Page 1

NEWS

ELSIE ARNTZEN WANTS TO DEPOLITICIZE PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. IS ANYBODY BUYING THAT? DYSTOPIAN DREAMS: THE TIMELESS COMMANDER ZINKE AND THE FOR AN OVERHAUL: OPINION GREAT LAND TRANSFER FLIP-FLOP ARTS ALLURE OF WORLDS GONE WRONG ETC. OVERDUE REDEFINING CONSENT IN HELENA


Come check out our new

STARBUCKS

available inside clip or CLICK!

3800 Russell St. Missoula, MT 59801

[2] Missoula Independent • January 12–January 19, 2017


6.08"w x 5.3"h

News

Voices The readers write .................................................................................................4 Street Talk Your own private dystopia............................................................................4 The Week in Review Pond hockey, a Palace departs and job interviews galore ...........6 Briefs A cold war at HPC, FWP trailer hitch and updating consent................................6 Etc. Inside the Draught Works expansion .......................................................................7 News Superintendent Elsie Arntzen wants to depoliticize education. Huh?..................8 News In Ravalli County, a sheriff trades his badge for a commissioner’s chair..............9 Opinion Commander Zinke and the great land transfer flip-flop ................................10 Feature Leading the Change: Meet Missoula’s majority-female council.......................12

ultImate u ul lttIm lt tIIIm mat ma atte e

TThe he h e co c cold ol ol ld d and a an n nd d fl flu flu remedy! re em me m e ed edy dy! y! House-made Ho H ou use se-m mad m ma ad a de d e soups sou oup ps ps cooke co cooked oke ked ked ed d da dail aily ail a ly y! daily!

Arts & Entertainment

Arts Dreaming of dystopia.............................................................................................16 Music The Microphones, John Prine and The Rolling Stones ......................................17 Art Julie Gautier-Downes’ Scattered Remains at the ZACC...........................................18 Film Not so gaga over La La Land ................................................................................19 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films.......................................................20 BrokeAss Gourmet Winter lasagna..............................................................................21 Happiest Hour Wintry mixology at the Silver Dollar ...................................................23 8 Days a Week The only calendar that matters ............................................................24 Agenda Standing Stitch for a cause...............................................................................30 Mountain High Darby Dog Derby!...............................................................................31

Exclusives

News of the Weird ........................................................................................................12 Classifieds....................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ...................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrology.....................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle .......................................................................................................C-9 This Modern World...................................................................................................C-12

PUBLISHER Matt Gibson GENERAL MANAGER Andy Sutcliffe EDITOR Brad Tyer PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston BOOKKEEPER Ruth Anderson ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson CALENDAR EDITOR Charley Macorn STAFF REPORTERS Kate Whittle, Alex Sakariassen, Derek Brouwer COPY EDITOR Jule Banville ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua GRAPHIC DESIGNER Charles Wybierala CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Steven Kirst, Robin Bernard, Beau Wurster MARKETING & EVENTS COORDINATOR Ariel LaVenture CLASSIFIED SALES REPRESENTATIVE Jessica Fuerst FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Scott Renshaw, Nick Davis, Matthew Frank, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Rob Rusignola, Chris La Tray, Sarah Aswell, Migizi Pensoneau, April Youpee-Roll

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2017 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • January 12–January 19, 2017 [3]


STREET TALK

[voices] by Erika Fredrickson

Asked Tuesday afternoon at the Southside KettleHouse

What’s your favorite dystopian movie, book or work of art? Followup: If the apocalypse comes, what’s your plan?

Seth Shults: Waterworld. It’s farfetched. You think about climate change and the polar ice caps melting like that, and it’s a huge what-if scenario. But it illustrates how humanity could evolve and adapt to its surroundings. Big Sky barricade: Stay put here in Montana. We have a lot of resources and we do have a lot of—not to say paranoid people, but people who are armed and prepared. We’re also isolated in the case of nuclear fallout.

Cameron Johnsen: Brave New World. It’s dystopian in its utopia. People are coerced to be happy, to take these drugs. They are happy but not happy by will. They’re happy by force. Quick fix: I’m conflicted on this, because if civilization truly ends, what’s the point? You’re going to be scraping by, trying not to get murdered or eaten. So the biological part of me is like, ‘Keep going.’ The rational part is like, ‘Just put a bullet in your head.’

Gerhardt Soeffker: The Road, the book by Cormac McCarthy. It’s so beautifully written and you don’t want to keep reading because, emotionally, it’s painful. But it’s such good writing, you keep on reading it. Top secret: Can’t tell you. I only have food for two.

Addie Bryan: The Fifth Wave book series. It’s about aliens invading. The first wave knocks out all the technology and the fifth wave—spoiler alert—convinces humans to kill other humans. It’s, sadly, very believable, especially in the time we live in. Bear power: I have a cabin in the middle of nowhere and I would live off the land and grow things, like in The Martian. No one would be able to find me. I’d be surrounded by grizzly bears— and I’m fine with that.

[4] Missoula Independent • January 12–January 19, 2017

41 isn’t the new 50 Dan—Your assertion that Amanda Curtis is a good candidate because she received 41 percent of the vote during a much abbreviated U.S. Senate run really needs to be rolled back (“Dem for the win?” Jan. 5). Your logic would have us believe that return is a remarkable achievement and given the chance at a longer effort, Amanda would surely top 50 percent, as if the political climate in Montana is somehow akin to the Tortoise and Hair parable. To be clear, I believe that Amanda is probably well liked by the Democratic base. However, a vote for a candidate who is well liked by the base counts exactly the same as a vote for someone who is just mostly liked by the base. You can look no further than Ryan Zinke's recent victory as a good example of how this works. It’s likely that what Curtis received in 2014 represents just the base Democratic vote, with the addition of a few Independents who didn't want to vote for Steve Daines for whatever reason. That is a long way from winning. I have not read any compelling reason to believe that the Independents and moderate Republican voters needed to secure a statewide election in Montana will warm up to Amanda. Don’t get me wrong, Amanda Curtis most surely has a role to play in Montana Democratic politics for some time to come. We desperately need all that energy, and Amanda seems to have a lot to offer. Still, Curtis emerging as the early Democratic favorite might have more to do with the jockeying of the statewide teachers organization that funds a large percentage of the Montana Democratic Party effort than any careful consideration of Curtis as a truly viable candidate. Just ask yourself if you think that Curtis can match the broad appeal that Pat Williams had when he beat Ron Marlenee by 51 percent, or Cy Jamison with just 49 percent. Because that's exactly the kind of appeal it’s going to take for a Democrat to win this seat in the foreseeable future. Is your answer no? Then let’s keep looking. Bruce Dickinson posted at missolanews.com

What the Travel Plan leaves out Motorized users combined with a mountain bike group have filed a lawsuit over the Bitterroot National Forest Travel Plan. They’re unhappy that some areas are off limits to their machinery. It’s interest-

ing that mountain bikers now aligned themselves with motorized users. I went to many Travel Plan meetings. Periods were extended and record numbers of comments were taken. In no meeting that I attended did a motorized user/mountain biker discuss the impacts their recreation have on plants and animals. It was typically about their “rights.” Approximately 2.7 percent of the contiguous U.S. is protected Wilderness. Not even 3 percent of what once was remains in a “natural” state. Wanting to protect what little is left outside of Wilderness hardly seems extreme. Wanting to ensure the integrity of a few Wilderness Study Areas doesn’t seem extreme. It’s wise.

“We could all exercise a little humility. We can go other places. The plants and animals who live there are about out of room. It’s not just about us.”

According to the BNF, the forest has about 837,851 acres of non-Wilderness. There are also 2,246 miles of roads. There are 543,840 acres open to snowmobile use. The harmful effects to wildlife and wild places from motorized use are well documented in peer-reviewed science. The same is beginning for mountain biking. All recreationalists, myself included, have impacts. We could all exercise a little humility. We can go other places. The plants and animals who live there are about out of room. It’s not just about us. Consider a typical meeting with extractive representatives wanting more timber and roads, motorized users/mountain bikers wanting more areas open and environmentalists wanting more protections.

Now imagine seats at the table for elk, bear, bighorn sheep, golden eagle, pica, bull trout, red squirrel, lynx, black-backed woodpecker, Douglas fir and sage. Also imagine a seat reserved for the sacredness and integrity of the Earth. The plants and animals might start out by stating many of their kind are no longer alive due to recreational pursuits, development and forest “management.” They might mention that a very small percentage of their original homeland remains and ask how much more should they give. They could mention the many benefits to humans of saving what’s left, such as clean water and spirituality. They may voice genuine concern for the future of their children. They might remind those in attendance that their ancestors used to co-exist in a sustainable manner with the people who originally lived here. They might make a final plea that humans alone have the capacity to make it possible for all species to live and thrive. That would be a great meeting, and a start toward real collaboration. It would be a truer representation of all the stakeholders regarding the Travel Plan. One has to ask: How much more should plants and animals give up for our weekend warrior pursuits? Gary Milner Corvallis

Thanks, Obama During the eight years before Obama, Bush squandered the Clinton surplus by passing a major tax cut for the richest folks, fostering deregulation and starting two wars that went on the national credit card and killed 5,000 Americans and countless foreigners (none of whom were named Bin Laden). Bush bequeathed to Obama an American economy that was losing 750,000 jobs per month and $4 per gallon gasoline. He was also torturing prisoners and overseeing a collapse of the banking and auto industries. This tsunami all washed ashore in Obama’s first year in office. I for one am proud of the Obama presidency. He regularly answers reporter’s most difficult questions with dignity and aplomb. He and Michelle managed to raise a beautiful family in the middle of it all. Thank you, Obama. John Heffernan Missoula Correction:“Fine print,” Jan. 5, erroneously identified Jake Eaton as a former chairman of the Montana Republican Party. In fact he is a former executive director of the state Republican Party.


hhappy p birthday i hd y

ZER FARE

OVER OVER

1.5 MILLION rides in 2016.

50% INCREASE in rider ridership ship since since ZERO-FARE ZERO-F ARE launch.

Missoulians continue to hop on the bus in record numbers thanks to a three-year ZERO-FARE demonstration pr p oject that began in January 2015 with the financial support of 15 public and private community partners. The increase in public transit ridership benefits our entire community.

Thank Y You o ou To To Our ZERO-FARE ZERO-F FA ARE Partners Partners The University of Montana | Associated Students of The University of Montana | City of Missoula County of Missoula | Destination Missoula | St. Patrick Hospital | Community Medical Center | Southgate Mall Missoulian | Missoula Aging Services | Missoula Downtown Association | Missoula Parking Commission Missoula County Public Schools | Homeword, Inc. | Missoula Metropolitan Planning Organization

(406) 721-3333

Benefits Us All

www.mountainline.com www.mountainline.com | Call us or visit our website. website. Find yyour our rroute. oute. #Ride #RideTheLine. TheLine.

missoulanews.com • January 12–January 19, 2017 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Amy Donovan

Wednesday, Jan. 4 Three candidates go before the Board of County Commissioners to vie for the open Missoula County Fairgrounds director position. The commission later selects Councilwoman Emily Bentley for the job. (Read more about Bentley and the other councilwomen in our cover story on page 12.)

Thursday, Jan. 5 The owners of the Palace-Badlander complex announce plans to close the Palace as a music venue and remodel it as a billiards hall. Local music nerds bemoan the loss of one of Missoula’s very few mid-size rock venues.

Friday, Jan. 6 The Flathead County sheriff confirms the identity of a backcountry skier killed on Jan. 5 by an avalanche in Glacier National Park. Ben Parsons, an endurance athlete and firefighter from Kalispell, was 36. It’s the first avalanche fatality in Glacier since 2010.

Saturday, Jan. 7 Teams including the Biscuit Whackers, #1 Sex Champions and Jorts of Glory brave below-zero temps to compete at the Seeley Lake Pond Hockey tournament, where they’re eventually bested by the BAMFs of Great Falls. The #1 Sex Champions presumably console themselves with their existing title.

Sunday, Jan. 8 An Indy staffer rolls back into town after a weekend trip just as a winter storm blankets the Missoula Valley. The sheriff’s office limits highway and interstate travel to emergency only.

Monday, Jan. 9 Missoula City Council selects candidates to interview for departing Councilman Harlan Wells’ Ward 2 vacancy. David Neu, Mike Curran, Mirtha Becerra, Roger Seewald, Ruth Swaney, Jack Metcalf, Gail Gutsche and Kenneth Chatriand are on the list.

Tuesday, Jan. 10 The Department of the Interior cancels the last two remaining oil and gas leases in the Badger-Two Medicine area, which is sacred to the Blackfeet.

Eight historic Edgar S. Paxson paintings, completed in 1914, are now reframed and reinstalled in the Missoula County Courthouse after a four-year absence during courthouse restoration.

Redefining rape

Bringing consent up to date The Montana Legislature is considering an overhaul of sexual assault statutes this session as result of a bipartisan interim committee’s work. One change in particular would make it easier to prosecute sexual assault cases involving an intoxicated victim, according to Deputy County Attorney Jason Marks. Marks says SB 29, sponsored by Sen. Diane Sands (D-Missoula), is momentous in part because it removes physical force from the definition of rape. SB 29 also changes the definition of “mentally incapacitated” to a new standard that could prove crucial in future cases. The law currently defines “mentally incapacitated” as “temporarily incapable of appreciating or controlling the person’s own conduct.” Marks says that’s a high legal hurdle to pass when it comes to proving that a victim was too drunk to consent to sex.

About half of all rapes prosecuted by the county involve alcohol use by the offender, victim, or both. “In order to prosecute someone for raping someone who was intoxicated and unable to consent, we basically have to prove that they were intoxicated to the point that they were non-responsive, basically passed out,” Marks says. SB 29 replaces “mentally incapacitated” with “substantially impaired” due to drugs or alcohol. Marks says the difference allows for situations where a victim might have been able to walk and talk, but was nonetheless in a state of blackout or otherwise too drunk to consent. “I’m very much in support of changing that definition to, I think, what we would agree is someone who is not in a position to give consent as we would understand it,” Marks says. So far, sex crime statute reform is garnering bipartisan support, including from state Sen. Nels Swandal, R-Wilsall, who sat on the Law and Justice In-

terim Committee. The committee’s work includes efforts to remove parental rights from rapists, reduce penalties on juveniles convicted of statutory rape and extending the statute of limitations on child rape. Swandal doesn’t think the provisions of SB 29 lessen the burden of proof for the prosecution, but they do reflect a more modern understanding of how sexual assault occurs. “It’s pretty apparent that our consent statutes are antiquated,” Swandal says. “I had several of these cases as a judge, and the prosecution often had a very difficult time proving the offense under current statute.” Swandal says he expects SB 29 and its related bills to pass the Senate and House, although he’s not ruling out the possibility of amendments as the bills are discussed. “I think they’ll pass, probably pretty much as presented,” he says. Kate Whittle

RADON: TEST. FIX. SAVE A LIFE. NOW is the time to test for radon Missoula County Health Department 301 W Alder (406) 258-4755 envhealth@co.missoula.mt.us Test Kits Available - $7

[6] Missoula Independent • January 12–January 19, 2017


[news] Trailer hitch

State appeals ethics decision The recent holiday season brought a bit of bad news for Trap Free Montana Public Lands. Shortly before Christmas, executive director K.C. York received word that Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks had set to work trying to overturn an ethics decision handed down by Commissioner of Political Practices Jonathan Motl. Now, York is framing the situation as a “David versus Goliath case” that pits a grassroots nonprofit against a state agency that commands an annual budget of more than $75 million. “This isn’t a trapping issue,” York says. “It’s about democracy. It’s about the law, responsibility, accountability, public duty.” Motl’s late-November ruling sought to resolve a kerfuffle over the Montana Trappers Association’s use of an FWP-owned trailer during the 2014 election. While on loan to the association that summer, FWP’s trailer and the furbearer displays inside appeared at three separate events alongside material opposing a trapping ban ballot initiative carried by York’s organization. York argued that the trailer’s presence gave the impression FWP stood against the initiative, which ultimately failed to gain enough signatures to make the ballot. Motl agreed that the agency had not taken adequate measures to ensure its property wasn’t used for political purposes, pointing out that “no one in the FWP can account for the whereabouts, specific use of or possession of the FWP trailer and displays” from September 2013 through late 2014. Motl fined FWP $1,500. “Rather than FWP coming forward now and paying the piper, if you will, and righting these wrongs and fulfilling their duty to all Montanans, they’re appealing,” York says. FWP Legal Counsel Zach Zipfel counters that the agency’s appeal, foreshadowed during the October hearing that preceded Motl’s decision, was never about the money. Rather, FWP believes Motl strayed too far from the plain language of Montana ethics code in assigning the agency blame. The agency’s appeal petition also rebuffs Motl’s claim that all third-party use of state property requires a written contract, and emphasizes the lack of evidence regarding any knowledge or authorization of the trappers association’s actions by FWP staff until after the fact. “It’s never been our contention that what happened should have happened,” Zipfel says. “It’s just our position that it didn’t violate the state ethics code.” Despite having “wiped out” its finances trying to

reach a settlement with FWP last year, York confirms that Trap Free Montana was recently able to secure legal representation for the appeal process. She’s confident her organization will come out on top, but fears the battle has already threatened the prospect of any lasting relationship with the agency. “It’s unfortunate, because we are trying to get a seat at the table,” York says. “Wildlife belongs to all Montanans, and this comes across more like trying to shut us out the door rather than take any responsibility or accountability for what happened.” Alex Sakariassen

Communication breakdown

‘Cold War’ at the HPC The anger was palpable in Kate Kolwicz’s letter of resignation from the city Historic Preservation Commission last week. She acknowledged as much, writing that “as we are all aware, the past many months have been difficult and frustrating.” The sources of frustration, Kolwicz wrote, included lack of training and a historic preservation officer, Leslie Schwab, who was “openly dismissive and contemptuous” of commission members. But Kolwicz, the third volunteer board member to resign over the city’s handling of the Missoula Mercantile demolition, says she also wanted to offer constructive criticism as she bowed out. So, in addition to explaining the sources of her frustration, Kolwicz offered four suggestions toward fixing the broken system. Then she emailed her letter to the board, thinking that was that. Schwab wasn’t about to give Kolwicz the last word. She fired off a string of rebuttal emails to her and other HPC members accusing Kolwicz of lying, disregarding legal advice and abusing staff “at your every convenience.” “Also,” Schwab concluded, “please stop flipping off the Mayor in public. It’s childish.” Such is the state of affairs in the wake of last year’s power struggle over the fate of the Merc. That bitterness and mutual distrust has only intensified in recent months, spilling into open hostility between Schwab and HPC members during public meetings. Even as Kolwicz ran for the door, Schwab made sure it hit her on the way out. “It’s like the Cold War,” says HPC member Scott Loken, who has served on the board for 10 years. “There’s no connection between our historic preservation officer and the commission.”

BY THE NUMBERS

$1,711.22 Total salary, excluding benefits, to be paid to current and former University of Montana presidents (i.e., Royce Engstrom and Sheila Stearns) every calendar day through June 30, 2017. The standoff has virtually paralyzed the commission. It has been unable to obtain a quorum for the last four months, leaving those members who do attend unable to take votes or even approve meeting minutes. City Council has yet to fill vacancies stretching back to March 2016. Remaining members, Loken says, “don’t want to come.” As the staff liaison to the board and an employee of the city’s Development Services division, Schwab was at the center of the Merc tug of war. City Communications Director Ginny Merriam says the toll led Schwab to engage in the email exchange with Kolwicz—an exchange Merriam described as “never appropriate, nor is it professional or a best practice.” No formal disciplinary action has been taken, Merriam says. Schwab did not respond to a request for comment. On Monday, Schwab did email HPC members an apology for her “unprofessional” emails. “I have felt picked on, and I became defensive,” she wrote. Kolwicz tells the Indy that while she appreciates Schwab’s apology, “I was disappointed that she did not specifically retract her false and libelous allegations towards me.” Schwab’s emails also prompted councilwoman Emily Bentley to contact HPC members in an attempt to begin rebuilding trust. Bentley says City Council plans to revise its much-maligned historic preservation ordinance, reexamine the HPC membership structure and fill open seats once Merc litigation with Preserve Historic Missoula concludes. What the city doesn’t plan to do, Bentley says, is undermine the commission’s authority. “I feel like we could give them more support,” she says. Derek Brouwer

ETC. The rumors were never true. Jeff Grant heard them often over the years—how Draught Works never intended to package its beer, how the brewery was content just being a bustling neighborhood taproom. After pouring a cream ale for the day’s first customer, he pulls up a stool and, in a thoughtful baritone, sets the record straight. “To be in a can was always part of the plan. We like to think that we grow slow and methodical, but once we decide to do something, we chase it aggressively.” With all the trucks and bundled-up workers coming and going, there’s been about as much activity outside Draught Works the past few weeks as within. Once the Freestone Climbing Gym moved out of the cavernous digs next door, Grant’s operation began the arduous process of moving in. By March, he and fellow co-owner Paul Marshall plan to start canning three of their flagship beers in the expanded facility. That means four to five new full-time employees, Grant says, and a production increase from 3,000 barrels a year to as much as 6,000 or 7,000. “We won’t grow our territorial market just because of the canning expansion. We want to continue and will continue to just focus on western Montana territory.” The question likely rattling around the skulls of many Missoulians is how much this expansion will impact the taproom where it all started. The answer is not much. No increase in seating, no change in how long the taps flow. Although Draught Works did attempt to secure a beer and wine license last year—a move that would have allowed for extended hours had it not hit a snag with the state—Grant says the effort was completely divorced from the canning pursuit. “The beer and wine license ship has sailed,” he adds. “We’re not revisiting it.” If the new facility has any effect on the retail side at all, it will likely manifest as an increase in the number of new beers available for sampling by thirsty patrons. The taproom has always been Draught Works’ testing ground, a way to settle on flagship brews, experiment with seasonals and, rumors aside, prep for the big leap they knew would one day come. Now that it’s here, Grant says, it “almost kind of feels like starting over again.”

