Personal Representative /s/ Matthew B. Thiel MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY, Cause No. DV-12-74 Dept. No 2. Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Claudine Noel Wiley Frohmader, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Claudine Noel Wiley Frohmader to Claudine Noel Cellier. The hearing will be on March 6, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: January 27, 2012. /s/ Robert L. Deschamps III, District Court Judge

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Montana Fourth Judicial District Court, Missoula County Case No. DV-09-1191 Judge ED McLEAN Dept. #1; MLIC ASSET HOLDINGS LLC, Plaintiff, vs. BITTERROOT TRAILS, LLC; MACLAY TIMBER LIMITED PARTNERSHIP; THOMAS MACLAY, also known as THOMAS BRUCE MACLAY, THOMAS B. MACLAY, TOM B. MACLAY, AND TOM MACLAY; H. BRUCE MACLAY, also known as BRUCE H. MACLAY, BRUCE MACLAY, HOLMES MACLAY, AND HOLMES BRUCE MACLAY; MARY B. MACLAY; LYNN LOUISE JACOBSON MACLAY; BITTERROOT RESORT, LLC; STATE OF MONTANA ACTING BY AND THROUGH THE DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION; CARLTON CREEK IRRIGATION COMPANY; and JOHNSON CONTROLS, INC., Defendants. TO BE SOLD at Sheriff’s Sale on the 22nd day of February 2012, at 10:00 o’clock a.m., at the front door of the Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, that real and personal property located in Missoula County, Montana described on the attached Exhibit A. Any transfer of the permittee’s/lessee’s right, title and interest in State Forest Land Use Authorization Permit No. 3063082 pursuant this Sheriff’s Sale is subject to the Constitutional discretion of the Montana State Board of Land Commissioners under Article X, Section 4 of the 1972 Montana Constitution to approve of any lessee holding an interest in a lease of State school trust lands. No representations or warranties whatsoever are made with regard to the property described on the attached Exhibit A, including but not limited to the existence or condition of any of the personal property or fixtures described thereon. DATED: January 27, 2012. /s/ CARL C. IBSEN, Sheriff, Missoula County, Montana EXHIBIT A PARCEL I: Township 11 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana Section 20: S1/2SE1/4 Section 21: W1/2, NW1/4NE1/4 Section 28: N1/2NE1/4, NW1/4 Section 29: NE1/4 PARCEL II: Township 11 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana Section 22: E1/2SW1/4, S1/2SE1/4 Section 27: NE1/4NW1/4 Remainder parcel of Carlton Heights – Maple Creek Addition, a platted subdivision of Missoula County, Montana according to the official plat of record in Book 25 of Plats at Page 64. PARCEL III: Township 11 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana Section 21: S1/2NE1/4, NE1/4NE1/4, SE1/4 PARCEL IV: Township 11 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana Section 22: N1/2, N1/2SE1/4, W1/2SW1/4 Section 27: NW1/4NW1/4 Tract 1 of Mackintosh Manor, Lot 40A-1, a platted subdivision of Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat of record in Book 31 of Plats at Page 70. PARCEL V: Parcel B-1 of Mackintosh Manor, Lot 24, a platted subdivision of Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat of record in Book 32 of Plats at Page 1. PARCEL VI: Lot 16A-1B of Macintosh Manor, Lots 45-48, & 16A-1A, a platted subdivision of Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat of record in Book 32 of Plats at Page 11. PARCELS VII, VIII & IX: Purposefully omitted PARCEL X: Lot 2 of Carlton Heights – Maple Creek Addition No. 2, a platted subdivision of Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof, as recorded in Book 31 of Plats at Page 68. PARCEL XI: Lot 24A-1 of Mackintosh Manor, Lots 24A-1 & 16A-1, a platted subdivision of Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat of record in Book 32 of Plats at Page 9; and Lots 20A, 21A & 22A of Mackintosh Manor, Lots 20-23 & 16A-1, a platted subdivision of Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat of record in Book 32 of Plats at Page 10. PARCEL XII: That portion of the SE1/4 and of the S1/2NE1/4 of Section 14, Township 11 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana, lying and being Easterly of the East right of way of the Burlington Northern Railroad. PARCEL XIII: That portion of the SE1/4 of Section 14, Township 11 North, Range 20 West, being West of the Westerly right-of-way of the Northern Pacific Railroad, LESS AND EXCEPTING that portion conveyed to the State of Montana in Book 122 of Deeds at Page 404 and ALSO EXCEPTING that portion condemned by the State of Montana in Book 101 of Micro Records at Page 1285, records of Missoula County, Montana. ALSO LESS AND EXCEPTING that portion platted as CARLTON, a platted subdivision of Missoula County, Montana. Together with all the tenements, hereditaments, appurtenances, easements, privileges, rights, including private roads and all easements and rights of access, now or hereafter belonging to or used in connection with the above described property, all minerals and mineral rights, all water and water rights, including but not limited to all shares of stock and other rights in any ditch or canal company or water users association, including but not limited to 54.9 shares of stock in Carlton Creek Irrigation Company, all ditches or other conduits, and all other rights thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining, and all wells, tanks, dams, reservoirs, dikes, embankments and other water development, storage or conservation facilities and structures; and Together with all right, title and interest of Mortgagor in and to that certain Private Roadway & Crossing Agreement No. 211,948 made March 1, 1975, between Burlington Northern, Inc. and Holmes Maclay and H. Bruce Maclay, co-partners doing business as Maclay & Son (the “Crossing Agreement”). Montana Rail Link, Inc. has succeeded to and owns the interest of Burlington Northern, Inc. under the Crossing Agreement, and H. Bruce Maclay and Mary B. Maclay have succeeded to and own the interest of Holmes Maclay and H. Bruce Maclay, co-partners doing business as Maclay & Son under the Crossing Agreement; and All windmills, pumps, irrigation equipment,

