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WHY HAVE ALL THE CRAIGSLIST PERSONALS GONE? THE RETURN OF ONCE AND FUTURE MISSOULA MUSICIAN JONNY FRITZ


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[2] Missoula Independent • April 5–April 12, 2018

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cover photo courtesy Joshua Meier

News

Voices The readers write .............................................................................................................4 Street Talk Craigslist and you. Yeah, you...................................................................................4 The Week in Review The news of the day, one day at a time..................................................6 Briefs ’Shroom season, white entitlement, and the changing of the channels........................6 Etc. Bitcoin’s energy boom..........................................................................................................6 News Missoula’s Children’s Museum takes a smoke break.......................................................8 News Why have all the Craigslist personals gone? And what now?...........................................9 Dan Brooks: Troy Downing thinks you’re stupid. And he would appreciate your support....10 Writers on the Range: Why public ownership trumps private investment ..........................11 Feature David Boone’s long road home..................................................................................14

Arts & Entertainment

Arts Musician Jonny Fritz brings it all back home .......................................................18 Books Poet Henrietta Goodman answers by way of sonnet .......................................19 Art Two artists search for clarity at E3 Convergence Gallery.......................................20 TV The allure of Wild, Wild Country............................................................................21 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films .....................................................22 What’s Good Here The world famous Missoula Pita Pit ......................................................23 Happiest Hour The Old Post’s Green Beret ...............................................................25 8 Days a Week The great spring fake-out ..........................................................................28 Agenda Help give the “M” trail a makeover............................................................................33 Mountain High Declutter and reclutter at UM’s outdoor gear sale ...........................34

Exclusives

News of the Weird ......................................................................................................11 Classifieds....................................................................................................................35 The Advice Goddess ...................................................................................................36 Free Will Astrology .....................................................................................................38 Crossword Puzzle .......................................................................................................41 This Modern World.....................................................................................................42

GENERAL MANAGER Andy Sutcliffe EDITOR Brad Tyer ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson CALENDAR EDITOR Charley Macorn STAFF REPORTERS Alex Sakariassen, Derek Brouwer STAFF REPORTER & MANAGING EDITOR FOR SPECIAL SECTIONS Susan Elizabeth Shepard COPY EDITOR Jule Banville EDITORIAL INTERN Micah Drew ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer SALES MANAGER Toni Leblanc ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Steven Kirst, Declan Lawson MARKETING & EVENTS COORDINATOR Ariel LaVenture CLASSIFIED SALES REPRESENTATIVE Declan Lawson FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Scott Renshaw, Nick Davis, Hunter Pauli, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Rob Rusignola, Chris La Tray, Sarah Aswell, Migizi Pensoneau, April Youpee-Roll, MaryAnn Johanson, Melissa Stephenson

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

Copyright 2018 by the Missoula Independent. All rights reserved. Reproduction, reuse or transmittal in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or through an information retrieval system is prohibited without permission in writing from the Missoula Independent.

missoulanews.com • April 5–April 12, 2018 [3]


[voices]

STREET TALK

by Micah Drew

What have have you used Craigslist for? Have you or anyone you know ever used the Craigslist personals to meet people?

Dylan Asby: I’ve sold a couple of hard drives and my Wii, and I’ve looked for cars on it. When Tinder isn’t enough: Not that I can think of, but there’s probably some horndog friend of mine who has.

Julie Anton: I’m a real estate agent, so I’ve used Craigslist to post listings, marketing for my listings, and also to sell personal items. For a different crowd: I don’t know anyone who has, but I’m old, so that may be why.

Signed on

We, the undersigned, are Missoula Independent alumni and freelancers. We support the organizing efforts of the Missoula Independent Union, and look forward to a future in which the union and Lee Enterprises work together to keep the Indy local, and essential to this state and city. Sarah Aswell, Jule Banville, Dan Brooks, Skylar Browning, Jason Cohen, Nancy de Pastino, Chad Dundas, Micah Fields, Matt Frank, Jesse Froehling, Molly Laich, Ari LeVaux, Jason McMackin, Tim Midyett, Hunter Pauli, Jamie Rogers, Jessie Schandelson (McQuillan), Michael Siebert, Ednor Therriault, Jimmy Tobias, Josh Vanek, Jason Wiener

Child of a union

Heidi Eggert: I’ve used it for selling garage sale items. Mum’s the word: I have not and I don’t know anyone who has. Or no one’s told me they have.

McKenzie Warren: I’ve only used it to find apartments around town. 0 for 4: I don’t know anyone who’s met up on it.

I am a member of MEA-MFT, Montana’s largest labor union, and I am writing to support the efforts of the employees of the Missoula Independent to form a union. I believe working people everywhere should have the unfettered right and opportunity to organize into unions and bargain collectively with their employers. I urge Lee Enterprises to step back from anti-union interference and let the employees decide entirely for themselves if they want to be union or not. In addition to being a union member myself, I was raised by parents who were union members, and they instilled in me the sense of fairness and dignity unions provide to employees. They were also able to support four children and educate all of us through college, some of us with graduate degrees, by bargaining in good faith for wages and benefits that made this possible. DeAnn Caussyn Helena

Stage set

Jeff Pruttis: I’ve never used it. I don’t like all the bullshit on it. There’s a lot of rip-off crap on there, and a lot of not good stuff that goes on there.

Asked Tuesday afternoon at Liquid Planet Grille.

[4] Missoula Independent • April 5–April 12, 2018

I support wholeheartedly the organization of a professional union to represent the interests of the journalists and all who work to bring the news to residents of Missoula and Montana citizens such as myself here in Great Falls in Cascade County. Missoula newspapers lead the way to the free flow of information and unrestricted exchange of ideas.

L

Partnerships among many U.S. companies, their employees and unions have resulted in key business improvements. Numerous studies have concluded that these types of shared capitalism are associated with more positive employee attitudes, higher levels of productivity and better financial performance. The impact is amplified if these financial ties are combined with employee involvement, employment security and practices that invest in employees, such as training. Research on labor-management partnerships indicates that providing employees, through their union repre-

“I was raised by parents who were union members, and they instilled in me the sense of fairness and dignity unions provide to employees.” sentatives, a bigger voice in the organization and workplace results in less conflict, improved organizational performance and cost savings. Journalists and their unions are heavily invested in the success and survival of their company, and a strong partnership creates the trust and cooperation needed to help financially troubled companies survive. It should help set the tone for labormanagement relations, providing workers with job security, preventing further wage and benefit concessions and promoting the kind of investment in training and talent that will help them compete in the digital world. Furthermore, unions may use their ownership position to present perspectives on business and economic affairs that better reflect the interests of the working class. This could potentially

broaden the appeal of the newspaper and have broader societal benefits by offering more diverse perspectives. In short, the stage is set for the union investors to show what they can do. They possess advantages which should be methodically exploited. A stronger union voice arguably promotes both industrial and political democracy. Tom Glover Great Falls

Sympathetic labor

I support the efforts of your newspaper’s employees to use their legal right to organize. I’m very concerned about reports of threats and coercion against these people by your management. As a member of a Montana labor union, I and my fellow members are watching these developments very carefully. Bill Dwyer Missoula

Sounds simple

The City Council may give lip service to housing costs in Missoula, but the reality is that they could clearly care less (“Faces of Skyview: With evictions imminent, trailer court residents look for a way out,” March 22). $3,200 for a sewer connection to a 400-square-foot home (little homes on Speedway in East Missoula). Look at the reality: Everything that the city can do to increase housing costs is being done! If, and that is a very big if, the city really cared about housing costs, permits’ cost could be cut 90 percent or more. Requirements for other expenses could be simply eliminated. Requiring resurveying before permits are issued is just a way to push up cost. Permits for construction are not based on the cost to the city for needed inspection, but rather on square feet. Really, how much more time does it take to look at a 100-squarefoot bathroom than a 300-square-foot bathroom? Does it have the required fixtures or not? Safety is really the only question that the city inspectors should be concerned with. Is a regulation needed for the safety of the people or not? Eliminating excessive regulations would go a long way toward reducing housing costs in Missoula County. Mark Chapman East Missoula

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via email: editor@missoulanews.com.


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missoulanews.com • April 5–April 12, 2018 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW Wednesday, March 28 The Department of Justice files suit against Beaverhead County water and sewer district alleging EPA violations including excessive levels of arsenic and radioactive contaminants. The system serves fewer than 50 people in the community of Jackson.

Thursday, March 29 Researchers at the University of Kansas announce the discovery of what may be a juvenile T. rex. The 17-foot specimen was unearthed in 2016 near Hell Creek, Montana.

Friday, March 30 Glacier National Park installs a webcam to watch a black bear emerging from hibernation in a den in a cottonwood tree. The webpage becomes the most-viewed page of the entire National Park Service website for the week.

Saturday, March 31 In a premature April Fool’s “prank,” the University of Washington Tacoma tweets that UM once planned to open a campus in Tacoma. “As part of the deal, #UW planned to open a campus in Billings. The agreement fell apart when both parties realized it made no sense.”

White people

Discrimination claim settled

The Montana Department of Transportation settled a discrimination lawsuit for $485,000 on Feb. 23, ending five years of litigation by Mountain West Holding Company, a Billings-based highway contracting firm with offices in Missoula, Butte and Bozeman. “Their claim essentially was that we were discriminating against them based upon their race,” says Dave Ohler, lead counsel for MDT. The owner of Mountain West is white. “So it’s commonly called a reverse discrimination kind of claim,” Ohler says. At issue was the state’s implementation of its Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Program, a requirement attached to federal highway funds that mandates states make efforts to include businesses owned by women, minorities and individuals of low net worth. Montana does not use race-based criteria to determine its goals for DBE utilization, but Mountain West alleged that the state’s goals at the time exceeded the federal requirements, and because of that Mountain West was denied contracts on the basis of race, gender or national origin. After the suit was dismissed in federal district court, Mountain West appealed, and the 9th Circuit rejected all

but one of the company’s claims, a count of violating the anti-discrimination protections of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act. “We obviously disputed the case and were prepared to go to trial and defend our position,” Ohler says. But the state decided to settle. “When you have a case, there’s always a potential for getting an adverse decision and a potential for getting legal decisions that aren’t favorable,” Ohler says. A who’s who of anti-affirmative action conservative and libertarian think-tanks filed briefs on behalf of Mountain West, including the Cato Institute, the Mountain States Legal Foundation and the Center for Equal Opportunity, all of which oppose programs like DBE because, they say, they interfere with fair market processes. Mountain West did not respond to a request for comment by press time. In a 2016 disparity report commissioned by MDT, almost half of DBE interviewees reported being subject to or witnessing discrimination toward minorities and women by other contractors or government employees. The report stated, “There is also substantial qualitative evidence that a ‘good ol’ boy’ network negatively affects opportunities for businesses including those owned by minorities and women.” Data collected in that report formed the basis for the current race-neutral policies that MDT uses

in deciding what percentage of spending to direct to DBEs. Mountain West functions as both a prime contractor and subcontractor on state projects, and also works for private companies. Its website touts the company’s traffic control for the oil sands megaloads that traveled through Montana. Mountain West held a large amount of the state’s highway business during the period in which the company says discriminatory policies were in place. The state said in court documents that Mountain West accounted for 50.58 percent of state spending on traffic control, 59.92 percent on guardrails, 60.30 percent on signage and 69.11 percent on concrete barriers in 2014. In every category, Mountain West’s share of state spending was more than the state spent with all DBEs combined. Susan Elizabeth Shepard

Changing channels

Moving down the dial

This fall, Montana PBS will move down the digital dial in the Flathead. Channel 46 in Kalispell will go dark, and the station’s broadcast will pick up on channel 15. It’s all part of a nationwide reorganization of television frequencies designed to

Sunday, April 1 The Easter Bunny comes out of its warren on Mount Sentinel and sees its shadow. There will be two more weeks of winter.

Monday, April 2

No gun control. We need to take control. Arm the oppressed!”

The Indy’s April Fools joke comes true as spring snowstorms blanket parts of Montana. Staffers are unsure what to do with this newfound power.

Tuesday, April 3 Lucky’s Market announces its grand opening will take place May 2 at the Southgate Mall. Instead of a ribbon cutting, there will be a ceremonial “bacon-cutting.”

—Banner displayed briefly in late March over the Higgins Street-facing side of the unfinished Marriott Hotel building downtown. An image of the banner was posted anonymously March 29 to the anarchist website It’s Going Down.

[6] Missoula Independent • April 5–April 12, 2018


[news] free up the airwaves for cell phones and other wireless devices. Dean Lawver, director of technology at Montana PBS, says rumblings of the change began several years ago. Clarity arrived in March 2017 when the Federal Communications Commission closed the bidding on a massive spectrum auction. Across the country, every channel above 36 was reallocated to private buyers including Comcast, Dish and T-Mobile. The auction raised $19.8 billion, roughly $10 billion of which was set aside to reimburse stations for the cost of moving to lower channels. “While today marks a major milestone, the work is far from over,” National Association of Broadcasters President and CEO Gordon Smith said in a postauction statement. “Now the FCC and the broadcast industry face the unprecedented task of moving almost a thousand TV stations — far more than originally anticipated — to new channels in very tight time frames.” Factoring in equipment upgrades and labor costs, Lawver estimates the switch to channel 15 for Kalispell’s KUKL-TV will cost as much as $100,000. The post-auction transition also means Montana PBS will have to replace its Butte- and Helena-based “translators,” which pick up the station’s primary signal and extend its reach. Those replacements will cost up to $120,000 each, Lawver says. The station is fortunate in that T-Mobile is picking up the tab for all PBS translator changes nationwide. Others weren’t so lucky. “There’s very active and robust translator groups in the state that are impacted without any means to recoup their losses,” Lawver says. “This channel 15 move lands right in the middle of a block of translator frequencies that have been operating in the Kalispell area for many years … We bump them out, so they have to go through all the motions of finding new channels.” While the transition calls for a lot of work on the part of broadcasters, viewers will sail through with relative ease. All they’ll have to do, says Aaron Pruitt, director and general manager for Montana PBS, is rescan for the new channels when the time comes. The FCC’s schedule calls for Montana PBS to start testing on the new channel in mid-September and complete the switch by Nov. 30.

“I think our communications will probably happen really close to when the actual transition happens, just to avoid confusion,” Pruitt says. “And, to be honest, to allow us some flexibility as to when it becomes operational.” KUKL isn’t the only Montana station switching channels. KAJJ-CD, the translator that broadcasts KPAX in Kalispell, will move from channel 39 to 18 this fall. KDBZ, which beams KECI to Butte and Bozeman, is slated to switch channels in June 2019. Alex Sakariassen

’Shroom season

Permitting morel hunters

In the coming weeks, the forests of western Montana will become ground zero for mushroom pickers. The Forest Service is expecting thousands of mushroom hunters to visit the Lolo and Kootenai forests for an anticipated ’shroom boom. Starting April 16, mushroom permits will be available through the Forest Service. While personal-use permits (for more than five gallons per individual — less than that doesn’t require a permit) are issued annually, commercial harvest permits align more closely with season conditions. The agency’s district offices consider forest conditions and the accessibility of likely mushroom hot spots, among other things, before proposing areas for commercial permitting. This summer, the Forest Service will offer commercial mushroom permits for 86,000 acres across eight recent burn areas in the Lolo and Kootenai forests. Last summer’s fires burned about 600,000 acres across both forests, creating ideal conditions for edible morel mushrooms. Andrew Larson, a forest ecology professor at the University of Montana, recently published research about morel abundance after wildfires.

BY THE NUMBERS com$2.7 million Highly petitive Fed-

eral Transit Administration grant awarded to Missoula’s Mountain Line bus system April 3. The grant will allow Mountain Line to replace three of its oldest buses and modernize other aspects of the city bus system.

“There are several morel species across the western U.S. in conifer forests, like we have here, that predictably fruit very abundantly after fire,” Larson says. The correlation between mushrooms and forest fires has given rise to the term “chasing the burn” as harvesters travel across the country from midApril through June. According to Larson, soil temperature — mycologists say 42.5 degrees is the magic number — and moisture are key indicators for morel fruiting. He also points out that morels are commonly found “spotting,” so where there’s one, there are likely more within a few feet. According to Larson, there’s no scientific consensus about why morels tend to fruit after fires. Some theories point to changes in soil pH and the post-fire shift from living to decaying vegetation as catalysts. To help regulate the influx of pickers, the Forest Service plans to bring in additional extraagency law enforcement for the early part of mushroom season, and will establish commercial camps near some permit areas to provide sanitation facilities. Larson says that even with the expected flood of pickers, he isn’t concerned about overharvesting. Researchers have found between 250 and 3,200 mushrooms per acre across various burn sites. In some high-severity burn areas, researchers found nearly 6,000 mushrooms per acre. There should be plenty to go around. Micah Drew

ETC. Cryptocurrency mines require a lot of energy. A lot of energy. The global bitcoin network uses more electricity than the country of Greece, according to Digiconomist.com. Bitcoin is poorly understood, but one thing a skeptical public has wrapped its collective head around is the sense that, in a warming world, mining fossil fuels to fuel the mining of speculative digital money might not be such a good idea. The criticism has stuck because most early bitcoin mining was conducted in China, and powered by coal mines. In the last year, as cryptocurrency exchange rates spiked and the Chinese government cracked down, large bitcoin mines have sprung up across the Pacific Northwest. The region’s primary appeal has been cheap power. Unlike in China, that power has been the renewable, hydroelectric variety. That’s been the widely publicized narrative in Washington state and Oregon. As the Indy first noted, the first industrial-scale bitcoin mine to open in Montana — Project Spokane/Hyperblock Technologies in Bonner — utilizies hydropower from Seli’š Ksanka Qlispe’ dam in the Flathead. But that narrative may need revision. In late March, Public Service Commissioner Travis Kavulla broke some news on Twitter. A new bitcoin mining operation that’s ramping up its servers in Butte and Anaconda, CryptoWatt Mining, has a 64 MW energy contract with Talen Energy. The power will be supplied by Colstrip. “Will bitcoin throw coal a lifeline?” Kavulla tweeted, only somewhat tongue-in-cheek. CryptoWatt spokesperson Matt Vincent confirms that CryptoWatt’s energy supplier is Colstrip. The company’s first three megawatts came online mid-March, with plans to complete the 64 MW build-out this year. “Being a for-profit entity, we’re certainly looking for the best deal we can get. It’s a competitive rate,” he says. CryptoWatt’s contract is more than three times the size of Project Spokane’s, while a Utah-based company recently said it’s investing $250 million at another mine in Butte. Project Spokane has also said it plans to quadruple in size. If Colstrip offers the cheapest energy around, you can bet that more Montana mines will follow CryptoWatt to Colstrip. And a new mining industry, eager to prove that it’s here for the long haul, could find itself running on the fumes of a dying one.

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missoulanews.com • April 5–April 12, 2018 [7]


[news]

Smoked out Children’s Museum seeks fresh start after cigar dispute by Derek Brouwer

Something had to give. The match was lit 18 months ago when the members-only cigar club, Fool’s End, opened beneath the Families First Children’s Museum in a shared building on West Front Street. Children’s Museum staff and patrons have been complaining about smoke smell in the exhibit hall ever since — an unusual problem in an age when indoor smoking seems as antiquated as a nicotine-stained bar back. The cigar club devised its business strategy “with the sole and exclusive purpose of evading” the state law that bans smoking in enclosed public places, according to Missoula County attorneys. A pending county lawsuit against the club, filed in February 2017 on behalf of the City-County Board of Health, hasn’t resolved the dispute. Neither has the landlord, the owner of the adjacent Tamarack Brewing Company. In Dec. 2017 — the busy season for indoor kids’ attractions — the Children’s Museum closed indefinitely until executive director Nick Roberts could find a way forward. There were two options, as Roberts saw it. The museum could identify the source of smoke, modify the building to stop it from contaminating the museum space, then remediate the museum of existing exposure. Or the museum could try to exit its lease, which has two years remaining, and relocate. On March 30, Roberts announced that the museum is leaving downtown. It will reopen in 4 to 6 months at Toole Crossing, on the Westside, in a space next to another kids’ learning center, the SpectrUM Discovery Area. Roberts says the move offers exciting opportunities to “start fresh” after more than a decade downtown. The departure from Front Street, on the other hand, sounds like less of a clean break. Lawyers are involved. “Our counsel has advised that we have grounds for vacating the building and exiting the lease,” Roberts says. The only tests examining tobacco exposure in the museum were conducted by Roberts’ organization in January,

[8] Missoula Independent • April 5–April 12, 2018

which he says “did definitively show” evidence of tobacco contaminants. Neither the landlord nor county prosecutors have conducted assessments to pinpoint the source of the exposure, Roberts says. When the museum tried to negotiate for mitigation and remediation work, “it just became apparent to us that it was going to be challenging,” he says. Tamarack owner Josh Townsley did not respond to an email and two phone calls for comment. The Children’s Museum’s unexpected move comes two years before a planned reopening inside the new Missoula Public

already plans to let the museum use its classroom space and exhibit area for Families First parenting-education programs. For the Children’s Museum, the move is an opportunity to redesign the facility from the ground up, Roberts says. In February, the museum sold most of its exhibits and furnishings at a silent auction at which bidders were required to sign waivers acknowledging that the items had been exposed to tobacco. What didn’t sell was donated: Franklin School, for instance, received the climbing wall, Roberts says. The museum will be fundraising over the coming months to purchase new ex-

photo by Derek Brouwer

The Children’s Museum is relocating to Toole Crossing after being unable to resolve tobacco smoke contamination issues at its downtown location.