Are you troubled by someone’s drinking? Al-Anon is for you!

Toby Hunter Win a 50% OFF Merchandise Coupon Sign Up for our Weekly Drawing

543-1128 • www.hideandsole.com

missoulanews.com • January 12–January 19, 2017 [7]


[news]

Legislators’ pet? Elsie Arntzen aims to depoliticize Public Instruction by Derek Brouwer

Like the student who brings her teacher a polished apple on the first day of school, Elsie Arntzen began her job as Montana’s new Superintendent of Public Instruction with a gesture designed to ingratiate herself to state lawmakers: She created an informal education caucus so legislators can chat about policy proposals over coffee and “delicious apple fritters” from a Helena bakery. Not everyone was impressed. Sen. Tom Facey, the Democratic minority whip, turned up his nose at Arntzen’s fritters. “She was here for 12 years and was not an enthusiastic supporter of public education for kids,” he told Lee Newspapers when the caucus was announced. A former elementary school teacher and state legislator from Billings, Arntzen is the first Republican to oversee Montana schools in 28 years. Walking into the role, she struck a conciliatory tone, emphasizing that “A+ communication, A+ collaboration, A+ cooperation” will be her office’s guiding principles. The caucus, she says, is one of her first stabs at “depoliticizing” the Office of Public Instruction. But Facey isn’t the only person skeptical of Arntzen’s bipartisan overtures. Behind her words is a legislative record that many in the education community see as a campaign to undermine Montana’s public schools. Eric Feaver, president of MEAMFT, the state teacher’s union, calls her voting record “deplorable” and “a train wreck.” If the priorities suggested by her legislative record carry over to her agenda as OPI chief—particularly her support for “school choice,” or privatization—Feaver and others say cooperation is unlikely. “I don’t trust her at all,” Feaver says. “I trust her to be exactly what her legislative voting record showed her to be.” Feaver looks to that record as a crystal ball in part because she didn’t campaign on specific policy proposals. Instead, she ran on a general promise of “putting students first” over the “powerful special interests” that control public education. President-elect Donald Trump hit similar notes in rolling out a school-choice agenda during his campaign, saying the

[8] Missoula Independent • January 12–January 19, 2017

country already spends “more than enough money” on education, and that improving the system is “simply a matter of putting students first, not the education bureaucracy.” For Arntzen, “depoliticizing” OPI means changing how it does business. In an interview, she describes the agency as “top down,” overly focused on compliance with state and federal rules, rather

Photo courtesy of opi.mt.gov

Elsie Arntzen, Montana’s new Superintendent of Public Instruction, says she doesn’t believe her office should lobby legislators on most education policy measures.

than making sure schools can do what’s best for students. She considers MEA-MFT a “special interest group” with which OPI “for so long has aligned itself.” It’s an alliance she is prepared to end. “My special interest is students,” she says. Arntzen’s de-partisanization of OPI got off to a rocky start. The Republican party operative she tapped as her senior policy adviser, Randy Vogel, declined the job after reporters unearthed Facebook posts in which he derided outgoing OPI chief Denise Juneau as a “female lesbian alcoholic” and surmised that Hillary Clinton is secretly gay.

Regardless of who’s in charge, there are relatively few policies the state superintendent can change with the wave of a hand. School boards have significant authority, while a governor-appointed Board of Public Education sets rules regarding teacher licensure and educational standards. Board of Public Education Chair Sharon Carroll says she has “long-trusted OPI to provide the assistance necessary to ensure that all Montana students receive a high quality public education,” and intends to continue that relationship. Other groups are similarly willing to partner—cautiously— with Arntzen. “You can’t discount what she did as a legislator,” says Montana Rural Education Association Executive Director Dennis Parman, who served as deputy superintendent under Juneau. “What we’ve tried to do since she came into office is look forward and see what we can do to partner with her administration. We’re just kind of taking a ‘time-will-tell’ approach.” Still, Feaver says, the superintendent position wields much of its power as the state’s most prominent voice for public education and, at least at the Legislature, Arntzen isn’t eager to speak up. Unlike her predecessors, she says it’s inappropriate to use her position to lobby legislators for any particular education agenda beyond statutory inflationary funding adjustments. “That’s what they’re elected for,” she says. So when a school choice bill comes up for a hearing, for instance, Arntzen plans to stay out of the fray. “We are going to make sure the Legislature has all the information they need to make their choice. We serve the people, and I would not want government lobbying,” she says. The same goes, apparently, for other school funding measures. When a bill to provide inflationary increases for special education came before the House education committee on Monday, Arntzen did not attend, and her staff did not speak in favor. dbrouwer@missoulanews.com


[news]

The other side Hoffman trades badge for commission seat by Alex Sakariassen

When Chris Hoffman woke up to his first day as Ravalli County Sheriff back in 2003, he didn’t feel particularly political. And over the subsequent 14 years, he quips, he was really only a Republican every election year. The rest of the time, he did his best to avoid the brambles of Bitterroot politics, acquiescing as needed for the occasional budget dispute or repudiation of some appeal from the conservative fringe. Though he insists he feels no different now than he did that morning 14 Januaries ago, Hoffman admits that his pseudo-neutrality just got a whole lot harder to maintain. “It’s very easy to walk away from the politics as a peace officer, as a sheriff,” he says. “Not so easy when you’re a county commissioner.” Hoffman officially joined the Ravalli County Board of Commissioners Dec. 30, filling a two-year term in the seat formerly occupied by J.R. Iman. The two squared off last spring in a Republican primary that Hoffman concedes drew little notice. “I think everybody’s attention was turned to the national scene,” he says. Now, with his first full week in office behind him, the mustachioed Corvallis native is beginning to realize just how steep the learning curve is going to be. “I’m just playing catch-up at this point,” Hoffman says. “I’m focusing on not being the rock in the middle of the pond right now. I need to get caught up and make sure I know what I’m talking about before I can weigh in.” At first blush, the move from law enforcement to county government seems an odd one for a man who, by his own admission, has had a “storied” relationship with the board he just joined. Hoffman’s stint as sheriff often placed him at odds with commissioners over staffing and budget issues, and he grew increasingly vocal in recent years about his frustration over what he saw as the commission impeding his ability to run his department. But his bid for Iman’s seat wasn’t a matter of spite, Hoffman says, nor was it due to being fed up with his law enforcement role. The timing just seemed right for

“new blood” in the sheriff ’s chair, Hoffman says, and he “wasn’t ready for a rocking chair.” “You can’t gripe, you can’t complain, you can’t criticize unless you’re willing to dive in and try to make the changes,” he says. “If you can’t make them from without, then you need to try to make them from within.” Iman thinks Hoffman is in for a “rude awakening” when it comes to the scope of a county commissioner’s duties. There’s

In the 14 years Hoffman has worn the badge, the problems have ranged from unsolicited letters demanding he create a local militia to a spate of jailhouse suicides. (The four suicides in 2004-’05 prompted him to request an independent detention center assessment and a $900,000 budget increase for mental health screening.) And while Hoffman is confident that his successor, former Undersheriff Steve Holton, and the rest of the department are well positioned to handle whatever comes next, he

photo courtesy of Chris Hoffman

Ravalli County Clerk and Recorder Regina Plettenberg, left, swears Chris Hoffman in to his new role as county commissioner on Dec. 30. Hoffman left a 14-year stint as sheriff to join the board, despite having done his best to avoid the thorny world of Bitterroot politics in the past.

the task of redistricting in the wake of a voter-approved measure to downsize the commission from five members to three, he says, and the pressure of negotiating a budget at a time when county health insurance costs alone are nearly $800 a month per employee. Still, Iman says he harbors no “sour grapes” over Hoffman’s victory. Hoffman was a fine sheriff, he says, and has the experience of overseeing the largest departmental budget in Ravalli County. “It’s not that he’s unfamiliar with those kinds of things,” Iman says. “It’s just that everybody else’s problems become his too, not just the problems of one department.”

still finds it difficult not to check in or take lunch at his old office, just a block or so from his new one. But he’s moved on, and if his former job often put him in conflict with the board on which he now sits, those are conflicts he plans to leave behind as well. “I didn’t come up here to get into a fistfight,” Hoffman says. “I came up here to see what I could add and how I could help ... If people are expecting there to be these great epic battles, I think they may be disappointed.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • January 12–January 19, 2017 [9]


[opinion]

Change? What change? Commander Zinke and the great land transfer flip-flop by Dan Brooks

Last week, during what are probably his waning days in office, Montana’s Republican Rep. Ryan Zinke voted to change House rules in a way that will make it easier to transfer federal lands to the states. Currently, the Congressional Budget Office accounts for revenues generated by public lands—from grazing rights, mineral leases, sales of hats with antlers on them, whatever—when calculating their value vis a vis land transfers. The new rules stipulate that such revenues don’t count, and so land transfers can be considered budget-neutral. I think we can all get behind this approach to accounting. My own household has recently voted that buying books is budget-neutral, since knowledge is power and power is, clearly, money. But whatever dubious logic House Republicans employed to determine that revenue does not have value is not the issue here. The issue is that Zinke, a staunch opponent of land transfers throughout his legislative career, just voted to make it easier to transfer land. Let’s say your dad is a manufacturer of granite countertops and, through careful management of his golf game, has made you Vice President of Government Outreach for the Countertop Manufacturers Association. As a lobbyist for the CMA, you want to create jobs by drilling a hole in Mount Rushmore to excavate the rich granite from Teddy Roosevelt’s head. The problem is that Mount Rushmore is owned by the federal government, which stole it from the Indians fair and square and now employs thousands of people to manage it. It’s hard to convince these people to let you drill a hole in Teddy Roosevelt. They don’t care how many jobs it would create, because those jobs would be localized in South Dakota, and Mount Rushmore belongs to the whole nation. All it would take is a few representatives from California or some other place technically included in the United States to get uppity and scotch your whole plan. But what if Mount Rushmore belonged to South Dakota? That would

[10] Missoula Independent • January 12–January 19, 2017

make it easier to sell lawmakers on your head-drilling plan because you’d only be dealing with, like, 50 guys. The CMA could just donate to all of their campaigns, at a fraction of what it would cost to swing a vote in the U.S. Congress. This is why business interests are so interested in transferring federal lands to the states: State government is easier to buy off. The problem is that land transfers tend to cost the federal government

“It’s almost as if public land is an issue with bipartisan appeal to the voters of Montana, and pretty soon Zinke won’t have to answer to those voters anymore.”

money, in the form of lost revenue, and saving money is what the Republican Party is supposed to be about. Hence last week’s vote. What’s striking is not that House Republicans thought they could change the facts of federal cash flow with the stroke of a pen, but that Zinke went along with it. Just six months ago, Zinke resigned his position as a delegate to the Republican National Convention over the Republican platform’s support for

transferring federal lands. Now he’s greasing the skids for exactly that. Even worse, he won’t explain why. After declining requests for interviews from the Indy, Montana Public Radio and other outlets, his office released a six-word statement: “Ryan Zinke’s position has not changed.” Not yet, it hasn’t. In a few weeks, though, Zinke’s position will change significantly—from lowly congressional representative of a scrappy but underinfluential state to Secretary of the Interior. Assuming he gets confirmed, Commander Zinke will slip the surly bonds of electoral politics and join the executive branch. As head of Interior, he will oversee the Bureau of Land Management, the National Park Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. He will become the chief steward of Roosevelt’s valuable head, to say nothing of his legacy. Perhaps Zinke’s position on land transfer has not changed. He might still oppose it. There’s nothing in last week’s rules package that expressly advocates selling federal land to the states. But the new rules make such sales a lot easier, and Zinke voted for them. It’s almost as if public land is an issue with bipartisan appeal to the voters of Montana, and pretty soon he won’t have to answer to those voters anymore. He doesn’t owe us anything, and there’s not much more we can do for him from here. We did kind of launch his whole career, though—sending him to Helena and then to Washington, where his Navy service attracted a national audience to the stage we put him on. That doesn’t mean he has to think one way about public lands for the rest of his life. It might mean we deserve an explanation for his apparent change of position, though. If he doesn’t think he owes us that—well, that’s the second-craziest system of accounting I’ve heard all week. Dan Brooks writes about politics, culture and the untapped reserves in each president’s head at combatblog.net.


[offbeat]

TOO-MUCH-REALITY TV – Russian producers are planning the so-far-ultimate survivors’ show—in the Siberian wilderness for nine months (temperatures as low as minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit), with 30 contestants selected after signing liability waivers that protect the show even if someone is raped or murdered. (Police may come arrest the perpetrators, but the producers are not responsible for intervening.) The show (“Game2: Winter”) will be telecast live, around the clock, beginning July 2017 via 2,000 cameras placed in a large area full of bears and treacherous forest. Producers told Siberian Times in December that 60 prospects had already signed up for the last-person-standing prize: the equivalent of $1.6 million (only requirements: be 18 and “sane”). (Bonus: The production company’s advertising lists the “dangerous” behaviors they allow, including “fighting,” “murder,” “rape,” “smoking.”) ROUNDUP FROM THE WORLD’S PRESS – With car-camel collisions increasing in Iran’s two southern provinces, an Iranian government ministry is in the process of issuing identification cards to each camel, supposedly leading to outerwear license “plates” on each of the animals. Authorities told the Islamic Republic News Agency the registration numbers are needed if an accident victim needs to report the camel or to help trace smugglers. (No actual U.S.-style license plates on camels have yet made the world’s news photographs.) Martin Shkreli became the Wall Street bad boy in 2015 when his company, Turing Pharmaceuticals, bought the right to market the lifesaving drug Daraprim and promptly raised its typical price of $18 a pill to $750, but in November, high schoolers in the chemistry lab at Sydney Grammar in Australia created a molecular knockoff of Daraprim for about $2 a tablet. Their sample of “pyrimethamine” (Daraprim’s chemical name) was judged authentic by a University of Sydney chemistry professor. Daraprim, among other uses, fights deadly attacks on immune systems, such as HIV. GAZING UPON NATURE AS NATURE CALLS – To serve restroom users in a public park in China’s Hunan Province’s picturesque Shiyan Lake area, architects gave users in toilet cubicles a view of the forest through ceiling-to-floor windows. To discourage sightseers who believe the better view is not from the cubicles but into them, the bottom portion, up to the level of the toilet, is frosted—though that stratagem probably blurs only a pair of legs, seated. (CNN reported in October that China has at least one other such restroom, in Guilin province, viewing distant mountains.) The Dubai-based Gulf News reported in November that 900 Kuwaiti government workers had their pay frozen during the current investigation into no-shows, including one man on the payroll (unidentified) who reportedly had not actually worked in 10 years. Another, who had been living abroad for 18 months while drawing his Kuwaiti pay, was reduced to half-pay, but insisted he had asked several times for assignments but was told nothing was available. (Gulf News reported that the 10-year man is appealing the freeze!) Prosecutors in Darlington, England, obviously take child “cruelty” seriously because Gary McKenzie, 22, was hauled into court in October on four charges against a boy (whose name and age were not published), including passing gas in the boy’s face. The charge was described as “in a manner likely to cause him unnecessary suffering or injury to health.” He was on trial for two other slightly harsher acts—and another gas-passing, against a different boy—but the judgment has not been reported. World-class chess players are famous for intense powers of concentration, but a chess journal reported in October that top-flight female players have actually been disqualified from matches for showing too much cleavage as they play, thus distracting their opponent (according to Ms. Sava Stoisavljevic, head of the European Chess Union). In fact, the Women’s World Chess Championship, scheduled for February, has decreed that, since the matches will be held in Tehran, all contestants must wear hijabs (leading a U.S. women’s champion to announce she is boycotting). NEWS YOU CAN USE – German Horst Wenzel, “Mr. Flirt,” fancies himself a smooth-talking maestro, teaching mostly wealthy but tongue-tied German men lessons (at about $1,500 a day!) in how to approach women—but this year has decided to “give back” to the community by offering his expertise pro-bono to lonely Syrian and Iraqi refugees who have flooded the country. At one class in Dortmund in November, observed by an Associated Press reporter, most “students” were hesitant, apparently divided between the embarrassed (when Wenzel informed them it’s “normal” to have sex on the first or second date) and the awkwardly confident (opening line: “I love you. Can I sleep over at your place?”). But, advised Wenzel, “Don’t tell (a German woman) that you love (her) at least for the first three months (because) German women don’t like clinginess.” UNDIGNIFIED DEATHS – (1) A 24-year-old woman who worked at a confectionary factory in Fedortsovo, Russia, was killed in December when she fell into a vat of chocolate. (Some witnesses said she was pouring flour when she fell; others say she fell while trying to retrieve her dropped cellphone.) (2) A 24-year-old man was decapitated in London in August when he leaned too far out the window of one train and struck an extension on a passing train. Next to the window he leaned from was a sign warning people not to stick their heads out. Thanks this week to Peter Swank and Alexander Campbell, and to the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisers.

missoulanews.com • January 12–January 19, 2017 [11]


I

n the dwindling light of a December evening, a woman pushed a blanket-covered stroller along the narrow, icy shoulder of Russell Street. Councilwoman Emily Bentley, driving to the gym, noticed her. Bentley could see the woman wasn’t wearing gloves. She had probably just gotten off a bus. Bentley says that woman comes to mind when she sits in Council chambers, debating issues of infrastructure and housing. She wonders if the stranger’s image resonates so acutely because Bentley herself has two kids at home. “Women see things differently,” Bentley says. “Well, I’m not a man, so I don’t know if I see things differently from men, but I feel like my perspective is much more geared toward families. I’m a young mother, so that’s what my perspective is.” During a pivotal year for Missoula City Council, women’s perspectives have been more front and center than ever. Six new members, including five women,

[12] Missoula Independent • January 12–January 19, 2017

were elected to Council in 2016, joining incumbents to create a majority-woman city Council for the first time in Missoula’s history. While national politics continue to showcase the vitriol commonly aimed at ambitious women, and while most federal, state and municipal governments are still male dominated, Missoula’s majoritywoman Council is both an outlier and, perhaps, a sign of things to come. In some ways, including feminist values, Missoula’s political and societal attitudes are ahead of the curve. As such, Missoula’s Council provides a glimpse of the challenges and opportunities awaiting women as they continue to tackle roles in such traditionally male-dominated spaces.

Taking Leave It’s been a big-ticket year in Missoula politics. A gun purchase background check ordinance, the Missoula Mercantile

demolition, refugee resettlement, the maneuvering toward the purchase of Mountain Water, the tourist homes ordinance, even Mayor Engen’s stint in rehab have generated intense local interest and media coverage. In the midst of all that action, Bentley says, she’s proud to have brought forth a simple measure to help women who work for the city. Her maternity leave policy, approved in November by every Council member except Harlan Wells, instituted six weeks of paid medical maternal leave for female city employees. “I knew there were females on staff this year that were having children that needed those benefits,” Bentley says. “The money’s really important, obviously, but even more important is the sick days. They have to be able to take days off when they get sick. If they use them all on maternity leave, they can’t.” Bentley regrets that the measure doesn’t cover men as well—a matter of ex-

pense—but Bentley is still happy with the statement that the policy sends: Missoula supports women and families. “Even women who don’t have children who are on Council totally get it. But to be fair, the men on Council totally got it,” Bentley says. “It was the right thing to do.” Elizabeth Hubble, co-director of the Women’s, Gender and Sexuality department at the University of Montana, sees no coincidence in the city’s creation of a new maternity leave policy while Council has a female majority. “That’s the importance of having those diverse voices,” Hubble says. “I think a lot of men are supportive and are potential allies, but when an issue doesn’t affect them personally on a regular basis, it takes someone to bring that up for them to be, ‘Oh gosh that is important.’” In the early 2000s, Council’s makeup was more evenly divided than it is now between conservative and liberal viewpoints,


and meetings were much more contentious. Mayor John Engen, who was elected to City Council in 2001, recalls committee meetings that were outright hostile. Older, retired men occupied most of Council’s seats. No longer. Engen says he appreciates the diversity of viewpoints that women bring to the table. “Having experience on Council that reflects the larger community, on balance, makes a bunch of sense to me,” Engen says. “I think this Council looks more like Missoula than the Council that I joined when I was first elected.” Gwen Jones, who has represented Ward 3 on Council for a year, says that she feels positive about the Council’s current dynamic. “I love having a majority of women on Council,” Jones says. “I think we have really civil discourse.” Jones says she often recalls a family photo of her grandmother, Esther, who helped run a ranch near Miles City. In the photo, her father and his brother stand next to their grandfather and grandma Esther, whose shirtsleeves are rolled up. “It looks like early summer, they’ve all got flannel shirts on, they clearly have all been working their asses off somewhere out on the ranch with all the cattle and everything,” Jones says. “Yes, she did the cooking—I don’t think Grandpa cooked—

but when it came to running the ranch, they were all in. They just did what needed to be done. That’s the way I see City Council. People bring different strengths.”

Double Bind Donald Trump interrupted Hillary Clinton 51 times during the first presidential debate in September. Clinton interrupted Trump nine times. To many

Marilyn Marler, Council’s current president, remembers being one of three women on Council when she was elected to represent Ward 6 in 2006. As a botanist with the University of Montana Division of Biological Sciences, Marler was familiar with the dynamics of male-dominated spaces. “I think one of the hardest things about being a woman in politics, or even in science, is that people talk over you,” Marler says. “You’ll say something and

often unspoken pressures on women to be deferential and polite. “I was thinking about having a ‘sorry’ jar at city Council for the women, so every time we say sorry, we would tell on each other, and you have to put a quarter in it,” Marler says. “It’s totally ingrained. The men never apologize. That’s why they wouldn’t be included in the sorry jar, because they never apologize, and wouldn’t.” Marler says she often considers how to present herself in a simultaneously au-

“I think one of the hardest things about being a woman in politics, or even in science, is that people talk over you. You’ll say something, and five minutes later a guy says the same thing and everyone thinks that it’s his idea.” observers, that was evidence of an all-toocommon problem faced by women: how to speak up—and be listened to—in the face of entrenched male entitlement. Decades of research, starting with a landmark 1975 study from the University of California, Santa Barbara, shows that men are far more likely to cut off women while they’re speaking in both public and private spheres.

five minutes later a guy says the same thing and everyone thinks that it’s his idea. You just keep going or tell people, ‘Excuse me, but you interrupted me, I wasn’t done talking yet.’ I mean, you just learn to.” Marler and other Councilwomen say they mostly feel well respected by their male colleagues and city staffers. But even their own behavior reflects the subtle and

thoritative and approachable manner. Bentley says she does as well. “I have a strong presence and a strong voice,” Bentley says. “But I do worry a lot about—I lose sleep at night worrying if I was being bitchy. But in some ways, that’s positive, in a sense that I circle back around with folks all the time to check in and make sure everybody’s feeling good and respected.”