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C6 February 9 – February 16, 2012

motors, engines, and devices of every kind now or hereafter used for or in connection with the irrigation of the above-described real property, or for stock watering or domestic purposes thereon, including but not limited to that property described below (the “Irrigation Equipment”), together with all additions, accessions, replacements, improvements, repairs and substitutions to said Irrigation Equipment and the proceeds thereof and all other irrigation equipment and fixtures now or hereafter located upon the above-described real property, all of which are declared to be appurtenant to said land, or incident to the ownership thereof, or used in connection therewith, and 54.9 shares of stock in the Carlton Creek Irrigation Company. The Irrigation Equipment is described as follows: Field 1 Pump: Cornell Pump Co., Model 2.5 W 15-2, Serial No. 61005 (6 7/8); Field 1 Motor: Lesson, Model 215TTDW7921 AA L, S/N 140,656; Field 2 Pump: Cornell Pump Co., Model 3YB30-2, S/N 60359 ( 7 3/16); Field 2 Motor: Baldor Industrial, Model 40F51Y56, S/N 1,890; Field 3 Pivot: Grow Smart – Lindsay, Model 01-41580, S/N L7810; Field 3 Pump: Cornell Pump Co., Model 4 RB 40-4, S/N 70525 (12 1/2); Field 3 Motor: Baldor Industrial, Model 42E96Y13, S/N 6,900; Field 5 Pivot: Selectric Inc/Klockner Moeller, Model 4400-L7682, S/N PX43; Field 6 Pivot: Zimmatic – Lindsay, Model RMAC Talking Pivot, S/N L57236; Field 7 Pivot: Zimmatic – Lindsay, Model RMAC Talking Pivot, S/N L57235; Field 9 Pivot: Zimmatic – Lindsay, Model RMAC Talking Pivot, S/N L57237; Field 8 and 9 Pump: Cornell Pump Co., Model 4WB30-2, S/N 2091 (6 9/16); Field 8 and 9 Pump: GE, Model 5K284XAM101, S/N LCJ1122430 Two (2) Hand Lines Wheel Line No. 1: 1978 Wade Rain Wheel Line; Pump: Cornell, 15 HP, Model 2.5 W-15; Motor: Cornell, Serial No. 61005; Wheel Line No. 2: 1978 Wade Rain Wheel Line; Pump: Cornell, 30HP, Model 3YB-30-2; Motor: Cornell, Serial No. 60359; Wheel Line No. 3: 1984 Wade Rain Wheel Line; Pump: Cornell, 30 HP, Model 4WB30-2; Serial No. LCJ1122430. All right, title and interest of the lessee/permittee in and under State Forest Land Use Authorization Permit No. 3063082 issued by the State of Montana, Department of Natural Resources and Conservation. All rents, issues, royalties and profits now due or which may hereafter become due under or by virtue of any lease, license, sublease, or agreement, written or verbal, for the use or occupancy of the above-described property or any part thereof, whether now existing or hereafter made; and All right, title and interest hereafter acquired in or to any of the property, real or personal, described above, and all right, title and interest hereafter acquired in or to any lands lying within the exterior boundaries of the fee owned and leased lands described herein. All personal property, goods, equipment, including irrigation equipment attached to or placed in or upon that real property described above, vehicles, artwork, furniture, furnishings, fixtures, appliances, inventory, supplies, machinery, accounts, deposit accounts, accounts receivable, contract rights, investments, investment property, letter-of-credit rights, supporting obligations, software, chattel paper, general intangibles (including payment intangibles), wherever located, together with all additions, accessions, replacements, improvements, repairs and substitutions to said property and to the proceeds thereof. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 12/18/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200632688, Bk 789, Pg 569, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Scott McWatters and Kelly McWatters, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Parcel I: A parcel of land being a portion of Government Lot 2 located in Section 19, Township 14 North, Range 22 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana, being more particularly described as Tract A on Certificate of Survey No. 5585. Parcel II: Together with a non-exclusive easement for ingress and egress as described in easement recorded December 15, 2004, in Book 744 of Micro Records, Page 1640. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 03/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 21, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $277,830.31. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $259,993.39, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on May 3, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s

checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.97054) 1002.206690-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 12/15/98, recorded as Instrument No. 199834018, Bk. 566, Pg. 1422, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which David E. Chamberlain, a single person was Grantor, Norwest Mortgage, Inc. was Beneficiary and First Montana Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First Montana Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Parcel E of Certificate of Survey No. 3983, located in the Northwest quarter (NW1/4) of Section 17, Township 12 North, Range 17 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Less and excepting therefrom any right, title or interest in any minerals, mineral rights or related matters, including but not limited to oil, gas, coal, and other hydrocarbons. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 16, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $87,037.10. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $71,944.10, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 27, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.73996) 1002.156751-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/27/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200730982, Bk 809, Pg 883, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which James Leonard Sampson, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 15 of Hurt First Addition, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 16, 2011, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $164,920.13. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $158,804.88, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments

for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 27, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.97982) 1002.206550-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 3, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: DOC ID #: 00010836378208005 CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 552, A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE SOUTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 11 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA Julianne A. Pitts and James C. Pitts, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on August 16, 2005 and recorded on August 16, 2005 in Book 758, Page 358 under Document No. 200521181. The beneficial interest is currently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $933.29, beginning August 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 1, 2011 is $143,448.48 principal, interest at the rate of 6.125% now totaling $12,447.06, late charges in the amount of$139.98, escrow advances of $3,486.97, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,262.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $24.07 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 28, 2011 /s/ Dalia Martinez First American Title Company of


PUBLIC NOTICES Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho )) ss. County of Bingham) On this 28th day of November, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Marti A Ottley Notary Public Inkom, ID Commission expires: 8/15/2012 Bac V. Pitts 42019.191 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 6, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana; Lots 20, 21 and the West 4 feet of Lot 22 of Block 36 of the Amended Plat of a portion of Car Line Addition, located in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Recording Reference: Book 129 of Micro Records at Page 605 Gary A. Linton II and Tammy K. Linton, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Community Bank-Missoula, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated January 30, 2004 and recorded on February 4, 2004 in Book 725, Page 1880 under Document No 200403051. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. successor by merger Principal Residential Mortgage, Inc. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $831.30, beginning May 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 16, 2011 is $80,469.63 principal, interest at the rate of 7.0% now totaling $3,986.77, late charges in the amount of $419.02, escrow advances of $2,042.91, suspense balance of $-38.74 and other fees and expenses, advanced of $394.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $15.43 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors, if such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 29, 2011 /s/ Becky Stucki First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho )) ss. County of Bingham) On this 29th day of November, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Becky Stucki, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Marti A Ottley Notary Public Inkom, ID Commission expires: 8/15/2012 Citimortgage V Linton 42011.536 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 9, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 3 IN BLOCK 1 AND A 1/30TH INTEREST UNDIVIDED OR, IN AND TO LOT 11 IN BLOCK 2 OF SWANLAND RECREATION SITES, A SUBDIVISION OF THE COUNTY OF MISSOULA, STATE OF MON-

TANA LESS AND EXCEPT THAT PORTION CONVEYED TO THE STATE OF MONTANA IN BOOK 402 MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 1738. Virgil L. Phelps and Diane L. Phelps, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on June 10, 2009 and recorded on June 15, 2009 in Book 841, Page708 under Document No. 200914268. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage Corporation. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $812.75, beginning August 1, 2011, and each month subsequent which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 25, 2011 is $128,806.87 principal, interest at the rate of 6.25000% now totaling $2,541.95, late charges in the amount of $121.89, escrow advances of $641.32, and other fees and expenses advanced of $42.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $22.06 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 5, 2011 /s/ Dalia Martinez First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho )) ss. County of Bingham) On this 5th day of December, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Marti A Ottley Notary Public Inkom, ID Commission expires:8/15/2012 PHHV Phelps 41392.823 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 9, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THE FOLLOWING -DESCRIBED PREMISES IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, TO WIT: LOT 4 IN BLOCK 5 OF ELMS ADDITION NO. 4, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. TAX !D#: 917302 Christine L. Staggs, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Lawyer’s Title Insurance Co, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated March 14, 2008 and recorded April 1, 2008 in Book 816, Page 310, as Document No. 200807134. The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,142.79, beginning July 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 16, 2011 is $238,423.82 principal, interest at the rate of 3.50000% now totaling $4,515.34, late charges in the amount of $961.22, escrow

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s advances of $2,910.91, suspense balance of $847.38 and other fees and expenses advanced of $34.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $22.86 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 5, 2011 /s/ Dalia Martinez First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 5th day of December, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Marti A Ottley Notary Public Inkom, ID Commission expires: 8/15/2012 Gmac / Staggs 41207.948 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 27, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: Lots 16 and 17 in Block 48 of East Missoula, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. EDWARD BIELSKI, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to ARTHUR F. LAMEY, JR, ESQ, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, by DEED OF TRUST DATED MAY 7, 2004 AND RECORDED MAY 13, 2004 in Book 732, Page 145 UNDER DOCUMENT NO. 200412852.. The beneficial interest is currently held by WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE UNDER THE INDENTURE RELATING TO lMH ASSETS CORP., COLLATERALIZED ASSET-BACKED BONDS, SERIES 2004- 6. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $622.53, beginning April 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 16, 2011 is $81,686.00 principal, interest at the rate of 7.39000% now totaling $10,812.13, late charges in the amount of$622.40, escrow advances of $2,944.71, suspense balance of $-376.16 and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,779.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $16.54 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without