Library building, after it’s completed in 2020. That vision called for shared space between the museum and SpectrUM, a partnership the two organizations will now begin testing sooner than anticipated. The two organizations’ adjacent spaces at Toole Crossing will serve as a “living laboratory” for the sorts of collaboration that SpectrUM was gearing up to undertake in 2020, says Nathalie Wolfram, associate director of UM Broader Impacts Group, SpectrUM’s parent organization. SpectrUM relocated to Toole Crossing from its downtown location last June, recognizing, Wolfram says, that Northside and Westside residents had been eager to add kid-friendly gathering places in their neighborhoods. With the Children’s Museum as its soon-to-be-neighbor, Wolfram says, SpectrUM is poised to contribute even more to the community. The organization

hibits for the redesigned, all-new Toole Crossing space. The museum received more than 20,000 annual visitors on Front Street, and Roberts is confident that community support for the museum hasn’t waned as a result of the smoke-out. The museum plans to maintain the Westside location as well even after the library opens in 2020. “Who would have thought that tobacco smoke would have sparked such a dramatic transition?” Roberts says. The county filed its latest motion for summary judgment in its case against Fool’s End on March 22, a week before the Children’s Museum announced its move. The case will carry on, deputy county attorney John Hart says, even though the county is now fighting to air out an empty room. dbrouwer@missoulanews.com


[news]

Less safe space Why are all the Craigslist personals gone? by Susan Elizabeth Shepard

“Because of that, they’re more easily March 22 marked the end of the Craigslist personals era for Missoula and manipulated and intimidated by law enevery other city in the country. That’s the forcement and other forces,” she wrote. day that users clicking on any personals “This puts them at more danger not just subsections — including “strictly platonic” for prosecution, but violence from the — were presented with this statement: state or by customers and predators.” On an average day, the number of “US Congress just passed HR 1865, ‘FOSTA’, seeking to subject websites to Craigslist personals posts seeking free criminal and civil liability when third par- companionship greatly outnumbered ties (users) misuse online personals un- those on Backpage selling services. lawfully. Any tool or service can be Craigslist’s sudden deletion of the entire misused. We can’t take such risk without section alarmed Josh, the name used by a jeopardizing all our other services, so we are regretfully taking craigslist personals offline.” The back pages of the Indy 15 years ago were full of personal ads. Fewer in number but still consistent were the small display ads for escort services. They all eventually moved onto Craigslist, which dealt a body blow to print media with its nationwide free classifieds. In 2010, Craigslist closed its Adult Services section under pressure from law enforcement, at which point a majority of As of March 22, this is all that remains escort ads moved to Back- Craigslist personals. page.com, a classifieds site poster reached by the Indy. Josh said he owned by an alt-weekly conglomerate. Most of the small number of com- remembers a time when seeking same-sex mercial sex ads placed in the Missoula partners could be life-threatening. It rearea are on Backpage, not Craigslist, these mains scary in less progressive parts of the days, and Backpage has not yet changed country, where Craigslist could serve as a its practices. In an effort to spread infor- safe place. “I know there are other men mation about FOSTA, also known as the like me out there who grew up in a time “fight online sex trafficking act,” one and place where ‘exploring your bi side’ poster to missoula.backpage.com put up was not an option,” Josh said. “Remember a series of screenshots, drawn from the what happened to Matthew Shepard?” Josh also questioned the constitusocial media accounts of a former sex worker and attorney based far from Mon- tionality of FOSTA. “The ‘sex trafficking’ tana, explaining the law. “I wondered why legislation is a sad and dangerous joke. I was suddenly getting emails from men Since when are good intentions allowed in Missoula,” wrote the attorney, who to trample the First Amendment?” he goes by Ms. A, when contacted by the wrote. “Holding the provider of a social Indy. She said the explanatory posts were media platform legally liable for the conintended to reassure and educate sex tent of that platform is a de facto form workers facing the loss of advertising ven- of censorship.” Camden, 28, who gave the Indy his ues, especially those who don’t underfirst name only, used the Craigslist perstand the law or their rights under it.

sonals to find dates and friends for 10 years. When he saw they’d been taken down, he posted on Craigslist about the loss. “I’ve made sooo many wholesome friends off Craigslist personals. … It’s sad that they’re gone.” “I’ve used all the sections on there, to buy, sell and trade things, to meet up with people for activities, just for good wholesome stuff. And it sucks that the personals section is gone now,” Camden told the Indy. While he said most of his experiences had been positive, Camden thought the site had some dark corners, too. “I get why it’s gone,” he said. “Craigslist can be held responsible or something now for bad stuff that happens in there.” Alice, a 29-year-old woman using a pseudonym, posted in the general community section of Craigslist, “What can the normal, professional, kinky Missoulians do now to find each other with casual encounters...down.” Reached by email, of the she told the Indy that she’d had overwhelmingly positive experiences with Craigslist. “I would post to the casual encounters section, mostly for a no-strings attached relationship, but twice have developed into serious relationships.” She added that Craiglist personals had been a safe place for her to find partners, because she could check out their phone numbers online and request public introductory meetings. “Only once did I get a bad vibe from someone after not picking up on it through email,” she wrote. “I can’t go to Fantasy on Brooks, I can’t go to strip clubs. I work a management job, I see lots of faces across the community and I can’t express what I’m looking for anywhere else. I don’t even know where to turn to find a replacement.” sshepard@missoulanews.com

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[opinion]

Playing stupid Troy Downing thinks you’re dumb. He wants your support. by Dan Brooks

The Republican primaries are not for another two months, so it would be premature to say that Troy Downing has produced the dumbest ad of the 2018 election. All we can do is hope. Last week, Troy Downing for U.S. Senate released a 30-second spot that told us less about the candidate than what his campaign thinks of Montana voters. The ad begins with the central message of Downing’s campaign: He is a veteran who likes the president. Vague rock music plays over shots of a younger Downing in his flight suit and pilots climbing into fighter jets, as a voiceover explains that “Troy Downing is a Montanan, war vet, helicopter and jet pilot, and big supporter of President Trump.” This last part appears on the screen in quotation marks, but without any attribution; it is a quote in the sense that it has been said aloud. Then the rock music fades out, and the Top Gun shot of a pilot in a fighter cockpit dissolves to a man sitting on a tractor, playing the trumpet. “Jon Tester was an elementary school music teacher, plays the trumpet, fights against our president every day,” the voiceover says. “So whom shall we send to the senate: the trumpeter or the Trump supporter?” As the rock music kicks in again, a fighter jet swoops down and knocks the trumpet player off his tractor, sending his instrument flying through the air. First of all, big points for correctly using “whom.” This choice runs against the guiding principle of the ad, which is that the viewer is dumb and proud of it. I wish, dear reader, that you could hear how the voiceover artist says “plays the trumpet.” It’s the tone of voice you would use to say “sleeps at the porno theater” or “gives cigarettes to animals.” The message is clear: Tester is the kind of man who plays an instrument and teaches music to children, whereas Downing is the kind who knocks that first guy on his ass. More interesting than what this ad

[10] Missoula Independent • April 5–April 12, 2018

says about Downing is what it says about us — or what the Downing campaign thinks of us. We are the kind of people who know that flying a jet is cool and playing an instrument is lame. Also, we love President Trump. This is the consultant’s view of Montana. It is true that our state contains more veterans per capita than any other state but Alaska. Ryan Zinke won

“A society of wealthy veterans who ran around knocking trumpets out of the mouths of our few remaining nerds would be miserable.” two elections here by trading on his military service, so the strategy has worked before. And because Montana went for Trump by 20 points in 2016, it makes sense for Republican candidates to tie themselves to the president. Greg Gianforte won a special election last spring by rebranding himself as a Trump supporter and, while he was at it, throwing another man to the ground. So this ad follows an established playbook. But Downing’s justifiable pride in his Air Force service curdles when his

campaign presents it as something we will immediately recognize as superior to teaching school. At the risk of provoking letters to the editor, I think educating children might contribute more to society than invading Afghanistan. I recognize that this is a controversial position, and a reasonable person could argue against it. But a politics that assumes we will agree, without even trying to convince one another, that soldiers are better than teachers might be a little sick. Instead of assuming that Montanans are jingo hicks who look suspiciously on any man who has taught school or can play a musical instrument, the Downing campaign could ask how Tester won two terms in the senate in the first place. It wasn’t by presenting himself as a heman who uses his jet to put teachers in their place. Neither was it by shooting a TV to prove how much he loved guns and hunting — as both Gianforte and his Democratic opponent, Rob Quist, did in campaign ads last spring — or pandering to any of the other stereotypes about this state. Tester won elections by presenting himself as someone ordinary voters could relate to — the kind of Montanans we all know and respect, even if they have loser jobs like teaching or dork hobbies like music. We can’t all be millionaire jet pilots. More important, a society of wealthy veterans who ran around knocking trumpets out of the mouths of our few remaining nerds would be miserable. I don’t think Downing wants to create that society. I bet he doesn’t even look down on Sen. Tester for playing an instrument, or teaching school, or working his family farm while Downing was in Afghanistan. After watching his ad, though, I worry that Downing looks down on us. Who would hope to represent a state where this kind of advertisement worked? Why would you want to work for such people? Dan Brooks is on Twitter at @DangerBrooks.


[opinion]

Seizing water Why public ownership trumps private investment by Karen Knudsen

President Donald Trump has unveiled a $1.5 trillion plan to rebuild our nation’s crumbling infrastructure, including the pipes and treatment plants that keep clean water flowing from our taps. But if you read the fine print, his plan offers just $200 billion in federal funds. The remaining $1.3 trillion is expected to come from other sources, including private investors. Private investment in water systems might look like a good deal to those who want to limit federal spending; it certainly appeals to cash-strapped cities and towns. And the need is great: The American Society of Civil Engineers gives our nation’s drinking water facilities a “D” grade and says $1 trillion will be needed to fix them over the next 25 years. But private investment comes at a cost. Fundamentally, it means handing over our most essential resource to those who put profits before the public interest. That’s what we learned here in Missoula, where we recently wrested control of our water system away from a multinational corporation. Missoula is unusual in that our water system was privately owned since the town’s founding in the 1870s. Our first water entrepreneur was “One-Eyed Riley,” whose delivery method involved a yoke and two buckets. Since then, the system passed through many hands, but was never well managed. Compared to neighboring towns with public utilities, Missoulians endured high rates and poor service. Necessary capital improvements were not made, and the system steadily deteriorated. When the Carlyle Group purchased our water system in 2011, we hoped the situation would improve. But we soon realized the fundamental tension that lay between Carlyle’s goal of generating a short-term profit and Missoulians’ need for safe, clean water over the long haul. After a four-year court battle, we purchased our water system from Carlyle for $84 million. Now, for the first time in our town’s history, owner-

ship of our water system — its pipes, pumps, wells, water rights, wilderness lakes and dams — has landed where it belongs, in the hands of the people, where it can be managed for the public good, for all time. Unfortunately, other cities seem headed the other way, seeking private financing as the answer to their water woes. Many will be disappointed: Private investors require high rates of return, so they are unlikely to support projects that won’t pay off sufficiently.

“Some people assume that private management means greater efficiency and lower rates. Yet the reverse is often true.” If there is money to be made from water, look out. Population, pollution and climate change are squeezing global drinking water supplies, so investors — including commercial bottling plants — are rushing in. There are disturbing accounts of bottling plants targeting a town’s good water source, only to deplete local water wells, dry up wetlands and drain streams. Some people assume that private management means greater efficiency and lower rates. Yet the reverse is often true. The New York Times analyzed three communities where private equity firms manage water or sewer services. In all three places — Bayonne, New Jer-

sey; and Rialto and Santa Paula in California — rates rose more quickly than in comparable towns. In Bayonne, the price of water skyrocketed by nearly 28 percent after the private equity giant Kohlberg Kravis Roberts took charge of the city’s system. That’s why some cities that had gone private — from Ojai, California, to Fort Wayne, Indiana — have seized their water systems back from private ownership. While the price tag can be daunting, public investment is the better option. State and local governments already provide the lion’s share of money for water infrastructure, and federal funding is available through the Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Funds (though those funds are flat-lined in the president’s proposed 2019 budget). There are also collateral benefits from public investment. The Economic Policy Institute found that spending $188.4 billion on water infrastructure would yield $265 billion in economic activity and create 1.9 million jobs. In Missoula, we are reaping the benefits from public ownership of our priceless water assets. Decisions about our water are made right here in town, not in a distant boardroom. Instead of short-term profits, our priority is longterm water security, a critical concern in the era of climate change. We don’t have to worry about rates going up to fatten investors’ wallets, and there are less tangible benefits, including a more intimate connection to the resource on which all life depends. So here’s our advice: If your community hopes Trump’s infrastructure bill will fix your water system, be sure to read the fine print. And if you’re lucky enough to control your own water, never give it up without a fight. Karen Knudsen is a contributor to Writers on the Range, the opinion service of High Country News (hcn.org ), She is the director of the Clark Fork Coalition, based in Missoula.

missoulanews.com • April 5–April 12, 2018 [11]


[offbeat]

% 2.32

PETS ON A PLANE – In the same week that a dog perished after a United Airlines flight attendant insisted it be stored in an overhead compartment on a flight from Houston to New York City, another family’s pet was lost by the beleaguered carrier. Irgo, a 10-year-old German shepherd belonging to the Swindle family, was mistakenly sent to Japan instead of Kansas City, Missouri. When Kara Swindle and her children went to pick up their dog on March 13 after flying from Oregon, they were given a Great Dane — whose destination was supposed to be Japan. The dogs got mixed up in Denver, where they both had connecting flights. Swindle was concerned that her dog wouldn’t survive the long flight back: “He is a 10-year-old dog, and he’s never been on a flight before,” she told KCTV 5 News. However, United had Irgo checked out by a veterinarian in Tokyo and loaded onto a private charter to Wichita, Kansas, where he was reunited with his family on March 15. I AM NOT DEAD YET! – Constantin Reliu, 63, appealed unsuccessfully to a court in Barlad, Romania, in March to overturn a death certificate that his wife had obtained after not hearing from him for more than a decade. According to the Guardian, Reliu left Romania for Turkey in 1992 to look for employment, but neglected to keep in touch with his family. In 2003, Reliu’s wife, believing he had died in an earthquake in Turkey, argued in court for a death certificate, which didn’t come to light until Reliu was deported back to Romania because of expired papers in Turkey. Upon his arrival, immigration officers explained to Reliu that he had died in 2003. His appeal failed, as the court maintained he was too late, and the ruling is final, leaving Reliu in an odd state of limbo. “I am officially dead, although I’m alive,” Reliu told Romanian media outlets. “I have no income and because I am listed dead, I can’t do anything.” DIVINE INTERVENTION – In a recent interview on “60 Minutes Overtime,” Oprah Winfrey said that if God wanted her to run for president, “wouldn’t God kind of tell me?” Oprah may have gotten her answer in the form of a letter from Jesus Christ, an 83-year-old North Waterboro, Maine, woman who started a letter-writing campaign 50 years ago to spread a message of faith and peace — around the same time that she changed her name. WGME-TV reported that Christ sent her letter to Winfrey on March 9, without knowledge of the media speculation, or Winfrey’s wish for a heavenly sign, regarding her running for president. Christ said she sent the letter because she likes Winfrey, but “If she does (run), I’ll vote for her — that’s for sure.” Destiny Church in Columbia, Maryland, tried a novel approach to attract new members to its congregation. On March 4, the church gave away five used cars to “demonstrate God’s unbelievable, no-strings-attached goodness,” according to the Washington Post. The idea was hatched to increase attendance at the church’s new location after several years meeting in a high school auditorium. “Who doesn’t need a new car?” asked Sandy Dobson, who came with her son. “Different people have different things that bring them to Christ, to church. It doesn’t always have to be traditional methods.” Pastor Stephen Chandler added that Jesus himself taught that giveaways are guaranteed to draw a crowd: The biggest gatherings Christ preached to came on the two times he distributed free loaves and fishes. ANIMALS WITH ISSUES – Louis, an 18-year-old male gorilla at the Philadelphia Zoo, appears to be something of a germophobe, according to the Associated Press. When he is carrying food, 6-foot-tall Louis walks on his hind legs, like a human, rather than leaning forward on his front knuckles, as gorillas usually do. Zoo curator Michael Stern says workers installed a fire hose over a mud puddle in Louis’ yard, which he crosses like a tightrope to avoid getting his feet dirty. Stern says in the wild, gorillas may stand up on their hind feet to reach food or wade in a swamp, but only for a few seconds. RESTORING FAITH IN HUMANITY – The Rev. Alex Santora of Our Lady of Grace Church in Hoboken, New Jersey, called local police on March 14 when a suspicious package was delivered to the house of worship. But after officers from the Hoboken Police Department declared it to be safe, church staff found a surprising delivery inside: a baby Jesus statue that had been stolen from the church’s Nativity scene about 90 years ago. WPIX-TV reported that an unsigned note inside the package explained: The statue was stolen when the note-writer’s mother was a young girl, and it became a sort of heirloom in her family. When she died, it was passed on to the notewriter, who thought it should be returned.

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EWWWWW! – Ravenna, Ohio, resident Nickolette Botsford was startled by what felt like an extrahard cashew as she enjoyed some Planters nuts in early March. As she drove, she handed the object to her mom, who turned on the interior light in the car and realized it was a human tooth — with dried blood on it. “I got very upset, I was crying, I threw up two or three times,” Botsford told WOIO-TV. She went to a hospital, where doctors confirmed it was a human tooth and treated her for exposure to blood or bodily fluids. Botsford called Planters, and parent company Kraft Heinz sent a courier to pick up the tooth for testing. The company said it is investigating its manufacturing process and suppliers. Send your weird news items with subject line WEIRD NEWS to WeirdNewsTips@amuniversal.com

[12] Missoula Independent • April 5–April 12, 2018


missoulanews.com • April 5–April 12, 2018 [13]


T

wo years ago, I ran into David Boone outside his Missoula home and we talked about how his life had fallen apart. The singer-songwriter had been playing local coffee shops, bars and wineries since he was 19. Initially, he wrote songs in the acoustic-folk vein of Jack Johnson, but with a rawer and messier personaldiary feel. In time, he developed a more complex style that evoked Bruce Springsteen, playing emotionally charged tunes with just the right restraint. Between 2008 and 2012, he consistently won second or third place for Best Musician in the Indy’s annual Best of Missoula issue. What was clear to anyone who got to know him was that he was the kind of musician who wrote songs compulsively. The kind of person who considers nothing else as a career, because nothing else makes sense. He’d had his ups and downs, including struggles with bipolar disorder, but those were few and far between, and mostly entailed mild symptoms. And

music always got him through the worst of it. By the time I wrote a story about him in 2012 for the Indy, all of his hard work seemed to be paying off. He had recorded a four-song EP in London with Danton Supple, a producer who worked on albums for acts including Coldplay, Patti Smith, Morrissey and U2. Boone’s EP, which was released under the moniker DAWNS, had the kind of catchy, expansive, pop-infused indie-rock sound you might hear on popular radio stations anywhere in the country. But in May 2013, after months of touring to promote the album, Boone had a severe manic episode that landed him in the hospital, and he was put on several medications. He had rarely taken anything for his bipolar condition, and he soon found out that his body didn’t react well to Klonopin, an anti-epileptic drug used to treat panic attacks. He also didn’t react well to stopping the medication: When his doctors took him off the Klonopin, he went into severe withdrawal.

photo by Steele Williams

[14] Missoula Independent • April 5–April 12, 2018


For almost five years since then, Boone, now 37, has struggled with a long list of debilitating symptoms, most of which doctors have been unable to diagnose or alleviate: memory loss, warped vision, the sensation that his skin is on fire and a feeling of emotional disconnect from everyone, even his wife, Stephanie, and his 6-year-old son, Meyers. Boone has been to the Neurobehavioral Medicine Inpatient Unit at Providence Center four times and spent two months in a withdrawal clinic in Arizona. He’s had electroshock therapy. Fillings in his teeth were removed on the off chance that the mercury was making him sick. With the aggregation and duration of his symptoms has come severe anxiety that’s kept Boone more or less housebound. The musician, once a mainstay on local stages and a touring pro, suddenly couldn’t bear to play in front of a crowd. He could barely play music at all. On the curb in front of his house, Boone told me how painful it felt to live in his own skin. He seemed groggy and his speech was blunted, and beneath it all was an air of panic, as if he had just awakened from several years of deep sleep and was desperately trying to reorient himself to the world. At the time, he had no idea what was happening to his body. His biggest fear was that his hell was going to last forever. He wasn’t sure he could handle that. “You think it gets better someday for me?” he asked.

younger brother slept in a camper in the backyard. Music continued to buoy him throughout high school, and Boone’s ambition surged. He started a band called Faucet with a few friends. When he heard that Pearl Jam would play Washington-Grizzly Stadium, he tracked down the the band manager’s address in The Musician’s Atlas. “My buddy and I got this harebrained idea that we would drive to the address and drop a demo off to open for Pearl Jam,” Boone says, laughing. “I actually thought that was a reasonable idea that would come to fruition.”

ended up in the Montana State Hospital at Warm Springs for a few months. Music brought him back. He moved to Missoula, where he lived with friends and in hotels, always with a guitar. “Music was my therapy,” he says. “I let everything that happened to me run through me into my music. That’s how I processed my losses.” Stephanie met Boone at a show he played with Tom Catmull in 2003 at Break Espresso. She’d never talked to him before, she says, and thought nothing of him at first. But during Catmull’s song “Black Coffee,” where he sings “Black cof-

“deeply human resonance”). Over the years, his songwriting has evolved toward more complex narratives. His biggest breakthrough arrived with the 2006 album Hard Enough to Bend. The songs are tender, tragic gems, built in minor keys, punctuated with hopeful glimmers. Some deal in Boone’s nostalgia for his early childhood (playing at the river, hunting in the winter, not needing much money to be happy) and the loss of innocence he experienced later. Others are about fictional characters who seem to reflect Boone’s personal heartbreak and hope. Over the next several years he released more al-

BREAKTHROUGH

Boone grew up in Dogtown, just outside of Seeley Lake, with his dad, William, his mother, Mary, and two brothers and two sisters. Mary didn’t want her kids exposed to rock and roll, David says, so his main contact with music was at Sunday church services, where the family sang hymns. But sometimes, at home, William would sneak David out to his truck to listen to Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin cassettes. David got his first guitar when he was 7, but a week later William accidentally crushed it while he and his son were wrestling. Five years later, he got another one — this time an electric guitar with an amp. “I had a passion for music as soon as I touched the guitar,” Boone says now. “But I went through some very hard things when I was 14 and 15. So it became a coping mechanism, a way to process what was going on in my life.” Boone’s dark times began when his parents got divorced and everybody moved out of the house. Mary moved to Washington state, his sisters went to live with family friends, and his older brother moved in with a grandmother. Boone’s father moved to a small cabin near the Dogtown house, and Boone and his

an email to the Indy. “He and Steph, with a very young baby, came to London and we recorded and mixed over a couple of months at various studios. They became close friends very quickly.” The music Boone recorded with Supple embraced his Americana storytelling sensibilities, but the new songs were more elaborately structured, and were performed with a full band, including Audrey Riley, a session cellist who’s recorded albums with the Smiths and Nick Cave, among others. The Boones came home from London feeling good. Boone worked on side projects (a Honda commercial, for instance) and got ready to push his album into the world. Boone’s dream was less about being famous than about having the freedom to play when and where he wanted to, without struggle. In fall 2012, Boone, Stephanie and Meyers headed out on tour with a backup band. They had put all their money into hiring high-end promoters across the country to market the DAWNS EP. But out on tour, they were reaping few benefits from the promotion. Scouts didn’t show up to shows as promised. Crowds were thin. “We had put everything on the line in the pursuit of a dream,” Boone wrote in a recent Facebook post. “We had also put all of our own home equity on the line. In gambling terms, we were going for broke. But it seemed all the stars had aligned, and now was our time and we had to take the leap. Yet as the tour unfolded, a very unsettling feeling continued to grow inside of me.”

