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BOOKS

SUSANNA SONNENBERG DISSECTS FEMALE FRIENDSHIP IN NEW SAVAGELY HONEST MEMOIR, SHE MATTERS

TAKES GISSETTE PADILLA MARRIED IN MONTANA: YOUR OPINION AAIMHUNTER ARTS INSIDE AT THE NRA PLAYS WITH MEMORY 2013 WEDDING PLANNER


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


BOOKS

SUSANNA SONNENBERG DISSECTS FEMALE FRIENDSHIP IN NEW SAVAGELY HONEST MEMOIR, SHE MATTERS

TAKES GISSETTE PADILLA MARRIED IN MONTANA: YOUR OPINION AAIMHUNTER ARTS INSIDE AT THE NRA PLAYS WITH MEMORY 2013 WEDDING PLANNER


[2] Missoula Independent • January 3 – January 10, 2013


FRIDAY Live Irish Music

News Voices/Letters Filibuster, gun control and more guns .......................................................4 The Week in Review Lottery winner heads to Alaska........................................................6 Briefs Officer resigns, Obamacare and wild horses .............................................................6 Etc. Green jobs coming to Frenchtown ...............................................................................7 News Stalled Violence Against Women Act hurts Montana .................................................8 News Guns fly off local shelves (again) in wake of tragedy ................................................9 Opinion A hunter’s take on the National Rifle Association...............................................10 Opinion Arming teachers, principals is just the beginning...............................................11 Feature Bold predictions for 2013..........................................................................................................14

Arts & Entertainment Arts Gissette Padilla messes with memory.........................................................................18 Music The Pine Hearts, Code Orange Kids, Max Hay and The Living Sisters....................19 Books Sonnenberg delivers savagely honest memoir .......................................................20 Film Hitchcock exemplifies the pitfall of biopics ..............................................................21 Film Following formula to a dull Promised Land .............................................................22 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films ..........................................................23 Flash in the Pan Vietnamese comfort food ......................................................................24 Happiest Hour Atomic Cocktail .......................................................................................25 8 Days a Week Already nostalgic about 2012...................................................................26 Mountain High The Seeley Lake Pond Hockey Tournament ...........................................33 Agenda Breathing the Big Sky............................................................................................34

6-8pm

FRIDAY 1/4 Rachael Cardiello and the Warm Electric Winter featuring Shakewell • 9 pm Brunch at 10 am Saturday & Sunday

Tuesday Trivia Night Wednesday $10 Burger and Beer Thursday Open Mic Night Saturday 1/5 Live Music 9 pm

Exclusives Street Talk............................................................................................................................4 In Other News ...................................................................................................................12 Classifieds ........................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess........................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y .........................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle............................................................................................................C-5 This Modern World ...................................................................................................................................C-12

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson ASSOCIATE EDITOR Matthew Frank PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Jason McMackin STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen COPY EDITOR Kate Whittle PHOTO INTERN Eric Oravsky ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Pumpernickel Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Sasha Perrin, Steven Kirst, Tawana De Hoyos SPECIAL PROJECTS COORDINATOR Alecia Goff SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Allen MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler MARKETING & EVENTS INTERN Whitney Skauge FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, Chris Dombrowski Andy Smetanka, Brad Tyer, Dave Loos, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Jamie Rogers, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Melissa Mylchreest

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President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2012 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • January 3 – January 10, 2013 [3]


[voices]

STREET TALK

Teachers with Tasers

Asked on New Year's Eve, on the Missoula County Courthouse lawn.

by Eric Oravsky

This week’s cover story features bold predictions for 2013. What’s your bold prediction for 2013? Follow-up: What’s your New Year’s resolution?

Casey Carlson: Well, the world definitely didn’t end, so now I am waiting to see what happens with Obama in his next term, whether it is going to be better, or worse. Better things: I don’t have any resolutions for 2013. I am pretty happy with who I am. I don’t really see any purpose. Most people forget what their resolutions are the next month anyway.

Dan McClellan: There is going to be more federal debt, although that isn’t that bold of a prediction. Seems pretty obvious, actually. I am looking way ahead and saying that the Raiders are going to have a good season and win the Super Bowl. Bring in the light: I am going to be remodeling the basement. I won’t say how, but it is going to be better.

Aubry Nicholson: I think that Obama will do something useful, but I’m not sure what yet. I think it is going to be pretty cold this winter. Waistin’ time: By the time my child is six months old I really want to be out of my maternity pants, and I also want to write a lot more. I am a creative writing student at the university.

After the horrific shootings in Connecticut, we all hope to find a way to prevent this tragedy from ever happening again. Right now—as in the past—many in our nation are looking to gun control, and the pundits are insisting we act now, while emotions are still high. Being a member of the Montana Legislature, I am in a position to enact law to protect my fellow Montanans, the teachers and children in our schools. Over the past week, I have lost sleep due to the heartache, and trying to find an answer. Some have suggested limiting violent video games. This may be a good place for parents to start, but we all know that kids will get and play these games, even if it is illegal. Others have suggested gun control. Yet this tragedy occurred in a gunfree zone, as do most mass shootings. Moreover, we all know that gun control is not going to take weapons off the streets or out of the hands of dangerous people. If simply banning something got rid of it, cocaine, heroine and meth should have disappeared years ago. I have spoken to many people over the past few days, trying to find a solution. Most people don’t have an answer. Of course we need to look at how Montana handles mental health. The truth is, however, that we cannot legislate goodness in people, and more importantly, we cannot legislate evil out of the heart of bad people. Ultimately, we need to allow our teachers to have the ability to protect themselves and our kids. I have several ideas how to do this safely, without compromising the classroom environment for teachers or students. First, teachers should be trained to use a taser and/or pepper spray, which would be securely placed in every classroom. Second, I suggest we put at least

Molly Stockdale: I predict that everything will stay exactly the same. I have given up hope that anything will change. Family first: I would have to say that I want to focus on my family more this year. Less business and more fun.

[4] Missoula Independent • January 3 – January 10, 2013

“The truth is that we cannot legislate goodness in people, and more importantly, we cannot legislate evil out of the heart of bad people.” a permit—should also be allowed on college campuses. We may be helpless to stop another of these evil and senseless acts but we do not have to stand by powerless, waiting, and hoping that it does not happen in one of our Montana elementary schools, high schools or college campuses. Rep. Champ Edmunds Missoula

A sick body politic The filibuster overhaul supported by Bob Brown and Anders Blewett is a nice

idea (see Letters, Dec. 27), but it is nothing more than treating the symptom of an illness rather than going to the cause and changing whatever behavior or action caused the symptom in the first place. The filibuster itself isn’t the problem, it’s the people who abuse it. Brown is a Republican and former Secretary of State. Mr. Blewitt is a Democrat and currently a Montana legislator. Being members of the two major parties exposes their respective strengths and weaknesses. Their strengths being that they are part of the organizations that have the power to make or rescind the nation’s and state’s laws. Their weaknesses being that they are part of the organizations that have the power to abuse the nation’s and state’s laws, and they can rarely look past their own party allegiance and political duopoly. Filibuster overhaul is not what is needed to cure our ills, it’s political overhaul—a political overhaul that recognizes that we, as a nation, have outgrown the two-party system. A two-party system that is doing more to hinder the growth of our government than help it grow and prosper. For that we need new blood, new ideas, new parties and new oxygen flowing in the body politic. Yet try to get a former Republican elected official, or a currently serving Democratic elected official, to admit and speak up for what so many of us regularly acknowledge and wish for. No, they’d rather speak about what their parties can do to overhaul symptoms, rather than going to the root of the problem—the ossified twoparty male-majority political system. John Marshall Hot Springs Correction: A caption in our Year in Photos feature misidentified the highest peak in the Swan Range. Holland Peak is the highest at 9,356 feet. The Indy regrets the error.

[comments from missoulanews.com]

Backtalk from “Moving target,” Dec. 20

Armed moderates Ty Bender: I predict that people will start thinking with their brains. I’m just hoping that more people actually start doing some good for the world and not just trying to get on the next TV show. Fresh air: Definitely getting outside a lot more, hiking and skiing. Nothing real big, just getting out.

one firearm in every school, perhaps in the principal’s office (locked up, of course) with several administrators having access and trained on how to use it. Finally, teachers who wish to use their concealed carry permits on school grounds should be allowed to do so, perhaps with additional training. Concealed carry—with

Well, maybe us moderates are finally coming out of the closet. Thanks for the voice of reason. Nice job! Posted on 12/20/2012 at 5:53 p.m.

music and movies affects vulnerable persons’ minds even if they had a moral and ethical upbringing. I’ve seen it first hand and more than once. Posted on 12/21/2012 at 11:08 a.m.

Shoot ’em up

Warning signs

Yes, a voice of reason, but I want to add one more comment, and that is there is no doubt that the culture of violence in

Neither one of the shooters were diagnosed with a mental disorder. That doesn’t mean they were rational or men-

tally stable by any means. It certainly says something about our society when it is easier for a person to get an assault rifle and go on a killing spree than it is to find solace in a friend, counselor, relative, etc. There must have been incidents leading up to these events. Had there been facilities or personnel available to these people maybe these scenarios could have been avoided. Posted on 12/21/2012 at 12:28 p.m.


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missoulanews.com • January 3 – January 10, 2013 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Chad Harder

Wednesday, December 26 Joseph Bednarczyk, of Bigfork, claims a $30,000 prize from the Montana Lottery with a ticket bought from Smith’s Food & Drug in Kalispell. Bednarczyk tells a reporter that he and his wife will use the money to travel to Alaska and pan for gold.

Thursday, December 27 Lolo’s Erik Wengren, 19, pleads guilty to disorderly conduct a week after writing on Facebook that he was going to open fire at his cousin’s school in Gillette, Wyo. Wengren tells the judge it was only a joke.

Friday, December 28 Gov.-elect Steve Bullock announces that Jeff Hagener will be the new director of Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks, a post Hagener held from 2001 to 2008. Bullock also picks John Rogers to head the Governor’s Office of Economic Development.

Saturday, December 29 Around 10 a.m., a 6-foot-tall white male who claims he’s armed robs Palmer Drug on Southwest Higgins and absconds with an undisclosed amount of narcotic prescription drugs. Police later identify and release photos of a “person of interest.�

Sunday, December 30 At the Missoula Holiday Classic hockey tournament at Glacier Ice Rink, the Missoula Bruins tie Spokane 1-1 despite taking 50 shots on goal. The result is still enough to advance the Bruins to the semifinals.

Monday, December 31 Missoula law enforcement officers hit the streets with increased patrols to deter drunk driving. The effort appears to pay off; a public report of city-county crime activity reveals only four DUI arrests the entire night.

Tuesday, January 1 Montana’s minimum wage rises 15 cents to $7.80 per hour, meaning a full-time minimum-wage worker will make about $300 more a year. The increase results from Initiative 151, passed by voters in 2006, which added an annual cost-of-living adjustment to the state’s minimum wage.

After taking on a face full of snow, Chance Eaton keeps his boots up while bombing down the Blue Mountain Recreation Area sledding hill with his 3-year-old daughter Claire on New Year’s Eve.

Healthcare

“Obamacare� in Alberton Fencing surrounds a patch of disturbed ground adjacent to the Westside’s Lowell Elementary School, the site where workers recently began constructing Montana’s first school-based healthcare clinic. The clinic is being paid for with a $500,000 grant to Missoula Partnership Health Center funded by the federal Affordable Care Act. When the clinic’s complete in the spring, it will offer Lowell students and their families, many of which are low-income, improved access to healthcare. Studies have shown school-based clinics reduce inappropriate emergency room visits and Medicaid expenditures, while lowering rates of student absenteeism and tardiness. U.S. Sen. Max Baucus, a chief author of the controversial healthcare reform law, announced two weeks ago another such clinic for Alberton. Superior’s Mineral Regional Health Center, located about 30 miles west of Alberton, landed the $455,000 School-Based Health Center Capital Grant. Construction of the 2,000-square-foot clinic is expected to begin this summer on a piece of school property near the football field, giving the community of 417 local medical services for the first time.

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[6] Missoula Independent • January 3 – January 10, 2013

“This means kids in Alberton and their families will no longer have to choose between gas money to get to a clinic in Missoula or getting the health care they need,� Baucus said in a statement. Jim Baldwin, Alberton’s superintendent of schools, says that’s no exaggeration. He says 95 percent of Alberton residents travel to Missoula for healthcare, and that translates into significant time away from school and work. Any healthcare the district’s 160 elementary school students do receive is provided by the school nurse, who comes one day a week. Exacerbating the dearth of local medical services, Baldwin says, is poverty. When he came to the district 15 years ago, about 30 percent of the district’s students qualified for free or reduced-priced lunches. Today, that number is over 70 percent. He calls the clinic “a really good deal for everybody concerned.� It’s primarily intended for students, but will eventually be open to the entire community. Meanwhile, in Billings, the Yellowstone Boys and Girls Ranch also recently won a school-based health clinic grant intended to improve tele-medicine services to rural schools in the region. Matthew Frank

Lake County

Lying officer resigns Sgt. Dan Duryee, one of the four officers in the Lake County Sheriff ’s Department defending themselves in federal court over wide-ranging allegations of misconduct, submitted a letter of resignation last week. His last day wearing a Lake County badge was to be Jan. 3. In September 2010, Duryee admitted to making false claims about serving in the military. A few colleagues in the Lake County Sheriff ’s Department had suspected Duryee’s detailed combat stories were fabricated, and in May 2010 they asked the Montana Public Safety Officer Standards and Training Council, or POST, to investigate. “It is evident that Duryee was allowed to be a member of the Special Response Team and a sniper without attending any formal training, based on his false claims of military service and combat experience,� POST concluded. Duryee’s colleagues said he had been telling made-up war stories for more than a decade, but in a letter to Sheriff Jay Doyle, Duryee admitted to only once telling a “fish story.� He wrote, “This was a lie...I make no excuses for what I did. It was wrong and disrespectful. I deeply regret this story.�


[news] POST recommended revocation of Duryee’s law enforcement certification. But that was beyond what Doyle thought was appropriate. His internal investigation concluded that Duryee hadn’t committed a crime and there were no grounds for discipline. In May 2011, Duryee was taken to court after he entered a Polson apartment through a bedroom window and allegedly used excessive force in apprehending a man suspected of domestic assault—but it was the wrong apartment, and the wrong man. That case was dismissed two months ago. But Duryee’s still embroiled in the federal court case five current and former officers in the Lake County Sheriff ’s Department brought against Duryee, Sheriff Jay Doyle, Undersheriff Dan Yonkin and Detective Mike Sargeant in February 2012. The plaintiffs claim that the defendants retaliated against them for bringing forward evidence of wrongdoing within the department, ranging from Duryee’s lies to several officers’ involvement in a poaching group known as the “Coyote Club.” The defendants acted “in concert and with criminal purpose,” the plaintiffs argue. A trial is expected to begin in March 2013. Matthew Frank

20, she told reporters with the Sunlight Foundation that she intends to push for more stringent regulations on super PACs like the liberal Majority PAC and Republican strategist Karl Rove’s American Crossroads, which spent $3 million and $1.8 million respectively in Montana’s Senate race. American Crossroads outspent every other super PAC last year, dropping more than $104 million supporting or opposing various candidates nationwide. Only 1.29 percent of that money went to races where American Crossroads saw the desired result. “Hope springs eternal,” Weintraub told the Sunlight Foundation. “I think the commission ought to

Elections

FEC faces uphill battle Over the past month, retrospectives on Montana’s 2012 U.S. Senate race have estimated that candidates, parties and independent organizations combined spent as much as $51 million trying to sway voter opinion. Nearly a quarter of that came from nonprofits in the form of what’s commonly called “dark money,” expenses made using contributions from a host of shadowy donors. Sen. Jon Tester may have come out the victor, but the question now facing Montana and the nation is troubling: How do we shine a light on those shadows? The answer depends on how the Federal Election Commission reacts to the growing secrecy of campaign spending over the coming year. Late last month, the FEC elected as its new chair Ellen Weintraub, hailed by numerous campaign finance reform advocates as the most liberal voice on the sixperson commission in favor of increased transparency. Weintraub is also the first Democrat to chair the commission since 2008—the same year the Supreme Court issued a ruling in Citizens United that contributed heavily to an influx of unlimited money in federal campaigns. Weintraub has a long list of goals going into 2013. Shortly after receiving her new position Dec.

address these issues...Whether we’ll be able to take them on is an entirely different question.” The answer will doubtlessly have ramifications in Montana as Republicans seek to oust Sen. Max Baucus in 2014. But even with Weintraub’s election, the FEC will have a tough time reining in outside spending. The commission remains deadlocked with three Democrats and three Republicans, and five of the six have already surpassed the end of their terms without Congress or President Barack Obama appointing replacements. Weintraub’s own term expired in April 2007; she was appointed on Dec. 6, 2002. Alex Sakariassen

Wild horses

Options for the unwanted Adoption rates for wild horses culled from oversized herds have tumbled nationwide in the past decade. The number of horses held at federal corrals,

BY THE NUMBERS Total revenues from athletics at Montana’s six four-year campuses in 2011-2012, according to a recent report to theBoard of Regents.

$54 million

feed lots and pastures has simultaneously skyrocketed—from roughly 10,000 in 2001 to more than 49,000 in 2012. As a result, the annual cost to taxpayers for federal management of wild horses has more than tripled since 2000 to an estimated $76 million. “We’re up between a rock and a hard place right now,” says Bureau of Land Management spokesman Tom Gorey. BLM was handed a controversial solution in 2004 when then-Sen. Conrad Burns of Montana sponsored legislation allowing the agency to sell eligible wild horses at numbers above the adoption limit of four per buyer every six months. BLM has since sold 5,400 wild horses and burros under the sale program, but the purchase of 1,777 of those animals by Colorado livestock hauler Tom Davis between 2009 and 2012 raised concerns among wild horse advocates. The nonprofit news organization ProPublica launched an investigation this fall into suspicions that Davis sold many of the animals he purchased to slaughterhouses in Mexico. Montana currently has no wild horses in federal holding, but several facilities in Wyoming and Idaho were well over capacity as of November 2012. The Department of the Interior is now revising its sale policy to limit the number of wild horses available to individual buyers each year. Even officials managing smaller herds in states like Idaho, Montana and Wyoming are searching for answers regarding what to do with unadopted animals. BLM spokeswoman Jessica Gardetto, in Boise, points to partnerships with private eco-sanctuaries as one small fix. The first such sanctuary—Deerwood Ranch—went up in Wyoming this year and is now home to 250 wild horses. The Greenfire Preserve in Idaho, located near the Challis wild horse herd, is working toward a similar partnership with BLM, Gardetto says. “We have so many horses, and the range can’t support all of them,” Gardetto says. “That’s why a lot of horses go to long-term pastures.” Gorey believes these eco-sanctuaries won’t solve the agency’s capacity problems entirely. But he and Gardetto agree they’ll help promote education and tourism around the animals, and offer an alternative for older horses that are less prone to adoption. Alex Sakariassen

ETC. Several months ago, we asked Ray Stillwell, president of the Green Investment Group, about the prospect of the Frenchtown mill, his company’s newest asset, being designated a federal Superfund site. He laughed it off, saying, “There’s a reason we buy paper mills, as opposed to steel mills.” You’d think $19 million would buy more due diligence. The 3,200-acre site along the Clark Fork River northwest of Missoula is, evidently, a bigger mess than any of the other six former Smurfit-Stone properties the Illinois-based Green Investment Group owns. Earlier this year, the Environmental Protection Agency reported that the site contains soil, groundwater, sludge and wastewater ponds contaminated with dioxins, furans, arsenic, lead and other papermaking chemicals seeping into the Clark Fork. In late November, the EPA asked the state for consent to add the property to the Superfund National Priorities List, which Gov. Brian Schweitzer granted a couple of weeks ago. Now Stillwell and his business partner, Mark Spizzo, say they’re “not surprised” that the state prefers the federal Superfund route, adding that they’ll continue their so-far-unsuccessful efforts to lure green industries to the uncontaminated portions of the site. This is the right way to go. Let the Green Investment Group focus on redevelopment and leave the clean-up to the EPA and Montana Department of Environmental Quality. The company has never led a clean-up of this scale, nor did it demonstrate much concern for the extent of the contamination when it absolved Smurfit-Stone of all environmental liability. Regardless of Green Investment Group’s agreement, Superfund law allows the EPA to sue all former mill operators. It’ll be a messy, years-long undertaking figuring out who pays for the clean-up, but we’re encouraged by who will be leading the state through the process: Missoula’s own Tracy Stone-Manning, who Gov.-elect Steve Bullock recently selected to helm the DEQ. Before working for Sen. Jon Tester, Stone-Manning, as head of the Clark Fork Coalition, essentially brokered the removal of the Milltown Dam. Now we need her restoration chops a little ways downstream. So green jobs are headed to the Frenchtown mill. Hopefully the Green Investment Group can create some, too.

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missoulanews.com • January 3 – January 10, 2013 [7]


[news]

Crippling blow Stalled Violence Against Women Act hurts Montana by Carlotta Grandstaff

With all the fevered talk of debt ceilings, fiscal cliffs and tax cuts, one piece of legislation that has enjoyed bipartisan congressional support for 18 years, and has helped untold numbers of vulnerable Americans, has been left by Congress to teeter on the edge of its own cliff. Congress first authorized the Violence Against Women Act, or VAWA, in 1994. Its goal is to help communities design local programs to help beaten and abused women get on with their lives safely and productively. VAWA expired in September 2011 and was not reauthorized. The House and Senate each passed their own versions of the reauthorization bill in 2012, but have not been able to compromise on a final measure. Its fate is in limbo, as are the programs it has funded nationwide for nearly 20 years. VAWA’s impact has been felt in the Bitterroot Valley, where it funds more than half of locally designed programs to help battered women and their children get back on their feet. For more than 13 years, Stacy Umhey has been the director of Hamilton’s Supporters of an Abuse-Free Environment, known locally as SAFE. “There isn’t a single program at SAFE that won’t get gutted if VAWA isn’t reauthorized,” she says. Those programs are impressive, considering SAFE’s humble origins. Launched in 1988 by the local Soroptimist club, SAFE began as a hotline and a network of private Bitterroot Valley homes that opened their doors to beaten, abused and frightened women with nowhere to go. In the nearly quarter century since then, the Soroptimists’s idea has blossomed into a fully fledged program consisting of an emergency shelter, transitional housing, children’s programs, counseling, legal assistance and an organized network of supporters, including local law enforcement, judges, teachers, medical personnel, lawyers and the community at large. The SAFE program is housed at a campus east of Hamilton, across Fair-

[8] Missoula Independent • January 3 – January 10, 2013

grounds Road from Hamilton High School. SAFE assists women seeking Temporary Orders of Protection from their abusers by offering emergency shelter, available 24/7, and transitional housing for up to two years, as well as programs to the children of women in transitional housing. SAFE shares a portion of its VAWA grant with Ravalli County to fund two full-time positions—a domestic violence investigator who works for the county attorney, and a victim’s advocate.

“There isn’t a single program at SAFE that won’t get gutted if VAWA isn’t reauthorized.” —Stacy Umhey, director of Hamilton’s Supporters of an Abuse-Free Environment “That’s all the stuff we didn’t do before 2000,” Umhey says. SAFE first began applying for the VAWA grant funds in 2000, and since then the federal program has funded 55 percent of the shelter’s programs. The VAWA funding, previously a popular and non-controversial program with Congress, is now just another political football in the ever more tiresome game of congressional dysfunction. “It’s being held up by issues of ideology and politics,” Umhey says. The sticking point between the two versions of the bill is the protection provided to three groups of women: undocumented workers, American Indians and lesbians, gays, bisexuals and transgenders, which was added to the Senate bill.