Women currently occupy the majority of seats on Missoula City Council, in stark contrast to most governmental bodies in America, including the U.S. Congress, which is 80 percent male. From left: Councilwomen Julie Armstrong, Marilyn Marler and Gwen Jones.

missoulanews.com • January 12–January 19, 2017 [13]


Ward 5’s Annelise Hedahl says Sheryl Sandberg’s 2013 best-seller, Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead, prompted her to consider how professional women can advocate for themselves, and the ways men—especially of an older generation—can undercut them. “With this Council, we have a very thoughtful group of men who are very respectful of women and their opinions,” Hedahl says. “In my industry, real estate, there are a lot of older gentlemen who’ve been in it a while who will never pass up the chance to mansplain something to me. Like, OK, I’m in the same business, I understand that. I’ll be me and you be you.”

der. Female politicians wrestle, consciously or not, with notions that equate masculinity with capability, while capability in a woman can come across as threatening. As an example, Hubble compares the way the media treat Sarah Palin and Hillary Clinton. Palin, who presents a more traditional version of femininity with long hair and makeup, is characterized as a ditz. Clinton, who has long pushed back against expectations of how she should act and dress—note her famous preference for pantsuits—is characterized as domineering. Neither woman was judged simply by her skills or policies. Both were subject to the “double

this issue heard,” Hubble says. “If you’re trying to make change from within that system, you have to decide what fights to fight.” But those choices can be fraught with gendered expectations. Ward 6’s Michelle Cares and Hedahl, for instance, voted against the proposed gun purchase background check ordinance—an ordinance that a stereotypical progressive woman might be expected to support. Both say they think the law is unenforceable and draws the city into needless legal wrangling. Hedahl, who has children, says ordinance proponents paid no attention to

Gwen Jones agrees with the majority of members who support Council addressing weighty national issues, such as gun safety. “When government from the top down is becoming paralyzed, I think on the local level is where you start to make change,” Jones says.

Several Councilwomen attend a rigorous schedule of committee meetings while working full time and raising families. Councilwoman Heidi West, top, and Councilwoman Emily Bentley, below, both credit supportive partners for help.

[14] Missoula Independent • January 12–January 19, 2017

Hedahl says she’s noticed herself and other women on Council undermining their own authority by adding, “But, umm, I don’t know,” or using “uptalk”—expressing statements in the form of questions. “I think it’s a woman thing. I think we want to be pleasing and we want to say the right things and we don’t want to be too assertive,” Hedahl says. Hubble isn’t surprised at the behavioral minefield faced by Councilwomen. Vocal habits and emotional expression—Hedahl is well known for crying in Council—don’t necessarily reflect skill or expertise, Hubble notes, but they do serve as signifiers of class, status and gen-

bind” that continues to apply to women— but not men—in politics. That double bind is one reason Missoula’s Councilwomen might feel compelled to calibrate their self-presentation with such caution. And that caution is necessary, Hubble notes, because Missoula’s Councilwomen approach their jobs from a perspective not of radical feminism, which works to subvert and dismantle traditional systems of power, but from a position Hubble considers liberal feminism. “Liberal feminism is working within the system to make changes and compromise, and finding the best way to make

her logic, asking how a mother could vote against a law ostensibly aimed at gun safety. “It was awful to see all these women that I knew and all the emails I received from people I respect, and I’m [perceived as] the bad mom who’s down with school shootings,” Hedahl says. Cares, a self-identified progressive who sits on the board of the YWCA, breaks with most other Council members by saying she’d prefer to see the city spend less time on “social justice” issues, such as the Nov. 15 resolution in support of indigenous protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline.


“Let’s take on emergency services and infrastructure. I think we should focus more on those things,” Cares says. It’s a stance that’s not shared by most of the other progressive women on Council, but then Missoula’s Councilwomen— like Missoula’s Councilmen—aren’t a monolithic bloc. Ward 5 representative Julie Armstrong, who voted in favor of the Dakota Access protest resolution, did not respond to requests for comment for this story. West and Marler, who introduced the Dakota Access Pipeline resolution, both bristle at Cares’ suggestion that it wasn’t an important use of Council’s time. “She can speak to what she thinks, but there’s a difference of opinion on that,” Marler says.

Next Up Repugnant attitudes toward women dominated the presidential election, including Trump’s threats to put Clinton on trial and his dismissal of her as a “nasty

found the election “discouraging.” But it also prompted some soul searching. “My efforts will be focused on reaching out to people who think differently and truly listen, so I can better understand the divide that became evident with this election,” Hedahl says. Other Councilwomen, including Jones and Bentley, say they are given heart by the fact that women lead locally in so many important public institutions. Aside from Council, Missoula County is also overseen by a two-thirds female majority of county commissioners, and County Attorney Kirsten Pabst, district court judges Leslie Halligan and Karen Townsend, municipal court judge Kathleen Jenks, justices of the peace Landee Halloway and Marie Anderson, and Interim UM President Sheila Stearns all have prominent roles in the community, helping to normalize a status that, in many arenas of public life in Missoula and beyond, is still out of demographic whack. And it’s unclear how long Council’s woman majority might last. On. Jan. 9,

developed by Rutgers University’s Center for American Women and Politics. “We are often taught or told that women don’t run for office due to concerns surrounding issues such as work-life balance,” Rinfret says. “Although this can be true, since 2014 we have seen trends that some of the largest obstacles for women running for national or state office are support for fundraising for their candidacy or from their respective party.” By some projections, the U.S. Congress won’t be gender-equal until 2121. But Rinfret finds encouragement in local governing bodies like Missoula City Council. “The more women we have run for office, and the support we provide them to do so, is important,” Rinfret says. “The Missoula Council serves as a strong local example and a positive trend for the future.” Organizations that deliver leadership training to women predict a groundswell of progressive candidates spurred to action by Trump’s election. She Should Run,

“I hope something good that came out of that [presidential] election was making young people realize that you can’t take all these freedoms for granted, that you have to actually engage.” woman.” In Montana, Denise Juneau’s bid for Congress was met with derision from GOP operative Randy Vogel, who labeled her a “female lesbian alcoholic” with insulting intent. Nov. 9, the day after the presidential election, was a rough day for City Council. The schedule was packed and nobody wanted to do anything, as Marler recalls. She says someone brought in a dog and Council members and staff swarmed it, stroking its fur for comfort. Bentley, a vocal Clinton supporter, was well aware of how much sexist criticism had been lobbed at the first woman to be nominated for the presidency by a major party. In fact, Bentley remembered seeing what was in store for women in politics when Bill Clinton was elected president in 1992. “I was 12. The same age as Chelsea [Clinton]. And I remember knowing that Rush Limbaugh was making fun of the way she looked. And I was the same age. Just like, who makes fun of a 12-year-old?” Bentley says. “That was hard to watch.” Still, she and Missoula’s other Councilwomen were stunned by Donald Trump’s win. Heidi West says she “felt like somebody punched me in the gut.” Hedahl says she was initially “baffled” by people who supported Trump and

Missoula County announced it had hired Bentley as Missoula County Fairgrounds director. At press time, it’s unclear what that means for her future on Council. Hedahl and Marler both say they aren’t running for reelection this year. Hedahl says one term was enough to decide that politics aren’t for her. Land-use planning decisions sometimes create awkward conflicts with her career in real estate, she says, and she also dislikes the feeling of constant scrutiny. “We get incredible amounts of, not hate mail, but dissatisfaction,” Hedahl says. “You have to have a pretty large palate for that, and I don’t.” As Marler wraps up her 12-year Council career, she’s looking to recruit candidates to run for the seat she’s leaving behind. “I hope something good that came out of that [presidential] election was making young people realize that you can’t take all these freedoms for granted, that you have to actually engage,” Marler says. Sara Rinfret, an assistant professor of political science at the University of Montana, is helping organize the Montana NEW Leadership program, which will host a weeklong training on the UM campus this summer to help college women learn how to run for office. The program was

a national nonprofit that encourages women to pursue careers in politics, reports that more than 4,500 women signed up for its incubator program in the month after the election. VoteRunLead, a nonprofit that hosts educational webinars for female politicians, says it has wait-listed hundreds of new applicants. In a Jan. 2 article, VRL Executive Director Erin Vilardi told the Guardian, “Most women said they woke up on November 9 and realized they could no longer just spectate or click on online petitions, they wanted to know how to run for office, whether it’s the school board, the city Council, state or national representation.” In the coming years, women will continue to push to make their voices heard at the national level, and progressives can expect to do battle with the incoming administration’s agenda. Many of Missoula’s Councilwomen predict that they’ll continue to use the platform of municipal government to take stands on national issues, along with the day-to-day work of local policy making. West, in particular, is bracing for attacks on the environment, social justice and health care. “We don’t have the option not to fight,” West says. kwhittle@missoulanews.com

Councilwomen Annelise Hedahl, top, and Michelle Cares, below, have different political perspectives, but both opposed the city’s gun purchase background check ordinance. Hedahl says ordinance supporters criticized her vote based on her gender and motherhood status, instead of her reasoning.

missoulanews.com • January 12–January 19, 2017 [15]


[arts]

Happily never after The timeless allure of worlds gone wrong by Molly Laich

I

n every new relationship comes that critical moment when you screen your favorite film for the other person, and by God they better like it. (Never in life has this worked out well for me. The Last Temptation of Christ, Welcome to the Dollhouse and Synecdoche, New York have all failed to move the mark, and I am persistently alone.) For my first boyfriend, that magical movie was Kevin Costner’s The Postman. Set in 2013 (16 years in the future for 1997 audiences), the film imagines a ruined landscape in which a series of world wars have annihilated all society and infrastructure. The remaining few survivors struggle to feed themselves while rogue bands of armed men ravage the countryside, seeking to consolidate power by enslaving the weak. A few things about this boyfriend: In every situation, he scanned for danger and looked to itemize opportunity. I was one

of the first customers for his burgeoning weed enterprise and, in fact, that’s how we met. He rolled up his eighths in carefully taped-shut sandwich bags and offered twofor-one sales on Tuesdays. His father kept an arsenal in the basement of his home. Boyfriend watched The Postman with the rapt attention of someone ready—and really quite eager—for an apocalypse. “I plan to stockpile and sell cigarettes,” he told me, dreamily. (This was back in 2002, when enough people still smoked to make that a viable business plan.) All this month, perhaps not unrelated to the presidential inauguration, the Roxy is showing films that portend a bleak and terrifying future as part of its series “Dystopian Dreams.” (Lest you get your hopes up/down, I should warn you that The Postman is not one of those films.) Everybody loves a good dystopian film, and imagining how we alone would triumph when the odds are so stacked against us is a big part of why. We all consider ourselves experts on how society works, how dysfunctional it can be and who’s to blame for everything that’s gone wrong. Paradoxically, dystopian films are often weirdly apolitical. In the case of the most common reasons for a ruined future—widespread disease, nuclear war, environmental disaster or a combination of all three—it’s easy to nestle your own belief system into the why of it. Liberals can imagine that humanity’s bellicose ways destroyed us, while conservatives can assume that we were done in

[16] Missoula Independent • January 12–January 19, 2017

by tactical errors or a bureaucratic inability to fight back. We are often united in these basic misunderstandings. One exception may be Mike Judge’s Idiocracy (2006), which offers a plainly partisan lesson about the dangers of stupidity for future generations. It’s both funny and frightening how the prospect of a dysfunctional government run by a monster-truck-driving president in an American Flag doo-rag may have proved more prescient than previously supposed. When we imagine a world gone wrong, always there’s this fantasy that somehow we can use the opportunity to rebuild something cooler, but rarely does it happen that way. A few malevolent masterminds inevitably swoop in and ruin the party for everyone else. In George Miller’s Mad Max: Fury Road, water shortages have led to an amphetamine-fueled oligarchy in which the people are forced to submit or probably perish. Mad Max represents the lone hero intent on existing outside the system until, ironically, circumstances force him to take on allies in the form of Furiosa and other misfits to best a greater evil. To me, there isn’t a better dystopian film than director Alfonso Cuaron’s Children of Men (2006). The year is 2027, and the world has fallen into chaos because mysteriously, and for the last 20 years, people are no longer able to make babies. Elementary schools are overgrown with

wildlife, and all the major countries have folded except England, thanks to a militaristic, totalitarian rule of order. Like zombies, the people can’t be sure if they’re being punished by science or by God. But unlike the overused living-dead trope, there’s no scapegoat for the humans to turn their rage against—just one another. Children of Men creates a realistic and terrifying near-future where we still have to work office jobs as the world crumbles around us. It doesn’t get too tricky trying to guess future fashion trends, although the aging hipster nurse with dreadlocks and an eyebrow piercing is a nice touch. We may have the Star Wars franchise to thank as a primary influence for Children of Men’s astute details about cars with slight technological enhancements that still look dirty and abused because rebel factions don’t have time to run through the car wash. In retrospect, the parallels between Kevin Costner’s now largely forgotten and critically mocked film The Postman and my first relationship are poignant and many. At just under three hours and a little over two months, respectively, both the film and the relationship ran a tad long—to offer just one example. It’s embarrassing that Costner directed himself as another exalted, “reluc-

tant” hero who delivers both the mail and hope, but for lovers of dystopias, there’s still a lot to admire in the film. Will Patton’s role as an English teacher turned evil dictator offers a powerful example of how the right circumstances can catapult an otherwise unlikely figure into a position of great and inexplicable power. Fans of Trump can probably get behind a story like that. Tom Petty shows up playing himself as a man leading a successful gang of peaceful settlers who don’t let guns into their community. There’s something in this movie for everyone. The Roxy screens Children of Men Thu., Jan. 12, Delicatessen Thu., Jan. 19, and Blade Runner Thu., Jan. 26. 7 PM. arts@missoulanews.com


[music]

Side notes The Microphones’ Early Tapes plays to nostalgia By opening with the absolutely silly song “Teenage Mustache,” The Microphones’ Phil Elverum is sending a clear message about his new release: You are not about to listen to a longlost masterpiece. Instead, Early Tapes 1996-1998 is exactly what the title implies: a patchwork collection of old, unheard odds and ends from the late ’90s. But just because it doesn’t hold a candle to the band’s masterpieces, The Glow Pt. 2 and It Was Hot, We Stayed in the Water, doesn’t mean that it isn’t enjoyable or worth the listen—if you’re already a fan. Early Tapes carries all the charms and all the problems of a prequel. Everyone loves an origin story and everyone loves nostalgia, and on those two fronts the album delivers. On each track, you are treated to the familiar, awkward, pleasant voice of

Elverum singing brand new (to you) songs, and on a few of the better tracks, like “Wires and Cords” and “Compressor,” you get a peek into how the endlessly quirky, experimental indie rock band evolved into something special. In addition, the album’s liner notes include anecdotes and thoughts from Elverum that add insight into the band’s history, not to mention the history of indie rock in the Northwest. Still, prequels are not made for new followers. Listening to Early Tapes is like reading through a dusty box of letters dug up from the attic. If you know (and miss) the sender, they will tug on your heartstrings, even if it’s mostly notes about the weather. If you don’t know the sender, it’s only some smudged, strange words about forgotten weather systems that passed through long ago. (Sarah Aswell)

The Rolling Stones, Blue & Lonesome The story behind Blue & Lonesome— the first new studio record from the Rolling Stones in over a decade—is that the band wanted to get “back to its roots.” I know, bands always say that, and it always makes me roll my eyes. But in this case: Wow. The last Stones record I loved was Some Girls from 1978. This record makes me love them all over again. The band took three days to record a dozen blues standards that they covered in their early days, plus songs they’ve played to work the kinks out when regrouping to record or tour—songs from legends like Howlin’ Wolf and Willie Dixon. The result is raw,

immediate and infused with a surprising amount of swagger and energy. Perhaps the biggest shock is how good Mick Jagger still sounds. His voice may be a tiny bit ragged around the edges, but he belts out these tunes like a much younger man. Just listen to “I Can’t Quit You Baby,” in which he channels Little Walter’s stylistic yips and howls. Finally, there is Jagger’s harmonica playing, which is so solid you may be tempted to think he had a session man play his parts. He didn’t. That’s Mick. What a record. What a testament to the staying power of, arguably, the greatest rock ’n’ roll band of all time. (Chris La Tray)

John Prine, For Better, Or Worse John Prine should be one of the four faces on songwriting’s Mount Rushmore, cheek by jowl with Lucinda Williams, Bob Dylan and Bruce Springsteen. “Your Flag Decal Won’t Get You Into Heaven Anymore,” from his brilliant 1971 debut album, is perhaps even more relevant today than it was back then. So after 45 years of penning some of the most indelible songs of his generation, Prine has earned the right to put it in cruise control for an album of covers. For Better, or Worse is a bookend companion to In Spite of Ourselves, Prine’s 1999 collection of country duets with a clutch of iconic women. Heard side-byside, it hardly seems that 17 years could separate the two albums. Prine’s voice, gravelly after a bout with

cancer, is the perfect foil, allowing his partners to shine. Prine’s duet partners this time around include Alison Krauss, Susan Tedeschi, Kacey Musgraves, Amanda Shires, Lee Ann Womack and Kathy Mattea, tackling songs that range from classic (Hank Williams’ “Cold, Cold Heart”) to obscure (Loretta Lynn and Ernest Tubb’s “Who’s Gonna Take the Garbage Out”). Happily, Iris DeMent, who sang on In Spite of Ourselves, returns to join Prine on this album with “Mr. and Mrs. Used to Be,” another tune drawn from the Lynn-Tubb songbook and a classic back-and-forth that captures the humor and affectionate needling of Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash in their infamous “Jackson.” (Ednor Therriault)

missoulanews.com • January 12–January 19, 2017 [17]


[art]

Slow death Julie Gautier-Downes shoots the ruins of abandoned spaces by Erika Fredrickson

Julie Gautier-Downes’ ghost town series has a forensic air to it. In one photograph, a cabin appears disemboweled, the insides marred by battered, peeling wood and long shreds of stained curtains. In another image, a rocking chair leans into the wall, the spindles of one arm popped from their bottom sockets, the other arm ripped out entirely. The series title, Scattered Remains, evokes a violent aftermath, but the dust and rust in every picture speaks to the truth of these spaces: They were abandoned, maybe even urgently, but they fell apart over the course of 50 to 100 years—a slow death. “They are studies of the traces of people from late-1800s and early-1900s towns, and they’re spaces that have been vacant for a long time,” GautierDownes says. “They’re of gold rush towns or silver mining towns, and a lot of the images are looking through windows at what’s left behind.” The Spokane-based photographer exhibits Scattered Remains with an opening reception on Friday, Jan. 13, at the Zootown Arts Community Center. The show is a mix of still lifes and landscapes shot in Nevada, California, Montana and France. (There are 60 photographs in all, but Gautier-Downes will pare it down for the ZACC gallery space.) What seems like a documentary project for history nuts is, it turns out, much more personal. In 2008, while attending college at UC Santa Cruz, Gautier-Downes got a frantic phone call from her mom. Their Santa Barbara home—where Gautier-Downes and her sister spent most of their childhood—was about to be consumed by a brush fire. Her mother asked her what she wanted to save. “She was running around frantically grabbing what was important, like photos and family records,” Gautier-Downes says. “We saved the dog—that was a good one. And all the family photos on the bulletin boards and photographs of dead grandparents. All my sister’s paintings. Some blank photo albums, because she didn’t realize they were blank. That was it. When you have 45 minutes to stuff your Prius full of stuff, it’s hard to grab a lot.” Before the fire, Gautier-Downes says, her photography didn’t have a theme or much direction, and it was never personal. After the fire, she started spending time in the Mojave Desert shooting abandoned houses and the objects that remained inside. Her pictures of mobile homes, skeletal house frames and boarded-up windows have more to do with what people choose to leave behind than with the special objects they take when they go. The newfound focus became a thread. Gautier-Downes finished school in Santa Cruz and went on to earn an MFA in photography at the Rhode Island School of Design. She moved to New York City and then Spokane, where

The hotel at Montana’s Garnet Ghost Town is part of Julie Gautier-Downes’ series Scattered Remains.

she joined the Saranac Art Projects, an artists’ cooperative. The whole time she was making pictures of abandoned homes. Scattered Remains is an ongoing series she started in 2013, and Garnet Ghost Town is the only Montana representative in the project. An image from the Garnet hotel shows a tattered corset clinging to a dressform and pieces of a lantern on a cobwebbed desk. These photos have the calm of a still life and contrast nicely with some of the more violently wrecked imagery—though they all carry a certain mystery.

[18] Missoula Independent • January 12–January 19, 2017

“I have books on ghost towns and I do find that history interesting,” Gautier-Downes says. “But I consider this more of an art project than a documentary project. Just seeing these objects without knowing the actual story makes more room for whatever narrative the viewer wants it to have.” In her newest series, Tableau, Gautier-Downes has been creating installations made to look like deserted spaces based on places with which she’s familiar. “Last Meal,” for instance, imagines a wood-paneled kitchen a lot like the one in her grandparents’ home, but staged as if they had walked away and never come

back. The walk-in pieces are a little eerie and a little mournful, but pleasing in terms of texture and color. “Making this work is just part of how I process things,” she says. “I don’t find it depressing. I try not to get too caught up in the sadness of these spaces. I think more about it as a project on curiosity, as something archaeological. These are quiet spaces where other people once lived.” Scattered Remains opens at the ZACC Fri., Jan. 13, with a reception from 5:30 to 8:30 PM. efredrickson@missoulanews.com


[film]

Free spin La La Land glides by on superficial charm by Molly Laich

Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling star in La La Land.