BREAKDOWN

photo courtesy Joshua Meier

In May 2013, after months of touring to promote an album, musician David Boone had a severe manic episode that landed him in the hospital.

His friend’s dad drove them to Seattle, where they tracked down the mailbox and deposited the demo. Nothing came of it, of course. Boone’s middle-school teacher, Clifford Nelson, who had introduced Boone to the music of Bob Dylan and Don McLean, helped record Faucet’s demo. He also set the band up with its first paid gig, at Seeley-Swan High School’s homecoming dance. The day after the dance, Nelson was murdered in his trailer. The crime has never been solved, and the event, along with his family turmoil, sent Boone over the edge. The following semester, at 16, he dropped out of school. Not long afterward, he was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, hospitalized several times and

fee in the morning sure tastes fine with you,” she suddenly saw an image of her and Boone walking down a wedding aisle. “So I was like, ‘Ohhh-kay. I guess I have to ask this dude out.’” They were engaged three weeks later. For 15 years, she’s been his manager, helping promote his music. And drawing on her experience as a professional personal trainer, Stephanie encouraged Boone to stick to a healthy diet and exercise regimen. Symptoms of Boone’s bipolar disorder were, for the most part, kept at bay. For a while, his songs were steeped in simple devotion to God and a love-conquers-all philosophy (the Indy archives include scathing reviews of Boone’s music, critiquing its earnestness and predictability, but also praising its sincerity and

bums. A Tale of Gold was an upbeat rock album, which Boone released in 2007 at a sold-out show at the Wilma. He followed it with 2009’s State of the Union, an angrier album reflecting his disenchantment with politics and society. At the time of State of the Union, he threatened to give up music. He was building a house for his family and he thought maybe a break from music would do him good. “I’m constantly disappointed,” he told me at the time, “and I think it drives my art, but it’s also exhausting.” But he didn’t stop. He kept writing songs and sent them to the management company 365 Artists, where producer Danton Supple heard them. “I really liked the music and warmed to Boone straight away,” Supple wrote in

For Stephanie Boone, May 9, 2013, started like any other day. She went to work at her fitness studio and Boone stayed at home with 2-year-old Meyers. She imagined that the two of them would spend the morning playing music together, and the afternoon outside. But halfway through the day she got a gut feeling that something wasn’t right. “He hadn’t texted me all day,” she says. “And usually there’d be something from him like, ‘Where are the diapers?’ or ‘What should we have for dinner?’” It didn’t seem like a big enough deal to worry about, though, so she brushed her concern aside. When she got home that evening the house was a mess — toys strewn everywhere, food and dirty dishes all over the kitchen. Boone seemed unusually anxious and distracted. “It just wasn’t like him to have everything so out of place,” she says. That night, his behavior became even more erratic. He was paranoid and agitated, she says. He thought there were people whispering to him through the

missoulanews.com • April 5–April 12, 2018 [15]


electrical outlets. His speech kept slipping into what sounded like foreign languages. He stayed up all night burning incense and playing his guitar with the window shades pulled down tight. Even though she’d never witnessed it before, Stephanie understood that Boone was in a manic state. In the morning, she got a friend to watch Meyers and took Boone to Providence Center. In the waiting room, Stephanie says, Boone’s obsessive compulsiveness kicked in and he used an entire bottle of sanitizer on his hands. Still, he was in a deliriously good mood. “He thought that I was a princess and he was taking me to a ball with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie,” Stephanie says. “The doctor said most people having a manic episode are focused entirely on themselves, not the people around him. And the doctor said that was a good sign, at least.”

Once a mainstay on local stages and a touring pro, Boone suddenly couldn’t bear to play in front of a crowd. He could barely play music at all. exercise, and we were fine. I wish we had this time, too. It was one perpetual snowball that went the wrong way.” Boone was put on medications including lithium and seroquel and for the next few months, Stephanie watched as his anxiety seemed to get worse. She decided that they should move to her hometown of Philadelphia for a few months, where she could get support from her

“I was in a constant state of fight or flight,” he says. “I experienced crushing depression, paralyzing anxiety and panic, burning sensations through--out my body, severe nerve pain and a list of at least 100 other symptoms I don’t really even want to recount.” Boone’s most terrifying and debilitating symptom was memory loss. His doctors called it “jamais vu,” the opposite

bedroom two times the week before he was born. But a newborn isn’t going to care about paint colors, you know? I was projecting. When you have such a high bar for yourself because of your own misfortunes as a child, it puts more pressure on you. And when it all falls apart, it’s like my worst nightmare times about a thousand.” According to the National Institutes of Health, physiological dependence on

photo courtesy David Boone

After severe withdrawal from Klonopin, Boone has spent the past five years trying to get well with an array of medications.

Boone spent two days at Providence, and when he returned home he went to work recording more songs with Supple to make a full-length DAWNS album. But both Stephanie and Boone were wary about the prospect of another episode. Stephanie says doctors told them he should go on medication, and that the 12 years of relative good health he’d had was probably a fluke. They weren’t sure if the doctors were right, but they had Meyers to consider. “I was so hypervigilant about being better for my son, immediately,” Boone says. “Like, ‘This cannot be happening. I have a child. I am a dad now.’ And so I was way more willing to take medications. We usually would just weather the storm, just me and Steph, with diet and

family. In October 2013, before they left, Boone’s doctors put him on Klonopin to help him sleep better. But nothing helped. “It was like the anxiety was growing,” Stephanie says. “That kept getting worse, which was really weird. He never had really bad anxiety before. And then his depression got worse.” In April 2014, after they returned from Philly, Boone’s doctors weaned him off the Klonopin over the course of seven days. It sent him into severe withdrawal. “He had tunnel-vision, sweating all over, gastrointestinal issues, tinnitus,” Stephanie says. “Then he was just vomiting all over, and that was when I was like, I have to take him in.” Boone describes the symptoms as unrelenting and agonizing.

[16] Missoula Independent • April 5–April 12, 2018

symptoms, he was experiencing them far past the normal withdrawal window. A fundraiser for Boone in Missoula helped provide him enough money for in-patient care at a Tucson, Arizona, clinic called Cottonwood that specializes in holistic treatments of benzo withdrawal. The clinicians there told Boone he was one of the worst cases they’d ever seen. The hope was to get him off meds and back into managing his bipolar disorder with a healthy lifestyle. It was a peaceful place, Stephanie recalls, with gardens and waterfalls, and counselors conducted therapy on nature hikes. But at $6,000 a month, the Boones couldn’t afford it for long, so they returned to Missoula. “It was a good experience,” Stephanie says. “But when we got home, he was still on medications and he started going downhill again.” As time passed, Boone’s doctors

photo by Steele Williams

Before his manic episode, Boone, picture here with his son, Meyers, made an EP with producer Danton Supple and created music videos for the tracks.

of deja vu, in which patients have an eerie sensation that is often experienced by people with aphasia, amnesia or epilepsy. “When I go to a familiar place, I know that it should be familiar, but I can’t feel connected to it,” he says. He couldn’t remember where to put the capo on his guitar, or how to play chords. He couldn’t recall his own songs. He was aware of what he’d lost, and the longer it didn’t come back, the more anxiety it caused. He also found himself reexamining his childhood trauma. “A lot of what was driving me [in] the years leading up to me crashing was wanting to have the perfect childhood for Meyers,” Boone says. “I remember painting his

benzodiazepines, including Klonopin, is “accompanied by a withdrawal syndrome characterized by sleep disturbance, irritability, increased tension and anxiety, panic attacks, hand tremor, sweating, difficulty in concentration, dry wretching and nausea, some weight loss, palpitations, headache, muscular pain and stiffness and a host of perceptual changes.” Withdrawal symptoms usually cease in a few days, weeks or months, depending on other factors. But some people have reported a “protracted withdrawal” that lasts for years. Online forums like benzobuddies.org have documented these cases, which are often dismissed by mainstream doctors. Boone was not only experiencing all of the drug’s withdrawal

suggested that the window for withdrawal symptoms had probably closed, and that Boone’s persistent symptoms were probably psychosomatic. Boone’s doctors tried other medications, all of which seemed to bring more side effects than relief. He turned to alternatives: homeopathy, acupuncture, reiki, body talk, counseling, EMDR, biofeedback, supplementation. Ever since his son was a baby, Boone had taken Meyers to Caffe Dolce once a week for hot chocolate. “The joke was going to be that it was like Tuesdays with Morrie, but mine was Thursdays with Meyers,” Boone says. After his Klonopin withdrawal, Boone would sit at the table with Meyers and feel life passing by. He


says he began to feel distant from Meyers, as if he was looking at him through thick glass. He knew he loved him, but he couldn’t find an immediate emotional connection to him, and that sensation grew each day until it became normal. Meyers seemed to sense the shift in his father and preferred to cuddle up to Stephanie, which made Boone’s feeling of isolation more pronounced. “I couldn’t look at pictures of Meyers for three years,” Boone says now. “I turned over every picture Steph framed, because each one represented a beautiful memory that I had missed and I had no way to retrieve. I was perpetually stuck inside a bubble.” One winter day in 2015, enshrouded in his bubble, Boone and Meyers were driving home from their Thursday date. Boone recalls the sun coming out and a car passing by, windows down, blasting music. “This guy was just singing at the top of his lungs and Meyers, who was just 3, said, ‘I like the man singing more than I like the song.’ It was like whatever this guy was conveying had more life to it than the song itself,” Boone says. “And for me, that summarized the feeling I had with Meyers.” Boone had to lean on the idea that the love he knew he had for Meyers outweighed the fact that, for the moment, he felt unable to truly feel it. Not long afterward, Boone starting writing the song “Man in the Car Singing” about his experience with his son: “You, you woke up / screaming from your dreams / it was terrifying to me / was it me or the monster / or were we the same enemy?” And it’s true / sometimes we don’t know why / our love is better than us / our love is more than we can do.” The song captured Boone’s anxiety. But the fact that he was writing music again also provided evidence that he was finding his way back. He couldn’t see it yet, but people around him were noticing. One morning, Meyers, unprodded, climbed onto his dad’s lap for the first time in two years and wrapped his arms around him.

BURSTING THE BUBBLE

Before the Klonopin withdrawal, Boone used to write each of his songs in one big rush. It was like they had been brewing in his head, and when they were ready to come out, he’d sit down with his guitar and let them fly. Stephanie jokes that his songs were always born at the most inconvenient times, like when the family was headed out the door for an appointment. After he found himself in a bubble, songs came to him slowly, and fractured.

Sometimes a full verse would present itself. Other times he’d come up with a line before feeling sick again and setting his guitar down for another month. In May 2017, Boone traveled to a clinic in Seattle where he was diagnosed with severe chronic PTSD. He was told his temporal lobes were underactive, which fed into his experience of “derealization” (losing touch with reality), depersonalization (loss of a connection to self ) and memory loss. “They say it’s a cognitive distortion, or an error in thinking,” Boone says. “But until the brain heals and the body becomes less hypervigilant and fully calms down, that is ultimately your reality.”

With Ament involved, Boone contacted Danton Supple. It had been four years since they’d talked — a lifetime for Boone. Supple agreed to produce an album, and Boone began sending demo tracks to Supple’s London studio. In August, Supple flew to Missoula, and he and Boone set up a makeshift recording studio in an empty house near Caffe Dolce that a friend of Boone’s was trying to sell. The new album is called A Bubble to Burst. Besides Ament, it features Pete Wilkinson of Echo and the Bunnymen, and local musicians Tyler Paul and John Sporman. With DAWNS, Supple created layers of sound that gave the songs an al-

Last week, Supple finished mixing the 11-track album, which will be released sometime in the next couple of months. Boone has rejoined social media to promote three tracks he’s pre-releasing this week: “Breakdown,” “Something” and “Country Song.” “When I heard the new batch of tracks, which were just acoustic and vocal in a room, I was blown away by how beautiful they were,” Supple says. “I immediately wanted to make an album, but this would be a very different direction [than] before. The story of David, Steph and Meyers’ last few years is central to the album’s narrative and its emotion. But it’s not mournful or complaining, which it

photo by Amy Donovan

Boone’s recovery has included making a new album, which will be released in late spring, and building a studio space to record his music.

The diagnosis didn’t make Boone feel any more certain that he’d get better, but it flipped a switch. In October 2017, I sat with him in his living room as he played some new songs he’d written. He was going to make another album, but he wasn’t sure how. He knew that the only way to make it happen was to tap into his previous ambitiousness and take a shot. He wrote an email to his longtime hero, Missoula resident and Pearl Jam bassist Jeff Ament, to see if he would play bass. Ament agreed to collaborate on a handful of tracks. “David’s been consistently active in the [Missoula] music scene,” Ament wrote to the Indy via email. “I really liked the wide range of styles and grooves in his songs. I wanted to give David some different flavors: keys, upright bass and some pick style electric bass, so a bit of everything. The songs I played on demanded [that kind of attention].”

most cinematic feel. For Bubble, he built music around demos that Boone had recorded alone in his living room. The effect is something between the raw emotion of Boone’s early albums and the polish of DAWNS. The music is surprisingly upbeat, but the lyrics directly address the physical and emotional struggles Boone has faced the past five years. On “Man vs. Machine” he sings: What is this thing called a man? he was built strong he can do whatever he can stand on my head lay on my side buckle my belt swallow my pride What if he broke down what if the tide went too high for him to swim to the other side what if they built a better man made of machine he can do whatever I can’t …

could quite easily be. It’s full of optimism, love and the joys of a shared journey. David’s whole life path has been one of resilience and a struggle to succeed against the odds — and he has.”

DO WHAT YOU LOVE

Boone doesn’t see it that way. Not yet. He’s still taking medications, and he still feels lost in a bubble. In January 2018, Boone started posting his saga on Facebook. In five years, he says, aside from doctors, he’d barely talked to more than five people. On March 8, Boone wrote: “Does anyone else feel like the world, and society, and technology and life is just moving so fast now that you can almost sense it expanding you from the inside of your body? Stress and tension and tightness and pressure, causing this internal expansion that we can’t

catch up to and there’s no way we can adapt to quickly enough, that we are inextricably tied to, but it is stretching us beyond our capacity. Beyond even our desire to be a part of it anymore. Or is it just me?” For the people closest to Boone, the most difficult part of his illness is getting him to see that the next chapter of his story is the one where he bursts the bubble. His therapist at Providence, Emery Jones, likens Boone’s situation to a domestic violence scenario in which the abused can only feel safe when they’re out of danger. And Boone’s body, because he is still being weaned off medications that give him severe side effects, is not out of danger. “The continuous impact of symptoms makes it so he doesn’t experience his normal self,” Jones says. “I can see his baseline and function are increasing, but he has the perception he’s phenomenally impaired. What has to happen is that he needs a window — a lightening of the symptoms for long enough that he has a felt sense of it resolving.” In the meantime, Jones helps Boone stay above water as he waits for relief. And the fact that he is recording an album, Jones says, shows how far he’s come. It might be the case that Boone feels that, too. For a long time, he wasn’t sure he wanted this story to be told. Two years ago, he told me: “I want a story that has a happy ending. And I don’t know if mine does.” When he agreed to cooperate for this story, it’s because he knows his new music means something. “I hope from here on forward, I’m able to show up,” he says. “I do think these are some of my best songs, and I don’t fully understand how it happened.” Boone says A Bubble to Burst is about Meyers and Stephanie and the difficulties of the last five years. It’s about his gratitude for his family and his hope that he can return to himself. “It’s about seeing through what’s not true. It’s about the music industry, mental illness...” He stops himself. “It’s hard for me to describe it all.” For Boone, the last five years have changed everything, including the vision he once had for himself as an artist. For years, he tried to make it in the music business and now, he says, all he wants is to be back at some Missoula coffee shop or winery, wherever, playing his music for anyone who will listen. “My mentor, Clifford Nelson, told me 25 years ago that you should do what you do because you love it. And that’s it. I wish I could go back in time and whisper that in my ear. I never needed more than that.” editor@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • April 5–April 12, 2018 [17]


[arts]

Sweet creepin’ Musician Jonny Fritz finds inspiration in everyday people by Ednor Therriault

S

o what finally drove country music artist Jonny Fritz from Nashville? Was it the hammerlock of Music Row on the songwriting opportunities? The proliferation of dimwitted bro country hits? The endless lunch meetings with smarmy label hacks? Actually, it was none of that. “It’s just a small southern town and everybody knows everything you’re doing. I just got tired of not having any privacy,” says Fritz, whom we spoke with just after he’d done a guest DJ stint on KBGA. The once and future Missoula resident put Music City in the rearview three years ago after 15 years based there and moved to Los Angeles. “L.A. is the opposite,” he says. “You can live a thousand lives in L.A. and nobody cares. Small-town gossip has no place in the big city.” What the 34-year-old Fritz doesn’t mention is the possibility that in Nashville, he was probably a square peg in a town full of round, radio-friendly holes. His music is not easily categorized. Is he a Jonathan Richman with a higher voice? A 12 Country Greats-era Ween without the psychosis? Lucinda Williams with a sense of humor? To our ear, he’s all that and more. There’s his distinct voice: a reedy, half-swallowed tenor that exudes honesty and vulnerability without a speck of irony. The music is straight-up country that breaks little new ground, but that puts the focus where it should be, squarely on the lyrics and Fritz’s plaintive delivery. Over the course of four solo albums, he’s shared his micro observations with seemingly offhanded phrases that approach brilliance. Lines like, “I’m only happy in hindsight/ I only want what’s not in store” and “I’m gettin’ to the age where turnin’ a page/ Is easier than learnin’ my lines,” are instantly relatable to those of us trying to navigate middle age in a rapidly changing world. “What really inspires music to me is everyday people,” he says, “like just going to the post office is the most inspiring thing I can do, or going to a Walmart. Just the way a person will look at another person or say something.”

L.A. country singer Jonny Fritz was born in Missoula, and returns this week to open a show at the Wilma.

His move to California bore fruit almost immediately. He befriended Jim James from My Morning Jacket, and James expressed interest in making a record. With the help of Fritz’s “hot shit L.A. band of young bucks,” Sweet Creep was recorded entirely outdoors in just

[18] Missoula Independent • April 5–April 12, 2018

three days on a hilltop in Montecito Heights. “It was such a special thing,” says Fritz. “You’d hear planes going overhead, there was an ATV off in the corner … there’s tons of stuff in this record that we didn’t cut out. We were like, just leave it, man, it sounds cool.”