any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 20 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 21, 2011 /s/ Dalia Martinez First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham) On this 21st day of November, 2011, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Marti A Ottley Notary Public Inkom, ID Commission expires: 8/15/2012 GmacVBielski 41965.332 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 05/08/2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which PHILIP J. O’CONNELL AND JULIE E. GIBSON, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to INSURED TITLES, LLC. as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 01/28/2005 and recorded 01/31/2005, in document No. 200502537 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 747 at Page Number 585 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOTS 10 AND 11 IN BLOCK 1 OF MOUNT SENTINEL ADDITION NO. 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 440 EAST KENT AVENUE, Missoula, MT 59801. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the de-

fault for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 09/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $215,622.03 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 7.625% per annum from 09/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 12/23/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0148466 FEI NO. 1006.150246 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 05/07/2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING T H E  M I S S O U L A CITY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT will be conducting a public hearing at 7:30 p.m., Wednesday, February 22, 2012, Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine, Missoula, MT, on the following items: 1. A request by Lyn and Robert McKee for a variance to allow a casino at 1120 Kensington Avenue which does not contain frontage on an arterial street, and is located in the C1-4 zoning district. SEE MAP U.

CLARK FORK STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 33 and 127. Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting February 13th, 2012 by appt only by calling 541-7919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to February 16th, 2012, 4:00 P.M. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling the Missoula Office of Planning & Grants at 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. For additional information regarding the variance request you may contact Hilary Schoendorf at the 258-3869 or email hschoendorf@co.missoula.mt.us.

"I Oh You One"–or four, actually.

by Matt Jones

ACROSS

1 Multi-purpose shot, for short 4 "___ on a Plane" 10 E-mail from Nigeria, maybe 14 Big Band, for one 15 Start, as a riot 16 What programmers write 17 Cameraman's question about which talk show star to film? 20 Maritime patrol org. 21 Malaria-carrying fly 22 Concert memento 25 Darkest part of a shadow 29 Reagan aide Peggy and aviator Fred 34 Shrinking Asian body of water, with 63-down 35 Spanish NBA player who explodes in a volatile fuel mix? 38 Tell the cops everything 39 Coffee server 40 Title role for Peter Weller 42 They tow broken-down cars 43 Use a shiv 45 Menu phrase meaning "you can add pineapple to any item"? 47 Put on the payroll 48 Atones 49 Country on the Red Sea 51 Accompany 55 Genie's home 60 Song from Sarah McLachlan's "Surfacing" 61 Must decide which pitching feat to choose? 66 Ice skating jump 67 Save from peril 68 It's small and strummable 69 Side 70 Lower, like regions 71 1/525,600th of a yr.

Last week’s solution

DOWN

1 Introduction 2 Bridge part 3 Ripped jeans cover-up 4 Obedience school lesson 5 Dir. opposite SSE 6 Eight, in Essen 7 Sportages and Spectras 8 Smurf suffix 9 Splinter group 10 Psychological patterns 11 Dove bar? 12 Super Bowl highlights? 13 Got together with 18 Getting older 19 Home of the Beavers, for short 23 MGM opening sound 24 "And I'm ready ___ right through the sky" (Richard Marx lyric) 26 Prickly bush 27 Tried to attack 28 Pond scum 30 Like some gases 31 "Girl with ___" (Renoir painting) 32 Night, to Noriega 33 Everett of "Citizen Kane" 35 Like annoying salesmen 36 "Glee" character Abrams 37 Take weapons from 41 Pie charts show them: abbr. 44 Flower that helps heal cracked skin 46 Musician's org. 50 Smoking alternative, once 52 Strong loathing 53 Talk show host Lake 54 Occupied 56 Undecided, in an angsty way 57 Old school pronoun 58 Shopping trip sheet 59 ___ A Sketch 61 Head cover 62 Fire 63 See 34-across 64 Election Day day: abbr. 65 "Love, Reign ___ Me" (The Who)

©2012 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 February 9 – February 16, 2012


PUBLIC NOTICES the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which ALTON M. KANE AND EILEEN N. KANE as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to PINNACLE TITLE & ESCROW as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. MIN# 100199400004566148, as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 05/23/2008 and recorded 05/29/2008, in document No. 200811995 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 819 at Page Number 972 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 199 OF DOUBLE ARROW RANCH PHASE IV, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION OF MISSOULA COUNTY, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLATT THEREOF. Property Address: 821 GRANDVIEW DRIVE, Seeley Lake, MT 59868. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 10/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGA-

TIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $208,947.63 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.00% per annum from 10/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 12/22/2011, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0147830 FEI NO. 1006.150233 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 05/25/2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which

CLARK G. ANDERSON as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to STEWART TITLE as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC, as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 05/25/2007 and recorded 05/31/2007, in document No. 200713508 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 798 at Page Number 594 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 2 OF TOWER LOTS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 1125 TOWER STREET, Missoula, MT 59804. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-12. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 09/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $194,451.04 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 3.02% per annum from 08/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may be-

come due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 01/10/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0085495 FEI NO. 1006.142564 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 05/21/2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which JEFFERY A ANDERSON, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE & SEPARATE PROPERTY as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 03/08/2007 and recorded 03/14/2007, in document No. 200705934 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 793 at Page Number 749 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOTS 11 AND 12 IN BLOCK 19 SOUTH MISSOULA, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA

COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 446 EDITH ST, Missoula, MT 59801-3914. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 02/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $220,834.53 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.00% per annum from 02/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 01/05/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0000509 FEI NO.