In this modern take on classic Hollywood musicals, Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling star as a couple of twentysomethings trying to make it in Los Angeles. Mia is an aspiring actress who works at a coffee shop on a movie lot, while Sebastian plays jazz and hopes to open his own club someday. They keep running into each other in not one but many meet-cutes, until finally the chemistry sticks and we commence to watch these people sing and dance their way through a relationship. Damien Chazelle wrote and directed the picture. It’s his first since 2014’s splendid Whiplash, about a sadistic drum leader and his driven student. Chazelle also wrote last year’s audience favorite 10 Cloverfield Lane, which I vehemently hated, but in retrospect was perhaps a little too hard on. La La Land begins with a spirited musical number performed by a chorus of strangers deadlocked on the interstate in L.A. The people get out of their cars to sing and dance together in a fanciful way. Wouldn’t it be great (the film invites us to imagine) if life were really like this? What if we were together and dancing instead of sad and separate? That the song isn’t very good or even memorable takes a backseat to the sheer audacity of it. La La Land follows basic Hollywood musical logic. The numbers aren’t meant to be taken as literal events taking place within the scene, but rather they represent the characters’ emotional content. Sebastian and Mia take an evening walk in the Hollywood Hills with an idyllic view of the city as their backdrop. It’s their third chance meeting, and third time’s a charm, so we know their flirtatious synchronized tap dance signals the unfurling of their romance. The film fades in and out of fantasy and reality in a way I suspect may be more convenient than deliber-

ate. Mia looks at her cracked iPhone to see a reminder for her audition, but later, when there’s a misunderstanding and she’s late to her date with Sebastian, it’s as if cellphones don’t exist. And it bugs me that we see Gosling performing his jazz several times, but when it comes to Mia’s one-woman show, the movie thinks just hearing about its existence is enough. Other curmudgeons have pointed out that Stone and Gosling are not particularly talented singers and dancers, and it’s true. I was surprised by how little the film asks of them in the musical numbers. This is a complaint commonly registered by theater nerds about film adaptations of beloved shows. Why is Anne Hathaway playing Fantine in Les Miserables when so many great stage actresses could sing it better, or Zellweger and ZetaJones in Chicago, and on and on. (It may be worth noting that all of the aforementioned performers are about 10 times better at singing than Stone and Gosling.) Pipes aside, I personally prefer the Emma Stone from Superbad and that early Doritos commercial, when she still had some meat on her bones and I was the only one who noticed her talent. And I want my Ryan Gosling less lovestruck, a la The Notebook, and more emotionally distant and moody, as in Lars and the Real Girl and Drive. La La Land is a mostly well-made film that many audiences seem to love. It won best picture for comedy or musical at the Golden Globes and it’s an early Oscar contender for best picture. But it’s too long, the music isn’t great, and I can’t stand all the brightly colored twirling skirts. Seriously, who dresses like that outside of a tampon commercial? La La Land continues at the Carmike 12. arts@missoulanews.com

JANUARY WHITE SALE Book 2, get the 3rd day and night FREE! Longer stays get 33% OFF lodging and lift tickets. *Offer valid the nights of January 1–31, 2017. Package includes Martin Luther King Jr. weekend. Restrictions apply. Visit skiwhitefish.com for full details.

Book online at SKIWHITEFISH.COM or by calling 800-858-4152 MUST USE PROMO CODE: JWS

Partially Located on National Forest Lands Photo © GlacierWorld.com

missoulanews.com • January 12–January 19, 2017 [19]


[film] the rest of the spaceship’s crew is still asleep. Then you’re just screwed. Rated PG-13. Stars Chris Pratt, Jennifer Lawrence and Michael Sheen. Playing at the Carmike 12 and the Pharaohplex.

OPENING THIS WEEK THE BYE BYE MAN Three students move into an old house with lots of space, cheap utilities and a murderous monster that possesses anyone who thinks his name. Sounds about right for college housing. Rated PG-13. Stars Faye Dunaway, Doug Jones and Cressia Bonas. Playing at the Carmike 12.

ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away a band of rebels must steal the designs for the Galactic Empire’s new super weapon, a moon-sized, planet-destroying Death Star. Rated PG-13. Stars Felicity Jones, Diego Luna and the CGI ghost of Peter Cushing. Playing at the Carmike 12 and the Pharaohplex.

SILENCE Two 17th century priests travel to Japan to find their mentor. As this is a film by Martin Scorsese, I’m betting things don’t go so well. Rated R. Stars Andrew Garfield, Adam Driver and Liam Neeson. Playing at the Roxy.

SING The best way for a broke koala to save his failing theater is to host a local singing competition. Too bad his assistant offered $100,000 in prize money they don’t have. Rated PG. Stars the voice talents of Matthew McConaughey, Reese Witherspoon and Nick Kroll. Playing at the Carmike 12 and the Pharaohplex.

LIVE BY NIGHT Sure his dad was a strict police captain, but it’s 1926 and the real money is in bootlegging. Rated R. Stars Ben Affleck, Zoe Saldana and Elle Fanning. Playing at the Carmike 12. MONSTER TRUCKS Hidden inside the workings of his homemade truck is a tentacled monster with the need for speed. See, this is why no one trusts American-made cars. Rated PG. Stars Lucas Till, Rob Lowe and Barry Pepper. Playing at the Carmike 12 and the Pharaohplex. PATRIOTS DAY Based on the true story, a city-wide manhunt searches for the terrorists responsible for the 2013 Boston Marathon Bombing. Rated R. Stars Mark Wahlberg, J.K. Simmons and John Goodman. Playing at the Pharaohplex and Carmike 12. SLEEPLESS A dirty cop gets in over his head when he and his partner are caught stealing coke from a drug lord. Rated R. Stars Jamie Foxx, T.I. and Michelle Monaghan. Playing at the Carmike 12.

NOW PLAYING ASSASSIN’S CREED Nothing is true; everything is permitted. Instead of being executed, a career criminal is tasked with reliving his ancestor’s memories as an assassin working during the Spanish Inquisition. I didn’t expect that. Rated PG-13. Stars Michael Fassbender, Jeremy Irons and Marion Cotillard. Playing at the Carmike 12. CHILDREN OF MEN Two decades after human infertility has left society on the brink of collapse, a depressed activist becomes the guardian of the first pregnant woman in 20 years. Rated R. Stars Clive Owen, Julianne Moore and Michael Caine. Screening Thu., Jan. 12 at 7 PM.

Now who’s been taken? Liam Neeson stars in Silence, opening at the Roxy. DELICATESSEN The most frustrating thing about running a butcher shop in post-apocalyptic France is constantly replacing the employees you’ve killed and sold as meat. Rated R. Stars Marie-Laure Dougnac, Pascal Benezech and Jean-Claude Dreyfus. Playing at the Roxy. Thu., Jan. 19 at 7 PM. THE EAGLE HUNTRESS A 13-year-old girl trains to be the first eagle hunter in twelve generations of her Kazakh family. Rated G. Directed by Otto Bell, narrated by Daisy Ridley. Playing at the Roxy. FENCES Based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning play by August Wilson, a failed baseball player struggles to keep his bitterness from affecting his family while working as a garbage collector. Rated PG-13. Stars Denzel Washington, Viola Davis and Stephen McKinley Henderson. Playing at the Carmike 12. THE GREAT MUPPET CAPER The Muppet gang heads to Great Britain where they get caught up in a series of jewel heists. Waka waka! Rated G. Stars Jim Henson, Frank Oz and Diana Rigg. Showing Sun., Jan. 15 at 2:45 PM. HIDDEN FIGURES You think you’re under-appreciated at work? These AfricanAmerican women did the calculations that put John Glenn in orbit while they worked at a segregated facility. Rated PG. Stars Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer and Janelle Monáe. Playing at the Carmike 12 and the Pharaohplex. HOWARD ZINN: YOU CAN’T BE NEUTRAL ON A MOVING TRAIN Follow the life of political activist and historian Howard Zinn through the words of his friends and enemies.

[20] Missoula Independent • January 12–January 19, 2017

Not Rated. Directed by Deb Ellis. Showing Mon., Jan. 16 at 7 PM at the Roxy. JUMPING FRAMES Vienna International Ballet Experience hosts an evening of short films all about dance at the Roxy Theater. Fri., Jan. 13 at 7 PM. LA LA LAND An aspiring actress falls in love with a jazz pianist in this love letter to Hollywood musicals. Rated PG-13. Stars Ryan Gosling, Emma Stone and John Legend. Playing at the Carmike 12. (See Film.)

STRIKE A POSE Unsurprisingly, the seven young male dancers who joined Madonna on her 1990 tour have very important stories to tell. Not Rated. Directed by Ester Gould. Playing Thu., Jan. 12 at 7 PM at the Roxy. TOTAL RECALL (1990) Side effects of a memory-implant vacation may include nausea, diarrhea and traveling to Mars to overthrow an evil corporation and saving a domed city of mutants. Consult your physician today. Rated R. Stars Arnold Schwarzenegger, Sharon Stone and Michael Ironside. Showing Sat., Jan. 14 at 8 PM at the Roxy.

MANCHESTER BY THE SEA Returning to your hometown is always tough, especially when you’re returning to raise your orphaned nephew. Rated R. Stars Casey Affleck, Michelle Williams and Lucas Hedges. Playing at the Roxy and the Pharaohplex.

UNDERWORLD: BLOOD WARS Why am I suddenly in the mood to play some Vampire: The Masquerade? Vampires and werewolves battle it out in this fifth installment of Len Wiseman’s vision. Rated R. Stars Kate Beckinsale, Theo James and Charles Dance. Playing at the Pharaohplex and the Carmike 12.

MOANA An adventurous teenager sails out on a daring mission to save her people with a little help from a demi-god. Rated PG. Disney’s computer-animated musical stars the voices of Auli’i Cravalho, Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson and Alan Tudyk. Playing at the Carmike 12 and the Pharaohplex.

WHY HIM? Don’t you hate it when your daughter introduces you to her new shirtless, drug-using, foul-mouthed boyfriend? At least this one is a millionaire. Rated R. Stars Bryan Cranston, James Franco and Megan Mullally. Playing at the Carmike 12 and the Pharaohplex.

A MONSTER CALLS Between dealing with school bullies and his mom’s terminal illness, you’d think this boy would be happy to have a Liam Neeson-voiced tree come tell him stories at night. Rated PG-13. Also stars Lewis MacGougall and Sigourney Weaver. Playing at the Pharaohplex.

Capsule reviews by Charley Macorn.

PASSENGERS Being an early riser is a good thing. Unless you’ve woken up 90 years before you’re supposed to and

Planning your outing to the cinema? Visit the arts section of missoulanews.com to find up-to-date movie times for theaters in the area. You can also contact theaters to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 at 541-7469; The Roxy at 728-9380; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603.


[dish]

Winter lasagna with fresh beet pasta by Gabi Moskowitz This gorgeous lasagna has layers of beautiful purple pasta, creamy, earthy sage bechamel, sweet roasted pumpkin, spinach and caramelized onions. It makes a rich and satisfying vegetarian entree or can, alternatively, be served in small pieces as a pasta course. It takes a long time to prepare, but is well worth it. In the absence of time or interest in making fresh beet pasta, use regular fresh or dried lasagna noodles. Serves 6-8. Ingredients 1 recipe beet pasta dough (dough only) 1/8 cup flour 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter 5 fresh sage leaves, finely chopped 1 cup roasted pumpkin puree 1 lb spinach, cleaned and chopped 1 red onion, sliced 1 pint heavy cream 1 1/2 cups shredded white cheddar cheese 2 tbsp olive oil salt and pepper to taste Directions Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Lightly grease a 9"x12" lasagna pan. Set aside. Using a floured rolling pin and knife or a pasta machine, roll dough into about 20 strips that are 12" long and 3 1/2" wide. Dust lightly with flour to keep them from sticking. Set aside. To make the sage bechamel, melt butter over medium heat in a saucepan. Stir in flour and whisk 23 minutes until a sticky dough forms. Gradually add cream and whisk constantly until a thick white sauce forms, ensuring there are no lumps. Stir in sage and season with salt and pepper to taste. You may need to

BROKEASS GOURMET thin it out with a little water if sauce becomes too thick. When sauce is the consistency of Alfredo sauce, remove from heat, whisking periodically to avoid congealing. Heat olive oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add onions and stir to coat evenly in oil. Reduce heat to medium low and allow onions to caramelize, stirring very occasionally (this should take 10-15 minutes). When onions are soft, remove from heat and transfer to a plate. Return frying pan to the stove, but do not clean it. Add spinach bit by bit until it has wilted. Drain excess liquid from pan and transfer cooked spinach to a plate. To prepare the lasagna, spoon about 1/4 cup bechamel in the bottom of the prepared pan. Cover with a layer of noodles. Spoon more bechamel over the noodles and scatter the caramelized onions and a sprinkle of salt and pepper over the bechamel. Sprinkle about 1/2 cup cheese over the onions and cover with a layer of noodles. Top noodles with more bechamel and the pumpkin, along with a light sprinkle of salt and pepper. Top noodles with more bechamel and the spinach, along with a light sprinkle of salt and pepper and 1/2 cup cheese. Cover with more noodles, a thin layer of bechamel and the remaining 1/2 cup cheese. Cover entire lasagna tightly with foil. Bake, covered, for 40 minutes. Cook, uncovered, for the remaining 10 minutes, or however long it takes to achieve a bubbly, lightly browned top. Allow to cool 10-12 minutes. Cut into squares and serve. BrokeAss Gourmet caters to folks who want to live the high life on the cheap, with delicious recipes that are always under $20. Gabi Moskowitz is the blog’s editor-in-chief and author of The BrokeAss Gourmet Cookbook and Pizza Dough:100 Delicious, Unexpected Recipes.

missoulanews.com • January 12–January 19, 2017 [21]


[dish]

Super Lunch Combo 3 sushi rolls, miso soup and green salad

Just $12.00 406-829-8989 1901 Stephens Ave Order online at asahimissoula.com. Delicious dining or carryout. Chinese & Japanese menus.

Asahi 1901 Stephens Ave 829-8989 asahimissoula.com Exquisite Chinese and Japanese cuisine. Try our new Menu! Order online for pickup or express dine in. Pleasant prices. Fresh ingredients. Artistic presentation. Voted top 3 People’s Choice two years in a row. Open Tue-Sun: 11am-10pm. $-$$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Nothing says Bernice’s like the cold, grey month of January. Come in, sit quietly, or share a table with friends in our warm and cozy dining room. Enjoy a cup of joe, a slice of cake, or a breakfast pastry as the sun beams in through our large glass windows. Want a healthy lunch? Come by in the afternoon and try a salad sampler or Bernice’s own Garlic Hummus Sandwich on our Honey Whole Wheat Bread. Bless you all in 2017! xoxo bernice. $-$$ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a timehonored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$

JANUARY

COFFEE SPECIAL

COME IN AND WARM UP

Butterfly House Blend

$10.95/lb. IN OUR COFFEE BAR

BUTTERFLY HERBS

BUTTERFLY

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

ALL DAY

MONDAY & THURSDAY SATURDAY NIGHT

SUSHI SPECIALS

Bridge Pizza 600 S Higgins Ave. 542-0002 bridgepizza.com A popular local eatery on Missoula's Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula's place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drivethru, & delivery. Open everyday 11am 10:30pm. $-$$ Burns Street Bistro 1500 Burns St. 543-0719 burnsstbistro.com We cook the freshest local ingredients as a matter of pride. Our relationship with local farmers, ranchers and other businesses allows us to bring quality, scratch cooking and fresh-brewed Black Coffee Roasting Co. coffee and espresso to Missoula’s Historic Westside neighborhood. Handmade breads & pastries, soups, salads & sandwiches change with the seasons, but our commitment to delicious food does not. Mon-Fri 7am - 2pm. Sat/Sun Brunch 9am - 2pm. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 44 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and

coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $

Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West 541-FOOD The GFS Deli features made-to-order sandwiches, Fire Deck pizza & calzones, rice & noodle wok bowls, an award-winning salad bar, an olive & antipasto bar and a self-serve hot bar offering a variety of housemade breakfast, lunch and dinner entrées. A seasonallychanging selection of deli salads and rotisserieroasted chickens are also available. Locally-roasted coffee/espresso drinks and an extensive fresh juice and smoothie menu complement bakery goods from the GFS ovens and Missoula’s favorite bakeries. Indoor and patio seating. Open every day 7am-10pm $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St. 549-7723 grizzlyliquor.com Voted Missoula’s Best Liquor Store! Largest selection of spirits in the Northwest, including all Montana micro-distilleries. Your headquarters for unique spirits and wines! Free customer parking. Open Monday-Saturday 9-7:30 $-$$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 ironhorsebrewpub.com We’re the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we’ll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Iza 529 S. Higgins 830-3237 izarestaurant.com Local Asian cuisine feature SE Asian, Japanese, Korean and Indian dishes. Gluten Free and Vegetarian

Not available for To-Go orders

[22] Missoula Independent • January 12–January 19, 2017

$…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over


[dish] no problem. Full Beer, Wine, Sake and Tea menu. We have scratch made bubble teas. Come in for lunch, dinner, drinks or just a pot of awesome tea. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm, Dinner M-Sat 3pm-close. $-$$ Liquid Planet 223 N. Higgins 541-4541 Whether it’s coffee or cocoa, water, beer or wine, or even a tea pot, French press or mobile mug, Liquid Planet offers the best beverage offerings this side of Neptune. Missoula’s largest espresso and beverage bar, along with fresh and delicious breakfast and lunch options from breakfast burritos and pastries to paninis and soups. Peruse our global selection of 1,000 wines, 400 beers and sodas, 150 teas, 30 locally roasted coffees, and a myriad of super cool beverage accessories and gifts. Find us on facebook at /BestofBeverage. Open daily 7:30am to 9pm. Liquid Planet Grille 540 Daly 540-4209 (corner of Arthur & Daly across from the U of M) MisSOULa’s BEST new restaurant of 2015, the Liquid Planet Grille, offers the same unique Liquid Planet espresso and beverage bar you’ve come to expect, with breakfast served all day long! Sit outside and try the stuffed french toast or our handmade granola or a delicious Montana Melt, accompanied with MisSOULa’s best fries and wings, with over 20 salts, seasonings and sauces! Open 7am-8pm daily. Find us on Facebook at /LiquidPlanetGrille. $-$$ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. (on the hip strip) 543-7154 themissoulaseniorcenter.org Did you know the Missoula Senior Center serves delicious hearty lunches every week day for only $4 for those on the Nutrition Program, $5 for U of M Students with a valid student ID and $6 for all others. Children under 10 eat free. Join us from 11:30 - 12:30 M-F for delicious food and great conversation. $ The Mustard Seed Asian Cafe Southgate Mall 542-7333 Contemporary Asian fusion cuisine. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combine the best of Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences. Full menu available at the bar. Award winning desserts made fresh daily , local and regional micro brews, fine wines & signature cocktails. Vegetarian and Gluten free menu available. Takeout & delivery. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary KoreanJapanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$

Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. 543-3188 orangestreetfoodfarm.com Experience The Farm today!!! Voted number one Supermarket & Retail Beer Selection. Fried chicken, fresh meat, great produce, vegan, gluten free, all natural, a HUGE beer and wine selection, and ROCKIN’ music. What deal will you find today? $-$$$

Wintry mixology at the Silver Dollar

HAPPIEST HOUR

Pearl Cafe 231 E. Front St. 541-0231 pearlcafe.us Country French meets the Northwest. Idaho Trout with King Crab, Rabbit with Wild Mushroom Ragout, Garden City Beef Ribeye, Fresh Seafood Specials Daily. House Made Charcuterie, Sourdough Bread & Delectable Desserts. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Pita Pit 130 N Higgins 541-7482 pitapitusa.com Fresh Thinking Healthy Eating. Enjoy a pita rolled just for you. Hot meat and cool fresh veggies topped with your favorite sauce. Try our Chicken Caesar, Gyro, Philly Steak, Breakfast Pita, or Vegetarian Falafel to name just a few. For your convenience we are open until 3am 7 nights a week. Call if you need us to deliver! $-$$ Sushi Hana 403 N. Higgins 549-7979 SushiMissoula.com Montana’s Original Sushi Bar. We Offer the Best Sushi and Japanese Cuisine in Town. Casual atmosphere. Plenty of options for non-sushi eaters including daily special items you won’t find anywhere else. $1 Specials Mon & Wed. Lunch Mon–Sat; Dinner Daily. Sake, Beer, & Wine. Visit SushiMissoula.com for full menu. $$-$$$ Taco Sano Two Locations: 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West 1515 Fairview Ave inside City Life 541-7570 • tacosano.net Home of Missoula’s Best BREAKFAST BURRITO. 99 cent TOTS every Tuesday. Once you find us you’ll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9pm 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over

photo by Matthew Frank

What you’re drinking: What, you want a menu? If it’s Monday night, there’s a good chance that 18-year veteran tender Brian Patterson is behind the bar at the Silver Dollar, one of Missoula’s few remaining tethers (est. 1935) to its (mostly) unreconstructed drinking past. Like, unless it comes out of a soda gun, they don’t even have mixers at the Silver Dollar. Too complicated. Why bother? But on Mondays, usually, Patterson brings in his own kit—from home—and goes wild with, well, maybe a Manhattan with anejo tequila instead of bourbon? Does that sound good? That might be good! Hell if I know. I came in at 9:15 on a slushy Monday night when Patterson had just worked all day at his other job, which is property management. Pipes had been frozen. It had been busy. He hadn’t had time on his way to work to swing by home and pick up his kit, with which he might have made me a martini. Or a whiskey sour. Or anything, really, other than a beer and a shot. Besides, it turns out the Buddha’s Fingers that Patterson had acquired two days earlier in hopes of pickling it, zesting it and all manner of mixologist whatnot had already gone to mold, so this wasn’t the night for specialty cocktails in any case. That’s cool. We weren’t in search of anything in particular. So we asked for the Blackfoot IPA—because it was on tap and what halfwit wouldn’t?—and

chased it with the Wild Turkey 101, which is about as top-shelf as it gets at the Silver Dollar. We did not regret our choices. What it tastes like: Who knows! Next week is a new week, and Patterson says he’s ready to go. But beware: His sense of seasonality might be more perverse than yours. This wintry weather puts him in mind of tropical beach drinks, concoctions designed to transport you to “happier places.” You might think about whether that’s really where you want your cocktail to take you. Who’s making it: Probably Brian Patterson, who landed in Missoula two decades ago under circumstances as improbable as they come. It’s a good story. If it’s not too busy, he might tell you about it. When you’re drinking it: Mondays; no guarantees. Where to find it: The Silver Dollar: a suitably long room, three pool tables, unpretentiously exposed brick and a bank of gambling machines. With a bar. And no mixers. —Brad Tyer Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

missoulanews.com • January 12–January 19, 2017 [23]


MON | 8 PM | WILMA Robert Earl Keen plays the Wilma Mon., Jan. 16. Pretty sharp. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $35/$30 advance.