The Senate bill passed in April with bipartisan support on a vote of 68-31. Both of Montana’s senators, Democrats Max Baucus and Jon Tester, supported the measure. The House version, passed in May, stripped the protections for the three groups, and passed on mostly party lines with a vote of 222-205. Former Rep. Denny Rehberg, a Republican, voted for the stripped-down version. The bill is now stalled, and the key to its passage may lie with still another group of women: those elected to the House and Senate. Just before Christmas, all 12 Democratic female senators sent a letter to the 25 Republican women in the House, urging them to support the Senate version of the bill in the remaining days of the 112th Congress. In part, the letter reads: “All women should be protected and introducing into this legislation the notion that some women subject to violence deserve to be protected while others do not is something we believe we can all agree is unacceptable. We should not pick and choose which victims of abuse to help and which to ignore.” Congress did not act on the bill before it adjourned for the holidays. Whether the House Republican women will join with their Democratic counterparts in the Senate remains to be seen. Since mid-November 2012, as Congress was still wrangling over differing versions of the bill, violence against women—the deed, not the legislation— made headlines twice when two western Montana women were murdered, allegedly by their partners. Jessie Hawkins was murdered in a Hamilton motel room last Nov. 13, and Tina Schowengerdt was murdered Dec. 8 at her Deer Lodge home. “From my seat it’s so clear on its face that we need these services,” says Umhey. “This is so unique. VAWA has never been a controversial piece of legislation.” editor@missoulanews.com


[news]

Arms race Guns fly off local shelves (again) in wake of tragedy by Mike Gerrity

Two days before Christmas, a dozen men scan racks of firepower at Axmen South Mercantile and Pawn in Missoula. At least five employees are working the floor, but as the phone rings every minute, there are only so many hands to manage the demand. Rich Ochsner says his business is booming again. “Things have definitely been brisk,” he says. As one customer peruses a case of pistols, he chats with a salesman on how the re-ignited gun control debate may limit his choices on munitions in town. “I heard Wal-Mart took all their AR-15s off

in Aurora, Colo., last summer or in Tucson, Ariz., one year ago. Instead, Ochsner says his customers are more compelled to stock up as soon as the discussion leaves the evening news and enters the halls of Congress. “Actually, it gets busy when there’s talk of legislation,” he says. “We saw it in the second (presidential) debate. We saw it during the Clinton days.” Axmen isn’t the only store seeing demand spike. Over at Liquid Assets on North Higgins, owner Kevin Pfau says he sold the last AR-15 he had just before Christmas. Wholesale prices on all guns

the end of hunting season. He also doesn’t carry the weapons now in highest demand, which he calls “black guns.” But whenever he has to place a background check through the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives call center, either for a new customer or somebody trying to get their gun out of loan, the process is excruciatingly longer. “Yesterday, for one customer in the morning, it took me until 2:30,” Briggs says. “There’s a much higher call volume going through right now.” Tim Taunt at Nickel’s Worth doesn’t

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Axmen South Mercantile and Pawn in Missoula sold nearly 115 AR-15 semi-automatic rifles in the week following the mass shooting in Newtown, Conn.

the shelves after the shooting,” the customer says. No rifles have pulled from the WalMart Supercenter on Mullan Road as of Dec. 28, but like nearly every other gun seller in Missoula, they are completely out of anything resembling an AR-15. One week after the mass shooting in Newtown, Conn., Axmen staff estimate the store sold nearly 115 AR-15 semi-automatic rifles. It’s the same model of rifle used by the gunman who killed 20 children and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School before shooting himself. High-capacity magazines are also nearly gone from Missoula, as gun enthusiasts fear that the items made infamous by the attack could soon vanish from the market under President Barack Obama’s vow to bring a new assault weapons ban before Congress. “I think people are concerned more than anything,” Ochsner says. “Everyone worries about Article 2 being jeopardized.” Those nerves are not necessarily acted upon every time there is a highly publicized mass shooting, such as the one

have been steadily climbing since Obama’s election in 2008, and the recent focus on the AR-15’s vulnerability under a new assault weapons ban has driven up its value even higher. “Today if you were to get online, you’re going to pay much more for an AR than you were last week,” says Pfau. Some customers bought handguns as Christmas presents this year, but Pfau says he has had to wait months for his wholesale orders to be filled. “Last month I placed an order for 22 guns, and I got two,” he says. Dan Louden, who owns Cash on Broadway, says he did not have any AR15s on the shelf before Newtown, but that the gun now sells for between $800 and $1,000. He adds customers are calling him looking for the rifle and high-capacity magazines, and he is trying to stock what he can. “I tried to buy magazines on the Internet the other day. No luck,” he says. Over at Alderwood Estate and Loan, Steven Briggs says his shop has not seen more gun customers than usual since

stock much more than 20 rifles and a dozen handguns. He says the prospect of Mitt Romney losing the election earlier in the fall was already contributing to an uptick in sales. The shooting, he said, hasn’t made a difference so far. “I try not to analyze how people think too much,” Taunt says. “We didn’t really see an increase any more than what was happening in the fall.” As he helped a UPS carrier unload boxes from his truck on a snowy Dec. 27 morning, Ochsner said that he had a few high-capacity magazines that made it through Christmas unsold. Until the gun control debate resolves itself in Wa s h i n g t o n , D . C . , c o n t r o v e r s i a l weapons and their components will continue to be hunted down in Montana, price gouging be damned. As one of Ochsner’s helpers hauled in a cardboard box easily long enough to contain a rifle, he made a reference to the coveted AR-15. “Could be one right there!” editor@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • January 3 – January 10, 2013 [9]


[opinion]

Missed target A hunter’s take on the National Rifle Association by Ari LeVaux

The National Rifle Association claims to be the largest pro-hunting organization in the world. But as a hunter, the NRA couldn’t represent me less. And as a human being, I object to being associated with those bullies. The NRA is not for hunters, any more than AAA is for bicyclists. Sure, some hunters are NRA members, but first and foremost the NRA serves gun fetishists and the firearms industry. In 2011, nearly 14 million Americans hunted, while NRA members number about 4 million—fewer than half of which actually hunt. Unlike a lot of gun fetishists, hunters actually use their guns as the killing tools that they are. I don’t shoot for the joy of killing, or for the thrill of a loud explosion an inch from my head. The gun is not a toy that we have a constitutional right to play with, but a tool to which we’re guaranteed access. While most hunters don’t have the firearms experience or training of law enforcement or military personnel, a hunter’s experience nonetheless imparts a significant level of competence with a gun. Hunters feel the jitters while trying to shoot, and we shoot in all kinds of uncomfortable and less than ideal circumstances. We’ve seen what bullets can do to a body. We can contemplate, in a somewhat informed way, questions like how or if an armed civilian might stop a mass murder. And if for some reason a non-government militia had to be organized, it would doubtless be composed largely of hunters, along with military veterans and, of course, the gun freaks. The NRA wants desperately to welcome more hunters into its ranks, but fewer than one in five hunters are members, and most hunters who haven’t joined by now probably won’t. Like me, many hunters consider the NRA a bunch of paranoid loonies, with an increasing volume of innocent blood on their hands. When I say “Fuck the NRA,” as I do quite often lately, it’s for a host of reasons both personal and political, but has nothing to do with my feelings for guns or the Second Amendment. The very fact that it’s kind of scary to say “Fuck the NRA” is one of the biggest reasons to say it. It’s a bullying organization, quick to use language like “traitor.” NRA members have a lot of guns, and the organization appears to keep track of who does and says what. Ask any politician or gun-control activist. The Big Brother-style intimidation tactics extend to individual hunters like myself.

[10] Missoula Independent • January 3 – January 10, 2013

When I take my gun to the store to get it worked on, the information slip I fill out includes a line for my NRA number— despite the fact that only about 4 percent of gun owners are NRA members. Will the gunsmith treat my gun with less love if I leave that line blank? Does the NRA keep track of who services which gun when— even as it decries federal attempts to keep track of guns? I face the same blank field requesting my NRA number when I buy a membership at my local shooting range— some ranges won’t sell membership to non-NRA members. Among Americans with experience using guns as weapons, rather than as

“The NRA is not for hunters, any more than AAA is for bicyclists.”

toys, compare 14 million hunters with 3 million active and reserve military, a million police officers and 7 million military veterans with combat experience. Of course, there is some crossover among these groups. And again, hunters have the least amount of formal firearms training. But in terms of votes, any way you slice it, there is no larger population of Americans with experience shooting at things than hunters. The NRA doesn’t speak for us; we need to speak for ourselves. Fewer than one in five hunters is an NRA member. So how is it that the NRA has so much power, and the seeming ability to control politicians like marionettes? Money, of course. More than can be raised from membership dues and bake sales alone. Between 2005 and 2010, the NRA took in about $40 million from the nation’s gun manufacturers, according to the Violence Policy Center. Fear mongering is one of the best ways to create demand for guns, and nearly every piece of NRA propaganda does that. We need guns to protect us from the government, the UN, home intruders, strangers on the street. We all

need to be armed! On the Monday following the Sandy Hook shootings, a Utah sixth-grader took a pistol to elementary school, for “protection.” President Barack Obama’s re-election has been an absolute bonanza for the industry, as was his initial election. But he can’t get re-elected again, despite what the conspiracy theorists might tell you. That reality, combined with the unprecedented national trauma and soul-searching that Sandy Hook has inspired, could spell tough times ahead for the gun industry. Stock in publicly traded gun manufacturers like Ruger, which makes my hunting rifle, have been punished since Sandy Hook. On the Tuesday after the shooting, Cerberus Capitol Management announced it was selling its 95 percent stake in The Freedom Group, a privately held conglomerate whose companies include some of the world’s largest weapons manufacturers, including Remington, Barnes bullets and Bushmaster, which makes the AR-15 assault rifle used by Newtown shooter Adam Lanza. Could a hunter—or some other armed citizen—have prevented the Sandy Hook shootings? Such a thing has not happened in at least 30 years, according to a recent study by Mother Jones, which looked at 62 mass shootings in the last 30 years. “In not a single case was the killing stopped by a civilian using a gun...in recent rampages in which armed civilians attempted to intervene, they not only failed to stop the shooter but also were gravely wounded or killed.” Meanwhile, a growing body of evidence supports the observation that gun owners and their families are more likely to be shot by their own guns than to successfully repel attackers with them. In pretending otherwise, the NRA is selling the myth of security while it sells public safety down the river. The NRA needs hunters a lot more than hunters need the NRA. And the nation needs the opinions of hunters more than it needs the opinion of the NRA. Hunters are intermediaries between government armed forces and private citizens. We are armed citizens who know what guns can do, and if sensible gun-control policy is ever to be pursued, hunters need to be part of the conversation. Ari LeVaux is an avid hunter who writes “Flash in the Pan” every week in the Independent.


[opinion]

God, guns and schools Arming teachers, principals is just the beginning by Dan Brooks

I am sorry to have wasted my bold prediction for 2013 on actual laws the Montana legislature might actually pass (see page 14), because it took my attention away from state Rep. David Howard. That was a mistake, and it was one the Republican from Park City would never make himself—neither the actuality part nor the attention. In the wake of the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Conn., Howard has taken to Facebook to propose a bold new initiative directly to the people. I would not dim the brilliance of his plan through paraphrase, so here it is (sic throughout): “Create an immediate Solution: Reinstitute prayer in Schools so that those who pray can shine the light of God on the Children. Then arm those (teachers and principals) who want to be trained like a police officer to carry a concealed weapon, and have the local police make unscheduled stops on campus. This will create a strong adversary and provide people who can fight back so those gutless sociopaths can be stopped from preying upon our schools and killing our children.” Have you ever heard a better statement of purpose for the American public education system? “To create strong adversaries” should be inscribed over the door of every elementary school in the country, just as soon as we finish giving teachers and principals their much-needed tactical weapons training. Once Howard’s plan has been implemented, school shootings will be replaced by school shootouts, and everything will be fine. Putting a gun in every classroom is only half of Howard’s strategy to reduce gun violence in schools—sorry, “Schools”— of course. There is also the part about using prayer to “shine the light of God on the Children.” Under present United States policy, God cannot see the Children, because His holy tracking system has been disabled by the ACLU. Were teachers al-

lowed to flag each Child via morning prayer, God would be able to exempt them from shooting when He sends heavily armed maniacs to die at the hands of even better-armed science teachers. But thanks to the Supreme Court, He is powerless. As a Montana state legislator, Howard can only do so much to overturn the ban on classroom prayer established by the U.S. Supreme Court 50 years ago in Engel v. Vitale. The court has yet to rule on classroom multi-combatant crossfire scenarios,

“Once Howard’s plan has been implemented, school shootings will be replaced by school shootouts, and everything will be fine.” however, so in that area the representative from HD 60’s way is clear. Training and arming the state’s schoolteachers is merely a logistical problem, whereas getting that God-light onto the kids presents some theoretical obstacles. Fortunately, theoretical legislation is Howard’s specialty. Consider his record from the last session of the state legislature, in 2011. Howard sponsored or requested 10 bills, eight of which died in committee. One of them would have provided state assistance to offset economic damage caused by the cattle disease brucellosis. Another seven addressed the statewide scourge of illegal immigration—bills to require proof of citizenship in order to receive state services, a

bill criminalizing the failure to carry “alien registration” documents and, somewhat paradoxically, a bill prohibiting the issue of identification cards to illegal aliens. Any Montanan who has struggled to make himself understood to a Canadian dishwasher understands the scope of the problem that these bills address. Yet most state representatives are afraid to take a stand, for fear of losing the crucial immigrant vote. Only Howard is brave enough to take up the controversial cause of nativism, just as only he is bold enough to buck popular sentiment and demand that we assist God in identifying and loving the Children. So I offer two more bold predictions for 2013. The first is that Howard’s classroom concealed-carry plan will work, and deranged gunmen will become so afraid to enter our schools that teachers will have to fan out into the streets and look for them. Second, Howard will parlay the success of his proposal into a whole passel of imaginary legislation, equipping cats with robotic arms so dogs stop pushing them around, requiring strippers to really mean it when they call you handsome and negotiating a peaceful settlement to the war on Christmas. These measures will not always be popular, and passing them won’t be easy. The real business of government rarely is. But you can bet that David Howard will be up in Helena fighting for them, standing up for God and being born here and all the other issues his contemporaries are afraid to face. To quote the great lawgiver’s Facebook page, “Young mass Killers, Frontal Lobe of the brain is larger!” Also, the tree of liberty must be watered from time to time with appeals to sentimentality and racism. The second quote is a paraphrase. I think Howard would agree with me, though, and maybe even make a law about it. Dan Brooks writes about politics, consumer culture and lying at combatblog.net.

missoulanews.com • January 3 – January 10, 2013 [11]


[quirks]

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN AND AGAIN AND AGAIN—AND AGAIN - Since embarking on a life of crime in Brooklyn, N.Y., in 1985, Jack Mannino, 44, has been thwarted repeatedly and spent most of his adult life in prison. “I never got away with anything,” he stated while testifying in federal court after pleading guilty to bank robbery and agreeing to testify against his former partner, Gary Fama, to get a lighter sentence. The pair stole $5,658 and sped away in reverse, blowing the transmission in Mannino’s new Lexus only two blocks from the bank. They fled, but, in addition to the car, registered in his name, Mannino left behind his wallet, containing his driver’s license and credit cards. After hearing his testimony, Fama’s attorney, Elizabeth Macedonio, commented, “You must be the worst criminal in the history of criminals.” (The New York Times) HOLIDAY FOLLIES - After the jumbo video screen at Regina’s Mosaic Stadium, home of the Saskatchewan Roughriders football club, began displaying a burning yule log, the fire department received frantic calls reporting “a very bright flame, in some cases the smell of smoke,” deputy fire chief Gerard Kay said. The log video was changed to a thank-you message to fans, Roughriders CEO Jim Hopson said, adding that before turning on the fireplace scene, “Someone jokingly said, ‘Y’know, I don’t know about that yule log. Someone is going to think the stadium is on fire.’ Sure as heck, someone thought the stadium was on fire.” (CBC News) Confetti used in Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City contained shredded confidential police records from Long Island’s Nassau County Police Department. The paper strips included personal information, the identities of undercover detectives and details of Mitt Romney’s motorcade route to a debate last fall. “There are phone numbers, addresses, more Social Security numbers, license plate numbers, and then we find all these incident reports from police,” parade-goer Ethan Finkelstein, 18, said. The records were reportedly brought to the parade by a department employee, who tossed the easily identifiable documents with his family during the parade. (New York’s WPIX-TV) INVASION OF THE ROBOT PANTS - Samsung disclosed that it subjects its smart phones to stress tests that involve sprinkling rain on them, pressing their home buttons 20,000 times and using a robotic tush covered by pants to sit on the phones. (Samsung video release) NASA demonstrated a robotic exoskeleton that’s worn over the legs, with a harness that reaches up the back and around the shoulders, like overalls. The 57-pound device is designed to help astronauts stay healthier in space by using it as an exercise machine to supply resistance against leg movement. As the technology advances, NASA said the exoskeleton could benefit astronauts working on the surface of other planets by improving their ability to walk in a reduced-gravity environment. (NASA news release) IDENTITY CRISIS - The Canada Border Services Agency warned motorists to expect delays at the border crossing in Emerson, Manitoba, because of “work refusals by several officers at this port of entry.” Some border agents refused to work after the CBSA ordered all agents to wear name tags. Agents at two Ontario crossings walked off the job for the same reason but returned to work wearing the name tags. The union representing the border guards said wearing name tags puts them at risk of retaliation from angry border crossers, but the CBSA pooh-poohed any safety risk. “Personalized name tags reflect our commitment to service excellence,” it explained, “and reinforce the professionalism and integrity for which CBSA officers are known.” (CBC News) NEXT NOSH AT COSTCO’S TOOTHPICK BUFFET - Caviar vending machines have shown up at three Los Angeles shopping malls. Called “caviar boutiques,” the machines also dispense truffles, escargot, Bellini cocktails and caviar accessories. (Los Angeles’s KTLA-TV) OOPS! - The Florida sheriff’s office that investigated the disappearance of 2-year-old Caylee Anthony in 2008 overlooked evidence that someone in the Anthony home did a Google search for “fool-proof” suffocation methods on the day the girl was last seen alive. The victim’s mother, Casey Anthony, was tried for her daughter’s death but acquitted because jurors doubted prosecutors conclusively proved how Caylee died. Orange County Sheriff’s investigators missed the search after pulling 17 vague entries from the computer’s Internet Explorer browser, because they ignored the Mozilla Firefox browser that Anthony regularly used. It contained more than 1,200 entries, including the suffocation search. A computer expert for Anthony’s defense team did find the search before the trial, and lead defense attorney Jose Baez mentioned it in his subsequent book about the case. (Associated Press and Orlando’s WKMG-TV) SUCH INGRATES - When elderly residents at a Boston public housing project complained they were freezing because the new heating system, with preset energy-saving thermostats, wasn’t heating their apartments adequately, if at all, Housing Authority Administrator William McGonagle responded that 163 separate tests showed the complex met state code. “We’ve been through this at other elderly and disabled developments,” he said. “It takes time for them to get used to it.” (Boston Herald) FATHER/GURU OF THE YEAR - Adam Maguire, 28, burned his children in their upper back and neck areas “in an attempt to show them pain compliance while meditating,” according to Houlton, Maine, Police Chief Butch Asselin. Maguire’s girlfriend told police the couple was teaching the children meditation to help with their ADHD and told them that when you clear your mind, you no longer feel pain. (Associated Press) FOOD THREATS - When Robert Nemeti, 24, tried to buy chocolate pudding at a British supermarket selfservice checkout, his purchase was interrupted by the machine announcing he needed to show identification proving he was over 18. When a worker at the Southampton Tesco store came to check his ID, she said it was a health issue because the Cadbury Hot Chocolate Pudding would get hot when cooked “and you may burn yourself.” Tesco later called the ID request an error, explaining, “The self-service machines can be temperamental. The pudding should not be an age-restricted product.” (Britain’s Daily Mail) WAY TO GO - A 56-year-old man was taking out the garbage at an apartment complex in Fife, Wash., when he dropped his keys down a storm drain. He tried to retrieve them by lifting the heavy grate and reaching in, police said, but was unable to get out and became lodged in the catch basin with his head under water and his feet sticking out of the top. He died after being pulled out. (Seattle Times)

[12] Missoula Independent • January 3 – January 10, 2013


missoulanews.com • January 3 – January 10, 2013 [13]


I

t ain’t easy making bold predictions. Harold Camping, aka the Doomsday Minister, swung and missed with his widely publicized assertion that the world would end back in October 2011. The Mayas didn’t fare much better this year. Even when the stakes are less than end days, worthy predictions can be hard to find. Political pundits rarely get it right—unless we’re talking about projections from Nate Silver. Sports prognosticators regularly get beaten; it’s something Las Vegas sports books depend on. And don’t even get us started on psychics or “seers.” Successfully telling the future can be a fickle thing, and yet we think about it all the time. It’s in our nature to take whatever information we have and posit a guess on what will happen next. At best, those educated guesses can be hopeful or serve as a warning; even when they’re wildly off they can make us think a little more about what’s possible, for good and ill. Our list of bold predictions—from both staff and members of the community—aims to broaden our thinking about the New Year.

THE MONTANA LEGISLATURE CONCLUDES A SHOCKINGLY PUNCH LINE-FREE SESSION Early signs point to this bold prediction falling shorter than gubernatorial candidate Rick Hill’s physical stature. Already, Rep. Jerry O’Neil, R-Columbia Falls, made national news for his request to be paid in gold coins and Rep. Clayton Fiscus, R-Billings, made eyeballs roll with the latest attempt to force public schools to teach intelligent design. The Indy was among those to worry that we were in for another 90 days of nonsense. It’s not going to happen. Yes, there will be nasty fights and sophomoric name-calling over budgets and jobs proposals and natural resource extraction and the environment, as always. But embarrassing fodder like a spear-hunting bill or a declaration of the benefits of climate change or a move to eliminate Barack Obama’s name from the ballot will disappear from the agenda—and, just as importantly for our state pride, from discussion on national talk shows. Instead, both political parties will come to realize that constituents want to see a blue-collar effort this session that focuses on credible solutions to real problems. There can be wildly divergent impressions over what constitutes a “credible solution,” and spirited debate to establish the best one, but it will not include the sideshow that became a little too common in Helena in 2011.

by Independent staff and guest contributors

GUEST PROGNOSTICATOR: COLIN HICKEY founder of MissoulaEvents.net, Missoula Downtown Association marketing and events director, booking agent for Badlander and Palace

VOLUMEN REUNITE FOR ONE LAST SHOW Rep. Jerry O’Neil

THE SPOKANIFICATION OF MISSOULA REACHES NEW LEVELS Put another way, get ready to welcome more national chains to our little valley—and not just out on Reserve Street. Einstein Bros Bagels, a chain originally founded by the folks behind Boston Market, hopes to open on West Broadway later this month, and there are rumors of a Texas barbecue chain moving into another downtown location. They won’t be the only two. College towns are ripe for growing franchises, and there are enough open storefronts near campus and around town to attract newcomers. Expect to see a Chili’s, Red Lobster and, finally, after years of unfulfilled rumors, Olive Garden. Cabela’s, which recently announced plans to open a Kalispell location, also moves into the Missoula market. Based on recent reports, something is coming to the old K-Mart storefront on Brooks Street. And Trader Joe’s will join the recently opened Natural Grocers as another competitor among area supermarkets. The growth will spark an outpouring of “Shop Local” campaigns and efforts to protect the Main Street appeal of Missoula’s downtown. Bumper stickers will emerge reading, “Friends Don’t Let Friends Eat Never-Ending Pasta Bowls.” It’ll take a 2014 bold prediction, however, to see whether the campaigns fail, or if the new chains experience a fate similar to the former Higgins Avenue Starbucks.

