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Independent MISSOULA

Vol. 20, No. 40 • Oct. 1–Oct. 8, 2009

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Scope: Family internment feeds Shimomura’s pop art Film: Yearning for yesteryear flows freely in Kegger Up Front: Local midwife delivers new birth center


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


Independent MISSOULA

Vol. 20, No. 40 • Oct. 1–Oct. 8, 2009

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Scope: Family internment feeds Shimomura’s pop art Film: Yearning for yesteryear flows freely in Kegger Up Front: Local midwife delivers new birth center


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Page 2 October 1–October 8, 2009


nside Cover Story Late last year, several parents frustrated by their dealings with the state’s custody laws— and especially the power wielded by courtappointed advocates called guardians ad litem—met at the Missoula Public Library to share their stories and offer support for one Cover by Cathrine L. Walters another. But what began as a simple support group has rapidly snowballed into a grassroots attempt at altering the rules—or complete lack thereof—pertaining to the guardians. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

News

Letters Still touting Tester’s bill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 The Week in Review Griz win, other grizzlies get shot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Briefs Reckless bikers, Little Shell delay and a new hostel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Etc. John Stokes’ impeccable timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Up Front Local midwife delivers new birth center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Up Front Baucus’ bumblings send Kalispell man to the source . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Ochenski Self-sufficiency helps weather the recession . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Writers on the Range Escaping the past can be difficult in Libby . . . . . . . . . . 11 Agenda The Wobblies celebrate free speech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Arts & Entertainment

Thursday 10/1 @ 9pm

Friday 10/2 @ 9pm

Tom Catmull & the Clerics Wednesday 10/7 @ 8pm

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Flash in the Pan Red chicken enchiladas from scratch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 8 Days a Week Wishing for more Latin in our stories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Mountain High Montana Conservation Voters potluck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Scope Family internment feeds Shimomura’s pop art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Noise No-Fi Soul Rebellion, Brother Ali, Red Fang and Pearl Jam . . . . . . . . . . 31 Books Clumsy concept unravels Barbieri’s novel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Film Kegger caked in beer mud nostalgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Exclusives Street Talk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 In Other News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Independent Personals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Classifieds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 The Advice Goddess . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Free Will Astrolog y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Crossword Puzzle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

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PUBLISHER Matt Gibson GENERAL MANAGER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Peter Kearns PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Ira Sather-Olson STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Matthew Frank, Alex Sakariassen COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Carolyn Bartlett, Steven Kirst, Chris Melton, Scott Woodall CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING MANAGER Miriam Mick CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold ADVERTISING & ADMIN COORDINATOR Hannah Smith CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Chris LaTray, Ednor Therriault, Katie Kane, Ali Gadbow, Azita Osanloo, Cathrine L. Walters, Anne Medley, Jesse Froehling

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Page 3 October 1–October 8, 2009


STREET TALK

by Alex Sakariassen

Asked outside the Good Food Store Tuesday afternoon.

Q:

This week the Indy reviews Kegger, a documentary about Missoula’s infamous Aber Day Kegger parties during the 1970s. What’s another bygone piece of Missoula culture you’d like to see celebrated? Follow-up: Since the Aber Day Kegger ended, what’s your favorite annual Missoula bash?

Eric Rasmussen: I really miss the peace sign on the hill and just having that around town. It seemed like an ongoing celebration, something visible. The best party is your own: Some friends and I actually host an Octoberfest out by Kelly Island. We’re in our sixth year and we get a couple hundred people.

Karen Hamilton: I liked it when they brought back the old orange Griz jerseys for one game. That was fun. Glutton for footwork: Put me down for the River Bank Run. I think it’s just a great family event with good people and a nice spirit.

Jimmy Klapper: Horseracing at the fairgrounds would be great to have back. I bet a little, but it’s just fun to watch, you know? River rat: My favorite is the Lochsa Rendezvous at the beginning of May. It’s a great way to kick off the river season, and brings people out who you don’t see in the winter.

Shanda Aguirre: I don’t know. It was culture shock moving here [from Seattle] and hearing about the Testicle Festival. People eat testicles? All about Caras: There was the bike festival a couple weeks ago [PEDal Fest], and that was pretty fun. I like anything that Caras Park hosts.

Missoula Independent

Page 4 October 1–October 8, 2009

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

The next chapter Alex Sakariassen’s September 17 article on Roderick Nash (see “Montana’s place in ‘Big W’”) offers an excellent jumping-off point for a closer look at Sen. Jon Tester’s Forest Jobs and Recreation Act, a bill that has been discussed extensively in the Independent and elsewhere. From the get-go, Montana has been ahead of the curve on the wilderness debate. It’s no news to most readers that Montana’s wild lands were the inspiration for some of our nation’s most visionary wilderness philosophers and advocates, and that several of the first wilderness areas designated along with the passage of the 1964 Wilderness Act fell within our borders. In following the story of Bob Marshall and other Wilderness heroes in his 1967 book, Wilderness and the American Mind, Nash would agree that Montana played a leading role in helping to shape our nation’s evolving perceptions of wild landscapes. Five years after Nash’s seminal publication, Montana again took the helm of wilderness policy and guided it in another direction by creating the “first citizen’s wilderness”—the Scapegoat—which marked the first time that Congress chose to act on a wilderness recommendation not made by the Forest Service. Since 1972, the example set by residents of Lincoln and surrounding communities has been replicated countless times and in all corners of the United State, further contributing to the growth of wilderness in America. Today, Montana is poised to push the envelope and rechart the course of federal land management once more—we are literally writing the next chapter of Roderick Nash’s book. The pages have been years in the making—they have endured edits from all sides of the political and economic equation, have suffered from rips and tears, and have gone through multiple drafts. At last, a collection of authors—fed up with years of bickering, inaction and failed attempts at communication—have come together to finish the installment. Building upon Montana’s traditions of independence and cooperation, the authors—timber companies like Pyramid Mountain, representatives of motorized and passive recreation interests, conservation organizations like Trout Unlimited and the Montana Wilderness Association, watershed organizations like the Blackfoot Challenge, and others—broke the long stalemate and decided the status quo was not good enough. What the authors have devised is the new paradigm of public lands legislation: placebased, collaborative proposals that reflect the needs of a range of stakeholders who are willing to come to the table, work together, and produce results. What the authors of this next chapter in Nash’s saga understand is that the gridlock that has characterized public lands management needs to change.

Tester’s Forest Jobs and Recreation Act represents an opportunity on the scale of the designation of the Scapegoat in 1972—a chance to make wilderness designation a local affair, and one that benefits the full range of people who call Montana home. It is the basis for a new chapter on the role of wilderness in the American mind. Zach Porter Missoula

Risky business I am writing to support Sen. Jon Tester’s efforts to work with Montanans to find creative forest management solutions with his Forest Jobs and Recreation Act. Clearly, “business as

We are “ literally writing the next chapter of Roderick

Nash’s book.

state basis. This should be done by utilizing both a single-payer option and while preserving the private sector. Montana has different needs and personalities than does California or Massachusetts, needs which must be addressed by those who know us best— our fellow Montanans. It makes no sense to send a tax dollar to Washington, D.C. for health care and to have it come back to Montana beaten and ragged as a mere two bits. The implications of the states caring for their own in health care, education, housing and welfare are far-reaching. Not only would such action truly downsize the federal government, leading to great savings and the better use of tax dollars, but residents of a state would also be empowered, realizing the importance of using the resources of a particular state fully for the benefit of one’s neighbors. For example, remove federal control over Montana’s forest lands, implement an effective harvest and replanting program, and you create jobs, add value to a native resource and preserve the environment simultaneously. It will not be easy to get out from under the federal yoke, but it would benefit all, including future generations. Also, this may be the only way to keep the U.S.A. from going bankrupt. Ed Chaberek Superior

Pickens Plan primed usual” forest management is not working as evidenced by important Montana wild lands left without permanent wilderness protection; Montana timber industry jobs and infrastructure being lost or put at risk; forest professionals unable to move ahead with restoration and management projects that make good sense and are badly needed for Montana’s forest health; and a legacy of mistrust between various interests with a stake in how Montana public lands are managed. Thanks goes to the diverse group of collaborative partners who stepped up and did the hard work of building relationships with those who have different views. These groups have worked hard to find the common ground needed to create workable solutions to Montana’s forest management questions. Thanks to Tester for listening to Montanans and moving forward with the Forest Jobs and Recreation Act legislation. Mark Vosburgh Missoula

State-run health care Everyone has an opinion about health care reform—guess you know what that’s like! Despite the implication, here’s mine: Health care should be provided to all by the states on a state-by-

Since July 2008, members of the Pickens Plan army have been working to spread the word about the continuing dangers of our dependence on foreign oil. In August 2009—even with oil at about half the price it was in 2008—we still spent over $25 billion to import more than 60 percent of the oil we used in just one month. That is money that could have been supporting the American economy instead of the economies of places like Saudi Arabia, Angola and Venezuela. Natural gas is an abundant resource that can replace a significant percentage of that imported oil. It is cleaner than either gasoline or diesel, it is cheaper than imported oil and we have reserves projected to last more than 100 years. There’s a bill in Congress, the NAT GAS Act, which will help jump-start the natural gas vehicle industry in the United States. It has nearly 90 bipartisan cosponsors in the House, making the NAT GAS Act one of the few substantive bills in Congress with the support of both parties. I urge our representatives in Washington to move the NAT GAS Act onto the House and Senate floor for a vote this fall so it can quickly be signed into law by President Obama. Let’s reduce our dangerous dependence on foreign oil. James Costamagna Missoula


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Page 5 October 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 8, 2009


WEEK IN REVIEW

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

News Quirks

VIEWFINDER

• Wednesday, September 23

by Anne Medley

The Montana Department of Public Health & Human Services unveils its voter-approved Healthy Montana Kids program, which, once implemented on Oct. 1, will combine children’s Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Plan into a single plan. Officials estimate 30,000 Montana children will be added to the plan.

• Thursday, September 24 Dennis McDonald launches his first political attack on U.S. Rep. Denny Rehberg in anticipation of challenging the congressman for his seat in Washington, D.C. McDonald claims Rehberg exercised poor judgment the night of the powerboat crash on Flathead Lake, and suggests Rehberg admit some responsibility in the accident.

• Friday, September 25 Missoula Assistant City Attorney Judy Wang, an award-winning advocate for victims of domestic violence, dies of injuries suffered after a car rearends hers on I-90 near Anaconda, causing it to roll several times. Montana Highway Patrol officers believe the 25-year-old Butte man who hit Wang was under the influence of alcohol.

• Saturday, September 26 The Griz sneak past Northern Arizona with an overtime win in Flagstaff, 41-34. Ty Palmer cathces a 25yard touchdown pass on the first play of the extra session to seal the team’s fourth straight victory. UM takes a week off before an Oct. 10 homecoming showdown with Cal Poly.

• Sunday, September 27 A family of bears charges two bow hunters hiking west of Essex in the Great Bear Wilderness, prompting the hunters to fire pistols in self-defense. The lumbering creatures were likely grizzlies, according to Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks officials. The hunters were able to hike out safely, but officials are unsure how the bears fared.

• Monday, September 28 The Missoula City Council hears a back-and-forth about back-in angle parking during its weekly meeting. According to Public Works Director Steve King, the current experiment on Spruce Street offers better visibility as cars pull into traffic, but some locals argue the neighborhood looks like a commercial strip.

• Tuesday, September 29 Law enforcement officials issue a felony escape warrant for Terry Sandcrane, a violent offender convicted in 2008 of sexual assault, after he walks away from the Missoula Pre-Release Center during the early morning hours. Missoula Police eventually track him down later in the day.

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A bulldozer dumps the last loads of contaminated sediment from the Milltown Dam into train cars bound for Opportunity on Sept. 29. More than 3 million tons of contaminated sediment have been shipped to Opportunity over the past two years under the supervision of Envirocon Senior Project Director Matthew Fein. “It’s a good milestone to reach,” Fein says.

Little Shell

“A punch in the stomach” The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) again delayed a decision granting Montana’s Little Shell Tribe federal recognition, in what’s become a predictable practice in bureaucratic stalling. Little Shell President John Sinclair told the Independent in August that the tribe is “used to waiting.” He made the statement after the DOI announced a 60-day delay in late July. When that postponement expired last week, the DOI announced a further 30day delay. Sinclair says the latest news came as a shock in light of recent conversations. “It was kinda like a punch in the stomach,” Sinclair says. “What we were told was [the 60-day delay] was longer than they really wanted, so when they added another 30 days it was quite surprising.” In a letter to Sinclair, Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs George Skibine stated the extension is necessary to complete a legal review of the tribe’s petition. The DOI will

notify Sinclair prior to releasing its decision so he can arrange a meeting with tribal representatives, Skibine wrote. “The delays seem to be getting shorter,” Sinclair says. “We went from six months down to three months down to one month. I don’t know if that’s a sign.” Federal recognition would award the landless Little Shell access to government funding in health care, education and housing. The 4,000-member tribe has grown increasingly scattered across Montana over the last century. An estimated 30 percent now live outside the state. Montana has recognized the Little Shell Tribe since 2000. Congressmen, legislators and Gov. Brian Schweitzer continue to support the group politically in the decades-long federal battle, but so far to no avail. “Time is not on our side,” wrote Sen. Jon Tester in a letter to Skibine in July. “And considering the timeline of events over the past 31 years, the Little Shell people deserve a decision—not another delay.” Skibine declared Oct. 26 the new deadline for a decision. It’s the department’s

fourth extension since summer 2008. Alex Sakariassen

Hutchins Hostel

Travelers get new digs Bon Jovi’s “Runaway” blares from a boom box as contractors drill, nail and tile a 120year-old East Broadway building in anticipation of Missoula’s first hostel in nearly a decade. Dave Loos hopes to open his 12-person facility, dubbed Hutchins Hostel, later this month. “It’s the right time to try it here, especially given the economy,” he says. The bottom flat of the two-tiered building will offer two bunkrooms, a lounge and access to shiny silver appliances—including a commercial dishwasher—for $30 per night. Loos’ facility aims to fill the gap left after Missoula’s 22-bed Birchwood Hostel closed in 2000. Since then, he says, thrifty tourists have had a hard time finding affordable yet comfortable accommodations. “The choice right now is either stay at a campground or stay at a hotel,” says Loos.

picture frames & growth charts for your little buckaroo Ask not what you can do for your country. Ask what's for lunch.

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Inside

Letters

Briefs

Before he started the project, Loos tapped Ernie Franceschi and Gayl Teichert for operational insight. The couple shuttered the Birchwood nine years ago after more than two decades of housing travelers from around the globe. “We go from the beautiful to the bizarre,” Franceschi says of the Birchwood’s clientele. He specifically recalls one Japanese man who was roller-skating cross-country, and wonders aloud what happened to a half-naked toddler found alone in the middle of the night. Then there was the Troy booster club, which, in 1980, tripped a fuse while blow-drying at least a dozen Farrah Fawcett hairdos. “We were in the house and our lights were dimming,” Franceschi says, “and we couldn’t figure it out.” Loos developed the business plan for an eco-friendly hostel while working toward a graduate degree in environmental studies at the University of Montana. Throughout the renovation, he aimed to keep the project green, bringing the flat up to code with smart insulation and lighting. If everything pans out, he aims to add solar panels down the line, as well. In the meantime, after 13 months of poring over blueprints, pounding nails and painting, Loos is focused on his first chance at house mothering. “I hope I can get as many interesting people as Ernie and Gayl did,” he says. Jessica Mayrer

Bikes

Reckless cyclists raise ire After successfully getting the city to address aggressive panhandlers, downtown business owners have now set their sites on reining in reckless cyclists. “Bikes should not be ridden on sidewalks in the urban setting,” says Rod Austin, operations director for the Downtown Business Improvement District. “That’s just another reason for people to not come downtown.” Austin, who recently started lobbying city government on the issue, says downtown Missoula has become increasingly bicycle friendly with the addition of new bike lanes painted onto N. Higgins Avenue this summer. But despite the added lanes, downtown ambassadors spot speeding cyclists nearly missing pedestrians on sidewalks daily.

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

“We hate it,” says Chris Niswanger, manager at Worden’s Market. Montana law allows biking on sidewalks unless municipalities post signs saying otherwise. Bozeman is one city that enacted an outright ban downtown, but Missoula officials appear lukewarm to the concept. Missoula City Councilman Dave Strohmaier, who chairs the Public Health and Safety Committee, says the city needs to research the cost and effectiveness of posting signs before bringing more stringent measures

into the mix. He thinks educating cyclists about using bike lanes over sidewalks is a better place to start. Phil Smith, the city’s bicycle/pedestrian program manager, agrees, saying most cyclists don’t want to intimidate pedestrians. “The challenge to us is how do we get people to be more thoughtful,” says Smith. But Austin maintains if Missoula officials don’t act, someone will get hurt. “We’re basically waiting for a wreck to happen,” he says. While he waits for the city to act, Austin aims to stencil requests on roadways asking cyclists to de-bike before window shopping or cruising with friends. If asking nicely doesn’t work, he’ll apply more pressure. “I’m going to try to put a little bit more force behind it,” he says. Jessica Mayrer

Agenda

News Quirks

Development

City twisted on Terrace After extended wrangling, the Missoula City Council Monday night unanimously approved the 38-lot Clark Fork Terrace subdivision south of Interstate 90 near the Canyon River Golf Course. The move secures a 300-foot riverfront easement, which, if the city gets its way, will become part of a public trail system that connects an extended Kim Williams Trail with the Clark Fork River. The development approved Monday night, dubbed “Clark Fork Terrace One,” is part of a larger project planned by Bob Brugh’s firm, Neighborhood by Design. The firm also aims to build 33 additional homes on 47.38 adjacent acres. That portion of the subdivision is hung up in Missoula District Court after Brugh sued the city over one of two trail easement requirements the city imposed as a condition of approval. The stipulation would force Brugh to give up a slice of his property in exchange for council approval, essentially making him hand over land without fair compensation, says Neighborhood by Design attorney Alan McCormick. “That’s not a legitimate use of government power,” argues McCormick. The city maintains the development itself triggers the need for a more cohesive trail system capable of easing traffic concerns. And as the lawsuit churns on, some council members say they aren’t thrilled to do business again with Neighborhood by Design. “I’m a firm believer that you don’t negotiate with someone once they start suing you,” says Councilman Jon Wilkins. But Monday’s subdivision approval triggers an agreement with adjacent property owner Canyon River, prompting it to build an additional portion of trail along the river. The Clark Fork Terrace subdivision, which sits between the Milltown Dam site and additional trails, prompted the council to suck it up and approve the project. “In other words, my arm is being twisted on this one,” Wilkins says. Jessica Mayrer

BY THE NUMBERS

11

Missoula Housing Authority units vandalized in the Garden District early Saturday morning. The vandals unscrewed pipes in two buildings, causing flood damage estimated to be approximately $200,000.

etc. Dead air never sounded so good. KGEZ radio owner and controversial shock jock John Stokes lost his soapbox on Sept. 24 when Flathead County authorities officially shut down his Kalispell-based station. U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge Ralph Kirscher filed a motion earlier last week forcing Stokes from Chapter 11 to Chapter 7 bankruptcy. The move liquidated Stokes’ assets and sent him into early retirement from the world of talk radio. Stokes has a colored history–literally and figuratively–in the annals of free speech in these parts. He publicly burned a green swastika during a 2002 anti-Earth Day gathering to demonstrate his contempt for conservationists, whom he calls “green Nazis.” The Montana Human Rights Network contested Stokes’ Federal Communications Commission license in 2007, claiming he failed to serve the public interest. He’s been the subject of a string of defamation complaints, the most recent of which landed him in the $3.8 million lawsuit that plummeted him into bankruptcy. Over the years, Stokes regularly tested just how far the “free speech” argument would go. He viewed his show, “The Edge,” as his personal right-wing playpen as well as a launch pad for personal attacks. While we won’t shed any tears over the sounds of static coming from KGEZ, we have to admit the shuttering of Stokes’ station couldn’t come at a more fitting time. The Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) are commemorating the 100th anniversary of their stand for free speech on Fri., Oct. 2. In 1909, the Wobblies took to the corner of Front Street and Higgins Avenue to voice their grievances against Montana’s prohibitive publicspeaking law from atop a genuine soapbox. One by one, each person that stepped up to speak was arrested, leading to an overflow at the local jail. Eventually, city officials let down their guard and decided that IWW members could speak freely on the street. Local members of the IWW will reenact the event on the same street corner, but not before allowing members of the public a chance to mount the soapbox first. The event will likely draw the usual crowd of impassioned locals ready to share their latest health care or wilderness legislation tirades with anyone in earshot. Let’s just hope Friday’s speakers show a little more class than Stokes ever did.

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Missoula Independent

Page 7 October 1–October 8, 2009




Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

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Baby steps Local midwife delivers new birth center by Jennifer Savage

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If Jeanne Hebl gets her way, women in Missoula will once again have another option when it comes to where they birth their babies. Hebl, a local certified nurse midwife, expects to open a freestanding birth center near the corner of 39th and Reserve streets by the end of October. She recently secured a lease on a house and has been working to transform the space over the last few weeks. Hebl plans for

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This Monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Featured Artist:

Angela Brooker

Voted Missoulaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best Tattoo Parlor 13 Years Running 1701 S 5th St. W. :: 728-1191 :: www.painlesssteeltattoo.com Missoula Independent

Page 8 October 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 8, 2009

thing in between. The American Association of Birth Centers (AABC) claims that, while hospital births are still the predominant option for delivery in the United States, home-like facilities account for a lower cesarean section rate, shorter stays and equal care compared to low-risk, in-hospital births. A birth center also costs lessâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;approximately $5,000, says Hebl, compared to $10,000 for a hospital birth.

she says, they show that the Birth Center was cautious and successful at the same time. Casey Massey delivered her first child at the Birth Center two years ago with the help of Hebl, and when Massey found out she was pregnant with her second child earlier this year she called her midwife right away. Massey didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know where sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d birth her baby after the centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s closure, and was convinced sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d have to birth at the hospital. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not so much about where I wanted to have the baby but who I wanted to have the baby with,â&#x20AC;? says Massey. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want Jeanne and everything that comes with Jeanne.â&#x20AC;? Massey decided on a home birth because Heblâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new location was still in the planning stages. But she says thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only because of her experience at the Birth Center. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m comfortable with a home birth, but I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have that confidence without the experience I had at a birth center with Jeanne,â&#x20AC;? Massey said. Photo by Anne Medley â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m so glad sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opening a Jeanne Hebl, a local certified nurse midwife, recently announced plans to open new birth center.â&#x20AC;? a new birth center in Missoula. Hebl helped Lynn Montgomery open Missoulaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Women who have birthed first Birth Center in 2006, but the facility closed after Montgomeryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unexpectwith Hebl are not the only ones ed death last year. supportive of broadening the new facility to allow birthing women â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some people are not quite ready to birthing choices in Missoula. and their families access to a full kitchen, birth at home either because of their Dolly Browder, a longtime certified birthing tubs and two large birthing space or they have misgivings, so they go professional midwife in Missoula and rooms that offer a private, home-like feel. to the hospital,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But you men- national advocate for midwifery care, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The demand is out there,â&#x20AC;? Hebl tion a birth center and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in.â&#x20AC;? calls Heblâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new facility a great option for says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Women want another choice.â&#x20AC;? Hebl began looking to open another expecting parents. Heblâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birth center comes less than a birth center in the months following â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a really sad day when Dr. year after the birth center she helped Montgomeryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s death, but had trouble Montgomery died and his place was start was forced to close. Lynn finding a physician, like Montgomery, taken over and not preserved,â&#x20AC;? says Montgomery, an obstetrician-gynecolo- who would be willing to partner with her. Browder. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a sad day for parents gist and perinatologist, built the Birth Finding no takers, Hebl decided to do it and families in Montana not to have Center on Reserve Street in 2006 after herself. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spent the better part of the another option for birth. seeing a need in the Missoula communi- year attending home births and looking â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really important what sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ty for an alternative to the maternity ward for the right spot to open her business. doing,â&#x20AC;? Browder continues. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Birth cenat Community Medical Center. At its As a certified nurse midwife, Hebl is a ters need to exist because parents need peak, the center saw nearly 75 patients licensed practitioner and says she can to have a choice about birth.â&#x20AC;? per day and employed 16 staff members. legally open a birth center without a For Hebl, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always been about In just over two years, more than 200 physician. She will not, however, have choice. She wanted to become a midwife women performed natural, un-medicat- hospital privileges if a patient needs to be ever since her cousin was whisked away ed births at the center. transferred to the hospital. in a hospital and forced to labor alone. But Montgomery died suddenly in â&#x20AC;&#x153;The only reason I needed a physiâ&#x20AC;&#x153;When I saw my cousin disappear October 2008, suffering a massive heart cian was to provide continuity of care behind the closed doors of a hospital attack while playing hockey at Glacier Ice and to be an advocate for patients in the when she was in labor and no one Rink. In January of this year, Community hospital,â&#x20AC;? Hebl says. could go with her, I thought this isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Medical Center leased the building that She explains that she can accompany right,â&#x20AC;? says Hebl. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when I knew I housed the Birth Center and bought all her patients and serve as a doula, or labor wanted to be a midwife. I wanted to be of its assets. Community does not offer support coach, for a hospital birth. She [renowned midwife] Ina Mae Gaskin birth-related services in the building, will also continue to support home births. and help provide healthcare for leaving women in Missoula, once again, Hebl says Montgomeryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Birth women, by women. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what we with two choices when it comes to where Center had a 10 percent hospital trans- want to do here.â&#x20AC;? to birth: home or the hospital. fer rate and a 2 percent cesarean rate. editor@missoulanews.com Hebl says her facility will offer some- Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proud of these statistics because,


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Picture of frustration Baucus’ bumblings send Kalispell man to the source by Matthew Frank

As Montana Sen. Max Baucus leads the effort to reform health care, critics claim he’s too beholden to the health insurance industry to usher in any big changes. Short of that, one Kalispell man asked the senator to at least make one small one. Levente Csaplar walked into Baucus’ Kalispell office several weeks ago and urged the staff to remove a portrait of former Montana Sen. Mike Mansfield, the state’s longest serving and most revered

‘Do you know that that’s a governmentsponsored program?’ And they looked at each other like, ‘That’s not what Fox News told us. And Fox News said they’re going to kill us when we’re 70 years old.’” The accidental health care reform advocate never envisioned himself as a conservative-bashing rabble-rouser. In fact, Csaplar, a 58-year-old Northwestern Mutual financial representative with a law degree, used to call himself a conservative, until the political position became syn-

Photo by Matthew Frank

Levente Csaplar says Montana Sen. Max Baucus doesn’t deserve to display a picture of former Sen. Mike Mansfield in Baucus’ Kalispell office, and he asked him to take it down. “[Mansfield] was a man to be admired,” Csaplar says. “Max Baucus is not a man to be admired.”

congressman. Csaplar asserted that Baucus’ “dithering” and “inadequate” work on health care reform hardly lives up to the example set by the man Baucus calls his hero, and the senator didn’t deserve the picture. “Baucus should be representing the country as a whole, or at least the state of Montana,” Csaplar says. “He’s in charge of probably one of the top three issues of our time, and he should not be giving as much credence to the people ripping us off—and they have been ripping us off for so long.” Csaplar’s request, he says, upset Baucus’ staffers, who left the photo on the wall. Csaplar’s frustration over the health care debate isn’t limited to just Baucus. A few weeks after his episode at Baucus’ office, Csaplar approached a group of “silver-haired” demonstrators outside the senator’s office holding signs stating things like, “Stop GovernmentSponsored Health Care!” “I walked up and said, ‘Excuse me, ladies and gentlemen. How many of you are on Medicare?’ And about half of them raised their hands,” he recalls. “And I said,

onymous with shrinking government to the point of impotency. He says voting for a candidate like Ronald Reagan or George W. Bush who chides big government “is like going to a brain surgeon who hates brain surgery to do your brain surgery. You’ve got to be stupid to do that.” Csaplar, who now refers to himself as an independent, says his frustration is a function of his firsthand knowledge of the health insurance business. He sold health insurance as part of his financial services business for about 10 years before deciding to stop because of his belief that insurance companies only suck money out of the health care system. Before that, he worked for a time in the University of North Carolina’s managed care department, where he witnessed a system that rewarded less physician interaction with patients. In addition, his wife is a pediatrician and an internist. When he looks at his personal situation, Csaplar calculates that, between the taxes and premiums he and his company paid for health insurance last year, his insurance coverage cost $32,720. “Why should I pay three times?” he asks. “Why should I pay the state, why

should I pay the federal government, and why should I pay the insurance company? It doesn’t make sense. Let’s get rid of two of those. I don’t care which ones.” More than the inefficiencies and injustices of the current health care system, Csaplar counts himself among the Montanans of all political leanings outraged by dishonest efforts to preserve the current system. “What [opponents] are basically doing,” Csaplar says, “is they’re trying to keep the buggy-whip manufacturers in business, because the buggy-whip manufactures—i.e., the health insurance companies—are fighting tooth and nail to get the last penny out of the American consumer. If the price of health care has doubled or tripled in the last I-don’tknow-how many years—an average rate of between 7 and 12 percent a year— there’s no way that health insurance companies can be in business 10 years from now, and they know that. But they want to squeeze the last penny out of you and me. “They want to table this thing and get it out of the way,” Csaplar continues, “because they’re getting paid too much money to not fix the problem. There’s too much money involved in this. That’s the bottom line. If there weren’t all those entrenched financial interests, this would not be an issue.” All of which explains why, according to Csaplar, the opposition labels reform as socialism, spreads mistruths about death panels and generally “throws up anything that’ll stick to the wall,” when, in fact, Medicare, Medicaid and the Veterans Health Administration, for example, are all single-payer, government-run systems that work. And count Baucus complicit, Csaplar says, not because he spreads mistruths, but because he panders to those who do, and by doing so promotes the health of companies before the health of people. “If you really want to make things better, then make them better,” Csaplar says of Baucus. “Don’t just keep the status quo going.” Csaplar obviously didn’t expect the health care debate to change after he stormed into Baucus’ office, but he did hope to make a point—and thinks he did. Legislators need to know the public’s frustrated and the tenor of the reform discussion needs to improve, and he believes that starts with his senator. “I’m not going to vote for him either way. He’s lost my vote forever,” says Csapler, before adding, “Unless he pulls this thing out…” mfrank@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 9 October 1–October 8, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Hungry for help Local self-sufficiency helps weather the recession

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Missoula Independent

Page 10 October 1–October 8, 2009

The recession brought with it a tremendous toll on our citizens. Property values dropped precipitously, millions of Americans lost their jobs, the wild, credit-fueled spending spree we have been told was the cornerstone of our economy ground to a near halt and people started re-discovering, oftentimes through necessity, the wisdom of frugality and self-sufficiency. For the most part, however, this has been a citizen-driven movement almost entirely devoid of any bold political leadership. Here in Montana—and across the nation—part of that re-discovery took the form of home gardens. Suddenly, throughout our cities, backyard lawns were turned over to production of fruits and vegetables, raised beds sprouted in even the tiniest urban lots and the simple miracle of home food production made a tremendous resurgence. Accompanying the wave of private gardens has been a significant increase in community gardens. Churches and other institutions suddenly decided the best way to take care of people was to give them the opportunity to grow their own food and share in the harvest—building both a sense of community and a sense of personal accomplishment in tough times. What it means in the long run remains to be seen, but what it means in the short run is definitely good news for both consumers and the environment. Consider this: The average distance standard commercial foods have to travel from feedlots and farms to your kitchen table runs somewhere between 1,500 and 2,500 miles. In an age where petroleum can suddenly skyrocket in price, the cost of fuel alone can often double the market price for the product while adding to global warming and air pollution. And, of course, if we use less petroleum, we’re likely to find ourselves in fewer wars whenever we feel our supply of foreign oil is threatened. Then there’s the benefit of safer food. Do you know what they put on the produce grown in Central America? Most likely you have no idea and sadly, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) isn’t about to tell you thanks to lame food labeling laws. Sure, you know it’s not organic if it doesn’t say so, but few realize that many dangerous chemicals that have been banned in the United States continue to find widespread use in other countries that continue to ship their produce to American markets. This is one area, along with the bane of genetically

modified “Frankenfoods” where Montanans expected Sen. Jon Tester, perhaps the only organic farmers in the U.S. Senate, to lead. But he has so far been virtually invisible on the issue of preserving the integrity of organic foods and protecting them from crosspollination with genetically modified crops. Or how about quality? Studies have found that mass-produced vegetables do, in fact, contain fewer essential nutrients and minerals than those produced on a more natural, sustainable basis. Why? Simple: The goal of corpo-

“The governor laughed and said, ‘You’re not seriously worried about food supply, are you?’