FRI | 10 PM | TOP HAT Gipsy Moon plays the Top Hat Fri., Jan. 13. 10 PM. Free.

THUR | 1/19 | 10 PM | TOP HAT Moonshine Mountain plays the Top Hat Thu., Jan. 19. 10 PM. Free.

[24] Missoula Independent • January 12–January 19, 2017


FRI | 8 PM | PALACE Undun celebrates the release of its third album at the Palace Lounge Fri., Jan. 13. 8 PM. 21plus. $5.

One FREE Week

IN JANUARY TO EXPERIENCE OUR CLUB

+ $25 Off Enrollment Fee IF YOU JOIN BY TUESDAY JANUARY 31, 2017* *MUST BE 18 YRS. OR OLDER

SUN | 3 PM | ADAMS CENTER Ventriloquist and comedian Jeff Dunham performs at the Adams Center Sun., Jan. 15. $34.50–$47. 3 PM.

2105 Bow St. Missoula, MT 406.728.4410 thewomensclub.com

missoulanews.com • January 12–January 19, 2017 [25]


01-1 2

01-1 3

Thursday Friday The Learning Center at Red Willow hosts a free mediation class for veterans at the Missoula Vet Center. 1 PM. Call 406-7214918 to register.

nightlife The Vienna International Ballet Experience continues. Couru to vibe.international/missoula for a full schedule. Protect your identity while protecting your prescriptions with a free presentation at Missoula Public Library. 5:30 PM–7 PM. Keema and the Keepsakes keep Draught Works rocking. 6 PM–8 PM. Free. Bob Wire brings his rocking country sound to Bitter Root Brewing. 6 PM–8:30 PM. Free. University of Montana historian William Farr offers new historical insights into the route Native Americans traveled from Travelers’ Rest east to the Great Plains in their quest for buffalo. Lolo Community Center. 7 PM. Free. He’s not talking about the cover of Ride the Lightning. I checked. World-renowned archaeologist Dr. James Keyser gives a free public talk on the ancient rock art of Montana at the Montana Natural History Center. 7 PM. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. Get cash toward your bar tab for first place, plus specials on beer. Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM. Shramana’s VFW residency continues with Swamp Ritual, Poverty Porn and Shot Stereo, which are all bands and not History Channel programming. 9 PM. $3. 21-plus. Need a touch of country in your karaoke? Rocking Country Karaoke at the Sunrise Saloon will have you boot-scootin’ in no time. 9 PM. Free. Start spreading the news! There’s karaoke today! You don’t need to be a veteran of the Great White Way to sing your heart out at the Broadway Bar. 9:30 PM. Free. After the New Year’s Eve I had, I can totally relate. Rotgut Whines play the Top Hat. 10 PM. Free.

You’ll be in stitches at Yarns at the Library, the fiber-arts craft group that meets at the Missoula Public Library in the board room from noon–2 PM Fridays. No registration required, just show up!

6:45, show at 7 PM. Check missoulapubliclibrary.org for info. Free. Aran Buzzas brings his folky tonk to the betterRoot Cider House. 7 PM–9 PM. Free.

The Women in Black stand in mourning of international violence every Friday on the Higgins bridge from 12:15–12:45 PM. Visit jrpc.org/calendar to learn more.

Bitterroot Baroque presents its first concert of the 2017 season with San Francico’s Musica Pacifica. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church. 7:30 PM. $25.

Folks with disabilities can get creative at Art Group, every second and fourth Friday of the month at Summit Independent Living from 2–4 PM. Call 728-1630.

I don’t think they’ll be able to undo this one. Undun celebrates the release of its third album Agents of War with special guests Blessidoom & Wizzerd at the Palace Lounge. 8 PM. 21-plus. $5.

I don’t know about you, but wrapping up my work week by watching some poor cricket getting devoured by a large Chilean tarantula is somehow very satisfying. Tarantula feeding at the Missoula Butterfly House and Insectarium, every Friday at 4 PM. $4 admission.

nightlife The Vienna International Ballet Experience continues. Couru to vibe.international/missoula for a full schedule. In photographs of long-abandoned homes in the United States and France, Julie Gautier-Downes questions what can be learned about past inhabitants through the objects left behind. See the finished exhibit at the ZACC. 5:30 PM– 8:30 PM. Desert to Mountain contains a se-

Bitterroot Baroque presents its first concert of the 2017 season with San Francico’s Musica Pacifica at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church. 7:30 PM. $25. ries of images bridging the journey from one part of artist Rebecca Sobin’s life into the next, defining where she has traveled as an artist. The ZACC. 5:30 PM–8:30 PM. Free. Bring an instrument or just kick back and enjoy the tunes at the Irish Music Session every Friday at the Union Club from 6–9 PM. No cover. The Top Hat presents FamilyFriendly Friday, a time where parents and their kids can socialize, listen to music, eat great food and have fun. This week the Craicers

provide the live music. Free. Cozy up with a glass of made-inMontana wine and enjoy live music at Ten Spoon Vineyard. This week enjoy the music of Carla Green Jazz. 6 PM. Free. Knock back a couple of cold ones and listen to Tom Catmull at the Missoula Brewing Co. 6 PM–8 PM. Free. Enjoy free cinema at Missoula Public Library’s World Wide Cinema night, the second Friday of every month. The series showcases indie and foreign films. Doors open at

Missing the Dead Hipster Dance Party? Double down on the nostalgia with Dead Hipster I Love the 90s. I guarantee you will hear the Space Jam theme. 9 PM. $3. 21plus. I sure hope they know where the rest of their shirts are. Blue Collar plays the Sunrise Saloon. 9:30 PM. Free. Tired of having handsome spies in tuxes harass you while you’re just trying to get work done at your desk? Unwind with Moneypenny at the Union Club. 9:30 PM. Free. Gipsy Moon and Satsang play the Top Hat. 10 PM. Free.

freedom

Spotlight and 60-plus years after the U.N. banned slavery worldwide, there are more than 30 million people still enslaved in the world, which is more than any other time in human history. People worldwide, including in the United States, are still exWHAT: Faces of Freedom: Voices Calling for ploited for labor and the End of Modern Slavery for sex. According to the Montana DepartWHO: Freedom 58 Project ment of Justice, the avWHERE: The Public House erage age of girls forced into the sex WHEN: Sun., Jan. 15, at 5 PM trade is 13. Only an estimated 2 percent of HOW MUCH: Free those children are ever MORE INFO: freedom58project.com freed.

And here I thought most cephalopods worked in inks. Charcoal Squids play the VFW with New Old Future, Yezazee and Iameye. 9 PM. $6 18-20/$3 21-plus.

Human trafficking is still a huge problem across the globe and within the borders of the United States. Even a century and a half after the passage of the thirteenth amendment

[26] Missoula Independent • January 12–January 19, 2017

Freedom 58 Project's Faces of Freedom is a traveling exhibit of art that features hundreds of works celebrating survivors of human trafficking and bringing light to this injustice. The exhibit also gives information on how

human trafficking can be combatted in our own community. Featured in Faces of Freedom is the photography of Montana State University graduate Bonnie Sanders. – Charley Macorn


Sunday

Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs,8 AM at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org.

The 10th Annual Darby Dog Derby Sled Dog Race features junior, skijor and pee wee races. Visit bitterrootmushers.org for more info and registration. Lost Trail Pass. 9:30 AM–2 PM.

Sat. and 2 PM on Sun. at the Missoula Public Library. Free.

Learn to curl with the Missoula Curling Club, skate with the Missoula Figure Skating Club and play hockey with the Missoula Bruins at the Ranch Club’s Outdoor, Indoor Fun Day. 10 AM–5 PM. Proceeds benefit the Cycstic Fibrosis Foundation and Missoula Aging Services. $5.

nightlife

01-1 5

01-1 4

Saturday

Get your fresh produce and farmdirect goodies when Stage 112 hosts the Missoula Valley Winter Market from 9 AM–1 PM. The 10th Annual Darby Dog Derby Sled Dog Race features junior, skijor and pee wee races. Visit bitterrootmushers.org for more info and registration. Lost Trail Pass. 9:30 AM–2 PM. Learn to tell your “Story of Self” to affect policy change during the upcoming legislative session. A comprehensive training organized by the Montana Progressive Democrats gets you comfortable telling your own story to give testimony or lobby your representatives. The Solstice Building. 10 AM–3 PM. Free Winter Storytelling at Travelers’ Rest State Park celebrates the Salish tradition of sharing stories during the long, dark winter every Saturday in January and February. This week Kristi Hager speaks on artists George Catlin and Karl Bodmer on the Missouri. 11 AM. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like storytelling, finger plays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM on Sat. and 2 PM on Sun. at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Tony Incashola, director of the Salish-Pend d’Oreille Culture Committee tells Salish Winter Stories at River Street Dance Festival in Hamilton. 1:30 PM. Free. The Montana Natural History Center presents activities for kids every Saturday. This week, sip cocoa and learn about the amazing

Dodgy Mountain Men come out of the hills and into the Top Hat. 10 PM. $5. ways animals hibernate. Free with admission to Center. 2 PM.

partner necessary! Potluck food and refreshments. $10 per person.

nightlife

Also chapter names from my biography of Vaclav Havel, Cannon, Locksaw Cartel and Misfortune Tellers play the Palace. 9 PM. Free.

VIBE USA ends its weeklong celebration of all things dance with a gala finale at the Wilma. Doors at 5 PM, show at 6. $50/$25 in advance. The Loose String Band plays the Highlander taproom at Missoula Brewing Co. 6 PM–8 PM. Free. Just what I needed to finish my witch’s brew. Night Blooming Jasmine blossoms at Imagine Nation Brewing Co. 6 PM–8 PM. Free. I’m not going to give the hard sell on this. Andrea Harsell plays Draught Works. 6 PM–8 PM. Free. Tango Missoula hosts a beginners’ lesson at 8 PM followed by dancing from 9 PM to midnight. Downtown Dance Collective. No experience or

DJ Kris Moon completely disrespects the adverb with the Absolutely Dance Party at the Badlander, which gets rolling at 9 PM, with fancy drink specials to boot. $5. Show up to see Showdown play Sunrise Saloon. 9:30 PM. Free. I remember when they were kneehigh to a jam band. Full Grown Band plays the Union Club. 9:30 PM. Free.

Collagraph printmaking class. No prerequisite required. All levels are welcome. Bring found materials and favorite textures to incorporate into your plate! Class cost includes two hours of shop time to be used to print the final edition. $40. 11 AM–1 PM. Watch the Green Bay Packers try and defeat the Dallas Cowboys in a wonderful venue, not the lame stadium in Arlington, at the Wilma. 2:40 PM. Free. People Who Stutter is a casual group of folks who get together the third Sunday of each month to just hang out and exchange stories and info. With Tricia Opstad, MS, CCC-SLP and Trevor Monsos. Liquid Planet Grille, 1025 Arthur St., 1:30–3:30 PM. Free. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like storytelling, finger plays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM on

Ventriloquist and comedian Jeff Dunham performs at the Adams Center. $34.50–$47. 3 PM.

Heather Lingle provides the soundtrack at Draught Works. 5 PM–7 PM. Free. It’s really about the notes they aren’t playing. Every Sunday, Imagine Nation hosts Jazzination. 5 PM–8 PM. Free. Artists from around the state created artwork to raise awareness of human trafficking. A gallery exhibit at the Public House highlights what we can do to end this tragedy. 5 PM–7 PM. Open mic at Lolo Hot Springs’ Bear Cave Bar and Grill offers cool prizes like cabin stays, bar tabs and hot springs passes, plus drink specials, starting at 7 PM. Call 406-273-2297 to sign up. No cover. Sundays are shaken, not stirred, at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $5 martinis all evening, live jazz and local DJs keepin’ it classy. Music starts at 8 PM. Free. Every Sunday is “Sunday Funday” at the Badlander. Play cornhole, beer pong and other games, have drinks and forget tomorrow is Monday. 9 PM.

Dodgy Mountain Men come out of the hills and into the Top Hat. 10 PM. $5.

60$//,67+(1(:%,* 60 0$/ //,6 67+ +(1 1(: HOHYDWH07RUJ HO OHYD DWH0 07R RUJ missoulanews.com • January 12–January 19, 2017 [27]


Tuesday

01-1 6

01-1 7

Monday

Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters helps you improve your public speaking skills with weekly meetings at ALPS in the Florence Building, noon–1 PM. Free and open to the public. Visit shootinthebull.info for details. It’s Mule-Tastic Tuesday, which means the Montana Distillery will donate $1 from every cocktail sold to a local nonprofit organization. 12–8 PM. Caregiver Support Group, for caregivers to an older adult or person with a disability, meets every third Tuesday of the month from 4–5 PM at Missoula Aging Services, 337 Stephens Ave. Call 728-7682 for more information.

nightlife

Anders Osborne performs at the Top Hat along with Jackie Greene. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $29/$26 advance. Spend Monday morning exploring before enjoying a hot beverage with Coffee Walks. This week, explore the North Hills. Meet at Currents Aquatics Center. 9 AM-12 PM. $5. The Confident Stitch hosts its second annual Stitch for a Cause. Pop by all day and donate your time sewing pillows for the Montana Cancer Center. 10 AM–5 PM. A $7 donation gets you all the materials to make pillows for post-op mastectomy patients. Sip a fancy cocktail for a cause at Moscow Monday at the Montgomery Distillery. A dollar from every drink sold is donated to Missoula Medical Aid. 12 PM– 8 PM.

WordPlay! offers opportunity for community creativity. Word games, poetry, free writing and expansion all happen in Ste. 4 of the Warehouse Mall at BASE. Open to all ages and abilities every Mon. at 4 PM.

nightlife Celebrate the work and legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. with a youth rally at Caras Park at 5 PM, followed by the March for Justice to St. Paul Lutheran Church at 5:30 PM. A community celebration and dinner social follow.

Find out how the Garden City grows at the weekly Missoula City Council meeting, where you can no doubt expect ranting public commenters, PowerPoint presentations and subtle wit from Mayor Engen. Missoula council chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Meetings are the first four Mondays of every month at 7 PM, except for holidays.

Get mindful at Be Here Now, a mindfulness meditation group that meets Mondays from 7:30–8:45 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Free, but donations appreciated. Visit openway.org.

Shake off your Monday blues at the Dram Shop with $3 drinks every Monday. 12 PM–9 PM.

This guy is pretty sharp. Robert Earl Keen plays the Wilma. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $35/$30 advance.

Aaron “B-Rocks” Broxterman hosts karaoke night at the Dark Horse Bar. 9 PM. Free.

Brush up on your skillz with the Bridge Group for beginners or those in need of a refresher course. Missoula Senior Center, Mondays at 1 PM. $2.25.

Prepare a couple of songs and bring your talent to Open Mic Night at Imagine Nation Brewing. Sign up when you get there. Every Monday from 6–8 PM.

Veterans are invited to take a free Learning Center Tai Chi class at the Missoula Vet Center. Call 406-721-4918 to register.

Bingo at the VFW: The easiest way to make rent money since keno. 245 W. Main. 6:30 PM. $12 buy-in.

[28] Missoula Independent • January 12–January 19, 2017

Dust off that banjolin and join in the Top Hat’s picking circle, 6–8 PM every Tuesday. All ages. So you’ve taken some photos.

Unity Dance & Drum’s African Dance Class with Tarn Ream and live musicians meets every Tuesday at the Missoula Senior Center. 10 AM. All levels and ages welcome. $10 per class, $35 for 4. For more info call 549-7933. Learn the two-step and more at country dance lessons at the Hamilton Senior Center, Tuesdays from 7–9 PM. $5. Bring a partner. Call 381-1392 for more info. Show off your big brain at Quizzoula trivia night, every Tuesday at the VFW. Current events, picture round and more. 8:30 PM. Free. Our trivia question for this week: Who was the first U.S. President to have a middle name? Answer in tomorrow’s Nightlife. Mike Avery hosts the Music Showcase every Tuesday, featuring some of Missoula’s finest musical talent at the Badlander, 9 PM–1 AM. To sign up, email michael.avery@live.com.

Jackie Greene and Anders Osborne give a special co-bill performance at the Top Hat. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $29/$26 advance.

Unstress yourself after the holidays with coloring book therapy at Missoula Brewing Company. Fifty cents of every pint sold goes to help animals at the Humane Society of Western Montana. 5 PM–8 PM. Free.

Every Monday the Learning Center at Red Willow offers yoga for wellness. 12 PM. $12 drop-in.

The 1,000 Hands For Peace meditation group uses ancient mudras for cleansing the heart. Meets Tuesdays at 5:30–6:30 PM at Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. Donations accepted.

Now what? Photographer Jesse Boone hosts a free lecture on how to best capture, edit and display your photos. Rocky Mountain School of Photography. 7 PM.

Every Monday DJ Sol spins funk, soul, reggae and hip-hop at the Badlander. Doors at 9 PM, show at 10. Free. 21-plus. Live in SIN at the Service Industry Night at Plonk, with DJ Amory spinning and a special menu. 322 N. Higgins Ave. 10 PM to close. Just ask a server for the SIN menu. No cover.

Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart star in No Mans Land as part of National Theatre Live, Tue., Jan. 17. 7 PM at the Roxy. $16/ $11 students.


01-1 8

Wednesday The Art Associates of Missoula monthly meeting welcomes Kate Davis, bird sculptor and photographer with Raptors of the Rockies. Art Associates meetings are free and open to the public. 10 AM. For more info, call Susie at 5440891.

nightlife At the Phish Happy Hour you can enjoy Phish music, video and more at the Top Hat at 4:30 PM. But I know you’ll show up at 4:20. Free. All ages. Learn the ins and outs of farm planning with a series of workshops at the Missoula County Extension Building. This week learn how to strategically plan your farm. $15. Visit farmlinkmontana.org for more info and registration.

Wednesday Night Brewery Jam invites all musicians to bring an instrument and join in. Hosted by Geoffrey Taylor at Imagine Nation Brewing Co. 6–8 PM. Free. This open mic is truly open. Jazz, classic rock, poetry, spoken word, dance, shadow puppets— share your creative spark at The Starving Artist Café and Art Gallery, 3020 S. Reserve St. Every Wed., 6–8 PM. Free.

Kick back and enjoy the live music of Kimberlee Carlson Jazz at the Top Hat. 7 PM. Free. Win big bucks off your bar tab and/or free pitchers by answering trivia questions at Brains on Broadway Trivia Night at the Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway Ave. 7 PM. Trivia answer: John Quincy Adams.

Los Angeles comedian Nicholas J. Hyde returns to his old stomping grounds to headline the Missoula’s Homegrown Comedy Showcase/ Open Mic at the Roxy. Free admission with concession purchase. 7:30 PM. Get up onstage at VFW’s open mic, with a different host each week. Half-price whiskey might help loosen up those nerves. 8 PM. Free.

Show your Press Box buddies you know more than sports and compete in Trivial Beersuit starting at 8:30 every Wednesday. $50 bar tab for the winning team. Make the move from singing in the shower to a live audience at the Eagles Lodge karaoke night. $50 to the best singer. 8:30–10:30 PM. No cover.

Singer/songwriter Andrew Lammons brings his mandolin to Great Burn Brewery. 6 PM–8 PM. Free. Got two left feet? Well, throw them away and head down to Sunrise Saloon for beginners’ dance lessons. 7 PM. $5.

01-1 9

Thursday Release some stress during tai chi classes every Thursday at 10 AM at the Open Way Center, 702 Brooks St. $10 drop-in class. Visit openway.org.

Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. Get cash toward your bar tab for first place, plus specials on beer. Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30– 10 PM.

Every Thursday in January, learn about the science, activities and movements of animals in the winter at the Montana Natural History Center. 10 AM. Free.

Someone call animal control! Wild Coyote at the Sunrise Saloon. 8:30 PM. Free.

The Learning Center at Red Willow hosts a free mediation class for veterans at the Missoula Vet Center. 1 PM. Call 406-7214918 to register.

nightlife Clearly they’ve never met my exwife. Love is a Dog From Nebraska plays Draught Works. 6 PM–8 PM. Free. Folk singer Tyler Schanck plays Bitter Root Brewery. 6 PM–8 PM. Free. I looked it up, and it’s absolutely a real word. A weekly randonee ski race series starts at Snowbowl. Visit randoradness.weebly.com for registration and more info. The Northside Potluck at Stensrud celebrates the beauty of our community. I sure hope someone brings deviled eggs. 7 PM– 10 PM. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and

Shramana’s residency at the VFW continues with Eneferens, Arctodus, Zebulon Kosted and Jolly Jane. Wait, aren’t they the Suicide Squad? 9 PM. $3. 21-plus. Start spreading the news! There’s karaoke today! You don’t need to be a veteran of the Great White Way to sing your heart out at the Broadway Bar. 9:30 PM. Free. Why not solar power? Moonshine Mountain plays the Top Hat. 10 PM. Free.