[14] Missoula Independent • January 3 – January 10, 2013

Local sci-wave rock legends Volumen reunite for one night only to give their legions of fans what they have asked for: an official last show. Representatives from the Missoula Babysitters Union go on record saying, “It was our busiest night since the Wilco concert of ’08.” Weeks later, people all around Missoula will be seen smiling and singing the chorus to “Sexy Astronaut.”


JOHN MAYER PLAYS BACK-TO-BACK BENEFIT CONCERTS AT THE WILMA; ENDS SECOND SHOW WITH PROPOSAL TO KATY PERRY For those who don’t read Us Weekly, People or the Indy Blog, tabloid magnet and celebrated guitarist John Mayer moved to the Livingston area last year and shortly thereafter started dating pop starlet Katy Perry. The power couple has become a favorite of the paparazzi and gossip reporters claim the couple is now “getting serious.” Apparently, Perry took Mayer to spend the holidays with her parents. Anyway, Mayer has taken quite the liking to Big Sky Country. He initially landed here to disappear, but over time has come out of hiding and embraced his new neighbors. The best example is a Jan. 16 concert, along with Zac Brown, at Bozeman’s Emerson Theatre to benefit the firefighters who battled last summer’s devastating Pine Creek Fire. It’s already sold out. We predict that sort of locally focused generosity continues as the year goes on, and culminates with Mayer playing back-to-back nights at the Wilma, with a portion of the proceeds going to a local charity. Each show is billed as “John Mayer and guests,” and features a revolving door of big names that Mayer has worked with in the past, including Kanye West, Frank Ocean and Demi Lovato. On the second night, Mayer brings out Perry for a duet of “Half of My Heart.” At the end of the song he announces to the crowd—just like Kanye recently announced on stage that he and Kim Kardashian are having a baby—that Perry is the one who has “all of his heart,” and that they’re engaged. Sadly, this becomes the biggest national story out of Missoula all year.

Photo by Chad Harder

GOV. BRIAN SCHWEITZER ANNOUNCES A 2016 PRESIDENTIAL RUN

Photo by Chad Harder

The rumors have swirled for months in newspapers, on television and from barstools that Schweitzer will run for president in 2016. Each time the soon-to-beformer governor is asked about his intentions, however, he demurs, avoids the question altogether or turns it into some dismissive punch line. Despite his caginess, we can’t help but think that Schweitzer, who clearly loves the limelight, will step up at least to raise his already rising national visibility. The best evidence to support this prediction occurred in early December on CNN’s “State of the Union with Candy Crowley,” when Schweitzer nearly came out and said he was running. “I’m governor of Montana until January,” Schweitzer told Crowley. “At that point, I’ll no longer have a governor’s mansion. I won’t have a driver. I won’t have security, so I’ll have a little time on my hands. I think I did mention that I have a warm regard for the people of Iowa and New Hampshire.” That nod to two key primary states led to days of new headlines about Schweitzer’s future. There’s no doubt the headlines will continue—and lead to an official run for the nation’s highest office.

REPUBLICANS LINE UP TO CHALLENGE MAX BAUCUS; CAMPAIGN SPENDING GOES THROUGH THE ROOF Sen. Max Baucus isn’t up for re-election until fall of 2014. Nobody’s even announced a challenge yet. But the campaign ads have already started, and it’s only going to get worse in the new year. Republicans will come crawling out of the woodwork, making Montana’s Republican Senate primary vaguely reminiscent of the 2012 Republican presidential primary. Rep. Steve Daines, elected to the U.S. House this year, will throw his name in the hat. He exhibited his Senate aspirations in early 2011, briefly declaring against Sen. Jon Tester before Denny Rehberg entered the fray. Former state Sen. Ryan Zinke will make a run, too, after his failed attempt at claiming the office of lieutenant governor alongside 2012 gubernatorial candidate Neil Livingstone. However, the conservative spotlight will inevitably fall on the young Corey Stapleton, a runner-up in the 2012 primary whom former state Sen. Bob Keenan declared “absolutely the most electable Republican” on the gubernatorial ticket. Outside spending for and against Baucus in 2013 will make last year’s Tester-Rehberg race look like a dollar-menu item at McDonald’s. Democratic PACs and liberal-leaning nonprofits will pony up $4 million by the end of 2013 in an effort to maintain the party’s Senate majority. Third-party conservative groups will dole out more than $3 million opposing the incumbent, though after backing so many losing candidates in 2012, those same groups will ease off on attack ads in favor of grassroots networking. All told, the 2014 Montana Senate race will see roughly $8 million in total spending before it even reaches the actual election year.

GUEST PROGNOSTICATOR: CAITLIN COPPLE city councilwoman, regional development organizer for Pride Foundation

FOUR OF MONTANA’S LARGEST CITIES EMBRACE LGBT-INCLUSIVE NON-DISCRIMINATION ORDINANCES

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

So far, just Missoula and Helena have LGBT-inclusive non-discrimination ordinances. Bozeman is the next place where the Montana Human Rights Network will lead the campaign to protect LGBT people from being fired, denied housing or public accommodations just because of who they are or whom they love. The true test will come this fall, when the campaign will move to Billings, and all the organizations in the movement are gearing up for a tougher fight. A win in Billings would be huge, since it is the most populous city in the state and seen as a bellwether for Montana politics. As the Montana representative for Pride Foundation, the world’s largest LGBT community foundation, I will continue to help our grantees with their efforts to make our state a safer and more welcoming place for all its citizens.

missoulanews.com • January 3 – January 10, 2013 [15]


Photo by Chad Harder Photo by Chad Harder

GUEST PROGNOSTICATOR: DAN BROOKS Indy columnist and writer at combatblog.net

MONTANA’S MEDICAL MARIJUANA LAW BECOMES MOOT Montana will finally settle on a medical marijuana law, and it will be rendered totally unenforceable by legal recreational dope in Washington state. Western Montana will be the equivalent of a dry county: a place you get through to get to where it’s legal, even for local residents. The Montanans of 2013 will watch holo-films of the year 2011, when the state legislature acted swiftly to stop a growing industry, and wonder if we might have been what’s now Washington’s growing industry.

GUEST PROGNOSTICATOR: JAMES GRUNKE CEO Missoula Economic Partnership

MISSOULA EXPERIENCES A ROBUST ECONOMIC REBOUND The pent-up demand from the last three years is ready to release. We’re going to see new hires. We’re going to see current businesses expanding. We’re going to have companies relocating to Missoula. It’s easy to say “baloney” to this, but we’re talking to two, three, four or five businesses each and every week that are looking for opportunity in Missoula. All indications say we’re in for a good rebound, finally.

CONSTRUCTION OF THE KEYSTONE PIPELINE IN MONTANA STALLS AMID MORE PROTEST Few environmental issues are as polarizing as TransCanada’s proposed Keystone XL pipeline. The massive project calls for a pipeline to run from Alberta’s tar sands south through parts of eastern Montana—including under the Yellowstone and Missouri rivers—and all the way to oil refineries in southern Texas. State officials and Montana’s D.C. delegation are firmly in support of it, claiming it brings valuable jobs to the region. Environmental activists have drawn a line in the sand, decrying the tar sands’ overall impact on climate change as well as the inherent dangers of such a big pipeline and the possibility of ruptures. While the process has been slow—President Obama must approve the project since it crosses an international boundary, and he punted on the issue during an election year—it continues to move forward. Last month, the Montana Land Board approved the sale of easements to TransCanada for $741,000. Soon-to-be-former Gov. Brian Schweitzer has gone so far as to guarantee it happens this year. “I have $100 burning a hole in my pocket that I will bet you that it gets built,” he told The Canadian Press in February. “I'd say construction will start in 2013.” Despite these developments, it’s the activists who win again in the new year. While Schweitzer and other officials are bending over backwards to appease TransCanada, activists in Washington, D.C., and all along the proposed pipeline’s route have been staging spirited rallies and demonstrations. Montana resident and actress Margot Kidder was among those arrested last year outside the White House, joining fellow Hollywood stars like Daryl Hannah, Danny Glover and Robert Redford in protest. Even more impressive are the thousands of rank-and-file who continue to come out to oppose the pipeline. These grassroots efforts aren’t going anywhere, and the stubborn resolve of the activists ultimately wins out in 2013. Photo by Alex Sakariassen

WINTER IN THE BLOOD MAKES ROGER EBERT’S LIST OF TOP FILMS The Montana-based film Winter in the Blood finds itself on the revered film critic’s list of bests, not only for its sharp anti-hero storyline, but also for its cinematography, which captures the sweeping landscape of eastern Montana and the Blackfeet Reservation. The nod from Ebert puts the reservation and its people on the map for films to come. Winter in the Blood, directed by Alex and Andrew Smith, is based on the 1974 novel of the same title by the late, great American Indian author James Welch. It chronicles the story of Virgil First Raise, who has become frozen to the possibilities of life, but whose vision quest takes him off the reservation and leads him to surprising redemption. The film stars veteran actor David Morse (The Hurt Locker); a fresh-faced Native American, Chaske Spencer, who is best known for his role as Sam Uley in the Twilight series; and several local actors, including Missoula’s own Lily Gladstone. Though Ebert often chooses well-deserved mainstream films for his list—his 2012 honors include Lincoln and Arbitrage—he’s also keen on picking sleepers, such as 2012’s Oslo, August 31 and A Simple Life. Winter in the Blood seems primed to similarly hook Ebert’s attention. It has already been to the ballyhooed Sundance Film Festival in 2011, when it was teased in its pre-production phase to raise awareness and funds. Plus, the Smith brothers were praised for their previous film, 2002’s Slaughter Rule. That film starred a little-known young actor named Ryan Gosling who now, of course, has become the hunk of indie films and a favorite for Facebook memes. Spencer and Gladstone will follow a similar rise, elevating the hard work of American Indian actors and putting them on the red carpets of the future. Photo courtesy of Ken Billington

[16] Missoula Independent • January 3 – January 10, 2013


GUEST PROGNOSTICATOR: CHAD DUNDAS GUEST PROGNOSTICATOR: BEN FOWLKES professional fighting correspondent for USA Today and related Gannett media properties, University of Montana graduate and Missoula resident

MONTANA CELEBRATES ITS FIRST MMA WORLD CHAMPION Go down to the Access Fitness gym on Brooks Street just about any weekday and you’ll find him: Lloyd Woodard, Montana’s great mustachioed hope for a world title. You probably don’t think of Missoula as the kind of city that churns out great fighters, and for good reason. If you’re from here and you want to be a professional fighter, the best thing you could do would be to stick around just long enough to get a few amateur bouts and then move to Vegas or Portland or San Diego or Montreal when you’re ready to get serious. Woodard’s spent some time in the big gyms, but he keeps coming back here because, like many of us, he can’t quit Montana. Somehow, he’s making it work. You know that cage fighting stuff you see on TV? That’s mixed martial arts (commonly known as MMA). Woodard does that. He’s good, too. He competes in the up-and-coming Bellator Fighting Championships organization (airing weekly on Spike TV in 2013), which is like the UFC, only smaller. The first time he fought current lightweight champ Mike Chandler in 2011, Woodard lost a closely contested decision. This year he re-enters Bellator’s 155-pound tournament, where the winner gets a crack at the belt and a chance to go from also-ran to budding superstar. It’s the kind of opportunity that can change a young fighter’s life, and the 28-year-old Woodard has the skills to win the whole thing—if he can keep his emotions in check and fight smart. Maybe I’m an overly optimistic homer, but I like his chances. This time next year I think Woodard will be wearing that championship belt, repping the 406 on national TV. In a sport that draws competitors from all over the world—Brazil and Russia are particularly well-represented in Bellator—that’s kind of a major accomplishment. It puts Missoula on the map in the fight world, and proves you don’t have to train at a big gym to do big things.

fourth generation Missoulian who writes about mixed martial arts for ESPN.com. He and Ben Fowlkes also host the Co-Main Event MMA Podcast, available weekly from iTunes and at comaineventpodcast.com.

UM HIRES DAVE DICKENSON AS FOOTBALL COACH For the third time in just five seasons, the Montana Grizzlies will be on the hunt for a new head football coach near the end of 2013, when Mick Delaney re-retires after guiding the team to the NCAA Division I FCS quarterfinals. Delaney, who calls it quits exactly two weeks after turning 71, leaves the team in solid shape (Montana finishes 10-4 in 2013) but also at a place that is becoming frightfully familiar to the normally rocksteady maroon and silver faithful: loose ends. Luckily, his exit also comes at a fortuitous time for the university. After spending much of 2012 simultaneously paying the salaries of both Delaney and fired coach Robin Pflugrad, the school suddenly finds itself with some $300,000 available in the budget to woo a more permanent replacement. In Montana University System Bucks that’s, like, a million dollars and it ultimately proves enough to pluck former Griz quarterback and statewide demigod Dave Dickenson out of his comfy perch as offensive coordinator of the CFL’s Calgary Stampeders. Or at least it should, if everybody involved knows what’s good for them. Dickenson, the Great Falls-Russell grad who led Montana to the Division I-AA national championship in 1995, returns to Missoula at a critical time in the Griz Dynasty. Despite the fact that 2013 will represent a rebound year after the botch-amania that was 2012, there are still real fears afoot about the future of the program. A litany of factors—not the least of which include an ugly, mediafueled sexual assault scandal and President Royce Engstrom’s annoyingly obtuse and poorly planned dismissal of Pflugrad—have left the Grizzlies looking as vulnerable as they have since the rise of the Don Read era. The hiring of Super Dave alleviates many of those concerns. Dickenson’s status as an in-state legend eases the fitful minds of boosters and message board mavens, while providing a necessary sense of renewal for a town that hasn’t felt all that touchy-feely about its football team since Bobby Hauck’s players started running afoul of the law a half decade ago. The move truly gives Engstrom the vague “change in leadership” cited as the reason for axing Pflugrad and also buys the president some much-needed political capital with fans who still resent him for never explaining what he meant by that. Additionally, Dickenson’s football mind helps improve things on the field, where Montana has become something of a Frankenstein after cycling through four offensive coordinators and two defensive coordinators from 2009-2013. For the man himself the opportunity is obvious: A chance to return UM to its former glory. If Dickenson can pull that off, it’ll not only cement his legacy as Greatest Grizzly of All Time, but pretty much make him a shoe-in to have his face replace the bison skull on the state’s next commemorative quarter.

GUEST PROGNOSTICATOR: STEVE RUNNING regents professor of ecology and director of Numerical Terradynamics Simulation Group at the University of Montana’s College of Forestry and Conservation. Also shared in the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007 for his work with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

GLOBAL OIL PRICES SPIKE, SENDING U.S. GAS PRICES TO $6 PER GALLON Missoulians will respond to the news in mass by ditching their cars and getting out their bikes—or building or buying new ones, if need be. The city will contribute by designating entire streets solely for the thousands of new bike riders that result.

Photo by Alex Sakariassen

MONTANA’S FIRST WOLF-TRAPPING SEASON BACKFIRES The addition of trapping to the state’s wolf hunt fails to yield a harvest any greater than last year’s total of 166. But the few wolves (and “incidental catches,” including dogs) that are caught will only infuriate and embolden the growing contingent of anti-trapping activists and lawmakers, just as photos of trapped wolves and coyotes in Wyoming and Idaho have over the past year.

Photo by Chad Harder

missoulanews.com • January 3 – January 10, 2013 [17]


[arts]

Into the void In Retrieval from an Unconscious Mind, Gissette Padilla plays with memory by Erika Fredrickson

N

eurologist and author Oliver Sacks has written about all kinds of people whose memories have been ravaged. A musicologist he treated, for instance, was plagued by a brain infection that left him with a memory lasting only seconds. He could clearly recall events from his far past, but he was unable to keep track of new memories. It kept him in a precarious state of grasping for reality, like tightrope walking over an abyss. For First Friday at The Brink Gallery, Gissette Padilla, a Venezuelan native who lives in Houston, Texas, explores the way even someone with a healthy brain struggles to pin down memories. “I’m interested in how memory is always being altered and rehashed,” she says. “There’s a close relationship between remembering, perceiving and imagining.” The exhibit, Retrieval from an Unconscious Mind, is made up of printmaking collages showing outlines of people paired with more abstract objects. She uses a printmaking process of overlapping images over and over until the repeating layers create chaos on the paper. In most of her pieces you can make out a familiar representation of a person or thing, but the rest of the space is filled with dreamlike, non-concrete designs. Padilla recalls her eight years growing up in

Venezuela before her father got his work visa and moved them to Houston. She remembers her grandmother’s restaurant and the smell of the food there. The smell of gasoline, even now, transports her back to her native land as well. “I smell gasoline and it takes me back to where my grandmother lives, which was this bay,” she says. “We could smell it from there. It’s strange that I like it—the smell of gasoline—but it has a good memory for me.” Other parts of her early years remain hazy. And whereas some of us can go visit old haunts to reignite memories, Padilla hasn’t been able to go back to Venezuela. Just as she was graduating high school, her father lost his job and therefore his work visa. That situation, she says, has prevented all of them from returning. In fact, Padilla had to stay in Texas for both undergrad, which she attended at the University of Houston, and grad school, which she finished in 2011 at the University of Texas at San Antonio. “I was really wanting to go to an art school,” she says. “I’d applied and gotten into a few, got a few scholarships, but because of my status I couldn’t really leave Texas. I didn’t have a driver’s license. All of that affected where I made and showed my work.” It also affected the substance of her work. Her life in Texas and her life in Venezuela are two separate

[18] Missoula Independent • January 3 – January 10, 2013

worlds, like being reincarnated from one life to the other. Instead of letting that constraint get the best of her, it’s become one of the main focuses of her body of work. The abstract sections of her prints—the “voids,” as she calls them—symbolize the parts of her memory she can’t quite fill in. “The voids are just parts I don’t recall,” she says. “I try to make them up by adding this layer of chaos, but the fact is that’s still a void, regardless of if you fill it up. The work is very much about that. It’s about me trying to put these things together but no matter how hard I try they still don’t exist to me anymore.” Sometimes, when there’s a void, filling it with anything, however imprecise, is all we can do. Oliver Sacks tells the story of a woman whose shortterm memory loss compels her to shake her doctor’s hand each time she sees him as if meeting him for the first time. One day, the doctor hides a pin in his palm and pricks her hand during the handshake. From then on, though she still never recognizes him, the woman never shakes his hand again. Each time she’s asked about it, she offers a different reason for not shaking his hand (“Must we always shake hands with people we meet?” she asks during one visit), though getting pricked on the hand isn’t one of them.

Sacks’ cases are dramatic, but the faultiness of personal memory is something we can all relate to. “Memory ages in time,” says Padilla. “It changes. It becomes a nostalgic moment as opposed to what it really was the first time around.” Such loss, such self-deception—however unconscious—seems both heartbreaking and disturbing. But as an artist, Padilla indulges in it. She’s inspired by the movie Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, where two exes, played by Jim Carrey and Kate Winslet, go through a procedure to erase each other from their memories. Rather than being spotless, their minds continue to cling to tidbits of their lives together, though the memories are discombobulated. “That movie had such great visuals,” Padilla says. “It felt honest to what an odd dream would feel like. With the use of pattern, color and line, I am able to create a space that visually represents how a memory might look over time with missing parts and images overlapping each other.” Retrieval from an Unconscious Mind opens for First Friday at The Brink Gallery Fri., Jan. 4, with a reception from 5 to 8 PM. Free. efredrickson@missoulanews.com


[music]

Light up The Pine Hearts don’t bring you down If Screeching Weasel wrote bluegrass-Americana songs, it might sound something like The Pine Hearts. The Olympia, Wash., band, who just recently played in Missoula, has a new album that weaves together spirited anthems about holding on despite the troubles of the world, about being in love with someone even though they’re leaving forever. Maybe it’s singer Joe Cappocia’s slightly nasal vocals that makes him seem a little punk rock, despite the fact that Distant Lights is an album overflowing with banjo and mandolin. Or it could be that the youthfulness of this group gives them an extra kinetic kick—fans of the feisty boys of Old Crow Medicine Show, for instance, will likely fall in love with The Pine Hearts. Unlike some Americana bands that stress the ways life has hardened them, The Pine Hearts still seem hopeful despite the heartbreak. Even with laments such as, “The world used to be on a string. Who slipped this noose beneath my chin?” from the track “Last Man Standing,” there’s a sense that every-

one will be okay if we just loosen up the knots of our day-to-day a little bit. (As Ben Weasel says, “Let the sunshine in, I know it’s fucking hard.”) The first track from Distant Lights, “Don’t Let the Stars Bring You Down,” is the catchiest of them all. It’s the least cynical song I’ve heard in a while, about science and religion and how if we never crack the code to what the universe means we can still enjoy the mystery. Love this band. It’s my new soundtrack to these long, gray winter days. (Erika Fredrickson)

Code Orange Kids: Love Is Love/Return to Dust The Code Orange Kids are the best band from Pittsburgh, Penn., you‘ve never heard and if I made top-10 lists they would rank numero uno for 2012. Attach whatever moniker you want to the foursome’s aggro sound: post-hardcore seems most fitting, but I suggest FistCrashDeathKickFire. The opener, “Flowermouth (The Leach),” begins with drummer/vocalist Jami Morgan belching out screeching vocals alongside ratty syncopated bass notes. Total grindage ensues and the band slams through five different changes before resting on a quiet repetitive riff that could lull a geeked-up tweeker to sleep. In the span of two minutes and 26 seconds the group is able to make

Max Hay: Another Flea Another Flea, the first studio album in seven years from globe-trotting troubadour (and Helena native/former Missoulian) Max Hay is an interesting ride. Hay flirts with reggae, country, bossa nova and folk styles throughout, with varying results. The title track sets up a rollicking groove with bluesy harmonica embellishments, and the slow country drawl of “What Happened” fits Hay’s baritone nicely, bolstered by elastic electric guitar lines courtesy of Jason Guthmiller. “Dogbite Moon” excels as a subtle, Tom Waits-y ballad, but gets overpowered in the second half by high-gain guitar, and the messy musical commentary on “Timmick Graw’s

one want to take fists to every sad clown painting on the planet and then lovingly restore those paintings. “Nothing (The Rat)” takes a turn for the heavier and manages to be something more than a jock-metal jam with, once again, big, sloppy bass bombs and a subtle slow-down near the end. I have but one minor complaint: The overall production is a bit too cherry. It’s clean almost to a fault. But so fruitin’ what? These youngsters (average age: 19) know how to build heavy, gorgeous, bombastic tracks without cloying musical clichés. Speaking of clichés: These kids are not all right; they are unreal. ( Jason McMackin)

Goatee” gets bogged down by unintelligible sound effects. The horrific slide whistle ending of the Zappaesque “Career Objectives” is played for laughs, but the novelty quickly wears thin. Most musicians are best experienced live, and Hay is likely no exception. While his latest album sounds like he may have had too many studio toys to play with, live videos of these songs indicate they translate well to his one-man show. Listening to Another Flea may leave you confused, but if you can appreciate off-kilter musical endeavors, you’ll enjoy seeing him the next time he comes around. (Jed Nussbaum)

The Living Sisters: Run For Cover The Living Sisters—who are not sisters but, as of press time, remain in good health—are justifiably proud of their voices. The precise harmonies on “Can You Get to That?,” from their EP Run for Cover, which releases on Jan. 8, are vivid and aggressive in the mix, hovering between the headphones at a distance roughly three inches behind the listener’s frontal lobe. They sound good, but it’s the rhythm that makes the track great. Kick, tambourine and claps lag indolently behind the beat, with a barely audible bassline to anchor it all. The result is a study in pixie soul, like if Tegan and Sara went to Bible school in-

stead of Wellesley. Also there is Caucasian blues guitar of the lip-biting variety. This is presumably one of the “country elements” promised in the promotional materials, and it worries me. It is the only pat component in an otherwise inspired arrangement, and it doesn’t belong. Still, if such touches prove to be the predictable features of an otherwise inspired covers album, the listener will come out way ahead. Playing other people’s songs is fun. The Living Sisters have fun playing “Can You Get to That?,” and the head bobs along accordingly. (Dan Brooks)

missoulanews.com • January 3 – January 10, 2013 [19]


[books]

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[20] Missoula Independent • January 3 – January 10, 2013

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Susanna Sonnenberg’s second memoir, She Matters: A Life in Friendships, is a fiercely intimate look at the significant female relationships in the author’s life and how they’ve come to define her. With little regard for place or chronology, the friendships are catalogued and contained in discrete sections and chapters, from college in Boston to Paris to breakfast dates at the Catalyst in Missoula, where Sonnenberg has settled with her husband and two children. By the end, you’ll have explored more than 20 serious relationships, told in a savagely honest and self-reflecting voice by a woman gifted at describing feelings that are so often hard to define. Sonnenberg’s sentences are bizarre and off-kilter without ever calling attention to themselves, and she writes them without clumsy metaphors or similes. “We have different styles. Patricia starts with the reports, I start with mood. I pierce, hunt for the biggest truth, restless until I’ve divined it.” She pierces! No need to completely nerd out with me on the extraordinary verbs at play here, but they deserve at least a Susanna Sonnenberg reads from She Matters: A Life in small celebration. This is a book Friendships at Shakespeare & Co. Tue., Jan. 8, at 7 PM. Free. about a specific thing, but the writing is so good, the cadence of the cause I got confused about boundaries, ruined everysentences so soft and feminine, I would trust this authing with sex and then couldn’t get over the embarthor with just about any subject. rassment. I’ve always assumed that these failings Because to be honest, I haven’t always been wild about women and their incessant bonding. Cultivat- spoke to a fundamental flaw in myself, that it was being female friendships seems to me some skill that cause I was weird and girls hated me and it would be other women have, a thing that I’ve been left out of that way for me always. I’d never had another woman my entire life. I can count the number of girlfriends slow down and explain to me that these relationships I’ve had on one hand, and every one of those is aren’t as effortless as they look from the outside, that plagued with some ancient disaster or cruel neglect they take work and sacrifice, and just like romances, they often end. (Consider the instructive simplicity on my part. So I came to this reading assignment with my of this passage: “When she came over with Thomas, own sureness of my inadequacies on the subject. And I’d leave her a glass of water on the counter. I had sure, a lot of the book deals with roads I am nowhere learned not to hold it out to her.”) The lifelong friend near travelling, things like having children, bonds is the exception, not the rule, and believe it or not, I made with fellow mothers, disappointing husbands, didn’t know that before reading this book. play dates. (Staring at her husband after an abortion, If it seems inappropriate for me to go on about she says: “How doltish and inept he seemed filling a myself in a book review, well, I would argue that a doorway, how puny on the other side of the bed as good memoir will always invite you to think about he stood taking off his glasses, checking the alarm on your own life. She Matters completely overwhelmed his clock. I hated his pillow.”) In these moments, it me, took my brain to corners I’d have rather spent a feels as though Sonnenberg is offering me unsolicited lifetime neglecting. By the end I felt both guilty and wisdom for some hypothetical period in my future. exonerated. I read this book in two feverish days, out What I didn’t expect was how unsentimental and of necessity, because it was my job. If I had to do it devastating female friendships can be. When it comes over again, I’d keep it by my bedside and read one to my own, most of them have expired, either bechapter a night. As it stands, I’m still recovering. cause of other men, because we fought and I didn’t know how or was unwilling to say I was sorry, or bearts@missoulanews.com


[film]

Murder fashionista.