1006.151029 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 05/21/2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which SCOTT DEAN JOHNSON, AND MARY ELIZABETH JOHNSON, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 06/23/2006 and recorded 06/30/2006, in document No. 200616003 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 778 at Page Number 63 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 14 IN BLOCK 5 OF BITTERROOT HOMES ADDITION NO. 3, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 809 DIXON AVE, Missoula, MT 59801-8619. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor

in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 09/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $184,614.96 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 7.125% per annum from 09/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 01/05/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0000772 FEI NO. 1006.151027

LEGAL SERVICES Montana’s best injury and disability lawyers. Automobile accidents, bodily injury and disabilities, workers compensation, social security disability. Bulman Law Associates P.L.L.C. www.bulmanlaw.com or call 721-7744

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Home Ownership Matters By Jennifer Taylor, 2012 MOR President Washington may be having trouble finding bipartisan consensus, but a National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) survey has pinpointed one area where likely voters can agree: Home ownership and many of the programs that support it are important enough to affect elections. No matter where voters stood in terms of policy – Democrat or Republican – about 70% of voters say a Congressional candidate who wanted to eliminate the home mortgage interest deduction likely wouldn’t get their vote. Even people whose homes have lost value think home ownership is worthwhile. An incredible 84% of those who owe more on their mortgage than their home is worth say they’re happy with their decision to own a home, and 69% of them

would tell a close friend or family member just starting out to buy a home. A majority of likely voters wants the federal government to continue doing what it can to make home loans available and affordable, especially if discontinuing federal support would mean higher mortgage interest rates for consumers. • 60% of voters think dealing with mortgage and foreclosure issues is key to stabilizing the economy, including 57% of Republicans and 66% of Democrats. • 58% of voters say stabilizing and restoring the nation’s housing market should be “an absolute high priority” for the federal government.

FEATURED LISTING • 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath Condo • Near Downtown and Osprey Stadium

$127,900 MLS # 20117311

1333 Toole Ave Unit B7

$219,500 MLS# 20112298

"With the 2012 election season in full swing, candidates running for the White House and Congress would be wise to heed the will of the American voters, who have expressed broad support for government policies that encourage home ownership and oppose efforts to make it more difficult to get a home loan and to tamper with the mortgage interest deduction," said Celinda Lake, president of Lake Research Partners, a Democratic polling firm that conducted the survey with Republican polling firm Public Opinion Strategies. The complete poll results are available by visiting their website at www.nahb.org/homeownershippoll. The National Association of REALTORS® has been fighting to preserve policies that protect homeowners’ rights for many years. If you would like more information, just visit www.realtoractioncenter.com to see how.

1.91 ACRES

FEATURED LISTING

• 2708 sqft, 5 bed, 2 bath • Fenced for animals, Greenhouse • www.4029windsockway.com

• Great investment properties! • Discounted price for 4 units. • Owner will carry contract.

4029 Windsock Way Stevensville

$469,875 MLS#20120451

1810 Stoddard 1325/1315 Byron

Jon Freeland

Sheri Jones

406-360-8234

406-369-1047

Cell: (406) 360-2879

jfreeland@missoulahomes.com

Sheri.Jones@RealLiving.com • MontanaWannaBe.com

jlybert@missoulahomes.com

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C8 February 9 – February 16, 2012

Janet Lybert


RENTAL

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1805 PHILLIPS: 1 BEDROOM, SECOND FLOOR, DINING AREA, DECK-AREA, ON-SITE LAUNDRY FACILITIES, SOME QUALIFICATIONS *, OFF STREET PARKING, NO SMOKING OR PETS, HEAT PAID $590. Garden City Property Management 549-6106

Homeword.org

Natural Housebuilders, Inc.

369-0940 or 642-6863

1 Bedroom Balcony overlooks the river. $600 H/W/S/G paid, coin-op laundry, storage, off street parking. GATEWEST 7287333 1 Bedroom Near the U $520 All utilities paid. Off street parking. GATEWEST 728-7333

Natural Housebuilders, Inc., *ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes* Additions/Remodels* HIGHER-COMFORT crafted building* Solar Heating* 3690940 or 642-6863* www.naturalhousebuilder.net

ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes Additions/Remodels • Solar Heating HIGHER-COMFORT crafted building

APARTMENTS

1914 S. 14th St. Brand new studios, central location, w/d, a/c, shared yard, garage space avail. $575. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

2 Bedroom Great Location $650 W/S/G paid, W/D hookups, dishwasher, new flooring, storage, carport. GATEWEST 728-7333

2 Bedroom Close to Good Food Store, $695 H/W/S/G paid, dishwasher, coin-op laundry, off street parking, on a quiet cul-desac GATEWEST 728-7333

2 Bedroom North Russell $615 H/W/S/G/ paid, coin-op laundry, off street parking & storage. GATEWEST 728-7333

2 bed near the mall, $650. W/S/G INCLUDED. DW, W/D hookups, Storage, Carport, Cat on approval, New interior flooring

1 bed, Walking distance to the U, $550. W/S/G paid. Gas heat, Coin-op laundry, Off-street parking. No pets.