rate mega-farms is to squeeze as much production from every acre of land as possible. To do this, enormous quantities of fertilizer and pesticides are used, which gives us lower-quality food and often sickens those who have to work in the chemical-drenched environment of “modern” agriculture. Nor is the chemical input associated with mass-produced food the only variable in the quality of what you feed to your loved ones. The typical corporate tomato, for instance, cannot be allowed to ripen on the vine because it would never survive the shipping process intact. Consequently, like many other fruits and vegetables, they are picked well before they’re actually ripe. The fruit is artificially ripened through exposure to ethylene gas, producing tomatoes that look beautiful in the store, but often taste like cardboard at home. Luckily, more people can buy homegrown tomatoes these days

thanks to the resurgence of farmers’ markets. Anyone can cruise down to the market on weekends and get everything they need for the coming week from a friendly local producer. Not only will you get better and often cheaper foods, but you can actually talk to the people who grow or raise the products. Want to know what they use on the crops? Just ask. Curious about what they fed the pigs, chickens or beef? Just ask. By and large, local producers are proud of what they grow and more than happy to tell you how they did it. When he first took office, Gov. Brian Schweitzer asked me what he could do to be remembered as a good governor. I told him, “Take care of the people of Montana first and foremost and they will love you.” One of my suggestions was to take into account the looming retirement of the Baby Boomer generation and put in place a program to help fund and build community greenhouses. The logic was simple: As people age, they enjoy warmer surroundings and, since a large slice of the population would be going from revenue producers to revenue consumers, it would be a good way to give folks a chance to enjoy the company of their peers in warm and beautiful greenhouses and ease their financial burden by growing their own food. Instead of embracing the concept, the governor laughed and said, “You’re not seriously worried about food supply, are you?” Well, here we are all these years later and there’s still no large-scale program to promote community greenhouses at either the state or federal level. Yet, amazingly, politicians continue to harp on our security, and continue to spend hundreds of billions on high-tech weapons of war while ignoring the simplest of things that can bring great security to millions of citizens nationwide—local food production. The recession has been hard on us, but if there’s a silver lining to this dark cloud, it’s the rediscovery of our capabilities for self-sufficiency, an enhanced sense of community and the taking back of control of our own lives. We should be proud that our people are leading the way—and we can only hope that some day soon, the politicians will follow. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Home turf Escaping the past can be difficult in Libby by Moira Blazi

Libby is a strange place. In the morning, the Cabinet Mountains sparkle, sporting new snow way up on the highest peaks. Folks arrive at work, open the front doors of their businesses and shout out “Mornin’” from across the street. Joggers pass by my house, dodging a stray doe that lingers after a night of garden feasting. Yes, this is also the town that in July was declared a “disaster area.” The Environmental Protection Agency described what happened to this town as the worst case of industrial poisoning of a community in American history. Libby is covered with asbestos, or more accurately, it was. For close to 70 years, the same corporation that inspired the movie A Civil Action mined asbestos-containing vermiculite close to the town. For years, the workers drove to the mine along the banks of the magnificent Kootenai River. Most mornings, they were probably smiling because they knew they had the best jobs in town. There was medical insurance and vacation, pension, sick leave, decent hours and good pay. They took the raw ore from the mountain and crushed it, sifted it and loaded it. Pictures in the public library in Libby show the mine sending up a 50foot-tall plume of dust. The plume also contained lung-destroying asbestos that fed into air currents coming off the Kootenai high country. Of course, there’s no mining today, though you wouldn’t know it from the recent media coverage. From Fox News to Democracy Now, they’ve all picked up on the disaster bandwagon, and they’ve all made Libby look like a death town. Nothing could be further from the truth. This is a place where folks tool victoriously into the parking lot of the supermarket where I work, a little too fast, perhaps, sometime in November. They are excited to show their friends and neigh-

bors the moose, or seven-point elk, or maybe even a cougar, lying stiff and silent in the back of their pickup. This is a place where a 10-minute drive and another 10minute walk will give you a chance of seeing bighorn sheep. Take a short drive upriver and look up on the top of the power poles, and you’ll spot osprey nests and a bald eagle or two. And the people? They’re the best. My weeds were too high, and so I got a ticket. A friend offered his teenage boys to weed-whack. The next day, when I arrived home for lunch, the dandelions

We are living “ in a town that has endured more hardship, loss and sadness than any town could ever deserve, but it is a town that’s still very much

alive.

had been buzzed, the goldenrod clipped and the grass trimmed just right. A neighbor said, “Oh, Frank was here today.” No teenage sons, just my neighbor, who was born and raised in Libby. But I’m not a Pollyanna. Sometimes at the market I see someone struggling to pull an oxygen tank. There is the man who tries to hide how hard it is for him to lift his gallon of milk up and onto my check stand. I want to jump over the

counter and do it for him. Some—no, many—of my neighbors have asbestosis. A much smaller number suffer from mesothelioma, cancer of the inner lining of the lungs, a disease pretty much unheard of except in folks who have breathed in a lot of asbestos. Most mornings, in the deli seating area of the market, broad-shouldered, gray-haired men drink coffee and talk about the new porch or the firewood deadfall up on Granite Creek. Sitting right next to them is a twentysomething peering at Facebook, taking advantage of the new Wi-Fi available here. There is no disconnect; everybody gets along. Folks will balk at a concert ticket over $10, but gladly spend $50 at the American Legion benefit for someone’s wife who has cancer. But there is a disconnect for those of us who have recently arrived, who are in minimal danger of contamination, who have had our small-windowed, tin-roofed houses cleaned up by the government, and our yards excavated and filled back in, those of us fortunate enough to have grown up playing in sawdust rather than piles of asbestos-contaminated dirt. Now, we are privileged to live in one of the most beautiful places in the world. We can take our pick of 20 lakes with their trout, kokanee salmon, bass, perch and pike. Newcomers like me and the grizzlies just up the mountain have figured out that this is a promised land. Our family and friends in places like California don’t know it, though, and some think we are living in a death town. We are not. We are living in a town that has endured more hardship, loss and sadness than any town could ever deserve, but it is a town that’s still very much alive. Moira Blazi is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). Not long ago she moved from Santa Barbara, California, to Libby, Montana.

2105 Bow St. Missoula, MT 59801

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To: The Missoula Community For over 26 years we have been proud to be a center of health and wellness for Missoula Women. AND we’re looking forward to another 26 years! As one of the country’s first complete women’s fitness centers our vision has been to be a place of physical health, mental strength, open mindedness and open heartedness. This beacon has led us to be a place where women can improve their health, reduce stress and become a part of a dynamic community. We have developed from “gym fitness” to wellness that spans the gamut from an energizing Zumba class, to joyful NIA, cycling, water exercise and a variety of Pilates, yoga….plus massage, facials, physical therapy and more. It has been our privilege to enhance a healthy community by supporting many organizations such as the YWCA, Living Art, the Chamber of Commerce, the American Cancer Society, the Missoula Business Women’s Network and more.

This week we invite YOU, the Missoula public, to join us in a free appreciation and awareness event for Missoula Medical Aid, a local non-profit organization committed to advancing health and environmental quality in Honduras. Please join us Thursday, October 1, from 5–7 p.m. for a presentation of the fascinating and heart-wrenching stories and slides from program volunteers. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres and beverages provided.

Thank you, once again, Missoula for supporting us in the truest form of preventative health care and for embracing the work of The Women’s Club.

Visit us at thewomensclub.com or become a fan on facebook.com! Photo by Chad Harder

Missoula Independent

Page 11 October 1–October 8, 2009


END OF SUMMER

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Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Just a century ago, you could be jailed in Missoula for spouting pro-labor rhetoric on street corners. Actually, you probably would have been thrown in the slammer for saying anything resembling a public speech, since the Missoula City Council had a particularly stringent anti-public speaking law on the books in 1909. Understandably, local members of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) found the rule reprehensible. So they took to the corner of Front Street and Higgins Avenue, with a soapbox in hand and fiery speeches burning in their bellies. One by one, each person who stepped up to speak was arrested, leading to an overflow at the local jail. Eventually, city officials let down their guard and decided IWW members could speak freely on the street. In commemoration of this fight for free speech, Montana’s Two Rivers General Membership Branch of the IWW plans to have a celebration of sorts, starting Friday at 5 PM with a chance for you to speak your mind on a soapbox

THURSDAY OCTOBER 1 Nab a pumpkin with your kid for Halloween and help provide medical care for underprivileged patients at Hope Medical Center in Guinea, West Africa when you stop by the Missoula Alliance Church’s Third Annual Pumpkin Patch, from noon–7 PM until Oct. 8 and 9 AM–7 PM from Oct. 9–31 at the church, 100 E. Foss Court. Free entry. Call 251-3983. The Wheeler Conference hosts “Failure to Inform: Is there a looming media crisis in Montana?” at the Holiday Inn Parkside, beginning with opening remarks at 8:30 a.m. The all-day event includes multiple panel discussions on print, broadcast and digital media. $35. Visit www.wheelercenter.org.

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Missoula Independent

Page 12 October 1–October 8, 2009

UM’s Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority turns 100 this year, and in the spirit of giving back, they’re holding a used book drive to support local children’s charities. You can drop off your used books until Oct. 10 at: UM’s Bookstore, Fact & Fiction, Garden of Read’N, Barnes & Noble and the University-area Secret Seconds store. Call 288-3700. Advocate for abused and neglected children in court when you head to a fundraiser/informational event for Missoula’s chapter of Court Appointed Special Advocates at the Missoula County Courthouse lawn, 200 W. Broadway St., at noon. Free. Call 542-1208.

FRIDAY OCTOBER 2 Take a break from your First Friday stroll and head over to Ellie Blue, 328 E. Pine St., where you’ll “Paint the town Blue” and meet Missoula City Council candidates endorsed by Missoula County Democrats with a reception from 5–7 PM featuring visual art by Beth Jaffe and music by Bob Wire at 7. Free. E-mail misssoulademocrats@missoulademocrats.org.

in the same spot that laborers did 100 years ago. Once you’ve spoken your peace, stay for a reenactment of the event, followed by a screening of Gita Saedi Kiely’s documentary film Jailed for Their Words. Freedom of speech has certainly progressed since the 1900s, but this interactive slice of historical insight offers us yet another way to appreciate just how far we’ve come. –Ira Sather-Olson The Two Rivers General Membership Branch of the IWW honors the 100-year anniversary of its free speech fight in Missoula on Fri., Oct. 2, with an open soapbox at the corner of Front Street and Higgins Avenue at 5 PM, followed by a historical reenactment at 6 PM. At 7 PM, Jailed for Their Words will screen upstairs at the Union Hall, 208 E. Main St. Free. Call Dave Jones at 363-5292 or e-mail flyfeverdj@hotmail.com. Healthy Choices for the Family which runs from 1–5 PM in UM’s University Center Ballroom. Donations accepted: food (non-perishable and seasonal perishable) or cash donation to www.zanesfund.org. Call Noreen at 544-5588. You might not know it, but Bhutan is a tiny country sandwiched between China and India, so get a taste of their culture with a prayer flag hoisting, traditional games, music, food and dance during Chilies and Happiness: A Celebration of Bhutanese Culture in Missoula at 4 PM at the PEAS Farm, 3010 Duncan Drive. Free. E-mail bhutantakin@gmail.com.

MONDAY OCTOBER 5 You were supposed to be signed up by Sept. 21, but there might still be a spot for you to join the Community Dispute Resolution Center of Missoula County’s mediation training sessions, which run Oct. 5–9 from 9 AM–5 PM in Room 326 of UM’s University Center. $700/$500/$200, depending on which training sessions you choose. Call 549-8218 or e-mail cdmarino55@yahoo.com. Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400.

TUESDAY OCTOBER 6 You can fight for peace in many different ways, but how about knitting for it? Find out when the group Knitting for Peace meets every Tue. from 1–3 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955.

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 7

Do your part to generate awareness of environmental issues, and funds for the Montana Wilderness Association, when you join others at the Fifth Annual Bulls, Blues and Brews Benefit and Silent Auction at the Missoula Children’s Theatre at 6 PM. $10, features appetizers, beer/wine and music by Def Cartel. Call 243-6568.

Just say no, to the death tax that is. At least that’ll be part of the message during a public briefing on the state of the estate tax sponsored by the American Family Business Foundation and hosted by Walt Muralt from 10:15–11:15 AM at the Broadway Inn Conference Center, 1609 W. Broadway St. Free. RSVP with Palmer Schoening at palmer.schoening@nodeathtax.org or call 202-9692444 ext. 500.

SATURDAY OCTOBER 3

THURSDAY OCTOBER 8

Tickle your brain pickle with talks on how yoga and meditation benefit your health, as well as discussions on creative cooking and more during the Wisdom of Wellness Conference: Making

Aspen Hospice of Montana is currently looking for volunteers to help offer comfort, pain relief and emotional support for those who are near the end of their lives. Call Lois at 642-3010.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.


Volleyball This week

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - Less than two hours after three men robbed a woman in Columbus, Ohio, the victim notified police that one of them showed up at her home and asked her for a date. “We are not exactly sure what he was thinking at the time,” police Sgt. Shaun Laird told WBNS-TV after Stephfon Bennett, 20, was arrested. “She recognized him right away when he returned and was able to have her cousin call 911.” Billy J. Robinson, 20, was trying to steal a car in broad daylight in East Peoria, Ill., when the owner interrupted him and ordered him to follow her to the police station. “Believe it or not,” Police Chief Ed Papis told the Peoria Journal-Star, “he started to follow her but had a change of heart.” The car’s owner called police, who broadcast a detailed description, which mentioned a large, abnormal growth hanging from the suspect’s left ear lobe. Not long after, Robinson walked into the police station saying he needed money for a bus ticket out of town. The dispatcher recognized him by the walnut-sized mass on his ear. Officers who searched the two bags Robinson was carrying found sweaty clothes matching the robber’s, as well as step-by-step instructions on how to break into and hotwire a car, with the boldly written recommendation, “Try this at night.” TSA’S BEND-AND-SPREAD POLICY - Airline security concerns have been raised by a suicide bomber in Saudi Arabia who detonated an explosive device concealed in his anal cavity. The bomber, a wanted al-Qaeda militant, pretended to renounce terrorism and repent in order to get close to Saudi Arabia’s deputy interior minister. In the August attack, the bomber obliterated himself, but the prince survived unharmed. “It does pose real issues for airline security if the bomb is inside the person,” security policy expert Carl Ungerer told Australian media, which noted that since a passenger tried to ignite a shoe bomb in 2001, air travelers have to take off their shoes to be screened and that a thwarted plot to smuggle liquid explosives aboard airliners in 2006 led to limits on liquids passengers can carry aboard. POWER GRABS - Denver’s power company wants to charge solar-energy users for electricity even if they don’t use any. Tom Henley of Xcel Energy told 7NEWS that the proposed fee would level the playing field for electricity users who are currently subsidizing connectivity fees for solar users, who some months use no electricity. Henley later admitted no Xcel customers pay extra to fund connectivity fees and that the proposed fee, which would add $2 a month to customers’ bills, would all go to Xcel. He said the fee is intended to ensure that down the road solar users don’t get free rides. Wind farms can trigger false alerts of dangerous weather, warned the National Weather Service, which said the massive blades show up on Doppler radar as a violent storm or even a tornado. Weather radar operates by detecting motion and can filter out structures, including the 200-feet wind tower but not the rotating blades. “If you take a glance and then all of a sudden you see red, you might issue an incorrect warning as a result,” NWS science and operation officer Dave Zaff told the Associated Press. Laptops, cell phones and televisions can be powered without electric wires or batteries, according to a company that has developed a system that sends electricity wirelessly. “Wires suck,” Eric Giler, chief executive of WiTricity said at the TEDGlobal conference in Oxford, England. “Batteries also suck.” The Times reported that MIT physicist Marin Soljacic developed the system using the principle of resonance to let two magnetic coils transfer energy. The first coil is connected to the home’s power supply, the second coil to the unit to be powered. London’s Institute of Physics, which tested the device and concluded it “had no detrimental effects on the human body,” stated its drawbacks are that only small appliances can be charged and they must be within 7 feet on a powersupplying wall. FIRST THINGS FIRST - When Kendrick Johnson, 32, got stuck in a condo elevator in St. Petersburg, Fla., at 10 a.m., he waited more than an hour before deciding to call for help. Instead of calling 911, however, Johnson called his boss. She was in her car and drove to a nearby fire station to get help. Rescue crews arrived at 11:40 and freed Johnson by 12:30. Johnson is the building’s maintenance man. POSSE VS. POSSE - A sudden crime spree in Fox Creek, Alberta, (population 2,000) stirred residents to form citizen patrols. So many patrols took to the streets that the Royal Canadian Mounted Police said it had responded to several false alarms where one slowmoving citizen patrol group reported observing another slow-moving citizen patrol group acting suspiciously. NEVER MIND - Delaware state police arrested a woman who threatened a convenience store clerk with a pair of scissors after demanding the clerk give her the $20 she insisted she had paid him for gas. The clerk insisted she only gave him $1. Wilmington’s News-Journal reported that Vickie Gambrell, 53, went into a rage, stormed behind the counter and began punching the clerk in the head and face. The clerk handed over two $10 bills when the woman held the scissors to her neck. As the woman began to drive away, she looked into her pocketbook and noticed the $20 bill she claimed she gave the clerk. She returned to the store to apologize, only to find state troopers had arrived. A THOUSAND WORDS NOT WORTH A PICTURE - Yale University Press decided to publish a scholarly book about 12 controversial cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad that sparked angry and violent protests when they appeared in a Danish newspaper in 2005, but without showing the images the book is about. The recommendation by two dozen diplomats and experts on Islam and counterterrorism the publisher contacted about using the images, as well as historical images of Muhammad, was “overwhelming and unanimous,” said Yale University Press director Jon Donatich. He told the New York Times the cartoons are freely available on the Internet, so reprinting them could be interpreted as gratuitous.

Friday, October 2nd 7pm Idaho State University Bengals

All UM students get in free with Griz Card!

Saturday, October 3rd 7pm Weber State Wildcats

* All games played in the West Auxiliary Gym of the Adams Center

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Missoula Independent

Page 13 October 1–October 8, 2009


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incent Bray, 25, sits between his mother and sister on a light-colored sectional in a two-story house outside Lolo. Bray’s two daughters—ages 4 and 2—tear through the living room every few minutes, ignoring the fact that it’s almost bedtime. Bray served nearly a year as an Apache helicopter mechanic at Balad Airbase in Iraq. He would have served his full tour, but says his then-wife— whom he’d been with since high school—began having problems caring for their children. Bray received a hardship discharge and returned home, only to face a difficult divorce and months of troubling custody disputes. At first it looked like Bray might get full custody of his daughters, he says. But when a district court judge appointed a guardian ad litem (GAL) to the case, Bray felt he’d left one war and entered another.

The court continues to haggle over Bray’s case. He currently has full custody of the girls, but says it’s taken a year to get there and he has no guarantee of how long the situation will last. Many with similar tales of expensive and lengthy courtroom battles believe part of the problem lies in Montana’s preference to award both parents equal custody. But it’s the issue of GALs—not joint custody—that prompted local parents disillusioned by the system to step forward. Late last year, several affected parents met at the Missoula Public Library to share their stories and offer support for one another. What began as a simple support group rapidly snowballed into a grassroots attempt at altering the rules—or complete lack thereof—pertaining to GALs in Montana. Montanans Supporting Guardian Guidelines (MSGG) has since reached out to psy-

no required training, no standard for qualifications and no guidelines for how GALs should carry out their duties. A GAL “may be an attorney,” MCA states, but the code offers no further direction for who should serve as a GAL. Some training in court procedure and family issues is offered through Court-Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) programs–county-based nonprofits funded largely through grants, county money and private donations–but these programs are strictly voluntary. GALs are free to work in private practice or on a volunteer basis under the limited description of the MCA. The district court in Missoula maintains its own list of 46 active GALs in the county, many of whom are also attorneys. Despite the job description’s vagaries, the code grants GALs access to a wealth of private information. They have nearly unlimited access to “court, medical, psychological, law enforcement, social services, and school records pertaining to the child and the child’s siblings and parents or caretakers” in the course of their investigations. GALs then use information gained from interviews and documents to file recommendation reports “concerning the child’s support, parenting, and parental contact.” Investigations can take weeks, even months, before the GAL files a report. Typical recommendations for parenting plans can range from suggested visitation schedules to mandated psychiatric evaluations of parents. GALs even have the authority to remove children from parents in emergency situations. Parties wishing to file a grievance against a GAL carry the burden of

asked him to serve there as well. He accepted, and has served in Hamilton for several years. In Fickinger’s experience, the GAL’s role as protector is anything but light. “Most parents are experts in their own kids because they live with them and have for a long time,” Fickinger says. “Most of them aren’t experts in child development—in things like attachment and things that are very important—and can very often without meaning to ask for things or try to do things with their child that could actually have a detrimental effect on the child and be dangerous for their emotional wellbeing…At core, that’s the job of the guardian ad litem, to testify in court about the best interests of the child.” Attorneys and psychologists familiar with custody cases claim Montana has a predilection for awarding joint— or 50–50–custody unless outstanding circumstances dictate a more customized approach. A GAL typically enters a custody case when a judge determines an independent investigation is necessary to draft a parenting plan. They remain active with the case until dismissed by the judge. Cost of the GAL is split between the mother and father. From 2003 to 2009, Montana’s judicial system appropriated funding to cover GAL appointments for poor families. The Legislature voted to revoke the funding early this summer, and state coverage for GAL costs officially halted in July. Fickinger says GALs and families were given only a few weeks’ notice about the change. The state then gave GALs two choices: continue pro bono work with poor families or drop the active

A group of Missoula parents steps forward to change the face of custody battles in Montana by Alex Sakariassen, photos by Cathrine L. Walters Bray contends the GAL assigned to his case ignored sentiments that he get full custody. Instead, joint custody— the state’s preference in divorces— became the desired result. “I can’t say that it’s just been hard for me,” Bray says. “Since I came home from Iraq, I’ve lived here and everybody in this family in some way, shape or form has dealt with trying to do the amount of work it takes to get through this.” Bray now lives with his parents, splitting his time between a job at Sherwin Williams and helping his dad make woodworking tools in a shop across the driveway. He’s taking 18 credits at the University of Montana, but legal fees over the last year and a half have exhausted the money he made in the armed services. He says his only solace comes from time with his daughters.

Missoula Independent

Page 14 October 1–October 8, 2009

chologists, University of Montana faculty, local legislators and the governor’s office for assistance in addressing the flaws in the system. Few members were willing to share specific personal anecdotes, admittedly full of heated he-said, she-said fighting. All expressed fear of legal retaliation in ongoing court disputes if they went on the record. But those involved with MSGG unanimously agree about speaking out on one point: GALs in Montana are highly unregulated, and that needs to change.

ontana Code Annotated (MCA) outlines a GAL’s role in the court system as an individual appointed to “represent the interests of a minor dependent child with respect to the child’s support, parenting, and parental contact.” The legal statute lists

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proof that the GAL has failed to execute his or her duties. In the end, the GAL reports directly to a district judge. And therein lies the largest point of contention. “I think everyone will tell you there are good guardians and there are bad guardians,” says Simon Fickinger, an active GAL in Montana’s Fourth Judicial District Court, which covers Missoula and Mineral counties. “But a bad guardian has a lot of power to get in there and really mess things up. It’s a dangerous kind of thing…Anybody who has a judge’s ear, so to speak, has a lot of power. And a guardian ad litem has exactly that.” Since becoming a GAL in 2003, Fickinger’s handled between 75 and 100 cases, many pro bono. His work in the Fourth Judicial District Court drew so much attention that the 21st Judicial District Court—based in Hamilton—

cases. (Fickinger refused to drop a single case.) Fickinger says he understands the sensitivity of custody battles; he has a teenage son and daughter. He received his undergraduate degree in psychology from Messiah College and his master’s in clinical psychology from Millersville University, both in Pennsylvania. His continued work as a conflict mediator keeps him focused on issues of child and family psychology. While Fickinger appears qualified for the position, William Stratford, a clinical psychologist in Missoula, contends Montana’s GAL system is, overall, a “crap-shoot of quality.” The process is lengthy and the added costs to families are often enormous. And if the state’s legal conclusion is 50–50 custody from the outset, he points out, “Why should it take months and


months and years to resolve these situations?” He agrees with the need to protect a child’s best interests, but questions the state’s current ability to do so. “Conceptually, that’s a huge point,” Stratford says. “A guardian ad litem that stands back and represents the interests of the child is certainly important. Making sure the child is protected is how the system started. But I think that what got morphed was the level of involvement on the part of the guardian ad litem…They go out and do evaluations and file reports. That’s the job of a professional. I think the role of protector has morphed into the role of evaluator.” Stratford, who has worked in the field of child and family psychology for 35 years, contributed to GAL investigations in regard to mental health information for 15 years. But a few years back, his frustrations with the unregulated nature of GALs came to a head. As a private psychologist, Stratford now refuses to work with any GAL, regardless of their individual reputation. “People have tried to address the standardization question before, and what shocks me is that this has been allowed to go on so long,” Stratford says. “It’s such a glaring problem.” Mars Scott couldn’t agree more. Over his 29 years as an attorney working largely on family cases, Scott’s witnessed countless reasons why Montana needs to overhaul its statute on GALs. He’s seen guardians toss their judicial weight around, make outrageous recommendations and charge clients enormous fees. “I had one case where the guardian ad litem fees exceeded $25,000—just the GAL fees,” Scott says. “And I’ve heard of cases that were more than that.” That’s a pile of money, he adds, for someone whose position requires no more than a high school diploma. Money aside, Scott says his greatest concern is the blind trust judges often have in GALs. He explains that because a GAL’s work can be not only thankless but also downright abusive, judges often fear that by not taking guardians at their word they may discourage people from taking the job. This, combined with the lack of standardization, sets the stage for potential inequity in custody battles. “I think the judges want to find in favor of what GALs recommend and if you’re in court trying to do something different, you better have a pretty compelling case,” Scott says. “It’s an uphill battle, there’s no doubt about it, because I think the judges want to trust their GALs.”

ray knew little of the GAL system when he returned from Iraq. He finalized his divorce in December 2007 and faced the task of negotiating a parenting plan. Only as the next few months played out did Bray begin to understand the ongoing legal mess he’d become involved in.

“When you’ve got a guardian ad litem on a case, they can dampen all the stuff they don’t want the judge to hear,” Bray says. “If the judge isn’t hearing about what one parent does, detrimental or not detrimental, he’s not getting the full story.” Bray alleges the GAL assigned to his case rarely bothered seeking his side of the custody issue. Instead he claims the GAL seemed intently focused on recommending a joint custody agreement. Constant reports and investigations by the GAL lengthened Bray’s time in court, and he grew progressively more frustrated in light of his hectic work schedule and the burden of classes. The state covered his

He’s concerned about the long-term damage his daughters have suffered for being subjects of such a drawn-out fight. “Something should be done about this,” Bray says. “I’m not saying that I’m going to go ask for a million dollars because of mental distress or anything, but I’d like to see someone recommend something. Honestly, I’d be happy with an apology.” Ruth Bray thought the answer to her son’s questions might lie in a small support group that meets at the Missoula Public Library every first and third Thursday of the month. The two have only attended two MSGG gatherings since June, but so far they understand completely where the group is coming from.

forum. Many attendees are still tangled in legal messes, leaving them with a feeling of vulnerability should their discontent leak publicly. But within a few short months, it became clear that everyone at MSGG shared a desire to bring about some positive change in state law. “This is some not only detrimental, harmful, hairy stuff, but it’s also really crazy making,” McKey says. “So I felt the need to try to make contact with parents who were going through similar things that I was going through. I knew of people through my attorney…and I knew through the various mental health professionals that I work with that there are many of us out there.”

“I think everyone will tell you there are good guardians and there are bad guardians. But a bad guardian has a lot of power to get in there and really mess things up.” —Simon Fickinger, guardian ad litem in Missoula, Mineral and Ravalli counties

GAL bills, but the cost of keeping his attorney on the case was considerable. “I really wanted to get a parenting plan that would allow me to get divorced,” Bray says. “Just let the rest of us move on with our lives…Why make the rest of us wait and suffer and deal with all of these other things? We’re basically just stuck in this, and there is no way for us to get out.” Even now, Bray sees no recourse. He says the GAL–who dropped the case when the state cut funding in July–issued a final recommendation that Bray maintain custody. Bray still asks himself why that decision took over a year to reach.

“They strictly want these people to be held responsible for the things that they do, whether right or wrong,” Vincent Bray says. “GALs can’t do whatever.”

mily McKey just couldn’t let it go. She hasn’t dealt with a GAL in years, she says, but the Missoula resident still struggles with the pains she was put through fighting for her children. At first, McKey started MSGG as a support group for parents to air their GAL grievances in a somewhat private

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Members of MSGG prefer not to talk about their individual stories. They’d rather focus on progress for the whole, says co-chair Jodi NetzerSchoening. With that in mind, McKey and Schoening chose not to speak beyond the fact they’ve both been jaded by GALs. The group’s focus paid off in June when its concerns caught the attention of state Rep. Betsy Hands, D-Missoula. MSGG e-mailed Hands toward the end of the legislative session in the hopes of gaining political ground for 2011. Hands says she could do little for MSGG initially, but she did facilitate a

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Vincent Bray holds his youngest daughter during a birthday party at his parents’ house outside Lolo. Bray left Iraq on a hardship discharge in 2007, only to face a divorce and a lengthy and costly custody battle for his two daughters. Stories like his helped motivate a grassroots group of parents to affect change in Montana’s flawed guardian ad litem system.