Suspenseless Hitchcock exemplifies the pitfall of biopics by Kate Whittle

You’ve heard of Alfred Hitchcock, I presume, and seen at least a couple of his movies. His suspense films have aged better than the horror movies (Psycho is less scary than a “Simpsons” Halloween episode) but still, his best known works are undeniably masterpieces and examples of pioneering cinema. Since our society isn’t content these days to just admire talented artists for their work, two films this year have tried to imagine what Hitchcock was like in person, based on varying degrees of truth. The first, a BBC-original flick called The Girl, first aired in the United States in October. The Girl was thoroughly unsettling in its depiction of a brief period of Hitchcock’s life. Toby Jones played the director as a one-note controlling creep who abused Tippi Hedren (Sienna Miller) on the set of The Birds, demanded sexual favors and eventually ruined her career. The Girl is based on testimony from Hedren herself, who’s now in her 80s and mother to Melanie Griffith. Hedren said in a Huffington Post story that Hitchcock was brilliant and creative, but “evil.” The Girl wasn’t very good, but in some ways the unambiguous depiction was more satisfying by the time the credits rolled than Sacha Gervasi’s new film, Hitchcock. Here, Anthony Hopkins plays the director, with awkward mannerisms and a fat suit that make him look more unpleasant than the real-life Hitchcock did. The film follows the making of Psycho and the tension between Hitchcock and his wife. It creates and resolves some drama, but for the most part, it

seems like the filmmakers are Hitchcock fans who couldn’t bring themselves to be mean to the guy. Hopkins plays the director as a mostly simple man who’s mothered by his wife and likes to flirt with pretty blondes. We see hints that he can be creepy, and Jessica Biel’s character Vera Miles complains that he’s controlling, but if you’re waiting for something squirmy or gross to happen, it doesn’t. The film is so sexless, Hitchcock and his wife sleep in separate beds (which, by the way, was a production designer’s choice and not based in reality.) I should note that Hopkins is barely recognizable when he’s slathered in prosthetics and using Hitchcock’s accent, which of course is the point, but his fat suit looks fake to the point of distraction. Are there really no talented actors out there who are already overweight? Hopkins’ look stands out when every other character in the film is portrayed by stunningly beautiful people, like Scarlett Johannsen and Helen Mirren. Johannsen plays Janet Leigh, the star of Psycho, as a one-dimensional sweetheart. I don’t like to talk about the comparative attractiveness of women in movies, because you can find that basically everywhere else on earth, but it’s clear that Johannsen is

meant to be eye candy. She’s introduced into the film with a shot of her ass. I kept waiting for something interesting to happen with her character, and it didn’t.

Mirren, as Hitchcock’s wife, Alma Reville, steals the show. As documented in real life, Reville fixes scripts, suggests edits and gives the final say on shots. In the film, Gervasi gives Reville a very credible dilemma: She sacrifices endlessly for her husband while getting little of the public’s adulation, but when she helps a male friend with his script and gets some much-needed attention, Hitchcock gets jealous.

When things finally bubble over into a fight between Reville and Hitchcock, Mirren totally destroys. She’s compelling, interesting and easy to identify with. Biopics can be hard to pull off, in part because the audience likely knows the outcome of the story. Does Psycho become a success? Did Hitchcock and Reville stay married? Well, you already know the answers. The fun is in watching how the problems get fixed. Hitchcock’s other satisfying plot is the behind-the-scenes making of Psycho. Watching old-school movie-making tricks and film splicing is neat, and often far more engaging than watching Hitchcock bumble awkwardly about his office with a drink. So what do we know, really, about the man? In real life, Alfred Hitchcock was known to have been abusive to an actress, but he also seemed to respect his wife as a work partner and gave her utmost credit. In real life, people are complicated. It’s too bad neither recent film about the director could capture that complexity. Hitchcock continues at the Wilma Theatre. arts@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • January 3 – January 10, 2013 [21]


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In the opening minutes of Promised Land, Steve Butler (Matt Damon), a local representative for a massive energy company, awaits a meeting with a company boss in order to be considered for a regional vice-president position. Another employee sits with him in a restaurant, and Butler explains why he’s committed to his work, traveling through rural America getting leasing rights for the natural gas extraction commonly known as fracking. He’s a farm-raised boy himself, Butler says, one who saw his small hometown shrivel up and blow away after the one signifi-

The maddening part is that Promised Land seems to be doing so many things right for so long. Frances McDormand gets a terrific part as Butler’s co-worker, Sue, who brings a far more nuts-andbolts approach to her job than the more personally motivated Butler. Some of the film’s best material involves Sue’s semi-flirtatious interactions with a local merchant (Titus Welliver). The obligatory romantic interest sub-plot—involving Butler’s dealings with a tart-tongued schoolteacher (Rosemarie DeWitt)—gets a satisfying twist in that it’s not exactly

Fake number

cant local employer shut down. The “delusional self-mythology” of salt-of-the-earth folk is the problem, he argues. Butler and his company, through the money they’re offering, provide a rare chance to make those folks’ lives better. It’s thrilling watching a movie you’re expecting to go in one very specific direction instead offer the prospect of something fascinatingly different. The script—co-written by Damon, John Krasinski and Dave Eggers—gives us a protagonist who’s not selfevidently in need of redemption, nor does he appear to be a stooge with blinders on. Steve Butler, at least at the outset, is a character we’re not used to seeing in mainstream movies: a corporate guy who’s selling people not a cynical lie, but something that doesn’t have to be perfect, because it’s a hell of a lot more than what they’ve got now. Perhaps it would have been wise, in retrospect, to pay more attention to the opening shot by Damon’s Good Will Hunting director Gus Van Sant. In that shot, Butler washes his face in the clear water of the restaurant bathroom sink—clear water that, nudge nudge, might not be available to the townsfolk Butler is getting to sign on the dotted line, if fracking spoils the groundwater. Because before long, Butler is running up against opposition to the gas-leasing plan, first from Frank Yates (Hal Holbrook), a retired engineer now serving as a local science teacher, then from Dustin (Krasinski), an environmental activist who hits town to get people fired up. Will our hero realize before it’s too late that he’s on the wrong side? Will the filmmakers realize before it’s too late that they’ve chosen the wrong story arc?

[22] Missoula Independent • January 3 – January 10, 2013

a romantic interest sub-plot. There are plenty of offhand moments that make this setting feel authentic. There’s also a surprisingly cynical turn when we see that environmentalists can be just as calculating in trying to get what they want as their Big Bad Corporation counterpoints. But Promised Land isn’t confident enough to stick with the notion that the most interesting villain might be a condescending “we know what’s best for you” attitude toward those who are struggling to perpetuate a fading American lifestyle. Instead, Butler’s moment with the earnest Yates feels like a set-up for a variation on Ralph Bellamy’s “I don’t know how to say this without sounding condescending, but I’m proud of you” moment from Pretty Woman. And as the plot builds toward the revelations that will force Butler to make a moral decision, it grinds with predictable determination straight into a dramatic moment when the camera will slowly dolly in on Butler’s face, the wheels of conscience turning behind his eyes. Maybe it shouldn’t make that moment even more frustrating that it involves a big speech in the town gymnasium, but it does. Gymnasium speeches tend to be one of those cinematic crowd-pleaser devices from which no real dramatic good can come. Promised Land has all the promise in the world when it’s using the framework of an “issue” drama to explore something much more human. Its own “delusional self-mythology” is that it becomes more important by virtue of becoming more obvious. Promised Land opens at the Carmike 12. arts@missoulanews.com


[film]

OPENING THIS WEEK CHICKEN WITH PLUMS Talented musician Nasser-Ali loses the will to live after his wife breaks his violin and he can’t find a replacement. We see his final eight days of life in a series of flashbacks, a nude Sophia Loren and the angel of death. Silver linings? You decide. Rated PG-13. Wilma. MONSTERS INC. 3D In this 3D update, the monsters who power the city with fear are invaded by the one thing they fear the most: a child! Oh, the irony. Starring the voices of John Goodman, Billy Crystal and Jennifer Tilly. Rated G. Carmike 12. PROMISED LAND Matt Damon plays a salesman for a natural gas company who learns something or two about real people’s feelings when he arrives in a small town where his corporation is tapping into the natural resources. Written by a trifecta made up of Dave Eggers, Matt Damon and John Krasinski. Directed by Gus Van Sant. Rated R. TEXAS CHAINSAW In the spirit of regurgitating old themes, Texas Chainsaw—a sequel to the 1974 film and not the 2003 Michael Bay movie—tells ths story of a young woman traveling to Texas to cash in on her inheritance. Little does she know that the prize includes a maniac with a chainsaw. Rated R. 3D and 2D. Carmike 12

OPENING THIS WEEK CIRQUE DU SOLEIL: WORLDS AWAY 3D Brought to you by James Cameron and director Andrew Adamson (Shrek, Narnia), this film is a visual mouthful of people in skintight suits doing ethereal acrobatics. Starring Erica Linz, Dallas Barnett and Lutz Halbhubner. Rated PG. Carmike 12. DJANGO UNCHAINED Django, a slave-turned-bounty hunter, seeks out his wife in the antebellum south. It’s about to get real violent up in here. Directed by Quentin Tarantino. Starring Jamie Foxx, Don Johnson and Leonardo DiCaprio. Rated R. Village 6. THE GUILT TRIP Unlikely road trippers Andy Brewster (Seth Rogen) and his mom (Barbra Streisand) head across country to sell Brewster’s latest invention. I hope the invention is a plot creator for films. Also starring Kathy Najimy. Rated PG-13. Village 6 and Pharaohplex. HITCHCOCK Alfred Hitchcock and his wife fall in love during the filming of Pyscho, ‘nuff said. Starring An-

Rainman. Jack Reacher continues at the Carmike 6.

thony Hopkins, Helen Mirren and Scarlett Johansson. Rated PG-13. Pharaohplex and Wilma.

Daniel Day-Lewis, Sally Field and David Strathairn. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12.

THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY Reclaim the treasure stolen by that old dragon Smaug, Bilbo Baggins, and you and your elven friends will be heroes for a millennia! Starring Martin Freeman, Ian McKellen and Richard Armitage. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex and Showboat.

PARENTAL GUIDANCE Guess what? Billy Crystal is back! He plays an old-school grandpa taking care of his grandkids (along with Bette Middler) who are so 21st century with the technologies and the Innertubes and the Facebooks, oy vey! Also starring the forever beautiful Marisa Tomei. Rated PG. Opens Christmas Day. Carmike 12, Village 6 and Showboat.

JACK REACHER Jack Reacher knows you best be as ruthless and cunning as your opponent. And he is. This dude is the kind of crime investigator that makes the bad guys’ sheets sweaty. Starring Tom Cruise, Rosamund Pike and Richard Jenkins. Rated PG13. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharoahplex and Entertainer. LES MISERABLES After a lifetime on the run in 19th century France, Jean Valjean agrees to care for a young girl and lives are forever changed. Plus, you know, singing. Starring the enchanting Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe and Anne Hathaway. Rated PG13. Carmike 12. LINCOLN Steven Spielberg directs Daniel Day-Lewis in this biopic about the United States’ greatest president as he struggles with the war, emancipation of the slaves, his cabinet and his family. Starring

RISE OF THE GUARDIANS After the evil little twit Pitch tries to destroy the hopes and dreams of the world’s children, the Immortal Guardians get in cahoots to take him on. Nobody messes with the Easter Bunny, not now, not ever. Starring the voices of Hugh Jackman, Alec Baldwin and Isla Fisher. Rated PG. Village 6 and Pharoahplex. SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN In this documentary, a couple of South Africans seek out the “Latin Bob Dylan,” Sixto Rodriguez, a ‘70s rocker who blew up in the African nation after a bootleg recording found its way there 20 years after its recording. Starring Rodriguez, Steve Segerman and Dennis Coffey. Rated PG13. Wilma.

have to take down one of his own in order to save the world. Starring Daniel Craig, Javier Bardem and Dame Judi Dench. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12. THIS IS 40 Men are from Mars and women are into toilet humor in this follow-up to Judd Apatow’s film Knocked Up, which follows the continuing lives (and lack of sex and sexy, sexiness!) of characters Pete and Debbie. Starring Paul Rudd, Leslie Mann and Jason Segel. Rated R. Carmike 12.

Capsule reviews by Jason McMackin. Moviegoers be warned! For show times please visit missoulanews.com, contact the theaters telephonically or check theater websites in order to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 and Village 6 at 541-7469; Wilma at 7282521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603.

SKYFALL Bond is back and this time MI6 is under attack. Looks like Great Britain’s best operative may

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missoulanews.com • January 3 – January 10, 2013 [23]


[dish]

Photo by Ari LeVaux

Vietnamese comfort food by Ari LeVaux Pho, a brothy Vietnamese rice noodle and beef soup, is usually mispronounced “faux.” It’s more like “fuuh,” as if you were about to say a bad word and then realized you were in mixed company. However you pronounce it, this addictive dish of steaming comfort food is grabbing the world by the bowls. Pho is widely assumed to be a twist on the French feu, meaning fire—as in pot-au-feu, or “pot on the fire,” a soup that influenced pho during France’s colonization of Vietnam. It could also be derived from the Chinese fun, meaning noodle. Either way, pho has good etymology. The benefits of fun are self explanatory, while its fiery nature makes pho ideal summertime food because it makes you sweat, which cools you down. The same warming effect is welcome in winter too. Or when it’s raining. Or at night. Or in the morning. And for lunch, when you can’t decide between soup, salad and pasta, you can choose pho, and get it all in the same bowl. A defining characteristic of the modern, global pho-nomenon is the fragrant and often whopping side salads with which pho is served. These salads usually consist of a pile of bean sprouts, topped with one or more varieties of basil, and typically cilantro, lime wedges and sliced jalapeños. You might also find minced garlic, chopped scallions, and an obscure southeast Asian herb called razor leaf. Some purists from northern Vietnam, the birthplace of pho, consider the salad-in-your-soup thing something of a pho pas, since the practice was introduced when the dish migrated south. Another postHanoi improvement has been a growing body of condiments like hoisin sauce, spicy vinegar, chili sauce, chili powder and fish sauce, all of which are served in a table-top condiment caddy alongside soup and salad. After pupating in Saigon for a spell, pho spread to nearby countries like Thailand (where it’s called guoi tiao, or “noodle soup”). From there, it migrated with the Vietnamese diaspora, incorporating local ingredients wherever it landed—most notably the jalapeño pepper in North America. Many American pho houses, aka Vietnamese restaurants, have also latched onto Western humor, with names like “Pho King” and “What the Pho?” (proper pronunciation required for full comedic effect). These restaurants generally have large menus featuring a bewildering array of dishes, some of which will be dead-ends. So unless you’re experienced, go straight for the pho—either classic beef, which can include tripe, tendon, meatballs and slices of raw, tender steak that cook in your bowl at the table), or one of many similar soups that feature chicken, seafood, pork, duck or vegetables. Here’s a basic recipe for a traditional pho of beef flank (or some other tough cut). Those who want different meats or vegetarian options can modify accordingly; daikon is often used to make vegetarian pho broth.

[24] Missoula Independent • January 3 – January 10, 2013

FLASH IN THE PAN

Parboil some beef bones for 10 minutes to release a shocking amount of scum and particles, then dump that water, rinse the bones in hot water and put them back in the pot with 6 quarts of clean water. We’re going for a clear, subtle broth here. Venison bones make great broth, too. I like to oven roast the bones before adding them to the pot, which adds a level of richness and reduces the need for scum removal. Bring the water and bones to a simmer and turn the heat to the lowest setting. Add 8 star anise pods (either whole or in pieces), 1 tablespoon cardamom pods, a 3-inch cinnamon stick, 6 cloves, 4 tablespoons fish sauce, 1 tablespoon salt, a 1⁄2-cup of sugar (optional, but typical) and 1 pound of tough red meat cut into 2-inch chunks. Ideally, isolate the cloves, anise and cardamom in cheesecloth or a food-safe mesh bag so they can be easily removed—one inadvertently chewed anise pod can overpower an otherwise splendid, nuanced meal. Next, slowly cook 2 medium yellow onions, sliced in half, and a 4-inch piece of ginger, sliced lengthwise, over a flame or in a dry pan, until charred, blistered and fragrant. Add them to the stock. When the meat is falling-apart tender—a matter of hours, depending on the cut of meat—remove the chunks with a slotted spoon, disturbing the broth as little as possible so it will remain clear (don’t ever stir it). Altogether the stock should simmer for at least three hours, with fat being carefully skimmed as it simmers—or make the broth a day before serving and cool it in the fridge, which will cause the fat to solidify for easy removal. Blanch some rice noodles for 20 seconds in boiling water. Rinse them in cold water to remove the starch, drain and set aside. The noodles should be just a little soft, like an undercooked al dente. Assemble side salads on a plate, and make sure your condiments are in place, including hoisin sauce, soy sauce and a red chili sauce such as the ubiquitous Sriracha. Place noodles in bowls, but not too many, as they will absorb broth; about a third of a bowl of noodles is good. Add a chopped scallion and some cubes of meat to each bowl, atop the noodles, along with a shake or grind of black pepper and a tablespoon of soy sauce. Ladle broth into the bowls and serve. To eat, start by tearing off the herb leaves and adding them to your bowl, along with a handful of sprouts and as many jalapeño slices as you dare—piquant heat being an essential part of the soup's warming effect. Adjust the flavor to your liking with condiments. If you did it right, you’ll need a handkerchief on hand—or plenty of napkins—as you sip and sweat your way through the bowl. Whether it gives you a wintertime running nose or summertime sweats, pho is a fiery and fun phorce to be reckoned with.


[dish] Alcan Bar and Grill 16780 Beckwith St. Frenchtown • 626-9930 Tantalize your taste buds with Angus beef burgers, chicken strips, shrimp, and biscuits and gravy from Alcan Bar & Grill. With more than 20 years of experience and 10 years in the business, we have been offering fresh meals and beverages at the area's most competitive prices. Our friendly professionals offer personalized service and make sure you leave our restaurant as one of our friends. We offer have a variety of specials for ladies night and sports events featuring drink specials and free food. Contact us today and enjoy our incredible menu selection. 9 am – 2 am Mon-Sun. Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway (across from courthouse) 728-8900 Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Nothing says Bernice’s like the cold, grey months of January. Come in, sit quietly, or share a table with friends in our warm and cozy dining room. Enjoy a cup of joe, a slice of cake, or a breakfast pastry as the sun beams in through our large glass windows. Want a healthy lunch? Come by in the afternoon and try a salad sampler or Bernice’s own Garlic Hummus Sandwich on our Honey Whole Wheat Bread. Bless you all in 2013, Bernice. bernicesbakerymt.com Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Monday – Friday, 7:30 – 2. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 40 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Cafe Zydeco 2101 Brooks • 406-926-2578 Authentic cajun cuisine, with an upbeat zydeco atmosphere in the heart of Missoula. Accomodates indoor and outdoor seating. Breakfast served all day. Featuring Crawfish omlettes, beignets, and cafe au lait. Open Monday-Wednesday 11am-3pm, Thursday-Saturday 11am8pm, and Sunday 9am-3pm (Beignets available Saturday 11am-2pm, and All Day Sunday) Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 • ciaomambo.com The vibrant energy at Ciao Mambo is fantastically accompanied by steaming hot pizzas, delicious assortments of pastas and of course authentic Italian wine. We focus on making sure that whether it be date night, family night, or business dinners we accommodate whatever the need! And do not forget there are always leftovers! Open 5 to close every day, come make us your go to dinner destination! $-$$

$…Under $5

Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks • 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm Sun-Wed and 11am-10pm Thurs-Sat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc's is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you're heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc's is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items.

Educate your taste buds! www.thinkfft.com Mon-Thurs 7am - 8pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 *When school is not in session, we often close at 3pm Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. • 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and gluten-free options. Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! (Happy Hour 3-6 PM MonSat. 2 Empanadas for $7) Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. 11am-8pm Monday-Saturday. Downtown Missoula. $ $ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. • 721-6033 Missoula's Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. M-TH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am4pm, Sat 8am-4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St 549-7723 www.grizzlyliquor.com Missoula's Tailgate Headquarters! We carry all of the spirits & accessories to make your tailgate party a success! Largest selection of spirits in Montana, including locally made whiskey, vodka, gin, rum and wine. We're located downtown with free customer parking. Grizzly Liquor was voted Missoula's #1 Liquor Store! Open M-F 96:30, Sat 9-6. $-$$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula's best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. 721-8550 Thursday is Trivia Night! Prizes, food and drink specials! Starting at 7 pm. Also,check our brand new wine menu! Considering a staycation? Check out our packages. Call for more details! Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula.