1 bedroom , $600. Heat W/S/G paid. DW, Coin-op laundry, Storage, Balcony on the river, Near downtown. Off street parking,

2100 Stephens • 728-7333

2100 Stephens • 728-7333

2100 Stephens • 728-7333

Summit Property Management, LLC.

FIDELITY

549-3929

www.rentspm.com Find your new home with

Professional Property Management 1511 S Russell • 721-8990

professionalproperty.com

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

Rent Incentive

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

1 BD 4-plex 113 N. Johnson $465/mo.

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

549-7711 Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com

GardenCity

1 BD Apt 524 Hickory $480/mo. 2 BD Apt Uncle Robert Ln. $645/mo. Visit our website at www.fidelityproperty.com

For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

MHA Management An affiliation of the Missoula Housing Authority

"Let us tend your den" Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

Finalist

Finalist

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals • Professional Office & Retail Leasing

30 years in Missoula

251-4707 1 BD Apt 1409 2nd St. $450/mo.

422 Madison • 549-6106

www.naturalhousebuilder.net

Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

1&2

Property Management

FREE LAUNDRY SOAP

2327 W. FOOTHILLS: SOUTHHILLS 2 BEDROOM, GREAT VIEWS OF MISSOULA, WASHER & DRYER HOOK-UPS, DISHWASHER, OFF STREET PARKING, NO SMOKING, PET UPON APPROVAL ! $650. Garden City Property Management 549-6106

Call for Current Listings & Services Email: gatewest@montana.com

Now Leasing Solstice 1535 Liberty Ln. 2BR standard units Rent $705 Deposit $650 1225 34th St. 1 BR Heat included Seniors 55+ or w/ disability Rent $600 Deposit $650 330 N. 1st St. W. 2BR all utilities paid Rent $691 Deposit $650 Some restrictions apply. For more information contact MHA Management at

549-4113

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 February 9 – February 16, 2012


RENTAL 2342 BURLINGTON: BEAUTIFUL TOP QUALITY 2-BEDROOM CONDO!, MICROWAVE, STORAGE, DW, YARD, HU’S, DOUBLE BATH SINK, DISPOSAL, NO SMOKING, #1-MAIN FLOOR WITH PATIO BRIGHT–ON END, #8 - 2ND FLOOR WITH DECK & SOME PERGO FLOORS, 1 PET 3901 O’LEARY: 2 BEDROOM, 2 STORY (2ND & 3RD FLR), CARPORT, STRG, *FREE CABLE *, DW, PRIVATE DECK, WASHER & DRYER, 1 _ BATH, NO SMOKING/ PETS HEAT PAID, $825 $100.00 COSTCO GIFT CERTIFICATE Garden City Property Management 5496106 502 E. FRONT: 2 BEDROOM, NEAR DOWNTOWN & U!, NEAT OLD BLDNG, 1+1 BDRM, WOOD FLRS, MAIN FLR, ON-

SITE LAUNDRY, SHARED FRONT DECK, NO SMOKING OR DOGS, CAT OK ! HEAT PAID, $895 $100.00 COSTCO GIFT CERTIFICATE. Garden City Property Management 549-6106 514 ROLLINS: 1 BEDROOM, SLANT STREET AREA, SECOND FLOOR, STRG, SHARED YARD, PARKING, FREE CABLE , CENTRAL LOCATION, NO SMOKING OR DOGS, CAT ALLOWED ! ALL PD $650. Garden City Property Management 5496106 Studio near the Good Food Store $495. H/W/S/G pd. Dishwasher, off street parking, coin op laundry on a quiet cul-de-sac GATEWEST 728-7333 Studio near the Orange Street Food Farm, $450. ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED. Coin-op laundry,

Off-street parking. GATEWEST 728-7333 Studio North Russell $475 H/W/S/G paid coin-op laundry, off street parking & storage. GATEWEST 728-7333

MOBILE HOMES Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent w/s/g/elec included $400/month 406-273-6034

DUPLEXES 2414 LEO: 2 BEDROOM, SIDE BY SIDE DUPLEX, 2 STORY, 1 _ BATH, HOOK-UPS, DISHWASHER, YARD, FREE CABLE,

DETACHED GARAGE, NO SMOKING OR PETS. $795 Garden City Property Management 549-6106 3907 Buckley Pl., 2bd/1ba. S X S duplex, shared yard, single garage, w/d hkups, just off 39th St. … $695 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