Missoula Independent

Page 15 October 1–October 8, 2009


brief meeting in Helena with one of so important for me to get across Gov. Brian Schweitzer’s aides to put about the group that we’re not an extra set of ears on the issue. against guardians. This is not about Now she hopes to carry MSGG’s being against guardians…There are effort to the legislative level, draftseveral [GALs] who my heart would ing a bill over the next year to tell me got involved because they address the group’s concerns. cared about kids.” “Our only standard that I underAfter moving to Missoula with his stand is they have to be 18 years second wife in 1993, Fickinger old,” Hands says of GALs in Montana. jumped from nonprofit to nonprofit “The caveat it that judges are going before settling into private practice as to use good judgment or try to use a conflict mediator. In his free time, he their best judgment for appointing helped kick-start youth programs with guardians. I don’t imagine they’d organizations like Friends for Youth. find a high school graduate and GAL work comes with a less throw them into this type of situasparkling reputation than his other tion. But certainly other states have responsibilities. For doing what his reviewed the program and decided training tells him is best for chilyou should have a little more experidren, he’s been the recipient of ence than, say, a diploma.” everything from name calling to Hands gathered information on outright death threats. other GAL systems in the nation From left, Jodi Netzer-Schoening, Jen Harrington and Emily McKey are at the “If you’re a guardian ad litem, over the summer, familiarizing her- core of Montanans Supporting Guardian Guidelines, a group of parents active- somebody’s going to have a probly pursuing a system of standardization for guardians ad litem in the state. self with where Montana stood in lem with you, guaranteed, even if the greater picture. The verdict wasyou’re fantastic,” Fickinger says. have on single parents and children. the state must abide by rules concernn’t good. Many states suffer from a lack MSGG struck a chord with her. ing confidentiality of private informa- “It’s a job with a target because if of standardization, she says, but “Just knowing that oftentimes par- tion, objectivity in dealing with you’re doing your job right, very often Montana’s system appears one of the ents use custody of their children to involved parties and documentation of one side or both sides of the parents most worrisome. are going to be upset with you. have control over their ex-spouse, it charges to clients—to name a few. “It’s a program that’s valued happens all the time,” Hands says. “It’s “You’re making recommendations “Although it would still be a very around the country, and I think the easy to make divorce more difficult.” important role and very much affect right to the judge about the kid,” he limiting factor we have in Montana is the best interests of our kids, it would- continues, “and unless what you think a lack of funding for being able to n’t require so much of the personal is most appropriate somehow happens really beef it up and give it the attenocally, MSGG made a major break- opinions, personal ‘what’s best for my to align with what they’re thinking, tion it deserves,” Hands says. “That’s through a few weeks back when kids,’” Schoening says of such a model. they’re going to be upset.” the crux—finding some funding in Hands asked the group to contribute “Whether that happens or not, that’s Ann O’Connell has received her these tough times that might help to draft GAL guidelines and propose a probably a step in the process. I’m just own list of threats in her 14 years as a with training or help with certifica- grievance process for the district court happy that the guidelines are getting GAL. At one point, her sons worried that tion. It could take several sessions. It’s to review. Schoening says those looked at.” her car stood out as one of only a few not something that’s going to be involved, mainly Missoula health proSchoening is careful to note that Honda Elements in town, making her an solved overnight.” fessionals and attorneys, will likely MSGG by no means feels all GALs act easy target. O’Connell shrugged off the Hands worked with low-income look to other states for examples of inappropriately in Montana court- warning. It’s part of dealing with emofamilies for over five years in varying effectiveness. Personally, she prefers rooms. They understand the need for tionally charged situations, she says. positions with homeWORD, a Missoula- guidelines like those in Washington. “You can’t blame people for being such a legal role and respect the potenand Billings-based nonprofit providing The Washington court system has tial personal risk GALs face in making emotional about their children,” affordable housing for indigent resi- multiple statutes regarding GALs, out- unpopular recommendations. O’Connell says, “but there’s people dents. She witnessed firsthand the lining everything from responsibilities “We have concerns for the guardians that go over that line and are threatenimpacts divorce and custody battles to a strict grievance process. GALs in as well,” Schoening says. “That’s why it’s ing or attack you other ways, professionally. It’s vicious.” O’Connell began working pro bono GAL cases in 1995 in addition to her work as a legal investigator. Six years ago, when the state began funding GAL work for poor families, she jumped on full-time. “I didn’t really expect it to turn into a full-time job, to tell you the truth,” she says. “But it ended up doing that, mainly because I got a lot of professionals that would recommend me on cases.” While she believes some level of experience or training should be required for GALs, O’Connell doesn’t agree that the system should place added emphasis on education. A law degree or a master’s “doesn’t mean you’re going to make a good guardian ad litem,” she says, adding the mere fact that GALs answer directly to a judge should be check and balance enough. “I think you should always have in the back of your mind that you don’t know everything, you’re not God-like or something,” O’Connell says. “You’re just presenting the evidence to the When the Missoula-based group Montanans Supporting Guardian Guidelines decided to push for change in court and making recommendations. the state’s regulation of guardians ad litem, they contacted Rep. Betsy Hands, D-Missoula. Hands plans to take But it’s the judge that makes the final the group’s initiative to the legislative level by drafting a bill that establishes legal guidelines for guardians. decision. I think that’s the thing people

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Missoula Independent

Page 16 October 1–October 8, 2009


Simon Fickinger has worked as a GAL in Missoula since 2003. GALs represent the best interests of children during custody proceedings, a role Fickinger considers extremely valuable. But he says the state’s lack of guidelines for GALs creates potential problems.

don’t realize. You may have the ear of the court, but they don’t always follow your recommendations.” In late September, MSGG took another step by sharing some of their stories with a clinical psychology class at the University of Montana. Schoening says the plan is for UM to take up the research end of their initiative by analyzing the GAL issue in a series of class projects. The final results will end up in the hands of professionals for use in drafting local guidelines. Hands says the research could also prove essential in the legislative process. Local GALs aren’t against changing the system. Fickinger agrees that the MCA statute leaves too many doors open for possible misconduct. He says he welcomes legal guidelines for the position, as long as the initiative doesn’t push too hard. “There ought to be some qualification, there ought to be some training,” he says. “Those are the things I think are really important…The problem with moves like this is that people start off trying to make things safer for people and to solve some very, very real problems that someone has experienced. It usually doesn’t stop there. It usually goes to the point it’s supposed to go and then off into the ridiculous.” Attorneys and professionals echo Fickinger’s desire to see standardized qualifications for GALs, reiterating the damage shoddy guardian conduct can inflict. “By and large, I’m supportive of having basic requirements in place for some-

one to be appointed as a GAL,” says Scott. “I think there’s this sort of idea out there among the public that it’s a great thing if someone could just walk into court and help people with their parenting and child situations and make recommendations…The problem is, it’s really an area that needs people that have the appropriate training and education to understand not only the dynamics within a particular relationship but also basic understanding of child development.” A localized review, when complete, will push MSGG closer to its end goal of creating statewide change. But for now the group remains focused entirely on establishing a pilot set of guardian guidelines for Missoula. They won’t write the draft guidelines, Schoening says, but they’ll stand over the shoulders of professionals while their stories drive the process forward. Hands says any legislation she pursues in the next year will require feedback from all involved parties, especially judges, making the value of just one district court review considerable. “Any awareness that we can bring, be it an individual, be it a group, be it guideline changes, to me is a success,” Schoening says. “If it’s supporting somebody else that’s in the middle of something, I believe our group is a success. If it’s getting judges to actually sit down or a volunteer group to sit down, I believe it’s a success.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com

the $$–$$$...$15 and over Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 Ciao Mambo, at the end of the Hip Strip on 4th and Higgins, serves up fresh, classic, immigrant style Italian food seven days a week. Terrific service and an extensive domestic and Italian wine list makes Ciao Mambo a hit for any occasion. Dinner only and take out service available. Ciaomambo.com or 543-0377. $$-$$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. Special senior menu & a great kids’ menu. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Pearl Café & Bakery 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French Specialties, Bison, Elk, Fresh Fish Daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Reservations recommended for the warm & inviting dining areas, or drop in for a quick bite in the wine bar. Now, you may go to our website Pearlcafe.US to make reservations or buy gift certificates, while there check out our gorgeous wedding and specialty cakes. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Red Bird Restaurant & Wine Bar 111 N. Higgins Ave. • 549-2906 A hidden culinary treasure in the Historic Florence Hotel. Treat yourself to a sensuous dining experience, service, cuisine and ambiance delivered with creative and elegant detail. Seasonal menus featuring the freshest ingredients. New wine bar open Monday - Saturday, 5:00 - 10:30. Enter through the Florence Building lobby. $$-$$$

Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. • 549-2790 Share a meal on our park side patio or within the warm elegance of our location at the historic Wilma Building. Enjoy our seasonal menu of classic Mediterranean and European fare with a contemporary American twist, featuring the freshest local ingredients. Serving lunch Tues-Sat 11:00-2:30, and dinner 7 days a week 5:00-Close. Beer and Wine available. $$-$$$ Sushi Bar & Japanese Cuisine 549-7979 Corner of Pine & Higgins Located in beautiful Downtown Missoula, serving traditional Japanese cuisine and exquisite sushi. Sushi Hana offers a variety of traditional and local favorites, including nigirisushi, maki-sushi rolls and sashimi. In addition, we offer Tempura, Teriyaki and appetizers with a delicious assortment of sauces. Expanded selection of sakes, beer and wine. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. $$–$$$

$–$$...$5–$15 Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzone, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a "biga" (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch & dinner. Beer & Wine. Mon-Sat. $-$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 Dine-In, Drive-Thru, Delivery... Truly a Missoula find. Popular with the locals. Voted Missoula's best pizza. Everything from hand-tossed, thin-crust, stone deck pizza to wild salmon burritos, free-range chicken, rice bowls, ribs, pasta, salads, soups, sandwiches & "Pizza by the Slice." And now offering gluten-free dough. Local brews on tap and wine by the glass. Open every day for lunch & dinner. $-$$ Catalyst Cafe and Espresso Bar 111 N Higgins • 542-1337 Open daily from 7 am to 3 pm. Breakfast and lunch served all day, everyday. Huevos Rancheros, Omelets, Tomato

Lime and Tortilla Soup, Bing Cherry Salads, Fried Egg Sandwiches. Locally owned and operated since 1991. Daily specials from our local farmers and ranchers. $-$$ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula “Original” Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, baked goods and an espresso bar til close. Mon thru Thurs 7am - 8pm Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm. www.thinkfft.com $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted free-range chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm. $–$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$ HuHot Mongolian Grill 3521 Brooks • 829-8888 At HuHot you’ll find dozens of meats, seafood, noodles, vegetables and homemade sauces for the timid to the adventurous. Choose your favorites from the fresh food bars. You pick ‘em…we grill ‘em. We are as carnivore, vegetarian, diabetic, lo-salt and low-carb friendly as you want to be! Start with appetizers and end with desserts. You can even toast your own s’mores right at you table. A large selection of beer, wine and sake’ drinks available. Stop by for a great meal in a fun atmosphere. Kid and family friendly. Open daily at 11 AM. $-$$

dish

attentive service. Not matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $-$$ Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins Ave. 830-3237 All of our menu items are made from scratch and we use no MSG products. Featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive hot and ice tea menu including bubble tea. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Open Mon-Sat, lunch and dinner. $-$$ The Mustard Seed Asian Café Located outside Southgate Mall Paxson St. Entrance • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our all new bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our non-smoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, microbrews, fine wines & signature drinks. Take out & delivery available. $$–$$$. Noodle Express 2000 W. Broadway 541-7333 Featuring a mixture of non-traditional Chinese, Japanese, and Polynesian contemporary dishes. Phone ahead ordering is enhanced with a convenient PickUp window. $-$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. • 543-3188 Don't feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly,

Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $6.95. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $6.95. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$.

Missoula Independent

Page 17 October 1–October 8, 2009


Need a date for dinner?

October

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BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

Check out the personals on page 35. the

dish

Posh Chocolat 119 South Higgins 543-2566 Next to the Historic Wilma Building in downtown Missoula. The chocolate lovers paradise is now also a great place for lunch. With a total remodel, serving freshly made sweet and savory crepes, delicious quiches, soups, seasonal salads and artisanal European style pastries. And don't forget what's been keeping us busy since 2005; stop in and try our single origin, 100% Ecuadorian, hand crafted Truffles. www.poshchocolat.com. $-$$ Red Robin 2901 Brooks Street 406.830.3170 www.redrobin.com Half the price, twice the fun! Halfy Hour at the Southgate Mall Red Robin®! Half price bar drinks Monday – Friday, 4-6 p.m. and Monday – Saturday, 9-10 p.m. Enjoy a drink with one of our insanely delicious Gourmet Burgers, Bottomless Steak Fries. Or, snack on one of our shareable starters with friends! $-$$ SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway • 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine 542–1471 Located in the HUB of the LOOP! Open for Lunch and Dinner, featuring a Sat.-Sun. Brunch 11-2pm. Great Fresh food With Huge Portions. Traditional Irish fare combined with tasty specials from around the globe! FULL BAR, BEER, WINE, MARTINIS, 100% SMOKE FREE. "Where the Gaelic and the Garlic Mix!" $-$$ Staggering Ox 1220 SW Higgins • 542-2206 123 E Main • 327-9400 Home of the famous Clubfoot Sandwich - unique, portable, delicious! We serve fantastic sandwiches on fresh-baked bread. Now featuring a special summer menu. Call in your order and pick it up on your way to play $-$$

Missoula Independent

The Stone of Accord 4951 N. Reserve St. • 830-3210 Serving Award Winning Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinners 7 days a week! All of your favorite Irish classics, plus a daily selection of Chef's specialties. A fully stocked bar, wine and liquor store and the Emerald Casino make The Stone of Accord the perfect place for an enjoyable meal. 6:30am-2:00am $-$$ Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 14 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Monday - Sunday 8a.m. - 3p.m. $-$$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$ Wok-ee Mountain Asian Restaurant 11300 US Hwy 93, Lolo 273-9819 Brand new Thai & Chinese cuisine featuring original recipes. Specializing in curry. Extensive menu, vegetarian options and many soup options as well including Vietnamese style pho, Tom Yum, wonton and more. Wok-ee Mountain Asian Restaurant is perfect for take out or dine in. $-$$

$...Under $5 Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Where Myrtle Avenue ends at Bernice's, a tiny bakery sits as a veritable landmark to those who enjoy homestyle baked goods, strong coffee, community, and a variety of delicious treats. Join us for lunch if you'd like. Crazy delicious. Crazy cheap. 30 years and still baking. Open Every Day 6AM to 8PM. $

Page 18 October 1–October 8, 2009

Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 37 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 Cold Stone Creamery, the ultimate ice cream experience! Our smooth and creamy ice cream is made fresh daily using our secret recipe. Come in for our weekday specials. Get $5 off ice cream cakes with your business card. Get Gift Cards any time. Treat yourself to a 10minute vacation at Cold Stone Creamery. $-$$ Indulge Bakery 700 SW Higgins Ave 544-4293 indulgebakery.wordpress.com Now open! Enjoy international flavors - Russian teacakes, pizzelles, baci di dama, as well as cupcakes, scones, specialty breads, with new specialties added daily. Get bread fresh from the oven between 3 & 5PM. Open M-F 7AM to 6:30PM, Sat 7AM-4PM. We're just around the corner from Bamboo Chopsticks. Stop in today. $ Le Petit Outre 129 South 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European handcrafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, MondayFriday 7-6. $

BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffee, Teas & the Unusual 232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN


by Ari LeVaux

Red chicken enchiladas from scratch Enchilar, in Spanish, means “to add chile pepper to.” The past-participle form, enchilada, means “with chile”— or “chileed,” if you will. The American Southwest produces the nation’s largest chile crop, as well as some of the most chileed food on the planet. In my adopted home of New Mexico, chile is somewhat analogous to the curries of other regions, functioning as sauce, marinade, soup, something to eat with carbs like rice, and any other part of the meal. If chile is the curry of the Southwest, tortillas are the rice-equivalent, and enchiladas, literally, are chileed tortillas. They are usually prepared with beans, cheese or meat, and are a fundamental expression of New Mexican food. Green chiles are picked early, roasted while still green and fleshy, and frozen or canned. Red chiles are left on the vine until they ripen to red and leathery, and dried. These two sibling seed pods, separated during infancy, produce a dramatic range of flavors and textures in the foods they inhabit. Green is a juicy, pungent sort of heat, while red is an earthier sweet heat. I prefer my chicken enchiladas red. When making red sauce, consider that significantly increasing your output only minimally increases your preparation time, so it pays to make extra. Red can last a month in the fridge, from where it will find its way into numerous dishes—eggs, sandwiches, salad dressings, etc.—as a dip or sauce. Red also stands ready as marinade. Simply mix it with meat, and the marinating begins. From carne adovada (red pork) to chicken enchiladas, marinating meat in red before cooking produces consistently spectacular results. A dish can only be as good as its raw ingredients, and in the case of chicken enchiladas the quality of chile, chicken and tortillas matter the most. Using whole chile pods, rather than pre-ground powder, will produce much better results. In most areas you can find a plastic bag of whole pods in the “international” aisle of the supermarket. And if, in your travels, you see local red chile pods for sale, bring some home. They’ll last months unassisted.

Ask Ari:

cups of chicken broth over your chile chunks (or powder). Let soak for an hour. With a mortar and pestle or spice grinder, grind 1 teaspoon each of coriander and cumin seeds, then grind in 2 tablespoons pumpkin seeds and 1 teaspoon of oregano (or use pre-ground spices for a tolerable but inferior product). Mix 2 tablespoons of flour or pancake mix into the spice powder and pour it onto a dry pan, pre-heated to med/high. Toast, stirring constantly, until it starts to brown. Reduce heat to med/low, clear an opening in the center of the browned spices, and add 2 tablespoons of oil and a half bulb’s worth of chopped garlic cloves. As soon as the garlic becomes fragrant, mix it into the toasted powder. Stir this toasted mix into your soaking chile. Process in a blender, adding extra broth to keep it thin enough to vortex, but not much thinner. Pull apart your roasted chicken into strips and chunks—mostly small, but also leave some medium-sized chunks. Marinate the chicken in the red for at least 20 minutes, but preferably overnight. You are now ready to proceed with the final Photo by Ari LeVaux step at a moment’s notice: assembling and bakThe second step: Pull apart your cooked chicken ing the tray of enchiladas. and toss all the bones and skin into simmering water. Line the bottom of a baking pan with at least Keep simmering until it’s time to use the broth. one layer of corn tortillas, folding them around The third step: To make enough red to mari- corners and up the sides of the pan. Fill the pan nate one medium-sized chicken, you need 10 with alternating layers of red chile chicken mixgood-sized chile pods (or a half-cup of chile pow- ture and more tortillas, adding chunks of cheese der). Rip the stems off each chile, revealing the amid the layers and on top at your discretion. I seed-filled inner cavity. The heat resides in the like asiago cheese, which steers the flavor toward seeds and inner membranes. Your tolerance/pref- a chicken parmesan-like feeling. For a more tradierence for heat, in conjunction with the heat in tional cheese, go with bright orange cheddar. In the chile variety you’re using, dictates the extent the end you’ll want at least three layers of tortilla to which you clean your chiles. I can handle my in the tray, each with a layer of red chicken on top. share of heat, but I still clean hot chiles pretty Bake at 350 degrees for 20–30 minutes, until well, because that makes it easier to eat more of the top starts to get crispy but not dark in color or the finished product. dried out. Remove from heat. Hand-crush your cleaned chiles into a bowl. If Now that your red chileed tortillas with chickthe skins are more leathery than crumbly, use en are ready to enjoy, be warned: You might not scissors to snip them into smallish pieces. Pour 4 stop eating until the whole enchilada is gone.

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Pepper problems

Dear Ari, Our peppers are still reddening on the plants, but with frost coming I’ve got some picking and preserving ahead. We still have several jars of pickled peppers on the shelf from last year, gathering dust, and I’ve had mixed luck with drying peppers in the past. We had good luck one year making chipotles by smoking jalapeno and Rio Grande chiles. Another time we tried blending garlic and jalapenos and freezing them in ice cube trays. Not a lot of flavor, and the ice cube trays were never the same. Now I’m thinking of filling jars with jalapenos and oil. I like cooking with the hot oil that results, and the peppers taste less vinegary when preserved in oil. I’m also considering attempting to replicate the chile paste I find in

Q

The first step in preparing my red chicken enchiladas is to procure and bake a chicken. You want a high-quality bird, with the kind of texture in its flesh that comes from scratching for bugs and avoiding the rooster. If you live near a market that sells good-quality rotisserie chicken, consider bringing one home and proceed to the next step. Put said chicken in pan, breast-side-up. Rub with oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper and, if you want, stuff the cavity with large chunks of carrot, onion and celery. Bake at 350 degrees for about an hour and a half, until the drumstick falls off when you shake it.

the Asian section of the grocery store. It seems like its primarily chile, garlic and preservative. Our pepper varieties are Thai Hot, Rio Grande Hot, Bulgarian Carrot, Espanola Improved, Anaheim and Poblano. What do you think of these ideas, and do you have any suggestions for preserving peppers beyond pickling them? —Pickled Out Dude, what’s wrong with your pickled peppers? Having a few jars left over from last year should not be a problem, and shouldn’t even happen, unless your pickles suck, or you’re just not a pickled pepper person. Assuming you’re not a pickle person, you’re excused, and your ideas sound great—especial-

A

ly the pepper paste and pepper oil, not to mention the proven chipotle option. I think the Thai Hot and Bulgarian Carrot are best for paste, but careful with those Bulgarians. They’re hot. Preserving with oil can produce spectacularly delicious results. But because oil-preservation carries a botulism risk, I’m not going to go there. As for your Rio Grandes, Poblanos, Espanolas and Anaheims: These peppers are for roasting, either in the broiler or on the grill, until the skins blister. Then freeze them—and remember to leave several bags in my freezer. Send your food and garden queries to flash@flashinthepan.net

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Page 19 October 1–October 8, 2009


8

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Arts & Entertainment listings October 1–October 8, 2009

THURSDAY October

Heidi Meili Steve Fetveit

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01

Nab a pumpkin with your kid for Halloween and help provide medical care for underprivileged patients at Hope Medical Center in Guinea, West Africa at the Third Annual Pumpkin Patch, from noon–7 PM until Oct. 8 and 9 AM–7 PM from Oct. 9-31 at the Missoula Alliance Church, 100 E. Foss Court. Free entry. Call 251-3983. The Wheeler Conference hosts “Failure to Inform: Is there a looming media crisis in Montana?” at the Holiday Inn Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St., beginning with opening remarks at 8:30 AM The all-day event includes multiple panel discussions on print, broadcast and digital media. $35. Visit www.wheelercenter.org. Wrap your brain around becoming a confident yoga instructor when Nancy Ruby comes to town for a YogaMotion Instructor Traning session starting today at a TBA time and place. Grab detailed info packets at Down Dog Missoula, 327 E. Broadway St. Visit www.yogamotion.com or call 585-9600. If you can’t read this, you may be a baby below the age of 36 months, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program at 10:30 AM every Tue., Thu. and Fri. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Advocate for abused and neglected children in court when you head to a fundraiser/informational event for Missoula’s chapter of Court Appointed Special Advocates at the Missoula County Courthouse lawn, 200 W. Broadway St., at noon. Free. Call 542-1208. I’m sure your lunch will go down smooth when you head to see professor Ralph Judd discuss “Frontier of Vaccine Development Against Meningitis and Gonorrhea” at noon in Room 304 of the Clapp Building (no pun intended). Free. Call 243-6670. Don’t expect literal papercuts on your child’s hands when Indy contributor Andy Smetanka leads “Afterschool Adventures: Playdate with an Artist” but do expect your child to make sweet silhouette art at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front. St., at 3 PM. $4.25/free under age 1. Call 541-7529.

Wildflower Montessori School

Now Enrolling Ages 2-6 Fine Arts Emphasis Whole Organic Meals

Photo by Anne Medley

Despondency is a gateway drug when, from left, Alicia Bullock-Muth, Immanuela Meijer and Hailey Faust star in the UM School of Theatre and Dance’s production of Neil Simon’s Brighton Beach Memoirs, showing Tue., Oct. 6 through Sat., Oct. 10 at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre in UM’s PARTV Center. $18 general/$14 seniors and students/$8 children 12 and under.

If art loses hands-down to video games, then the Missoula Public Library’s your gig, where Game On! invites teen gamers to glue their eyes on the big screen and mow snacks at 3:30 PM the first Thu. of every Month. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

nightlife Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from 5–7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. Wiggle those hips and strike poses of elegant expression when former UM dance prof Amy Ragsdale leads a beginning to intermediate Modern Dance class at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., every Thu. at 5 PM. Cost TBA. Call 360-8763. If you’re a Missoula Art Museum (MAM) or Museum at Fort Missoula member partake in a private reception at 5 PM at the MAM, 335 N. Pattee St., where you’ll meet artist Roger Shimomura and preview his exhibit Minidoka on My Mind before it hits the eyes of others on First Friday. Cost TBA. Call 728-0447. A local cabal of doctors and volunteers recently traveled to Honduras to provide medical assistance as part of Missoula Medical Aid. As a thanks, an open house kicks off from 5–7 PM at the Women’s Club, 2105 Bow St.,

with presentations and complimentary snacks and drinks. Free. Call 728-4410. All genres are encouraged—excepting, perhaps, kuduro—every Thu. at 5:30 PM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 1/2 South Ave. W., where musicians bring their noise makers and synergy builds a joyful sound during the Tangled Tones Pickin’ Circle. Free. Call 396-3352. Jazz with a dynamic spin spins your head ‘round when the Discount Quartet plays the Brooks and Browns Lounge at the Holiday InnDowntown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St., at 5:30 PM. Free. After the revolution we’ll need a new Betsy Ross, which is why you should pick up some tips every Thu. at Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., where their Sewing Lounge begins at 6 PM. $9–10 hour. Call 541-7171. Sweep yourself into a musical potpourri of sorts when songstress Andrea Harsell graces the Bitterroot Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, with a show at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-7468. end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Oct. 2, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Playa c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

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Page 20 October 1–October 8, 2009

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Sample a taste of Day of the Dead-themed art when Whitefish’s Stumptown Art Studio, 145 Central Ave., holds a First Thursday reception from 6–9 PM featuring collage and 3-D art from Flathead Valley high school students. Free. Call 862-5929 or visit www.stumptownartstudio.org. Collagraph prints of CDs and vinyl records grab hold of your iris when Glenn Phillips presents his exhibit Grooves with a First Thursday reception from 6–9 PM at Whitefish’s Walking Man Frame Shop and Gallery, 305 Baker Ave. Free. Call 863-2787. If your aspirations have soured because of the down economy, recalibrate your aims during a Life Coach Associates meet and greet in the small conference room of the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., at 6:30 PM. Free. Call 721-0387. Feeling too straight and separate? Remedy that situation pronto at Gay Men Together, a safe and affirming place for gay and bisexual men, at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Grab a 60-minute glimpse into artist Roger Shimomura’s paintings, prints and experimental theater pieces that span a 40-year career during the Missoula Art Museum’s distinguished artist lecture titled Roger Shimomura: An American Diary at the Missoula Children’s Theatre, 200 N. Adams St., at 7 PM. Free for MAM and Fort Missoula Museum members and students/$5 public. Call 728-0447 and register by Sept. 28. (See Scope in this issue.) Rock some sweet fiddle solos and bust a move while others shred without use of an amp during Old Timey Music Sessions at Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., at 7:30 PM this and every Thu. through Oct. Free. Call 726-3765. An amalgam of rock, folk and pop gums your eardrums when Seattle’s Camille Bloom plays The Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, at 7:30 PM. $10. Call 541-8463. Labor class unite for a glimpse into the history of the struggle, during the 1930s to be exact, when Montana Rep Missoula presents Clifford Odets’ Waiting for Lefty at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave., at 7:30 PM through Oct. 3. $10/$5 for students during a 7 PM student rush. Call 243-6809. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Bring yer guitar, bass or other instrument of choice every Thu. night to The Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, when it holds an open-mic style artists showcase at 8 PM. Free. Interested musicians should call 541-8463. Yodeling never sounded so boss: Sop yourself to the succulent undulations of Montucky’s country master Wylie and the Wild West, who play the University Theatre at 8 PM. $17/$15 advance/Free children. Tickets available at all Griztix locations or www.griztix.com. Call 243-4051. Cloud your gaze with dreams of shredding powder during a screening of the ski film Refresh at the Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St., at 8 PM. $7. Call 549-0542. Bowling and karaoke go together like Iran and world stability during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Sorry ladies, but Thu. nights belong to the dudes at Men’s Night at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where the testosterone-fueled karaoke begins at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Bassackwards Karaoke turns your world underside-up every Thu. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on Airway Boulevard. Free. Call 531-8327. Get your fix with Sandy Bradford and Mark Souhrada when they host the jam at Los Caporales in Columbia Falls at 9 PM. Call 892-5025.

Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip-hop, crunk, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $3. See a plethora of patterns and colors after a few pitchers, muster up the courage to belt out some classics, and perhaps win a prize, during Kaleidoscope Karaoke every Tue.–Sun. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9:30 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. Dance with a cougar or two, or not, every Thu. at 10 PM when the James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., hosts The Social Club, featuring DJ Fleege spinning an expansive array of tech house and progressive electro dance tunes. Free. Cross your karaoke sword with others under the influence of that music box you sing along to during Combat DJ and Karaoke nights, this and every Thu. at the Press Box, 835 E. Broadway St., at 10 PM. Free. Portland’s Dorado gets you cutting rugs when the funk rockers hit the Top Hat for a show at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

FRIDAY October

nightlife Innovative, pioneering and progressive are just a few of the words you’ll probably use when you gawk at First Friday art from the SALTMINE artist collective, which features work by Edgar Smith, Karen Rice, Peter Keefer, Michael deMeng, Cathryn Mallory, Stephen Glueckert and Bev Beck Glueckert from 5–7 PM at the Catalyst, 111 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Expect fine art in the form of landscapes, portraits and figures when artist Joe Goertzen holds a First Friday reception at the Loft of Missoula, 119 W. Main St., from 5–8 PM. Free. Local illustrator Ed Jenne displays his meticulous finger for pen and watercolors when he presents a First Friday opening for his full color

art print Railroad Roundhouse and Steam Locomotives at 210 N. Higgins Ave., upstairs in Unit 216, from 5–8:30 PM. Free. Wood engravings romp with advocacy when artist Claire Emery showcases her woodwork in conjunction with the Wildlands CPR book A Road Runs Through It: Reviving Wild Places (which features some of her pieces), during a First Friday opening at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave., from 5–8 PM. Free. Local photog Alan Graham McQuillan hosts his First Friday exhibit Northern Italy, which features street pics, and photos of the churches of Ravenna and more with a reception from 5–8 PM at Big Sky Embroidery, 610 S. Higgins Ave. Free.

SPOTLIGHT labor power

02

Find out more about “Transportation Safety for Wheelchair Riders and Children With Disabilities” during a conference by Eleanore’s Project Inc. starting with registration at 8:30 AM followed by instruction at 9:30 AM at the Holiday Inn Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. $150 group of three/$80 professionals/$10 parents and wheel chair riders. Call 370-4717 or visit www.eleanoresproject.org. The LH Ranch in Gold Creek, 472 Mullan Road, celebrates 158 years of existence by asking you to help round up and drive cattle home off the forest summer range this weekend starting at a TBA time on Friday. Includes games for kids, barbecues, camping and more until Oct. 4. The weekend event raises funds for a children’s program. $125–$10. Call 2883430 for info and directions. The Missoula Public Library hosts a preschool storytime geared toward children 3–6 years old every Fri. at 10:30 AM. This week, Obamanomics: How Bottom-Up Economic Prosperity Will Replace TrickleDown Economics by John R. Talbott. Just kidding. (Did I need to tell you that?) Free. Call 721-BOOK. If you can’t read this, perhaps you’re simply pre-literate, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program for babes up to 36 months at 10:30 AM every Thu., Fri. and Tue. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Toddlers find plenty of political and social fodder during toddler storytime from 10:30–11:15 AM in the downstairs meeting room of the Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-1670. Homeschoolers have all the fun, especially when they make slime or nuke bars of soap in the microwave, so take your non-public schooled kid to Super Science for Homeschoolers, which runs every Friday through October at Stevensville’s North Valley Public Library, 208 Main St., from noon–2 PM. Free. Register by calling Patricia at 777-5061. Join, if only temporarily, the local spiritual community group Opus Aima Obscurae when they meet at noon at the Higgins Street bridge to support the Women in Black and witness a reenactment of Missoula’s 1909 fight for free speech. Free. E-mail ravendigitalis@gmail.com.