JANUARY

MISSOULA'S BEST

COFFEE SPECIAL

COFFEE

Organic French Roast $10.95/lb. IN OUR COFFEE BAR

BUTTERFLY HERBS

BUTTERFLY

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Iza 529 S. Higgins • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Contemporary Asian cuisine featuring local, vegan, gluten free and organic options as well as wild

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over

missoulanews.com • January 3 – January 10, 2013 [25]


[dish]

Atomic cocktail HAPPIEST HOUR What you’re drinking: Only the most explosive Champagne-infused cocktail we’ve ever tried, because you like to ring in the new year with a bang.

Where the name comes from: According to renowned mixologist Dave Wondrich, the drink dates back to the early 1950s and the Vegas strip. Casino managers worried that patrons would stay home amid A-bomb tests at the Nevada Test Site and created a concoction that was “cold, sparkly, and very, very potent to

Jakers 3515 Brooks St. 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Jimmy John’s 420 N. Higgins 542-1100 jimmyjohns.com Jimmy John’s - America’s Favorite Sandwich Delivery Guys! Unlike any other sub shop, Jimmy John’s is all about the freshest ingredients and fastest service. Freaky Fast, Freaky Good - that’s Jimmy John’s. Order online, call for delivery or visit us on Higgins. $-$$

What it is (this time without all the bomb clichés, please): Fine. The Atomic includes one shot of vodka, one shot of cognac and a half-shot of sherry mixed with ice and strained into a chilled cocktail glass. Top it with brut Champagne. Why we like it: The name is an instant conversation starter that sounds way too intimidating for such a dangerously drinkable cocktail. Plus, we never know how else to use sherry.

caught seafood, Idaho trout and buffalo. Join us for lunch and dinner. Happy Hour 3-6 weekdays with specials on food and drink. Extensive sake, wine and tea menu. Closed Sundays. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm Happy Hour 3-6pm Dinner 5pm-close. Sat: Dinner 5pm-close $-$$ $-$$

wash down the radiation.” This, for some of you, is all the recommendation you need. Words of warning: It ain’t called the Atomic for nothin’. Consider it a festive way to kick off an evening, but certainly not something you want to pound well past midnight. —Skylar Browning Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $

4PM-9PM

MONDAYS & THURSDAYS ALL DAY

$1

SUSHI Not available for To-Go orders

[26] Missoula Independent • January 3 – January 10, 2013

Silvertip Casino 680 SW Higgins 728-5643 The Silvertip Casino is Missoula’s premiere casino offering 20 Video gaming machines, best live poker in Missoula, full beverage liquor, 11 flat screen tv’s and great food at great prices. Breakfast Specials starting at $2.99 (7-11am) For a complete menu, go to www.silvertipcasino.com. Open 24/7. $-$$ Sis's Kitchen 531-5034 sisskitchen.com Wheat, Gluten & Allergen Free Foods. Frozen & Dry Mix Products. Sis's Kitchen plays a part in Best of Missoula "Best Pizza" Winner's for 2008-2012. Find our products at: The Good Food Store • Biga Pizza • Bridge Pizza • Pizza Cafe in Ronan (12"crust). $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI We have quick and delicious lunch specials 6 days a week starting at $7, and are open for dinner 7 nights a week. Try our comfort food items like Pork Katsu and Chicken Teriyaki. We also offer party platters to go and catering for all culinary styles. Lunch 11:30-3 Mon-Sat. Dinner 5-9:30 Every Night. Corner of Pine and Higgins. Very Family Friendly. 549-7979. $$-$$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins 327-8929 Stop in when you're in the neighborhood. We'll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula's best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 1110 Sun 12-9.

The Mercantile Deli 119 S. Higgins Ave. 721-6372 themercantiledeli.com Located next to the historic Wilma Theater, the Merc features a relaxed atmosphere, handcrafted Paninis, Sandwiches, and wholesome Soups and Salads. Try a Monte Cristo for breakfast, a Pork Love Panini for lunch, or have us cater your next company event. Open Monday – Saturday for breakfast and lunch. Downtown delivery available. $-$$

Taco John’s 623 W Broadway 2600 S Reserve West-Mex® is about fresh taste and BOLD flavors. Taco John’s recipes make you smile and yell “OLÉ”. We combine hearty helpings of seasoned meats, crispy Potato Olés®, and flavorful cheeses with fresh-made Mexican specialties like burritos, tacos, and quesadillas. All topped off with bold sauces, spices and salsas. You’ll find West-Mex® cooking makes for an unbeatably satisfying meal. See you soon ... Amigo :) $-$$

The Mustard Seed Asian Café Southgate Mall 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our nonsmoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, micro brews, fine wines & signature drinks. Gluten free menu, also. Takeout & delivery available. $$-$$$

Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 tacosano.net Once you find us you'll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER.

Pearl Cafe 231 East Front St. 541-0231 pearlcafe.us Serving country French specialties, Montana elk, Berkshire Pork, and delicious seafood dishes. Delectable salads and appetizers, as well as breads and desserts baked in-house. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$

SATURDAYS

Sean Kelly’s A Public House 130 W. Pine St. 542-1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for lunch & dinner. Featuring brunch Saturday & Sunday from 11-2pm. Serving international & Irish pub fare. Full bar, beer, wine, martinis. $-$$

Philly West 134 W. Broadway 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday - Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. Pita Pit 130 N. Higgins 541-PITA (7482) pitapitusa.com Fresh Thinking Healthy Eating. Enjoy a pita rolled just for you. Hot meat and cool fresh veggies topped with your favorite sauce. Try our Chicken Caesar, Gyro, Philly Steak, Breakfast Pita, or Vegetarian Falafel to name just a few. For your convenience we are open until 3am 7 nights a week. Call if you need us to deliver!

Tamarack Brewing Company 231 W. Front Street 406-830-3113 facebook.com/tamarackmissoula Tamarack Brewing Company opened its first Taphouse in Missoula in 2011. Overlooking Caras Park, Tamarack Missoula has two floors -- a sports pub downstairs, and casual dining upstairs. Patrons can find Tamarack’s handcrafted ales and great pub fare on both levels. Enjoy beer-inspired menu items like brew bread wraps, Hat Trick Hop IPA Fish and Chips, and Dock Days Hefeweizen Caesar Salads. Try one of our staple ales like Hat Trick Hop IPA or Yard Sale Amber Ale, or one of our rotating seasonal beers, like, Old 'Stache Whiskey Barrel Porter, Headwall Double IPA, Stoner Kriek and more. Don’t miss $8 growler fills on Wednesday and Sunday, Community Tap Night every Tuesday, Kids Eat Free Mondays, and more. See you at The ‘Rack! $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$


January 3 – January 10, 2013 Children of the Earth Tribe Song and Chant Circle at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center is for all those ready to sing in honor of our connection to one another and the earth. 519 S. Higgins (Enter through back alley door.). 7:30 PM. Free will offering. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 8–10 PM. During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, amazing musicians could play some great jams. Just don’t tell your cousin Rapping Timmy about it. That guy’s version of “Santeria” is terrible. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up. The Dead Hipster Dance Party is all kinds of sweaty, but ‘tis the droplets of the beautiful people. Get a taste in the place where love and funk is in the air (sometimes they are the same scent). Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight. Show up the rest of the room with your version of “Ninja Survive” when you hit the Dark Horse for Combat Karaoke hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free. Cowboy up. Terry Cyr’s photograph, “Helmville Rodeo Montana #112,” is just one of the many artworks on display this First Friday during a reception at the MAM, 220 N. Pattee St., on Fri., Jan. 4 from 5–8 PM. Free.

THURSDAYJAN.03 Slide on a blazer (don’t forget to roll up the sleeves) and drop some “In Soviet Russia” jokes at Missoula’s Homegrown StandUp Comedy at the Union Club. Sign up by 9:30 PM to perform or just sit back and take in the funny. Free.

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ton, 101 Marcus St. 6–8:30 PM. Free.

Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free.

Get hip to that demon barber fella and audition for the Hamilton Players’ production of Sweeney Todd. Auditions consist of music, reading and directed motion. Scripts may be checked out for 48 hours from the Chapter One Bookstore in Hamilton. Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Rickets Road. 7 PM. Call 375-9050.

Dan Dubuque don’t care none for them genres, he just plays tunes for you to drink beer by at the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamil-

In the post-Mayan calendar world, nerds are cool. Don’t forget your pocket protectors when you head on down to The Manhattan Project Presents: Revenge of the Nerds Party, a night of electronic tunes by local DJs Geeter Tron, Chaddabox, Spacebag, and Beatloaf, starting at 9 PM. Free. Dressing up like a nerd is encouraged. Grab your best gal and spin her ‘round that dance floor as Sam Platts and the Kootenai Three play fine old classic country music at the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave. 9:30 PM. Free.

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[calendar]

FIRST FRIDAY â‚ŹRich Lande of Hamilton shows Born and Raised: The Alley Cat Series at The Artists’ Shop, 127 N. Higgins, with a First Friday reception Jan. 4 from 5 to 8 PM, during which time Lande will talk about his work. ďŹ Donna Loos shows a new series of work along with Janet Whaley whose sculpture and platters will also be on display. The reception at Montana Art & Framing, at 709 Ronan St., goes from 5 to 9 PM on First Friday, Jan. 4.

AUDITIONS ACTRESSES NEEDED FOR

STEEL MAGNOLIAS Produced by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc.

Directed by TJ Charlson

Sunday, January 13, 2013 1:00–6:00 p.m. NEEDED: Female performers, ages 18 to 65. PERFORMANCES: March 14-17, 20-24, 2013 Missoula Community Theatre 200 North Adams Street (Main Street entrance) Ĺ”XXXNDUJODPSH MCT IS ADA COMPLIANT

SPONSORED BY: PAYNE FINANCIAL GROUP, INC. t US BANK tDIRECTV

[28] Missoula Independent • January 3 – January 10, 2013

FRIDAYJAN.04 Be where it’s at and meet the talented artists from the MAM’s 41st Benefit Art Auction. This year’s exhibition features 110 artworks as well as live and silent auctions. Sample tasty hors d’oeuvres and enjoy jazzy music. 335 N. Pattee St. 5 PM, with a 7 PM exhibiting artists’ gallery talk. Bleed for those in need and donate blood at the American Red Cross, 2401 N. Reserve St. Ste. 6. 10 AM–2 PM. Call 800 REDCROSS.

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709 Ronan St. 5–9 PM. Free.

Enjoy the tripped-out guitar tooting of Mr. Dan Dubuque this First Friday at Betty’s Divine, 521 S. Higgins Ave. 6 PM. Free.

Pet the bad cat and check out painter Rich Lande’s acrylic works in Born and Raised: The Alley Cat Series. The Artists’ Shop, 127 N. Higgins Ave. 5–8 PM. Free.

Naturalist’s Mercantile Grand Opening and First Friday Lecture Series features Rob Domenech, founder of the Raptor View Research Institute. Hear about birds, buy some bird finding paraphernalia at 131 E. Main St. 5–8 PM. Free. (See Spotlight.) Check out the serene delights of artist Donna Loos, whose work includes ceramics, stoneware and paintings. Montana Art & Framing,

Venezuelan artist Gissette Padilla is on hand at her exhibit, Retrieval from an Unconscious Mind, at the Brink Gallery, 11 W. Front St. 5–8 PM. Free. (See Arts.) Matt Lundmark ain’t no 21st century digital boy. His exhibit, Pen and Ink in a Digital Age, tells what he do and how he do it. Prudential Montana Real Estate, 314 N. Higgins Ave. 5–8 PM. Free.


[calendar] Author and rad dude Philip Burgess presents and signs his book Penny Post Cards and Prairie Flowers, which follows the goings-on of homesteading ladies via post cards. Fact & Fiction, 200 N. Higgins Ave. 5:30–7 PM. Free. The Ewan Buddhist Center, at 180 S. Third St. W., hosts artist Heyoka Merrifield, whose work includes bronze sculptures and handcrafted jewelry. Most important, his works are held in the private collections of Cher and Elton John. Rad. 5:30–7:30 PM. David Boone brings the tunes to the Ten Spoon Vineyard Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Dr., from at 6 PM, with the whole deal open

from 5–9 PM. Antipasto plates by Biga Pizza available while supplies last, or bring your own food. Free.

cussion to follow. 6 PM. Free. Contact the library for title information at 777-5061.

Curious about what it feels like to hold a sword in your hand and face a masked opponent? Come try a free fencing class on the first Friday of the new year. En garde! 1200 Shakespeare St., Ste. A. Classes start at 6 PM and 7 PM, limited to the first 15 people. Free.

Dance the night away with the Soul City Cowboys and stop having those weird dreams about David Lee Roth in a sailor suit. 2420 South Ave. 8 PM. Free.

Hey bub, get a load of some great gams and follow the adventures of some big-time gumshoes at the North Valley Public Library in Stevi, which screens classic film noir every Friday evening with an informal dis-

Enjoy the tunes of yesteryear (Foghat!) when Flashback plays Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St. 8–10 PM. Cost TBA. Fill your trousers with tomato soup and head to the Badlander for the Bassface Krew’s Fishbowl Friday: The Girl Cheese Edition, a night of electronica; tunes by local DJs Geeter Tron, Chaddabox,

Spacebag and Beatloaf. 9 PM. Free, with $5 fishbowl drink special, plus free grilled cheese sandwiches all night. Wham!

play. It could be you. Starts at 3 PM. 213 Main Street in Hot Springs. Sign up ahead at 406721-2416 or just show up.

Bust a move, break a sweat and leave behind a trail of dancing goo when DJs Krave and Boy Burns Bridge make tunes go at the Palace. 9 PM. Cost TBA.

Grab your best gal and spin her ‘round that dance floor as Sam Platts and the Kootenai Three play fine old classic country music at the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave. 9:30 PM. Free.

Joan Zen brings home the bacon and fries it up in the pan at the old Union Club. 9 PM. Free. John “Poncho” Dobson hosts open mic at Fergie’s Pub every Fri., where you’re bound to mingle with a mix of resort celebs, odd locals and dizzy soakers. You never know who’ll show up and

If you love a winner, you are bound to love UM Entertainment Management program’s Peoples Choice award winner Lannie Head Wounds and Sean Kelly’s Top of the Mic contest winner The Hasslers at Pulse inside the Press Box. $2 tall boys and $1 Jello shots. 10 PM. Free.

Photo by Steele Williams

Boone-dawg. David Boone performs music at the Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Dr., on Fri., Jan. 4, at 6 PM. Free.

missoulanews.com • January 3 – January 10, 2013 [29]


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SATURDAYJAN.05 The Hasslers bug you with musical offerings at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 6–8 PM. Free. Never fear, lovers of fresh, local vittles, the Heirloom Winter Market at the Missoula County Fairgrounds is rolling with music, kids’ activities, locally grown produce, meat, baked goods, jam, honey and so much more. 11–2 PM. The guild that sews together, stays together, so join Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., at Craft Vigilantes, its monthly Modern Quilt Guild for beginners and pros alike. 12–5 PM. $20 (first few sign ups are free).

nightlife The Sun Raven Band features multi-instrumentalists playing acoustic and electric guitar, upright and electric bass, banjo and mandolin, and considers itself a “truly original band.” Check it at the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6–8:30 PM. Free. Reel in the years at the Missoula Folklore Society Contra Dance, with lessons at 7:30 PM and full-blown dancing at 8 PM. Sassafras Stomp makes the music and Rab Commings has the call. Union Hall, 208 Main St. $9/$6 members. A bunch of ragtag musicians with who-knows-what kind of instruments get together from 7 to 9:30 PM on the first Sat. of every month for the Bitterroot Valley Good-Time Jamboree at the Grange Hall, 1436 South First St. in Hamilton. Call Clem at 961-4949. Dance the night away with the Soul City Cowboys and stop having those weird dreams about David Lee Roth in a sailor suit. 2420 South Ave. 8 PM. Free. Absolutely with DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo is the de facto dopest DJ duo in town. Get hip to their jamz, hippies. Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2-for-1 Absolut drinks until 11 PM. $2. Cash in with Wendy from Accounts Receivable when Paydirt plays dancing tunes at the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave. 9:30 PM. free.

SUNDAYJAN.06 Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with Josh Farmer, The Vanguard Combo and Front Street Jazz.

birds in the hand The fact is, we can all agree birds are awesome. Undoubtedly it’s because our avian brethren can do something we cannot: fly. After years of research, it’s well-known that most of us humans would choose flying over invisibility as a superpower. The Naturalist’s Mercantile, a new downtown store catering to naturalists of all ages and stripes, hopes to tap into our fascination with birds when it hosts its inaugural First Friday lecture, which features Rob Domenech, founder of the Raptor View Research Institute. Established in 2004, the institute studies raptors and the ecosystems they reside in. According to Domenech, the raptor population provides an environmental barometer that allows scientists to monitor the health of ecosystems, both on local and landscape scales. Currently, there is some debate on whether the lead used in bullets is the cause of declining golden eagle populations. While legislation is in the works in some states to ban lead bullets in favor of non-toxic alternatives such as copper, the institute prefers to stand behind science and educate the public rather than pushing for changes

Open Mic with Joey Running Crane at the VFW, 245 W. Main, seems like a fine idea, especially with 2-for-1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. 10 PM. Free. Call him up and get yourself a slot at 229-0488.

TUESDAYJAN.08 At the mercantile, Domenech intends to share slides and graphs as well information on the migration patterns of golden eagles. In a period of seven

WHO: Rob Domenech, founder of Raptor View Research Institute WHERE: 131 E. Main St. WHEN: Fri., Jan. 4, from 5 PM to 8 PM HOW MUCH: Free

This is the kind of mass I can really get behind. The Missoula Area Secular Society presents its Sunday M.A.S.S. Brunch, where atheists, secular humanists, agnostics and other freethinkers meet the first Sun. of every month for brunch from 10 AM–noon at the meeting room of Sean Kelly’s Stone of Accord, 4951 N. Reserve St. Free to attend, but the food costs you. Visit secularmissoula.org. Dance your way to a free mind and an open body at Turning the Wheel Missoula’s Ecstatic Dance. Headwaters Dance Studio, 1042 Monroe St. 11-12:30 PM. $10/$75 for eight classes. Visit turningthewheel.org.

[30] Missoula Independent • January 3 – January 10, 2013

Get rural in the big city, eat some of the town’s best grub and hear the country-esque musical stylings of Cash for Junkers. Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. 7–10 PM. Free. You know it’s gotta be a real party when DJ Super Steve rocks the karaoke with the hottest Kamikaze tuneage this side of the hemisphere at the Dark Horse. Are you brave enough to let the computer pick your songs? 9 PM. Free.

WHAT: Naturalist’s Mercantile Grand Opening and First Friday Lecture Series

to current laws. However, Domenech points out the institute has found of 162 birds “over 50 percent of that golden eagle population has elevated lead levels in their blood.” Whether lead bullets are the cause of the birds’ decline in population is not fully known, but Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks has banned the use of lead shot in some wildlife management areas such as Ninepipe and Pablo.

Bingo at the VFW: the easiest way to make rent since keno. 245 W. Main. 6:45 PM. $12 buy-in.

weeks, the institute counted a total 2,746 raptors on Nora Ridge in the west central part of the Rocky Mountain Front. If you’re looking for more proof that birds are rad, you can follow a female osprey that members of the institute loaded up with a satellite transmitter as she migrated south for the winter. In 10 days she flew 2,000 miles from Florence to an area near Veracruz, Mexico.

MONDAYJAN.07 Get worbly and wobbly in your speakeasy underpants at Missoula Area Dubstep (MAD) Monday, a night of dubstep with local DJs Tigerlilly, Milkcrate Mechanic, Mr. Reid and M-AD. Badlander. 9 PM. Free, with $5 pitchers of PBR on tap. Anyone affected by epilepsy can come to the Epilepsy Support Group at Summit Independent Living Center, 700 SW Higgins Ave. 2– 3:30 PM. Free. Call 721-0707. The Rough Cut Science Seminar

—Jason McMackin

Susanna Sonnenberg reads from and discusses her book, She Matters: A Life in Friendships at Shakespeare & Co., 103 S. Third St. W. 7 PM. Free. (See Arts.) Talk books at the Marjorie A. Crawford Literature Seminar facilitated by Shawn Wathen at the Bitterroot Public Library. This month Solaris by Stanislaw Lern is the topic. 9:30– 11:30 AM. Free. Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room for Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters, at 5205 Grant Creek Dr., and work on your elk-camp locution with the best. All are invited. Noon–1 PM. Free. Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication, a non-violent communication weekly practice group, at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. 519 S. Higgins. Noon– 1 PM. Free.

Series shows off the brainiacs of Montana’s scientific community, with presentations on current research each week at 4 PM in the University Center Theater. Visit montanaioe.org/rough-cut-series for the schedule.

Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. Third St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1–3 PM. For information, call 5433955.

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It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Boys Bluegrass from 5:30 to 8 PM. Free. Call 327-0900.

Occupy Missoula General Assembly meets at the Union Hall above the Union Club at 6 PM. Visit occupymissoula.org. The UM Climate Action Now Meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM Flat, 633 5th St. E. 6:30 PM.

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It’s a new year, time for a new you, and a new you starts with talking right. The Compassionate Communication Class develops the tools for making effective conversation. 725 W. Alder St. #17. 725. 6–7:30


[calendar] PM. $65 per single class or $120 for two. Contact Patrick Marsolek for info at info@PatrickMarsolek.com Drink from the cup of knowledge during the Socrates Café at the Bitterroot Public Library West Meeting room. Questions are chosen, terms discussed and thoughts given. 7–9 PM. Free. No DeLorean needed to go way back in time at the Western Montana Genealogical Society meeting. Tate Jones, executive director of the Rocky Mountain Museum of Military History, presents a program on the old days. Missoula Public Library, Large Meeting Rm. 7 PM. Free. The Montana Musicians and Artists Coalition hosts the Musician Showcase at Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St., an evening of tuneful live tuneage made by locals for locals. 8–11 PM. Free. 18 plus. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free pub trivia, which takes place every Tuesday at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with: Where did the world’s first underground railroad service open on Jan., 10 1863? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.)

Photo by Sarah Daisy Lindmark

What’s his secret? He won’t tell. Tom Catmull, above, and John Sporman perform at the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton, 101 Marcus St., on Thu., Jan 10, from 6–8:30 PM. Free.

missoulanews.com • January 3 – January 10, 2013 [31]


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Go fly a kite. Matt Lundmark’s exhbit, Pen and Ink in a Digital Age, is on Display Fri., Jan. 4, from 5–8 PM, at Prudential Montana Real Estate, 314 N. Higgins Ave. Free.

Get a snortful of modern blues and a shake or two of that electric bugaloo when Three-Eared Dog performs at the Union Club. 9 PM. Free. Perhaps there will be food everywhere as if the party was catered when Dead Hipster Dance Party presents the R. Kelly Party, a night of grown and sexy tunes by American treasure R. Kelly. Happy birthday, Mr. Kelly. Badlander. 9 PM. Free.

WEDNESDAYJAN.09

Business Lab at 6 PM and they want you fine folks to attend. Hey, winter is here and TV ain’t exactly pumping out the good stuff these days, so get off your bum for a few and take Cathy Clark’s West Coast Swing Class at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent Ave. 7 PM. $5. Pub trivia answer: London, England.

THURSDAYJAN.10

Kraptastic Karaoke welcomes Black Eyed Peas fanatics to belt out their fave jamz at the Badlander, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $5 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free.