HOUSES 1229 VAN BUREN: 3 BEDROOM HOUSE IN THE RATTLESNAKE!!, 3 STORY, 2 _ BATHROOMS, HOOK-UPS, DW, DISPOSAL, DBLE GRG + PARKING, NO SMOKING, PET OK! $1350 Garden City Property Management 549-6106 1518 W. Central … 4bd/1ba, centrally located home, dbl. gar.,

covered patio, yard … $1300 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1800 S. 4th W. #8 : Two bedroom, 2nd floor, Dining area, Big closets, Large unit, New Carpet, Near Good Food Store, Off street parking, On site laundry, No smoking or dogs allowed, Cat considered

unit, snow and trash removal. Quiet neighborhood, bus stop

ROOMMATES

in front of building, close to downtown. Move in condition,

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

$800/mo, 207.2410

small

pets

ok

$100.00 COSTCO GIFT CERTIFICATE GCPM , $750, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com

3901 O’Leary: Two bedroom, 2 story unit, Newer, Carport, Storage, Free cable, Private deck, #219 has washer and dryer, 1 1/2 bath, Dishwasher, No smoking or pets allowed

2 BR MOVE IN CONDITION! 2BR/1.5 bath condo located in Missoula’s Northside

$100.00 COSTCO GIFT CERTIFICATE GCPM , $825, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com

neighborhood. New carpet, tile and paint throughout. This 2

9856 Anderson Rd 3 bd/1.5 ba, w/d hkups, dw,gas fireplace, on site storage, large partially fenced yard ... $950. Grizzly Property Management 5422060

level unit includes W/D, carport parking, outside storage

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 120 N Easy St.: Enjoy one-level living a short walk from the river in this turn-key 3bd/2bath home on a concrete foundation. 1 block from a city park, and minutes from the university, this home features a large fenced yard, landscaping, and an area in the private back yard that is wired for a hot tub. $179,000 - MLS # 20120171. Call Shannon Hilliard at 239-8350 today! www.120NEasy.com 18737 Sorrel Springs Lane, Frenchtown, $379,000 MLS # 20113420, 4 bedroom 2 1/2 bath, Beautiful home on 4 acres with spectacular views. Call Betsy Milyard for a showing today at 880-4749. 2511 Sunridge Court $225,000 MLS # 20116337 5 bedroom 3 bath THE HOUSE HAS CENTRAL AIR, VAULTED CEILINGS, A MASSIVE FAMILY ROOM WITH GAS FIREPLACE AND MUCH MORE. OVER 2800 SQ. FT. OF FINISHED LIVING SPACE, THERE IS PLENTY OF ROOM FOR ENTERTAINING FRIENDS AND FAMILY. Call Betsy Milyard for a showing today at 880-4749. 6106 Longview $235,000 MLS # 20116338 Large 4 Bedroom 2 Bath home located in the South Hills. This home features hardwood floors, open floor plan, and large fenced yard. Call Betsy Milyard for more info 880-4749.

860 Haley, Florence $550,000 - MLS# 20115636 5 bedroom, 3 bath, 2 car garage home available. Over 5000 finished square ft. Tons of space, game room and its own movie theater - perfect for living and entertaining! Your own private movie theater comes with 55” LED 3D TV, seven theater chairs, and an awesome sound system. Call Betsy Milyard for more info 880-4749. Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free comparative market analysis. 360-8234 Enjoy country living close to town, 3 bed, 2.5 bath home. Covered deck front and back. Large double detached garage with additional living quarters. Carport behind garage for extra storage. Nice views and close to Forest Service land for horse back riding and hiking. Lolo Creek close for fishing. Park on the North boundary. Fence between Lot 1 and 2 not on property line. Will sell with adjacent 1.71 acre lot. $299,900. MLS#20115937. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. I can help you sell your home! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com Looking for a place to call home? Call me! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com ooking for homebuyer education? Call me! Rochelle Glasgow

@ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com Megan Lane, Frenchtown, $199,900 MLS: 10007166 BRAND NEW 3 BED, 2 BATH HOME ON 1 ACRE. HOME TO BE BUILT SO YOU CAN PICK YOUR COLORS AND SOME FINISHING TOUCHES. GENEROUS $2000 APPLIANCE ALLOWANCE AND $1300 LANDSCAPING ALLOWANCE. Call Betsy for more info 8804749. PRICE REDUCED 4 bed 2 bath house on one full landscaped acre near Wye. Great Well at 30 gpm. 2 gas fireplaces, updated kitchen and bathrooms. $280,000. MLS #20120012. 9869 Lee’s Lane, Missoula. Call Anne 546-5816 for details. www.movemontana.com PRICE REDUCED! Well maintained 4 bed home w/ hardwood flooring in living, dining and kitchen. Fully fenced backyard w/ deck. Nicely landscaped w/ mature trees and srubs. UG sprinklers in both front and back yard. 232 Cap De Villa, Lolo. $230,000. MLS#20116816. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. Rattlesnake dream property with a 1 bedroom apartment! 3 bed, 2 bath, 3 car garage located on over 1/2 acre manicured & landscaped gardens & lawn. UG sprinkler, “secret garden” & fenced yard. $425,000. MLS#20114396. Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Prop-

erties. 544-7507. www.2404rattlesnake.com. Three story townhome near North Reserve. Two Bed, one Loft, three bath with fenced yard and double car garage. GREAT Deal at $180,000. MLS #20117696. 3741A Concord, Missoula. Call Anne 546-5816 for details. www.movemontana.com View or list properties for sale By Owner at www.byownermissoula.com OR call 550-3077 Wonderful 5 bed, 3 bath home @ top of Fairviews with 2 car garage. Level lot! Borders open

space. All new carpet & interior paint. Trex deck off dining room. Great views! Back yard is fenced. $275,000. MLS#20116161. Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.110artemos.com

Robin Rice • 240-6503

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES For a limited time a purchase of a condo at the Uptown Flats will include a large flat screen TV and assistance with up to $5000 Buyers closing costs!The Uptown Flats have two one bed one bath

8169 Lower Miller Creek • 3 Bed, 2 bath Well kept manufactured home on five productive acres in Upper Miller Creek. • 2 storage sheds, a detached double car garage and a separate shop/garage. • Only be 5 minutes from town. • $250,000 • MLS # 20113133.