Released in 2016, Sweet Creep touches on some bigger themes as well. “Are You Thirsty” is a blunt offer of help to someone who’s quit the bottle: “Did you take a break from drinking, and found out you had no friends? Do you eat a lot more candy now, and smoke

more cigarettes?” Fritz says he has no use for hazy metaphors or trite bromides. “I can get really critical of other people’s music, especially if there’s too much of the standard lyrics and filler,” he says. “Or if there’s too many clichés. I’m never going to say, like, ‘I’m drinking beer at a tavern.’ I just want to sing the songs that have never been sung before.” Although enamored of his new L.A. digs, Fritz is working on returning parttime to Missoula, his city of birth. “Los Angeles is wonderful, but in the summer, it’s brutal,” he says. “Missoula is wonderful, but in the winter, it’s brutal.” He’s currently refurbishing a house he bought on Missoula’s southside, with an eye to becoming a snowbird. It’s a logical move, as he’s already established relationships with several Missoula musicians, such as the Best Westerns, with whom he has recorded, and Izaak Opatz. “I’m obsessed with Izaak Opatz,” he says. “He’s got a record called Mariachi Static. It’s such a fucking great record.” As with the KBGA appearance, he’s already begun inserting himself into the community in typically unconventional ways. Just last month, he dropped by Western Cider’s inaugural “Drink and Draw” session, where he posed for a few cider-slurping sketchers. With the lean body of a runner, expressive brown eyes and puffy drag chute of unruly brown hair, Fritz makes for a pretty enticing sketch subject. He’s quite a willing model, even baring it all for the deck of nudie playing cards he sells on his website. When it comes to keeping Missoula weird, Jonny Fritz will soon be moving the needle in the right direction with both his refreshingly original music and his delightfully deviant personality. “Honestly, I feel like if people are gonna reach out and say, ‘Man, I listened to your music and I get it,’ then I’d love to reach out and talk to you, because if you get it, then you get it.” Jonny Fritz opens for I’m With Her at the Wilma Sun., April 8, at 8 PM. $27.50 – $37.50 advance. All ages. arts@missoulanews.com


[books]

Circle back Poet Henrietta Goodman answers by sonnet by Sarah Aswell

Some books of poems beg the reader to exam- and trash and moldy food, as well as to her ine each poem individually, like flipping coins over mother’s confusing guidance and mystifying acin your hand, one by one. Other books of poems tions. They also offer a tidy way of processing: The feel epic: The author asks you to gulp down all the opening octave often offers up an event or a poems at once to reach full effect. Henrietta Good- thought, which winds up in complexity over the man’s All That Held Us lies somewhere between first eight lines. Then, with the rhyme scheme the two — each of her untitled Italian sonnets is change in the ninth line comes a break in tension, linked to the one that comes before it with a single a sestet of greater understanding and analysis. But line, image or idea, creating something reminiscent before any tidy conclusions can be made (sonnets of a garland or a necklace or a prayer flag. The re- love tidy conclusions), Goodman whisks you to her next sonnet, which opens sult is a book of poems that with a thread from the last — can each stand alone graceperhaps the fourth line of fully as single beads, but the last poem repeated, or reach their full potential just a handful of words or a when they flow together one little phrase stolen from the after another. page before, or a flash of an The book, which was image we’ve just seen. The published as a result of winecho presents you with a ning the John Ciardi Prize for new moment from her life, Poetry, consists of three and a new puzzle and new groups of 16 Petrarchan sontension. nets, all thoughtfully and Like any good story, the carefully rhymed and metiny arcs of each sonnet cretered. Besides being a book ate larger arcs. The poems in of poems, it’s a memoir: the first section are formaGoodman spends each tidy tive, the second arc is filled block of text exploring some with conflict, the final third facet of her past. As she filled with reflection, deeper writes in one poem, “the past understanding, and forward never makes anything from All That Held Us movement. One of the scratch,” and her poems reHenrietta Goodman strongest poems of the book flect that, reaching back genPaperback, BkMk Press appears at the beginning of erations, circling back on 66 pages, $13.95 the third act, when a man at images and ideas, echoing lines and thoughts as she returns and re-returns to one of Goodman’s readings asks if she’s ever written anything positive about her father — and the the memories and themes of her childhood. The book centers on a small core of women: last line of the poem is, “So this, my answer.” It’s a Goodman, herself, her mysterious (or perhaps just moment of strength and clarity after both the unknowable) mother, her grandmother and her reader and Goodman have waded this far. And like aunt, a hoarder of physical objects but also memo- many of the poems in the last third of the book, ries and thoughts, which she scribbled everywhere. they feel powerful and rewarding. Also like a garland or a necklace or a rosary, “We didn’t know any men at all,” Goodman writes in the first poem, setting up a narrative that is largely the poems in All That Held Us encourage you to one of femininity and being female as well as one create a circle. Upon reading the last line of the last of not quite knowing how to know men. When men poem (which is about Goodman’s parents), the do appear in the book — her largely absent father, first urge is to flip to the front again, to read the a boyfriend, handymen — they are treated as for- cycle again, with your new knowledge of Goodeigners, needed but not needed, wanted but not man’s story and her world. And, you guessed it, the wanted. In one poem she writes, “The thing to do first line of the first poem is also about Goodman’s with any snake was find/a man to kill it, no matter parents. Henrietta Goodman reads from All That what kind/of snake, or kind of man.” The sonnets feel like a perfect vehicle for Held Us at Shakespeare & Co. Wed., April 11, Goodman’s story. They offer her a strict scaffolding at 7 PM. Free. from which she can build her messy story. They stand in stark contrast to her aunt’s piles of boxes arts@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • April 5–April 12, 2018 [19]


[art]

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[20] Missoula Independent • April 5–April 12, 2018

Under light Two artists search for clarity at E3 Convergence by Melissa Mylchreest

When Missoula artist Elisha Harteis found out she had the opportunity to do an installation show at Missoula’s E3 Gallery, she knew she wanted Butte-based artist Kelly Packer as her co-exhibitor. “Kelly and I have been friends for a number of years, and we’ve always loved each other’s work and wanted to do some sort of show together,” Harteis says. The thing was, neither had the time nor resources to collaborate on a whole new body of work: Not only were they both busy with their jobs and creative lives, they were both pregnant as well. So the two decided to come together with separate, individual shows that they had either already created or were in the process of creating, and see what sort of themes emerged. While this may sound like the recipe for a disjointed or haphazard end product, the results couldn’t be further from the truth. They titled the Elisha Harteis’ mythical creatures are part of a new exhibit show A Glimpse of Clarity (a phrase titled A Glimpse of Clarity. lifted from Packer’s artist statement) to describe the way both artists create art with an eye also pretty abstract,” Packer says. “I work from Xtoward exposure and vulnerability, examining the rays and bones and things like that.” Overlapping spaces in memory and day-to-day life that allow for geometric shapes, the appearance of translucency and shadow, the rough form of a figure on a stark, moments of lucidity or insight. Harteis’ nearly life-sized sculptures of pensive dark background — it feels as though the viewer is, children — often wearing pajama-like outfits, often Packer says, looking at X-rays on a light screen, or juxtaposed with animals — are a regular sight in perhaps leaning over a dissection tray. Her work galleries around town. Her multimedia, three-di- elucidates the internal in a different way than mensional ceramic and metal work traffics in ideas Harteis, but she argues that they’re interested in of childhood, imagination, play and darkness. In similar emotional narratives. “Our points of departure are different, and the this particular show, a large, mythical creature — part bird, part horse, part elephant — stands in con- outcome is very different too, but we’re both frontation or communication with a child. Brightly- speaking about the same vulnerability,” Packer says. colored ceramic spheres hang all around them. “I see my drawings as turning bodies inside out, Shadows cast by metal frames dapple the space. It’s which is more literal than Elisha’s work.” Taken together, the two bodies of work resan exploration in whimsy and sensory stimulation, but also a nod toward the power of the make-be- onate as though they were created with the intenlieve worlds that children inhabit, and the some- tion of being displayed side-by-side. It’s perhaps a testament to the two friends’ long-standing convictimes frightening things that happen there. Packer, who went to school at the University tion that their work always belonged in a joint of Montana, spent 10 years in Boise where she show. Even though their visions took shape sepafounded the Enso Artspace artist collective, and re- rately, they’re both engaged in the same ongoing cently returned to Montana, landing in Butte. Her conversation. A Glimpse of Clarity opens Fri., April 6, at paintings and drawings are reminiscent of Richard Diebenkorn and Paul Klee, but perhaps even more E3 Convergence Gallery with a reception from abstract, making use of jewel-toned colors, 5 to 9 PM. sketched and scratched lines, and fantastic figures. “My work is more anatomically inspired, but it’s arts@missoulanews.com


[tv]

Cult classic The allure of Wild, Wild Country by Molly Laich

Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh is the subject of Netflix’s Wild, Wild Country.

So many things boggle the mind about Netflix’s six-part documentary Wild, Wild Country, it’s hard to know where to begin. Produced by Jay and Mark Duplass, the series follows an Indian guru named Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh (or Osho) and his many devout followers as they take over a small Oregonian town named Antelope, rename the place “Rajneeshpuram” and generally wreak havoc on everything they touch for four explosive years. Eventually, the colony implodes under the strain of internal conflict and scandal, which leads us to the obscure cultural artifact that we are only now collectively uncovering. Seriously, what the hell was going on in this country in the early 1980s and how is this the first anyone from my generation is hearing of it? Wild, Wild Country tells its story through newsreels of the time, inside footage from within the commune and through extensive interviews with players on all sides. (Not since 2006’s Jesus Camp have I seen documentarians toe the line between two ideologies so deftly.) We begin in India, when Osho and a select few followers — mostly European and American tourists looking to buy spirituality — decide to resettle in America. Beware a gang of meditators who also know how to make money. No good can come of it. The film’s interview subjects include, but are not limited to: Straight-shooting townspeople in overalls who don’t like hippies stomping through their town, some of the commune’s original founders and enthusiastic lawyers on both sides. Most provocative of all, we have Osho’s personal secretary and the commune’s maniacal mastermind, Ma Anand Sheela. She comes off as equal parts villainous and fierce, both in footage from the time and in her present-day, unapologetic interview as a formidable woman in her 60s. As Osho’s personal spokesman during the clan’s formative years, we see Sheela oscillate methodically from

cunning manipulation to seemingly genuine compassion for her master. I think we’re meant to disapprove of her overall, but isn’t it just like a cult leader to let a powerful woman do all the work and then take the fall? I couldn’t help admiring Sheela’s unwavering strength of character throughout, even if she did exploit 3,500 homeless people over a frenzied three weeks and mastermind a plot to poison Oregonian townspeople with salmonella. Oh, and what about the parallels between Rajneeshpuram and our current political climate? It’s true enough that the natives’ small-town, traditional ideology clashed irreconcilably with the free-love intellectualism of the sannyasins; just like how we can’t talk to each other today, right? This observation mostly bores me. I am much more fascinated by the red people’s blind devotion to a bland leader, how efficiently they organized, and what little time it took for simple and beautiful ideas to take such dark and twisted turns toward the corrupt. I joined a cult once, long story: A boyfriend talked me into attending a kind of Scientology-lite self-help pyramid scheme called the Landmark Forum that I narrowly escaped (two long weekends and $700 later). From this I learned an important life lesson. Whenever people begin to ambitiously organize around impossibly lofty ideals, forget about it. Everything takes money to sustain itself, and therein always lies the crux. It’s particularly bizarre and absurd to watch the Rajneeshans worship their leader, who remains ominous and mostly in silence throughout (save for a brief stint on the talk show circuit to call his faithful servant a bitch). Everyone’s talking about what a special man Osho is, but pardon me, that’s idiotic. Peace and love require no master orany kind of dress code and, really, how special can one man be? arts@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • April 5–April 12, 2018 [21]


[film] At press time the Southgate 9 did not have a complete schedule. Visit amctheatres.com for up-to-date scheduling.

OPENING THIS WEEK

BLOCKERS These parents will stop at nothing from preventing their daughters from having sex on prom night. One of the parents is played by John Cena, so there’s like a 50percent chance someone’s getting an attitude adjustment. Rated R. Also stars Leslie Mann and Ike Barinholtz. Playing at the Pharaohplex and the AMC 12. CHAPPAQUIDDICK The scandal following a car accident and the death of a young woman lands on Senator Ted Kennedy’s doorsteps. I wonder how this will impact the high school’s volleyball team? Rated PG-13. Stars Kate Mara, Jason Clark and Jim Gaffigan. Playing at the AMC 12. LEANING INTO THE WIND–ANDY GOLDSWORTHY Sixteen years after the release of the groundbreaking film Rivers and Tides–Andy Goldsworthy, director Thomas Riedelsheimer returns to catch up with the famed artist and his explorations of nature and self. Rated PG. Playing at the Roxy. MIRACLE SEASON After a car crash kills their captain, a high school volleyball team wonders if they have what it takes to go all the way to state without their anchor. Wait a second, do you think this is the same car accident from Chappaquidick? Rated PG. Also stars William Hurt, Tiera Skovbye, and Danika Yarosh. Playing at the AMC 12. A QUIET PLACE A family must navigate their lives in silence after mysterious creatures that hunt by sound threaten their survival. I said A FAMILY MUST NAVIGATE THEIR LIVES IN SILENCE AFTER MYSTERIOUS CREATURES THAT HUNT BY SOUND THREATEN THEIR SURVIVAL. Rated PG-13. Stars John Krasinksi and Emily Blunt. Shhhhhhhhhh! Playing at the Pharaohplex and the AMC 12.

NOW PLAYING ANNIHILATION It’s already killed soldiers and explorers, now a team of biologists, anthropologists and zoologists trek into a death zone to find out what’s behind all the carnage. Rated R. Stars Natalie Portman, Jennifer Jason Leigh and Oscar Isaac. Playing at the Roxy. BELLE DE JOUR (1967) Actress Catherine Deneuve found her most iconic role as a Parisian housewife who begins spending her late afternoon’s working at a bordello. Rated R. Also stars Jean Sorel and Michel Piccoli. Playing Sun., April 8 at 7 PM at the Roxy. BIUTIFUL (2010) Parents make a lot of sacrifices for their children, but how far will one man go for his family as he travels through the dangerous underworld of Barcelona? Rated R. Directed by Alejandro Iñárritu and starring Javier Bardem and Maricel Alvarez. Playing Tue., April 10 at 7 PM at the Roxy. BLACK PANTHER After making 10 movies starring white guys named Chris, Marvel Studios finally gives the king of Wakanda his own feature film. Black Panther must prevent a

“Don’t you dare say a bad word about Leatherheads in my presence.” John Krasinksi stars in A Quiet Place, opening at the AMC 12 and the Pharaohplex. Shakespearean-style coup from kicking of a new world war. Rated. PG-13. Stars Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan and Lupita Nyong’o. Playing at the AMC 12, the Southgate 9 and the Pharaohplex. CRAZY, STUPID, LOVE (2011) Hey girl, I know you love Steve Carell on The Office, but what if he was a recent divorcee who needed relationship advice from one Mr. Ryan Gosling and his abs? Rated PG-13. Also stars Julianne Moore and Emma Stone. Playing Thu., April 12 at 7 PM at the Roxy. THE DEATH OF STALIN Sniveling brown-nosers, opportunistic advisors and incompetent heirs all vie for a tyrant’s power. So take your mind off American politics with this pitch-black satire about Soviet infighting. Rated R. Stars Steve Buscemi, Jeffrey Tambor and Michael Palin. Playing at the Roxy. FANTASTIC MR. FOX Before you see Wes Anderson’s latest stab at stop motion animation, check out his feature length adaptation of Roald Dahl’s classic children’s book. A compulsive chicken thief turns newspaper reporter, but the call to pull off one more big score pulls him out of retirement and right into danger. Rated PG. Stars the voices of George Clooney, Meryl Streep and Bill Murray. Playing Sat., April 7 and Sun., April 8 at 2 PM at the Roxy. GAME NIGHT A competitive couple’s weekly board game get-together becomes the scene of a real-life murder mystery. Was it Professor Plum? I never trusted that guy. Rated R. Stars Jason Bateman, Rachel McAdams and Billy Magnussen. Playing at the Southgate 9. GHOST IN THE SHELL (1995) If last year’s whitewashed American remake taught us one thing, it’s that no one can recreate the mindbending story and cyberpunk action of this Japanese animation classic. Not Rated, but not for kiddos. Directed by Mamoru Oshii. Playing Sat., April 7 at 9 PM at the Roxy. GOD’S NOT DEAD: A LIGHT IN THE DARKNESS The third film in this evangelical franchise follows a congregation having a crisis of faith after its church burns down. No Kevin Sorbo in this one, so who gets to play the strawman atheist? Rated PG. Stars Shane Haper, Samantha Boscarino and John Corbett. Playing at the Southgate 9. THE GREATEST SHOWMAN P.T. Barnum might be best known for coining the

[22] Missoula Independent • April 5–April 12, 2018

phrase “there’s a sucker born every minute,” but the life of the famed circus founder still has a few surprises up its musical sleeve. Speaking of which, now you can join in with your favorite songs at the new Singalong release. Rated PG. Stars Hugh Jackman, Zac Efron and Zendaya. Showing at the Southgate 9. I CAN ONLY IMAGINE Based on the most-played contemporary Christian song of all time, this film follows a young musician who deals with the death of his father by writing the most-played contemporary Christian song of all time. We’ve got a real Ouroboros situation here. Rated PG. Stars J. Michael Finley, Dennis Quaid and Cloris Leachman. Playing at the Pharaohplex, the AMC 12 and the Southgate 9. MIDNIGHT SUN A girl with a severe allergy to sunlight becomes obsessed with Arnold Schwarzenegger’s son. Surprisingly, this isn’t a horror film, but a tear-jerking romance. Rated PG-13. Stars Bella Thorne, Patrick Schwarzenegger and Rob Riggle. Playing at the AMC 12 and the Southgate 9. THE NOTEBOOK (2004) Hey girl, I know you love movies about 1940’s romances getting torn apart by the Second World War. I know more importantly that you love movies where Ryan Gosling wears a white shirt in the rain. Rated PG-13. Also stars Rachel McAdams and James Garner. Playing Thu., April 5 at 7 PM at the Roxy.

lion with a screenplay from the guy who wrote XMen: The Last Stand. Rated PG-13. Stars Nostalgia, Performative Nerdery and The Iron Giant with a gun for some stupid reason. Playing at the AMC 12, the Southgate 9 and the Pharaohplex. SHERLOCK GNOMES It took them seven years to make a sequel to Gnomeo and Juliet, a movie the internet assures is 100-percent real. It looks like Johnny Depp has reached the “voicing a CGI garden gnome detective” portion of his career. Rated PG. Also stars the voices of James McAvoy, Emily Blunt and Maggie Smith. Playing at the Pharaohplex and the AMC 12. THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE (2017) A group of American soldiers return home to deal with the trauma they suffered, both external and internal, during the war in Iraq. Rated R. Stars Miles Teller, Beulah Koale and Joe Cole. Playing Mon., April 9 at 6 PM at the Roxy. TOMB RAIDER Hollywood gives another go of adapting the longrunning video game series after trying their damnedest with Angelina Jolie a decade and a half ago. As reboots go, this one will probably have 100percent less U2 on the soundtrack. Rated PG-13. Stars Alicia Vikander, Dominic West and Daniel Wu. Playing at the Pharaohplex and the Southgate 9

PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING Monstrous kaiju battle human-piloted robots in this sequel without Guillermo del Toro, without Idris Elba and without Charlie Hunnam. At least Charlie Day is back. Rated PG-13. Also stars John Boyega, Scott Eastwood and Jing Tian. Playing at the Pharaohplex, the AMC 12 and the Southgate 9.

UNSANE When her estranged ex-boyfriend starts stalking her, a troubled businesswoman signs up for a support group to help her take back her life. Too bad the “support group” ends up being an involuntarily commitment to a mental institution. These are the dangers of gaslighting. Rated R. Stars Claire Foy, Joshua Leonard and Juno Temple. Playing at the Southgate 9.

PAUL, APOSTLE OF CHRIST The biblical tale of Saint Paul hits the big screen with none other than Jesus Christ himself, Jim Caviezel, playing Saint Luke. Little bit of a demotion there. Rated PG-13. Also stars James Faulkner and Olivier Martinez. Playing at the AMC 12.

A WRINKLE IN TIME Based on the classic book of the same name, a trio of children band together with astral travelers to save Chris Pine from a universe-spanning evil. Rated PG. Also stars Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon and Mindy Kaling. Playing at the AMC 12.

READY PLAYER ONE If we’ve learned one thing from Cartoon All-Stars to the Rescue, it’s that jamming a movie full of pop culture references and character cameos is a surefire way to be remembered forever. Steven Spielberg adapts Ernest Cline’s novel about cyberpunk rebel-

Capsule reviews by Charley Macorn. Planning your trip to the local cinema? Get up-to-date listings and film times at theroxytheater.org, amctheatres.com and pharaohplex.com to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities.


[dish]

2230 McDonald Ave, Missoula, MT 59801 Sunday–Thursday 2–9PM Friday & Saturday 12–9PM

GREATBURNBREWING.COM

photo by Susan Elizabeth Shepard

The world famous Missoula Pita Pit by Susan Elizabeth Shepard It’s unusual for the Indy to cover a chain restaurant in this space, but Pita Pit, which was founded in Ontario, has its U.S. headquarters in Coeur d’Alene, making it more or less a local business. Also, in case you missed it, the Missoula location is enormously famous due to the virality of a video recorded by three young women who received terrible customer service there last month. You can look it up. I’m not describing it in a food column. Any college town worthy of the name has a Pita Pit in its downtown area. Open until 3 a.m. by franchise dictate, it’s often the option of last resort for hungry people out and about in the wee hours. At the risk of sounding cross-promotional, the Indy’s iDeals section always has Pita Pit gift certificates for sale at bargain rates, making them a popular choice with staffers looking for a cheap lunch that includes some form of vegetables. And they’re fine, really. Especially if you stick

WHAT’S GOOD HERE with ingredients that traditionally go into a pita: chickpea-based products like hummus and falafel. They come with a salad’s worth of veggies including spinach, tomatoes, red onions and black olives. The salty feta cheese is a counterpoint to the unusual black-peppery falafel. The containing pita is split to the halfway point, leaving enough of a pocket for the sandwich maker to tightly stuff the fillings into before rolling it all up, making for a tidy, portable packet of food. Everything was really fresh, too. I’m not much of a chain-fast-food eater, so I was impressed that the vegetables were crunchy and flavorful, not wilted and watery like a certain sandwich chain I won’t name that’s got a Country Teasers song in its latest ad. The service was polite and competent. At no point did any employees lose their cool. Probably they don’t like to talk about their possibly racist, definitely intemperate former coworker and the fame to which she catapulted them. I didn’t risk asking.

missoulanews.com • April 5–April 12, 2018 [23]


[dish]

Lunch and Dinner From-Scratch, Fresh, Delicious

Gluten-Free & Vegan NO PROBLEM!

FOOD BIZ BOOT CAMP aka “How to Start a Small Food Business in Missoula” Learn the ins & outs of starting your own specialty food business. Taught by business professionals. 5 Tues. April 17-May 15 6:30-8:30pm $100/student (406) 926-2720 Pre-registration required – limit 12 moonlightkitchens.com 1951 Kensington Ave. - Missoula

APRIL

COFFEE SPECIAL

Moon Bean Special Blend

$10.95/lb.

BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

Bernice’s Bakery 190 S Third St W 728-135 A Missoula gem since 1978, now serving lunch seven days a week from 11 - 4pm. Featured items: scratch-made soups, salads, sandwiches and more. Bernice's is known for its scrumptious desserts including cupcakes, pastries, cookies, and cakes. Gluten-free and vegan options available. A must-have for the coffee lover in your life? A bag of Bernice’s signature blend locally roasted with love. Check us out on Facebook, Instagram or visit our website at www.bernicesbakerymt.com $-$$ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Bridge Pizza 600 S Higgins Ave. 542-0002 bridgepizza.com A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drivethru, & delivery. Open everyday 11am 10:30pm. $-$$ Burns Street Bistro 1500 Burns St. 543-0719 burnsstbistro.com We cook the freshest local ingredients as a matter of pride. Our relationship with local farmers, ranchers and other businesses allows us to bring quality, scratch cooking and fresh-brewed Black Coffee Roasting Co. coffee and espresso to Missoula’s Historic Westside neighborhood. Handmade breads & pastries, soups, salads & sandwiches change with the seasons, but our commitment to delicious food does not. Mon-Fri 7am - 2pm. Sat/Sun Brunch 9am - 2pm. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 45 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $

Chameleon Mobile Kitchen 1616 S 3rd St W (through May) 8340 Hwy 200 E (June-Sept) 214-1372 Our menu features slow-roasted meats and fresh seasonal veggies paired with diverse sauces and salsas made from scratch. Tacos, burritos, hot sandwiches, bowls and pasta. We also offer daily specials, seasonal drinks, and house-baked goods. We are fully equipped and self-contained for on-site public and private events and offer drop-off catering. Call ahead for pick-up. Online menu available on Google Maps. Open Tues Thurs 11:30 am - 10 pm, Fri & Sat 11:30 am midnight, closed Sunday and Monday. $-$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West 541-FOOD The GFS Deli features made-to-order sandwiches, Fire Deck pizza & calzones, rice & noodle wok bowls, an awardwinning salad bar, an olive & antipasto bar and a self-serve hot bar offering a variety of housemade breakfast, lunch and dinner entrées. A seasonally-changing selection of deli salads and rotisserie-roasted chickens are also available. Locally-roasted coffee/espresso drinks and an extensive fresh juice and smoothie menu complement bakery goods from the GFS ovens and Missoula’s favorite bakeries. Indoor and patio seating. Open every day 7am-10pm. $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St. 549-7723 grizzlyliquor.com Voted Missoula’s Best Liquor Store! Largest selection of spirits in the Northwest, including all Montana micro-distilleries. Your headquarters for unique spirits and wines! Free customer parking. Open Monday-Saturday 9-7:30. $$$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$

$…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over

[24] Missoula Independent • April 5–April 12, 2018


[dish] Iza 529 S. Higgins 830-3237 izarestaurant.com Local Asian cuisine feature SE Asian, Japanese, Korean and Indian dishes. Gluten Free and Vegetarian no problem. Full Beer, Wine, Sake and Tea menu. We have scratch made bubble teas. Come in for lunch, dinner, drinks or just a pot of awesome tea. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:303pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm, Dinner M-Sat 3pmclose. $-$$ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. (on the hip strip) 543-7154 themissoulaseniorcenter.org Did you know the Missoula Senior Center serves delicious hearty lunches every week day for only $4 for those on the Nutrition Program, $5 for U of M Students with a valid student ID and $6 for all others. Children under 10 eat free. Join us from 11:30 - 12:30 M-F for delicious food and great conversation. $ The Mustard Seed Asian Cafe Southgate Mall • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian fusion cuisine. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combine the best of Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences. Full menu available at the bar. Award winning desserts made fresh daily , local and regional micro brews, fine wines & signature cocktails. Vegetarian and Gluten free menu available. Takeout & delivery. $$-$$$ Nara Japanese/Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary KoreanJapanese restaurant and enjoy its warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer, Wine and Sake. $$-$$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. 543-3188 orangestreetfoodfarm.com Experience The Farm today!!! Voted number one Supermarket & Retail Beer Selection. Fried chicken, fresh meat, great produce, vegan, gluten free, all natural, a HUGE beer and wine selection, and ROCKIN’ music. What deal will you find today? $-$$$ Pearl Cafe 231 E. Front St. 541-0231 • pearlcafe.us Country French meets the Northwest. Idaho Trout with King Crab, Beef Filet with Green Peppercorn Sauce, Fresh Northwest Fish, Seasonally Inspired Specials, House Made Sourdough Bread & Delectable Desserts. Extensive wine list, local beer on draft. Reservations recommended. Visit us on Facebook or go to Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$

Pita Pit 130 N Higgins 541-7482 pitapitusa.com Fresh Thinking Healthy Eating. Enjoy a pita rolled just for you. Hot meat and cool fresh veggies topped with your favorite sauce. Try our Chicken Caesar, Gyro, Philly Steak, Breakfast Pita, or Vegetarian Falafel to name just a few. For your convenience we are open until 3am 7 nights a week. Call if you need us to deliver! $-$$

The Old Post’s Green Beret

HAPPIEST HOUR

Sushi Hana 403 N. Higgins 549-7979 SushiMissoula.com Montana’s Original Sushi Bar. We Offer the Best Sushi and Japanese Cuisine in Town. Casual atmosphere. Plenty of options for non-sushi eaters including daily special items you won’t find anywhere else. $1 Specials Mon & Wed. Lunch Mon–Sat; Dinner Daily. Sake, Beer, & Wine. Visit SushiMissoula.com for full menu. $$-$$$ Taco Sano Two Locations: 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West 1515 Fairview Ave inside City Life 541-7570 • tacosano.net Home of Missoula’s Best BREAKFAST BURRITO. 99 cent TOTS every Tuesday. Once you find us you’ll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9pm 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$ Tia’s Big Sky 1016 W. Broadway 317-1817 tiasbigsky.com We make locally sourced Mexican food from scratch. We specialize in organic marinated Mexican street chicken (rotisserie style) fresh handmade tortillas, traditional and fusion tamales, tacos, pozole and so much more. Most items on our menu are gluten free and we offer many vegetarian and vegan options. We also have traditional Mexican deserts, as well as drinks. Much of our produce is grown for us organically by Kari our in house farmer! Eat real food at Tia’s! Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over

photo by Derek Brouwer

What you’re drinking: The Old Post just seems like a beer bar. Maybe it’s the beer-and-a-burger special on Monday nights. Maybe it’s the pictorial riff on the evolutionary “March of Progress” above the beer list, which depicts a man devolving as his mug gets emptier. (I’d be remiss if I didn’t take this opportunity to point out that the actual “March of Progress” — you know, the visual progression of ape to man — is a crock of you-know-what. Evolution doesn’t work like that. It’s a branching bush! Not a straight line!) Anyway, the Old Post is more than beer. The bartenders also serve up great mixed drinks, including this week’s cocktail: The Green Beret. What it is: Vodka, lime White Claw hard seltzer, Red Bull and a splash of Midori, served with an orange slice and a cherry. Midori, by the way, is a melon-flavored, brightgreen liqueur. The Old Post advertised the drink as a St. Patrick’s Day special, but it’s still

on the chalkboard menu, and isn’t obnoxiously green or really in any way Irish. Mine was served in a pint glass. What it tastes like: Orders of the $6 Green Beret come with a warning: “It’s very sweet.” True, but there are different kinds of sweet, which my obviously refined palate classifies as syrupy sweet or seltzer sweet. The Green Beret is the sharper seltzer kind — more like a Sierra Mist than a Mountain Dew. That’s a compliment. But here’s my warning: Don’t drink it on an empty stomach. This one’s fairly strong. Where to find it: The Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St. —Derek Brouwer Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

missoulanews.com • April 5–April 12, 2018 [25]


FRI | 7:30 PM

Country star Brett Eldredge plays the Adams Center Fri., April 6. 7:30 PM. $25–$45.

TUE | 9 PM

Car Seat Headrest plays the Top Hat Tue., April 10. Doors at 8 PM, show at 9. $18/$15 advance.

[26] Missoula Independent • April 5–April 12, 2018

SAT | 8 PM

Diplo plays the Wilma. Sat., April 7. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. Sold out.


UPCOMING JUN JUN 04 THE FLAMING LIPS 22 JUN

07

SLIGHTLY STOOPID STICK FIGURE & PEPPER

JUN

BELA FLECK & THE FLECKTONES/ 12 THE WOOD BROTHERS SEP JASON ISBELL NEW JUL

21 PRIMUS/MASTODON 08 APR

18

The Hasslers play the Top Hat Fri., April 6 at 10:15 PM. $5.

GNASH & DREAMERS

APR

COLD HARD CASH SHOW

25

APR

TECH N9NE

APR

10 YEARS

20

FRI | 10:15 PM

ALL TIME LOW

APR APR

CAR SEAT HEADREST NAKED GIANTS

GRIEVES

RAINBOW KITTEN SURPRISE SEP COLD WAR NEW 05 KIDS SEP LAKE STREET NEW 12 DIVE

01

APR

STELTH ULVANG

APR APR

MOUSE POWELL & CODEPENDENTS

29

APR

RIPE

MAY

THE DIP & AMORY

WILD CHILD

28 PHUTUREPRIMITIVE

15 20

AND THE 400 UNIT

JOSH RITTER & THE ROYAL CITY BAND

MAY

07 GHOST PEPPERS & ROTGUT WHINES 24 10

DIRTY HEADS

IRATION, THE MOVEMENT, & PACIFIC DUB

24

ERIKA WENNERSTROM (OF HEARTLESS BASTARDS) JOSH T. PEARSON

PEDRO THE LION DAVID DONDERO

TICKETS & INFO AT LOGJAMPRESENTS.COM

FRI | 8 PM

Peter Frampton plays the Wilma Fri., April 6. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $59.50/ $49.50.

missoulanews.com • April 5–April 12, 2018 [27]


04-0 5

Thursday Missoula Insectarium feeds live crickets to one of its hungry predators at 3:30 PM every Thursday. $4.

John Floridis is joined by special guest Ed Stalling for an evening of music at Imagine Nation. 6 PM. Free.

The University Center Gallery hosts an opening reception for Karl Schwiesow’s YESNO from 4 PM–6 PM. Free.

Say “yes and” to a free improv workshop every Thursday at BASE. Free and open to all abilities, levels and interests. 725 W. Alder. 6:30 PM–8 PM

Artists Shelby Hanson and Cori Crumrine host an opening reception for their MFA theses at the Gallery of Visual Arts in the Social Sciences Building. 5 PM–7 PM. Free.

nightlife Singer-songwriter Leigh Guest plays Draught Works. 6 PM–8 PM. Free. Shakespeare & Co. host an evening of crime fiction readings from Gwen Florio, Alec Cizak and Russell Thayer and everyone’s a suspect! 6 PM–7 PM. Free. Singer-songwriter Parker Duncan provides the Americana tunes at Bitter Root Brewing. 6 PM–8 PM. Free.

Backpacking guide Bob Clark takes you on a photo tour of some of Montana and Wyomingメs most spectacular wilderness areas. Le Petit Bakery. 7 PM–8:30 PM. Free and open to the public. All those late nights watching gameshow reruns are finally paying off. Get cash toward your bar tab when you win first place at trivia at the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM. Trio Noir meets pinot noir when Chuck Florence, David Horgan and Beth Lo provide the jazzy soundtrack at Plonk Wine Bar. 8 PM–11 PM. Free. My DJ name is Orthodox Triceratops. Join the Missoula Open Decks Society for an evening of

Tyler Barham plays the Sunrise Saloon Thu., April 5 at 8:30 PM. Free. music. Bring your gear and your dancing shoes to the VFW at 8 PM. Tyler Barham presents a special night of music at the Sunrise Saloon. 8:30 PM. Free. Kris Moon hosts a night of volcanic party action featuring himself, DJ T-Rex and a rotating cast of local DJs projecting a curated lineup of music videos on the

walls every Thursday at the Badlander. 9 PM. Free. Aaron “B-Rocks” Broxterman hosts karaoke night at the Dark Horse Bar. 9 PM. Free. Why did the chicken cross the road? To get to Missoula’s HomeGrown Comedy Stand-up Open Mic at the Union Club. Signup at 9:30 PM, show at 10. Free.

04-0 6

Friday Celebrate Montana’s beautiful public lands with beer, music and a raffle at Backcountry Hunters & Anglers’ Beers, Bands & Public Lands at Caras Park. 5 PM–9 PM. $15 for entry and two drink tickets.

nightlife Singer-songwriter Dan Dubuque performs at the Highlander Beer Taphouse. 6 PM–8 PM. Free. Missoula Community Gamelan presents an evening of familyfriendly Balinese music and dance at the Top Hat from 6 PM– 8 PM. Free. Mandela van Eeden, host of The Trail Less Traveled, talks about New Zealand sea kayaking and previews selections from this year’s International Wildlife Film Festival. The Roxy Theater. 6 PM. $10. A portion of proceeds will be donated to Wild Skies Raptor Center. Tango Practica at Downtown Dance Collective lets you bust a move in a friendly, welcoming environment. 6 PM–7:30 PM. $5 suggested donation.

[28] Missoula Independent • April 5–April 12, 2018

Missoula Community Gamelan presents an evening of family-friendly Balinese music and dance at the Top Hat Fri., April 6 from 6 PM–8 PM. Free I hear he’s still mad at Cypress Hill for stealing his orchestra. Peter Frampton plays the Wilma. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $59.50/$49.50. Country star Brett Eldredge plays the Adams Center. 7:30 PM. $25–$45. Charles Ellsworth provides the acoustic tunes at the VFW. 8 PM. Free. Dance away First Friday with

Monk’s Dance Party. Featuring DJ Ja’Ton on the decks, the party starts at 9 PM. Free. I’d like to solve the puzzle, Pat. Letter B plays the VFW at 9 PM. Free. Idle Ranch Hands play the Union Club while my herd is starving to death. Typical. 9:30 PM. Free. Missoula expatriates The Hasslers return for a night of Americana at the Top Hat. 10:15 PM. $5.


First Friday E3 Gallery presents an opening reception of the recent work of Elisha Harteis and Kelly Packer in A Glimpse of Clarity. Music by Butter Behemoth. 5 PM–9 PM. Photographer Brian Christianson has spent the whole year so far recording the winter wonderland of the Rattlesnake Wilderness. See the results at Montana Wilderness Association's reception at the Public House. Berkshire Hathaway Montana Properties hosts the global art of Barbara Morrison. 5 PM–8 PM. The staff of Bernice's Bakery unveil their hidden talents with pottery, photography, jewelry and more. 5 PM–8 PM.

Engel & Völkers Western Frontier's First Friday event features the art work of Randy Zielinksi, baby gear by Weathered Web and a fundraiser for Living Art of Montana. 5 PM–8 PM.

Quick. 5 PM–8 PM. Music, comedy, poetry and a photography exhibit of by LaNada Peppers punctuates Missoula BASE's First Friday. 6 PM–7:30 PM. FrontierSpace returns from the mists to host a reception for Clever | Layer by Courtney Starrett and Susan Reiser. 5 PM–9 PM. Lake Missoula Tea Company’s First Friday features the wilderness-inspired art of Amanda Krolczyk and the music of the Gospel Humpers. 5 PM–8 PM.

Compass Barbershop hosts a popup shop for the Missoula's Cool Art Club. 5 PM–8 PM.

The Saga of Ellard and the Astral Sunrise, a narrative told through a series of light boxes filled with crafted sculptural figures and found objects, tells a tale of aliens in a post-apocalyptic world at Wave and Circuit. 5 PM–8 PM.

Western Montana Community Center reminds you how mindblowing consent is by throwing a party featuring the artwork of Josh

Missoula Art Museum hosts an opening reception for Corwin Clairmont's Two-Headed Arrow/The Tar Sands Project. 5 PM–8 PM.

The IO Society celebrates the 100th birthday of the Berlin Dada movement with art, performance pieces and pieces of cake at the Ceretana Art Space. 801 Sherwood. 6 PM–9 PM. Gallery 709 inside Montana Art and Framing hosts an opening reception for George Gogas's prints of the Judith Basin Fri., April 6. 5 PM– 8:30 PM. Bathing Beauties Beads welcomes the flowery jewelry of Kristen Tack of Agile Goat Creations. 5 PM–8 PM.

Sarah Morris’s The Birdy Bunch opens at La Stella Blu with an artists reception from 5 PM–8 PM.

Gallery 709 inside Montana Art and Framing presents George Gogas's prints of the Judith Basin. 5 PM–8:30 PM.

Pastellist Elloise Jeter takes a small view of large Montana landscapes at 4 Ravens Gallery. 5 PM–8 PM.

Betty's Divine hosts a reception for the work of illustrator Hannah Harvey from 5 PM–8 PM.

Blaque Owl Tattoo celebrates its 7th birthday with an appreciation party . 5 PM–8 PM.

Radius Gallery hosts Eurythmic, featuring the work of Lucy Capehart, Amanda Jaffe, Tim Nielson and Brooks Oliver. Who am I to disagree? 5 PM–8 PM. Pop by The Artists's Shop to check out the new work of artist AliciaKay. 6 PM–9 PM. Noteworthy Paper & Press’s maker showcase features mini screen print demos and framed prints by Corvidae Drawings & Design and James Todd. 5 PM–8 PM.

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Saturday Need a little inspiration to get out of bed on the weekend? Come join Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday morning runs at the Runner’s Edge at 8 AM. Open to all skill levels.

soula Art Museum. 11 AM. Free. Celebrate the third anniversary of the Dram Shop with food, drink specials and the live music of Tiger Bullitt. Party from 12 PM–9 PM, Music from 9 PM to midnight.

Help carry lumber and supplies to drop points along the “M” trail so the good folks at Montana Conservation Corps can repair the damaged stairs. Meet at the trailhead. 9 AM–12 PM.

UM Professor of Philosophy Christoper Preston reads from his new book The Synthetic Age at Shakespeare & Co. 1 PM. Free.

Grab a cup of coffee and hear Corwin Clairmont discuss the origins of his exhibition Two-Headed Arrow/The Tar Sands Project. Mis-

Want to go from sweeping the kitchen to sweeping the ice? Missoula Curling Club hosts a workshop on the fascinating sport of

curling. Glacier Ice Rink 4 PM. Free.

nightlife Pinegrass provides the bluegrass soundtrack at Draught Works. 6 PM–8 PM. Free. Bob Wire turns the honky tonk knob to maximum at Great Burn Brewing. 6 PM–8 PM. Free.

Zootown Cabaret presents a musical review of theater songs themed around travel and personal journey. Missoula Winery and Event Center. 7:30 PM. $12/$6 students. I file this band under D for decade. 10 Years plays the Top Hat. Doors at 8 PM, show at 9. $20/$18 advance.

DJ Kris Moon completely disrespects the adverb with the Absolutely Dance Party at the Badlander, which gets rolling at 9 PM, with two for one Absolut Vodka specials until midnight. I get the name now. Free. Mudslide Charley slides into the Union Club for an evening of music. 9:30 PM. Free.

It’s the only way to make sure you cover the majority of your chip with guac. Diplo plays the Wilma. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. Sold out.

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Sunday The International Fair features food, activities and performances from artists from around the world. University Center. 11 AM–4 PM. $2. Mat Cosca provides the tunes at Draught Works from 5 PM–7 PM. Free. Indulge your inner Lisa Simpson with live jazz and a glass of craft

beer on the river every Sunday at Imagine Nation Brewing. 5 PM– 8 PM.

nightlife Tuba solo! Bring an instrument to FreeSessions v.2, an improvised jam session to promote healthy collaboration between Missoula’s musicians. Imagine Nation Brewing. 6 PM–8 PM.

The Ed Norton Big Band takes a break from annoying the Ralph Kramden Philharmonic Orchestra to play the Montana Winery. 6 PM–8 PM. $9. So am I. I’m With Her plays the Wilma. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. Jonny Fritz opens. Sold out. Every Sunday is “Sunday Funday” at the Badlander. Play corn-

missoulanews.com • April 5–April 12, 2018 [29]


Sip a fancy cocktail for a cause at Moscow Monday at the Montgomery Distillery. A dollar from every drink sold is donated to a local organization. This week raise a glass for Free Cycles. 12 PM–8 PM.

nightlife Prepare a couple of songs and bring your talent to Open Mic Night at Imagine Nation Brewing. Sign up when you get there. Every Monday from 6–8 PM. Tom Catmull plays Red Bird Wine Bar from 7 PM–10 PM. Free. I’m always down for liquor. American’s Liquor Down Band plays Monk’s. 9 PM. Free. Motown on Mondays puts the s-ou-l back into Missoula. Resident DJs Smokey Rose and Mark Myriad curate a night of your favorite Motor City hits at the Badlander. 9 PM. Free. Every Monday DJ Sol spins funk, soul, reggae and hip-hop at the Badlander. Doors at 9 PM, show at 10. Free. 21-plus.

04-1 0

Tuesday Every Tuesday is Walk With a Doc Day at Grizzly Peak. A health professional discusses their speciality while walking with the group. 9 AM–10 AM. Free. The Iron Griz hosts a wine tasting featuring bottles from Oregon winemaker Sokol Blosser. 5 PM– 7 PM. $18.

nightlife The only thing I want to know the answer to is why we don’t call it the Meagher Beagher. Trivia Night at Thomas Meagher Bar lets you show off that superior intellect of yours. 8 PM. Free. Who lives in a pineapple under the sea? Car Seat Headrest plays the Top Hat. Doors at 8 PM, show at 9. $18/$15 advance. Step up your factoid game at Quizzoula trivia night, every Tuesday at the VFW. 8:30 PM. Free. This week’s trivia question: What MLB first baseman reached 1,000 career hits on today’s date in 1983? Answer in tomorrow’s Nightlife. This next song is about drinking a LaCroix in your Subaru with your dog. Missoula Music Showcase features local singers and songwriters each week at the Badlander. 9 PM. Free.