Photo by Anne Medley

The story goes that Waiting For Lefty opened in New York in the spring of 1935 and resulted in an hour-long standing ovation. That, my friends, is a playwright’s dream. You could die a success after something like that. Hell, it’s even a theater troupe’s and director’s dream, for that matter. That was a different time, of course. The Great Depression had taken hold of the nation and outrageously high unemployment led to some of the most violent labor struggles our country has ever seen. Cllifford Odets’ play was based on a 1934 cab driver strike, and it was still fresh in the minds of many New York workers. Inspired by the power of Waiting for Lefty, the Longshoreman’s Union—many of whom were in attendance—went on immediate strike. Can you imagine a whole group of longshoremen sitting at the Crystal Theatre? That would be incredible. Montana Rep Missoula’s production of Waiting for Lefty is a grand nod to the climate of that time and the play that spawned real political and social action. Our own recession keeps us tied to such themes. The play itself also resonates personally with MRM’s artistic director Greg Johnson who menWHAT: Waiting For Lefty tored under Peter Kass, whose own mentor was Odet. Johnson WHO: Montana Rep Missoula says Kass instilled in him the legaWHERE: Crystal Theatre cy of Odets’ Group Theatre—one of the most influential theater WHEN: Oct. 1–Oct. 3, 7:30 PM nightly troupes of the 1930s that comHOW MUCH: $10 Thu./$15 Fri. and Sat. bined social consciousness with stage performance. I’m not sure most of us have ever seen or will ever see theater create such a hubbub. But there’s good reason to see what the fuss was all about. Certainly the political climate of the time fueled the fire. But if Odet hadn’t gotten it just right, hadn’t perfectly reflected the fears and anger of the labor class, the play would never have created such a thrilling reaction. —Erika Fredrickson

Missoula Independent

Page 21 October 1–October 8, 2009


An array of abstract art fills your peepers when artist Jennifer Bardsley presents New Works at Paradigm Architects, 125 1/2 W. Main St. (behind the Red Bird Restaurant), from 5–8 PM. Free. Photographer Joni Packard takes us through Simple Gifts...the Beauty and Wonder of Everyday Moments during a reception for her exhibit at Yellowstone Photo, 321 N. Higgins Ave., from 5–8 PM. Free. See photogs who push the digital envelope as far as it can aesthetically go duringDigital Visions, a show featuring work by Chris Autio, Peter Keefer, Lewis Kelly and John Salisbury with a reception from 5–9 PM at Montana Art and Framing, 709 Ronan St. Free. Call 541-7100. Paintings and prints about the Asian American experience, particularly at WWII internment camps, gets explored during the Missoula Art Museum’s opening exhibit of Roger Shimomura’s Minidoka on my Mind with a reception from 5–8 PM at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free. Scott Fife’s Big Trouble-The Idaho Project and Teresa Tamura’s Made in Minidoka: The Incarceration of Japanese Americans in Idaho also open. Call 728-0447. (See Scope in this issue.) Take a break from your First Friday stroll and head over to Ellie Blue, 328 E. Pine St., where you’ll “Paint the town Blue” and meet Missoula City Council candidates endorsed by Missoula County Democrats with a reception from 5–7 PM featuring visu-

al art by Beth Jaffe and music by Bob Wire at 7. Free. E-mail misssoulademocrats@missoulademocrats.org. Help celebrate Missoula’s 100th anniversary fight for free speech on the streets with an opportunity to speak on a soapbox at the corner of Front Street and Higgins Avenue at 5 PM, followed by a historical reenactment at 6 PM, then a screening of the film Jailed for their Words at 7 PM upstairs at the Union Hall, 208 E. Main St. Free. Call Dave Jones at 363-5292 or e-mail flyfeverdj@hotmail.com. (See Agenda in this issue.) Soak your eyes in oil paintings and video installations on First Friday when artist M. Scott Miller presents his exhibit Colored Horses and Mark Shogren presents a video installation titled Leonard Hotel Suite with a reception from 5–8:30 PM at the Gallery@Studio420, 420 D N. Higgins Ave. Free. Absorb portraits by Missoula International School of AniMeals’ cats and kittens during a reception at Bernice’s Bakery, 190 S. Third St. W., at 5 PM. Free. Missoula’s hair chopping and cropping extraordinaire Katt Ahlstrom presents a series of paintings including nudes, abstracts, self-portraits, plant life and more with a First Friday cocktail themed reception at the Western Montana Community Center, 127 S. Higgins Ave. Ste 202, from 5–8 PM. Free. Original illustrations, sculptures and works in progress are on tap when artist Jess Abell holds a First Friday

BETTY’S DIVINE 521 S. Higgins, 721-4777 Good times are free. Summertime motion on the Higgins Street Bridge. It's not where you move, it's the way you move. Embracing movement, expanding consciousness. Photos by Tom Robertson. Statriot Designs, masterminds behind the Monf^*#ingtana T-shirts, are releasing 3 new designs. Shirts will be available at one night only prices. Wine and Cookies too! 5-8pm BUTTERFLY HERBS 232 N. Higgins, 728-8780 Please join Butterfly Herbs for their October First Friday celebration where Abe Coley shows his freshest paintings. Whiskey and chocolate will be served. Join us from 5-8pm. HEALTHY HUMMINGBIRD MASSAGE & ARTS CENTER 725 Alder, Suite 27, 207-6269 Featuring art by Eli Suzukovich III. Many of the illustrations are pieces of old and new stories & legends. Other images are stories yet to be told, reflections on

reception at Red Light Studios, 204 E. Spruce St., from 5–8 PM. Free. Local artist Abe Coley shows “his freshest paintings” and notes that whiskey and chocolate are likely to be served during a First Friday reception at Butterfly Herbs, 232 N. Higgins Ave., from 5–8 PM. Free. Local photog Tom Robertson invites you to embrace movement and expanded consciousness when he shows off his work during a First Friday reception at Betty’s Divine, 521 S. Higgins Ave., from 5–8 PM. Free, with wine and cookies. Piece together stories of old, new and strange events, all while gazing at illustrations by Eli Suzukovich III during a First Friday reception at Healthy Hummingbird Massage & Art Center, 725 W. Alder St. Ste. 27, at 5 PM. Free, with food, drinks and live music. Help celebrate the opening of the new yoga studio Inner Harmony Yoga with music by Joan Zen, wine, appetizers and more at a First Friday opening reception from 5–9 PM at the studio, 214 E. Main St. Ste. B. Free. Vist yogainmissoula.com. You like Missoula’s Day of the Dead parade, don’t you? Well, do your part to make it happen during a First Friday silent auction benefit for the parade from 5–9 PM at Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Artist Kim Shirley rocks and probably wants to hawk some new works during a First Friday reception of her work at The Ceretana Studios, 801 Sherwood St., from 5–8 PM. Free.

Kids chow snacks, scrutinize art and play with friends during a First Friday celebration at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St., from 5–8 P M. Free. Call 541-PLAY. Get your buzz on just after work with a varied selection of vino when The Loft, 119 W. Main St., presents a weekly wine tasting every Fri. at 5:15 PM. $10. Expect a high-class time when jazz and wine mingle during the Real Book Jazz Jam and Wine Tasting, which occurs the first and third Fri. of each month from 5:30–8:30 PM at the Loft, 119 W. Main St. Free, but wine tasting is $10. Call Carla at 360-8746. Burritos and tacos swirl in your stomach juices as you take in paintings, mixed media and photography during a First Friday opening at La Parrilla, 130 W. Broadway St., featuring work from Melanie Gardner, Patricia Thornton, Kim Shirley, Brian Elling, Don Linton and others starting at 5:30 PM. Free. Do your part to increase awareness of environmental issues, and help donate funds to the Montana Wilderness Association, when you join others at the Fifth Annual Bulls, Blues and Brews Benefit and Silent Auction at the Missoula Children’s Theatre at 6 PM. $10, features appetizers, beer/wine and music by Def Cartel. Call 243-6568. Check pics that local photogs like Jeremy Lurgio and the Indy’s own

daily experiences, and the retelling of strange events & people the artist often encounters. Come and enjoy good company and great art at Healthy Hummingbird Massage & Art Center. 207-6269

MISS ZULA'S 111 N. Higgins, 541-7376 Rodeo...The Riders....The Ridden...Photography of Juan de Santa Anna. Cowboys and Cowgirls...not just Montanan...but from all over the world. They appreciate and respect the critters that help put food on the plates of so many...Their skill, their art... learned or natural...good or bad...a way of life. Behind our gourmet meal... are the folks who wrestle in mud and dust to bring it home... to us. In Black & White or in Color... a lifestyle of passion, pain and peace. A few images from the Helmville Rodeo & Miles City Bucking Horse Sale...honoring what those folks do. An artist's reception will be held on October 2 from 5-8pm during Missoula's First Friday celebration.

Healthy Hummingbird Massage & Art Center.

Miss Zula’s Featuring the art of Juan de Santa Anna Rodeo, The Riders, The Ridden.

207-6269 The Warehouse: 725 W. Alder St. Suite 27 one block down Spruce from St. Pat's

Missoula Independent

Page 22 October 1–October 8, 2009

111 N Higgins Missoula, MT • 541-7376

Chad Harder took for the Community Food & Agriculture Coalition’s 2010 calendar during a First Friday gallery reception from 6–8 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Free, with local food and beverages. Humorist Michael Perry talks pigs, chickens and other features of rural life in Wisconsin when the author reads selections from his work in the Dell Brown Room of UM’s Turner Hall at 7 PM. Free. Call 243-5267. Catch actors Boyd Gaines and Christina Pickles live on the stage as they read short works of fiction during a live performance of NPR’s Selected Shorts at Whitefish’s Middle School Performing Arts Center, 600 Second St. E., at 7 PM. $25 at all Montana Coffee Trader locations in the Flathead and www.griztix.com. Call 243-4215. Yelling at others to get your way doesn’t work, so delve into “compassionate communication” during a discussion at Hamilton’s First Christian Church meeting room, 328 Fairgrounds Road, from 7–9:30 PM. Free. Call Veronica at 363-3076 or email veronica@veronicalassen.com. Labor class unite for a glimpse into the history of the struggle, during the 1930s to be exact, when Montana Rep Missoula presents Clifford Odets’ Waiting for Lefty at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave., at 7:30 PM through Oct. 3. $10/$5 for students during a 7 PM student rush. Call 243-6809. (See Spotlight in this issue.)

MONTE DOLACK GALLERY 139 West Front St., 549-3248 Join us for a reception at the Monte Dolack Gallery in historic downtown Missoula on Friday, October 2nd from 5 – 8pm during First Friday Gallery Night. Monte unveils his newest series of paintings, Views from Mount Jumbo. This exhibition will also include the release of Monte’s newest fine art poster, Missoula Valley, available signed and numbered or unsigned. www.dolack.com. Open Weekdays 10-5:30 and Sat 11-5. NOTEWORTHY PAPER & PRESS 101 Higgins, 541-6683 This month, Noteworthy* Paper & Press will be highlighting the work of local artist Tim Thornton. Tim worked as a painter for theater, television and film in California before settling into the Missoula art community. His pieces feature images from early horror cinema - perfect for autumn and Halloween! Some of the pieces are transparencies mounted on wood blocks, while others are screen prints. The show will run through Halloween. Light refreshments served. 5–8pm See you there!

Honored to be Joining Missoula's First Friday Art Galleries!! First Friday is on the South Side! Come see our Giclees and Fine Photographic Art! Browse our cards, jewelry and giftbaskets! Highland Winds Art Gallery & Shop 541-7577

1520 S. 7th Street W. (west of Russell)


A night of acoustic alternative from the Windy City sparkles your insides when Chicago’s Ross Logan plays a show with Tia and Dylan at The Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, at 7:30 PM. $5. Call 541-8463. Feel free to bust out your best version of the coffee grinder breakdance when the Jimmy Snow Country Show plays the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Wafts of jazz-influenced funk reverberate the floors of the Top Hat when New Jersey’s Charlie Hunter breaks it down with a show at 8 PM. $17/$15 advance. Bust a gut to some irreverent humor steeped in left-leaning, feminist thought when Bozeman’s Broad Comedy hits the Wilma Theatre for a show at 8 PM. $20 at Blue Mountain Clinic, Worden’s Market, Rockin Rudy’s and www.ticketweb.com. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Finish off your First Friday run with a dose of bluegrass via Pinegrass when they play a Montana Folklore Society hosted concert at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., at 8 PM. $10 at the door or advance at Rockin Rudy’s. Visit www.montanafolk.org. Belt out a few bars of somethin’ sexy at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo, every Fri. and Sat. night at 9 PM. Free. Be thankful that the freedom to speak includes the freedom to sing when you sidle up to the mic at

karaoke night at the VFW, kicking off at 9 PM. Free. If you liked Tolkien’s mines of Khazad-dum, you’ll love tunneling through the AmVets Club, where DJDC rocks dance music to slay orcs to at 9 PM. Free. It’s time for an all-request video dance party to celebrate the week’s end: Feelgood Friday featuring hiphop video remixes with The Tallest DJ in America at 9 PM at The Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway. Free. Call 543-5678. Feel free to shake it like a salt shaker when DJ Sanchez cranks out the jams at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Learn to sing “Dancing Queen” backwards and forwards like the star that you aspire to be when Bassackwards Karaoke invades the Alcan Bar & Grill in Frenchtown, 16780 Beckwith St., every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 531-8327. Once your First Friday buzz has worn off, get caught in the ether of dirty funk and soul when Reverend Slanky hits the Badlander at 9 PM. $5. Pop gets in your face when Missoula ex-pats No-Fi Soul Rebellion make a return trek from Bellingham, Wash. to play the Palace at 9 PM with Portland’s Boy Eats Drum Machine and locals Bacon and Egg. $5. (See Noise in this issue.) Don your best bondage pants, black eyeliner and nipple piercings and get down to DJs Chris Henry,

ir8prim8 and Raven as they spin industrial, goth, ebm, new wave and post punk from the ‘80s and ‘90s during “Dark Dreams: Old School Edition” at 9 PM at Club Q in the Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St. $5. Reggae and Latin rhythms from Argentinians living in Southern Cali tickle your organ of Corti when Los Pinguos plays the Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St., at 9 PM. $15. Call 549-0542. Don’t shame yourself into not checking out No Shame when the Missoula rockers play a show at the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St. in Frenchtown, at what I think is 9 PM. Free. It’s an open mic night of sorts, for actors and directors, where failing is dared and shame is shunned during the Montana Actors Theatre’s No Shame Theatre which runs from 9:30–11:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. Cost TBA. Visit www.mtactors.com.

start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

SATURDAY

03

October

Your heart, the planet and your farmer-neighbors give thanks every Sat. from 8 AM–noon as you head down to the Clark Fork River Market (clarkforkrivermarket.com), which takes place beneath the Higgins Street bridge, and to the Missoula Farmers’ Market (missoulafarmersmarket.com), which opens at 8:30 at the north end of Higgins Avenue. And if it’s non-edi-

bles you’re after, check out East Pine Street’s Missoula Saturday Market (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), which runs 9 AM–1 PM. Free to spectate, and often to sample. Local woman Ashley Hinton-Sharp was just diagnosed with congestive heart failure and some of her friends are throwing a benefit called “Heart Strong” featuring a drawing, music, potluck and massages for a TBA cost and TBA time at Bonner Park. E-mail Mudita at mudita@whoiamnow.com. Help stamp out cardiovascular disease by walking when you join others for the Missoula Heart Walk, a fundraiser for the American Heart Association which starts at 10 AM at UM’s Oval. Free to register. Call 829-3377 or visit www.missoulaheartwalk.org.

Catch Missoula’s favorite musical reverend when Tom Catmull and the Clerics play Sean Kelly’s at 9:30 PM. Cost TBA. Avoid whiskey face in the face of auditory insurrection when Whiskey Rebellion plays the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. Grab dad and the howitzer and shoot yourselves over to see rock cannons Son of A Gun, who play Florence’s High Spirits Club & Casino, 5341 Hwy. 93 N., at 9:30 PM. Free. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they

Missoula Independent

Page 23 October 1–October 8, 2009


Perhaps your coffee could use a bit o’ the strong Irish cream before heading to the Missoula Area Toastmasters’ Humorous Speech Contest, which starts at 10 AM at the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, 5705 Grant Creek Road, and features the contest, refreshments, door prizes and more. $4. Sample a taste of photography, sculpture, pottery and more from artists in the Seeley-Swan Valley during the Alpine Artisans October Tour of the Arts, a self-guided tour of studios around the valley on Oct. 3–4 from 10 AM–4 PM each day. Free. Visit www.alpineartisans.org for a detailed map. The cold hasn’t hit yet but that doesn’t mean you can’t rock the pancake spin when you join the Missoula Figure Skating Club for a free day of figure skating from 10–11:30 AM at the Glacier Ice Rink, 1101 South Ave. W. Free. Visit www.missoulafsc.org. Your bedtime tales of college-age debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Tune the imagination wheel to warp speed at Ready, Set, Read, an early literacy program for kids age 3–7 that includes art projects and games at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front. St., at 11 AM. $4.25/free under age 1. Call 541-7529. Enjoy the story of a 26-year-old fashion designer fleeing from the city to her homeland in Ireland when Heather Barbieri, author of The Lace Makers of Glenmara, heads up the Fact & Fiction book club luncheon from 11:30 AM–1:30 PM at the Holiday Inn-Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. $16, registration was due Sept. 29, but call 721-2881. (See Books in this issue.) Get a 20 minute shot of artistic pleasure when you take a tour of the Missoula Art Museum’s latest exhibition from the late Freeman Butts titled Family Gifts:Works By Freeman Butts at noon at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free. Call 728-0447. Rocks, trees, grassy hills and other items that comprise the Mansfield Mall on UM’s campus become fodder for creative dance pieces when the UM Dance Department holds a sitespecific dance concert at noon at the mall, located next to the Mansfield Library. Free. Visit www.umtheatredance.org. Tickle your brain pickle with talks on how yoga and meditation benefit your health, as well as discussions on creative cooking and more during the Wisdom of Wellness Conference: Making Healthy Choices for the Family which runs from 1–5 PM in UM’s University Center Ballroom. Donations accepted: food (non-perishable and seasonal perishable) or cash donation to www.zanesfund.org. Call Noreen at 544-5588. The woolen warriors of Missoula’s Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework circle bring the world to drink every Sat. at 2 PM in Liquid Planet’s conference room. Free. BYO yarn and needles, and check out missoulaknits.blogspot.com. Find good country company without going far during the Ninth Annual Moon-Randolph Homestead Fall Gathering, featuring a potluck feast, cider pressing, music making, games for adults and kids, as well as mirth and “monkeyshines,” starting with a harvest and pressing at 2 PM and dinner at 4 PM at the Homestead, 1515 Spurlock Road. Suggested donation: $10 family/$5 person. Call 7289269, and make sure to bring some apples for the press. You might not know it, but Bhutan is a tiny country sandwiched between China and India, so get a taste of their culture with a prayer flag hoisting, traditional games, music, food and dance during Chilies and Happiness: A Celebration of Bhutanese Culture in Missoula at 4 PM at the PEAS Farm, 3010 Duncan Drive. Free. E-mail bhutantakin@gmail.com.

Missoula Independent

Shoot yourself up with a few hits of late afternoon jazz when the Discount Quartet plays the Brooks and Browns Lounge at the Holiday Inn-Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St., at 4 PM. Free.

nightlife Help assist those with disabilities to train for life with the Special Olympics when you attend the Montana Sports Legends Dinner & Auction for Special Olympics Montana with a silent auction, dinner and entertainment at 6 PM at the Hilton Garden Inn, 3720 N. Reserve St. Cost TBA. RSVP at 800-242-6876 Ext. 108 or visit www.somt.org. Support the arts in Whitefish when you head to the Second Annual Oktoberfish fundraiser for Stumptown Art Studio, from 6–10 PM outside on Karrow Avenue in Whitefish, and features a beer garden, music, “dinner by the bite” and more. $50 person. Call 862-5929 or visit www.stumptownartstudio.org. He croons while you swoon to his aural orchestra: Catch waves of Americana and roots

with Missoula’s fav guitarist Tom Catmull, who plays the Bitterroot Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-7468. Missoula gets a little crunker when southern rappers the Ying Yang Twins crunk up the Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St., with a show at 7 PM. $20, all ages. Tickets available at 5 PM at the door. Call 549-0542 or visit www.thejegroup.com. Labor class unite for a glimpse into the history of the struggle, during the 1930s to be exact, when Montana Rep Missoula presents Clifford Odets’ Waiting for Lefty at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave., at 7:30 PM through Oct. 3. $10/$5 for students during a 7 PM student rush. Call 243-6809. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Heat up your Saturday night with some dialogue about the Rinzai Zen tradition with a Dharma talk based on the traditional Zen Koan at the Open Way Center, 702 Brooks St., at 7:30 PM. Free. It’s time to get down crazily with other contra dancers during a Montana Folklore Society

SPOTLIGHT b r o a d b a n te r

sponsored contra dance featuring Sleeping Child String Band with caller Roy Curet, starting with a beginner dancer workshop at 7:30 PM and moving into the music at 8, upstairs at the Union Hall, 208 E. Main St. $8/$6 folklore society members. Visit www.montanafolk.org. Reggae and Latin rhythms from Argentinians living in Southern Cali warm the hairs in your ear when Los Pinguos plays the O’Shaughnessy Cultural Arts Center, 1 Central Ave. in Whitefish, at 7:30 PM. $27/$20. Call 862-5371 or visit www.whitefishtheatreco.org. Dance like a wild beast during Shine and art and dance party featuring DJs Kris Moon, Hase, Bobo, Hendawg, ir8prim8, Milkcrate Mechanic and aerial artists Shaneca Adams, Veronica deSoyza and Raven as well as fire spinners and more, starting at dusk and going ‘til dawn at Ryan Creek Meadows, 26 miles east of Missoula off I-90, exit 130. $15 at all Griztix locations and www.griztix.com. Visit www.ryancreekmeadows.com. If you slept on it last night, here’s your second chance to two-step or body glide yourself to see the Jimmy Snow Country Show, who plays the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. A night of irie bliss seeps into your ears and eyes when Southern California’s Pepper brings their reggae rock flavors to the Wilma Theatre at 8 PM. Iration and illScarlett open. $20 plus fees at Rockin Rudy’s and www.ticketweb.com. Smooth jazz on the river blends with steak and vino when the Discount Quartet plays Finn & Porter Restaurant, 100 Madison St., from 8–10 PM. Free. Mellowish indie folk vibes from Urbana, Ill. sway your head to and fro when You and Yourn plays the ZACC Gallery, 235 N. First St. W., at 8 PM. $5, all ages. Opening support from The Scribblers, Tyson Ballew and Ross Vorhees. Solid Sound Karaoke proves that music can also be a liquid or a gas, but never plasma, at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. If you get nervous in front of crowds, just imagine they’re all naked at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo at 9 PM. Free.

If you get squeamish when a group of women poke fun at the abstinence movement by sarcastically singing a song called “I’m Saving My Hymen for Jesus,” or find offense when said group raps about trying to find that elusive part of the female anatomy known as the “G-Spot,” I can say with certainty that Broad Comedy probably isn’t for you. Same goes if you’re hurt by playful jabs at soccer moms and Republicans. But if you get a laugh from no-holds-barred, Sarah Silverman-like satirical musical comedy firmly rooted in feminism with a left-wing bent, the five ladies that comprise this Bozeman-based troupe are guaranteed to make your ribs hurt when they land in Missoula on Friday night. Bozeman’s Katie Goodman—a writer, director, actress and daughter of Boston Globe columnist Ellen Goodman—created the group 10 years ago with her husband Soren Kisiel. Since then, the broads have busted guts to critical acclaim at Caroline’s Comedy Club in New York City, held down a three-month run of the show in Boston, and won the WHAT: Broad Comedy “Best of” “best of” category at the 2005 Vancouver International Fringe performance Festival.

WHEN: Fri., Oct. 2, 8 PM

When they hit the Wilma stage on Friday, you’ll get a smorgasbord of their reperHOW MUCH: $20 at Blue Mountain Clinic, toire, where hip-hop parodies Rockin Rudy’s, Worden’s Market or like “Soccer Mom Ho” mix with www.ticketweb.com the searing hilarity of a performance by the “United States Extreme Right Wing Cheerleading Squad.” A portion of proceeds from the show goes toward Blue Mountain Clinic, so your laughs also benefit something other than your belly.

WHERE: Wilma Theatre

Page 24 October 1–October 8, 2009

–Ira Sather-Olson

Feel free to perform “Bella Ciao” by Mirah & The Black Cat Orchestra during karaoke night at 9 PM at the VFW but don’t be surprised if someone tells you we’re in Missoula, and so it’s time to start talking American. Free. Here’s your chance to get freaky on the dance floor. AmVets Club offers up DJDC and his dance music to the hungry horde at 9 PM. Free. The Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St., lets the karaoke genie out of the bottle at 9 PM. Turn south after taking exit 89 from I-90. Free. Call 370-3200. When DJ Sanchez commands the turntables every Sat. at 9 PM at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, nobody’s exempt from the mandatory “dance down the bar” rule. Free. Call 363-6969. Have one too many drinks and you just might start singing pop tunes backwards during Bassackwards Karaoke at Larry’s Six Mile Bar & Grill in Huson, 23384 Huson Road, every other Sat. at 9 PM. Free. DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are guaranteed to keep you dancing to an assortment of hip-hop, electronic and other bass-heavy, booty-busting beats ‘til the bar closes, or at least until the vodka runs out, during Absolutely at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. Witness a man, and the machines that love/hate him, when San Francisco’s Captured! By Robots plays what could be metal, pop, or whatever his robots feel like playing at 9 PM at the Palace. $8. Opening support from The Runs.


I think a night of rainbow friendly club music is in store when Club Q at the Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St., opens its doors for what’s bound to be a dance party freakout at 9 PM. Cover TBA. Call 549-0542. He pens a column like he shreds on the geetar. Snare yourself in the trap of Bob Wire & the Magnificent Bastards when the honky tonkers play the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. Rev your persuader and rock the Saturdaynight special when Son of a Gun plays Florence’s High Spirits Club & Casino, 5341 Hwy. 93 N., at 9:30 PM. Free. DJ Dubwise supplies dance tracks all night long so you can take advantage of Sexy Saturday and rub up against the gender of your choice at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. Strings will be plucked and bowed as the slick and hip sounds of the Wartime Blues hit your dome with Americana at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

SUNDAY October

04

Zen up your Sunday mornin’ with zazen (sitting meditation) from 8–10 AM led by Genchoku Patrick Johnson at the Open Way Center, 702 Brooks St. Free. E-mail mbcurtis@bresnan.net. Help benefit homeless animals in Missoula when you and your dog walk in the woods to raise money for the Humane Society of Western Montana during the first annual Canine Classic At Paws Up, which starts with registration at 8:30 AM at the Resort at Paws Up, 40060 Paws Up Road in Greenough. Registration costs vary, call 549-HSWM or visit www.myhswm.org. Allay your thirst for self-balancing, soul searching, healing and manifesting techniques with the free class Mind Body Spirit Energies 101, which will meet bi-monthly, starting with a meet & greet registration today at a TBA time and place. Free. RSVP by calling 800-809-0122. Sunday brunch at 10 AM with jazz from Three of a Kind is classy so don’t just roll out of bed and head into the Blue Canyon Kitchen & Tavern, located in the Hilton Garden Inn at 3720 N. Reserve Street. Rocks, trees, grassy hills and other items that comprise the Mansfield Mall on UM’s campus become fodder for creative dance pieces when the UM Dance Department holds a site-specific dance concert at noon at the mall, located next to the Mansfield Library. Free. Visit www.umtheatredance.org. Revive that ol’ UM pride during a kick-off celebration for homecoming week at the Southgate Mall Clock Court from 1–3 PM which features appearances from Monte, the UM Cheer Squad and Dance Team and more. Free. Call 243-5211. Hook yourself into the minds of three artists: William Kentridge, Carrie Mae Weems and Doris Salcedo as they discuss works that deal with reconciliation and exposing injustice during a special pre-screening of the PBS show Art:21 at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St., at 1 PM. Free. Call 728-0447.

nightlife Two Iraq War vets share their “contagious love program” when they make a stop at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Resource Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave., for a potluck and discussion at 6 PM. Free. Doors open at 5 PM, bring a dish to share. Call 543-3955. Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with jazz DJs and jazz bands starting at 7:30 PM. Free. This week: Jazz from the Donna Smith Trio, the Sam White Quartet and DJ Gary Stein.

Euchre is one of those games that goes great with beer because you can tell what the cards look like even if your vision is a little blurry. See what I mean, or try to anyway, tonight at Sean Kelly’s just-for-fun Euchre Tournament at 8 PM. Free. The weekend isn’t over ‘til you wrap it up with Jam Night at the Finish Line, 153 Meridian Road in Kalispell, with host Landslide at 8 PM. Free. Call 257-0248. Hear ye, hear ye: AmVets Club offers a new spin on karaoke called “Jheryoake.” Delve into the mystery at 9 PM, when happy hour gets the crowd loose until 10. Free. He’s not your brotha from another mutha, but Minneapolis Brother Ali knows how to sling some personable rhymes when he plays with Evidence, Toki Wright and BK One at the Palace at 9 PM. $15 advance at Ear Candy Music. (See Noise in this issue.) Prickly banjo leads and folksy vibes entice you when Portland’s Tony Furtado plays the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

MONDAY October

05

You were supposed to be signed up by Sept. 21, but there might still be a spot for you to join the Community Dispute Resolution Center of Missoula County’s mediation training sessions, which run Oct. 5–9 from 9 AM–5 PM in Room 326 of UM’s University Center. $700/$500/$200, depending on which training sessions you choose. Call 549-8218 or email cdmarino55@yahoo.com.

~ Artists For Food ~ Fundraiser Supporting The Missoula Food Bank Friday, October 2 nd at 6:30 275 West Main Downtown Missoula Please bring a canned/nonperishable food item! For donations or questions call 406.728.0343 Hosted by

Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400.

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Kids in kindergarten through grade 12 should make sure they’ve registered by Oct. 2 to take part in a Missoula Children’s Theatre afterschool performing arts program that starts today at a TBA time and runs every Mon. and Wed. for five weeks and culminates in a Nov. 14 performance of the show Shambles and Fablesa whiz-BANG Revue! $90 per child. Register by calling 728-1911 or visit www.mctinc.org.

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nightlife If you devote 5:30 to 8:30 PM on Monday or Wednesday nights to silent meditation, political drinking or other non-kid-friendly endeavors, the Parenting Place offers free child care and dinner at 1644 S. Eighth St. Call 728-KIDS to reserve a spot. What reason have you got for lying around the house watching the tube when Florence’s High Spirits offers Free Pool at 6 PM? Free. Call 273-9992. You’ve got another chance to connect the dots this evening when the VFW hosts bingo at 7 PM. Free. Joining up with UM’s French Club Le Cercle Francophone means you can repeatedly ask people, “Sont vous mon papa?” or just brush up on your French skills when the club meets this and every Mon. at James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., at 7 PM. Free Still snorting up Ritalin to relieve those bouts of ADHD? Check the lecture “Treating ADHD: Medication or Meditation?” at 7 PM at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., and gain knowledge on transcendental meditation techniques that may decrease symptoms. Free. Call 207-7496. They bring some tasty Americana junk while you sit there and get tastefully crunk: Missoula’s Cash For Junkers rocks some oldtimey tunes at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 100, at 7 PM. Free.

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Missoula Independent

Page 25 October 1–October 8, 2009


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The Recording Industry Association of America discovers a new way to deter piracy when Whitefish artist Glenn Phillips holds a reception Thu., Oct. 1, for his exhibit Grooves, featuring collagraph prints of CDs and vinyl records, at The Walking Man Frame Shop & Gallery, 305 Baker Ave. in Whitefish, from 6–9 PM. Free.

Bingo is no longer in the domain of the geriatric when Colin Hickey leads Colin Bingo at 8:30 PM at the Badlander with the first bingo card for free, subsequent cards for $1. Free. Who says America never invented a pub sport? Beer Pong proves them all wrong at the Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where alcohol and performance anxiety climax into a thing of beauty at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. See what happens when two former String Cheese Incident members throw away the jam and cheese when their “livetronica” act EOTO plays the Palace at 9 PM. $10. Grab a hold of some funky green stuff and get ready to giggle like a kid when comedian Doug Benson rolls through town with Graham Elwood for the Medical Marijuana Tour with a performance at the Top Hat at 9 PM. $25/$18 advance at the Top Hat and Rockin Rudy’s. Opening support from local Dead Hipster Chris Baumann. Bring a bicycle with a big hook in it to Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery at 9:30 PM, and see if you can troll for cars from the bar while you watch the show. Free.

TUESDAY October

06

Balance, agility, power and grace get instilled in your child’s brain and body during Family Motion:Mismo, a gymnastics activity at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front. St., at 11 AM. Call 541-PLAY for cost and registration. Moms get a minute away from their kids and can vent their joys, and frustrations, of being a parent during Mom Me Time, at 11:30 AM at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-7690.

You can fight for peace in many different ways, but how about knitting for it? Find out when the group Knitting for Peace meets every Tue. from 1–3 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955. Savor hot job tips at the employment search workshop “Your Menu for Success” in Room 154 of UM’s Lommasson Center from 3:30–5 PM. Free. Call 243-2022. Teens ages 13–18 stir their creative juices during Teen Media Club every Tue. at 4 PM at the Missoula Public Library computer classroom, where video creation, music mixing and digital art formulation are all the rage. Free. Call 721-2665. Kids in kindergarten through grade 12 should make sure they’ve registered by Oct. 2 to take

Missoula Independent

Page 26 October 1–October 8, 2009

part in a Missoula Children’s Theatre afterschool performing arts program that starts today at a TBA time and runs every Tue. and Thu. for five weeks and culminates in a Nov. 15 performance of the show Shambles and Fables–a whiz-BANG Revue! $90 per child. Register by calling 728-1911 or visit www.mctinc.org.

nightlife It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Bluegrass at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. Don’t blame me if you overeat and ham starts seeping from your pores, but do latch onto another installment of an Elk’s Lodge dinner, which this week features ham, scalloped potatoes and corn. $9. RSVP by calling 549-0542. Kids ages 10 and up learn the ins, outs and basics of glass fusing, and perhaps create a pendent or necklace, during a Youth Glass Class from 5:30–7:30 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. $15. Pre-registration only. Call 549-7555 or e-mail holly@zootownarts.com. Tweak your articulation skills for the best during Tune-Up For Couples Part I, a refresher on relationship communication skills with Dr. Kevin Dohr from 6–7:30 PM at Families First, 815 E. Front St., Ste. 3. $12 couple/$10 children’s museum members. Call 721-7690 to register. Missoula’s YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691. You never know what you’ll find—except for probably a bunch of womyn—at Womyn’s Night at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Follow your dreams of becoming the next Willie Nelson, and get buy-one-get-one-free drink tickets, during an open mic night every Tue. at the Brooks and Browns Lounge at the Holiday Inn Parkside, 200 S. Pattee St., from 7–10 PM, with sign-up at 6 PM. E-mail moorebeej@yahoo.com. Let the bass resonate in your ears when UM professor Fern Glass rocks the four strings of the cello with a recital at the Music Recital Hall in UM’s Music Building at 7:30 PM. $10/$5 students and seniors. Call 243-6880. A teen’s dual desire for baseball and women contrasts with his parents’ expectations during the UM School of Theatre and Dance’s production of Neil Simon’s Brighton Beach Memoirs which runs Oct. 6–10 at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre in UM’s PARTV Center. $18 general/$14 seniors and students/$8 children 12 and under. Call 243-4581 or visit www.umtheatredance.org.