“FAMOUS NINE MILE HOUSE” • Purchase the restaurant/bar, the house, outbuildings, & 4 trailer spots for • Dynamite investment for the right person with great potential for income from the rentals and the restaurant. • $449,000 • MLS # 20113100

860 Haley, Florence • 5 Bedroom, 3 Bath, 2 Car Garage • Over 5000 Finished sqft. Amazing home with gorgeous views, & paved road access. Tons of space, game room and its own movie theater - perfect for living and entertaining! • $550,000 • MLS #20115636

PRICE REDUCED

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10 February 9 – February 16, 2012

RICE TEAM

117 Dallas, in LOLO. $184,900 • 3 Bed 2 Bath home on the hill in Lolo. • Spacious living room, large backyard & deck, great views of the mountains, and huge family room in the basement. • Perfect home for RD financing.

Please call me with any questions Astrid Oliver Senior Loan Originator Guild Mortgage Company 1001 S. Higgins Ave 2A Missoula, MT 59801

Phone: 406-258-7522 Cell: 406-550-3587 NMLS # 395211, Guild License #3274, Branch 206 NMLS # 398152


REAL ESTATE units at $149,900. Call Anne 546-5816 for showing. www.movemontana.com Four bed, 1-1/2 bath, 3 car garage home at 345 Brooks st. Close to downtown, neighborhood coffee shop/restaurant, and university. Long time family home has potential to also have downstairs rental. Just $275,000 MLS 20117301 Call Anne 5465816 for details. www.movemontana.com

MANUFACTURED HOMES Great single wide 2 bed, 2 bath mobile on large lot with double car garage. Fenced yard, lots of trees and curbing around the landscaping. Covered deck. 1641 Stoddard, Missoula. $99,500. MLS#20116883. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. PRICE REDUCED! Manufactured 3 bed 2 bath home, permanent

foundation, low maintenance vinyl siding, 3 acres, partially fenced, double garage. Large deck with awning over looking the Bitterroot Valley. Large master bedroom with nice master bath. 663 Ridge Road, Stevensville. $179,000. MLS#20117486. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

LAND FOR SALE Beautiful 14 acre parcel just west of Huson. Meadow with trees & pasture. Modulars or double wides on foundation ok. Owner may finance. 23645 Mullan Road, Huson. $169,900. MLS#20112135. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

location with lots of foot traffic. Building only for sale. Call Anne 546-5816 for showing. www.movemontana.com

Contracts. We also lend on Real Estate with strong equity. 406721-1444 www.Creative-Finance.com

MISSOULA’S CONDOS AT THEIR FINEST

COMMERCIAL

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL

UPSCALE DOWNTOWN LIFESTYLE

321 N. Higgins Commercial building on coveted downtown

QUICK CASH FOR REAL ESTATE NOTES and Land Installment

THE UPTOWN FLATS 1 and 2 bedroom condos available

Starting at $149,900

Rochelle Glasgow

544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

Missoula Properties

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday Noon-4pm or call Jeff or Anne for Appointment

Jeff Ellis

Anne Jablonski

529-5087

546-5816 PORTICO REAL ESTATE

www.theuptownflatsmissoula.com

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Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 February 9 – February 16, 2012


Sierra Nevada or New Belgium

$6.19

6 pack

Bear Creek Assorted Soups

$3.25

12 oz. Tub Organic On The Vine Tomatoes

$2.69 each

9-12 oz.

Budweiser 16 oz. Can

$6.59 8 pack

April's Natural Blackberry Flavor Korean Green Tea

Williamette Valley Meats Bacon Wrapped Beef Tenderloin Fillet

$6.99 lb.

3 lb. Bag organic Bose Pears

Family Pack Beef T-Bone Steak

$1.79

$4.99

each

lb.

Organic Hass Avocado

Family Pack Assorted Pork Chops

$1.89 20 count

Arenal Wine

$7.99 .75 liter

Western Family Cake Mixes

98¢

79¢ each

18.25 oz.

$1.89 lb.

Hutterite Colony Large Eggs

$1.49 dozen

Big Sky Bread Company Honey Almond Granola

$3.39

8 lb. Bag California Navel Oranges

$4.75 each

12 oz.

Gold'n Plump Whole Marinated Chicken

$4.99 52 oz.

1015 Sweet Onions

69¢ lb.

8-9 oz. Frozen Lobster Tail

$12.99 each

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Missoula Independent