Wednesday 04-1 1

04-0 9

Monday

Get geared up for your next outdoor adventure at the Outdoor Program’s used outdoor gear sale. University Center Atrium. 12 PM–5 PM. Every Wednesday is Community UNite at KettleHouse Brewing Company’s Northside tap room. A portion of every pint sold goes to support local Missoula causes. This week quaff a brew for EF Tours Best of Belize Summer 2018 Trip. 5 PM–8 PM.

nightlife Ryan James provides the Americana soundtrack at Great Burn Brewing. 6 PM. Free. Caroline Keys is joined by Gibson Hartwell and Faith Eliott for an intimate evening of original music at the Lakebottom Sound Series at the Roxy. 7 PM. $13/$10 advance. Award-winning poet Henrietta Goodman reads from her book All That Held Us at Shakespeare & Co. 7 PM. Free. Join Aladdin Glambert for a night of drag roulette. Drag kings, queens and in-betweens are thrown into the deep end with randomly selected songs. University Center. 7 PM. Free and open to the public. Win big bucks off your bar tab and/or free pitchers by answering trivia questions at Brains on Broadway Trivia Night at the

Caroline Keys, pictured, is joined by Gibson Hartwell and Faith Eliott for the Lakebottom Sound Series at the Roxy Wed., April 11 at 7 PM. $13/$10 advance. Broadway Sports Bar and Grill. 7 PM. Trivia answer: Eddie Murray Death, Kindred and the Senses are embodied as the friends and enemies of humanity in UM The-

Spotlight

atre & Dance’s Everyman, opening at the Masquer Theatre. 7:30 PM. $9. Every Wednesday is Beer Bingo at the Thomas Meagher Bar. Win

cash prizes along with beer and liquor giveaways. 8 PM. Free. Kraptastic Karaoke indulges your need to croon, belt and warble at the Badlander. 9:30 PM. No cover.

under ground

Imagine a post-apocalyptic world, ravaged by an out-of-control comet, full of ferocious beasts, underground aliens and brave heroes. It seems like the perfect setting for a fantasy epic, and it absolutely is, but unlike The Lord of the Rings or The Legend of Drizzt, the adventurous tale of The Saga of Ellard and The Astral Sunrise doesn’t exist in text. It only plays out in the imaginations of those viewing the exhibit, and that’s exactly how the creators want it. WHAT: The Saga of Ellard and The Astral Sunrise collaborative art show WHO: Ariel Gregory and Adelaide Gale Every WHERE: Wave and Circuit, 829 S. Higgins. HOW MUCH: Free MORE INFO: adelaidegaleevery.com and

“That was one of the spots Ariel and I diverged,” says Adelaide Gale Every, President of the artist collective VonCommon Art Studio. “I wanted to go from the beginning and write a detailed story and have an in-depth description for each piece.” Every’s collaborator, puppeteer Ariel Gregory, thought they should take a step back and let the audiences make up their own minds about what’s happening. The two settled on naming only a few characters, and leaving the rest up to the audience.

[30] Missoula Independent • April 5–April 12, 2018

The duo’s resulting project, assembled with the help of Gregory’s partner Britt Juchem, follows the eponymous protagonist Ellard on a daring adventure through a ruined world, and underground to explore the mysteries of an alien civilization. The story unfolds through a series of light-boxes filled with figurative sculptures and assemblages made of found objects. “It’s got everything,” Every says. “Monsters, aliens, fun for the whole family!” —Charley Macorn


Best of Missoula

BOM ’18 Best Local Arts & Entertainment Art Gallery

OFFICIAL BALLLOT Vote by May 16

New Restaurant (Opened in 2016 or 2017) Family-Friendly Restaurant Restaurant Service

Band

Restaurant Wine List

Museum

Outdoor Dining

Musician Photographer Writer Movie Theater

Romantic Dining Salad Sandwich Shop Seafood

Best Local Fashion & Beauty

Steak

Day Spa

Retail Beer Selection

Cosmetics

Supermarket Retail Wine Selection

Jewelry Kids' Clothing Women's Clothing Men's Clothing Lingerie Place for a Man's Haircut Place for a Woman's Haircut Shoe Store

Vegetarian Food

R

Vote on exclusive categories at missoulanews.com

Green Business Hardware Store Head Shop Marijuana Dispensary Hobby/Craft Shop Lodging Motorcycle/ATV Dealer New-Car Dealer Used-Car Dealer New Retail Store (Opened in 2016 or 2017) Pet Supplies Ranch Supply Store Store for Gifts Store for Musical Instruments Toy Store

Wings Coffee Hut Convenience Store

Best Local Nightlife Bar

Liquor Store

Bar Food

Pizza Delivery

Bar for a Stiff Pour

Place to Eat Alone

Beer Selection Bloody Mary

Tattoo Parlor Thrift Store

Cocktail Selection

Best Local Food & Drink

Casino

Margarita Distillery

Appetizers

Happy Hour

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Bakery

Late-Night Munchies

Barbecue

Microbrewery

Breakfast

Place to Dance

Brunch

Place to Hear Live Music

Budget Lunch

Pool Table

Coffee

Sports Bar

Tea

Best Local Sports & Recreation

Delicatessen Doughnuts Burger

Best Local Goods & Services

Bike Shop

Fly-Fishing Guide

Adult Store

Fly-Fishing Shop

Food Cart/Truck

Auto Repair

Golf Course

Fresh Produce

Bank/Credit Union

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Desserts

Bookstore (New Books)

Place for Paddle Sports Gear

Ice Cream/Frozen Yogurt

Bookstore (Used Books)

Place to get a Snowboard

Milk Shake

Music Store

Sporting Goods Store

Mexican Food

Dry Cleaner Furniture Store

Store for Guns

Pizza Restaurant

Garden Center

Store for Skis

French Fries

Store for Mountaineering Gear

*****MUST VOTE FOR AT LEAST 30 CATEGORIES***** Consider this the fine print: We require ballots to include your full name, email address and phone number in the spaces provided. Ballots missing any of this information, or ballots with fewer than 30 categories filled in, will be mocked, ridiculed and not counted. Same goes for photocopies of filled in ballots and ballots with unclear markings or hanging chads. Hard-copy ballots may be mailed or hand-delivered to the Indy office at 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or dropped off at any of the ballot locations listed below.

Name: Email: Phone:

The Artists’ Shop, Bagels on Broadway, Blaque Owl Tattoo, Break Espresso, Bridge Pizza, Burns St Bistro, Buttercup Market, Butterfly Herbs, Carousel for Missoula, Doc’s Sandwich Shop, Donation Warehouse, Draught Works Brewery, Fantasy for Adults, Five on Black, Flower, Flower Coffee, Go Fetch!, Good Food Store, Great Burn Brewing, Green Light, Hob Nob, Iza Asian Restaurant, Kettlehouse, Lolo Peak Brewery, Masala, Mellow Mood, Montana Distillery, Orange Street Food Farm, Piece of Mind, Portico Real Estate, Press Box, Rockin Rudy’s, Skin Chic, Sushi Hana, Taco del Sol, Taco Sano, Taste Buds Kitchen, Thomas Meagher Bar, Trail Head, Union Club, Westside Lanes, Women’s Club, Worden’s Market, Zootown Brew

missoulanews.com • April 5–April 12, 2018 [31]


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Thursday

Reno, Nevada’s Pry plays the ZACC Below Thu., April 12. 8:30 PM. $5. Missoula Insectarium feeds live crickets to one of its hungry predators at 3:30 PM every Thursday. $4. The International Fly Fishing Film Festival features fabulous fishing, famous fisherwomen and fishermen finding fame. The Roxy Theater. 4 PM and 7 PM. $15. Visit flyfilmfest.com for more info.

nightlife Marcus Yabba Griffiths and Traxx provide a night of roots reggae at Imagine Nation Brewing. 5:30 PM–8:30 PM. Free. Didn’t we have enough of this over the summer? Michael Shaw and the Wildfires play a scorching night of music at Draught Works. 6 PM–8 PM. Free. Sixth generation Bitterrooter Jordan Smith plays Bitter Root Brewing. 6 PM–8 PM. Say “yes and” to a free improv workshop every Thursday at BASE. Free and open to all abilities, levels and interests. 725 W. Alder. 6:30 PM–8 PM Andrew Light, climate change expert and former climate adviser to Secretary of State John Kerry, gives a talk on the history, goals and defense of the Paris Climate Agreement. Gallagher Business Building 123. 7 PM. Free and open to the public. So before last year’s fire season, we had a banner year for wildflowers. Take a look at what’s survived at Montana Native Plant Society’s meeting. Gallagher Business Building. 7 PM. Free.

[32] Missoula Independent • April 5–April 12, 2018

Join local jazz, soul and blues band Cork & Spark for an intimate performance at Daly Jazz. Doors at 7:30 PM, show at 8. $10. RSVP to jessitrauth@gmail.com. Have a talk with Death. Everyman continues at the Masquer Theatre. 7:30 PM. $9. All those late nights watching gameshow reruns are finally paying off. Get cash toward your bar tab when you win first place at trivia at the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM. My DJ name is Orthodox Triceratops. Join the Missoula Open Decks Society for an evening of music. Bring your gear and your dancing shoes to the VFW at 8 PM. Jacque Jolene plays the Sunrise Saloon at 8:30 PM. Free. Spokane’s Dancing Plague, Reno’s Pry and Missoula’s Tiny Plastic Stars put aside their differences to face a larger threat, getting people to dance. ZACC Below. 8:30 PM. $5. Kris Moon hosts a night of volcanic party action featuring himself, DJ T-Rex and a rotating cast of local DJs projecting a curated lineup of music videos on the walls every Thursday at the Badlander. 9 PM. Free. Aaron “B-Rocks” Broxterman hosts karaoke night at the Dark Horse Bar. 9 PM. Free.

We want to know about your event! Submit to calendar@missoulanews.com at least two weeks in advance of the event. Don’t forget to include the date, time, venue and cost. Surprise! Happy Birthday!


Agenda

THURSDAY, APRIL 5

SATURDAY, APRIL 7

Climate Smart's Monthly Meetup discusses how Missoula's urban trees provide many climate benefits. Imagine Nation Brewing. 5 PM–7 PM.

Help carry lumber and supplies to drop points along the M trail so the good folks at Montana Conservation Corps can repair the damaged stairs. Meet at the trailhead. 9 AM–12 PM.

FRIDAY, APRIL 6 The “M,” in one form or another, has overlooked Missoula like a watchful protector for over a century. Perched more than 600 feet up Mt. Sentinel, it’s one of the most iconic images in our city — if not the most iconic — and it’s gone through quite a few iterations over the years. Originally built in 1908 by University of Montana students using whitewashed rocks, the “M” was 25 by 25 feet before being built up to its current size of 125 by 100 feet. Over the years it's been blown away by a blizzard, rebuilt, destroyed and rebuilt again. One of the most important aspects of preserving the “M” is making sure the trail going

up to it is in good shape. Montana Conservation Corps is one group working on the project to improve the “M” trail and they're looking for your help. Volunteers are needed to carry lumber and supplies up Mt. Sentinel so MCC can repair the wear and tear on the trail’s switchback stairs. It’s that kind of continuing maintenance that ensures future generations can enjoy this iconic hike. —Charley Macorn Meet at the trailhead at Mt. Sentinel Sat., April 7 from 9 AM–12 PM to support the work of the Montana Conservation Corps.

Gentle + Effective

Health Care Medical Marijuana Recommendations Alternative Wellness is helping qualified patients get access to the MT Medical Marijuana Program. Must have Montana ID and medical records. Please Call 406-249-1304 for a FREE consultation or alternativewellness.nwmt@gmail.com

Acupuncture Clinic of Missoula 728-1600 3031 S Russell St Ste 1

acupunctureclinicofmissoula.com

Lights, CANera, Action! Missoula Food Bank's annual week-long canned structure design and build competition kicks off with a silver screen theme. Missoula Food Bank. 10 AM Musicians, comedians and Missoulians come together for a fundraiser for Garden City Harvest and PEAS Farm cofounder Josh Slotnick's campaign for Missoula County Commissioner. The Roxy Theater. 7 PM. $10.

Xsports4vets hosts an evening of music, dinner and live music to raise funds to continue its work to support veterans. Governor's Room at the Florence Hotel. 6 PM–9 PM. $35. The 3rd Annual Opportunity Resources Gala features a silent auction and the live music of Peter Edwards & A Touch of Class. All funds raised go to supports people with disabilities. Doubletree Hotel. 6 PM–9 PM. $75.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

HealthWise Chiropractic DR. PAUL MILLER 25 Years Experience HANDS-ON, NO-NONSENSE Insurance accepted. Reasonable non-insured rates.

2100 Stephens Ste 118, Missoula (406) 721-4588 healthwisemissoula.com Mention this ad for 25% off initial visit.

missoulanews.com • April 5–April 12, 2018 [33]


Mountain High With spring finally here (freak snow storms aside) there are two things that should be on everyone’s mind: getting geared up for all activities under the sun and spring cleaning. Starting with the latter, what feels better than removing the clutter from your closet or garage? I, myself, am looking to eject the pair of ski boots that didn’t fit right this winter, remove the two bicycle wheels out from underneath my staircase and get rid of my old hydration pack that got me across the Grand Canyon twice in one day. That cleansing feeling only intensifies the itch to buy more stuff! (Getting an REI dividend back helps, too.) I’m in the market for a new(er) pack, a paddleboard (if I can find one on the cheap) and some skate skis. If only there were a place where both of

THURSDAY, APRIL 5 The Women in Wilderness conversation series continues its celebration of the dedicated women working in wild and public lands. University Center Room 333. 6 PM. Free. Interested in hunting for wild mushrooms without ending up dead? Mycologist Larry Evans hosts a beginner's class in mushroom foraging at North Valley Public Library. 6 PM–7 PM. Free. Backpacking guide Bob Clark takes you on a photo tour of some of Montana and Wyoming’s most spectacular wilderness areas. Le Petit Bakery. 7 PM–8:30 PM. Free and open to the public. Jim Sparks closes out the Five Valleys Audubon Advanced Birding Workshops with a talk on Forest Birds. FWP Regional Office. 7 PM. $15.

FRIDAY, APRIL 6 Celebrate Montana's beautiful public lands with beer, music and a raffle at Backcountry Hunters & Anglers' Beers, Bands & Public

[34] Missoula Independent • April 5–April 12, 2018

these springtime hallmarks came together in a perfect storm. Lo and behold, there is! The University of Montana will hold its annual gear sale this week. Students and the general public can drop off used gear in the morning, and shop to their heart’s content all afternoon. A word of advice: the line to get in usually stretches around the University Center a half hour before the sale starts. Pack a picnic and some coffee for the wait! —Micah Drew The UM Outdoor Program hosts the Used Outdoor Gear Sale at the University Center Wed., Apr. 11, 12 PM- 5 PM. Free to enter.

Lands at Caras Park. 5 PM–9 PM. $15 for entry and two drink tickets.

TUESDAY, APRIL 10 Looking for a new set of wheels? The City of Missoula Police Department's Bicycle Auction can get you rolling quick. Gardner's Auction Service. 9 AM–4 PM.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11 Get geared up for your next outdoor adventure at the Outdoor Program's used outdoor gear sale. University Center Atrium. 12 PM– 5 PM. Show off your outdoor knowledge at Naturalist Trivia Night at Montana Natural History Center. 7 PM. $5. BYOB.

THURSDAY, APRIL 12 The International Fly Fishing Film Festival features fabulous fishing featuring famous fisherman and fisherwoman finding fame. The Roxy Theater. 4 PM and 7 PM. $15. Visit flyfilmfest.com for more info.


BULLETIN BOARD Basset Rescue of Montana. Basset’s of all ages needing homes. 406-207-0765. Please like us on Facebook... facebook.com/bassethoundrescue Chris Autio Photography. Full Studio. Promotional photography for artists. Real Estate Photography. Photo restoration. Product Photography. Call Chris at (406) 728-5097. chris@chrisautio.com

LOST & FOUND Lost: 6 month old black Border Collie/Idaho Shag puppy named Shadow. Easter Sunday on Gharrett Street. Please call 251-1386

PET OF THE WEEK

lived on a ranch, but unfortunately, did not enjoy working and watching goats. She enjoys meandering around the outdoors with supervision and playing with her dog friends! Come by and meet Sheba during our open hours, Wed-Fri from 1-6pm and SatSun from 12-5pm! Our famous Ken Shugart Award is coming up on April 14th and our theme is Montana Adventure. If you love the outdoors as much as Sheba, then be sure to visit www.myHSWM.org to get tickets!

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EMPLOYMENT Designer Assistant. Local lumber and design company to hire a long-term Designer Assistant. This person will greet customers, order samples, and replenish

inventory. This is a great entry-level career opportunity! For a full job description, please visit our website at www.lcstaffing.com and refer to order #31426

Earn $300-$1000 per month working part-time! The Missoulian is looking for reliable individuals to deliver the daily news-

paper in the Missoula, Bitterroot and Flathead areas. For individual route details go to: missoulian.com/carrier If you’re looking for extra income, are

EMPLOYMENT POSITIONS AVAILABLESEE WEBSITE FOR MORE INFO Must Have: Valid driver license, No history of neglect, abuse or exploitation Applications available at OPPORTUNITY RESOURCES, INC., 2821 S. Russell, Missoula, MT. 59801 or online at www.orimt.org. Extensive background checks will be completed. NO RESUMES. EEO/AA-M/F/disability/ protected veteran status.

Place your classified ad at 317 S. Orange, by phone 543-6609x115 or via email: classified@missoulanews.com


EMPLOYMENT

FLEE-BITTEN

SHUDDER SPEED

For three months, things were going really well with this man I was dating. He’d introduced me to his daughter. We’d even planned a trip together. And then he just disappeared. I eventually texted him to find out what happened, but he simply texted back, “Really busy, all good.”This isn’t the first time this has happened to me or my girlfriends.Why do men do this? Why don’t they tell you what’s really going on?

Every photo my boyfriend takes of me is horrific (one eye kind of shut, bad angle of my face, etc.). My female friends take decent pictures of me, so it’s not like it’s impossible. I know my boyfriend loves me and thinks I’m beautiful. Could he be trying to keep other men from being attracted to me?

—Upset

You’d think you wouldn’t have to give a man who loves you a detailed list of instructions for photographing you — down to “immediately erase any shots in which I look like I’m having a seizure or bear a strong resemblance to a surprised goat.” In fact, you are far from alone in complaining that the man you love takes terrible pictures of you — or in worrying that it means something. However, this worry of yours probably comes out of what I call our mind’s neatfreakitude. Research by cognitive neuroscientist Michael Gazzaniga suggests we get so itchy over mental chaos — being in a state of uncertainty about someone or something — that we’re quick to sweep aside inconsistencies and ignore missing information in service of creating a coherent narrative. And then (conveniently!) we turn right around and go with the story we’ve created — in this case, the suspicion that your boyfriend is plotting to make you look uggo in photographs. The reality is, if you aren’t a professional model being shot by a professional photographer, it sometimes takes dozens of shots to have even one you don’t want to delete in horror. (Shoot my long face from above, as my boyfriend sometimes forgets and does, and I look like a movie star — the horse that played Seabiscuit.) Because men evolved to prioritize physical attractiveness in women and women coevolved to expect this, women are extremely sensitive to being photographed in ways that don’t show them off at their sparkliest. That’s probably why, if you glance at various 20something women’s Instagram pages, you’ll see that many strike the very same pose in photo after photo (having figured out their exact best angle, to the micrometer). Sure, some men are as acutely sensitive about engineering their perfect pose — mostly those whose work attire is a sequined evening dress, a ginormous feather boa, and chandelier earrings the size of New Jersey.

When a guy just cuts you off like a bad tree limb, it’s tempting to come up with ego-cushioning explanations: He’s in a coma! He’s trapped in a wooded gully in his crashed car! He’s being interrogated at a CIA black site! (“Sorry ... Mr. Jones is getting a series of painful electric shocks to his nipples right now and cannot come to the phone.”) However, the best explanation for this man’s disappearance is probably textbook stuff — psych textbook, that is, and specifically a couple of personality traits. One of these is “conscientiousness.” And the bad side of the spectrum is being “low in conscientiousness” — psychologists’ term for a person who is careless, irresponsible, impulsive and lacking in self-control and who habitually ducks his obligations (as if they were flaming arrows). The other trait is the unfortunately named “psychopathy.” Though it calls to mind showerstabbing hobbyists, it doesn’t necessarily lead to murderous rampages. Still, it isn’t exactly the personality trait of angelic hospice nurses, as it’s marked by exploitiveness, aggression, poor impulse control, self-centeredness and a lack of empathy. Low conscientiousness and psychopathy partner up into an inability or unwillingness to admit to being wrong.Apologizing takes emotional strength and character strength — the conscientiousness and empathy that leave the wrongdoer feeling borderline queasy until they come clean and express remorse to the person they hurt. It isn’t just men who do the disappearo thing; it’s anyone low on conscientiousness. The problem is, when love appears to be on the horizon, we want to believe more than we want to see. It’s helpful to take an almost pessimistic approach to any new relationship: Assume a man has flaws; figure out what they are; and decide whether any are deal breakers. This takes observing his behavior over time (at least a year) in a variety of situations — especially crisis situations. You want to know that when the chips are down, a man’ll have your back — and not just to use you as a human shield so the SWAT team snipers won’t pick him off.

—Occasional Bride Of Frankenstein

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com.

an early riser and enjoy working independently, you can make money and be done before most people get going with their day. If this sounds like you, please submit your inquiry form today at missoulian.com/carrier or call 406-523-0494. You must have a valid driver’s license and proof of car insurance. This is an independent contractor business opportunity.

Warehouse Laborer. Industrial supply company to hire a Warehouse Laborer. This person will build shelves, move items, and reorganize the warehouse. For a full job description, please visit our website at www.lcstaffing.com and refer to order #31305

Front Office Administrative Assistant. Property company looking to hire a longterm Front Office Administrative Assistant. This person will handle incoming phone calls, file invoices, and process applications. For a full job description, please visit our website at www.lcstaffing.com and refer to order #31474

AutoCAD Drafter. Local engineering firm to recruit for a long-term, full-time AutoCAD Drafter. Will implement mechanical design components, codes, and other standards. They will meet project and design goals including

PROFESSIONAL

drafting and designing from the engineers. For a full job description, please visit our website at www.lcstaffing.com and refer to order #31392

SKILLED LABOR Carpenter Helper. Well-established construction firm to recruit for a Carpenter Helper. Will work on a variety of residential remodels including demolition, framing, siding, and finish work. For a full job description, please visit our website at www.lcstaffing.com and refer to order # 31209

I’m retiring. Turn Key business. Strength and intelligence needed. Ladders used. For more info send an inquiry to nancy@improvingyouroutlook.com. Small center looking for a child care aide to work with children ages newborn to 5 years old. Must have open availability from 7-5:30 M-F.