Election season’s approaching in the next month, and at least one issue comes to my mind that should garner support from both sides of the political spectrum: conservation of wilderness. Unless you’re someone who thinks everything should be paved, there’s no doubt in my mind that despite their differences, liberals and conservatives in Missoula can break bread on their love for the outdoors and the beautiful hills and valleys that surround us. Or, at least, they should. So as we bounce into this week, let’s begin with a stop at the Montana Conservation Voters Missoula County Chapter Annual Potluck Thu., Oct. 1, from 6:30–8 PM at the Missoula Children’s Theatre meeting room, 200 N. Adams St. Free. Bring a dish and a friend, and be prepared to visit with local candidates endorsed by MCV. Call 542-1055 or e-mail ross@mtvoters.org. But if your cockles get warmed by powdering up your hands and climbing up boulders, you might wanna head to the MCV event right at 6:30, then zoom over to UM’s Urey Lecture Hall at 7 PM for the Fourth Annual Reel Rock Film Tour, which features screenings of the rock climbing vids Progression and First Ascent, plus two other award-winning films from the Reel Rock Competition. $10/$8 advance at UM’s Campus Recreation Outdoor Program or from Pipestone Mountaineering. Call 243-5172. After a raucous Friday at work, Saturday brings with it a chance to bond with your little one during another installment of activities at Traveler’s Rest State Park near Lolo as part of its “Discover the Seasons of Traveler’s Rest” series. The fun begins at 10 AM and centers on the history and culture of hunting, so get ready for hunting stories by Salish tribal elder Louis Adams, and others. Activities kickoff once again at 10 AM on Sunday and include a 1 PM discussion by Norman Jacobson on all the tasty game that Lewis & Clark chomped on during their expedition. There’s more, so get the full low down at www.traversrest.org or call 273-4253. $2 adults/free kids. Also, keep in mind there’s a six-hour parfleche-making workshop led by local artisan Scott

and then follow the signs until you get to campground number six. After a busy Saturday, slither into Sunday with the Montana Natural History Center as you jump at a hike to a neighboring ridgeline to observe an abundance of raptors during their fall migration. Meet at the MNHC headquarters, 120 Hickory St., at 7 AM and get those half-open eyes ready to potentially see a number of creatures including golden eagles, sharp-skinned hawks, osprey and whatever else your eyeballs catch. Don’t worry if you’re not up to snuff on birds of prey, as there’ll be a guide on hand, too. Bring binoculars, a lunch, water and warm clothes for this free outing, which could be bumped to next weekend if the weather is foul. Space is limited so register ASAP by calling 327-0405. Maybe you’d rather breathe heavily, swell your leg muscles and bust out some sweet biking moves on your day of rest. That’s in store when you head to Missoulians on Bicycles’ 33 r d A n n u a l We s te r n M o n t a n a H i l l C l i m b i n g Championships, which takes place sometime after 9 AM on the corner of Takima and Pattee Canyon drives. Once in place, cyclists depart at one-minute intervals and pedal frantically 840 feet up the canyon hill as they race against the clock. Participants of all ages and abilities are welcome and can sign up on Sat., Oct. 3 at Big Sky Bikes, 1110 South Ave. W., from 5–6 PM, or at the same place on Sunday from 7:30–9 AM. $3 non- members/$1 members. Visit www.missoulabike.org to download a flyer. Before we close out the week two events on Thu., Oct. 8 rise to the surface. The first is a discussion on The Great Burn Wilderness Area and Fish Creek, featuring comments by Beverly Dupree, Vickie Edwards, Ladd Knotek and Bob Clark from 7–9 PM at the Roxy Theatre, 718 S. Higgins Photo by Alex Sakariassen Ave. Free, with a social hour and appetizers to follow. RSVP by calling 549-1142 or e-mailing bob.clark@sierraclub.org. Visit www. www.rockymountaineers.com or e-mail club president Lastly, join members of the Clark Fork Chapter of the Montana Joshua Phillips at mtsurveyor@gmail.com for more. Native Plant Society at 7:30 PM as they glean the good word from UM Saturday evening get your bones chilled when you scuttle over to prof Cara Nelson when she discusses “Rethinking Forest the Ghost Moonwalk at 7 PM at the Blodgett Creek Campground in Restoration Strategies in the Western United States: Matching the Bitterroot Forest, where you’ll gather with others around a camp- Practice to Theory” in Room L09 of the Gallagher Business Building fire to hear about ghosts of the Bitterroot Valley, including a trapper on UM’s Campus. Free. who died an untimely death. These hair-raising tales should last about Until we meet again, stay out of the smoke, keep informed about an hour, so bring a lawn chair, flashlight and appropriate clothes. Free. conservation-minded candidates in Missoula and keep pedalin’ and Call Julie Schreck at 375-2606. To get there turn west at the traffic light hikin’ like an outdoor freak. on Highway 93 and Main St. in Hamilton and cross the Bitterroot River. Take a right onto Ricketts Road and left onto Blodgett Canyon Road, calendar@missoulanews.com Cameron that runs from 10 AM–4 PM on Saturday and costs $25. Call 529-8211 to register in advance. If tales of hunting seem lackluster, you can also spend Saturday doing your part to help the Rocky Mountaineers clean out their cabin on Little St. Joseph Peak to make it hospitable for the winter, which according to their website is free and open to the public for use. Tasks include cutting and stacking firewood under the cabin, and general cleaning inside the bungalow. Meet at the K-Mart parking lot in Missoula by 9:30 AM to head off. Bring work gloves, lunch and water. Afterwards, a potluck party ensues.

Missoula Independent

Page 27 October 1–October 8, 2009


Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? What’s the GrapeRide? (Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.) Whitefish musicians trade their skills for free drinks as the Great Northern Bar hosts Open Mic Night, which begins at 8 PM with an acoustic jam circle, heads into an electric set at 9:30 and features fine hosting by members of the Canyon Creek Ramblers. Free. Call 862-2816. You’ve practiced in front of the mirror long enough—head to the High Spirits in Florence, where open mic night features a drum set, amps, mics and recording equipment and awaits you and your axe at 8 PM. Free. Call 2739992 to reserve your spot. Enjoy Tunes on Tuesdays with Christian Johnson from 8:30–11 PM, an acoustic open mic jam every Tue. night at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. Be your own American Idol during “Jheryoake”—that’s karaoke with Jerry Reeb—every Tue. at 9 PM with Happy Hour until 10 at the AmVets Club. Free. A yet-to-be named local band eager for an audience, and perhaps a handful of drink tokens, plays a free show for your discerning ears at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. Ready yourself for a triumphant night of metal when Savannah, Ga. psychedlic sludge metallers Kylesa rock with support from Oakland’s Saviours and Portland’s Red Fang at 9 PM at the Palace. $12/$10 presale at Ear Candy Music. Locals Sunshine for Orphans open. (See Noise in this issue.) Bluegrass siphons into your ears and cycles through your brain when locals Cottonwood Draw old timey up the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

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Page 28 October 1–October 8, 2009

WEDNESDAY

07

October

Morning Melodies, a free, funfilled, family-friendly music event tailored to preschoolers, occurs every Wed. at Montana Coffee Traders in downtown Whitefish at 10 AM. Free. Musical notes of verbs, adverbs, adjectives and the like squeeze into your preschoolers ears during preschool storytime with Allison Jessop from 10:30–11:30 AM in the children’s corner of the Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-1670. Brush up on your skills as an art guide when the Missoula Art Museum presents an Art Guide Training from 11 AM–1 PM, which includes an overview of the fifth grade art experience, MAM Art Guide policies and touring strategies, all at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Call Renee Taafee at 728-0447 for pricing.

Fictional characters dance and prance around your child’s imagination during Ready, Set, Read, an early literacy program for kids’ age 3–7 that includes art projects and games at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front. St., at 11 AM. $4.25/free under age 1. Call 541-7529. If you’re an international student looking to expand your hiring skills in the states, check a job search skills discussion from 3:30–5 PM in Room 154 of UM’s Lommasson Center. Free. Call 243-2022. The peeps at Dillards Hair and Nail Salon aim to do their part for breast cancer awareness month with their annual Cut-A-Thon which runs from 4–8 PM at the salon, located in Southgate Mall. Haircut costs TBA and all proceeds gained are donated to St. Patrick’s Hospital Foundation. Call 721-3660. Find ecological nirvana when you go see Neal Stewart from the University of Tennesse, Knoxville when he leads the discussion “The Tale of Two Weeds” which covers weeds, transgenes and more in Room 110 of UM’s Interdisciplinary Sciences Building at 4:10 PM. Free. Call 243-5292.

nightlife Develop eloquence in the face of inebriation, as well as impressive business contacts, when Toastmasters meets this, and every, Wed. at 6 PM in St. Patrick Hospital’s Duran Learning Center. Free. Call 728-9117. Blue Argon plays eclectic blues, R&B, and jazz featuring Colleen Cunningham, Steve Sellars and Jim Clayborn every Wed. at 6 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. It’s once again time to render flesh, muscles and an assortment of body parts into a work of genius during the Missoula Art Museum’s noninstructed figure drawing classes, from 6–8 PM this and every Wed. at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. $7/$5 members. Participants must be 18 and over. Call 728-0447. Teach those teens and tweens of yours self-control, good judgment and more during Parents Go To School: Love and Limits, Positive Approaches to Discipline led by John Sommers-Flanagan from 6:30–8 PM at Target Range Elementary, 4095 South Ave. W. Free. Call 721-7690 to register. Having fully bitched out Barnes & Noble, the Missoula Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework circle brings the circle of warm fuzzies to the Good Food Store, where you can knit purls of wisdom every Wed. at 7 PM. Free. BYO yarn and needles, and check out missoulaknits.blogspot.com. Organizational and sci-fi enthusiasts can satisfy both cravings by attending bimonthly meetings of MisCon, Montana’s longest running science fiction convention, the first and third Wednesdays of the month at 7 PM at Ruby’s Inn, 4825 N. Reserve St. Free. Call 544-7083. If you know the difference between His Knobs and His Knees, bring that skill to the Joker’s Wild Casino, 4829 N. Reserve St., where the Missoula Grass Roots Cribbage Club invites players both new and old to see how many ways they can get to that magical number 15 at 7 PM. Free. Call Rex at 360-3333.

In case of emergency, break finger puppet: Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 7 PM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. A teen’s dual desire for baseball and women contrasts with his parents’ expectations during the UM School of Theatre and Dance’s production of Neil Simon’s Brighton Beach Memoirs which runs Oct. 6–10 at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre in UM’s PARTV Center. $18 general/$14 seniors and students/$8 children 12 and under. Call 243-4581 or visit www.umtheatredance.org. Hump day isn’t just for binge drinking anymore. It’s also a day for playing games of chance with other like-minded booze lovers when Sean Kelly’s presents Hump Day Bingo, this and every Wed. at 8 PM. Free. Call 542-1471. Singing, fireworks and a bonfire aim to reignite your school pride during a Yell Night! Pep Rally at UM’s Oval at 8 PM. Free. Call 243-5211. Improv comedy with touches of absurdity commands some serious guttural giggles when New York City’s Upright Citizens Brigade Touring Company busts up the University Center Ballroom with a show at 8 PM. $12/$10 advance at the Source in the UC. Open mic night at the Elk’s Lodge is your chance to spit dope rhymes about balanced budgets in your best Arnold Schwarzenegger voice, but only when the mic becomes free starting at 8 PM. Free. Call 549-0542. You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. The answer to this week’s trivia question: The GrapeRide is an annual cycling event that occurs near Blenheim, New Zealand. The tenets of women’s lib broadens to include cheap drinks and DJs spinning dance tracks when Feruqi’s hosts ladies’ night every Wed. at 9 PM. Free. Be sure you’ve downed enough PBR in order to have the courage to sing “City Baby Attacked by Rats” by Charged GBH, or a similar tune, during Craptastic Karaoke at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. A second night of rock-fueled love from Georgia hits you when epic instrumental post-rockers Maserati hit the Palace with a show at 9 PM. $7. Opening support from Victory Smokes and the Hermans. Fight for the right to belt out a semicoherent version of The Darkness’ “I Believe in a Thing Called Love” every Wed. during Combat Karaoke at Rowdy’s Cabin, 4880 N. Reserve St., at 10 PM. Free. Call 543-8001. Expect a few covers from some rock brotha’s when M-Group kicks out some jams at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

THURSDAY

08

October

Peruse the works of local artisans and perhaps part with a few bucks and a few of their wares during the Homecoming Art Fair in the


University Center Atrium from 9 AM–6 PM. Free. Call 243-5714. If you can’t read this, you may be a baby below the age of 36 months, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program at 10:30 AM every Tue., Thu. and Fri. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Join others as you celebrate what Hispanics have offered to America during a Hispanic Heritage Month celebration at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., starting with piñata decorating from 3–5 PM, followed by a Latin dance performance by Patio Andaluz at 7, along with food sampling and more. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

nightlife Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from 5–7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. All genres are encouraged—excepting, perhaps, kuduro—every Thu. at 5:30 PM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 1/2 South Ave. W., where musicians bring their noise makers and synergy builds a joyful sound during the Tangled Tones Pickin’ Circle. Free. Call 396-3352. Connect your mind and soul to whatever diety you deem divine during a taize chanting circle with Rev. Jennifer Hackenburch and Erin Barnes the second and fourth Thu. of the month at 6 PM at 2237 S. Third St. W. Free. Call 370-9631. Missoula’s middle-aged folk get to revisit the glory of student revelry in the 1970s during two screenings of the Aber Day Kegger Documentary, the first at 6 PM and again at 8:30 PM at the University Theatre. $10. Visit www.aberdaykegger.com. (See Film in this issue.) Teens soak themselves in artistic fervor and collaborative drawing techniques (in order to create a mural) when UM professor Michael Parker leads Teen Open Studio Night from 6–8 PM at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free. Call 728-0447. Find fellowship with others in the comforts of Rhonda Byrne’s The Secret during another installment of the Bitterroot Public Library’s Fellowship Club at 6 PM in the west meeting room of the library, 306 State St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-1670. Get lost in waves of Americana and bluegrass when Missoula’s Bruce Threlkeld picks some strings at the Bitterroot Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-7468. Things might get just a little emotional and slightly alternative when California emo rockers Secondhand Serenade croon a tune at the Wilma Theatre at 7 PM. $22/$20 advance plus fees at Rockin Rudy’s, Ear Candy and www.ticketswest.com. The Audition, Evan Taubenfeld and Rust open. Rock some sweet fiddle solos and bust a move while others shred without use of an amp during Old Timey Music Sessions at Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., at 7:30 PM this and every Thu. through Oct. Free. Call 726-3765.

Charlie Hunter finds that inanimate objects give the best career advice when the New Jersey-based jazz and funk artist plays the Top Hat Fri., Oct. 2, at 8 PM. $17/$15 advance.

A teen’s dual desire for baseball and women contrasts with his parents’ expectations during the UM School of Theatre and Dance’s production of Neil Simon’s Brighton Beach Memoirs which runs Oct. 6–10 at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre in UM’s PARTV Center. $18 general/$14 seniors and students/$8 children 12 and under. Call 243-4581 or visit www.umtheatredance.org. Bring yer guitar, bass or other instrument of choice every Thu. night to The Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, when it holds an open-mic style artists’ showcase at 8 PM. Free. Interested musicians should Call 541-8463. Pop the taco out of your mouth and rock out like a feline when Seattle punkers TacocaT play the ZACC Gallery, 235 N. First St. W., at 8 PM. $5. Mosquito Bandito, Vera and Punchy and the Knockouts open. Bowling and karaoke go together like Iran and world stability during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Sorry ladies, but Thu. nights belong to the dudes at Men’s Night at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where the testosteronefueled karaoke begins at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Bassackwards Karaoke turns your world underside-up every Thu. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on Airway Boulevard. Free. Call 531-8327. Get your fix with Sandy Bradford and Mark Souhrada when they host the jam at Los Caporales in Columbia Falls at 9 PM. Call 892-5025. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip-hop, crunk, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ

Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $3. Blood just might spurt out of your ears, in a good way of course, when Kalispell’s Throne of Malediction and Gnarwail join Missoula’s Mageddon for a night of Montucky metal during Metal Militia night at the Palace at 9 PM. $3. See a plethora of patterns and colors after a few pitchers, and muster up the courage to belt out some classics too, and perhaps win a prize, during Kaleidoscope Karaoke every Tue.–Sun. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9:30 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. Dance with a cougar or two, or not, every Thu. at 10 PM when the James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., hosts The Social Club, featuring DJ Fleege spinning an expansive array of tech house and progressive electro dance tunes. Free. Well, the folks at KBGA really pulled it off this year with their annual Birthday Bash celebration last Friday. If you missed it, well, you missed out. I’d say Portland’s indietronic duo Talkdemonic was the highlight of the soiree, as they had the Badlander packed to the gills for their hour-or-so set. Check it out next year if you get a chance; you won’t be disappointed. On that note, if you’ve got an event that you’d like to have swarming with peeps, please let me know by sending your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Oct. 2, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Playa c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online. Just head to the arts section of our website, scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”

Missoula Independent

Page 29 October 1–October 8, 2009


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Crafted by war Shimomura’s story breaks free in pop art paintings by Ali Gadbow

Artist Roger Shimomura was only 2 when the United States’ government relocated he and his family, along with thousands of other Japanese-Americans, to the Minidoka Relocation Center in the remote high desert site of Hunt, Idaho. The move was part of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066, signed during World War II in an effort to exclude Americans of Japanese, Italian and German descent from certain areas of the West. More than 130,000 people were affected, some of whom ended up at an internment camp at Fort Missoula. Shimomura takes on this shocking slice of American history in his new exhibition at the Missoula

grandmother, who began a diary in 1912—on the day before she left Japan for the United States—and maintained it until her death in 1968. “She constantly filled me with a sense of what it meant to be of Japanese blood,” says Shimomura. Like his grandmother, Shimomura is driven to record and preserve, and he has spent many years collecting artifacts from the internment period, including letters, photographs and artwork produced in the camps. Considering his interests and personal history, it seems natural that Shimomura would explore the internment of Japanese Americans in his art. Much of

“In times of stress our government is capable of doing whatever allays people’s immediate fears,” says Shimomura. “And I would add that in this country, if you look ‘foreign’, you are presumed to be foreign and are then treated accordingly. Guilty till proven innocent.” “Classmates #1,” represents the exhibition’s tone. Two gaily-dressed young girls stand side by side, each holding an apple and smiling. The girl on the left is white, with blue eyes and blonde hair. The girl on the right is Asian. And a barbed wire fence separates the two girls. Because of the flat, comic-book style, the girls catch the viewer’s eye first, and it takes

Roger Shimomura’s Minidoka on My Mind exhibition features postmodern pieces like “Classmates #1,” pictured above. “I was working in comic book fashion at the time, so the change to the influence of Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints was merely a shift of race,” he says.

Art Museum (MAM), titled Minidoka on My Mind. But despite the bleak subject matter, Shimomura presents vibrantly colored and clean-lined paintings that reflect influences ranging from Andy Warhol and superhero comics to Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints. He also employs a forthrightly two-dimensional style, reducing old-fashioned optical tricks like shading or deep perspective to the merest gestures. The pop art of the 1960s famously toyed with the distinction between high art—the stuff that fills museums—and the supposedly inferior products of commercial graphic design, comic book art and illustration. Shimomura continues this tradition, questioning societal concepts of value while asking questions about race, history and politics. “Someone once characterized my work as ‘seeking the deeper meaning of life through comic books,’” says Shimomura. “I am a postmodernist if there ever was one.” Postmodernism, with its unceasing interrogation of perceptions, assumptions and associations, can seem self-indulgent and even dull in an academic setting, but Shimomura’s art distills challenging and even esoteric concepts into deceptively simple imagery. As a child Shimomura was influenced by his

Missoula Independent

Page 30 October 1–October 8, 2009

his material plays with cultural stereotypes and loaded imagery in order to explore Asian American identity, and that terrible episode in America’s history is a necessary part of that exploration. But Shimomura doesn’t want his work to operate simply as a history lesson. “I want to stress that these are paintings and not meant to be illustrations of the camp experience,” he says. “The difference lies in visual challenges that extend beyond mere representation, both visual and conceptual.” On the other hand, Shimomura does have an agenda, and he’ll use art to further it. He believes our nation can’t afford to ignore or forget what happened more than 60 years ago. “The threat of internment continues to remain imminent,” he says, citing hostage situations in Iran, Operation Desert Storm and 9/11. “In all [of these] cases the government talked about possible internment of Middle Eastern and Arab people living in the U.S. then allowing them to prove their innocence.” Shimomura’s message is serious. It cuts to the heart of our nation’s uneasy balance between the pursuits of liberty and equality and the desire to protect against real or perceived threats, and it reminds us that some things have not changed in those 60-plus years.

a moment to register the barbed wire crossing in front of the Asian girl’s face. Barbed wire serves as a simple but effective statement in many of the paintings, just visible in the background of some pieces and marching across the foreground of others. Minidoka on My Mind will serve as the basis for this year’s Fifth Grade Art Experience, and Missoula students will visit the Historical Museum at Fort Missoula as part of their learning experience. Fort Missoula, like Minidoka, was the site of a World War II “Relocation Center.” Shimomura hopes the connection between his art and internment history strikes a chord with people here. “It should resonate [in Missoula],” says Shimomura, “however it wouldn’t amaze me if a significant number [of people] had still not heard of what happened during WWII. It all depends upon your history books.” Roger Shimomura delivers the Distinguished Artists Lecture at the Missoula Children’s Theater Thursday, Oct. 1, at 7 PM. $5. Shimomura appears at an artist reception and gallery talk at MAM Friday, Oct. 2, from 5–8 PM. Free. arts@missoulanews.com


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Brother Ali Us

Rhymesayers Records

Already known for deft storytelling, Brother Ali’s latest proves the Minneapolis MC is at the head of the pack when it comes to candid, tell-itlike-it-is rhymes. Brother Ali is also maturing fast into adulthood, as illustrated in “Fresh Air,” where he spits low-key rhymes about buying a house and getting remarried, and on “Games,” as he chastises old friends for slinging drugs on the street instead of holding down a steady job. And, true to its title, Us isn’t as focused on Ali’s

No-Fi Soul Rebellion

Oh Please Please Please The Glad Sound

Let’s get the obvious out of the way: You can’t beat the experience of seeing No-Fi Soul Rebellion perform live. Mark Heimer thrives off-stage and in the crowd, belting out lines and sweating in your face while backed by pre-recorded pop-errific tracks embedded in a hollowed-out guitar held by his wife and back-up singer, Andrea Heimer. It’s wild. That said, Oh Please Please Please, more than any other No-Fi album, doesn’t need the live theatrics; it’s deliciously addictive on its own. “But We Always Set Up on the Floor” is a clap-happy nod to the band’s live MO. “Brother Lupine” showcases vocal tuning at its best without delving too much into Cher-like

Red Fang Red Fang Sargent House

You’re missing out if you haven’t seen the video directed by Whitey McConnaughy of Red Fang’s “Prehistoric Dog.” But even without the imagery of the band donning beer-can armor to demolish a group of Society for Creative Anachronism dudes, the song is a heavy duty gem. Besides “Preshistoric Dog,” the band’s eponymous album sports titles like “Night Destroyer,” “Bird On Fire” and “Wings of Fang,” and its galloping guitar and distorted bass makes it the perfect soundtrack to a Viking battle. But not just any Viking

Pearl Jam Backspacer Monkeywrench, Inc.

It takes Pearl Jam all of 37 minutes to remind listeners of one thing: It’s among the best bands of this generation. Perhaps you knew that already, but I didn’t. At least, I didn’t fully acknowledge it until hearing the band mostly sprint through 11 new tracks on their latest effort, Backspacer. No song longer than 4 minutes, no huge surprises and no self-indulgence— just a brisk, no-nonsense, solid anthem-rock album with more than a few candidates for classic status. “Gonna See My Friend,” “Got Some” and “The Fixer” set a breakneck, punk-fueled tempo. Each features Eddie Vedder at his throatiest, delivering tremulous angst alongside radio-friendly hooks like the repeated growl of “I wanna fight to get it back again” on “The Fixer.”

life, but rather on the stories of friends and fictional characters. It’s a satisfying shift that works with perfect devastation on “Tight Rope,” in which he analyzes the struggles of three characters—a Somali immigrant, a child of a divorce and a gay teen—and finds certain commonalities in their struggles. Beyond its lyrical clout, Us suffers from musical tameness. Producer Ant delivers a handful of admirable beats, but the repetitive nature of his soul and R&B influence doesn’t sustain much interest. Besides those hiccups, Ali keeps the album afloat by doing what he does best: rocking unpretentious rhymes that touch on the human experience through his fervent narratives. (Ira Sather-Olson) Brother Ali plays the Palace at 9 PM on Sun., Oct. 4, with Evidence, Toki Wright and BK One. $15 advance. robotics. The spooky synth and blunt dance beats make it perhaps the only song since “Thriller” that encourages the idea of a choreographed line dance in a graveyard. Heimer has a way with lyrics—never too heavy-handed or obvious, but not pretentious either. His Prince-inspired dance pop balances nicely with his edgy scoldings about things like trash-talking, conformity and intolerance. Heimer has an almost positive rap way about him. But when he belts out straightforward lines like, ‘I’m a sucker for a better life,” his sincerity never eclipses his badass style. (Erika Fredrickson) No-Fi Soul Rebellion plays the Palace Friday, Oct. 2, at 9 PM with Boy Eats Drum Machine and Bacon & Egg. $5.

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battle—one that involves mythical events like flying on the back of a fire-breathing dragon. All in all, the album’s epic sound keeps it cohesive, but each track is diverse enough to stay fresh. “Reverse Thunderstorm” spirals into a hurricane of angular guitars and a muddy storm of drums and bass. “Whales and Leeches” weds slo-mo rhythms with chiming riffs as creepy as hell’s version of a lullaby. It’s a monstrous patchwork of old Metallica-style roughage, grunge coolness and Melvins’ sludge, without being derivative. Though, while listening to the album recently a friend of mine said, “This is what the Melvins wish they could do.” Oh, snap! I hate to say it, but it might be true. (Erika Fredrickson) Red Fang plays the Palace Tuesday, Sept. 29, at 9 PM with Kylesa, Saviours and Sunshine for Orphans. $12/$10 advance. Check off “Unthought Known” as the obligatory torch song. With a nicely placed piano, it hits the same dramatic highs as anything from Ten or Vs. “Just Breathe” and “The End” do the same for those yearning for acoustic Vedder laments (and manage to overcome the unfortunate inclusion of orchestral strings). I didn’t realize until after listening to Backspacer that I now own every Pearl Jam album. I never meant to follow the band. I just always fell victim to the hits or wanted to hear the latest iteration. Backspacer delivers a subtle reminder that I should be paying a little more attention to a band that continues to stand the test of time. (Skylar Browning)

Missoula Independent

Page 31 October 1–October 8, 2009


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Flimsy design Clumsy concept unravels Barbieri’s novel by Azita Osanloo

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Missoula Independent

Page 32 October 1–October 8, 2009

In her new novel, The Lace Makers of the lace-making ladies of Glenmara, the women Glenmara, Heather Barbieri tells a story that many themselves celebrate the opportunity to make somewomen tend to enjoy. It is the perseverance story— thing other than tea towels and doilies. about a young, educated woman from middle class The problem with The Lace Makers of circumstances who overcomes heartbreak, betrayal Glenmara is not that it’s inspired by other novels and professional setback before finally achieving with similar heroines and similar narrative arcs; the love (better than before) and the American dream trouble is that Barbieri leans so heavily on the blue(better than anything she could have imagined). This print of the tea-and-sympathy novel that her own achievement comes with the help of a group of crafty work fails to tell any story in its own right. As a result, women who have suffered betrayals and losses in each plot point is as predictably cloying as the next. their own rights. It’s the tea-and-sympathy genre Kate and Bernie form a mother-daughter bond (think How to Make an immediately. Kate picks up American Quilt, Chocolat, the intricate skill of lacemakThe Friday Night Knitting ing (more or less) immediateClub, Calendar Girls, etc., ly. It takes Kate less than a etc.), heartwarming stories of few hundred words to fall in women coming together to love with her brooding artist help other women—often by (later, they’ll resolve their sinmaking use of their own gle conflict—over his dead industrious handiwork. fiancée—in just as few Barbieri’s heroine, Kate words). The priest who Robinson, is a 26-year-old objects to Kate’s presence is aspiring fashion designer who transferred out of town not has just lost her boyfriend, long after his parishioners Ethan, of five years. In a flashturn against his reactionary back, we’re told how Ethan views. For a novel that seemdumped Kate, leaving her for ingly wants to take us one of Kate’s models, “a girl through a journey of persewith black hair and pale skin verance, its narrative arc and aquamarine eyes and a moves as swimmingly as the sizable trust fund.” (The fish in the bay off Glenmara’s model also speaks five lancoast. The Lace Makers of Glenmara guages, plays the violin and Heather Barbieri In moments where fences at the championship hardcover, Harper there’s a glimmer of originalilevel.) Adding insult to injury, 288 pages, $24.99 ty—a rocky bay that’s haunted Kate’s debut line is not selling by the ghosts of those who and her agent gives her the cold shoulder, flippantly died in the famine, a plot point that revisits the 2005 telling her she needs to try something “high con- terrorist attack in the London Underground— cept.” A gal knows when it’s time to high tail it out Barbieri shuffles along hastily without allowing any of Manhattan, so Kate takes off for Ireland, land of potential nuance to develop, giving the impression her ancestors, for an indefinite period. By doing so, that she’s more concerned with hitting her plot she is fulfilling a promise to her mother, who suc- points than she is with actual storytelling. cumbed to cancer before the time of the novel, leavIn one moment, near the novel’s halfway point, ing Kate at a loss for maternal comfort, just when she Kate reflects on her failed clothing line. She’d been sorely needs it. “too busy reworking the concept, trying to get it After almost a month in Ireland, Kate finds her- right, until she gave up and hung the garments on self, quite by accident, in the tiny hamlet of the racks…in the end the pieces were only a poor Glenmara, a town known—if it’s known at all—for its imitation of the latest runway darling…What had fishermen, its fire-and-brimstone parish priest and she been thinking? Why hadn’t she been true to her its lace. She’s quickly adopted by Bernie, a widow vision…?” still in mourning for her late husband, who conIn light of Barbieri’s own imitative tendency, the vinces Kate to stay with her and join the lace-making moment is sadly ironic. Snow in July (Soho Press group that regularly meets at her house. Each of the 2005), Barbieri’s debut novel about two sisters from women in the group comes with her own personal Butte, exhibited a freshness that’s nonexistent in this tribulations: Aileen is estranged from her daugher; second work, leaving one to wonder if Barbieri herMoira is in denial about her abusive husband; Oona self became too busy “reworking a concept.” is in remission from breast cancer; Colleen is wor- Though The Lace Makers of Glenmara might ried about her missing husband. Over tea and lace, remind us of other novels we’ve loved, it’s a poor the women share their worries with one another— imitation best left on the shelf. and their skills with Kate. In their comforting presHeather Barbieri presents The Lace Makers ence, Kate extends her stay and eventually resurrects of Glenmara at a luncheon at the Holiday Inn her love life (with a brooding artist named Sullivan Downtown at the Park Saturday, Oct. 3, at 11:30 Deane), as well as her flagging career by designing a AM. $16 advance. Call Fact & Fiction 721-2881. line of exquisite lingerie with her new skills. Though arts@missoulanews.com the local priest objects to the outsider’s influence on


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Kegger caked in beer mud nostalgia by Andy Smetanka