We want to know about your event! Submit to calendar@missoulanews.com at least two weeks in advance of the event. Don’t forget to include the date, time, venue and cost. Send snail mail to Cal-eesi, Mother of Calendars c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801. Or submit your events online at missoulanews.bigskypress.com. Have you ever danced with the devil in the pale moon light?

missoulanews.com • January 12–January 19, 2017 [29]


Agenda Every year the Confident Stitch opens its doors on Martin Luther King Jr. Day to people wanting to give back to their community through sewing. This year, the local fabric and quilting store is setting its sights on a new project to help people affected by breast cancer. Jane Mandala, manager of the Confident Stitch, is optimistic about this year. “Last year volunteers and donors spent the day sewing over 30 bibs for the YWCA,” she says. “This year we're looking forward to creating even more.” This year's project works to create heartshaped pillows specially designed to fit under the armpits of people recovering from mastectomies

THURSDAY JANUARY 12 The Learning Center at Red Willow hosts a free mediation class for veterans at the Missoula Vet Center. 1 PM. Call 406-721-4918 to register. Speech-Language Pathologist Sarah Elliott presents on LSVT LOUD techniques at the Parkinson’s Support Group at the Ronald McDonald House conference room. 1 PM. Free. Protect your identity while protecting your prescriptions with a free presentation at Missoula Public Library. Experts from across the state cover a variety of healthcare fraud topics. 5:30 PM–7 PM.

FRIDAY JANUARY 13 The Women in Black stand in mourning of international violence every Friday on the Higgins bridge from 12:15–12:45 PM. Visit jrpc.org/calendar to learn more.

50

th nnnniiivveersaaryy A nnniversary Opening Op penniiningg N Nig Night ghtt Gal gh Gala G lla Jan ary 20 Januar

Our 2017 tour begins in Missoula!

SATURDAY JANUARY 14 Learn to tell your “Story of Self” to affect policy change during the upcoming legislative session. A comprehensive training organized by the Montana Progressive Democrats gets you comfortable telling your own story to give testimony or lobby your representatives. The Solstice Building. 10 AM–3 PM. Free

SUNDAY JANUARY 15 Artists from around the state created artwork to raise awareness of human trafficking. A gallery exhibit at the Public House highlights what we can do to end this tragedy. 5 PM–7 PM.

PAR A TV Lobby 5:00 PM / NO-HOST COCKT KT TAILS A

Montana Theatre

MONDAY JANUARY 16

6:00 PM / B AREFOO OT IN THE E PA ARK

UC Ballroom 8:30 PM / DINNER AND DANCING MUSIC BY UM JAZZ ENSEMBLE’S SWING ORCHESTRA AND SPECIAL GUESTS PHILIP AABERG AND ROB O QUIST

TICKETS: $100 PER PERSON DRESS: 1960s COCKT TA AIL (BLA AC CK AND GOLD)

There’s Ther re e’’s still time to rreserve e eserve tickets. tick ke ets. Call us at 243-6809 for reservations and more infformation. orma o LEARN MORE AT T:

montanarep.org montanarep.org

Folks with disabilities can get creative at Art Group, every second and fourth Friday of the month at Summit Independent Living from 2-4 PM. Call 7281630.

MONTANA THEA AT TRE EVENINGS / 7:30 PM

January 21, 26- 28 Feb bruary 2, 24

MA AT TINEE / January 28 / 2:00 PM TA ALKBACK: AFTER THE JAN.. 27 PERFORMANCE ONLINE TICKETS:

www.montanarep.org www w..montanar .mo ep.org UMARTS BO OX OFFICE

243-4581

12:00– 6:00 PM / TUESDAY–FRIDAY UM MAR RT TS S | College of Visual and Performing Per Arts School of Theatre & Dance

[30] Missoula Independent • January 12–January 19, 2017

The Confident Stitch hosts its second annual Stitch for a Cause. Pop by all day and donate your time sewing pillows for the Montana Cancer Center. 10 AM–5 PM. A $7 donation gets you all the materials to make pillows for post-op mastectomy patients. Sip a fancy cocktail for a cause at Moscow Monday at the Montgomery Distillery. A dollar from every drink sold is donated to Missoula Medical Aid. 12 PM–8 PM. Veterans are invited to take a free Tai Chi class from the Learning Center at the Missoula Vet Center. Call 406-721-4918 to register. Celebrate the work and legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. with a youth rally at Caras Park at 5 PM,

or lymph node reductions. The dip-shape in the heart of the pillow reduces stress on the arms and helps patients sleep easier after surgery by keeping them in the same position all through the night. A donation of $7 gets you all the materials and equipment, as well as instruction from the Confident Stitch. The finished products will be donated locally to people in need. —Charley Macorn Stitch for a Cause runs 10 AM to 5 PM Mon., Jan. 16 at the Confident Stitch. Visit theconfidentstitch.com for more info.

followed by the March for Justice to St. Paul Lutheran Church at 5:30 PM. A community celebration and dinner social follow. Find out how the Garden City grows at the weekly Missoula City Council meeting, where you can no doubt expect ranting public commenters, PowerPoint presentations and subtle wit from Mayor Engen. Missoula council chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Meetings are the first four Mondays of every month at 7 PM, except for holidays.

TUESDAY JANUARY 17 Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters helps you improve your public speaking skills with weekly meetings at ALPS in the Florence Building, noon–1 PM. Free and open to the public. Visit shootinthebull.info for details. It’s Mule-Tastic Tuesday, which means the Montana Distillery will donate $1 from every cocktail sold to a local nonprofit organization. 12–8 PM. Caregiver Support Group, for caregivers to an older adult or person with a disability, meets every third Tuesday of the month from 4–5 PM at Missoula Aging Services, 337 Stephens Ave. Call 7287682 for more information. The 1,000 Hands For Peace meditation group uses ancient mudras for cleansing the heart. Meets Tuesdays at 5:30-6:30 PM at Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. Donations accepted.

WEDNESDAY JANUARY 18 Nonviolent Communication Practice Group facilitated by Patrick Marsolek every Wednesday at Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. 12–1 PM. Email info@patrickmarsolek.com or 406-443-3439 for more information. NAMI Missoula hosts a free arts and crafts group for adults living with mental illness every Wednesday at 2 PM. Every Wednesday is Community UNite at KettleHouse Brewing Company’s Northside tap room. A portion of every pint sold goes to support local Missoula causes. 5 PM–8 PM. Learn the ins and outs of farm planning with a series of workshops Wednesdays at the Missoula County Extension Building. This week learn how to strategically plan your farm. $15. Visit farmlinkmontana.org for more info and registration.

THURSDAY JANUARY 19 The Learning Center at Red Willow hosts a free mediation class for veterans at the Missoula Vet Center. 1 PM. Call 406-721-4918 to register.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.


MOUNTAIN HIGH

F

or the last 10 years the Montana Mountain Mushers and the Bitterroot Mushers have held a two-day sled dog race at Lost Trail Pass. In celebration of their anniversary I have landed an exclusive phone interview with Karl Barks, one of the brave athletes competing this weekend, to get the inside scoop on the races. CM: Hello, thank you for speaking to me, Mr. Barks. How are you feeling about the race this weekend? KB: Rough. CM: I can imagine. I bet you have a lot on your plate. Which race will you be competing in? KB: Woof. CM: I'm sorry, I think I missed that. Are you competing in the 8-dog, 6-dog, 4-dog, 2-dog or skijor categories? KB: (inaudible, sounds like heavy breathing) CM: Fantastic. Now these races take up several miles. Where is the best place to view the races if

THURSDAY JANUARY 12 Learn about the science, activities and movements of animals in the winter during a presentation at the Montana Natural History Center. 10 AM. Free.

FRIDAY JANUARY 13 I don’t know about you, but wrapping up my work week by watching some poor cricket getting devoured by a large Chilean tarantula is somehow very satisfying. Tarantula feeding at the Missoula Butterfly House and Insectarium, every Friday at 4 PM. $4 admission.

SATURDAY JANUARY 14 You’ll be bright-eyed and bushy-tailed after Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which start at 8 AM every Saturday at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org. The 10th Annual Darby Dog Derby Sled Dog Race features junior, skijor and pee wee races. Visit bitterrootmushers.org for more info and registration. Lost Trail Pass. 9:30 AM–2 PM. Take a ride back in time to the Rocky Mountain rendezvous era with Winter Storytelling at Travelers’ Rest State Park. 11 AM. Free. The Montana Natural History Center presents activities for kids every Saturday. This week sip

you're only a spectator? KB: Bark. CM: Uh, does that mean the tree line? KB: Bark. CM: I don't know what that means. Don't worry, I can just direct people to the map on the Bitterroot Mushers website. Final question: Would you like to meet for a drink after the race? KB: Whine. CM: My favorite! Thank you for your time, Mr. Barks. You definitely are a good boy. A very good boy. —Charley Macorn 10th Annual Darby Dog Derby Sled Dog Race is held Sat., Jan 14–Sun., Jan 15 at Lost Trail Pass starting at 9:30 AM. Visit bitterrootmushers.org for more information and a schedule of events.

cocoa and learn about the amazing ways animals hibernate. Free with admission to Center. 2 PM.

MONDAY JANUARY 16 Spend Monday morning exploring before enjoying a hot beverage with Coffee Walks. This week explore the North Hills. Meet at Currents Aquatics Center. 9 AM-12 PM. $5.

WEDNESDAY JANUARY 18 The Missoula Marathon running class is designed for beginning to advanced runners. Every Wednesday at 6 PM, Run Wild Missoula in the basement of the Runner’s Edge, 304 N. Higgins. $100. Missoula Alpine Race League starts the season with a Seed Night at Montana Snowbowl. 7 PM. Visit montanasnowbowl.com for more info.

THURSDAY JANUARY 19 Every Thursday in January, learn about the science, activities and movements of animals in the winter at the Montana Natural History Center. 10 AM. Free. I looked it up, and it’s absolutely a real word. A weekly randonee ski race series starts at Snowbowl. Visit randoradness.weebly.com for registration and more info.

missoulanews.com • January 12–January 19, 2017 [31]


M I S S O U L A

Independent

January 12 - January 19, 2017

www.missoulanews.com TABLE OF CONTENTS

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD BULLETIN BOARD Basset Rescue of Montana. Senior bassets needing homes. 406-2070765. Please like us on Facebook... facebook.com/bassethoundrescue Birth Mama Doula Training - January 2017 chardoula@msn.com

College of Nursing is recruiting FEMALE participants for a study evaluating OULA dance fitness as a treatment for depression. For more information call Hayden at 406-243-2551 or email hayden.ferguson1@montana.edu FINALLY! 37TH CABINS FEVERS ANTIQUES FAIR!!! HELENA CIVIC CENTER January 14-15th. Opens 10AM. $5.00 for

weekend. Dealers- 5 states furniture, lighting, art, jewelry, primitive, repurposed, Dealers inquire (406)442-5595 Gun and Ammo Show January 27th, 28th, 29th, 2017 Big Sandy MT. For More Information Call Vance Or Jean (406) 386-2259 THE BOAT SHOW! “Boat Buying Event of the Year” at the Lewis & Clark Fairgrounds, Helena,MT.

I BUY

Honda • Subaru • VW Toyota • Nissan Japanese/German Cars Trucks SUVs

YWCA Thrift Stores

A positive path for spiritual living

1136 W. Broadway 920 Kensington

546 South Ave. W. • (406) 728-0187 Sundays 11 am • unityofmissoula.org

January 27th, 28th and 29th, 2017.The Montana BoatShow’s $3 admission charge gives you a chance at over $1,500 in door prizes! Children under 12enter free. For info call (406)443-6400 or 266-5700. Mark Your2017 Calendar! www.mtboatshow.com

LOST & FOUND Found Yellow Lab We found a yellow lab around 2-3 years old. She was found in the Target Range area by Big Sky on New Year’s Eve. We think she was spooked by the fireworks. She is very sweet and we are sure someone is looking for her.

TO GIVE AWAY FREE SAMPLES of Emu Oil. Learn more about the many health benefits that Emu offer from oil and skin care products to eggs, steaks, filets and ground meat. Wild Rose Emu Ranch. (406) 3631710. wildroseemuranch.com

Advice Goddess . . . . . . . . . . .C2 Free Will Astrology . . . . . . . .C4 Public Notices . . . . . . . . . . . .C6 Crossword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C8 This Modern World . . . . . . .C12

HYPNOSIS A clinical approach to negative self-talk • bad habits stress • depression Empower Yourself

728-5693 • Mary Place MSW, CHT, GIS

Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not

Snow Plowing

327-0300

406-880-0688 Fletch Law, PLLC Steve M. Fletcher Attorney at Law

Accidents & Personal Injury Over 20 years experience. Call immediately for a FREE consultation.

541-7307 www.fletchlaw.net

EVEN TEXTERS AND DRIVERS HATE TEXTERS AND DRIVERS. STOPTEXTSSTOPWRECKS.ORG

PET OF THE WEEK Mention Sasha to staff & volunteers and you’ll see everyone’s eyes light up. This sweet, beautiful & cuddly lap cat is truly a gem! We are waiving her adoption fee and would love to provide her adopter with all of the resources to help her transition into her new space! Stop by the shelter to meet her today! 5930 Highway 93 South. Wednesday-Friday 1:006:00 p.m. and Saturday-Sunday noon-5:00 p.m.

“Look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Be curious.” – Stephen Hawking Place your classified ad at 317 S. Orange, by phone 543-6609x115 or via email: classified@missoulanews.com


ADVICE GODDESS

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

By Amy Alkon SLEEPING BOOTY I’m a 32-year-old guy, and I want a real relationship. I am good-looking and charming and can get girls into bed pretty early on, but I’m beginning to wonder whether that’s hurting me. I think I end up starting relationships based on sex instead of common interests, personality, etc. Does it pay to hold off on sex, and if so, how long? —Wanting It Real There are some wonderful relationships that started the way a bunch of 12year-olds read aloud from a stolen smutty novel: skipping ahead to the sex parts. The reality is, those lovebirds probably got lucky (in getting it on with someone they happened to be compatible with). When you have sex right away, you’re prone to getting into a hormone haze—a sort of sex fog—that ends up blurring just about everything but the bed (and maybe the kitchen table, three or four times). Though people are increasingly getting into relationships through hookups (“sex first/date later”), relationship researcher Dean Busby and his colleagues find that waiting to have sex seems to keep “feels so right!” from killing your ability to see whether it actually is. In their research, dating for at least a month before having sex was associated with higher relationship stability and satisfaction, better sex, and better communication. Again, this isn’t to say that people who have sex on—or even before—the first date won’t have satisfying relationships. But as the researchers put it, “the rewards of sexual involvement early on may undermine other aspects of relationship development and evaluation”—for example, keeping partners from putting as much energy into “crucial couple processes” like hammering out communication. It can also prolong relationships that ultimately don’t work when both people are dressed and standing up. You don’t have to set your sex clock according to the research:“Oh, look at the time—week four and a half; better get it on!” The point is to wait until you see whether you really like a person and click with them in all the essential ways. Six months into a relationship, if you grab your partner and kiss them as if the world were ending, it should be because you love them that deeply, not because it’s the best way to get them to shut up that doesn’t involve jail time.

YOU HAD MEH AT HELLO I’m a man in my 50s. I recently started seeing this

fantastic lady. She’s my ideal woman except for one small thing: There is no sexual chemistry. However, I don’t plan on having more kids. Also, my body’s slowing down, and sex just isn’t at the top of my list anymore. I’m looking for my true best friend and partner. Still, without any real chemistry, is this relationship doomed? —Seeking Okay, so you feel sex isn’t all that important to you now. Good to know ... but not quite the same as donating a treasured artifact to the natural history museum—with a plaque: “Harpoon for display purposes only.” Your best friend whom you aren’t attracted to and don’t have sex with is—wait for it—your best friend. Sure, a relationship is a best friendship, but it’s more. The sexual part of it—sharing your body—makes for a deeper level of intimacy than, say, “Want a bite of my Reuben?” Unlike checkers or “Words with Friends,” sex isn’t just an activity. It’s an activity that causes biochemical reactions—like a surge of the hormones oxytocin and vasopressin. Though the research on these is in its infancy in humans, they seem to act as a form of emotional glue in some mammals that have been studied—in the wake of sex, causing little rodent-y things called prairie voles to velcro themselves to that special someone. As for this woman you’ve been seeing, think about how it must feel—right from the start—to have you about as sexually interested in her as you are in one of her end tables. Also consider that being in what sociologist Denise Donnelly calls an “involuntarily celibate relationship”—wanting to have “shared erotic pleasure” (of some kind) but having a partner who refuses—is extremely corrosive. Beyond leading to affairs in 26 percent of those surveyed, it led (predictably!) to sexual frustration (79 percent), feelings of rejection (23 percent) and depression (34 percent). But, whatever, right? I mean, BFFs forever! The thing is (assuming she isn’t madly in love with you), if you two admit that the spark simply isn’t there, you can still spend your lives together— just not in the same bed. Better to celebrate your best-friendiversary than mourn on your anniversary—that you still want your partner just as much as you used to, which is to say not in the slightest.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com.

[C2] Missoula Independent • January 12 - January 19, 2017

NO JUSTICE GIVEN: 4

WE, THE CITIZENS OF LAKE, MISSOULA & ALL SURROUNDING COUNTIES HAVE RUN SEVERAL ADS THE LAST 3 YEARS EXPOSING THE HUGE CORRUPTION OF LAW ENFORCEMENT THAT ARE GUILTY BY EITHER ENGAGING IN THE BARBARISM OF ABDUCTIONS, INTERROGATION and/or KNOWING OF THE UNTHINKABLE UNCIVILIZED TORTURES TO OUR PRECIOUS LOVED ONES THAT EITHER “SAW” SOME CRIME THAT “THEY SHOULD NOT HAVE SEEN”, OR BY SILENT COVER-UP OF CITIZENS OF ILL WILL, WHOM WANTED THEM DEAD; EITHER BY THEIR SADISTIC “THRILL OF THE KILL TORTURES,” OR FOR MONETARY OR OTHER PAYMENT. THE MURDERS ARE NOW IN THE HUNDREDS (400+) !! NEVER HAVE WE SEEN SO MANY DEAD BODIES FLOAT UP ON FLATHEAD LAKE; ESPECIALLY YOUNG MEN AND WOMEN!! TWO YOUNG MEN’S BODIES WERE RECENTLY FOUND UNDER WATER, SUPPOSEDLY HIDDEN & CRAMMED UNDER TWO ROCKSHELVES. AND THEN A NUMBER OF YOUNG PERSONS BODIES WERE ALSO SEEN FLOATING ON FLATHEAD LAKE BY PARADISE COVE AND ANOTHER 36 YO MALE FOUND UNDER THE MISSOULA BRIDGE! NO WONDER SO MANY LOCAL LAKE RESIDENTS HAVE PUT THEIR HOMES UP FOR SALE! THAT WHOLE DAMN AREA OF POLSON, MISSOULA & ALL THE SURROUNDING COUNTIES IS CORRUPT! IT IS BLATANTLY CLEAR THAT THE FLATHEAD LAKE IS USED TO “COVER UP” “FAKE DROWNINGS”, THUS MURDERSSERIAL KILLINGS! YES, SERIAL KILLINGS! ONE BY ONE, TWO BY TWO! NEVER HAVE WE SEEN SO MANY MURDERS! BUT THE MOST HORRIFIC FACT IS THAT THERE HAS BEEN NO HONEST LAW THERE!! HERE WE ARE IN 2017, HISTORY REPEATING ITSELF FROM THE ARTICLES OF 2009-20122016...” TO SERVE & DEFLECT.” THE PRIMITIVE-TYPE OF LAWLESSNESS IN MONTANA. “HOW CAN THEY BREAK THE LAW IF THEY ARE THE LAW?” THIS HAS BEEN THE MINDSET IN POLSON & SURROUNDING COUNTIES FOR AT LEAST 20 YEARS!! DOES ANYONE IN OUR GOVERNMENT HAVE THE VALOR TO TAKE A STAND & SPEAK OUT FOR ALL THE HUNDREDS OF INNOCENTS? NO, ALL YOU CARE ABOUT IS YOUR PAYCHECK & SO CALLED “SAFE” STATUS, BECAUSE YOU HAVE KNOWN WHOM THE CRUDE KILLERS ARE & EITHER THINK YOU & YOUR “INCUMBANTS” ARE UNTOUCHABLE AS YOU ARE “BOUGHT & SOLD” BY THE PERPETRATORS; “YOU PAT MY BACK & WE PAT YOURS,” NOT EVER THINKING THAT IT COULD BE YOUR SON, DAUGHTER, WIFE, HUSBAND THAT MIGHT BE THEIR NEXT VICTIM, ABDUCTED, INTERROGATED, TORTURED IN SUCH PRIMITIVE, SAVAGE BEHAVIORS: SUCH AS BEATEN ALL OVER WITH A BALLBAT; FACES STOMPED, CRUSHED & KICKED WITH POINTED BOOTS ALONG ONE’S SIDES, KIDNEYS, etc. WHILE “KNOCKED OUT COLD” ON THE DOCK; THEN DRAGGED IN THE BRUSH TO A SHACK or QUANSEHUT FOR FURTHER TORTURES; HANGED UPSIDE DOWN FROM THE ROOF RAFTER WITH ROPE TIED AROUND ONE’S ANKLES UNTIL ONE’S BLOOD POOLS TO THE BACK, SHOULDERS, HEAD, SO THE DISHONEST CORONER & MEDICAL EXAMINER CAN GIVE FALSE DIAGNOSES OF “DEATH BY DROWNING” DUE TO THE POOLING OF BLOOD TO THEIR LOWER EXTREMITIES! THESE ARE ONLY A FEW OF THE CRUDE TORTURES THAT HAVE BEEN HAPPENING FOR AT LEAST 20 YEARS!! WE WILL CONTINUE TO RELEASE THE UNCIVILIZED TYPES OF TORTURES OF OUR BELOVED SONS, DAUGHTERS, HUSBANDS, WIVES, NIECES & NEPHEWS.