PUBLIC NOTICESMNAXLP IN THE JUSTICE COURT OF THE STATE OF MONTANA IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF MISSOULA BEFORE LANDEE N. HOLLOWAY, JUSTICE OF THE PEACE Case No.: CV-2018-471 SUMMONS FOR POSSESSION BY PUBLICATION CORSO APARTMENT HOMES, Plaintiff, v. KATHLEEN BLONDA, et al., Defendant. TO: Kathleen Blonda,1575 Milwaukee Way #101 Missoula, MT 59801 YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer a Complaint filed in Justice Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer upon Plaintiff’s attorney, Thomas C. Orr, Thomas C. Orr Law Offices, P.O. Box 8096, Missoula, Montana 59807, within ten (10) days after service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in the case of your failure to appear or answer, relief sought by Plaintiff will be taken against you as requested. A $30.00 filing fee must accompany Defendant’s answer. DATED this 20th day of March, 2018. By: /s/ Hon. Landee N. Holloway IN THE JUSTICE COURT OF THE STATE OF MONTANA IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF MISSOULA BEFORE MARIE A. ANDERSEN, JUSTICE OF THE PEACE Case No.: CV18-507-LT SUMMONS FOR POSSESSION BY PUBLICATION CORSO APARTMENT HOMES, Plaintiff, v. ANTHONY DEROSE & JENESSA DEROSA, et al., Defendants. TO: Anthony DeRosa 1620 Milwaukee Way, #201 Missoula, MT 59801 YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer a Complaint filed in Justice Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer upon Plaintiff’s attorney, Thomas C. Orr, Thomas C. Orr Law Offices, P.O. Box 8096, Missoula, Montana 59807, within ten (10) days after service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in the case of your failure to appear or answer, relief sought by Plaintiff will be taken against you as requested. A $30.00 filing fee must accompany Defendant’s answer. DATED this 15 day of March, 2018. By: /s/ Hon. Marie A. Andersen IN THE JUSTICE COURT OF THE STATE OF MONTANA IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF MISSOULA BEFORE MARIE A. ANDERSEN, JUSTICE OF THE PEACE Case No.: CV18-507-LT SUMMONS FOR POSSESSION BY PUBLICATION CORSO APARTMENT HOMES, Plaintiff, v. ANTHONY DEROSA &

JENESSA DEROSA, et al., Defendants. TO: Jenessa DeRosa 1620 Milwaukee Way, #201 Missoula, MT 59801 YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer a Complaint filed in Justice Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer upon Plaintiff’s attorney, Thomas C. Orr, Thomas C. Orr Law Offices, P.O. Box 8096, Missoula, Montana 59807, within ten (10) days after service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in the case of your failure to appear or answer, relief sought by Plaintiff will be taken against you as requested. A $30.00 filing fee must accompany Defendant’s answer. DATED this 15 day of March, 2018. By: /s/ Hon. Marie A. Andersen Montana Fourth Judicial District Court Missoula County Cause No.: DV-18-132 Dept. No.: 3 Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of James David Beresgvoy Brown, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from James David Beresgvoy Brown to James David Beresovoy. The hearing will be on 04/19/2018 at 10:00. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: 3-6-18 /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: Michael Evjen, Deputy Clerk of Court. Montana Fourth Judicial District Court Missoula County Cause No.: DV-18-357 Dept. No.: 3 Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Changes of Mini Snyder, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Mini Marie Snyder to Marie Snyder. The hearing will be on 05/03/2018 at 10:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courhouse in Missoula County. Date: 4/2/2018. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ L. Atkins, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Probate No. DP-18-52 The Hon. Robert L. Deschamps, III NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of MARY TRACY LAPPE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said Decedent are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be

forever barred. Claims must either be mailed by certified mail, return receipt requested, to the CoPersonal Representatives, Elaine LaPointe-Vetter and Nora Lynn Morris, at 12400 Lewis & Clark Drive, Lolo, MT 59847, of filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 25th day of February, 2018. /s/ Nora Lynn Morris, Co-Personal Representative /s/ Elaine LaPointe-Vetter, Co_Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No.: 4 Karen S. Townsend Cause No.: DV-18-298 NOTICE OF HEARING ON PROPOSED NAME CHANGE OF ADULT IN THE MATTER OF THE NAME CHANGE OF, CLARICE SARALYN BAYER, PETITIONER. TAKE NOTICE THAT Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from CLARICE SARALYN BAYER, to MIRIAM OLIVE BAYER, and the petition will be heard by a District Court Judge on the 1st day of May, 2018 at 3:00 p.m., at the Missoula County District Courthouse for the Fourth Judicial District. At any time before the hearing, objections may be filed by any person who can demonstrate for good reasons against the change of name. DATED this 22 day of March, 2018. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court BY: /s/ Emily Hensen, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-2018-70 The Hon. Robert L. Deschamps, III NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of DONNY JOHN BARLOW, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the estate of the above-named Decedent. All persons having claims against the said Decedent are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed by certified mail, return receipt requested, to the Personal Representative, Jacqueline Barlow, c/o Carey B. Schmidt, Schmidt Law Firm PLLC, 1917 S. Higgins Avenue, Missoula, Montana 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 12 day of March, 2018 /s/ Jacqueline Barlow, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.:

Place your classified ad at 317 S. Orange, by phone 543-6609x115 or via email: classified@missoulanews.com [36] Missoula Independent • April 5–April 12, 2018


PUBLIC NOTICES MNAXLP DP-18-56 Dept. No.: 1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: STANLEY B. CLINE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to TAMMY J. MOCABEE, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of Douglas Harris, Attorney at Law, PO Box 7937, Missoula, Montana 59807-7937 or filed with the Clerk of the above-named Court. DATED this 20th day of February, 2018. /s/ Tammy J. Mocabee, PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DV-18-309 Dept. No.: 1 Leslie Halligan Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Jordan Robinson, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Jordan Gao Robinson to Sean Gao Robinson. The hearing will be on 05/02/2018 at 11:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: March 20, 2018. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Emily Hensen Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 2 Cause Probate No. DP-18-85 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF SARA MULLEN ALSO KNOWN AS SALLY MULLEN Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice of said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Theresa A. Kendrick, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Maclay Law Firm, PO Box 9197, Missoula, Montana 59807-9197, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 16th day of March, 2018. /s/ Theresa A. Kendrick, Personal Representative, c/o Maclay Law Firm, PO Box 9197, Missoula, MT 59807-9197 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Leslie Halligan Case No. DV-18-253 In the Matter of the Name Change of Logan Williams, Petitioner. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT Petitioner has petitioned the District Court for the Fourth Judicial District for change of name from Logan Williams to Logan Nelson, and the petition for name change will be heard by a District Court Judge on the 23 day of May, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. in the Missoula County Courthouse, in courtroom number 1. At any time before the hearing, objections may be filed by any person

who can demonstrate good reasons against the change of name. DATED this 20 day of March, 2018. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: /s/ Emily Hensen, Deputy Clerk of Court (SEAL) MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY DEPT. NO. 2 PROBATE NO. DP-18-92 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF Margaret Waltari a/k/a Margaret F. Waltari, a/k/a Margaret T. Waltari, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to LEANN SCHAFF, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at c/o Worden Thane P.C., 321 W. Broadway St., Ste. 300, Missoula, MT 598024142 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 27th day of March, 2018. /s/ Leann Schaff, Personal Representative c/o Worden Thane P.C. 321 West Broadway St., Ste. 300 Missoula, Montana 59802-4142 WORDEN THANE P.C. Attorneys for Personal Representative By: /s/ Amy M. Scott Smith, Esq. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP-18-61 Hon. Robert L. De-

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schamps III Presiding. NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF WINIFRED L. BROWN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said Deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Sally Sharbono, Personal Representative, Return Receipt Requested, c/o Skjelset & Geer, PLLP, PO Box 4102, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 22 day of February, 2018. /s/ Sally Sharbono, Personal Representative SKJELSET & GEER, P.L.L.P. By: /s/ Suzanne Geer Attorneys for the Estate STATE OF MONTANA ):ss. County of Missoula) I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. Signed this 22 day of February, 2018. /s/ Sally Sharbono, Personal Representative SUBSCRIBED AND SWORN TO before me this 22 day of February, 2018. /s/ Suzanne Geer Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at Stevensville, Montana My Commission Expires October 2, 2020 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Probate No. DP-18-86 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF FRANK B. BESSAC, Deceased. NOTICE IS

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MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DP-18-83 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: LOIS VERA RUZANSKI, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Cynthia M. R. Randall has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice, or their claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Jones & Associates, PLLC, Attorneys for the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 2625 Dearborn Avenue, Ste. 102A, Missoula, MT 59804, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of Montana the foregoing is true and correct. Dated this 12th day of March, 2018. /s/ Cynthia M. R. Randall, Personal Rep-

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MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate No. DP-18-90 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF GARY D. MURALT, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Walter R. Muralt , the Personal Representative,

return receipt requested, c/o Boone Karlberg P.C., P. O. Box 9199, Missoula, Montana 59807-9199, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. I declare, under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the state of Montana, that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 20th day of March, 2018 at Missoula, Montana. /s/ Walter R. Muralt, Personal Representative BOONE KARLBERG P.C. By: /s/ Julie Sirrs, Esq. PO Box 9199, Missoula, Montana 59807 Attorneys for Walter R. Muralt, Personal Representative

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HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Joan Steelquist, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Boone Karlberg P.C., P. O. Box 9199, Missoula, Montana 59807-9199, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. I declare, under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the state of Montana, that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 15th day of March, 2018 at Missoula, Montana. /s/ Joan Steelquist, Personal Representative BOONE KARLBERG P.C. By: /s/ Julie Sirrs, Esq. PO Box 9199, Missoula, Montana 59807 Attorneys for Joan Steelquist, Personal Representative

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Place your classified ad at 317 S. Orange, by phone 543-6609x115 or via email: classified@missoulanews.com missoulanews.com • April 5–April 12, 2018 [37]


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): Eighty-three-year-old author Harlan Ellison has had a long and successful career. In the course of publishing hundreds of literary works in seven different genres, he has won numerous awards. But when he was in his thirties, there was an interruption in the upward arc of his career. The film production company Walt Disney Studios hired him as a writer. During his first day on the job, Roy Disney overheard Ellison joking with a coworker about using Disney characters in an animated pornographic movie. Ellison was fired on the spot. I am by no means predicting a comparable event in your life, Aries. On the contrary. By giving you this heads up, I’m hoping you’ll be scrupulous and adroit in how you act in the early stages of a new project — so scrupulous and adroit that you will sail on to the next stages. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Are you an evolving Taurus or an unevolving Taurus? Are you an aspiring master of gradual, incremental progress or a complacent excuse-maker who secretly welcomes inertia? Will the theme of your next social media post be “The Smart Art of Compromise” or “The Stingy Glory of Stubbornness”? I’m hoping you will opt for the former rather than the latter in each of the three choices I just offered. Your behavior in the coming weeks will be pivotal in your long-term ability to animate your highest self and avoid lapsing into your mediocre self. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If you fly in a passenger jet from New York to London, the trip usually takes more than six hours. But on January 8, 2015, a powerful jet stream surging across the North Atlantic reduced that time significantly. With the wind’s extra push, several flights completed the trip in five hours and 20 minutes. I suspect you’ll have comparable assistance in the course of your upcoming journeys and projects, Gemini.You’ll feel like the wind is at your back. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Actor Keanu Reeves’ career ascended to a higher level when he appeared as a lead character in the film Speed. It was the first time he had been a headliner in a big-budget production. But he turned down an offer to reprise his starring role in the sequel, Speed 2. Instead he toured with his grunge band Dogstar and played the role of Hamlet in a production staged by a local theater company in Winnipeg, Manitoba. I admire him for being motivated more by love and passion than by fame and fortune. In my estimation, Cancerian, you face a choice that in some ways resembles Keanu’s, but in other ways doesn’t. You shouldn’t automatically assume that what your ego craves is opposed to what your heart yearns for and your soul needs.

a

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): A Leo sculptor I know is working on a 40-foot-long statue of a lion. Another Leo friend borrowed $30,000 to build a recording studio in her garage so she can pursue her quixotic dream of a music career. Of my other Leo acquaintances, one is writing a memoir of her time as a black-market orchid smuggler, another just did four sky dives in three days, and another embarked on a long-postponed pilgrimage to Slovenia, land of her ancestors. What about you? Are there any breathtaking challenges or smart gambles you’re considering? I trust you can surf the same astrological wave.

b

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): How sexy is it possible for you to be? I’m referring to authentic soul-stirring sexiness, not the contrived, glitzy, counterfeit version. I’m alluding to the irresistible magnetism that wells up in you when you tap in to your core self and summon a reverent devotion to your life’s mission. However sexy it is possible for you to be, Virgo, I suggest you unleash that magic in the coming weeks. It’s the most reliable strategy for attracting the spiritual experiences and material resources and psychological support you need.

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): According to my analysis of the cosmic omens, your impact is rising. You’re gaining influence. More people are tuning in to what you have to offer. And yet your stress levels also seem to be increasing. Why is that? Do you assume that having more power requires you to endure higher tension? Do you unconsciously believe that being more worried is the price of being more responsible? If so, banish that nonsense.The truth is this: The best way to manage your growing clout is to relax into it. The best way to express your growing clout is to relax into it. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The immediate future will challenge you to revisit several fundamental Scorpio struggles. For best results, welcome these seeming intrusions as blessings and opportunities, and follow these guidelines: 1.Your control over external circumstances will increase in direct proportion to your control over your inner demons. 2. Your ability to do what you want will thrive to the degree that you stop focusing on what you don’t want. 3. Your skill at regulating and triumphing over chaos will be invincible if you’re not engrossed in blaming others.

e

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I’m about to say things that sound extraordinary. And it’s possible that they are in fact a bit overblown. But even if that’s the case, I trust that there is a core of truth in them. So rejoice in their oracular radiance. First, if you have been hoping for a miracle cure, the next four weeks will be a time when you’re more likely than usual to find it or generate it. Second, if you have fantasized about getting help to address a seemingly irremediable problem, asking aggressively for that help now will lead to at least a partial fix. Third, if you have wondered whether you could ever retrieve a lost or missing part of your soul, the odds are more in your favor than they’ve been in a long time.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The French government defines books as an “essential good,” along with water, bread and electricity. Would you add anything to that list of life’s basics? Companionship? Stories? Deep sleep? Pleasurable exercise and movement? Once you identify your “essential goods,” I invite you to raise the level of reverence and care you give them.Take an oath to treat them as holy treasures. Boost your determination and ability to get all you need of their blessings. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to enhance your appreciation of the fundamentals you sometimes take for granted.

PUBLIC NOTICESMNAXLP resentative /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DV-18-279 NOTICE OF HEARING IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE OF: CHRISTOPHER JAMES WAGONER, Petitioner. NOTICE is hereby given that at the regular term of the District Court of Missoula County, Montana, at the Courtroom in the Courthouse, in Missoula County, in Missoula, Montana, on the 1st day of May, 2018, at 3:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as counsel can be heard, there will be heard and considered the application of CHRISTOPHER JAMES WAGONER for permission to change his legal name to MARIKA CRYSTAL WAGONER, and for consideration and determination of all further matters as may pertain thereto. DATED this 14th day of March, 2018. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Susie Wall, Deputy Clerk NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PETITION TO ABANDON A PUBLIC ROAD NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that a public hearing will be held on the 12th day of April, 2018 beginning at 2:00 p.m. in Room Annex 151, Courthouse Annex, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802, on a petition to abandon the following right-of-way: Those certain unused road and rights-of-way in Tract 1 of COS 6610 located in Section 27, Township 12N, Range 22W. The abandonment of this right-of-way is necessary and advantageous for the following reasons: There is no physical evidence that the portion of the Petitioned County Road as described in the petition existed. Public access through Section 27 is provided by U.S. Highway 12. As required by MCA 7-14-2612(3) and (4), the road and rights-of-way described in the petition do not provide access to any public land or private land which cannot also be accessed by U.S. Highway 12. The abandonment of the road and rights-ofway requested by this petition will remove encumbrances upon the title of tract 1 of COS 6610. The landowners of Tract 1 of COS 6610 wish to construct a home in the location of the road and rights-of-way that are requested to be abandoned by this petition. (For complete legal description and additional information, see map and exhibits on file in the Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 200 West Broadway, 1st floor, or go to www.missoulaproperty.us to view the full petition recorded as Book 994 Page 382) AND THAT all interested persons should appear at the above mentioned time and place to be heard for or against said petition. Written comments will be accepted by the Commissioner’s Office, located at Missoula County Administration Building, 199 West Pine Street, Missoula, Montana 59802, prior to the hearing day. BY ORDER of the Board of County Commissioners of Missoula County,

Montana. Tyler Gernant Clerk & Recorder/Treasurer 200 W. Broadway St. Missoula, MT 59802 (406) 258-4752 Date: March 22nd, 2018 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 12, 2018, at 11:00 AM at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 1269, LOCATED IN LOT 1, BLOCK 1, WILLOWS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA Phillip K Schrumpf, as Grantor, conveyed said real property to Fidelity National Title Group, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Nationstar Mortgage LLC, DBA Greenlight Loans, its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on October 29, 2013, and recorded on November 5, 2013 as Document No. 201321575. The beneficial interest is currently held by Nationstar Mortgage LLC d/b/a Mr. Cooper. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. is currently the Trustee. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments beginning October 1, 2017, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 15, 2018 is $95,455.98 principal, interest totaling $2,062.16 late charges in the amount of $300.78, escrow advances of $592.36, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,411.97, plus accruing interest, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, ex-

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Buckingham Palace is the home and office of the Queen of England. It has been the main royal residence since Queen Victoria took the throne in 1837. But in earlier times, the site served other purposes. The 17th-century English lawyer Clement Walker described the building occupying that land as a brothel, a hotbed of “debauchery.” Before that the space was a mulberry garden where silkworms tuned mulberry leaves into raw material for silk fabrics. I see the potential for an almost equally dramatic transformation of a certain place in your life, Aquarius. Start dreaming and scheming about the possibilities.

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Poet Carolyn Forché is a role model for how to leave one’s comfort zone. In her early career, she earned writing degrees at placid universities near her childhood home in the American Midwest. Her first book mined material about her family; its first poem is addressed to her grandmother. But then she relocated to El Salvador, where she served as a human rights advocate during that country’s civil war. Later she lived and wrote in Lebanon at the height of its political strife. Her drive to expand her range of experience invigorated her poetry and widened her audience. Would you consider drawing inspiration from Forché in the coming weeks and months, Pisces? I don’t necessarily recommend quite so dramatic a departure for you, but even a mild version will be well rewarded. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES.

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press or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 28, 2018 /s/ Kaitlin Ann Gotch Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho)) ss. County of Bingham) On this 28th day of February, 2018, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Kaitlin Ann Gotch, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Rae Albert Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 09/06/2022 Nationstar Mortgage LLC vs Philip K Schrumpf 102925-2 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 12, 2018, at 11:00 AM at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A tract of land in the N½ of Section 19, Township 14 North, Range 19 West and SE¼SW¼ of Section 18, Township 14 North, Range 19 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the NW corner of Section 19, Township 14 North, Range 19 West, P.M.M., thence N.85°49`04”E., 2436.23 feet to a point in Butler Creek Road and on the northerly limit of that Deed in Book 212 at page 468 and the true point of beginning; thence S.35°16`43”E., 442.74 feet; thence S.38°23`38”E., 1081.77 feet; thence south 384.92 feet; thence N.40°21`56”W., 1770.67 feet to a point on the Butler Creek Road and on the northerly list of that Deed in Book 212 at page 68;thence N.40°58`12”E., 329.98 feet along said road and limit to the point of beginning. RECORDING REFERENCE: Book 306 of Micro Records at page 970 Cameron Z Griggs and Kathleen M Griggs, as Grantor(s), conveyed

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will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 27, 126, 179, 180, 224, 265. Units can contain furniture, clothes, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting 4/9/2018 by appt only by calling 541-7919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to 4/12/2018 at 4:00 P.M. Buyer’s bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale, All Sales final.