If you’ve lived in Missoula for any time at all, weight solidly behind it. Missoula banks donated you’ve probably heard people grousing about how one teller apiece to stack and count the massive piles much better it used to be and how much it’s of ones and fives collected at the gates. One veteran changed, generally for the worse. Among Missoula’s organizer recalls getting a second chance on a failing ex-hippie baby boomer elite, it seems generally grade in history from no less a figure than K. Ross agreed upon that the Golden Age began as soon as Toole, who was so pleased with what the kegger they arrived (a window of roughly 10 years from meant for the library—hundreds of thousands in 1968 to 1978), and ended somewhere around 1981. today’s dollars—that he administered a brief one-onThey’re endearingly vain about it, some of them, but one oral exam and passed the fellow with a B+. in a new documentary about that era’s great The yearly tradition ended when the mounting Missoula shared experience—the Aber Day Kegger— cost of staging the festival overtook the proceeds it one can see what all the fuss is about. Kegger is a generated, going out gracefully if to much lamentaone-of-a-kind window into this fabled golden era. tion. In Kegger, you get a taste of what it was like to Before seeing Kegger, it brought my mind to a stand in a May-green valley, watching the Nitty Gritty halt, trying to picture an outdoor stein-hoist with Dirt Band and drinking beer out of a muddy pitcher, 10,000 people, 1,000 kegs of beer—yes, one thou- surrounded by 10,000 people all wearing the same sand—and a handful of cops on horseback able to keep the peace with just a few firm shoulder-pats here and there, all of this spang in the middle of a scantly inhabited Miller Creek. Many of the organizers and participants interviewed in Kegger seem scarcely to believe it happened, either, and not just once, but once a year for nearly a decade. From 1972 to 1979, the Aber Day Kegger was Missoula’s Missoula’s Aber Day Kegger was the Woodstock of Montana. biggest party, the biggest benefit beer-blast in the world. It was in Guinness. Its repu- flannel shirt. Kegger is a solid, well-made documentation reached far and wide, and toward the end of tary—if nothing groundbreaking in its basic the run, the party drew young hitchhikers and VW approach—but it benefits enormously from a trove bus caravans from every state. The live entertain- of archival footage, some of it shot quite beautifully, ment graduated from local acts (Black Cat Bone! in color and with good sound, of today’s grandparSweet Smoke!) to top national talent like Heart, ents when they were still in their 20s and partying Jimmy Buffett and Bonnie Raitt, though local boys their faces off. the Mission Mountain Wood Band were always the Other traces of this bygone era are everywhere. sweethearts of the rodeo. The famous “A Place, Sort Of ” T-shirt from Rockin Kegger’s interviewees talk about beer-slides Rudy’s with the flying platypus creature is one examdown grassy hills, thoroughly befouled porta-potties ple; ask any of its co-creators about its shadowy oriand kissing complete strangers while standing ankle gins and you’ll get only chuckles and vague illicitdeep in beer mud waiting for refills. (After a messy substance innuendo. Another of the era’s living fosfirst go of things up Deer Creek, the organizers of sils (just teasing!) is Monte Dolack, official artist of this remarkably streamlined event banned plastic the Kegger and all its posters, beer labels and relatcups and glass, instead selling bottomless plastic ed ephemera. As grateful owner of all three issues of pitchers that made excellent souvenirs when the Missoula Comix (yet more relics of the age, with art party was over.) I agree completely with those inter- by Dolack and the equally old-school Dirk Lee), I viewed for the movie who believe you could never have to bite my tongue when visiting relations start do anything like it now. cooing over displays of Dolack prints and greeting It wasn’t completely utopian, however. Drunk cards to keep from telling them about the naughty driving accidents—one gets the impression that giant space penis that violates planet Earth in #3. open-container laws back then were never enforced (Strange, I haven’t been able to find it on a card.) and people actually preferred to drive drunk— The Aber Day Kegger has been gone for 30 weren’t much of a problem with cars backed up for years, and perhaps with it halcyon days of an exclumiles trying to leave, but former organizers acknowl- sive sort, but much of what Kegger says about the edge the deleterious effects of turning 10,000 drunk Missoula of 1979 rings just as true in 2009. Women’s people loose on the town afterwards, squatting and hair and men’s beard styles have hardly changed, for screwing in every yard along lower Miller Creek once starters. And souvenir pitchers to prevent litter and the bands stopped playing and the kegs ran dry. not waste plastic? Sigh. So Missoula, or anyway it Perhaps the most extraordinary thing about the still should be. Aber Day Kegger is that this singularly rumbustious, Kegger screens at the University Theatre un-universitylike drinking event was always staged Thursday, Oct. 8, at 6 PM and 8:30 PM. $10. to benefit the school library, and, with notable arts@missoulanews.com exceptions, the school and community put their

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Missoula Independent

Page 33 October 1–October 8, 2009


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OPENING THIS WEEK HUMPDAY Two college buddies drunkenly agree to star in a porn video contest, but realize they’ll be the only stars on the screen. Wilma Theatre: 7 and 9, and 7 only on Fri., Sat. and Thu. with Sun. matinees at 1 and 3. THE INVENTION OF LYING Ricky Gervais stars as a supreme bs’r in a world where no one lies, but will his fibs work on an unsuspecting lady? Carmike 10: 4:10, 7:15 and 9:40 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:25. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:05, 2:40, 5, 7:25 and 9:45 with Sun. show at 8:05 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:05, 3:25, 5:45 and 8:05. STAR TREK Captain Kirk and his brethren are back in this 21st century redux as they work to contain a deadly supernova and wage battle against Nero. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 6:50 and 9:30 with Sat.–Sun. show at 1:45. TOY STORY AND TOY STORY 2 IN 3-D Two toys vie for affection from their owner by duking it out in these revamped, double-header kids flicks, now in 3-D. Carmike 10: 4:40, 7:35 and 8:20 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 12:15, 1 and 3:55. Pharaoplex in Hamilton: 7 PM only with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at noon, 4 and 8 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 2 and 6:30. WHIP IT Juno’s Ellen Page is back as a small town Texan looking to bust some kneecaps as a roller derby girl in Austin. Village 6: 7 and 9:30 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:15 and 4:30. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 1, 3:50, 7 and 9:35 with Sun. show at 7:40 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 2:20, 5 and 7:40. ZOMBIELAND Woody Harrelson plays a gun toting, redneck southerner who takes pleasure in seeing zombie guts splatter on walls. Village 6: 7:40 and 9:50 with additional Sat.–Sun shows at 1:10, 3:20 and 5:30. Pharaoplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinee at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:15, 2:35, 4:45, 7:20 and 9:40 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:55, 4:05, 6:15 and 8:15.

NOW PLAYING 9 Tim Burton helps create a rad, post-apocalyptic hell where little mutants called stitchpunks fight for survival against menacing machines. Carmike 10: 5, 7 and 9:15 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1 and 3. Stadium 14: Fri.–Sun. at 12:10, 2:45, 4:45, 6:50 and 8:50 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:40, 3:50, 6:05 and 8:10. ALL ABOUT STEVE Sandra Bullock plays a socially awkward, obsessive wordsmith who follows television camera slinger

Bradley Cooper around on his beat, trying to snare his heart in this cornball rom-com. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:25 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 1:30, 3:50, 6:40 and 9 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:15, 3:25, 5:40 and 8. CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS Food falls from the sky and Bruce Campbell hacks away at a vocal cameo in this 3-D animated kids flick. Carmike 10: 5:30, 7:40 and 9:50 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1 and 3:15. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:10, 2:25, 4:55, 7:05 and 9:05 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:30, 3:45, 6:05 and 8:15.

Somebody forgot to have their morning cup of coffee. Zombieland opens Friday at the Village 6.

Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:15 with Sat.–Sun. show at 1:30. DISTRICT 9 Peter Jackson produces a film about refugee aliens controlled by a multi-national corporation that cares only about making profits. Village 6: 7:10 and 9:45 with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 1:45 and 4:20. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4, 7 and 9:15. FAME Teens fight for artistic supremacy and good grades from Kelsey Grammer in this remake of the Oscar-winning original. Carmike 10: 4:35, 7:10 and 9:40 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45. Pharaoplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 1, 4, 6:55 and 9:30 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 2:05, 4:35 and 7:35. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:15 with Sat.–Sun. show at 1:30.

Bitterroot

Here comes fall in a big way! The radical shift in the weather today may make for a bit of a slowdown but you never know, it could be off the hook too. Once the colder weather is solidly in place, though, the blue wings and mahoganies will begin in earnest and the eagerly anticipated fall dryfly fishing will be upon us. Right now is transition time when the hoppers will still be viable but the fishes' focus will begin to focus on the fall mayfly hatches. There are still fall gray drakes around so having a variety of mayfly patterns in various sizes and life stages will be a necessity. On average, though, a size 14 cripple or parachute will be a good place to begin. Look for the streamer action to pick up BIG TIME on the lower 'root in the cooler, cloudy weather. It's almost always an olive colored deal down there this time of year. Can you say BUNNIES?? Tandem nymph rigs or tiny size 18 mayfly nymph droppers off your dries will be very effective all day long as well.

Blackfoot

Missoula Independent

with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:30 and 6:30 and Mon.–Thu. at 4. JENNIFER’S BODY A stuck-up teen turns into a blood lusting, nympho demon, but her best friend hoards her prey. Village 6: 7 and 9:30 with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 1:30 and 4:15. Pharaoplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 3:55 and 9:45 with Fri.–Sat. shows at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:20 and 7:50. JULIE & JULIA This adaptation of two memoirs revolve around cooking, blogging about cooking and the quest to become a culinary master, all thanks to cookbooks by Julia Child. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:25, 3:40, 6:40 and 9:25 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:35, 4:25 and 7:25. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with Sat.–Sun. matinee at 3 and no 9:10

show Sun. Showboat in Polson: 4:15, 6:50 and 9:10. LOVE HAPPENS Jennifer Aniston slings flowers and is bitter about love, but a chance encounter with a self-help guru just might help her score. Carmike 10: 4:20, 7:05 and 9:40 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1:40. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 1:15, 3:55, 6:45 and 9:15 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:50, 4:50 and 7:50. MY ONE AND ONLY Renée Zellweger plays a 1950s gold digger on the hunt for a sugar daddy to take care of her and her kids. Wilma Theatre: 7 and 9:05, and 9:05 only on Fri., Sat. and Thu. and Sun. matinees at 1 and 3:05. PANDORUM Dennis Quaid and Ben Foster wake up from a blackout on a spaceship, only to realize they’ve gotta snuff out a disease before it nabs them. Village 6: 7 and 9:30 with additional Sat.–Sun shows at 1:30 and 4:20. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 1:10, 4:10, 7:10 and 9:40 and midnight shows Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 2, 4:40 and 7:45. A PERFECT GETAWAY Steve Zahn and Milla Jovovich head to Hawaii for some honeymoon fun, but their plans get spoiled when they run into hikers who warn them of a recent murder. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30 with Sat.–Sun. show at 1:45. SURROGATES Bruce Willis rocks a fitting role as an FBI agent who abandons his robotic proxy in order to avenge a killer. Carmike 10: 5:35, 7:45 and 9:55 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1:15 and 3:25. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:20, 1:20, 2:30, 3:45, 4:50, 6:15, 7:15, 8:30 and 9:45 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:10, 2:10, 3:20, 4:30, 5:30, 6:40 and 7:40. WHITEOUT Kate Beckinsale’s a badass female U.S. Marshal stationed in Antarctica trying to solve the continent’s first murder, while also fending off a killer. Entertainer in Ronan: 4, 7 and 9:05. Capsule reviews by Ira Sather-Olson. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., Oct. 2. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6–5417469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in H a m i l t o n – 9 61- F I L M ; R ox y Tw i n i n H a m i l t o n – 36 3 - 5141 . S t a d i u m 14 i n Kalispell–752-7804. Showboat in Polson, Enter tainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.

The Kingfisher’s Weekly Fishing Report: Week of Sept 24th.

This fishing report brought to you by

926 East Broadway 721-6141 kingfisherflyshop.com

THE INFORMANT! Matt Damon plays a nerdish whistleblower who realizes his story doesn’t quite hold water when the FBI finds some skeletons in his closet. Village 6: 7:15 and 9:55 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:45 and 4:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 1:05, 4:05, 6:35 and 9:10 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:45, 4:45 and 7:55. INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS Brad Pitt aims to kick some serious Nazi ass with his Jewish war buddies in this latest offering from Quentin Tarantino. Carmike 10: 4:10 and 7:20

Read the “additional info” section @ www.kingfisherflyshop.com/missoula-hatch-reports to learn how you

could win a $3,000 shopping spree from The Kingfisher. Here comes the shift to the smaller bugs! Don't give up on the bigger attractors just yet, though, this river will keep on producing on way out of place size bugs well into mid October. Big yellow stimulators in a 10, Turck's Tarrantulas, etc . . will all remain viable for some time yet. Do expect to see more of the smaller aquatic critters out and about like the mahoganies and baetis. Odds are, any rising fish you see will be on one of those two bugs. Unlike the Clark or Bitterroot, though, a good drift over rising fish with the aforementioned oversized stuff will generally do the trick. In typical fall fashion, the Blackfoot should also begin to give it up MUCH more consistently on streamers over the next month. While it won't be the "fall brown trout extravaganza" everybody expects streamers to produce this time of the year, you should have a good mix of all species willing to participate. There is still a LOT of good fishing to be had on this river yet.

Clark Fork

No real wind to speak of and humid, cloudy weather bodes well for your Clark prospects today. There may be a slight stall in the madcap fishing today because of the transition day aspect, but we think it'll still be pret-

ty good anyway. Once this weather sets in, we expect it to be VERY good!! Baetis and mahoganies will be the name of the game although bigger mayflies to imitate the fall drakes will still be viable too. The tricos will come to an abrupt end in the cooler weather, but the streamer fishing should come on strong to make up for it. This is the time of year when the Clark Fork fish can get REALLY REALLY picky, so make sure you have a variety of sizes and life stages of your target bugs. We've always found color to be way less important than having a cripple, vs a parachute, a sparkle dun vs a comparadun, etc. You should have equally good fishing along the length of the river. Don't overlook fishing parachute hoppers for the nocturnal goldens. This time of year, one of these with an 18 p-tail dropper can be flat out wrong!

Rock Creek

Good stuff on tap for the creek with the new weather pattern. The slow down that had been taking place the past 4 or 5 days should be brought to a halt with the cooler, cloudy weather. Look for the fish to be more willing to come to the surface again and expect the streamer fishing to ramp up as well. Like the other rivers, Rock Creek will begin to fish primarily with fall

mayfly patterns like gray drakes, baetis and mahoganies. Smaller saltwater clousers are one of our favorite "streamers" up here this time of year but lots of different stuff should begin working well. Tandem nymph rigs are a no brainer and a variety of stuff from tiny mayfly profile nymphs to robust stones will be effective. While you may see rising fish here and there, don't sweat it if you don't. If you cast it, they will come!

Missouri

Damn it's been a windy affair over here lately! Unfortunately, it looks like there's going to be at least a couple more days like that before it gets better. On the plus side, however, the clouds and cooler temps are starting to move in which should make for some much more consistent dryfly action once the wind lets up. Look for a baetis extravaganza in calmer conditions as well as even better nymphing action than what's been going on the past couple of weeks. This is also a really good time of the year to run streamers in dedicated fashion for some of the biggest fish of the year Once we get a break in the wind, things are going to get CRAZY good over here.

W i n s t o n R o d s - y o u ' r e n o t N E A R LY a s g o o d a p e r s o n w i t h o u t o n e .

Page 34 October 1–October 8, 2009


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Build A Recycled Recumbent or 4 Wheel Bike- Free Build a Bike Group-Meets Weekly @ Missoula Free Cycles, 732 S. 1st St W., SATURDAYS 2:30pm, Please call to RSVP & for other meeting times. Group Contact “Bob Ruby” @ 800-809-0112 See Group @ http://missoulaareaevents.ning.c om Must Volunteer for 2 hrs at local free cycles. Call for Hrs: Free Cycles Office 406- 541-PATH (7284)

LOST AND FOUND Digital Camera Found Sunday 9/20 at Avalanche Lake Trail, Glacier NP. Digital camera in case. Please call to describe & claim. Rhonda 406.431.9866

FOUND: Bike bike and other items found on spruce downtown. call 531-4800 or 531-6119 to claim Stolen DOG Stolen dog on Sun. Sept. 20 on Mullan Rd. Her name is Tilly and is pointer/pitbull. 1.5 yrs old She is black and white and we miss her very much and would like her back please help 239-3419

TO GIVE AWAY LOTS & LOTS OF CLOTHES! All sizes. Please call 728-0889

VOLUNTEERS Looking for a volunteer position in your community? Visit the Western Montana Volunteer Center web site at www.volunteer.umt.edu for openings around the area. McIntosh Apple Day Festival is coming Saturday, Oct. 10th!! We need volunteers to for the following days: Thursday, October 1st – Frozen pie making – Bring your rolling pin! Wednesday, October 7th – Apple peeling and baking prep Thursday, October 8th – Apple pie assembly, baking and moving pies Saturday, October 10th – Apple day booths We are also in need of pint size, commercial mason jars with lids that are in good condition. Donations will be greatly appreciated. For more information, please call Ravalli County Museum at 363- -3338 Volunteer Tutors Needed! Do you want to make a difference in a child’s life? Become a McKinney tutor! WORD is currently seeking volunteers to work with homeless and at-risk children, K-8th grade. McKinney tutors are changing the world, one child at a time. Be a part of that change and call today! Contact Kimberly Apryle for further information (406)5433550x227 or visit www.wordinc.org

Partners Hospice Seeks Volunteers For Training Missoula’s only nonprofit and nationally accredited Hospice seeks volunteers to serve in a variety of capacities including companionship for patients who are at the end of their life, respite for caregivers and administrative duties in the office. Hospice volunteering is a rich and rewarding experience and compassionate, dependable individuals are encouraged to apply. Volunteer training provides participants an exploration of hospice services.

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October 6th- Octbober 22nd Tuesday & Thursday evenings 6-9 PM Contact Judy White: whitej@partnersinhomecare.org • 327-3657 Partners In Home Care is co-founded by Community Medical Center & St Patrick’s Hospital & Health Sciences Center


ADVICE GODDESS

EMPLOYMENT ! BARTENDING ! $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training provided. 1-800-965-6520 ext. 278 BOOKSELLER, P/T, Msla. Employer is seeking part-time BOOKSELLERS for nationally known bookstore. Duties include handling customer sales, stocking shelves, straightening shelves, setting up displays, and light cleaning. Open availability a plus. Rate of pay is dependent on experience. Enjoyment of reading and working with people is very necessary!!! #2976340 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 CHINKING LABORERS, F/T, Msla. Seeking an experienced full-time CHINKING LABORER, which will require some travel. Pay is $9.00/hr, or more DOE. #2976357 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 DELIVERY DRIVER-PART TIME, P/T, Msla. Seeking a mature individual to work as a part time delivery driver in Missoula. Pay starts at $9.00 an hour. #2976363 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 Human Resource Assistant Employment A, F/T, Msla. Partial description: The predominant work performed will be to provide assistance to customers with use of personal computers available at the local office resource room, oversee a self-administered testing process, administer specialized tests when requested; and, provide select employment services to applicants by conducting brief interviews to review job seeker registration forms, assure legibility and completeness of forms, and request clarification as needed. Performs some reception and administrative duties using knowledge of Job Service and Department policies and procedures as well as computer skills. #9807606 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 LEAD TELLER - Bank, F/T, Msla. Seeking an experienced bank teller to work as LEAD TELLER for a Missoula area bank. Entry level pay starts at $12.46/hr and benefits. Full Job description available at Missoula Job Service Front Desk. #2976358. 728-7060 MEDICAL OFFICE RECEPTIONIST, F/T, Msla. Opportunity for person with minimum one year medical receptionist office experience. Must know Medassist software program, also Office Hours program. Duties include general office skills such as filing, multiline phone, data entry, photo copying and managing the appointment calendar. Must be groomed for public contact. Work is MondayFriday, 8-5. Wage is $8.00 an hour. Paid vacation and health insurance available. #2976345 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060

bilities in your area. Murphy Business and Financial Corporation at 877-683-0410. PACK YOUR BAGS! FUN TRAVEL JOB! Can you travel 52 weeks a year? Now hiring 17-23 sharp guys and gals. Seeking enthusiastic, sharp beginners. Start today! 30 day paid training! Paid daily and weekly plus bonuses. Transportation and hotel provided. Call 1-877-872-8819 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. mytraveljob.com RECEPTIONIST, P/T, Msla. Local Law Firm is seeking a Part Time RECEPTIONIST to work 20-25 hours per week, Monday-Friday. Shift will be approximately 10:00am-3:00pm but is somewhat flexible. Ideal applicant will have at least 6 months previous office and phone experience, but employer is willing to train. Pay will be between $7.00 and $10.00 per hour, depending on experience. Duties will include answering phones, transferring incoming calls, taking messages, filing, scheduling appointments and other general office duties as assigned. #2976366 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 RELIEF HOUSE MANAGER, P/T, Msla. Seeking Relief House Managers to fill in as needed at an addiction services organization’s residential facility for females. Pay is 10.50/hour. Shifts will be on call: day, swing & graveyard, variable days & hours per week. #2976360 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 RV DELIVERY DRIVERS NEEDED. Deliver RVs, boats and trucks for PAY! Deliver to all 48 states and Canada. For details log onto www.RVdeliveryjobs.com STATE OF MONTANA POSITIONS, FT & PT, Various locations throughout Montana: Want to serve Montana citizens? Positions are available for locations throughout the state. Access the state job listings at: http://mt.gov/statejobs/statejobs.asp

SKILLED LABOR FARMERS UNION OIL has employment opening with potential for advancement. Experience, CDL Haz Mat a plus. Wages DOE. Benefits include vacation, 401K, health insurance. Send application, resumes, references to Farmers Union Oil, Box 460, Circle, MT 59215 MACHINE TOOL OPERATOR, F/T, Msla. The USDA Forest Service in Missoula is seeking a full-time machine tool operator. Rate of pay is $21.72/hr. Position closes on 10/01/09. #2976339 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060

Mystery Shoppers earn up to $150 Day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail and dining establishments. Experience not required. Call 877-308-1186

MONTANA BASED TRUCKING COMPANY is looking for quality owner operators. Western 7, coast to coast or Midwest. Dedicated runs available. Call 406-266-4210

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STAFF DEVELOPMENT INSTRUCTOR – FT position responsible for ensuring necessary training, tracking of certifications & develop new trainings for staff providing services to individuals with DD. 1yr exp teaching and/or training. Must maintain confidentiality. M – F: 8a – 5p. $10.50/hr. Closes Tu: 10/6/09, 5pm. CSW 1:1 – PT position providing 1:1 support in a vocational/community setting. Exp working w/adults w/DD. M – F: 10a – 2p. $9.25/hr. Closes Tu: 10/6/09, 5pm. Exc. Benefits including: generous amount of paid time off, retirement, medical & dental insurance, etc, plus the privilege of working with professional and caring fellow staff. Valid MT Driver’s License. No Record of Abuse, Neglect/Exploitation. Applications available at OPPORTUNITY RESOURCES, INC., 2821 S. Russell, Missoula, MT 59801. Extensive background checks will be completed. NO RESUMES. EOE.

courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1800-545-4546

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION CONSTRUCTION No exp needed. Paid training, good salary & benefits, vacation, $$ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call MonFri 800-437-6044 FIREFIGHTER Paid training to join elite U.S. Navy team. Good pay, medical/dental, promotions, vacation. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-887-0952 GOVT JOBS HS grads ages 1734. Financial secu-rity, great benefits, paid training, 30 days vacation/yr, travel. Call Mon-Fri 877-475-6289 PAID APPRENTICE HS grads ages 17-34. Electronics, engineering, communications, etc. Great benefits. Relocation avail. Call Mon-Fri 800-887-0952 WAREHOUSING TRAINEE Good pay, regular raises, great benefits, $ for school, vacation. No exp needed. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 877-475-6289 WELDER APPRENTICE Paid training in all aspects of welding. Great pay, benefits, vacation, regular raises. HS grads ages 1734. Call Mon-Fri 800-887-0952

HEALTH CAREERS Case Manager People Person: Busy Wellness Center looking for a Full-time Case Manager that loves to talk to strangers. Job entails performing health screenings (on the job training provided), setting up lectures and other activities. Will manage several employees and produce weekly statistical reports: basic accounting and finance knowledge required. (proficiency in MS Excel, Word required). Knowledge of Quickbooks a plus.

Requires high degree of critical thinking, independent decisionmaking, organizational skills and ability to identify and prioritize tasks. Pay based on production and ability. Some weekends required. If you love helping others, please email resume to burdulisc@yahoo.com CNA, F/T, Msla. Missoula long term care facility needs CNAs for all shifts. Candidates need at least 6 months experience. Must be available for weekends. Pay is $9.30/hr. Business is on bus line. #2976338 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 PUBLIC HEALTH NURSE, F/T, Msla. Missoula County is seeking a regular, full-time PUBLIC HEALTH NURSE to perform professional level duties in the field of public health nursing.Current license to practice as a registered professional nurse in Montana and a current Montana Driver’s License. #2976346 Missoula Workforce Center 728-060 RNs and LPNs, F/T & P/T, Msla. ATTENTION NURSES: Are you looking for unique inspirational employment with flexibility? Advancement opportunities based on job performance. LPNs are paid up to $18.50/hour and RNs are paid up to $21.50/hour. Various shifts and days are available. #2976359 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

OPPORTUNTIES ALL CASH VENDING! Earn up to $800/Day Potential? Your own local vending route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy for $9,995. 1-888-776-3068 COMPUTER WORK. Work from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1,500 Part-Time to $7,500/month FullTime. Training provided. www.rdmoremoneynow.com or call 1-800-934-3294 HELP WANTED. Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 h t t p : / / w w w. e a s y w o r k greatpay.com

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Do you love the Missoula Independent? Are you an enthusiastic, motivated, self-starter? Then we want to talk to you! The Missoula Independent is looking for an Account Executive for magazine, newspaper and online ad sales. Requires strong organization and communication skills. Media sales experience preferred, BUT NOT REQUIRED. Great benefits and work environment.

Send resume and a cover letter SELLING YOURSELF to: pkearns@missoulanews.com or to PO Box 8275, Missoula 59807

By Amy Alkon

SEITAN WORSHIPPER My online dating profile clearly indicates that I’m a vegan. A woman I’ve been communicating with informed me that she eats a healthy diet, but enjoys meat and fish. Fine with me, but our first phone conversation became an inquisition about whether I would attempt to make her a vegetarian. She compared it to trying to convert someone to another religion. She got intense about it, despite my insistence that I don’t proselytize. I finally conceded a belief that vegans are more evolved from a spiritual standpoint. She really went off about this, insisting that she wasn’t about to let anybody change her. At one point, she even said that letting my cat go outside was as cruel as factory farming. Most amazingly, this happened after numerous pleasant e-mails. —Stunned We all have certain things that really push our buttons. Apparently, for this woman, it’s that horrible, racist, sexist, in-your-face statement, “Hi, how are you?” You lucked out. This woman’s obviously out of her ground-beeffilled gourd. There’s a perfect time to discover that, and it’s before the first date. The thing is, she may actually be on to something—albeit in a somewhat shrewishly hysterical way. Here you are, presenting yourself as this easygoing sprout-muncher who manages to maintain a live-and-let…murder small defenseless animals attitude. But, do you really? Like a lot of people hoping to maximize their dating possibilities, you try to be “openminded,” but how realistic is it to tell yourself you can be with a woman you’ll kiss, then think, “Eeeuw, I can still taste that murdered cow”? Come on…you aren’t a vegan because you think clumps of seitan (boiled wheat gluten) taste so much better than pork chops. In fact, with a bit of prodding, you admit to feeling morally superior to us flesh-chomping barbarians. (Moral superiority—always such a successful basis for a relationship.) Now, it’s possible that you’re The Stepford Vegan, able to sit placidly as a woman tears apart a live goat with her sharpened incisors. But, my guess is, it’s only a matter of time until you look across the table at a girlfriend really enjoying herself as she swallows the last morsel of some dead animal, and go off on her: “Hey, I think you missed the dog! Want me to take his collar off so he’s easier to chew?” “Opposites attract” sounds good, but really only applies if you’re two magnets trying to get together. For a relationship to work out, you have to

be with somebody you respect, but not only that, somebody you actually admire. You can have differences, but you basically have to be excited about who they are, what they believe, and how they live. Painting yourself as tolerant and casting a wide net is a great idea—if you’re a generic person who “enjoys great wine, great food, and great conversation.” Are there five people on the planet who don’t? To find a person you’re compatible with, be honest about your dealbreakers (“must love dogs, but not braised, with a side of spring vegetables”). You might even restrict your online dating forays to a vegetarian personals site like VeggieDate.org. Just think, no more trying to forget that a date’s wallet once roamed the tall grasses as part of a cow! She’ll be right there with you in enjoying meatless fine dining, and then, on to McDonald’s. No, not for a real meal, but for a moment of emotional bonding—weeping and hugging as you watch a kid in the window chowing down on a Happy Meal.

Fee Love I’m trying Internet dating, and a friend said I’d have better results on a site with a membership fee. With so many free sites, why would anyone ever pay? —Thrifty The word “free” turns reasonably intelligent people into zonkedout morons. Tell people you’re giving away free tacos (actual worth: 35 cents including labor) and they’ll line up in the heat for an hour to get one. Offer them $1.35 to stand in a hot line for an hour, and they’ll scowl and flip you off. There are good people on free dating sites. They’re just crowded in among all the people who aren’t seriously looking, but, hey, as long as it’s free, they’ll throw up a pic, kick back, and check their inbox when they’re done swimming with the turtles in Galapagos. Sites with monthly membership fees, whether they’re $50 or $15.99, draw those who are more serious about finding somebody, and give them incentive to hop to it. People say the best things in life—love, friendship, moonlight— are free, but so are the worst things: lymphoma, a really big overbite and roadkill. If you’re in any sort of hurry to get to the good stuff, it probably behooves you to pay the sorting costs Got a problem? Write Amy A l k o n , 171 P i e r Av e , # 28 0 , Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail Advice Amy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

Missoula Independent page 37 October 1–October 8, 2009


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): Is the electron a wave or a particle? Physicists had to conduct thousands of experiments to arrive at the definitive answer, which is that it’s both. In other words, the solution to one of the fundamental questions about the nature of reality is a paradox. I think this strongly suggests that the correct response to many other riddles about the ultimate truth might be two seemingly opposing explanations. Could the Unitarians and Buddhists both be right? Socialists and capitalists? Mystics and scientists? In the upcoming days, Aries, you will be offered lots of practice in adopting this approach as you deal with a personal dilemma that’s very much akin to “Is the electron a wave or a particle?” TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Have you ever mused on the fact that your body is actually a kind of furnace? And that your whole life depends upon it? Food and oxygen are constantly combusting inside you, generating fiery energy that fuels your every movement, thought, and feeling. This awareness of fire as a source of vitality, not a destroyer, would be valuable for you to cultivate in the coming days. Your steady, earthy rhythm needs a shot of radiance and luminosity and fervor. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Several couples I know keep lists of the five celebrities they’d be allowed to boink if the chance ever presented itself. My friend Jim, for instance, will incur no karmic repercussions with his girlfriend Alicia if he ever spends a night of carnal delight with the following people: Lady Gaga, Sarah Silverman, Karen O, Shakira or Halle Berry. Alicia’s permitted to enjoy liaisons with Johnny Depp, Chris Rock, Marilyn Manson, Jimmy Fallon and Portia de Rossi. I bring this up, Gemini, because I believe you’ll soon be the beneficiary of some extravagant cosmic luck that could offer you a close brush with an exotic form of pleasure. This might not exactly take the form of a one-night stand with a famous fox, but it could be almost as extraordinary. CANCER (June 21-July 22): I’m happy you’re getting back to fundamentals and shedding pretensions and nourishing your roots, but I also want to make sure that you don’t get too funky and lowdown. I’d hate to have to be hoisting you up out of the gutter next week, or counseling you on how to cover for the fact that you’ve compromised your own highest standards. So please resist any temptations you might feel to descend toward the lowest common denominator, Cancerian. As you deepen your center of gravity, make sure you keep your attitude elevated.





LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “I may not love you,” wrote R. R. Doister, “but I can certainly love my fantasy about you.” Personally, I’ve been guilty of embodying that attitude toward certain people in my life. There have also been allies to whom I could have said, “I do love you, although I love my fantasy about you a little more.” And it has even been the case on numerous occasions that I’ve been proud to declare, “I love you even more than I love my fantasy about you.” What about you, Leo? Where do you stand on the issue? This is an excellent time to get on the righteous side of the great divide, which is to say: Adore your special people for who they really are more than for your fantasies about them.



VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In a puckish fantasy, the poet Linh Dinh imagined a hypothetical scenario in which it would be uncool to be too cool. “In an effort to inject more pep and resolve into its lethargic citizens,” he waxed with prophetic longing, “the government is mandating the use of an exclamation mark at the end of each sentence, spoken or written. ‘It looks like rain!’ for example, or ‘I must sleep!’” I suggest that you take his vision, Virgo, and turn it into reality for the immediate future! You would really benefit from getting more excited than usual! Who knows, maybe a simple thing like imagining every one of your sentences ending with an exclamation mark could make your whole being more thrillable!



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Is there a big difference between your current job and your beloved career? Do you suffer from the unsettling feeling that your calling hasn’t called you yet? Are you under the impression that your main reason for being here on Earth may reveal itself at some unknown time in the future, but not anytime soon? If you answered no to all those questions, congrats! You are more than halfway toward living a victorious life. But if you answered yes to at least one question, it’s high time to take action. Start by formulating an intention to find out what you need to know in order to deal with the problem more aggressively. The cosmic forces are arrayed in such a way as to reward you for doing so.



SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The Indian guru known as Amma has hugged over 30 million people during her three-decades career. I’ve known people who’ve received blessings from her, and they tell me that she can magically undo your karmic knots with her spiritual power, freeing you from having to suffer indefinitely for the bad decisions you made in the past. Amma rarely does a complete unraveling of all karmic knots in one sitting, however. Your negative conditioning might be holding you together, after all, and a sudden super-fix could cause you to fall apart. That’s the situation I suspect is true for you right now, Scorpio: You’ll be wise to undo some, but not all, of your karmic knots.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The coming week will have something to offend and agitate everyone—except you. Whines and moans and yelps will ring out across the land, even as you’re emanating poise and aplomb. You may be tempted to brazenly exploit everyone’s vulnerability and seize control of your corner of the world, but I think that would be shortsighted of you. A better strategy for capitalizing on your advantage would be to dole out large doses of mercy, making sure that the people who will be important to your future don’t lose their way.



CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “The bear must deal with 20 obstacles, and each one of them involves pears,” says the Sufi proverb, “because the bear adores pears.” That’s a twisty truth worth meditating on, Capricorn. I suspect that the gifts coming your way will bring their own unique problems; the dreams you’re in love with will generate new dilemmas to solve. By no means does this imply that you should avoid accepting the gifts or pursuing your dreams. Part of the fun of doing great things is dealing with the changes they generate!



AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): On behalf of all us non-Aquarians, I’d like to express our appreciation for the experiments you’ve been performing. Please don’t be discouraged just because the results thus far have been inconclusive and left you feeling a trifle rudderless. We feel confident that sooner or later you’ll come up with discoveries that will have bottom-line value to both you and the rest of us. We’d also like to apologize for the shortsighted and timid types among us who are accusing you of being unrealistic or overly optimistic. Please keep trying those novel approaches and making those imaginative forays.



PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): While reviewing the work of Angelina Jolie in the film Taking Lives, A. O. Scott called her “the flesh-and-blood actress most likely to be mistaken for a computer-generated special effect.” I don’t expect you to rival Jolie’s odd talent anytime soon, but I wonder if maybe you’ll be seeing a lot of that kind of stuff in the world around you. Some of the characters who will be advancing the plotlines in your life story may seem to be able to breathe fire, walk through walls, or change the weather at will. At the very least, you’ll witness phenomena that resemble optical illusions. My advice: Try to get these exotic outbreaks to work for you rather than against you. Embrace them, don’t fear them.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Missoula Independent Page 38 October 1–October 8, 2009

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FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT PERMIT APPLICATION The Office of Planning & Grants has received a floodplain application from Mr. Jeff Smith to work within the Clark Fork River floodplain. The project is located at 120 Channel Dr in Section 3 Township 14N Range 21W and includes the replacement of an existing home and construction of a detached garage.. The primary purpose of Floodplain Development Permits is to promote the public health, safety, and general welfare, to minimize flood losses in areas subject to flood hazards, and to promote wise use of the floodplain. Copies of the full applications are available for review in the Office of Planning and Grants in City Hall. Written comments from anyone interested in County floodplain permit application # 10-02 may be submitted prior to 5:00 p.m., October 23, 2009. Address comments to the Floodplain Administrator, Office of Planning & Grants, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802 or call 258-4841 for more information.

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT PERMIT APPLICATION. The Office of Planning and Grants has received a floodplain application from Mr. Ken Wickman to work within the Clark Fork River floodplain. The project is located at 19875 MiCasa, Tract 5C of COS3493 near Frenchtown in Sectiion 32 Township 15N Range 21W and includes the replacement of an existing manufactured home with a stickframe home. The primary purpose of the Floodplain Development Permits is to promote the public health, safety and general welfare, to minimize flood losses in areas subject to flood hazards and to promote wise us of the floodplain. Copies of the full applications are available for review in the Office of Planning and Grants in City Hall. Written comments from anyone interested in County floodplain permit application #10-01 may be submitted prior to 5:00 p.m., October 16, 2009. Address comments to the Floodplain Administrator, Office of Planning and Grants, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802 or call 258-4841 for more information

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT

NOTICE OF CLOSE OF REGISTRATION Notice is hereby given that regular* registration for the Evaro/FinleyO’Keefe Creek Community Council Election to be held on November 3, 2009, will close at 5:00 p.m., on October 5, 2009. NOTE: If you miss this regular registration deadline, you may still register for the election by showing up at the county election center up to and including on Election Day. Between noon and the close of business on the day before Election Day, you can drop off a late voter registration card, but you will need to return to the local election center on Election Day to pick up and vote a ballot. All active and inactive electors of the proposed Evaro/Finley-O’Keefe Creek Community Council are entitled to vote at said election. Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the County Election Administrator. Inactive electors may reactivate by appearing at the county election center in order to vote, by requesting an absentee ballot in any election, or by notifying the County Election Administrator in writing of the elector’s current residence in the county. If you have moved, please have your registration transferred to your present address. DATED this 25th day of August, 2009 /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County By Debbe Merseal, Chief Deputy

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NOTICE OF CLOSE OF REGISTRATION Notice is hereby given that regular* registration for the Seeley Lake County Sewer District Election to be held on November 3, 2009, will close at 5:00 p.m., on October 5, 2009.. NOTE: If you miss this regular registration deadline, you may still register for the election by showing up at the county election center up to and including on Election Day. Between noon and the close of business on the day before Election Day, you can drop off a late voter registration card, but you will need to return to the local election center on Election Day to pick up and vote a ballot.. All active and inactive electors of the Seeley Lake County Sewer District are entitled to vote at said election.. Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the County Election Administrator. Inactive electors may reactivate by appearing at the county election center in order to vote, by requesting an absentee ballot in any election, or by notifying the County Election Administrator in writing of the elector’s current residence in the county. If you have moved, please have your registration transferred to your present address. DATED this 25th day of August, 2009. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County By Debbe

Merseal, Chief Deputy

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF CLOSE OF REGISTRATION Notice is hereby given that regular* registration for the Municipal Election to be held on November 3, 2009, will close at 5:00 p.m., on October 5, 2009. NOTE: If you miss this regular registration deadline, you may still register for the election by showing up at the county election center up to and including on Election Day. Between noon and the close of business on the day before Election Day, you can drop off a late voter registration card, but you will need to return to the local election center on Election Day to pick up and vote a ballot. All active and inactive electors of the City of Missoula are entitled to vote at said election. Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the County Election Administrator. Inactive electors may reactivate by appearing at the county election center in order to vote, by requesting an absentee ballot in any election, or by notifying the County Election Administrator in writing of the elector’s current residence in the county. If you have moved, please have your registration transferred to your present address. DATED this 25th day of August, 2009. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County By Debbe Merseal, Chief Deputy

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF CLOSE OF REGISTRATION Notice is hereby given that regular* registration for the Seeley Lake Resort Area Election to be held on November 3, 2009, will close at 5:00 p.m., on October 5, 2009. *NOTE: If you miss this regular registration deadline, you may still register for the election by showing up at the county election center up to and including on Election Day. Between noon and the close of business on the day before Election Day, you can drop off a late voter registration card, but you will need to return to the local election center on Election Day to pick up and vote a ballot. All active and inactive electors of the proposed Seeley Lake Resort Area District are entitled to vote at said election. Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the County Election Administrator. Inactive electors may reactivate by appearing at the county election center in order to vote, by requesting an absentee ballot in any election, or by notifying the County Election Administrator in writing of the elector’s current residence in the county. If you have moved, please have your registration transferred to your present address. DATED this 25th day of August, 2009. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County By Debbe Merseal, Chief Deputy

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF ELECTION Notice is hereby given that on November 3, 2009 a mail ballot election will be held for the election of creating a Seeley Lake Resort Area District.. The drop off locations will be open at 7:00 a.m., and continue to be open until 8:00 p.m., on Election Day. The drop off locations are: Cold Springs School Courthouse (Election Office) Fairgrounds Election Center Hellgate School Lowell School Paxson School Rattlesnake School Russell School Seeley Lake School DATED this 8th day of September, 2009. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County By Debbe Merseal, Chief Deputy MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF ELECTION Notice is hereby given that on November 3, 2009 a mail ballot election will be held for the election of creating an Evaro/FinleyO’Keefe Creek Community Council. The drop off locations will be open at 7:00 a.m., and continue to be open until 8:00 p.m., on Election Day. The drop off locations are: Cold Springs School Courthouse (Election Office) Fairgrounds Election Center Hellgate School Lowell School Paxson School Rattlesnake School Russell School Seeley Lake School DATED this 8th day of September, 2009. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County By Debbe Merseal, Chief Deputy

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF PRELIMINARY DETERMINATION for the issuance of a MISSOULA AIR QUALITY PERMIT Source: Gravel Crushing Plant Applicant: Rainbow Enterprises The Missoula CityCounty Health Department has received a complete application for an Air Quality Permit for a gravel crushing plant to be operated at the following location: Section 33, Township 16 North, Range 14 West at 1714 Woodworth Road next to

Missoula Independent Page 39 October 1–October 8, 2009


PUBLIC NOTICES the Seeley Lake solid waste transfer station, Missoula County. Upon review of the permit application and other information, the Department finds that Rainbow Enterprises has filed a complete application indicating the proposed facility is capable of meeting applicable requirements of the Air Pollution Control Program. Therefore, the Department hereby gives notice of the preliminary determination to issue an Air Quality Permit to Rainbow Enterprises to operate the gravel crushing plant. The permit will be issued with several conditions attached. The Department will make a final determination concerning the application on October 16, 2009. Any interested person may review a copy of the application and proposed permit at the Environmental Health Division, 301 West Alder, Missoula, MT 59802. Written comments on the preliminary determination will be accepted until 5:00 PM October 15, 2009. Comments should be sent to the attention of Benjamin Schmidt, Air Quality Specialist (email: schmidtb@ho.missoula.mt.us).

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP) FOR Professional Engineering Services for Groundwater Study and Development of Preliminary Engineering Report for the Wye Area Regional Water System Notice to Engineering Consultants: Missoula County has been awarded a Renewable Resource Project Planning Grant from the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (DNRC) in the amount of $20,000 for a groundwater study and assistance in preparing a Preliminary Engineering Report (PER) for the development of the Missoula County Wye Area Regional Water System. Qualifications and Proposals are to be submitted to Missoula County Public Works at the address below no later than Monday, October 26, 2009 by 4:00 PM Mountain Time. Proposals shall be clearly marked Consultant’s Proposal for Engineering Services for Wye Area Regional Water System Project. Contingent upon this award, the Missoula County Board of Commissioners is soliciting qualifications and proposals for engineering and grant management services to assist the County in the development and administration of this project in compliance with all applicable requirements under the Montana DNRC Renewable Resource Planning Grant program. Payment terms will be negotiated with the selected respondent. The fee for engineering services will be paid with Grant funds. Development of the PER, per the Grant Agreement, is scheduled for completion by December 31, 2010. Project Background: The project is located in the Wye Area near the intersection of Highways 93 and I-90 approximately nine miles northwest of the City of Missoula. In response to potable water supply and distribution needs Missoula County elected to review the current water systems serving both commercial and residential developments in the area and evaluate the needs, alternatives and associated cost of developing a regional water system to serve the area. Scope of Consultant Services: The firm selected for this project will be required to perform the following activities: 1. Conduct a groundwater study to consist of : reviewing existing wells within the design area; reviewing existing well logs and groundwater reports; and potential drilling and monitoring of test wells as necessary to determine the availability of water and the impacts the project may have on Missoula’s sole-source aquifer. 2. Identify all possible alternatives for providing a regional water system to the Wye Area. 3. Correspond with state and federal agencies regarding impacts of the project. 4. Analyze viable alternatives for providing a regional water system to the Wye Area. 5. Prepare a Preliminary Engineering Report (PER), along with supplemental materials, meeting the requirements of the most current edition of the Uniform Application for Montana Public Facility Projects. Committee Selection and Evaluation Criteria: Selection of the consultant will be made by a three to five person team selected by the Missoula County Public Works Director. If needed, questions may be directed to respondents to clarify proposals. Respondents will be evaluated according to the following factors with a maximum of 100 points possible: 1. Professional qualifications, past performance and references: 0 - 30 Points 2. Ability to meet schedule : 0 - 35 Points 3. Experience and familiarity with groundwater studies and water system design: 0 - 25 Points 4. Familiarity and availability to project: 0 - 10 Points Submission Instructions: Five copies of consultant’s written proposal shall be submitted to the Missoula County Public Works Department at 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808 on or before 4:00 p.m. Mountain Time, on Monday, October 26, 2009. Envelopes shall be clearly marked “Consultant’s Proposal for Engineering Services for Wye Area Regional Water System Project”. Award

will be made to the most qualified consultant whose proposal is deemed most advantageous to Missoula County, all factors considered. Unsuccessful respondents will be notified in writing as soon as possible. This solicitation is being offered in accordance with state statutes governing procurement of professional services. Accordingly, Missoula County reserves the right to negotiate an agreement for each project, some projects or all projects based on fair and reasonable compensation for the scope of work and services proposed, as well as the right to reject any and all responses deemed unqualified, unsatisfactory or inappropriate. Questions should be directed to: Gregory H. Robertson, P.E., AICP Director of Public Works Phone: (406) 258-4818 Email: groberts@co.missoula.mt.us MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 2 Cause Probate No. DP09-156 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MELVIN G. LONG, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice of said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Cindy J. Long, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Maclay Law Firm, PO Box 9197, Missoula, Montana 59807-9197, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 18th day of September, 2009. /s/ Cindy J. Long, Personal Representative, c/o Maclay Law Firm, PO Box 9197, Missoula, MT 59807-9197 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 3 Cause No. DP-09-154 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ARLIN BURNISS ANGELSTAD, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed as Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Kim L. Angelstad, at St. Peter Law Offices, P.C., 2620 Radio Way, PO Box 17255, Missoula, MT 59808, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 11th day of September, 2009. /s/ Kim L. Angelstad, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No 4 Probate No. DP-09-153 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF KARL J. KELLNER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Judith C. Kendall, certified mail, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane P.C., PO Box 4747, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 11th day of September, 2009. /s/ Judith C. Kendall, 2524 Highwood Drive, Missoula, MT 59803 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-09-157 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF MICHEL McGUIRE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Anneke Hilvert, the Personal Reprsentative, return receipt requested, c/o Doreen D. Antenor, Attorney at Law, 415 North Higgins, Suite 7, PO Box 8597, Missoula, Montana 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 15th day of September, 2009. /s/ Anneke Hilvert, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-09-161 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ELIZABETH GERTRUDE SANDERS, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said

claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to SARA JANE WILSON, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Marsillo & Schuyler, PLLC, 103 South 5th East, Missoula, MT 59801 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 24th day of September, 2009. /s/ Sara Jane Wilson, Personal Representative

JAMIN T. CORY Trustee STATE OF MONTANA ) : ss. County of Missoula ) This instrument was acknowledged before me on September 9, 2009, by BENJAMIN T. CORY, as Trustee. /s/ Jennifer J. Balsley Print Name: Jennifer J. Balsley [NOTARY SEAL] Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at Missoula, Montana My commission expires: 12/19/2010

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP-09-133 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE: The Estate of Eddie R. Williams, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Patricia Davenport, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at c/o Sullivan, Tabaracci & Rhoades, P.C., 1821 South Avenue West, Third Floor, Missoula, MT 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court, DATED this 9th day of September, 2009. /s/ Patricia Davenport, Personal Representative

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/19/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200730329, Book 809, Page 230, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Pamela Stanford, a married person and Joseph Stanford, as Joint Tenants was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 1 in Sun Mountain Estates, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200828038; B:831, P:227, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to HSBC Bank USA, National Association, as Trustee for WFMBS 2008-AR1. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of July 30, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $702,701.72. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $644,528.75, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 9, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.19348) 1002.106432-FEI

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE OF REAL PROPERTY NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by BENJAMIN T. CORY, as successor Trustee, of the public sale of the real property hereinafter described pursuant to the “Small Tract Financing Act of Montana” (Section 71-1-301, et seq., MCA). The following information is provided: THE NAMES OF THE GRANTOR, ORIGINAL TRUSTEE, THE BENEFICIARY IN THE TRUST INDENTURE, ANY SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO THE BENEFICIARY OR GRANTOR, ANY SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE, AND THE PRESENT RECORD OWNER ARE: Grantor: DAVID ARTHUR DESCHAMPS and ZONDA KELLY BERRY, AS JOINT TENANTS (“Grantors”) Original Trustee: STEWART TITLE OF MISSOULA COUNTY Successor Trustee: BENJAMIN T. CORY, an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of Montana (the “Trustee”) Beneficiary: TREASURE STATE BANK (the “Beneficiary”) Present Record DAVID ARTHUR DESCHAMPS and Owner: ZONDA KELLY BERRY THE DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPERTY COVERED BY THE DEED OF TRUST IS: The real property and its appurtenances in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: LOTS 16 AND 17 IN BLOCK 11 OF CAR LINE ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. INCLUDING AND NOT TO BE SEVERED THEREFROM: 1979 GALL, Model TL, VIN # GA3474, Title # K221740 THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. The property is located in Missoula County at 1914 Margaret, Missoula, Montana 59801. RECORDING DATA: The following instruments and documents have been recorded in the Clerk and Recorder’s Office in Missoula County, Montana: Trust Indenture dated June 10, 2009, and recorded July 8, 2009, in Book 843 of Micro Records at Page 429, under Document No. 200916787 (the “Trust Indenture”); and Substitution of Trustee dated September 8, 2009, and recorded on the same date of this notice.THE DEFAULT FOR WHICH THE FORECLOSURE IS MADE IS: Nonpayment of the July 10, 2009 and August 10, 2009 initial payments in the amount of $3,750.00 due under the Promissory Note dated June 10, 2009, which is secured by the Trust Indenture. The borrower is due for the September 10, 2009 monthly payment in the amount of $726.78 and for each subsequent monthly payment in the same amount. THE SUMS OWING ON THE OBLIGATION SECURED BY THE TRUST INDENTURES ARE: Principal: $93.777.93. Interest: Interest continues to accrue at a rate of 7 % per annum. As of September 8, 2009 the interest balance is $1,618.64 and interest accrues at the rate of $17.98 per day. Late fees: $375.00 The Beneficiary anticipates and intends to disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the real property, and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts or taxes are paid by the Grantors or successor in interest to the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligation secured by the Trust Indenture. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of the sale include the Trustee’s and attorney’s fees, and costs and expenses of sale. THE TRUSTEE, AT THE DIRECTION OF THE BENEFICIARY, HEREBY ELECTS TO SELL THE PROPERTY TO SATISFY THE AFORESAID OBLIGATIONS. THE DATE, TIME, PLACE AND TERMS OF SALE ARE: Date: January 22, 2009 Time: 11:00 a.m., Mountain Standard Time or Mountain Daylight Time, whichever is in effect. Place: Front entrance to the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802 Terms: This sale is a public sale and any person, including the Beneficiary, and excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. Dated: September 9th, 2009. /s/ BEN-

Missoula Independent Page 40 October 1–October 8, 2009

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/05/99, recorded as Instrument No. 199921847 Bk. 592, Pg. 869, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Richard T. Nelson, a single man, and Carla Asbury, a single woman was Grantor, North American Mortgage Company was Beneficiary and Title Services, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 2 in Block 2 of Canyon View Subdivision, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200704350 Bk. 792, Pg. 625, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory

note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of August 4, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $95,620.82. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $92,326.47, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 11, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.06096) 1002.130910-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 09/26/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200725637, Bk. 806, Pg. 790 and re-recorded on October 25, 2007 as Instrument No. 200728089, Bk. 807, Pg. 1449, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Kristin D. Marshall, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Parcel I: Tract 5A-2A of Certificate of Survey No. 2582, located in the W 1/2 of Section 27, Township 15 North, Range 21 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Parcel II: A 60’ right-ofway for roadway purposes and for the installation and maintenance of utilities over the 60’ private road and public utility easement shown on Certificate of Survey No. 1155, which extends from the abovedescribed real property to the county road. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 03/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of August 3, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the

Loan was $373,074.97. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $356,238.20, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 11, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.05994) 1002.130901-FEI MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-09-151 Judge: Harkin NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of ROBERT E. SULLIVAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or their claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to MAUREEN P. DOUGHERTY, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at Crowley Fleck

Law Firm, PO Box 797, Helena, MT 599624-0797, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated September 2, 2009. /s/ Maureen P. Dougherty, Personal Representative c/o Daniel N. McLean, PO Box 797, Helena, MT 59624-0797 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 03/12/03, recorded as Instrument No. 200308773, Bk. 701, Pg. 551, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Laramie D. Loewen, an unmarried person was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Financial Inc. dba Mann Mortgage was Beneficiary and First American Title Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: The West 10 feet of Lot 11, all of Lots 12, 13, 14 and the East 25 feet of Lot 15 in Block 66 of Car Line Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Recording Reference: Book 199 of Micro Records at Page 2284. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of August 10, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $203,929.13. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $198,274.88, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 18, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a Missoula County Government

Missoula County Government

PUBLIC NOTICE The Planning & Zoning Commission will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Wednesday, October 14, 2009 at 1:30 p.m. in Room 201 of the County Courthouse, located at 200 W. Broadway in Missoula, Montana.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING THE MISSOULA COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT will be conducting a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday, October 21, 2009 in the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine, Missoula, MT, on the following item:

1. Part 1 Zoning District Amendment Request Part 1 Zoning Districts 4, 10, 12A, 32, & 36 A request to amend Resolution 81-132 to permit home occupations in Part 1 Zoning Districts 4, 10, 12A, 32, and 36 (see Map Q), subject to the existing standards outlined in Resolution 81-132. These home occupation standards currently apply to all other existing Part 1 Zoning Districts.

1. A request by John Porter to vary from the limit of building coverage of accessory buildings on a lot in a residential zone as required by Resolution 76-113, Section 3.06.D. The subject property is located at 115 Horseshoe Lane, legally described as PORTION OF LOT 19 OF CANYON VILLAGE NO 2 21-12-19, and is zoned C-A3. See map S.

Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request is available for public inspection at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants, City Hall, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana. Telephone 258-4657.

If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling the Office of Planning and Grants at 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. For a complete legal description or additional information regarding the variance request, you may contact Ana Aronofsky at the same number or by e-mail at aaronofsky@co.missoula.mt.us.

Stop Foreclosure Chapter 13 & other options

Daniel Morgan Andrew Pierce 433 W. Alder • 830-3875

If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services.


PUBLIC NOTICES public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.06305) 1002.131339-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/12/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200527308, BK 762, PG 554, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Ward J. Veneklasen and Pamela L. Veneklasen, husband and wife

was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Insured Titles, LLC was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles, LLC as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 1 in Block 4 of Linda Vista Tenth Supplement Phase I, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of August 10, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $264,898.62. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $259,200.00, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City

of Missoula on December 18, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.06348) 1002.131336-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 12/05/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200631476, BK 788, PG 745, mortgage records of Missoula County,

Montana in which Floyd Vandehey, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 12 in Block 2, El Mar Estates Phase 2, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of August 10, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $169,454.38. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $164,268.38, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200

West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 18, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, whereis basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.06355) 1002.131397-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 03/15/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200706553, Bk. 793, Pg. 1368, mortgage records of Missoula

County, Montana in which David E. Jones was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 18 in Block 9 of West View, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to US Bank National Association, as Trustee for GSAA 20077. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of August 13, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $159,624.08. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $156,040.20, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the

Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 21, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.06440) 1002.131443-FEI

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT

MISSOULA COUNTY SCHOOLS FINANCE REPORT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2009-10 RACHEL A. VIELLEUX MISSOULA COUNTY SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS

SCHOOL DISTRICTS*** MISSOULA #1 HELLGATE #4

LOLO #7 POTOMAC #11

BONNER #14 WOODMAN #18

DESMET #20

TARGET RG #23

SUNSET #30

CLINTON #32

SWAN VAL #33

SEELEY LK #34

S.D.#40

MCHS

Beginning Fund Balance 7-1-08 12,957,318.29 AMENDMENT TO 7-08 FUND BAL 0.00

13,944,323.13 0.00

1,524,066.28 0.00

240,111.78 0.00

898,108.95 0.00

229,795.08 0.00

615,459.79 0.00

1,068,491.73 0.00

77,160.93 0.00

673,283.78 0.00

513,796.81 0.00

532,480.37 0.00

18,243,660.68 0.00

11,649,689.48 0.00

RECEIPTS: GENERAL FUND 29,704,496.08 TRANSPORTATION 2,852,398.41 BUS DEPRECIATION 0.00 SCHOOL FOOD 1,790,481.05 TUITION 2,191.60 RETIREMENT 3,885,143.11 MISCELLANEOUS PROGRAMS 5,584,333.47 ADULT EDUCATION 110,111.91 TRAFFIC EDUCATION 0.00 LEASE RENTAL AGREEMENT 46,988.01 COMPENSATED ABSENCES 74,079.85 IMPACT AID 0.00 TECHNOLOGY 374,986.78 FLEXIBILITY 97.78 LITIGATION RESERVE 0.00 DEBT SERVICE 339,439.32 BUILDING 14,480.47 BUILDING RESERVE 1,037,556.90 COMPUTER SERVICE 0.00 PURCHASING 0.00 INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS 0.00 INTERNAL SERVICE 0.00 PRIVATE PURPOSE TRUST 1,276.63 INTERLOCAL AGREEMENT 0.00 SELF-INSURANCE 5,414,942.72 STUDENT EXTRA CURRICULAR 249,941.18 TRUST 0.00

7,292,096.10 829,248.98 0.00 459,374.85 23,953.47 884,739.93 706,664.31 19,843.76 0.00 0.00 6,943.57 0.00 117,081.01 0.00 0.00 1,219,406.83 192,821.93 5,400.51 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 47,507.90 0.00

3,571,915.70 152,229.59 23,874.61 220,178.52 788.45 483,833.45 380,097.74 23,615.81 0.00 0.00 4,945.81 0.00 61,253.37 9,102.10 0.00 67,305.05 58.86 81,999.82 0.00 0.00 963.93 0.00 0.00 22,116.79 0.00 43,319.58 0.00

639,875.01 109,255.87 40,063.22 40,063.22 34.50 78,691.90 102,367.90 0.00 0.00 0.00 10.32 0.00 1,641.56 48.30 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 18,228.33 0.00

2,235,592.30 175,686.79 0.00 169,271.45 247.01 251,092.52 233,867.89 9,199.75 0.00 0.00 2,745.32 0.00 5,872.62 2,809.02 0.00 154,279.75 4,756.77 1,580.50 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 23.21 0.00 0.00 68,215.30 0.00

312,837.63 63,593.06 0.00 0.00 0.64 28,919.38 27,744.99 39.53 0.00 0.00 487.97 0.00 680.70 32.42 0.00 0.00 116.95 499.96 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 32.15 0.00 0.00 15,482.80 0.00

957,944.87 84,034.72 0.00 64,014.57 137.87 121,084.48 101,197.05 0.00 0.00 0.00 39.79 0.00 33,214.56 85.00 0.00 42,921.28 562.71 14,466.45 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

2,690,305.04 142,881.19 0.00 139,545.62 523.06 318,036.17 342,259.53 9,493.92 0.00 423.83 249.24 0.00 27,632.03 254.44 15,573.22 174,483.06 1,209.09 39,576.79 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 43,305.77 0.00

72,563.38 245.86 0.00 0.00 26.68 3,385.03 38,565.36 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 147.01 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 11.30 0.00 0.00 1,429.73 0.00

1,379,537.01 171,374.50 0.00 82,099.76 129.17 165,542.77 160,442.31 51.23 0.00 0.00 341.73 0.00 46,670.57 12,999.16 0.00 127.07 218.18 1,650.29 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 15,024.60 125,336.67 0.00

351,917.66 86,065.52 0.00 1,172.10 0.00 36,178.16 35,080.43 0.00 0.00 0.00 1,672.65 0.00 928.21 64.23 0.00 0.00 464.33 0.07 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 20,666.34 0.00 0.00 2,353.54 33,147.25

1,172,774.45 97,791.40 0.00 80,724.34 0.00 140,436.45 144,256.75 0.00 0.00 0.00 1,797.76 0.00 19,551.61 124.43 0.00 330,216.72 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 24,942.06 0.00

7,433,180.56 464,770.56 116,098.15 394,188.50 264.05 920,895.47 854,407.15 23,219.06 25,865.07 0.00 10,436.89 0.00 49,851.24 61,836.93 0.00 1,093,766.21 217,589.87 46,072.15 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 6,573.98 0.00 1,092,981.58 148,654.63 0.00

26,695,523.96 1,872,738.07 0.00 787,638.46 35,581.96 3,384,268.70 5,983,424.14 854,859.61 222,283.29 12,056.42 2,451.44 517,355.31 475,474.65 9.53 0.00 1,697,976.69 14,307.37 468,388.79 535,388.25 0.00 343,268.90 574,272.93 32,430.83 1,758.95 4,230,083.55 1,885,035.25 0.00

TOTAL RECEIPTS:

51,482,945.27

11,805,083.15

5,147,599.18

1,030,280.13

3,315,240.20

450,468.18

1,419,703.35

3,945,752.00

116,374.35

2,161,545.02

569,710.49

2,012,615.97

12,960,652.05

50,626,577.05

TOTAL CASH AVAILABLE:

64,440,263.56

25,749,406.28

6,671,665.46

1,270,391.91

4,213,349.15

680,263.26

2,035,163.14

5,014,243.73

193,535.28

2,834,828.80

1,083,507.30

2,545,096.34

31,204,312.73

62,276,266.53

GENERAL 29,690,569.17 TRANSPORTATION 2,743,032.83 BUS DEPRECIATION 0.00 SCHOOL FOOD 1,776,768.99 TUITION 17,320.00 RETIREMENT 3,589,061.97 MISCELLANEOUS PROGRAMS 5,595,882.65 ADULT EDUCATION 100,425.82 TRAFFIC EDUCATION 0.00 LEASE RENTAL AGREEMENT 46,954.44 COMPENSATED ABSENCES 15,621.06 IMPACT AID 0.00 TECHNOLOGY 191,119.35 FLEXIBILITY 0.00 LITIGATION RESERVE 0.00 DEBT SERVICE 1,236,084.78 BUILDING 24,975.00 BUILDING RESERVE 2,272,827.10 COMPUTER SERVICE 0.00 PURCHASING 0.00 INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS 0.00 INTERNAL SERVICE 0.00 PRIVATE PURPOSE TRUST 5,135.24 INTERLOCAL AGREEMENT 0.00 SELF-INSURANCE 6,405,191.34 STUDENT EXTRA CURRICULAR 222,776.34 TRUST 0.00

7,332,941.02 799,095.88 0.00 450,820.65 30,019.39 881,445.61 880,014.43 15,285.48 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 98,896.14 0.00 0.00 1,250,909.17 9,507,403.50 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 41,107.71 0.00

3,443,780.44 164,547.72 95,000.00 222,184.61 0.00 427,278.43 429,087.07 27,615.83 0.00 0.00 2,502.75 0.00 60,429.09 0.00 0.00 99,050.27 0.00 37,193.62 0.00 0.00 12,146.00 0.00 0.00 34,975.32 0.00 46,957.31 0.00

643,722.62 102,440.15 0.00 34,764.27 0.00 74,573.23 133,117.64 0.00 0.00 0.00 386.16 0.00 7,123.10 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 17,442.26 0.00

2,230,493.49 166,247.88 0.00 172,135.32 0.00 234,877.41 223,145.27 7,788.01 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 117,477.50 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2,130.75 0.00 0.00 56,643.73 0.00

320,563.10 56,138.99 0.00 0.00 0.00 30,151.87 54,621.45 135.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 3,287.52 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 3,896.78 0.00 0.00 14,619.22 0.00

897,852.06 80,613.80 0.00 64,014.57 0.00 98,616.97 204,123.23 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 12,064.99 0.00 0.00 78,307.50 0.00 4,950.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

2,677,143.86 144,621.58 0.00 120,312.78 437.50 288,744.34 374,486.05 1,974.99 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 19,604.91 0.00 0.00 186,675.00 0.00 58,650.71 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 71,119.70 0.00

86,747.01 242.20 0.00 0.00 0.00 5,976.52 54,611.78 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 42.82 0.13 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

1,366,410.76 154,632.30 0.00 81,798.37 0.00 139,277.88 161,855.44 0.00 0.00 0.00 381.63 0.00 26,085.88 0.00 0.00 127.07 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 12,160.11 162,001.15 0.00

351,778.87 82,610.14 0.00 1,040.06 0.00 34,920.17 46,588.59 0.00 0.00 0.00 2,100.41 0.00 2,928.50 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 21,929.48 0.00 0.00 3,570.99 28,685.89

1,211,416.31 103,880.18 0.00 81,252.17 0.00 142,813.33 187,147.87 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 23,407.97 0.00 0.00 386,530.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 30,018.06 0.00

7,585,358.23 458,099.80 273,412.00 396,925.19 840.00 862,984.44 973,232.23 6,212.17 30,797.35 0.00 3,165.49 0.00 125,997.45 10,200.00 0.00 2,282,303.84 11,640,977.61 48,526.41 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 677.99 0.00 1,144,140.73 158,316.19 0.00

26,711,248.80 1,578,326.24 0.00 907,722.84 56,240.00 3,214,284.40 5,996,167.94 815,682.16 252,141.90 11,880.84 40,351.95 0.00 513,638.07 0.00 0.00 1,570,801.62 0.00 385,441.50 490,685.06 0.00 314,970.43 669,010.11 25,180.69 0.00 4,570,493.63 1,956,058.86 0.00

21,287,938.98

5,102,748.46

1,013,569.43

3,210,939.36

483,413.93

1,440,543.12

3,943,771.42

147,620.46

2,104,730.59

576,153.10

2,166,465.89

26,002,167.12

50,080,327.04

DISBURSEMENTS:

TOTAL PAYMENTS: TOTAL OBLIGATIONS:

53,933,746.08 273,483.91

-50,362.59

90,015.69

2,397.49

-56,848.75

-13,413.41

0.00

-51,504.67

1,362.24

123,544.60

1,040.66

1,038.36

687,162.48

46,175.42

TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS:

54,207,229.99

21,237,576.39

5,192,764.15

1,015,966.92

3,154,090.61

470,000.52

1,440,543.12

3,892,266.75

148,982.70

2,228,275.19

577,193.76

2,167,504.25

26,689,329.60

50,126,502.46

ENDING CASH BALANCE 6/30/09

10,233,033.57

4,511,829.89

1,478,901.31

254,424.99

1,059,258.54

210,262.74

594,620.02

1,121,976.98

44,552.58

606,553.61

506,313.54

377,592.09

4,514,983.13

12,149,764.07

Missoula Independent Page 41 October 1–October 8, 2009


JONESIN’

C r o s s w o r d s

"Chance Collisions"--a random assortment, across and down.

by Matt Jones

ACROSS

DOWN

1 Super power all about transparency

1 Sugar alcohol in some chewing gums

11 Baby on a farm

2 They may direct traffic

15 "I'm stumped"

3 Convert to a computer system, e.g.

16 Aware of 17 Like a lot of European cathedral architecture in the 16th century 18 Abbr. after old generals' names

4 Part of Y.S.L. 5 Be lazy 6 "___ to Extremes" (Billy Joel song) 7 Phrase of consequence

19 Altar exchanges

8 "Ow!"