Check out the new sound system and dance ‘til ya blast at Archaic Revival, a night of electro-tronic partying hosted by MC Lil Sassy, plus tunes by DJs Tygerlily and Hauli, as well as the Milkcrate Mechanic. Palace. 9 PM. Free, includes a 2-for-1 well drink special, plus free pool.

The Missoula Police Department is now accepting applications for its Citizens’ Law Enforcement Academy. The academy gives the people a chance to understand police work a little better and takes place over nine Wednesday nights beginning on Jan. 30. Deadline for applicants is Fri., Jan. 11. Call 552-6320.

.People who have Parkinson’s disease, as well as caregivers and professionals who work with the disease, can meet for the Missoula Parkinson’s Disease Support Group the second Thursday of each month at the Montana First Credit Union, 3708 N. Reserve St. Call Cindy Cone at 728-8283 or Ann Houston at 543-8939 for more info. Free.

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The Arlee Community Development Corporation meets in the Arlee High School

Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on and become fixated or-

[32] Missoula Independent • January 3 – January 10, 2013

atorically at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free. Confront and solve your problems with the help of the Bitterroot Public Library’s Fellowship Club which discusses The Road Less Traveled: A New Psychology of Love, Traditional Values and Spiritual Growth by M. Scott Peck, M.D.. 6–7:30 PM. Free. Tom Catmull and John Sporman are always delightful and never spiteful (unless you cross them or steal their cats) and they are performing tunes for you and yours at the Hamilton’s Bitter Root Brewery from 6–8:30 PM. Free. Puff-puff give when the American Lung Association presents, Breathing in the Big Sky: Missoula Forum on Air Quality Issues at the Missoula City Council Chambers. Moderated by Mayor John Engen, panelists include Tony Ward and Steve Running, from the University of Montana, Missoula physicians Georgia Milan and Paul Smith, Missoula air quality specialist Sarah Coefield. For more information, please contact: Kim at kdavitt@lungmtpacific.org or 728-0368. (See Agenda.) Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 8–10 PM. During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s,

amazing musicians could play some great jams. Just don’t tell your cousin Rapping Timmy about it. That guy’s version of “Santeria” is terrible. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up. The Dead Hipster Dance Party is all kinds of sweaty, but ‘tis the droplets of the beautiful people. Get a taste in the place where love and funk is in the air (sometimes they are the same scent). Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight. Show up the rest of the room with your version of “Ninja Survive” when you hit the Dark Horse for Combat Karaoke hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free. Go out and holler with dance music makers Blue Collar at the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave. 9:30 PM. Free. Bundle up, little skippers. Winter is full-blown. Sharpen your skates and wax them boards. It’s a beautimous time. Send your event info to me by 5 PM on Fri., Jan. 4 to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to The Calemandar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online. Just head to the arts section of our website and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”


[outdoors]

MOUNTAIN HIGH

Y

ou know what? To heck with the NHL this year. It’s too late to save the hockey season, but that’s no reason to abandon hockey as a whole. For hockey fans, the Seeley Lake Hockey Tournament is where the action is this weekend. The event was started three years ago by Tom Monaghan and Mike Lindemer, both of whom are from the upper Midwest, an area known for cold winters and good hockey. Each of the men have spent approximately 150 hours of maintenance time creating the three rinks on Seeley Lake. That works out to about 100 miles of driving a four-wheeler in a circle on the 140-foot by 75-foot rinks. There are 30 teams of six vying for the Stanley Cup-esque trophy, which is made out of an old milk can and emblazoned with

the names of past champions. To show that the event is all in good fun, there is also an award for the worst team. The team that has to shovel off the rink after losing most often will receive the Golden Shovel Award, a handsome trophy made of a shovel spraypainted gold, with team name soon to be emblazoned on it as well. Spectators are invited to come on down to the lake to catch some hockey fever. —Jason McMackin The Seeley Lake Pond Hockey Tournament takes place on Sat., Jan. 5, from 9 AM to 9:30 PM and Sun., Jan. 6 from 9 AM to 1 PM on Seeley Lake behind Lindey’s Steakhouse.

Photo by Chad Harder

THURSDAY JANUARY 3 Backcountry brethren, if you’re already Level 1 certified it’s time to step up you all’s knowledge at the American Avalanche Institute’s and Missoula Avalanche’s Level 2 Avalanche Class which begins today. Classroom sessions take place in Missoula and field work is at Snow Bowl. For more information visit americanavalancheinstitute.com/aai3/.

FRIDAY JANUARY 4 Time to lace up the skates, you hosers, and hit up the Seeley Lake Pond Hockey Tournament outside of Lindey’s Steak House. The weekendlong tourney features 24 teams, three rinks and plenty of room for spectators. Call 677-9229 for more information. Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s weekly meeting to talk about past glories and upcoming activities at Bigfork’s Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free. Let the kids climb the walls while you have a snort next door at Draught Works at the Freestone Climbing Center’s Kids Climbing Club. Kids get instruction and encouragement; you get to chill ‘til the next episode. 935 Toole Ave. 6–8 PM. $25 per month.

Make sure your first time is safe and that the person you’re doing it with knows what they’re doing. So moto on over to First Timer Friday at the Freestone Climbing Center, 935 Toole Ave. 7 PM. Free if it’s your first visit.

SATURDAY JANUARY 5 Just don’t run on a full stomach during Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which occurs every Sat. at 8 AM at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. After the run/walk, you’ll grab breakfast with other participants. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org.

SUNDAY JANUARY 6 Chase after your dreams at the Ozone Pursuit Cross Country Ski Race, which takes place at Lubrecht Experimental Forest east of Missoula on Hwy. 200. Visit missoulanordic.org.

TUESDAY JANUARY 8 Lover of getting high, by climbing mountains that is, Skip Horner speaks at the Rocky Mountaineers meeting at The Trail Head, 221 Front St. 7 PM. Free.

2012 Walk to End Alzheimer’s, Big Sky Documentary Film Festival, Caras Park Fund, Child Care Resources, City Of Missoula Public Art Committee, Clay Studio of Missoula, Community Food And Agriculture Coalition, Dolce Canto, Fair Trade City Missoula, Fit To Fight, Five Valleys Backcountry Ski Patrol, The Flagship Program, Garden City Harvest, Great Burn Study Group, Hellgate Hunters and Anglers, High Plains Films, Homeword, Jadyen Fred Foundation, La Leche League of Missoula, Loyola Sacred Heart Foundation, MaxWave, Missoula Aging Services, Missoula Butterfly House, Missoula Combat Challenge, Missoula Community Foundation, Missoula County Search and Rescue, Missoula Elite Lacrosse, Missoula Freestyle Ski Team, Missoula Ice Hounds, Missoula Horseman’s Council, Missoula Senior Center, Missoula Urban Demonstration (MUD), Missoula Youth Athletic Council, Montana Conservation Voters, Montana Innocence Project, Montana Repertory Theatre, Mountain Home Montana, Nature Link Institute, New Directions Wellness Center, North Missoula Community Development Corp., Ramp of Montana, Rattlesnake Creek Watershed Group, Run Wild Missoula, Snowbowl Pro Ski Patrol, Student School Of Psychology, Travelers Rest Preservation Heritage Assoc., West Central Montana Avalanche Foundation, Xsports4Vets, and Zootown Arts Community Center.

calendar@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • January 3 – January 10, 2013 [33]


[community]

When I told my grandpa I was moving to Missoula for grad school he said, “That place smells.” Of course, the last time he had been in Missoula was during WWII when he passed through via train on his way to join Patton’s army. At the time, the city was choking on the scent of lumber mills, specifically the teepee burners that fired up mill waste. It’s not so bad these days, but we do like talking about the inversion almost as much as we like to talk about the spread of noxious weeds. The inversion often makes what would normally be a sunny winter day a gross, smoggy affair down here in the valley. Anyone who has been to Snowbowl and looked down on Missoula during one of these days has seen just how bad an inversion looks. It’s the taste of the inversion that gets me, though. Odoriffic emanations from diesel pickups, wood stoves and slash piles choke the air. That can’t be good for us, right?

The American Lung Association doesn’t think so. The group is hosting a public health forum called Breathing the Big Sky: Missoula Forum on Air Quality Issues. The forum seeks to educate the community of the effects of poor air quality and seeks to find ways to help prevent the air from becoming so polluted. The forum is moderated by Mayor John Engen and panelists include Tony Ward and Steve Running from the University of Montana, Missoula physicians Georgia Milan and Paul Smith and Missoula air quality specialist Sarah Coefield. —Jason McMackin Breathing the Big Sky: Missoula Forum on Air Quality Issues takes place on Thu., Jan. 10, at 7 PM in the Missoula City Council Chambers., 140 W. Pine St.

[AGENDA LISTINGS] THURSDAY JANUARY 3 Children of the Earth Tribe Song and Chant Circle at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center is for all those ready to sing in honor of our connection to one another and the earth. 519 S. Higgins (Enter through back alley door.). 7:30 PM. Free will offering.

SUNDAY JANUARY 6 This is the kind of mass I can really get behind. The Missoula Area Secular Society presents its Sunday M.A.S.S. Brunch, where atheists, secular humanists, agnostics and other freethinkers meet the first Sun. of every month for brunch from 10 AM–noon at the meeting room of Sean Kelly’s Stone of Accord, 4951 N. Reserve St. Free to attend, but the food costs you. Visit secularmissoula.org.

MONDAY JANUARY 7 Occupy Missoula General Assembly meets at the Union Hall above the Union Club at 6 PM. Visit occupymissoula.org. The UM Climate Action Now Meeting is out to

save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM Flat, 633 Fifth St. E. 6:30 PM.

TUESDAY JANUARY 8 Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication, a non-violent communication weekly practice group, at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. 519 S. Higgins. Noon–1 PM. Free. Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. Third St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1–3 PM. For information, call 543-3955.

WEDNESDAY JANUARY 9 The Missoula Police Department is now accepting applications for its Citizens’ Law Enforcement Academy. The academy gives the people a chance to understand police work a little better and takes place over nine Wednesday nights beginning on Wed., Jan. 30. Deadline for applicants is Fri., Jan. 11. Call 552-6320. The Arlee Community Development Corporation meets in the Arlee High School Business Lab at 6 PM and they want you fine folks to attend.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

[34] Missoula Independent • January 3 – January 10, 2013


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control 541-7387 LIV• Liv is an energetic ball of fluff who looks remarkably like a self-propelled dust mop as she scoots around the shelter. She's very happy and friendly, and although she has only one eye, she's certainly in no way handicapped. She can see how to play and cuddle just fine! She would make a great companion.

A Dog in Need of a Good Home Showcasing shelter dogs difficult to Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MTSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

CHARLES•Charles is a big, sleek fellow who was already neutered and was wearing a collar when he was found. We know he belonged to someone, but surprisingly, no one ever came to reclaim him. He's a mellow guy who loves people, but he's not a cat that will pester you for attention. We think that's a pretty good combination!

2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

SAVANNAH•Savannah is sweet and wellmannered, just as you would expect of a southern lady. She's very affectionate and enjoys interacting with people, and she's also tolerant of other cats. Her total adoption fee has been sponsored in honor of the holidays, so she's even a bargain!

place -- either because the dog's presentation misleads or because the dog is indeed a challenge.

FRAT BOY MOE Lab X Moe takes socializing to new heights. In three months of adoption he escaped seven times. The sole reason was to find people after his people left him (outside) while they went to work. There's not one bit of Robinson Crusoe in him; he's not interested in exploring; he just wants to party. Now returned and awaiting another family, Moe needs at least one person who stays home often and also allows Moe to stay inside when alone. Moe's socializing profile includes both indoor and outdoor proficiency. His mild manner inside speaks to couch potato skills, while his high level of umph matches that of any outdoor enthusiast. He can hop over concrete road blocks and scale steep banks. Even nicer, he is a small Lab X, not overly strong, and he rarely pulls on the leash, which means people of all strengths and sizes can walk or hike with him. He likes most other dogs, is indifferent to cats, and is a smidge older (so he has outgrown all that adolescent nonsense). In sum, Moe is a mature, house-trained frat boy who can still move his body and loves to party with his people.

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana 549-3934 HENRY•Looking for a dog who’s smart, outgoing and friendly with everyone he meets? You need to meet Henry, a 4-year-old Blue tick hound who's playful, enjoys hiking, and loves kids and dogs alike. He’s a pup who relishes your attention, and will repay the affection with unending devotion.

KIPPER•Kipper, a mellow 7-year-old Australian Shepherd mix, is a boy who is happy to sit at your feet, walk by your side, and enjoy a car ride with you. He’s great with kids and dogs, and is neutered thanks to Blue Mountain Veterinarian Clinic, who donated his surgery. A wonderful boy who’s microchipped, he’ll be your constant companion if you let him.

ED•Ed is a sweet senior feline who would love nothing more than to partner with you for life. He’ll help you read the paper, watch tv, or keep you company while you work on your computer. This gentle soul loves treats and to be brushed. Best yet? He’s a great snuggle bug.

Flowers for every bride. In Trouble or in Love? The Flower Bed has affordable flowers for all your needs.

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GREYSON• Greyson, a 6-year-old Schnauzer/Maltese mix, is hoping you’re an adultonly family who can offer him patience and unconditional love as he develops that magical bond with his forever family. Greyson spent his early years in less than ideal conditions, yet is asking you to provide him a home of love and affection where he’ll flourish and give back tenfold.

SAHARA•Hi, I’m Sahara, a 4-year-old brown & black tabby who’s just settling into my stride. I love other cats, dogs and kids. Call me acrobatic, call me a sidekick – I’m playful and good company. I like attention, but also some quiet time. Think we’ll be great together? Come meet me!

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LEONA•Meet Leona, a beautiful white & MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

gray 5-year-old girl who was recently orphaned. Resilient and loveable, she enjoys oneon-one time, investigating the world around her and keeping your secrets, but only if she’s the only cat in your home. Better yet, offer her good chin rub and you’ve made a friend for life.

missoulanews.com • January 3 – January 10, 2013 [35]


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

January 3 - January 10, 2013

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD CABIN FEVER ANTIQUES FAIR & FLEAS! Helena Civic Center; Jan. 19&20; Adm. $5.00. Good both days. More dealers, more deals, MORE! Dealers inquire 442-5595, Leave message Grout Rite Your tile & grout specialists. Free Estimates. Over 31 yrs exp. 406-273-9938. www.groutrite.com NEED CLEANING? Students Bachelors - Builders - Move-in Move-out. Call Tasha @ RC Serv-

ices 888-441-3323 ext 101. Locally Owed & Operated. Licensed & Insured. Visit our website www.rcservices.info. HOLIDAY SPECIAL: Buy 2 Hours, Get 1 Hour FREE! (Limit 1 free hour per customer). $90 value for $60.

THE BOAT SHOW! “Boat buying event of the year” at Lewis & Clark Fairgrounds, Jan. 25th, 26th & 27th. Hometown Ford Store on display. 443-6400 or 2 6 6 - 5 7 0 0 . www.mtboatshow.com

SOCIAL SECURITY DENIED? Call Bulman Law Associates 7217744 www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com

LOST & FOUND LOST: Min-Pin missing from kennel. Russell and 3rd St. area.

Black with a little brown. No collar, no tag. 207-5782

TO GIVE AWAY FREE Clothing!! Pass It On Missoula is a community supported service offering FREE infant, toddler and maternity clothing to ALL Missoula area families! There are NO eligibility guidelines, simply reduce, reuse, and Pass It On locally! Commu-

nity donations are accepted on location PIOM offers FREE clothing to those in need, and affordable for all at 3/$5! Located at 105 S. 3rd St. W. and open Monday-Saturday 12-5PM

Table of contents Advice Goddess . . . . . .C2

ANNOUNCEMENTS 100 SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY ????’s & ANSWERS www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com 721-7744

Free Will Astrology . . .C4 Public Notices . . . . . . . .C5 Crossword . . . . . . . . . .C5 Sustainafieds . . . . . . . .C9

Piano Lessons

This Modern World . .C12

At YOUR Home All Ages, All Levels

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Dee Dee Meet Miss Dee Dee, a super sweet and playful 7-year old Jack Russell Terrier. This little lady knows how to keep herself entertained, but would prefer to frolic with other dogs or engage an adult family. Housetrained with an artful ability to use a doggie door, you’d never know she was born with a malformed hind leg as it never slows her down. Make Dee Dee’s acquaintance and be prepared to lose your heart to this sweet girl.


COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

ADVICE GODDESS

WORN OUT BY YOUR JOB? NO HEALTH INSURANCE? Call Bulman Law Associates 7217744

By Amy Alkon UNLUCKY IN SHOVE My husband was a heavydrinking, drug-taking skirtchaser who worked only sporadically, so I divorced him three years ago. He quit drinking and drugs, renounced skirt chasing, and was constantly professing his love for me, so I took him back on the condition that he contributes financially. He soon started behaving badly. He does no housework, misuses my tools and appliances, and never buys anything or replaces things he breaks, including major appliances. When I bring up an issue, he talks loudly and nonsensically over me. I now say nothing until things get outrageous— like when he inspects my dinner plate to make sure I don’t have more food than he does. (If he feels shortchanged, he’ll reach into my food and help himself!) One Sunday, he disappeared, later claiming he was with a female coworker and, supposedly, her husband. Yesterday, he retreated to my closet to talk to another woman on the phone while I prepared dinner. Upon emerging, he complained his food was cold. He sees nothing wrong with his behavior, and I’m not supposed to question any of it. Is this relationship worth trying to save?

phone line and an outlet for a hotplate installed in the closet. You point yourself toward happier times by being honest about the relationship you have instead of pretending it’s the relationship you want. This takes accepting that being human means being prone to emotionally-driven errors in judgment—in this case, maybe because you are longing for love, are loath to admit to another failed romantic investment, and dread being alone. Of course, as I’ve written before, there’s nothing lonelier than feeling alone while in a relationship with somebody else—especially somebody who claims to love you and then shows it by bringing absolutely nothing to the table but a finely-calibrated scale.

BACKGROUND CHECKS AND BALANCES Say you’re engaged and mutually decide to end the relationship. What’s the socially-acceptable amount of time you should wait before dating again? In this age of social networking and constant sharing of photos and events, we’re almost back to a small-town model where people are privy to all our business. It’s likely a guy would see that I’d only been out of an engagement a short time and get worried.

—Upset In love, it’s the little things that count, like keeping your boyfriend’s food warm while he’s in your closet talking to another woman. There’s apparently a thin line between contempt and hate. The way another man would gaze lovingly at the spray of his girlfriend’s freckles, your boyfriend only has eyes for your dinner—lest you have .16 of an ounce more mashed potatoes than he does. When he grabs a handful off your plate, you may finally squeak out a word or two in protest. He’ll of course do the gentlemanly thing—plug his ears and start mooing at the top of his lungs. You only mention emotional abuse, but like a woman who’s always “falling down the stairs” and giving herself a black eye, you’ve probably been living for scraps—the declarations of love between the abuse, or the declarations you used to get. This has you asking the entirely wrong question, “Is this relationship worth trying to save?” The essential question (about this or any relationship) is “Does this person make me feel happy— and loved?” And in this case, the answer to that question is another question: “Hey, anybody know anybody who delivers moving boxes 24/7?” As you’ve seen, denying reality doesn’t make it go away; it allows ugly behavior to become “the new normal”—until you find yourself wondering whether to get a second

—Three Months Single

The Internet can make a lot of first-date conversation seem irrelevant. Before you even sit down at the restaurant, there’s a good chance your date’s hacked into your Facebook page, dug up your parole officer’s home phone number, Google-Earthed your house from space and then zoomed in to see how you look weeding in a bikini. But what he can’t know from Web searches are the nuances, like whether you might be somebody who was out of her relationship in her head long before she could, for example, figure out how to divide the dog. If that’s the case, just be open with the guys you date about your circumstances. Some guys may rule you out before you get a chance to explain. But remember the stuff you probably complain about with your girlfriends, like how a hot woman can cause the male IQ to plunge to that of a jelly sandwich. If a guy’s into you, he’ll probably go out with you first and worry later about minor details—like, say, how your last five boyfriends all appear to have committed suicide by shooting themselves in the back.hooting themselves in the back.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

[C2] Missoula Independent • January 3 – January 10, 2013

VOLUNTEERS Volunteer Tutors Needed. Women’s Opportunity & Resource Development (WORD) is seeking college students and community members to work with children in transition in the Missoula public schools. • give just 1 to 2 hours per week •

provide academic support • provide mentoring. Tutoring is offered during the school day. Placements are available in both the Middle and Elementary Schools depending on your preference. Ben Brewster, Volunteer C o o r d i n a t o r , bbrewster@wordinc.org, 406543-3550 x 218. Changing the World, One Child at a Time

INSTRUCTION AIRLINE CAREERS – Become an

Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized.

Call 800-481-9472 www.CenturaOnline.com Montana School of Massage & Massage Clinic- Professional Massage Therapy Training MontanaMassage.com 549-9244

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MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS SAWMILLS from only $3997.00. Make & Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363, Ext.300N

COMPUTERS Even Macs are computers! Need help with yours? CLARKE CONSULTING @ 5496214 RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway 543-8287

MUSIC MUSIC LESSONS

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lessons on guitar, ukelele and piano. Sign up now! MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds entrance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 549-0013. www.montanamusic.com Outlaw Music Got Gear? We Do! Missoula’s Pro Guitar Shop specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, Tuesday-Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 5417 5 3 3 . Outlawmusicguitarshop.com Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo,

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PETS & ANIMALS Basset Rescue of Montana www.bassetrescueofmontana.or g 406-207-0765 CATS: #2162 Grey Torbi, British Shorthair, SF, 7yrs; #2305 Torti, DSH, SF, 4yrs; #2312 Grey/white, DMH, SF, 10yrs; #2334 Blk/wht, DMH, NM, 15yrs; #2391 Wht/Orange,

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MARKETPLACE Maine Coon X, F, 9wks; #2663 Blk, DSH, NM, 12wks; #2666 Blk/tan Tabby, ASH, SF, 9wks; #2668 Orange/wht, DSH, NM, 3yrs; $2670 Dilute Torti, Persian, SF, 9yrs; #2676 Blk, DSH, NM, 1yr; #2683 Blk/white, ASH, SF 9wks; #2695 Grey/brown, Russian Blue, NM, 3yrs; #2697 Buff, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #2698 Black, ASH, NM, 1yr; #2706 Buff, ASH, SF, 2yrs; #2708 Flame Point, Siamese X, NM, 12wks; #2722 Grey, Russian Blue, SF, 10yrs; #2723 Grey, Russian Blue, SF, 5yrs; #2724 Buff, ASH, SF, 10yrs; #2726 Tan/Blk Tips, Maine Coon X, NM, 3yrs; #2727 Blk/white, Maine Coon X, SF, 8mo; #2728 Creme/Blk, Siamese, NM, 6yrs For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 3 6 3 - 5 3 1 1 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840. DOGS: #2169 White/grey, Border/Heeler X, SF, 3 1/2yrs; #2285 Red/Tan, Boxer X, SF, 6yr; #2396 Yellow, Chow/Lab x, SF, 1yr; #2467 Brown, German Shep X, NM, 2yrs; #2564 Brindle, Catahoula, NM, 2yrs; #2575 Brn/white, Husky X, NM, 1yr; #2595 Blk/white, Heeler X, SF, 1yr; #2702 White/brindle, Boxer, NM, 1yr; #2705 Tan, Pit

X, NM, 5yrs; #2712 Yellow, Lab/Retriever, NM, 4yrs; #2716 Blk/rust, Dobie/Hound X, NM, 2yrs; #2717 Fawn/white, Pit/Terrier, SF, 3yrs; #2736 Blk/white, Boxer/Lab/BC, SF, 1yr; #2737 Blk/white, F, Boxer/Lab/BC, 2wks; #2738 Brown/white, Boxer/Lab/BC, M, 2wks; #2740 Heeler X, F, 1yr; #2741-2746 BOXER/Lab/BC PUPPIES; For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

GENERAL BARTENDING $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training available. 1-800-965-6520 ext. 278 Now Hiring! Start tomorrow. Days only. 273-2266

SKILLED LABOR TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and re-

EMPLOYMENT fresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-545-4546

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Dub & Scrub Organizer & House Cleaning Services. Organizing Projects & Basic Deep Cleaning. Jessica 396-4083 NEED CLEANING? Students Bachelors - Builders - Move-in Move-out. Call Tasha @ RC Services 888-441-3323 ext 101. Locally Owed & Operated. Licensed & Insured. Visit our website www.rcservices.info. HOLIDAY SPECIAL: Buy 2 Hours, Get 1 Hour FREE! (Limit 1 free hour per customer). $90 value for $60. THOMAS CLEANING Residential/Commercial. 8+ years experience. Licensed/Insured. Free estimates. Fast, friendly, and professional. References. (406) 396-4847

GARDEN/ LANDSCAPING Able Garden Design & Services LLC Garden growing all year with custom indoor microgardens. Other household maintenance services available. Call Rik 406-549-3667

HOME IMPROVEMENT Natural Housebuilders, Inc., *ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes* Additions/Remodels* HIGHERCOMFORT crafted building* Solar Heating* 369-0940 or 642-6863* www.naturalhousebuilder.net Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator. Ttestimonials Available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642

MISCELLANEOUS Consumer Attorney Have you been harassed by bill collectors? Fight back and stop abusive debt collection tactics. Know your rights - you may be entitled to significant money damages. Call Maury Solomon, Attorney at Law, 406-890-6349 for a FREE legal consultation. maury@maurysolomonlaw.com / PO Box 204, Kalispell, MT 59903.