Place your classified ad at 317 S. Orange, by phone 543-6609x115 or via email: classified@missoulanews.com [38] Missoula Independent • April 5–April 12, 2018


PUBLIC NOTICES MNAXLP said real property to Old Republic National Title Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on July 7, 2005, and recorded on August 4, 2005 as Book 757 Page 859 Document No. 200519979. The beneficial interest is currently held by U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR HARBORVIEW MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-13, MORTGAGE LOAN PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-13. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is currently the Trustee. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments beginning August 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 31, 2018 is $298,586.45 principal, interest totaling $60,266.42 late charges in the amount of $538.54, escrow advances of $34,056.34, and other fees and expenses advanced of $15,848.86, plus accruing interest, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the

Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation

up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 28, 2018 /s/ Rae Albert Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho)) ss. County of Bingham) On this 28th day of February, 2018 before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Rae Albert, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shannon Gavin Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 01/19/2024 Nationstar Mortgage LLC vs Cameron Z Griggs Kathleen M Griggs 100191-4 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 2, 2018, at 11:00 AM at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 10 in Block 4 of EL MAR ESTATES PHASE 4, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the

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official recorded plat thereof. Darlene R Guerdette, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to American General Financial Services, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on May 14, 2008, and recorded on May 19, 2008 as Book 819 Page 117 Document No. 200811140; Modification Agreement recorded 10/4/2012 in Book 901, Page 630. The beneficial interest is currently held by Wilmington Savings Fund Society, FSB, d/b/a Christiana Trust, not individually but as trustee for Carlsbad Funding Mortgage Trust. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is currently the Trustee. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments beginning January 1, 2017, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 28, 2018 is $230,181.08 principal, interest totaling $5,465.86 late charges in the amount of $396.00, escrow advances of $2,556.17 and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,251.00, plus accruing interest, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 28, 2018 /s/ Kaitlin Ann Gotch Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Service PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho)) ss. County of Bingham) On this 28 day of February, 2018, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Kaitlin Ann Gotch, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same /s/ Rae Albert Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 9/6/2022 Rushmore Loan Management Services vs Darlene R Guerdette 104055-1 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 26, 2018, at 11:00 AM at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT C OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5635, LOCATED IN THE NORTHWEST ONE QUARTER OF

SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 12 NORTH, RANGE 19 WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN MONTANA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT FOR RIGHT OF WAY FOR ROAD PURPOSES AS CONVEYED IN BOOK 107 OF MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 69. Kenneth M Fiester and J Dollene Fiester, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. (MERS) as nominee for AHM Mortgage, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on November 23, 2004, and recorded on November 29, 2004 as Book 744 Page 87 Document No. 200433268. The beneficial interest is currently held by Nationstar Mortgage LLC D/B/A Mr. Cooper. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. is currently the Trustee. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments beginning January 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 31, 2017 is $191,505.66 principal, interest totaling $79,681.46 late charges in the amount of $62.11, escrow advances of $24,468.15, and other fees and expenses advanced of $5323.51, plus accruing interest, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 05, 2018 /s/ Rae Albert Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho)) ss. County of Bingham) On this 5th day of March, 2018 before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Rae Albert, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Kaitlin Ann Gotch Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires:07/29/2022 Nationstar Mortgage LLC vs Fiester 102777-3 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 6, 2018, at 11:00 AM at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200

West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT 9C OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 1747, A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NW¼ OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 14 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA Allen Dreiling and Kasey A Dreiling, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J Peterson , as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for PHH Mortgage Corporation d/b/a ERA Mortgage, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on July 24, 2009, and recorded on July 29, 2009 as Book 844 Page 937 Document No. 200918694 Modification Agreement recorded May 25, 2016, Book 961 of Micro Records at Page 1000. The beneficial interest is currently held by Nationstar Mortgage LLC d/b/a Mr. Cooper. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is currently the Trustee. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments beginning October 1, 2017, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 16, 2018 is $243,225.33 principal, interest totaling $5,852.56 late charges in the amount of $337.89, escrow advances of $1,208.98, and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,529.68, plus accruing interest, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 8, 2018 /s/ Rae Albert Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho)) ss. County of Bingham) On this 8th day of March, 2018 before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Rae Albert, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Kaitlin Ann Gotch Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 07/29/2022 Nationstar Mortgage LLC vs Allen Dreiling Kasey A. Dreiling 100464-2

Place your classified ad at 317 S. Orange, by phone 543-6609x115 or via email: classified@missoulanews.com missoulanews.com • April 5–April 12, 2018 [39]


PUBLIC NOTICES MNAXLP NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 9, 2018, at 11:00 AM, at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A tract of land located in the NE1/4 of Section 21, Township 12 North, Range 17 West, Principal Meridian, Montana, Missoula County, Montana. More particularly described as Tract 2A of Certificate of Survey No. 5639. Jack L. Bogar and Laura M. Bogar, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to World Alliance Financial Corp., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 5, 2008, and recorded on June 10, 2008 in Book 820, Page 519, as Document No. 200812941. The beneficial interest is currently held by Nationstar Mortgage LLC d/b/a Champion Mortgage Company. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is currently the Trustee. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust due to death. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 21, 2018 is $146,812.87 principal, interest totaling $25,316.99, mortgage insurance premiums of $11,765.43, and other fees and expenses advanced of $4,590.00, plus accruing interest, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected,

and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 28, 2018. /s/ Rae Albert Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho)) ss. County of

Bingham) On this 28th day of February, 2018, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Rae Albert, known to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that she executed the same. (SEAL) /s/ Shannon Gavin Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 01/19/2024 PUBLIC NOTICE MISSOULA COUNTY FY 2019 APPLICATION FOR FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE COMMUNITY ASSISTANCE FUND (CAF) SUBSTANCE ABUSE PREVENTION FUND (SAP) Fiscal Year 07/1/2018 to 06/30/2019 Application forms for financial assistance from Missoula County to non-profit and governmental agencies and detailed instructions for completing and submitting the application packages will be available on April 3, 2018 on the County’s website at www.missoulacounty.us/fundingopportunities. Funding will be for twelve months, beginning July 1, 2018 and ending June 30, 2019. Applications will be due by 3:00 p.m., Wednesday, May 16, 2018 in the Community and Planning Services Department located at 323 West Alder, Missoula, MT 59802. The mailing address is 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. A postmark date is not acceptable. Allow extra days for mail delivery in order for your application to be received on time. Applications will be accepted for the following: COMMUNITY ASSISTANCE FUND (CAF PROGRAM) Missoula County is accepting competitive applications from governmental or health and human service non-profit organizations that provide basic needs assistance to atrisk populations in Missoula County. Priority will be given to projects or services that provide

food, medical services, shelter and emergency transportation to at-risk populations. Note: The availability of Community Assistance Funds is not guaranteed. Contact Nancy Rittel, Grants Administrator, at (406) 258-4933 or email nrittel@missoulacounty.us if you have questions. SUBSTANCE ABUSE PREVENTION MILL LEVY (SAP ML) Missoula County is accepting competitive applications from governmental or non-profit organizations that are engaged in underage substance abuse prevention work in Missoula County. Activities must be research-based. If your organization meets one or more of the following criteria you may be eligible for funding: (1) maintains a coalition that coordinates substance abuse prevention efforts; (2) provides community education about the risks and costs of abusing alcohol, tobacco and other drugs; (3) offers supervised non-school hour activities that give young people alternatives to drug use and opportunities for positive youth development; or (4) provides early intervention to help youth and families address alcohol, tobacco and other drug problems. Contact Melissa Gordon, Grants Administrator, at (406) 258-4980 or email mgordon@missoulacounty.us if you have questions. SECOND AMENDED NOTICE OF TRUSTEE SALE This Second Amended Notice replaces the December 1, 2017 Amended Notice of Trustee Sale recorded at Book 990 Page 67, Records of Missoula County Clerk and Recorder, Missoula County, Montana, on December 1, 2017. Pursuant to § 71-1-301, et seq., of the Montana Code Annotated, the undersigned hereby gives notice of a Trustee Sale to be held on Tuesday, July 24, 2018, at 11:30 a.m., at Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802, the following described property located in Missoula County, Montana: Tract A of Certifi-

cate of Survey No. 4278, located in the Northwest one-quarter of the Northeast one-quarter of Section 20, Township 13 North, Range 18 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Thomas B. Asbridge and Terran Asbridge, as joint tenants with the right of survivorship, conveyed the above described property, and improvements situated thereon, if any, to Insured Titles, LLC, PO Box 4706, Missoula, Montana 59806r, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to First Security Bank of Missoula, which was designated as beneficiary in a Deed of Trust dated May 18, 2006 recorded May 24, 2006 in Book 774 at Page 1270 of Micro Records of Missoula County, Montana. This sale will include the personal property found on the land, namely, a 1984 BROA Trailer with VIN: IDFL1AE201307583. The obligations secured by the aforementioned Trust Indenture are now in default and the required payments on the Promissory Notes secured by the Trust Indenture have not been made as required. As of March 14, 2018, the loan has matured and the entire balance is now due. The principal balance as of that date was the sum of $57,942.83, with interest accruing thereon at a rate of 6.95% per annum, with a daily interest accrual of $11.03. In addition, Grantors are in default for failing to pay taxes before becoming delinquent. In accordance with the provisions of the Trust Indenture, the beneficiary has

elected to accelerate the full remaining balance due under the terms of the Trust Indenture and note and elected to sell the interest of Thomas B. Asbridge and Terran Asbridge, the original Grantors, their successors and assigns, in and to the afore described property, subject to all easements, restrictions, encumbrances, or covenants existing of record or evident on the property at the time of sale to satisfy the remaining obligation owed. Beneficiary has directed Timothy D. Geiszler, a licensed Montana attorney, as successor Trustee to commence such sale proceedings. The sale noticed herein may be terminated and the Trust Indenture and note obligation be reinstated by the tender to the successor Trustee of all amounts in arrears to the date of payment, together with all fees, costs and expenses of sale as incurred. Trustee is unaware of any party in possession or claiming right to possession of the subject property other than those persons noticed herein. DATE this 15 day of March, 2018. GEISZLER STEELE, PC /s/ Timothy D. Geiszler, Successor Trustee STATE OF MONTANA County of Missoula This instrument was acknowledged before me on the 15th day of March, 2018, by Timothy D. Geiszler, GEISZLER STEELE, PC, Successor Trustee. /s/ Katie M. Neagle Notary Public for the State of Montana (SEAL)

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1315 E. Broadway #11. 1 bed/1.5 bath, close to U, coin-ops, pet? $750. Grizzly Property Management 5422060

Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

1324 S. 2nd St. “D”. 3 bed/2 bath, freshly painted, new flooring, central location. $1200. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

"Let us tend your den"

2 bed, 1 bath, near Good Food Store, $800, DW, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, HEAT Paid. NO PETS, NO SMOKING. Gatewest 728-7333

Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

2205 South Avenue West 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

$700-875, Newer Complex, balcony or deck, A/C, Storage & off-street parking, W/D Hook-ups in 2 bed. W/S/G Paid. NO PETS, NO SMOKING. Gatewest 728-7333

Finalist

Finalist

2 Bed, 1.5 Bath condo, near Grant Creek Trail, $1,100, D/W, W/D Hookups, Basic Cable, Covered carport, W/S/G Paid. NO PETS, NO SMOKING. Gatewest 728-7333

side, W/D, carport $650. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 2300 McDonald #3. 1 bed/1 bath, close to shopping & trails $600. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 237 1/2 E. Front St. “A” Studio/1 bath, downtown, HEAT PAID, coin-ops on site $625. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 303 E. Spruce #4 1 bed/1 bath, downtown, HEAT PAID, coin-ops, cat? $625. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 706 Longstaff #3. 1 bed/1 bath, Slant Streets, storage, W/D hookups $650. Grizzly Property Management 5432060 818 Stoddard “C”. 2 bed/1 bath, Northside, W/D hookups, storage $775. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

Lolo RV Park. Spaces available to rent. W/S/G/Electric included. $495/month. 406-273-6034 Valley West Manufactured Home Park Doublewide lot to rent $255-$260. no dogs # 926-1496

DUPLEXES 3 Bed, 2 Bath, South & Johnson, Newer complex, balcony, vaulted ceilings, wood laminate floors, W/D hook-ups, Storage & off-street parking.W/S/G paid. NO PETS, NO SMOKING. Gatewest 728-7333 524 S. 5th St. East “B”. 2 bed/1 bath, 2 blocks to U, W/D, DW, all

2102 34th St. 1 bed/1 bath, South-

328 McLeod 2 bed/1 bath, University area, gas fireplace, W/D hookups, POA $1275. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 Privately owned timeshare units in beautiful Flathead Valley. Cheap! $1,750. Judy 406-698-6103

COMMERCIAL RENTALS 400 Expressway C. Over 2400sqft, commercial office space. 6 built out offices, break room, bathroom. Easy access. Free 1mth rent w/min 1Yr lease. $2000mo.+utils. James 406531-3229

FIDELITY

GardenCity

MANAGEMENT SERVICES, INC. 7000

Property Management

Uncle Robert Ln #7

Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing Since 1971

Uncle Robert Lane 2 Bed/1 Bath $825/Month

Our goal is to spread recognition of NARPM and its members as the ethical leaders in the field of property managment

www.gatewestrentals.com

Visit our website at

westernmontana.narpm.org

fidelityproperty.com

422 Madison • 549-6106

For available rentals: gcpm-mt.com

HOUSE RENTALS

251-4707

Place your classified ad at 317 S. Orange, by phone 543-6609x115 or via email: classified@missoulanews.com [40] Missoula Independent • April 5–April 12, 2018


JONESIN’

REAL ESTATE 2122 Kent. Just listed and quickly sold. Single family homes are in demand! We have buyers. Let us work with you to sell your home. Call Joy Earls! 406-531-9811

APPROVED Subdivision on Waldo Road in Missoula. Are you an entrepreneur? This is your opportunity! Perfect for building small homes or modulars. 61 lots on Frontage Road. Call Joy Earls! 406-531-9811

Clark Fork River Frontage with 2 building sites!! Montana Dream! 24 acres, Sandy Beach & Launch Site. Older

home on property. $1.25 million. Let’s go fishing. Call Joy Earls! 406-5319811

CROSSWORDS By Matt Jones

HOMES OUT OF TOWN

THINKING OF SELLING?? JOY EARLS REAL ESTATE IS THE KEY!! We provide: Full Market Analysis, Staging and Complete Sales Plan. “WE’RE INDEPENDENT LIKE YOU!” Call Joy Earls! 406-531-9811

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL Denied Credit?? Work to Repair Your Credit Report With The Trusted Leader in Credit Repair. Call Lexington Law for a FREE credit report summary & credit repair consultation. 855-6209426. John C. Heath, Attorney at Law, PLLC, dba Lexington Law Firm.

630 Black Bear Lane, Georgetown Lake. This waterfront 3bd/2bth 2278 sqft home with private boat dock is unique. Located on Rainbow Point, this home has easy year round access. Minutes from Discovery Ski hill, Phillipsburg, and Pinlter Wilderness area. This is a deal! $875,000. Offered by Tracy Napier, Remax Premier 406-490-0338 www.georgetownlakehomes.com MLS 315864

"The 4 Ps"--Stay happy, people! ACROSS

Rochelle Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

728-8270

1 Cereal aisle consideration 6 Former Senate Majority Leader Trent 10 Carpet protection 13 Diagnostic machine 15 Hawkeye's state 16 "Here ___ Again" (1987 Whitesnake hit) 17 Spicy appetizers 20 Like chai, sometimes 21 M&Ms color replaced by blue 22 Parlor furniture 23 Charged subatomic particle 24 "Wild" author Cheryl 25 Some barnyard noises 29 Gender pronoun option 30 Card game where you match adjectives with nouns 36 Girl in "Calvin and Hobbes" 37 "The Subject Was Roses" director Grosbard 38 Ancient Aegean region 40 Slice choice 43 T or F, e.g. 44 Sleeper's breathing problem, to a Brit 45 "You Might Think" band

50 ___ Awards (event held in Nashville) 51 Outburst from a movie cowboy, perhaps 52 Massage 53 "That ___ not fair!" 57 "Wacky Races" character who later got her own cartoon 60 Director Roth 61 1982 Disney movie with a 2010 sequel 62 PiÒa ___ (rum drink) 63 Sugar suffix 64 Bypass 65 Cobalt, for one

DOWN

1 Tonga neighbor 2 Desktop that turned 20 in 2018 3 Hay unit 4 Watsonian exclamation 5 Certain theater company, for short 6 Pride member 7 Alley ___ (basketball play) 8 "Texas" dance move 9 ___ off (dwindle) 10 Devoutness 11 Give a thumbs-up 12 Gave a shot, perhaps 14 Mix again, as a salad 18 Photographer Goldin 19 School fundraising gp. 23 "Why do ___ trying?" 24 Olympic snowboarding medalist White 25 ___ in "questionable"

26 "___ and away!" 27 Domed church area 28 Movie snippet 29 One-person performances 31 Goes sour 32 Kate Middleton's sister 33 Pork cut 34 Auto manufacturer Ferrari 35 10 1/2 wide, e.g. 39 Abbr. on a tow truck 41 Tune that's tough to get out of your head 42 Like much of Keats's poetry 45 Blood group known as the universal donor 46 High shoes 47 Kids' rhyme starter 48 "Weekend Update" cohost Michael 49 Finnish architect Alvar who's the first entry in many encyclopedias 50 Sippy ___ 52 "Five hundred twenty-five thousand six hundred minutes" musical 53 Spot in the ocean 54 Sports page number 55 Scotch mixer 56 Birthstone that shares a first letter with its month 58 Luau delicacy 59 Cruise around Hollywood

©2018 Jonesin’ Crosswords • editor@jonesincrosswords.com

Place your classified ad at 317 S. Orange, by phone 543-6609x115 or via email: classified@missoulanews.com missoulanews.com • April 5–April 12, 2018 [41]


REAL ESTATE LD O S

Price Drop

New Listing

Montana Dream!

Call us sooner! 2122 W. KENT ST., MISSOULA

204 RIDGEWAY DR., LOLO

43 TROUTHAVEN DR., ROCK CREEK

23595 E. MULLAN RD., FRENCHTOWN

SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3 BEDS 2 BATHS 1,080 SQFT 3,049 SQ FT LOT $225,000

25-FOOT CATHEDRAL CEILINGS 5 BEDS 3 BATHS 3,248 SQFT BEAUTIFUL VIEWS $284,900

HUNTING, FISHING, HIKING YOUR OWN RETREAT. 39,204 SQFT LOT ONLY $68,000

CLARK FORK RIVER FRONTAGE 2 BUILDING SITES ON GRASSY KNOLL 24 ACRES... TREES, SANDY BEACH $1,250,000

NEW on MARKET Open House Sunday April 8th from Noon to 2pm.

600 Stephens • $309,900

Slant Street Home, 3 bed/1 bath up with 1 bed + bonus/1 bath down. 3 car heated garage + shop. Large fenced yard. Zoned RT2.7

Pat McCormick Real Estate Broker

6103 Brusset in Maloney Ranch Neighborhood 4 bedrooms 2.5 baths Double Attached Garage over 2400 sf $370,000

See www.MoveMontana.com for more details

Real Estate With Real Experience

pat@properties2000.com 406-240-SOLD (7653)

Properties2000.com

NHN Stone St

$174,900

Amazing 2.52 acre parcel in Orchard Homes! This parcel has great views, frontage on an irrigation fed pond, and city sewer available. If you're needing a little more room for gardens, animals, a shop, or all of those, come take a look. Matt Rosbarsky at 360-9023 for more information

Place your classified ad at 317 S. Orange, by phone 543-6609x115 or via email: classified@missoulanews.com [42] Missoula Independent • April 5–April 12, 2018


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control 541-7387 KOTA•

Kota is a 2 year old male American Bulldog mix. This big, goofy boy has a lot of love to give and is always searching for affection! He enjoys chasing tennis balls, but hasn't quite figured out the idea of retrieving them. He is very treat motivated and knows how to sit, lay down, and search for all the stray bits of kibble. Kota is hoping to find himself in a fun-loving and active family.

GYPSY• Gypsy is a 4 year old female German Shepherd. This sweet girl has spent her younger years in a travelling band of fortune tellers, but now she's ready to settle down and grow some roots. Gyspy loves people all of all ages, but could use a bit of advice in the way of manners. She is really hoping her future holds a family where she won't have to share any attention with other pets. BEAR• Bear is a 7 year old male Chocolate Lab. This big goofball loves to play and gets along well with other dogs. Fetch is his favorite game, and his attention cannot be broken when he sees a tennis ball. Bear is a very tolerant dog, allowing some rather poor play manners to go unchecked from his playmates. This loveable Lab would do best in a home that has room to move.

237 Blaine rockinrudy.com

630 S. Higgins 728-0777

208 East Main 728-7980

HOBBS• Hobbs is a 5 year old male black and white Tuxedo cat. He is a bit shy upon first greeting him. Once he's gotten used to you, Hobbs is a very sweet boy who loves receiving attention. Hobbs would prefer a quiet home. This classy boy is always ready for the most sophisticated occasion with his very handsome tuxedo markings and his distinguished white mustache. MISSY•Missy has beginning stages of kidney disease and needs a home that is familiar with providing for this health issue. Outside of her kidneys, Missy is a healthy and happy cat that is projected to live a long life, making her our shelter's Wonder Woman! Her adoption fee has been sponsored, and we are searching for an adopter that is able to give her a prescription kidney support diet for life

Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MontanaSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

ERWIN• Erwin is a 8 year old male black cat. This handsome and distinguished house panther is an older man who loves the company of people. Like his hero, The Black Panther, Erwin believes himself to be the protector of his kingdom. His Highness has enhanced, superhero abilities in lounging and cuddles. He'd prefer to live in a kingdom with only human subjects.

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana 549-3934 PRINCESS• Princess is a very sweet girl that would prefer to be the center of your attention. She wants to be the apple of your eye with no competition! She is a princess indeed! She is a little nervous around new people at first, but when she warms up, she will love you forever. Princess' adoption fee is waived through our Seniors for Seniors program for people 60 and up and pets 7 and up! BLUE MOON• Blue Moon is a handsome man with lots of energy! He loves to go go go and would like to go to an active household. He is friendly with new visitors and some dogs. If you are looking for an adventure pup to be by your side, come visit Blue Moon! LUCY• Lucy is a very sweet girl that is becoming more and more brave every day!  She loves other dogs and spending time with people that are calm and willing to give her a few minutes to warm up.  She is looking for a family with another dog who is very social with people. This sweetheart is already spayed and vaccinated and ready to go to her forever home today. 

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

Garry Kerr Dept. of Anthropology University of Montana

BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

SEDWICK• Sedwick is a very handsome man that loves to nuzzle up with people. His long hair and piercing gold eyes along with his loud purrs will steal your heart. He has been a wonderful office cat here at the shelter and enjoys lounging on a desk. Just as long as you’re taking breaks to give him some belly rubs! TIBBS• Tibbs LOVES to play! He has been so active and goofy here at the shelter. Once you start playing with him, you won’t be able to stop— he won’t let you! Tibbs is very social and enjoys greeting new people with head nuzzles and loud purrs.

Missoula 406-626-1500 william@rideglaw.com

1450 W. Broadway St. • 406-728-0022

RAPUNZEL• Rapunzel has been patiently waiting atop her tower for the perfect person to come adopt her. This long haired princess takes a little bit of time to open up to people, but with a bit of love and patience, she is a sweetheart! She spends her time in the HSWM office staring out the window waiting for her true love and watching the birds. missoulanews.com • April 5–April 12, 2018 [43]


Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal or people, politics and culture.

Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal or people, politics and culture.