WITH GOD’S BLESSING WE WILL SEE JUSTICE SOON!

EMPLOYMENT GENERAL Accounting Staff Person Auto industry company seeking an Accounting Staff Person. If you have excellent organizational skills, Excel experience and accounting background, self-motivated and are a team player then you are the one to join our team! Great customer service skills are essential. Reconcile bank accounts. Clean and review schedule/general

ledger and documentation. Communicate issues, assist in general ledger review. Research AR account applications and process vendor applications. Provide back up office support as needed. Monday - Friday, 8:30-5:30. Upon satisfactory completion of 500 hours as a Temp-to-Hire, we offer an excellent compensation and benefits package. $14.00-$17.00 DOE. EOE. M/F/Disability/Veteran/ Full job listing online at lcstaffing.com Job ID# 28955

EMPLOYMENT POSITIONS AVAILABLESEE WEBSITE FOR MORE INFO Must Have: Valid driver license, No history of neglect, abuse or exploitation Applications available at OPPORTUNITY RESOURCES, INC., 2821 S. Russell, Missoula, MT. 59801 or online at www.orimt.org. Extensive background checks will be completed. NO RESUMES. EEO/AA-M/F/disability/ protected veteran status.

Bartender Lolo resort is seeking an experienced Full Time BARTENDER. Must be of legal age to serve alcohol, have dependable transportation, good customer relations, server experience and bartending certificate a plus. Must be able to work weekends and nights; 35 to 40 hours per week. Wage is $9.00 per hour plus tips. Full job description at Missoula Job Service. employmissoula.com Job #10258800

Camp Support Local employer is seeking several seasonal CAMP SUPPORT members. You only need the annual RT-130 Yellow Card. If you do not have RT130 we can still use you for day positions. Must provide your own sleeping bag, tent, & personal hygiene items. Food & Lodging provided. Duties include running wash stations, setting up and taking down camps and other duties assigned. ON CALL BASIS. Pay is up to $15/hr depending on task.

Let us help in YOUR job search!

– 543-6033 – 2321 S. 3rd St. W. Missoula www.nelsonpersonnel.com


EMPLOYMENT Need Yellow Card? Visit www.outbackfirefighting.com for a schedule of training dates. Full job description at Missoula Job Service. employmissoula.com Job #10258749 Crew Member Missoula fast food restaurant is hiring CREW MEMBERS for all shifts. Fast food experience is a plus, but employer is willing to train. Duties include customer service, front counter and drive-through window service, and cleaning. Must be able to perform in a fast -paced environment, have the ability to multi-task, and be able to communicate effectively. Work begins as part-time and then moves to full-time. Crew members have the potential to advance to management positions. Business is open 24-7, so a variety of shifts are available. Full job description at Missoula Job Service. employmissoula.com Job #10257217 HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE Paid training with U.S. Navy. Good pay, medical/dental, vacation, great career. HS grads ages17-34. Call Mon-Fri (877) 475-6289, or jobs_seattle@navy.mil HIGH-TECH CAREER with U.S. Navy. Elite tech training w/great pay, benefits, vacation, $$ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri (877) 475-6289, or jobs_seattle@navy.mil NAVY RESERVE HIRING in all fields. Serve part-time. Paid training & potential sign-on bonus. Great benefits. $ for school. Call Mon-Fri (800) 887-0952, or jobs_seattle@navy.mil NAVY RESERVE Serve part-time. No military exp needed. Paid training & potential sign-on bonus. Great benefits. Retirement. Call Mon-Fri (800) 887-0952, or jobs_seattle@navy.mil NEED A JOB? Let NELSON PERSONNEL help in your job search! Fill out an application and schedule an interview. Call Us at 543-6033 Nelson Personnel is in search for CONSTRUCTION/CONCRETE workers $13/HR. Must have construction experience, reliable transportation, and clean record. Call 543-6033 NELSON PERSONNEL is looking to fill PRODUCTION SUPPORT,

JANITORIAL, & WAREHOUSE positions for a manufacturing company. $11/hr – Full-Time. Call Us at 543-6033 Ranch help wanted, Lewistown, MT area. Includes fencing, cleanup, cattle work, hay, maintenance. Tobacco free workplace. Drivers license required. 406-366-9144, leave message. Social Outreach Coordinator, part-time for Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Missoula. Closes Jan 15th. Contact uufm@live.com. THE NAVY IS HIRING Top-notch training, medical/dental, 30 days vacation/yr, $$ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri (877) 475-6289, or jobs_seattle@navy.mil WORK FOR MISSOULA COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS! Nelson Personnel needs people to help fill-in for various shifts for the school cafeterias. $8.05/HR Call Us at 543-6033 WORK OUTSIDE! NELSON PERSONNEL is looking to fill a Maintenance position for a property management company. $10/hr. Full-time. Call Us at 5436033

PROFESSIONAL Director of Giving Downtown Missoula Partnership. 30 hours/ week. $30-$32K/ year missoula downtown.com/employment. Open until filled. Help Desk Missoula County is seeking a full-time HELP DESK SPECIALIST. Requires an Associate’s Degree in computer technology or a certification from a recognized computer maintenance training program. Requires two years of experience providing technical support in a network and application environment. An equivalent combination of education and experience may be considered. Must be able to pass a criminal background check. Work is full-time and pay is $15.96/hr. Benefits available. Full job description at Missoula Job Service. employmissoula.com Job #10257271 HOME RESOURCE IS HIRING! Home ReSource seeks a mission-motivated, detail-oriented

people-person with excellent communication skills to be our F/T Development Director. For more information or to apply visit homeresource.org. Legal Director Clark Fork Coalition is seeking an experienced professional to join the team as its Legal Director. Ideal candidate will have a variety of skills and expertise in transactional law as well as litigation, and be comfortable advocating at the legislature as well as developing excellent working relationships with executive agencies. Must be adept in negotiating and reviewing transactions, and be well-versed in water law. Must be able to represent CFC at administrative hearings, testify at legislative hearings, lobby the Montana Legislature, and assist with litigation. Must be able to advise the Executive Director on corporate legal issues, and triage with outside counsel as needed. Full job description at Missoula Job Service. employmissoula.com Job #10259490 Mental Health Clinician 3 Rivers Mental Health Solutions is recruiting for full-time and part time Mental Health Clinicians. Position provides individual, group, and family therapies to clients, as well as clinical supervision to front line staff as a member of a treatment team. Position also provides psychological diagnostic interviews to adults with severe and disabling mental illness seeking mental health center services. Must be currently licensed or able to be licensed as an LCPC, LCSW, or in-training practitioner in the state of Montana. Full job description at Missoula Job Service. employmissoula.com Job #10256120

ganized and timely manner. Experience not required. $860 per week for a start, send your CV/Resume to aliciaje92@yahoo.com or call:(406) 234-2197 Software Developer Use your software development skills to provide tools and support to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. Join our team to analyze, design, develop, document, maintain and support custom software solutions and systems. Candidates should possess experience in Javascript, C#, and TSQL. Knowledge of,AngularJS, jQuery, HTML5, CSS3, ASP.NET, Git, Windows Forms, MVC, PHP, MySQL, and Oracle is desirable. Degree in CS/IS or equivalent professional experience is required.View complete job description at www.rmef.org. Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer M/F/D/V. Full job description at Missoula Job Service. employmissoula.com Job # 10258785

SKILLED LABOR CDL Driver Lumber Company seeking a CDL Driver for Thompson Falls area. This is a physically demanding job hauling sawmill byproduct via trailer and doubles. Ideal candidate will have a clean driving record and current medical card. We are looking for a long-term team player with strong work ethic. Monday-Friday days – 45-55 work weeks. Upon satisfactory completion of 500 hours as a Temp-to-Hire, we offer a benefit package including: Medical Insur-

ance, 401K, profit sharing, paid time off and more! Pre-employment screening required. $15.00/hr. Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/Disability/Veteran. Full job listing online at lcstaffing.com Job ID# 38972 HVAC Immediate opening for entry level HVAC Service Technician. Get paid to learn how to maintain and service residential and commercial HVAC equipment.The HVAC industry is going high tech and we are willing to train the right candidate. Job duties will include performing fabrication work, parts running to various job sites and general labor as required. Will be bending, stooping, kneeling, lifting, & carrying items up flights of stairs. Must be motivated and willing to learn. Valid Driver’s License and clean driving record required. Monday - Friday roughly 7AM-5PM. Experience in construction or HVAC preferred. $12/hour. Full job listing online at lcstaffing.com Job ID# 28902 Journeyman Electrician Missoula based electrical company looking for a MONTANA LICENSED JOURNEYMAN ELECTRICIAN. Full time position. Looking for a well-rounded electrician with preferred experience in service work, commercial, & residential. Must have good work ethic for fast-paced environment & good driving record. Work days are generally Monday — Thursday but can go until Saturday depending on job deadlines. Pay depends on experience. Full job description at Missoula Job Service. employmissoula.com Job #10253193 Skilled Carpenter Carpenter to

assist on 2 commercial remodels. Must have experience in demo work, framing both interior and exterior, drywall, and other construction projects onsite. Employee will not be doing any electrical work. Own tools & tool belt is a plus. Knowledge of tools, equipment and material. Skills in construction and framing. 2+ years carpentry experience. $14$18/hour DOE. Full job listing online at lcstaffing.com Job ID# 38967 Truck Driver— Job would involve mostly local hauls of commodities and fertilizers within a 500 mile radius of Scobey, Montana. Can be based in Scobey or Opheim area. C.D.L., air brakes, singles and doubles required. Must have passport and be able to haul in and out of Canada. Excellent wages, health insurance and 401k. For more information call Ty 406724-7162 or Tanner 406-487-2741 at PRO Co-op Ag Center.

HEALTH CAREERS LPN Seeking an LPN that has a passion for quality care! Riverside Health Care offers: Competitive Salary, Sign-on bonus & Relocation Assistance, Loan Forgiveness, Paid Continuing Education Credits, Tuition Assistance, A compassionate, caring team! Full job description at Missoula Job Service. employmissoula.com Job #10255408 Travel Nurses RN/LPN Montana Health Care staffing agency that places nurse travelers on temporary assignment in health care facilities throughout Montana

and North and South Dakota is seeking RN’s and LPN’s with acute care and long term care skills and who are based in Missoula. Must have a current Montana nursing license and minimum of one year of experience. $29-$33/hr for RNs and $22.00-$24.00/hr for LPNs, plus round trip mileage reimbursement and housing. Must have a valid driver’s license and dependable vehicle with proof of insurance. Full-time and part-time available with flexible schedules! Full job description at Missoula Job Service. employmissoula.com Job #10257569

SALES Trader Assistant/Logistics Wholesale distribution company is in need of Trader Assistant/Broker. If you are outgoing, adaptable and like to work in a fast-paced, changing and growing open office environment with strong work ethics, we want you! Assist our traders with prospects and customers, maintaining orders, arranging and tracking shipments, building and maintaining relationships with new and existing logistics companies, customer support and maintaining transaction paperwork and supplier audits. Must be extremely detail oriented and possess strong written, oral, organizational skills. Proficiency in MS Office: Outlook, Excel, and Word. 2+ years related business experience! Upon satisfactory completion of 500 hours as a Temp-to-Hire, the company offers a compensation and benefits package. $17+ /DOE. EOE. M/F/Disability/Veteran Full job listing online at lcstaffing.com Job ID# 28922

PR/Media Manager Glacier Country Tourism, located in Missoula, Montana, is currently seeking to fill the full time position of public relations and media manager. For a complete job description please visit this link www.glaciermt.com/jobs. Please submit cover letter, resume and five relevant references to Racene Friede no later than end of day January 31, 2017. Incomplete and/or late applications will not be considered. Secretary/Administrative Assistant Needed to be a Customer Care Rep in our company a in well-or-

missoulanews.com • January 12 - January 19, 2017 [C3]


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): In Norse mythology,Yggdrasil is a huge holy tree that links all of the nine worlds to each other. Perched on its uppermost branch is an eagle with a hawk sitting on its head. Far below, living near the roots, is a dragon. The hawk and eagle stay in touch with the dragon via Ratatoskr, a talkative squirrel that runs back and forth between the heights and the depths. Alas, Ratatoskr traffics solely in insults.That’s the only kind of message the birds and the dragon ever have for each other. In accordance with the astrological omens, Aries, I suggest you act like a far more benevolent version of Ratatoskr in the coming weeks. Be a feisty communicator who roams far and wide to spread uplifting gossip and energizing news. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You have a divine mandate to love bigger and stronger and truer than ever before. It’s high time to freely give the gifts you sometimes hold back from those you care for. It’s high time to take full ownership of neglected treasures so you can share them with your worthy allies. It’s high time to madly cultivate the generosity of spirit that will enable you to more easily receive the blessings that can and should be yours. Be a brave, softhearted warrior of love! GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I love and respect Tinker Bell, Kermit the Frog, Shrek, Wonder Woman, SpongeBob SquarePants, Snow White, Road Runner and Calvin and Hobbes. They have provided me with much knowledge and inspiration. Given the current astrological omens, I suspect that you, too, can benefit from cultivating your relationships with characters like them. It’s also a favorable time for you to commune with the spirits of Harriet Tubman, Leonardo da Vinci, Marie Curie or any other historical figures who inspire you. I suggest you have dreamlike conversations with your most interesting ancestors, as well. Are you still in touch with your imaginary friends from childhood? If not, renew acquaintances.

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “I never wish to be easily defined,” wrote Cancerian author Franz Kafka. “I’d rather float over other people’s minds as something fluid and non-perceivable; more like a transparent, paradoxically iridescent creature rather than an actual person.” Do you ever have that experience? I do. I’m a Crab like you, and I think it’s common among members of our tribe. For me, it feels liberating. It’s a way to escape people’s expectations of me and enjoy the independence of living in my fantasies. But I plan to do it a lot less in 2017, and I advise you to do the same. We should work hard at coming all the way down to earth. We will thrive by floating less and being better grounded; by being less fuzzy and more solid; by not being so inscrutable, but rather more knowable.

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Here’s my declaration: “I hereby forgive, completely and permanently, all motorists who have ever irked me with their rude and bad driving. I also forgive, totally and forever, all tech support people who have insulted me, stonewalled me or given me wrong information as I sought help from them on the phone. I furthermore forgive, utterly and finally, all family members and dear friends who have hurt my feelings.” Now would be a fantastic time for you to do what I just did, Leo: Drop grudges, let go of unimportant outrage and issue a blanket amnesty. Start with the easier stuff—the complaints against strangers and acquaintances—and work your way up to the allies you cherish.

I feel allergic to the uncomfortable ideas they espouse, I’m also fascinated by their unique provoc though cations. As I read their words, I’m half-irritated at their grating declarations, and yet greedy for more. I VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): There are some authors who both annoy me and intrigue me. Even

disagree with much of what they say, but feel grudgingly grateful for the novel perspectives they prod me to discover. (Nobel Prize-winner Elias Canetti is one such author.) In accordance with the current astrological rhythms, Virgo, I invite you to seek out similar influences—for your own good!

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Now would be an excellent time to add new beauty to your home. Are there works of art or buoyant plants or curious symbols that would lift your mood? Would you consider hiring a feng shui consultant to rearrange the furniture and accessories so as to enhance the energetic flow? Can you entice visits from compelling souls whose wisdom and wit would light up the place? Tweak your imagination so it reveals tricks about how to boost your levels of domestic bliss. reinvent the story of your life. You’ll be able to forge new understandings about your co-stars and e and reinterpret the meanings of crucial plot twists that happened once upon a time. Now check out these insights SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In 2017, you will have unprecedented opportunities to re-imagine, revise

from author Mark Doty: “The past is not static, or ever truly complete; as we age we see from new positions, shifting angles. A therapist friend of mine likes to use the metaphor of the kind of spiral stair that winds up inside a lighthouse. As one moves up that stair, the core at the center doesn’t change, but one continually sees it from another vantage point; if the past is a core of who we are, then our movement in time always brings us into a new relation to that core.” SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The Tao Te Ching is a poetically philosophical text written by a Chinese sage more than two millennia ago. Numerous authors have translated it into modern languages. I’ve borrowed from their work to craft a horoscope that is precisely suitable for you in the coming weeks. Here’s your high-class fortune cookie oracle: Smooth your edges, untangle your knots, sweeten your openings, balance your extremes, relax your mysteries, soften your glare, forgive your doubts, love your breathing, harmonize your longings and marvel at the sunny dust.

f

artist Marc Chagall. I wanted to get a copy to hang on my wall. But as I scoured the Internet, g century I couldn’t find a single business that sells prints of it. Thankfully, I did locate an artist in Vietnam who CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I recently discovered Tree of Jesse, a painting by renowned 20th-

said he could paint an exact replica. I ordered it, and was pleased with my new objet d’art. It was virtually identical to Chagall’s original. I suggest you meditate on taking a metaphorically similar approach, Capricorn. Now is a time when substitutes may work as well as what they replace.

h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “It is often safer to be in chains than to be free,” wrote Franz Kafka.That fact is worthy of your consideration in the coming weeks, Aquarius. You can avoid all risks by remaining trapped inside the comfort that is protecting you. Or you can take a gamble on escaping, and hope that the new opportunities you attract will compensate you for the sacrifice it entails. I’m not here to tell you what to do. I simply want you to know what the stakes are.

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “All pleasures are in the last analysis imaginary, and whoever has the best imagination enjoys the most pleasure.” So said 19th-century German novelist Theodor Fontane, and now I’m passing his observation on to you. Why? Because by my astrological estimates, you Pisceans will have exceptional imaginations in 2017—more fertile, fervent and freedom-loving than ever before. Therefore, your capacity to drum up pleasure will also be at an all-time high. There is a catch, however. Your imagination, like everyone else’s, is sometimes prone to churning out superstitious fears. To take maximum advantage of its bliss-inducing potential, you will have to be firm about steering it in positive directions.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

[C4] Missoula Independent • January 12 - January 19, 2017

BODY, MIND, SPIRIT ADD/ADHD relief... Naturally! Reiki • CranioSacral Therapy • Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT). Your Energy Fix. James V. Fix, RMT, EFT, CST. 406-2109805, 415 N. Higgins Ave #19 • Missoula, MT 59802. yourenergyfix.com Affordable, quality addiction counseling in a confidential, comfortable atmosphere. Stepping Stones Counseling, PLLC. Shari Rigg, LAC • 406-926-1453 • shari@steppingstonesmissoula.c om. Skype sessions available. ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com Call TODAY for a massage TODAY! 549-9244 * MontanaMassage.com Monday - Friday 9:30am to 7:00pm & Saturday 10:00am to 4:00pm * 800 Kensington Avenue, Suite 201 Missoula, MT 59801 MAKE THE CALL TO START GETTING CLEAN TODAY. Free 24/7 Helpline for alcohol & drug addiction treatment. Get help! It is time to take your life back! Call Now: 855-732-4139 Massage Training Institute of Montana WEEKEND CLASSES & ONLINE CURRICULUM. Enroll now for SPRING 2017 classes -

Kalispell, MT * (406) 250-9616 * massage1institute@gmail.com * mtimontana.com * Find us on Facebook Sound Healing General Store 10% off storewide. Open Tue-Fri 2ish-5ish. Energy Work & Vibration Sound Therapy. Call Robin for appointment. 406-317-2773. 127 N. Higgins (next to Hot House Yoga).

HERB CLASSES MEDICINAL PLANTS MEDICINE MAKING CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

GreenPathHerbSchool.com

406-274-2009

Susan Teitelman: Herbalist. Certified Holistic Nutritionist. FoodFarmacistMT@gmail.com TheFoodFarmacist.com 406210-1261

ADOPTION PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 877-362-2401

INSTRUCTION AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-7251563

Sound Healing Energy Work & Vibration Sound Therapy

General Store New Expanded Inventory Open Mon-Thurs 12ish-5:30ish Friday 2ish-5:30ish

127 N Higgins (next to Hot House Yoga) call Robin 317-2773


Gear

Apparel

120 West Broadway, Ste. B 406-830-8975 DurableGoodsMontana.com

Durable Goods Montana

MARKETPLACE CLOTHING For sale:Wilson Leather Company, true Mink coat, 3/4 length with Mandarin collar and soft leather coat, 3/4 length, fur collar and cuffs, tie belt. Both excellent quality and condition. Come and see to make offer (406) 540-4475 Kid Crossing offers exceptional value on nearly new children’s clothing and equipment. Providing eco-friendly clothing exchange since 2001. Reduce • Reuse • Recycle • Buy Local! 1521 South Russell St. • 406-829-8808 • www.kidcrossingstores.com

MUSIC Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available.

Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

CRUISE CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com Subaru Impreza 2.5 RS Coupe Up for sale 2000 AWD, 87,450 mi, $1500, 1 owner Automatic, 4 Cyl, 2.5L, Coupe, Silver/Gray. Call mornings/text anytime: (502) 252-1795 Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio Guitar, banjo, mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available. bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

On the river, at the game or in the powder: live large and drink well

missoulanews.com • January 12 - January 19, 2017 [C5]


PUBLIC NOTICES IN THE JUSTICE COURT OF THE STATE OF MONTANA IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF MISSOULA BEFORE MARIE A. ANDERSEN, JUSTICE OF THE PEACE Case No.: CV-20163280 SUMMONS FOR POSSESSION BY PUBLICATION INDIGO REAL ESTATE, INC., d/b/a COPPER RUN APARTMENTS, Plaintiff, v. CATHERINE HESS AND GEORGE HESS, et al., Defendants. TO: Catherine Hess, 2200 Great Northern Ave., Apt. #D14, Missoula, MT 59808 YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer a Complaint filed in Justice Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer upon Plaintiff ’s attorneys, Thomas C. Orr and Jennifer L. Barbee, Thomas C. Orr Law Offices, P.O. Box 8096, Missoula, Montana 59807, within ten (10) days after service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in the case of your failure to appear or answer, relief sought by Plaintiff will be taken against you as requested. A $30.00 filing fee must accompany Defendant’s answer. DATED this 23 day of December, 2016. By: /s/ Marie A. Andersen, Honorable Judge

CLARK FORK STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 84, 117, 142, 154, OS50. Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, Toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting 1/23/2017 by appt only by calling 541-7919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to at 1/26/17 at 4:00 P.M. Buyer’s bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale, All Sales final

IN THE JUSTICE COURT OF THE STATE OF MONTANA IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF MISSOULA BEFORE MARIE A. ANDERSEN, JUSTICE OF THE PEACE Case No.: CV-2016-3280 SUMMONS FOR POSSESSION BY PUBLICATION INDIGO REAL ESTATE, INC., d/b/a COPPER RUN APARTMENTS, Plaintiff, v. CATHERINE HESS AND GEORGE HESS, et al., Defendants. TO: George Hess, 2200 Great Northern Ave., Apt. #D14, Missoula, MT 59808 YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer a Complaint filed in Justice Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer upon Plaintiff ’s attorneys, Thomas C. Orr and Jennifer L. Barbee, Thomas C. Orr Law Offices, P.O. Box 8096, Missoula, Montana 59807, within ten (10) days after service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in the case of your failure to appear or answer, relief sought by Plaintiff will be taken against you as requested. A $30.00 filing fee must accompany Defendant’s answer. DATED this 23 day of December, 2016. By: /s/ Marie A. Andersen, Honorable Judge Montana Fourth Judicial District Court Missoula County Cause No.: DV-16-1059 Dept. No.: 1 Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Jonathan Arthur Pauley, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Jonathan Arthur Pauley to Lukea Anthony Johnson. The hearing will be on 01/25/2017 at 1:30 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: December 6, 2016. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Cady Sowre, Deputy Clerk of Court Montana Fourth Judicial District Court Missoula County Cause No.: DV-17-7 Dept. No.: 2 Robert L. Deschamps, III Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Sean David McClure, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Sean David McClure to Sean David Quartz. The

hearing will be on February 14, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: January 5, 2017. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Cady Sowre Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-16-241 Dept. No. 3 John W. Larson NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MICHAEL R. GRAUMAN, DECEASED. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to STEVE DARTY, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 2620 Connery Way, Missoula, Montana 59808, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 5th day of November, 2016. /s/ Steve Darty, Personal Representative DARTY LAW OFFICE, PLLC /s/ H. Stephen Darty, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-16-255 Dept. No. 3 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JANE KURINSKY, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All person having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Susan Kurinsky Clarion, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 4110 Weeping Willow Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803, or filed with the Clerk of the above-

named Court. Dated this 27th day of December, 2016. /s/ Susan Kurinsky Clarion, Personal Representative By: /s/ Nancy P. Gibson, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DV-161129 Dept. No.: 4 Karen S. Townsend Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Stephen N. Greymorning, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Stephen N. Morgan Greymorning to Neyooxet Greymorning. The hearing will be on 02/07/17 at 3:00 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: 12/29/16 /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Darci Lehnerz, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DV-161130 Dept. No.: 1 Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Sara Ellen Vilhuber, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Sara Ellen Vilhuber to Sara Ellen Sunshine. The hearing will be on 02/15/2017 at 1:30 p.m.The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: 12-30-16 /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Michael Evjen, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY DEPT. NO. 2 PROBATE NO. DP-16-244 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JEWEL RAE HUNTER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to LISA MARIE SUTTON, the Personal Representative, return re-

SERVICES HOME IMPROVEMENT Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Profes-

[C6] Missoula Independent • January 12 - January 19, 2017

sional, Certified Lead Renovator. Testimonials Available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642

ceipt requested, at c/o Worden Thane P.C., P.O. Box 4747, Missoula, MT 59806, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 13 day of December, 2016. /s/ LISA MARIE SUTTON c/o Worden Thane P.C. P.O. Box 4747, Missoula, Montana 598064747 WORDEN THANE P.C. Attorneys for Personal Representative By: /s/ Gail M. Haviland, Esq. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No.: 1 Case No.: DP-16-258 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: WANDA JEANNE NEUMILLER, Deceased. NOTICE IF HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to JANICE K. PEARSON, personal representative, 235 Red Fox Road, Lolo, MT 59847, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED: January 5th 2017 /s/ Janice K. Pearson, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-16243 Dept. No. 4 Karen S. Townsend NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF BRIAN L. AUCHENBACH SR., Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN CHRISTOPHER M. AUCHENBACH has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate on December 14, 2016. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to CHRISTOPHER M. AUCHENBACH, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 368 Washboard Dr., Condon, MT 59826, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 12/15/98, recorded as Instrument No. 199834018; BK 566; Pg 1422, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which David E Chamberlain, a single person was Grantor, Norwest Mortgage, Inc. was Beneficiary and First Montana Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First Montana Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Parcel E of Certificate of Survey No. 3983, located in the Northwest quarter (NW1/4) of Section 17, Township 12 North, Range 17 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 07/01/15 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of November 7, 2016, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $67,025.26. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $57,556.74, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, On the Front Steps, City of Missoula on March 30, 2017 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, in-

cluding Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. Chamberlain, David E. (TS# 7023.115228) 1002.285034-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/17/15, recorded as Instrument No. 201506323 BK: 943 Pg 6, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Michel D Helland and Sheryn J Helland, joint tenancy with full rights of survivorship was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as designated nominee for First Interstate Bank, its successorts and assigns was Beneficiary and William D Lamdin III was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded William D Lamdin III as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 14 of Trail Creek East Addition Phase VIII to the Double Arrow Ranch, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, ac-

EAGLE SELF STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units 62, 203, 289, 318, 381, 410, 419 & 513. Units can contain furniture, clothes, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, & other misc. household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday January 23, 2017. All auction units will only be shown each day at 3 P.M. written sealed bids may be submitted to storage office at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59804 prior to Thursday January 26, 2017 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final .


PUBLIC NOTICES cording to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201616785 BK: 967 Pg: 1213, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to LakeView Loan Servicing, LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note�) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan�) is now due for the 12/01/15 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of November 22, 2016, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $253,303.72. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $240,599.29, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 4, 2017 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. Helland, Michel and Sheryn J (TS# 7431.20747) 1002.289508-File No.

County, Montana: LOT 9 IN BLOCK 1 OF WEBBER ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF EUGENE KARL SCHAFER and JANET LINDQUIST SCHAFER, as Grantors, conveyed said real property to First American Title Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Equity Direct Mortgage Corp., A California Corporation, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust on May 8, 1998, and recorded on May 13, 1998 as Book 541 Page 296 Document No. 9812132.The beneficial interest is currently held by HSBC Bank USA, National Association as Trustee for Structured Asset Securities Corporation, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2004-SC1. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments beginning November 1, 2015, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 2, 2016 is $79,863.64 principal, interest totaling $8,673.77 late charges in the amount of $519.75, escrow advances of $3,112.74, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,979.45, plus accruing interest, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation.The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in

cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 30, 2016 /s/ Rae Albert Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho)) ss. County of Bingham) On this 30th day of November, 2017, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Rae Albert, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Kaitlin Ann Gotch Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 07/29/2022 Nationstar Mortgage LLC vs SCHAFER 101179-2

County, Montana: A tract of land located in the SW1/4 of Section 35, Township 11 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana, being more particularly described as Tract A-2 of Certificate of Survey No. 2250. MISTI L. JAMES and PAUL D. JAMES, as Grantors, conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson at Mackoff, Kellogg, Kirby & Kloster, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to “MERS� Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. as nominee for PHH Mortgage Corporation, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on April 12, 2010 and recorded on April 12, 2010 as Book 858 Page 203 under Document No. 201006917. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments beginning June 1, 2015, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The

total amount due on this obligation as of April 8, 2016 is $248,201.66 principal, interest totaling $11,613.87 late charges in the amount of $348.12, escrow advances of $2,403.29, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,042.25, plus accruing interest, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation.The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The con-

SKIJORING IN LINCOLN, MONTANA Jan. 21-22

veyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under

the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 13, 2016 /s/ Rae Albert Assis-

ESTATE SALE - LOG HOMES PAY THE BALANCE OWED ONLY!!! AMERICAN LOG HOMES IS ASSISTING FINAL RELEASE OF ESTATE & ACCOUNT SETTLEMENT ON HOUSES.

1)Model # 101 Carolina $40,840‌BBALANCE OWED $17,000 2)Model # 303 Lit le Rock $38,525‌BALANCE OWED $15,000 3)Model # 403 Augusta $42,450‌BALANCE OWED $16,500 NEW - HOMES HAVE NOT BEEN MANUFACTURED

5DFHVEHJLQDP6DWXUGD\

$WWKH/LQFROQ5RGHR*URXQGVPLOHVZHVWRIGRZQWRZQ %URXJKWWR\RXE\:LOG+RUVH6WDEOHV6NLMRULQJ

 DQG7KH/LQFROQ9DOOH\&KDPEHURI&RPPHUFH OLQFROQPRQWDQDFRP

• Make any plan design changes you desire! • Comes with Complete Building Blueprints & Construction Manual • Windows, Doors, and Roofing not included • NO TIME LIMIT FOR DELIVERY! BBB A+ Rating

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 24, 2017, at 11:00 AM at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 13, 2017, at 11:00 AM at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula

missoulanews.com • January 12 - January 19, 2017 [C7]


JONESIN’ CROSSWORDS

PUBLIC NOTICES

By Matt Jones tant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE

ACROSS

“Sweet!”–getting that glazed-over look. DOWN

1 Put in stitches 5 Andreas opener 8 Cogitates, with "over" 13 Antioxidant berry in fruit juices 14 Nervous twinge 15 Like a game's tutorial levels 16 Considered only in terms of money 19 Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America bestowals 20 Bird that runs 35 mph 22 Dating site datum 23 1986-to-2001 orbiter 24 Hi-___ graphics 26 Like "The Polar Express" 28 "Ain't happenin'" 30 "Friends" friend 31 Filet mignon cut 35 Foul, as weather 36 Number sometimes decoded as "Z" 39 Friedlander of "30 Rock" 42 Amish, e.g. 43 "Buy It Now" site 47 ___ of troubles 49 Ashley and Mary-Kate, for two 51 Christmas tree choice 52 Fall back, tidewise 54 Quirky comic Philips 55 Unagi, at sushi bars 56 It's provided by guild members 60 Advice that the four long entries with circles failed to follow 63 Baby garment with snaps 64 Word heard by Marge a lot, I imagine 65 Extreme aversion 66 ___ Martin (007's car) 67 Part of MS-DOS (abbr.) 68 Fairy tale preposition

1 Trump tweet ender, often 2 Prefix before friendly or terrorism 3 Brownie ingredients, sometimes 4 Khartoum's river 5 Uphill battle 6 Supermarket section 7 March Madness gp. 8 Cheese companion 9 Exploitative type 10 Retired hockey great Eric 11 "Dig in, everyone!" 12 High-class group, for short? 15 Hubble after whom a space telescope was named 17 "I've got __feeling about this!" 18 "Born on the Fourth of July" locale, briefly 20 "To ___ is human" 21 "Little Red Book" chairman 25 James Bond, for example 27 "Como ___?" ("How are you?" in Spanish) 29 Horns that are really winds 32 Iron-___ (T-shirt transfer patterns) 33 London or Brooklyn ending 34 Home of Times Sq. and Columbus Cir. 37 Brings by cart, perhaps 38 Bovine quartet 39 Peanut butter brand for "choosy moms" 40 Instances of agreement 41 Hackers' hangout that's tough to find via search engines 44 Keg attachment 45 "I'd like to buy ___" (request to Pat Sajak) 46 Armani competitor, initially 48 "I'll have ___ Christmas without you" (Elvis lyric) 50 "Rio ___" (John Wayne flick) 53 Ask for a doggie treat, perhaps 54 Judy Jetson's brother 57 "Make ___!" (Captain Picard's order) 58 Some PTA members 59 Aloha Stadium locale 60 Morgue acronym 61 Judge Lance played by Kenneth Choi on "American Crime Story" 62 First number shouted before a ball drop, often

The following described personal property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash or certified funds. Proceeds from the public sale for said personal property shall be applied to the debt owed to Rent-a-Space in the amounts listed below (plus as yet undetermined amounts to conduct the sale): Space/Name/$$$/Desc 2252/Brenda Patterson/$302/Guitar SALE LOCATION: Gardner’s Auction Service, 4810 Hwy 93 S, Missoula, MT www.gardnersauction.com SALE DATE/TIME: Wed, Feb 1, 2017 @ 4:30 PM (check website for details) TERMS: Public sale to the highest bidder. Sold “AS IS”, “WHERE IS”. Cash or certified funds.

©2017 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

[C8] Missoula Independent • January 12 - January 19, 2017

339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho)) ss. County of Bingham) On this 13th day of December, 2016, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Rae Albert, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Kaitlin Ann Gotch Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 07/29/2022 PHH vs JAMES 100886-2 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 5, 2017, at 11:00 AM at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 4 in Block 1 of Ben Hughes Addition, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to

the official recorded plat thereof. Lisa Jones and Sheldon Jones, as Grantor, conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson at Mackoff, Kellogg, Kirby & Kloster as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for PHH Mortgage Corporation, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust on November 17, 2010, and recorded on November 22, 2010 as Book 869 Page 775 under Document No. 201022882. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments beginning January 1, 2016, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan.

The total amount due on this obligation as of October 14, 2016 is $116,695.72 principal, interest totaling $4,563.13 late charges in the amount of $32.45, escrow advances of $970.38, and other fees and expenses advanced of $81.00, plus accruing interest, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, whereis basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the

property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 19, 2016 /s/ Kaitlin Ann Gotch Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho)) ss. County of Bingham ) On this 19th day of December, 2016, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Kaitlin Ann Gotch, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Rae Albert Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 9-6-2022 PHH vs JONES 102329-1


RENTALS

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-8777353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

APARTMENTS 1 bed, 1 bath, $700, newer complex, DW, wood laminate flooring, storage, off-street parking. W/S/G paid. NO PETS, NO SMOKING. Gatewest 728-7333 108 W. Broadway #2/ Studio/1 bath, just remodeled, W/D, DW, views of downtown. $950. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 1315 E. Broadway #4. 2 bed/1.5 bath, close to U, coin-ops, storage, pets? $850. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

1324 S. 2nd Street West “B”. 3 bed/2 bath, central location, single garage, W/D. $1100. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1400 Burns St. #8. 2 bed/1.5 bath, Westside, W/D hookups, patio, pet? $1050 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 2 bed, 1 bath, $650, near Southgate Mall, DW, W/D hookups, offstreet/carport parking, storage, W/S/G paid. Cat Upon Approval, NO SMOKING. Gatewest 7287333 2 bed, 1 bath, $850, S. Russell, W/D hookups, DW, wood laminate flooring, storage, off-street parking. W/S/G paid. NO PETS, NO SMOKING. Gatewest 7287333 2 bed, 1 bath, $875, newer complex, DW, wood laminate flooring, storage, off-street parking. W/S/G paid. NO PETS, NO SMOKING. Gatewest 7287333 2205 ½ South Avenue West. 3 bed/1 ¾ bath, all utilities included. $1225. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 2329 Fairview Ave. #2. 2 bed/1 bath, shared yard, close to shopping. $725. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 3 bed, 2 bath, $1175, by Southgate Mall, W/D hookups, DW, wood laminate flooring, storage, off-street parking. W/S/G paid. NO PETS, NO SMOKING. Gatewest 728-7333

MOBILE HOMES Lolo RV Park. Spaces available to rent. W/S/G/Electric included. $495/month. 406-273-6034

DUPLEXES

COMMERCIAL

1706 Scott Street “B’ 1 bed/1 bath, Northside, all utilities paid, pet? $700. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

210 South 3rd West. Lease space available by the Hip Strip near Bernice’s Bakery. Shannon Hilliard, Ink Realty Group. 239-8350 shannonhilliard5@gmail.com

524 S. 5th Street E. “A”. 3 bed/2 bath, two blocks to U., W/D, yard $1300. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

ROOMMATES

HOUSES

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com!

212 ½ S. 5th Street East. 1 bed/1 bath, University area, recently remodeled. $800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 3 bed, 1.5 bath house, $1200, off S. Reserve, W/D in unit, DW, microwave, garage. W/S/G paid. NO PETS, NO SMOKING. Gatewest 728-7333

Earn CE credits through our Continuing Education Courses for Property Management & Real Estate Licensees westernmontana.narpm.org

Grizzly Property Management

650 South Avenue East. 3 bed/1 bath, blocks to U, W/D hook-ups, double garage, fenced yard $1400. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

"Let us tend your den" Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

Lower Grant Creek Two bedroom, two bath, + office/bedroom, unfurnished, WD, kItchen appliances including dishwasher, single level, carport, no pets $1200.00 + NW Energy/call 406-880-4942

2205 South Avenue West 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

Finalist

Finalist

GardenCity Property Management 422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

FIDELITY MANAGEMENT SERVICES, INC. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

251- 4707 Uncle Robert Lane 2 Bed/1 Bath $795/month Visit our website at

fidelityproperty.com

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing Since 1971

www.gatewestrentals.com

missoulanews.com • January 12 - January 19, 2017 [C9]


REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE

acres. $425,500. BHHSMT Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

1001 Medicine Man Cluster. Stunning custom-built 3 bed, 3.5 bath with 3 car garage. $950,000. Shannon Hilliard, Ink Realty Group. 239-8350 shannonhilliard5 @gmail.com

More than 35 years of Sales & Marketing experience. JAY GETZ • @ HOME Montana Properties • (406) 214-4016 • Jay.Getz@Outlook.com • www.HOMEMTP.com

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES

18.6 acre building lot in Sleeman Creek, Lolo. $129,900. BHHS Montana Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

801 N Orange Street #303, Missoula, MT 59802 MLS #21605224 $159,710. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816 anne@movemontana.com

1845 South 9th West. Updated triplex with 4 bed, 2 bath upper unit and two 1 bed apartments in basement. $470,000. Shannon Hilliard, Ink Realty Group. 2398350 shannonhilliard5@gmail.com 2 Bdr, 2 Bath, Rose Park home. $270,000. BHHSMT Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath, East Missoula home. $200,000. BHHSMT Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Huson home on 5.5

Pinnacle Townhomes. Modern 3 bed, 2.5 bath with private fenced yard & double garage on Charlo Street. $289,900. Shannon Hilliard, Ink Realty Group 239-8350 shannonhilliard5@gmail.com

MANUFACTURED

HOMES For Sale 2- 16x80 mobile homes in great condition $35,000 delivered and set up within 150 miles of Billings. 406-259-4663

1201 South 6th Street, Missoula Modern Condo Unit #204

$244,900 • MLS # 20157047 PRICE DROP

2 Bedroom 3 Bathroom Unit, 1,496 sq ft. The Factory Condos Complex is possibly the ''Greenest'' Building in Missoula. High Efficiency Lighting and Energy Efficient Gas Boiler with H2O Baseboard Heat. Unit consists of 2 levels with 10 Foot Ceilings on Main Floor and 9 Foot Ceilings on the upper floor. Bamboo Floors throughout the Main Floor Highlight the Open Kitchen which has Butcher-Block Counter Tops. Fresh Interior, Brand New Appliances with Natural Gas Range. Living Area has a New Gas Fireplace Master Bath with Tiled Floors and Counter Tops.

Tylor Trenary Main Street Realty (406) 544-3310 tylor@mainstreetmissoula.com

[C10] Missoula Independent • January 12 - January 19, 2017


missoulanews.com • January 12 - January 19, 2017 [C11]


REAL ESTATE

Getting ready to sell? Learn the first thing you should do in RE Update at MoveMontana.com

ALL ON ONE LEVEL condo in convenient central location. Master bedroom has full bath and walk-in closet. Kitchen is equipped with newer stainless steel appliances. Single garage. $140,000

1545 South 8th West • $212,500

This Month’s Trivia “Give it a New Life”

3811 STEPHENS #26

Under contract

Super cute 2 bed, 1 bath with unfinished basement, hardwood floors, tiled bath, in-floor radiant heat & single garage.

Pat McCormick Real Estate Broker Real Estate With Real Experience

pat@properties2000.com 406-240-SOLD (7653)

Properties2000.com

LAND FOR SALE NHN Weber Butte Trail. 60 acre ranch in Corvallis with sweeping Bitterroot views. $800,000. Shannon Hilliard, Ink Realty Group 239-8350. shannonhilliard5 @gmail.com NW Montana Real Estate. Several large acreage parcels. Company owned. Bordered by National Forest. Timber. Water. Tungstenholdings.com. (406)293-3714

COMMERCIAL Holland Lake Lodge. Lodge with restaurant, gift shop & Montana liquor license on 12 acres of USFS land. $5,000,000. Shannon Hilliard, Ink Realty Group 239-8350. shannonhilliard5@gmail.com

OUT OF TOWN 122 Ranch Creek Road. 3294 sq.ft. home on 37+ acres in Rock Creek. Bordered by Lolo National Forest on 3 sides. $1,400,000. Shannon Hilliard, Ink Realty

Group. 239-8350 hilliard5@gmail.com

shannon-

3 Bdr, 2 Bath, River Road home. $304,900. BHHSMT Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4 Bdr, 2 Bath, Clinton home on 1.5 acres. $300,000. BHHSMT Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4.6 acre building lot in the woods with views and privacy. Lolo, Mormon Creek Rd. $99,000. BHHS Montana Properties. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 5578 Circle Drive, Florence. 3 bed, 2 bath on one acre near river trail. $263,000. Shannon Hilliard, Ink Realty Group. 239-8350 shannonhilliard5@gmail.com

Rochelle Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

728-8270

[C12] Missoula Independent • January 12 - January 19, 2017

Call Vickie Amundson @ 544-0799 for more information

Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you