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montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • January 3 – January 10, 2013 [C3]


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): In 2013, I pledge to conspire with you to increase your mastery of the art of friendship. Together we will concentrate on making you an even stronger ally than you already are. We will upgrade your skill at expressing your feelings with open-hearted clarity, and in ways that don’t make people defensive. We will also inspire you to help others communicate effectively in your presence. I hope you understand that doing this work will empower you to accomplish feats that were never before possible for you. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Chickens and alligators share a common ancestor. Seventy million years ago, they were both archosaurs. That’s why chickens possess a gene that has the ability to grow teeth. A few years ago, a biological researcher at the University of Wisconsin managed to activate this capacity, inducing a few mutant chickens to sprout alligator teeth. I predict there will be a metaphorically comparable event happening for you in 2013, Taurus. The “chicken” part of you will acquire some of the gravitas of an alligator. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “People wish to learn to swim and at the same time to keep one foot on the ground,” said French novelist Marcel Proust. An attitude like that is always a barrier to growth, of course, but in 2013 it would be especially ill-advised for you Geminis. In order to win full possession of the many blessings that will be offering themselves to you, you will have to give up your solid footing and dive into the depths over and over again. That may sometimes be a bit nerve-racking. But it should also generate the most fun you’ve had in years.

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Here’s the horoscope I hope to be able to write for you a year from now: You escaped the chains that kept you enslaved to your primary source of suffering. You broke the trance it kept you in, and you freed yourself from its demoralizing curse. Now you have forged a resilient new relationship with your primary source of suffering—a relationship that allows you to deal with it only when it’s healthy for you to do so and only when you feel strong enough to do it. Very nicely done! Congratulations! Excellent work!

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “In this world,” said Oscar Wilde, “there are only two tragedies. One is not getting what one wants, and the other is getting it.” I’m counting on you to refute the last part of that questionable assertion, Leo. According to my analysis of the long-term astrological omens, you will definitely be getting what you want in the next six months. You will receive your prize...you will earn your badge...you will win a big game or claim your birthright or find your treasure. When that happens, I trust you will make sure it is an enduring blessing. There will be no sadness involved!

c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): English poet Alfred Tennyson wrote so many memorable lines that he is among the top ten most frequently cited authors in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations. One of his most famous passages was “’Tis better to have loved and lost / Than never to have loved at all.” When he was on his death bed at age 83, his enigmatic last words were, “I have opened it.” Let’s make that declaration your mantra for the coming year, Virgo. In your case, it will have nothing to do with death, but just the opposite. It will be your way of announcing your entrance into a brighter, lustier, more fertile phase of your life. Try saying it right now: “I have opened it!”

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Back in 1830, it was expensive to stay up and do things in your room after dark. To earn enough money to pay for the whale oil that would light your lamp for an hour, you had to work for 5.4 hours. And today? It’s cheaper. You have to put in less than a second of hard labor to afford an hour’s worth of light. I suspect that in 2013 there will be a similar boost in your ease at getting the light you need to illuminate your journey. I’m speaking metaphorically here, as in the insight that arises from your intuition, the emotional energy that comes from those you care about, and the grace of the Divine Wow. All that good stuff will be increasing.

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “I’ve been absolutely terrified every moment of my life,” said Scorpio painter Georgia O’Keeffe, “and I’ve never let it keep me from doing a single thing I wanted to do.” I think her declaration is excellent medicine for you. In 2013, you will have great potential for upgrading your relationship with your fears—not necessarily suppressing them or smashing them, but rather using them more consistently as a springboard, capitalizing on the emotions they unleash, and riding the power they motivate you to summon.

f

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Ambition can creep as well as soar,” said Irish philosopher Edmund Burke. That will be good for you to remember throughout 2013, Sagittarius. Later this year, the time may come for your ambition to soar—in the month of April, for example, and again in the month of August. But for the foreseeable future, I think your ambition will operate best if you keep it contained and intense, moving slowly and gradually, attending to the gritty details with supreme focus.

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In Tom Robbins’ book Skinny Legs and All, one of the characters, Ellen Cherry, has a conversation with a voice in her head. The voice gives her a piece of advice: “The trick is this: keep your eye on the ball. Even when you can’t see the ball.” I think that happens to be excellent counsel for you to heed during the next six months, Capricorn. You may not always be able to figure out what the hell is going on, but that shouldn’t affect your commitment to doing the right thing. Your job is to keep your own karma clean and pure—and not worry about anyone else’s karma.

h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I’ll be bold and predict that 2013 will be a time when you’ll discover more about the art of happiness than you have in years. Here are some clues to get you started. 1. “It is not easy to find happiness in ourselves, and it is not possible to find it elsewhere.” —Agnes Repplier. 2. “There is only one way to happiness and that is to cease worrying about things that are beyond the power of our will.” —Epictetus. 3. “For the rational, healthy person, the desire for pleasure is the desire to celebrate his control over reality. For the neurotic, the desire for pleasure is the desire to escape from reality.” —Nathaniel Branden. 4. “Our happiness springs mainly from moderate troubles, which afford the mind a healthful stimulus, and are followed by a reaction which produces a cheerful flow of spirits.” —E. Wigglesworth. 5. “Happiness is essentially a state of going somewhere, wholeheartedly, one-directionally, without regret or reservation.” —William H. Sheldon. 6. “We act as though comfort and luxury were the chief requirements of life, when all that we need to make us really happy is something to be enthusiastic about.” —Charles Kingsley.

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In 2013, I pledge to help you feel at peace and in love with your body; I will do everything in my power to encourage you to triumph over media-induced delusions that tempt you to wish you were different from who you actually are. My goal is to be one of your resourceful supporters in the coming months—to be a member of your extensive team of allies. And I will be working with you to ensure that this team grows to just the right size and provides you with just the right foundation. If all goes well, your extra help will ensure that you finish almost everything you start in the coming year. You will regularly conquer everyday chaos and be a master of artful resolutions. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

[C4] Missoula Independent • January 3 – January 10, 2013

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Deadline Jan. 6th


PUBLIC NOTICES

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s

MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a petition has been filed with the County Commissioners requesting to abandon that certain county road under the jurisdiction of Missoula County, specifically described as: Old Lolo Creek Trail Beginning from NE middle of lot 10 through all of COS 6331 Tract A Ending at the NE corner portion of COS 5954 Parcel 1A A map is attached, Exhibit A, that illustrates the proposed action, which is incorporated herein by reference. The abandonment of this county road is necessary and advantageous for the following reasons: 1.Road dead ends 2. Hwy 12 W is the primary travel corridor for public use A PUBLIC HEARING on the above requested abandonment will be held before the Board of County Commissioners at their regular meeting on January 9, 2013 at 1:30 p.m., at the Missoula County Administration Building, located at 199 W Pine, Missoula, County, Missoula, MT. Interested parties are requested to be present at that time to be heard for or against the granting of this petition. Written protest will be accepted by the Commissioners’ Office, at the Missoula County Administration Building located at 199 W Pine, Missoula, MT prior to the hearing date. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Clerk & Recorder /Treasurer 200 W. Broadway St. Missoula, MT 59802 By /s/ Kim Cox Assistant Chief Deputy Clerk and Recorder/Elections (406) 258-3241 Date: December 12, 2012

"The World Didn't End"–but some other things happened in 2012.

MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON ANNEXATION OF PROPERTY TO MISSOULA RURAL FIRE DISTRICT The Missoula County Board of County Commissioners will, on January 9, 2013 at 1:30 P.M.; in the Missoula County Administration Building, located at 199 W Pine, Missoula, County, Missoula, MT will conduct a Public Hearing on the question of whether or not a certain property more fully described below, should be annexed to the Missoula Rural Fire District. Annexation to Missoula Rural Fire District 3735 Trails End Road in the SE of NE Section 25, Township 12N, Range 20W. COS 4223 Tract A2 SUID 1581001 Any person may appear and speak for or against the proposed annexation at the hearing. Any person may also submit written material related to the proposed annexation. Written materials may be submitted at the hearing or at any time prior to the hearing by delivery or mail to the County Commissioners’ Office, at the Missoula County Administration Building, located at 199 W Pine, Missoula, County, Mis-

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soula, MT 59802 or fax to the County Commissioners at (406) 721-4043. A copy of the Petition for Annexation is available for inspection and copying at the County Clerk and Recorder’s Office, located at 200 W Broadway, 2nd floor of the Court House Annex, Missoula, County, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Clerk & Recorder/Treasure By /s/ Kim Cox, Assistant Chief Deputy 200 W. Broadway St. Missoula, MT 59802 (406) 258-3241 Date: December 3, 2012 Jason J. Henderson, Esq. Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm 38 Second Ave E Dickinson, ND 58601 Phone: 701-227-1841 Fax: 701-225-6878 cdellwo@mackoff.com MT Bar #11414 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-12-165 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWABS INC. ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-12 Plaintiff, v. GERALD WHITEHEAD; TERRI WHITEHEAD; PATRICIA B. MARTINEZ; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICA’S WHOLESALE LENDER; MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE; STATE OF MONTANA, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR AND INDUSTRY, UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE DIVISION; ALSIDE SUPPLY CENTER; and NORTHWEST COLLECTORS, INC., Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT, GREETINGS: GERALD WHITEHEAD: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in this action, which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your Answer and serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff’s attorney within twenty-one (21) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, Judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action is brought for the purpose of rescinding a Trustee’s Sale and Trustee’s Deed, and to reinstate a Note and Deed of Trust covering property situated in Gallatin County, Montana, and described as follows: LOT 5 IN BLOCK 2 OF LINDA VISTA TENTH SUPPLEMENT PHASE 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court this 11th day of December, 2012. /s/ Shirley E. Faust Clerk of District Court BY: Andy Brunkhardt (SEAL) Deputy Clerk DATED: October 3, 2012. MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM Attorneys for the Plaintiff 38 Second Avenue East Dickinson, North Dakota 58601 By: /s/ Jason J. Henderson, Attorney #11414 THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION RECEIVED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. NOTICE. Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that unless you dispute the validity of the foregoing debt or any portion thereof within thirty days after receipt of this letter, we will assume the debt to be valid. On the other hand, if the debt or any portion thereof is disputed, we will obtain verification of the debt and will mail you a copy of such verification. You are also advised that upon your request within the thirty day period, we will provide you with the name and address of your original creditor, if different from

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• Two Central Missoula lots with 3 bed, 2 bath mobile. Pat McCormick •N ew windows, Real Estate Broker updated bathrooms, carport & storage shed. Real Estate With Real Experience • Great income potential or pat@properties2000.com first-time buyer opportunity. 406-240-SOLD (7653) Properties2000.com the creditor referred to in this Notice. We are attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-12-198 Dept. No. 1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF RALPH M. SHOTLIFF, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Charles L. Shotliff has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Charles L. Shotliff, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Dan Cederberg, PO Box 8234, Missoula, Montana 59807-8234, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 7th day of December, 2012. CEDERBERG LAW OFFICES, P.C., 269 West Front Street, PO Box 8234, Missoula, MT 59807-8234 /s/ Dan G. Cederberg, Attorneys for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-12-1471 Dept. No. 4 Karen S. Townsend Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Clifford A. Sipp-Angst, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Clifford Anthony Sipp-Angst to Clifford Anthony Steele. The hearing will be on 01/22/2013 at 2:30 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: 12/13/12. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Andrew Jenks, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 4 Cause No. DA-12-46 NOTICE OF HEARING TO TERMINATE PARENTAL RIGHTS AND ADOPTION In re the Adoption of B.D.M. n/k/a B.D.L. a Minor Child. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Petitioner, Scott Patrick Lenz (“Lenz”), has filed a petition with this Court requesting to terminate the parental rights of Jacob Salvador Montano with respect to the minor child B.D.M. n/k/a B.D.L. (“minor child”), and has filed a Petition to adopt the minor child, born on July 31, 2006, in Banner Desert Medical Center, in Mesa, Arizona. NOW, therefore, notice is given to Jacob Salvador Montano (“Montano”) and all persons interested in the matter that a hearing on the petitions will be held at the Courthouse in Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, on February 12, 2013 at 1:30 p.m., in the above-

named Court, whose telephone number is (406) 258-4780, at which time objections to said Petitions will be heard. Montano must mail his objections, if any, to Lenz at St. Peter Law Offices, P.C., 2620 Radio Way, PO Box 17255, Missoula, Montana, 59808 or filed with the Clerk of the above entitled Court. Montano’s failure to appear at the hearing constitutes his waiver of interest in custody of the minor child and will result in the court’s termination of his rights to the minor child, and enter a decree establishing a relationship between the Petitioner and the minor child. DATED this 28th day of December, 2012. /s/ Linda Osorio St. Peter MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY DEPT. NO 1 ED MCLEAN CAUSE NO. DV-121377 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION. EDWIN BRESTER Plaintiff, v. HENRY GLANTZ, MOLLIE GLANTZ, AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS, UNKNOWN HEIRS, OR ANY UNKNOWN DEVISEES OF ANY DECEASED PERSON, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS, UNKNOWN, CLAIMING OR WHO MIGHT CLAIM ANY RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE OR INTEREST IN OR LIEN OR ENCUMBRANCE UPON THE REAL PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT ADVERSE TO PLAINTIFF’S OWNERSHIP OR ANY CLOUD UPON PLAINTIFF’S TITLE THERETO, WHETHER SUCH CLAIM OR POSSIBLE CLAIM BE PRESENT OR CONTINGENT, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS, GREETINGS: You are hereby SUMMONED to answer the Complaint to Quiet Title in this Action which is filed with the abovenamed Court, a copy of which is served upon you, and to file your written answer with the Court and serve a copy thereof upon Plaintiff’s attorney within twenty-one (21) days after service of this SUMMONS, or such other period as may be specified by law, exclusive of the day of service. Your failure to appear or answer will result in judgment against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. A filing fee must accompany the answer. This action is brought for the purpose of Quieting Title to the following-described real property located in Missoula County, Montana: Lots 19, 20 and 21 in Block 81 of Daly Addition No. 2, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Dated this 18th day of December, 2012. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: /s/ Andrew Jenks, Deputy Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No.

DP-12-215 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF SUE ANN SHAFFER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to James A. Shaffer and Gale M. Shaffer, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane PC, PO Box 4747, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 9th day of December, 2012. /s/ James A. Shaffer, Co-Personal Representative /s/ Gale M. Shaffer, Co-Personal Representative WORDEN THANE, P.C. Attorneys for Personal Representative /s/ Patrick Dougherty MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DP-12-211 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF OTTO E. SCHWARTZ, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Douglas K. Schwartz has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be mailed to Douglas K. Schwartz, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o David J. Steele II, GEISZLER & FROINES, PC, 619 Southwest Higgins, Suite K, Missoula, Montana 59803 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 4th day of December, 2012. GEISZLER & FROINES, PC /s/ David J. Steele II, Attorneys for the Personal Representative. I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the state of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 4th day of December, 2012 /s/ Douglas K. Schwartz, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Karen S. Townsend Cause No. DV-1-1260 SUMMONS (JOHN MAESKY, JR., CAROLYN S. MAESKY, and all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate, or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the complaint adverse to Plaintiff’s ownership or any cloud upon Plaintiff’s title, whether the claim or possible claim is present or contingent) MICHAEL K. HAINES, Plaintiff, v. JOHN MAESKY, JR. and CAROLYN S. MAESKY, and all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might

ACROSS

1 Did some hoof work 5 Acoustic guitarist's lack 8 Reasons for some performance anxiety 13 "___ but known...." 14 Go head to head 15 Words intoned 16 With "The," hit summer movie with Robert Downey, Jr. 18 Imply 19 "Rah!" 20 Nervous movement 22 Wayside taverns 23 Cruise ship that capsized off Italy's coast in January 2012 26 Zeus's sister (and lover) 27 Ctrl-S function 28 "Yuck!" 31 Devilish sort 33 Beth preceder 37 If it had happened, you wouldn't be reading this 42 Org. with a shelter outreach program 43 Group of cubicles 44 Thesaurus wd. 45 It's just a little bit 48 Paint hastily 51 Where Michael Phelps won even more medals 57 R&B's india.___ 58 "This is ___ boring" 59 "OK, sir, I gotcha" 61 "___ Dearest" 63 Snacks snapped up after its manufacturer went bankrupt 65 Apply oil ritually 66 "Tickety ___" (animated Nick Jr. show) 67 Folk singer Burl 68 Last name in British automakers 69 "What a display!" 70 Jane's Addiction album "Ritual ___ Habitual"

Last week’s solution

DOWN

1 Fuzzy carpet 2 Devastation 3 "___ Billie Joe" (Bobbie Gentry song) 4 Best-selling author D'Souza 5 Schubert song played at weddings 6 Salyut 7 successor 7 Green sauce 8 Drab crayon hue 9 100% 10 Get up 11 Singer/guitarist Lopez 12 Taco salad ingredient 15 Center of activity 17 Airport terminal area 21 The newly-elected 24 Rough it 25 Mirror shape 28 Thurman who killed Bill onscreen 29 Natural ___ (subject of "fracking" in 2012) 30 Prefix meaning "less than normal" 32 Go boom 34 Pre-album releases, for short 35 He unleashed "Gangnam Style" on YouTube in 2012 36 "Chicken Run" extra 38 Like the scholarly world 39 Org. once involved with Kosovo 40 "Agent ___ Banks" 41 He played the youngest son on "Eight Is Enough" 46 Very beginning 47 Dairy noise 49 Getting all ___ your face 50 What a toddler aspires to be 51 1996 presidential race dropout Alexander 52 University of Maine town 53 Leonard who wrote "I Am Not Spock" 54 Powerball, e.g. 55 Sour cream and ___ (dip flavor) 56 Girder material 60 ___ buco (veal dish) 62 Suffix for "opal" 64 Court

©2013 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • January 3 – January 10, 2013 [C5]


PUBLIC NOTICES claim any right, title, estate, or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the complaint adverse to Plaintiff’s ownership or any cloud upon Plaintiff’s title, whether the claim or possible claim is present or contingent, Defendants. TO: JOHN MAESKY, JR., CAROLYN S. MAESKY, and all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate, or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the complaint adverse to Plaintiff’s ownership or any cloud upon Plaintiff’s title, whether the claim or possible claim is present or contingent. A lawsuit has been filed against you. This action is brought to quiet title to land situated in Missoula County, Montana, and described as follows: Seeley Lake Estates No. 1, S01, T16N, R15W, Block 003, Lot 004, SLY EST Seeley Lake Estates-Lot 4 Blk 3 Geo Code: 04254001301170000 Within 21 days after service of this summons on you (or 42 days if you are the State of Montana, a state agency, or a state officer or employee), you must serve on the plaintiffs an answer to the attached complaint or a motion under Rule 12 of the Montana Rules of Civil Procedure. Do not include the day you were served in your calculation of time. The answer or motion must be served on the plaintiff’s attorney, whose name and address are listed below. If you fail to respond, judgment by default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. You must file your answer or motion with the court. Date: October 24, 2012. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, CLERK, DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY By /s/ Cady Sowre, Deputy ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF: Brian J. Smith, Kathryn S. Mahe, GARLINGTON, LOHN & ROBINSON, PLLP, 350 Ryman Street-P.O. Box

7909, Missoula, MT 59807-7909 Telephone (406) 523-2500 Telefax (406) 523-2595 bjsmith@garlington.com ksmahe@garlington.com By /s/ Kathryn S. Mahe 12/20/2012, 12/27/2012, 1/3/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/23/04, recorded as Instrument No. 200411500, Bk 731, Pg 361, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Kraig A. Michels and Marie L. Michels, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc. was Beneficiary and First American Title Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lots 6, 7, 8, and the East One-Half of Lot 9 in Block 58 of Daly’s Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Recording Reference: Book 662 of Micro Records at Page 560 Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of November 1, 2012, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $284,510.72. This amount includes the outstand-

ing principal balance of $241,305.77, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on March 11, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access

sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.92066) 1002.184338-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/09/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200720650 Bk 803 Pg 515, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Zach Allen and Robin Allen, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and First American Title Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 4 in Block 1 of Meadowlark Addition No. 2, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of October 30, 2012, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $241,251.83. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $228,105.55, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s

Deadline Jan. 6th

[C6] Missoula Independent • January 3 – January 10, 2013

security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on March 11, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.100015) 1002.214890-File No.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 05/18/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200611976, Bk. 774, Pg. 1330, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Peggy S. Goodsell and Lewis A. Goodsell, as Joint Tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Mortgageit, Inc. was Beneficiary and Title Services was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract B of Certificate of Survey No. 3748, located in the Northwest onequarter of the Northwest one-quarter of the Southeast one-quarter of Section 29, Township 14 North, Range 20 West, Principal Meridian, Montana, Missoula County, Montana. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201202577, Bk. 889, Pg. 654, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 07/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of November 13, 2012, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $146,184.76. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of

$141,442.46, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on March 27, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwest-


PUBLIC NOTICES trustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.103366) 1002.234782-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 12/26/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200733266 Bk 811 Pg 138, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Marvin J. Garding and Kim M. Garding, as Joint Tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage, LLC was Beneficiary and Stewart Title Company of Missoula, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title Company of Missoula, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lots 16 and 17 in Block 7 of Hillview Heights #6 in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201210438 Bk 895 Pg 115, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of November 14, 2012, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $133,029.71. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $116,304.55, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on March 27, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.92807) 1002.234826-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT

TRUSTEE’S SALE on February 11, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: LOT 212 OF 44 RANCH, PHASES 3 AND 4, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Donald S. Vanderveen and Larena R. Vanderveen, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title of Missoula, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on May 5, 2010 and recorded on May 6, 2010 on Book 859 and Page 534 as Document No. 201008647. The beneficial interest is currently held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. First American Title Company of Montana, inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,122.08, beginning January 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of August 31, 2012 is $210,064.23 principal, interest at the rate of 4.75000% now totaling $7,483.50, late charges in the amount of $241.52, escrow advances of $1,947.33, and other fees and expenses advanced of $563.63, plus accruing interest at the rate of $27.34 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public

proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 1, 2012 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 1st day of October, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Chase V Vanderveen 41954.149 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on February 11, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT C OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 1821, A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 13 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MONTANA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA TOGETHER WITH A 20 FOOT WIDE PRIVATE DRIVEWAY EASEMENT, AS SHOWN ON THE CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO, 1821 Kathryn L. Williamson and Margaret F. Eldridge, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on October 22, 2007 and recorded on October 30, 2007 in Book 808 and Page 209 as Document No. 200728572. The beneficial interest is currently held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation as Receiver of Washington Mutual Bank F/K/A Washington Mutual Bank, FA. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,174.31, beginning February 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 28, 2012 is $330,917.96 principal, interest at the rate of 6.5% now totaling $39,291.92, late charges in the amount of $2,370.03, escrow advances of $5,302.26, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,850.95, plus accruing interest at the rate of $58.93 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above

described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 2, 2012 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 2nd day of October, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s Amy Gough Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 5/26/2015 Chase V Williamson 41916.723 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on February 11, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A TRACT OF LAND IN THE NE1/4SW1/4 OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 20 NORTH, RANGE 16 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, MORE SUBSTANTIALLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE TRACT WHICH IS A 24 INCH CAR AXLE FROM WHICH THE CENTER QUARTER OF SECTION 7 BEARS N.56 20’E., 1228.4 FEET; THENCE S. 24 45’E., 300 FEET TO A 24 INCH CAR AXLE ; THENCE S.89 47’ W., 180.75 FEET TO A 3/4 INCH PIPE; THENCE S.89’ 47’ W., 87.8 FEET; THENCE N. 14 48’ W., 53.7 FEET; THENCE N.14 48’W., 228.3 FEET; THENCE N.89 47’ E., 215 FEET THE POINT OF BEGINNING RECORDING REFERENCE: DEED EXHIBIT NO. 2479 AND BOOK 364 OF MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 821 Scott B Jungers, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated November 5, 2004 and recorded on November 5, 2004 in Bk-742, Page-1458 under Document No.