20 Ear protection?

9 Leaving out

21 Hired goon

10 Bottle top?

22 Network whose first broadcast was "Gone With the Wind"

11 Indiana's second largest city

23 Average scores

12 Like some musical "wonders"

24 Packaging string

13 Bring into harmony

25 "...man ___ mouse?"

14 Stuck

26 Wearing an underskirt

23 In a sassy way

28 Honor stitched to some jackets

24 2008 Olympics swimmer Dara

30 Board game with SLIDE spaces

26 Pac-Man dot

31 Fortune

27 Creepy-___ 29 Supports at the end of planes

33 Lewis locale 36 Pict. in a book

32 Like teddy bears and puppies

38 Ineffectual sort 40 They'd say "like, gag me" in the 1980s

34 Like some wisdom?

44 Title for Italian monks

37 Manatee's order

45 That is, to Cicero

39 Spring holidays

46 Joel of "Cabaret" 47 Class closer?

40 Blood pressure, heart rate, etc.

48 Honky ___ music

41 Aphrodite's beloved

49 Actresses West and Whitman

42 Of a period that ends in 39-down

50 Spoiled brat

43 Transfer an e-mail, perhaps

51 Opposing opinion

49 Speed ratio

52 Rarest of the main blood types in the U.S.

50 "Leave in," to a proofreader

55 Made stuff up

53 Pai ___ (Chinese gambling game)

56 Tool in forestry to measure slope, vertical angles and tree heights

35 Military planes provide it

54 Dr.'s org.

57 1040 IDs 58 Source of a stream

Last week’s solution

©2009 Jonesin' Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0434.

PUBLIC NOTICES NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on December 1, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOTS 19 AND 20 IN BLOCK 32 OF DALY’S ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORD PLAT THEREOF. Kendra E. Root, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 5, 2003 and recorded September 10, 2003 as document number 200333774, in Book 717, Page 589. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $953.59, beginning March 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of July 17, 2009 is $110,965.42 principal, interest at the rate of 6.75% now totaling $3449.24, late charges in the amount of $192.95, escrow advances of $-11.96, other fees and expenses advanced of $52.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $20.52 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: July 24, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-10974 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On July 24, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota My comm. Expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3278367 10/01/2009, 10/08/2009, 10/15/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on December 1, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: UNIT NO. 19 OF THE CEDARS, A RESIDENTIAL CONDOMINIUM SITUATED ON TRACT D, HILLVIEW HEIGHTS NUMBER ONE (1), CITY OF MISSOULA, COUNTY OF MISSOULA, STATE OF MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF, AND ACCORDING TO THE DECLARATION OF UNIT OWNERSHIP AND FLOOR PLANS ON FILE AND OF

Missoula Independent Page 42 October 1–October 8, 2009

RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE MISSOULA COUNTY CLERK AND RECORDER, RECORDED JUNE 26, 1978 IN VOLUME 121 OF MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 107, FILED AND RECORDED PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF THE MONTANA UNIT OWNERSHIP ACT, SECTION 67-2301, ET SEQ, R.C.M. 1947, AS AMENDED. TOGETHER WITH A 4.3358 PERCENT INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTENANT TO SAID CONDOMINIUM, ALL AS IDENTIFIED, ESTABLISHED AND DEFINED IN THE AFORESAID DECLARATION AND AMENDMENTS THERETO. Aaron M Healy and Tara Jennifer Healy, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated April 26, 2007 and recorded on May 2, 2007 at 4:29 o’clock P.M., in Book 796, Page 677, under Document No 200710635. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,367.78, beginning April 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of July 13, 2009 is $140,918.88 principal, interest at the rate of 8.59% now totaling $16,537.81, late charges in the amount of $1102.40, escrow advances of $-118.00, other fees and expenses advanced of $44.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $33.36 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes wilt be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: July 24, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On July 24, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to e the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 03/28/2011 ASAP# 3278401 10/01/2009, 10/08/2009, 10/15/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 30, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 10 in Block 31 of Knowles addition, a platted subdivision in the city of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof John Sherman Geesen, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to

Pinnacle Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 26, 2006 and recorded on August 7, 2006 in Book 780, Page 705, under Document No 200619813. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank Nat’l Trust Co, as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-10. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,515.00, beginning April 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of July 8, 2009 is $259,735.14 principal, interest at the rate of 11.050% now totaling $10,117.35, late charges in the amount of $905.40, escrow advances of $8,441.65, and other fees and expenses advanced of $73.05, plus accruing interest at the rate of $78.63 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash at the time of sale. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: July 20, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On July 20, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 3270075 09/24/2009, 10/01/2009, 10/08/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 30, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 9A OF DALY’S ADDITION, BLOCK 52, LOTS 8A &9A, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT OF RECORD IN BOOK 29 OF PLATS AT PAGE 100 Jason O. Hettick and Rainey R. Hettick, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated April 2, 2008 and recorded April 3, 2008 in Book 816, Page 0504, as Document No. 200807328. The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage LLC. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1026.15, beginning March 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of

August 1, 2009 is $137,684.55 principal, interest at the rate of 5.5% now totaling $3786.30, late charges in the amount of $354.60, escrow advances of $679.17, suspense balance of $-39.46 and other fees and expenses advanced of $1420.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $20.75 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: July 23, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On July 23, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3277197 10/01/2009, 10/08/2009, 10/15/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 30, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 48 OF AMENDED TRAIL CREEK ADDITION OF PHASE VI TO THE DOUBLE ARROW RANCH, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Mike R. Maksin, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as .Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated December 20, 2006 and recorded December 28, 2006 as document number 200633049, in Book 789, Page 930. The beneficial interest is currently held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1339.46, beginning April 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of July 11, 2009 is $180,343.99 principal, interest at the rate of 6.5% now totaling $4228.60, late charges in the amount of $935.52, escrow advances of $282.51, other fees and expenses advanced of $28.70, plus accruing interest at the rate of $32.12 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such

amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents {valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Date: July 23, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On July 23, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 2/23/2013 ASAP# 3275782 10/01/2009, 10/08/2009, 10/15/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE. To be sold for cash at Trustee’s sale on January 29, 2010, at 10:00 a.m., on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, all of Trustee’s right, title and interest to the following-described property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lots 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16 of Block 87, CARLINE ADDITION, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the recorded plat thereof. Linda Kooren, as Grantor, conveyed the real property to Insured Titles, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Dean Gingerich, as Beneficiary, by Trust Indenture recorded April 3, 2007, in Book 794 of Micro, Page 1087, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. A Substitution of Trustee designating Kevin S. Jones as Successor Trustee was recorded September 9, 2009, in Book 847, Page 189, Document No. 200922143, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The default of the obligation, the performance of which is secured by the aforementioned Trust Indenture, and for which default of this foreclosure is made, is for failure to pay the monthly payments as and when due. Pursuant to the provisions of the Trust Indenture, the Beneficiary has exercised, and hereby exercises, his option of declare the full amount secured by such Trust Indenture immediately due and payable. There presently is due on said obligation the principal sum of $268,919.56, plus interest at a rate of 12% totaling $24,054.46, plus late fees of $2,160.00, and escrow fees of $156.00, for a total amount due of $295,290.02, as of September 15,2009, plus the costs of foreclosure, attorney’s fees, trustee’s fees, escrow closing fees, and other accruing costs. The Beneficiary has elected, and does hereby elect, to sell the abovedescribed property to satisfy the obligation referenced above. The Beneficiary declares that the Grantor is in default as described above and demands that the Trustee sell the property described above in accordance with the terms and provisions of this Notice. DATED 17th day of September, 2009. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Trustee. STATE OF MONTANA)) ss. County of Missoula). On this 17th day of September, 2009, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Kevin S. Jones, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. (SEAL) /s/ Christy Shipp, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at: Missoula, Montana My Commission Expires: 5/7/2013


Sustainafieds A special classifieds section highlighting businesses dedicated to promoting a sustainable world. SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE INVESTING

Save on energy costs through sustainable building & remodeling

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Solar electric design, installation & complete electrical services

Affordable Asbestos Surveys for contractors and homeowners Quick Turnaround Time

Securities offered through Pacific West Securities, Inc. • Member FINRA/SIPC Advisory services provided through Pacific West Financial Consultants, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

GREEN HANGER

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For More Information Contact: John K. Faust, MBA Pacific West Financial Group • Custom Portfolios 700 SW Higgins, Suite 100A • Shareholder Advocacy Missoula, MT 59803 • Community Investing (406) 543-0708 • Screening johnfaust@pwfinancial.net

Design & Clearance Testing

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2BD/1BA, large private yard. Enjoy the feel of yester year! $149,000 • 925 3rd MLS# 904300

AXIOM IT Solutions uses programmable thermostats to reduce energy usage when they are not in the office, and purchases only environmentally friendly cleaning supplies and hand soap. They also teleconference when possible with out-of-town clients to cut down on travel.

jeannettewilliamsrealestate.com

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montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Page 43 October 1–October 8, 2009


RENTALS

AUTOMOTIVE CRUISEGENERAL We need your trucks and SUV’s. Buy, Sell, Consignment. Russell Street Bridge. www.missoulacarandtruck.com 543-6600 Turner’s Missoula Car & Truck

IMPORTS 2008 HYUNDAI ELANTRA SE OPTIONS WARRANTY 5SPD MANUAL 23K HIGHWAY MILES GRAY/BLACK $12000 #330-417-4628

4X4 2003 Chevy S-10 Crew Cab White, clean, runs great, 125,000 miles, $5000. OBO call 549-0289

CULVER’S FOREIGN CAR SERVICE AND SALES See us for your ser v i c e n e e d s and used vehicle inspections WE BUY SUBARUS AND TOYOTAS FOR RECONDITIONING AND RESALE 2302 McDonald 721- 5857 Proudly SERVICING MISSOULA SINCE 1978

VANS

Expect the best from

92 CARGO VAN. Includes equipment. Fuel-injection. Purchased from Mel’s Used Car Lot. $2600. 327-7859

MISSOULA

MOTOR HOMES/RVS

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 2809 Great Northern • 251-8500

2001 Forest River Reflectio $19,950, clear title, excellent condition, 22,750 miles, garymann22@yahoo.com, 406988-4588

Check out our always in demand rental units at www.rentinmissoula.com

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I Buy Hondas/Acuras/ Toyotas/Lexus & All Other Japanese Cars & Trucks. Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not. Also buying VWs too!

Professional Property Management

Call PPM for all your rental needs

Join the Montana Landlord's Association 10 chapters in Montana! MEMBERSHIP INCLUDES: •Current MT Landlord/tenant handbook •Residence & mobile home rental forms Gene Thompson, president

(406) 250-0729 • www.mlaonline.org

New Lease Special Call us about FREE rent! Leasing Office Located 4200 Expressway Onsite at Missoula, MT 59808 CRESTVIEW APARTMENTS

ppm@montana.com professionalproperty.com

406-721-8990

GardenCity

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Property Management 422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals:

MONTANA CRESTVIEW 406-327-1212

Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

116 Turner Court: studio, full kitchen & bathroom, storage, near park, $410 GCPM, 5496106 gcpm-mt.com 1315 E. Broadway #1 , $650 1bd/1ba carport, storage, near trail system. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 3320 Great Northern ApartmentsRent $495-$585 up to 2 cats considered w/ additional deposit/ documents. 721-8990 402 S. 6th #3 & #2, 2bd , all utilities included, walking distance to U of M, $695-$795 Missoula Property Management- 251-8500 4104 Hillview Way, 2 Bdrm 2 Bath units gas f.p. dw, w/d hkups, single garage. Rent $850. 721-8990 720 Turner – B, $695 3bd/1.5 Bath. Pet allowed, hk-ups. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 Alpine Meadows, $1,000 move in special! Dishwasher, W/D hookups, microwave, patio, storage, small pets ok $775 Missoula Property Management- 251-8500 RELAX! Renter? Owner? We’ve got you covered. Professional, competitive property management. PLUM PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 406-493-1349 jenniferplum@live.com

MOBILE HOMES 2 MONTHS FREE RENT!! Mobile Home Lots in Arlee. $215/mo incl w/s/g MPM 406-728-5016

"Let us tend your den"

HOUSES

Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

1716 Ernest: 4bedrooms, 2baths, basment den, wood floors, storage, small pet $1,095 , GCPM, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com

1601 South Ave West • 542-2060 grizzlypm.com

www.gcpm-mt.com

APARTMENTS

ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http://www.RealRentals.com

SERVICES Energy Efficient Homes w/ solar radiant floor heat Terry Davenport 369 - 0940

STORAGE SHEDS MontanaShedBuilders.com Affordable, Durable, Delivered

406-546-1246

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AUTOMOTIVE

Blue Mountain Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x20 $65 Bitterroot Mini Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x10 $45 • 10x15 $55 10x20 $65 • 10x30 $85 • 542-2060 Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

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Northwest Homes ign

Your local yurt company

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(406) 295-4661 shelterdesigns.net

Sprinkler Winterizations Great Rates

Clark Fork Sprinklers, LLC

396-0406 clarkforksprinklers.com

Specializing in roofing, siding, gutters & framing.

Summer Discounts!

251-3222

Gordon Timber Frames Timber & Standard Framing Excavation

Mark Hamilton 546-1837 NorthwestHomesMT.com

Outlook!

PLUMBING & HEATING Missoula's Alternative Plumber

Outsource Your Chores!

Providing errand and concierge services and domestic and personal assistance!

* *406-240-5132

randomtaskengineer.com

Improving Your

NEW ERA

Gift Certificates Available

Your Source For: • Tankless Water Heaters • Solar Hot Water • Ground Source Heat

543-6465 newerapandh.com

Joel Gordon-Licensed, Bonded, & Insured

CARPENTRY Affinity Environmental is proud to offer affordable asbestos surveys for contractors and homeowners. Lic/Reg/Ins. 728-5181

CABINETRY Happy Valley Contracting Cabinetry and General Contracting writing bids everyday 814-2222416

CLEANING Missoula Eco Clean Experienced Housecleaning Service. Biodegradable products, honest, dependable & meticulous. Let us Green Clean your home! Sue: 370-9832 TOO BUSY TO CLEAN? Let me take care of it for you. I clean private homes and small offices. I

CORNERSTONE

No remodeling or construction project too big or too small

(406) 241-2175

MOBILE OIL CHANGE SERVICE!! Montana Mobile Oil & Lube offers oil change services at the location of your choice. Basic Service: $35.00 (up to 5 quarts oil, filter and 12 point inspection) All makes and models serviced. No machine, car or truck too big or too small. Call for appointment! (406) 531-1346

PAINTING

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Missoula Independent Page 44 October 1–October 8, 2009

Commercial & Residential Interior & Exterior - All Phases • Historic Restoration

35 Years Experience Interior & Exterior Free Estimates

Licensed & Insured • (406) 880-1540

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546-5541

use only all natural plant derived cleaners for a safer clean. Please call Susan @ 207-6174

FINANCIAL The Nomadic Bookkeeper Bookkeeping for individuals and small businesses. Your home or office. Your computer or mine. QuickBooks tutor for private lessons. Lavinia Pisano 544-2178

HANDYMAN V&R Handyman Services No job too big or too small. We do it all. (406)210-9527

HOME IMPROVEMENT Affordable asbestos surveying. Quick turnaround time. Design & clearance testing. DEQ accredited Inspectors. Affinity Environmental Lic/Reg/Ins. 728-5181

INSPECTION Affinity Environmental offers asbestos, lead, and mold inspections. Call us for surveying & testing. Lic/Reg/Ins. 728-5181

MISCELLANEOUS Herbal Therapy Christopher & Jim Western Montana Caregivers (406) 381-5946 Christopher (406) 450-8193 Jim


REAL ESTATE ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

3BD/2BA Mechanic’s Dream Home, 3 car garage, mechanic’s pit, hardwood floors, large deck, privacy fenced yard Superior $158,900 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com

Mature individual for unfurnished bedroom. Share tranquil house near downtown with considerate male. $300 + 1/2 electricity/gas. 829-5992

3BD/2BD home, vaulted ceilings, two-car garage, large patio, nature trail 45 minutes from Missoula. $240,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com

RENTAL WANTED Looking for older MH or home to rent in Turah, Clinton, Evero hill or Huson, Please no MH parks. Contact Vanessa at 406-4611111

3BD/3BA Luxury Home on 10 acres, 4 car garage, huge tiled walk-in shower, soaking tub, office/den, timber-framed cathedral ceilings $688,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com

Plum Property Management

4 BD/2BA home, ready-to-finish basement. 17-foot ceilings, office/den, master suite, 2-car garage. 44 Ranch, $297,000! Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net

Long term, Short term, Your term! Let us rent it for you. Residential - Commercial Mobile Home Parks

4 Bedroom, cedar home on 11 acres, double garage. Private location with lots of surrounding trees. $349,900 MLS#901764 Janet 5327903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Message:12886 for pics

(406) 493-1349

4BD home, 39.5 acres. Certainteed siding, radiant heat, fireplace, wildlife, gravel pit! $824,900 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net

jenniferplum@live.com

1&2

A HUD HOME 3 bed, 2 bath. $34,132! This home will sell fast! For listings 800-620-4861, Ext. T234

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

AMAZING HOME OVERLOOKING ALBERTON GORGE. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, Double Garage, Vaulted Ceilings, Spectacular Views from inside and out, Outdoor Pool & Hot Tub, Decks & Patios, and much more. $395,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy9 to 74362, or visit...

Bedroom FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

549-7711 Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com

Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

251- 4707

www.mindypalmer.com

1 BD 4-Plex 2026 9th St. $585/mo.

GORGEOUS FLORENCE AREA HOME ON 2 ACRES. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, great views inside and out, large deck, outdoor sauna, and more. $295,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy3 to 74362, or visit...

1 BD Apt 109 N. Johnson $465/mo. 2 BD - Uncle Robert Lane, $620/mo. Visit our website at www.fidelityproperty.com

www.mindypalmer.com GORGEOUS SLANT STREETS CRAFTSMAN. 3 Bdr/2 Bath, many original features including hardwood, built-ins, beautiful mouldings & windows, large kitchen, dining room, full basement & more. $379,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy20 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

3320 Great Northern Ave. Apply TODAY and receive • One Month Free Rent or • Use the free month’s rent to lower your rent over lease term • FREE 1/2 Security Dep (on qualified units) • FREE Application Fee Next to Costco Amenities include: - Washer/Dryer - Air Conditioner - Energy Efficient Heat - Dishwasher

Newer Jr. 1 Bd apartments at an Affordable Price

Rent: $495 - $585 Call PPM for details

543-1500 www.professionalproperty.com

GORGEOUS STEVENSVILLE AREA HOME ON 10 ACRES. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, single-level living, double garage, hardwood and tile flooring, beautifully landscaped, great deck with outdoor living space, and much more. $474,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy13 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com GORGEOUS STEVENSVILLE AREA HOME ON 10 ACRES. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, single-level living, double garage, hardwood and tile flooring, beautifully landscaped, great deck with outdoor living space, and much more. $474,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy13 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com Great business opportunity! Live in your home and earn income. 2 bed, 2 bath modular home on one acre. Sixty-two 10’ X 15’ storage rental units which rent for $50 per month. $489,900. MLS#905520. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Message:XXXXX for pics

GREAT DOWTOWN MISSOULA LOCATION. 3 Bdr/2 Bath, Double Garage, High Ceilings, Hardwood Floors, Built-Ins, Walk to Downtown. $329,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy8 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com HANDCRAFTED CUSTOM HOME ON PETTY CREEK. 3 Bdr/2.5 Bath, 3.3 Acres, guest quarters, heated double garage, $695,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy6 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com Log cabin with no close neighbors. Beautiful views of flint Creek, Mission, Rattlesnake & Sapphire Ranges. $99,900 MLS# 906248 Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Message:12590 for pics Missoula’s Most Efficient Home! The “I-PAD”, is Missoula’s most durable and efficient, hybrid home. Save 60-70% in operational costs over a standard home with more special features than we can possibly list here!! All “I-PADs” are handcrafted by Kingdom Builders, Montana’s 2007 Energy Star Builder of the Year. Our “direct sale” program allows you buy them directly from the builder, saving you money. A 3 Bedroom/2 Bath “I-PAD” in the beautiful 44 Ranch Development (5138 Horn Rd) will available in less than 2 months for $215,426.00. For an informational flyer or to tour an “I-PAD” call Glen at (406) 360-3272 or gmoyer@bresnan.net. New home in Riverwalk Estates with no steps and easy maintenance, 3 bed/2 bath/double garage. 6549 Kiki Court, Missoula. $339,500. MLS#808566. JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811 New land/home package in Riverwalk Estates. No steps, concrete entrances with covered porch & patio. 3 bed/2 bath/double garage. 6605 Kiki Court W., Missoula. Starting at $299,970. MLS#903596. JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811 One block to the U!! Gardens, arbors, fruit trees and more. 4 bed/2 bath. 737 Evans, Missoula. $399,870. MLS#902594. JoyEarls @windermere.com 531-9811 Past Bitterroot Parade of Homes winner NEW 4 BD/3BA with many upgrades Alder cabinets, Large Master Suite, Tile, & Views of the Bitterroots $344,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.YourMT.com Quaint home on 2 lush lots with apples, grapes, currants, raspberries, cherries, and flowers. 2 bed/1 bath. 1852 8th West St., Missoula. $179,900. MLS#904867. JoyEarls@ windermere.com 531-9811 Rattlesnake Beauty NEW efficient, executive, 4 bed, 2.5 bath, home theater, new appliances, JennAir range. Dream kitchen. HUGE Master bedroom/bath/WIC. Green, efficient heating, cooling. Gorgeous Mt. Jumbo views, seasonal stream. Large 15k square foot lot. RENT TO OWN a poss, terms negotiable. $499K. 360-9711 RUSTIC ELEGANCE CLOSE TO TOWN. 3 Bdr/2.5 Bath, Double Garage, High Ceilings, Hardwood Floors, log accents, next to open space, easy walk to river, gorgeous. $329,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy12 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com SINGLE LEVEL LIVING JUST A SHORT WALK TO DOWNTOWN STEVI. 4Bdr/3 Bath, Open floor plan, large living room, great mountain and valley views. $239,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy15 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

UPDATED POTOMAC AREA HOME ON 16.5 ACRES. 3 Bdr/2 Bath, Open floor plan, deck and covered porch, very private and quiet, $239,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy5 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com WANTED TO BUY: Fixer-upper. At least 2 bedroom home. Orchard Homes, Target Range, Franklin School areas. $150,000 range. Absolutely no realtors. 728-7459 Well-maintained 3BD house, 45 minutes from Missoula, hardwood floors, storage shed, updated appliances. $125,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-2071185. www.AccessRealty.net

LAND FOR SALE 3.5 ACRES ON PETTY CREEK. Great location less that 3 miles from I-90. Awesome building spot overlooking creek and with valley/mountain views. Builder available. $185,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy14 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com 5BD/3BA 3,000+ sq. ft. Lolo home on 15.6 Acres, updated kitchen, cozy fireplace, $415,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.YourMT.com Beautiful 14 acre parcel just west of Huson. Meadow with trees & pasture. Modulars or double wides on foundation ok. $184,900. MLS#906774. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Message:12590 for pics Beautiful 20 acres fenced pasture land. Seasonal stream and pond. Great get away or build your dream home. No power to area. $170 per year road maintenance fee. $149,900 MLS# 905366 Janet 532-

7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com Text:44133 Message:12589 for pics

Joy Earls

Beautiful park-like setting, private trout ponds, nature trail, stunning views. Lots start at $39,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185. www.YourMT.com

Riverwalk Estates Close to town, river, and golfing. Price Reduced

Four 10 ACRE TRACTS IN GARNET MOUNTAINS. $27,500-$45,000. Call Dick at Montana International Realty 406-883-6700

Finished Home • 6549 Kiki Court Move in ready, easy living. MLS#808566 • $349,500 Now Only $329,500

OUT OF TOWN 800 square foot cabin near hunting, fishing, and skiing in beautiful Haugan, MT. $83,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185. www.YourMT.com Gorgeous leveled 80 acres of farming land in St. Ignatious with 3 Bed/ 2 Bath manufactured home. Amazing views of the Mission Mountains. 58503 Watson Road MLS # 706304 Price: $520,000 Call Priscilla @ 3707689, Prudential Missoula.

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL

Check my website for more info & listings.

New Home/Land Package 6605 West Kiki Court Joy Earls 531-9811 MLS#903596 • Starting at $299,970

joyearls.mywindermere.com

Two 5 acre parcels

15 minutes from Missoula with nice building sites and access to the Blackfoot River. $149,000 for either 5 acre parcel or buy both for $285,000. mls# 902286

Mary Mar ry

Mortgage Payments or CASHNOW! Replace the monthly payments you’re receiving for property you have sold with CASH NOW. I can help sell your secured note. Call me, Emmett Roney, today to get your cash. 406-239-2529 REAL ESTATE LOANS Up to 65% LTV. We specialize in “Non-Bankable Deals” Hard money lending with a conscience. We also buy Private Notes & Mortgages. Creative Finance & Investments, LLC. 406721-1444; 800-999-4809. Info@creative-finance.com MT Lic.#000203. 619 SW Higgins, Ste O, Missoula, MT 59803

Lorin & Amy Peterson

a father daughter team

R E A LT O R ® , B r ok er

Cell 406-544-2125 • mmarry@bigsky.net www.marysellsmissoula.com

Professional Service on a Personal Level To buy or not to buy - that is the question. • Can you still get a home loan? • How does the current market affect you? • Will the government’s programs help you? • Where should you start the buying process? • For answers to these questions & more call Mary today. I have the experience and understanding to help navigate you through the Real Eastate Experience

The Realtor® Who Speaks Your Language

370.7689 Amy 532-9287 Lorin 532-9223

priscillabrockmeyer.com

406-544-2125 www.marysellsmissoula.com mmarry@bigsky.net

Mary Marry REALTOR®, Broker

www.LorinAndAmy.com

3631 Brandon Way, Msla $277,900 • MLS# 906808

RICE TEAM

Great neighborhood 5 bedroom, 2 bath, double attached garage with updates in kitchen. Finished basement with family room, 2 bedrooms, bath & bonus room. Heat is water base board.

Janet Rice 532-7903 Robin Rice 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com www.missoulahomesonline.com • Bonner area 5 Bed / 2 Bath on 2 acres • Large kitchen w/ island • Chain link fence in front yard • Private deck in back, mature trees • $219,900 • MLS#906641 Text:44133 Message: 12591 for pics

• 3 bdrm/2 bath/10 Acres • Covered deck / fenced acreage • 28 x32 garage / 40x49 Quoncet shop • RV hookups behind garage • $264,900 • MLS# 902389 Text:44133 Message: 12592 for pics

• 40x82 insulated free span building • 1 acre with security fence • Three 14' overhead doors • 9292 Futurity Drive • $324,900 MLS#901478 Text:44133 Message: 12595 for pics

• 3 Bed / 2 Bath on 3 Acres • Bitterroot home with great views • Low maintenance vinyl siding • Large double car garage • $339,000 • MLS# 902482 Text:44133 Message: 12890 for pics

110 South Ave West, Msla $320,000 • MLS# 905618 Building & Land For Sale Commercial office building in a great location on South & Higgins. It offers lots of paved parking, handicap ramp with handicap restroom.

Anna Nooney BA, RLS, GRI

Cell: 406-544-8413 AnnaNoooney@Windermere.com

www.BuyInMissoula.com

University Home for Sale 317 S. 6th E $290,000 2+ bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage, new roof, hardwoods, 3 blocks from the University! Call Mike 406-546-6386

Missoula Independent Page 45 October 1–October 8, 2009


REAL ESTATE Downtown Restaurant For Sale Fabulous downtown locale 247 W. Front • Missoula includes 11 parking spaces! Seats 36+, outside seating, basement with lots of storage. Long time established Missoula restaurant with cabaret license included. $150,000 MLS# 901625

Grant Creek Log home on 26+ private acres $525,000 Borders Lolo National Forest. Ski out your back door, drive 10 minutes to Snowbowl Ski area, or take a hike in 3 different directions in the summer! Located just 15 minutes from downtown Missoula!The main house is a 3 bd, 2 bath, 3 story log home, with completely renovated bathrooms, newer 3 car open garage with tons of storage built above it and a small guest cabin! www.11815benchrd.com

Did you know?  Posting a classified ad is FREE! www.missoulanews.com

Graduation 2013?! OR

Just paid 4 years rent?

Steve.Corrick@PruMT.com • 406-329-2033 • www.MagnificentMontana.com

Privacy, Fruit Trees & Views

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Rochelle Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com

Steve Corrick Specializing in College Housing

For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

Missoula Properties

Sold house with 4 years worth of equity!

MLS# 907106 • $209,000 4BD/2BA home on nearly one acre. Hardwood floors, fireplace, carport, heated shop, additional outbuilding, basketball court, wonderful deck. An easy drive from Missoula! www.SaintMarysLakeRoad.com

Kevin & Monica Ray

207.1185 • 822.7653 1720 Brooks • Suite 5 • Missoula

www.YourMT.com

Marlies Borchers Realtor

ABR, GRI

Office: 406.327.8787 • Mobile: 406.370.5758

shesellsmontana.com 445 Alder St • Missoula • email: marlies@porticorealestate.com

Missoula's All New, All Local Online Community! Missoula Independent Page 46 October 1–October 8, 2009


USDA Organic Broccoli

Best O’ Fryer All Natural Fryer

$4.99

$1.39

lb.

56 oz.

Amy's Organic Toaster Pops

$2.29

6 count

New Belgium Cans Or Bottles

$11.99 12 pack

Painted Hills All Natural Boneless Sirloin Tip Roast Or Steak

$3.19

lb.

Painted Hills All Natural Boneless Top Sirloin Steak

$5.49

$2.99

Ciao Bella Gelato

$2.99

lb.

per pint

each

Stone Cellars Califonia Wines

$4.99 .75 liter

Extra Large Artichokes

$1.99

each

lb.

Painted Hills All Natural Extra Lean Ground Beef

$2.99

Earthbound 5 oz. Salads

Canterbury Naturals Pumpkin Cake Mix

$2.79

Large Butter Croissants

2 For 99¢

16 1/2 oz.

Jack Daniels 9 oz. Assorted Mustard

US #1 Yams & Sweet Potatoes

$1.39

lb.

2 For $5

Assorted Wasa Crackers

2 For $5

701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 9 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188 Missoula Independent Page 47 October 1–October 8, 2009


Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture

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