200431445. The beneficial interest is currently held by U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in Interest to Bank of America, National Association as Trustee as Successor by merger to LaSalle Bank, National Association as Trustee for Washington Mutual Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates WMALT 2005-1. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,091.39, beginning July 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 20, 2012 is $169,447.01 principal, interest at the rate of 5.875% now totaling $23,773.72, late charges in the amount of $491.13, escrow advances of $6,395.19, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,219.40, plus accruing interest at the rate of $27.27 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 9, 2012 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 9th day of October, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of

First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Cassidy M Wilcox Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 7/16/2013 Chase V. Jungers 41916.656 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on February 11, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 301 of Pleasant View Homes No. 3, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana according to the official recorded plat thereof Nathan P. Dolan, J. Patrick Dolan and Shelley Dolan, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 30, 2009 and Recorded July 30, 2009 in Book 844, Page 1139 under Document No. 200918896. The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage, LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $996.17, beginning May 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 01, 2012 is $180,344.47 principal, interest at the rate of 4.87500% now totaling $5,861.20, late charges in the amount of $547.20, escrow advances of $2,709.09, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,926.75, plus accruing interest at the rate of $24.09 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually

incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 5, 2012 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 5th day of October, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Amy Gough Notary Public Bingham County, ID Commission expires: 5/26/2015 Gmac V Dolan 41965.739 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on February 12, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THE NORTH ONE-HALF OF LOT 1 AND THE NORTH ONE- HALF OF LOT 2 IN BLOCK 14 OF BUTTE ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF Joe Long, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, Inc, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on October 11, 2006 and recorded on October 16, 2006 in Book 785, Page 371 under Document No. 200626757. The beneficial interest is currently held by BANK OF AMERICA N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $469.23, beginning April 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 2, 2012 is $153,902.90 principal, interest at the rate of 2.000% now totaling $4,612.79, late charges in the amount of $182.10, escrow advances of $897.24, and other fees and expenses advanced of $929.82S, plus accruing interest at the rate of $8.43 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • January 3 – January 10, 2013 [C7]


PUBLIC NOTICES of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be post-

poned by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 5, 2012 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 5th day of October, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Cassidy M Wilcox Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 7/16/2013 BACVs. Long 42019.517 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on February 19, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT 6 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5796, LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST ONE-QUAR-

TER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 14 NORTH, RANGE 21 WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN MONTANA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. TOGETHER WITH EASEMENTS ACROSS TRACT 4 AND TRACT 8 FOR ACCESS AND SEPTIC DRAINFIELD AND UTILITY SITE AS SHOWN ON CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5796 William J. Cleek and Michelle L. Cleek, as Grantors), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., A Montana Corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration System, Inc. as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on December 17, 2007 and recorded on December 27, 2007 on Book 810 and Page 1440 as Document No. 200733112. The beneficial interest is currently held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,398.64, beginning March 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 31, 2012 is $214,887.36 principal, in-

[C8] Missoula Independent • January 3 – January 10, 2013

terest at the rate of 6.375% now totaling $23,973.39, late charges in the amount of $762.89, escrow advances of $6,298.49, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,122.97, plus accruing interest at the rate of $37.53 per diem, late charges, and other costs and tees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or

other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or. any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee sale may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 15, 2012 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, Lisa J Tornabene First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 15th day of October, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana,

Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Chase Vs. Cleek 41954.955 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on February 19, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A TRACT OF LAND BEING LOCATED IN THE SOUTH ONEHALF OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 14 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS TRACT 9A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 1725. #005821635 Craig Puccinelli and Jolanda Puccinelli, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Fremont Investment & Loan, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated April 25, 2001 and Recorded on April 30, 2001 in Bk650, Pg-43, under Document No. 200108926. The beneficial interest is currently held by JPMC Specialty Mortgage LLC f/k/a WM Specialty Mortgage LLC. First American Title Company of Mon-

tana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $881.96, beginning December 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of August 29, 2012 is $96,469.08 principal, interest at the rate of 9.250% now totaling $16,325.00, late charges in the amount of $54.95, escrow advances of $4,710.08, suspense balance of $498.20 and other fees and expenses advanced of $5,922.66, plus accruing interest at the rate of $24.45 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the


PUBLIC NOTICES Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 10, 2012 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 10th day of October, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Chase vs. Puccinelli 41916.429 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEES SALE on February 19, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A tract of land located in and being a portion of the SW 1/4 of Section 12, Township 12 North, Range 19 West, Principal Meridian, Montana, Missoula County, Montana, and being more particularly described as tract 2C of certificate of survey No. 5209 P. Michael Croker, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title of Missoula County, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Long Beach Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on June 27, 2005 and recorded on June 29, 2005 in Book 755, Page 162, under Document No. 200516114. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Trust 2005-WL3. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,125.91, beginning November 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly install-

ments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 2, 2012 is $276,444.44 principal, interest at the rate of 7.900% now totaling $45,617.92, late charges in the amount of $3,200.37, escrow advances of $9,338.22, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,359.40, plus accruing interest at the rate of $59.83 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real properly taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for, any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 12, 2012 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 12th day of October, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Amy Gough Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 5/26/2015 Chase V. Croker 41916.665 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee Sale Number: 11-01664-5 Loan Number: 1205271905 APN: 5844006 TO BE SOLD for cash at Trustee’s Sale on March 20, 2013 at the hour of 11:00 AM, recognized local time, on the front steps to the County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula the following described real property in Missoula County, Montana, to-wit: LOT 17H

OF THE AMENDED PLAT OF COBBAN AND DISNMORE’S ORCHARD HOMES, LOT 17, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. More commonly known as: 142 SMALL LANE, MISSOULA, MT DALE S. MARTELL, SUSAN L MARTELL, AS HUSBAND AND WIFE, as the original grantor(s), conveyed said real property to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the original trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, as the original beneficiary, by a Trust Indenture dated as of December 23, 2005, and recorded on January 4, 2006 in Film No. 767 at Page 104 under Document No. 200600274, in the Official Records of the Office of the Record of Missoula County, Montana (“Deed of Trust”). The current beneficiary is: US Bank National Association, as Trustee for CSMC Mortgage-Backed PassThrough Certificates, Series 20064 (the “Beneficiary”). FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY was named as Successor Trustee (the “Trustee”) by virtue of a Substitution of Trustee dated May 6, 2011 and recorded in the records of Missoula County, Montana. There has been a default in the performance of said Deed of Trust: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears as of November 9, 2012: Balance due on monthly payments from February 1, 2011 and which payments total: $26,245.62: Late charges: $901.74 Net Other Fees: $40.00 Advances: $4,039.28 There is presently due on the obligation the principal sum of $190,585.93 plus accrued interest thereon at the rate of 3.50000% per annum from January 1, 2011, plus late charges. Interest and late charges continue to accrue. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds include the trustee’s or attorney’s fees and costs and expenses of sale. The beneficiary has elected to sell the property to satisfy the obligation and has directed the trustee to commence such sale proceedings. The beneficiary declares that the grantor is in default as described above and has directed the Trustee to commence proceedings to sell the property described above at public sale in accordance with the terms and provisions of this notice. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the aforesaid property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default theretofore existing. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714.730.2727 DATED: November 12, 2012 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee, By: Megan Curtis, Authorized Signature. A-4331827 12/20/2012, 12/27/2012, 01/03/2013 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 04/16/2013 at the

hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which RUSSELL C SMITH, AND TRACI SMITH, AS JOINT TENANTS WITH RIGHTS OF SURVIVORSHIP as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON, ATTORNEY AT LAW as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 06/05/2009 and recorded 06/15/2009, in document No. 200914280 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 841 at Page Number 720 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, TO-WIT: LOT 52 OF SOUTHPOINTEPHASE III, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. ASSESSOR’S PARCEL NO: 3471301 MORE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED AS: LOT 52 OF SOUTHPOINTE-PHASE III, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 3615 BRANDON WAY, MISSOULA, MT 59803-2965. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 04/01/2012, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $236,299.95 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.00% per annum from 04/01/2012 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above

described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 11/30/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0057405 FEI NO. 1006.162753 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 04/16/2013, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which DONALD R. FOREMAN AND MARKAY FOREMAN as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 06/27/2007 and recorded 07/03/2007, in document No. 200717008 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 800 at Page Number 1213 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more par-

ticularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 31 OF STILLWATER ADDITION AT MALONEY RANCH PHASE I, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. SEE TITLE A.P.N.: 2092-24-1-02-31-0000 MORE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED AS: LOT 31 OF STILLWATER ADDITION AT MALONEY RANCH PHASE I, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 3687 RODEO ROAD, MISSOULA, MT 59803. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 05/01/2012, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immedi-

ately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $206,036.93 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.375% per annum from 05/01/2012 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 11/30/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0068610 FEI NO. 1006.164734

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PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

2 bedroom, 1 bathroom $695 quiet cul-de-sac, DW, coin-op laundry, off street parking, H/W/S/G paid, No pets, no smoking. 2 WEEKS FREE With 6 Month Lease (Limited Time to Qualified Applicants) GATEWEST 728-7333 2101 Dearborn: Beautiful 2 bed condo, secure building, garage space, deck, heat paid, $1,050. 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property Management 549-6106, 446 Washington 1bed/1bath, downtown, HEAT PAID, coin-ops. $700. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

510 E. FRONT: DOWNTOWN – BY THE U!, 1+1 BEDROOM, HARDWOOD FLOORS, PORCH, LAUNDRY, CAT OK $895. $300 Costco Gift Card. Garden City Property Management 5496106 528 Daly: 1 bed, 1/2 block to U, wood floors, deck, cat welcome, $625. 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property Management 549-6106 731 W. Sussex #4. 2bed/1bath HEAT PAID, carport, coin-ops. $700. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 825 SW Higgins Ave. B3. 2 bed/1 bath HEAT PAID, patio, single garage, gas fireplace. $800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 New Complex, 1 & 2 bedroom units, $625-$795 DW, A/C, deck, storage, coin-op laundry, limited off-street parking, W/S/G paid, 2 bedroom units have W/D hookups or 2nd bath. No pets. No smoking. 2 WEEKS

FREE With 6 Month Lease (Limited Time to Qualified Applicants) GATEWEST 728-7333 Studio apartment $450 near Orange Street Food Farm, true studio layout, all utilities paid. No pets, no smoking. 2 WEEKS FREE With 6 Month Lease (Limited Time to Qualified Applicants) GATEWEST 728-7333

ROOMMATES

MOBILE HOMES

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent w/s/g/elec included $425/month 406-273-6034

RENTALS OUT OF TOWN

DUPLEXES

11270 Napton Way 1C. 3bed/1bath, shared yard, coinops, central location in Lolo.$800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

407 S. 5th St. E. “B” 2bed/1bath, W/D hookups, close to University, all utilities paid. RENT INCENTIVE. $800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

HOUSES

450 Scott: Accessible studio, free cable, full kitchen & bath, downtown, onsite laundry, all paid, $575. 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property Management 549-6106,

2608 O’Shaughnesy. 3 bed/2 bath, newer home in Hellgate Meadows subdivision, DW, W/D hookups, pet. $1275. RENT INCENTIVE. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

2115 Livingston. 3 bed/2.5 bath, newer home, DW, W/D hookups, double garage. $1275. RENT INCENTIVE. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

11285 Napton Way: Lolo 2 bed, dining, dishwasher, hook-ups, heat paid, cat allowed, $625. 1YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property Management 549-6106, 9850 Anderson Road. 4bed/1bath house in Bonner. Spacious yard, basement, W/D hookups. $1050. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

1&2

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

GardenCity

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

Property Management

549-7711 Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com

Office/retail space in Stephens Center. 950-2,170 sq. ft. $895-$1,990 + merchant fees.

2 Bedroom, 1.5 bath townhouse $750 S/G paid, W/D in unit, storage, carport & off-street parking.

2100 Stephens • 728-7333

2100 Stephens • 728-7333

FIDELITY Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

251-4707

117 North Johnson 1 Bed Apt. + Storage $485/month

30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

www.gatewestrentals.com

For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

2026 9th Street 1 Bed Apt. Hkups $525/month Uncle Robert Lane 2 Bed Apt. $645/month

Visit our website at fidelityproperty.com

PALACE APTS. NEWLY REMODELED UNITS! COME TAKE A TOUR 1 BEDROOM RENT: $433-$550 HEAT PAID 2 BEDROOM RENT: $526-$650 HEAT PAID RUSSELL SQUARE FAMILY BUILDING 2 BEDROOM RENT: $629 HEAT PAID ORCHARD GARDENS 1 BEDROOM RENT: $572 2 BEDROOM RENT: $691 ALL UTILITIES PAID

EQUINOX 1 BEDROOM RENT: $500 W/S/G PAID

Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

SOLSTICE 1 BEDROOM RENT: $587 2 BEDROOM RENT: $688 W/S/G PAID

"Let us tend your den" Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

MHA Management An affiliation of the Missoula Housing Authority

CLYATT APARTMENTS 2 BEDROOM RENT: $738 W/D HOOKUPS DISHWASHER

Rent Incentive 4265 Birdie Court 2 Bed Apt. $685/month

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing

422 Madison • 549-6106

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Finalist

Finalist

RUSSELL SQUARE WEST 1 BEDROOM RENT: $525 HEAT INCLUDED SENIOR 55+/DISABLED COMPLEX GOLD DUST APARTMENTS 2 BEDROOM RENT: $691 INCLUDES ALL UTILITIES DEPOSITS ONE BED: $550 TWO BED: $650

Deadline Jan. 6th

Some restrictions apply. For more information contact MHA Management at

549-4113 [C10] Missoula Independent • January 3 – January 10, 2013


REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 108 North Davis. 3 bed, 1.5 bath with 2 car garage near Milwaukee Bike Path. Lots of upgrades and a great front porch. $180,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com

3 Bdr, 2 Bath Pleasant View home. $205,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4 Bdr, 1 Bath South Hills home. $179,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

1136 & 1136 1/2 Howell. 3 UNITS. 3 bed house & two 2 bed apartments on corner lot. $380,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com

5 Bdr, 4 Bath, Wye area area home on 2.5 acres. $389,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

11689 Stollen Rock Court. 5 bed, 3 bath, 2 car garage on 3.15 acres. $329,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net

5209 Dutton Court. 5 bed, 3 bath with fantastic kitchen, laundry room and 3 car garage. Near city park. $339,900. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5 4 6 - 5 8 1 6 annierealtor@gmail.com

1265 #B Dakota. To-be-built 3 bed, 2 bath with double garage near McCormick Park. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com 2 Bdr, 1 Bath single-level Windsor Park home. $170,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

6544 McArthur. 3 bed, 2.5 bath with gas fireplace and 2 car garage. $240,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free comparative market analysis. 360-8234 Fantastic Home With View 6305 St. Thomas. 4 bed,

RICE TEAM

Robin Rice 240-6503

riceteam@bigsky.net missoularealestate4sale.com

4 Klakken, Noxon • $259,000 Charming 9 room motel on 1/2 acre with laundry, mobile & cabin rentals and manager's quarters 1530 Spring Hill $595,000 Beautiful cedar home with wraparound deck on 5 acres bordering Forest Service. Large kitchen, fireplace & heated garage.

6544 MacArthur $240,000 3 bed, 2.5 bath with custom cherry cabinets, granite counters, tile & hardwood floors.

3 bath, updated and gorgeous setting with large private lot, double garage, landscaped and ready to move into! KD 2405227 porticorealestate.com Huge Lot Bungalow Style Home Middle of Missoula, close to Good Food Store, 1/2 acre + lot, enormous shop, great home. 203 Curtis. 2405227 porticorealestate.com I can help you sell your home! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com Looking for a place to call home? Call me! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com Looking for homebuyer education? Call me! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com Open Floor Plan 1520 South 6th West. 2 bed, 1.5 bath with wood floors, fenced yard & basement. $185,000. KD Dickinson, Portico Real Estate 3278787. kdrae52@msn.com Remarkably Cute 2039 South 10th West. 2 bedroom home on large lot centrally located near Good Food Store, bike trails and schools. Full basement and single garage. KD, Portico Real Estate, 240-5227 www.porticorealestate.com

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES 1641 Stoddard To-be-built 6plex on Northside. $650,500 Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties 2025 Mullan Road. Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos. Large secure units with affordable HOA dues. Starting at $144,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 8804749. montpref@bigsky.net 4433A Bordeaux Blvd. Newer 3 bed, 2 bath with 2 car garage. Fenced backyard with dog kennel & pergola. Very nice! $179,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com 723 North 5th West. 2 bed, 1.5 bath with maple floors, open kitchen, fenced backyard & lots of light. $179,500. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 7 2 8 - 8 2 7 0 . glasgow@montana.com Affordable Townhomes Didn’t think you could afford to buy your own place? This sweet new, green-built development may be your ticket. STARTING AT $79,000. 1400 Burns. 2405227 porticorealestate.com Beautiful Downtown Triplex Two 2 bedroom units and one 1 bedroom; great rental history; great building on Historic Register with tons of character and in great shape! $359,500. 518 Alder porticorealestate.com 240-5227

723 North 5th St. $179,500 www.723n5thmissoula.com 2 bed, 1.5 bath with open kitchen, maple floors & deep soaking tub. Fenced backyard, patio & storage shed

19488 Highway 200 PRICE REDUCED! $394,900 5 bed on 3 acres across from Blackfoot River. Several outbuildings and large shop with loft.

MLS #20126435

1136 & 1136 1/2 Howell GREAT INVESTMENT! $380,000

Open & Light & Green & Clean Efficiency abounds in this 3 bed, 2.5 bath stand-alone super-insulated condo with heated floors and so much more. $250,000. 1530 S 12th W. Near Good Food Store and bike trails. 240-5227. porticorealestate.com Uptown Flats. From $149,900. Upscale gated community near downtown. All SS appliances, car port, storage and access to community room and exercise room plus more. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5465816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com

East Missoula Building Lot With great trees and a sweet ‘hood. $55,000. 2405227 porticorealestate.com Georgetown Lake Lot Bargain price of $44,000 for a 2.87 acre parcel only 6 miles to Discovery and half a mile to the lake, ready to build site, nice open meadow, year round access, 5464 7 9 7 www.postlets.com/repb/4881548 NHN Twin Creek Road/Bonner. 3.69 acres with creek. Mobiles on permanent foundations allowed. $165,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

Rattlesnake Acreage Rattlesnake 1/4 acre lot at the base of Mt. Jumbo with all utilities stubbed to the site and ready to build on. $160,000. KD 2405227. porticorealestate.com

COMMERCIAL 110 Main Street, Stevensville. Restaurant in heart of Stevensville next to Blacksmith Brewery. $149,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 8804749. montpref@bigsky.net

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

MANUFACTURED HOMES 1825 Burlington. Two central Missoula lots with 3 bed, 2 bath mobile. Great investment or first time buy. $89,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com

LAND FOR SALE 20 ACRES FREE. Buy 40-Get 60 acres. $0-Down, $168/month. Money back gaurentee. NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful views. Roads/surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.SunsetRanches.com 3.2 Acres in the Wye area. Gorgeous mountain and valley views. $65,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4,500 Sq Ft Lot on the Northside. Zoned for single or multifamily. All utilities available. $59,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

,SQIPSERW[MXL WXVIIXWQEVXW 7LIMPE0YRH:4 6IEP)WXEXI0SERW

21079-

This is a property that pencils out! Two story 3 bed, 1.5 bath with 2 bed, 1 bath basement apt. & 2 bed, 1 bath garage apt.

6IEP)WXEXI0IRHMRK'IRXIV`+EVJMIPH` WPYRH$JWFQWPEGSQ

www.1136howell.com • MLS #20125053 For location and more info, view these and other properties at: Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos $144,900 - $249,900 Under new ownership! 1 and 2 bedrooms. Large units, nice finishes, secure entry, secure U/G parking, riverfront, affordable HOA dues and much more. Owner financing comparable to FHA terms available with as little as 3.5% down! Units, pricing and info available at www.mullanheights.com

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Rochelle

Missoula Properties Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com

missoulanews.com • January 3 – January 10, 2013 [C11]


REAL ESTATE 4 Klakken, Noxon. Motel with 9 units, laundromat & 2 rentals on 1/2 acre. $259,000. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

3 car garage on 3 mountain view acres. $399,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

Commercial Lease Space Fantastic opportunity to be a neighbor to the award-winning Homeword Organization! New, LEED registered, high quality, sustainably-built office space close to river and downtown. $11-$15 per sq.ft. 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

2110 Petty Creek, Alberton. Gorgeous 3 bed, 2.5 with 2 car garage on over 10 acres. $409,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 8804749. montpref@bigsky.net

Gorgeous Victorian home zoned for commercial use in a great location $395,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

OUT OF TOWN 15305 Spring Hill Road, Frenchtown. Beautiful cedar 4 bed, 2.5 bath with 3 car garage & deck on acreage bordering Forest Service. $595,000. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. 170 South 1st Street, Clinton. 2 bedroom, 1 bath with basement & garage on private 2.2 fenced acres. Close to the river and Forest Service land. $165,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com 19488 Highway 200 East/ Bonner. 5 bed, 3 bath, basement &

3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Stevensville area home on 6+ acres. $339,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4 Bdr, 2 Bath Central Missoula home. $240,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4 Bdr, 3 Bath Stevensville area home on 13 acres. $575,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

PRICE REDUCED! 102 Boardwalk, Stevensville. 3 bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage. Zoned commercial with 48’x30’ shop. $293,500. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL

57005 West Road, Moiese. Certified Organic Farm with artesian well on 80 acres near Flathead River. $525,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com

QUICK CASH FOR REAL ESTATE NOTES and Land Installment Contracts. We also lend on Real Estate with strong equity. 406721-1444 www.Creative-Finance.com

PRICE REDUCED! 101 Boardwalk, Stevensville. 3 bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage. Zoned commercial with separate office. $310,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

[C12] Missoula Independent • January 3 – January 10, 2013

Deadline Jan. 6th


Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture

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